Science.gov

Sample records for count rate performance

  1. Count rate performance and deadtime analysis of the new 3D PETRRA PET camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Kevin; Kakana, Christina; Ott, Robert J.; Flower, M.; Divoli, Antigoni; Meriaux, Sebastian; Bateman, J. E.; Stephenson, R.; Duxbury, D.; Spill, E. J.

    2001-12-01

    We report on the count-rate performance of the unique PETRRA positron camera at activities up to 60MBq. The camera consists of two large area detectors, each comprising a tiled array of 10mm thick BaF2 scintillation crystals interfaced to a multi-step avalanche chamber filled with 4.2mbar of pure TMAE vapor. Preliminary results demonstrate coincident count rates of over 80kcps for a cylindrical (20x20cm3) phantom with 50MBq of F-18 in the field-of-view using a 20ns coincidence time window. Each component of the readout cycle has been characterized in terms of dead-time loss. The camera's dead-time related count loss is well-described by a paralysable model with a dead-time of ~500ns. Other sources of count rate loss are also discussed.

  2. Improving the count rate performance of a modular cylindrical SPECT system

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.J.; Hollinger, E.F.; Liu, J.; Chang, W.

    1996-12-31

    We recently proposed a design of a modular cylindrical cardiac SPECT system. one special feature of this system is an integrated provision for transmission imaging. To meet the clinical demands of obtaining transmission images, this system must be able to achieve a very high count rate (CR). To explore methods for achieving a high CR capability on a modular cylindrical detector system, we have used our existing modular cylindrical brain SPECT system to examine the feasibility of two approaches. First, we use digital-signal-processing (DSP) boards, in parallel, to execute real time position calculations. Second, we use local encoding and triggering circuits to perform analog signal processing, including identifying the detector module and digitizing the pulse signals. The results of our preliminary investigations indicate that applying the multiple-DSP parallel position calculation and local triggering techniques in a modular SPECT system can improve the CR capability significantly. Applying local triggering increased the CR capability by 15% at a CR capability of 200 kcps. Because we have used slow-speed DSP boards during this proof-of-concept testing, we have not yet met the CR requirements for transmission imaging. However, these results indicate that by using state-of-the-art DSP boards the CR capability of this modular SPECT system can be increased to over 300 kcps.

  3. A Comparison of the High Count Rate Performance of Three Commercially Available Digital Signal Processors

    SciTech Connect

    Dawn M. Scates; John K. Hartwell

    2005-10-01

    Three commercial ã-ray digital signal processors, a Canberra InSpector 2000, an ORTEC DigiDART, and an X-ray Instrumentation Associates Polaris system, coupled to a Canberra 2002C resistive-feedback preamplifier-equipped high-purity germanium detector, were performance tested to input rates of 440 kHz. The spectrometers were evaluated on their throughput, stability and peak shape performance. The accuracy of their quantitative corrections for dead time and pile-up were also tested. All three of the tested units performed well at input rates that strain most analog spectroscopy systems.

  4. LINEAR COUNT-RATE METER

    DOEpatents

    Henry, J.J.

    1961-09-01

    A linear count-rate meter is designed to provide a highly linear output while receiving counting rates from one cycle per second to 100,000 cycles per second. Input pulses enter a linear discriminator and then are fed to a trigger circuit which produces positive pulses of uniform width and amplitude. The trigger circuit is connected to a one-shot multivibrator. The multivibrator output pulses have a selected width. Feedback means are provided for preventing transistor saturation in the multivibrator which improves the rise and decay times of the output pulses. The multivibrator is connected to a diode-switched, constant current metering circuit. A selected constant current is switched to an averaging circuit for each pulse received, and for a time determined by the received pulse width. The average output meter current is proportional to the product of the counting rate, the constant current, and the multivibrator output pulse width.

  5. Performance of a GM tube based environmental dose rate monitor operating in the Time-To-Count mode

    SciTech Connect

    Zickefoose, J.; Kulkarni, T.; Martinson, T.; Phillips, K.; Voelker, M.

    2015-07-01

    The events at the Fukushima Daiichi power plant in the aftermath of a natural disaster underline the importance of a large array of networked environmental monitors to cover areas around nuclear power plants. These monitors should meet a few basic criteria: have a uniform response over a wide range of gamma energies, have a uniform response over a wide range of incident angles, and have a large dynamic range. Many of these criteria are met if the probe is qualified to the international standard IEC 60532 (Radiation protection instrumentation - Installed dose rate meters, warning assemblies and monitors - X and gamma radiation of energy between 50 keV and 7 MeV), which specifically deals with energy response, angle of incidence, dynamic range, response time, and a number of environmental characteristics. EcoGamma is a dual GM tube environmental gamma radiation monitor designed specifically to meet the requirements of IEC 60532 and operate in the most extreme conditions. EcoGamma utilizes two energy compensated GM tubes operating with a Time-To-Count (TTC) collection algorithm. The TTC algorithm extends the lifetime and range of a GM tube significantly and allows the dual GM tube probe to achieve linearity over approximately 10 decades of gamma dose rate (from the Sv/hr range to 100 Sv/hr). In the TTC mode of operation, the GM tube is not maintained in a biased condition continuously. This is different from a traditional counting system where the GM tube is held at a constant bias continuously and the total number of strikes that the tube registers are counted. The traditional approach allows for good sensitivity, but does not lend itself to a long lifetime of the tube and is susceptible to linearity issues at high count rates. TTC on the other hand only biases the tube for short periods of time and in effect measures the time between events, which is statistically representative of the total strike rate. Since the tube is not continually biased, the life of the tube

  6. Spectroscopic performance of DEPFET active pixel sensor prototypes suitable for the high count rate Athena WFI detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller-Seidlitz, Johannes; Andritschke, Robert; Bähr, Alexander; Meidinger, Norbert; Ott, Sabine; Richter, Rainer H.; Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Treis, Johannes

    2016-07-01

    The focal plane of the WFI of Athena consists of two sensors. One features a large field of view of 40' X 40' and one is forseen to be used for bright point like sources. Both parts base on DEPFET active pixel sensors. To fulfil the count rate requirement for the smaller sensor of less than 1% pile-up for a one Crab source it has to have a sufficient high frame rate. Since therefore the readout becomes a large fraction of the total photon integration time, the probability of measurements with incomplete signals increases. A shutter would solve the problem of these so called misfits but is not in agreement with the required high throughput of more than 80%. The Infinipix design has implemented a storage in addition to separate the collection and the readout of the charges without discarding them. Its working principle was successfully shown by Bähr et al.1 on single pixel level. For the further development three layout variants were tested on a 32 X 32 pixel array scale. The measurements of the spectroscopic performance show very promising results even for the intended readout speed for the Athena WFI of 2:5 μs per sensor row. Although, there are still layout and technology improvements necessary to ensure the reliability needed for space missions. In this paper we present the measurement results on the comparison of the three prototype layout variants.

  7. Compton suppression gamma-counting: The effect of count rate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Millard, H.T.

    1984-01-01

    Past research has shown that anti-coincidence shielded Ge(Li) spectrometers enhanced the signal-to-background ratios for gamma-photopeaks, which are situated on high Compton backgrounds. Ordinarily, an anti- or non-coincidence spectrum (A) and a coincidence spectrum (C) are collected simultaneously with these systems. To be useful in neutron activation analysis (NAA), the fractions of the photopeak counts routed to the two spectra must be constant from sample to sample to variations must be corrected quantitatively. Most Compton suppression counting has been done at low count rate, but in NAA applications, count rates may be much higher. To operate over the wider dynamic range, the effect of count rate on the ratio of the photopeak counts in the two spectra (A/C) was studied. It was found that as the count rate increases, A/C decreases for gammas not coincident with other gammas from the same decay. For gammas coincident with other gammas, A/C increases to a maximum and then decreases. These results suggest that calibration curves are required to correct photopeak areas so quantitative data can be obtained at higher count rates. ?? 1984.

  8. Characterizing energy dependence and count rate performance of a dual scintillator fiber-optic detector for computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Hoerner, Matthew R. Stepusin, Elliott J.; Hyer, Daniel E.; Hintenlang, David E.

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Kilovoltage (kV) x-rays pose a significant challenge for radiation dosimetry. In the kV energy range, even small differences in material composition can result in significant variations in the absorbed energy between soft tissue and the detector. In addition, the use of electronic systems in light detection has demonstrated measurement losses at high photon fluence rates incident to the detector. This study investigated the feasibility of using a novel dual scintillator detector and whether its response to changes in beam energy from scatter and hardening is readily quantified. The detector incorporates a tissue-equivalent plastic scintillator and a gadolinium oxysulfide scintillator, which has a higher sensitivity to scatter x-rays. Methods: The detector was constructed by coupling two scintillators: (1) small cylindrical plastic scintillator, 500 μm in diameter and 2 mm in length, and (2) 100 micron sheet of gadolinium oxysulfide 500 μm in diameter, each to a 2 m long optical fiber, which acts as a light guide to transmit scintillation photons from the sensitive element to a photomultiplier tube. Count rate linearity data were obtained from a wide range of exposure rates delivered from a radiological x-ray tube by adjusting the tube current. The data were fitted to a nonparalyzable dead time model to characterize the time response. The true counting rate was related to the reference free air dose air rate measured with a 0.6 cm{sup 3} Radcal{sup ®} thimble chamber as described in AAPM Report No. 111. Secondary electron and photon spectra were evaluated using Monte Carlo techniques to analyze ionization quenching and photon energy-absorption characteristics from free-in-air and in phantom measurements. The depth/energy dependence of the detector was characterized using a computed tomography dose index QA phantom consisting of nested adult head and body segments. The phantom provided up to 32 cm of acrylic with a compatible 0.6 cm{sup 3} calibrated

  9. Pneumotachometer counts respiration rate of human subject

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, O.

    1964-01-01

    To monitor breaths per minute, two rate-to-analog converters are alternately used to read and count the respiratory rate from an impedance pneumograph sequentially displayed numerically on electroluminescent matrices.

  10. High Count Rate Electron Probe Microanalysis.

    PubMed

    Geller, Joseph D; Herrington, Charles

    2002-01-01

    Reducing the measurement uncertainty of quantitative analyses made using electron probe microanalyzers (EPMA) requires a careful study of the individual uncertainties from each definable step of the measurement. Those steps include measuring the incident electron beam current and voltage, knowing the angle between the electron beam and the sample (takeoff angle), collecting the emitted x rays from the sample, comparing the emitted x-ray flux to known standards (to determine the k-ratio) and transformation of the k-ratio to concentration using algorithms which includes, as a minimum, the atomic number, absorption, and fluorescence corrections. This paper discusses the collection and counting of the emitted x rays, which are diffracted into the gas flow or sealed proportional x-ray detectors. The representation of the uncertainty in the number of collected x rays collected reduces as the number of counts increase. The uncertainty of the collected signal is fully described by Poisson statistics. Increasing the number of x rays collected involves either counting longer or at a higher counting rate. Counting longer means the analysis time increases and may become excessive to get to the desired uncertainty. Instrument drift also becomes an issue. Counting at higher rates has its limitations, which are a function of the detector physics and the detecting electronics. Since the beginning of EPMA analysis, analog electronics have been used to amplify and discriminate the x-ray induced ionizations within the proportional counter. This paper will discuss the use of digital electronics for this purpose. These electronics are similar to that used for energy dispersive analysis of x rays with either Si(Li) or Ge(Li) detectors except that the shaping time constants are much smaller.

  11. Gamma-gamma coincidence performance of LaBr3:Ce scintillation detectors vs HPGe detectors in high count-rate scenarios

    DOE PAGES

    Drescher, A.; Yoho, M.; Landsberger, S.; ...

    2017-01-15

    In this study, a radiation detection system consisting of two cerium doped lanthanum bromide (LaBr3:Ce) scintillation detectors in a gamma-gamma coincidence configuration has been used to demonstrate the advantages that coincident detection provides relative to a single detector, and the advantages that LaBr3:Ce detectors provide relative to high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors. Signal to noise ratios of select photopeak pairs for these detectors have been compared to high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors in both single and coincident detector configurations in order to quantify the performance of each detector configuration. The efficiency and energy resolution of LaBr3:Ce detectors have been determined andmore » compared to HPGe detectors. Coincident gamma-ray pairs from the radionuclides 152Eu and 133Ba have been identified in a sample that is dominated by 137Cs. Gamma-gamma coincidence successfully reduced the Compton continuum from the large 137Cs peak, revealed several coincident gamma energies characteristic of these nuclides, and improved the signal-to-noise ratio relative to single detector measurements. LaBr3:Ce detectors performed at count rates multiple times higher than can be achieved with HPGe detectors. The standard background spectrum consisting of peaks associated with transitions within the LaBr3:Ce crystal has also been significantly reduced. Finally, it is shown that LaBr3:Ce detectors have the unique capability to perform gamma-gamma coincidence measurements in very high count rate scenarios, which can potentially benefit nuclear safeguards in situ measurements of spent nuclear fuel.« less

  12. Gamma-gamma coincidence performance of LaBr3:Ce scintillation detectors vs HPGe detectors in high count-rate scenarios.

    PubMed

    Drescher, A; Yoho, M; Landsberger, S; Durbin, M; Biegalski, S; Meier, D; Schwantes, J

    2017-04-01

    A radiation detection system consisting of two cerium doped lanthanum bromide (LaBr3:Ce) scintillation detectors in a gamma-gamma coincidence configuration has been used to demonstrate the advantages that coincident detection provides relative to a single detector, and the advantages that LaBr3:Ce detectors provide relative to high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors. Signal to noise ratios of select photopeak pairs for these detectors have been compared to high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors in both single and coincident detector configurations in order to quantify the performance of each detector configuration. The efficiency and energy resolution of LaBr3:Ce detectors have been determined and compared to HPGe detectors. Coincident gamma-ray pairs from the radionuclides (152)Eu and (133)Ba have been identified in a sample that is dominated by (137)Cs. Gamma-gamma coincidence successfully reduced the Compton continuum from the large (137)Cs peak, revealed several coincident gamma energies characteristic of these nuclides, and improved the signal-to-noise ratio relative to single detector measurements. LaBr3:Ce detectors performed at count rates multiple times higher than can be achieved with HPGe detectors. The standard background spectrum consisting of peaks associated with transitions within the LaBr3:Ce crystal has also been significantly reduced. It is shown that LaBr3:Ce detectors have the unique capability to perform gamma-gamma coincidence measurements in very high count rate scenarios, which can potentially benefit nuclear safeguards in situ measurements of spent nuclear fuel.

  13. Measured count-rate performance of the Discovery STE PET/CT scanner in 2D, 3D and partial collimation acquisition modes.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, L R; Schmitz, R E; Alessio, A M; Wollenweber, S D; Stearns, C W; Ganin, A; Harrison, R L; Lewellen, T K; Kinahan, P E

    2008-07-21

    We measured count rates and scatter fraction on the Discovery STE PET/CT scanner in conventional 2D and 3D acquisition modes, and in a partial collimation mode between 2D and 3D. As part of the evaluation of using partial collimation, we estimated global count rates using a scanner model that combined computer simulations with an empirical live-time function. Our measurements followed the NEMA NU2 count rate and scatter-fraction protocol to obtain true, scattered and random coincidence events, from which noise equivalent count (NEC) rates were calculated. The effect of patient size was considered by using 27 cm and 35 cm diameter phantoms, in addition to the standard 20 cm diameter cylindrical count-rate phantom. Using the scanner model, we evaluated two partial collimation cases: removing half of the septa (2.5D) and removing two-thirds of the septa (2.7D). Based on predictions of the model, a 2.7D collimator was constructed. Count rates and scatter fractions were then measured in 2D, 2.7D and 3D. The scanner model predicted relative NEC variation with activity, as confirmed by measurements. The measured 2.7D NEC was equal or greater than 3D NEC for all activity levels in the 27 cm and 35 cm phantoms. In the 20 cm phantom, 3D NEC was somewhat higher ( approximately 15%) than 2.7D NEC at 100 MBq. For all higher activity concentrations, 2.7D NEC was greater and peaked 26% above the 3D peak NEC. The peak NEC in 2.7D mode occurred at approximately 425 MBq, and was 26-50% greater than the peak 3D NEC, depending on object size. NEC in 2D was considerably lower, except at relatively high activity concentrations. Partial collimation shows promise for improved noise equivalent count rates in clinical imaging without altering other detector parameters.

  14. Bayesian analysis of energy and count rate data for detection of low count rate radioactive sources.

    PubMed

    Klumpp, John; Brandl, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    A particle counting and detection system is proposed that searches for elevated count rates in multiple energy regions simultaneously. The system analyzes time-interval data (e.g., time between counts), as this was shown to be a more sensitive technique for detecting low count rate sources compared to analyzing counts per unit interval (Luo et al. 2013). Two distinct versions of the detection system are developed. The first is intended for situations in which the sample is fixed and can be measured for an unlimited amount of time. The second version is intended to detect sources that are physically moving relative to the detector, such as a truck moving past a fixed roadside detector or a waste storage facility under an airplane. In both cases, the detection system is expected to be active indefinitely; i.e., it is an online detection system. Both versions of the multi-energy detection systems are compared to their respective gross count rate detection systems in terms of Type I and Type II error rates and sensitivity.

  15. Opcode counting for performance measurement

    DOEpatents

    Gara, Alan; Satterfield, David L; Walkup, Robert E

    2013-10-29

    Methods, systems and computer program products are disclosed for measuring a performance of a program running on a processing unit of a processing system. In one embodiment, the method comprises informing a logic unit of each instruction in the program that is executed by the processing unit, assigning a weight to each instruction, assigning the instructions to a plurality of groups, and analyzing the plurality of groups to measure one or more metrics. In one embodiment, each instruction includes an operating code portion, and the assigning includes assigning the instructions to the groups based on the operating code portions of the instructions. In an embodiment, each type of instruction is assigned to a respective one of the plurality of groups. These groups may be combined into a plurality of sets of the groups.

  16. Opcode counting for performance measurement

    DOEpatents

    Gara, Alan; Satterfield, David L.; Walkup, Robert E.

    2015-08-11

    Methods, systems and computer program products are disclosed for measuring a performance of a program running on a processing unit of a processing system. In one embodiment, the method comprises informing a logic unit of each instruction in the program that is executed by the processing unit, assigning a weight to each instruction, assigning the instructions to a plurality of groups, and analyzing the plurality of groups to measure one or more metrics. In one embodiment, each instruction includes an operating code portion, and the assigning includes assigning the instructions to the groups based on the operating code portions of the instructions. In an embodiment, each type of instruction is assigned to a respective one of the plurality of groups. These groups may be combined into a plurality of sets of the groups.

  17. Opcode counting for performance measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Gara, Alan; Satterfield, David L.; Walkup, Robert E.

    2016-10-18

    Methods, systems and computer program products are disclosed for measuring a performance of a program running on a processing unit of a processing system. In one embodiment, the method comprises informing a logic unit of each instruction in the program that is executed by the processing unit, assigning a weight to each instruction, assigning the instructions to a plurality of groups, and analyzing the plurality of groups to measure one or more metrics. In one embodiment, each instruction includes an operating code portion, and the assigning includes assigning the instructions to the groups based on the operating code portions of the instructions. In an embodiment, each type of instruction is assigned to a respective one of the plurality of groups. These groups may be combined into a plurality of sets of the groups.

  18. High performance universal analog and counting photodetector for LIDAR applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linga, Krishna; Krutov, Joseph; Godik, Edward; Seemungal, Wayne; Shushakov, Dmitry; Shubin, V. E.

    2005-08-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of applying the emerging technology of internal discrete amplification to create an efficient, ultra low noise, universal analog and counting photodetector for LIDAR remote sensing. Photodetectors with internal discrete amplification can operate in the linear detection mode with a gain-bandwidth product of up to 1015 and in the photon counting mode with count rates of up to 109 counts/sec. Detectors based on this mechanism could have performance parameters superior to those of conventional avalanche photodiodes and photomultiplier tubes. For silicon photodetector prototypes, measured excess noise factor is as low as 1.02 at gains greater than 100,000. This gives the photodetectors and, consequently, the LIDAR systems new capabilities that could lead to important advances in LIDAR remote sensing.

  19. High count rate gamma camera with independent modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massari, R.; Ucci, A.; Campisi, C.; Scopinaro, F.; Soluri, A.

    2015-11-01

    Advances in nuclear medical imaging are based on the improvements of the detector's performance. Generally the research is focussed on the spatial resolution improvement. However, another important parameter is the acquisition time that can significantly affect performance in some clinical investigation (e.g. first-pass cardiac studies). At present, there are several clinical imaging systems which are able to solve these diagnostic requirements, such as the D-SPECT Cardiac Imaging System (Spectrum Dynamics) or the Nucline Cardiodesk Medical Imaging System (Mediso). Actually, these solutions are organ-specific dedicated systems, while it would be preferable having general purpose planar detectors with high counting rate. Our group has recently introduced the use of scintillation matrices whose size is equal to the overall area of a position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT) in order to design a modular gamma camera. This study allowed optimising the overall pixel identification by improving and controlling the light collection efficiency of each PSPMT. Although we achieved a solution for the problems about the dead area at the junction of the PSPMTs when they are set side by side. In this paper, we propose a modular gamma camera design as the basis to build large area detectors. The modular detector design allows us to achieve better counting performance. In this approach, each module that is made of one or more PSPMTs, can actually acquire data independently and simultaneously, increasing the overall detection efficiency. To verify the improvement in count rate capability we have built two detectors with a field of view of 5 × 5cm2, by using four R8900-C12 PSPMTs (Hamamatsu Photonics K.K.). Each PSPMT was coupled to a dedicated discrete scintillation structure designed to obtain a good homogeneity, high imaging performance and high efficiency. One of the detectors was designed as a standard gamma camera, while the other was composed by four independent

  20. Compensated count-rate circuit for radiation survey meter

    DOEpatents

    Todd, Richard A.

    1981-01-01

    A count-rate compensating circuit is provided which may be used in a portable Geiger-Mueller (G-M) survey meter to ideally compensate for counting loss errors in the G-M tube detector. In a G-M survey meter, wherein the pulse rate from the G-M tube is converted into a pulse rate current applied to a current meter calibrated to indicate dose rate, the compensated circuit generates and controls a reference voltage in response to the rate of pulses from the detector. This reference voltage is gated to the current-generating circuit at a rate identical to the rate of pulses coming from the detector so that the current flowing through the meter is varied in accordance with both the frequency and amplitude of the reference voltage pulses applied thereto so that the count rate is compensated ideally to indicate a true count rate within 1% up to a 50% duty cycle for the detector. A positive feedback circuit is used to control the reference voltage so that the meter output tracks true count rate indicative of the radiation dose rate.

  1. Highly stable high-rate discriminator for nuclear counting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    English, J. J.; Howard, R. H.; Rudnick, S. J.

    1969-01-01

    Pulse amplitude discriminator is specially designed for nuclear counting applications. At very high rates, the threshold is stable. The output-pulse width and the dead time change negligibly. The unit incorporates a provision for automatic dead-time correction.

  2. Compensated count-rate circuit for radiation survey meter

    DOEpatents

    Todd, R.A.

    1980-05-12

    A count-rate compensating circuit is provided which may be used in a portable Geiger-Mueller (G-M) survey meter to ideally compensate for couting loss errors in the G-M tube detector. In a G-M survey meter, wherein the pulse rate from the G-M tube is converted into a pulse rate current applied to a current meter calibrated to indicate dose rate, the compensation circuit generates and controls a reference voltage in response to the rate of pulses from the detector. This reference voltage is gated to the current-generating circuit at a rate identical to the rate of pulses coming from the detector so that the current flowing through the meter is varied in accordance with both the frequency and amplitude of the reference voltage pulses applied thereto so that the count rate is compensated ideally to indicate a true count rate within 1% up to a 50% duty cycle for the detector. A positive feedback circuit is used to control the reference voltage so that the meter output tracks true count rate indicative of the radiation dose rate.

  3. Multianode cylindrical proportional counter for high count rates

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, J.A.; Kopp, M.K.

    1980-05-23

    A cylindrical, multiple-anode proportional counter is provided for counting of low-energy photons (< 60 keV) at count rates of greater than 10/sup 5/ counts/sec. A gas-filled proportional counter cylinder forming an outer cathode is provided with a central coaxially disposed inner cathode and a plurality of anode wires disposed in a cylindrical array in coaxial alignment with and between the inner and outer cathodes to form a virtual cylindrical anode coaxial with the inner and outer cathodes. The virtual cylindrical anode configuration improves the electron drift velocity by providing a more uniform field strength throughout the counter gas volume, thus decreasing the electron collection time following the detection of an ionizing event. This avoids pulse pile-up and coincidence losses at these high count rates. Conventional RC position encoding detection circuitry may be employed to extract the spatial information from the counter anodes.

  4. Multianode cylindrical proportional counter for high count rates

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, James A.; Kopp, Manfred K.

    1981-01-01

    A cylindrical, multiple-anode proportional counter is provided for counting of low-energy photons (<60 keV) at count rates of greater than 10.sup.5 counts/sec. A gas-filled proportional counter cylinder forming an outer cathode is provided with a central coaxially disposed inner cathode and a plurality of anode wires disposed in a cylindrical array in coaxial alignment with and between the inner and outer cathodes to form a virtual cylindrical anode coaxial with the inner and outer cathodes. The virtual cylindrical anode configuration improves the electron drift velocity by providing a more uniform field strength throughout the counter gas volume, thus decreasing the electron collection time following the detection of an ionizing event. This avoids pulse pile-up and coincidence losses at these high count rates. Conventional RC position encoding detection circuitry may be employed to extract the spatial information from the counter anodes.

  5. Reducing the Teen Death Rate. KIDS COUNT Indicator Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, Rima; Shore, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Life continues to hold considerable risk for adolescents in the United States. In 2006, the teen death rate stood at 64 deaths per 100,000 teens (13,739 teens) (KIDS COUNT Data Center, 2009). Although it has declined by 4 percent since 2000, the rate of teen death in this country remains substantially higher than in many peer nations, based…

  6. Total Gamma Count Rate Analysis Method for Nondestructive Assay Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Cecilia R. Hoffman; Yale D. Harker

    2006-03-01

    A new approach to nondestructively characterize waste for disposal, based on total gamma response, has been developed at the Idaho Cleanup Project by CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC and Idaho State University, and is called the total gamma count rate analysis method. The total gamma count rate analysis method measures gamma interactions that produce energetic electrons or positrons in a detector. Based on previous experience with waste assays, the radionuclide content of the waste container is then determined. This approach potentially can yield minimum detection limits of less than 10 nCi/g. The importance of this method is twofold. First, determination of transuranic activity can be made for waste containers that are below the traditional minimum detection limits. Second, waste above 10 nCi/g and below 100 nCi/g can be identified, and a potential path for disposal resolved.

  7. A Calibration of NICMOS Camera 2 for Low Count Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, D.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Barbary, K.; Dawson, K. S.; Deustua, S.; Faccioli, L.; Fadeyev, V.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Fruchter, A. S.; Gladders, M. D.; de Jong, R. S.; Koekemoer, A.; Krechmer, E.; Lidman, C.; Meyers, J.; Nordin, J.; Perlmutter, S.; Ripoche, P.; Schlegel, D. J.; Spadafora, A.; Suzuki, N.

    2015-05-01

    NICMOS 2 observations are crucial for constraining distances to most of the existing sample of z\\gt 1 SNe Ia. Unlike conventional calibration programs, these observations involve long exposure times and low count rates. Reciprocity failure is known to exist in HgCdTe devices and a correction for this effect has already been implemented for high and medium count rates. However, observations at faint count rates rely on extrapolations. Here instead, we provide a new zero-point calibration directly applicable to faint sources. This is obtained via inter-calibration of NIC2 F110W/F160W with the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) in the low count-rate regime using z∼ 1 elliptical galaxies as tertiary calibrators. These objects have relatively simple near-IR spectral energy distributions, uniform colors, and their extended nature gives a superior signal-to-noise ratio at the same count rate than would stars. The use of extended objects also allows greater tolerances on point-spread function profiles. We find space telescope magnitude zero points (after the installation of the NICMOS cooling system, NCS) of 25.296\\+/- 0.022 for F110W and 25.803\\+/- 0.023 for F160W, both in agreement with the calibration extrapolated from count rates ≳1000 times larger (25.262 and 25.799). Before the installation of the NCS, we find 24.843\\+/- 0.025 for F110W and 25.498\\+/- 0.021 for F160W, also in agreement with the high-count-rate calibration (24.815 and 25.470). We also check the standard bandpasses of WFC3 and NICMOS 2 using a range of stars and galaxies at different colors and find mild tension for WFC3, limiting the accuracy of the zero points. To avoid human bias, our cross-calibration was “blinded” in that the fitted zero-point differences were hidden until the analysis was finalized. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555, under programs

  8. Advanced Reference Counting Pointers for Better Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinholtz, William

    2007-01-01

    A computer program implements reference counting pointers (RCPs) that are lock-free, thread-safe, async-safe, and operational on a multiprocessor computer. RCPs are powerful and convenient means of managing heap memory in C++ software. Most prior RCP programs use locks to ensure thread safety and manage concurrency. The present program was developed in a continuing effort to explore ways of using the C++ programming language to develop safety-critical and mission- critical software. This effort includes exploration of lock-free algorithms because they offer potential to avoid some costly and difficult verification problems. Unlike previously published RCP software, the present program does not use locks (meaning that no thread can block progress on another thread): Instead, this program implements algorithms that exploit capabilities of central-processing- unit hardware so as to avoid locks. Once locks are eliminated, it becomes possible to realize the other attributes mentioned in the first sentence. In addition to the abovementioned attributes, this program offers several advantages over other RCP programs that use locks: It is smaller (and, hence, is faster and uses less memory), it is immune to priority inversion, and there is no way for it to cause a C++ exception.

  9. The piecewise-linear dynamic attenuator reduces the impact of count rate loss with photon-counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Scott S.; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2014-06-01

    Photon counting x-ray detectors (PCXDs) offer several advantages compared to standard energy-integrating x-ray detectors, but also face significant challenges. One key challenge is the high count rates required in CT. At high count rates, PCXDs exhibit count rate loss and show reduced detective quantum efficiency in signal-rich (or high flux) measurements. In order to reduce count rate requirements, a dynamic beam-shaping filter can be used to redistribute flux incident on the patient. We study the piecewise-linear attenuator in conjunction with PCXDs without energy discrimination capabilities. We examined three detector models: the classic nonparalyzable and paralyzable detector models, and a ‘hybrid’ detector model which is a weighted average of the two which approximates an existing, real detector (Taguchi et al 2011 Med. Phys. 38 1089-102 ). We derive analytic expressions for the variance of the CT measurements for these detectors. These expressions are used with raw data estimated from DICOM image files of an abdomen and a thorax to estimate variance in reconstructed images for both the dynamic attenuator and a static beam-shaping (‘bowtie’) filter. By redistributing flux, the dynamic attenuator reduces dose by 40% without increasing peak variance for the ideal detector. For non-ideal PCXDs, the impact of count rate loss is also reduced. The nonparalyzable detector shows little impact from count rate loss, but with the paralyzable model, count rate loss leads to noise streaks that can be controlled with the dynamic attenuator. With the hybrid model, the characteristic count rates required before noise streaks dominate the reconstruction are reduced by a factor of 2 to 3. We conclude that the piecewise-linear attenuator can reduce the count rate requirements of the PCXD in addition to improving dose efficiency. The magnitude of this reduction depends on the detector, with paralyzable detectors showing much greater benefit than nonparalyzable detectors.

  10. The piecewise-linear dynamic attenuator reduces the impact of count rate loss with photon-counting detectors.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Scott S; Pelc, Norbert J

    2014-06-07

    Photon counting x-ray detectors (PCXDs) offer several advantages compared to standard energy-integrating x-ray detectors, but also face significant challenges. One key challenge is the high count rates required in CT. At high count rates, PCXDs exhibit count rate loss and show reduced detective quantum efficiency in signal-rich (or high flux) measurements. In order to reduce count rate requirements, a dynamic beam-shaping filter can be used to redistribute flux incident on the patient. We study the piecewise-linear attenuator in conjunction with PCXDs without energy discrimination capabilities. We examined three detector models: the classic nonparalyzable and paralyzable detector models, and a 'hybrid' detector model which is a weighted average of the two which approximates an existing, real detector (Taguchi et al 2011 Med. Phys. 38 1089-102). We derive analytic expressions for the variance of the CT measurements for these detectors. These expressions are used with raw data estimated from DICOM image files of an abdomen and a thorax to estimate variance in reconstructed images for both the dynamic attenuator and a static beam-shaping ('bowtie') filter. By redistributing flux, the dynamic attenuator reduces dose by 40% without increasing peak variance for the ideal detector. For non-ideal PCXDs, the impact of count rate loss is also reduced. The nonparalyzable detector shows little impact from count rate loss, but with the paralyzable model, count rate loss leads to noise streaks that can be controlled with the dynamic attenuator. With the hybrid model, the characteristic count rates required before noise streaks dominate the reconstruction are reduced by a factor of 2 to 3. We conclude that the piecewise-linear attenuator can reduce the count rate requirements of the PCXD in addition to improving dose efficiency. The magnitude of this reduction depends on the detector, with paralyzable detectors showing much greater benefit than nonparalyzable detectors.

  11. Separating Spike Count Correlation from Firing Rate Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Vinci, Giuseppe; Ventura, Valérie; Smith, Matthew A.; Kass, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Populations of cortical neurons exhibit shared fluctuations in spiking activity over time. When measured for a pair of neurons over multiple repetitions of an identical stimulus, this phenomenon emerges as correlated trial-to-trial response variability via spike count correlation (SCC). However, spike counts can be viewed as noisy versions of firing rates, which can vary from trial to trial. From this perspective, the SCC for a pair of neurons becomes a noisy version of the corresponding firing-rate correlation (FRC). Furthermore, the magnitude of the SCC is generally smaller than that of the FRC, and is likely to be less sensitive to experimental manipulation. We provide statistical methods for disambiguating time-averaged drive from within-trial noise, thereby separating FRC from SCC. We study these methods to document their reliability, and we apply them to neurons recorded in vivo from area V4, in an alert animal. We show how the various effects we describe are reflected in the data: within-trial effects are largely negligible, while attenuation due to trial-to-trial variation dominates, and frequently produces comparisons in SCC that, because of noise, do not accurately reflect those based on the underlying FRC. PMID:26942746

  12. High count rate γ-ray spectroscopy with LaBr3:Ce scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löher, B.; Savran, D.; Fiori, E.; Miklavec, M.; Pietralla, N.; Vencelj, M.

    2012-09-01

    The applicability of LaBr3:Ce detectors for high count rate γ-ray spectroscopy is investigated. A 3 in.×3 in. LaBr3:Ce detector is used in a test setup with radioactive sources to study the dependence of energy resolution and photo peak efficiency on the overall count rate in the detector. Digitized traces were recorded using a 500 MHz FADC and analysed with digital signal processing methods. Good performance is obtained using standard techniques up to about 500 kHz counting rate. A pile-up correction method is applied to the data in order to further improve the capabilities at even higher rates with a focus on recovering the losses in efficiency due to signal pile-up. It is shown that γ-ray spectroscopy can be performed with only moderate lossen in efficiency and high resolution at count rates even above 1 MHz and that the performance can be enhanced in the region between 500 kHz and 10 MHz by using the applied pile-up correction techniques.

  13. A real-time phoneme counting algorithm and application for speech rate monitoring.

    PubMed

    Aharonson, Vered; Aharonson, Eran; Raichlin-Levi, Katia; Sotzianu, Aviv; Amir, Ofer; Ovadia-Blechman, Zehava

    2017-03-01

    Adults who stutter can learn to control and improve their speech fluency by modifying their speaking rate. Existing speech therapy technologies can assist this practice by monitoring speaking rate and providing feedback to the patient, but cannot provide an accurate, quantitative measurement of speaking rate. Moreover, most technologies are too complex and costly to be used for home practice. We developed an algorithm and a smartphone application that monitor a patient's speaking rate in real time and provide user-friendly feedback to both patient and therapist. Our speaking rate computation is performed by a phoneme counting algorithm which implements spectral transition measure extraction to estimate phoneme boundaries. The algorithm is implemented in real time in a mobile application that presents its results in a user-friendly interface. The application incorporates two modes: one provides the patient with visual feedback of his/her speech rate for self-practice and another provides the speech therapist with recordings, speech rate analysis and tools to manage the patient's practice. The algorithm's phoneme counting accuracy was validated on ten healthy subjects who read a paragraph at slow, normal and fast paces, and was compared to manual counting of speech experts. Test-retest and intra-counter reliability were assessed. Preliminary results indicate differences of -4% to 11% between automatic and human phoneme counting. Differences were largest for slow speech. The application can thus provide reliable, user-friendly, real-time feedback for speaking rate control practice.

  14. Quantum-counting CT in the regime of count-rate paralysis: introduction of the pile-up trigger method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappler, S.; Hölzer, S.; Kraft, E.; Stierstorfer, K.; Flohr, T.

    2011-03-01

    The application of quantum-counting detectors in clinical Computed Tomography (CT) is challenged by extreme X-ray fluxes provided by modern high-power X-ray tubes. Scanning of small objects or sub-optimal patient positioning may lead to situations where those fluxes impinge on the detector without attenuation. Even in operation modes optimized for high-rate applications, with small pixels and high bias voltage, CdTe/CdZnTe detectors deliver pulses in the range of several nanoseconds. This can result in severe pulse pile-up causing detector paralysis and ambiguous detector signals. To overcome this problem we introduce the pile-up trigger, a novel method that provides unambiguous detector signals in rate regimes where classical rising-edge counters run into count-rate paralysis. We present detailed CT image simulations assuming ideal sensor material not suffering from polarization effects at high X-ray fluxes. This way we demonstrate the general feasibility of the pile-up trigger method and quantify resulting imaging properties such as contrasts, image noise and dual-energy performance in the high-flux regime of clinical CT devices.

  15. A count rate based contamination control standard for electron accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    May, R.T.; Schwahn, S.O.

    1996-12-31

    Accelerators of sufficient energy and particle fluence can produce radioactivity as an unwanted byproduct. The radioactivity is typically imbedded in structural materials but may also be removable from surfaces. Many of these radionuclides decay by positron emission or electron capture; they often have long half lives and produce photons of low energy and yield making detection by standard devices difficult. The contamination control limit used throughout the US nuclear industry and the Department of Energy is 1,000 disintegrations per minute. This limit is based on the detection threshold of pancake type Geiger-Mueller probes for radionuclides of relatively high radiotoxicity, such as cobalt-60. Several radionuclides of concern at a high energy electron accelerator are compared in terms of radiotoxicity with radionuclides commonly found in the nuclear industry. Based on this comparison, a count-rate based contamination control limit and associated measurement strategy is proposed which provides adequate detection of contamination at accelerators without an increase in risk.

  16. Photon number resolving SiPM detector with 1 GHz count rate.

    PubMed

    Akiba, M; Inagaki, K; Tsujino, K

    2012-01-30

    We demonstrate 1 GHz count rate photon detection with photon number resolution by using a multi-pixel photon counter (MPPC) and performing baseline correction. A bare MPPC chip mounted on a high-frequency circuit board is employed to increase response speed. The photon number resolving capability is investigated at high repetition rates. This capability remains at a repetition rate of 1 GHz and at rates as high as an average of 2.6 photons detected per optical pulse. The photon detection efficiencies are 16% at λ = 450 nm and 4.5% at λ = 775 nm with a dark count rate of 270 kcps and an afterpulse probability of 0.007.

  17. Measuring PET scanner sensitivity; Relating count rates to image signal-to-noise ratios using noise equivalent counts

    SciTech Connect

    Strother, S.C. ); Casey, M.E. ); Hoffman, E.J. . Nuclear Medicine Lab.)

    1990-04-01

    Sensitivity parameters derived from a plot of a scanner's true coincidence count (TCC) rates as a function of activity in a 20 cm cylindrical phantom have no direct link to image quality. Noise equivalent count (NEC) rate curves, which incorporate the noise effects of subtracting the randoms and scatter count components provide a direct link between image signal-to-noise ratios and the scatter, randoms and trues coincidence count rates. The authors have measured TCC and NEC curves with a standardized 20 cm diameter nylon cylinder for five different PET scanners with several scanner-collimator combinations. In addition, the authors have compared TCC and NEC curves on one scanner with those from an Alderson brain phantom.

  18. Noise models for low counting rate coherent diffraction imaging.

    PubMed

    Godard, Pierre; Allain, Marc; Chamard, Virginie; Rodenburg, John

    2012-11-05

    Coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) is a lens-less microscopy method that extracts the complex-valued exit field from intensity measurements alone. It is of particular importance for microscopy imaging with diffraction set-ups where high quality lenses are not available. The inversion scheme allowing the phase retrieval is based on the use of an iterative algorithm. In this work, we address the question of the choice of the iterative process in the case of data corrupted by photon or electron shot noise. Several noise models are presented and further used within two inversion strategies, the ordered subset and the scaled gradient. Based on analytical and numerical analysis together with Monte-Carlo studies, we show that any physical interpretations drawn from a CDI iterative technique require a detailed understanding of the relationship between the noise model and the used inversion method. We observe that iterative algorithms often assume implicitly a noise model. For low counting rates, each noise model behaves differently. Moreover, the used optimization strategy introduces its own artefacts. Based on this analysis, we develop a hybrid strategy which works efficiently in the absence of an informed initial guess. Our work emphasises issues which should be considered carefully when inverting experimental data.

  19. Reducing the Child Poverty Rate. KIDS COUNT Indicator Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, Rima; Shore, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    In 2007, nearly one in five or 18 percent of children in the U.S. lived in poverty (KIDS COUNT Data Center, 2009). Many of these children come from minority backgrounds. African American (35 percent), American Indian (33 percent) and Latino (27 percent) children are more likely to live in poverty than their white (11 percent) and Asian (12…

  20. High event rate ROICs (HEROICs) for astronomical UV photon counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harwit, Alex; France, Kevin; Argabright, Vic; Franka, Steve; Freymiller, Ed; Ebbets, Dennis

    2014-07-01

    The next generation of astronomical photocathode / microchannel plate based UV photon counting detectors will overcome existing count rate limitations by replacing the anode arrays and external cabled electronics with anode arrays integrated into imaging Read Out Integrated Circuits (ROICs). We have fabricated a High Event Rate ROIC (HEROIC) consisting of a 32 by 32 array of 55 μm square pixels on a 60 μm pitch. The pixel sensitivity (threshold) has been designed to be globally programmable between 1 × 103 and 1 × 106 electrons. To achieve the sensitivity of 1 × 103 electrons, parasitic capacitances had to be minimized and this was achieved by fabricating the ROIC in a 65 nm CMOS process. The ROIC has been designed to support pixel counts up to 4096 events per integration period at rates up to 1 MHz per pixel. Integration time periods can be controlled via an external signal with a time resolution of less than 1 microsecond enabling temporally resolved imaging and spectroscopy of astronomical sources. An electrical injection port is provided to verify functionality and performance of each ROIC prior to vacuum integration with a photocathode and microchannel plate amplifier. Test results on the first ROICs using the electrical injection port demonstrate sensitivities between 3 × 103 and 4 × 105 electrons are achieved. A number of fixes are identified for a re-spin of this ROIC.

  1. Performance limits of a single photon counting pixel system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmeissani, M.; Mikulec, B.

    2001-03-01

    X-ray imaging using hybrid pixel detectors in single photon counting mode is a relatively recent and exciting development. The photon counting mode implies that each pixel has a threshold in energy above which a hit is recorded. Sharing of charge between adjacent pixels would therefore lead to a loss of registered hits and for medical imaging applications to a higher patient dose. This explains why the demand for high spatial resolution and consequently small pixel sizes (<100 μm) motivates the Medipix2 collaboration to study the effects of charge sharing between pixels on system performance. Two different simulation codes are used to simulate the energy loss inside the detector and the charge transport towards the pixel electrodes. The largest contribution to the lateral spreading of charge comes from diffusion and can result in a considerable loss of detection efficiency in photon counting systems for small pixel sizes. The Medipix2 collaboration consists of groups from Barcelona, Cagliari, CEA/Leti DEIN, CERN, Freiburg, Glasgow, Mitthögskolan, Napoli, NIKHEF, MRC lab Cambridge, Pisa, Prague and Sassari.

  2. Counting High School Graduates when Graduates Count: Measuring Graduation Rates under the High Stakes of NCLB.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Christopher B.; Chaplin, Duncan

    This paper addresses the debate over high school graduation rates, examining how the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB) has redirected attention toward graduation rates. It introduces provisions of the NCLB pertaining to high school graduation, discussing implications from a measurement perspective, and presents strategies for developing a…

  3. Detecting trends in raptor counts: power and type I error rates of various statistical tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatfield, J.S.; Gould, W.R.; Hoover, B.A.; Fuller, M.R.; Lindquist, E.L.

    1996-01-01

    We conducted simulations that estimated power and type I error rates of statistical tests for detecting trends in raptor population count data collected from a single monitoring site. Results of the simulations were used to help analyze count data of bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) from 7 national forests in Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin during 1980-1989. Seven statistical tests were evaluated, including simple linear regression on the log scale and linear regression with a permutation test. Using 1,000 replications each, we simulated n = 10 and n = 50 years of count data and trends ranging from -5 to 5% change/year. We evaluated the tests at 3 critical levels (alpha = 0.01, 0.05, and 0.10) for both upper- and lower-tailed tests. Exponential count data were simulated by adding sampling error with a coefficient of variation of 40% from either a log-normal or autocorrelated log-normal distribution. Not surprisingly, tests performed with 50 years of data were much more powerful than tests with 10 years of data. Positive autocorrelation inflated alpha-levels upward from their nominal levels, making the tests less conservative and more likely to reject the null hypothesis of no trend. Of the tests studied, Cox and Stuart's test and Pollard's test clearly had lower power than the others. Surprisingly, the linear regression t-test, Collins' linear regression permutation test, and the nonparametric Lehmann's and Mann's tests all had similar power in our simulations. Analyses of the count data suggested that bald eagles had increasing trends on at least 2 of the 7 national forests during 1980-1989.

  4. Exploration of maximum count rate capabilities for large-area photon counting arrays based on polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Albert K.; Koniczek, Martin; Antonuk, Larry E.; El-Mohri, Youcef; Zhao, Qihua

    2016-03-01

    Pixelated photon counting detectors with energy discrimination capabilities are of increasing clinical interest for x-ray imaging. Such detectors, presently in clinical use for mammography and under development for breast tomosynthesis and spectral CT, usually employ in-pixel circuits based on crystalline silicon - a semiconductor material that is generally not well-suited for economic manufacture of large-area devices. One interesting alternative semiconductor is polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si), a thin-film technology capable of creating very large-area, monolithic devices. Similar to crystalline silicon, poly-Si allows implementation of the type of fast, complex, in-pixel circuitry required for photon counting - operating at processing speeds that are not possible with amorphous silicon (the material currently used for large-area, active matrix, flat-panel imagers). The pixel circuits of two-dimensional photon counting arrays are generally comprised of four stages: amplifier, comparator, clock generator and counter. The analog front-end (in particular, the amplifier) strongly influences performance and is therefore of interest to study. In this paper, the relationship between incident and output count rate of the analog front-end is explored under diagnostic imaging conditions for a promising poly-Si based design. The input to the amplifier is modeled in the time domain assuming a realistic input x-ray spectrum. Simulations of circuits based on poly-Si thin-film transistors are used to determine the resulting output count rate as a function of input count rate, energy discrimination threshold and operating conditions.

  5. Extended Measurement Capabilities of the Electron Proton Helium INstrument aboard SOHO - Understanding single detector count rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühl, P.; Banjac, S.; Heber, B.; Labrenz, J.; Müller-Mellin, R.; Terasa, C.

    Forbush (1937) was the first to observe intensity decreases lasting for a few days utilizing ionization chambers. A number of studies on Forbush decreases (FDs) have been performed since then utilizing neutron monitors and space instrumentation. The amplitude of these variations can be as low as a few permil. Therefore intensity measurements need to be of high statistical accuracy. Richardson et al. (1996) suggested therefore to utilize the single counter measurements of the guard counters of the IMP 8 and Helios E6 instruments. Like the above mentioned instruments the Electron Proton Helium INstrument (EPHIN) provides single counting rates. During the extended solar minimum in 2009 its guard detector counted about 25000~counts/minute, allowing to determine intensity variations of less than 2 permil using 30 minute averages. We performed a GEANT 4 simulation of the instrument in order to determine the energy response of all single detectors. It is shown here that their energy thresholds are much lower than the ones of neutron monitors and therefore we developed a criterion that allows to investigate FDs during quiet time periods.

  6. Cryogenic, high-resolution x-ray detector with high count rate capability

    DOEpatents

    Frank, Matthias; Mears, Carl A.; Labov, Simon E.; Hiller, Larry J.; Barfknecht, Andrew T.

    2003-03-04

    A cryogenic, high-resolution X-ray detector with high count rate capability has been invented. The new X-ray detector is based on superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs), and operates without thermal stabilization at or below 500 mK. The X-ray detector exhibits good resolution (.about.5-20 eV FWHM) for soft X-rays in the keV region, and is capable of counting at count rates of more than 20,000 counts per second (cps). Simple, FET-based charge amplifiers, current amplifiers, or conventional spectroscopy shaping amplifiers can provide the electronic readout of this X-ray detector.

  7. Reducing the Child Death Rate. KIDS COUNT Indicator Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, Rima; Shore, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    In the 20th century's final decades, advances in the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases sharply reduced the child death rate. Despite this progress, the child death rate in the U.S. remains higher than in many other wealthy nations. The under-five mortality rate in the U.S. is almost three times higher than that of Iceland and Sweden…

  8. Diplomas Count: An Essential Guide to Graduation Policy and Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Virginia B., Ed.

    2006-01-01

    "Education Week" provides a weekly review of state and federal K-12 education policy news. In this issue it offers detailed data on graduation rates across the 50 states and the District of Columbia, and in the nation's 50 largest school districts. The analysis is based on the Cumulative Promotion Index developed by Christopher B. Swanson, the…

  9. Bone and gallium scans in mastocytosis: correlation with count rates, radiography, and microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ensslen, R.D.; Jackson, F.I.; Reid, A.M.

    1983-07-01

    Mastocytosis (urticaria pigmentosa) was proven in a patient suffering from severe back pain. A bone scan showed diffusely increased bone activity. Count rates were also abnormally elevated over several areas of the skeleton. Radiographs were consistent with mastocytosis in bone.

  10. Performance Ratings and Librarians Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peele, David

    1970-01-01

    Two aspects of rating personnel performance are explored: (1) the rating form and some guidelines for filling it in and (2) the right of the librarian who is being rated to discuss or appeal a rating he believes to be biased. (NH)

  11. A High Count Rate Neutron Beam Monitor for Neutron Scattering Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, Amanda; Crow, Lowell; Diawara, Yacouba; Hayward, J P; Hayward, Jason P; Menhard, Kocsis; Sedov, Vladislav N; Funk, Loren L

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Beam monitors are an important diagnostic tool in neutron science facilities. Present beam monitors use either ionization chambers in integration mode, which are slow and have no timing information, or pulse counters which can easily be saturated by high beam intensities. At high flux neutron scattering facilities, neutron beam monitors with very low intrinsic efficiency (10-5) are presently selected to keep the counting rate within a feasible range, even when a higher efficiency would improve the counting statistics and yield a better measurement of the incident beam. In this work, we report on a high count rate neutron beam monitor. This beam monitor offers good timing with an intrinsic efficiency of 10-3 and a counting rate capability of over 1,000,000 cps without saturation.

  12. Nuclear photonics at ultra-high counting rates and higher multipole excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Thirolf, P. G.; Habs, D.; Filipescu, D.; Gernhaeuser, R.; Guenther, M. M.; Jentschel, M.; Marginean, N.; Pietralla, N.

    2012-07-09

    Next-generation {gamma} beams from laser Compton-backscattering facilities like ELI-NP (Bucharest)] or MEGa-Ray (Livermore) will drastically exceed the photon flux presently available at existing facilities, reaching or even exceeding 10{sup 13}{gamma}/sec. The beam structure as presently foreseen for MEGa-Ray and ELI-NP builds upon a structure of macro-pulses ({approx}120 Hz) for the electron beam, accelerated with X-band technology at 11.5 GHz, resulting in a micro structure of 87 ps distance between the electron pulses acting as mirrors for a counterpropagating intense laser. In total each 8.3 ms a {gamma} pulse series with a duration of about 100 ns will impinge on the target, resulting in an instantaneous photon flux of about 10{sup 18}{gamma}/s, thus introducing major challenges in view of pile-up. Novel {gamma} optics will be applied to monochromatize the {gamma} beam to ultimately {Delta}E/E{approx}10{sup -6}. Thus level-selective spectroscopy of higher multipole excitations will become accessible with good contrast for the first time. Fast responding {gamma} detectors, e.g. based on advanced scintillator technology (e.g. LaBr{sub 3}(Ce)) allow for measurements with count rates as high as 10{sup 6}-10{sup 7}{gamma}/s without significant drop of performance. Data handling adapted to the beam conditions could be performed by fast digitizing electronics, able to sample data traces during the micro-pulse duration, while the subsequent macro-pulse gap of ca. 8 ms leaves ample time for data readout. A ball of LaBr{sub 3} detectors with digital readout appears to best suited for this novel type of nuclear photonics at ultra-high counting rates.

  13. A New Statistics-Based Online Baseline Restorer for a High Count-Rate Fully Digital System.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongdi; Wang, Chao; Baghaei, Hossain; Zhang, Yuxuan; Ramirez, Rocio; Liu, Shitao; An, Shaohui; Wong, Wai-Hoi

    2010-04-01

    The goal of this work is to develop a novel, accurate, real-time digital baseline restorer using online statistical processing for a high count-rate digital system such as positron emission tomography (PET). In high count-rate nuclear instrumentation applications, analog signals are DC-coupled for better performance. However, the detectors, pre-amplifiers and other front-end electronics would cause a signal baseline drift in a DC-coupling system, which will degrade the performance of energy resolution and positioning accuracy. Event pileups normally exist in a high-count rate system and the baseline drift will create errors in the event pileup-correction. Hence, a baseline restorer (BLR) is required in a high count-rate system to remove the DC drift ahead of the pileup correction. Many methods have been reported for BLR from classic analog methods to digital filter solutions. However a single channel BLR with analog method can only work under 500 kcps count-rate, and normally an analog front-end application-specific integrated circuits (ASIC) is required for the application involved hundreds BLR such as a PET camera. We have developed a simple statistics-based online baseline restorer (SOBLR) for a high count-rate fully digital system. In this method, we acquire additional samples, excluding the real gamma pulses, from the existing free-running ADC in the digital system, and perform online statistical processing to generate a baseline value. This baseline value will be subtracted from the digitized waveform to retrieve its original pulse with zero-baseline drift. This method can self-track the baseline without a micro-controller involved. The circuit consists of two digital counter/timers, one comparator, one register and one subtraction unit. Simulation shows a single channel works at 30 Mcps count-rate with pileup condition. 336 baseline restorer circuits have been implemented into 12 field-programmable-gate-arrays (FPGA) for our new fully digital PET system.

  14. Illinois Quality Counts: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of Illinois' Quality Counts prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile consists of several sections and their corresponding descriptions including: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs; (4) Indicators for Family…

  15. Palm Beach Quality Counts: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of Palm Beach's Quality Counts prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile consists of several sections and their corresponding descriptions including: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs; (4) Indicators for…

  16. Miami-Dade Quality Counts: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of Miami-Dade's Quality Counts prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile consists of several sections and their corresponding descriptions including: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs; (4) Indicators for…

  17. Apparatus and method for temperature correction and expanded count rate of inorganic scintillation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Ianakiev, Kiril D.; Hsue, Sin Tao; Browne, Michael C.; Audia, Jeffrey M.

    2006-07-25

    The present invention includes an apparatus and corresponding method for temperature correction and count rate expansion of inorganic scintillation detectors. A temperature sensor is attached to an inorganic scintillation detector. The inorganic scintillation detector, due to interaction with incident radiation, creates light pulse signals. A photoreceiver processes the light pulse signals to current signals. Temperature correction circuitry that uses a fast light component signal, a slow light component signal, and the temperature signal from the temperature sensor to corrected an inorganic scintillation detector signal output and expanded the count rate.

  18. Counting Rate, Naming Rate, Phonological Sensitivity, and Memory Span: Major Factors in Dyslexia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackerman, Peggy T.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Children (N=20, age 9-12) with severe dyslexia were slower in counting from memory and naming alternating digits and letters than children with milder reading impairment. The children most disabled also had poorer phonological sensitivity, shorter digit spans, and lower verbal intelligence quotients. (Author/DB)

  19. Optical People Counting for Demand Controlled Ventilation: A Pilot Study of Counter Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William J.; Sullivan, Douglas

    2009-12-26

    This pilot scale study evaluated the counting accuracy of two people counting systems that could be used in demand controlled ventilation systems to provide control signals for modulating outdoor air ventilation rates. The evaluations included controlled challenges of the people counting systems using pre-planned movements of occupants through doorways and evaluations of counting accuracies when naive occupants (i.e., occupants unaware of the counting systems) passed through the entrance doors of the building or room. The two people counting systems had high counting accuracy accuracies, with errors typically less than 10percent, for typical non-demanding counting events. However, counting errors were high in some highly challenging situations, such as multiple people passing simultaneously through a door. Counting errors, for at least one system, can be very high if people stand in the field of view of the sensor. Both counting system have limitations and would need to be used only at appropriate sites and where the demanding situations that led to counting errors were rare.

  20. 45 CFR 261.25 - Do we count Tribal families in calculating the work participation rate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Do we count Tribal families in calculating the work participation rate? 261.25 Section 261.25 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare... OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ENSURING THAT RECIPIENTS WORK What Are the Provisions Addressing...

  1. Linear-log counting-rate meter uses transconductance characteristics of a silicon planar transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichholz, J. J.

    1969-01-01

    Counting rate meter compresses a wide range of data values, or decades of current. Silicon planar transistor, operating in the zero collector-base voltage mode, is used as a feedback element in an operational amplifier to obtain the log response.

  2. Statistical treatment of photon/electron counting: extending the linear dynamic range from the dark count rate to saturation.

    PubMed

    Kissick, David J; Muir, Ryan D; Simpson, Garth J

    2010-12-15

    An experimentally simple photon counting method is demonstrated providing 7 orders of magnitude in linear dynamic range (LDR) for a single photomultiplier tube (PMT) detector. In conventional photon/electron counting methods, the linear range is dictated by the agreement between the binomially distributed measurement of counted events and the underlying Poisson distribution of photons/electrons. By explicitly considering the log-normal probability distribution in voltage transients as a function of the number of photons present and the Poisson distribution of photons, observed counts for a given threshold can be related to the mean number of photons well beyond the conventional limit. Analytical expressions are derived relating counts and photons that extend the linear range to an average of ∼11 photons arriving simultaneously with a single threshold. These expressions can be evaluated numerically for multiple thresholds extending the linear range to the saturation point of the PMT. The peak voltage distributions are experimentally shown to follow a Poisson weighted sum of log-normal distributions that can all be derived from the single photoelectron voltage peak-height distribution. The LDR that results from this method is compared to conventional single photon counting (SPC) and to signal averaging by analog to digital conversion (ADC).

  3. Low-Noise Free-Running High-Rate Photon-Counting for Space Communication and Ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Wei; Krainak, Michael A.; Yang, Guan; Sun, Xiaoli; Merritt, Scott

    2016-01-01

    We present performance data for low-noise free-running high-rate photon counting method for space optical communication and ranging. NASA GSFC is testing the performance of two types of novel photon-counting detectors 1) a 2x8 mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) avalanche array made by DRS Inc., and a 2) a commercial 2880-element silicon avalanche photodiode (APD) array. We successfully measured real-time communication performance using both the 2 detected-photon threshold and logic AND-gate coincidence methods. Use of these methods allows mitigation of dark count, after-pulsing and background noise effects without using other method of Time Gating The HgCdTe APD array routinely demonstrated very high photon detection efficiencies (50) at near infrared wavelength. The commercial silicon APD array exhibited a fast output with rise times of 300 ps and pulse widths of 600 ps. On-chip individually filtered signals from the entire array were multiplexed onto a single fast output. NASA GSFC has tested both detectors for their potential application for space communications and ranging. We developed and compare their performances using both the 2 detected photon threshold and coincidence methods.

