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Sample records for counterterrorism crisis management

  1. Understanding communication in counterterrorism crisis management.

    SciTech Connect

    Djordjevich, Donna D.; Barr, Pamela K.; Arnold, Jason Darrel; Johnson, Michael M.; Sa, Timothy J.; Hawley, Marilyn F.; Davis, Midge L.; Wright, Aliseya; Bernard, Michael Lewis; Wilcox, William B.; Tam, Ricky; Ammerlahn, Heidi R.

    2004-10-01

    This report describes the purpose and results of the two-year, Sandia-sponsored Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project entitled Understanding Communication in Counterterrorism Crisis Management The purpose of this project was to facilitate the capture of key communications among team members in simulated training exercises, and to learn how to improve communication in that domain. The first section of this document details the scenario development aspects of the simulation. The second section covers the new communication technologies that were developed and incorporated into the Weapons of Mass Destruction Decision Analysis Center (WMD-DAC) suite of decision support tools. The third section provides an overview of the features of the simulation and highlights its communication aspects. The fourth section describes the Team Communication Study processes and methodologies. The fifth section discusses future directions and areas in which to apply the new technologies and study results obtained as a result of this LDRD.

  2. Crisis Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents summaries of four articles relevant to school crisis response. The first article, "Peritraumatic Dissociation Predicts Posttraumatic Stress in Youth Following Accidents" summarized by Jim Matthews, suggests that peritraumatic dissociation is a powerful predictor of PTSD symptoms among youth who have been in a car…

  3. Crisis Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents summaries of four articles relevant to school crisis response. The first article, "Peritraumatic Dissociation Predicts Posttraumatic Stress in Youth Following Accidents" summarized by Jim Matthews, suggests that peritraumatic dissociation is a powerful predictor of PTSD symptoms among youth who have been in a car…

  4. Images for Crisis Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raffan, James

    1984-01-01

    Most take canoeing, leadership, first aid, CPR and other courses to help cope when something happens, but there is more to dealing with crisis than learning proper procedures and techniques. Three areas of concern interlock to form the Crisis Management Triangle: knowledge and skill, preventive awareness, and crisis management planning. (ERB)

  5. Crisis Management Research Summaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    In this column, Crisis Management in the Schools Interest Group members summarize recent crisis management publications. The first article summarized was a meta-analysis of the risk factors associated with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) among adults. The second study looked at the presence of life stressors among students who were expelled…

  6. Crisis Management Research Summaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    In this column, Crisis Management in the Schools Interest Group members summarize recent crisis management publications. The first article summarized was a meta-analysis of the risk factors associated with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) among adults. The second study looked at the presence of life stressors among students who were expelled…

  7. Crisis management strategies.

    PubMed

    Koster, Maria C; Politis-Norton, Helen

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the different facets of crisis as experienced within the pharmaceutical industry but which are also prevalent throughout other industries. It highlights the importance of early identification and management of crises and issues, which in return are strongly intertwined with a fundamental positive internal corporate climate. A corporate philosophy should always embrace crisis management with the attitude of 'when' and not 'if'; therefore, a company should act today and not tomorrow once a crisis is on its doorstep. Preparation is of utmost importance and there are several items that can be addressed even before a crisis has arisen. Further, this paper also provides guidance on how to deal with the media, what to do and what not to do, and how to appoint the appropriate spokesperson. In this era of fast exchange of information, crisis, which previously may have stayed behind corporate doors, may not do so any longer. Image is very important and should therefore not be risked. Crisis and issue management should therefore be integrated in every company's philosophy and standard operating procedures.

  8. Crisis Management Research Summaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.; Zhe, Elizabeth; Torem, Chris; Comeaux, Natashia; Dempsey, Allison

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a summary of recent crisis management publications. The first research report summarized, "Predictors of PTSD," was a study of predictor variables for responses to the World Trade Center attack. The second paper, "Effective Mental Health Response to Catastrophic Events," looked at effective responses following Hurricane…

  9. Crisis Management Research Summaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.; Zhe, Elizabeth; Torem, Chris; Comeaux, Natashia; Dempsey, Allison

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a summary of recent crisis management publications. The first research report summarized, "Predictors of PTSD," was a study of predictor variables for responses to the World Trade Center attack. The second paper, "Effective Mental Health Response to Catastrophic Events," looked at effective responses following Hurricane…

  10. Crisis Management in Catholic Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batsis, Thomas M.

    The way in which a school community deals with a crisis situation is a test of its sense of community. This guidebook, intended for Catholic-school principals, presents a detailed plan to help schools establish crisis-management teams and offers directions for their operation. Chapter 1 presents an overview of crisis management and focuses on how…

  11. Crisis Communication and Management: Surviving a Public Relations Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eramo, Eric M.

    2009-01-01

    Crisis management, or crisis communication, is never a good thing for a business to experience. It is, however, a public relations' professional moment to shine and put their honed skills to good use. A good crisis management plan is not only action during the crisis but preparation and reflection. Hiring a PR firm that deals with crisis…

  12. Organizational Learning and Crisis Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Jia

    2007-01-01

    The impact of crises on organizations has been stronger than ever. This article explores the role of organizational learning in crisis management, an area that has received little attention from HRD community. Recognizing the dynamics and interconnectedness of crisis management, organizational learning, and organizational change, the article…

  13. Crisis Management: Research Summaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.; Dorman, Sally; Anderson, Luke; McNair, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    This article presents summaries of three studies relevant to school crisis response. The first report, "A Framework for International Crisis Intervention" (Sally Dorman), is a review of how existing crisis intervention models (including the NASP PREPaRE model) have been adapted for international use. The second article, "Responding…

  14. Crisis Management: Research Summaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.; Dorman, Sally; Anderson, Luke; McNair, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    This article presents summaries of three studies relevant to school crisis response. The first report, "A Framework for International Crisis Intervention" (Sally Dorman), is a review of how existing crisis intervention models (including the NASP PREPaRE model) have been adapted for international use. The second article, "Responding…

  15. The Roman Empire - The Third Century Crisis and Crisis Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-04

    Tacitus. Hoboken: John Wiley And Sons, 2012. Putra , Fadillah. "Crisis Management In Public Administration." Planning Forum. 12, (2009, January 01...Fadillah Putra , "Crisis Management In Public Administration," Planning Forum 12, (2009, January 01). 12. "Crisis Of The Third Century: Ad 200-285

  16. A comparative analysis of PRA and intelligent adversary methods for counterterrorism risk management.

    PubMed

    Merrick, Jason; Parnell, Gregory S

    2011-09-01

    In counterterrorism risk management decisions, the analyst can choose to represent terrorist decisions as defender uncertainties or as attacker decisions. We perform a comparative analysis of probabilistic risk analysis (PRA) methods including event trees, influence diagrams, Bayesian networks, decision trees, game theory, and combined methods on the same illustrative examples (container screening for radiological materials) to get insights into the significant differences in assumptions and results. A key tenent of PRA and decision analysis is the use of subjective probability to assess the likelihood of possible outcomes. For each technique, we compare the assumptions, probability assessment requirements, risk levels, and potential insights for risk managers. We find that assessing the distribution of potential attacker decisions is a complex judgment task, particularly considering the adaptation of the attacker to defender decisions. Intelligent adversary risk analysis and adversarial risk analysis are extensions of decision analysis and sequential game theory that help to decompose such judgments. These techniques explicitly show the adaptation of the attacker and the resulting shift in risk based on defender decisions. © 2011 Society for Risk Analysis.

  17. Managing a Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    Planning ahead, practicing your response for various scenarios, being open and honest, showing empathy and respect for other peoples' perspectives and assuring stakeholders that you have the situation covered are the foundations of communicating successfully during a crisis, experts say. This article provides strategies for Community College…

  18. Managing a Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    Planning ahead, practicing your response for various scenarios, being open and honest, showing empathy and respect for other peoples' perspectives and assuring stakeholders that you have the situation covered are the foundations of communicating successfully during a crisis, experts say. This article provides strategies for Community College…

  19. Owl Pellets and Crisis Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Tom

    2002-01-01

    Describes a press conference that was used as a "teachable moment" when owl pellets being used for instructional purposes were found to be contaminated with Salmonella. The incident highlighted the need for safe handling of owl pellets, having a crisis management plan, and the importance of conveying accurate information to concerned parents.…

  20. Owl Pellets and Crisis Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Tom

    2002-01-01

    Describes a press conference that was used as a "teachable moment" when owl pellets being used for instructional purposes were found to be contaminated with Salmonella. The incident highlighted the need for safe handling of owl pellets, having a crisis management plan, and the importance of conveying accurate information to concerned parents.…

  1. School Crisis Management: A Model of Dynamic Responsiveness to Crisis Life Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liou, Yi-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to analyze a school's crisis management and explore emerging aspects of its response to a school crisis. Traditional linear modes of analysis often fail to address complex crisis situations. The present study applied a dynamic crisis life cycle model that draws on chaos and complexity theory to a crisis management case,…

  2. School Crisis Management: A Model of Dynamic Responsiveness to Crisis Life Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liou, Yi-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to analyze a school's crisis management and explore emerging aspects of its response to a school crisis. Traditional linear modes of analysis often fail to address complex crisis situations. The present study applied a dynamic crisis life cycle model that draws on chaos and complexity theory to a crisis management case,…

  3. Do You Have a Crisis Management Plan?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pleviak, Walter; Milkevitch, Frank

    2001-01-01

    Although certain crises cannot be prevented, reactions to many can be planned. A crisis-management team should be organized for each building. Critical crisis-plan elements include telephone trees, forms, reference articles, sample letters, and processes for dealing with local media. Spokespersons should have facts straight before speaking. (MLH)

  4. Crisis Management's New Role in Educational Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gainey, Barbara S.

    2009-01-01

    From natural disasters to the financial debacle, it is clear to the educational community that crises know no boundaries. Far from a passing fad, crisis planning must be an integrated part of effective school district leadership. Two studies explore the status of crisis management in selected public school systems and offer recommendations for…

  5. Network Centric Information Structure - Crisis Information Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-01

    information management during emergency and crisis. The paper presents a prioritized set of important information elements that would be of value during a crisis or a rescue mission. It suggests how the information should be collected, stored and distributed, and it suggests information distribution methods supporting a network centric information structure concept. The work is funded by Teleplan and the Norwegian Research

  6. Creating Your School's Crisis Management Team.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blythe, Bruce T.

    2001-01-01

    Schools can reduce their vulnerability to violence and other hazards by analyzing foreseeable risks, assembling a broad-based crisis-management team (CMT), providing adequate staff training, and developing a crisis manual. Common response problems concerning decision-making authority, communication, and performance expectations for CMTs are…

  7. Crisis Management's New Role in Educational Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gainey, Barbara S.

    2009-01-01

    From natural disasters to the financial debacle, it is clear to the educational community that crises know no boundaries. Far from a passing fad, crisis planning must be an integrated part of effective school district leadership. Two studies explore the status of crisis management in selected public school systems and offer recommendations for…

  8. Resource Guide for Crisis Management in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaPointe, Richard T.; And Others

    A crisis can occur at any time, whether or not a school's staff plans for it. This resource guide is a compilation of user-friendly examples of policies, procedures, guidelines, checklists, and forms to help Virginia schools develop and implement a systematic crisis-management plan. Chapter 1 provides an introductory overview of the essential…

  9. [Crisis management in clinical nursing practice: a case analysis].

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chun-Hua; Yen, Miaofen

    2006-02-01

    The clinical medical environment is highly changeable. Hospital administrators must face and resolve various kinds of crisis. Effective crisis management can preempt or reduce negative impacts on an organization, as well as reduce unnecessary costs and bolster an organization's reputation. This article uses actual cases to describe crisis management with reference to four stages of crisis development and 6M models, providing instruction from experience, Educational growth, and enhanced crisis handling and crisis management skills.

  10. Teaching the Crisis Management/Communication Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coombs, W. Timothy

    2001-01-01

    Argues that a course or unit in crisis management/communication is an excellent way of teaching public relations theory, management concepts, information management, problem solving, and communication management. Identifies course objectives, discusses main topics and student evaluation, and concludes with advice and a list of readings. (SR)

  11. Managing up in times of financial crisis.

    PubMed

    Demers, R F

    2001-10-01

    The use of managing up in an institution's time of financial crisis is described. The goals of crisis management include survival, maintaining quality and service, learning issues and impacts, supporting the team, and preparing for the aftermath as the crisis subsides. Survival calls for a commitment by leaders to remain focused, and to maintain and support the management team. Pharmacy directors must be able to adapt to chaos and to the limited information disseminated by senior leadership. Identifying the underlying cause of the crisis, which may not be directly related to the measures taken to resolve it, is also critical to survival. Among the keys to maintaining quality and service are keeping the staff focused on patient care and maintaining credibility by sharing all information that is available. Pharmacy directors need to maintain the confidence of their staff members and to encourage them to do the best they can with the resources available. Taking the initiative to acquire appropriate data, to translate that data into relevant information, and to seek benchmarks for comparison is also important. Once the crisis has passed, attention must be given to updating and maintaining databases, supporting the staff, and improving morale. Scenario planning can help identify measures that might be taken if another crisis should develop. Using principles of managing up can prepare pharmacy directors for optimal response to an institutional financial crisis.

  12. School Crisis Management Manual: Guidelines for Administrators. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Judie

    This three-part manual is intended for principals and other administrators responsible for developing and managing school crisis plans. Part 1, preparation for a school crisis, includes sections on the selection and training of members of the school crisis team, steps in developing a school crisis plan, and four crisis scenarios to train team…

  13. Crisis management teams in health organisations.

    PubMed

    Canyon, Deon V

    2012-01-01

    Crisis management teams (CMT) are necessary to ensure adequate and appropriate crisis management planning and response to unforeseen, adverse events. This study investigated the existence of CMTs, the membership of CMTs, and the degree of training received by CMTs in Australian health and allied health organisations. This cross-sectional study draws on data provided by executive decision makers in a broad selection of health and allied health organisations. Crisis management teams were found in 44.2 per cent of the health-related organisations surveyed, which is ten per cent lower than the figure for business organisations. Membership of these CMTs was not ideal and did not conform to standard CMT membership profiles. Similarly, the extent of crisis management training in health-related organisations is 20 per cent lower than the figure for business organisations. If organisations do not become pro-active in their crisis management practices, the onus is on government to improve the situation through regulation and the provision of more physical, monetary and skill resources to ensure that the health services of Australia are sufficiently prepared to respond to adverse events.

  14. Crisis Debriefing Teams' Manager's Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDowell, Everett E.

    This guide for crisis debriefing teams (CDTs) in the Aurora public schools (APS) in Colorado is intended to provide immediate guidelines for schools to access trained support to deal with crises (such as serious injury or death) that can affect school communities. It is intended for use by counselors, psychologists, nurses, social workers, and…

  15. Camp Crisis Management: Responding to New Challenges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Will

    2002-01-01

    Camps should have crisis management plans. Steps to formulating a plan include involving appropriate off-site agencies, identifying potential threats, gathering resources, crafting an appropriate response, training via role-playing, managing incoming and outgoing information, and writing it down. Sidebars present resources, successful response…

  16. Managing a Crisis with Social Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, T. Gregory

    2012-01-01

    Thanks to the proliferation of handheld devices and social media such as Facebook and Twitter, people can share information instantly and succinctly. The December 8, 2011, shooting on the Virginia Tech campus underscores how important it is for information to go out quickly but accurately to help school administrators effectively manage a crisis.…

  17. School Crisis Management Manual: Guidelines for Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Judie

    A disturbing escalation in campus emergencies compels school districts to draft effective crisis-management action plans. Effective plans can be devised that relieve burdens on principals and other school personnel, by diminishing chaos and panic, disseminating accurate information, attending to emotional strain on staff and students, and…

  18. Managing a Crisis with Social Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, T. Gregory

    2012-01-01

    Thanks to the proliferation of handheld devices and social media such as Facebook and Twitter, people can share information instantly and succinctly. The December 8, 2011, shooting on the Virginia Tech campus underscores how important it is for information to go out quickly but accurately to help school administrators effectively manage a crisis.…

  19. Surgical Crisis Management Skills Training and Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Moorthy, Krishna; Munz, Yaron; Forrest, Damien; Pandey, Vikas; Undre, Shabnam; Vincent, Charles; Darzi, Ara

    2006-01-01

    Background: Intraoperative surgical crisis management is learned in an unstructured manner. In aviation, simulation training allows aircrews to coordinate and standardize recovery strategies. Our aim was to develop a surgical crisis simulation and evaluate its feasibility, realism, and validity of the measures used to assess performance. Methods: Surgical trainees were exposed to a bleeding crisis in a simulated operating theater. Assessment of performance consisted of a trainee’s technical ability to control the bleeding and of their team/human factors skills. This assessment was performed in a blinded manner by 2 surgeons and one human factors expert. Other measures consisted of time measures such as time to diagnose the bleeding (TD), inform team members (TT), achieve control (TC), and close the laceration (TL). Blood loss was used as a surrogate outcome measures. Results: There were considerable variations within both senior (n = 10) and junior (n = 10) trainees for technical and team skills. However, while the senior trainees scored higher than the juniors for technical skills (P = 0.001), there were no differences in human factors skills. There were also significant differences between the 2 groups for TD (P = 0.01), TC (P = 0.001), and TL (0.001). The blood loss was higher in the junior group. Conclusions: We have described the development of a novel simulated setting for the training of crisis management skills and the variability in performance both in between and within the 2 groups. PMID:16794399

  20. SARS: Key factors in crisis management.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Hsin-Chao; Chen, Thai-Form; Chou, Shieu-Ming

    2005-03-01

    This study was conducted at a single hospital selected in Taipei during the SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) outbreak from March to July, 2003 in Taiwan. During this period of time, 104 SARS patients were admitted to the hospital. There were no negative reports related to the selected hospital despite its being located right in the center of an area struck by the epidemic. The purpose of this study was to identify the key factors enabling the hospital to survive SARS unscathed. Data were collected from in-depth interviews with the nursing directors and nursing managers of the SARS units, along with a review of relevant hospital documents. The five key elements identified as survival factors during this SARS crisis are as follows: 1. good control of timing for crisis management, 2. careful decision-making, 3. thorough implementation, 4. effective communication, and 5. trust between management and employees. The results of this study reconfirmed the selected hospital as a model for good crisis management during the SARS epidemic.