  4. Low-Noise Free-Running High-Rate Photon-Counting for Space Communication and Ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Wei; Krainak, Michael A.; Yang, Guangning; Sun, Xiaoli; Merritt, Scott

    2016-01-01

    We present performance data for low-noise free-running high-rate photon counting method for space optical communication and ranging. NASA GSFC is testing the performance of two types of novel photon-counting detectors 1) a 2x8 mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) avalanche array made by DRS Inc., and a 2) a commercial 2880-element silicon avalanche photodiode (APD) array. We successfully measured real-time communication performance using both the 2 detected-photon threshold and logic AND-gate coincidence methods. Use of these methods allows mitigation of dark count, after-pulsing and background noise effects without using other method of Time Gating The HgCdTe APD array routinely demonstrated very high photon detection efficiencies ((is) greater than 50%) at near infrared wavelength. The commercial silicon APD array exhibited a fast output with rise times of 300 ps and pulse widths of 600 ps. On-chip individually filtered signals from the entire array were multiplexed onto a single fast output. NASA GSFC has tested both detectors for their potential application for space communications and ranging. We developed and compare their performances using both the 2 detected photon threshold and coincidence methods.

  5. Comparisons of monthly mean cosmic ray counting rates observes from worldwide network of neutron monitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryu, J. Y.; Wada, M.

    1985-01-01

    In order to examine the stability of neutron monitor observation, each of the monthly average counting rates of a neutron monitors is correlated to those of Kiel neutron monitor. The regression coefficients thus obtained are compared with the coupling coefficients of isotropic intensity radiation. The results of the comparisons for five year periods during 1963 to 1982, and for whole period are given. The variation spectrum with a single power law with an exponent of -0.75 up to 50 GV is not so unsatisfactory one. More than one half of the stations show correlations with the coefficient greater than 0.9. Some stations have shifted the level of mean counting rates by changing the instrumental characteristics which can be adjusted.

  6. Performance and capacity analysis of Poisson photon-counting based Iter-PIC OCDMA systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Lingbin; Zhou, Xiaolin; Zhang, Rong; Zhang, Dingchen; Hanzo, Lajos

    2013-11-04

    In this paper, an iterative parallel interference cancellation (Iter-PIC) technique is developed for optical code-division multiple-access (OCDMA) systems relying on shot-noise limited Poisson photon-counting reception. The novel semi-analytical tool of extrinsic information transfer (EXIT) charts is used for analysing both the bit error rate (BER) performance as well as the channel capacity of these systems and the results are verified by Monte Carlo simulations. The proposed Iter-PIC OCDMA system is capable of achieving two orders of magnitude BER improvements and a 0.1 nats of capacity improvement over the conventional chip-level OCDMA systems at a coding rate of 1/10.

  7. Simulation of Rate-Related (Dead-Time) Losses In Passive Neutron Multiplicity Counting Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, L.G.; Norman, P.I.; Leadbeater, T.W.; Croft, S.; Philips, S.

    2008-07-01

    Passive Neutron Multiplicity Counting (PNMC) based on Multiplicity Shift Register (MSR) electronics (a form of time correlation analysis) is a widely used non-destructive assay technique for quantifying spontaneously fissile materials such as Pu. At high event rates, dead-time losses perturb the count rates with the Singles, Doubles and Triples being increasingly affected. Without correction these perturbations are a major source of inaccuracy in the measured count rates and assay values derived from them. This paper presents the simulation of dead-time losses and investigates the effect of applying different dead-time models on the observed MSR data. Monte Carlo methods have been used to simulate neutron pulse trains for a variety of source intensities and with ideal detection geometry, providing an event by event record of the time distribution of neutron captures within the detection system. The action of the MSR electronics was modelled in software to analyse these pulse trains. Stored pulse trains were perturbed in software to apply the effects of dead-time according to the chosen physical process; for example, the ideal paralysable (extending) and non-paralysable models with an arbitrary dead-time parameter. Results of the simulations demonstrate the change in the observed MSR data when the system dead-time parameter is varied. In addition, the paralysable and non-paralysable models of deadtime are compared. These results form part of a larger study to evaluate existing dead-time corrections and to extend their application to correlated sources. (authors)

  8. Performance of in-pixel circuits for photon counting arrays (PCAs) based on polycrystalline silicon TFTs.

    PubMed

    Liang, Albert K; Koniczek, Martin; Antonuk, Larry E; El-Mohri, Youcef; Zhao, Qihua; Street, Robert A; Lu, Jeng Ping

    2016-03-07

    Photon counting arrays (PCAs), defined as pixelated imagers which measure the absorbed energy of x-ray photons individually and record this information digitally, are of increasing clinical interest. A number of PCA prototypes with a 1 mm pixel-to-pixel pitch have recently been fabricated with polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si)-a thin-film technology capable of creating monolithic imagers of a size commensurate with human anatomy. In this study, analog and digital simulation frameworks were developed to provide insight into the influence of individual poly-Si transistors on pixel circuit performance-information that is not readily available through empirical means. The simulation frameworks were used to characterize the circuit designs employed in the prototypes. The analog framework, which determines the noise produced by individual transistors, was used to estimate energy resolution, as well as to identify which transistors contribute the most noise. The digital framework, which analyzes how well circuits function in the presence of significant variations in transistor properties, was used to estimate how fast a circuit can produce an output (referred to as output count rate). In addition, an algorithm was developed and used to estimate the minimum pixel pitch that could be achieved for the pixel circuits of the current prototypes. The simulation frameworks predict that the analog component of the PCA prototypes could have energy resolution as low as 8.9% full width at half maximum (FWHM) at 70 keV; and the digital components should work well even in the presence of significant thin-film transistor (TFT) variations, with the fastest component having output count rates as high as 3 MHz. Finally, based on conceivable improvements in the underlying fabrication process, the algorithm predicts that the 1 mm pitch of the current PCA prototypes could be reduced significantly, potentially to between ~240 and 290 μm.

  9. A proposal for harmonising laboratory performance assessment criteria in national asbestos fibre counting schemes.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, M C; Rojo, J M

    2001-08-01

    Four European national asbestos fibre counting proficiency testing schemes have been studied in order to compare their criteria for the assessment of laboratory performance. Performance assessment is based on each laboratory's results after counting a certain number of samples. Two methods are currently being applied. To be classified 'satisfactory' laboratories must obtain at least 75% of normalised counts lying within defined performance limits (in three schemes), or the median and coefficient of variation of normalised counts must be within performance limits (in the fourth scheme). Differences in the numbers of test samples mean that the schemes are operating with different selectivity in assessing their laboratories' performances. Differences in the percentage of laboratory results falling within performance limits indicate that the schemes do not operate the same confidence probability in correctly assessing individual counts. It means that some schemes may be more lenient than others. This paper discusses two proposals to move towards harmonisation of the asbestos fibre counting proficiency testing schemes: (i) standardisation of the number of samples used for laboratory assessment and (ii) changes to the criteria to establish the limits of satisfactory performance.

  10. Regression analysis of mixed recurrent-event and panel-count data with additive rate models.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liang; Zhao, Hui; Sun, Jianguo; Leisenring, Wendy; Robison, Leslie L

    2015-03-01

    Event-history studies of recurrent events are often conducted in fields such as demography, epidemiology, medicine, and social sciences (Cook and Lawless, 2007, The Statistical Analysis of Recurrent Events. New York: Springer-Verlag; Zhao et al., 2011, Test 20, 1-42). For such analysis, two types of data have been extensively investigated: recurrent-event data and panel-count data. However, in practice, one may face a third type of data, mixed recurrent-event and panel-count data or mixed event-history data. Such data occur if some study subjects are monitored or observed continuously and thus provide recurrent-event data, while the others are observed only at discrete times and hence give only panel-count data. A more general situation is that each subject is observed continuously over certain time periods but only at discrete times over other time periods. There exists little literature on the analysis of such mixed data except that published by Zhu et al. (2013, Statistics in Medicine 32, 1954-1963). In this article, we consider the regression analysis of mixed data using the additive rate model and develop some estimating equation-based approaches to estimate the regression parameters of interest. Both finite sample and asymptotic properties of the resulting estimators are established, and the numerical studies suggest that the proposed methodology works well for practical situations. The approach is applied to a Childhood Cancer Survivor Study that motivated this study.

  11. A physics investigation of deadtime losses in neutron counting at low rates with Cf252

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Louise G; Croft, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    {sup 252}Cf spontaneous fission sources are used for the characterization of neutron counters and the determination of calibration parameters; including both neutron coincidence counting (NCC) and neutron multiplicity deadtime (DT) parameters. Even at low event rates, temporally-correlated neutron counting using {sup 252}Cf suffers a deadtime effect. Meaning that in contrast to counting a random neutron source (e.g. AmLi to a close approximation), DT losses do not vanish in the low rate limit. This is because neutrons are emitted from spontaneous fission events in time-correlated 'bursts', and are detected over a short period commensurate with their lifetime in the detector (characterized by the system die-away time, {tau}). Thus, even when detected neutron events from different spontaneous fissions are unlikely to overlap in time, neutron events within the detected 'burst' are subject to intrinsic DT losses. Intrinsic DT losses for dilute Pu will be lower since the multiplicity distribution is softer, but real items also experience self-multiplication which can increase the 'size' of the bursts. Traditional NCC DT correction methods do not include the intrinsic (within burst) losses. We have proposed new forms of the traditional NCC Singles and Doubles DT correction factors. In this work, we apply Monte Carlo neutron pulse train analysis to investigate the functional form of the deadtime correction factors for an updating deadtime. Modeling is based on a high efficiency {sup 3}He neutron counter with short die-away time, representing an ideal {sup 3}He based detection system. The physics of dead time losses at low rates is explored and presented. It is observed that new forms are applicable and offer more accurate correction than the traditional forms.

  12. Effects, determination, and correction of count rate nonlinearity in multi-channel analog electron detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Reber, T. J.; Plumb, N. C.; Waugh, J. A.; Dessau, D. S.

    2014-04-15

    Detector counting rate nonlinearity, though a known problem, is commonly ignored in the analysis of angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy where modern multichannel electron detection schemes using analog intensity scales are used. We focus on a nearly ubiquitous “inverse saturation” nonlinearity that makes the spectra falsely sharp and beautiful. These artificially enhanced spectra limit accurate quantitative analysis of the data, leading to mistaken spectral weights, Fermi energies, and peak widths. We present a method to rapidly detect and correct for this nonlinearity. This algorithm could be applicable for a wide range of nonlinear systems, beyond photoemission spectroscopy.

  13. Study of the counting rate capability of MRPC detectors built with soda lime glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forster, R.; Margoto Rodríguez, O.; Park, W.; Rodríguez Rodríguez, A.; Williams, M. C. S.; Zichichi, A.; Zuyeuski, R.

    2016-09-01

    We report the results of three MRPC detectors built with soda lime glass and tested in the T10 beam line at CERN. The detectors consist of a stack of 280 μm thick glass sheets with 6 gaps of 220 μm . We built two identical MRPCs, except one had the edges of glass treated with resistive paint. A third detector was built with one HV electrode painted as strips. The detectors' efficiency and time resolution were studied at different particle flux in a pulsed beam environment. The results do not show any improvement with the painted edge technique at higher particle flux. We heated the MRPCs up to 40 °C to evaluate the influence of temperature in the rate capability. Results from this warming has indicated an improvement on the rate capability. The dark count rates show a significant dependence with the temperature.

  14. Keeping Count of All and Losing Count of a Few: The Construction of the High School Dropout Rate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Shana Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    The quality of the construction of the high school dropout rate is the policy issue investigated in this dissertation. This qualitative dissertation explores the constructs necessary to create a high school dropout rate and seeks to unearth complexities in the construction of the high school dropout rate. Every single year, approximately 1.2…

  15. Effective Count-Rates for PET Scanners with Reduced and Extended Axial Field of View

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, LR; Harrison, RL; Alessio, AM; Hunter, WCJ; Lewellen, TK; Kinahan, PE

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between noise equivalent counts (NEC) and axial field of view (AFOV) for PET scanners with AFOVs ranging from one-half to twice those of current clinical scanners. PET scanners with longer or shorter AFOVs could fulfill different clinical needs depending on exam volumes and site economics. Using previously validated Monte Carlo simulations, we modeled true, scattered, and random coincidence counting rates for a PET ring diameter of 88 cm with 2, 4, 6, and 8 rings of detector blocks (AFOV 7.8, 15.5, 23.3, and 31.0 cm). Fully 3D acquisition mode was compared to full collimation (2D) and partial collimation (2.5D) modes. Counting rates were estimated for a 200 cm long version of the 20 cm diameter NEMA countrate phantom and for an anthropomorphic object based on a patient scan. We estimated the live-time characteristics of the scanner from measured count-rate data and applied that estimate to the simulated results to obtain NEC as a function of object activity. We found NEC increased as a quadratic function of AFOV for 3D mode, and linearly in 2D mode. Partial collimation provided the highest overall NEC on the 2-block system and fully 3D mode provided the highest NEC on the 8-block system for clinically relevant activities. On the 4-, and 6-block systems 3D mode NEC was highest up to ~300 MBq in the anthropomorphic phantom, above which 3D NEC dropped rapidly, and 2.5D NEC was highest. Projected total scan time to achieve NEC-density that matches current clinical practice in a typical oncology exam averaged 9, 15, 24, and 61 min for the 8-, 6-, 4-, and 2-block ring systems, when using optimal collimation. Increasing the AFOV should provide a greater than proportional increase in NEC, potentially benefiting patient throughput-to-cost ratio. Conversely, by using appropriate collimation, a two-ring (7.8 cm AFOV) system could acquire whole-body scans achieving NEC-density levels comparable to current standards within long, but feasible

  16. Knowledge Workers' Perceptions of Performance Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Alan D.; Rupp, William T.

    2004-01-01

    One major purpose of performance appraisals is to determine individual merit, especially where pay for performance systems are employed. Based upon expectancy theory, high performance ratings should entail high merit increases while low performance ratings result in low merit increases. However, it appears that decoupling performance ratings and…

  17. Linking reproduction and survival can improve model estimates of vital rates derived from limited time-series counts of pinnipeds and other species.

    PubMed

    Battaile, Brian C; Trites, Andrew W

    2013-01-01

    We propose a method to model the physiological link between somatic survival and reproductive output that reduces the number of parameters that need to be estimated by models designed to determine combinations of birth and death rates that produce historic counts of animal populations. We applied our Reproduction and Somatic Survival Linked (RSSL) method to the population counts of three species of North Pacific pinnipeds (harbor seals, Phoca vitulina richardii (Gray, 1864); northern fur seals, Callorhinus ursinus (L., 1758); and Steller sea lions, Eumetopias jubatus (Schreber, 1776))--and found our model outperformed traditional models when fitting vital rates to common types of limited datasets, such as those from counts of pups and adults. However, our model did not perform as well when these basic counts of animals were augmented with additional observations of ratios of juveniles to total non-pups. In this case, the failure of the ratios to improve model performance may indicate that the relationship between survival and reproduction is redefined or disassociated as populations change over time or that the ratio of juveniles to total non-pups is not a meaningful index of vital rates. Overall, our RSSL models show advantages to linking survival and reproduction within models to estimate the vital rates of pinnipeds and other species that have limited time-series of counts.

  18. Effects of dilution rates, animal species and instruments on the spectrophotometric determination of sperm counts.

    PubMed

    Rondeau, M; Rouleau, M

    1981-06-01

    Using semen from bull, boar and stallion as well as different spectrophotometers, we established the calibration curves relating the optical density of a sperm sample to the sperm count obtained on the hemacytometer. The results show that, for a given spectrophotometer, the calibration curve is not characteristic of the animal species we studied. The differences in size of the spermatozoa are probably too small to account for the anticipated specificity of the calibration curve. Furthermore, the fact that different dilution rates must be used, because of the vastly different concentrations of spermatozoa which is characteristic of those species, has no effect on the calibration curves since the dilution rate is shown to be artefactual. On the other hand, for a given semen, the calibration curve varies depending upon the spectrophotometry used. However, if two instruments have the same characteristic in terms of spectral bandwidth, the calibration curves are not statistically different.

  19. High Broadband Spectral Resolving Transition-Edge Sensors for High Count-Rate Astrophysical Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    We are developing arrays of transition-edge sensor (TES) X-ray detectors optimized for high count-rate solar astronomy applications where characterizing the high velocity motions of X-ray jets in solar flares is of particular interest. These devices are fabricated on thick Si substrates and consist of 35x35micron^2 TESs with 4.5micron thick, 60micron pitch, electroplated absorbers. We have tested devices fabricated with different geometric stem contact areas with the TES and surrounding substrate area, which allows us to investigate the loss of athermal phonons to the substrate. Results show a correlation between the stem contact area and a non-Gaussian broadening in the spectral line shape consistent with athermal phonon loss. When the contact area is minimized we have obtained remarkable board-band spectral resolving capabilities of 1.3 plus or minus 0.leV at an energy of 1.5 keV, 1.6 plus or minus 0.1 eV at 5.9 keV and 2.0 plus or minus 0.1 eV at 8 keV. This, coupled with a capability of accommodating 100's of counts per second per pixel makes these devices an exciting prospect of future x-ray astronomy applications.

  20. Genetic Modifiers of White Blood Cell Count, Albuminuria and Glomerular Filtration Rate in Children with Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, Jonathan M.; Alvarez, Ofelia A.; Nelson, Stephen C.; Aygun, Banu; Nottage, Kerri A.; George, Alex; Roberts, Carla W.; Piccone, Connie M.; Howard, Thad A.; Davis, Barry R.; Ware, Russell E.

    2016-01-01

    Discovery and validation of genetic variants that influence disease severity in children with sickle cell anemia (SCA) could lead to early identification of high-risk patients, better screening strategies, and intervention with targeted and preventive therapy. We hypothesized that newly identified genetic risk factors for the general African American population could also impact laboratory biomarkers known to contribute to the clinical disease expression of SCA, including variants influencing the white blood cell count and the development of albuminuria and abnormal glomerular filtration rate. We first investigated candidate genetic polymorphisms in well-characterized SCA pediatric cohorts from three prospective NHLBI-supported clinical trials: HUSTLE, SWiTCH, and TWiTCH. We also performed whole exome sequencing to identify novel genetic variants, using both a discovery and a validation cohort. Among candidate genes, DARC rs2814778 polymorphism regulating Duffy antigen expression had a clear influence with significantly increased WBC and neutrophil counts, but did not affect the maximum tolerated dose of hydroxyurea therapy. The APOL1 G1 polymorphism, an identified risk factor for non-diabetic renal disease, was associated with albuminuria. Whole exome sequencing discovered several novel variants that maintained significance in the validation cohorts, including ZFHX4 polymorphisms affecting both the leukocyte and neutrophil counts, as well as AGGF1, CYP4B1, CUBN, TOR2A, PKD1L2, and CD163 variants affecting the glomerular filtration rate. The identification of robust, reliable, and reproducible genetic markers for disease severity in SCA remains elusive, but new genetic variants provide avenues for further validation and investigation. PMID:27711207

  1. In Orbit Performance of Si Avalanche Photodiode Single Photon Counting Modules in the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System on ICESat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, X.; Jester, P. L.; Palm, S. P.; Abshire, J. B.; Spinhime, J. D.; Krainak, M. A.

    2006-01-01

    Si avalanche photodiode (APD) single photon counting modules (SPCMs) are used in the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) on Ice, Cloud, anti land Elevation Satellite (ICESat), currently in orbit measuring Earth surface elevation and atmosphere backscattering. These SPCMs are used to measure cloud and aerosol backscatterings to the GLAS laser light at 532-nm wavelength with 60-70% quantum efficiencies and up to 15 millions/s maximum count rates. The performance of the SPCMs has been closely monitored since ICESat launch on January 12, 2003. There has been no measurable change in the quantum efficiency, as indicated by the average photon count rates in response to the background light from the sunlit earth. The linearity and the afterpulsing seen from the cloud and surface backscatterings profiles have been the same as those during ground testing. The detector dark count rates monitored while the spacecraft was in the dark side of the globe have increased almost linearly at about 60 counts/s per day due to space radiation damage. The radiation damage appeared to be independent of the device temperature and power states. There was also an abrupt increase in radiation damage during the solar storm in 28-30 October 2003. The observed radiation damage is a factor of two to three lower than the expected and sufficiently low to provide useful atmosphere backscattering measurements through the end of the ICESat mission. To date, these SPCMs have been in orbit for more than three years. The accumulated operating time to date has reached 290 days (7000 hours). These SPCMs have provided unprecedented receiver sensitivity and dynamic range in ICESat atmosphere backscattering measurements.

  2. 5 CFR 430.308 - Rating performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Rating performance. 430.308 Section 430.308 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT Managing Senior Executive Performance § 430.308 Rating performance. (a) Initial summary...

  3. 5 CFR 430.308 - Rating performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rating performance. 430.308 Section 430.308 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT Managing Senior Executive Performance § 430.308 Rating performance. (a) Initial summary...

  4. The relationship between compost bedded pack performance, management, and bacterial counts.

    PubMed

    Black, R A; Taraba, J L; Day, G B; Damasceno, F A; Newman, M C; Akers, K A; Wood, C L; McQuerry, K J; Bewley, J M

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the relationships among temperature, moisture, carbon-to-nitrogen (C:N) ratio, space per cow, and bacterial counts from bedding material collected from compost bedded pack (CBP) barns. A field survey of 42 routinely aerated CBP barns was conducted in Kentucky between October 2010 and March 2011. Two bedding material samples of 1,064.7 cm(3) each were collected during a single site visit from 9 evenly distributed locations throughout each barn and thoroughly mixed to create a composite sample representative of the entire CBP. Bacterial counts were determined for coliforms, Escherichia coli, streptococci, staphylococci, and Bacillus spp. University of Kentucky Regulatory Services (Lexington) laboratory personnel performed nutrient analyses to determine moisture, carbon, and nitrogen contents. Surface and 10.2-cm pack depth temperatures were collected for each of the 9 evenly distributed locations and the mean calculated to produce a composite temperature. Space per cow was calculated as the total CBP area divided by number of cows housed on the CBP. The GLM procedure of SAS (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC) generated models to describe factors affecting bacterial counts. Bacterial counts were 6.3 ± 0.6, 6.0 ± 0.6, 7.2 ± 0.7, 7.9 ± 0.5, and 7.6 ± 0.5 log 10 cfu/g of dry matter for coliform, Escherichia coli, streptococci, staphylococci, and Bacillus spp., respectively. Composite temperature, CBP moisture, C:N ratio, and space per cow had no effect on coliform counts. Escherichia coli reached a peak concentration when the C:N ratio was between 30:1 and 35:1. Staphylococci counts increased as ambient temperature increased. Streptococci counts decreased with increased space per cow and composite temperature and increased with increasing ambient temperature and moisture. Streptococci counts peaked at a C:N ratio ranging from 16:1 to 18:1. Bacillus spp. counts were reduced with increasing moisture, C:N ratio, and ambient

  5. Optimization of statistical methods for HpGe gamma-ray spectrometer used in wide count rate ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gervino, G.; Mana, G.; Palmisano, C.

    2016-07-01

    The need to perform γ-ray measurements with HpGe detectors is a common technique in many fields such as nuclear physics, radiochemistry, nuclear medicine and neutron activation analysis. The use of HpGe detectors is chosen in situations where isotope identification is needed because of their excellent resolution. Our challenge is to obtain the "best" spectroscopy data possible in every measurement situation. "Best" is a combination of statistical (number of counts) and spectral quality (peak, width and position) over a wide range of counting rates. In this framework, we applied Bayesian methods and the Ellipsoidal Nested Sampling (a multidimensional integration technique) to study the most likely distribution for the shape of HpGe spectra. In treating these experiments, the prior information suggests to model the likelihood function with a product of Poisson distributions. We present the efforts that have been done in order to optimize the statistical methods to HpGe detector outputs with the aim to evaluate to a better order of precision the detector efficiency, the absolute measured activity and the spectra background. Reaching a more precise knowledge of statistical and systematic uncertainties for the measured physical observables is the final goal of this research project.

  6. Note: Fully integrated active quenching circuit achieving 100 MHz count rate with custom technology single photon avalanche diodes.

    PubMed

    Acconcia, G; Labanca, I; Rech, I; Gulinatti, A; Ghioni, M

    2017-02-01

    The minimization of Single Photon Avalanche Diodes (SPADs) dead time is a key factor to speed up photon counting and timing measurements. We present a fully integrated Active Quenching Circuit (AQC) able to provide a count rate as high as 100 MHz with custom technology SPAD detectors. The AQC can also operate the new red enhanced SPAD and provide the timing information with a timing jitter Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) as low as 160 ps.

  7. Note: Fully integrated active quenching circuit achieving 100 MHz count rate with custom technology single photon avalanche diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acconcia, G.; Labanca, I.; Rech, I.; Gulinatti, A.; Ghioni, M.

    2017-02-01

    The minimization of Single Photon Avalanche Diodes (SPADs) dead time is a key factor to speed up photon counting and timing measurements. We present a fully integrated Active Quenching Circuit (AQC) able to provide a count rate as high as 100 MHz with custom technology SPAD detectors. The AQC can also operate the new red enhanced SPAD and provide the timing information with a timing jitter Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) as low as 160 ps.

  8. Assessing base rates of sexual behavior using the unmatched count technique.

    PubMed

    Starosta, Amy J; Earleywine, Mitch

    2014-01-01

    Estimating the prevalence of sexual behaviors is difficult because of self-report biases. This is particularly relevant in assessing high-risk sexual behaviors for the purpose of reducing the transmission and acquisition of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and HIV/AIDS. The present study employed the unmatched count technique (UCT), which provides estimates of the prevalence of risky sexual behaviors without requiring participants to confess to socially undesirable or stigmatized behaviors. Compared to a standard, anonymous self-report questionnaire, the UCT protocol revealed that people were less likely to notify their partners about STIs or discuss their history of sexual experiences. Effects were particularly large in women suggesting that women may be more likely to misrepresent their sexual behaviors. The findings suggest that conventional, anonymous self-report questionnaire data of base rates of risky sexual behavior and sexual communication are consistently inaccurate. These discrepant base rates suggest that the UCT might provide a better estimate of the frequency of these behaviors. Results suggest that inconsistent sexual behavior is more rampant than anonymous questionnaires suggest. They also underscore the need for improvements in the anonymity of assessment of sexual behaviors, which could in turn improve the targeting of prevention efforts. Results have important public health implications because accurate assessment of sexual behaviors is crucial for developing effective STI prevention interventions among target populations.

  9. 5 CFR 430.208 - Rating performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rating performance. 430.208 Section 430.208 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT Performance Appraisal for General Schedule, Prevailing Rate, and Certain Other Employees §...

  10. 5 CFR 430.208 - Rating performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Rating performance. 430.208 Section 430.208 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT Performance Appraisal for General Schedule, Prevailing Rate, and Certain Other Employees §...

  11. Characteristic performance evaluation of a photon counting Si strip detector for low dose spectral breast CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Hyo-Min; Ding, Huanjun; Molloi, Sabee; Barber, William C.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: The possible clinical applications which can be performed using a newly developed detector depend on the detector's characteristic performance in a number of metrics including the dynamic range, resolution, uniformity, and stability. The authors have evaluated a prototype energy resolved fast photon counting x-ray detector based on a silicon (Si) strip sensor used in an edge-on geometry with an application specific integrated circuit to record the number of x-rays and their energies at high flux and fast frame rates. The investigated detector was integrated with a dedicated breast spectral computed tomography (CT) system to make use of the detector's high spatial and energy resolution and low noise performance under conditions suitable for clinical breast imaging. The aim of this article is to investigate the intrinsic characteristics of the detector, in terms of maximum output count rate, spatial and energy resolution, and noise performance of the imaging system. Methods: The maximum output count rate was obtained with a 50 W x-ray tube with a maximum continuous output of 50 kVp at 1.0 mA. A{sup 109}Cd source, with a characteristic x-ray peak at 22 keV from Ag, was used to measure the energy resolution of the detector. The axial plane modulation transfer function (MTF) was measured using a 67 μm diameter tungsten wire. The two-dimensional (2D) noise power spectrum (NPS) was measured using flat field images and noise equivalent quanta (NEQ) were calculated using the MTF and NPS results. The image quality parameters were studied as a function of various radiation doses and reconstruction filters. The one-dimensional (1D) NPS was used to investigate the effect of electronic noise elimination by varying the minimum energy threshold. Results: A maximum output count rate of 100 million counts per second per square millimeter (cps/mm{sup 2}) has been obtained (1 million cps per 100 × 100 μm pixel). The electrical noise floor was less than 4 keV. The energy

  12. Characteristic performance evaluation of a photon counting Si strip detector for low dose spectral breast CT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyo-Min; Barber, William C.; Ding, Huanjun; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Molloi, Sabee

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The possible clinical applications which can be performed using a newly developed detector depend on the detector's characteristic performance in a number of metrics including the dynamic range, resolution, uniformity, and stability. The authors have evaluated a prototype energy resolved fast photon counting x-ray detector based on a silicon (Si) strip sensor used in an edge-on geometry with an application specific integrated circuit to record the number of x-rays and their energies at high flux and fast frame rates. The investigated detector was integrated with a dedicated breast spectral computed tomography (CT) system to make use of the detector's high spatial and energy resolution and low noise performance under conditions suitable for clinical breast imaging. The aim of this article is to investigate the intrinsic characteristics of the detector, in terms of maximum output count rate, spatial and energy resolution, and noise performance of the imaging system. Methods: The maximum output count rate was obtained with a 50 W x-ray tube with a maximum continuous output of 50 kVp at 1.0 mA. A109Cd source, with a characteristic x-ray peak at 22 keV from Ag, was used to measure the energy resolution of the detector. The axial plane modulation transfer function (MTF) was measured using a 67 μm diameter tungsten wire. The two-dimensional (2D) noise power spectrum (NPS) was measured using flat field images and noise equivalent quanta (NEQ) were calculated using the MTF and NPS results. The image quality parameters were studied as a function of various radiation doses and reconstruction filters. The one-dimensional (1D) NPS was used to investigate the effect of electronic noise elimination by varying the minimum energy threshold. Results: A maximum output count rate of 100 million counts per second per square millimeter (cps/mm2) has been obtained (1 million cps per 100 × 100 μm pixel). The electrical noise floor was less than 4 keV. The energy resolution

  13. Optimizing Transition-Edge Sensor Design for High Count-Rate Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Stephen J.; Adams, Joe S.; Bandler, Simon R.; Brekosky, Regis P.; Brown, Ari-D.; Chervenak, James A.; Eckart, Megan E.; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Scott Porter, F.; Finkbeiner, Fred M.; Sadleir, John E.

    2009-12-16

    We are developing transition-edge sensor (TES) X-ray detectors optimized for high count-rate applications. These devices are fabricated on thick (300 {mu}m) Si substrates, resulting in a 20 times increase in thermal conductance to the heat sink compared to our conventional membrane isolated TES's. Operating a TES with higher heat sink conductance requires 4.5 times more bias current. This results in a 2.7 times increase in {beta}, the logarithmic derivative of resistance with respect to current. Noise measurements show a lower limit on the TES excess noise scales as (2{beta}){sup 1/2}, consistent with the near-equilibrium, non-linear expansion of the Ohmic Johnson noise. This is consistent with our membrane devices though the increased {beta} means the theoretical best attainable resolution is degraded by 25-35%. We have tested devices with different contact geometries between the absorber, and the TES and substrate. This allows us to investigate the loss of athermal phonons to the substrate, which can degrade the resolution. Results show a correlation between the stem contact area and a low-energy tail in the spectral response at 5.9 keV due to the athermal phonon loss. In several devices tested we demonstrate a resolution of 4.1-5.6 eV, coupled with detector time constants as fast as 44 {mu}s, representing an increase in detector response by 7 times compared to the membrane devices.

  14. Survey material choices in haematology EQA: a confounding factor in automated counting performance assessment

    PubMed Central

    De la Salle, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    The complete blood count (CBC) is one of the most frequently requested tests in laboratory medicine, performed in a range of healthcare situations. The provision of an ideal assay material for external quality assessment is confounded by the fragility of the cellular components of blood, the lack of commutability of stabilised whole blood material and the lack of certified reference materials and methods to which CBC results can be traced. The choice of assay material between fresh blood, extended life assay material and fully stabilised, commercially prepared, whole blood material depends upon the scope and objectives of the EQA scheme. The introduction of new technologies in blood counting and the wider clinical application of parameters from the extended CBC will bring additional challenges for the EQA provider.

  15. Time and position resolution of high granularity, high counting rate MRPC for the inner zone of the CBM-TOF wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petriş, M.; Bartoş, D.; Caragheorgheopol, G.; Deppner, I.; Frühauf, J.; Herrmann, N.; Kiš, M.; Loizeau, P.-A.; Petrovici, M.; Rădulescu, L.; Simion, V.; Simon, C.

    2016-09-01

    Multi-gap RPC prototypes with a multi-strip-electrode readout were developed for the small polar angle region of the CBM-TOF subdetector, the most demanding zone in terms of granularity and counting rate. The prototypes are based on using low resistivity (~ 1010 Ω·cm) glass electrodes for performing in high counting rate environment. The strip width/pitch size was chosen such to fulfill the impedance matching with the front-end electronics and the granularity requirements of the innermost zone of the CBM-TOF wall. The in-beam tests using secondary particles produced in heavy ion collisions on a Pb target at SIS18—GSI Darmstadt and SPS—CERN were focused on the performance of the prototypes in conditions similar to the ones expected at SIS100/FAIR. An efficiency larger than 98% and a system time resolution in the order of 70-80 ps were obtained in high counting rate and high multiplicity environment.

  16. Performance Evaluation of Whole Body Counting Facilities in the Marshall Islands (2002-2005)

    SciTech Connect

    Kehl, S R; Hamilton, T; Jue, T; Hickman, D

    2007-04-03

    The United States Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) has recently implemented a series of strategic initiatives to address long-term radiological surveillance needs at former U.S. nuclear test sites in the Marshall Islands (https://eed.llnl.gov/mi/). Local atoll governments have been actively engaged in developing shared responsibilities for protecting the health and safety of resettled and resettling population at risk from exposure to elevated levels of residual fallout contamination in the environment. Under the program, whole body counting facilities have been established at three locations in the Marshall Islands. These facilities are operated and maintained by Marshallese technicians with scientists from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) providing technical support services including data quality assurance and performance testing. We have also established a mirror whole body counting facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory as a technician training center. The LLNL facility also allows program managers to develop quality assurance and operational procedures, and test equipment and corrective actions prior to deployment at remote stations in the Marshall Islands. This document summarizes the results of external performance evaluation exercises conducted at each of the facilities (2002-2005) under the umbrella of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Intercomparison Studies Program (ISP). The ISP was specifically designed to meet intercomparison requirements of the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP). In this way, the Marshall Islands Radiological Surveillance Program has attempted to establish quality assurance measures in whole body counting that are consistent with standard requirements used to monitor DOE workers in the United States. Based on ANSI N13.30, the acceptable performance criteria for relative measurement bias and precision for radiobioassay service laboratory quality control

  17. Experience with local lymph node assay performance standards using standard radioactivity and nonradioactive cell count measurements.

    PubMed

    Basketter, David; Kolle, Susanne N; Schrage, Arnhild; Honarvar, Naveed; Gamer, Armin O; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard; Landsiedel, Robert

    2012-08-01

    The local lymph node assay (LLNA) is the preferred test for identification of skin-sensitizing substances by measuring radioactive thymidine incorporation into the lymph node. To facilitate acceptance of nonradioactive variants, validation authorities have published harmonized minimum performance standards (PS) that the alternative endpoint assay must meet. In the present work, these standards were applied to a variant of the LLNA based on lymph node cell counts (LNCC) run in parallel as a control with the standard LLNA with radioactivity measurements, with threshold concentrations (EC3) being determined for the sensitizers. Of the 22 PS chemicals tested in this study, 21 yielded the same results from standard radioactivity and cell count measurements; only 2-mercaptobenzothiazole was positive by LLNA but negative by LNCC. Of the 16 PS positives, 15 were positive by LLNA and 14 by LNCC; methylmethacrylate was not identified as sensitizer by either of the measurements. Two of the six PS negatives tested negative in our study by both LLNA and LNCC. Of the four PS negatives which were positive in our study, chlorobenzene and methyl salicylate were tested at higher concentrations than the published PS, whereas the corresponding concentrations resulted in consistent negative results. Methylmethacrylate and nickel chloride tested positive within the concentration range used for the published PS. The results indicate cell counts and radioactive measurements are in good accordance within the same LLNA using the 22 PS test substances. Comparisons with the published PS results may, however, require balanced analysis rather than a simple checklist approach.

  18. Performance Invalidity Base Rates Among Healthy Undergraduate Research Participants.

    PubMed

    Ross, Thomas P; Poston, Ashley M; Rein, Patricia A; Salvatore, Andrew N; Wills, Nathan L; York, Taylor M

    2016-02-01

    Few studies have examined base rates of suboptimal effort among healthy, undergraduate students recruited for neuropsychological research. An and colleagues (2012, Conducting research with non-clinical healthy undergraduates: Does effort play a role in neuropsychological test performance? Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, 27, 849-857) reported high rates of performance invalidity (30.8%-55.6%), calling into question the validity of findings generated from samples of college students. In contrast, subsequent studies have reported much lower base rates ranging from 2.6% to 12%. The present study replicated and extended previous work by examining the performance of 108 healthy undergraduates on the Dot Counting Test, Victoria Symptom Validity Test, Word Memory Test, and a brief battery of neuropsychological measures. During initial testing, 8.3% of the sample scored below cutoffs on at least one Performance Validity Test, while 3.7% were classified as invalid at Time 2 (M interval = 34.4 days). The present findings add to a growing number of studies that suggest performance invalidity base rates in samples of non-clinical, healthy college students are much lower than An and colleagues initial findings. Although suboptimal effort is much less problematic than suggested by An and colleagues, recent reports as high as 12% indicate including measures of effort may be of value when using college students as participants. Methodological issues and recommendations for future research are presented.

  19. 45 CFR 2522.540 - Do the costs of performance measurement or evaluation count towards the statutory cap on...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Do the costs of performance measurement or evaluation count towards the statutory cap on administrative costs? 2522.540 Section 2522.540 Public Welfare... measurement or evaluation count towards the statutory cap on administrative costs? No, the costs...

  20. Performance of in-pixel circuits for photon counting arrays (PCAs) based on polycrystalline silicon TFTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Albert K.; Koniczek, Martin; Antonuk, Larry E.; El-Mohri, Youcef; Zhao, Qihua; Street, Robert A.; Lu, Jeng Ping

    2016-03-01

    Photon counting arrays (PCAs), defined as pixelated imagers which measure the absorbed energy of x-ray photons individually and record this information digitally, are of increasing clinical interest. A number of PCA prototypes with a 1 mm pixel-to-pixel pitch have recently been fabricated with polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si)—a thin-film technology capable of creating monolithic imagers of a size commensurate with human anatomy. In this study, analog and digital simulation frameworks were developed to provide insight into the influence of individual poly-Si transistors on pixel circuit performance—information that is not readily available through empirical means. The simulation frameworks were used to characterize the circuit designs employed in the prototypes. The analog framework, which determines the noise produced by individual transistors, was used to estimate energy resolution, as well as to identify which transistors contribute the most noise. The digital framework, which analyzes how well circuits function in the presence of significant variations in transistor properties, was used to estimate how fast a circuit can produce an output (referred to as output count rate). In addition, an algorithm was developed and used to estimate the minimum pixel pitch that could be achieved for the pixel circuits of the current prototypes. The simulation frameworks predict that the analog component of the PCA prototypes could have energy resolution as low as 8.9% full width at half maximum (FWHM) at 70 keV; and the digital components should work well even in the presence of significant thin-film transistor (TFT) variations, with the fastest component having output count rates as high as 3 MHz. Finally, based on conceivable improvements in the underlying fabrication process, the algorithm predicts that the 1 mm pitch of the current PCA prototypes could be reduced significantly, potentially to between ~240 and 290 μm.

  1. Patient-dependent count-rate adaptive normalization for PET detector efficiency with delayed-window coincidence events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Xiaofeng; Ye, Hongwei; Xia, Ting; Asma, Evren; Winkler, Mark; Gagnon, Daniel; Wang, Wenli

    2015-07-01

    Quantitative PET imaging is widely used in clinical diagnosis in oncology and neuroimaging. Accurate normalization correction for the efficiency of each line-of- response is essential for accurate quantitative PET image reconstruction. In this paper, we propose a normalization calibration method by using the delayed-window coincidence events from the scanning phantom or patient. The proposed method could dramatically reduce the ‘ring’ artifacts caused by mismatched system count-rates between the calibration and phantom/patient datasets. Moreover, a modified algorithm for mean detector efficiency estimation is proposed, which could generate crystal efficiency maps with more uniform variance. Both phantom and real patient datasets are used for evaluation. The results show that the proposed method could lead to better uniformity in reconstructed images by removing ring artifacts, and more uniform axial variance profiles, especially around the axial edge slices of the scanner. The proposed method also has the potential benefit to simplify the normalization calibration procedure, since the calibration can be performed using the on-the-fly acquired delayed-window dataset.

  2. Mu-Spec - A High Performance Ultra-Compact Photon Counting spectrometer for Space Submillimeter Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseley, H.; Hsieh, W.-T.; Stevenson, T.; Wollack, E.; Brown, A.; Benford, D.; Sadleir; U-Yen, I.; Ehsan, N.; Zmuidzinas, J.; Bradford, M.

    2011-01-01

    We have designed and are testing elements of a fully integrated submillimeter spectrometer based on superconducting microstrip technology. The instrument can offer resolving power R approximately 1500, and its high frequency cutoff is set by the gap of available high performance superconductors. All functions of the spectrometer are integrated - light is coupled to the microstrip circuit with a planar antenna, the spectra discrimination is achieved using a synthetic grating, orders are separated using planar filter, and detected using photon counting MKID detector. This spectrometer promises to revolutionize submillimeter spectroscopy from space. It replaces instruments with the scale of 1m with a spectrometer on a 10 cm Si wafer. The reduction in mass and volume promises a much higher performance system within available resource in a space mission. We will describe the system and the performance of the components that have been fabricated and tested.

  3. Comparing human observer performance in detecting microcalcifications with energy weighting and photon counting breast CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalluri, Kesava; Mahd, Mufeed; Glick, Stephen J.

    2012-03-01

    Breast CT (BCT) using a photon counting detector (PCD) has a number of advantages that can potentially improve clinical performance. Previous computer simulation studies showed that the signal to noise ratio (SNR) for microcalcifications is higher with energy weighted photon counting BCT as compared to cesium iodide energy integrating detector (CsI-EID) based BCT. CsI-EID inherently weighs the incident x-ray photons in direct proportion to the energy (contradicting the information content) which is not an optimal approach. PCD do not inherently weigh the incident photons. By choosing optimal energy weights, higher SNR can be achieved for microcalcifications and hence better detectability. In this simulation study, forward projection data of a numerical breast phantom with microcalcifications inserted were acquired using CsI-EID and PCD. The PCD projections were optimally weighed, and reconstructed using filtered back-projection. We compared observer performance in identifying microcalcifications in the reconstructed images using ROC analysis. ROC based results show that the average area(s) under curve(s) (AUC) for AUCPCD based methods are higher than the average AUCCsI-EID method.

  4. Analysis and correction of count rate reduction during simultaneous MR-PET measurements with the BrainPET scanner.

    PubMed

    Weirich, Christoph; Brenner, Daniel; Scheins, Jürgen; Besancon, Etienne; Tellmann, Lutz; Herzog, Hans; Shah, N Jon

    2012-07-01

    In hybrid magnetic resonance-positron emission tomography (MR-PET) studies with the Siemens 3T MR-BrainPET scanner an instantaneous reduction of the PET sensitivity was observed during execution of certain MR sequences. This interference was investigated in detail with custom-made as well as standard clinical MR sequences. The radio-frequency pulses, the switched gradient fields and the constant magnetic field were examined as the relevant parameters of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system as well as the air temperature within the PET detectors. Our investigation comprised the analysis of the analog PET signals, the total count rates, the geometric distribution of the count rate reduction within the BrainPET detector as well as reconstructed images. The fast switching magnetic field gradients were identified to distort the analog PET detector signals. The measured count rate reduction was found to be less than 3%, but only up to 2% in the case of echo planar imaging sequences, as applied in functional MRI. For clinical sequences routinely used in hybrid MR-BrainPET measurements, a correction method has been designed, implemented, and evaluated .

  5. High-voltage integrated active quenching circuit for single photon count rate up to 80 Mcounts/s.

    PubMed

    Acconcia, Giulia; Rech, Ivan; Gulinatti, Angelo; Ghioni, Massimo

    2016-08-08

    Single photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) have been subject to a fast improvement in recent years. In particular, custom technologies specifically developed to fabricate SPAD devices give the designer the freedom to pursue the best detector performance required by applications. A significant breakthrough in this field is represented by the recent introduction of a red enhanced SPAD (RE-SPAD) technology, capable of attaining a good photon detection efficiency in the near infrared range (e.g. 40% at a wavelength of 800 nm) while maintaining a remarkable timing resolution of about 100ps full width at half maximum. Being planar, the RE-SPAD custom technology opened the way to the development of SPAD arrays particularly suited for demanding applications in the field of life sciences. However, to achieve such excellent performance custom SPAD detectors must be operated with an external active quenching circuit (AQC) designed on purpose. Next steps toward the development of compact and practical multichannel systems will require a new generation of monolithically integrated AQC arrays. In this paper we present a new, fully integrated AQC fabricated in a high-voltage 0.18 µm CMOS technology able to provide quenching pulses up to 50 Volts with fast leading and trailing edges. Although specifically designed for optimal operation of RE-SPAD devices, the new AQC is quite versatile: it can be used with any SPAD detector, regardless its fabrication technology, reaching remarkable count rates up to 80 Mcounts/s and generating a photon detection pulse with a timing jitter as low as 119 ps full width at half maximum. The compact design of our circuit has been specifically laid out to make this IC a suitable building block for monolithically integrated AQC arrays.

  6. ChromAIX: a high-rate energy-resolving photon-counting ASIC for spectal computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steadman, Roger; Herrmann, Christoph; Mülhens, Oliver; Maeding, Dale G.; Colley, James; Firlit, Ted; Luhta, Randy; Chappo, Marc; Harwood, Brian; Kosty, Doug

    2010-04-01

    In Computed Tomography applications a major opportunity has been identified in the exploitation of the spectral information inherently available due to the polychromatic emission of the X-ray tube. Current CT technology based on indirect-conversion and integrating-mode detection can be used to some extent to distinguish the two predominant physical causes of energy-dependent attenuation (photo-electric effect and Compton effect) by using dual-energy techniques, e.g. kVp switching, dual-source or detector stacking. Further improvements can be achieved by transitioning to direct-conversion technologies and counting-mode detection, which inherently exhibits a better signal-to-noise ratio. Further including energy discrimination, enables new applications, which are not feasible with dual-energy techniques, e.g. the possibility to discriminate K-edge features (contrast agents, e.g. Gadolinium) from the other contributions to the x-ray attenuation of a human body. The capability of providing energy-resolved information with more than two different measurements is referred to as Spectral CT. To study the feasibility of Spectral CT, an energy-resolving proprietary photon counting ASIC (ChromAIX) has been designed to provide high count-rate capabilities while offering energy discrimination. The ChromAIX ASIC consists of an arrangement of 4 by 16 pixels with an isotropic pitch of 300 μm. Each pixel contains a number of independent energy discriminators with their corresponding 12-bit counters with continuous read-out capability. Observed Poissonian count-rates exceeding 10 Mcps (corresponding to approximately 27 Mcps incident mean Poisson rate) have been experimentally validated through electrical characterization. The measured noise of 2.6 mVRMS (4 keV FWHM) adheres to specifications. The ChromAIX ASIC has been specifically designed to support direct-converting materials CdZnTe and CdTe.

  7. A Six-Year Study on the Changes in Airborne Pollen Counts and Skin Positivity Rates in Korea: 2008–2013

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hye Jung; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Park, Kyung Hee; Kim, Kyu Rang; Han, Mae Ja; Choe, Hosoeng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The occurrence of pollen allergy is subject to exposure to pollen, which shows regional and temporal variations. We evaluated the changes in pollen counts and skin positivity rates for 6 years, and explored the correlation between their annual rates of change. Materials and Methods We assessed the number of pollen grains collected in Seoul, and retrospectively reviewed the results of 4442 skin-prick tests conducted at the Severance Hospital Allergy-Asthma Clinic from January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2013. Results For 6 years, the mean monthly total pollen count showed two peaks, one in May and the other in September. Pollen count for grasses also showed the same trend. The pollen counts for trees, grasses, and weeds changed annually, but the changes were not significant. The annual skin positivity rates in response to pollen from grasses and weeds increased significantly over the 6 years. Among trees, the skin positivity rates in response to pollen from walnut, popular, elm, and alder significantly increased over the 6 years. Further, there was a significant correlation between the annual rate of change in pollen count and the rate of change in skin positivity rate for oak and hop Japanese. Conclusion The pollen counts and skin positivity rates should be monitored, as they have changed annually. Oak and hop Japanese, which showed a significant correlation with the annual rate of change in pollen count and the rate of change in skin positivity rate over the 6 years may be considered the major allergens in Korea. PMID:26996572

  8. Re-Visiting the Competence/Performance Debate in the Acquisition of the Counting Principles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Corre, Mathieu; Van de Walle, Gretchen; Brannon, Elizabeth M.; Carey, Susan.

    2006-01-01

    Advocates of the ''continuity hypothesis'' have argued that innate non-verbal counting principles guide the acquisition of the verbal count list (Gelman & Gallistel, 1978). Some studies have supported this hypothesis, but others have suggested that the counting principles must be constructed anew by each child. Defenders of the continuity…

  9. The Slope Imaging Multi-Polarization Photon-Counting Lidar: Development and Performance Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dabney, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    The Slope Imaging Multi-polarization Photon-counting Lidar is an airborne instrument developed to demonstrate laser altimetry measurement methods that will enable more efficient observations of topography and surface properties from space. The instrument was developed through the NASA Earth Science Technology Office Instrument Incubator Program with a focus on cryosphere remote sensing. The SIMPL transmitter is an 11 KHz, 1064 nm, plane-polarized micropulse laser transmitter that is frequency doubled to 532 nm and split into four push-broom beams. The receiver employs single-photon, polarimetric ranging at 532 and 1064 nm using Single Photon Counting Modules in order to achieve simultaneous sampling of surface elevation, slope, roughness and depolarizing scattering properties, the latter used to differentiate surface types. Data acquired over ice-covered Lake Erie in February, 2009 are documenting SIMPL s measurement performance and capabilities, demonstrating differentiation of open water and several ice cover types. ICESat-2 will employ several of the technologies advanced by SIMPL, including micropulse, single photon ranging in a multi-beam, push-broom configuration operating at 532 nm.

  10. Performances of photodiode detectors for top and bottom counting detectors of ISS-CREAM experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun, H. J.; Anderson, T.; Angelaszek, D.; Baek, S. J.; Copley, M.; Coutu, S.; Han, J. H.; Huh, H. G.; Hwang, Y. S.; Im, S.; Jeon, H. B.; Kah, D. H.; Kang, K. H.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, K. C.; Kwashnak, K.; Lee, J.; Lee, M. H.; Link, J. T.; Lutz, L.; Mitchell, J. W.; Nutter, S.; Ofoha, O.; Park, H.; Park, I. H.; Park, J. M.; Patterson, P.; Seo, E. S.; Wu, J.; Yoon, Y. S.

    2015-07-01

    The Cosmic Ray Energetics and Mass (CREAM) experiment at the International Space Station (ISS) aims to elucidate the source and acceleration mechanisms of high-energy cosmic rays by measuring the energy spectra from protons to iron. The instrument is planned for launch in 2015 at the ISS, and it comprises a silicon charge detector, a carbon target, top and bottom counting detectors, a calorimeter, and a boronated scintillator detector. The top and bottom counting detectors are developed for separating the electrons from the protons, and each of them comprises a plastic scintillator and a 20×20 silicon photodiode array. Each photodiode is 2.3 cm×2.3 cm in size and exhibits good electrical characteristics. The leakage current is measured to be less than 20 nA/cm2 at an operating voltage. The signal-to-noise ratio is measured to be better than 70 using commercial electronics, and the radiation hardness is tested using a proton beam. A signal from the photodiode is amplified by VLSI (very-large-scale integration) charge amp/hold circuits, the VA-TA viking chip. Environmental tests are performed using whole assembled photodiode detectors of a flight version. Herein, we present the characteristics of the developed photodiode along with the results of the environmental tests.

  11. Correction of dead-time and pile-up in a detector array for constant and rapidly varying counting rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, C.; Cano-Ott, D.; Mendoza, E.; Wright, T.

    2015-03-01

    The effect of dead-time and pile-up in counting experiments may become a significant source of uncertainty if not properly taken into account. Although analytical solutions to this problem have been proposed for simple set-ups with one or two detectors, these are limited when it comes to arrays where time correlation between the detector modules is used, and also in situations of variable counting rates. In this paper we describe the dead-time and pile-up corrections applied to the n_TOF Total Absorption Calorimeter (TAC), a 4π γ-ray detector made of 40 BaF2 modules operating at the CERN n_TOF facility. Our method is based on the simulation of the complete signal detection and event reconstruction processes and can be applied as well in the case of rapidly varying counting rates. The method is discussed in detail and then we present its successful application to the particular case of the measurement of 238U(n, γ) reactions with the TAC detector.

  12. HEPS-BPIX, a single photon counting pixel detector with a high frame rate for the HEPS project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wei; Zhang, Jie; Ning, Zhe; Lu, Yunpeng; Fan, Lei; Li, Huaishen; Jiang, Xiaoshan; Lan, Allan K.; Ouyang, Qun; Wang, Zheng; Zhu, Kejun; Chen, Yuanbo; Liu, Peng

    2016-11-01

    China's next generation light source, named the High Energy Photon Source (HEPS), is currently under construction. HEPS-BPIX (HEPS-Beijing PIXel) is a dedicated pixel readout chip that operates in single photon counting mode for X-ray applications in HEPS. Designed using CMOS 0.13 μm technology, the chip contains a matrix of 104×72 pixels. Each pixel measures 150 μm×150 μm and has a counting depth of 20 bits. A bump-bonded prototyping detector module with a 300-μm thick silicon sensor was tested in the beamline of Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. A fast stream of X-ray images was demonstrated, and a frame rate of 1.2 kHz was proven, with a negligible dead time. The test results showed an equivalent noise charge of 115 e- rms after bump bonding and a threshold dispersion of 55 e- rms after calibration.

  13. Rating the energy performance of buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Olofsson, Thomas; Meier, Alan; Lamberts, Roberto

    2004-12-01

    In order to succeed in developing a more sustainable society, buildings will need to be continuously improved. This paper discusses how to rate the energy performance of buildings. A brief review of recent approaches to energy rating is presented. It illustrates that there is no single correct or wrong concept, but one needs to be aware of the relative impact of the strategies. Different strategies of setting energy efficiency standards are discussed and the advantages of the minimum life cycle cost are shown. Indicators for building energy rating based on simulations, aggregated statistics and expert knowledge are discussed and illustrated in order to demonstrate strengths and weaknesses of each approach. In addition, the importance of considering the level of amenities offered is presented. Attributes of a rating procedure based on three elements, flexible enough for recognizing different strategies to achieve energy conservation, is proposed.

  14. In ADHD patients performing the Counting Stroop task: a social neuroscience approach.

    PubMed

    Mercadillo, Roberto E; Trujillo, Celia; Sánchez-Cortazar, Julián; Barrios, Fernando A

    2012-10-01

    Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) symptoms are manifested in social dynamics. In this study, the brain activity of eight child and adolescent patients diagnosed with ADHD was examined while they performed the Counting Stroop task and results were interpreted using social neuroscience premises. Brain activity was identified in frontal, parietal, and temporal regions related to the orienting system of attention and with linguistic, facial recognition, and mnemonic processes. Consistent with previous reports, these patients showed no activation in prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortices related to the executive system of attention. Also, they manifested activation in the insular cortex involving interoceptive processes that may be associated with impulsiveness. Global brain activity involves a network formed during early development and includes experiential components such as learning of rules, reward systems, empathy, and decision making. An integrative assessment of ADHD should consider psychosocial and neurobiological causes integrated into an individual's own experiences assembled throughout life.

  15. SWAD: inherent photon counting performance of amorphous selenium multi-well avalanche detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavro, Jann; Goldan, Amir H.; Zhao, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Photon counting detectors (PCDs) have the potential to improve x-ray imaging, however they are still hindered by several performance limitations and high production cost. By using amorphous Selenium (a-Se) the cost of PCDs can be significantly reduced compared to crystalline materials and enable large area detector fabrication. To overcome the problem of low carrier mobility and low charge conversion gain in a-Se, we are developing a novel direct conversion a- Se field-Shaping multi-Well Avalanche Detector (SWAD). SWAD circumvents the charge transport limitation by using a Frisch grid built within the readout circuit, reducing charge collection time to ~200 ns. Field shaping permits depth independent avalanche gain in wells, resulting in total conversion gain that is comparable to Si and CdTe. In the present work we investigate the effects of charge sharing and energy loss to understand the inherent photon counting performance for SWAD at x-ray energies used in breast imaging applications (20-50keV). The energy deposition profile for each interacting x-ray was determined with Monte Carlo simulation. For the energy ranges we are interested in, photoelectric interaction dominates, with a k-fluorescence yield of approximately 60%. Using a monoenergetic 45 keV beam incident on a target pixel in 400um of a-Se, our results show that only 20.42 % and 22.4 % of primary interacting photons have kfluorescence emissions which escape the target pixel for 100um and 85um pixel sizes respectively, demonstrating SWAD's potential for high spatial resolution applications.

  16. Supplier Performance Evaluation and Rating System (SPEARS)

    SciTech Connect

    Oged, M.; Warner, D.; Gurbuz, E.

    1993-03-01

    The SSCL Magnet Quality Assurance Department has implemented a Supplier Performance Evaluation and Rating System (SPEARS) to assess supplier performance throughout the development and production stages of the SSCL program. The main objectives of SPEARS are to promote teamwork and recognize performance. This paper examines the current implementation of SPEARS. MSD QA supports the development and production of SSCsuperconducting magnets while implementing the requirements of DOE Order 5700.6C. The MSD QA program is based on the concept of continuous improvement in quality and productivity. The QA program requires that procurement of items and services be controlled to assure conformance to specification. SPEARS has been implemented to meet DOE requirements and to enhance overall confidence in supplier performance. Key elements of SPEARS include supplier evaluation and selection as well as evaluation of furnished quality through source inspection, audit, and receipt inspection. These elements are described in this paper.

  17. A Count for Quality: Child Care Center Directors on Rating and Improvement Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulman, Karen; Matthews, Hannah; Blank, Helen; Ewen, Danielle

    2012-01-01

    Quality Rating and Improvement Systems (QRIS)--a strategy to improve families' access to high-quality child care--assess the quality of child care programs, offer incentives and assistance to programs to improve their ratings, and give information to parents about the quality of child care. These systems are operating in a growing number of…

  18. Performance of coincidence-based PSD on LiF/ZnS Detectors for Multiplicity Counting

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Sean M.; Stave, Sean C.; Lintereur, Azaree; Siciliano, Edward R.; Cowles, Christian C.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Behling, Richard S.

    2016-10-06

    Abstract: Mass accountancy measurement is a nuclear nonproliferation application which utilizes coincidence and multiplicity counters to verify special nuclear material declarations. With a well-designed and efficient detector system, several relevant parameters of the material can be verified simultaneously. 6LiF/ZnS scintillating sheets may be used for this purpose due to a combination of high efficiency and short die-away times in systems designed with this material, but involve choices of detector geometry and exact material composition (e.g., the addition of Ni-quenching in the material) that must be optimized for the application. Multiplicity counting for verification of declared nuclear fuel mass involves neutron detection in conditions where several neutrons arrive in a short time window, with confounding gamma rays. This paper considers coincidence-based Pulse-Shape Discrimination (PSD) techniques developed to work under conditions of high pileup, and the performance of these algorithms with different detection materials. Simulated and real data from modern LiF/ZnS scintillator systems are evaluated with these techniques and the relationship between the performance under pileup and material characteristics (e.g., neutron peak width and total light collection efficiency) are determined, to allow for an optimal choice of detector and material.

  19. TMF ultra-high rate discharge performance

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, B.

    1997-12-01

    BOLDER Technologies Corporation has developed a valve-regulated lead-acid product line termed Thin Metal Film (TMF{trademark}) technology. It is characterized by extremely thin plates and close plate spacing that facilitate high rates of charge and discharge with minimal temperature increases, at levels unachievable with other commercially-available battery technologies. This ultra-high rate performance makes TMF technology ideal for such applications as various types of engine start, high drain rate portable devices and high-current pulsing. Data are presented on very high current continuous and pulse discharges. Power and energy relationships at various discharge rates are explored and the fast-response characteristics of the BOLDER{reg_sign} cell are qualitatively defined. Short-duration recharge experiments will show that devices powered by BOLDER batteries can be in operation for more than 90% of an extended usage period with multiple fast recharges. The BOLDER cell is ideal for applications such as engine-start, a wide range of portable devices including power tools, hybrid electric vehicles and pulse-power devices. Applications such as this are very attractive, and are well served by TMF technology, but an area of great interest and excitement is ultrahigh power delivery in excess of 1 kW/kg.

  20. Quality Counts 2005: No Small Change--Targeting Money toward Student Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Week, 2005

    2005-01-01

    "Quality Counts 2005" focuses on the burgeoning efforts to link funding to educational outcomes. This special issue of "Education Week" includes the following articles: (1) Financial Evolution (Lynn Olson); (2) Making Every Dollar Count (Robert C. Johnston); (3) Weighty Decisions (Jeff Archer); (4) Salary Adjustments (Melissa…

  1. 45 CFR 286.100 - What activities count towards the work participation rate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... participation rate? 286.100 Section 286.100 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF...-the-job training (OJT); (6) Job search and job readiness assistance; (see § 286.105) (7) Community service programs; (8) Vocational educational training; (see § 286.105) (9) Job skills training...

  2. Relationship between visual counts and call detection rates of gray whales (Eschrichtius robustus) in Laguna San Ignacio, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ponce, Diana; Thode, Aaron M; Guerra, Melania; Urbán R, Jorge; Swartz, Steven

    2012-04-01

    Daily acoustic calling rates of Eastern North Pacific (ENP) gray whales were measured on 6 days during 1 mo of their 2008 breeding season in the sheltered coastal lagoon of Laguna San Ignacio in Baja California, Mexico. Visual counts of whales determined that the numbers of single animals in the lower lagoon more than tripled over the observation period. All call types showed production peaks in the early morning and evening with minimum rates generally detected in the early afternoon. For four of the five observation days, the daily number of "S1"-type calls increased roughly as the square of the number of the animals in the lower lagoon during both daytime and nighttime. This relationship persisted when raw call counts were adjusted for variations in background noise level, using a simple propagation law derived from empirical measurements. The one observation day that did not fit the square-law relationship occurred during a week when the group size in the lagoon increased rapidly. These results suggest that passive acoustic monitoring does not measure gray whale group size directly but monitors the number of connections in the social network, which rises as roughly M(2)/2 for a group size M.

  3. Dependence of the neutron monitor count rate and time delay distribution on the rigidity spectrum of primary cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangeard, P.-S.; Ruffolo, D.; Sáiz, A.; Nuntiyakul, W.; Bieber, J. W.; Clem, J.; Evenson, P.; Pyle, R.; Duldig, M. L.; Humble, J. E.

    2016-12-01

    Neutron monitors are the premier instruments for precisely tracking time variations in the Galactic cosmic ray flux at GeV-range energies above the geomagnetic cutoff at the location of measurement. Recently, a new capability has been developed to record and analyze the neutron time delay distribution (related to neutron multiplicity) to infer variations in the cosmic ray spectrum as well. In particular, from time delay histograms we can determine the leader fraction L, defined as the fraction of neutrons that did not follow a previous neutron detection in the same tube from the same atmospheric secondary particle. Using data taken during 2000-2007 by a shipborne neutron monitor latitude survey, we observe a strong dependence of the count rate and L on the geomagnetic cutoff. We have modeled this dependence using Monte Carlo simulations of cosmic ray interactions in the atmosphere and in the neutron monitor. We present new yield functions for the count rate of a neutron monitor at sea level. The simulation results show a variation of L with geomagnetic cutoff as observed by the latitude survey, confirming that these changes in L can be attributed to changes in the cosmic ray spectrum arriving at Earth's atmosphere. We also observe a variation in L with time at a fixed cutoff, which reflects the evolution of the cosmic ray spectrum with the sunspot cycle, known as solar modulation.

  4. Stimulus generation, ratings, phoneme counts, and group classifications for 696 famous people by British adults over 40 years of age.

    PubMed

    Smith-Spark, James H; Moore, Viv; Valentine, Tim; Sherman, Susan M

    2006-11-01

    Matching stimuli across a range of influencing variables is no less important for studies of face recognition than it is for those of word processing. Whereas a number of corpora exist to allow experimenters to select a carefully controlled set of word stimuli, similar databases for famous faces do not exist. This article, therefore, provides researchers in the area of face recognition with a useful resource on which to base their stimulus selection. In the first phase of the investigation, British adults over 40 years of age were requested to generate the names of famous people (or celebrities) that they thought they would recognize and to write these down. The most frequently named celebrities were then rated by adults from the same age population for familiarity, distinctiveness, and age of acquisition. The result is a database of 696 famous people, with an indication of their relative eminence in the public consciousness and rated for these important variables. Phoneme counts are also provided for each famous person, together with family name frequency counts in the general population, where available. Materials and links may be accessed at www.psychonomic.org/archive.

  5. Tower counts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woody, Carol Ann; Johnson, D.H.; Shrier, Brianna M.; O'Neal, Jennifer S.; Knutzen, John A.; Augerot, Xanthippe; O'Neal, Thomas A.; Pearsons, Todd N.

    2007-01-01

    Counting towers provide an accurate, low-cost, low-maintenance, low-technology, and easily mobilized escapement estimation program compared to other methods (e.g., weirs, hydroacoustics, mark-recapture, and aerial surveys) (Thompson 1962; Siebel 1967; Cousens et al. 1982; Symons and Waldichuk 1984; Anderson 2000; Alaska Department of Fish and Game 2003). Counting tower data has been found to be consistent with that of digital video counts (Edwards 2005). Counting towers do not interfere with natural fish migration patterns, nor are fish handled or stressed; however, their use is generally limited to clear rivers that meet specific site selection criteria. The data provided by counting tower sampling allow fishery managers to determine reproductive population size, estimate total return (escapement + catch) and its uncertainty, evaluate population productivity and trends, set harvest rates, determine spawning escapement goals, and forecast future returns (Alaska Department of Fish and Game 1974-2000 and 1975-2004). The number of spawning fish is determined by subtracting subsistence, sport-caught fish, and prespawn mortality from the total estimated escapement. The methods outlined in this protocol for tower counts can be used to provide reasonable estimates ( plus or minus 6%-10%) of reproductive salmon population size and run timing in clear rivers. 

  6. A New High Channel-Count, High Scan-Rate, Data Acquisition System for the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanco, Thomas G.; Sekula, Martin K.; Piatak, David J.; Simmons, Scott A.; Babel, Walter C.; Collins, Jesse G.; Ramey, James M.; Heald, Dean M.

    2016-01-01

    A data acquisition system upgrade project, known as AB-DAS, is underway at the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. AB-DAS will soon serve as the primary data system and will substantially increase the scan-rate capabilities and analog channel count while maintaining other unique aeroelastic and dynamic test capabilities required of the facility. AB-DAS is configurable, adaptable, and enables buffet and aeroacoustic tests by synchronously scanning all analog channels and recording the high scan-rate time history values for each data quantity. AB-DAS is currently available for use as a stand-alone data system with limited capabilities while development continues. This paper describes AB-DAS, the design methodology, and the current features and capabilities. It also outlines the future work and projected capabilities following completion of the data system upgrade project.

  7. Counting Rate Characteristics and Image Distortion in Preclinical PET Imaging During Radiopharmaceutical Therapy.

    PubMed

    Mellhammar, Emma; Dahlbom, Magnus; Axelsson, Johan; Strand, Sven-Erik

    2016-12-01

    PET may provide important information on the response during radiopharmaceutical therapy (RPT). Emission of radiation from the RPT radionuclide may disturb coincidence detection and impair image resolution. In this study, we tested the feasibility of performing intratherapeutic PET on 3 preclinical PET systems.

  8. Two-photon fluorescence correlation spectroscopy with high count rates and low background using dielectric microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Aouani, Heykel; Schön, Peter; Brasselet, Sophie; Rigneault, Hervé; Wenger, Jérôme

    2010-01-01

    Two-photon excitation fluorescence is a powerful technique commonly used for biological imaging. However, the low absorption cross section of this non-linear process is a critical issue for performing biomolecular spectroscopy at the single molecule level. Enhancing the two-photon fluorescence signal would greatly improve the effectiveness of this technique, yet current methods struggle with medium enhancement factors and/or high background noise. Here, we show that the two-photon fluorescence signal from single Alexa Fluor 488 molecules can be enhanced up to 10 times by using a 3 µm diameter latex sphere while adding almost no photoluminescence background. We report a full characterization of the two-photon fluorescence enhancement by a single microsphere using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. This opens new routes to enhance non-linear optical signals and extend biophotonic applications. PMID:21258531

  9. When Rating Systems Do Not Rate: Evaluating ERA's Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henman, Paul; Brown, Scott D.; Dennis, Simon

    2017-01-01

    In 2015, the Australian Government's Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA) assessment of research quality declined to rate 1.5 per cent of submissions from universities. The public debate focused on practices of gaming or "coding errors" within university submissions as the reason for this outcome. The issue was about the…

  10. Single Photon Counting Performance and Noise Analysis of CMOS SPAD-Based Image Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Dutton, Neale A. W.; Gyongy, Istvan; Parmesan, Luca; Henderson, Robert K.

    2016-01-01

    SPAD-based solid state CMOS image sensors utilising analogue integrators have attained deep sub-electron read noise (DSERN) permitting single photon counting (SPC) imaging. A new method is proposed to determine the read noise in DSERN image sensors by evaluating the peak separation and width (PSW) of single photon peaks in a photon counting histogram (PCH). The technique is used to identify and analyse cumulative noise in analogue integrating SPC SPAD-based pixels. The DSERN of our SPAD image sensor is exploited to confirm recent multi-photon threshold quanta image sensor (QIS) theory. Finally, various single and multiple photon spatio-temporal oversampling techniques are reviewed. PMID:27447643

  11. Single Photon Counting Performance and Noise Analysis of CMOS SPAD-Based Image Sensors.

    PubMed

    Dutton, Neale A W; Gyongy, Istvan; Parmesan, Luca; Henderson, Robert K

    2016-07-20

    SPAD-based solid state CMOS image sensors utilising analogue integrators have attained deep sub-electron read noise (DSERN) permitting single photon counting (SPC) imaging. A new method is proposed to determine the read noise in DSERN image sensors by evaluating the peak separation and width (PSW) of single photon peaks in a photon counting histogram (PCH). The technique is used to identify and analyse cumulative noise in analogue integrating SPC SPAD-based pixels. The DSERN of our SPAD image sensor is exploited to confirm recent multi-photon threshold quanta image sensor (QIS) theory. Finally, various single and multiple photon spatio-temporal oversampling techniques are reviewed.

  12. Children's Performance on the "Give X" Task: A Microgenetic Analysis of "Counting" and "Grabbing" Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chetland, Elizabeth; Fluck, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Children's understanding of the cardinal significance of counting is often assessed by the "give x" task, in which they are categorized as "counters" or "grabbers". Previous research indicates a sudden stage-like shift, implying insight into a principle. Employing a microgenetic approach, the present study was…

  13. Identification and validation of a factor of commutability between platelet counts performed on EDTA and citrate.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Pierre; Goussot, Vincent; David, Alice; Lizard, Sarab; Riedinger, Jean-Marc

    2017-02-01

    The anticoagulant mostly employed for platelet count is EDTA. The Francophone Group of Cellular Hematology recommends checking of blood smear stained with May-Grünwald Giemsa any thrombocytopenia less than 100 G/L without medical history or whether an alarm is generated by the cell counter. The pseudo-thrombocytopenia (PTP) with EDTA is the best known artifact in platelet count. A sample of blood on citrated tube is necessary to get rid of the interference. The objective of this study was to compare the platelet counts obtained on EDTA (numEDTA) and citrate (numCTAD) tubes and to define, then validate a factor of conversion between both methods. The prevalence of PTP EDTA is 0.26%. The PTP was transient in 80% of the patients. The numEDTA and numCTAD+10% (numCTAD increased by 10% to take dilution into account) are correlated but are not equivalent. The numCTAD+10% underestimate numEDTA significantly. The systematic bias is removed if we increase by 17% numCTAD. The factor of correction is stable over a period of 3 hours.

  14. 5 CFR 9701.409 - Rating and rewarding performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... management system must establish a single summary rating level of unacceptable performance, a summary rating level of fully successful performance (or equivalent), and at least one summary rating level above fully successful performance. (2) For employees in an Entry/Developmental band, the DHS performance...

  15. Evaluation of super-resolution performance of the K2 electron-counting camera using 2D crystals of aquaporin-0

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Po-Lin; Li, Xueming; Li, Zongli; Beckett, Brian; Brilot, Axel F.; Grigorieff, Nikolaus; Agard, David A.; Cheng, Yifan; Walz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The K2 Summit camera was initially the only commercially available direct electron detection camera that was optimized for high-speed counting of primary electrons and was also the only one that implemented centroiding so that the resolution of the camera can be extended beyond the Nyquist limit set by the physical pixel size. In this study, we used well-characterized two-dimensional crystals of the membrane protein aquaporin-0 to characterize the performance of the camera below and beyond the physical Nyquist limit and to measure the influence of electron dose rate on image amplitudes and phases. PMID:26318383

  16. Evaluation of super-resolution performance of the K2 electron-counting camera using 2D crystals of aquaporin-0.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Po-Lin; Li, Xueming; Li, Zongli; Beckett, Brian; Brilot, Axel F; Grigorieff, Nikolaus; Agard, David A; Cheng, Yifan; Walz, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    The K2 Summit camera was initially the only commercially available direct electron detection camera that was optimized for high-speed counting of primary electrons and was also the only one that implemented centroiding so that the resolution of the camera can be extended beyond the Nyquist limit set by the physical pixel size. In this study, we used well-characterized two-dimensional crystals of the membrane protein aquaporin-0 to characterize the performance of the camera below and beyond the physical Nyquist limit and to measure the influence of electron dose rate on image amplitudes and phases.

  17. Evaluation of two-stage system for neutron measurement aiming at increase in count rate at Japan Atomic Energy Agency-Fusion Neutronics Source.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, K; Ishii, K; Ochiai, K; Baba, M; Sukegawa, A; Sasao, M; Kitajima, S

    2014-11-01

    In order to increase the count rate capability of a neutron detection system as a whole, we propose a multi-stage neutron detection system. Experiments to test the effectiveness of this concept were carried out on Fusion Neutronics Source. Comparing four configurations of alignment, it was found that the influence of an anterior stage on a posterior stage was negligible for the pulse height distribution. The two-stage system using 25 mm thickness scintillator was about 1.65 times the count rate capability of a single detector system for d-D neutrons and was about 1.8 times the count rate capability for d-T neutrons. The results suggested that the concept of a multi-stage detection system will work in practice.

  18. Evaluation of two-stage system for neutron measurement aiming at increase in count rate at Japan Atomic Energy Agency-Fusion Neutronics Source

    SciTech Connect

    Shinohara, K. Ochiai, K.; Sukegawa, A.; Ishii, K.; Kitajima, S.; Baba, M.; Sasao, M.

    2014-11-15

    In order to increase the count rate capability of a neutron detection system as a whole, we propose a multi-stage neutron detection system. Experiments to test the effectiveness of this concept were carried out on Fusion Neutronics Source. Comparing four configurations of alignment, it was found that the influence of an anterior stage on a posterior stage was negligible for the pulse height distribution. The two-stage system using 25 mm thickness scintillator was about 1.65 times the count rate capability of a single detector system for d-D neutrons and was about 1.8 times the count rate capability for d-T neutrons. The results suggested that the concept of a multi-stage detection system will work in practice.

  19. Multiple-factor influences upon feeding flight rates at wading bird colonies (Alias: Are flight-line counts useful?)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erwin, R.M.; Ogden, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    The temporal patterns of feeding, resting, and reproductive behavior in colonial wading birds have been studied by a number of investigators, both on a short-term (daily) and long-term (annual) basis. In coastal marine environments, activities at colonies are influenced by tides, time of day and phase of the nesting cycle. The purpose of this paper is twofold: (1) to examine the effects of tide, time of day (physical factors), nesting phase, colony site, and species identity (biological factors) on feeding flight rates at breeding colonies and, as a result of this, (2) to evaluate the usefulness of feeding flight counts as an index of the number of nests in the colony. Earlier work suggests that the relationship between the number of individuals flying to and from the nesting colony may be quite consistent with nest numbers. Thus, by monitoring flights from remote locations, observers might obtain relatively accurate census data while minimizing time and disturbance at colonies. Recent concern for the deleterious impact of humans at waterbird colonies underscores the need to investigate alternative census methods.

  20. Clinical features and outcome of T-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adults: a low initial white blood cell count, as well as a high count predict decreased survival rates.

    PubMed

    Yanada, Masamitsu; Jinnai, Itsuro; Takeuchi, Jin; Ueda, Takanori; Miyawaki, Shuichi; Tsuzuki, Motohiro; Hatta, Yoshihiro; Usui, Noriko; Wada, Hideho; Morii, Takeshi; Matsuda, Mitsuhiro; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Okada, Masaya; Honda, Sumihisa; Miyazaki, Yasushi; Ohno, Ryuzo; Naoe, Tomoki

    2007-07-01

    Although biological and clinical features differ between B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and T-lineage ALL (T-ALL), there have been few reports that focused on the prognosis for T-ALL in adults, primarily due to its rarity. Here, we studied the long-term outcomes and prognostic factors specific for adult T-ALL by combining patient data from the three prospective trials conducted by the Japan Adult Leukemia Study Group (JALSG). Among 559 patients whose immunophenotypes could be evaluated, 87 (15.6%) were identified as T-ALL. Of them, 66 patients (75.8%) achieved complete remission, and relapse occurred in 41 patients. With a median follow-up for surviving patients of 7.5 years, the probability of overall survival was 35.0% at 5 years. Risk factor analysis revealed that serum albumin levels, initial white blood cell (WBC) counts, and age had independent values for predicting survival. For WBC, not only the high-count group (50 x 10(9)l(-1) or higher), but also the low-count group (less than 3 x 10(9)l(-1)) showed a significantly lower survival rates than the intermediate-count group (p=0.0055 and 0.0037, respectively). Although our findings need confirmation, these results will be helpful in the identification of prognostically distinct subgroups within adult T-ALL.

  1. 5 CFR 930.206 - Performance rating and awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS FOR SPECIFIC POSITIONS AND EXAMINATIONS (MISCELLANEOUS) Administrative Law Judge Program § 930.206 Performance rating and awards. (a) An agency may not rate the job performance...

  2. Performance of a Discrete Wavelet Transform for Compressing Plasma Count Data and its Application to the Fast Plasma Investigation on NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrie, Alexander C.; Yeh, Penshu; Dorelli, John C.; Clark, George B.; Paterson, William R.; Adrian, Mark L.; Holland, Matthew P.; Lobell, James V.; Simpson, David G.; Pollock, Craig J.; Moore, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    Plasma measurements in space are becoming increasingly faster, higher resolution, and distributed over multiple instruments. As raw data generation rates can exceed available data transfer bandwidth, data compression is becoming a critical design component. Data compression has been a staple of imaging instruments for years, but only recently have plasma measurement designers become interested in high performance data compression. Missions will often use a simple lossless compression technique yielding compression ratios of approximately 2:1, however future missions may require compression ratios upwards of 10:1. This study aims to explore how a Discrete Wavelet Transform combined with a Bit Plane Encoder (DWT/BPE), implemented via a CCSDS standard, can be used effectively to compress count information common to plasma measurements to high compression ratios while maintaining little or no compression error. The compression ASIC used for the Fast Plasma Investigation (FPI) on board the Magnetospheric Multiscale mission (MMS) is used for this study. Plasma count data from multiple sources is examined: resampled data from previous missions, randomly generated data from distribution functions, and simulations of expected regimes. These are run through the compression routines with various parameters to yield the greatest possible compression ratio while maintaining little or no error, the latter indicates that fully lossless compression is obtained. Finally, recommendations are made for future missions as to what can be achieved when compressing plasma count data and how best to do so.

  3. Analytic performance of the iQ200 automated urine microscopy analyzer and comparison with manual counts using Fuchs-Rosenthal cell chambers.

    PubMed

    Wah, David T; Wises, Porntip K; Butch, Anthony W

    2005-02-01

    Automated instruments that can examine urine for cells and particles have reduced the need for labor-intensive manual microscopy. We evaluated the performance of the Iris iQ200 Automated Urine Microscopy Analyzer (Iris Diagnostics, Chatsworth, CA) and compared results with manual cell and particle counts using Fuchs-Rosenthal counting chambers. Within-run imprecision (coefficient of variation) of the iQ200 for urine samples ranged from 3.0% to 45% for RBC counts between 1,029 and 3 x 10(6) cells/L, 3.4% to 40% for WBC counts between 1,006 and 4 x 10(6) cells/L, and 8.9% to 35% for epithelial cell counts between 93 and 4 x 10(6) cells/L. Between-run imprecision was 3.3% at 1,017 x 10(6) cells/L and 19.2% at 28 x 10(6) cells/L. There was good agreement between the iQ200 and manual cell counts (r > or = 0.94); however; the iQ200 produced lower results based on slopes of 0.92 (RBC count), 0.81 (WBC count), and 0.94 (epithelial cell counts). The iQ200 has satisfactory performance and correlates well with manual cell counts. Most urine samples containing RBCs, WBCs, and epithelial cells can be reported without review of captured images.

  4. Note: Simple calibration of the counting-rate dependence of the timing shift of single photon avalanche diodes by photon interval analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Otosu, Takuhiro; Ishii, Kunihiko; Tahara, Tahei

    2013-03-15

    The counting-rate dependence of the temporal response of single photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) is a critical issue for the accurate determination of the fluorescence lifetime. In this study, the response of SPADs was examined with analyzing the time interval of the detected photons. The results clearly show that the shift of the detection timing causes the counting-rate dependence of the temporal response, and this timing shift is solely determined by the time interval from the preceding photon. We demonstrate that this timing instability is readily calibrated by utilizing the macrotime data taken with the time-tag mode that is implemented in the time-correlated single photon counting modules.

  5. High Rate Performing Li-ion Battery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-09

    developing novel 18650 cells with new electrode chemistry, LVP cathode material has been scaled up successfully up to 50 g in one pot. The electrochemical ...systematically from 25 to 100g using one pot synthesis approach and its electrochemical performance was evaluated in each batch. Commercial type lithium-ion...systematic morphology examination, electrochemical study, ex-situ XRD and electron spin resonance (ESR) experiments to address above questions. We

  6. WE-FG-207A-04: Performance Characteristics of Photon-Counting Breast CT.

    PubMed

    Kalender, W

    2016-06-01

    Mammography-based screening has been a valuable imaging tool for the early detection of non-palpable lesions and has contributed to significant reduction in breast cancer associated mortality. However, the breast imaging community recognizes that mammography is not ideal, and in particular is inferior for women with dense breasts. Also, the 2-D projection of a 3-D organ results in tissue superposition contributing to false-positives. The sensitivity of mammography is breast-density dependent. Its sensitivity, especially in dense breasts, is low due to overlapping tissue and the fact that normal breast tissue, benign lesions and breast cancers all have similar "densities", making lesion detection more difficult. We ideally need 3-D imaging for imaging the 3-D breast. MRI is 3-D, whole breast ultrasound is 3-D, digital breast tomosynthesis is called 3-D but is really "pseudo 3-D" due to poor resolution along the depth-direction. Also, and importantly, we need to be able to administer intravenous contrast agents for optimal imaging, similar to other organ systems in the body. Dedicated breast CT allows for 3-D imaging of the uncompressed breast. In current designs, the patient is positioned prone on the table and the breast is pendant through an aperture and the scan takes approximately 10 seconds [O'Connell et al., AJR 195: 496-509, 2010]. Almost on the heels of the invention of CT itself, work began on the development of dedicated breast CT. These early breast CT systems were used in clinical trials and the results from comparative performance evaluation of breast CT and mammography for 1625 subjects were reported in 1980 [Chang et al., Cancer 46: 939-46, 1980]. However, the technological limitations at that time stymied clinical translation for decades. Subsequent to the landmark article in 2001 [Boone et al., Radiology 221: 657-67, 2001] that demonstrated the potential feasibility in terms of radiation dose, multiple research groups are actively investigating

  7. Phase space representation of neutron monitor count rate and atmospheric electric field in relation to solar activity in cycles 21 and 22.

    PubMed

    Silva, H G; Lopes, I

    Heliospheric modulation of galactic cosmic rays links solar cycle activity with neutron monitor count rate on earth. A less direct relation holds between neutron monitor count rate and atmospheric electric field because different atmospheric processes, including fluctuations in the ionosphere, are involved. Although a full quantitative model is still lacking, this link is supported by solid statistical evidence. Thus, a connection between the solar cycle activity and atmospheric electric field is expected. To gain a deeper insight into these relations, sunspot area (NOAA, USA), neutron monitor count rate (Climax, Colorado, USA), and atmospheric electric field (Lisbon, Portugal) are presented here in a phase space representation. The period considered covers two solar cycles (21, 22) and extends from 1978 to 1990. Two solar maxima were observed in this dataset, one in 1979 and another in 1989, as well as one solar minimum in 1986. Two main observations of the present study were: (1) similar short-term topological features of the phase space representations of the three variables, (2) a long-term phase space radius synchronization between the solar cycle activity, neutron monitor count rate, and potential gradient (confirmed by absolute correlation values above ~0.8). Finally, the methodology proposed here can be used for obtaining the relations between other atmospheric parameters (e.g., solar radiation) and solar cycle activity.

  8. Phase space representation of neutron monitor count rate and atmospheric electric field in relation to solar activity in cycles 21 and 22

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, H. G.; Lopes, I.

    2016-07-01

    Heliospheric modulation of galactic cosmic rays links solar cycle activity with neutron monitor count rate on earth. A less direct relation holds between neutron monitor count rate and atmospheric electric field because different atmospheric processes, including fluctuations in the ionosphere, are involved. Although a full quantitative model is still lacking, this link is supported by solid statistical evidence. Thus, a connection between the solar cycle activity and atmospheric electric field is expected. To gain a deeper insight into these relations, sunspot area (NOAA, USA), neutron monitor count rate (Climax, Colorado, USA), and atmospheric electric field (Lisbon, Portugal) are presented here in a phase space representation. The period considered covers two solar cycles (21, 22) and extends from 1978 to 1990. Two solar maxima were observed in this dataset, one in 1979 and another in 1989, as well as one solar minimum in 1986. Two main observations of the present study were: (1) similar short-term topological features of the phase space representations of the three variables, (2) a long-term phase space radius synchronization between the solar cycle activity, neutron monitor count rate, and potential gradient (confirmed by absolute correlation values above ~0.8). Finally, the methodology proposed here can be used for obtaining the relations between other atmospheric parameters (e.g., solar radiation) and solar cycle activity.

  9. WBC count

    MedlinePlus

    Leukocyte count; White blood cell count ... blood is 4,500 to 11,000 white blood cells per microliter (mcL) or 4.5 to 11. ... LOW WHITE BLOOD CELL (WBC) COUNT A low number of WBCs is called leukopenia. A WBC count below 4500 is below normal ...

  10. Photon counting performance measurements of transfer electron InGaAsP photocathode hybrid photomultiplier tubes at 1064 nm wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Krainak, Michael A.; Hasselbrack, William B.; La Rue, Ross A.

    2007-05-01

    We report the test results of a hybrid photomultiplier tube (HPMT) with a transfer electron (TE) InGaAsP photocathode and GaAs Schottky avalanche photodiode (APD) anode. Unlike Geiger mode InGaAsP APDs, these HPMTs (also known as intensified photodiode (IPD), vacuum APD, or hybrid photodetector) operate in linear mode without the need for quenching and gating. Their greatest advantages are wide dynamic range, high speed, large photosensitive area, and potential for photon counting and analog detection dual mode operation. The photon detection efficiency we measured was 25% at 1064 nm wavelength with a dark count rate of 60,000/s at -22 degrees Celsius. The output pulse width in response to a single photon detection is about 0.9 ns. The maximum count rate was 90 Mcts/s and was limited solely by the speed of the discriminator used in the measurement (10 ns dead time). The spectral response of these devices extended from 900 to 1300 nm. We also measured the HPMT response to 60 ps laser pulses. The average output pulse amplitude increased monotonically with the input pulse energy, which suggested that we can resolve photon number in an incident pulse. The jitter of the HPMT output was found to be about 0.5 ns standard deviation and depended on bias voltage applied to the TE photocathode. To our knowledge, these HPMTs are the most sensitive non gating photon detectors at 1064 nm wavelength, and they will have many applications in laser altimeters, atmospheric lidars, and free space laser communication systems.

  11. Performance of TSI 3760 condensation nuclei counter at reduced pressures and flow rates

    SciTech Connect

    Zhiqun Zhang; Liu, B.Y.H. )

    1991-01-01

    This article describes an experimental study of the performance of the TSI model 3760 clean room condensation nuclei counter (CNC) at various pressures and flow rates. Studies were made to determine the counting efficiency of the instrument in the pressure range of 0.1-1 atom and flow rate range of 0.15-1.4 L/min. The counting efficiency curves were found to be shifted to larger particle sizes as the pressure or flow rate was reduced. The low pressure and low flow rate limits of the instrument were also determined. The numerical model developed in a previous study was used to predict the performance of the CNC. The numerical results were compared with the experimental data and found to agree well in the pressure range of 0.2-1.0 atm and flow rate range of 0.3-1.4 L/min. Discrepancies were found to be more significant at the lower pressures and flow rates.

  12. Spectral Performance of Photon Counting Pixel Detector Using Attenuation Spectra for Test Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Esebamen, Omeime Xerviar Ohi; Norlin, Boerje; Thungstroem, Goeran

    2010-01-05

    When a material is placed along the path of an X-ray beam using a broad range of energy X-ray source, the energy dependence of the attenuation for the X-ray photons will be substantially dissimilar for different materials. The process at which X-ray radiation loses its penetrating strength as it travels through a material will be significantly larger for photons with energy above k-edge energy of that material than for those with slightly lower energy. Hence energy resolved X-ray imaging can be used to achieve colour images revealing the material content of the test sample. The attenuation of the spectrum done by scanning an energy window through the spectrum was measured for a number of samples of different materials. The test samples include Sn, Gd and I with K-edge energy at 29 keV, 50 keV and 33 keV, respectively, using a Feinfocus microfocus X-ray source (FTP-105.02) with Medipix2 photon counting chip.

  13. 5 CFR 9701.409 - Rating and rewarding performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... performance. (a)(1) Except as provided in paragraphs (a)(2) and (3) of this section, each DHS performance... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Rating and rewarding performance. 9701... successful performance. (2) For employees in an Entry/Developmental band, the DHS performance...

  14. 5 CFR 9901.412 - Rating and rewarding performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... and sustained change in the employee's performance since the last rating of record. (c) The... prepare a performance assessment (e.g., close-out assessment) for the purpose of providing input on an employee's performance to a new supervisor. Such an assessment is not a rating of record (recommended...

  15. 5 CFR 9901.412 - Rating and rewarding performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... and sustained change in the employee's performance since the last rating of record. (c) The... prepare a performance assessment (e.g., close-out assessment) for the purpose of providing input on an employee's performance to a new supervisor. Such an assessment is not a rating of record (recommended...

  16. Photon counting modules using RCA silicon avalanche photodiodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lightstone, Alexander W.; Macgregor, Andrew D.; Macsween, Darlene E.; Mcintyre, Robert J.; Trottier, Claude; Webb, Paul P.

    1989-01-01

    Avalanche photodiodes (APD) are excellent small area, solid state detectors for photon counting. Performance possibilities include: photon detection efficiency in excess of 50 percent; wavelength response from 400 to 1000 nm; count rate to 10 (exp 7) counts per sec; afterpulsing at negligible levels; timing resolution better than 1 ns. Unfortunately, these performance levels are not simultaneously available in a single detector amplifier configuration. By considering theoretical performance predictions and previous and new measurements of APD performance, the anticipated performance of a range of proposed APD-based photon counting modules is derived.

  17. Improving the performance of ultrafast microchannel-plate photomultipliers in time-correlated photon counting by pulse pre-shaping

    SciTech Connect

    Cova, S.; Ripamonti, G. )

    1990-03-01

    With ultrafast microchannel-plate (MCP) photomultipliers that produce subnanosecond pulses, the commercially available circuit modules do not provide a correct constant-fraction trigger (CFT) operation. This has a detrimental effect on the resolution obtained in time-correlated photon counting experiments. In order to circumvent this CFT limitation and better exploit the ultrafast MCP performance, a simple pulse-shaping filter has been devised and experimented with. The filter can be interposed between the MCP output and the input of any commercial CFT module, without modifying the latter. The benefit of the filter is confirmed by the experimental results. With MCP samples that produced awkward resolution curves with satellite peaks and other irregular features, the introduction of the filter regularized and narrowed the curve. Also with a setup having fairly good performance, the introduction of the filter was advantageous: the full width at half maximum (FWHM) resolution improved from 75 to 55 ps.

  18. Evaluation of conventional imaging performance in a research whole-body CT system with a photon-counting detector array.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhicong; Leng, Shuai; Jorgensen, Steven M; Li, Zhoubo; Gutjahr, Ralf; Chen, Baiyu; Halaweish, Ahmed F; Kappler, Steffen; Yu, Lifeng; Ritman, Erik L; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2016-02-21

    This study evaluated the conventional imaging performance of a research whole-body photon-counting CT system and investigated its feasibility for imaging using clinically realistic levels of x-ray photon flux. This research system was built on the platform of a 2nd generation dual-source CT system: one source coupled to an energy integrating detector (EID) and the other coupled to a photon-counting detector (PCD). Phantom studies were conducted to measure CT number accuracy and uniformity for water, CT number energy dependency for high-Z materials, spatial resolution, noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio. The results from the EID and PCD subsystems were compared. The impact of high photon flux, such as pulse pile-up, was assessed by studying the noise-to-tube-current relationship using a neonate water phantom and high x-ray photon flux. Finally, clinical feasibility of the PCD subsystem was investigated using anthropomorphic phantoms, a cadaveric head, and a whole-body cadaver, which were scanned at dose levels equivalent to or higher than those used clinically. Phantom measurements demonstrated that the PCD subsystem provided comparable image quality to the EID subsystem, except that the PCD subsystem provided slightly better longitudinal spatial resolution and about 25% improvement in contrast-to-noise ratio for iodine. The impact of high photon flux was found to be negligible for the PCD subsystem: only subtle high-flux effects were noticed for tube currents higher than 300 mA in images of the neonate water phantom. Results of the anthropomorphic phantom and cadaver scans demonstrated comparable image quality between the EID and PCD subsystems. There were no noticeable ring, streaking, or cupping/capping artifacts in the PCD images. In addition, the PCD subsystem provided spectral information. Our experiments demonstrated that the research whole-body photon-counting CT system is capable of providing clinical image quality at clinically realistic levels of x

  19. Evaluation of conventional imaging performance in a research whole-body CT system with a photon-counting detector array

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhicong; Leng, Shuai; Jorgensen, Steven M; Li, Zhoubo; Gutjahr, Ralf; Chen, Baiyu; Halaweish, Ahmed F; Kappler, Steffen; Yu, Lifeng; Ritman, Erik L; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the conventional imaging performance of a research whole-body photon-counting CT system and investigated its feasibility for imaging using clinically realistic levels of x-ray photon flux. This research system was built on the platform of a 2nd generation dual-source CT system: one source coupled to an energy integrating detector (EID) and the other coupled to a photon-counting detector (PCD). Phantom studies were conducted to measure CT number accuracy and uniformity for water, CT number energy dependency for high-Z materials, spatial resolution, noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio. The results from the EID and PCD subsystems were compared. The impact of high photon flux, such as pulse pile-up, was assessed by studying the noise-to-tube-current relationship using a neonate water phantom and high x-ray photon flux. Finally, clinical feasibility of the PCD subsystem was investigated using anthropomorphic phantoms, a cadaveric head, and a whole-body cadaver, which were scanned at dose levels equivalent to or higher than those used clinically. Phantom measurements demonstrated that the PCD subsystem provided comparable image quality to the EID subsystem, except that the PCD subsystem provided slightly better longitudinal spatial resolution and about 25% improvement in contrast-to-noise ratio for iodine. The impact of high photon flux was found to be negligible for the PCD subsystem: only subtle high-flux effects were noticed for tube currents higher than 300 mA in images of the neonate water phantom. Results of the anthropomorphic phantom and cadaver scans demonstrated comparable image quality between the EID and PCD subsystems. There were no noticeable ring, streaking, or cupping/capping artifacts in the PCD images. In addition, the PCD subsystem provided spectral information. Our experiments demonstrated that the research whole-body photon-counting CT system is capable of providing clinical image quality at clinically realistic levels of x

  20. A Longitudinal Examination of Rater and Ratee Effects in Performance Ratings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vance, Robert J.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Investigated the consistency and loci of leniency, halo, and range restriction effects in performance ratings in a longitudinal study. Policy supervisors (N=90) rated 350 subordinates on five occasions. Concluded that reliable variance in mean ratings is partly attributable to ratees, but mainly introduced by raters. (JAC)

  1. A biofilter for treating toluene vapors: performance evaluation and microbial counts behavior

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yazhong; Luo, Yimeng; Ma, Hongye; Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    A lab-scale biofilter packed with mixed packing materials was used for degradation of toluene. Different empty bed residence times, 148.3, 74.2 and 49.4 s, were tested for inlet concentration ranging from 0.2 to 1.2 g/m3. The maximum elimination capacity of 36.0 g/(m3 h) occurred at an inlet loading rate of 45.9 g/(m3 h). The contribution of the lower layer was higher than other layers and always had the highest elimination capacity. The carbon dioxide production rate and distribution of micro-organisms followed toluene elimination capacities. The results of this study indicated that mixed packing materials could be considered as a potential biofilter carrier, with low pressure drop (less than 84.9 Pa/m), for treating air streams containing VOCs. PMID:27231662

  2. Emilio Segre' Observatory and expected time-variations in neutron monitor total and multiplicities counting rates caused by cosmic ray particle energy change in the periods of thunderstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorman, L. I.

    In the first part of paper we give short description of the Israelo-Italian Emilio Segre' Observatory (33°18.3‧N, 35°47.2‧E, 2025 m above sea level, Rc=10.8 GV), established in June 1998. In the second part, on the basis of theoretical model (Dorman & Dorman 1995, 1999; Dorman et al. 1995) of atmospheric electric field effect in the neutron monitor total counting rate and counting rates of different neutron multiplicities, we calculate the expected cosmic ray time variations in the different channels of 6NM-64 neutron monitor of Emilio Segre' Observatory in the periods before and during thunderstorms. Our calculations show that one-minute data of 6NM-64 neutron monitor of Emilio Segre' Observatory and one minute data of EFS-1000 sensor of atmospheric electric field can be used for obtaining important information on atmospheric electric field space-time distribution.

  3. 5 CFR 9701.409 - Rating and rewarding performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Rating and rewarding performance. 9701.409 Section 9701.409 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES... SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Performance Management § 9701.409 Rating and...

  4. 5 CFR 9701.409 - Rating and rewarding performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rating and rewarding performance. 9701.409 Section 9701.409 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES... SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Performance Management § 9701.409 Rating and...

  5. Conductor and Ensemble Performance Expressivity and State Festival Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Harry E.; Chang, E. Christina

    2005-01-01

    This study is the second in a series examining the relationship between conducting and ensemble performance. The purpose was to further examine the associations among conductor, ensemble performance expressivity, and festival ratings. Participants were asked to rate the expressivity of video-only conducting and parallel audio-only excerpts from a…

  6. 5 CFR 9701.409 - Rating and rewarding performance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Rating and rewarding performance. 9701.409 Section 9701.409 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES... SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Performance Management § 9701.409 Rating and...

  7. Background Count Rates and the Anti-Coincidence Detector on the Instrument on Astro-E2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilbourne, C. A.

    2004-01-01

    Minimum ionizing particles incident on the XRS microcalorimeter array will deposit energy in the pixels on the same scale as an x-ray photon and would be confused with x-rays without an anti-coincidence detector. The XRS anti-coincidence detector is a silicon ionization detector placed directly behind the calorimeter array. Given an isotropic particle flux, 98% of those particles that pass through a calorimeter pixel will also deposit energy in the anti-coincidence detector. Particle events that are not rejected by coincidence are those that pass through at small angles relative to the plane of the array, and thus deposit more energy. Modeling with GEANT4 showed that only 0.1% of all protons incident on the array miss the anti-coincidence detector yet deposit less than 10 keV in a pixel. The unrejected background will thus be dominated by secondary events; we will provide an estimate of this rate. Protons incident on the thick silicon frame around the active area of the array deposit enough energy t o heat the whole chip slightly. This results in small simultaneous pulses on multiple pixels. These can be easily rejected by pixel-to-pixel coincidence. We will discuss the impact of these events on the instrument dead time and will present the expected rate. We will present laboratory background data demonstrating the performance of the anti-coincidence detector and the effectiveness of coincidence analysis in the laboratory environment.

  8. Race, Sex, and Performance Ratings in the Federal Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Gregory B.

    1997-01-01

    Analysis of a 1% sample of performance appraisals of federal employees of comparable education and experience (1990-95) found that women, especially whites, received higher ratings than white men at the same level. Minorities were more likely to receive a "fully successful" rating and less likely to receive an "outstanding" rating. (SK)

  9. A parametric study of rate of advance and area coverage rate performance of synthetic aperture radar.

    SciTech Connect

    Raynal, Ann Marie; William H. Hensley, Jr.; Burns, Bryan L.; Doerry, Armin Walter

    2014-11-01

    The linear ground distance per unit time and ground area covered per unit time of producing synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery, termed rate of advance (ROA) and area coverage rate (ACR), are important metrics for platform and radar performance in surveillance applications. These metrics depend on many parameters of a SAR system such as wavelength, aircraft velocity, resolution, antenna beamwidth, imaging mode, and geometry. Often the effects of these parameters on rate of advance and area coverage rate are non-linear. This report addresses the impact of different parameter spaces as they relate to rate of advance and area coverage rate performance.

  10. The impact of pitch counts and days of rest on performance among major-league baseball pitchers.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, John C; Forman, Sean L

    2012-05-01

    Although the belief that overuse can harm pitchers is widespread, there exists little evidence to show that the number of pitches thrown and the days of rest affect future performance and injury among adults. The purpose of this study is to quantify the effects of pitches thrown and the days of rest on pitcher performance. We examined performances of major-league baseball starting pitchers from 1988 to 2009 using fractional polynomial multiple regression to estimate the immediate and cumulative impact of pitches thrown and the days of rest on performance, while controlling for other factors that likely affect pitcher effectiveness. Estimates indicate each pitch thrown in the preceding game increased earned run average (ERA) by 0.007 in the following game. Each pitch averaged in the preceding 5 and 10 games increased the ERA by 0.014 and 0.022, respectively. Older pitchers were more sensitive to cumulative pitching loads than younger pitchers were, but they were less affected by pitches thrown in the preceding game. Rest days were weakly associated with performance. In summary, we found that there is a negative relationship between past pitches thrown and future performance that is virtually linear. The impact of the cumulative pitching load is larger than the impact of a single game. Rest days do not appear to have a large impact on performance. This study supports the popular notion that high pitching loads can dampen future performance; however, because the effect is small, pitch-count benchmarks have limited use for maintaining performance and possibly preventing injury.

  11. Anarthria impairs subvocal counting.

    PubMed

    Cubelli, R; Nichelli, P; Pentore, R

    1993-12-01

    We studied subvocal counting in two pure anarthric patients. Analysis showed that they performed definitively worse than normal subjects free to articulate subvocally and their scores were in the lower bounds of the performances of subjects suppressing articulation. These results suggest that subvocal counting is impaired after anarthria.

  12. Effects of Rating Purpose and Rater Self-Esteem on Performance Ratings.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    MUlIGUR 83-3 Z 11l 4. TITLE (and Subtitle) a. TYPE Or REPORT A PVfOO COVERED Effects of Rating Purpose and Rater Self - Esteem Interim I on...rnmbee) U..N1’ MiAY 27 093 Performance Ratings, Rating Purpose, Self - Esteem 26, ASTRACT (Continueo an revere* side of necessay aid Identify by block gmN...The influences of intended rating purpose (administrative vs. employee counseling) and rater self - esteem on ratings of employee performance were

  13. Combined prognostic utility of white blood cell count, plasma glucose, and glomerular filtration rate in patients undergoing primary stent placement for acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Kosuge, Masami; Kimura, Kazuo; Morita, Satoshi; Kojima, Sunao; Sakamoto, Tomohiro; Ishihara, Masaharu; Asada, Yujiro; Tei, Chuwa; Miyazaki, Shunichi; Sonoda, Masahiro; Tsuchihashi, Kazufumi; Yamagishi, Masakazu; Shirai, Mutsunori; Hiraoka, Hisatoyo; Honda, Takashi; Ogata, Yasuhiro; Ogawa, Hisao

    2009-02-01

    Although high white blood cell (WBC) count and plasma glucose (PG) and low glomerular filtration rate (GFR) on admission have been associated with poor outcomes after acute myocardial infarction (AMI), the combined prognostic utility of these 3 variables was unclear. The association of WBC count, PG, and GFR on admission to in-hospital outcomes was examined in 2,633 patients who underwent primary stent placement for ST-segment elevation AMI within 48 hours after symptom onset. In-hospital mortality progressively increased as the number of the variables of high WBC count (> or =11,120/microl; upper tertile), high PG (> or =10.4 mmol/L; upper tertile), and low GFR (< or =60 ml/min/1.73 m(2); lower tertile) increased. Patients with all 3 variables had a strikingly higher in-hospital mortality rate (25.9%). After adjusting for baseline characteristics, multivariate analysis showed that compared with patients who had none of these variables, odds ratios for in-hospital mortality were 1.63 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.88 to 3.03, p = 0.12) in patients with only 1 variable, 2.33 (95% CI 1.28 to 3.96, p = 0.047) in those with 2 variables, and 6.16 (95% CI 2.98 to 12.6, p <0.001) in those with all 3 variables. In conclusion, combined evaluation of WBC count, PG, and GFR on admission was a simple and useful method for the early prediction of risk of in-hospital death in patients undergoing primary stent placement for ST-segment elevation AMI.

  14. Predicting Supervisor, Peer, and Self Ratings of Intern Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kegel-Flom, Penelope

    1975-01-01

    Relationships between the ratings of interns by their supervisors, their peers, and the interns themselves on four dimensions are compared and analyzed in relationship to earlier measures of aptitude, achievement, and personality. Findings reported show supervisor ratings to be highest and admission variables to be unrelated to intern performance.…

  15. Comparative analysis of dose rates in bricks determined by neutron activation analysis, alpha counting and X-ray fluorescence analysis for the thermoluminescence fine grain dating method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bártová, H.; Kučera, J.; Musílek, L.; Trojek, T.

    2014-11-01

    In order to evaluate the age from the equivalent dose and to obtain an optimized and efficient procedure for thermoluminescence (TL) dating, it is necessary to obtain the values of both the internal and the external dose rates from dated samples and from their environment. The measurements described and compared in this paper refer to bricks from historic buildings and a fine-grain dating method. The external doses are therefore negligible, if the samples are taken from a sufficient depth in the wall. However, both the alpha dose rate and the beta and gamma dose rates must be taken into account in the internal dose. The internal dose rate to fine-grain samples is caused by the concentrations of natural radionuclides 238U, 235U, 232Th and members of their decay chains, and by 40K concentrations. Various methods can be used for determining trace concentrations of these natural radionuclides and their contributions to the dose rate. The dose rate fraction from 238U and 232Th can be calculated, e.g., from the alpha count rate, or from the concentrations of 238U and 232Th, measured by neutron activation analysis (NAA). The dose rate fraction from 40K can be calculated from the concentration of potassium measured, e.g., by X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF) or by NAA. Alpha counting and XRF are relatively simple and are accessible for an ordinary laboratory. NAA can be considered as a more accurate method, but it is more demanding regarding time and costs, since it needs a nuclear reactor as a neutron source. A comparison of these methods allows us to decide whether the time- and cost-saving simpler techniques introduce uncertainty that is still acceptable.

  16. Fighter pilots' heart rate, heart rate variation and performance during an instrument flight rules proficiency test.

    PubMed

    Mansikka, Heikki; Virtanen, Kai; Harris, Don; Simola, Petteri

    2016-09-01

    Increased task demand will increase the pilot mental workload (PMWL). When PMWL is increased, mental overload may occur resulting in degraded performance. During pilots' instrument flight rules (IFR) proficiency test, PMWL is typically not measured. Therefore, little is known about workload during the proficiency test and pilots' potential to cope with higher task demands than those experienced during the test. In this study, fighter pilots' performance and PMWL was measured during a real IFR proficiency test in an F/A-18 simulator. PMWL was measured using heart rate (HR) and heart rate variation (HRV). Performance was rated using Finnish Air Force's official rating scales. Results indicated that HR and HRV differentiate varying task demands in situations where variations in performance are insignificant. It was concluded that during a proficiency test, PMWL should be measured together with the task performance measurement.

  17. Impact of Performance-Funding on Retention and Graduation Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanford, Thomas; Hunter, James M.

    2011-01-01

    As the architect of the oldest and most stable performance-funding program, Tennessee provides a unique opportunity to analyze the impact of changes in performance-funding policies on changes in institutional retention and six-year graduation rates over time. Utilizing spline linear mixed models, this study examines the impact of changes in…

  18. Determination of Pu content in a Spent Fuel Assembly by Measuring Passive Total Neutron count rate and Multiplication with the Differential Die-Away Instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Henzl, Vladimir; Croft, Stephen; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Tobin, Stephen J.

    2012-07-13

    Inspired by approach of Bignan and Martin-Didier (ESARDA 1991) we introduce novel (instrument independent) approach based on multiplication and passive neutron. Based on simulations of SFL-1 the accuracy of determination of {sup tot}Pu content with new approach is {approx}1.3-1.5%. Method applicable for DDA instrument, since it can measure both multiplication and passive neutron count rate. Comparison of pro's & con's of measuring/determining of {sup 239}Pu{sub eff} and {sup tot}Pu suggests a potential for enhanced diversion detection sensitivity.

  19. Multiplicity Counting

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, William H.

    2015-12-01

    This set of slides begins by giving background and a review of neutron counting; three attributes of a verification item are discussed: 240Pueff mass; α, the ratio of (α,n) neutrons to spontaneous fission neutrons; and leakage multiplication. It then takes up neutron detector systems – theory & concepts (coincidence counting, moderation, die-away time); detector systems – some important details (deadtime, corrections); introduction to multiplicity counting; multiplicity electronics and example distributions; singles, doubles, and triples from measured multiplicity distributions; and the point model: multiplicity mathematics.

  20. Mars sedimentary rock erosion rates constrained using crater counts, with applications to organic-matter preservation and to the global dust cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kite, Edwin S.; Mayer, David P.

    2017-04-01

    Small-crater counts on Mars light-toned sedimentary rock are often inconsistent with any isochron; these data are usually plotted then ignored. We show (using an 18-HiRISE-image, > 104-crater dataset) that these non-isochron crater counts are often well-fit by a model where crater production is balanced by crater obliteration via steady exhumation. For these regions, we fit erosion rates. We infer that Mars light-toned sedimentary rocks typically erode at ∼102 nm/yr, when averaged over 10 km2 scales and 107-108 yr timescales. Crater-based erosion-rate determination is consistent with independent techniques, but can be applied to nearly all light-toned sedimentary rocks on Mars. Erosion is swift enough that radiolysis cannot destroy complex organic matter at some locations (e.g. paleolake deposits at SW Melas), but radiolysis is a severe problem at other locations (e.g. Oxia Planum). The data suggest that the relief of the Valles Marineris mounds is currently being reduced by wind erosion, and that dust production on Mars < 3 Gya greatly exceeds the modern reservoir of mobile dust.

  1. RBC count

    MedlinePlus

    ... marrow disease that causes abnormal increase in RBCs ( polycythemia vera ) Your RBC count will increase for several ... Multiple myeloma Myelofibrosis Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) Peripheral Polycythemia vera Renal cell carcinoma Splenomegaly Transfusion reaction - hemolytic ...

  2. Reticulocyte count

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - reticulocyte ... A higher than normal reticulocytes count may indicate: Anemia due to red blood cells being destroyed earlier than normal ( hemolytic anemia ) Bleeding Blood disorder in a fetus or newborn ( ...

  3. Effects of dietary inclusion of silymarin on performance, intestinal morphology and ileal bacterial count in aflatoxin-challenged broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Jahanian, E; Mahdavi, A H; Asgary, S; Jahanian, R

    2017-01-04

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of dietary supplementation of silymarin on performance, jejunal morphology and ileal bacterial population in broiler chicks intoxicated with a mix of aflatoxins. A total of three hundred thirty six 7-day-old Ross broiler chicks were randomly distributed between seven experimental groups with four replicates of 12 birds each. Experimental treatments consisted of a control group (unchallenged), and a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement, including two aflatoxin levels (0.5 and 2 ppm) and three levels of silymarin (0, 500 and 1000 ppm). Birds were challenged with a mix of aflatoxins from 7 to 28 days of age. Results showed that increasing aflatoxin level resulted in decreased average daily feed intake (ADFI) and weight gain (ADWG), consequently impaired feed conversion ratio (FCR) throughout the trial period. Dietary supplementation of silymarin resulted in the marked increases in ADFI and ADWG, and improved FCR values in aflatoxin-challenged chicks. Ileal bacterial populations at days 28 and 42 of age were increased by incremental levels of aflatoxins. On the other hand, dietary silymarin supplementation suppressed ileal populations of Escherichia coli, Salmonella, Klebsiella and total negative bacteria in aflatoxicated birds. Increase in dietary aflatoxin level resulted in the decreased villi height, villi height-to-crypt depth ratio (VH:CD), villi surface area and apparent villi absorptive area, while it increased crypt depth, goblet cell count and lymphoid follicular diameter. Feeding silymarin at the level of 1000 ppm increased villi height and VH:CD in aflatoxicated birds. Present results indicate that dietary inclusion of silymarin could improve performance by suppressing ileal bacteria and enhancing absorptive surface area in aflatoxin-challenged broiler chicks.

  4. Communication satellite ground station receiver performance at low data rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riddle, L. P.

    Performance of satellite ground station receivers at low data rates is analyzed for power-limited satellites, when various amounts of frequency dynamics are present. Specifically, the lowest data rates for which the receiver can successfully demodulate suppressed-carrier BPSK data under a wide variety of conditions are determined. Minimum data rates on the order of 100 to 1400 bits per second are achievable with a bit error probability less than 0.00001 and with a mean time to cycle slip on the order of 1/2 hour or more, when Costas loops are employed for carrier extraction.

  5. Base rates, multiple indicators, and comprehensive forensic evaluations: why sexualized behavior still counts in assessments of child sexual abuse allegations.

    PubMed

    Everson, Mark D; Faller, Kathleen Coulborn

    2012-01-01

    Developmentally inappropriate sexual behavior has long been viewed as a possible indicator of child sexual abuse. In recent years, however, the utility of sexualized behavior in forensic assessments of alleged child sexual abuse has been seriously challenged. This article addresses a number of the concerns that have been raised about the diagnostic value of sexualized behavior, including the claim that when population base rates for abuse are properly taken into account, the diagnostic value of sexualized behavior is insignificant. This article also identifies a best practice comprehensive evaluation model with a methodology that is effective in mitigating such concerns.

  6. Turnover rates and organizational performance: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Tae-Youn; Shaw, Jason D

    2013-03-01

    The authors conducted a meta-analysis of the relationship between turnover rates and organizational performance to (a) determine the magnitude of the relationship; (b) test organization-, context-, and methods-related moderators of the relationship; and (c) suggest future directions for the turnover literature on the basis of the findings. The results from 300 total correlations (N = 309,245) and 110 independent correlations (N = 120,066) show that the relationship between total turnover rates and organizational performance is significant and negative (ρ = -.15). In addition, the relationship is more negative for voluntary (ρ = -.15) and reduction-in-force turnover (ρ = -.17) than for involuntary turnover (ρ = -.01). Moreover, the meta-analytic correlation differs significantly across several organization- and context-related factors (e.g., types of employment system, dimensions of organizational performance, region, and entity size). Finally, in sample-level regressions, the strength of the turnover rates-organizational performance relationship significantly varies across different average levels of total and voluntary turnover rates, which suggests a potential curvilinear relationship. The authors outline the practical magnitude of the findings and discuss implications for future organizational-level turnover research.

  7. Effective Rating Scale Development for Speaking Tests: Performance Decision Trees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulcher, Glenn; Davidson, Fred; Kemp, Jenny

    2011-01-01

    Rating scale design and development for testing speaking is generally conducted using one of two approaches: the measurement-driven approach or the performance data-driven approach. The measurement-driven approach prioritizes the ordering of descriptors onto a single scale. Meaning is derived from the scaling methodology and the agreement of…

  8. Performance of a space-based wavelet compressor for plasma count data on the MMS Fast Plasma Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrie, A. C.; Smith, S. E.; Dorelli, J. C.; Gershman, D. J.; Yeh, P.; Schiff, C.; Avanov, L. A.

    2017-01-01

    Data compression has been a staple of imaging instruments for years. Recently, plasma measurements have utilized compression with relatively low compression ratios. The Fast Plasma Investigation (FPI) on board the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission generates data roughly 100 times faster than previous plasma instruments, requiring a higher compression ratio to fit within the telemetry allocation. This study investigates the performance of a space-based compression standard employing a Discrete Wavelet Transform and a Bit Plane Encoder (DWT/BPE) in compressing FPI plasma count data. Data from the first 6 months of FPI operation are analyzed to explore the error modes evident in the data and how to adapt to them. While approximately half of the Dual Electron Spectrometer (DES) maps had some level of loss, it was found that there is little effect on the plasma moments and that errors present in individual sky maps are typically minor. The majority of Dual Ion Spectrometer burst sky maps compressed in a lossless fashion, with no error introduced during compression. Because of induced compression error, the size limit for DES burst images has been increased for Phase 1B. Additionally, it was found that the floating point compression mode yielded better results when images have significant compression error, leading to floating point mode being used for the fast survey mode of operation for Phase 1B. Despite the suggested tweaks, it was found that wavelet-based compression, and a DWT/BPE algorithm in particular, is highly suitable to data compression for plasma measurement instruments and can be recommended for future missions.