  1. A STUDY ON CRISIS MANAGEMENT,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    THREAT EVALUATION, DECISION MAKING), (*STRATEGIC WARFARE, THREAT EVALUATION), (*FOREIGN POLICY, DECISION MAKING), OPERATIONS RESEARCH, MANAGEMENT ...PLANNING AND CONTROL, AERIAL WARFARE, USSR, PERCEPTION, GAME THEORY, WEAPON SYSTEMS , WARFARE, EGYPT, ISRAEL, JORDAN, LEBANON, CUBA, CYPRUS, THEORY, COMMUNISTS, CHINA, SOUTH KOREA, NORTH KOREA.

  2. Crisis management during anaesthesia: desaturation

    PubMed Central

    Szekely, S; Runciman, W; Webb, R; Ludbrook, G

    2005-01-01

    Background: Desaturation occurs for many reasons under anaesthesia, some rare and obscure, and many potentially life threatening. The rapidity with which the cause is determined and appropriate management is instituted varies considerably between anaesthetists. Objectives: To examine the role of a previously described "core" algorithm COVER ABCD–A SWIFT CHECK, supplemented by a specific sub-algorithm for desaturation, in the management of incidents of desaturation occurring in association with anaesthesia. Methods: The potential performance of this structured approach for each of the relevant incidents among the first 4000 reported to the Australian Incident Monitoring Study (AIMS) was compared with the actual management as reported by the anaesthetists involved. Results: Amongst the first 4000 incidents reported to AIMS there were 584 episodes of desaturation in association with general anaesthesia; 41% were dealt with by COVER, 48% by ABCD, and 11% required a specific desaturation sub-algorithm. Nearly a fifth of all desaturations were caused by endobronchial intubation. Within the specific desaturation subgroup, half were due to pulmonary problems in the form of underlying lung disease, excessive secretions or obesity and a third could not be diagnosed. Conclusion: Desaturation may have many causes, some of which are obscure, and failure to respond promptly may place the patient at risk. In the face of persistent desaturation, management should consist of hand ventilation with 100% oxygen, completion of COVER ABCD–A SWIFT CHECK, and a return to a supine posture. Blood gases, chest radiography, and bronchoscopy may be required where desaturation is persistent and/or no apparent causes can be found. PMID:15933303

  3. Crisis management during anaesthesia: recovering from a crisis

    PubMed Central

    Bacon, A; Morris, R; Runciman, W; Currie, M

    2005-01-01

    Preventing harm to the patient is the priority during a crisis. After a major incident, and especially when a patient has been harmed, there are a number of matters to be addressed: the ongoing care of the patient; documentation of the incident; investigation of the root causes; completion of reports; interviews with the patient and/or the next of kin, together with apologies and expression of regret; updates and ongoing support for friends and relatives; a word of thanks to the staff involved for their assistance; formal debriefing of staff for quality assurance and possibly ongoing support and a separate debriefing for psychological purposes; ensuring that the recommendations of the root cause analysis are carried out; or, failing that, that the issues are logged on a risk register. The extent and depth of the follow up protocol depends on what, if any, harm may have been done. This may constitute completion of an incident report; notification of an equipment failure to a federal regulatory authority; arranging consultations with a mental health professional to manage psychological sequelae (especially following an awareness episode); follow up during weeks of intensive care treatment; or, when a death has occurred, a full medico-legal and/or coronial set of procedures. A précis is appended in an action card format. PMID:15933299

  4. Crisis management during anaesthesia: pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Bacon, A; Paix, A; Williamson, J; Webb, R; Chapman, M

    2005-01-01

    Background: Pneumothorax is a potentially dangerous condition which may arise unexpectedly during anaesthesia. The diagnosis is one of exclusion, as initial changes in vital signs (cardiorespiratory decompensation and difficulty with ventilation) are non-specific, and other causes of such changes are more common, whereas local signs may be difficult to elicit, especially without full access to the chest. Objectives: To examine the role of a previously described core algorithm "COVER ABCD–A SWIFT CHECK", supplemented by a specific sub-algorithm for pneumothorax, in the management of pneumothorax occurring in association with anaesthesia. Methods: Reports of pneumothorax were extracted and studied from the first 4000 incidents reported to the Australian Incident Monitoring Study (AIMS). The potential performance of the structured approach, using the combination of algorithims described above for each of the relevant incidents, was compared with the actual management as reported by the anaesthetists involved. Results: Pneumothorax was noted as a possible diagnosis in 65 reports; 24 cases had a confirmed pneumothorax, of which 17 were in association with general anaesthesia. It was considered that, correctly applied, the application of the algorithms would have led to earlier recognition of the problem and/or better management in 12% of cases. Conclusion: Any pneumothorax may become a dangerous tension pneumothorax with the application of positive pressure ventilation. Limited access to the chest during anaesthesia may compromise the diagnosis. Recognition of any preoperative predisposition to a pneumothorax (for example, iatrogenic or traumatic penetrating procedures around the base of the neck) and close communication with the surgeon are important. Aspiration diagnosis in suspected cases and correct insertion of a chest drain are essential for the safe conduct of anaesthesia and surgery. PMID:15933291

  5. Wilderness Crisis Management. Explore Magazine Technical Series No. 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raffan, James

    This paper deals with managing a crisis in a wilderness situation. The terms "crisis" and "turning point" are used to describe what is more traditionally called an accident. Using these terms introduces the idea that crisis events occur as logical consequences of preceding decisions, errors, or omissions, not as the result of…

  6. EDITORIAL: Crisis management - and creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson Honorary Editor, Ken

    1996-11-01

    yet more unknown persons. But we live in a democracy, and the new core will be put out for consultation. This will take place between November 1st and 20th, and so will be over, more or less, by the time you read this Editorial. Ordinary teachers of physics are unlikely to be asked for opinions. However, the Institute's informal rapid response team will do their best to represent the interests not only of its members but of the wider physics community. The question remains, however, as to why such rapid reactions are necessary. Surely now is the time to reflect upon the consequences of the rushed initiatives of the past eight years or so in education, and indeed undertake a professional, independent evaluation of them. But our rulers seem incapable of doing other than create crises, and then managing the crises they create by creating even more. There are of course alternatives to this, as could easily be discovered by looking north of Hadrian's Wall, where change is taking placed in a managed, courteous fashion, and where the numbers of students studying physics post-16 is gently increasing. The Scottish Office Education Department has recently taken part in an OECD study of curriculum innovation in 13 countries. The department reports some key findings in the Scottish initiative which are in fact common to all the successful initiatives reported [1, 2]. The message is clear: curriculum change will fail - either completely or at least in reaching the anticipated outcome fully - if certain requirements are not met. The most significant of these, reported in the OECD study, are: Teachers will respond to challenges to become involved in curriculum innovation and to acquire new skills and competences if they are given encouragement and reassurance that they will be well supported in their efforts. Innovation must be systemic, i.e. showing an awareness that many aspects of education are interrelated (so that a change in one affects others). Teacher involvement is vital

  7. Managing a volcanic crisis using Exupery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hort, Matthias

    2010-05-01

    Despite ever increasing efforts to monitor historically active volcanoes many of those are still very poorly or unmonitored, even in highly populated areas. In case of volcanic unrest or even a volcanic crisis quickly assessing the situation is therefore often very difficult due to the little information that is available for that specific volcano. With vastly increasing possibilities in communication technology and managing huge data volumes mobile systems become more and more an option to be used as a crisis management tool in volcanology. This is going to supplement different programs that have supported volcanic crisis management efforts in third world countries in the past that includes sending experts and improving or even installing new instruments around the volcano. One of the main problems especially when quickly upgrading the monitoring system during a crisis is that each instrument usually comes with its own acquisition and processing system. This makes it very difficult to manage the monitoring network and provide an interdisciplinary interpretation of the data with respect to the activity status of the volcano. Here we present a newly developed volcano fast response system which overcomes several of these shortcomings. The core of the system is a novel database (SEISHUB) that allows for the collection of data of various kinds, i.e. simple time series data like seismic data, gas measurements, GPS measurements, as well as satellite data (SO2 flux, thermal anomaly, ground deformation). Part of the collected data may also come from an already existing network. Data from new field instruments are transmitted through a wireless network that has been specifically designed for the volcano fast response system. One of the main difficulties with such a multidisciplinary data set is an easy access to the data. This is provided through a common Web based GIS interface which allows various datalayers being simultaneously accessed through a Web Browser. The

  8. Crisis management can leave residual effects.

    PubMed

    Margolis, G L; DeMuro, P R

    1991-10-01

    A healthcare organization that once suffered from poor financial performance may fail to correct recovery methods that can cause lingering legal and accounting problems. A crisis management style is prone to creating problems with an organization's debt structure, Medicare and Medicaid payment, tax issues, labor relations, licensing and accreditation, compliance with fraud and abuse rules, and accounting for charity care. After stabilizing a worrisome financial situation, a healthcare organization should conduct an internal audit to ensure that its legal and accounting practices remain above board.

  9. The limits of technology in nuclear crisis management

    SciTech Connect

    White, P.C.

    1986-01-01

    For some purposes, one may consider the roles of technology in nuclear crisis management to fall into four categories. Certain technologies, such as signals intelligence, may assist in monitoring for the emergence of crisis precursors. Other kinds of surveillance, such as that by certain satellites, are intended to detect phenomena, such as missile launches, which clearly signal the transition from pre-crisis to mid-crisis. During this phase, communications and surveillance technologies may be called upon to aid in managing the crisis. Finally, communications technologies will play a vital role in crisis resolution, preferably during the pre-crisis phase, but in mid-crisis if necessary. It has long been recognized that a large fraction of these technical means are vulnerable, both to selective, direct attack, and to the unintended, collateral effects of conflict itself. Systematic efforts are underway to make these systems more robust and survivable in crisis environments, but one must clearly recognize the limits of technology. In particular, one must weigh very seriously the implications and possible consequences of intentional, direct attack, including decapitation, on just those means which may permit timely crisis resolution. In the end, these technologies may prove so vulnerable, that nations may be forced to rely on pre-crisis planning, including force structuring, clearly defined options planning, and clear statements of intent, in order to permit any sort of mid-crisis resolution and conflict termination.

  10. Crisis management during anaesthesia: water intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Kluger, M; Szekely, S; Singleton, R; Helps, S

    2005-01-01

    Background: Irrigation of closed body spaces may lead to substantial perioperative fluid and electrolyte shifts. A syndrome occurring during transurethral resection of prostate (TURP), and a similar syndrome described in women undergoing transcervical endometrial ablation (TCEA) are both characterised by a spectrum of symptoms which may range from asymptomatic hyponatraemia to convulsions, coma, and death. Such potentially serious consequences require prompt recognition and appropriate management of this "water intoxication" syndrome. Objectives: To examine the role of a previously described core algorithm "COVER ABCD–A SWIFT CHECK", supplemented by a specific sub-algorithm for water intoxication, in the management of this syndrome occurring in association with anaesthesia. Methods: The potential performance of this structured approach for each of the relevant incidents among the first 4000 reported to the Australian Incident Monitoring Study (AIMS) was compared with the actual management as reported by the anaesthetists involved. Results: From the first 4000 incidents reported to AIMS, 10 reports of water intoxication were identified, two from endometrial ablations under general anaesthesia and eight from male urological procedures under spinal anaesthesia. The "core" crisis management algorithm detected a problem in seven cases; however, it was deficient in dealing with neurological presentations. Diagnosis of the cause of the incident would have required a specific water intoxication sub-algorithm in eight cases and a hypotension algorithm in a further two cases. Corrective strategies also required a specific sub-algorithm in eight cases, while the hypotension and cardiac arrest sub-algorithms were required in conjunction with the water intoxication sub-algorithm in the remaining two. Conclusion: This relatively uncommon problem is managed poorly using the "core" crisis management sub-algorithm and requires a simple specific sub-algorithm for water

  11. Crisis management during anaesthesia: awareness and anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, G; Bacon, A; Runciman, W; Helps, S

    2005-01-01

    Background: Patient awareness during general anaesthesia has considerable potential for severe emotional distress in the patient as well as professional, personal, and financial consequences for the anaesthetist. Objectives: To examine the role of a previously described core algorithm "COVER ABCD–A SWIFT CHECK", supplemented by a specific sub-algorithm for awareness, in the detection and management of potential awareness in association with general anaesthesia. Method: The potential performance of this structured approach for each of the relevant incidents among the first 4000 reported to the Australian Incident Monitoring Study (AIMS) was compared with the actual management as reported by the anaesthetists involved. Results: Of the first 4000 reports received by AIMS, there were 21 incidents of patient awareness under general anaesthesia, and 20 of patients being paralysed while awake from "syringe swaps" before induction of anaesthesia. In 12 of the 21 reports there was an obvious cause, most commonly a low concentration of volatile agent (8 of 12 reports). The AIMS "core" crisis management algorithm would have detected the cause of awareness in all of these cases. In nine reports the course of anaesthesia appeared unremarkable, and in these the algorithm would not have been expected to detect or prevent awareness. Volatile agent monitoring would have prevented some cases of awareness, as would bispectral index electroencephalographic (BIS) monitoring. The role of BIS monitoring is still contentious, but it should be considered for high risk patients. Conclusion: Awareness should be minimised by thorough checking of equipment, particularly vaporisers, and frequent application of a structured scanning routine. Awareness may occur during crisis management and aftermath protocols should include patient follow up to detect and manage awareness when it occurs. PMID:15933289

  12. Knowledge communication: a key to successful crisis management.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Anders; Härenstam, Malin

    2013-09-01

    A winning concept of crisis management can be summarized in 2 words: knowledge communication. If decision makers, communicators, experts, and the public understand what the crisis is about and share their knowledge, the process of handling it will be optimized. Effective crisis communication implies the necessity of an unhindered but purposeful exchange of information within and between authorities, organizations, media, involved individuals, and groups before, during, and after a crisis. This article focuses on the importance of the before, or prevention, part of a crisis since it holds a rich possibility to enhance the chances for successful crisis management of a bioterrorism incident. An extended perspective on crisis communication efficiently links to a more thorough understanding of risk perception with various stakeholders and the public, which also will be helpful for situational awareness. Furthermore, the grounded baseline for the dialogue type of crisis communication suitable in modern society and to modern social media is achieved by linking to those risk communication efforts that are made. The link between risk and crisis should be afforded more attention since, especially in biosecurity, there would be no crisis without risk negligence and poor or malfunctioning preventive efforts.

  13. Biofeedback Training in Crisis Managers: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Janka, A; Adler, C; Brunner, B; Oppenrieder, S; Duschek, S

    2017-06-01

    Working in crisis environments represents a major challenge, especially for executive personnel engaged in directing disaster operations, i.e. crisis managers. Crisis management involves operating under conditions of extreme stress resulting, for instance, from high-level decision-making, principal responsibility for personnel, multitasking or working under conditions of risk and time pressure. The present study aimed to investigate the efficacy of a newly developed biofeedback training procedure based on electrodermal activity, especially designed for the target group of crisis managers. The training comprised exercises promoting acquisition of control over sympathetic arousal under resting conditions and during exposure to visual, acoustic and cognitive stressors resembling situations related to crisis management. In a randomized controlled design, 36 crisis managers were assigned to either a biofeedback training group or waiting list control group. Subjective stress was assessed using the Perceived Stress Scale. In the training group, stress level markedly decreased; the decrease remained stable at follow-up 2 months after the training. The results indicate that biofeedback training in crisis management is an effective method for stress management that may help to reduce vulnerability to stress-related performance decline and stress-related disease.

  14. Avoiding School Management Conflicts and Crisis through Formal Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nwogbaga, David M. E.; Nwankwo, Oliver U.; Onwa, Doris O.

    2015-01-01

    This paper examined how conflicts and crisis can be avoided through formal communication. It was necessitated by the observation that most of the conflicts and crisis which tend to mar school management today are functions of the inconsistencies arising from "grapevines, rumours, and gossips" generated through informal communication…

  15. Crisis management with applicability on fire fighting plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panaitescu, M.; Panaitescu, F. V.; Voicu, I.; Dumitrescu, L. G.

    2017-08-01

    The paper presents a case study for a crisis management analysis which address to fire fighting plants. The procedures include the steps of FTA (Failure tree analysis). The purpose of the present paper is to describe this crisis management plan with tools of FTA. The crisis management procedures have applicability on anticipated and emergency situations and help to describe and planning a worst-case scenario plan. For this issue must calculate the probabilities in different situations for fire fighting plants. In the conclusions of paper is analised the block diagram with components of fire fighting plant and are presented the solutions for each possible risk situations.

  16. Crisis Management- Operational Logistics & Asset Visibility Technologies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    greatly increase the effectiveness of future crisis response operations. The proposed logistics framework serves as a viable solution for common...increase the effectiveness of future crisis response operations. The proposed logistics framework serves as a viable solution for common logistical...FRAMEWORK............................................................29 A. INTEGRATED COMMUNICATIONS NETWORK MODEL ................29 B. INTEGRATED

  17. Crisis Management Aspects of Bam Catastrophic Earthquake: Review Article

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun; Azami-Aghdash, Saber; Kazemi, Abdolhassan; Ziapour, Behrad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bam earthquake was the most catastrophic natural disasters in recent years. The aim of this study was to review different aspects of crisis management during and after the catastrophic earthquake in Bam City, Iran. Methods: Data needed for this systematic review were collected through searching PubMed, EMBASE and SID databases, for the period from 2003 to 2011. Keywords included earthquake, Iran and Bam earthquake. The data were summarized and were analyzed using Content Analysis. Results: Out of 422 articles, 25 articles were included in the study. Crisis Management aspects and existing pitfalls were classified into seven categories including planning and organization, human resource management, management of logistics, international humanitarian aids, field performance of the military and security forces, health and medical service provision, and information management. Positive aspects and major pitfalls of crisis management have been introduced in all the mentioned categories. Conclusion: The available evidence indicated poor crisis management during Bam earthquake that resulted in aggravating the losses as well as diminishing the effect of interventions. Thus, concerning the importance of different aspects of the crisis management and the high prevalence of disasters in Iran, the observed vulnerability in disaster management process should be addressed. PMID:26000241

  18. Exploring Crisis Management in U.S. Small Businesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Jon

    As a critical infrastructure, the US electricity grid supplies electricity to 340 million people within eight separate regions. The power infrastructure is vulnerable to many types of disasters capable of severing supplies of electricity. The impact on the employees and communities when small- and medium-size enterprises are shut down due to disasters can be severe. The purpose of the quantitative comparative study was to explore small- and medium-size enterprises crisis management strategies in the case of power infrastructure vulnerabilities. Perceptions of small business leaders were probed about crisis management planning relevant to three secondary factors: prior experience of crises, threat perceptions, and planning self-efficacy. Participants completed an adapted questionnaire instrument based on a five-point Likert scale for six sub-factors including resilience through planning, financial impact, operational crisis management, the perfect storm, the aftermath of survival, and atrophy. The instrument also measured three additional factors to include, prior experience of crises, threat perceptions, and planning self-efficacy, across seven types of crises. The results of this study indicated that of the 276 respondents, 104 had no crisis plans, but 172 did have crisis plans. Of those who had implemented crisis plans, 19% had specific provisions to address power outages or attacks on the electrical grid. Of the respondents who had not planned for power outages nor experienced significant losses of power, a statistically significant number acknowledged an external threat to their business. The majority of respondents indicated that long-term planning was related to resilience; however, the migration of crisis understanding into the planning process or implementation was not implemented. This heightened awareness of potential crises without the corresponding development and implementation of mitigation crisis plans requires additional research to understand

  19. The Organization's Role in Managing Midlife Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Philip I.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Describing some of the causes of midlife crisis and reasons why organizations should offer help to their employees, the authors suggest these actions: continuing education, retraining, mentoring, autonomy, support groups, counseling, and sabbaticals. (SK)

  20. Risk Management and Crisis Response: Are You Prepared?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schirick, Ed

    2002-01-01

    How a camp responds to a crisis may determine whether it can survive financially. Effective risk management requires total commitment from ownership and management, and staff involvement. Steps in formulating a risk management plan include identifying all potential crises and their frequency and severity potential, developing responses,…

  1. Mental health telephone triage: managing psychiatric crisis and emergency.

    PubMed

    Sands, Natisha; Elsom, Stephen; Marangu, Elijah; Keppich-Arnold, Sandra; Henderson, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    The study aims to identify and articulate how mental health telephone triage (MHTT) clinicians manage psychiatric crisis and emergency via the telephone. An observational design was employed in the study. Wireless headsets were used to observe 197 occasions of MHTT. Clinicians use a range of practical strategies, therapeutic skills, and psychosocial interventions to manage psychiatric crises and emergencies via the telephone. The evidence base for managing psychiatric crisis/emergency in MHTT is minimal. These findings contribute to the MHTT knowledge base and provide evidence-based strategies for high-quality emergency mental health care. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Managing a Crisis for School Security

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badzmierowski, William F.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, campus tragedies across the country have prompted leaders of education institutions to redouble their crisis planning efforts. Too often, however, these emergency plans focus almost exclusively on facilities, hardware and systems without sufficient consideration for the people they potentially affect. People, not equipment, will…

  3. Effective Crisis Management at the Smaller Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeWitt, Robert C.

    Pennsylvania State University Beaver Campus developed crisis guidelines and a formal working relationship with a local community mental health center in order to be able to deal with on-campus crises and their followup. The guidelines provide each employee with a single, easy-to-follow document that outlines the decision making process to be…

  4. Crisis Management; Who is in Charge?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    becomm an after the fact exermise or damag motrol. It is much easier maneging the crisis at this point before it erupts into a situation out of...was concerned about the safety of the men; ad was mad as hell. One time he asked me, ’Vhy wasn’t I called immediately?’ ...And the only wanwer I could

  5. Crisis Management in a Primary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barclay, Colette

    2004-01-01

    Dunblane Primary School, Scotland, and Columbine High School, USA. Two headline tragedies that have led to trauma for their pupils and staff. Trauma that could be devastating because of the psychological impact and the practical requirements a crisis brings. Children's social and personal development can be negatively affected, their academic…

  6. Crisis Management in a Primary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barclay, Colette

    2004-01-01

    Dunblane Primary School, Scotland, and Columbine High School, USA. Two headline tragedies that have led to trauma for their pupils and staff. Trauma that could be devastating because of the psychological impact and the practical requirements a crisis brings. Children's social and personal development can be negatively affected, their academic…

  7. Crisis management during anaesthesia: the development of an anaesthetic crisis management manual

    PubMed Central

    Runciman, W; Kluger, M; Morris, R; Paix, A; Watterson, L; Webb, R

    2005-01-01

    Background: All anaesthetists have to handle life threatening crises with little or no warning. However, some cognitive strategies and work practices that are appropriate for speed and efficiency under normal circumstances may become maladaptive in a crisis. It was judged in a previous study that the use of a structured "core" algorithm (based on the mnemonic COVER ABCD–A SWIFT CHECK) would diagnose and correct the problem in 60% of cases and provide a functional diagnosis in virtually all of the remaining 40%. It was recommended that specific sub-algorithms be developed for managing the problems underlying the remaining 40% of crises and assembled in an easy-to-use manual. Sub-algorithms were therefore developed for these problems so that they could be checked for applicability and validity against the first 4000 anaesthesia incidents reported to the Australian Incident Monitoring Study (AIMS). Methods: The need for 24 specific sub-algorithms was identified. Teams of practising anaesthetists were assembled and sets of incidents relevant to each sub-algorithm were identified from the first 4000 reported to AIMS. Based largely on successful strategies identified in these reports, a set of 24 specific sub-algorithms was developed for trial against the 4000 AIMS reports and assembled into an easy-to-use manual. A process was developed for applying each component of the core algorithm COVER at one of four levels (scan-check-alert/ready-emergency) according to the degree of perceived urgency, and incorporated into the manual. The manual was disseminated at a World Congress and feedback was obtained. Results: Each of the 24 specific crisis management sub-algorithms was tested against the relevant incidents among the first 4000 reported to AIMS and compared with the actual management by the anaesthetist at the time. It was judged that, if the core algorithm had been correctly applied, the appropriate sub-algorithm would have been resolved better and/or faster in one in

  8. Designing Mixed Reality Mobile Games for Crisis Management Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Di Loreto, Ines; Mora, Simone; Divitini, Monica

    2013-01-01

    Games for crisis management offer an interesting complement to traditional training. Experiments on their usage show that games can be promising tools able to address some of the limitations of traditional training. Also our first assessment with a board game for panic management shows that this particular kind of game could be useful for soft…

  9. The antimicrobial resistance crisis: management through gene monitoring

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is an acknowledged crisis for humanity. Its genetic origins and dire potential outcomes are increasingly well understood. However, diagnostic techniques for monitoring the crisis are currently largely limited to enumerating the increasing incidence of resistant pathogens. Being the end-stage of the evolutionary process that produces antimicrobial resistant pathogens, these measurements, while diagnostic, are not prognostic, and so are not optimal in managing this crisis. A better test is required. Here, using insights from an understanding of evolutionary processes ruling the changing abundance of genes under selective pressure, we suggest a predictive framework for the AMR crisis. We then discuss the likely progression of resistance for both existing and prospective antimicrobial therapies. Finally, we suggest that by the environmental monitoring of resistance gene frequency, resistance may be detected and tracked presumptively, and how this tool may be used to guide decision-making in the local and global use of antimicrobials. PMID:27831476

  10. The application of clinical simulation in crisis management training.

    PubMed

    Wong, S H S; Ng, K F J; Chen, P P

    2002-04-01

    Since it was first introduced more than 30 years ago, clinical simulation has become a popular tool for medical training, particularly in crisis management. The modern high-fidelity patient simulator consists of a whole-body mannequin with integrated electronic patient monitoring; it is controlled by computers capable of simulating numerous clinical scenarios and patient characteristics, and reacting to various interventions appropriately. Simulator training is theoretically superior to conventional training in management of rare crisis situations, as it allows unlimited practice in a safe yet familiar environment. Training in clinical skills can be developed, together with competency in crisis management behaviours such as leadership and communication skills. Although there is evidence demonstrating the popularity, reliability, and validity of simulator training, its superiority over conventional training has not been proven, and research in this area is required.

  11. [Practical management of nutritional and food problems in crisis situations].

    PubMed

    Belchior-Bellino, V

    2002-01-01

    This article deals with one of the most consistent problems arising during crisis situations, i.e., food shortage. The author first presents the international context conducive to natural or man-made famine. He emphasizes the importance of early detection and the need for an evaluation phase using public health survey skills to determine the objectives of relief. He then describes strategies for management of alimentary and nutritional requirements in famine-stricken populations in function of the different types of malnutrition encountered. The article ends with a presentation of preventive measures that must be implemented in association with crisis management.

  12. [Development of a Crisis Management Manual for Occupational Health Experts].

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Juri; Tateishi, Seiichiro; Igarashi, Yu; Ide, Hiroshi; Miyamoto, Toshiaki; Hara, Tatsuhiko; Kobashi, Masaki; Inoue, Megumi; Kawashima, Megumi; Okada, Takeo; Mori, Koji

    2015-12-01

    When crises such as natural disasters or industrial accidents occur in workplaces, not only the workers who are injured, but also those who engage in emergency or recovery work may be exposed to various health hazards. We developed a manual to enable occupational health (OH) experts to prevent health hazards. The manual includes detailed explanations of the characteristics and necessary actions for each need in the list of "OH Needs During Crisis Management" developed after an analysis of eight cases in our previous research. We changed the endings of explanatory sentences so that users could learn how often each need occurred in these eight cases. We evaluated the validity of the manual using two processes: 1) Providing the manual to OH physicians during an industrial accident; 2) Asking crisis management experts to review the manual. We made improvements based on their feedback and completed the manual. The manual includes explanations about 99 OH needs, and users can learn how and what to do for each need during various crisis cases. Because additional OH needs may occur in other crises, it is necessary to collect information about new cases and to improve the comprehensiveness of the manual continuously. It is critical that this crisis management manual be available when a crisis occurs. We need to inform potential users of the manual through various media, as well as by posting it on our website.

  13. Recognition and crisis management of asthma in schools.

    PubMed

    Shah, S; Gibson, P G; Wachinger, S

    1994-08-01

    Under-reporting of asthma and inappropriate management at school can hamper a child's academic progress. The aim of this study was to assess asthma reporting and crisis management, following implementation of a Primary School Asthma Programme. The intervention covered 12 primary schools with 5093 students in an area of high unemployment with a large proportion of the community from a non-English background. The programme included School Asthma First Aid Kits, training workshops for school staff and individual Crisis Management Plans for students with asthma. Registration of students with asthma at school increased from 6.2% before the intervention in 1989 to 12.7% in 1992. School Asthma Crisis Plans were completed appropriately by the child's doctor and parents and returned by 68% of the students with asthma. Teachers' asthma knowledge and confidence with the management of acute asthma at school improved following asthma education workshops. It was concluded that asthma reporting and acute crisis management of asthma at school can be achieved by a programme undertaken by school medical services.

  14. Crisis Management for Secondary Education: A Survey of Secondary Education Directors in Greece

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savelides, Socrates; Mihiotis, Athanassios; Koutsoukis, Nikitas-Spiros

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The Greek secondary education system lacks a formal crisis management system. The purpose of this paper is to address this problem as follows: elicit current crisis management practices, outline features for designing a formal crisis management system in Greece. Design/methodology/approach: The research is based on a survey conducted with…

  15. Crisis Management for Secondary Education: A Survey of Secondary Education Directors in Greece

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savelides, Socrates; Mihiotis, Athanassios; Koutsoukis, Nikitas-Spiros

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The Greek secondary education system lacks a formal crisis management system. The purpose of this paper is to address this problem as follows: elicit current crisis management practices, outline features for designing a formal crisis management system in Greece. Design/methodology/approach: The research is based on a survey conducted with…

  16. Crisis Management: How to Handle a Salmonella Outbreak at Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, William A.; Popkin, Rodger

    1992-01-01

    Details events of six days during Salmonella outbreak at camp in North Carolina. Explains how camp handled 280 sick campers and staff, well campers, news media, and parents. Based on an epidemiologic survey of food eaten, it was suspected that the culprit of the outbreak was a meat item. Offers suggestions for crisis management in the camp…

  17. Behavioral and Emotional Crisis Management in Adventure Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Dene S.; Davis-Berman, Jennifer; Gillen, Mark

    1998-01-01

    Defines emotional crises in an adventure education context. Discusses crisis intervention from a mental-health perspective and presents nonviolent intervention techniques for anxiety, disruptive behavior, and harmful behavior. Describes two techniques--critical incident stress debriefing and traumatic stress defusing--aimed at managing traumatic…

  18. Digging Deeper: Crisis Management in the Coal Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Barbara M.; Horsley, J. Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    This study explores crisis management/communication practices within the coal industry through the lens of high reliability organization (HRO) concepts and sensemaking theory. In-depth interviews with industry executives and an analysis of an emergency procedures manual were used to provide an exploratory examination of the status of crisis…

  19. Perceptions of Crisis Management in a K-12 School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Joy

    2012-01-01

    This multiple-case qualitative study was conducted to examine the perceptions of community members, students, and staff regarding school crisis management following a 2006 tornado and 2010 bus accident in a small rural school district in Missouri. Online surveys were collected from 66 participants, and 10 follow-up interviews were completed with…

  20. Expanding Possibilities through Metaphor: Breaking Biases to Improve Crisis Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cirka, Carol C.; Corrigall, Elizabeth A.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we demonstrate that an exercise using metaphors to overcome cognitive biases helped students to proactively imagine and prepare for an expanded set of potential crises. The exercise complements traditional textbook approaches to crisis management and incorporates creativity skill building in a realistic context. Learning outcomes…

  1. Using Emotional Intelligence in Training Crisis Managers: The Pandora Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackinnon, Lachian; Bacon, Liz; Cortellessa, Gabriella; Cesta, Amedeo

    2013-01-01

    Multi-agency crisis management represents one of the most complex of real-world situations, requiring rapid negotiation and decision-making under extreme pressure. However, the training offered to strategic planners, called Gold Commanders, does not place them under any such pressure. It takes the form of paper-based, table-top exercises, or…

  2. Access to opioids: a global pain management crisis.

    PubMed

    Buitrago, Rosa

    2013-03-01

    The lack of availability of opioids in many countries has created a pain management crisis. Because the Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs requires governments to report annual opioid statistics, there is a need for methods to calculate individual nations' opioid needs. Ways to address this need are discussed.

  3. Expanding Possibilities through Metaphor: Breaking Biases to Improve Crisis Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cirka, Carol C.; Corrigall, Elizabeth A.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we demonstrate that an exercise using metaphors to overcome cognitive biases helped students to proactively imagine and prepare for an expanded set of potential crises. The exercise complements traditional textbook approaches to crisis management and incorporates creativity skill building in a realistic context. Learning outcomes…

  4. Digging Deeper: Crisis Management in the Coal Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Barbara M.; Horsley, J. Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    This study explores crisis management/communication practices within the coal industry through the lens of high reliability organization (HRO) concepts and sensemaking theory. In-depth interviews with industry executives and an analysis of an emergency procedures manual were used to provide an exploratory examination of the status of crisis…

  5. Crisis Management: How to Handle a Salmonella Outbreak at Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, William A.; Popkin, Rodger

    1992-01-01

    Details events of six days during Salmonella outbreak at camp in North Carolina. Explains how camp handled 280 sick campers and staff, well campers, news media, and parents. Based on an epidemiologic survey of food eaten, it was suspected that the culprit of the outbreak was a meat item. Offers suggestions for crisis management in the camp…

  6. Using Emotional Intelligence in Training Crisis Managers: The Pandora Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackinnon, Lachian; Bacon, Liz; Cortellessa, Gabriella; Cesta, Amedeo

    2013-01-01

    Multi-agency crisis management represents one of the most complex of real-world situations, requiring rapid negotiation and decision-making under extreme pressure. However, the training offered to strategic planners, called Gold Commanders, does not place them under any such pressure. It takes the form of paper-based, table-top exercises, or…

  7. Perceptions of Crisis Management in a K-12 School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Joy

    2012-01-01

    This multiple-case qualitative study was conducted to examine the perceptions of community members, students, and staff regarding school crisis management following a 2006 tornado and 2010 bus accident in a small rural school district in Missouri. Online surveys were collected from 66 participants, and 10 follow-up interviews were completed with…

  8. Stakeholder involvement in nuclear crisis management in Greece.

    PubMed

    Ioannides, K G; Tzialla, C E; Papachristodoulou, C A; Papanikolaou, C; Apostolopoulos, C

    2005-01-01

    The setting up of the Greek Stakeholders Group in the framework of the EC Food and Agriculture Restoration Management Involving Networked Groups (FARMING) project is described. The Group included members from more than 20 governmental and non-governmental organisations, having interest and/or responsibilities in the management of a crisis following a nuclear accident. The stakeholders, during their meetings in 2002, discussed the agricultural countermeasures and rural waste disposal options which have been compiled by the EC Sustainable Restoration and Long-Term Management of Contaminated Rural, Urban and Industrial Ecosystems (STRATEGY) project. All stakeholders agreed that the most preferable were those options that ensure public acceptance, minimise environmental impact and maintain farming practices and acceptable living and working conditions. Their views are synoptically presented along with the major conclusions from the stakeholders meetings regarding nuclear crisis management.