  9. AUTOMATIC COUNTING APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Howell, W.D.

    1957-08-20

    An apparatus for automatically recording the results of counting operations on trains of electrical pulses is described. The disadvantages of prior devices utilizing the two common methods of obtaining the count rate are overcome by this apparatus; in the case of time controlled operation, the disclosed system automatically records amy information stored by the scaler but not transferred to the printer at the end of the predetermined time controlled operations and, in the case of count controlled operation, provision is made to prevent a weak sample from occupying the apparatus for an excessively long period of time.

  10. A yearly spraying of olive mill wastewater on agricultural soil over six successive years: impact of different application rates on olive production, phenolic compounds, phytotoxicity and microbial counts.

    PubMed

    Magdich, Salwa; Jarboui, Raja; Rouina, Béchir Ben; Boukhris, Makki; Ammar, Emna

    2012-07-15

    Olive mill wastewater (OMW) spraying effects onto olive-tree fields were investigated. Three OMW levels (50, 100 and 200 m(3)ha(-1)year(-1)) were applied over six successive years. Olive-crop yields, phenolic compounds progress, phytotoxicity and microbial counts were studied at different soil depths. Olive yield showed improvements with OMW level applied. Soil polyphenolic content increased progressively in relation to OMW levels in all the investigated layers. However, no significant difference was noted in lowest treatment rate compared to the control field. In the soil upper-layers (0-40 cm), five phenolic compounds were identified over six consecutive years of OMW-spraying. In all the soil-layers, the radish germination index exceeded 85%. However, tomato germination test values decreased with the applied OMW amount. For all treatments, microbial counts increased with OMW quantities and spraying frequency. Matrix correlation showed a strong relationship between soil polyphenol content and microorganisms, and a negative one to tomato germination index.

  11. Neutron counting with cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Van Esch, Patrick; Crisanti, Marta; Mutti, Paolo

    2015-07-01

    A research project is presented in which we aim at counting individual neutrons with CCD-like cameras. We explore theoretically a technique that allows us to use imaging detectors as counting detectors at lower counting rates, and transits smoothly to continuous imaging at higher counting rates. As such, the hope is to combine the good background rejection properties of standard neutron counting detectors with the absence of dead time of integrating neutron imaging cameras as well as their very good spatial resolution. Compared to Xray detection, the essence of thermal neutron detection is the nuclear conversion reaction. The released energies involved are of the order of a few MeV, while X-ray detection releases energies of the order of the photon energy, which is in the 10 KeV range. Thanks to advances in camera technology which have resulted in increased quantum efficiency, lower noise, as well as increased frame rate up to 100 fps for CMOS-type cameras, this more than 100-fold higher available detection energy implies that the individual neutron detection light signal can be significantly above the noise level, as such allowing for discrimination and individual counting, which is hard to achieve with X-rays. The time scale of CMOS-type cameras doesn't allow one to consider time-of-flight measurements, but kinetic experiments in the 10 ms range are possible. The theory is next confronted to the first experimental results. (authors)

  12. Investigating the limits of PET/CT imaging at very low true count rates and high random fractions in ion-beam therapy monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Kurz, Christopher Bauer, Julia; Conti, Maurizio; Guérin, Laura; Eriksson, Lars; Parodi, Katia

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: External beam radiotherapy with protons and heavier ions enables a tighter conformation of the applied dose to arbitrarily shaped tumor volumes with respect to photons, but is more sensitive to uncertainties in the radiotherapeutic treatment chain. Consequently, an independent verification of the applied treatment is highly desirable. For this purpose, the irradiation-induced β{sup +}-emitter distribution within the patient is detected shortly after irradiation by a commercial full-ring positron emission tomography/x-ray computed tomography (PET/CT) scanner installed next to the treatment rooms at the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT). A major challenge to this approach is posed by the small number of detected coincidences. This contribution aims at characterizing the performance of the used PET/CT device and identifying the best-performing reconstruction algorithm under the particular statistical conditions of PET-based treatment monitoring. Moreover, this study addresses the impact of radiation background from the intrinsically radioactive lutetium-oxyorthosilicate (LSO)-based detectors at low counts. Methods: The authors have acquired 30 subsequent PET scans of a cylindrical phantom emulating a patientlike activity pattern and spanning the entire patient counting regime in terms of true coincidences and random fractions (RFs). Accuracy and precision of activity quantification, image noise, and geometrical fidelity of the scanner have been investigated for various reconstruction algorithms and settings in order to identify a practical, well-suited reconstruction scheme for PET-based treatment verification. Truncated listmode data have been utilized for separating the effects of small true count numbers and high RFs on the reconstructed images. A corresponding simulation study enabled extending the results to an even wider range of counting statistics and to additionally investigate the impact of scatter coincidences. Eventually, the recommended

  13. White Blood Cell Count

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? White Blood Cell Count Share this page: Was this page helpful? ... Count; Leukocyte Count; White Count Formal name: White Blood Cell Count Related tests: Complete Blood Count , Blood Smear , ...

  14. Gamma-ray spectroscopy at MHz counting rates with a compact LaBr3 detector and silicon photomultipliers for fusion plasma applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nocente, M.; Rigamonti, D.; Perseo, V.; Tardocchi, M.; Boltruczyk, G.; Broslawski, A.; Cremona, A.; Croci, G.; Gosk, M.; Kiptily, V.; Korolczuk, S.; Mazzocco, M.; Muraro, A.; Strano, E.; Zychor, I.; Gorini, G.

    2016-11-01

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements at MHz counting rates have been carried out, for the first time, with a compact spectrometer based on a LaBr3 scintillator and silicon photomultipliers. The instrument, which is also insensitive to magnetic fields, has been developed in view of the upgrade of the gamma-ray camera diagnostic for α particle measurements in deuterium-tritium plasmas of the Joint European Torus. Spectra were measured up to 2.9 MHz with a projected energy resolution of 3%-4% in the 3-5 MeV range, of interest for fast ion physics studies in fusion plasmas. The results reported here pave the way to first time measurements of the confined α particle profile in high power plasmas of the next deuterium-tritium campaign at the Joint European Torus.

  15. The Effects of Ratee Characteristics on Rater Performance Appraisal Behavior.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-01

    should spend more time observing Kate and less time working on the 9.,e , e{e,,,,. ; c e’. ’,..... : ;..: ..-.- . . . . . . ... % Page-17 Favero & Ilg...observing, the more accurate were the performance ratings. Page-23 Favero & Ilgen Henneman & Wexley (in press) found a similar relationship between...Page-27 Favero & Ilgen Footnotes 1. We wish to thank Patricia C . Smith for providing us with this scale. 2. Other manipulations and measures included

  16. Counting Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    Scientists use sampling to get an estimate of things they cannot easily count. A population is made up of all the organisms of one species living together in one place at the same time. All of the people living together in one town are considered a population. All of the grasshoppers living in a field are a population. Scientists keep track of the…

  17. Counting Penguins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Mike; Kader, Gary

    1998-01-01

    Presents an activity on the simplification of penguin counting by employing the basic ideas and principles of sampling to teach students to understand and recognize its role in statistical claims. Emphasizes estimation, data analysis and interpretation, and central limit theorem. Includes a list of items for classroom discussion. (ASK)

  18. Asian-American Patient Ratings of Physician Primary Care Performance

    PubMed Central

    Taira, Deborah A; Safran, Dana Gelb; Seto, Todd B; Rogers, William H; Kosinski, Mark; Ware, John E; Lieberman, Naomi; Tarlov, Alvin R

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine how Asian-American patients’ ratings of primary care performance differ from those of whites, Latinos, and African-Americans. DESIGN Retrospective analyses of data collected in a cross-sectional study using patient questionnaires. SETTING University hospital primary care group practice. PARTICIPANTS In phase 1, successive patients who visited the study site for appointments were asked to complete the survey. In phase 2, successive patients were selected who had most recently visited each physician, going back as far as necessary to obtain 20 patients for each physician. In total, 502 patients were surveyed, 5% of whom were Asian-American. MAIN RESULTS After adjusting for potential confounders, Asian-Americans rated overall satisfaction and 10 of 11 scales assessing primary care significantly lower than whites did. Dimensions of primary care that were assessed include access, comprehensiveness of care, integration, continuity, clinical quality, interpersonal treatment, and trust. There were no differences for the scale of longitudinal continuity. On average, the rating scale scores of Asian-Americans were 12 points lower than those of whites (on 100-point scales). CONCLUSIONS We conclude that Asian-American patients rate physician primary care performance lower than do whites, African-Americans, and Latinos. Future research needs to focus on Asian-Americans to determine the generalizability of these findings and the extent to which they reflect differences in survey response tendencies or actual quality differences. PMID:9127228

  19. Low-Cost Disposable Cartridge for Performing a White Blood Cell Count and Partial Differential at the Point-of-Care.

    PubMed

    Majors, Catherine E; Pawlowski, Michal E; Tkaczyk, Tomasz; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca R

    2014-10-01

    Being able to perform a white blood cell (WBC) count and differential is a crucial laboratory test for basic diagnostic practices. In this paper, we demonstrate proof of concept results for a disposable cartridge that could be used to perform a WBC count and 3-part differential at the point-of-care. The cartridge is composed of a glass slide, a layer of transfer tape, and a glass cover slip and incorporates acridine orange for cell staining and sub-type differentiation; the stained blood is then imaged, and image analysis techniques return a WBC count and 3-part differential. The cartridge was tested on a laboratory microscope with 3 normal samples, and had promising results with 85.7% of images resulting in a WBC count with ±15% of the true value. Further, the 3-part differential concentrations determined using the disposable cartridge had strong correlations with the true concentrations (R(2) values of 0.9986, 0.9421, and 0.6942 for granulocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes, respectively). Preliminary designs for a low-cost, portable microscope have been created and are currently being prototyped.

  20. Low-Cost Disposable Cartridge for Performing a White Blood Cell Count and Partial Differential at the Point-of-Care*

    PubMed Central

    Majors, Catherine E.; Pawlowski, Michal E.; Tkaczyk, Tomasz; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca R.

    2015-01-01

    Being able to perform a white blood cell (WBC) count and differential is a crucial laboratory test for basic diagnostic practices. In this paper, we demonstrate proof of concept results for a disposable cartridge that could be used to perform a WBC count and 3-part differential at the point-of-care. The cartridge is composed of a glass slide, a layer of transfer tape, and a glass cover slip and incorporates acridine orange for cell staining and sub-type differentiation; the stained blood is then imaged, and image analysis techniques return a WBC count and 3-part differential. The cartridge was tested on a laboratory microscope with 3 normal samples, and had promising results with 85.7% of images resulting in a WBC count with ±15% of the true value. Further, the 3-part differential concentrations determined using the disposable cartridge had strong correlations with the true concentrations (R2 values of 0.9986, 0.9421, and 0.6942 for granulocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes, respectively). Preliminary designs for a low-cost, portable microscope have been created and are currently being prototyped. PMID:25918749

  1. Pasture forages, supplementation rate, and stocking rate effects on dairy cow performance.

    PubMed

    Fike, J H; Staples, C R; Sollenberger, L E; Macoon, B; Moore, J E

    2003-04-01

    Objectives were to evaluate effects of forage species, stocking rate, and supplementation rate on performance and physiology of grazing lactating Holstein cows under intensive rotational stocking management during summer. Eight treatments were arranged in a 2 x 2 x 2 factorial design. Animals (n = 62) grazed pastures of Tifton 85 bermudagrass or Florigraze rhizoma peanut, a tropical legume. Low and high stocking rates were 7.5 and 10.0 cows/ha for bermudagrass and 5.0 and 7.5 cows/ha for rhizoma peanut. Within each forage-stocking rate combination, cows were fed supplement at 0.33 or 0.5 kg of supplement (as-fed basis)/kg daily milk production. Cows grazing rhizoma peanut pastures produced more milk (16.9 vs. 15.4 kg/d) but had higher rectal temperatures (39.4 vs. 39.1 degrees C). Milk production per cow was improved at the higher stocking rate for bermudagrass but was reduced at the higher stocking rate for peanuts. Increasing supplementation rate boosted plasma glucose, milk production, and milk protein percent. Increased supplementation rate had a greater positive impact on milk production of cows grazing bermudagrass compared to rhizoma peanut (21.9 vs. 10.6% increase) due to a lower substitution of grain for forage intake. Organic matter intakes of forage, supplement, and total diet were greatest by cows grazing rhizoma peanut pastures and averaged 12.4, 6.1, and 18.5 kg/d compared to 9.2, 5.4, and 14.6 kg/d for cows grazing bermudagrass. Despite lower individual feed intake and performance, production per unit land area was 29% greater (112 vs. 90 kg of milk/ha per d) for cows grazing bermudagrass due to the greater stocking rate possible with that forage. Only cows supplemented at the high rate and kept at the high stocking rate on bermudagrass maintained body weight. Cows on other treatments lost body weight. Tifton 85 bermudagrass appears to be an excellent summer forage for dairy cows grazing in the southeastern U.S. given its nutritive value

  2. Evaluating the performance of equations for estimating glomerular filtration rate.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Lesley A; Zhang, Yaping; Schmid, Christopher H

    2008-01-01

    Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is an important indicator of kidney function, critical for detection, evaluation and management of chronic kidney disease (CKD). GFR cannot be practically measured in most clinical or research settings; therefore, estimating equations are used as a primary measure of kidney function. A considerable body of literature now evaluates the performance of GFR estimating equations. The results of these studies are often not comparable, because of variation in GFR measurement methods, endogenous filtration marker assays and tools by which the equations were evaluated. In this article, methods for the evaluation of GFR estimating equations are discussed. Topics addressed include statistical methods used in development and validation of equations; explanation of measures of performance used for evaluation, with focus on distinction between bias, precision and accuracy, and with reference to examples of published evaluations of creatinine- and cystatin C-based equations; explanation of errors in GFR estimates; and challenges and questions in reporting performance of GFR estimating equations.

  3. Fighter pilots' heart rate, heart rate variation and performance during instrument approaches.

    PubMed

    Mansikka, Heikki; Simola, Petteri; Virtanen, Kai; Harris, Don; Oksama, Lauri

    2016-10-01

    Fighter pilots' heart rate (HR), heart rate variation (HRV) and performance during instrument approaches were examined. The subjects were required to fly instrument approaches in a high-fidelity simulator under various levels of task demand. The task demand was manipulated by increasing the load on the subjects by reducing the range at which they commenced the approach. HR and the time domain components of HRV were used as measures of pilot mental workload (PMWL). The findings of this study indicate that HR and HRV are sensitive to varying task demands. HR and HRV were able to distinguish the level of PMWL after which the subjects were no longer able to cope with the increasing task demands and their instrument landing system performance fell to a sub-standard level. The major finding was the HR/HRV's ability to differentiate the sub-standard performance approaches from the high-performance approaches. Practitioner Summary: This paper examined if HR and HRV were sensitive to varying task demands in a fighter aviation environment and if these measures were related to variations in pilot's performance.

  4. Suppression of emission rates improves sonar performance by flying bats.

    PubMed

    Adams, Amanda M; Davis, Kaylee; Smotherman, Michael

    2017-01-31

    Echolocating bats face the challenge of actively sensing their environment through their own emissions, while also hearing calls and echoes of nearby conspecifics. How bats mitigate interference is a long-standing question that has both ecological and technological implications, as biosonar systems continue to outperform man-made sonar systems in noisy, cluttered environments. We recently showed that perched bats decreased calling rates in groups, displaying a behavioral strategy resembling the back-off algorithms used in artificial communication networks to optimize information throughput at the group level. We tested whether free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis) would employ such a coordinated strategy while performing challenging flight maneuvers, and report here that bats navigating obstacles lowered emission rates when hearing artificial playback of another bat's calls. We measured the impact of acoustic interference on navigation performance and show that the calculated reductions in interference rates are sufficient to reduce interference and improve obstacle avoidance. When bats flew in pairs, each bat responded to the presence of the other as an obstacle by increasing emissions, but hearing the sonar emissions of the nearby bat partially suppressed this response. This behavior supports social cohesion by providing a key mechanism for minimizing mutual interference.

  5. Suppression of emission rates improves sonar performance by flying bats

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Amanda M.; Davis, Kaylee; Smotherman, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Echolocating bats face the challenge of actively sensing their environment through their own emissions, while also hearing calls and echoes of nearby conspecifics. How bats mitigate interference is a long-standing question that has both ecological and technological implications, as biosonar systems continue to outperform man-made sonar systems in noisy, cluttered environments. We recently showed that perched bats decreased calling rates in groups, displaying a behavioral strategy resembling the back-off algorithms used in artificial communication networks to optimize information throughput at the group level. We tested whether free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis) would employ such a coordinated strategy while performing challenging flight maneuvers, and report here that bats navigating obstacles lowered emission rates when hearing artificial playback of another bat’s calls. We measured the impact of acoustic interference on navigation performance and show that the calculated reductions in interference rates are sufficient to reduce interference and improve obstacle avoidance. When bats flew in pairs, each bat responded to the presence of the other as an obstacle by increasing emissions, but hearing the sonar emissions of the nearby bat partially suppressed this response. This behavior supports social cohesion by providing a key mechanism for minimizing mutual interference. PMID:28139707

  6. Death rates in HIV-positive antiretroviral-naive patients with CD4 count greater than 350 cells per microL in Europe and North America: a pooled cohort observational study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background It is unclear whether antiretroviral (ART) naive HIV-positive individuals with high CD4 counts have a raised mortality risk compared with the general population, but this is relevant for considering earlier initiation of antiretroviral therapy. Methods Pooling data from 23 European and North American cohorts, we calculated country-, age-, sex-, and year-standardised mortality ratios (SMRs), stratifying by risk group. Included patients had at least one pre-ART CD4 count above 350 cells/mm3. The association between CD4 count and death rate was evaluated using Poisson regression methods. Findings Of 40,830 patients contributing 80,682 person-years of follow up with CD4 count above 350 cells/mm3, 419 (1.0%) died. The SMRs (95% confidence interval) were 1.30 (1.06-1.58) in homosexual men, and 2.94 (2.28-3.73) and 9.37 (8.13-10.75) in the heterosexual and IDU risk groups respectively. CD4 count above 500 cells/mm3 was associated with a lower death rate than 350-499 cells/mm3: adjusted rate ratios (95% confidence intervals) for 500-699 cells/mm3 and above 700 cells/mm3 were 0.77 (0.61-0.95) and 0.66 (0.52-0.85) respectively. Interpretation In HIV-infected ART-naive patients with high CD4 counts, death rates were raised compared with the general population. In homosexual men this was modest, suggesting that a proportion of the increased risk in other groups is due to confounding by other factors. Even in this high CD4 count range, lower CD4 count was associated with raised mortality. PMID:20638118

  7. [Platelet count in the cat].

    PubMed

    Moritz, A; Hoffmann, C

    1997-11-01

    The technique of collecting blood samples is primarily responsible for the appearance of platelet-agglomeration in cats. Blood obtained by the conventional way ("one syringe technology", drips of blood) caused in 52% of the cases an activation of the large and therefore active thrombocytes however. Rejection of the first 2-5 ml blood for the platelet count ("two syringe technology") reduced the rate of platelet-agglomeration significantly. No big differences in platelet-agglomeration were found with regard to the place used for collecting blood (V. cephalica antebrachii/V. jugularis). Platelet-agglutination was observed with Li-Heparin, K-EDTA, Na-Citrat or ACD anticoagulated blood samples. Citrat (Na-Citrat, ACD) seemed to have a stabilizing effect on feline thrombocytes as has been described for human thrombocytes. The platelet count in cats should be performed within 30 minutes.

  8. Environmental performance rating and disclosure: China's Green Watch program.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Bi, Jun; Wheeler, David; Wang, Jinnan; Cao, Dong; Lu, Genfa; Wang, Yuan

    2004-06-01

    In this paper we describe a new incentive-based pollution control program in China, in which the environmental performance of firms is rated from best to worst using five colors--green, blue, yellow, red and black--and the ratings are disseminated to the public through the media. We focus on the first two municipal disclosure programs, which have been implemented at very different levels of economic and institutional development. In both cases, the increases in compliance with pollution regulations have been similar to increases produced by public disclosure programs in Indonesia, the Philippines, and Vietnam. The results suggest that incentives created by public disclosure may significantly reduce pollution in China, even though environmental NGO's play little role and there is no formal channel for public participation in environmental regulation.

  9. A Study of the Associations between Conditions of Performance and Characteristics of Performers and New York State Solo Performance Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    vonWurmb, Elizabeth C.

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation undertakes an analysis of 1,044 performance evaluations from New York State School Music Association (NYSSMA) Spring Festival solo adjudication ratings of student performers from a large suburban school district. It relies on results of evaluations of observed performances, and takes these evaluations as assessments of what the…

  10. Reticulocyte Count Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Reticulocyte Count Related tests: Red Blood Cell Count ; Hemoglobin ; Hematocrit ; Complete Blood Count ; Blood Smear ; Erythropoietin ; Vitamin ... on a complete blood count (CBC) , RBC count , hemoglobin or hematocrit , to help determine the cause To ...

  11. Dietary β-glucan improved growth performance, Vibrio counts, haematological parameters and stress resistance of pompano fish, Trachinotus ovatus Linnaeus, 1758.

    PubMed

    Do Huu, Hoang; Sang, Huynh Minh; Thanh Thuy, Nguyen Thi

    2016-07-01

    This study evaluated effects of graded levels of dietary β-glucan (0, 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 g kg(-1)) on growth performance, haematological parameters, intestinal Vibrio counts, dose requirement and salinity stress resistance in pompano fish Trachinotus ovatus (6.45 g ± 0.06 (SEM)). After 8-weeks of diet feeding, growth was significantly higher in fish fed diets with 0.10% β-glucan compared to fish fed control diet (no β-glucan). Survival increased significantly in fish fed 0.05 and 0.10% β-glucan compared to control diet. There were significant increases in red blood cells (in 0.20% β-glucan diet), in total leukocytes (in 0.05-0.20% β-glucan diet), in both lymphocyte and monocyte count in fish fed 0.10%-0.40% β-glucan diet. However, dietary β-glucan did not affect neutrophil, eosinophil and basophil counts. Intestinal Vibrio counts were reduced in fish fed any level of β-glucan compared to control. In addition, dietary β-glucan levels highly correlated with growth, survival, intestinal Vibrio counts and haematological index. Optimal β-glucan levels for maximal growth of fish were predicted to be 0.122% at day 21 (R(2) = 98.53%), 0.120% at day 28 (R(2) = 78.55%), 0.115% at day 42 (R(2) = 62.21%) and 0.090% at day 56 (R(2) = 75.18%), showing a decreasing β-glucan requirement with increasing fish size. Furthermore, optimal β-glucan levels for maximal haematological parameters based on lymphocyte count, was estimated to be 0.120% (R(2) = 98.53%) at day 56. Also, fish fed 0.05%-0.20% β-glucan showed better resistance against salinity stress. In conclusion, β-glucan supplementation is effective for improving growth, intestinal Vibrio counts and boosted stress resistance of the pompano fish, T. ovatus.

  12. The MIC photon counting detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fordham, J. L. A.; Bone, D. A.; Oldfield, M. K.; Bellis, J. G.; Norton, T. J.

    1992-12-01

    The MIC (Microchannel plate Intensified CCD (Charge Coupled Device)) detector is an advanced performance Micro Channel Plate (MCP) intensified CCD photon counting detector developed for high resolution, high dynamic range, astronomical applications. The heart of the detector is an MCP intensifier developed specifically for photon counting applications. The maximum detector format is 3072 by 2304 pixels. The measured resolution of the detector system is 18 micrometers FWHM at 490 nm. The detector is linear to approximately 1,000,000 events/detector area/sec on a flat field and linear to count rates up to 200 events/object/s on star images. Two versions of the system have been developed. The first for ground based astronomical applications based around a 40 mm diameter intensifier, was proven in trials at a number of large optical telescopes. The second, specifically for the ESA X-Ray Multi Mirror Mission (XMM), where the MIC has been accepted as the blue detector for the incorporated Optical Monitor (OM). For the XMM-OM, the system is based around a 25 mm diameter intensifier. At present, under development, is a 75 mm diameter version of the detector which will have a maximum format of 6144 by 4608 pixels. Details of the MIC detector and its performance are presented.

  13. High-performance micromachined vibratory rate- and rate-integrating gyroscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jae Yoong

    The performance of vibratory micromachined gyroscopes has been continuously improving for the past two decades. However, to further improve performance of the MEMS gyroscope in harsh environment, it is necessary for gyros to reduce the sensitivity to environmental parameters, including vibration and temperature change. In addition, conventional rate-mode MEMS gyroscopes have limitation in performance due to tradeoff between resolution, bandwidth, and full-scale range. In this research, we aim to reduce vibration sensitivity by developing gyros that operate in the balanced mode. The balanced mode creates zero net momentum and reduces energy loss through an anchor. The gyro can differentially cancel measurement errors from external vibration along both sensor axes. The vibration sensitivity of the balanced-mode gyroscope including structural imbalance from microfabrication reduces as the absolute difference between in-phase parasitic mode and operating mode frequencies increases. The parasitic sensing mode frequency is designed larger than the operating mode frequency to achieve both improved vibration insensitivity and shock resistivity. A single anchor is used in order to minimize thermoresidual stress change. We developed two gyroscope based on these design principles. The Balanced Oscillating Gyro (BOG) is a quad-mass tuning-fork rate gyroscope. The relationship between gyro design and modal characteristics is studied extensively using finite element method (FEM). The gyro is fabricated using the planar Si-on-glass (SOG) process with a device thickness of 100microm. The BOG is evaluated using the first-generation analog interface circuitry. Under a frequency mismatch of 5Hz between driving and sense modes, the angle random walk (ARW) is measured to be 0.44°/sec/✓Hz. The performance is limited by quadrature error and low-frequency noise in the circuit. The Cylindrical Rate-Integrating Gyroscope (CING) operates in whole-angle mode. The gyro is completely

  14. Pseudo-random single photon counting: a high-speed implementation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiang; Chen, Ling; Chen, Nanguang

    2010-01-01

    Pseudo-random single photon counting (PRSPC) is a new time-resolved optical measurement method which combines the spread spectrum time-resolved method with single photon counting. A pseudo-random bit sequence is used to modulate a continuous wave laser diode, while single photon counting is used to build up the optical signal in response to the modulated excitation. Periodic cross-correlation is performed to obtain the temporal profile of the subject of interest. Compared with conventional time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC), PRSPC enjoys many advantages such as low cost and high count rate without compromising the sensitivity and time-resolution. In this paper, we report a PRSPC system that can be used for high-speed acquisition of the temporal point spread function of diffuse photons. It can reach a photon count rate as high as 3 Mcps (counts per second). Phantom experiments have been conducted to demonstrate the system performance. PMID:21258444

  15. Single-photon counting for the 1300-1600-nm range by use of peltier-cooled and passively quenched InGaAs avalanche photodiodes.

    PubMed

    Rarity, J G; Wall, T E; Ridley, K D; Owens, P C; Tapster, P R

    2000-12-20

    We evaluate the performance of various commercially available InGaAs/InP avalanche photodiodes for photon counting in the infrared at temperatures that can be reached by Peltier cooling. We find that dark count rates are high, and this can partially saturate devices before optimum performance is achieved. At low temperatures the dark count rate rises because of a strong contribution from correlated afterpulses. We discuss ways of suppressing these afterpulses for different photon-counting applications.

  16. Predictive Model Assessment for Count Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-05

    critique count regression models for patent data, and assess the predictive performance of Bayesian age-period-cohort models for larynx cancer counts...the predictive performance of Bayesian age-period-cohort models for larynx cancer counts in Germany. We consider a recent suggestion by Baker and...Figure 5. Boxplots for various scores for patent data count regressions. 11 Table 1 Four predictive models for larynx cancer counts in Germany, 1998–2002

  17. Comparison of membrane filtration rates and hydrophobic grid membrane filter coliform and Escherichia coli counts in food suspensions using paddle-type and pulsifier sample preparation procedures.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, A N; Hearn, E M; Kovacs-Nolan, J

    2000-01-01

    Food suspensions prepared by Pulsifier contained less debris and filtered 1.3x to 12x faster through hydrophobic grid membrane filters (HGMFs) than those prepared by Stomacher 400. Coliform and Escherichia coli counts made by an HGMF method yielded 84 and 36 paired samples, respectively, positive by both suspending methods. Overall counts of pulsificates and stomachates did not differ significantly for either analysis, though coliform counts by Pulsifier were significantly higher in mushrooms and significantly lower in ground pork (P = 0.05). Regression equations for log10 counts of coliform and E. coli by Pulsifier and Stomacher were: Pulsifier = 0.12 + 0.97 x Stomacher, and Pulsifier = 0.01 + 1.01 x Stomacher, respectively.

  18. Carica papaya Leaves Juice Significantly Accelerates the Rate of Increase in Platelet Count among Patients with Dengue Fever and Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever.

    PubMed

    Subenthiran, Soobitha; Choon, Tan Chwee; Cheong, Kee Chee; Thayan, Ravindran; Teck, Mok Boon; Muniandy, Prem Kumar; Afzan, Adlin; Abdullah, Noor Rain; Ismail, Zakiah

    2013-01-01

    The study was conducted to investigate the platelet increasing property of Carica papaya leaves juice (CPLJ) in patients with dengue fever (DF). An open labeled randomized controlled trial was carried out on 228 patients with DF and dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF). Approximately half the patients received the juice, for 3 consecutive days while the others remained as controls and received the standard management. Their full blood count was monitored 8 hours for 48 hours. Gene expression studies were conducted on the ALOX 12 and PTAFR genes. The mean increase in platelet counts were compared in both groups using repeated measure ANCOVA. There was a significant increase in mean platelet count observed in the intervention group (P < 0.001) but not in the control group 40 hours since the first dose of CPLJ. Comparison of mean platelet count between intervention and control group showed that mean platelet count in intervention group was significantly higher than control group after 40 and 48 hours of admission (P < 0.01). The ALOX 12 (FC  =  15.00) and PTAFR (FC  =  13.42) genes were highly expressed among those on the juice. It was concluded that CPLJ does significantly increase the platelet count in patients with DF and DHF.

  19. Carica papaya Leaves Juice Significantly Accelerates the Rate of Increase in Platelet Count among Patients with Dengue Fever and Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever

    PubMed Central

    Subenthiran, Soobitha; Choon, Tan Chwee; Cheong, Kee Chee; Thayan, Ravindran; Teck, Mok Boon; Muniandy, Prem Kumar; Afzan, Adlin; Abdullah, Noor Rain; Ismail, Zakiah

    2013-01-01

    The study was conducted to investigate the platelet increasing property of Carica papaya leaves juice (CPLJ) in patients with dengue fever (DF). An open labeled randomized controlled trial was carried out on 228 patients with DF and dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF). Approximately half the patients received the juice, for 3 consecutive days while the others remained as controls and received the standard management. Their full blood count was monitored 8 hours for 48 hours. Gene expression studies were conducted on the ALOX 12 and PTAFR genes. The mean increase in platelet counts were compared in both groups using repeated measure ANCOVA. There was a significant increase in mean platelet count observed in the intervention group (P < 0.001) but not in the control group 40 hours since the first dose of CPLJ. Comparison of mean platelet count between intervention and control group showed that mean platelet count in intervention group was significantly higher than control group after 40 and 48 hours of admission (P < 0.01). The ALOX 12 (FC  =  15.00) and PTAFR (FC  =  13.42) genes were highly expressed among those on the juice. It was concluded that CPLJ does significantly increase the platelet count in patients with DF and DHF. PMID:23662145

  20. Effects of task performance, helping, voice, and organizational loyalty on performance appraisal ratings.

    PubMed

    Whiting, Steven W; Podsakoff, Philip M; Pierce, Jason R

    2008-01-01

    Despite the fact that several studies have investigated the relationship between organizational citizenship behavior and performance appraisal ratings, the vast majority of these studies have been cross-sectional, correlational investigations conducted in organizational settings that do not allow researchers to establish the causal nature of this relationship. To address this lack of knowledge regarding causality, the authors conducted 2 studies designed to investigate the effects of task performance, helping behavior, voice, and organizational loyalty on performance appraisal evaluations. Findings demonstrated that each of these forms of behavior has significant effects on performance evaluation decisions and suggest that additional attention should be directed at both voice and organizational loyalty as important forms of citizenship behavior aimed at the organization.

  1. Has the Rate of CD4 Cell Count Decline before Initiation of Antiretroviral Therapy Changed over the Course of the Dutch HIV Epidemic among MSM?

    PubMed Central

    Gras, Luuk; Geskus, Ronald B.; Jurriaans, Suzanne; Bakker, Margreet; van Sighem, Ard; Bezemer, Daniela; Fraser, Christophe; Prins, Jan M.; Berkhout, Ben

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Studies suggest that the HIV-1 epidemic in the Netherlands may have become more virulent, leading to faster disease progression if untreated. Analysis of CD4 cell count decline before antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation, a surrogate marker for disease progression, may be hampered by informative censoring as ART initiation is more likely with a steeper CD4 cell count decline. Methods Development of CD4 cell count from 9 to 48 months after seroconversion was analyzed using a mixed-effects model and 2 models that jointly modeled CD4 cell counts and time to censoring event (start ART, <100 CD4 cells/mm3, or AIDS) among therapy-naïve MSM HIV-1 seroconverters in the Netherlands. These models make different assumptions about the censoring process. Results All 3 models estimated lower median CD4 cell counts 9 months after seroconversion in later calendar years (623, 582, and 541 cells/mm3 for 1984–1995 [n = 111], 1996–2002 [n = 139], and 2003–2007 seroconverters [n = 356], respectively, shared-parameter model). Only the 2 joint-models found a trend for a steeper decline of CD4 cell counts with seroconversion in later calendar years (overall p-values 0.002 and 0.06 for the pattern-mixture and the shared-parameter model, respectively). In the shared-parameter model the median decline from 9 to 48 months was 276 cellsmm3 for 1984–1995 seroconverters and 308 cells/mm3 for 2003–2007 seroconverters (difference in slope, p = 0.045). Conclusion Mixed-effects models underestimate the CD4 cell decline prior to starting ART. Joint-models suggest that CD4 cell count declines more rapidly in patients infected between 2003 and 2007 compared to patients infected before 1996. PMID:23724048

  2. Analytical performance issues: comparison of ATP bioluminescence and aerobic bacterial count for evaluating surface cleanliness in an Italian hospital.

    PubMed

    Amodio, Emanuele; Cannova, Lucia; Villafrate, Maria Rosaria; Merendino, Anna Maria; Aprea, Luigi; Calamusa, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Contaminated hospital surfaces have been demonstrated to be an important environmental reservoir of microorganisms that can increase the risk of nosocomial infection in exposed patients. As a consequence, cleaning and disinfecting hospital environments play an important role among strategies for preventing healthcare-associated colonization and infections. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether adenosine triphosphate (ATP) presence, measured by bioluminescence methods, can predict microbiological contamination of hospital surfaces. The study was carried out between September and December 2012 at the University Hospital "P. Giaccone" of Palermo. A total of 193 randomly selected surfaces (tables, lockers, furnishings) were sampled and analyzed in order to assess ATP levels (expressed as relative light units or RLU) and aerobic colony count (ACC) or presence of S. aureus. ACC had median values of 1.85 cfu/cm(2)(interquartile range = 4.16) whereas ATP median was 44.6 RLU/cm(2)(interquartile range = 92.3). Overall, 85 (44.0%) surfaces exceeded the established microbial benchmark: 73 (37.8%) exceeded the 2.5 cfu/cm(2)ACC standard, 5 (2.6%) surfaces were positive for S. aureus and 7 (3.6%) showed both the presence of S. aureus and an ACC of more than 2.5 cfu/cm(2). ACC and bioluminescence showed significant differences in the different surface sites (p < 0.001). A significant correlation was found between ACC and RLU values (p-value < 0.001; R(2)= 0.29) and increasing RLU values were significantly associated with a higher risk of failing the benchmark (p < 0.001). Our data suggest that bioluminescence could help in measuring hygienic quality of hospital surfaces using a quick and sensitive test that can be an useful proxy of microbial contamination; however, further analysis will be necessary to assess the cost-efficacy of this methodology before requiring incorporation in hospital procedures.

  3. Evaluation of a semi-automated platelet-counting system.

    PubMed Central

    Rowan, R M; Fraser, C; Gray, J H; McDonald, G A

    1977-01-01

    Coulter Electronics Ltd have produced a semi-automated platelet-counting system. Platelet-rich plasma may be obtained either by tube sedimentation or by means of the Thrombo-fuge, the latter being an instrument designed to produce accelerated sedimentation. The instrument is linear over the entire range of platelet counts, and machine reproducibility is good. Comparison of machine-rated with visual counts satisfied statistical evaluation. The technique can be handled by one operator and platelet counts can be achieved at the rate of 30 per hour by both methods although individual counts on the Thrombo-fuge may be obtained in approximately one-quarter of the time required for tube sedimentation. The throughput using the Thrombo-fuge could certainly be doubled were two sample plates supplied. Few problems were encountered during the evaluation and most could be avoided by meticulous technique. Visual counts must be performed when the sample haematocrit is greater than 50%-Discrepant counts have been obtained in patients with white cell counts exceeding 50 X 10(9)/1 and in patients with giant platelets. ESR elevation for any reason does not lead to serious discrepancy in results. The incidence of platelet clumping due to the presence of platelet agglutinins and of microclot formation due to inadequate mixing is probably much higher than is commonly thought, and certainly peripheral blood film scrutiny should never be omitted in patients with low counts. Careful examination of peripheral blood films must be combined with instrument counting for some time lest further causes of discrepant counting emerge. PMID:856881

  4. Analysis of calibration data for the uranium active neutron coincidence counting collar with attention to errors in the measured neutron coincidence rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, Stephen; Burr, Tom; Favalli, Andrea; Nicholson, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    The declared linear density of 238U and 235U in fresh low enriched uranium light water reactor fuel assemblies can be verified for nuclear safeguards purposes using a neutron coincidence counter collar in passive and active mode, respectively. The active mode calibration of the Uranium Neutron Collar - Light water reactor fuel (UNCL) instrument is normally performed using a non-linear fitting technique. The fitting technique relates the measured neutron coincidence rate (the predictor) to the linear density of 235U (the response) in order to estimate model parameters of the nonlinear Padé equation, which traditionally is used to model the calibration data. Alternatively, following a simple data transformation, the fitting can also be performed using standard linear fitting methods. This paper compares performance of the nonlinear technique to the linear technique, using a range of possible error variance magnitudes in the measured neutron coincidence rate. We develop the required formalism and then apply the traditional (nonlinear) and alternative approaches (linear) to the same experimental and corresponding simulated representative datasets. We find that, in this context, because of the magnitude of the errors in the predictor, it is preferable not to transform to a linear model, and it is preferable not to adjust for the errors in the predictor when inferring the model parameters.

  5. Performance evaluation of a center pivot variable rate irrigation system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Variable Rate Irrigation (VRI) for center pivots offers potential to match specific application rates to non-uniform soil conditions along the length of the lateral. The benefit of such systems is influenced by the areal extent of these variations and the smallest scale to which the irrigation syste...

  6. Sensitivity of School-Performance Ratings to Scaling Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Hui Leng; Koretz, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Policymakers usually leave decisions about scaling the scores used for accountability to their appointed technical advisory committees and the testing contractors. However, scaling decisions can have an appreciable impact on school ratings. Using middle-school data from New York State, we examined the consistency of school ratings based on two…

  7. Effect of processing rate on seed cotton cleaning equipment performance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The processing rate per unit width of seed cotton cleaning equipment– cylinder cleaners and stick machines– recommended by manufacturers is 4.8-8.2 bales hr-1 m-1 (1.5-2.5 bales hr-1 ft-1). Survey data has indicated that many gins exceed this processing rate. Previous research with picker-harvested ...

  8. Background Factors Predicting Teacher Ratings of Children's School Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, M. Kaye

    This study examined background factors in children that influence teachers' ratings on the Classroom Adjustment Rating Scale (CARS). Sixteen classrooms in five schools were selected to include a range of socio-economic and cultural groupings from Inner London, England Primary Schools. Teachers used the CARS and an additional short scale of overall…

  9. Conversation Counts.

    PubMed

    Sorrel, Amy Lynn

    2016-03-01

    Informed consent is a hallmark of good old-fashioned patient care. But some Texas physicians and hospitals are finding ways to use the process as an opportunity to improve patient safety and patient-centered care. The Texas Medical Disclosure Panel - the state regulatory body overseeing informed consent for medical treatments - is taking steps to make state forms even more understandable for patients at a time when health literacy rates are low.

  10. National Unmanned Aerial System Standardized Performance Testing and Rating (NUSTAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopardekar, Parimal

    2016-01-01

    The overall objective of the NUSTAR Capability is to offer standardized tests and scenario conditions to assess performance of the UAS. The following are goals of the NU-STAR: 1. Create a prototype standardized tests and scenarios that vehicles can be tested against. 2. Identify key performance parameters of all UAS and their standardized measurement strategy. 3. Develop standardized performance reporting method (e.g., consumer report style) to assist prospective buyers. 4. Identify key performance metrics that could be used by judged towards overall safety of the UAS and operations. 5. If vehicle certification standard is made by a regulatory agency, the performance of individual UAS could be compared against the minimum requirement (e.g., sense and avoid detection time, stopping distance, kinetic energy, etc.).

  11. Information Systems Technician Rating Stakeholders: Implications for Effective Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    TECHNOLOGY TERRORISM AND HOMELAND SECURITY Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of...stakeholder pattern from that of IT, since the HM rating is managed with the “czar” leadership model, with the Navy Bureau of Medi- cine and Surgery

  12. Temporal Coordination and Adaptation to Rate Change in Music Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loehr, Janeen D.; Large, Edward W.; Palmer, Caroline

    2011-01-01

    People often coordinate their actions with sequences that exhibit temporal variability and unfold at multiple periodicities. We compared oscillator- and timekeeper-based accounts of temporal coordination by examining musicians' coordination of rhythmic musical sequences with a metronome that gradually changed rate at the end of a musical phrase…

  13. Performance Evaluation of High-Rate GPS Seismometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, T.; Ebinuma, T.

    2011-12-01

    High-rate GPS observations with higher than once-per-second sampling are getting increasingly important for seismology. Unlike a traditional seismometer which measures short period vibration using accelerometers, the GPS receiver can measure its antenna position directly and record long period seismic wave and permanent displacements as well. The high-rate GPS observations are expected to provide new insights in understanding the whole aspects of earthquake process. In this study, we investigated dynamic characteristics of the high-rate GPS receivers capable of outputting the observations at up to 50Hz. This higher output rate, however, doesn't mean higher dynamics range of the GPS observations. Since many GPS receivers are designed for low dynamics applications, such as static survey, personal and car navigation, the bandwidth of the loop filters tend to be narrower in order to reduce the noise level of the observations. The signal tracking loop works like a low-pass filter. Thus the narrower the bandwidth, the lower the dynamics range. In order to extend this dynamical limit, high-rate GPS receivers might use wider loop bandwidth for phase tracking. In this case, the GPS observations are degraded by higher noise level in return. In addition to the limitation of the loop bandwidth, higher acceleration due to earthquake may cause the steady state error in the signal tracking loop. As a result, kinematic solutions experience undesirable position offsets, or the receiver may lose the GPS signals in an extreme case. In order to examine those effects for the high-rate GPS observations, we made an experiment using a GPS signal simulator and several geodetic GPS receivers, including Trimble Net-R8, NovAtel OEMV, Topcon Net-G3A, and Javad SIGMA-G2T. We set up the zero-baseline simulation scenario in which the rover receiver was vibrating in a periodic motion with the frequency from 1Hz to 10Hz around the reference station. The amplitude of the motion was chosen to provide

  14. Lung counting: comparison of detector performance with a four detector array that has either metal or carbon fibre end caps, and the effect on mda calculation.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Asm Sabbir; Hauck, Barry; Kramer, Gary H

    2012-08-01

    This study described the performance of an array of high-purity Germanium detectors, designed with two different end cap materials-steel and carbon fibre. The advantages and disadvantages of using this detector type in the estimation of the minimum detectable activity (MDA) for different energy peaks of isotope (152)Eu were illustrated. A Monte Carlo model was developed to study the detection efficiency for the detector array. A voxelised Lawrence Livermore torso phantom, equipped with lung, chest plates and overlay plates, was used to mimic a typical lung counting protocol with the array of detectors. The lung of the phantom simulated the volumetric source organ. A significantly low MDA was estimated for energy peaks at 40 keV and at a chest wall thickness of 6.64 cm.

  15. Trends in CD4 Count Testing, Retention in Pre-ART Care, and ART Initiation Rates over the First Decade of Expansion of HIV Services in Haiti

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, Serena P.; Bernard, Daphne; Dévieux, Jessy G.; Atwood, Sidney; McNairy, Margaret L.; Severe, Patrice; Marcelin, Adias; Julma, Pierrot; Apollon, Alexandra; Pape, Jean W.

    2016-01-01

    Background High attrition during the period from HIV testing to antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation is widely reported. Though treatment guidelines have changed to broaden ART eligibility and services have been widely expanded over the past decade, data on the temporal trends in pre-ART outcomes are limited; such data would be useful to guide future policy decisions. Methods We evaluated temporal trends and predictors of retention for each step from HIV testing to ART initiation over the past decade at the GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince Haiti. The 24,925 patients >17 years of age who received a positive HIV test at GHESKIO from March 1, 2003 to February 28, 2013 were included. Patients were followed until they remained in pre-ART care for one year or initiated ART. Results 24,925 patients (61% female, median age 35 years) were included, and 15,008 (60%) had blood drawn for CD4 count within 12 months of HIV testing; the trend increased over time from 36% in Year 1 to 78% in Year 10 (p<0.0001). Excluding transfers, the proportion of patients who were retained in pre-ART care or initiated ART within the first year after HIV testing was 84%, 82%, 64%, and 64%, for CD4 count strata ≤200, 201 to 350, 351 to 500, and >500 cells/mm3, respectively. The trend increased over time for each CD4 strata, and in Year 10, 94%, 95%, 79%, and 74% were retained in pre-ART care or initiated ART for each CD4 strata. Predictors of pre-ART attrition included male gender, low income, and low educational status. Older age and tuberculosis (TB) at HIV testing were associated with retention in care. Conclusions The proportion of patients completing assessments for ART eligibility, remaining in pre-ART care, and initiating ART have increased over the last decade across all CD4 count strata, particularly among patients with CD4 count ≤350 cells/mm3. However, additional retention efforts are needed for patients with higher CD4 counts. PMID:26901795

  16. Imaging performance comparison between a LaBr{sub 3}:Ce scintillator based and a CdTe semiconductor based photon counting compact gamma camera

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, P.; Mettivier, G.; Pani, R.; Pellegrini, R.; Cinti, M. N.; Bennati, P.

    2009-04-15

    The authors report on the performance of two small field of view, compact gamma cameras working in single photon counting in planar imaging tests at 122 and 140 keV. The first camera is based on a LaBr{sub 3}:Ce scintillator continuous crystal (49x49x5 mm{sup 3}) assembled with a flat panel multianode photomultiplier tube with parallel readout. The second one belongs to the class of semiconductor hybrid pixel detectors, specifically, a CdTe pixel detector (14x14x1 mm{sup 3}) with 256x256 square pixels and a pitch of 55 {mu}m, read out by a CMOS single photon counting integrated circuit of the Medipix2 series. The scintillation camera was operated with selectable energy window while the CdTe camera was operated with a single low-energy detection threshold of about 20 keV, i.e., without energy discrimination. The detectors were coupled to pinhole or parallel-hole high-resolution collimators. The evaluation of their overall performance in basic imaging tasks is presented through measurements of their detection efficiency, intrinsic spatial resolution, noise, image SNR, and contrast recovery. The scintillation and CdTe cameras showed, respectively, detection efficiencies at 122 keV of 83% and 45%, intrinsic spatial resolutions of 0.9 mm and 75 {mu}m, and total background noises of 40.5 and 1.6 cps. Imaging tests with high-resolution parallel-hole and pinhole collimators are also reported.

  17. 29 CFR 778.311 - Flat rate for special job performed in overtime hours.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Flat rate for special job performed in overtime hours. 778... COMPENSATION Special Problems Lump Sum Attributed to Overtime § 778.311 Flat rate for special job performed in... paid a flat rate for a special job performed during overtime hours, without regard to the time...

  18. 29 CFR 778.311 - Flat rate for special job performed in overtime hours.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Flat rate for special job performed in overtime hours. 778... COMPENSATION Special Problems Lump Sum Attributed to Overtime § 778.311 Flat rate for special job performed in... paid a flat rate for a special job performed during overtime hours, without regard to the time...

  19. 29 CFR 778.311 - Flat rate for special job performed in overtime hours.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Flat rate for special job performed in overtime hours. 778... COMPENSATION Special Problems Lump Sum Attributed to Overtime § 778.311 Flat rate for special job performed in... paid a flat rate for a special job performed during overtime hours, without regard to the time...

  20. Teacher Performance Assessment Instruments: Plans for Practice Rating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capie, William; And Others

    This manual consists of lesson plans developed to train data collectors in the use of the Teacher Performance Assessment Instruments (TPAI). Each set of plans was designed for one of three purposes. Lesson plans developed for the Teaching Plans and Materials Instrument (TPM) simulate a portfolio prepared by the teacher. One-day plans developed for…

  1. Effects of different floor types and levels of washing of waterers on broiler performance and bacteria count of drinking water.

    PubMed

    Andrews, L D; Stamps, L K; Moore, R W; Newberry, L A

    1993-07-01

    The objective of the present experiment was to determine the effect of different flooring materials and washing of waterers on broiler performance. The floor treatments were 1) black, plastic-coated expanded metal, relatively rigid (B); 2) white plastic, semi-rigid, with rectangular openings (WR); 3) white plastic, semi-rigid, with square openings (WS); and 4) 3 cm of rice hull litter (C). One hanging waterer was placed in each pen. Wash treatments were 1) trough and bell washed every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday (AW); 2) wash trough only on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday (TW); and 3) the waterers were never washed after the 2nd wk (NW). Broilers reared on C has significantly lower BW than those broilers on B floors. Broilers reared on the B and WS floors had significantly higher breast blister scores and percentage of birds with blisters than broilers reared on C floors. Broilers reared on C had lower enlarged feather follicle scores than those reared on all raised floors and a lower percentage of enlarged feather follicles than those broilers reared on WS or WR floors. Broilers reared on WS+TW had significantly better feed conversion than WS+AW, B+TW, and B+AW treatments. Broilers reared on WR+TW treatment were significantly higher in breast blister score than broilers reared on WR+AW, C+TW, and C+AW treatments. Broilers reared on C+TW and C+AW treatments were significantly lower in breast blister score except for broilers reared on C+NW, WR+AW, and WS+AW treatments. Broilers reared on C+NW treatment were significantly lower in enlarged feather follicle score than those broilers reared on B+TW, WR+AW, and WS+NW treatments.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. The Watt Count System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The Watt Count System combines aerospace and computer technology, an engineering systems design approach and the environmental control expertise of a group of engineers who worked on Apollo. First step of the system is a computerized energy consumption analysis based on plans for a new home. Company calculates heating and cooling loads and customizes the most energy efficient system for the particular structure analyzed. A quality control engineer assures that insulation and ducting are installed to specifications. Analysis and design techniques are so accurate that company is able to give homeowner a two-year guarantee that the home's energy consumption will not exceed the kilowatt hour level determined by the computer in step one. In an annual energy performance comparison, a Watt Count home used 45 percent less energy than a conventionally equipped home.

  3. The role of the Internet in doctor performance rating.

    PubMed

    Segal, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Historically, if a patient was dissatisfied with care, he or she could tell his or her friends and family. The criticism was limited to a small circle of people. If the patient was injured negligently, he or she could hire an attorney to prosecute a lawsuit. The threshold for finding an attorney and prevailing posed a significant barrier for the patient achieving redress. With the Internet, if a patient is unhappy he or she needs do little more than access a growing number of Internet physician rating sites. Such criticism can be rendered anonymously. The posts are disseminated worldwide, and once posted, the criticism rarely comes down. While transparency is a laudable goal, such sites often lack accountability. More formal sites run by authoritative bodies, such as medical licensing boards, also provide data about physicians, but such data is often unfiltered, making it difficult for the public to properly interpret. Given how important reputation is to physicians, the traditional remedy of suing for defamation because of libelous posts is ordinarily ineffective. First, many patients who post libelous comments, do so anonymously. Next, the Internet Service Providers (ISPs) hosting such sites are generally immune from liability for defamation. Finally, the law has a very formal definition for libel, and a negative rating does not necessarily equate to "defamation." A novel method of addressing un-policed physician rating sites in the Internet age is described. The system embraces the use of mutual privacy contracts to provide physicians a viable remedy to anonymous posts. In exchange, patients receive additional privacy protections above and beyond that mandated by law.

  4. Effects of Standard Extremity on Mixed Standard Scale Performance Ratings.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    Zellinger, 1 980); c) comparisons of the psychomeir ic character ist ics of rziings ob tained from MSS and other rating formats (Arvey & Hoyle , 1...Landy, 1977), and sometimes favoring BARS (Arvey & Hoyle , 1’-74; Finley, et al., 1977). Lack of Inter-ra+er reliability does ",eem to be a consistent...problem with the MSS (Arvey & Hoyle , 1974; Finley, et al., 1977; Saal, 1979; SaaI & Li:ndy, 1977). However, the convergent and discrimlnant vai dily of

  5. Modeling and Simulation of Count Data

    PubMed Central

    Plan, E L

    2014-01-01

    Count data, or number of events per time interval, are discrete data arising from repeated time to event observations. Their mean count, or piecewise constant event rate, can be evaluated by discrete probability distributions from the Poisson model family. Clinical trial data characterization often involves population count analysis. This tutorial presents the basics and diagnostics of count modeling and simulation in the context of pharmacometrics. Consideration is given to overdispersion, underdispersion, autocorrelation, and inhomogeneity. PMID:25116273

  6. Monte Carlo Simulation of Counting Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogden, Philip M.

    A computer program to perform a Monte Carlo simulation of counting experiments was written. The program was based on a mathematical derivation which started with counts in a time interval. The time interval was subdivided to form a binomial distribution with no two counts in the same subinterval. Then the number of subintervals was extended to…

  7. High performance interconnection between high data rate networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foudriat, E. C.; Maly, K.; Overstreet, C. M.; Zhang, L.; Sun, W.

    1992-01-01

    The bridge/gateway system needed to interconnect a wide range of computer networks to support a wide range of user quality-of-service requirements is discussed. The bridge/gateway must handle a wide range of message types including synchronous and asynchronous traffic, large, bursty messages, short, self-contained messages, time critical messages, etc. It is shown that messages can be classified into three basic classes, synchronous and large and small asynchronous messages. The first two require call setup so that packet identification, buffer handling, etc. can be supported in the bridge/gateway. Identification enables resequences in packet size. The third class is for messages which do not require call setup. Resequencing hardware based to handle two types of resequencing problems is presented. The first is for a virtual parallel circuit which can scramble channel bytes. The second system is effective in handling both synchronous and asynchronous traffic between networks with highly differing packet sizes and data rates. The two other major needs for the bridge/gateway are congestion and error control. A dynamic, lossless congestion control scheme which can easily support effective error correction is presented. Results indicate that the congestion control scheme provides close to optimal capacity under congested conditions. Under conditions where error may develop due to intervening networks which are not lossless, intermediate error recovery and correction takes 1/3 less time than equivalent end-to-end error correction under similar conditions.

  8. Dual crystal x-ray spectrometer at 1.8 keV for high repetition-rate single-photon counting spectroscopy experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Gamboa, E. J.; Bachmann, B.; Kraus, D.; ...

    2016-08-01

    The recent development of high-repetition rate x-ray free electron lasers (FEL), makes it possible to perform x-ray scattering and emission spectroscopy measurements from thin foils or gasses heated to high-energy density conditions by integrating over many experimental shots. Since the expected signal may be weaker than the typical CCD readout noise over the region-of-interest, it is critical to the success of this approach to use a detector with high-energy resolution so that single x-ray photons may be isolated. We describe a dual channel x-ray spectrometer developed for the Atomic and Molecular Optics endstation at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS)more » for x-ray spectroscopy near the K-edge of aluminum. The spectrometer is based on a pair of curved PET (002) crystals coupled to a single pnCCD detector which simultaneously measures x-ray scattering and emission in the forward and backward directions. Furthermore, the signals from single x-ray photons are accumulated permitting continuous single-shot acquisition at 120 Hz.« less

  9. Dual crystal x-ray spectrometer at 1.8 keV for high repetition-rate single-photon counting spectroscopy experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gamboa, E. J.; Bachmann, B.; Kraus, D.; MacDonald, M. J.; Bucher, M.; Carron, S.; Coffee, R. N.; Drake, R. P.; Emig, J.; Ferguson, K. R.; Fletcher, L. B.; Glenzer, S. H.; Gorkhover, T.; Hau-Riege, S. P.; Krzywinski, J.; Levitan, A. L.; Meiwes-Broer, K. -H.; Osipov, T.; Pardini, T.; Peltz, C.; Skruszewicz, S.; Bostedt, C.; Fennel, T.; Döppner, T.

    2016-08-01

    The recent development of high-repetition rate x-ray free electron lasers (FEL), makes it possible to perform x-ray scattering and emission spectroscopy measurements from thin foils or gasses heated to high-energy density conditions by integrating over many experimental shots. Since the expected signal may be weaker than the typical CCD readout noise over the region-of-interest, it is critical to the success of this approach to use a detector with high-energy resolution so that single x-ray photons may be isolated. We describe a dual channel x-ray spectrometer developed for the Atomic and Molecular Optics endstation at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) for x-ray spectroscopy near the K-edge of aluminum. The spectrometer is based on a pair of curved PET (002) crystals coupled to a single pnCCD detector which simultaneously measures x-ray scattering and emission in the forward and backward directions. Furthermore, the signals from single x-ray photons are accumulated permitting continuous single-shot acquisition at 120 Hz.

  10. Can Ratio of Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Count and Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate in Diabetic Foot Infecti on Predict Osteomyelitis and/or Amputation?

    PubMed Central

    Yapıcı, Oktay; Berk, Hande; Öztoprak, Nefise; Seyman, Derya; Tahmaz, Alper; Merdin, Alparslan

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to search for any relations between the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and the development of osteomyelitis and the need for amputation in patients with diabetic foot infection (DFI). All data included DFI patients who were hospitalized in our Infectious Diseases Clinic between 2012 and 2015 and who were classified according to International Classification Disease Code System. 75 patients were analyzed in the study. The DFI patients were stratified into 3 groups of whom had amputation procedure, whom had only debridement/drainage procedure and whom had any surgery procedure. Sidac post hoc analysis was used to perform the effects of NLR, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and glycosylated hemoglobin on the surgery procedure status. The DFI patients were also stratified into two another separate group for another analysis to search for the effect of NLR values on the development of osteomyelitis. The mean value of NLR in the amputated patients’ group (15.7±10.3 was significantly higher than those with debridement procedure (9.9±5.6) and those without any surgery (6.0±2.8) (P=0.001). NLR values were also found significantly higher in patients with osteomyelitis in the second analysis (P=0.004). In this study, the NLR was found to have a predictive value on the development of osteomyelitis and on the progression to amputation in patients with DFI. PMID:28286632

  11. Comparison of On-Orbit Performance of Rate Sensing Gyroscopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sedlak, Joseph; Hashmall, Joseph; Airapetian, Vladimir

    2000-01-01

    This work presents results from the study of a large volume of spacecraft flight data pertaining to gyroscope performance. We have examined long and short term trends of gyroscope biase of first, an exact solution for the time-dependence of the attitude part of the state error covariance, averaged over the three spacecraft axes, is given. This solution is more complete than the usual cubic polynomial for the variance in that it includes coupling among the three gyroscope axes and includes an important term arising from the initial correlations. Second, several continuous 24-hour spans of gyroscope data are examined to verify the short-term statistical model. This analysis demonstrates that in-flight data can be used to determine the strength of the white noise driving the random walk of the gyroscope bias. This may be useful for postlaunch improvement to the noise model and for diagnosing the health of the gyroscope. Third, the long-term trends in gyroscope biases show a nearly linear systematic variation over time scales of years. This has been found on three different missions. While the random walk model is adequate as a basis for onboard Kalman filters or for state estimation using relatively short time spans, these trends indicate that some applications could benefit by accounting for the secular changes in the biases. One example is a new gyroscope calibration method that is under development that allows for multi-epoch bias solutions.