  9. CRISIS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grinnell, Richard M.; Kyte, Nancy S.

    1977-01-01

    Examines some different ways that a client's crisis affects the social worker who is attempting to help him resolve his crisis, the agency or facility within which the worker operates, and the community in which all three function. (Author/RK)

  10. Rich Language Analysis for Counterterrorism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidère, Mathieu; Howard, Newton; Argamon, Shlomo

    Accurate and relevant intelligence is critical for effective counterterrorism. Too much irrelevant information is as bad or worse than not enough information. Modern computational tools promise to provide better search and summarization capabilities to help analysts filter and select relevant and key information. However, to do this task effectively, such tools must have access to levels of meaning beyond the literal. Terrorists operating in context-rich cultures like fundamentalist Islam use messages with multiple levels of interpretation, which are easily misunderstood by non-insiders. This chapter discusses several kinds of such “encryption” used by terrorists and insurgents in the Arabic language, and how knowledge of such methods can be used to enhance computational text analysis techniques for use in counterterrorism.

  11. Crisis planning to manage risks posed by animal rights extremists.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Matthew R; Rich, Barbara A; Bennett, B Taylor

    2010-01-01

    Among the multitude of crises that US research institutions may face are those caused by animal rights activists. While most activists opposed to animal research use peaceful and lawful means of expressing their opinions, some extremists resort to illegal methods. Arson, break-ins, and theft with significant property damage at US animal research facilities began in the 1980s. The most troubling trend to develop in the past decade is the targeting of individuals associated with animal research, whether directly or indirectly, and the use of violent scare tactics to intimidate researchers and their families. The National Association for Biomedical Research has a 30-year history of monitoring the animal rights movement and assisting member institutions with crisis situations. In this article we discuss attacks on researchers at their homes, cyber crimes, exploitation of new media formats, infiltration of research facilities, and the targeting of external research stakeholders and business partners. We describe the need for a well-conceived crisis management plan and strong leadership to mitigate crisis situations. Institutions with well-informed leaders and crisis management teams ready to take timely action are best equipped to protect staff, laboratory animals, and research programs. They act on early warnings, provide support for targeted staff, seek legal remedies, thoughtfully control access to research facilities, and identify and enlist new research supporters. We underscore the importance of up-to-date crisis planning so that institutions are not only aware of ongoing risks posed by animal rights extremists but also better prepared to take preemptive action and able to manage those risks successfully.

  12. The Role of Perception in Crisis Management: A Tale of Two Hurricanes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olaniran, Bolanle A.

    2007-01-01

    The "anticipatory" model of crisis management draws the attention of crisis practitioners and researchers to the precrisis phase of crisis management. The model views institutions' position as a condition that has implications for peoples' perceptions regarding the lack of control over factors such as policies, human resources,…

  13. Crisis management and disaster planning: some recent lessons.

    PubMed

    1989-11-01

    Two recent disasters--Hurricane Hugo and the San Francisco-Oakland area earthquake--put a number of hospitals (and their disaster plans) to the text this fall. In future issues, we will present details on how hospitals faced those emergencies. The need for crisis management and disaster planning, however, is not limited to natural disasters like hurricanes, earthquakes, tornadoes, or floods. Man-made disasters, both internal and external, can occur virtually at any time. These include accidents, terrorists bombs, fires, explosions, and toxic chemical spills. In this report, we will present the key elements of a crisis management plan, as well as some expert pointers on what to include in a disaster plan. We will give you details on how two hospitals fared when a major air crash occurred in their community. We will tell you some of the things they would do differently, and we will also describe how an interagency disaster planning committee responded.

  14. A Comparison of Perceived Crisis Training Management and Optimum Training Management Techniques in the Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-27

    Ambiguity and Time Management relating to crisis management are key issues for consideration in the development of this investigation. These concepts are...themselves to be optimum-management-oriented. The study indicates the possibility of continuing problems in the areas of time management contributing to

  15. Crisis-management and the Security in the Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Izumi

    This paper discusses about the crisis-management and the security in the Internet. The crime that not is so far occurs during widespread to the society of the Internet, and a big social trouble. Moreover, the problem of a new security such as a cyber war and cyber terrorism appeared, too. It is necessary to recognize such a situation, and to do both correspondences corresponding to the environmental transformation by government and the people.

  16. Curriculum and cases for pain medicine crisis resource management education.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Gary J; Newmark, Jordan L; Nemark, Jordan L; Raemer, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Medical crises that may occur in the setting of a pain medicine service are rare events that require skillful action and teamwork to ensure safe patient outcome. A simulated environment is an ideal venue for both acquisition and reinforcement of this knowledge and skill set. Here, we present an educational curriculum in pain medicine crisis resource management for both pain medicine fellows and attending physicians as well as the results of a successful pilot program.

  17. Managed Learning Environments and an Attendance Crisis?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Ruth; Rainer, Austen; Marczyk, Olenka

    2007-01-01

    Students who have the benefit of a Managed Learning Environment (MLE) are very appreciative of the facility to access lecture notes, practical and tutorial exercises and other learning resources. This access allows students to work independently and in many students' eyes, obviates the need to attend all timetabled sessions. Should the lecturers…

  18. A Location Based Communication Proposal for Disaster Crisis Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gülnerman, A. G.; Goksel, C.; Tezer, A.

    2014-12-01

    The most vital applications within urban applications under the title of Geographical Information system applications are Disaster applications. Especially, In Turkey the most occured disaster type Earthquakes impacts are hard to retain in urban due to greatness of area, data and effected resident or victim. Currently, communications between victims and institutions congested and collapsed, after disaster that results emergency service delay and so secondary death and desperation. To avoid these types of life loss, the communication should be established between public and institutions. Geographical Information System Technology is seen capable of data management techniques and communication tool. In this study, Life Saving Kiosk Modal Proposal designed as a communication tool based on GIS, after disaster, takes locational emegency demands, meets emergency demands over notification maps which is created by those demands,increase public solidarity by visualizing close emergency demanded area surrounded another one and gathers emergency service demanded institutions notifications and aims to increasethe capability of management. This design prosals' leading role is public. Increase in capability depends on public major contribution to disaster management by required communication infrastructure establishment. The aim is to propound public power instead of public despiration. Apart from general view of disaster crisis management approaches, Life Saving Kiosk Modal Proposal indicates preparedness and response phases within the disaster cycle and solve crisis management with the organization of design in preparedness phase, use in response phase. This resolution modal flow diagram is builded between public, communication tool (kiosk) amd response force. The software is included in communication tools whose functions, interface designs and user algorithms are provided considering the public participation. In this study, disaster crisis management with public

  19. The antimicrobial resistance crisis: causes, consequences, and management.

    PubMed

    Michael, Carolyn Anne; Dominey-Howes, Dale; Labbate, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    The antimicrobial resistance (AMR) crisis is the increasing global incidence of infectious diseases affecting the human population, which are untreatable with any known antimicrobial agent. This crisis will have a devastating cost on human society as both debilitating and lethal diseases increase in frequency and scope. Three major factors determine this crisis: (1) the increasing frequency of AMR phenotypes among microbes is an evolutionary response to the widespread use of antimicrobials; (2) the large and globally connected human population allows pathogens in any environment access to all of humanity; and (3) the extensive and often unnecessary use of antimicrobials by humanity provides the strong selective pressure that is driving the evolutionary response in the microbial world. Of these factors, the size of the human population is least amenable to rapid change. In contrast, the remaining two factors may be affected, so offering a means of managing the crisis: the rate at which AMR, as well as virulence factors evolve in microbial world may be slowed by reducing the applied selective pressure. This may be accomplished by radically reducing the global use of current and prospective antimicrobials. Current management measures to legislate the use of antimicrobials and to educate the healthcare world in the issues, while useful, have not comprehensively addressed the problem of achieving an overall reduction in the human use of antimicrobials. We propose that in addition to current measures and increased research into new antimicrobials and diagnostics, a comprehensive education program will be required to change the public paradigm of antimicrobial usage from that of a first line treatment to that of a last resort when all other therapeutic options have failed.

  20. The Antimicrobial Resistance Crisis: Causes, Consequences, and Management

    PubMed Central

    Michael, Carolyn Anne; Dominey-Howes, Dale; Labbate, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    The antimicrobial resistance (AMR) crisis is the increasing global incidence of infectious diseases affecting the human population, which are untreatable with any known antimicrobial agent. This crisis will have a devastating cost on human society as both debilitating and lethal diseases increase in frequency and scope. Three major factors determine this crisis: (1) the increasing frequency of AMR phenotypes among microbes is an evolutionary response to the widespread use of antimicrobials; (2) the large and globally connected human population allows pathogens in any environment access to all of humanity; and (3) the extensive and often unnecessary use of antimicrobials by humanity provides the strong selective pressure that is driving the evolutionary response in the microbial world. Of these factors, the size of the human population is least amenable to rapid change. In contrast, the remaining two factors may be affected, so offering a means of managing the crisis: the rate at which AMR, as well as virulence factors evolve in microbial world may be slowed by reducing the applied selective pressure. This may be accomplished by radically reducing the global use of current and prospective antimicrobials. Current management measures to legislate the use of antimicrobials and to educate the healthcare world in the issues, while useful, have not comprehensively addressed the problem of achieving an overall reduction in the human use of antimicrobials. We propose that in addition to current measures and increased research into new antimicrobials and diagnostics, a comprehensive education program will be required to change the public paradigm of antimicrobial usage from that of a first line treatment to that of a last resort when all other therapeutic options have failed. PMID:25279369

  1. Managing the water crisis: A youth perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simataa, Faith

    2017-04-01

    The youth are identified as a key group to include in effective engagement and decision-making for water security and sustainable development. An increase in severe droughts in Namibia has highlighted its destructive impacts and led to a growing concern about the societal exposure of communities. Acknowledging the benefit of access to safe drinking water to humanity, in reality a disproportionate burden of protecting environmental benefits such as clean water is borne by the poor and vulnerable sections of the society. As a result, a key consideration highlighted in the Hyogo and Sendai Frameworks is the inclusion of gender & age perspectives, and vulnerable groups in planning for disaster risk reduction. Therefore, the paper argues that empowering the youth with knowledge and skills capability in disaster risk issues becomes essential for a sustainable management approach, and a potential 'rescue' mechanism from the web of poverty. The paper also illustrates that there is indeed weak adherence to good governance and that the government needs to improve structures for youth coordination to ensure water stewardship. Realizing this gap in knowledge, innovation and education to build a culture of resilience at all levels of society, the paper offers a perspective on the role of youth in the development agenda of Namibia and how they can influence decision-making processes in addressing water insecurity in the country. Keywords: Empowerment, Namibia, Water insecurity, Youth

  2. Simulation-based crisis resource management training for pediatric critical care medicine: a review for instructors.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Adam; Donoghue, Aaron; Gilfoyle, Elaine; Eppich, Walter

    2012-03-01

    To review the essential elements of crisis resource management and provide a resource for instructors by describing how to use simulation-based training to teach crisis resource management principles in pediatric acute care contexts. A MEDLINE-based literature source. OUTLINE OF REVIEW: This review is divided into three main sections: Background, Principles of Crisis Resource Management, and Tools and Resources. The background section provides the brief history and definition of crisis resource management. The next section describes all the essential elements of crisis resource management, including leadership and followership, communication, teamwork, resource use, and situational awareness. This is followed by a review of evidence supporting the use of simulation-based crisis resource management training in health care. The last section provides the resources necessary to develop crisis resource management training using a simulation-based approach. This includes a description of how to design pediatric simulation scenarios, how to effectively debrief, and a list of potential assessment tools that instructors can use to evaluate crisis resource management performance during simulation-based training. Crisis resource management principles form the foundation for efficient team functioning and subsequent error reduction in high-stakes environments such as acute care pediatrics. Effective instructor training is required for those programs wishing to teach these principles using simulation-based learning. Dissemination and integration of these principles into pediatric critical care practice has the potential for a tremendous impact on patient safety and outcomes.

  3. Crisis resource management, simulation training and the medical emergency team.

    PubMed

    Gillon, Stuart; Radford, Sam; Chalwin, Richard; Devita, Michael; Endacott, Ruth; Jones, Daryl

    2012-09-01

    Recently there has been increased focus on improved detection and management of deteriorating patients in Australian hospitals. Since the introduction of the medical emergency team (MET) model there has been an increased role for intensive care unit staff in responding to deterioration of patients in hospital wards. Review and management of MET patients differs from the traditional model of ward patient review, as ICU staff may not know the patient. Furthermore, assessment and intervention is often time-critical and must occur simultaneously. Finally, about 10% of MET patients require intensive care-level interventions to be commenced on the ward, and this requires participation of non-ICU-trained ward staff. • To date, the interventions performed by MET staff and approaches to training responders have been relatively under investigated, particularly in the Australian and New Zealand context. In this article we briefly review the principles of the MET and contend that activation of the MET by ward staff represents a response to a medical crisis. We then outline why MET intervention differs from traditional ward-based doctor-patient encounters, and emphasise the importance of non-technical skills during the MET response. Finally, we suggest ways in which the skills required for crisis resource management within the MET can be taught to ICU staff, and the potential benefits, barriers and difficulties associated with the delivery of such training in New Zealand and Australia.

  4. Social media in disaster risk reduction and crisis management.

    PubMed

    Alexander, David E

    2014-09-01

    This paper reviews the actual and potential use of social media in emergency, disaster and crisis situations. This is a field that has generated intense interest. It is characterised by a burgeoning but small and very recent literature. In the emergencies field, social media (blogs, messaging, sites such as Facebook, wikis and so on) are used in seven different ways: listening to public debate, monitoring situations, extending emergency response and management, crowd-sourcing and collaborative development, creating social cohesion, furthering causes (including charitable donation) and enhancing research. Appreciation of the positive side of social media is balanced by their potential for negative developments, such as disseminating rumours, undermining authority and promoting terrorist acts. This leads to an examination of the ethics of social media usage in crisis situations. Despite some clearly identifiable risks, for example regarding the violation of privacy, it appears that public consensus on ethics will tend to override unscrupulous attempts to subvert the media. Moreover, social media are a robust means of exposing corruption and malpractice. In synthesis, the widespread adoption and use of social media by members of the public throughout the world heralds a new age in which it is imperative that emergency managers adapt their working practices to the challenge and potential of this development. At the same time, they must heed the ethical warnings and ensure that social media are not abused or misused when crises and emergencies occur.

  5. Crisis resource management: evaluating outcomes of a multidisciplinary team.

    PubMed

    Jankouskas, Tara; Bush, Mary Chasko; Murray, Bosseau; Rudy, Sally; Henry, Jody; Dyer, Anne Marie; Liu, Wenlei; Sinz, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    Crisis resource management (CRM) is a team-training program that teaches nontechnical skills such as: collaboration, communication, task management, teamwork, and leadership. The purpose of this study was to evaluate improvement in the nontechnical skills of a multidisciplinary team of pediatric residents, anesthesiology residents and pediatric nurses following participation in the CRM educational program. Self-efficacy theory guided the teaching method used in the CRM program. The Collaboration and Satisfaction about Care Decisions instrument and the Anesthetists' Nontechnical Skills System served as outcome measures. Seven multidisciplinary groups were studied with a total of 40 subjects. A significant increase was found in posttest scores for perceived collaboration and satisfaction with care and in numerical ratings of observed team skills following the CRM program. The results suggest multidisciplinary team participation in the CRM program increased perceived team collaboration, satisfaction with care, and observed teamwork skills.

  6. The use of scenarios and gaming in crisis management planning and training

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, W.E.

    1995-12-31

    This paper provides a brief introduction to scenarios and gaming. It clarifies the definitions of each, discusses their possible uses and purposes, and presents some principles of good practice. In then describes how scenarios and gaming can be used together with a computerized crisis management decision support system to provide useful tools for crisis management planning and training.

  7. Exploring the Strategic Role of Human Resource Development in Organizational Crisis Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Jia; Hutchins, Holly M.; Garavan, Thomas N.

    2009-01-01

    Crisis management has been a largely overlooked territory in human resource development (HRD) despite the increasingly recognized impact of organizational crises on the individual and organizational performance. This article explores the strategic role of HRD in the context of organizational crisis management using Garavan's strategic HRD model as…

  8. Role playing: applications in hostage and crisis negotiation skills training.

    PubMed

    Van Hasselt, Vincent B; Romano, Stephen J; Vecchi, Gregory M

    2008-03-01

    Role playing has been a mainstay of behavioral assessment for decades. In recent years, however, this analogue strategy has also enjoyed widespread application in the field of law enforcement. Most notably, role-play procedures have become an integral component of assessment and training efforts in hostage and crisis negotiation, which attempts to resolve high-risk and often volatile situations in a peaceful, nonviolent manner when possible. The purpose of this paper is to (a) describe development and validation of a role-play test specifically geared toward law enforcement negotiators, (b) present different role-play formats that have been incorporated in law enforcement negotiation training, and (c) discuss limitations and considerations in use of these instruments. Suggestions for directions that future efforts in this area might take are offered. The heuristic value of role playing in crisis management, counterterrorism, and emergency and mass casualty disaster training exercises is also underscored.