  12. All about Carbohydrate Counting

    MedlinePlus

    Toolkit No. 14 All About Carbohydrate Counting What is carbohydrate counting? Carbohydrate counting is a way to plan your meals. It can help ... Diabetes Association, Inc. 2/14 Toolkit No. 14: All About Carbohydrate Counting continued The chart at the ...

  13. 1980 CRC Fuel Rating Program: Road Octane Performance in 1980 Model Cars

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    CRC Report No. 520 /198o CRC FUEL RATING PROGRAM: ROAD OCTANE PERFORMANCE IN 1980 MODEL CARS July 1981 C-3 .. % COORDINATING RESEARCH COUNCIL INC...30346 (404) 396-3400 1980 CRC FUEL RATING PROGRAM: ROAD OCTANE PERFORMANCE IN 1980 MODEL CARS (CRC Project No. CM-124-80) IN FORMULATING AND...Test Cars ......................................... 3 C. Road Rating Technique.............................. 3 D. Data Analysis

  14. Ratings of Violin and Viola Vibrato Performance in Audio-Only and Audiovisual Presentations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, Robert

    1997-01-01

    Compares the ratings assigned to audio and videotaped vibrato performances of inexperienced and experienced violinists and violists. Rated the performances on five vibrato factors: width, speed, evenness, pitch stability, and overall sound. Although the experienced players were consistently rated higher, the results suggested that visual cues may…

  15. A Pixel Readout Chip in 40 nm CMOS Process for High Count Rate Imaging Systems with Minimization of Charge Sharing Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Maj, Piotr; Grybos, P.; Szczgiel, R.; Kmon, P.; Drozd, A.; Deptuch, G.

    2013-11-07

    We present a prototype chip in 40 nm CMOS technology for readout of hybrid pixel detector. The prototype chip has a matrix of 18x24 pixels with a pixel pitch of 100 μm. It can operate both in single photon counting (SPC) mode and in C8P1 mode. In SPC the measured ENC is 84 erms (for the peaking time of 48 ns), while the effective offset spread is below 2 mV rms. In the C8P1 mode the chip reconstructs full charge deposited in the detector, even in the case of charge sharing, and it identifies a pixel with the largest charge deposition. The chip architecture and preliminary measurements are reported.

  16. Pedestrian Counting with Occlusion Handling Using Stereo Thermal Cameras

    PubMed Central

    Kristoffersen, Miklas S.; Dueholm, Jacob V.; Gade, Rikke; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2016-01-01

    The number of pedestrians walking the streets or gathered in public spaces is a valuable piece of information for shop owners, city governments, event organizers and many others. However, automatic counting that takes place day and night is challenging due to changing lighting conditions and the complexity of scenes with many people occluding one another. To address these challenges, this paper introduces the use of a stereo thermal camera setup for pedestrian counting. We investigate the reconstruction of 3D points in a pedestrian street with two thermal cameras and propose an algorithm for pedestrian counting based on clustering and tracking of the 3D point clouds. The method is tested on two five-minute video sequences captured at a public event with a moderate density of pedestrians and heavy occlusions. The counting performance is compared to the manually annotated ground truth and shows success rates of 95.4% and 99.1% for the two sequences. PMID:26742047

  17. Current performance of planter technology to support variable-rate seeding in the Southern US

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Advances in planting technology are expanding opportunities to vary seeding rates on–the-go. Variable-rate seeding can help maximize overall profits by matching optimal planting rates to field production variability. An important aspect of variable-rate seeding is ensuring peak performance of the pl...

  18. Diagnostic test performance of somatic cell count, lactate dehydrogenase, and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase for detecting dairy cows with intramammary infection.

    PubMed

    Nyman, A-K; Emanuelson, U; Waller, K Persson

    2016-02-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the diagnostic test performance of somatic cell count (SCC), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAGase), analyzed in composite test milking samples, for detecting dairy cows with or without intramammary infection (IMI). A second objective was to investigate whether an adjustment of these udder health indicators according to their associations with different influential factors (i.e., parity, days in milk, and season) improved their test performance. Moreover, we wanted to investigate whether test performance of SCC improved if SCC results from previous adjacent test milkings were included in the model. Such test milking data were not available for LDH or NAGase. In this cross-sectional study, quarter milk samples for bacteriological examination were taken from almost 1,000 cows from 25 dairy herds during 3 consecutive days: the day before test milking, the day of test milking, and the day after test milking. From each cow, a composite test milking sample was analyzed for milk composition, SCC, LDH, and NAGase. Among the cows sampled, 485 were IMI negative and 256 were IMI positive in one or more udder quarters according to the definitions used. The remaining cows had inconclusive IMI status. To assess the test performance of SCC, LDH, and NAGase to identify IMI-negative and IMI-positive cows, univariable generalized estimating equation models were used with the udder health indicator of interest as outcome and IMI status as explanatory variable. From these models, receiver-operator characteristic curves were created and the area under cure (AUC) was calculated. From each model, a cut-off was chosen for calculations of the sensitivity (Se), specificity (Sp), positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy (ACC) for each udder health indicator. The AUC was similar for the adjusted SCC (0.84), nonadjusted SCC (0.83) and geometric mean SCC (0.80-0.81), but

  19. Recommendations for the performance rating of flat plate terrestrial photovoltaic solar panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treble, F. C.

    1976-01-01

    A review of recommendations for standardizing the performance rating of flat plate terrestrial solar panels is given to develop an international standard code of practice for performance rating. Required data to characterize the performance of a solar panel are listed. Other items discussed are: (1) basic measurement procedures; (2) performance measurement in natural sunlight and simulated sunlight; (3) standard solar cells; (4) the normal incidence method; (5) global method and (6) definition of peak power.

  20. Forbush effects in total neutron monitor counting rate and neutron multiplicities recorded by the 6NM-64 of the E. Segre' Observatory at 2025 m and by the Rome 17NM-64

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorman, L. I.

    We show some Forbush-decrease events by using 5-minute and 1-hourly data of total neutron monitor counting rate and of detected neutron multiplicities according to observations by the Emilio Segre' Observatory 6NM-64 at the height of 2025 m (Rc=10.8 GV) and by the Rome 17NM-64 neutron monitor (Rc=6.2 GV). By these data it is possible in principle to evaluate approximately the cosmic ray primary variations for each Forbush-decrease (by using the method of coupling functions); also the detected neutron multiplicities can provide additional important information.

  1. Enabling photon counting detectors with dynamic attenuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Scott S.; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2014-03-01

    Photon-counting x-ray detectors (PCXDs) are being investigated as a replacement for conventional x-ray detectors because they promise several advantages, including better dose efficiency, higher resolution and spectral imaging. However, many of these advantages disappear when the x-ray flux incident on the detector is too high. We recently proposed a dynamic, piecewise-linear attenuator (or beam shaping filter) that can control the flux incident on the detector. This can restrict the operating range of the PCXD to keep the incident count rate below a given limit. We simulated a system with the piecewise-linear attenuator and a PCXD using raw data generated from forward projected DICOM files. We investigated the classic paralyzable and nonparalyzable PCXD as well as a weighted average of the two, with the weights chosen to mimic an existing PCXD (Taguchi et al, Med Phys 2011). The dynamic attenuator has small synergistic benefits with the nonparalyzable detector and large synergistic benefits with the paralyzable detector. Real PCXDs operate somewhere between these models, and the weighted average model still shows large benefits from the dynamic attenuator. We conclude that dynamic attenuators can reduce the count rate performance necessary for adopting PCXDs.

  2. The Big Pumpkin Count.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coplestone-Loomis, Lenny

    1981-01-01

    Pumpkin seeds are counted after students convert pumpkins to jack-o-lanterns. Among the activities involved, pupils learn to count by 10s, make estimates, and to construct a visual representation of 1,000. (MP)

  3. Compensatory and Noncompensatory Information Integration and Halo Error in Performance Rating Judgments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kishor, Nand

    1992-01-01

    The relationship between compensatory and noncompensatory information integration and the intensity of the halo effect in performance rating was studied. Seventy University of British Columbia (Canada) students rated 27 teacher profiles. That the way performance information is mentally integrated affects the intensity of halo error was supported.…

  4. The Effect of Selected Nonmusical Factors on Adjudicators' Ratings of High School Solo Vocal Performances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Sandra A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of differentiated performance attire and stage deportment on adjudicators' ratings of high school solo vocal performances. High school choral students (n = 153) and undergraduate (n = 97) and graduate music majors (n = 32) served as adjudicators (N = 282). Adjudicators rated recorded solo vocal…

  5. What Are Error Rates for Classifying Teacher and School Performance Using Value-Added Models?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schochet, Peter Z.; Chiang, Hanley S.

    2013-01-01

    This article addresses likely error rates for measuring teacher and school performance in the upper elementary grades using value-added models applied to student test score gain data. Using a realistic performance measurement system scheme based on hypothesis testing, the authors develop error rate formulas based on ordinary least squares and…

  6. Loss-Free Counting with Digital Signal Processors

    SciTech Connect

    Markku Koskelo; Dave Hall; Martin Moslinger

    2000-11-12

    Loss-free-counting (LFC) techniques have frequently been used with traditional analog pulse processing systems to compensate for the time or pulses lost when a spectroscopy system is unavailable (busy) for processing an accepted pulse. With the availability of second-generation digital signal processing (DSP) electronics that offer a significantly improved performance for both high and low count rate applications, the LFC technique has been revisited. Specific attention was given to the high and ultra-high count rate behavior, using high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors with both transistor reset preamplifiers (TRP) and conventional RC preamplifiers. The experiments conducted for this work show that the known LFC techniques further benefit when combined with modern DSP pulse shaping.

  7. Preliminary results from the evaluation of Cockpit Resource Management training - Performance ratings of flightcrews

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmreich, Robert L.; Wilhelm, John A.; Gregorich, Steven E.; Chidester, Thomas R.

    1990-01-01

    The first data from the NASA/University of Texas Crew Performance project on the behavior of flightcrews with and without formal training in Cockpit Resource Management (CRM) is reported. Expert observers made detailed ratings of 15 components of crew behavior in both line operations and in full mission simulations. The results indicate that such training in crew coordination concepts increases the percentage of crews rated as above average in performance and decreases the percentage rated as below average. The data also show high and unexpected degrees of variations in rated performance among crews flying different aircraft within the same organization. It was also found that the specific behaviors that triggered observer ratings of above or below average performance differed markedly between organizations. Characteristics of experts' ratings and future research needs are also discussed.

  8. Grad Rates Don't Tell Full Story of Community College Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sbrega, John J.

    2012-01-01

    Anyone who fixates on graduation rates has little understanding not only of the rich mission and value of community colleges, but also how deeply flawed and inadequate those rates are as a principal assessment tool for the performance of community colleges. In this article, the author discusses what is wrong with the use of graduation rates as the…

  9. Rewarded remembering: dissociations between self-rated motivation and memory performance.

    PubMed

    Ngaosuvan, Leonard; Mäntylä, Timo

    2005-08-01

    People often claim that they perform better in memory performance tasks when they are more motivated. However, past research has shown minimal effects of motivation on memory performance when factors contributing to item-specific biases during encoding and retrieval are taken into account. The purpose of the present study was to examine the generality of this apparent dissociation by using more sensitive measures of experienced motivation and memory performance. Extrinsic motivation was manipulated through competition instructions, and subjective ratings of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation were obtained before and after study instructions. Participants studied a series of words, and memory performance was assessed by content recall (Experiment 1) and source recall (Experiment 2). Both experiments showed dissociation between subjective ratings of extrinsic motivation and actual memory performance, so that competition increased self-rated extrinsic motivation but had no effects on memory performance, including source recall. Inconsistent with most people's expectations, the findings suggest that extrinsic motivation has minimal effects on memory performance.

  10. Maryland Kids Count Factbook, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Advocates for Children and Youth, Baltimore, MD.

    This 7th annual Kids Count Factbook provides information on trends in the well-being of children in Maryland and its 24 jurisdictions. The statistical portrait is based on 18 indicators of well-being: (1) low birth-weight infants; (2) infant mortality; (3) early prenatal care; (4) binge drinking; (5) child deaths; (6) child injury rate; (7) grade…

  11. The Rating of High-Performing Principals' Performance on Their Leadership Dimensions by Senior Administrators, Middle Managers and Classroom Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutton, Disraeli Montgomery

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine if there was a difference in the ratings among senior administrators/managers, middle managers and classroom teachers of the four dimensions of leadership performance related to high-performing principals in the Jamaican public school system. The study showed that there were differences in how senior…

  12. Comparative diagnostic and prognostic performances of the hematoxylin-eosin and phospho-histone H3 mitotic count and Ki-67 index in adrenocortical carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Duregon, Eleonora; Molinaro, Luca; Volante, Marco; Ventura, Laura; Righi, Luisella; Bolla, Stefania; Terzolo, Massimo; Sapino, Anna; Papotti, Mauro G

    2014-09-01

    Mitotic count on hematoxylin and eosin slides is a fundamental morphological criterion in the diagnosis and grading of adrenocortical carcinoma in any scoring system employed. Moreover, it is the unique term strongly associated with patient's prognosis. Phospho-histone H3 is a mitosis-specific antibody, which was already proven to facilitate mitotic count in melanoma and other tumors. Therefore, a study was designed to assess the diagnostic and prognostic role of phospho-histone H3 in 52 adrenocortical carcinomas, comparing manual and computerized count to standard manual hematoxylin- and eosin-based method and Ki-67 index. Manual hematoxylin and eosin and phospho-histone H3 mitotic counts were highly correlated (r=0.9077, P<0.0001), better than computer-assisted phospho-histone H3 evaluations, and had an excellent inter-observer reproducibility at Bland-Altman analysis. Three of 15 cases having <5 mitotic figures per 50 high-power fields by standard count on hematoxylin and eosin gained the mitotic figure point of Weiss Score after a manual count on phospho-histone H3 slides. Traditional mitotic count confirmed to be a strong predictor of overall survival (P=0.0043), better than phospho-histone H3-based evaluation (P=0.051), but not as strong as the Ki-67 index (P<0.0001). The latter further segregated adrenocortical carcinomas into three prognostic groups, stratifying cases by low (<20%), intermediate (20-50%), and high (>50%) Ki-67 values. We conclude that (a) phospho-histone H3 staining is a useful diagnostic complementary tool to standard hematoxylin and eosin mitotic count, enabling optimal mitotic figure evaluation (including atypical mitotic figures) even in adrenocortical carcinomas with a low mitotic index and with a very high reproducibility; (b) Ki-67 proved to be the best prognostic indicator of overall survival, being superior to the mitotic index, irrespective of the method (standard on hematoxylin and eosin or phospho-histone H3-based) used to count

  13. Material screening with HPGe counting station for PandaX experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Chen, X.; Fu, C.; Ji, X.; Liu, X.; Mao, Y.; Wang, H.; Wang, S.; Xie, P.; Zhang, T.

    2016-12-01

    A gamma counting station based on high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector was set up for the material screening of the PandaX dark matter experiments in the China Jinping Underground Laboratory. Low background gamma rate of 2.6 counts/min within the energy range of 20 to 2700 keV is achieved due to the well-designed passive shield. The sentivities of the HPGe detetector reach mBq/kg level for isotopes like K, U, Th, and even better for Co and Cs, resulted from the low-background rate and the high relative detection efficiency of 175%. The structure and performance of the counting station are described in this article. Detailed counting results for the radioactivity in materials used by the PandaX dark-matter experiment are presented. The upgrading plan of the counting station is also discussed.

  14. Reliability of the total lymphocyte count as a parameter of nutrition.

    PubMed

    Forse, R A; Rompre, C; Crosilla, P; O-Tuitt, D; Rhode, B; Shizgal, H M

    1985-05-01

    To evaluate the total lymphocyte count as a means of nutritional assessment, body composition studies (a proven method of nutritional assessment) and total lymphocyte determinations were performed simultaneously in 153 patients. The total lymphocyte count correlated poorly with both the body cell mass and the nutritional state measured by the Nae to Ke ratio. For diagnosing malnutrition, the total lymphocyte count had a false-positive rate of 34% and a false-negative rate of 50%. In a group of 78 patients who received total parenteral nutrition for 2 weeks, the total lymphocyte count did not accurately reflect the nutritional changes. Due to its poor sensitivity and specificity, the total lymphocyte count is of no value as a measure of the nutritional state.

  15. Avian leucocyte counting using the hemocytometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dein, F.J.; Wilson, A.; Fischer, D.; Langenberg, P.

    1994-01-01

    Automated methods for counting leucocytes in avian blood are not available because of the presence of nucleated erythrocytes and thrombocytes. Therefore, total white blood cell counts are performed by hand using a hemocytometer. The Natt and Herrick and the Unopette methods are the most common stain and diluent preparations for this procedure. Replicate hemocytometer counts using these two methods were performed on blood from four birds of different species. Cells present in each square of the hemocytometer were counted. Counting cells in the corner, side, or center hemocytometer squares produced statistically equivalent results; counting four squares per chamber provided a result similar to that obtained by counting nine squares; and the Unopette method was more precise for hemocytometer counting than was the Natt and Herrick method. The Unopette method is easier to learn and perform but is an indirect process, utilizing the differential count from a stained smear. The Natt and Herrick method is a direct total count, but cell identification is more difficult.

  16. Recurrence rates and clinical outcome for dogs with grade II mast cell tumours with a low AgNOR count and Ki67 index treated with surgery alone.

    PubMed

    Smith, J; Kiupel, M; Farrelly, J; Cohen, R; Olmsted, G; Kirpensteijn, J; Brocks, B; Post, G

    2017-03-01

    Grade II mast cell tumours (MCT) are tumours with variable biologic behaviour. Multiple factors have been associated with outcome, including proliferation markers. The purpose of this study was to determine if extent of surgical excision affects recurrence rate in dogs with grade II MCT with low proliferation activity, determined by Ki67 and argyrophilic nucleolar organising regions (AgNOR). Eighty-six dogs with cutaneous MCT were evaluated. All dogs had surgical excision of their MCT with a low Ki67 index and combined AgNORxKi67 (Ag67) values. Twenty-three (27%) dogs developed local or distant recurrence during the median follow-up time. Of these dogs, six (7%) had local recurrence, one had complete and five had incomplete histologic margins. This difference in recurrence rates between dogs with complete and incomplete histologic margins was not significant. On the basis of this study, ancillary therapy may not be necessary for patients with incompletely excised grade II MCT with low proliferation activity.

  17. South Carolina Kids Count, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, A. Baron

    This Kids Count report examines statewide trends in the well-being of South Carolina's children. The statistical portrait is based on 42 indicators in the areas of demographics, family, economic status, health, readiness and early school performance, scholastic achievement, and adolescent risk behaviors. The indicators are: (1) population; (2)…

  18. South Carolina Kids Count, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, A. Baron

    This Kids Count report examines statewide trends in the well-being of South Carolina's children. The statistical portrait is based on 41 indicators in the areas of demographics, family, economic status, health, readiness and early school performance, scholastic achievement, and adolescent risk behaviors. The indicators are: (1) population; (2)…

  19. The Effects of Total Motile Sperm Count on Spontaneous Pregnancy Rate and Pregnancy After IUI Treatment in Couples with Male Factor and Unexplained Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Hajder, Mithad; Hajder, Elmira; Husic, Amela

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Male infertility factor is defined if the total number of motile spermatozoa (TMSC) < 20 × 106/ejaculated, and unexplained infertility if spermiogram is normal with normal female factor. The aim: of this study was to determine the predictive value of TMSC for spontaneous pregnancy (ST) and pregnancy after treatment with intrauterine insemination (IUI) in couples with male factor and unexplained infertility. What is known already: According to the WHO qualification system abnormal spermiogram can be diagnosed as oligozoospermia (O), asthenozoospermia (A), teratozoospermia (T) or combination (O+A+T) and azoospermia (A). Although this classification indicates the accuracy of findings its relevance for prognosis in infertile couple and the choice of treatment is questionable. Materials and Methods: The study included 98 couples with male infertility factor (bad spermiogram) and couples with normospermia and normal female factor (unexplained infertility). Testing group is randomized at: group (A) with TMSC> 3,106 / ejaculate and a spontaneous pregnancy, group (B) with TMSCl <3 x 106 / ejaculate and pregnancy after IUI, plus couples who have not achieved SP with TMSC> 3 x 106 / ejaculate and couples who have not achieved pregnancy. Main results: From a total of 98 pairs of men’s and unexplained infertility, 42 of them (42.8%) achieved spontaneous pregnancy, while 56 (57.2%) pairs did not achieve spontaneous pregnancy. TMSC was significantly higher (42.4 ± 28.4 vs. 26.2 ± 24, p <0.05) in the group A compared to group B. Couples with TMSC 1-5 × 106 ejaculate had significantly lower (9.8% vs. 22.2%, p <0.0001) rate of spontaneous pregnancy in comparison to couples after IUI treatment. Couples with unexplained infertility had significantly higher (56.8% vs. 29.9%, p <0.01) spontaneous pregnancy rate compared to couples after IUI treatment. Infertile couples had significant pregnancy rate with TMSC 5-10 x 106 / ejaculate (OR = 1.45, 95% CI:1.26-1.78, <0

  20. Preschool Children's Spontaneous Focusing on Numerosity, Subitizing, and Counting Skills as Predictors of Their Mathematical Performance Seven Years Later at School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannula-Sormunen, Minna M.; Lehtinen, Erno; Räsänen, Pekka

    2015-01-01

    This seven-year longitudinal study examined how children's spontaneous focusing on numerosity (SFON), subitizing based enumeration, and counting skills assessed at five or six years predict their school mathematics achievement at 12 years. The participants were 36 Finnish children without diagnosed neurological disorders. The results, based on…

  1. A high count rate one-dimensional position sensitive detector and a data acquisition system for time resolved X-ray scattering studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pernot, P.; Kahn, R.; Fourme, R.; Leboucher, P.; Million, G.; Santiard, J. C.; Charpak, G.

    1982-10-01

    A curved multiwire proportional drift chamber has been built as a general purpose instrument for X-ray scattering and X-ray diffraction experiments with synchrotron radiation. This parallax-free one-dimensional linear position sensitive detector has a parallel readout with a double hit logic. The data acquisition system, installed as a part of the D11 camera at LURE-DCI, is designed to perform time slicing and cyclic experiments; it has been used with either the fast multiwire chamber or a standard position sensitive detector with delay line readout.

  2. Guidance on the Use of Hand-Held Survey Meters for radiological Triage: Time-Dependent Detector Count Rates Corresponding to 50, 250, and 500 mSv Effective Dose for Adult Males and Adult Females

    SciTech Connect

    Bolch, W.E.; Hurtado, J.L.; Lee, C.; Manger, Ryan P; Hertel, Nolan; Burgett, E.; Dickerson, W.

    2012-01-01

    In June 2006, the Radiation Studies Branch of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention held a workshop to explore rapid methods of facilitating radiological triage of large numbers of potentially contaminated individuals following detonation of a radiological dispersal device. Two options were discussed. The first was the use of traditional gamma cameras in nuclear medicine departments operated as makeshift wholebody counters. Guidance on this approach is currently available from the CDC. This approach would be feasible if a manageable number of individuals were involved, transportation to the relevant hospitals was quickly provided, and the medical staff at each facility had been previously trained in this non-traditional use of their radiopharmaceutical imaging devices. If, however, substantially larger numbers of individuals (100 s to 1,000 s) needed radiological screening, other options must be given to first responders, first receivers, and health physicists providing medical management. In this study, the second option of the workshop was investigated by the use of commercially available portable survey meters (either NaI or GM based) for assessing potential ranges of effective dose (G50, 50Y250, 250Y500, and 9500 mSv). Two hybrid computational phantoms were used to model an adult male and an adult female subject internally contaminated with 241Am, 60Cs, 137Cs, 131I, or 192Ir following an acute inhalation or ingestion intake. As a function of time following the exposure, the net count rates corresponding to committed effective doses of 50, 250, and 500 mSv were estimated via Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation for each of four different detector types, positions, and screening distances. Measured net count rates can be compared to these values, and an assignment of one of four possible effective dose ranges could be made. The method implicitly assumes that all external contamination has been removed prior to screening and that the measurements be

  3. Guidance on the Use of Hand-Held Survey Meters for Radiological Triage: Time-Dependent Detector Count Rates Corresponding to 50, 250, and 500 mSv Effective Dose for Adult Males and Adult Females

    PubMed Central

    Bolch, Wesley E.; Hurtado, Jorge L.; Lee, Choonsik; Manger, Ryan; Hertel, Nolan; Dickerson, William

    2013-01-01

    In June of 2006, the Radiation Studies Branch of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention held a workshop to explore rapid methods of facilitating radiological triage of large numbers of potentially contaminated individuals following detonation of a radiological dispersal device. Two options were discussed. The first was the use of traditional gamma-cameras in nuclear medicine departments operated as make-shift whole-body counters. Guidance on this approach is currently available from the CDC. This approach is feasible if a manageable number of individuals were involved, transportation to the relevant hospitals was quickly provided, and the medical staff at each facility had been previously trained in this non-traditional use of their radiopharmaceutical imaging devices. If, however, substantially large numbers of individuals (100s to 1000s) needed radiological screening, other options must be given to first responders, first receivers, and health physicists providing medical management. In this study, the second option of the workshop was investigated – the use of commercially available portable survey meters (either NaI or GM based) for assessing potential ranges of effective dose (<50, 50–250, 250–500, and >500 mSv). Two hybrid computational phantoms were used to model an adult male and an adult female subject internally contaminated with either 241Am, 60Cs, 137Cs, 131I, and 192Ir following an acute inhalation or ingestion intake. As a function of time following the exposure, the net count rates corresponding to committed effective doses of 50, 250, and 500 mSv were estimated via Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation for each of four different detectors types, positions, and screening distances. Measured count rates can be compared to these values and an assignment of one of four possible effective dose ranges could be made. The method implicitly assumes that all external contamination has been removed prior to screening, and that the

  4. Guidance on the use of handheld survey meters for radiological triage: time-dependent detector count rates corresponding to 50, 250, and 500 mSV effective dose for adult males and adult females.

    PubMed

    Bolch, Wesley E; Hurtado, Jorge L; Lee, Choonsik; Manger, Ryan; Burgett, Eric; Hertel, Nolan; Dickerson, William

    2012-03-01

    In June 2006, the Radiation Studies Branch of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention held a workshop to explore rapid methods of facilitating radiological triage of large numbers of potentially contaminated individuals following detonation of a radiological dispersal device. Two options were discussed. The first was the use of traditional gamma cameras in nuclear medicine departments operated as makeshift wholebody counters. Guidance on this approach is currently available from the CDC. This approach would be feasible if a manageable number of individuals were involved, transportation to the relevant hospitals was quickly provided, and the medical staff at each facility had been previously trained in this non-traditional use of their radiopharmaceutical imaging devices. If, however,substantially larger numbers of individuals (100’s to 1,000’s) needed radiological screening, other options must be given to first responders, first receivers, and health physicists providing medical management. In this study, the second option of the workshop was investigated--the use of commercially available portable survey meters (either NaI or GM based) for assessing potential ranges of effective dose (< 50, 50-250, 250-500,and >500 mSv). Two hybrid computational phantoms were used to model an adult male and an adult female subject internally contaminated with 241Am, 60Cs, 137Cs, 131I, or 192Ir following an acute inhalation or ingestion intake. As a function of time following the exposure, the net count rates corresponding to committed effective doses of 50, 250, and 500 mSv were estimated via Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation for each of four different detector types, positions, and screening distances.Measured net count rates can be compared to these values, and an assignment of one of four possible effective dose ranges could be made. The method implicitly assumes that all external contamination has been removed prior to screening and that the measurements be

  5. Photon Counting Using Edge-Detection Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gin, Jonathan W.; Nguyen, Danh H.; Farr, William H.

    2010-01-01

    New applications such as high-datarate, photon-starved, free-space optical communications require photon counting at flux rates into gigaphoton-per-second regimes coupled with subnanosecond timing accuracy. Current single-photon detectors that are capable of handling such operating conditions are designed in an array format and produce output pulses that span multiple sample times. In order to discern one pulse from another and not to overcount the number of incoming photons, a detection algorithm must be applied to the sampled detector output pulses. As flux rates increase, the ability to implement such a detection algorithm becomes difficult within a digital processor that may reside within a field-programmable gate array (FPGA). Systems have been developed and implemented to both characterize gigahertz bandwidth single-photon detectors, as well as process photon count signals at rates into gigaphotons per second in order to implement communications links at SCPPM (serial concatenated pulse position modulation) encoded data rates exceeding 100 megabits per second with efficiencies greater than two bits per detected photon. A hardware edge-detection algorithm and corresponding signal combining and deserialization hardware were developed to meet these requirements at sample rates up to 10 GHz. The photon discriminator deserializer hardware board accepts four inputs, which allows for the ability to take inputs from a quadphoton counting detector, to support requirements for optical tracking with a reduced number of hardware components. The four inputs are hardware leading-edge detected independently. After leading-edge detection, the resultant samples are ORed together prior to deserialization. The deserialization is performed to reduce the rate at which data is passed to a digital signal processor, perhaps residing within an FPGA. The hardware implements four separate analog inputs that are connected through RF connectors. Each analog input is fed to a high-speed 1

  6. Comparison of body composition, heart rate variability, aerobic and anaerobic performance between competitive cyclists and triathletes

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Erşan; Aras, Dicle

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to compare the body composition, heart rate variability, and aerobic and anaerobic performance between competitive cyclists and triathletes. [Subjects] Six cyclists and eight triathletes with experience in competitions voluntarily participated in this study. [Methods] The subjects’ body composition was measured with an anthropometric tape and skinfold caliper. Maximal oxygen consumption and maximum heart rate were determined using the incremental treadmill test. Heart rate variability was measured by 7 min electrocardiographic recording. The Wingate test was conducted to determine anaerobic physical performance. [Results] There were significant differences in minimum power and relative minimum power between the triathletes and cyclists. Anthropometric characteristics and heart rate variability responses were similar among the triathletes and cyclists. However, triathletes had higher maximal oxygen consumption and lower resting heart rates. This study demonstrated that athletes in both sports have similar body composition and aerobic performance characteristics. PMID:27190476

  7. White blood cell counts: reference methodology.

    PubMed

    Chabot-Richards, Devon S; George, Tracy I

    2015-03-01

    Modern hematology laboratories use automated hematology analyzers to perform cell counts. These instruments provide accurate, precise, low-cost differential counts with fast turnaround times. Technologies commonly used include electrical impedance, radiofrequency conductivity, laser light scattering, and cytochemistry. This article reviews the principles of these methodologies and possible sources of error, provides guidance for selecting flagging criteria, and discusses novel, clinically relevant white blood cell parameters provided by new instruments, including immature granulocyte count and granularity index.

  8. Inventive Performance Improvement of Integrated Optical Rate Sensor Using TIPS/TRIZ

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blosiu, Julian O.; Youmans, Bruce R.; Kowalick, Jim

    1996-01-01

    The Theory of Inventive Problem Solving (TIPS or also known as TRIZ) is a new scientific approach to innovative improvements of products and processes. This methodology was applied to inventively improve performance of an Integrated Optic Rate Sensor (IORS).

  9. 24 CFR 985.103 - SEMAP score and overall performance rating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... high performer may receive national recognition by the Department and may be given competitive advantage under notices of fund availability. (b) Standard rating. PHAs with SEMAP scores of 60 to...

  10. 24 CFR 985.103 - SEMAP score and overall performance rating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... high performer may receive national recognition by the Department and may be given competitive advantage under notices of fund availability. (b) Standard rating. PHAs with SEMAP scores of 60 to...

  11. 24 CFR 985.103 - SEMAP score and overall performance rating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... high performer may receive national recognition by the Department and may be given competitive advantage under notices of fund availability. (b) Standard rating. PHAs with SEMAP scores of 60 to...

  12. 24 CFR 985.103 - SEMAP score and overall performance rating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... high performer may receive national recognition by the Department and may be given competitive advantage under notices of fund availability. (b) Standard rating. PHAs with SEMAP scores of 60 to...

  13. 24 CFR 985.103 - SEMAP score and overall performance rating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... high performer may receive national recognition by the Department and may be given competitive advantage under notices of fund availability. (b) Standard rating. PHAs with SEMAP scores of 60 to...

  14. Photon Counting - One More Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanton, Richard H.

    2012-05-01

    Photon counting has been around for more than 60 years, and has been available to amateurs for most of that time. In most cases single photons are detected using photomultiplier tubes, "old technology" that became available after the Second World War. But over the last couple of decades the perfection of CCD devices has given amateurs the ability to perform accurate photometry with modest telescopes. Is there any reason to still count photons? This paper discusses some of the strengths of current photon counting technology, particularly relating to the search for fast optical transients. Technology advances in counters and photomultiplier modules are briefly mentioned. Illustrative data are presented including FFT analysis of bright star photometry and a technique for finding optical pulses in a large file of noisy data. This latter technique is shown to enable the discovery of a possible optical flare on the polar variable AM Her.

  15. Hanford whole body counting manual

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, H.E.; Rieksts, G.A.; Lynch, T.P.

    1990-06-01

    This document describes the Hanford Whole Body Counting Program as it is administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the US Department of Energy--Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and its Hanford contractors. Program services include providing in vivo measurements of internally deposited radioactivity in Hanford employees (or visitors). Specific chapters of this manual deal with the following subjects: program operational charter, authority, administration, and practices, including interpreting applicable DOE Orders, regulations, and guidance into criteria for in vivo measurement frequency, etc., for the plant-wide whole body counting services; state-of-the-art facilities and equipment used to provide the best in vivo measurement results possible for the approximately 11,000 measurements made annually; procedures for performing the various in vivo measurements at the Whole Body Counter (WBC) and related facilities including whole body counts; operation and maintenance of counting equipment, quality assurance provisions of the program, WBC data processing functions, statistical aspects of in vivo measurements, and whole body counting records and associated guidance documents. 16 refs., 48 figs., 22 tabs.

  16. 1982 CRC Fuel Rating Program: Road Octane Performance of Oxygenates in 1982 Model Cars.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-07-01

    RATING PROGRAM: ROAD OCTANE PERFORMANCE OF OXYGENATES IN 1982 MODEL CARS July 1985 L 85 09 11 023 COORDINATING RESEARCH COUNCIL, INC. 219 PERIMETER...1982 CRC FUEL RATING PROGRAM: ROAD OCTANE PERFORM4ANCE OF OXYGENATES IN 1982 MODEL CARS (CRC, PROJECT N~O. CM-124-82) IN FORMULATING AND APPROVING...3 V. TEST CARS ............................................ 4 VI. BLENDING OCTANE NUMBERS................................ 5 VII. ROAD

  17. Improved rate control for electron-beam evaporation and evaluation of optical performance improvements.

    PubMed

    Gevelber, Michael; Xu, Bing; Smith, Douglas

    2006-03-01

    A new deposition-rate-control and electron-beam-gun (e-gun) strategy was developed that significantly reduces the growth-rate variations for e-beam-deposited SiO2 coatings. The resulting improvements in optical performance are evaluated for multilayer bandpass filters. The adverse effect of uneven silica-source depletion on coating spectral performances during long deposition runs is discussed.

  18. Rating Performance Assessments of Students with Disabilities: A Study of Reliability and Bias

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mastergeorge, Ann M.; Martinez, Jose Felipe

    2010-01-01

    Inclusion of students with disabilities in district-wide and state assessments is mandated by federal regulations, and teachers sometimes play an important role in rating these students' work. In this study, trained teachers rated student proficiency in performance assessments in language arts and mathematics in third, fifth, and ninth grades. The…

  19. A Finite Rate Chemical Analysis of Nitric Oxide Flow Contamination Effects on Scramjet Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabell, Karen F.; Rock, Kenneth E.

    2003-01-01

    The level of nitric oxide contamination in the test gas of the Langley Research Center Arc-Heated Scramjet Test Facility and the effect of the contamination on scramjet test engine performance were investigated analytically. A finite rate chemical analysis was performed to determine the levels of nitric oxide produced in the facility at conditions corresponding to Mach 6 to 8 flight simulations. Results indicate that nitric oxide levels range from one to three mole percent, corroborating previously obtained measurements. A three-stream combustor code with finite rate chemistry was used to investigate the effects of nitric oxide on scramjet performance. Results indicate that nitric oxide in the test gas causes a small increase in heat release and thrust performance for the test conditions investigated. However, a rate constant uncertainty analysis suggests that the effect of nitric oxide ranges from no net effect, to an increase of about 10 percent in thrust performance.

  20. USING AN ADAPTER TO PERFORM THE CHALFANT-STYLE CONTAINMENT VESSEL PERIODIC MAINTENANCE LEAK RATE TEST

    SciTech Connect

    Loftin, B.; Abramczyk, G.; Trapp, D.

    2011-06-03

    Recently the Packaging Technology and Pressurized Systems (PT&PS) organization at the Savannah River National Laboratory was asked to develop an adapter for performing the leak-rate test of a Chalfant-style containment vessel. The PT&PS organization collaborated with designers at the Department of Energy's Pantex Plant to develop the adapter currently in use for performing the leak-rate testing on the containment vessels. This paper will give the history of leak-rate testing of the Chalfant-style containment vessels, discuss the design concept for the adapter, give an overview of the design, and will present results of the testing done using the adapter.

  1. Some Promising Early Results from a Rudimentary Latent-Trait Theory of Performance Rating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cason, Gerald J.; Cason, Carolyn L.

    A theory is discussed in which observed performance ratings are derived from the distance between a rater reference point and subject performance point located on a postulated equal-interval scale and a postulated s-shaped rater characteristic curve, operationalized as the normal ogive. Least-squares estimates of rater (nR=47, 31, and 29) and…

  2. Impact of Verbal Scale Labels on the Elevation and Spread of Performance Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhlemeier, Hans; Hemker, Bas; van den Bergh, Huub

    2013-01-01

    In recent years many countries have introduced authentic performance-based assessments in their national exam systems. Teachers' ratings of their own candidates' performances may suffer from errors of leniency and range restriction. The goal of this study was to examine the impact of manipulating the descriptiveness, balancedness, and polarity of…

  3. Academic Performance and Pass Rates: Comparison of Three First-Year Life Science Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downs, C. T.

    2009-01-01

    First year students' academic performance in three Life Science courses (Botany, Zoology and Bioscience) was compared. Pass rates, as well as the means and distributions of final marks were analysed. Of the three components (coursework, practical and theory examinations) contributing to the final mark of each course, students performed best in the…

  4. Impact of ground speed and varying seeding rates on meter performance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Achieving optimum planter performance is an important requirement for obtaining higher crop yields. Planter performance depends on several factors but meter speed is an important one which is a function of ground speed, seeding rate and row spacing. A study was conducted to evaluate the influence of...

  5. Developing Performance Cost Index Targets for ASHRAE Standard 90.1 Appendix G – Performance Rating Method - Rev.1

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, Michael I.; Hart, Philip R.

    2016-03-01

    Appendix G, the Performance Rating Method in ASHRAE Standard 90.1 has been updated to make two significant changes for the 2016 edition, to be published in October of 2016. First, it allows Appendix G to be used as a third path for compliance with the standard in addition to rating beyond code building performance. This prevents modelers from having to develop separate building models for code compliance and beyond code programs. Using this new version of Appendix G to show compliance with the 2016 edition of the standard, the proposed building design needs to have a performance cost index (PCI) less than targets shown in a new table based on building type and climate zone. The second change is that the baseline design is now fixed at a stable level of performance set approximately equal to the 2004 code. Rather than changing the stringency of the baseline with each subsequent edition of the standard, compliance with new editions will simply require a reduced PCI (a PCI of zero is a net-zero building). Using this approach, buildings of any era can be rated using the same method. The intent is that any building energy code or beyond code program can use this methodology and merely set the appropriate PCI target for their needs. This report discusses the process used to set performance criteria for compliance with ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2016 and suggests a method for demonstrating compliance with other codes and beyond code programs.

  6. Developing Performance Cost Index Targets for ASHRAE Standard 90.1 Appendix G – Performance Rating Method

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, Michael I.; Hart, Philip R.

    2016-02-16

    Appendix G, the Performance Rating Method in ASHRAE Standard 90.1 has been updated to make two significant changes for the 2016 edition, to be published in October of 2016. First, it allows Appendix G to be used as a third path for compliance with the standard in addition to rating beyond code building performance. This prevents modelers from having to develop separate building models for code compliance and beyond code programs. Using this new version of Appendix G to show compliance with the 2016 edition of the standard, the proposed building design needs to have a performance cost index (PCI) less than targets shown in a new table based on building type and climate zone. The second change is that the baseline design is now fixed at a stable level of performance set approximately equal to the 2004 code. Rather than changing the stringency of the baseline with each subsequent edition of the standard, compliance with new editions will simply require a reduced PCI (a PCI of zero is a net-zero building). Using this approach, buildings of any era can be rated using the same method. The intent is that any building energy code or beyond code program can use this methodology and merely set the appropriate PCI target for their needs. This report discusses the process used to set performance criteria for compliance with ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2016 and suggests a method for demonstrating compliance with other codes and beyond code programs.

  7. Identification of CSF fistulas by radionuclide counting

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Y.; Kunishio, K.; Sunami, N.; Yamamoto, Y.; Satoh, T.; Suga, M.; Asari, S. )

    1990-07-01

    A radionuclide counting method, performed with the patient prone and the neck flexed, was used successfully to diagnose CSF rhinorrhea in two patients. A normal radionuclide ratio (radionuclide counts in pledget/radionuclide counts in 1-ml blood sample) was obtained in 11 normal control subjects. Significance was determined to be a ratio greater than 0.37. Use of radionuclide counting method of determining CSF rhinorrhea is recommended when other methods have failed to locate a site of leakage or when posttraumatic meningitis suggests subclinical CSF rhinorrhea.

  8. Evidence of the construct validity of developmental ratings of managerial performance.

    PubMed

    Scullen, Steven E; Mount, Michael K; Judge, Timothy A

    2003-02-01

    The construct validity of developmental ratings of managerial performance was assessed by using 2 data sets, each based on a different 360 degrees rating instrument. Specifically, the authors investigated the nature of the constructs measured by developmental ratings, the structural relationships among those constructs, and the generalizability of results across 4 rater perspectives (boss, peer, subordinate, and self). A structure with 4 lower order factors (Technical Skills, Administrative Skills, Human Skills, and Citizenship Behaviors) and 2 higher order factors (Task Performance and Contextual Performance) was tested against competing models. Results consistently supported the lower order constructs, but the higher order structure was problematic, indicating that the structure of ratings is not yet well understood. Multisample analyses indicated few practically significant differences in factor structures across perspectives.

  9. Averaging of TNTC counts.

    PubMed Central

    Haas, C N; Heller, B

    1988-01-01

    When plate count methods are used for microbial enumeration, if too-numerous-to-count results occur, they are commonly discarded. In this paper, a method for consideration of such results in computation of an average microbial density is developed, and its use is illustrated by example. PMID:3178211

  10. Complexities of Counting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stake, Bernadine Evans

    This document focuses on one child's skip counting methods. The pupil, a second grade student at Steuben School, in Kankakee, Illinois, was interviewed as she made several attempts at counting twenty-five poker chips on a circular piece of paper. The interview was part of a larger study of "Children's Conceptions of Number and Numeral,"…

  11. Counting Sheep in Basque

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Araujo, Frank P.

    1975-01-01

    Demonstrates the interplay of a cognitive system, the Basque numerative system, and a behavioral one, counting sheep. The significant features of the Basque numerative system are analyzed; then it is shown how use of these features facilitates the counting of sheep on open ranges by Basque sheep farmers in California. (Author/RM)

  12. Performance of a Micro-Strip Gas Chamber for event wise, high rate thermal neutron detection with accurate 2D position determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mindur, B.; Alimov, S.; Fiutowski, T.; Schulz, C.; Wilpert, T.

    2014-12-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) position sensitive detector for neutron scattering applications based on low-pressure gas amplification and micro-strip technology was built and tested with an innovative readout electronics and data acquisition system. This detector contains a thin solid neutron converter and was developed for time- and thus wavelength-resolved neutron detection in single-event counting mode, which improves the image contrast in comparison with integrating detectors. The prototype detector of a Micro-Strip Gas Chamber (MSGC) was built with a solid natGd/CsI thermal neutron converter for spatial resolutions of about 100 μm and counting rates up to 107 neutrons/s. For attaining very high spatial resolutions and counting rates via micro-strip readout with centre-of-gravity evaluation of the signal amplitude distributions, a fast, channel-wise, self-triggering ASIC was developed. The front-end chips (MSGCROCs), which are very first signal processing components, are read out into powerful ADC-FPGA boards for on-line data processing and thereafter via Gigabit Ethernet link into the data receiving PC. The workstation PC is controlled by a modular, high performance dedicated software suite. Such a fast and accurate system is crucial for efficient radiography/tomography, diffraction or imaging applications based on high flux thermal neutron beam. In this paper a brief description of the detector concept with its operation principles, readout electronics requirements and design together with the signals processing stages performed in hardware and software are presented. In more detail the neutron test beam conditions and measurement results are reported. The focus of this paper is on the system integration, two dimensional spatial resolution, the time resolution of the readout system and the imaging capabilities of the overall setup. The detection efficiency of the detector prototype is estimated as well.

  13. The association of culling and death rate within 30 days after calving with productivity or reproductive performance in dairy herds in Fukuoka, Southern Japan

    PubMed Central

    GOTO, Akira; NAKADA, Ken; KATAMOTO, Hiromu

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of peripartum disorders in dairy herds negatively influences productivity and reproductive performance. Concrete data from local areas are helpful for explaining the importance of peripartum management to dairy farmers. This study was conducted to clarify the association of culling and death rate within 30 days after calving with productivity or reproductive performance in 179 dairy herds in Fukuoka, Southern Japan. A database was compiled from the records of the Livestock Improvement Association of Japan, the Dairy Cooperative Association and the Federation of Agricultural Mutual Relief Association. In this study, we created a comprehensive database of dairy farm production data for epidemiological analysis and used a general linear mixed model to analyze the association of culling and death rate within 30 days after calving with milk production or reproductive performance. The database can be used to describe, analyze and predict the risk of production. A cross-sectional analysis with contrasts was applied to investigate the association of cows served by AI/all cows, pregnant cows/cows served by AI, days open, milk yield and somatic cell counts with culling and death rate within 30 days after calving. The days open value significantly increased with increasing rate of culling and death within 30 days after calving (P for trend <0.001). No significant differences were found for the other comparisons. Our data suggest that proper feeding and management in the dry period may lead to improved postpartum reproductive performance in this dairy cow cohort. PMID:26666177

  14. Internal Homogeneity, Descriptiveness, and Halo: Resurrecting Some Answers and Questions About the Structure of Job Performance Rating Categories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, William H.

    1983-01-01

    Assessed the effects of two rating category attributes on halo in job performance ratings. Results suggested reducing halo by using rating categories that do not force raters to rely on their overall evaluation of the ratee, or use the same salient observations for rating job performance on multiple categories. (JAC)

  15. Effect of algal recycling rate on the performance of Pediastrum boryanum dominated wastewater treatment high rate algal pond.

    PubMed

    Park, J B K; Craggs, R J

    2014-01-01

    Recycling a portion of gravity harvested algae promoted the dominance of a rapidly settling colonial alga, Pediastrum boryanum (P. boryanum) and improved both biomass productivity and settleability in High Rate Algal Pond (HRAP) treating domestic wastewater. The effect of algal recycling rate on HRAP performance was investigated using 12 replicate mesocosms (18 L) that were operated semi-continuously under ambient conditions. Three experiments were conducted during different seasons with each experiment lasting up to 36 days. Recycling 10%, 25%, and 50% of the 'mass' of daily algal production all increased total biomass concentration in the mesocosms. However, recycling >10% reduced the organic content (volatile suspended solids (VSS)) of the mesocosm biomass from 83% to 68% and did not further increase biomass productivity (based on VSS). This indicates that if a HRAP is operated with a low algal concentration and does not utilise all the available sunlight, algal recycling increases the algal concentration up to an optimum level, resulting in higher algal biomass productivity. Recycling 10% of the daily algal production not only increased biomass productivity by ∼40%, but increased biomass settleability by ∼25%, which was probably a consequence of the ∼30% increase in P. boryanum dominance in the mesocosms compared with controls without recycling.

  16. A complete database of international chess players and chess performance ratings for varied longitudinal studies.

    PubMed

    Howard, Robert W

    2006-11-01

    Chess is an oft-used study domain in psychology and artificial intelligence because it is well defined, its performance rating systems allow ea sy identification o f experts and their development, andchess playing is a complex intellectual task However, usable computerized chess data have been very limited. The present article has two aims. The first is to highlight the methodological value of chess data and how researchers can use them to address questions in quite different areas. The second is to present a computerized database of all international chess players and official performance ratings beginning from the inaugural 1970 international rating list. The database has millions of records and gives complete longitudinal official performance data for over 60,000 players from 1970 to the present. Like a time series of population censuses, these data can be used for many different research and teaching purposes. Three quite different studies, conducted by the author using the database, are described.

  17. Performance of SONY 18650-HC Lithium-Ion Cells for Various Cycling Rates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-15

    AEROSPACE REPORT NO. TR-2010(8550)-5 Performance of SONY 18650 -HC Lithium-Ion Cells for Various Cycling Rates 15 January 2010 Albert H...SONY 18650 -HC Lithium-Ion Cells for Various Cycling Rates 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8802-09-C-0001 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 20100310195 14. ABSTRACT Five different life tests of SONY 18650 -HC lithium

  18. Bayesian Kernel Mixtures for Counts.

    PubMed

    Canale, Antonio; Dunson, David B

    2011-12-01

    Although Bayesian nonparametric mixture models for continuous data are well developed, there is a limited literature on related approaches for count data. A common strategy is to use a mixture of Poissons, which unfortunately is quite restrictive in not accounting for distributions having variance less than the mean. Other approaches include mixing multinomials, which requires finite support, and using a Dirichlet process prior with a Poisson base measure, which does not allow smooth deviations from the Poisson. As a broad class of alternative models, we propose to use nonparametric mixtures of rounded continuous kernels. An efficient Gibbs sampler is developed for posterior computation, and a simulation study is performed to assess performance. Focusing on the rounded Gaussian case, we generalize the modeling framework to account for multivariate count data, joint modeling with continuous and categorical variables, and other complications. The methods are illustrated through applications to a developmental toxicity study and marketing data. This article has supplementary material online.

  19. High Rate Performance Nanocomposite Electrode of Mesoporous Manganese Dioxide/Silver Nanowires in KI Electrolytes

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yanhua; Cui, Xiuguo; Zu, Lei; Hu, Zhongkai; Gan, Jing; Lian, Huiqin; Liu, Yang; Xing, Guangjian

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, manganese dioxide has become a research hotspot as an electrode material because of its low price. However, it has also become an obstacle to industrialization due to its low ratio of capacitance and the low rate performance which is caused by the poor electrical conductivity. In this study, a KI solution with electrochemical activity was innovatively applied to the electrolyte, and we systematically investigated the rate performance of the mesoporous manganese dioxide and the composite electrode with silver nanowires in supercapacitors. The results showed that when mesoporous manganese dioxide and mesoporous manganese dioxide/silver nanowires composite were used as electrodes, the strength of the current was amplified five times (from 0.1 to 0.5 A/g), the remaining rates of specific capacitance were 95% (from 205.5 down to 197.1 F/g) and 92% (from 208.1 down to 191.7 F/g) in the KI electrolyte, and the rate performance was much higher than which in an Na2SO4 electrolyte with a remaining rate of 25% (from 200.3 down to 49.1 F/g) and 60% (from 187.2 down to 113.1 F/g). The morphology and detail structure were investigated by Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and Nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms. The electrochemical performance was assessed by cyclic voltammograms, galvanostatic charge/discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. PMID:28347086

  20. Effects of contingency contracting on study rate and test performance1

    PubMed Central

    Bristol, Marie M.; Sloane, Howard N.

    1974-01-01

    A contingency contracting program designed to increase study rate and subsequent test performance was implemented with a group of undergraduate psychology students. The function of the contingency contracting program in producing increased study rate was evaluated by individual experiments with each student in an experimental contracting group. The overall effect of the program on test performance was assessed by comparing the final scores for the course earned by the experimental group with those earned by two matched control groups. A reversal procedure established that contingency contracting did significantly increase the study rate of students of a wide range of ability. However, it was selectively effective in improving the test performance of below-average students only. Study rate gains in contracted courses did not generalize to noncontracted courses. Self-recording of study time in the absence of scheduled differential consequences did not improve test performance. Study rate under no-consequence conditions varied with test schedule. For both consequence and no-consequence groups, the correlation between study time and final score for the course was only moderate. PMID:4436175

  1. False-positive rates associated with the use of multiple performance and symptom validity tests.

    PubMed

    Larrabee, Glenn J

    2014-06-01

    Performance validity test (PVT) error rates using Monte Carlo simulation reported by Berthelson and colleagues (in False positive diagnosis of malingering due to the use of multiple effort tests. Brain Injury, 27, 909-916, 2013) were compared with PVT and symptom validity test (SVT) failure rates in two nonmalingering clinical samples. At a per-test false-positive rate of 10%, Monte Carlo simulation overestimated error rates for: (i) failure of ≥2 out of 5 PVTs/SVT for Larrabee (in Detection of malingering using atypical performance patterns on standard neuropsychological tests. The Clinical Neuropsychologist, 17, 410-425, 2003) and ACS (Pearson, Advanced clinical solutions for use with WAIS-IV and WMS-IV. San Antonio: Pearson Education, 2009) and (ii) failure of ≥2 out of 7 PVTs/SVT for Larrabee (Detection of malingering using atypical performance patterns on standard neuropsychological tests. The Clinical Neuropsychologist, 17, 410-425, 2003; Malingering scales for the Continuous Recognition Memory Test and Continuous Visual Memory Test. The Clinical Neuropsychologist, 23, 167-180, 2009 combined). Monte Carlo overestimation is likely because PVT performances are atypical in pattern or degree for what occurs in actual neurologic, psychiatric, or developmental disorders. Consequently, PVT scores form skewed distributions with performance at ceiling and restricted range, rather than forming a standard normal distribution with mean of 0 and standard deviation of 1.0. These results support the practice of using ≥2 PVT/SVT failures as representing probable invalid clinical presentation.

  2. Effects of Target Arrival Rate on Mission Performance of Cooperatively Controlled UAVs with Comunication Constraints

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-17

    cooperatively controlled uninhabited aerial vehicles with task allocation per- formed by iterative network flow. Specifically, we quantify the effect of arrival...2004 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Effects of Target Arrival Rate on Mission Performance of Cooperatively Controlled UAVs with Comunication Constraints 5a...missions. The maximum mission time is tf = 220 s for each arrival model. III. MODELS A. Task Allocation: Iterative Network Flow Task allocation is performed

  3. Understanding Blood Counts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart, Kidneys, Liver and Lung Function Infections Iron Overload Low Blood Counts Pain Disease- and Treatment-Related ... cancer research around the world and provides free information and support services. Privacy Policy Security Copyright Link ...

  4. Blood Count Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... white blood cells (WBC), and platelets. Blood count tests measure the number and types of cells in ... helps doctors check on your overall health. The tests can also help to diagnose diseases and conditions ...

  5. Calorie count - Fast food

    MedlinePlus

    ... count - fast food FOOD ITEM SERVING SIZE CALORIES Breakfast Foods Dunkin Donuts Egg White Veggie Wrap 1 ... Cheese Biscuit Sandwich 1 sandwich 510 BK Ultimate Breakfast Platter 1 platter 1190 McDonalds Fruit 'n Yogurt ...

  6. Carbohydrate Counting and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... are the other main nutrients. Carbohydrates include sugars, starches, and fiber. Carbohydrate counting can help you control ... called starchy vegetables because they are high in starch. These vegetables have more carbohydrates per serving than ...

  7. Inventory count strategies.

    PubMed

    Springer, W H

    1996-02-01

    An important principle of accounting is that asset inventory needs to be correctly valued to ensure that the financial statements of the institution are accurate. Errors is recording the value of ending inventory in one fiscal year result in errors to published financial statements for that year as well as the subsequent fiscal year. Therefore, it is important that accurate physical counts be periodically taken. It is equally important that any system being used to generate inventory valuation, reordering or management reports be based on consistently accurate on-hand balances. At the foundation of conducting an accurate physical count of an inventory is a comprehensive understanding of the process coupled with a written plan. This article presents a guideline of the physical count processes involved in a traditional double-count approach.

  8. The impact of a specific blend of essential oil components and sodium butyrate in feed on growth performance and Salmonella counts in experimentally challenged broilers.

    PubMed

    Cerisuelo, A; Marín, C; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, F; Gómez, E A; de la Fuente, J M; Durán, R; Fernández, C

    2014-03-01

    Essential oils (EO) and short-chain fatty acids have potential antimicrobial activity in broilers. This study aimed to investigate the effect of a specific blend of EO and a combination of this blend of EO with sodium-butyrate on growth performance and Salmonella colonization in broilers. A total of 480 one-day-old male broilers were distributed into 5 treatments (8 pens per treatment and 12 birds per pen) and reared during 42 d in experimental conditions. Dietary treatments consisted of the addition of different doses of EO (0 mg/kg, control; 50 mg/kg, EO50 and 100 mg/kg, EO100) or a combination of EO with 1 g/kg of sodium-butyrate (B; EO50 + B, EOB50 and EO100 + B, EOB100) to a basal diet. All birds were orally infected with 10(8) cfu of Salmonella Enteritidis on d 7 of study. Individual BW and feed intake per pen were measured at arrival and on a weekly basis. The prevalence and enumeration of Salmonella in feces was determined per treatment at 72 h postinfection and on d 23 and 37 of study. At slaughter, cecal content and liver samples from 16 birds per treatment were cultured for Salmonella and cecal pH was measured. No differences were observed on growth performance among treatments. All fecal samples analyzed were positive for Salmonella from d 10 to the end of the rearing period. At slaughter, Salmonella contamination (positive samples) in cecum was lower in birds fed EOB50 compared with the other treatments (P < 0.05), whereas birds fed the control diet showed the highest colonization rates. The pH of the cecal content was not different among treatments. Thus, EO or its combination with sodium-butyrate did not affect growth performance. However, a clear effectiveness of these products was observed in Salmonella control, especially when low doses of EO were combined with sodium-butyrate (EOB50).

  9. Cognitive Performance and Heart Rate Variability: The Influence of Fitness Level

    PubMed Central

    Luque-Casado, Antonio; Zabala, Mikel; Morales, Esther; Mateo-March, Manuel; Sanabria, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the relation between cognitive performance and heart rate variability as a function of fitness level. We measured the effect of three cognitive tasks (the psychomotor vigilance task, a temporal orienting task, and a duration discrimination task) on the heart rate variability of two groups of participants: a high-fit group and a low-fit group. Two major novel findings emerged from this study. First, the lowest values of heart rate variability were found during performance of the duration discrimination task, compared to the other two tasks. Second, the results showed a decrement in heart rate variability as a function of the time on task, although only in the low-fit group. Moreover, the high-fit group showed overall faster reaction times than the low-fit group in the psychomotor vigilance task, while there were not significant differences in performance between the two groups of participants in the other two cognitive tasks. In sum, our results highlighted the influence of cognitive processing on heart rate variability. Importantly, both behavioral and physiological results suggested that the main benefit obtained as a result of fitness level appeared to be associated with processes involving sustained attention. PMID:23437276

  10. An Experimental Investigation of Leak Rate Performance of a Subscale Candidate Elastomer Docking Space Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garafolo, Nicholas G.; Daniels, Christopher C.