  9. Benefits of Linked Data for Interoperability during Crisis Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roller, R.; Roes, J.; Verbree, E.

    2015-08-01

    Floodings represent a permanent risk to the Netherlands in general and to her power supply in particular. Data sharing is essential within this crisis scenario as a power cut affects a great variety of interdependant sectors. Currently used data sharing systems have been shown to hamper interoperability between stakeholders since they lack flexibility and there is no consensus in term definitions and interpretations. The study presented in this paper addresses these challenges by proposing a new data sharing solution based on Linked Data, a method of interlinking data points in a structured way on the web. A conceptual model for two data sharing parties in a flood-caused power cut crisis management scenario was developed to which relevant data were linked. The analysis revealed that the presented data sharing solution burderns its user with extra costs in the short run, but saves resources in the long run by overcoming interoperability problems of the legacy systems. The more stakeholders adopt Linked Data the stronger its benefits for data sharing will become.

  10. Health and rescue services management system during a crisis event

    PubMed Central

    Nicolaidou, Iolie; Hadjichristofi, George; Kyprianou, Stelios; Christou, Synesios; Constantinou, Riana

    2016-01-01

    Τhe performance of rescuers and personnel handling major emergencies or crisis events can be significantly improved through continuous training and through technology support. The work done in order to create a system has been discussed which can support both resources and victims during a crisis or major emergency event. More specifically, the system supports real-time management of firefighter teams, rescue teams, health services, and victims during a major disaster. It can be deployed in an ad hoc manner in the disaster area, as a stand-alone infrastructure (using its own telecommunications and power). It mainly consists of a control station, which is installed in the area command centre, the firefighters units, the rescuers units, the ambulance vehicles units, and the telemedicine units that can be used in order to support victim handling at the casualties clearing station. The system has been tested and improved through continuous communication with experts and through professional exercises; the results and conclusions are presented. PMID:27733928

  11. Helping Crisis Managers Protect Reputational Assets: Initial Tests of the Situational Crisis Communication Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coombs, W. Timothy; Holladay, Sherry J.

    2002-01-01

    Explains a comprehensive, prescriptive, situational approach for responding to crises and protecting organizational reputation: the situational crisis communication theory (SCCT). Notes undergraduate students read two crisis case studies from a set of 13 cases and responded to questions following the case. Validates a key assumption in SCCT and…

  12. Crisis DSM Generation To Support Refugee Camp Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gstaiger, Veronika; d'Angelo, Pablo; Schneiderhan, Tobais; Krauss, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    The extraction of high resolution surface information from satellite data has become an important area of research. One of the numerous fields of application is disaster management. Detailed information about the affected terrain is not only needed for analyses during the emergency relief phase, but also for reconstruction and prevention activities. In this paper the authors present the generation of a Digital Surface Model (DSM) based on three very high resolution optical satellite images. The DSM was produced to supplement a flood mapping activity in Jordan and serves as example for the implementation of scientific results during an emergency request. The flood affected the Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan and was mapped by the Center for Satellite Based Crisis Information (ZKI) at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) in January 2013 under emergency mapping conditions.

  13. Counterterrorism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-13

    illicit drug trafficking. Whether terrorism is used to support drug trafficking or funding from drug trafficking is used to support terrorist...usually present in individuals younger than the early 20s. Individuals in their teens have been employed as soldiers in guerilla groups, but...fight us from amongst the people in protracted struggles for popular support and legitimacy, and limit the utility of our conventional military

  14. Crisis management systems: staff nurses demand more support from their supervisors.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Huey-Ming; Yin, Chang-Yi

    2008-08-01

    This study illustrates the contributions of the necessity, comprehensiveness, and difference (between necessity and comprehensiveness) levels of crisis management systems to participants' general satisfaction with their working institutions' nursing-related crisis management activities. Crisis management systems include strategic, technical/structural, assessment, public communication, and psychological/cultural aspects. An effective institutional crisis management system might help to decrease the number of incidents related to medical disputes or to prevent a crisis from worsening and becoming disastrous. A cross-sectional survey was administered during a nursing conference held in Taipei, Taiwan, on June 27, 2005. Two hundred ninety questionnaires were distributed, and 121 were retrieved (response rate, 41.7%; nursing administrators and staff). Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Ordinal logistic regression analyses show that being a public hospital managed by the government and having more difference on the strategic aspect between the necessity and comprehensiveness levels contribute to lower satisfaction with nursing-related crisis management activities (Nagelkerke R(2) = .441). In addition, staff nurses perceive higher necessity levels on all five aspects compared to nursing administrators. This study provides important insights into how the policies and activities of a medical institution's crisis management system can be prioritized and implemented. It is also important for students in nursing programs and for currently employed nurses to learn how to manage disputes related to nursing practice, so that early resolution can be achieved and crises can be avoided. These results suggest that staff nurses demand more support from their supervisors.

  15. Crisis Management Systems: A Case Study for Aspect-Oriented Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kienzle, Jörg; Guelfi, Nicolas; Mustafiz, Sadaf

    The intent of this document is to define a common case study for the aspect-oriented modeling research community. The domain of the case study is crisis management systems, i.e., systems that help in identifying, assessing, and handling a crisis situation by orchestrating the communication between all parties involved in handling the crisis, by allocating and managing resources, and by providing access to relevant crisis-related information to authorized users. This document contains informal requirements of crisis management systems (CMSs) in general, a feature model for a CMS product line, use case models for a car crash CMS (CCCMS), a domain model for the CCCMS, an informal physical architecture description of the CCCMS, as well as some design models of a possible object-oriented implementation of parts of the CCCMS backend. AOM researchers who want to demonstrate the power of their AOM approach or technique can hence apply the approach at the most appropriate level of abstraction.

  16. Stromboli (2002-2003) crisis management and risk mitigation actions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolaso, Guido; De Bernardinis, Bernardo; Cardaci, Chiara; Scalzo, Antonella; Rosi, Mauro

    The 2002-2003 eruptive emergency of Stromboli was the most dangerous to have occurred on the island in the past three centuries. Starting from 30 December, the national Department of Civil Protection (DCP), operating under the direct authority of the prime minister, took responsibility for the emergency management. One of the most relevant achievements was the setting up, on the island, of Centro Operativo Avanzato, a permanent scientific/civil protection structure where signals of volcano monitoring are visualized in real time and eventually used by the personnel of the DCP for immediate reactions. Volcanic risk was also structurally reduced by the construction of a new pier to facilitate rapid evacuation of Ginostra village and the planning and implementation of new walking trails and shelters at the top of the mountain. The shelters, six in total, of moderate size, were designed to resist the impact of heavy materials launched by the volcano. The risk mitigation initiatives were completed with the installation of alarm sirens in the two villages, the production and distribution of leaflets, and also by the installation of signs indicating the fastest routes to reach safe waiting areas in case of tsunami. Besides the substantial improvements in the preparedness of the Civil Protection and Stromboli's community to respond effectively to possible future emergencies of the volcano, one of the most important heritages was the elaboration and testing of new protocols and procedures concerning the handling of volcanic emergencies. Although the issues raised during the crisis showed similarities with other volcanic crisis around the world, the role played by the Civil Protection with personnel specifically trained in volcanic problems showed comparatively considerable advantages.

  17. Stress in crisis managers: evidence from self-report and psychophysiological assessments.

    PubMed

    Janka, A; Adler, C; Fischer, L; Perakakis, P; Guerra, P; Duschek, S

    2015-12-01

    Directing disaster operations represents a major professional challenge. Despite its importance to health and professional performance, research on stress in crisis management remains scarce. The present study aimed to investigate self-reported stress and psychophysiological stress responses in crisis managers. For this purpose, 30 crisis managers were compared with 30 managers from other disciplines, in terms of self-reported stress, health status and psychophysiological reactivity to crisis-related and non-specific visual and acoustic aversive stimuli and cognitive challenge. Crisis managers reported lower stress levels, a more positive strain-recuperation-balance, greater social resources, reduced physical symptoms, as well as more physical exercise and less alcohol consumption. They exhibited diminished electrodermal and heart rate responses to crisis-related and non-specific stressors. The results indicate reduced stress and physical complaints, diminished psychophysiological stress reactivity, and a healthier life-style in crisis managers. Improved stress resistance may limit vulnerability to stress-related performance decline and facilitate preparedness for major incidents.

  18. Corporate crisis management managing a major crisis in a chemical facility.

    PubMed

    Marwitz, Steve; Maxson, Neil; Koch, Bill; Aukerman, Todd; Cassidy, Jim; Belonger, David

    2008-11-15

    Chemical sites should have well trained and organized emergency response plans to manage an incident within the plant or during transport. The implementation of an incident command system utilizing either internal resources or external response through mutual aid agreements is generally sufficient to address the direct impact of an event on the site. When the site resources become overwhelmed in addressing resulting issues such as press releases, medical advice/support, employees and family support, Agency notifications, etc, Corporate should be ready and able to respond. This paper, taken from an in-depth CCPS workshop led by the author, describes an outline for corporate assistance in the event of a major incident at a site or during transportation.

  19. Advanced crisis response and consequence management: enabling a coordinated response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Robert S.; Brush, Jennifer L.; Heinrich, Mark L.; Mantock, James M.; Jones, Brian E.; Henry, Kurt A.

    2002-08-01

    The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) envisioned a system to assist decision-makers during crisis situations ranging from terrorist attacks to large-scale natural disasters. This system would provide the tools for responders, incident commanders, and officials at all levels to share vital information during the planning and execution of a coordinated response. The system would offer custom configuration of components with capabilities including map-based situational awareness, situation-based response checklists, casualty tracking, and epidemiological surveillance. On-scene commanders would use this system to document the progress of a response, direct and coordinate responder activities, and manage the response as a whole. Off-scene responders (hospitals, command centers, and local, state and federal agencies) would have the ability to visually assess the state of assets and casualties to better anticipate the need for personnel and supplies. DARPA's Enhanced Consequence Management, Planning and Support System (ENCOMPASS), successfully demonstrated all of these capabilities. ENCOMPASS was successfully transitioned to a commercial program: the Lightweight Epidemiology Advanced Detection and Emergency Response System, otherwise known as LEADERS.

  20. Review article: Crisis resource management in emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Carne, Belinda; Kennedy, Marcus; Gray, Tim

    2012-02-01

    Effective team management is a core element of expert practice in emergency medicine. Thus far, training in emergency medicine has focussed predominantly on proficiency in medical and technical skills, with emergency physicians acquiring these 'non-technical' skills in an ad hoc manner or by trial and error with varying levels of success. This paper describes a set of behaviours that, when practised in conjunction with medical and technical expertise, can reduce the incidence of clinical error and contribute to effective teamwork and the smooth running of an ED. Teaching and practice of these behaviours is now a core element of training and skills maintenance in other high-risk areas, such as aviation, and is becoming part of the routine training for anaesthetists. They address areas, such as communication, leadership, knowledge of environment, anticipation and planning, obtaining timely assistance, attention allocation and workload distribution. We outline the application of these behaviours in the speciality of emergency medicine, and suggest that the teaching and practice of crisis resource management principles should become part of the curriculum for training and credentialing of emergency medicine specialists. © 2011 The Authors. EMA © 2011 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  1. Animal disease outbreak control: the use of crisis management tools.

    PubMed

    Kroschewski, K; Kramer, M; Micklich, A; Staubach, C; Carmanns, R; Conraths, F J

    2006-04-01

    In this era of globalisation the effective control of animal disease outbreaks requires powerful crisis management tools. In the 1990s software packages for different sectors of the government and agricultural industry began to be developed. In 2004, as a special application for tracking the movement of animals and animal products, the European Union developed the Trade Control and Expert System (TRACES) on the basis of its predecessor, the ANImal MOvement (ANIMO) project. The nationwide use of the ANIMO system by the veterinary authorities in Germany marked the beginning of the development in 1993 of a computerised national animal disease reporting system--the TierSeuchenNachrichten (TSN)--using the ANIMO hardware and software components. In addition to TRACES and TSN the third pillar for the management of animal disease outbreaks and crises in Germany is the national cattle and swine database--called Herkunftssicherungs- und Informationssystem für Tiere. A high degree of standardisation is necessary when integrating the different solutions at all levels of government and with the private sector. In this paper, the authors describe the use of these tools on the basis of their experience and in relation to what we can do now and what we should opt for in the future.

  2. A new framework for assessing hospital crisis management based on resilience engineering approach.

    PubMed

    Shirali, Gh A; Azadian, Sh; Saki, A

    2016-06-14

    In recent years, an increasing number of natural and man-made disasters have exposed many people and properties to various disasters. This has resulted in approximately 75,000 deaths worldwide every year due to disasters. Crisis management is becoming increasingly important to cope effectively with the magnitude and potential damage resulting from disasters. Hospitals, as the final point in the rescue chain, have a key role in the crisis management and need to be resilient against disasters. The purpose of this paper is to present a new framework for assessing the crisis management based on resilience principles in hospital infrastructure of a developing country. A questionnaire was developed and completed by 310 staff (nurses and managers) of eight hospitals in Iran. The findings indicate that the eight hospitals included in the study have moderate conditions in general, while hospitals X3, X4, and X7 have poor conditions in the crisis management. Consequently, it seems that the crisis management system was not resilient in all these hospitals in general. Using resilience engineering in assessing crisis management can improve and develop the ability of the hospitals' management to cope with any type of disaster.

  3. The Status of Crisis Management at NASPA Member Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catullo, Linda A.; Walker, David A.; Floyd, Deborah L.

    2009-01-01

    This study assessed the level of crisis preparedness in higher education from the perspective of chief student affairs administrators at residential universities post-September 11, 2001 to pre-Virginia Tech shootings in April 2007. Crisis preparedness was determined by compiling and comparing data results derived from an instrument implemented in…

  4. Science-Driven Approach to Disaster Risk and Crisis Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail-Zadeh, A.

    2014-12-01

    Disasters due to natural extreme events continue to grow in number and intensity. Disaster risk and crisis management requires long-term planning, and to undertake that planning, a science-driven approach is needed to understand and assess disaster risks and to help in impact assessment and in recovery processes after a disaster. Science is used in assessments and rapid modeling of the disaster impact, in forecasting triggered hazards and risk (e.g., a tsunami or a landslide after a large earthquake), in contacts with and medical treatment of the affected population, and in some other actions. At the stage of response to disaster, science helps to analyze routinely the disaster happened (e.g., the physical processes led to this extreme event; hidden vulnerabilities; etc.) At the stage of recovery, natural scientists improve the existing regional hazard assessments; engineers try to use new science to produce new materials and technologies to make safer houses and infrastructure. At the stage of disaster risk mitigation new scientific methods and approaches are being developed to study natural extreme events; vulnerability of society is periodically investigated, and the measures for increasing the resilience of society to extremes are developed; existing disaster management regulations are improved. At the stage of preparedness, integrated research on disaster risks should be developed to understand the roots of potential disasters. Enhanced forecasting and early warning systems are to be developed reducing predictive uncertainties, and comprehensive disaster risk assessment is to be undertaken at local, regional, national and global levels. Science education should be improved by introducing trans-disciplinary approach to disaster risks. Science can help society by improving awareness about extreme events, enhancing risk communication with policy makers, media and society, and assisting disaster risk management authorities in organization of local and regional

  5. Towards a better management of complex emergencies through crisis management meta-modelling.

    PubMed

    Lauras, Matthieu; Truptil, Sébastien; Bénaben, Frédérick

    2015-10-01

    Managing complex emergency situations is a challenging task, mainly due to the heterogeneity of the partners involved and the critical nature of such events. Whatever approach is adopted to support this objective, one unavoidable issue is knowledge management. In the context of our research project, gathering, formalising and exploiting all the knowledge and information about a given crisis situation is a critical requirement. This paper presents some research results concerning this specific topic: from a theoretical point of view, the generic dimensions of crisis characterisation are defined, while from a technical point of view, we describe a software solution able to collect that knowledge (based on meta-models and ontologies). This is used to confront the characteristics of the situation (context) with characteristics of the resources (relief system) in order to design a suitable response. Finally, an illustrative example concerning a crash between a tanker truck and a train is described.

  6. [Human factors and crisis resource management: improving patient safety].

    PubMed

    Rall, M; Oberfrank, S

    2013-10-01

    A continuing high number of patients suffer harm from medical treatment. In 60-70% of the cases the sources of harm can be attributed to the field of human factors (HFs) and teamwork; nevertheless, those topics are still neither part of medical education nor of basic and advanced training even though it has been known for many years and it has meanwhile also been demonstrated for surgical specialties that training in human factors and teamwork considerably reduces surgical mortality.Besides the medical field, the concept of crisis resource management (CRM) has already proven its worth in many other industries by improving teamwork and reducing errors in the domain of human factors. One of the best ways to learn about CRM and HFs is realistic simulation team training with well-trained instructors in CRM and HF. The educational concept of the HOTT (hand over team training) courses for trauma room training offered by the DGU integrates these elements based on the current state of science. It is time to establish such training for all medical teams in emergency medicine and operative care. Accompanying safety measures, such as the development of a positive culture of safety in every department and the use of effective critical incident reporting systems (CIRs) should be pursued.

  7. [THE GLOBAL AND ECONOMIC CRISIS. AND HEALTH MANAGEMENT].