    2011-01-01

    A novel docking seal was developed for the main interface seal of NASA s Low Impact Docking System (LIDS). This interface seal was designed to maintain acceptable leak rates while being exposed to the harsh environmental conditions of outer space. In this experimental evaluation, a candidate docking seal assembly called Engineering Development Unit (EDU58) was characterized and evaluated against the Constellation Project leak rate requirement. The EDU58 candidate seal assembly was manufactured from silicone elastomer S0383-70 vacuum molded in a metal retainer ring. Four seal designs were considered with unique characteristic heights. The leak rate performance was characterized through a mass point leak rate method by monitoring gas properties within an internal control volume. The leakage performance of the seals were described herein at representative docking temperatures of -50, +23, and +50 C for all four seal designs. Leak performance was also characterized at 100, 74, and 48 percent of full closure. For all conditions considered, the candidate seal assemblies met the Constellation Project leak rate requirement.

  11. Factor-Based Student Rating in Academic Performance in Southern Province of Rwanda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rulinda, Ephrard; Role, Elizabeth; Makewa, Lazarus Ndiku

    2013-01-01

    This study examined students' perception on academic performance using five-factor ratings namely, principal's instructional leadership, school climate, school facilities, teachers' effectiveness and family support. Data for this study were collected from selected Parent's Private Seventh-Day Adventist Secondary Schools (PPSDASS) in Southern…

  12. Supervisor-Subordinate Age Dissimilarity and Performance Ratings: The Buffering Effects of Supervisory Relationship and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van der Heijden, Beatrice I. J. M.; Scholarios, Dora; Van der Schoot, Esther; Jedrzejowicz, Piotr; Bozionelos, Nikos; Epitropaki, Olga; Knauth, Peter; Marzec, Izabela; Mikkelsen, Aslaug; Van der Heijde, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    Using 394 pairs of employees and their immediate supervisors working in the Information and Communication Technology (ICT) sector in three northern European countries, this study examined the effect of workplace moderators on the link between relational demography and supervisor ratings of performance. Directional age differences between superior…

  13. A Meta-Analysis of Adult-Rated Child Personality and Academic Performance in Primary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poropat, Arthur E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Personality is reliably associated with academic performance, but personality measurement in primary education can be problematic. Young children find it difficult to accurately self-rate personality, and dominant models of adult personality may be inappropriate for children. Aims: This meta-analysis was conducted to determine the…

  14. 24 CFR 985.107 - Required actions for PHA with troubled performance rating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT SECTION 8 MANAGEMENT ASSESSMENT PROGRAM (SEMAP) Program Operation...-site review of PHA program management for any PHA assigned an overall performance rating of troubled to... required to address the program deficiencies. (b) HUD written report. HUD must provide the PHA a...

  15. The Effect of Changes in Criterion Value on Differential Reinforcement of Low Rate Schedule Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pizzo, Matthew J.; Kirkpatrick, Kimberly; Blundell, Pamela J.

    2009-01-01

    The differential reinforcement of low rate (DRL) schedule is commonly used to assess impulsivity, hyperactivity, and the cognitive effects of pharmacological treatments on performance. A DRL schedule requires subjects to wait a certain minimum amount of time between successive responses to receive reinforcement. The DRL criterion value, which…

  16. 29 CFR 778.311 - Flat rate for special job performed in overtime hours.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... OF LABOR STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY OR INTERPRETATION NOT DIRECTLY RELATED TO REGULATIONS OVERTIME COMPENSATION Special Problems Lump Sum Attributed to Overtime § 778.311 Flat rate for special job performed in... amount may be credited toward statutory overtime compensation due. (b) Application of rule...

  17. Development and Validation of a Rating Scale for Wind Jazz Improvisation Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Derek T.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to construct and validate a rating scale for collegiate wind jazz improvisation performance. The 14-item Wind Jazz Improvisation Evaluation Scale (WJIES) was constructed and refined through a facet-rational approach to scale development. Five wind jazz students and one professional jazz educator were asked to record…

  18. Practitioner Review: Do Performance-Based Measures and Ratings of Executive Function Assess the Same Construct?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toplak, Maggie E.; West, Richard F.; Stanovich, Keith E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Both performance-based and rating measures are commonly used to index executive function in clinical and neuropsychological assessments. They are intended to index the same broad underlying mental construct of executive function. The association between these two types of measures was investigated in the current article. Method and…

  19. 29 CFR 778.311 - Flat rate for special job performed in overtime hours.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Flat rate for special job performed in overtime hours. 778.311 Section 778.311 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY OR INTERPRETATION NOT DIRECTLY RELATED TO REGULATIONS OVERTIME COMPENSATION Special Problems Lump...

  20. Use of the Behaviorally Anchored Rating Scale in Evaluating Teacher Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beebe, Robert J.

    Behaviorally anchored rating scales (BARS), a new quantitative method of employee performance evaluation, is advocated for teacher evaluation. Development of a BARS consists generally of five steps: a representative sample of potential raters generates the scales; the group identifies the broad qualities to be evaluated; the group formulates…

  1. The Study of an Integrated Rating System for Supplier Quality Performance in the Semiconductor Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yu-Cheng; Yen, Tieh-Min; Tsai, Chih-Hung

    This study provides an integrated model of Supplier Quality Performance Assesment (SQPA) activity for the semiconductor industry through introducing the ISO 9001 management framework, Importance-Performance Analysis (IPA) Supplier Quality Performance Assesment and Taguchi`s Signal-to-Noise Ratio (S/N) techniques. This integrated model provides a SQPA methodology to create value for all members under mutual cooperation and trust in the supply chain. This method helps organizations build a complete SQPA framework, linking organizational objectives and SQPA activities to optimize rating techniques to promote supplier quality improvement. The techniques used in SQPA activities are easily understood. A case involving a design house is illustrated to show our model.

  2. Energy dispersive photon counting detectors for breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, William C.; Wessel, Jan C.; Malakhov, Nail; Wawrzyniak, Gregor; Hartsough, Neal E.; Gandhi, Thulasidharan; Nygard, Einar; Iwanczyk, Jan S.

    2013-09-01

    We report on our efforts toward the development of silicon (Si) strip detectors for energy-resolved clinical breast imaging. Typically, x-ray integrating detectors based on scintillating cesium iodide CsI(Tl) or amorphous selenium (a- Se) are used in most commercial systems. Recently, mammography instrumentation has been introduced based on photon counting silicon Si strip detectors. Mammography requires high flux from the x-ray generator, therefore, in order to achieve energy resolved single photon counting, a high output count rate (OCR) for the detector must be achieved at the required spatial resolution and across the required dynamic range for the application. The required performance in terms of the OCR, spatial resolution, and dynamic range must be obtained with sufficient field of view (FOV) for the application thus requiring the tiling of pixel arrays and scanning techniques. Room temperature semiconductors, operating as direct conversion x-ray sensors, can provide the required speed when connected to application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) operating at fast peaking times with multiple fixed thresholds per pixel, provided that the sensors are designed for rapid signal formation across the x-ray energy ranges of the application at the required energy and spatial resolutions. We present our methods and results from the optimization of prototype detectors based on Si strip structures. We describe the detector optimization and the development of ASIC readout electronics that provide the required spatial resolution, low noise, high count rate capabilities and minimal power consumption.

  3. Performance and intestinal coliform counts in weaned piglets fed a probiotic culture (Lactobacillus casei subsp. casei CECT 4043) or an antibiotic.

    PubMed

    Fajardo Bernárdez, Paula; Fuciños González, Clara; Méndez Batán, Jesús; Pastrana Castro, Lorenzo; Pérez Guerra, Nelson

    2008-09-01

    The production of biomass and antibacterial extracellular products by Lactobacillus casei subsp. casei CECT 4043 was followed in both batch and in realkalized fed-batch cultures. Enhanced concentrations of biomass and antibacterial extracellular products were obtained with the use of the latter fermentation technique in comparison with the batch mode. The culture obtained by fed-batch fermentation was mixed with skim milk and used to prepare a probiotic feed for weaned piglets. To test the effect of the potentially probiotic culture of L. casei on body weight gain, feed intake, feed conversion efficiency, and on fecal coliform counts of piglets, two groups of animals received either feed supplemented with the probiotic preparation or avilamycin for 28 days. The control group was fed nonsupplemented feed. At the end of the administration period (day 28), the groups receiving probiotic and avilamycin exhibited the highest average body weight gain values, although the mean feed intake and feed conversion efficiency values were not different among the groups (P > 0.05). For the entire experimental period (42 days), the control group exhibited the lowest feed intake value, the probiotic group exhibited the highest feed conversion efficiency value, and the antibiotic group exhibited the highest body weight gain (P < 0.05). Interestingly, no significant difference in body weight gain was observed between the probiotic and the control groups by day 42 (P > 0.05). Fecal coliform values decreased (although not significantly) by day 28 in the three groups. However, the mean counts returned to pretreatment levels by day 42 in all groups.

  4. Effect of loading rate on performance of constructed wetlands treating an anaerobic supernatant.

    PubMed

    Chazarenc, F; Maltais-Landry, G; Troesch, S; Comeau, Y; Brisson, J

    2007-01-01

    The effect of organic loading, season and plant species on the treatment of fish farm effluent was tested using three-year old mesocosm wetland systems. During one year, nine 1 m2 mesocosms (horizontal subsurface flow), located in a controlled greenhouse environment, were fed with a reconstituted fish farm effluent containing a high fraction of soluble components (1,600 microS/cm and in mg/L: 230 +/- 80 COD, 179 +/- 60 sCOD, 100 +/- 40 TSS, 37 +/- 7 TKN, 14 +/- 2 TP). Combinations of three hydraulic loading rates (30, 60 and 90 L.m(-2) d(-1)) and two plant species (Phragmites australis, Typha angustifolia) and an unplanted control were tested for treatment performance and hydraulic behaviour. Loadings higher than 15 g COD m(-2) d(-1) resulted in a net decrease of hydraulic performances (generation of short circuiting) coupled with low TKN removal. Maximal TKN removal rates (summer: 1.2, winter: 0.6 g.m(-2) d(-1)) were reached in planted units. In all mesocosms, phosphorus was removed during summer (maximal removal rate: 0.3 g TP m(-2) d(-1)) and was released in winter (release rate = approximately half of summer removal rate). This study confirmed that constructed wetlands are susceptible to clogging when treating anaerobic storage tank supernatant rich in highly biodegradable compounds. Contributions of plants to hydraulic efficiency were mainly observed in summer, associated with high evapotranspiration rates. Both plant species gave a similar removal efficiency for all pollutants.

  5. High rate response of ultra-high-performance fiber-reinforced concretes under direct tension

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, Ngoc Thanh; Tran, Tuan Kiet; Kim, Dong Joo

    2015-03-15

    The tensile response of ultra-high-performance fiber-reinforced concretes (UHPFRCs) at high strain rates (5–24 s{sup −} {sup 1}) was investigated. Three types of steel fibers, including twisted, long and short smooth steel fibers, were added by 1.5% volume content in an ultra high performance concrete (UHPC) with a compressive strength of 180 MPa. Two different cross sections, 25 × 25 and 25 × 50 mm{sup 2}, of tensile specimens were used to investigate the effect of the cross section area on the measured tensile response of UHPFRCs. Although all the three fibers generated strain hardening behavior even at high strain rates, long smooth fibers produced the highest tensile resistance at high rates whereas twisted fiber did at static rate. The breakages of twisted fibers were observed from the specimens tested at high strain rates unlike smooth steel fibers. The tensile behavior of UHPFRCs at high strain rates was clearly influenced by the specimen size, especially in post-cracking strength.

  6. The effects of scene content parameters, compression, and frame rate on the performance of analytics systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsifouti, A.; Triantaphillidou, S.; Larabi, M. C.; Doré, G.; Bilissi, E.; Psarrou, A.

    2015-01-01

    In this investigation we study the effects of compression and frame rate reduction on the performance of four video analytics (VA) systems utilizing a low complexity scenario, such as the Sterile Zone (SZ). Additionally, we identify the most influential scene parameters affecting the performance of these systems. The SZ scenario is a scene consisting of a fence, not to be trespassed, and an area with grass. The VA system needs to alarm when there is an intruder (attack) entering the scene. The work includes testing of the systems with uncompressed and compressed (using H.264/MPEG-4 AVC at 25 and 5 frames per second) footage, consisting of quantified scene parameters. The scene parameters include descriptions of scene contrast, camera to subject distance, and attack portrayal. Additional footage, including only distractions (no attacks) is also investigated. Results have shown that every system has performed differently for each compression/frame rate level, whilst overall, compression has not adversely affected the performance of the systems. Frame rate reduction has decreased performance and scene parameters have influenced the behavior of the systems differently. Most false alarms were triggered with a distraction clip, including abrupt shadows through the fence. Findings could contribute to the improvement of VA systems.

  7. Review of recycling performance indicators: a study on collection rate in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wen, Lihchyi; Lin, Chun-Hsu; Lee, Soo-Cheol

    2009-08-01

    The Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration (Taiwan EPA) launched a national Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) system after integrating eight private recycling organizations in 1998. After that, the environmental performance of the EPR system brought a lot of attention to policy makers. Many studies show positive environmental effects of the EPR system in Taiwan. However, there are controversial questions remained, such as whether the performance indicators used are the right choice to estimate the environmental effects of the recycling policy? Can those estimated results really reflect the performance of the system? This paper would therefore like to more accurately evaluate the performance indicators of the EPR system based on data observed over the past decade in Taiwan. In the process of evaluating the performance indicators, we have found that the collection rates for durable goods are often ignored in countries that pursue a zero waste policy. This may affect the actual recycling outcome and resource direction targeted by producers. However, in order for the collection rate to be adopted as a policy indicator, how to estimate the amounts of retired or waste products during a period is critical. In this paper, we estimate the collection rate for electrical and electronic waste by using the survival analysis and ownership data analysis approaches. We also provide a comparison of both approaches and put forward suggestions for directions in the future in solid waste management.

  8. Comparison of self and proxy ratings for motor performance of individuals with Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Parveen, Sabiha

    2016-03-01

    The impact of Parkinson disease (PD) has been examined in recent years by comparing self-ratings by individuals with PD and proxy ratings by caregivers, communication partners, and/or health care providers. However, the existing evidence is mixed with some researchers suggesting perfect agreement between rater groups while others suggesting differences among rater groups for motor performance of individuals with PD. The current study examined self and proxy perception of performance of individuals with PD for six motor characteristics (gait, rigidity, right and left bradykinesia, rest tremors, and perception of physical effort) based on Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) motor tasks. Participants included 20 individuals with PD, 20 communication partners, and a trained rater. The study compared perceptual ratings and corresponding UPDRS scores as well as rater group differences for perceptual motor ratings. A series of Pearson Product Moment Correlations indicated significant relationship only between self-ratings for gait and rest tremors by individuals with PD and corresponding UPDRS scores (p<.05). Further, a multivariate analysis of variance was completed to compare rater group differences. Results indicated significant overestimation of rest tremors by both individuals with PD and communication partners when compared to corresponding ratings by the trained rater. Overall, the study provided evidence for perception deficits among individuals with PD and communication partners regarding motor performance of individuals with PD. Additional studies are needed to further explore the changes in perception abilities of individuals with PD and communication partners with respect to disease duration, disease severity, and other co-morbid factors.

  9. Base Rates of Social Skills Acquisition/Performance Deficits, Strengths, and Problem Behaviors: An Analysis of the Social Skills Improvement System-Rating Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gresham, Frank M.; Elliott, Stephen N.; Kettler, Ryan J.

    2010-01-01

    Base rate information is important in clinical assessment because one cannot know how unusual or typical a phenomenon is without first knowing its base rate in the population. This study empirically determined the base rates of social skills acquisition and performance deficits, social skills strengths, and problem behaviors using a nationally…

  10. The use of decay rates to analyse the performance of railway track in rolling noise generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C. J. C.; Thompson, D. J.; Diehl, R. J.

    2006-06-01

    Through the development and testing of theoretical models for rolling noise in the past, it has been well demonstrated that the rate of decay of vibration along the rail is closely linked to the noise performance of the track, since it controls the effective radiating length of the rail. The decay rates of vibration along the rail have long been used by researchers as an intermediate, measurable parameter by which to test and improve the accuracy of prediction models. Recently, it has been suggested that the decay rates should be used as a criterion for the selection of track for noise measurements that are part of the acceptance testing of interoperable trains in Europe. In this context, a more detailed understanding of the factors that affect the measurement of decay rates and a consistent approach to the data processing have become important topics. Here, a method is suggested for the calculation of decay rates from frequency response measurements. Different effects are shown in the measured decay rates of a ballasted track with mono-bloc sleepers, a slab track and a ballasted track with bi-bloc sleepers. In the last case, a model for a periodically supported track is used to study the effects observed. It is shown that a peak in the decay rate just above the pinned-pinned frequency may be overestimated because of the measurement procedure that has been used.

  11. Novel Photon-Counting Detectors for Free-Space Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.; Yang, Guan; Sun, Xiaoli; Lu, Wei; Merritt, Scott; Beck, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    We present performance data for novel photon counting detectors for free space optical communication. NASA GSFC is testing the performance of three novel photon counting detectors 1) a 2x8 mercury cadmium telluride avalanche array made by DRS Inc. 2) a commercial 2880 silicon avalanche photodiode array and 3) a prototype resonant cavity silicon avalanche photodiode array. We will present and compare dark count, photon detection efficiency, wavelength response and communication performance data for these detectors. We discuss system wavelength trades and architectures for optimizing overall communication link sensitivity, data rate and cost performance. The HgCdTe APD array has photon detection efficiencies of greater than 50 were routinely demonstrated across 5 arrays, with one array reaching a maximum PDE of 70. High resolution pixel-surface spot scans were performed and the junction diameters of the diodes were measured. The junction diameter was decreased from 31 m to 25 m resulting in a 2x increase in e-APD gain from 470 on the 2010 array to 1100 on the array delivered to NASA GSFC. Mean single photon SNRs of over 12 were demonstrated at excess noise factors of 1.2-1.3.The commercial silicon APD array has a fast output with rise times of 300ps and pulse widths of 600ps. Received and filtered signals from the entire array are multiplexed onto this single fast output. The prototype resonant cavity silicon APD array is being developed for use at 1 micron wavelength.

  12. What determines observer-rated social performance in individuals with social anxiety disorder?

    PubMed

    Stevens, Stephan; Hofmann, Mareike; Kiko, Sonja; Mall, Anna Katharina; Steil, Regina; Bohus, Martin; Hermann, Christiane

    2010-12-01

    Clark and Wells (1995) proposed that cognitive variables and safety behaviors are related to social performance in social anxiety disorder (SAD). Here, we tested this relationship by concurrent assessment of cognitive, behavioral, and physiological variables and social performance in a prototypical social interaction situation. 103 participants with SAD and 23 healthy controls interacted with a confederate. Anxiety, self-focused attention, cognitions, and safety behaviors were assessed by self-report and by confederate ratings. Social performance was evaluated by independent observers using a behavioral coding system. Social performance was predicted using two regression models for self-report and confederate ratings. Between-group differences in social performance disappeared when talking time was taken into account. Talking time emerged as the most powerful predictor of social performance (54% and 58% accounted variance). Positive cognitions, self-focused attention and safety behaviors accounted for an additional, but marginal amount of variance. Reduced talking time might represent a safety behavior and may be considered an easy to measure final common behavioral outcome of cognitive processes underlying social anxiety.

  13. Market Conditions and Performance in the Nursing Home Compare Five-Star Rating.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ae-Sook

    2016-10-01

    Previous studies have documented that market conditions affect nursing home performance; however, the evidence is inconsistent and conflicting. This study introduces three groups of county market conditions and a peer effect variable, and tests their impacts on the Nursing Home Compare (NHC) Five-Star overall rating. Indiana nursing home data and county characteristics are taken mainly from the NHC and Census Bureau websites. The result of the ordered logistic regression analysis indicates that nursing homes in excess demand markets, namely those that are highly concentrated and have fewer nursing homes, tend to perform better than their counterparts in both excess supply and balanced markets. In addition, a peer effect variable, measured as the average overall rating of the competitors, promotes performance improvement. These findings imply that small markets enable consumers to be well informed about a provider's reputation for quality, consequently enhancing performance. Furthermore, not only consumers but also providers seem to seek performance information on the report card to understand their relative position in the market, which thus affects their market strategies and subsequently performance.

  14. Sugar withdrawal and differential reinforcement of low rate (DRL) performance in rats.

    PubMed

    Mangabeira, Victor; Garcia-Mijares, Miriam; Silva, M Teresa A

    2015-02-01

    Sugar consumption is assumed to induce a behavioral state that is similar to the one provoked by addictive substances. Drug withdrawal increases impulsivity, assessed by differential reinforcement of low rate (DRL) performance. The present study investigated the effect of withdrawal from a prolonged period of sugar consumption on DRL performance. Water-deprived rats were trained under a DRL 20s (DRL 20) schedule. The animals were allowed to choose between plain water and a sucrose solution (E group) or water only (C group) for 30 days. The sucrose solution was then removed, and measures of DRL 20 performance were obtained on 3 consecutive days. Results showed that DRL performance in the C group improved after sugar withdrawal, whereas performance in the E group led to the loss of reinforcers. An analysis of variance-type analysis showed that the E group had higher response rates per reinforcer, lower IRTs, and greater differences between baseline and abstinence than the C group after 3 days of sugar withdrawal. Thus, sugar abstinence after a relatively long consumption period resulted in impairment of DRL performance, confirming the parallel effects of addictive drugs and sugar and suggesting an increase in impulsivity as a consequence of sugar deprivation.

  15. Supervisor-subordinate age dissimilarity and performance ratings: the buffering effects of supervisory relationship and practice.

    PubMed

    Van der Heijden, Beatrice I J M; Scholarios, Dora; Van der Schoot, Esther; Jedrzejowicz, Piotr; Bozionelos, Nikos; Epitropaki, Olga; Knauth, Peter; Marzec, Izabela; Mikkelsen, Aslaug; Van der Heijde, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    Using 394 pairs of employees and their immediate supervisors working in the Information and Communication Technology (ICT) sector in three northern European countries, this study examined the effect of workplace moderators on the link between relational demography and supervisor ratings of performance. Directional age differences between superior and subordinate (i.e., status incongruence caused when the supervisor is older or younger than his/her subordinate) and non-directional age differences were used as predictors of supervisor ratings of occupational expertise. The quality of the supervisor-subordinate relationship and the existence of positive age-related supervisory practices were examined as moderators of this relationship. The results provide no support for a relationship between directional age differences and age-related stereotyping by supervisors in ratings of performance, neither for the effects of age-related supervisory practices. However, high quality supervisor-subordinate relationships did moderate the effects of age dissimilarity on supervisory ratings. The implications of these findings for performance appraisal methodologies and recommendations for further research are discussed.

  16. Effects of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on survival rate and growth performance of Convict Cichlid (Amatitlania nigrofasciata)

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, F; Mousavi, S. M.; Ahmadmoradi, E.; Zakeri, M.; Jahedi, A.

    2015-01-01

    Using probiotics can control pathogens by a variety of mechanisms. Probiotics can promote growth performance and have, therefore, become increasingly important in the aquaculture industry. Convict Cichlid belongs to the family of Cichlidae and is known for its rapid development in laboratory conditions and is suitable for behavioral examinations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on growth performance, survival rate and body composition of Convict Cichlids (Amatitlania nigrofasciata). One hundred sixty eight Convict Cichlids (mean weight: 2.1 ± 0.12 g and mean length: 2.2 ± 0.05 cm) were fed by commercial diets with different concentrations of S. cerevisiae (0, 0.5%, 1%, 2%). At the end of the experiment, survival rate and growth indices were measured. Based on the results, growth performance significantly increased with probiotic, S. cerevisiae, specially, at the 2% probiotic level of concentration. In the present study, the best FCR (feed conversion rate), SGR (specific growth rate), CF (condition factor) and BWG (body weight gain) values were observed in a 2% concentration of S. cerevisiae. The results suggest that this yeast could improve feed utilization in this fish species. PMID:27175152

  17. Effects of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on survival rate and growth performance of Convict Cichlid (Amatitlania nigrofasciata).

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, F; Mousavi, S M; Ahmadmoradi, E; Zakeri, M; Jahedi, A

    2015-01-01

    Using probiotics can control pathogens by a variety of mechanisms. Probiotics can promote growth performance and have, therefore, become increasingly important in the aquaculture industry. Convict Cichlid belongs to the family of Cichlidae and is known for its rapid development in laboratory conditions and is suitable for behavioral examinations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on growth performance, survival rate and body composition of Convict Cichlids (Amatitlania nigrofasciata). One hundred sixty eight Convict Cichlids (mean weight: 2.1 ± 0.12 g and mean length: 2.2 ± 0.05 cm) were fed by commercial diets with different concentrations of S. cerevisiae (0, 0.5%, 1%, 2%). At the end of the experiment, survival rate and growth indices were measured. Based on the results, growth performance significantly increased with probiotic, S. cerevisiae, specially, at the 2% probiotic level of concentration. In the present study, the best FCR (feed conversion rate), SGR (specific growth rate), CF (condition factor) and BWG (body weight gain) values were observed in a 2% concentration of S. cerevisiae. The results suggest that this yeast could improve feed utilization in this fish species.

  18. Fast counting electronics for neutron coincidence counting

    DOEpatents

    Swansen, James E.

    1987-01-01

    An amplifier-discriminator is tailored to output a very short pulse upon an above-threshold input from a detector which may be a .sup.3 He detector. The short pulse output is stretched and energizes a light emitting diode (LED) to provide a visual output of operation and pulse detection. The short pulse is further fed to a digital section for processing and possible ORing with other like generated pulses. Finally, the output (or ORed output ) is fed to a derandomizing buffer which converts the rapidly and randomly occurring pulses into synchronized and periodically spaced-apart pulses for the accurate counting thereof. Provision is also made for the internal and external disabling of each individual channel of amplifier-discriminators in an ORed plurality of same.

  19. Fast counting electronics for neutron coincidence counting

    DOEpatents

    Swansen, J.E.

    1985-03-05

    An amplifier-discriminator is tailored to output a very short pulse upon an above-threshold input from a detector which may be a /sup 3/He detector. The short pulse output is stretched and energizes a light emitting diode (LED) to provide a visual output of operation and pulse detection. The short pulse is further fed to a digital section for processing and possible ORing with other like generated pulses. Finally, the output (or ORed output) is fed to a derandomizing buffer which converts the rapidly and randomly occurring pulses into synchronized and periodically spaced-apart pulses for the accurate counting thereof. Provision is also made for the internal and external disabling of each individual channel of amplifier-discriminators in an ORed plurality of same.

  20. Rate and Predictors of Non-AIDS Events in a Cohort of HIV-Infected Patients with a CD4 T Cell Count Above 500 Cells/mm3

    PubMed Central

    Lucero, Constanza; Torres, Berta; León, Agathe; Calvo, Marta; Leal, Lorna; Pérez, Iñaki; Plana, Montserrat; Arnedo, Mireia; Mallolas, Josep; Gatell, Josep M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The reduction of risk of non-AIDS events after combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) initiation and the crude incidence rate (CIR) of these events in patients who control the viral load without cART (controllers) in a cohort of 574 antiretroviral-naive patients with a baseline CD4 T cell count above 500 cells/mm3 were assessed. Non-AIDS severe events were defined as a first admission to the hospital due to non-AIDS-defining malignancies, cardiovascular, neuropsychiatric, liver-related, or end-stage renal disease events. Potential determinants of non-AIDS/death events were studied using Cox regression models. Eighty-five non-AIDS/death events occurred during 6,062 persons-years of follow-up (PYFU) with a CIR of 1.4 per 100 PYFU. Factors associated with non-AIDS/death event were age (HR 3.4; 95% CI: 1.6–6.9), nadir CD4 below 350 cells/mm3 (HR 2.5; 95% CI: 1.4–4.6), and a last determination of viral load above the median (HR 1.9; 95% CI: 1.0–3.3). The CIR of non-AIDS/death events was 2.1 and 1.8 per 100 PYFU before and after cART in patients who started cART (n=446). A reduction of CIR of non-AIDS events after cART initiation was observed only in patients with a nadir of CD4 above 350 cells/mm3 (2.5 vs. 0.6 per 100 PYFU, p=0.004, and remained stable after cART in patients with a median nadir of CD4 below 350 cells/mm3. CIR was similar in elite, viremic, and noncontrollers (1.1, 1.0, and 1.5 per 100 PYFU, respectively, p=0.25). Reduction of CIR of non-AIDS events after cART initiation depends on nadir CD4 T cell count. Most of the controllers patients had a CIR similar to noncontrollers. These data support the early initiation of cART in HIV-infected patients. PMID:23530980

  1. Interpretation of galaxy counts

    SciTech Connect

    Tinsely, B.M.

    1980-10-01

    New models are presented for the interpretation of recent counts of galaxies to 24th magnitude, and predictions are shown to 28th magnitude for future comparison with data from the Space Telescope. The results supersede earlier, more schematic models by the author. Tyson and Jarvis found in their counts a ''local'' density enhancement at 17th magnitude, on comparison with the earlier models; the excess is no longer significant when a more realistic mixture of galaxy colors is used. Bruzual and Kron's conclusion that Kron's counts show evidence for evolution at faint magnitudes is confirmed, and it is predicted that some 23d magnitude galaxies have redshifts greater than unity. These may include spheroidal systems, elliptical galaxies, and the bulges of early-type spirals and S0's, seen during their primeval rapid star formation.

  2. Whose interests count?

    PubMed

    Brudney, Daniel; Lantos, John D

    2014-10-01

    Whose interests should count and how should various interests be balanced at the pediatric patient's bedside? The interests of the child patient clearly count. Recently, however, many authors have argued that the family's interests also count. But how should we think about the interests of others? What does it mean to talk about "the family" in this context? Does it really just mean the interests of each individual family member? Or is the family itself a moral entity that has interests of its own independent of the interests of each of its members? Are such interests important only as they affect the patient's interest or also for their own sake? In this special supplement to Pediatrics, a group of pediatricians, philosophers, and lawyers grapple with these questions. They examine these issues from different angles and reach different conclusions. Jointly, they demonstrate the ethical importance and, above all, the ethical complexity of the family's role at the bedside.

  3. Bit Error Rate Performance of Partially Coherent Dual-Branch SSC Receiver over Composite Fading Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milić, Dejan N.; Đorđević, Goran T.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we study the effects of imperfect reference signal recovery on the bit error rate (BER) performance of dual-branch switch and stay combining receiver over Nakagami-m fading/gamma shadowing channels with arbitrary parameters. The average BER of quaternary phase shift keying is evaluated under the assumption that the reference carrier signal is extracted from the received modulated signal. We compute numerical results illustrating simultaneous influence of average signal-to-noise ratio per bit, fading severity, shadowing, phase-locked loop bandwidth-bit duration (BLTb) product, and switching threshold on BER performance. The effects of BLTb on receiver performance under different channel conditions are emphasized. Optimal switching threshold is determined which minimizes BER performance under given channel and receiver parameters.

  4. A preliminary study on the association between ventilation rates in classrooms and student performance.

    PubMed

    Shaughnessy, R J; Haverinen-Shaughnessy, U; Nevalainen, A; Moschandreas, D

    2006-12-01

    Poor conditions leading to substandard indoor air quality (IAQ) in classrooms have been frequently cited in the literature over the past two decades. However, there is limited data linking poor IAQ in the classrooms to student performance. Whereas, it is assumed that poor IAQ results in reduced attendance and learning potential, and subsequent poor student performance, validating this hypothesis presents a challenge in today's school environment. This study explores the association between student performance on standardized aptitude tests that are administered to students on a yearly basis, to classroom carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations, which provide a surrogate of ventilation being provided to each room. Data on classroom CO2 concentrations (over a 4-5 h time span within a typical school day) were recorded in fifth grade classrooms in 54 elementary schools within a school district in the USA. Results from this preliminary study yield a significant (P < 0.10) association between classroom-level ventilation rate and test results in math. They also indicate that non-linear effects may need to be considered for better representation of the association. A larger sample size is required in order to draw more definitive conclusions. Practical Implications Future studies could focus on (1) gathering more evidence on the possible association between classroom ventilation rates and students' academic performance; (2) the linear/non-linear nature of the association; and (3) whether it is possible to detect 'no observed adverse effect level' for adequate ventilation with respect to academic performance in schools. All of this information could be used to improve guidance and take regulatory actions to ensure adequate ventilation in schools. The high prevalence of low ventilation rates, combined with the growing evidence of the positive impact that sufficient ventilation has on human performance, suggests an opportunity for improving design and management of school

  5. Interrater Reliability and Concurrent Validity of a New Rating Scale to Assess the Performance of Everyday Life Tasks in Dementia: The Core Elements Method.

    PubMed

    de Werd, Maartje M E; Hoelzenbein, Angela C; Boelen, Daniëlle H E; Rikkert, Marcel G M Olde; Hüell, Michael; Kessels, Roy P C; Voigt-Radloff, Sebastian

    2016-12-01

    Errorless learning (EL) is an instructional procedure involving error reduction during learning. Errorless learning is mostly examined by counting correctly executed task steps or by rating them using a Task Performance Scale (TPS). Here, we explore the validity and reliability of a new assessment procedure, the core elements method (CEM), which rates essential building blocks of activities rather than individual steps. Task performance was assessed in 35 patients with Alzheimer's dementia recruited from the Relearning methods on Daily Living task performance of persons with Dementia (REDALI-DEM) study using TPS and CEM independently. Results showed excellent interrater reliabilities for both measure methods (CEM: intraclass coefficient [ICC] = .85; TPS: ICC = .97). Also, both methods showed a high agreement (CEM: mean of measurement difference [MD] = -3.44, standard deviation [SD] = 14.72; TPS: MD = -0.41, SD = 7.89) and correlated highly (>.75). Based on these results, TPS and CEM are both valid for assessing task performance. However, since TPS is more complicated and time consuming, CEM may be the preferred method for future research projects.

  6. Metals processing control by counting molten metal droplets

    DOEpatents

    Schlienger, Eric; Robertson, Joanna M.; Melgaard, David; Shelmidine, Gregory J.; Van Den Avyle, James A.

    2000-01-01

    Apparatus and method for controlling metals processing (e.g., ESR) by melting a metal ingot and counting molten metal droplets during melting. An approximate amount of metal in each droplet is determined, and a melt rate is computed therefrom. Impedance of the melting circuit is monitored, such as by calculating by root mean square a voltage and current of the circuit and dividing the calculated current into the calculated voltage. Analysis of the impedance signal is performed to look for a trace characteristic of formation of a molten metal droplet, such as by examining skew rate, curvature, or a higher moment.

  7. Flow rate and humidification effects on a PEM fuel cell performance and operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guvelioglu, Galip H.; Stenger, Harvey G.

    A new algorithm is presented to integrate component balances along polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) channels to obtain three-dimensional results from a detailed two-dimensional finite element model. The analysis studies the cell performance at various hydrogen flow rates, air flow rates and humidification levels. This analysis shows that hydrogen and air flow rates and their relative humidity are critical to current density, membrane dry-out, and electrode flooding. Uniform current densities along the channels are known to be critical for thermal management and fuel cell life. This approach, of integrating a detailed two-dimensional across-the-channel model, is a promising method for fuel cell design due to its low computational cost compared to three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics models, its applicability to a wide range of fuel cell designs, and its ease of extending to fuel cell stack models.

  8. Effect of restricted suckling on pregnancy rates and calf performance in Brahman cows.

    PubMed

    Bastidas, P; Troconiz, J; Verde, O; Silva, O

    1984-02-01

    Seventy-six Brahman cows and first-calf heifers were assigned to one of two groups: 1) normal suckling (34 cows) or 2) twice-daily suckling (45 minutes of suckling each time; 42 cows). Twice-daily suckling was carried out from 30 days postcalving until weaning (seven months). All animals were maintained under artificial insemination for a four-month breeding period. Mean pregnancy rate was 63.06 +/- 0.06% and was influenced by suckling group (P<0.01) and number of parturitions (P<0.05). The pregnancy rates were 33% higher in twice-daily suckled cows. Forty-four percent of the first calf heifers in the twice-daily suckling group became pregnant compared to 9% in the normal suckling group (P<0.01). Twice-daily suckling improved pregnancy rate without depressing preweaning calf performance.

  9. Participation rates and the difference in performance of women and men in chess.

    PubMed

    Bilalić, Merim; McLeod, Peter

    2007-09-01

    The superiority of men over women in chess has been cited as evidence that there are fundamental differences in male and female intelligence (Howard, 2005a, 2006; Irwing & Lynn, 2005). An alternative interpretation of the difference is that it is due to differential male and female participation rates in chess (Charness & Gerchak, 1996; Bilalić & McLeod, 2006; Chabris & Glickman, in press). This has been dismissed by Howard (2006) on the grounds that changes in the difference in skill level between top male and female players in recent years are not correlated with changing relative participation rates. Here it is shown that Howard's analysis is misleading. The data are consistent with differential participation rates as the explanation of the gap between the performance of women and men in chess.

  10. Calculating inspector probability of detection using performance demonstration program pass rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumblidge, Stephen; D'Agostino, Amy

    2016-02-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has been working since the 1970's to ensure that nondestructive testing performed on nuclear power plants in the United States will provide reasonable assurance of structural integrity of the nuclear power plant components. One tool used by the NRC has been the development and implementation of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section XI Appendix VIII[1] (Appendix VIII) blind testing requirements for ultrasonic procedures, equipment, and personnel. Some concerns have been raised, over the years, by the relatively low pass rates for the Appendix VIII qualification testing. The NRC staff has applied statistical tools and simulations to determine the expected probability of detection (POD) for ultrasonic examinations under ideal conditions based on the pass rates for the Appendix VIII qualification tests for the ultrasonic testing personnel. This work was primarily performed to answer three questions. First, given a test design and pass rate, what is the expected overall POD for inspectors? Second, can we calculate the probability of detection for flaws of different sizes using this information? Finally, if a previously qualified inspector fails a requalification test, does this call their earlier inspections into question? The calculations have shown that one can expect good performance from inspectors who have passed appendix VIII testing in a laboratory-like environment, and the requalification pass rates show that the inspectors have maintained their skills between tests. While these calculations showed that the PODs for the ultrasonic inspections are very good under laboratory conditions, the field inspections are conducted in a very different environment. The NRC staff has initiated a project to systematically analyze the human factors differences between qualification testing and field examinations. This work will be used to evaluate and prioritize

  11. Single Photon Counting Detectors for Low Light Level Imaging Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Kimberly

    2015-10-01

    This dissertation presents the current state-of-the-art of semiconductor-based photon counting detector technologies. HgCdTe linear-mode avalanche photodiodes (LM-APDs), silicon Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes (GM-APDs), and electron-multiplying CCDs (EMCCDs) are compared via their present and future performance in various astronomy applications. LM-APDs are studied in theory, based on work done at the University of Hawaii. EMCCDs are studied in theory and experimentally, with a device at NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab. The emphasis of the research is on GM-APD imaging arrays, developed at MIT Lincoln Laboratory and tested at the RIT Center for Detectors. The GM-APD research includes a theoretical analysis of SNR and various performance metrics, including dark count rate, afterpulsing, photon detection efficiency, and intrapixel sensitivity. The effects of radiation damage on the GM-APD were also characterized by introducing a cumulative dose of 50 krad(Si) via 60 MeV protons. Extensive development of Monte Carlo simulations and practical observation simulations was completed, including simulated astronomical imaging and adaptive optics wavefront sensing. Based on theoretical models and experimental testing, both the current state-of-the-art performance and projected future performance of each detector are compared for various applications. LM-APD performance is currently not competitive with other photon counting technologies, and are left out of the application-based comparisons. In the current state-of-the-art, EMCCDs in photon counting mode out-perform GM-APDs for long exposure scenarios, though GM-APDs are better for short exposure scenarios (fast readout) due to clock-induced-charge (CIC) in EMCCDs. In the long term, small improvements in GM-APD dark current will make them superior in both long and short exposure scenarios for extremely low flux. The efficiency of GM-APDs will likely always be less than EMCCDs, however, which is particularly disadvantageous for

  12. Determination of the kinetic rate constant of cyclodextrin supramolecular systems by high performance affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Li, Haiyan; Ge, Jingwen; Guo, Tao; Yang, Shuo; He, Zhonggui; York, Peter; Sun, Lixin; Xu, Xu; Zhang, Jiwen

    2013-08-30

    It is challenging and extremely difficult to measure the kinetics of supramolecular systems with extensive, weak binding (Ka<10(5)M(-1)), and fast dissociation, such as those composed of cyclodextrins and drugs. In this study, a modified peak profiling method based on high performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) was established to determine the dissociation rate constant of cyclodextrin supramolecular systems. The interactions of β-cyclodextrin with acetaminophen and sertraline were used to exemplify the method. The retention times, variances and the plate heights of the peaks for acetaminophen or sertraline, conventional non-retained substance (H2O) on the β-cyclodextrin bonded column and a control column were determined at four flow rates under linear elution conditions. Then, plate heights for the theoretical non-retained substance were estimated by the modified HPAC method, in consideration of the diffusion and stagnant mobile phase mass transfer. As a result, apparent dissociation rate constants of 1.82 (±0.01)s(-1) and 3.55 (±0.37)s(-1) were estimated for acetaminophen and sertraline respectively at pH 6.8 and 25°C with multiple flow rates. Following subtraction of the non-specific binding with the support, dissociation rate constants were estimated as 1.78 (±0.00) and 1.91 (±0.02)s(-1) for acetaminophen and sertraline, respectively. These results for acetaminophen and sertraline were in good agreement with the magnitude of the rate constants for other drugs determined by capillary electrophoresis reported in the literature and the peak fitting method we performed. The method described in this work is thought to be suitable for other supramolecules, with relatively weak, fast and extensive interactions.

  13. Exploring individual quality: Basal metabolic rate and reproductive performance in storm-petrels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blackmer, A.L.; Mauck, R.A.; Ackerman, J.T.; Huntington, C.E.; Nevitt, G.A.; Williams, J.B.

    2005-01-01

    Despite evidence that some individuals achieve both superior reproductive performance and high survivorship, the factors underlying variation in individual quality are not well understood. The compensation and increased-intake hypotheses predict that basal metabolic rate (BMR) influences reproductive performance; if so, variation in BMR may be related to differences in individual quality. We evaluated whether BMR measured during the incubation period provides a proximate explanation for variation in individual quality by measuring the BMRs and reproductive performance of Leach's storm-petrels (Oceanodroma leucorhoa) breeding on Kent Island, New Brunswick, Canada, during 2000 and 2001. We statistically controlled for internal (body mass, breeding age, sex) and external (year, date, time of day) effects on BMR. We found that males with relatively low BMRs hatched their eggs earlier in the season and that their chicks' wing growth rates were faster compared to males with relatively high BMRs. Conversely, BMR was not related to egg volume, hatching date, or chick growth rate for females or to lifetime (???23 years) hatching success for either sex. Thus, for males but not for females, our results support the compensation hypothesis. This hypothesis predicts that animals with low BMRs will achieve better reproductive performance than animals with high BMRs because they have lower self-maintenance costs and therefore can apportion more energy to reproduction. These results provide evidence that intraspecific variation in reproductive performance is related to BMR and suggest that BMR may influence individual quality in males. ?? The Author 2005. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Society for Behavioral Ecology. All rights reserved.

  14. LOW ENERGY COUNTING CHAMBERS

    DOEpatents

    Hayes, P.M.

    1960-02-16

    A beta particle counter adapted to use an end window made of polyethylene terephthalate was designed. The extreme thinness of the film results in a correspondingly high transmission of incident low-energy beta particles by the window. As a consequence, the counting efficiency of the present counter is over 40% greater than counters using conventional mica end windows.

  15. WY Kids Count.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyoming Kids Count, Cheyenne.

    This WY Kids Count brochure uses the metaphor of children's building blocks to present information on the current well-being of Wyoming children and to advocate enhancing the lives of young children. Each block (i.e., each develop the brochure) presents concerns in a separate area: (1) poverty, highlighting the number of children living in…

  16. What Counts as Evidence?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty Stahl, Katherine A.

    2014-01-01

    Each disciplinary community has its own criteria for determining what counts as evidence of knowledge in their academic field. The criteria influence the ways that a community's knowledge is created, communicated, and evaluated. Situating reading, writing, and language instruction within the content areas enables teachers to explicitly…

  17. Photon Counting Detectors for the 1.0 - 2.0 Micron Wavelength Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    We describe results on the development of greater than 200 micron diameter, single-element photon-counting detectors for the 1-2 micron wavelength range. The technical goals include quantum efficiency in the range 10-70%; detector diameter greater than 200 microns; dark count rate below 100 kilo counts-per-second (cps), and maximum count rate above 10 Mcps.

  18. A Comparison of the Performance and Importance Ratings on Intervention Practices of Preschool and Elementary School Educators in Thailand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tangdhanakanond, Kamonwan; Archwamety, Teara; McFarland, Max; Beckman, Tammi

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were: (a) to compare the "performance" ratings on five aspects of intervention practices as determined by preschool educators to the "performance" ratings as determined by elementary school educators, (b) to compare the "importance" ratings on five aspects of intervention practices…

  19. High rate capacitive performance of single-walled carbon nanotube aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Van Aken, Katherine L.; Pérez, Carlos R.; Oh, Youngseok; Beidaghi, Majid; Joo Jeong, Yeon; Islam, Mohammad F.; Gogotsi, Yury

    2015-05-30

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) aerogels produced by critical-point-drying of wet-gel precursors exhibit unique properties, such as high surface-area-to-volume and strength-to-weight ratios. They are free-standing, are binder-free, and can be scaled to thicknesses of more than 1 mm. In this paper, we examine the electric double layer capacitive behavior of these materials using a common room temperature ionic liquid electrolyte, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (EMI-TFSI). Electrochemical performance is assessed through galvanostatic cycling, cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy. Results indicate stable capacitive performance over 10,000 cycles as well as an impressive performance at high charge and discharge rates, due to accessible pore networks and enhanced electronic and ionic conductivities of SWCNT aerogels. Finally, these materials can find applications in mechanically compressible and flexible supercapacitor devices with high power requirements.

  20. High rate capacitive performance of single-walled carbon nanotube aerogels

    DOE PAGES

    Van Aken, Katherine L.; Pérez, Carlos R.; Oh, Youngseok; ...

    2015-05-30

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) aerogels produced by critical-point-drying of wet-gel precursors exhibit unique properties, such as high surface-area-to-volume and strength-to-weight ratios. They are free-standing, are binder-free, and can be scaled to thicknesses of more than 1 mm. In this paper, we examine the electric double layer capacitive behavior of these materials using a common room temperature ionic liquid electrolyte, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (EMI-TFSI). Electrochemical performance is assessed through galvanostatic cycling, cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy. Results indicate stable capacitive performance over 10,000 cycles as well as an impressive performance at high charge and discharge rates, due to accessible pore networks andmore » enhanced electronic and ionic conductivities of SWCNT aerogels. Finally, these materials can find applications in mechanically compressible and flexible supercapacitor devices with high power requirements.« less

  1. Magnetically aligned graphite electrodes for high-rate performance Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billaud, Juliette; Bouville, Florian; Magrini, Tommaso; Villevieille, Claire; Studart, André R.

    2016-08-01

    As lithium-ion batteries become ubiquitous, the energy storage market is striving for better performance, longer lifetime and better safety of the devices. This race for performance is often focused on the search for new materials, whereas less effort has been dedicated to the electrode engineering. Enhancing the power density by increasing the amount of active material remains impractical since it impinges the transport of ions across the electrode during the charging and discharging processes. Here, we show that the electrochemical performance of a battery containing a thick (about 200 μm), highly loaded (about 10 mg cm-2) graphite electrode can be remarkably enhanced by fabricating anodes with an out-of-plane aligned architecture using a low external magnetic field. The lower tortuosity resulting from such a simple and scalable magnetic alignment approach leads to a specific charge up to three times higher than that of non-architectured electrodes at a rate of 1C.

  2. Effects of growth rate on cell extract performance in cell-free protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Zawada, James; Swartz, James

    2006-07-05

    Cell-free protein synthesis is a useful research tool and now stands poised to compete with in vivo expression for commercial production of proteins. However, both the extract preparation and protein synthesis procedures must be scaled up. A key challenge is producing the required amount of biomass that also results in highly active cell-free extracts. In this work, we show that the growth rate of the culture dramatically affects extract performance. Extracts prepared from cultures with a specific growth rate of 0.7/h or higher produced approximately 0.9 mg/mL of chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) in a batch reaction. In contrast, when the source culture growth rate was 0.3/h, the resulting extract produced only 0.5 mg/mL CAT. Examination of the ribosome content in the extracts revealed that the growth rate of the source cells strongly influenced the final ribosome concentration. Polysome analysis of cell-free protein synthesis reactions indicated that about 22% of the total 70S ribosomes are in polysomes for all extracts regardless of growth rate. Furthermore, the overall specific production from the 70S ribosomes is about 22 CAT proteins per ribosome over the course of the reaction in all cases. It appears that rapid culture growth rates are essential for producing a productive extract. However, growth rate does not seem to influence specific ribosome activity. Rather, the increase in extract productivity is a result of a higher ribosome concentration. These results are important for cell-free technology and also suggest an assay for intrinsic in vivo protein synthesis activity.

  3. High Time Resolution Photon Counting 3D Imaging Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegmund, O.; Ertley, C.; Vallerga, J.

    2016-09-01

    Novel sealed tube microchannel plate (MCP) detectors using next generation cross strip (XS) anode readouts and high performance electronics have been developed to provide photon counting imaging sensors for Astronomy and high time resolution 3D remote sensing. 18 mm aperture sealed tubes with MCPs and high efficiency Super-GenII or GaAs photocathodes have been implemented to access the visible/NIR regimes for ground based research, astronomical and space sensing applications. The cross strip anode readouts in combination with PXS-II high speed event processing electronics can process high single photon counting event rates at >5 MHz ( 80 ns dead-time per event), and time stamp events to better than 25 ps. Furthermore, we are developing a high speed ASIC version of the electronics for low power/low mass spaceflight applications. For a GaAs tube the peak quantum efficiency has degraded from 30% (at 560 - 850 nm) to 25% over 4 years, but for Super-GenII tubes the peak quantum efficiency of 17% (peak at 550 nm) has remained unchanged for over 7 years. The Super-GenII tubes have a uniform spatial resolution of <30 μm FWHM ( 1 x106 gain) and single event timing resolution of 100 ps (FWHM). The relatively low MCP gain photon counting operation also permits longer overall sensor lifetimes and high local counting rates. Using the high timing resolution, we have demonstrated 3D object imaging with laser pulse (630 nm 45 ps jitter Pilas laser) reflections in single photon counting mode with spatial and depth sensitivity of the order of a few millimeters. A 50 mm Planacon sealed tube was also constructed, using atomic layer deposited microchannel plates which potentially offer better overall sealed tube lifetime, quantum efficiency and gain stability. This tube achieves standard bialkali quantum efficiency levels, is stable, and has been coupled to the PXS-II electronics and used to detect and image fast laser pulse signals.

  4. Assessing Children's Homework Performance: Development of Multi-Dimensional, Multi-Informant Rating Scales.

    PubMed

    Power, Thomas J; Dombrowski, Stefan C; Watkins, Marley W; Mautone, Jennifer A; Eagle, John W

    2007-06-01

    Efforts to develop interventions to improve homework performance have been impeded by limitations in the measurement of homework performance. This study was conducted to develop rating scales for assessing homework performance among students in elementary and middle school. Items on the scales were intended to assess student strengths as well as deficits in homework performance. The sample included 163 students attending two school districts in the Northeast. Parents completed the 36-item Homework Performance Questionnaire - Parent Scale (HPQ-PS). Teachers completed the 22-item teacher scale (HPQ-TS) for each student for whom the HPQ-PS had been completed. A common factor analysis with principal axis extraction and promax rotation was used to analyze the findings. The results of the factor analysis of the HPQ-PS revealed three salient and meaningful factors: student task orientation/efficiency, student competence, and teacher support. The factor analysis of the HPQ-TS uncovered two salient and substantive factors: student responsibility and student competence. The findings of this study suggest that the HPQ is a promising set of measures for assessing student homework functioning and contextual factors that may influence performance. Directions for future research are presented.

  5. Comparing methods for analyzing overdispersed count data in aquatic toxicology.

    PubMed

    Noe, Douglas A; Bailer, A John; Noble, Robert B

    2010-01-01

    Endpoints in aquatic toxicity tests can be measured using a variety of measurement scales including dichotomous (survival), continuous (growth) and count (number of young). A distribution is assumed for an endpoint and analyses proceed accordingly. In certain situations, the assumed distribution may be incorrect and this may lead to incorrect statistical inference. The present study considers the analysis of count effects, here motivated by the Ceriodaphnia dubia reproduction study. While the Poisson probability model is a common starting point, this distribution assumes that the mean and variance are the same. This will not be the case if there is some extraneous source of variability in the system, and in this case, the variability may exceed the mean. A computer simulation study was used to examine the impact of overdispersion or outliers on the analysis of count data. Methods that assumed Poisson or negative binomially distributed outcomes were compared to methods that accommodated this potential overdispersion using quasi-likelihood (QL) or generalized linear mixed models (GLMM). If the data were truly Poisson, the adjusted methods still performed at nominal type I error rates. In the cases of overdispersed counts, the Poisson assumed methods resulted in rejection rates that exceeded nominal levels and standard errors for regression coefficients that were too narrow. The negative binomial methods worked best in the case when the data were, in fact, negative binomial but did not maintain nominal characteristics in other situations. In general, the QL and GLMM methods performed reasonably based on the present study, although all procedures suffered some impact in the presence of potential outliers. In particular, the QL is arguably preferred because it makes fewer assumptions than the GLMM and performed well over the range of conditions considered.

  6. Designing high-performance electrochemical energy-storage nanoarchitectures to balance rate and capacity.

    PubMed

    Sassin, Megan B; Hoag, Cheyne P; Willis, Bradley T; Kucko, Nathan W; Rolison, Debra R; Long, Jeffrey W

    2013-02-21

    The impressive specific capacitance and high-rate performance reported for many nanometric charge-storing films on planar substrates cannot impact a technology space beyond microdevices unless such performance translates into a macroscale form factor. In this report, we explore how the nanoscale-to-macroscale properties of the electrode architecture (pore size/distribution, void volume, thickness) define energy and power performance when scaled to technologically relevant dimensions. Our test bed is a device-ready electrode architecture in which scalable, manufacturable carbon nanofoam papers with tunable pore sizes (5-200 nm) and thickness (100-300 μm) are painted with ~10 nm coatings of manganese oxide (MnOx). The quantity of capacitance and the rate at which it is delivered for four different MnOx-C variants was assessed by fabricating symmetric electrochemical capacitors using a concentrated aqueous electrolyte. Carbon nanofoam papers containing primarily 10-20 nm mesopores support high MnOx loadings (60 wt%) and device-level capacitance (30 F g(-1)), but the small mesoporous network hinders electrolyte transport and the low void volume restricts the quantity of charge-compensating ions within the electrode, making the full capacitance only accessible at slow rates (5 mV s(-1)). Carbon nanofoam papers with macropores (100-200 nm) facilitate high rate operation (50 mV s(-1)), but deliver significantly lower device capacitance (13 F g(-1)) as a result of lower MnOx loadings (41 wt%). Devices comprising MnOx-carbon nanofoams with interconnecting networks of meso- and macropores balance capacitance and rate performance, delivering 33 F g(-1) at 5 mV s(-1) and 23 F g(-1) at 50 mV s(-1). The use of carbon nanofoam papers with size-tunable pore structures and thickness provides the opportunity to engineer the electrode architecture to deliver scalable quantities of capacitance (F cm(-2)) in tens of seconds with a single device.

  7. ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 Performance Rating Method Reference Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Goel, Supriya; Rosenberg, Michael I.

    2016-05-01

    This document is intended to be a reference manual for the Appendix G Performance Rating Method (PRM) of ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1- 2010 (Standard 90.1-2010).The PRM is used for rating the energy efficiency of commercial and high-rise residential buildings with designs that exceed the requirements of Standard 90.1. The procedures and processes described in this manual are designed to provide consistency and accuracy by filling in gaps and providing additional details needed by users of the PRM. It should be noted that this document is created independently from ASHRAE and SSPC 90.1 and is not sanctioned nor approved by either of those entities . Potential users of this manual include energy modelers, software developers and implementers of “beyond code” energy programs. Energy modelers using ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for beyond code programs can use this document as a reference manual for interpreting requirements of the Performance Rating method. Software developers, developing tools for automated creation of the baseline model can use this reference manual as a guideline for developing the rules for the baseline model.

  8. How important are lens oxygen ratings? They are one of many performance factors.

    PubMed

    Bennett, E S

    1990-01-01

    To prevent corneal edema in most patients, contact lenses must transmit oxygen to the following minimum degree: (a) in daily wear, 24.1 x 10(-9) (cm x ml O2)/(s x ml x mm Hg), and (b) in extended wear, 34.3 x 10(-9) (cm x ml O2)/(s x ml x mm Hg). High Dk/L ratings are particularly important for patients wearing extended wear lenses and for those with exceptionally high corneal oxygen demand. Nevertheless, it is well known that other lens performance properties can be compromised by manipulating material or design parameters to increase the Dk/L rating. Increasing the Dk/L of hydrogel lenses, for example, may lead to problems such as fragility, dehydration, and corneal adherence. Similarly, high-Dk/L, rigid gas-permeable lenses may exhibit poor surface wettability and flexural resistance, base curve radius changes, and possible corneal adherence. Because such problems can compromise visual acuity, affect ease of handling, or decrease comfort, nonoxygen factors may exert a stronger influence on successful lens wear than high oxygen transmissibility alone for most patients. Among the nonoxygen factors important for contact lens wear are good movement, surface wettability, resistance to deposit buildup, and flexural resistance. Clinicians must consider these properties, along with oxygen transmission ratings, when fitting patients with contact lenses. Lenses that exhibit good overall performance, in my view, provide the greatest probability of successful wear.

  9. Rational Design of Cathode Structure for High Rate Performance Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongwei; Wang, Changhong; Dai, Yafei; Qiu, Shengqiang; Yang, Jinlong; Lu, Wei; Chen, Liwei

    2015-08-12

    Practical applications of Li-S batteries require not only high specific capacities and long cycle lifetimes but also high rate performance. We report a rationally designed Li-S cathode, which consists of a freestanding composite thin film assembled from S nanoparticles, reduced graphene oxide (rGO), and a multifunctional additive poly(anthraquinonyl sulfide) (PAQS). The S nanoparticles provide a high initial specific capacity, and the layered and porous rGO structure provides electron and ion transport paths and restricts polysulfide shuttling. PAQS is not only a highly efficient sulfide trapping agent but also an excellent Li(+) conductor, which benefits the battery reaction kinetics at a high rate. The resulting cathode exhibits an initial specific capacity of 1255 mAh g(-1) with a decay rate as low as 0.046% per cycles over 1200 cycles. Importantly, it displays a reversible capacity of 615 mAh g(-1) when discharged at a high rate of 8 C (13.744 A g(-1)).

  10. Flexibility in metabolic rate and activity level determines individual variation in overwinter performance.

    PubMed

    Auer, Sonya K; Salin, Karine; Anderson, Graeme J; Metcalfe, Neil B

    2016-11-01

    Energy stores are essential for the overwinter survival of many temperate and polar animals, but individuals within a species often differ in how quickly they deplete their reserves. These disparities in overwinter performance may be explained by differences in their physiological and behavioral flexibility in response to food scarcity. However, little is known about whether individuals exhibit correlated or independent changes in these traits, and how these phenotypic changes collectively affect their winter energy use. We examined individual flexibility in both standard metabolic rate and activity level in response to food scarcity and their combined consequences for depletion of lipid stores among overwintering brown trout (Salmo trutta). Metabolism and activity tended to decrease, yet individuals exhibited striking differences in their physiological and behavioral flexibility. The rate of lipid depletion was negatively related to decreases in both metabolic and activity rates, with the smallest lipid loss over the simulated winter period occurring in individuals that had the greatest reductions in metabolism and/or activity. However, changes in metabolism and activity were negatively correlated; those individuals that decreased their SMR to a greater extent tended to increase their activity rates, and vice versa, suggesting among-individual variation in strategies for coping with food scarcity.

  11. High-rate partial nitrification performance of high ammonium containing wastewater under low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Sen; Matsumoto, Noriko; Shinohara, Takehiko; Nishiyama, Takashi; Fujii, Takao; Bhatti, Zafar; Furukawa, Kenji

    2010-01-01

    In this study, a swim-bed reactor was used for partial nitrification treatment of magnesium ammonium phosphate precipitation process treated effluent of methane fermentation digester liquor. Even without temperature, DO, and pH control, the maximum nitrite production rate of 2.66 kg NO(2)-N/m(3)/d was achieved under a nitrogen loading rate of 5.45 kg N/m(3)/d at 18 degrees C and a nitrite production rate of 0.22 kg NO(2)-N/m(3)/d was still attained at a nitrogen loading rate of 0.48 kg N/m(3)/d even the operational temperature decreased to 8 degrees C. The average effluent NO(2)-N/(NO(2)+NO(3)-N) ratio reached 95.4% during the entire experimental period. The mean particle size of suspended sludge increased from 260 to 450 microm and the microscopic observation confirmed the formation of dense-flocs. The results indicated that there were two regimes for ammonium oxidation, one at 20-30 degrees C and the other at 10-20 degrees C. Scanning electron microscopic observation and FISH analysis demonstrated that ammonium-oxidizing bacteria were the dominant microorganisms and were considered to be responsible for the satisfactory partial nitrification performance.

  12. Spatial variation in the relationship between performance and metabolic rate in wild juvenile Atlantic salmon.

    PubMed

    Robertsen, Grethe; Armstrong, John D; Nislow, Keith H; Herfindal, Ivar; McKelvey, Simon; Einum, Sigurd

    2014-07-01

    Maintenance of metabolic rate (MR, the energy cost of self-maintenance) is linked to behavioural traits and fitness and varies substantially within populations. Despite having received much attention, the causes and consequences of this variation remain obscure. Theoretically, such within-population variation in fitness-related traits can be maintained by environmental heterogeneity in selection patterns, but for MR, this has rarely been tested in nature. Here, we experimentally test whether the relationship between MR and performance can vary spatially by assessing survival, growth rate and movement of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) juveniles from 10 family groups differing in MR (measured as egg metabolism) that were stocked in parallel across 10 tributaries of a single watershed. The relationship between MR and relative survival and growth rate varied significantly among tributaries. Specifically, the effect of MR ranged from negative to positive for relative survival, whereas it was negative for growth rate. The association between MR and movement was positive and did not vary significantly among tributaries. These results are consistent with a fitness cost of traits associated with behavioural dominance that varies across relatively small spatial scales (within a single watershed). More generally, our results support the hypothesis that spatial heterogeneity in environmental conditions contributes to maintain within-population variation in fitness-related traits, such as MR.

  13. Rate effects on timing, key velocity, and finger kinematics in piano performance.

    PubMed

    Bella, Simone Dalla; Palmer, Caroline

    2011-01-01

    We examined the effect of rate on finger kinematics in goal-directed actions of pianists. In addition, we evaluated whether movement kinematics can be treated as an indicator of personal identity. Pianists' finger movements were recorded with a motion capture system while they performed melodies from memory at different rates. Pianists' peak finger heights above the keys preceding keystrokes increased as tempo increased, and were attained about one tone before keypress. These rate effects were not simply due to a strategy to increase key velocity (associated with tone intensity) of the corresponding keystroke. Greater finger heights may compensate via greater tactile feedback for a speed-accuracy tradeoff that underlies the tendency toward larger temporal variability at faster tempi. This would allow pianists to maintain high temporal accuracy when playing at fast rates. In addition, finger velocity and accelerations as pianists' fingers approached keys were sufficiently unique to allow pianists' identification with a neural-network classifier. Classification success was higher in pianists with more extensive musical training. Pianists' movement "signatures" may reflect unique goal-directed movement kinematic patterns, leading to individualistic sound.

  14. Graphene/carbon black hybrid film for flexible and high rate performance supercapacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yaming; Chen, Junchen; Cao, Jianyun; Liu, Yan; Zhou, Yu; Ouyang, Jia-Hu; Jia, Dechang

    2014-12-01

    Reduced graphene oxide/carbon black (rGO/CB) hybrid films with different carbon black (CB) contents are prepared by a simple vacuum filtration method. The CB particles evenly distribute between the graphene layers, not only preventing the compact restack of rGO sheets but also providing electrical contact between the base planes of rGO sheets. As expected, the as-prepared rGO/CB hybrid film shows enhanced rate capability when compared with rGO film. Furthermore, a solid-state flexible supercapacitor has been constructed with the optimized rGO/CB hybrid film by using polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/H2SO4 gel as electrolyte and Au coated PET film as current collector and mechanical support. The solid-state flexible supercapacitor shows a specific capacitance of 112 F g-1 at a scan rate of 5 mV s-1, and excellent rate performance with a specific capacitance of 79.6 F g-1 at a high scan rate of 1 V s-1. Moreover, the flexible solid-state supercapacitor exhibits good cycling stability with capacitance retention of 94% after 3000 cycles in normal state plus 2000 cycles in bent state.

  15. Monitoring performance of the cameras under the high dose-rate gamma ray environments.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jai Wan; Choi, Young Soo; Jeong, Kyung Min

    2014-05-01

    CCD/CMOS cameras, loaded on a robot system, are generally used as the eye of the robot and monitoring unit. A major problem that arises when dealing with images provided by CCD/CMOS cameras under severe accident situations of a nuclear power plant is the presence of speckles owing to the high dose-rate gamma irradiation fields. To use a CCD/CMOS camera as a monitoring unit in a high radiation area, the legibility of the camera image in such intense gamma-radiation fields should therefore be defined. In this paper, the authors describe the monitoring index as a figure of merit of the camera's legibleness under a high dose-rate gamma ray irradiation environment. From a low dose-rate (10 Gy h) to a high dose-rate (200 Gy h) level, the legible performances of the cameras owing to the speckles are evaluated. The numbers of speckles generated by gamma ray irradiation in the camera image are calculated by an image processing technique. The legibility of the sensor indicator (thermo/hygrometer) owing to the number of speckles is also presented.

  16. Fatigue Index and Fatigue Rate during an Anaerobic Performance under Hypohydrations

    PubMed Central

    Naharudin, Mohamed Nashrudin; Yusof, Ashril

    2013-01-01

    Background Since hypohydration commonly occurs in sports, studies on anaerobic exercise performance under this condition have been extensively carried out. When describing anaerobic performance, authors usually refer to a drop in anaerobic performance as fatigue index (FI) which is conventionally calculated using peak and low power data points. Meanwhile, another possible method in explaining anaerobic fatigue is using the rate constant which is derived from the exponential decline of power output known as fatigue rate (FR). Few studies have demonstrated that there was no change in anaerobic performance under mild hypohydrations. Purpose This study aimed to compare the kinetics of power output using FI and FR of an anaerobic performance (Wingate test) under 2, 3 and 4% state of hypohydrations. Method Thirty two collegiate cyclists (age  = 22±2 years; body weight  = 71.45±3.43 kg; height  = 173.23±0.04 cm) were matched using their baseline anaerobic peak power (APP) then randomly divided into 4 groups of EU (euhydrated), 2H, 3H and 4H respectively. Results As expected the, FI, APP, anaerobic lower power (ALP) and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) did not show significant differences between and within the groups. However, the FR in 3H (0.018±0.005s−1) and 4H (0.019±0.010s−1) were significantly lower than EU (0.033±0.012s−1). Post-test FR also showed significant reduction in 3H and 4H compared to their pre-test values (p<0.05). Conclusion Despite the lack of changes in APP and RPE, subjects in 3H and 4H showed evidence of lower reduction of power output over time. The findings support earlier reports which showed no change in anaerobic performance under mild hypohydrations. The relatively lower FR suggests higher drive in maintaining power output under hypohydrations of 3 and 4% body weight. PMID:24204790

  17. Composite LiFePO 4/AC high rate performance electrodes for Li-ion capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böckenfeld, N.; Kühnel, R.-S.; Passerini, S.; Winter, M.; Balducci, A.

    This manuscript reports the performance of composite electrodes based on the mixture of two, electrochemically active, materials: lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO 4) and activated carbon (AC). The sodium salt of carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) was used as binder to cast the composite electrodes out of aqueous slurries. The investigated electrodes display high specific capacity and high cycling stability. Upon constant current tests with a charge rate of 50C and a discharge rate of 1D, the electrodes display a capacity of ca. 70 mAh g -1 while 60 mAh g -1 are delivered during pulse sequence tests at 100C. These results indicate such electrodes as promising candidates for the realization of lithium-ion capacitors.

  18. Design and Performance of the Acts Gigabit Satellite Network High Data-Rate Ground Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoder, Doug; Kearney, Brian

    1995-01-01

    The ACTS High Data-Rate Ground stations were built to support the ACTS Gigabit Satellite Network (GSN). The ACTS GSN was designed to provide fiber-compatible SONET service to remote nodes and networks through a wideband satellite system. The ACTS satellite is unique in its extremely wide bandwidth, and electronically controlled spot beam antennas. This paper discusses the requirements, design and performance of the RF section of the ACTS High Data-Rate Ground Stations and constituent hardware. The ACTS transponder systems incorporate highly nonlinear hard limiting. This introduced a major complexity in to the design and subsequent modification of the ground stations. A discussion of the peculiarities of the A CTS spacecraft transponder system and their impact is included.

  19. Sample Size Determination for Clustered Count Data

    PubMed Central

    Amatya, A.; Bhaumik, D.; Gibbons, R.D.

    2013-01-01

    We consider the problem of sample size determination for count data. Such data arise naturally in the context of multi-center (or cluster) randomized clinical trials, where patients are nested within research centers. We consider cluster-specific and population-average estimators (maximum likelihood based on generalized mixed-effects regression and generalized estimating equations respectively) for subject-level and cluster-level randomized designs respectively. We provide simple expressions for calculating number of clusters when comparing event rates of two groups in cross-sectional studies. The expressions we derive have closed form solutions and are based on either between-cluster variation or inter-cluster correlation for cross-sectional studies. We provide both theoretical and numerical comparisons of our methods with other existing methods. We specifically show that the performance of the proposed method is better for subject-level randomized designs, whereas the comparative performance depends on the rate ratio for the cluster-level randomized designs. We also provide a versatile method for longitudinal studies. Results are illustrated by three real data examples. PMID:23589228

  20. Monitoring changes in physical performance with heart rate measures in young soccer players.

    PubMed

    Buchheit, M; Simpson, M B; Al Haddad, H; Bourdon, P C; Mendez-Villanueva, A

    2012-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to verify the validity of using exercise heart rate (HRex), HR recovery (HRR) and post-exercise HR variability (HRV) during and after a submaximal running test to predict changes in physical performance over an entire competitive season in highly trained young soccer players. Sixty-five complete data sets were analyzed comparing two consecutive testing sessions (3-4 months apart) collected on 46 players (age 15.1 ± 1.5 years). Physical performance tests included a 5-min run at 9 km h(-1) followed by a seated 5-min recovery period to measure HRex, HRR and HRV, a counter movement jump, acceleration and maximal sprinting speed obtained during a 40-m sprint with 10-m splits, repeated-sprint performance and an incremental running test to estimate maximal cardiorespiratory function (end test velocity V (Vam-Eval)). Possible changes in physical performance were examined for the players presenting a substantial change in HR measures over two consecutive testing sessions (greater than 3, 13 and 10% for HRex, HRR and HRV, respectively). A decrease in HRex or increase in HRV was associated with likely improvements in V (Vam-Eval); opposite changes led to unclear changes in V (Vam-Eval). Moderate relationships were also found between individual changes in HRR and sprint [r = 0.39, 90% CL (0.07;0.64)] and repeated-sprint performance [r = -0.38 (-0.05;-0.64)]. To conclude, while monitoring HRex and HRV was effective in tracking improvements in V (Vam-Eval), changes in HRR were moderately associated with changes in (repeated-)sprint performance. The present data also question the use of HRex and HRV as systematic markers of physical performance decrements in youth soccer players.

  1. The role of reactant unmixedness, strain rate, and length scale on premixed combustor performance

    SciTech Connect

    Samuelsen, S.; LaRue, J.; Vilayanur, S.; Guillaume, D.

    1995-12-31

    Lean premixed combustion provides a means to reduce pollutant formation and increase combustion efficiency. However, fuel-air mixing is rarely uniform in space and time. This nonuniformity in concentration will lead to relative increases in pollutant formation and decreases in combustion efficiency. The nonuniformity of the concentration at the exit of the premixer has been defined by Lyons (1981) as the ``unmixedness.`` Although turbulence properties such as length scales and strain rate are known to effect unmixedness, the exact relationship is unknown. Evaluating this relationship and the effect of unmixedness in premixed combustion on pollutant formation and combustion efficiency are an important part of the overall goal of US Department of Energy`s Advanced Turbine System (ATS) program and are among the goals of the program described herein. The information obtained from ATS is intended to help to develop and commercialize gas turbines. The contributions to the program which the University of California (Irvine) Combustion Lab (UCICL) will provide are: (1) establish the relationship of inlet unmixedness, length scales, and mean strain rate to performance, (2) determine the optimal levels of inlet unmixedness, length scales, and mean strain rates to maximize combustor performance, and (3) identify efficient premixing methods for achieving the necessary inlet conditions. The program during this reporting period is focused on developing a means to measure and qualify different degrees of temporal and spatial unmixedness. Laser diagnostic methods for planer unmixedness measurements are being developed and preliminary results are presented herein. These results will be used to (1), aid in the design of experimental premixers, and (2), determine the unmixedness which will be correlated with the emissions of the combustor. This measure of unmixedness coupled with length scale, strain rate and intensity information is required to attain the UCI goals.

  2. Effect of feed intake restriction on reproductive performance and pregnancy rate in Egyptian buffalo heifers.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Hassan Ali; Abdel-Raheem, Sherief Mohamed

    2013-04-01

    The objective of the present experiment is to study the effect of feed intake restriction on the reproductive performance and pregnancy rate in Egyptian buffalo heifers. Thirty anestrus buffalo heifers were randomly divided into two equal groups. The low feed intake (LFI, n=15, 50 % restriction) group was fed a diet that consists of 3 kg concentrate, 1 kg wheat straw, and 3 kg fresh alfalfa, while the high feed intake (HFI, n=15) group was fed double the amount given to the LFI group for 4 months. All animals were weighed, transrectally examined, and visually checked for the signs of estrus, and blood samples were collected. Heifers in heat were mated with one fertile bull. The number of heifers showing estrus activity was 93.3 % in HFI vs. 20 % in LFI (P<0.01). Ovarian activity started earlier (P=0.03) in the HFI than LFI group. The weight at breeding, the diameter of the dominant follicle, number of heifers showing ovulations, number of services per conception, pregnancy rate, and overall mean of progesterone and estrogen concentrations were significantly higher (P<0.01) in the HFI than in the LFI group. The level of serum total protein, albumin, globulin, glucose, total cholesterol, and calcium were significantly higher (P<0.05) in the HFI group. Restriction of the daily feed intake to 50 % from NRC recommendations impair reproductive performance in terms of increasing the age at first service and reducing the pregnancy rate in buffalo heifers. In conclusion, feed intake could be effective in improvement of reproductive performance in buffalo heifers and further studies should be done on large scale of buffaloes in this point.

  3. Modeling the Effects of Transmission Type, Gear Count and Ratio Spread on Fuel Economy and Performance Using ALPHA (SAE 2016-01-1143)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents an analysis of the effects of varying the absolute and relative gear ratios of a given transmission on fuel economy and performance, considers alternative methods of selecting absolute gear ratios, examines the effect of alternative engines on the selections o...

  4. Assessing Performance in Shoulder Arthroscopy: The Imperial Global Arthroscopy Rating Scale (IGARS)

    PubMed Central

    Bayona, Sofia; Akhtar, Kash; Gupte, Chinmay; Emery, Roger J.H.; Dodds, Alexander L.; Bello, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Background: Surgical training is undergoing major changes with reduced resident work hours and an increasing focus on patient safety and surgical aptitude. The aim of this study was to create a valid, reliable method for an assessment of arthroscopic skills that is independent of time and place and is designed for both real and simulated settings. The validity of the scale was tested using a virtual reality shoulder arthroscopy simulator. Methods: The study consisted of two parts. In the first part, an Imperial Global Arthroscopy Rating Scale for assessing technical performance was developed using a Delphi method. Application of this scale required installing a dual-camera system to synchronously record the simulator screen and body movements of trainees to allow an assessment that is independent of time and place. The scale includes aspects such as efficient portal positioning, angles of instrument insertion, proficiency in handling the arthroscope and adequately manipulating the camera, and triangulation skills. In the second part of the study, a validation study was conducted. Two experienced arthroscopic surgeons, blinded to the identities and experience of the participants, each assessed forty-nine subjects performing three different tests using the Imperial Global Arthroscopy Rating Scale. Results were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance with measures of absolute agreement. The intraclass correlation coefficient was calculated for each test to assess inter-rater reliability. Results: The scale demonstrated high internal consistency (Cronbach alpha, 0.918). The intraclass correlation coefficient demonstrated high agreement between the assessors: 0.91 (p < 0.001). Construct validity was evaluated using Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance (chi-square test, 29.826; p < 0.001), demonstrating that the Imperial Global Arthroscopy Rating Scale distinguishes significantly between subjects with different levels of experience utilizing a virtual reality

  5. Designing high-performance electrochemical energy-storage nanoarchitectures to balance rate and capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassin, Megan B.; Hoag, Cheyne P.; Willis, Bradley T.; Kucko, Nathan W.; Rolison, Debra R.; Long, Jeffrey W.

    2013-01-01

    The impressive specific capacitance and high-rate performance reported for many nanometric charge-storing films on planar substrates cannot impact a technology space beyond microdevices unless such performance translates into a macroscale form factor. In this report, we explore how the nanoscale-to-macroscale properties of the electrode architecture (pore size/distribution, void volume, thickness) define energy and power performance when scaled to technologically relevant dimensions. Our test bed is a device-ready electrode architecture in which scalable, manufacturable carbon nanofoam papers with tunable pore sizes (5-200 nm) and thickness (100-300 μm) are painted with ~10 nm coatings of manganese oxide (MnOx). The quantity of capacitance and the rate at which it is delivered for four different MnOx-C variants was assessed by fabricating symmetric electrochemical capacitors using a concentrated aqueous electrolyte. Carbon nanofoam papers containing primarily 10-20 nm mesopores support high MnOx loadings (60 wt%) and device-level capacitance (30 F g-1), but the small mesoporous network hinders electrolyte transport and the low void volume restricts the quantity of charge-compensating ions within the electrode, making the full capacitance only accessible at slow rates (5 mV s-1). Carbon nanofoam papers with macropores (100-200 nm) facilitate high rate operation (50 mV s-1), but deliver significantly lower device capacitance (13 F g-1) as a result of lower MnOx loadings (41 wt%). Devices comprising MnOx-carbon nanofoams with interconnecting networks of meso- and macropores balance capacitance and rate performance, delivering 33 F g-1 at 5 mV s-1 and 23 F g-1 at 50 mV s-1. The use of carbon nanofoam papers with size-tunable pore structures and thickness provides the opportunity to engineer the electrode architecture to deliver scalable quantities of capacitance (F cm-2) in tens of seconds with a single device.The impressive specific capacitance and high-rate

  6. Theoretical Bit Error Rate Performance of the Kalman Filter Excisor for FM Interference

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    un filtre de Kalman as- servi numeriquement par verrouillage de phase et s’avere quasi-optimum quant a la demodulation d’une interference de type MF...Puisqu’on presuppose que l’interftrence est plus forte le signal ou que le bruit, le filtre de Kalman se verrouille sur l’interfdrence et permet...AD-A263 018 THEORETICAL BIT ERROR RATE PERFORMANCE OF THE KALMAN FILTER EXCISOR FOR FM INTERFERENCE by Brian RKominchuk APR 19 1993 DEFENCE RESEARCH

  7. Practical limits to the performance of magnetic bearings: Peak force, slew rate, and displacement sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maslen, E.; Hermann, P.; Scott, M.; Humphris, R. R.

    1993-01-01

    Magnetic bearings are subject to performance limits which are quite different from those of conventional bearings. These are due in part to the inherent nonlinearity of the device and in part to its electrical nature. Three important nonideal behaviors are presented: peak force capacity, force slew rate limitation, and sensitivity to rotor motion at large displacements. The problem of identifying the dynamic requirements of a magnetic bearing when used to support a known structure subject to known loads is discussed in the context of these limitations. Several simple design tools result from this investigation.

  8. Relationships between metabolic rate, muscle electromyograms, and swim performance of adult chinook salmon

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, David R. ); Brown, Richard S. ); Cullinan, Valerie I. ); Mesa, Matthew G.; VanderKooi, S P.; McKinstry, Craig A. )

    2003-10-01

    We measured oxygen consumption rates of adult spring Chinook salmon and compared these values to other species of Pacific salmon. Our results indicated that adult salmon achieve their maximum level of oxygen consumption at about their upper critical swim speed. It is also at this speed that the majority of the energy supplied to the swimming fish switches from red muscle (powered by aerobic metabolism) to white muscle (powered by anaerobic metabolism). Determining the swimming performance of adult salmon will assist managers in developing fishways and other means to safely pass fish over hydroelectric dams and other man-made structures.

  9. 28-Day emergency surgical re-admission rates as a clinical indicator of performance.

    PubMed Central

    Courtney, Edward D. J.; Ankrett, Sarah; McCollum, Peter T.

    2003-01-01

    With the introduction of clinical governance, the NHS Executive has identified 28-day emergency re-admission rates as a clinical indicator to be used to assess and compare performance between NHS trusts. We undertook a 3-month retrospective audit of patients identified from the trust computer as having been re-admitted as an emergency within 28 days of discharge from the general surgical division. We wanted to examine reasons for re-admission, possible errors in coding and any preventable factors in these patients subsequently re-admitted acutely. PMID:12648333

  10. Small PV Systems Performance Evaluation at NREL's Outdoor Test Facility Using the PVUSA Power Rating Method

    SciTech Connect

    Adelstein, J.; Sekulic, W.

    2005-11-01

    The PV Systems Performance and Reliability R & D group currently has seven grid-tied 1-2 kilowatt PV systems deployed at NREL's Outdoor Test Facility (OTF) and two 6 kilowatt systems mounted on the roof of NREL's Solar Energy Research Facility (SERF). The systems, which employ several PV module technologies including crystalline silicon (c-Si), amorphous silicon (a-Si), cadmium telluride (CdTe), and copper indium diselenide (CIS), are being monitored to determine the long-term performance and reliability of the modules and arrays under actual field conditions. The length of observation ranges from 2 months for our newest system to 11 years for our oldest systems. The annual degradation and seasonal fluctuation of the systems' power output are calculated using the PV for Utility-Scale Applications (PVUSA) power rating regression model.

  11. Solid-State Disk with Double Data Rate DRAM Interface for High-Performance PCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong; Bang, Kwanhu; Ha, Seung-Hwan; Park, Chanik; Chung, Sung Woo; Chung, Eui-Young

    We propose a Solid-State Disk (SSD) with a Double Data Rate (DDR) DRAM interface for high-performance PCs. Traditional SSDs simply inherit the interface protocol of Hard Disk Drives (HDD) such as Parallel Advanced Technology Attachment (PATA) or Serial-ATA (SATA) for maintaining the compatibility. However, SSD itself provides much higher performance than HDD, hence the interface also needs to be enhanced. Unlike the traditional SSDs, the proposed SSD with DDR DRAM interface is placed in the North Bridge which provides two or more DDR DRAM interface ports in high-performance PCs. The novelty of our work is on DQS signaling scheme which allows arbitrary Column Address Strobe (CAS) latency unlike typical DDR DRAM interface scheme. The experimental results show that the proposed SSD maximally outperforms the traditional SSD by 8.7 times in read mode, by 1.5 times in write mode. Also, for synthetic workloads, the proposed scheme shows performance improvement over the conventional architecture by a factor of 1.6 times.

  12. Performance and Abuse Testing of 5 Year Old Low Rate and Medium Rate Lithium Thionyl Chloride Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frerker, Rick; Zhang, Wenlin; Jeevarajan, Judith; Bragg, Bobby J.

    2001-01-01

    Most cells survived the 3 amp (A) over-discharge at room temperature for 2 hours. The cell that failed was the LTC-114 after high rate discharge of 500 mA similar to the results of the 1 A over-discharge test. Most cells opened during 0.05 Ohm short circuit test without incident but three LTC-111 cells exploded apparently due to a lack of a thermal cutoff switch. The LTC-114 cells exposed to a hard short of 0.05 Ohms recovered but the LTC-114 cells exposed to a soft short of 1 Ohm did not. This is probably due to the activation of a resetable fuse during a hard short. Fresh cells tend to survive exposure to higher temperatures than cells previously discharged at high rate (1 Amp). LTC-111 cells tend to vent at lower temperatures than the all LTC-114 cells and the LTC-115 cells that were previously discharged at rates exceeding 1 Amp.

  13. Feasibility of Amorphous Selenium Based Photon Counting Detectors for Digital Breast Tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; O'Connor, P.; Lehnert, J., De Geronimo, G., Dolazza, E., Tousignant, O., Laperriere, L., Greenspan, J., Zhao, W.

    2009-02-27

    Amorphous selenium (a-Se) has been incorporated successfully in direct conversion flat panel x-ray detectors, and has demonstrated superior image quality in screening mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) under energy integration mode. The present work explores the potential of a-Se for photon counting detectors in DBT. We investigated major factors contributing to the variation in the charge collected by a pixel upon absorption of each x-ray photon. These factors included x-ray photon interaction, detector geometry, charge transport, and the pulse shaping and noise properties of the photon counting readout circuit. Experimental measurements were performed on a linear array test structure constructed by evaporating an a-Se layer onto an array of 100 {mu}m pitch strip electrodes, which are connected to a 32 channel low noise photon counting integrated circuit. The measured pulse height spectrum (PHS) under polychromatic xray exposure was interpreted quantitatively using the factors identified. Based on the understanding of a-Se photon counting performance, design parameters were proposed for a 2D detector with high quantum efficiency and count rate that could meet the requirements of photon counting detector for DBT.

  14. Probing Mechanisms for Inverse Correlation between Rate Performance and Capacity in K-O2 Batteries.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Neng; Ren, Xiaodi; He, Mingfu; McCulloch, William D; Wu, Yiying

    2017-02-08

    Owing to the formation of potassium superoxide (K(+) + O2 + e(-) = KO2), K-O2 batteries exhibit superior round-trip efficiency and considerable energy density in the absence of any electrocatalysts. For further improving the practical performance of K-O2 batteries, it is important to carry out a systematic study on parameters that control rate performance and capacity to comprehensively understand the limiting factors in superoxide-based metal-oxygen batteries. Herein, we investigate the influence of current density and oxygen diffusion on the nucleation, growth, and distribution of potassium superoxide (KO2) during the discharge process. It is observed that higher current results in smaller average sizes of KO2 crystals but a larger surface coverage on the carbon fiber electrode. As KO2 grows and covers the cathode surface, the discharge will eventually end due to depletion of the oxygen-approachable electrode surface. Additionally, higher current also induces a greater gradient of oxygen concentration in the porous carbon electrode, resulting in less efficient loading of the discharge product. These two factors explain the observed inverse correlation between current and capacity of K-O2 batteries. Lastly, we demonstrate a reduced graphene oxide-based K-O2 battery with a large specific capacity (up to 8400 mAh/gcarbon at a discharge rate of 1000 mA/gcarbon) and a long cycle life (over 200 cycles).

  15. Augmenting data rate performance for higher order modulation in triangular index profile multicore fiber interconnect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Jitendra K.; Priye, Vishnu; Rahman, B. M. A.

    2016-07-01

    A triangular profile multicore fiber (MCF) optical interconnect (OI) is investigated to augment performance that typically degrades at high data rates for higher order modulation in a short reach transmission system. Firstly, probability density functions (PDFs) variation with inter-core crosstalk is calculated for 8-core MCF OI with different index profile in the core and it was observed that the triangular profile MCF OI is the most crosstalk tolerant. Next, symbol error probability (SEP) for higher order quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK) modulated signal due to inter-core crosstalk is analytically obtained and their dependence on typical characteristic parameters are examined. Further, numerical simulations are carried out to compare the error performance of QPSK for step index and triangular index MCF OI by generating eye diagram at 40 Gbps per channel. Finally, it is shown that MCF OI with triangular index profile supporting QPSK has double spectral efficiency with tolerable trade off in SEP as compared with those of binary phase shift keying (BPSK) at high data rates which is scalable up to 5 Tbps.

  16. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN HEART RATE AND PHYSIOLOGICAL PARAMETERS OF PERFORMANCE IN TOP-LEVEL WATER POLO PLAYERS

    PubMed Central

    Ben Zoubir, S.; Hambli, M.; Chaouachi, A.; Hue, O.; Chamari, K.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the heart rate (HR) response of eight elite water polo players during the four 7-min quarters of the game and to check for relationships with the physiological parameters of performance (V.O2max, Th1vent, Th2vent). Each athlete performed a V.O2max treadmill test and played a water polo game wearing a heart rate monitor. The game fatigue index was calculated as the ratio of the fourth-quarter HR to the first-quarter HR: HR4/HR1. The results showed a slight decrease in fourth-quarter HR compared with the first quarter, with the mean four-quarter HR equal to 79.9±4.2% of HRmax. Stepwise multiple regression analysis showed V.O2max to be the main explanatory factor of game intensity, i.e. game HR expressed in %HRreserve (R=0.88, P<0.01). We observed that higher aerobic capacity resulted in higher game intensity. We also observed a decrease in the playing intensity in the fourth quarter compared with the first, likely due to very high game involvement. We concluded that high aerobic capacity seems necessary to ensure high game intensity in water polo. This suggests that coaches should encourage their athletes to reach a minimum level of V.O2max and that HR monitoring could be of great interest in the control of water polo training sessions. PMID:24917687

  17. Performance of two-stage vegetable waste anaerobic digestion depending on varying recirculation rates.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Zhuang; Wu, Shubiao; Zhang, Wanqin; Dong, Renjie

    2014-06-01

    Vegetable waste, which characterized by high moisture content, was evaluated as a substrate for biogas production. The effects of recirculation rate (RR) on the performance of two-stage anaerobic digestion were investigated. The system was operated at an organic loading rate of 1.7 g VS/L/d with varying RRs (0, 0.6, 1, and 1.4). Results demonstrated that volumetric biogas production rates in acidogenic reactor increased from approximately 0.2 7 L/L/d to 0.97 L/L/d, when pH is increased from approximately 5.1 to 6.7. These indicate that recirculation of alkaline effluent from the methanogenic reactor helps create a favorable condition for biogas production in the acidogenic reactor. The decrease in chemical oxygen demand (COD) concentrations from approximately 21,000 mg/L to 6800 mg/L was also observed in the acidogenic reactor. This condition may be attributed to dilution under recirculation. The dynamics between hydrolysis and methanogenesis under recirculation indicated that mass transfer capacity between two-stage reactors improved.

  18. Modeling Outcomes of First-Line Antiretroviral Therapy and Rate of CD4 Counts Change among a Cohort of HIV/AIDS Patients in Ethiopia: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Awoke, Tadesse; Worku, Alemayehu; Kebede, Yigzaw; Kasim, Adetayo; Birlie, Belay; Braekers, Roel; Zuma, Khangelani; Shkedy, Ziv

    2016-01-01

    Background Antiretroviral therapy has shown to be effective in reducing morbidity and mortality in patients infected with HIV for the past couples of decades. However, there remains a need to better understand the characteristics of long-term treatment outcomes in resource poor settings. The main aim of this study was to determine and compare the long-term response of patients on nevirapine and efavirenz based first line antiretroviral therapy regimen in Ethiopia. Methods Hospital based retrospective cohort study was conducted from January 2009 to December 2013 at University hospital located in Northwest Ethiopia. Human subject research approval for this study was received from University of Gondar Research Ethics Committee and the medical director of the hospital. Cox-proportional hazards model was used to assess the effect of baseline covariates on composite outcome and a semi-parametric mixed effect model was used to investigate CD4 counts response to treatments. Results A total of 2386 HIV/AIDS naive patients were included in this study. Nearly one-in-four patients experienced the events, of which death, lost to follow up, treatment substitution and discontinuation of Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors(NNRTI) accounted: 99 (26.8%), 122 (33.0%), 137 (37.0%) and 12 (3.2%), respectively. The hazard of composite outcome on nevirapine compared with efavirenz was 1.02(95%CI: 0.52-1.99) with p-value = 0.96. Similarly, the hazard of composite outcome on tenofovir and stavudine compared with zidovudine were 1.87 (95%CI: 1.52-2.32), p-value < 0.0001 and 1.72(95% CI: 1.22-2.32), p-value = 0.002, respectively. The rate of CD4 increase in response to treatment was high during the first 10 months and stabilized later. Conclusions This study revealed that treatment responses were comparable whether nevirapine or efavirenz was chosen to initiate antiretroviral therapy for HIV/AIDS patients in Ethiopia. There was significant difference on risk of composite outcome

  19. Design Study of an Incinerator Ash Conveyor Counting System - 13323

    SciTech Connect

    Jaederstroem, Henrik; Bronson, Frazier

    2013-07-01

    A design study has been performed for a system that should measure the Cs-137 activity in ash from an incinerator. Radioactive ash, expected to consist of both Cs-134 and Cs-137, will be transported on a conveyor belt at 0.1 m/s. The objective of the counting system is to determine the Cs-137 activity and direct the ash to the correct stream after a diverter. The decision levels are ranging from 8000 to 400000 Bq/kg and the decision error should be as low as possible. The decision error depends on the total measurement uncertainty which depends on the counting statistics and the uncertainty in the efficiency of the geometry. For the low activity decision it is necessary to know the efficiency to be able to determine if the signal from the Cs-137 is above the minimum detectable activity and that it generates enough counts to reach the desired precision. For the higher activity decision the uncertainty of the efficiency needs to be understood to minimize decision errors. The total efficiency of the detector is needed to be able to determine if the detector will be able operate at the count rate at the highest expected activity. The design study that is presented in this paper describes how the objectives of the monitoring systems were obtained, the choice of detector was made and how ISOCS (In Situ Object Counting System) mathematical modeling was used to calculate the efficiency. The ISOCS uncertainty estimator (IUE) was used to determine which parameters of the ash was important to know accurately in order to minimize the uncertainty of the efficiency. The examined parameters include the height of the ash on the conveyor belt, the matrix composition and density and relative efficiency of the detector. (authors)

  20. High-Intensity Intermittent Exercise and its Effects on Heart Rate Variability and Subsequent Strength Performance

    PubMed Central

    Panissa, Valéria L. G.; Cal Abad, Cesar C.; Julio, Ursula F.; Andreato, Leonardo V.; Franchini, Emerson

    2016-01-01

    Prupose: To investigate the effects of a 5-km high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) on heart rate variability (HRV) and subsequent strength performance. Methods: Nine trained males performed a control session composed of a half-squat strength exercise (4 × 80% of one repetition maximum—1 RM) in isolation and 30-min, 1-, 4-, 8-, and 24-h after an HIIE (1-min at the velocity peak:1-min passive recovery). All experimental sessions were performed on different days. The maximum number of repetitions (MNR) and total weight lifted (TWL) during the strength exercise were registered in all conditions; in addition, prior to each session, HRV were assessed [beat-to-beat intervals (RR) and log-transformed of root means square of successive differences in the normal-to-normal intervals (lnRMSSD)]. Results: Performance in the strength exercise dropped at 30-min (31%) and 1-h (19%) post-HIIE concomitantly with lower values of RR (781 ± 79 ms; 799 ± 134 ms, respectively) in the same recovery intervals compared to the control (1015 ± 197 ms). Inferential analysis did not detect any effect of condition on lnRMSSD, however, values were lower after 30-min (3.5 ± 0.4 ms) and 1-h (3.3 ± 0.5 ms) with moderate and large effect sizes (0.9 and 1.2, respectively) compared with the control condition (3.9 ± 0.4 ms). Conclusion: Both RR and lnRMSSD seem to be associated with deleterious effects on strength performance, although further studies should be conducted to clarify this association. PMID:26973543

  1. The interplay between aerobic metabolism and antipredator performance: vigilance is related to recovery rate after exercise.

    PubMed

    Killen, Shaun S; Reid, Donald; Marras, Stefano; Domenici, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    When attacked by a predator, fish respond with a sudden fast-start motion away from the threat. Although this anaerobically-powered swimming necessitates a recovery phase which is fueled aerobically, little is known about links between escape performance and aerobic traits such as aerobic scope (AS) or recovery time after exhaustive exercise. Slower recovery ability or a reduced AS could make some individuals less likely to engage in a fast-start response or display reduced performance. Conversely, increased vigilance in some individuals could permit faster responses to an attack but also increase energy demand and prolong recovery after anaerobic exercise. We examined how AS and the ability to recover from anaerobic exercise relates to differences in fast-start escape performance in juvenile golden gray mullet at different acclimation temperatures. Individuals were acclimated to either 18, 22, or 26°C, then measured for standard and maximal metabolic rates and AS using intermittent flow respirometry. Anaerobic capacity and the time taken to recover after exercise were also assessed. Each fish was also filmed during a simulated attack to determine response latency, maximum speed and acceleration, and turning rate displayed during the escape response. Across temperatures, individuals with shorter response latencies during a simulated attack are those with the longest recovery time after exhaustive anaerobic exercise. Because a short response latency implies high preparedness to escape, these results highlight the trade-off between the increased vigilance and metabolic demand, which leads to longer recovery times in fast reactors. These results improve our understanding of the intrinsic physiological traits that generate inter-individual variability in escape ability, and emphasize that a full appreciation of trade-offs associated with predator avoidance and energy balance must include energetic costs associated with vigilance and recovery from anaerobic exercise.

  2. The interplay between aerobic metabolism and antipredator performance: vigilance is related to recovery rate after exercise

    PubMed Central

    Killen, Shaun S.; Reid, Donald; Marras, Stefano; Domenici, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    When attacked by a predator, fish respond with a sudden fast-start motion away from the threat. Although this anaerobically-powered swimming necessitates a recovery phase which is fueled aerobically, little is known about links between escape performance and aerobic traits such as aerobic scope (AS) or recovery time after exhaustive exercise. Slower recovery ability or a reduced AS could make some individuals less likely to engage in a fast-start response or display reduced performance. Conversely, increased vigilance in some individuals could permit faster responses to an attack but also increase energy demand and prolong recovery after anaerobic exercise. We examined how AS and the ability to recover from anaerobic exercise relates to differences in fast-start escape performance in juvenile golden gray mullet at different acclimation temperatures. Individuals were acclimated to either 18, 22, or 26°C, then measured for standard and maximal metabolic rates and AS using intermittent flow respirometry. Anaerobic capacity and the time taken to recover after exercise were also assessed. Each fish was also filmed during a simulated attack to determine response latency, maximum speed and acceleration, and turning rate displayed during the escape response. Across temperatures, individuals with shorter response latencies during a simulated attack are those with the longest recovery time after exhaustive anaerobic exercise. Because a short response latency implies high preparedness to escape, these results highlight the trade-off between the increased vigilance and metabolic demand, which leads to longer recovery times in fast reactors. These results improve our understanding of the intrinsic physiological traits that generate inter-individual variability in escape ability, and emphasize that a full appreciation of trade-offs associated with predator avoidance and energy balance must include energetic costs associated with vigilance and recovery from anaerobic exercise

  3. Rate-of-Change Dependence of the Performance of Two CGM Systems During Induced Glucose Swings

    PubMed Central

    Pleus, Stefan; Schoemaker, Michael; Morgenstern, Karin; Schmelzeisen-Redeker, Günther; Haug, Cornelia; Link, Manuela; Zschornack, Eva; Freckmann, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The accuracy of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) systems is often assessed with respect to blood glucose (BG) readings. CGM readings are affected by a physiological and a technical time delay when compared to BG readings. In this analysis, the dependence of CGM performance parameters on the BG rate of change was investigated for 2 CGM systems. Methods: Data from a previously published study were retrospectively analyzed. An established CGM system (Dexcom G4, Dexcom, San Diego, CA; system A) and a prototype system (Roche Diagnostics GmbH, Mannheim, Germany; system B) with 2 sensors each were worn by 10 subjects in parallel. Glucose swings were induced to achieve rapidly changing BG concentrations. Mean absolute relative differences (MARD) were calculated in different BG rate-of-change categories. In addition, sensor-to-sensor precision was assessed. Results: At BG rates of change of –1 mg/dl/min to 0 mg/dl/min and 0 mg/dl/min to +1 mg/dl/min, MARD results were 12.6% and 11.3% for system A and 8.2% and 10.0% for system B. At rapidly changing BG concentrations (<–3 mg/dl/min and ≥+3 mg/dl/min), higher MARD results were found for both systems, but system B was less affected (system A: 24.9% and 29.6%, system B: 10.6% and 16.3%). The impact of rate of change on sensor-to-sensor precision was less pronounced. Conclusions: Both systems were affected by rapidly changing BG concentrations to some degree, although system B was mostly unaffected by decreasing BG concentrations. It would seem that technological advancements in CGM systems might allow for a more precise tracking of BG concentrations even at rapidly changing BG concentrations. PMID:25852074

  4. Kinetic performance limits of constant pressure versus constant flow rate gradient elution separations. Part I: theory.

    PubMed

    Broeckhoven, K; Verstraeten, M; Choikhet, K; Dittmann, M; Witt, K; Desmet, G

    2011-02-25

    We report on a general theoretical assessment of the potential kinetic advantages of running LC gradient elution separations in the constant-pressure mode instead of in the customarily used constant-flow rate mode. Analytical calculations as well as numerical simulation results are presented. It is shown that, provided both modes are run with the same volume-based gradient program, the constant-pressure mode can potentially offer an identical separation selectivity (except from some small differences induced by the difference in pressure and viscous heating trajectory), but in a significantly shorter time. For a gradient running between 5 and 95% of organic modifier, the decrease in analysis time can be expected to be of the order of some 20% for both water-methanol and water-acetonitrile gradients, and only weakly depending on the value of V(G)/V₀ (or equivalently t(G)/t₀). Obviously, the gain will be smaller when the start and end composition lie closer to the viscosity maximum of the considered water-organic modifier system. The assumptions underlying the obtained results (no effects of pressure and temperature on the viscosity or retention coefficient) are critically reviewed, and can be inferred to only have a small effect on the general conclusions. It is also shown that, under the adopted assumptions, the kinetic plot theory also holds for operations where the flow rate varies with the time, as is the case for constant-pressure operation. Comparing both operation modes in a kinetic plot representing the maximal peak capacity versus time, it is theoretically predicted here that both modes can be expected to perform equally well in the fully C-term dominated regime (where H varies linearly with the flow rate), while the constant pressure mode is advantageous for all lower flow rates. Near the optimal flow rate, and for linear gradients running from 5 to 95% organic modifier, time gains of the order of some 20% can be expected (or 25-30% when accounting for

  5. 32-channel single photon counting module for ultrasensitive detection of DNA sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudkov, Georgiy; Dhulla, Vinit; Borodin, Anatoly; Gavrilov, Dmitri; Stepukhovich, Andrey; Tsupryk, Andrey; Gorbovitski, Boris; Gorfinkel, Vera

    2006-10-01

    We continue our work on the design and implementation of multi-channel single photon detection systems for highly sensitive detection of ultra-weak fluorescence signals, for high-performance, multi-lane DNA sequencing instruments. A fiberized, 32-channel single photon detection (SPD) module based on single photon avalanche diode (SPAD), model C30902S-DTC, from Perkin Elmer Optoelectronics (PKI) has been designed and implemented. Unavailability of high performance, large area SPAD arrays and our desire to design high performance photon counting systems drives us to use individual diodes. Slight modifications in our quenching circuit has doubled the linear range of our system from 1MHz to 2MHz, which is the upper limit for these devices and the maximum saturation count rate has increased to 14 MHz. The detector module comprises of a single board computer PC-104 that enables data visualization, recording, processing, and transfer. Very low dark count (300-1000 counts/s), robust, efficient, simple data collection and processing, ease of connectivity to any other application demanding similar requirements and similar performance results to the best commercially available single photon counting module (SPCM from PKI) are some of the features of this system.

  6. High Red Blood Cell Count

    MedlinePlus

    Symptoms High red blood cell count By Mayo Clinic Staff A high red blood cell count is an increase in oxygen-carrying cells in your bloodstream. Red blood cells transport oxygen from your lungs to tissues throughout ...

  7. Error Rates in Measuring Teacher and School Performance Based on Student Test Score Gains. NCEE 2010-4004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schochet, Peter Z.; Chiang, Hanley S.

    2010-01-01

    This paper addresses likely error rates for measuring teacher and school performance in the upper elementary grades using value-added models applied to student test score gain data. Using realistic performance measurement system schemes based on hypothesis testing, we develop error rate formulas based on OLS and Empirical Bayes estimators.…

  8. Motor learning in children with spina bifida: dissociation between performance level and acquisition rate.

    PubMed

    Edelstein, Kim; Dennis, Maureen; Copeland, Kim; Frederick, Jon; Francis, David; Hetherington, Ross; Brandt, Michael E; Fletcher, Jack M

    2004-10-01

    The cerebellum is part of a neural circuit involved in procedural motor learning. We examined how congenital cerebellar malformations affect mirror drawing performance, a procedural learning task that involves learning to trace the outline of a star while looking at the reflection of the star in a mirror. Participants were 88 children with spina bifida myelomeningocele, a neural tube defect that results in lesions of the spinal cord, dysmorphology of the cerebellum, and requires shunt treatment for hydrocephalus, and 35 typically developing controls. Participants completed 10 trials in the morning and 10 trials following a 3-hr delay. Although children with spina bifida myelomeningocele were initially slower at tracing and made more errors than controls, all participants improved their performance of the task, as demonstrated by increased speed and accuracy across trials. Moreover, degree of cerebellar dysmorphology was not correlated with level of performance, rate of acquisition, or retention of mirror drawing. The results suggest that congenital cerebellar dysmorphology in spina bifida does not impair motor skill learning as measured by acquisition and retention of the mirror drawing task.

  9. The Effects of Guided Imagery on Heart Rate Variability in Simulated Spaceflight Emergency Tasks Performers

    PubMed Central

    Yijing, Zhang; Xiaoping, Du; Fang, Liu; Xiaolu, Jing; Bin, Wu

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of guided imagery training on heart rate variability in individuals while performing spaceflight emergency tasks. Materials and Methods. Twenty-one student subjects were recruited for the experiment and randomly divided into two groups: imagery group (n = 11) and control group (n = 10). The imagery group received instructor-guided imagery (session 1) and self-guided imagery training (session 2) consecutively, while the control group only received conventional training. Electrocardiograms of the subjects were recorded during their performance of nine spaceflight emergency tasks after imagery training. Results. In both of the sessions, the root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD), the standard deviation of all normal NN (SDNN), the proportion of NN50 divided by the total number of NNs (PNN50), the very low frequency (VLF), the low frequency (LF), the high frequency (HF), and the total power (TP) in the imagery group were significantly higher than those in the control group. Moreover, LF/HF of the subjects after instructor-guided imagery training was lower than that after self-guided imagery training. Conclusions. Guided imagery was an effective regulator for HRV indices and could be a potential stress countermeasure in performing spaceflight tasks. PMID:26137491

  10. Barbell deadlift training increases the rate of torque development and vertical jump performance in novices.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Brennan J; Stock, Matt S; Shields, JoCarol E; Luera, Micheal J; Munayer, Ibrahim K; Mota, Jacob A; Carrillo, Elias C; Olinghouse, Kendra D

    2015-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine the effects of 10 weeks of barbell deadlift training on rapid torque characteristics of the knee extensors and flexors. A secondary aim was to analyze the relationships between training-induced changes in rapid torque and vertical jump performance. Fifty-four subjects (age, mean ± SD = 23 ± 3 years) were randomly assigned to a control (n = 20) or training group (n = 34). Subjects in the training group performed supervised deadlift training twice per week for 10 weeks. All subjects performed isometric strength testing of the knee extensors and flexors and vertical jumps before and after the intervention. Torque-time curves were used to calculate rate of torque development (RTD) values at peak and at 50 and 200 milliseconds from torque onset. Barbell deadlift training induced significant pre- to post-increases of 18.8-49.0% for all rapid torque variables (p < 0.01). Vertical jump height increased from 46.0 ± 11.3 to 49.4 ± 11.3 cm (7.4%; p < 0.01), and these changes were positively correlated with improvements in RTD for the knee flexors (r = 0.30-0.37, p < 0.01-0.03). These findings showed that a 10-week barbell deadlift training program was effective at enhancing rapid torque capacities in both the knee extensors and flexors. Changes in rapid torque were associated with improvements in vertical jump height, suggesting a transfer of adaptations from deadlift training to an explosive, performance-based task. Professionals may use these findings when attempting to design effective, time-efficient resistance training programs to improve explosive strength capacities in novices.

  11. Effects of Time-Release Caffeine Containing Supplement on Metabolic Rate, Glycerol Concentration and Performance

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Adam M.; Hoffman, Jay R.; Wells, Adam J.; Mangine, Gerald T.; Townsend, Jeremy R.; Jajtner, Adam R.; Wang, Ran; Miramonti, Amelia A.; Pruna, Gabriel J.; LaMonica, Michael B.; Bohner, Jonathan D.; Hoffman, Mattan W.; Oliveira, Leonardo P.; Fukuda, David H.; Fragala, Maren S.; Stout, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    This study compared caffeine pharmacokinetics, glycerol concentrations, metabolic rate, and performance measures following ingestion of a time-release caffeine containing supplement (TR-CAF) versus a regular caffeine capsule (CAF) and a placebo (PL). Following a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, cross-over design, ten males (25.9 ± 3.2 y) who regularly consume caffeine ingested capsules containing either TR-CAF, CAF, or PL. Blood draws and performance measures occurred at every hour over an 8-hour period. Plasma caffeine concentrations were significantly greater (p < 0.05) in CAF compared to TR-CAF during hours 2-5 and significantly greater (p = 0.042) in TR-CAF compared to CAF at hour 8. There were no significant differences between trials in glycerol concentrations (p = 0.86) or metabolic measures (p = 0.17-0.91). Physical reaction time was significantly improved for CAF at hour 5 (p=0.01) compared to PL. Average upper body reaction time was significantly improved for CAF and TR-CAF during hours 1-4 (p = 0.04 and p = 0.01, respectively) and over the 8-hour period (p = 0.04 and p = 0.001, respectively) compared to PL. Average upper body reaction time was also significantly improved for TR-CAF compared to PL during hours 5-8 (p = 0.004). TR-CAF and CAF showed distinct pharmacokinetics yielding modest effects on reaction time, yet did not alter glycerol concentration, metabolic measures, or other performance measures. Key points Time-release caffeine and regular caffeine showed distinct pharmacokinetics over an 8-hour period following ingestion. Time-release caffeine and regular caffeine yielded modest effects on reaction time over an 8-hour period following ingestion. Time-release caffeine and regular caffeine did not alter glycerol concentration, metabolic measures, or other performance measures over an 8-hour period following ingestion. PMID:25983581

  12. Technology Counts 2007: A Digital Decade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Week, 2007

    2007-01-01

    "Technology Counts 2007" looks back, and ahead, after a decade of enormous upheaval in the educational technology landscape. This special issue of "Education Week" includes the following articles: (1) A Digital Decade; (2) Getting Up to Speed (Andrew Trotter); (3) E-Rate's Imprint Seen in Schools (Andrew Trotter); (4) Teaching…

  13. All Our Children: Massachusetts Kids Count 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamond, Franna, Ed.

    This Kids Count report examines statewide trends from 1990 to 1994 in the well-being of Massachusetts' children. The statistical portrait is based on indicators of well-being in five areas: (1) economic well-being of children and their families, including child poverty rate, family income, job loss, earnings of male high school dropouts and…

  14. Alabama Kids Count 2001 Data Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Apreill; Bogie, Don

    This Kids Count data book examines statewide trends in well-being for Alabama's children. The statistical portrait is based on 17 indicators in the areas of health, education, safety, and security. The indicators are: (1) infant mortality rate; (2) low weight births; (3) child health index; (4) births to unmarried teens; (5) first grade retention;…

  15. Alabama Kids Count 2002 Data Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Apreill; Bogie, Don

    This Kids Count data book examines statewide trends in well-being of Alabamas children. The statistical portrait is based on 18 indicators in the areas of child health, education, safety, and security: (1) infant mortality rate; (2) low weight births; (3) child health index; (4) births to unmarried teens; (5) first grade retention; (6) school…

  16. Kids Count Report in Nebraska, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Janet M.

    This Kids Count report examines statewide trend data on the well-being of Nebraska's children. Section 1 of the report presents U.S. Census data on population trends in Nebraska as well as child poverty rates, and urges Nebraskans to work together to ensure that its youngest citizens have the best start possible. Section 2, the bulk of this…

  17. County Data Book 1997: Kentucky Kids Count.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky Kids Count Consortium.

    This Kids Count data book examines trends in the well-being of Kentucky's children on a statewide and county basis. An introduction summarizes some of the trends for Kentucky's children in the 1990s. The bulk of the report presents statewide and county data grouped into five categories: (1) poverty rates and programs (persons in poverty; median…

  18. KIDS COUNT in Virginia: 1999 Data Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Action Alliance for Virginia's Children and Youth, Richmond.

    This Kids Count data book examines statewide trends in the well-being of Virginia's children. The statistical portrait is based on five general areas of children's well being: health, safety, education, families, and economic factors. Key indicators in these five areas include: (1) prenatal care rates; (2) low birthweight; (3) child deaths; (4)…

  19. Counting RG flows

    SciTech Connect

    Gukov, Sergei

    2016-01-05

    Here, interpreting renormalization group flows as solitons interpolating between different fixed points, we ask various questions that are normally asked in soliton physics but not in renormalization theory. Can one count RG flows? Are there different "topological sectors" for RG flows? What is the moduli space of an RG flow, and how does it compare to familiar moduli spaces of (supersymmetric) dowain walls? Analyzing these questions in a wide variety of contexts -- from counting RG walls to AdS/CFT correspondence -- will not only provide favorable answers, but will also lead us to a unified general framework that is powerful enough to account for peculiar RG flows and predict new physical phenomena. Namely, using Bott's version of Morse theory we relate the topology of conformal manifolds to certain properties of RG flows that can be used as precise diagnostics and "topological obstructions" for the strong form of the C-theorem in any dimension. Moreover, this framework suggests a precise mechanism for how the violation of the strong C-theorem happens and predicts "phase transitions" along the RG flow when the topological obstruction is non-trivial. Along the way, we also find new conformal manifolds in well-known 4d CFT's and point out connections with the superconformal index and classifying spaces of global symmetry groups.

  20. Counting RG flows

    DOE PAGES

    Gukov, Sergei

    2016-01-05

    Here, interpreting renormalization group flows as solitons interpolating between different fixed points, we ask various questions that are normally asked in soliton physics but not in renormalization theory. Can one count RG flows? Are there different "topological sectors" for RG flows? What is the moduli space of an RG flow, and how does it compare to familiar moduli spaces of (supersymmetric) dowain walls? Analyzing these questions in a wide variety of contexts -- from counting RG walls to AdS/CFT correspondence -- will not only provide favorable answers, but will also lead us to a unified general framework that is powerfulmore » enough to account for peculiar RG flows and predict new physical phenomena. Namely, using Bott's version of Morse theory we relate the topology of conformal manifolds to certain properties of RG flows that can be used as precise diagnostics and "topological obstructions" for the strong form of the C-theorem in any dimension. Moreover, this framework suggests a precise mechanism for how the violation of the strong C-theorem happens and predicts "phase transitions" along the RG flow when the topological obstruction is non-trivial. Along the way, we also find new conformal manifolds in well-known 4d CFT's and point out connections with the superconformal index and classifying spaces of global symmetry groups.« less

  1. Neural networks counting chimes.

    PubMed Central

    Amit, D J

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that the ideas that led to neural networks capable of recalling associatively and asynchronously temporal sequences of patterns can be extended to produce a neural network that automatically counts the cardinal number in a sequence of identical external stimuli. The network is explicitly constructed, analyzed, and simulated. Such a network may account for the cognitive effect of the automatic counting of chimes to tell the hour. A more general implication is that different electrophysiological responses to identical stimuli, at certain stages of cortical processing, do not necessarily imply synaptic modification, a la Hebb. Such differences may arise from the fact that consecutive identical inputs find the network in different stages of an active temporal sequence of cognitive states. These types of networks are then situated within a program for the study of cognition, which assigns the detection of meaning as the primary role of attractor neural networks rather than computation, in contrast to the parallel distributed processing attitude to the connectionist project. This interpretation is free of homunculus, as well as from the criticism raised against the cognitive model of symbol manipulation. Computation is then identified as the syntax of temporal sequences of quasi-attractors. PMID:3353371

  2. Optimal gate-width setting for passive neutrons multiplicity counting

    SciTech Connect

    Croft, Stephen; Evans, Louise G; Schear, Melissa A

    2010-01-01

    When setting up a passive neutron coincidence counter it is natural to ask what coincidence gate settings should be used to optimize the counting precision. If the gate width is too short then signal is lost and the precision is compromised because in a given period only a few coincidence events will be observed. On the other hand if the gate is too large the signal will be maximized but it will also be compromised by the high level of random pile-up or Accidental coincidence events which must be subtracted. In the case of shift register electronics connected to an assay chamber with an exponential dieaway profile operating in the regime where the Accidentals rate dominates the Reals coincidence rate but where dead-time is not a concern, simple arguments allow one to show that the relative precision on the net Reals rate is minimized when the coincidence gate is set to about 1.2 times the lie dieaway time of the system. In this work we show that making the same assumptions it is easy to show that the relative precision on the Triples rates is also at a minimum when the relative precision of the Doubles (or Reals) is at a minimum. Although the analysis is straightforward to our knowledge such a discussion has not been documented in the literature before. Actual measurement systems do not always behave in the ideal we choose to model them. Fortunately however the variation in the relative precision as a function of gate width is rather flat for traditional safeguards counters and so the performance is somewhat forgiving of the exact choice. The derivation further serves to delineate the important parameters which determine the relative counting precision of the Doubles and Triples rates under the regime considered. To illustrate the similarities and differences we consider the relative standard deviation that might be anticipated for a passive correlation count of an axial section of a spent nuclear fuel assembly under practically achievable conditions.

  3. Critical transport rates that limit the performance of microbial electrochemistry technologies.

    PubMed

    Popat, Sudeep C; Torres, César I

    2016-09-01

    Microbial electrochemistry technologies (METs) take advantage of the connection of microorganisms with electrodes. In the classic case of a microbial anode, the maximization of current density produced is often the goal. But, current production is dependent on many transport processes occurring, which can be rate-limiting. These include the fluxes of electron donor and acceptor, the ionic flux, the acidity and alkalinity fluxes at anode and cathode respectively, the electron transport flux at the biofilm, and the reactant/product crossover flux. Associated with these fluxes are inherent concentration gradients that can affect performance. This critical review provides an analysis on how these transport processes have hindered the development of METs, and how MET designs have evolved as more knowledge of these transport limitations is gained. Finally, suggestions are provided on how to design MET systems taking into consideration critical transport processes that are intimately linked to the current produced.

  4. The effect of Be and Cr electrode deposition rate on the performance of MIS solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moharram, A. H.; Panayotatos, P.; Yeh, J. L.; Lalevic, B.