    PubMed

    del Rey Calero, Juan

    2014-01-01

    The Global and economic crisis and Health Management The Health care process discussed are 4 steps: assessment, planing, intervention and evaluation. The identify association between social factors linked to social vulnerability (socio economic status, unemployed, poverty) and objective health relate quality of life. The poverty rate is 24.2%, unemployed 26.26%, youth unemployed 56.13%.ratio worker/retired 2.29. Debts 100% GDP The health inequality influence on health related quality of life. The Health System efficiency index. according Bloomber rate (2,013) Spain is 5 degrees in the world, points 68.3 on 100, for the life expectancy 82.3 years, the personal cost of health care 2,271€. Health care 10% GDP (public 7%,private 3%), SS protected population 92.4%, retired person cost 9.2% GDP, p. capita GDP 23,737€. Cost of Care: Hospital/specialist 54%, P. Care 15%, Pharmaceutical 19.8%, P. Health 3.1%.

  8. Strategic and Collaborative Crisis Management: A Partnership Approach to Large-Scale Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Timothy

    2007-01-01

    Large-scale crisis such as natural disasters and acts of terrorism can have a paralyzing effect on the campus community and business continuity. Campus officials in these situations face significant challenges that go beyond the immediate response including re-building the physical plant, restoring campus infrastructure, retaining displaced…

  9. Strategic and Collaborative Crisis Management: A Partnership Approach to Large-Scale Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Timothy

    2007-01-01

    Large-scale crisis such as natural disasters and acts of terrorism can have a paralyzing effect on the campus community and business continuity. Campus officials in these situations face significant challenges that go beyond the immediate response including re-building the physical plant, restoring campus infrastructure, retaining displaced…

  10. An official American Thoracic Society workshop report: assessment and palliative management of dyspnea crisis.

    PubMed

    Mularski, Richard A; Reinke, Lynn F; Carrieri-Kohlman, Virginia; Fischer, Mark D; Campbell, Margaret L; Rocker, Graeme; Schneidman, Ann; Jacobs, Susan S; Arnold, Robert; Benditt, Joshua O; Booth, Sara; Byock, Ira; Chan, Garrett K; Curtis, J Randall; Donesky, Doranne; Hansen-Flaschen, John; Heffner, John; Klein, Russell; Limberg, Trina M; Manning, Harold L; Morrison, R Sean; Ries, Andrew L; Schmidt, Gregory A; Selecky, Paul A; Truog, Robert D; Wang, Angela C C; White, Douglas B

    2013-10-01

    In 2009, the American Thoracic Society (ATS) funded an assembly project, Palliative Management of Dyspnea Crisis, to focus on identification, management, and optimal resource utilization for effective palliation of acute episodes of dyspnea. We conducted a comprehensive search of the medical literature and evaluated available evidence from systematic evidence-based reviews (SEBRs) using a modified AMSTAR approach and then summarized the palliative management knowledge base for participants to use in discourse at a 2009 ATS workshop. We used an informal consensus process to develop a working definition of this novel entity and established an Ad Hoc Committee on Palliative Management of Dyspnea Crisis to further develop an official ATS document on the topic. The Ad Hoc Committee members defined dyspnea crisis as "sustained and severe resting breathing discomfort that occurs in patients with advanced, often life-limiting illness and overwhelms the patient and caregivers' ability to achieve symptom relief." Dyspnea crisis can occur suddenly and is characteristically without a reversible etiology. The workshop participants focused on dyspnea crisis management for patients in whom the goals of care are focused on palliation and for whom endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation are not consistent with articulated preferences. However, approaches to dyspnea crisis may also be appropriate for patients electing life-sustaining treatment. The Ad Hoc Committee developed a Workshop Report concerning assessment of dyspnea crisis; ethical and professional considerations; efficient utilization, communication, and care coordination; clinical management of dyspnea crisis; development of patient education and provider aid products; and enhancing implementation with audit and quality improvement.

  11. Fool-proofing design and crisis management for customized intelligent physical fitness and healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chung-Chi; Huang, Chung-Lin; Liu, Hsiao-Man

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, it is quite important to develop a customized system which can enhance physical fitness and health for people. And the system reliability is more important. In the paper, a fool-proofing design and crisis management for customized physical fitness and healthcare system is proposed. It is designed to prevent the failure of the various mechanisms of customized physical fitness and healthcare system, including records, surveillance, assessments, predictions, diagnosis, prescription, and scheduling. It is separated into (1) fool-proofing design module (2) crisis management module. The fool-proofing indexes are set to prevent the failure of the various mechanisms. The states of the various mechanisms are managed by the auto-checked fool-proofing indexes. If mistakes prevention was fail, we have to execute the crisis management for stopping harmful results. The crisis management will find the error level and response the solution by using fuzzy method. By the experiments, we can find the advantages of the fool-proofing design and crisis management for customized physical fitness and healthcare system. And it is effective to prevent the failure of the various mechanisms of intelligent customized physical fitness and healthcare system.

  12. Special Operations Forces Interagency Counterterrorism Reference Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    www.usaid.gov/ The USAID plays critical roles both strategically and operationally in the USG interagency process. Operating under policy direction...and counterterrorism communities. Most of the scores of functional fusion centers now operating follow guidelines developed through the DoJ...Afghanistan to support the effort. Its primary responsibilities were to act as an intelligence-gathering fusion center and to operate the

  13. Adversarial risk analysis for counterterrorism modeling.

    PubMed

    Rios, Jesus; Rios Insua, David

    2012-05-01

    Recent large-scale terrorist attacks have raised interest in models for resource allocation against terrorist threats. The unifying theme in this area is the need to develop methods for the analysis of allocation decisions when risks stem from the intentional actions of intelligent adversaries. Most approaches to these problems have a game-theoretic flavor although there are also several interesting decision-analytic-based proposals. One of them is the recently introduced framework for adversarial risk analysis, which deals with decision-making problems that involve intelligent opponents and uncertain outcomes. We explore how adversarial risk analysis addresses some standard counterterrorism models: simultaneous defend-attack models, sequential defend-attack-defend models, and sequential defend-attack models with private information. For each model, we first assess critically what would be a typical game-theoretic approach and then provide the corresponding solution proposed by the adversarial risk analysis framework, emphasizing how to coherently assess a predictive probability model of the adversary's actions, in a context in which we aim at supporting decisions of a defender versus an attacker. This illustrates the application of adversarial risk analysis to basic counterterrorism models that may be used as basic building blocks for more complex risk analysis of counterterrorism problems.

  14. Maintaining the Momentum: A Counterterrorism Cycle for the Next Decade

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    Foust , “Oversight for Effectiveness: A Counterterrorism Perspective on the Targeted Killings “White Paper”, National Security Network, February 27, 2013...www.longwarjournal.org/archives/2013/01/us_drones_strike_aga_5.php#ixzz2NeZthfFY 52 51 Joshua Foust , “Oversight for Effectiveness: A Counterterrorism

  15. Nuclear arms control, nonproliferation, and counterterrorism: impacts on public health.

    PubMed

    Dreicer, Mona; Pregenzer, Arian

    2014-04-01

    Reducing the risks of nuclear war, limiting the spread of nuclear weapons, and reducing global nuclear weapons stockpiles are key national and international security goals. They are pursued through a variety of international arms control, nonproliferation, and counterterrorism treaties and agreements. These legally binding and political commitments, together with the institutional infrastructure that supports them, work to establish global norms of behavior and have limited the spread of weapons of mass destruction. Beyond the primary security objectives, reducing the likelihood of the use of nuclear weapons, preventing environmental releases of radioactive material, increasing the availability of safe and secure nuclear technology for peaceful purposes, and providing scientific data relevant to predicting and managing the consequences of natural or human-caused disasters worldwide provide significant benefits to global public health.

  16. Nuclear Arms Control, Nonproliferation, and Counterterrorism: Impacts on Public Health

    SciTech Connect

    Dreicer, Mona; Pregenzer, Arian

    2014-04-01

    Reducing the risks of nuclear war, limiting the spread of nuclear weapons and reducing global nuclear weapons stockpiles are key national and international security goals. They are pursued through a variety of international arms control, nonproliferation and counter-terrorism treaties and agreements. These legally binding and political commitments, together with the institutional infrastructure that supports them, work to establish global norms of behavior and have limited the spread of weapons of mass destruction. Beyond the primary security objectives, reducing the likelihood of the use of nuclear weapons, preventing environmental releases of radioactive material, increasing the availability of safe and secure nuclear technology for peaceful purposes, and providing scientific data relevant to predicting and managing the consequences of natural or human-caused disasters world-wide provide significant benefits to global public health.

  17. Nuclear Arms Control, Nonproliferation, and Counterterrorism: Impacts on Public Health

    DOE PAGES

    Dreicer, Mona; Pregenzer, Arian

    2014-04-01

    Reducing the risks of nuclear war, limiting the spread of nuclear weapons and reducing global nuclear weapons stockpiles are key national and international security goals. They are pursued through a variety of international arms control, nonproliferation and counter-terrorism treaties and agreements. These legally binding and political commitments, together with the institutional infrastructure that supports them, work to establish global norms of behavior and have limited the spread of weapons of mass destruction. Beyond the primary security objectives, reducing the likelihood of the use of nuclear weapons, preventing environmental releases of radioactive material, increasing the availability of safe and secure nuclearmore » technology for peaceful purposes, and providing scientific data relevant to predicting and managing the consequences of natural or human-caused disasters world-wide provide significant benefits to global public health.« less

  18. Nuclear Arms Control, Nonproliferation, and Counterterrorism: Impacts on Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Pregenzer, Arian

    2014-01-01

    Reducing the risks of nuclear war, limiting the spread of nuclear weapons, and reducing global nuclear weapons stockpiles are key national and international security goals. They are pursued through a variety of international arms control, nonproliferation, and counterterrorism treaties and agreements. These legally binding and political commitments, together with the institutional infrastructure that supports them, work to establish global norms of behavior and have limited the spread of weapons of mass destruction. Beyond the primary security objectives, reducing the likelihood of the use of nuclear weapons, preventing environmental releases of radioactive material, increasing the availability of safe and secure nuclear technology for peaceful purposes, and providing scientific data relevant to predicting and managing the consequences of natural or human-caused disasters worldwide provide significant benefits to global public health. PMID:24524501

  19. U.S.-China Counterterrorism Cooperation: Issues for U.S. Policy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-29

    counterterrorism cooperation has been limited, but the tone and context of counterterrorism helped to stabilize — even if it did not transform — the closer...counterterrorism cooperation has been limited, but the tone and context of counterterrorism helped to stabilize — even if it did not transform — the closer...counterterrorism campaign helped to stabilize U.S.-PRC relations up to the highest level, which faced tensions early in the Bush Administration in April

  20. U.S.-China Counterterrorism Cooperation: Issues for U.S. Policy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-08

    counterterrorism cooperation has been limited, but the tone and context of counterterrorism helped to stabilize — even if it did not transform — the closer...U.S.-China counterterrorism cooperation has been limited, but the tone and context of counterterrorism helped to stabilize — even if it did not...Ties The counterterrorism campaign helped to stabilize U.S.-PRC relations up to the highest level, which faced tensions early in the Bush

  1. Evolving School-Crisis Management since 9/11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brickman, Heather K.; Jones, Stephanie E.; Groom, Sara E.

    2004-01-01

    The word "terrorism" has become commonplace in the headlines, workplaces, and homes since September 11, 2001. In the past, school crisis plans commonly addressed how to evacuate in the event of a gas leak or fire. Today, schools must be prepared to address biological, chemical, and radiological attacks, as well as car bombings, suicide attacks,…

  2. Managing Communication during a School Crisis: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentilucci, James L.

    2007-01-01

    Crisis communication training of school principals is problematic because it overemphasizes media relations and underemphasizes the critical importance of immediate and personal communication with students, staff, and parents--those most affected by school crises. A case study involving the death of a student in a small rural school explains why…

  3. Evolving School-Crisis Management since 9/11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brickman, Heather K.; Jones, Stephanie E.; Groom, Sara E.

    2004-01-01

    The word "terrorism" has become commonplace in the headlines, workplaces, and homes since September 11, 2001. In the past, school crisis plans commonly addressed how to evacuate in the event of a gas leak or fire. Today, schools must be prepared to address biological, chemical, and radiological attacks, as well as car bombings, suicide attacks,…

  4. Crisis-Management Plans Are Untested, Survey Says

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    June, Audrey Williams

    2007-01-01

    Newly released survey results reveal that many colleges are focusing more than ever on preparing for a crisis since the massacre at Virginia Tech, but that they may not be well equipped to handle one. The online survey was conducted by SimpsonScarborough, a consulting firm that focuses on colleges and universities. It invited 546 people who are…

  5. Crisis Management: A School District Response to Suicide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Morag B. Colvin

    This manual outlines crisis policy development, specifically targeting students at risk for life threatening behaviors. Its stated intent is to present a consistent message to all school districts so that they can create adequate and prudent standards for the care of their young people. The materials in this manual are intended to help school…

  6. Crisis-Management Plans Are Untested, Survey Says

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    June, Audrey Williams

    2007-01-01

    Newly released survey results reveal that many colleges are focusing more than ever on preparing for a crisis since the massacre at Virginia Tech, but that they may not be well equipped to handle one. The online survey was conducted by SimpsonScarborough, a consulting firm that focuses on colleges and universities. It invited 546 people who are…

  7. Climate change and managing water crisis: Pakistan's perspective.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Mumtaz; Mumtaz, Saniea

    2014-01-01

    scarcity. To minimize adverse impacts of climate change on the water crisis in Pakistan, the preparation of integrated national, provincial, and local level master plans encompassing technical, social, environmental, administrative, and financial considerations is necessary. It is imperative to implement two simultaneous approaches of adaptation (living with climate change) and mitigation (addressing negativities of climate change). Salient features are integrated management of watersheds/catchments/water bodies, optimum exploitation of present sources, development of new sources, water conservation, adequate drainage, efficient design of water storage, conveyance, distribution and supply systems, utilization of waste water, and regulation of water quality.

  8. Social Media in Crisis Management and Forensic Disaster Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittrich, André; Lucas, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Today, modern sensors or sensor networks provide good quality measurements for the observation of large-scale emergencies as a result of natural disasters. Mostly however, only at certain points in their respective locations and for a very limited number of measurement parameters (e.g. seismograph) and not over the entire course of a disaster event. The proliferation of different social media application (e.g. Twitter, Facebook, Google+, etc.), yields the possibility to use the resulting data as a free and fast supplement or complement to traditional monitoring techniques. In particular, these new channels can serve for rapid detection, for information gathering for emergency protection and for information dissemination. Thus, each user of these networks represents a so-called virtual sensor ('social sensor'), whose eyewitness account can be important for understanding the situation on the ground. The advantages of these social sensors are the high mobility, the versatility of the parameters that can be captured (text, images, videos, etc.) as well as the rapid spread of information. Due to the subjective characteristics however, the data often show different quality and quantity. Against this background, it is essential for an application in crisis management to reasonably (pre-)process the data from social media. Hence, fully-automated processes are used which adequately filter and structure the enormous amount of information and associate it with an event, respectively, a geographic location. This is done through statistical monitoring of the volume of messages (Twitter) in different geographic regions of the world. In combination with a frequency analysis with respect to disaster-relevant terms (in 43 languages), thematic as well as spatio-temporal clustering, an initial assessment regarding the severity and extent of the detected event, its classification and (spatio-temporal) localization can be achieved. This detection in real time (2-5 minutes) thus allows

  9. Cyclone Tracy and the Darwin Educators: A Case in Crisis Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beare, Hedley

    The story of successful crisis management teaches some lessons applicable not only to surmounting crises but to everyday management decisions as well. On Christmas eve, 1974, a cyclone demolished 90 percent of the city of Darwin in Australia's Northern Territory. As thousands gathered in neighborhood schools, a team of educational administrators…

  10. Cyclone Tracy and the Darwin Educators: A Case in Crisis Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beare, Hedley

    The story of successful crisis management teaches some lessons applicable not only to surmounting crises but to everyday management decisions as well. On Christmas eve, 1974, a cyclone demolished 90 percent of the city of Darwin in Australia's Northern Territory. As thousands gathered in neighborhood schools, a team of educational administrators…

  11. Crisis Management and Managerial Innovation in the Navy Shipboard Setting: A Preliminary Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-11-01

    individual and unit performance. Under the Navy’s Human Goals Plan, Human Resource Management ( HRM ) specialists are assigned to assist a ship through the HRM ...effectiveness. USS PAUL * F. FOSTER (DD 964) was scheduled for an HRM Cycle in Fall 1976. During * the planning stages of this cycle, the CO decided to...implement Management Action Planning (MAP) to address middle management issues revealed in the HRM survey and the disturbing level of crisis management. In

  12. Survey of change in practice following simulation-based training in crisis management.

    PubMed

    Weller, J; Wilson, L; Robinson, B

    2003-05-01

    We investigated the long-term effects on clinical practice of a simulation-based course in anaesthesia crisis management. A questionnaire was posted to all anaesthetists who had attended a course in the preceding year. The response rate was 69% (66/96). The crisis management course was valued highly by respondents, who perceive a change in practice as a result of the training. This change in practice was not limited to the specific clinical events simulated in the course, but applied to a wide range of events and to routine practice. The high rate of subsequent critical events reported in the survey supports the need for training in this area. This survey suggests that simulation-based training in crisis management is an effective form of continuing medical education for anaesthetists.

  13. Food Safety Crisis Management-A Comparison between Germany and the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    van Asselt, E D; van der Fels-Klerx, H J; Breuer, O; Helsloot, I

    2017-02-01

    In order to prevent food safety incidents from becoming a crisis, a good crisis management structure is essential. The aim of the current study was to compare and evaluate the national food incident response plans of 2 neighboring EU Member States: Germany and the Netherlands. This revealed that the structure of these plans is comparable, starting with initial alerting, assessment of the problem, upscaling, an execution phase and finally an evaluation of the crisis management. However, the German communication structure is more complex than the Dutch one and cross-border communication between both countries is currently limited. In general, the presence of national response plans does not guarantee a good and swift response to a food safety incident as this is often hampered by difficulties in tracing the source of the problem as well as difficulties in communication between organizations involved in crisis management. A timely detection can be improved through the development of fast screening and detecting systems and through combining various data sources using computer software systems. Mutual cooperation and communication can be improved through joint exercises or projects. This will help to streamline communication toward consumers and trade partners. Such communication should be transparent relaying not only the facts but also the uncertainties in a crisis in order to gain consumer trust and safeguard international trade. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  14. The fiscal crisis in the health sector: Patterns of cutback management across Europe.

    PubMed

    Ongaro, Edoardo; Ferré, Francesca; Fattore, Giovanni

    2015-07-01

    The article investigates trends in health sector cutback management strategies occurred during the ongoing financial and fiscal crisis across Europe. A European-wide survey to top public healthcare managers was conducted in ten different countries to understand their perception about public sector policy reactions to the financial and economic crisis; answers from 760 respondents from the healthcare sector (30.7% response rate) were analyzed. A multinomial logistic regression was used to assess the characteristics of respondents, countries' institutional healthcare models and the trend in public health resources availability during the crisis associated to the decision to introduce unselective cuts, targeted cuts or efficiency savings measures. Differentiated responses to the fiscal crisis that buffeted public finances were reported both across and within countries. Organizational position of respondents is significant in explaining the perceived cutback management approach introduced, where decentralized positions detect a higher use of linear cuts compared to their colleagues working in central level organizations. Compared to Bismark-like systems Beveridge-like ones favour the introduction of targeted cuts. Postponing the implementation of new programmes and containing expenses through instruments like pay freezes are some of the most popular responses adopted, while outright staff layoffs or reduction of frontline services have been more selectively employed. To cope with the effects of the fiscal crisis healthcare systems are undergoing important changes, possibly also affecting the scope of universal coverage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Principal Leadership and School Culture with a School-Wide Implementation of Professional Crisis Management: A Redemptive v. Punitive Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Mark Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study investigated the nature of the relationship between principal leadership and school culture within a school-wide implementation of Professional Crisis Management (PCM). PCM is a comprehensive and fully integrated system designed to manage crisis situations effectively, safely, and with dignity. While designed primarily to…

  16. Making patient safety the focus: crisis resource management in the undergraduate curriculum.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Brendan; Nestel, Debra; Joseph, Michele

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines the role of high fidelity simulation and crisis resource management in bridging the gap between theory and practice. Patient safety is fundamental to healthcare professional practice and is a common goal for healthcare providers. It provides a focus to motivate practitioners. Patient safety issues are not a priority in undergraduate curricula. Raising the profile at this level is crucial to improving the safety and quality of healthcare delivery. This paper explores the role of simulation in providing a realistic, safe environment for participants with different levels of experience to manage evolving crises in the context of their work environment. The Southern Health Simulation and Skills Centre uses a patient safety focus in delivering a specialised educational programme adapted from aviation to healthcare. The programme, crisis resource management, enables participants to consolidate knowledge, attitudes and skills to achieve a deeper understanding of how their performance impacts on patient safety and the quality of healthcare provided. Self-reported written evaluation data was collected from participants of three different courses at Southern Health. Participants consistently report that these courses offer unique learning experiences that address aspects of workplace learning in ways that have not previously been possible. A video-assisted reflective process powerfully reinforces learning. Crisis resource management courses demonstrate the value of simulation in bridging the gap between 'knowing' and 'doing' and keeping the focus on patient safety. Recommendations are made for ways in which the core elements of crisis resource management philosophy can influence the conceptualization of a new medical curriculum.

  17. Nuclear security policy in the context of counter-terrorism in Cambodia

    SciTech Connect

    Khun, Vuthy Wongsawaeng, Doonyapong

    2016-01-22

    The risk of nuclear or dirty bomb attack by terrorists is one of the most urgent and threatening danger. The Cambodian national strategy to combat weapons of mass destruction (WMD) depicts a layered system of preventive measures ranging from securing materials at foreign sources to interdicting weapons or nuclear or other radioactive materials at ports, border crossings, and within the Cambodian institutions dealing with the nuclear security to manage the preventive programs. The aim of this study is to formulate guidance, to identify scenario of threat and risk, and to pinpoint necessary legal frameworks on nuclear security in the context of counterterrorism based on the International Atomic Energy Agency nuclear security series. The analysis of this study is guided by theoretical review, the review of international laws and politics, by identifying and interpreting applicable rules and norms establishing the nuclear security regime and how well enforcement of the regime is carried out and, what is the likelihood of the future reform might be. This study will examine the existing national legal frameworks of Cambodia in the context of counterterrorism to prevent acts of nuclear terrorism and the threat of a terrorist nuclear attack within the Cambodia territory. It will shed light on departmental lanes of national nuclear security responsibility, and provide a holistic perspective on the needs of additional resources and emphasis regarding nuclear security policy in the context of counterterrorism in Cambodia.

  18. Nuclear security policy in the context of counter-terrorism in Cambodia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khun, Vuthy; Wongsawaeng, Doonyapong

    2016-01-01

    The risk of nuclear or dirty bomb attack by terrorists is one of the most urgent and threatening danger. The Cambodian national strategy to combat weapons of mass destruction (WMD) depicts a layered system of preventive measures ranging from securing materials at foreign sources to interdicting weapons or nuclear or other radioactive materials at ports, border crossings, and within the Cambodian institutions dealing with the nuclear security to manage the preventive programs. The aim of this study is to formulate guidance, to identify scenario of threat and risk, and to pinpoint necessary legal frameworks on nuclear security in the context of counterterrorism based on the International Atomic Energy Agency nuclear security series. The analysis of this study is guided by theoretical review, the review of international laws and politics, by identifying and interpreting applicable rules and norms establishing the nuclear security regime and how well enforcement of the regime is carried out and, what is the likelihood of the future reform might be. This study will examine the existing national legal frameworks of Cambodia in the context of counterterrorism to prevent acts of nuclear terrorism and the threat of a terrorist nuclear attack within the Cambodia territory. It will shed light on departmental lanes of national nuclear security responsibility, and provide a holistic perspective on the needs of additional resources and emphasis regarding nuclear security policy in the context of counterterrorism in Cambodia.

  19. Developing Clinical Competency in Crisis Event Management: An Integrated Simulation Problem-Based Learning Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liaw, S. Y.; Chen, F. G.; Klainin, P.; Brammer, J.; O'Brien, A.; Samarasekera, D. D.

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the integration of a simulation based learning activity on nursing students' clinical crisis management performance in a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum. It was hypothesized that the clinical performance of first year nursing students who participated in a simulated learning activity during the PBL session…

  20. Using Role-Play to Enhance Foodborne Illness Crisis Management Capacity in the Produce Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreske, Audrey; Ducharme, Diane; Gunter, Chris; Phister, Trevor

    2013-01-01

    Foodborne illness outbreaks have measurable public health effects and often lead to negative produce industry impacts. Reducing loss following a crisis event requires a management plan, although many fresh produce industry members don't have one. Evidence-based workshops using a role-play simulated outbreak were delivered to impact crisis…

  1. Managing More than the Money: Superintendents' Perceptions of Their Leadership during Economic Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taibi-Lewis, Constance

    2011-01-01

    Research on the process and effects of school budget development by superintendents during the current economic crisis is limited. This study sought to determine the job satisfaction, efficacy, and longevity of school superintendents during economic crises. Using data from an original survey instrument TRIPLEM (Managing More than the Money…

  2. Crisis Management Plans in Higher Education: Commonalities, Attributes, and Perceived Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lott, Mary Keane

    2012-01-01

    Crisis has remained as prevalent in our lives today as it ever has been, especially in this post-9/11 era. People handle all types of crises, whether personally, professionally or socially. Arguably, people's worldviews after the tragedies of September 11, 2001 have never been the same, including the way they manage and respond to crises. This…

  3. Do technical skills correlate with non-technical skills in crisis resource management: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Riem, N; Boet, S; Bould, M D; Tavares, W; Naik, V N

    2012-11-01

    Both technical skills (TS) and non-technical skills (NTS) are key to ensuring patient safety in acute care practice and effective crisis management. These skills are often taught and assessed separately. We hypothesized that TS and NTS are not independent of each other, and we aimed to evaluate the relationship between TS and NTS during a simulated intraoperative crisis scenario. This study was a retrospective analysis of performances from a previously published work. After institutional ethics approval, 50 anaesthesiology residents managed a simulated crisis scenario of an intraoperative cardiac arrest secondary to a malignant arrhythmia. We used a modified Delphi approach to design a TS checklist, specific for the management of a malignant arrhythmia requiring defibrillation. All scenarios were recorded. Each performance was analysed by four independent experts. For each performance, two experts independently rated the technical performance using the TS checklist, and two other experts independently rated NTS using the Anaesthetists' Non-Technical Skills score. TS and NTS were significantly correlated to each other (r=0.45, P<0.05). During a simulated 5 min resuscitation requiring crisis resource management, our results indicate that TS and NTS are related to one another. This research provides the basis for future studies evaluating the nature of this relationship, the influence of NTS training on the performance of TS, and to determine whether NTS are generic and transferrable between crises that require different TS.

  4. Managing More than the Money: Superintendents' Perceptions of Their Leadership during Economic Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taibi-Lewis, Constance

    2011-01-01

    Research on the process and effects of school budget development by superintendents during the current economic crisis is limited. This study sought to determine the job satisfaction, efficacy, and longevity of school superintendents during economic crises. Using data from an original survey instrument TRIPLEM (Managing More than the Money…

  5. Crisis Management Plans in Higher Education: Commonalities, Attributes, and Perceived Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lott, Mary Keane

    2012-01-01

    Crisis has remained as prevalent in our lives today as it ever has been, especially in this post-9/11 era. People handle all types of crises, whether personally, professionally or socially. Arguably, people's worldviews after the tragedies of September 11, 2001 have never been the same, including the way they manage and respond to crises. This…

  6. Integrating Learning, Leadership, and Crisis in Management Education: Lessons from Army Officers in Iraq and Afghanistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kayes, D. Christopher; Allen, Nate; Self, Nate

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a model and case study used to teach crisis leadership as a management education topic. The materials emerge from studies of U.S. Army leaders (company commanders and platoon leaders) working in Iraq and Afghanistan. The authors explain how examples and cases from military combat provide tools to teach about crisis…

  7. Accelerating and Braking in Times of Economic Crisis: Organisational Learning in a Top Management Team

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallo, Andreas; Kock, Henrik; Nilsson, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to present the results of a study of an industrial company's top management team (TMT) that fought to survive an economic crisis. Specifically, the article seeks to focus on describing the TMT's composition, group processes, and work during a period of high external pressure; analysing the TMT's work in…

  8. Developing Clinical Competency in Crisis Event Management: An Integrated Simulation Problem-Based Learning Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liaw, S. Y.; Chen, F. G.; Klainin, P.; Brammer, J.; O'Brien, A.; Samarasekera, D. D.

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the integration of a simulation based learning activity on nursing students' clinical crisis management performance in a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum. It was hypothesized that the clinical performance of first year nursing students who participated in a simulated learning activity during the PBL session…

  9. ACT for Leadership: Using Acceptance and Commitment Training to Develop Crisis-Resilient Change Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, Daniel J.; Consulting, Pickslyde

    2010-01-01

    The evidence-based executive coaching movement suggests translating empirical research into practical methods to help leaders develop a repertoire of crisis resiliency and value-directed change management skills. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is an evidence-based modern cognitive-behavior therapy approach that has been and applied to…

  10. Interagency Communication and Collaboration on School Crisis Response Planning and Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skavdahl, Britta M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to determine what research-based and federally recommended practices in the area of school crisis response planning and management were being implemented in K-8 school districts in Northern California, as well as the degree with which the recommended practices were being implemented. Finally, the study…

  11. Accelerating and Braking in Times of Economic Crisis: Organisational Learning in a Top Management Team

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallo, Andreas; Kock, Henrik; Nilsson, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to present the results of a study of an industrial company's top management team (TMT) that fought to survive an economic crisis. Specifically, the article seeks to focus on describing the TMT's composition, group processes, and work during a period of high external pressure; analysing the TMT's work in…

  12. Interagency Communication and Collaboration on School Crisis Response Planning and Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skavdahl, Britta M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to determine what research-based and federally recommended practices in the area of school crisis response planning and management were being implemented in K-8 school districts in Northern California, as well as the degree with which the recommended practices were being implemented. Finally, the study…

  13. Using Role-Play to Enhance Foodborne Illness Crisis Management Capacity in the Produce Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreske, Audrey; Ducharme, Diane; Gunter, Chris; Phister, Trevor

    2013-01-01

    Foodborne illness outbreaks have measurable public health effects and often lead to negative produce industry impacts. Reducing loss following a crisis event requires a management plan, although many fresh produce industry members don't have one. Evidence-based workshops using a role-play simulated outbreak were delivered to impact crisis…

  14. Social Validity of the Critical Incident Stress Management Model for School-Based Crisis Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Julie Q.

    2007-01-01

    The Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM) model for crisis intervention was developed for use with emergency service personnel. Research regarding the use of the CISM model has been conducted among civilians and high-risk occupation groups with mixed results. The purpose of this study is to examine the social validity of the CISM model for…

  15. Integrating Learning, Leadership, and Crisis in Management Education: Lessons from Army Officers in Iraq and Afghanistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kayes, D. Christopher; Allen, Nate; Self, Nate

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a model and case study used to teach crisis leadership as a management education topic. The materials emerge from studies of U.S. Army leaders (company commanders and platoon leaders) working in Iraq and Afghanistan. The authors explain how examples and cases from military combat provide tools to teach about crisis…

  16. JSA guideline for the management of malignant hyperthermia crisis 2016.

    PubMed

    2017-04-01

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH) can be fatal if the crisis is not appropriately treated. It is an inherited disease usually triggered by the administration of volatile inhalational anesthetics and/or succinylcholine, a muscle relaxant. In a patient with suspected MH, the mechanism of calcium release from storage in the sarcoplasmic reticulum in the skeletal muscle is abnormally accelerated. Unexplained hypercarbia representing >55 mmHg of end-tidal carbon dioxide, tachycardia, and muscle rigidity (including masseter muscle rigidity) are early signs of the initiation of MH, because the metabolism is accelerated. The body temperature can rise by >0.5 °C/15 min and may reach ≥40 °C. Respiratory and metabolic acidosis, arrhythmia, cola-colored urine, increased levels of serum potassium, and tented T-waves on electrocardiogram are common and can lead to cardiac arrest. MH should be treated by discontinuation of the triggering agents, administration of intravenous dantrolene (initially 1 mg/kg), and reduction of the body temperature. Early diagnosis and sufficient dantrolene with body temperature reduction are essential to relieve the patient's MH crisis. This guideline in Japanese translation has been posted on the website: http://www.anesth.or.jp/guide/pdf/guideline_akuseikounetsu.pdf .

  17. Parental management of adrenal crisis in children with congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Louise; Knafl, Kathleen; Knafl, George; Van Riper, Marcia

    2017-08-03

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) requires parents to inject their child with hydrocortisone intramuscularly during times of illness and adrenal crisis. The purpose of this study was to describe circumstances surrounding adrenal crisis events in children with CAH; to explore parents' perceptions of the consequences of having a child with a life-threatening condition; and to examine a relationship between parents' perceived management ability and the impact CAH has on the family. In Phase 1 of this mixed-methods, cross-sectional study, 77 parents were asked to complete questionnaires comprising measures of family life in the context of childhood illness. Descriptive statistics were computed with four separate analyses using linear mixed models allowing for correlation between responses from parents of the same family and for the variance to be different for fathers and mothers. The following relationships were examined: (1) parental management ability and type of provider instruction on how to manage adrenal crises; (2) parental management ability and child age; (3) the perceived impact of the condition on the family and management ability; and (4) the age of the child and number of adrenal crisis events. In Phase 2, 16 semi-structured interviews were conducted to elicit detailed descriptions of parents' experiences in managing crises. There was a significant, positive relationship between detailed provider instruction to parents on adrenal crisis management and perceived management ability (p = .02), additionally the stronger the perceived management ability, the less impact CAH had on the family (p < .001). From birth to age 5, parents reported more frequent crisis events and less perceived ability to manage the condition when compared with parents of older children (p = .009). The threat of an adrenal crisis event is a pervasive concern for parents, especially when they are not being properly prepared by providers. Provider support is needed for these parents

  18. Review of crisis resource management (CRM) principles in the setting of intraoperative malignant hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Isaak, Robert Scott; Stiegler, Marjorie Podraza

    2016-04-01

    The practice of medicine is characterized by routine and typical cases whose management usually goes according to plan. However, the occasional case does arise which involves rare catastrophic emergencies, such as intraoperative malignant hyperthermia (MH), which require a comprehensive, coordinated, and resource-intensive treatment plan. Physicians are expected to provide expert quality care for routine, typical cases, but is it reasonable to expect the same standard of expertise and comprehensive management when the emergency involves a rare entity? Although physicians would like to say yes to this question, the reality is that no physician will ever amass the amount of experience in patient care needed to truly qualify as an expert in the management of a rare emergency entity, such as MH. However, physicians can become expert in the global process of managing emergencies by using the principles of crisis resource management (CRM). In this article, we review the key concepts of CRM, using a real life example of a team who utilized CRM principles to successfully manage an intraoperative MH crisis, despite there being no one on the team who had ever previously encountered a true MH crisis.