    1985-07-01

    An experimental study has been performed on MIS solar cells with Be, Cr and layered Cr-Be electrodes on single crystal Si, Wacker and Monsanto poly-Si substrates. Electrical characterization in the dark and under illumination was correlated to X-ray and Auger spectroscopy results. It was found that the electrode deposition rate directly affects the oxygen content of the electrodes for all metal-substrate configurations. This oxygen is believed to originate from the deposition ambient as well as from the SiO2 layer. In the case of cells with Cr and layered Cr-Be electrodes oxygen acts to reduce the electrode work function (thus increasing the open-circuit voltage) in direct proportion to the relative content of oxygen to chromium.

  5. Performance of a constructed wetland treating intensive shrimp aquaculture wastewater under high hydraulic loading rate.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ying-Feng; Jing, Shuh-Ren; Lee, Der-Yuan; Chang, Yih-Feng; Chen, Yi-Ming; Shih, Kai-Chung

    2005-04-01

    A water treatment unit, mainly consisting of free water surface (FWS) and subsurface flow (SF) constructed wetland cells, was integrated into a commercial-scale recirculating aquaculture system for intensive shrimp culture. This study investigated performance of the treatment wetlands for controlling water quality. The results showed that the FWS-SF cells effectively removed total suspended solids (55-66%), 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (37-54%), total ammonia (64-66%) and nitrite (83-94%) from the recirculating water under high hydraulic loading rates (1.57-1.95 m/day). This led to a water quality that was suitable for shrimp culture and effluent that always satisfied the discharge standards. The area ratios of wetlands to culture tank being demonstrated (0.43) and calculated (0.096) in this study were both significantly lower than the reported values. Accordingly, a constructed wetland was technically and economically feasible for managing water quality of an intensive aquaculture system.

  6. Evaluation of Pulse Counting for the Mars Organic Mass Analyzer (MOMA) Ion Trap Detection Scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Amerom, Friso H.; Short, Tim; Brinckerhoff, William; Mahaffy, Paul; Kleyner, Igor; Cotter, Robert J.; Pinnick, Veronica; Hoffman, Lars; Danell, Ryan M.; Lyness, Eric I.

    2011-01-01

    The Mars Organic Mass Analyzer is being developed at Goddard Space Flight Center to identify organics and possible biological compounds on Mars. In the process of characterizing mass spectrometer size, weight, and power consumption, the use of pulse counting was considered for ion detection. Pulse counting has advantages over analog-mode amplification of the electron multiplier signal. Some advantages are reduced size of electronic components, low power consumption, ability to remotely characterize detector performance, and avoidance of analog circuit noise. The use of pulse counting as a detection method with ion trap instruments is relatively rare. However, with the recent development of high performance electrical components, this detection method is quite suitable and can demonstrate significant advantages over analog methods. Methods A prototype quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer with an internal electron ionization source was used as a test setup to develop and evaluate the pulse-counting method. The anode signal from the electron multiplier was preamplified. The an1plified signal was fed into a fast comparator for pulse-level discrimination. The output of the comparator was fed directly into a Xilinx FPGA development board. Verilog HDL software was written to bin the counts at user-selectable intervals. This system was able to count pulses at rates in the GHz range. The stored ion count nun1ber per bin was transferred to custom ion trap control software. Pulse-counting mass spectra were compared with mass spectra obtained using the standard analog-mode ion detection. Prelin1inary Data Preliminary mass spectra have been obtained for both analog mode and pulse-counting mode under several sets of instrument operating conditions. Comparison of the spectra revealed better peak shapes for pulse-counting mode. Noise levels are as good as, or better than, analog-mode detection noise levels. To artificially force ion pile-up conditions, the ion trap was overfilled

  7. Relationships between heart rate and physiological parameters of performance in top-level water polo players.

    PubMed

    Galy, O; Ben Zoubir, S; Hambli, M; Chaouachi, A; Hue, O; Chamari, K

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the heart rate (HR) response of eight elite water polo players during the four 7-min quarters of the game and to check for relationships with the physiological parameters of performance ([Formula: see text]O2max, Th1vent, Th2vent). Each athlete performed a [Formula: see text]O2max treadmill test and played a water polo game wearing a heart rate monitor. The game fatigue index was calculated as the ratio of the fourth-quarter HR to the first-quarter HR: HR4/HR1. The results showed a slight decrease in fourth-quarter HR compared with the first quarter, with the mean four-quarter HR equal to 79.9±4.2% of HRmax. Stepwise multiple regression analysis showed [Formula: see text]O2max to be the main explanatory factor of game intensity, i.e. game HR expressed in %HRreserve (R=0.88, P<0.01). We observed that higher aerobic capacity resulted in higher game intensity. We also observed a decrease in the playing intensity in the fourth quarter compared with the first, likely due to very high game involvement. We concluded that high aerobic capacity seems necessary to ensure high game intensity in water polo. This suggests that coaches should encourage their athletes to reach a minimum level of [Formula: see text]O2max and that HR monitoring could be of great interest in the control of water polo training sessions.

  8. Growth Curve Models for Zero-Inflated Count Data: An Application to Smoking Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Hui; Powers, Daniel A.

    2007-01-01

    This article applies growth curve models to longitudinal count data characterized by an excess of zero counts. We discuss a zero-inflated Poisson regression model for longitudinal data in which the impact of covariates on the initial counts and the rate of change in counts over time is the focus of inference. Basic growth curve models using a…

  9. Potentiostatic activation of as-made graphene electrodes for high-rate performance in supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthilkumar, Krishnan; Jeong, Seok; Lah, Myoung Soo; Sohn, Kee-Sun; Pyo, Myoungho

    2016-10-01

    A thermally expanded graphene oxide (EGO) electrode is electrochemically activated to simultaneously introduce electrolyte-accessible mesopores and oxygen functional groups. The former is produced via O2 evolution and the latter is incorporated by the intermediate hydroxyl radicals generated during the potentiostatic oxidation of H2O in 1 M H2SO4 at 1.2 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). When applied as a supercapacitor, the potentiostatically treated EGO (EGO-PS) shows significant enhancement in an electric-double layer (EDL) process with a noticeable Faradaic reaction and delivers high capacitance at fast charge/discharge (C/D) rates (334 F g-1 at 0.1 A g-1 and 230 F g-1 at 50 A g-1). In contrast to EGO-PS, EGO that is oxidized potentiodynamically (EGO-PD) shows negligible enhancement in EDL currents. EGO that is subjected to successive potential pulses also shows behaviors similar to EGO-PD, which indicates the importance of hydroxyl radical accumulation via a potentiostatic method for simultaneous functionalization and microstructural control of graphenes. The potentiostatic post-treatment presented here is a convenient post-treatment strategy that could be used to readily increase capacitance and simultaneously improve the high-rate performance of carbon-based electrodes.

  10. Performance measurements of superconducting current leads having low helium boiloff rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemann, R. C.; Cha, Y. S.; Hull, J. R.

    1992-08-01

    We have created a performance-measurement facility for current leads as a part of our Laboratory's program to develop applications for high-temperature superconductors. The facility measures the rate of helium vapor boil-off due to current-lead heat input to liquid helium and the pressure drop across a current lead for a pair of leads operating at currents to 100 A. The facility's major components are a liquid-helium dewar having low background heat input; a dewar insert which incorporates the current leads and associated instrumentation or connections for flow, pressure, level, temperature and voltage measurements; and a computer-driven data-acquisition system. The background beat input is small enough so that boiloff rates one-tenth that of an optimized conventional lead can be characterized. The facility has been operated with both conventional; i.e., vapor-cooled copper leads and with leads incorporating high-temperature superconductors at their cold ends. Details of the facility design, construction and operating experiences are presented.

  11. Universal roles of hydrogen in electrochemical performance of graphene: high rate capacity and atomistic origins

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Jianchao; Ong, Mitchell T.; Heo, Tae Wook; Campbell, Patrick G.; Worsley, Marcus A.; Liu, Yuanyue; Shin, Swanee J.; Charnvanichborikarn, Supakit; Matthews, Manyalibo J.; Bagge-Hansen, Michael; Lee, Jonathan R.I.; Wood, Brandon C.; Wang, Y. Morris

    2015-01-01

    Atomic hydrogen exists ubiquitously in graphene materials made by chemical methods. Yet determining the effect of hydrogen on the electrochemical performance of graphene remains a significant challenge. Here we report the experimental observations of high rate capacity in hydrogen-treated 3-dimensional (3D) graphene nanofoam electrodes for lithium ion batteries. Structural and electronic characterization suggests that defect sites and hydrogen play synergistic roles in disrupting sp2 graphene to facilitate fast lithium transport and reversible surface binding, as evidenced by the fast charge-transfer kinetics and increased capacitive contribution in hydrogen-treated 3D graphene. In concert with experiments, multiscale calculations reveal that defect complexes in graphene are prerequisite for low-temperature hydrogenation, and that the hydrogenation of defective or functionalized sites at strained domain boundaries plays a beneficial role in improving rate capacity by opening gaps to facilitate easier Li penetration. Additional reversible capacity is provided by enhanced lithium binding near hydrogen-terminated edge sites. These findings provide qualitative insights in helping the design of graphene-based materials for high-power electrodes. PMID:26536830

  12. Paradoxical roles of hydrogen in electrochemical performance of graphene: High rate capacity and atomistic origins

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Jianchao C.; Ong, Mitchell T.; Heo, Tae Wook; Campbell, Patrick G.; Worsley, Marcus A.; Liu, Yuanyue Y.; Charnvanichborikarn, Supakit; Matthews, Manyalibo J.; Bagge-Hansen, Michael; Lee, Jonathan R. I.; Wood, Brandon C.; Wang, Y. Morris; Shin, Swanee J.

    2015-11-05

    Atomic hydrogen exists ubiquitously in graphene materials made by chemical methods. Yet determining the effect of hydrogen on the electrochemical performance of graphene remains a significant challenge. Here we report the experimental observations of high rate capacity in hydrogen-treated 3-dimensional (3D) graphene nanofoam electrodes for lithium ion batteries. Structural and electronic characterization suggests that defect sites and hydrogen play synergistic roles in disrupting sp2 graphene to facilitate fast lithium transport and reversible surface binding, as evidenced by the fast charge-transfer kinetics and increased capacitive contribution in hydrogen-treated 3D graphene. In concert with experiments, multiscale calculations reveal that defect complexes in graphene are prerequisite for low-temperature hydrogenation, and that the hydrogenation of defective or functionalized sites at strained domain boundaries plays a beneficial role in improving rate capacity by opening gaps to facilitate easier Li penetration. Additional reversible capacity is provided by enhanced lithium binding near hydrogen-terminated edge sites. Furthermore, these findings provide qualitative insights in helping the design of graphene-based materials for high-power electrodes.

  13. Paradoxical roles of hydrogen in electrochemical performance of graphene: High rate capacity and atomistic origins

    DOE PAGES

    Ye, Jianchao C.; Ong, Mitchell T.; Heo, Tae Wook; ...

    2015-11-05

    Atomic hydrogen exists ubiquitously in graphene materials made by chemical methods. Yet determining the effect of hydrogen on the electrochemical performance of graphene remains a significant challenge. Here we report the experimental observations of high rate capacity in hydrogen-treated 3-dimensional (3D) graphene nanofoam electrodes for lithium ion batteries. Structural and electronic characterization suggests that defect sites and hydrogen play synergistic roles in disrupting sp2 graphene to facilitate fast lithium transport and reversible surface binding, as evidenced by the fast charge-transfer kinetics and increased capacitive contribution in hydrogen-treated 3D graphene. In concert with experiments, multiscale calculations reveal that defect complexes inmore » graphene are prerequisite for low-temperature hydrogenation, and that the hydrogenation of defective or functionalized sites at strained domain boundaries plays a beneficial role in improving rate capacity by opening gaps to facilitate easier Li penetration. Additional reversible capacity is provided by enhanced lithium binding near hydrogen-terminated edge sites. Furthermore, these findings provide qualitative insights in helping the design of graphene-based materials for high-power electrodes.« less

  14. Investigation of factors affecting terrestrial passive sampling device performance and uptake rates in laboratory chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.A.; Weisskopf, C.P.

    1995-12-31

    A rapid sampling method using passive sampling devices (PSDS) for soil contaminant characterization shows extreme promise. The use of PSDs increases ease and speed of analysis, decreases solvent usage and cost, and minimizes the transport of contaminated soils. Time and cost savings allow a high sampling frequency, providing a more thorough site characterization than traditional methods. The authors have conducted both laboratory and field studies with terrestrial PSDS. Laboratory studies demonstrated the concentration and moisture dependence of sampler uptake and provided an estimate of the optimal field sampling time for soils contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). These PSDs were also used to accurately estimate PCB concentrations at hazardous waste site where concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 200 ug PCB/g soil. However, PSDs in the field had sampling rates approximately three times greater than in the laboratory. As a result several factors affecting PSD sampling rates and/or performance in laboratory chambers were evaluated. The parameters investigated were soil bulk density or compactness, chamber size and air flow. The chemicals used in these studies included two PCB congeners (52 and 153), three organochlorine pesticides (DDT, dieldrin and methoxychlor), three organophosphate pesticides (chlorpyrifos, diazinon and terbufos) and three herbicides (alachlor, atrazine and metolachlor).

  15. Synthesis of Li-Rich Cathode Material with High C-Rate Performance by Reductive Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sung Nam; Seo, Jung Yoon; Song, Shin Ae; Kim, Ki Young; Park, Seung Bin; Jung, Dae Soo

    2017-01-01

    Li-rich cathode materials have intrinsically poor rate capability along with low electronic conductivity, which remain as unsolved drawbacks limiting their use in applications that require cathode material with layered structures. Here, we prepared surface-modified Li-rich cathode materials to address these drawbacks via reductive treatment. After reductive treatment, we confirmed that these samples feature better electrochemical performance; the reductive treated samples show higher capacity and better capacity retention during cycling compared to samples treated only in air. In particular, the reductive treated samples showed excellent rate capability of 168 mAh g-1 at a current density of 400 mA g-1 compared to 138 mAh g-1 for the air treated sample. We confirmed that reductive treatment reduces the resistance for charge transfer based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy analysis. We also investigated the effects of reductive treatment on the cathode structure of both samples using x-ray diffraction as well as x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  16. Synthesis of Li-Rich Cathode Material with High C-Rate Performance by Reductive Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sung Nam; Seo, Jung Yoon; Song, Shin Ae; Kim, Ki Young; Park, Seung Bin; Jung, Dae Soo

    2017-03-01

    Li-rich cathode materials have intrinsically poor rate capability along with low electronic conductivity, which remain as unsolved drawbacks limiting their use in applications that require cathode material with layered structures. Here, we prepared surface-modified Li-rich cathode materials to address these drawbacks via reductive treatment. After reductive treatment, we confirmed that these samples feature better electrochemical performance; the reductive treated samples show higher capacity and better capacity retention during cycling compared to samples treated only in air. In particular, the reductive treated samples showed excellent rate capability of 168 mAh g-1 at a current density of 400 mA g-1 compared to 138 mAh g-1 for the air treated sample. We confirmed that reductive treatment reduces the resistance for charge transfer based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy analysis. We also investigated the effects of reductive treatment on the cathode structure of both samples using x-ray diffraction as well as x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  17. Relationships Between Metabolic Rate, Muscle Electromyograms and Swim Performance of Adult Chinook Salmon

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, David R.; Brown, Richard S.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Mesa, Matthew G.; VanderKooi, S P.; McKinstry, Craig A.

    2003-10-01

    In 2000 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory initiated a two-year study to investigate the metabolic rate and swimming performance and to estimate the total energy used (i.e., aerobic and anaerobic) by adult spring Chinook salmon migrating upstream through a large hydropower dam on the Columbia River. The investigation involved one year of laboratory study and one year of field study at Bonneville Dam. The objectives of the laboratory study, reported here, were to (1) measure active rates of oxygen consumption of adult spring chinook salmon at three water temperatures over a range of swimming speeds; (2) estimate the Ucrit of adult spring chinook salmon; and (3) monitor EMGs of red and white muscle in the salmon over a range of swimming speeds. Future papers will report on the results of the field study. Our results indicated that the rate of oxygen consumption and red and white muscle activity in adult spring chinook salmon were strongly correlated with swimming speed over a range of fish sizes and at three different temperatures. Active oxygen consumption increased linearly with swim speed before leveling off at speeds at or above Ucrit. This pattern was similar at each water temperature and indicated that fish were approaching their maximal aerobic oxygen consumption at higher swim speeds. Modeling showed that temperature, but not size or sex, influenced the relation between V02 and swim speed, thus a V02-swim speed model based on temperature (but independent of sex and size) should be a biologically relevant way of estimating the energy use of fish in the wild.

  18. Engine Performance and Knock Rating of Fuels for High-output Aircraft Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothbrock, A M; Biermann, Arnold E

    1938-01-01

    Data are presented to show the effects of inlet-air pressure, inlet-air temperature, and compression ratio on the maximum permissible performance obtained on a single-cylinder test engine with aircraft-engine fuels varying from a fuel of 87 octane number to one 100 octane number plus 1 ml of tetraethyl lead per gallon. The data were obtained on a 5-inch by 5.75-inch liquid-cooled engine operating at 2,500 r.p.m. The compression ratio was varied from 6.50 to 8.75. The inlet-air temperature was varied from 120 to 280 F. and the inlet-air pressure from 30 inches of mercury absolute to the highest permissible. The limiting factors for the increase in compression ratio and in inlet-air pressure was the occurrence of either audible or incipient knock. The data are correlated to show that, for any one fuel,there is a definite relationship between the limiting conditions of inlet-air temperature and density at any compression ratio. This relationship is dependent on the combustion-gas temperature and density relationship that causes knock. The report presents a suggested method of rating aircraft-engine fuels based on this relationship. It is concluded that aircraft-engine fuels cannot be satisfactorily rated by any single factor, such as octane number, highest useful compression ratio, or allowable boost pressure. The fuels should be rated by a curve that expresses the limitations of the fuel over a variety of engine conditions.

  19. The Performance of Short-Term Heart Rate Variability in the Detection of Congestive Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Allan Kardec; Ohnishi, Noboru

    2016-01-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) is a cardiac disease associated with the decreasing capacity of the cardiac output. It has been shown that the CHF is the main cause of the cardiac death around the world. Some works proposed to discriminate CHF subjects from healthy subjects using either electrocardiogram (ECG) or heart rate variability (HRV) from long-term recordings. In this work, we propose an alternative framework to discriminate CHF from healthy subjects by using HRV short-term intervals based on 256 RR continuous samples. Our framework uses a matching pursuit algorithm based on Gabor functions. From the selected Gabor functions, we derived a set of features that are inputted into a hybrid framework which uses a genetic algorithm and k-nearest neighbour classifier to select a subset of features that has the best classification performance. The performance of the framework is analyzed using both Fantasia and CHF database from Physionet archives which are, respectively, composed of 40 healthy volunteers and 29 subjects. From a set of nonstandard 16 features, the proposed framework reaches an overall accuracy of 100% with five features. Our results suggest that the application of hybrid frameworks whose classifier algorithms are based on genetic algorithms has outperformed well-known classifier methods. PMID:27891509

  20. Deceleration and acceleration capacities of heart rate associated with heart failure with high discriminating performance.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei; Jin, Xian; Zhang, Peng; Yu, Qiang; Yin, Guizhi; Lu, Yi; Xiao, Hongbing; Chen, Yueguang; Zhang, Dadong

    2016-03-23

    Accurate measurements of autonomic nerve regulation in heart failure (HF) were unresolved. The discriminating performance of deceleration and acceleration capacities of heart rate in HF was evaluated in 130 HF patients and 212 controls. Acceleration capacity and deceleration capacity were independent risk factors for HF in males, evaluated by multiple logistic regression analysis, with odds ratios (ORs) of 5.94 and 0.13, respectively. Acceleration capacity was also an independent risk factor for HF in females, with an OR of 8.58. Deceleration capacity was the best cardiac electrophysiological index to classify HF in males, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.88. Deceleration capacity was the best classification factor of HF in females with an AUC of 0.97, significantly higher than even left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Acceleration capacity also showed high performance in classifying HF in males (0.84) and females (0.92). The cut-off values of deceleration capacity for HF classification in males and females were 4.55 ms and 4.85 ms, respectively. The cut-off values of acceleration capacity for HF classification in males and females were -6.15 ms and -5.75 ms, respectively. Our study illustrates the role of acceleration and deceleration capacity measurements in the neuro-pathophysiology of HF.

  1. Deceleration and acceleration capacities of heart rate associated with heart failure with high discriminating performance

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei; Jin, Xian; Zhang, Peng; Yu, Qiang; Yin, Guizhi; Lu, Yi; Xiao, Hongbing; Chen, Yueguang; Zhang, Dadong

    2016-01-01

    Accurate measurements of autonomic nerve regulation in heart failure (HF) were unresolved. The discriminating performance of deceleration and acceleration capacities of heart rate in HF was evaluated in 130 HF patients and 212 controls. Acceleration capacity and deceleration capacity were independent risk factors for HF in males, evaluated by multiple logistic regression analysis, with odds ratios (ORs) of 5.94 and 0.13, respectively. Acceleration capacity was also an independent risk factor for HF in females, with an OR of 8.58. Deceleration capacity was the best cardiac electrophysiological index to classify HF in males, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.88. Deceleration capacity was the best classification factor of HF in females with an AUC of 0.97, significantly higher than even left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Acceleration capacity also showed high performance in classifying HF in males (0.84) and females (0.92). The cut-off values of deceleration capacity for HF classification in males and females were 4.55 ms and 4.85 ms, respectively. The cut-off values of acceleration capacity for HF classification in males and females were −6.15 ms and −5.75 ms, respectively. Our study illustrates the role of acceleration and deceleration capacity measurements in the neuro-pathophysiology of HF. PMID:27005970

  2. Musculotendinous stiffness of triceps surae, maximal rate of force development, and vertical jump performance.

    PubMed

    Driss, Tarak; Lambertz, Daniel; Rouis, Majdi; Jaafar, Hamdi; Vandewalle, Henry

    2015-01-01

    The relationships between ankle plantar flexor musculotendinous stiffness (MTS) and performance in a countermovement vertical jump (CMJ) and maximal rate of torque development (MRTD) were studied in 27 active men. MTS was studied by means of quick releases at 20 (S0.2), 40 (S0.4), 60 (S0.6), and 80% (S0.8) of maximal voluntary torque (T(MVC)). CMJ was not correlated with strength indices but was positively correlated with MRTD/BM, S 0.4/BM. The slope α 2 and intercept β 2 of the torque-stiffness relationships from 40 to 80% T(MVC) were correlated negatively (α 2) and positively (β 2) with CMJ. The different stiffness indices were not correlated with MRTD. The prediction of CMJ was improved by the introduction of MRTD in multiple regressions between CMJ and stiffness. CMJ was also negatively correlated with indices of curvature of the torque-stiffness relationship. The subjects were subdivided in 3 groups in function of CMJ (groups H, M, and L for high, medium, and low performers, resp.). There was a downward curvature of the torque-stiffness relationship at high torques in group H or M and the torque-stiffness regression was linear in group L only. These results suggested that torque-stiffness relationships with a plateau at high torques are more frequent in the best jumpers.

  3. Reduced graphene oxide aerogel with high-rate supercapacitive performance in aqueous electrolytes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Reduced graphene oxide aerogel (RGOA) is synthesized successfully through a simultaneous self-assembly and reduction process using hypophosphorous acid and I2 as reductant. Nitrogen sorption analysis shows that the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area of RGOA could reach as high as 830 m2 g−1, which is the largest value ever reported for graphene-based aerogels obtained through the simultaneous self-assembly and reduction strategy. The as-prepared RGOA is characterized by a variety of means such as scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Electrochemical tests show that RGOA exhibits a high-rate supercapacitive performance in aqueous electrolytes. The specific capacitance of RGOA is calculated to be 211.8 and 278.6 F g−1 in KOH and H2SO4 electrolytes, respectively. The perfect supercapacitive performance of RGOA is ascribed to its three-dimensional structure and the existence of oxygen-containing groups. PMID:23692674

  4. The Relationship of Laboratory Performance Ratings, Information Achievement and Pencil-Paper Performance Test Scores in College-Level Electricity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Charles E.

    In this study, a pencil paper performance test (PPPT) was developed and administered to an experimental group of 46 students and a control group of 48 students to determine: (1) the difference between laboratory performance and the successful completion of a laboratory course in electricity, (2) the relationship between laboratory performance as…

  5. TCP Flow Level Performance Evaluation on Error Rate Aware Scheduling Algorithms in Evolved UTRA and UTRAN Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Uchida, Masato; Tsuru, Masato; Oie, Yuji

    We present a TCP flow level performance evaluation on error rate aware scheduling algorithms in Evolved UTRA and UTRAN networks. With the introduction of the error rate, which is the probability of transmission failure under a given wireless condition and the instantaneous transmission rate, the transmission efficiency can be improved without sacrificing the balance between system performance and user fairness. The performance comparison with and without error rate awareness is carried out dependant on various TCP traffic models, user channel conditions, schedulers with different fairness constraints, and automatic repeat request (ARQ) types. The results indicate that error rate awareness can make the resource allocation more reasonable and effectively improve the system and individual performance, especially for poor channel condition users.

  6. Mass production of graphene nanoscrolls and their application in high rate performance supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Bingna; Xu, Zhen; Gao, Chao

    2016-01-01

    The output of graphene nanoscrolls (GNSs) has been greatly enhanced to the gram-level by using an improved spray-freeze-drying method without damaging the high transforming efficiency (>92%). The lowest bulk density of GNS foam reaches 0.10 mg cm-3. Due to the unique morphology and high specific surface area (386.4 m2 g-1), the specific capacitances of the GNSs (90-100 F g-1 at 1 A g-1) are all superior to those of multiwalled carbon nanotubes meanwhile maintaining excellent rate capabilities (60-80% retention at 50 A g-1). For the first time, all-graphene-based films (AGFs) are fabricated via the intercalation of GNSs into graphene layers. The AGF exhibits a capacitance of 166.8 F g-1 at 1 A g-1 and rate capability (83.9% retention at 50 A g-1) better than those of pure reduced graphene oxide (RGO) films and carbon nanotubes/graphene hybrid films (CGFs).The output of graphene nanoscrolls (GNSs) has been greatly enhanced to the gram-level by using an improved spray-freeze-drying method without damaging the high transforming efficiency (>92%). The lowest bulk density of GNS foam reaches 0.10 mg cm-3. Due to the unique morphology and high specific surface area (386.4 m2 g-1), the specific capacitances of the GNSs (90-100 F g-1 at 1 A g-1) are all superior to those of multiwalled carbon nanotubes meanwhile maintaining excellent rate capabilities (60-80% retention at 50 A g-1). For the first time, all-graphene-based films (AGFs) are fabricated via the intercalation of GNSs into graphene layers. The AGF exhibits a capacitance of 166.8 F g-1 at 1 A g-1 and rate capability (83.9% retention at 50 A g-1) better than those of pure reduced graphene oxide (RGO) films and carbon nanotubes/graphene hybrid films (CGFs). Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: SEM image for GNS transformation efficiency assessment, images for GNS density modeling and calculation, tables for GNS specific capacitance and retention, figures and tables for AGF, CGF and RGO

  7. Counting Statistics and Ion Interval Density in AMS

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, J S; Ognibene, T; Palmblad, M; Reimer, P

    2004-08-03

    Confidence in the precisions of AMS and decay measurements must be comparable for the application of the {sup 14}C calibration to age determinations using both technologies. We confirmed the random nature of the temporal distribution of {sup 14}C ions in an AMS spectrometer for a number of sample counting rates and properties of the sputtering process. The temporal distribution of ion counts was also measured to confirm the applicability of traditional counting statistics.

  8. Yoctocalorimetry: phonon counting in nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roukes, M. L.

    1999-03-01

    It appears feasible with nanostructures to perform calorimetry at the level of individual thermal phonons. Here I outline an approach employing monocrystalline mesoscopic insulators, which can now be patterned from semiconductor heterostructures into complex geometries with full, three-dimensional relief. Successive application of these techniques also enables definition of integrated nanoscale thermal transducers; coupling these to a dc SQUID readout yields the requisite energy sensitivity and temporal resolution with minimal back action. The prospect of phonon counting opens intriguing experimental possibilities with analogies in quantum optics. These include fluctuation-based phonon spectroscopy, phonon shot noise in the energy relaxation of nanoscale systems, and quantum statistical phenomena such as phonon bunching and anticorrelated electron-phonon exchange.

  9. Higher Education Counts: Achieving Results. 2009 Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connecticut Department of Higher Education (NJ1), 2009

    2009-01-01

    "Higher Education Counts" is the annual accountability report on Connecticut's state system of higher education, as required under Connecticut General Statutes Section 10a-6a. The report contains accountability measures developed through the Performance Measures Task Force and approved by the Board of Governors for Higher Education. The…

  10. Higher Education Counts: Achieving Results. 2006 Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connecticut Department of Higher Education (NJ1), 2006

    2006-01-01

    "Higher Education Counts" is the annual accountability report on Connecticut's state system of higher education, as required under Connecticut General Statutes Section 10a-6a. The report contains accountability measures developed through the Performance Measures Task Force and approved by the Board of Governors for Higher Education. The…

  11. Higher Education Counts: Achieving Results. 2008 Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connecticut Department of Higher Education (NJ1), 2008

    2008-01-01

    "Higher Education Counts" is the annual accountability report on Connecticut's state system of higher education, as required under Connecticut General Statutes Section 10a-6a. The report contains accountability measures developed through the Performance Measures Task Force and approved by the Board of Governors for Higher Education. The…

  12. Higher Education Counts: Achieving Results. 2007 Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connecticut Department of Higher Education (NJ1), 2007

    2007-01-01

    "Higher Education Counts" is the annual accountability report on Connecticut's state system of higher education, as required under Connecticut General Statutes Section 10a-6a. The report contains accountability measures developed through the Performance Measures Task Force and approved by the Board of Governors for Higher Education. The…

  13. South Carolina Kids Count Report, 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina Kids Count, Columbia.

    This Kids Count report examines statewide trends in the well-being of South Carolina's children. The statistical portrait is based on 44 indicators in the areas of demographics, family, economic status, health, readiness and early school performance, scholastic achievement, and adolescent risk behaviors. The indicators are: (1) population; (2)…

  14. 49 CFR 26.55 - How is DBE participation counted toward goals?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How is DBE participation counted toward goals? 26... Faith Efforts, and Counting § 26.55 How is DBE participation counted toward goals? (a) When a DBE participates in a contract, you count only the value of the work actually performed by the DBE toward DBE...

  15. False-Negative Rate and Recovery Efficiency Performance of a Validated Sponge Wipe Sampling Method

    SciTech Connect

    Krauter, Paula; Piepel, Gregory F.; Boucher, Raymond; Tezak, Matthew S.; Amidan, Brett G.; Einfeld, Wayne

    2012-02-01

    Recovery of spores from environmental surfaces varies due to sampling and analysis methods, spore size and characteristics, surface materials, and environmental conditions. Tests were performed to evaluate a new, validated sponge wipe method using Bacillus atrophaeus spores. Testing evaluated the effects of spore concentration and surface material on recovery efficiency (RE), false-negative rate (FNR), limit of detection (LOD), and their uncertainties. Ceramic tile and stainless steel had the highest mean RE values (48.9 and 48.1%, respectively). Faux leather, vinyl tile, and painted wood had mean RE values of 30.3, 25.6, and 25.5, respectively, while plastic had the lowest mean RE (9.8%). Results show roughly linear dependences of RE and FNR on surface roughness, with smoother surfaces resulting in higher mean REs and lower FNRs. REs were not influenced by the low spore concentrations tested (3.10x10^-3 to 1.86 CFU/cm^2). Stainless steel had the lowest mean FNR (0.123), and plastic had the highest mean FNR (0.479). The LOD90 (>1 CFU detected 90% of the time) varied with surface material, from 0.015 CFU/cm^2 on stainless steel up to 0.039 on plastic. It may be possible to improve sampling results by considering surface roughness in selecting sampling locations and interpreting spore recovery data. Further, FNR values (calculated as a function of concentration and surface material) can be used presampling to calculate the numbers of samples for statistical sampling plans with desired performance and postsampling to calculate the confidence in characterization and clearance decisions.

  16. False-Negative Rate and Recovery Efficiency Performance of a Validated Sponge Wipe Sampling Method

    PubMed Central

    Piepel, Greg F.; Boucher, Raymond; Tezak, Matt; Amidan, Brett G.; Einfeld, Wayne

    2012-01-01

    Recovery of spores from environmental surfaces varies due to sampling and analysis methods, spore size and characteristics, surface materials, and environmental conditions. Tests were performed to evaluate a new, validated sponge wipe method using Bacillus atrophaeus spores. Testing evaluated the effects of spore concentration and surface material on recovery efficiency (RE), false-negative rate (FNR), limit of detection (LOD), and their uncertainties. Ceramic tile and stainless steel had the highest mean RE values (48.9 and 48.1%, respectively). Faux leather, vinyl tile, and painted wood had mean RE values of 30.3, 25.6, and 25.5, respectively, while plastic had the lowest mean RE (9.8%). Results show roughly linear dependences of RE and FNR on surface roughness, with smoother surfaces resulting in higher mean REs and lower FNRs. REs were not influenced by the low spore concentrations tested (3.10 × 10−3 to 1.86 CFU/cm2). Stainless steel had the lowest mean FNR (0.123), and plastic had the highest mean FNR (0.479). The LOD90 (≥1 CFU detected 90% of the time) varied with surface material, from 0.015 CFU/cm2 on stainless steel up to 0.039 on plastic. It may be possible to improve sampling results by considering surface roughness in selecting sampling locations and interpreting spore recovery data. Further, FNR values (calculated as a function of concentration and surface material) can be used presampling to calculate the numbers of samples for statistical sampling plans with desired performance and postsampling to calculate the confidence in characterization and clearance decisions. PMID:22138998

  17. Multiple tests based on a gaussian approximation of the unitary events method with delayed coincidence count.

    PubMed

    Tuleau-Malot, Christine; Rouis, Amel; Grammont, Franck; Reynaud-Bouret, Patricia

    2014-07-01

    The unitary events (UE) method is one of the most popular and efficient methods used over the past decade to detect patterns of coincident joint spike activity among simultaneously recorded neurons. The detection of coincidences is usually based on binned coincidence count (Grün, 1996 ), which is known to be subject to loss in synchrony detection (Grün, Diesmann, Grammont, Riehle, & Aertsen, 1999 ). This defect has been corrected by the multiple shift coincidence count (Grün et al., 1999 ). The statistical properties of this count have not been further investigated until this work, the formula being more difficult to deal with than the original binned count. First, we propose a new notion of coincidence count, the delayed coincidence count, which is equal to the multiple shift coincidence count when discretized point processes are involved as models for the spike trains. Moreover, it generalizes this notion to nondiscretized point processes, allowing us to propose a new gaussian approximation of the count. Since unknown parameters are involved in the approximation, we perform a plug-in step, where unknown parameters are replaced by estimated ones, leading to a modification of the approximating distribution. Finally the method takes the multiplicity of the tests into account via a Benjamini and Hochberg approach (Benjamini & Hochberg, 1995 ), to guarantee a prescribed control of the false discovery rate. We compare our new method, MTGAUE (multiple tests based on a gaussian approximation of the unitary events) and the UE method proposed in Grün et al. ( 1999 ) over various simulations, showing that MTGAUE extends the validity of the previous method. In particular, MTGAUE is able to detect both profusion and lack of coincidences with respect to the independence case and is robust to changes in the underlying model. Furthermore MTGAUE is applied on real data.

  18. The effects of the academic performance of college students whose major is sports on body composition and abdominal fat rates

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Hyeon-Ok; Lee, Bo-Ae

    2016-01-01

    The subjects of this research are 30 students of Dong-Eui Institute of Technology in Busan city, who were grouped into two categories after applying the curriculum of the second semester of the freshman year to their classes: those whose academic performance was at the top 20% (15 students) and those whose academic performance was at the bottom 20% (15 students). For the measurement items, we measured their weight, body fat mass, body fat rates, body mass index, and abdominal fat rates by using a body composition testing machine. We then analyzed the t-test results by using the IBM SPSS ver. 18.0 program. Through this research, we found that there was a significant difference among those in the group of students whose academic performance was at the top 20% in terms of body fat mass and body fat rates, which means that academic performance has relatively little effect on body composition and abdominal fat rates. PMID:27656630

  19. The effects of the academic performance of college students whose major is sports on body composition and abdominal fat rates.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hyeon-Ok; Lee, Bo-Ae

    2016-08-01

    The subjects of this research are 30 students of Dong-Eui Institute of Technology in Busan city, who were grouped into two categories after applying the curriculum of the second semester of the freshman year to their classes: those whose academic performance was at the top 20% (15 students) and those whose academic performance was at the bottom 20% (15 students). For the measurement items, we measured their weight, body fat mass, body fat rates, body mass index, and abdominal fat rates by using a body composition testing machine. We then analyzed the t-test results by using the IBM SPSS ver. 18.0 program. Through this research, we found that there was a significant difference among those in the group of students whose academic performance was at the top 20% in terms of body fat mass and body fat rates, which means that academic performance has relatively little effect on body composition and abdominal fat rates.

  20. Rates of False-Positive Classification Resulting From the Analysis of Additional Embedded Performance Validity Measures.

    PubMed

    Silk-Eglit, Graham M; Stenclik, Jessica H; Miele, Andrea S; Lynch, Julie K; McCaffrey, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have documented improvements in the classification accuracy of performance validity tests (PVTs) when they are combined to form aggregated models. Fewer studies have evaluated the impact of aggregating additional PVTs and changing the classification threshold within these models. A recent Monte Carlo simulation demonstrated that to maintain a false-positive rate (FPR) of ≤.10, only 1, 4, 8, 10, and 15 PVTs should be analyzed at classification thresholds of failing at least 1, at least 2, at least 3, at least 4, and at least 5 PVTs, respectively. The current study sought to evaluate these findings with embedded PVTs in a sample of real-life litigants and to highlight a potential danger in analytic flexibility with embedded PVTs. Results demonstrated that to maintain an FPR of ≤.10, only 3, 7, 10, 14, and 15 PVTs should be analyzed at classification thresholds of failing at least 1, at least 2, at least 3, at least 4, and at least 5 PVTs, respectively. Analyzing more than these numbers of PVTs resulted in a dramatic increase in the FPR. In addition, in the most extreme case, flexibility in analyzing and reporting embedded PVTs increased the FPR by 67%. Given these findings, a more objective approach to analyzing and reporting embedded PVTs should be introduced.

  1. Relations between response trajectories on the continuous performance test and teacher-rated problem behaviors in preschoolers.

    PubMed

    Allan, Darcey M; Lonigan, Christopher J

    2015-06-01

    Although both the continuous performance test (CPT) and behavior rating scales are used in both practice and research to assess inattentive and hyperactive/impulsive behaviors, the correlations between performance on the CPT and teachers' ratings are typically only small-to-moderate. This study examined trajectories of performance on a low target-frequency visual CPT in a sample of preschool children and how these trajectories were associated with teacher-ratings of problem behaviors (i.e., inattention, hyperactivity/impulsivity [H/I], and oppositional/defiant behavior). Participants included 399 preschool children (mean age = 56 months; 49.4% female; 73.7% White/Caucasian). An attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) rating scale was completed by teachers, and the CPT was completed by the preschoolers. Results showed that children's performance across 4 temporal blocks on the CPT was not stable across the duration of the task, with error rates generally increasing from initial to later blocks. The predictive relations of teacher-rated problem behaviors to performance trajectories on the CPT were examined using growth curve models. Higher rates of teacher-reported inattention and H/I were uniquely associated with higher rates of initial omission errors and initial commission errors, respectively. Higher rates of teacher-reported overall problem behaviors were associated with increasing rates of omission but not commission errors during the CPT; however, the relation was not specific to 1 type of problem behavior. The results of this study indicate that the pattern of errors on the CPT in preschool samples is complex and may be determined by multiple behavioral factors. These findings have implications for the interpretation of CPT performance in young children.

  2. Relations between Response Trajectories on the Continuous Performance Test and Teacher-Rated Problem Behaviors in Preschoolers

    PubMed Central

    Allan, Darcey M.; Lonigan, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Although both the Continuous Performance Test (CPT) and behavior rating scales are used in both practice and research to assess inattentive and hyperactive/impulsive behaviors, the correlations between performance on the CPT and teachers' ratings are typically only small-to-moderate. This study examined trajectories of performance on a low target-frequency visual CPT in a sample of preschool children and how these trajectories were associated with teacher-ratings of problem behaviors (i.e., inattention, hyperactivity/impulsivity [H/I], and oppositional/defiant behavior). Participants included 399 preschool children (Mean age = 56 months; 49.4% female; 73.7% White/Caucasian). An ADHD-rating scale was completed by teachers, and the CPT was completed by the preschoolers. Results showed that children's performance across four temporal blocks on the CPT was not stable across the duration of the task, with error rates generally increasing from initial to later blocks. The predictive relations of teacher-rated problem behaviors to performance trajectories on the CPT were examined using growth curve models. Higher rates of teacher-reported inattention and H/I were uniquely associated with higher rates of initial omission errors and initial commission errors, respectively. Higher rates of teacher-reported overall problem behaviors were associated with increasing rates of omission but not commission errors during the CPT; however, the relation was not specific to one type of problem behavior. The results of this study indicate that the pattern of errors on the CPT in preschool samples is complex and may be determined by multiple behavioral factors. These findings have implications for the interpretation of CPT performance in young children. PMID:25419645

  3. The evaluation of sequential platelet counts has prognostic value for acute kidney injury patients requiring dialysis in the intensive care setting

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Carla; Soares, Márcio; Rocha, Eduardo; Cardoso, Lucio; Maccariello, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the prognostic value of platelet counts in acute kidney injury patients requiring renal replacement therapy. METHODS: This prospective cohort study was performed in three tertiary-care hospitals. Platelet counts were obtained upon admission to the intensive care unit and during the first week of renal replacement therapy on days 1, 3, 5 and 7. The outcome of interest was the hospital mortality rate. With the aim of minimizing individual variation, we analyzed the relative platelet counts on days 3, 5, 7 and at the point of the largest variation during the first week of renal replacement therapy. Logistic regression analysis was used to test the prognostic value of the platelet counts. RESULTS: The study included 274 patients. The hospital mortality rate was 62%. The survivors had significantly higher platelet counts upon admission to the intensive care unit compared to the non-survivors [175.5×103/mm3 (108.5–259×103/mm3) vs. 148×103/mm3 (80−141×103/mm3)] and during the first week of renal replacement therapy. The relative platelet count reductions were significantly associated with a higher hospital mortality rate compared with the platelet count increases (70% vs. 44% at the nadir, respectively). A relative platelet count reduction >60% was significantly associated with a worse outcome (mortality rate = 82.6%). Relative platelet count variations and the percentage of reduction were independent risk factors of hospital mortality during the first week of renal replacement therapy. CONCLUSION: Platelet counts upon admission to the intensive care unit and at the beginning of renal replacement therapy as well as sequential platelet count evaluation have prognostic value in acute kidney injury patients requiring renal replacement therapy. PMID:23778497

  4. A dynamic attenuator improves spectral imaging with energy-discriminating, photon counting detectors.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Scott S; Pelc, Norbert J

    2015-03-01

    Energy-discriminating, photon counting (EDPC) detectors have high potential in spectral imaging applications but exhibit degraded performance when the incident count rate approaches or exceeds the characteristic count rate of the detector. In order to reduce the requirements on the detector, we explore the strategy of modulating the X-ray flux field using a recently proposed dynamic, piecewise-linear attenuator. A previous paper studied this modulation for photon counting detectors but did not explore the impact on spectral applications. In this work, we modeled detection with a bipolar triangular pulse shape (Taguchi et al., 2011) and estimated the Cramer-Rao lower bound (CRLB) of the variance of material selective and equivalent monoenergetic images, assuming deterministic errors at high flux could be corrected. We compared different materials for the dynamic attenuator and found that rare earth elements, such as erbium, outperformed previously proposed materials such as iron in spectral imaging. The redistribution of flux reduces the variance or dose, consistent with previous studies on benefits with conventional detectors. Numerical simulations based on DICOM datasets were used to assess the impact of the dynamic attenuator for detectors with several different characteristic count rates. The dynamic attenuator reduced the peak incident count rate by a factor of 4 in the thorax and 44 in the pelvis, and a 10 Mcps/mm (2) EDPC detector with dynamic attenuator provided generally superior image quality to a 100 Mcps/mm (2) detector with reference bowtie filter for the same dose. The improvement is more pronounced in the material images.

  5. Right frontopolar cortex activity correlates with reliability of retrospective rating of confidence in short-term recognition memory performance.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Osamu; Miura, Naoki; Watanabe, Jobu; Takemoto, Atsushi; Uchida, Shinya; Sugiura, Motoaki; Horie, Kaoru; Sato, Shigeru; Kawashima, Ryuta; Nakamura, Katsuki

    2010-11-01

    Human memory systems contain self-monitoring mechanisms for evaluating their progress. People can change their learning strategy on the basis of confidence in their performance at that time. However, it has not been fully understood how the brain is engaged in reliable rating of confidence in past recognition memory performance. We measured the brain activity by fMRI while healthy subjects performed a visual short-term recognition memory test and then rated their confidence in their answers as high, middle, or low. As shown previously, their behavioral performance in the confidence rating widely varied; some showed a positive confidence-recognition correlation (i.e., "rate reliably") while others did not. Among brain regions showing greater activity during rating their confidence relative to during a control, non-metamemory task (discriminating brightness of words), only a posterior-dorsal part of the right frontopolar cortex exhibited higher activity as the confidence level better correlated with actual recognition memory performance. These results suggest that activation in the right frontopolar cortex is key to a reliable, retrospective rating of confidence in short-term recognition memory performance.

  6. The Use of High School Faculty Ratings to Predict USMA Fourth Class Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, Gerald W.

    The potential use of High School Faculty Ratings for admission purposes is investigated. The ratings include the evaluations of a candidate on 10 traits and three overall characteristics. The rating forms are given to a mathematics, English, and physical education teacher, a counselor or high school principal, and one other faculty member by the…

  7. Kids Count [and] Families Count in Delaware: Fact Book, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Carl, Ed.; Wilson, Nancy, Ed.

    This Kids Count report is combined with Families Count, and provides information on statewide trends affecting children and families in Delaware. The first statistical profile is based on 10 main indicators of child well-being: (1) births to teens; (2) low birth weight babies; (3) infant mortality; (4) child deaths; (5) teen deaths; (6) juvenile…

  8. "Just" Counting: Young Children's Oral Counting and Enumeration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Threlfall, John; Bruce, Bob

    2005-01-01

    This article focuses on the specific skills and abilities of young children in oral counting and enumeration. Responses to an oral counting task and an enumeration task by a sample (n=93) of 3- and 4-year old children attending a range of pre-five establishments in an urban district of northern England are described. The findings, whilst providing…

  9. Size and rate effects on mechanical behavior of ultra high performance concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Boon Him

    Cor-Tuf, broadly characterize as a reactive powder concrete is a type of cementitious material. Cementitious materials have been observed to exhibit a strain-rate dependent mechanical behavior. The mechanical behavior of cementitious materials can also depend significantly on specimen sizes. Therefore it is crucial to determine the behavior of Cor-Tuf with different specimen sizes for high-rate applications. For this purpose, split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB), also known as Kolsky bar was utilized to determine the dynamic behavior of Cor-Tuf for different specimen sizes under uniaxial dynamic compression loading at different strain rates. It was observed that as strain rate increases the compressive strength decreases for the small specimen. However for specimens at larger diameter, the compressive strength was observed to be rate independent. The Young's modulus decreases as strain rate increases for all specimen sizes. However the critical strain and energy absorption per unit volume was observed to increase as the strain rate increases.

  10. Performance assessment of the BEBIG MultiSource high dose rate brachytherapy treatment unit.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Antony; Mzenda, Bongile

    2009-12-21

    A comprehensive system characterisation was performed of the Eckert & Ziegler BEBIG GmbH MultiSource High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment unit with an (192)Ir source. The unit is relatively new to the UK market, with the first installation in the country having been made in the summer of 2009. A detailed commissioning programme was devised and is reported including checks of the fundamental parameters of source positioning, dwell timing, transit doses and absolute dosimetry of the source. Well chamber measurements, autoradiography and video camera analysis techniques were all employed. The absolute dosimetry was verified by the National Physical Laboratory, UK, and compared to a measurement based on a calibration from PTB, Germany, and the supplied source certificate, as well as an independent assessment by a visiting UK centre. The use of the 'Krieger' dosimetry phantom has also been evaluated. Users of the BEBIG HDR system should take care to avoid any significant bend in the transfer tube, as this will lead to positioning errors of the source, of up to 1.0 mm for slight bends, 2.0 mm for moderate bends and 5.0 mm for extreme curvature (depending on applicators and transfer tube used) for the situations reported in this study. The reason for these errors and the potential clinical impact are discussed. Users should also note the methodology employed by the system for correction of transit doses, and that no correction is made for the initial and final transit doses. The results of this investigation found that the uncorrected transit doses lead to small errors in the delivered dose at the first dwell position, of up to 2.5 cGy at 2 cm (5.6 cGy at 1 cm) from a 10 Ci source, but the transit dose correction for other dwells was accurate within 0.2 cGy. The unit has been mechanically reliable, and source positioning accuracy and dwell timing have been reproducible, with overall performance similar to other existing HDR equipment. The unit is capable of high

  11. Impression Management and Interview and Job Performance Ratings: A Meta-Analysis of Research Design with Tactics in Mind.

    PubMed

    Peck, Jessica A; Levashina, Julia

    2017-01-01

    Impression management (IM) is pervasive in interview and job performance settings. We meta-analytically examine IM by self- and other-focused tactics to establish base rates of tactic usage, to understand the impact of tactics on interview and job performance ratings, and to examine the moderating effects of research design. Our results suggest IM is used more frequently in the interview rather than job performance settings. Self-focused tactics are more effective in the interview rather than in job performance settings, and other-focused tactics are more effective in job performance settings rather than in the interview. We explore several research design moderators including research fidelity, rater, and participants. IM has a somewhat stronger impact on interview ratings in lab settings than field settings. IM also has a stronger impact on interview ratings when the target of IM is also the rater of performance than when the rater of performance is an observer. Finally, labor market participants use IM more frequently and more effectively than students in interview settings. Our research has implications for understanding how different IM tactics function in interview and job performance settings and the effects of research design on IM frequency and impact.

  12. Contemporary Daughter/Son Adult Social Role Performance Rating Scale and Interview Protocol: Development, Content Validation, and Exploratory Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cozad, Dana Everett

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and content validate a Performance Rating Scale and Interview Protocol, enabling study of the social role performance of adult daughters and sons as they fulfill the societal norms and expectations of adult children. This exploratory investigation was one of 13 contemporary adult social roles completed by…

  13. Evaluation of High Performance Converters Under Low Dose Rate Total Ionizing Dose (TID) Testing for NASA Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Ashok K.; Sahu, Kusum

    1998-01-01

    This paper reports the results of low dose rate (0.01-0.18 rads(Si)/sec) total ionizing dose (TID) tests performed on several types of high performance converters. The parts used in this evaluation represented devices such as a high speed flash converter, a 16-bit ADC and a voltage-to-frequency converter.

  14. Impression Management and Interview and Job Performance Ratings: A Meta-Analysis of Research Design with Tactics in Mind

    PubMed Central

    Peck, Jessica A.; Levashina, Julia

    2017-01-01

    Impression management (IM) is pervasive in interview and job performance settings. We meta-analytically examine IM by self- and other-focused tactics to establish base rates of tactic usage, to understand the impact of tactics on interview and job performance ratings, and to examine the moderating effects of research design. Our results suggest IM is used more frequently in the interview rather than job performance settings. Self-focused tactics are more effective in the interview rather than in job performance settings, and other-focused tactics are more effective in job performance settings rather than in the interview. We explore several research design moderators including research fidelity, rater, and participants. IM has a somewhat stronger impact on interview ratings in lab settings than field settings. IM also has a stronger impact on interview ratings when the target of IM is also the rater of performance than when the rater of performance is an observer. Finally, labor market participants use IM more frequently and more effectively than students in interview settings. Our research has implications for understanding how different IM tactics function in interview and job performance settings and the effects of research design on IM frequency and impact. PMID:28261135

  15. Somatic, Endurance Performance and Heart Rate Variability Profiles of Professional Soccer Players Grouped According to Age

    PubMed Central

    Botek, Michal; McKune, Andrew J.; Klimešová, Iva

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This cross-sectional study compared somatic, endurance performance determinants and heart rate variability (HRV) profiles of professional soccer players divided into different age groups: GI (17–19.9 years; n = 23), GII (20–24.9 years; n = 45), GIII (25–29.9 years; n = 30), and GIV (30–39 years; n = 26). Players underwent somatic and HRV assessment and maximal exercise testing. HRV was analyzed by spectral analysis of HRV, and high (HF) and low (LF) frequency power was transformed by a natural logarithm (Ln). Players in GIV (83 ± 7 kg) were heavier (p < 0.05) compared to both GI (73 ± 6 kg), and GII (78 ± 6 kg). Significantly lower maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max, ml•kg-1•min-1) was observed for GIV (56.6 ± 3.8) compared to GI (59.6 ± 3.9), GII (59.4 ± 4.2) and GIV (59.7 ± 4.1). All agegroups, except for GII, demonstrated comparable relative maximal power output (Pmax). For supine HRV, significantly lower Ln HF (ms2) was identified in both GIII (7.1 ± 0.8) and GIV (6.9 ± 1.0) compared to GI (7.9 ± 0.6) and GII (7.7 ± 0.9). In conclusion, soccer players aged >25 years showed negligible differences in Pmax unlike the age group differences demonstrated in VO2max. A shift towards relative sympathetic dominance, particularly due to reduced vagal activity, was apparent after approximately 8 years of competing at the professional level. PMID:28031758

  16. Uncertainty analysis of the Measured Performance Rating (MPR) method. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    A report was commissioned by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority and the Electric Power Research Institute to evaluate the uncertainties in the energy monitoring method known as measured performance rating (MPR). The work is intended to help further development of the MPR system by quantitatively analyzing the uncertainties in estimates of the heat loss coefficients and heating system efficiencies. The analysis indicates that the MPR should detect as little as a 7 percent change in the heat loss coefficients and heating system efficiencies. The analysis indicate that the MPR should be able to detect as little as a 7 percent change in the heat loss coefficient at 95 percent confidence level. MPR appears sufficiently robust for characterizing common weatherization treatments; e.g., increasing attic insulation from R-7 to R-19 in a typical single-story, 1,100 sq. ft. house resulting in a 19 percent reduction in heat loss coefficient. Furnace efficiency uncertainties ranged up to three times those of the heat loss coefficients. Measurement uncertainties (at the 95 percent confidence level) were estimated to be from 1 to 5 percent for heat loss coefficients and 1.5 percent for a typical furnace efficiency. The analysis also shows a limitation in applying MPR to houses with heating ducts in slabs on grade and to those with very large thermal mass. Most of the uncertainties encountered in the study were due more to the methods of estimating the ``true`` heat loss coefficients, furnace efficiency, and furnace fuel consumption (by collecting fuel bills and simulating two actual houses) than to the MPR approach. These uncertainties in the true parameter values become evidence for arguments in favor of the need of empirical measures of heat loss coefficient and furnace efficiency, like the MPR method, rather than arguments against.

  17. Improved Aerobic Colony Count Technique for Hydrophobic Grid Membrane Filters

    PubMed Central

    Parrington, Lorna J.; Sharpe, Anthony N.; Peterkin, Pearl I.

    1993-01-01

    The AOAC International official action procedure for performing aerobic colony counts on hydrophobic grid membrane filters (HGMFs) uses Trypticase soy-fast green FCF agar (FGA) incubated for 48 h. Microbial growths are various shades of green on a pale green background, which can cause problems for automated as well as manual counting. HGMFs which had been incubated 24 or 48 h at 35°C on Trypticase soy agar were flooded underneath with 1 to 2 ml of 0.1% triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) solution by simply lifting one corner of the filter while it was still on the agar and adding the reagent. Microbial growths on HGMFs were counted after color had been allowed to develop for 15 min at room temperature. With representative foods, virtually all colonies stained pink to red. Automated electronic counts made by using the MI-100 HGMF Interpreter were easier and more reliable than control HGMF counts made by the AOAC International official action procedure. Manual counting was easier as well because of increased visibility of the microbial growths. Except in the case of dairy products, 24-h TTC counts did not differ significantly from 48-h FGA counts, whereas the FGA counts at 24 h were always significantly lower, indicating that for many food products the HGMF TTC flooding method permits aerobic colony counts to be made after 24 h. PMID:16349033

  18. Improved aerobic colony count technique for hydrophobic grid membrane filters.

    PubMed

    Parrington, L J; Sharpe, A N; Peterkin, P I

    1993-09-01

    The AOAC International official action procedure for performing aerobic colony counts on hydrophobic grid membrane filters (HGMFs) uses Trypticase soy-fast green FCF agar (FGA) incubated for 48 h. Microbial growths are various shades of green on a pale green background, which can cause problems for automated as well as manual counting. HGMFs which had been incubated 24 or 48 h at 35 degrees C on Trypticase soy agar were flooded underneath with 1 to 2 ml of 0.1% triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) solution by simply lifting one corner of the filter while it was still on the agar and adding the reagent. Microbial growths on HGMFs were counted after color had been allowed to develop for 15 min at room temperature. With representative foods, virtually all colonies stained pink to red. Automated electronic counts made by using the MI-100 HGMF Interpreter were easier and more reliable than control HGMF counts made by the AOAC International official action procedure. Manual counting was easier as well because of increased visibility of the microbial growths. Except in the case of dairy products, 24-h TTC counts did not differ significantly from 48-h FGA counts, whereas the FGA counts at 24 h were always significantly lower, indicating that for many food products the HGMF TTC flooding method permits aerobic colony counts to be made after 24 h.

  19. Trapping cells in paper for white blood cell count.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Bai, Jianhao; Wu, Hong; Ying, Jackie Y

    2015-07-15

    White blood cell count is an important indicator of each individual's health condition. An abnormal white blood cell count usually results from an infection, cancer, or other conditions that trigger systemic inflammation responses. White blood cell count also provides predictive information on the incidence of cardiovascular diseases and Type 2 diabetes. Therefore, monitoring white blood cell count on a regular basis can potentially help individuals to take preventive measures and improve healthcare outcomes. Currently, white blood cell count is primarily conducted in centralized laboratories, and it requires specialized equipment and dedicated personnel to perform the test and interpret the results. So far there has been no rapid test that allows white blood cell count in low-resource settings. In this study, we have demonstrated a vertical flow platform that quantifies white blood cells by trapping them in the paper. White blood cells were tagged with gold nanoparticles, and flowed through the paper via a small orifice. The white blood cell count was determined by measuring the colorimetric intensity of gold nanoparticles on the surface of white blood cells that were trapped in the paper mesh. Using this platform, we were able to quantify white blood cells in 15 μL of blood, and visually differentiate the abnormal count of white blood cells from the normal count. The proposed platform enabled rapid white blood cell count in low resource settings with a small sample volume requirement. Its low-cost, instrument-free operations would be attractive for point-of-care applications.

  20. High Sensitivity Carbon Nanotubes Flow-Rate Sensors and Their Performance Improvement by Coating

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xing; Zhou, Zhaoying; Wang, Dingqu; Liu, Xiaoli

    2010-01-01

    A new type of hot-wire flow-rate sensor (HWFS) with a sensing element made of a macro-sized carbon nanotube (CNT) strand is presented in this study. An effective way to improve repeatability of the CNT flow-rate sensor by coating a layer of Al2O3 on the CNT surface is proposed. Experimental results show that due to the large surface-to-volume ratio and thin coated Al2O3 layer, the CNT flow-rate sensor has higher sensitivity and faster response than a conventional platinum (Pt) HWFS. It is also demonstrated that the covered CNT flow-rate sensor has better repeatability than its bare counterpart due to insulation from the surrounding environment. The proposed CNT flow-rate sensor shows application potential for high-sensitivity measurement of flow rate. PMID:22399913