  19. Civil Military Cooperation for Counterterrorism Operations within the United States

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    military, specifically Special Operations Forces, possesses a pool of talent in advanced counterterrorism operations that is not being utilized by...United States. The U.S. military, specifically Special Operations Forces, possesses a pool of talent in advanced counterterrorism operations that...examine and restructure the force allowing creativity to be applied to existing and older problems. The Army has created new and effective ideas when

  20. ESRD in the geriatric population: the crisis of managed care and the opportunity of disease management.

    PubMed

    Steinman, Theodore I

    2002-01-01

    The geriatric population with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is placed at risk with regards to the quality and extent of medical coverage because of the rapidly changing financial environment. Managed care organizations (MCOs) are generally for-profit companies that must focus on the bottom line. While the verbal commitment to quality care is voiced, the financial pressures on MCOs have led to a decrease in coverage of many services and outright denial for some necessary treatments. While denying services, the MCOs have also reduced payments to providers for services rendered. The coverage crisis is compounded by health maintenance organizations (HMOs) quitting Medicare because the reimbursement from the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) is less than their costs. Because of the above issues which can potentially impact on the quality of care delivered to the ESRD geriatric population, a new approach to disease management has created the opportunity to improve total patient care to a level not yet achieved in the United States. Disease management encompasses integrated care across all disciplines. Every component of care can be tracked by a dedicated information system. Improvement in outcomes has far exceeded the U.S. Renal Data System (USRDS) benchmark performance measurements with a disease management model approach. The key to success is the health service coordinator (HSC), a senior nurse with many years of ESRD experience. This individual coordinates care across all disciplines and expedites necessary referrals. With rapid attention to patient needs there has been a significant reduction in hospital admissions, hospital length of stay, and emergency room visits. Patient care will steadily improve as the disease management system matures as a consequence of understanding the patients total physical and psychosocial needs.

  1. Emergency and crisis management: critical incident stress management for first responders and business organisations.

    PubMed

    Guenthner, Daniel H

    2012-01-01

    A literature review was performed on critical incident stress after September 11th, 2001 (9/11), and Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, which focused on the need to implement a holistic critical incident stress management programme for first responders and business organisations. Critical incident stress management is required to handle acute stress and other distress in the face of natural or man-made disasters, including terrorist attacks. A holistic approach to community resilience through a well-planned and implemented critical incident stress management programme has been shown in the literature to promote self-help and self-efficacy of individuals and organisations. The interventions and programme elements defined clearly show how a number of different intervention and prevention strategies will promote business and community resilience and also self-efficacy in a culturally-diverse community and organisation. Implementing a critical incident stress management programme within a responding business organisation is critical because of the fact that first responders are the most susceptible every day to exposure to critical incidents that will affect their mental health; and business employees will suffer some of the same maladies as first responders in the event of a disaster or crisis. Utilising the framework provided, a holistic critical incident stress management programme can be implemented to help reduce the effects of burnout, absenteeism, acute stress, post-traumatic stress, substance use and traumatic stress, and to work to promote community resilience and toughen individuals against the effects of stress. Taking care of the needs of the employees of a business organisation, and of those of first responders, is clearly required.

  2. Effective information management and assurance for a modern organisation during a crisis.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    During a crisis, organisations face a major unpredictable event with potentially negative consequences. Effective information management and assurance can assist the organisation in making sure that they have the correct information in a secure format to make decisions to recover their operations. The main elements of effective information management and assurance are confidentiality, integrity and availability, combined with non-repudiation. Should an element of effective information management or assurance be removed it can have a detrimental effect on the other elements and render the information management and assurance practices of the organisation ineffectual.

  3. The use of crisis medication in the management of terminal haemorrhage due to incurable cancer: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Harris, D G; Finlay, I G; Flowers, S; Noble, S I R

    2011-10-01

    Terminal haemorrhage is a rare but devastating event that may occur in certain advanced cancers. The focus of management involves administration of 'crisis medicine' with the intention of relieving patient distress through sedative doses of anxiolytics or opioids. This practice, whilst widely accepted, is based on limited evidence and has never been formally evaluated. To evaluate the utility of crisis medication in the management of terminal haemorrhage, through the experiences of nurses who had personally managed such events. Semi-structured interviews exploring the experiences of palliative care and head and neck oncology nurses were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Saturation of themes occurred after interviewing 11 nurses with cumulative experience of managing 37 terminal haemorrhages. Participants reported crisis medication to have little, if any, role in the management of terminal haemorrhage, which was such a rapid event that patients died before it could be administered. As many events had not been predicted, anticipatory prescribing of crisis medication did not always occur. Staying with and supporting the patient, and using dark-coloured towels to camouflage blood were reported to be of more practical use. A focus on accessing crisis medicines had often been to the detriment of these simple yet beneficial measures. Anticipatory prescribing of crisis medication rarely benefits the patient and may unintentionally detract from nursing care. Guidelines on the management of terminal haemorrhage should reconsider the emphasis on crisis medication and focus on non-pharmacological approaches to this invariably fatal event.

  4. [The impact of crisis intervention on the management of patients with personality disorder].

    PubMed

    Damsa, Cristian; Di Clemente, Thierry; Massarczyk, Odile; Haupert, Joëlle; Pull, Charles

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate in psychiatric emergency unit at Hospital Center of Luxembourg the impact of crisis intervention on the management of patients with personality disorder. There were included in this study all the patients with the diagnosis of personality disorder (axis II, criteria DSM IV), even the reason for emergency consultation was related to a disorder diagnosed on the axis I (criteria DSM IV). Data were retrospectively collected to compare patients examined in the psychiatric emergency unit during five months, from 1st September 2001 to 31st January 2002, with those examined from 1st September 2002 to 31st January 2003 and able to benefit from a crisis intervention. The results show a significant reduction of voluntary hospitalizations and a significant increase of the number of patients with more than five outpatient consultations, after the introduction of crisis interventions. The theoretical frame of our psychotherapeutic interventions is briefly exposed. The results of this study emphasize the importance of crisis interventions in psychiatry for improving the management of patients with a personality disorder.

  5. Crisis crowdsourcing framework: designing strategic configurations of crowdsourcing for the emergency management domain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, Sophia B.

    2014-01-01

    Crowdsourcing is not a new practice but it is a concept that has gained significant attention during recent disasters. Drawing from previous work in the crisis informatics, disaster sociology, and computer-supported cooperative work (CSCW) literature, the paper first explains recent conceptualizations of crowdsourcing and how crowdsourcing is a way of leveraging disaster convergence. The CSCW concept of “articulation work” is introduced as an interpretive frame for extracting the salient dimensions of “crisis crowdsourcing.” Then, a series of vignettes are presented to illustrate the evolution of crisis crowdsourcing that spontaneously emerged after the 2010 Haiti earthquake and evolved to more established forms of public engagement during crises. The best practices extracted from the vignettes clarified the efforts to formalize crisis crowdsourcing through the development of innovative interfaces designed to support the articulation work needed to facilitate spontaneous volunteer efforts. Extracting these best practices led to the development of a conceptual framework that unpacks the key dimensions of crisis crowdsourcing. The Crisis Crowdsourcing Framework is a systematic, problem-driven approach to determining the why, who, what, when, where, and how aspects of a crowdsourcing system. The framework also draws attention to the social, technological, organizational, and policy (STOP) interfaces that need to be designed to manage the articulation work involved with reducing the complexity of coordinating across these key dimensions. An example of how to apply the framework to design a crowdsourcing system is offered with with a discussion on the implications for applying this framework as well as the limitations of this framework. Innovation is occurring at the social, technological, organizational, and policy interfaces enabling crowdsourcing to be operationalized and integrated into official products and services.

  6. Hyperglycemic crisis.

    PubMed

    Van Ness-Otunnu, Ronald; Hack, Jason B

    2013-11-01

    Hyperglycemic crisis is a metabolic emergency associated with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus that may result in significant morbidity or death. Acute interventions are required to manage hypovolemia, acidemia, hyperglycemia, electrolyte abnormalities, and precipitating causes. Despite advances in the prevention and management of diabetes, its prevalence and associated health care costs continue to increase worldwide. Hyperglycemic crisis typically requires critical care management and hospitalization and contributes to global health expenditures. Diagnostic and resolution criteria and management strategies for diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic crisis are provided. A discussion of prevalence, mortality, pathophysiology, risk factors, clinical presentation, differential diagnosis, evaluation, and management considerations for hyperglycemic crisis are included. Emergency physicians confront the most severe sequelae of uncontrolled diabetes and provide crucial, life-saving management. With ongoing efforts from diabetes societies to incorporate the latest clinical research to refine treatment guidelines, management and outcomes of hyperglycemic crisis in the emergency department continue to improve. We provide an overview of the evaluation and treatment of hyperglycemic crisis and offer a concise, targeted management algorithm to aid the practicing emergency physician. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The use of emergency manuals in perioperative crisis management: a cautious approach.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Ashley; August, David A; Klainer, Suzanne; Miller, Andrew D; Kaye, Alan D; Raemer, Daniel B; Urman, Richard D

    2015-01-01

    When an unexpected perioperative crisis arises, simulation studies have suggested that the use of an emergency manual (EM) may offset the large cognitive load involved in crisis management, facilitating the efficient performance of key steps in treatment. However, little is known about how well EMs will translate into actual practice and what is required to use them optimally. While EMs are a promising tool in the management of perioperative critical events, more research is needed to define best practices and their limitations. In the interim, cautious use of these cognitive aids is recommended, especially when the diagnosis is not straightforward, falls "in between" sections of the EM, or falls outside of the EM itself. Further research should focus on the efficacy of EMs as measured by the percentage of critical steps correctly performed by their users in scenarios that do not closely mirror one of the listed EM scenarios from the beginning or as the situation evolves.

  8. Crisis Communication in the Area of Risk Management: The CriCoRM Project

    PubMed Central

    Scarcella, Carmelo; Antonelli, Laura; Orizio, Grazia; Rossmann, Costanze; Ziegler, Lena; Meyer, Lisa; Garcia-Jimenez, Leonarda; Losada, Jose Carlos; Correia, Joao; Soares, Joana; Covolo, Loredana; Lirangi, Enrico; Gelatti, Umberto

    2013-01-01

    Background During the last H1N1 pandemic has emerged the importance of crisis communication as an essential part of health crisis management. The Project aims specifically to improve the understanding of crisis communication dynamics and effective tools and to allow public health institutions to communicate better with the public during health emergencies. Design and methods The Project will perform different activities: i) state of the art review; ii) identification of key stakeholders; iii) communicational analysis performed using data collected on stakeholder communication activities and their outcomes considering the lessons learnt from the analysis of the reasons for differing public reactions during pandemics; iv) improvement of the existing guidelines; v) development of Web 2.0 tools as web-platform and feed service and implementation of impact assessment algorithms; vi) organization of exercises and training on this issues. Expected impact of the study for public health In the context of health security policies at an EU level, the project aims to find a common and innovative approach to health crisis communication that was displayed by differing reactions to the H1N1 pandemic policies. The focus on new social media tools aims to enhance the role of e-health, and the project aims to use these tools in the specific field of health institutions and citizens. The development of Web 2.0 tools for health crisis communication will allow an effective two-way exchange of information between public health institutions and citizens. An effective communication strategy will increase population compliance with public health recommendations. Significance for public health The specific aim of the project is to develop a European strategy approach on how to communicate with the population and with different stakeholders groups involved in the crisis management process, based on an analysis of the communication process during the H1N1 pandemic (content analysis of press

  9. Crisis Communication in the Area of Risk Management: The CriCoRM Project.

    PubMed

    Scarcella, Carmelo; Antonelli, Laura; Orizio, Grazia; Rossmann, Costanze; Ziegler, Lena; Meyer, Lisa; Garcia-Jimenez, Leonarda; Losada, Jose Carlos; Correia, Joao; Soares, Joana; Covolo, Loredana; Lirangi, Enrico; Gelatti, Umberto

    2013-09-02

    During the last H1N1 pandemic has emerged the importance of crisis communication as an essential part of health crisis management. The Project aims specifically to improve the understanding of crisis communication dynamics and effective tools and to allow public health institutions to communicate better with the public during health emergencies. THE PROJECT WILL PERFORM DIFFERENT ACTIVITIES: i) state of the art review; ii) identification of key stakeholders; iii) communicational analysis performed using data collected on stakeholder communication activities and their outcomes considering the lessons learnt from the analysis of the reasons for differing public reactions during pandemics; iv) improvement of the existing guidelines; v) development of Web 2.0 tools as web-platform and feed service and implementation of impact assessment algorithms; vi) organization of exercises and training on this issues. In the context of health security policies at an EU level, the project aims to find a common and innovative approach to health crisis communication that was displayed by differing reactions to the H1N1 pandemic policies. The focus on new social media tools aims to enhance the role of e-health, and the project aims to use these tools in the specific field of health institutions and citizens. The development of Web 2.0 tools for health crisis communication will allow an effective two-way exchange of information between public health institutions and citizens. An effective communication strategy will increase population compliance with public health recommendations. Significance for public healthThe specific aim of the project is to develop a European strategy approach on how to communicate with the population and with different stakeholders groups involved in the crisis management process, based on an analysis of the communication process during the H1N1 pandemic (content analysis of press releases, press coverage and forum discussions) and on interviews with key

  10. Oil terrorism-militancy link: Mediating role of moral disengagement in emergency and crisis management.

    PubMed

    Mafimisebi, Oluwasoye Patrick; Thorne, Sara

    2015-01-01

    The controversial issues of terrorism and militancy have generated contemporary interests and different interpretations have emerged on how to combat and manage these dangerous events. This study widens understanding of moral disengagement mechanism application in the perpetuation of inhumanities within the context of oil terrorist and militant behaviors. The research findings and model are explicit on how people form moral evaluations of agents who are forced to make morally relevant decisions over times in context of crisis situations. Quite crucially, understanding the context of terrorism and militancy provides policymakers, emergency and crisis managers better analysis and response to such events. The research fundamental purpose was to investigate the mediating role of moral disengagement on delinquency of oil terrorism and militancy; and considered implications for emergency and crisis management practices. The study found that situational-induced crises such as oil terrorism and militancy were sufficient to account for an individual's misdeeds and unethical or inhumane decisions made under frustration and agitation may be perceived as less indicative of one's fundamental character. Findings suggest that more repugnant delinquencies could have been committed in the name of justice than in the name of injustice, avenues for future research. In context, the result of the moral disengagement scale shows that morality of delinquency (oil terrorism and militancy) is accomplished by cognitively redefining the morality of such acts. The main finding is that people in resistance movements are rational actors making rational choices. The authors argue that theorists, policymakers, and practitioners must give meaningful attention to understanding the multidimensional nature of emergency, crisis and disaster management for better strength of synthesis between theory and practice. The research is concluded by thorough examination of the implication and limitations for

  11. Calming the campus: training school staff and crisis teams to manage student behavior during emergencies.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kendall

    2007-01-01

    Conversations with school and crisis personnel following large scale emergencies in and around schools, such as shootings, wildfires, and the attack on the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001, indicated a need for pre-incident training in managing student behavior during emergencies. This article outlines a training program of this kind and offers suggestions regarding both content and process of this training. The suggestions follow discussion of the unique context and needs of the school setting.

  12. Management of refugee crisis in Albania during the 1999 Kosovo conflict.

    PubMed

    Kondaj, Ruki

    2002-04-01

    The report presents key data on Kosovo refugees in Albania during the 1999 crisis in Kosovo. In a three-month period, from March through May 1999, Albania received, accommodated, and cared for 479,223 officially registered refugees from Kosovo (FR Yugoslavia). Many foreign governmental and non-governmental organizations helped the Albanian government during the crisis. The Government cooperated with the organizations through Government Commission, which appointed a Special Coordinator to the Emergency Management Group that coordinated factors and actions in the field. A Health Desk was established by the Emergency Management Group to provide an overview of the health impact of the crisis upon refugees and domestic Albanian population. There were no serious outbreaks of infectious diseases, but the Health Desk registered 2,165 cases of diarrhea without and 14 cases of diarrhea with blood in the stool. Scabies and lice affected around 4% of the refugees. After the refugees returned to Kosovo, Emergency Management Group continued to coordinate the work on the rehabilitation of the refugee-affected areas. In this phase, humanitarian emergency work served as a bridge between emergency activities and normal development.

  13. Developing clinical competency in crisis event management: an integrated simulation problem-based learning activity.

    PubMed

    Liaw, S Y; Chen, F G; Klainin, P; Brammer, J; O'Brien, A; Samarasekera, D D

    2010-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the integration of a simulation based learning activity on nursing students' clinical crisis management performance in a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum. It was hypothesized that the clinical performance of first year nursing students who participated in a simulated learning activity during the PBL session would be superior to those who completed the conventional problem-based session. The students were allocated into either simulation with problem-based discussion (SPBD) or problem-based discussion (PBD) for scenarios on respiratory and cardiac distress. Following completion of each scenario, students from both groups were invited to sit an optional individual test involving a systematic assessment and immediate management of a simulated patient facing a crisis event. A total of thirty students participated in the first post test related to a respiratory scenario and thirty-three participated in the second post test related to a cardiac scenario. Their clinical performances were scored using a checklist. Mean test scores for students completing the SPBD were significantly higher than those who completing the PBD for both the first post test (SPBD 20.08, PBD 18.19) and second post test (SPBD 27.56, PBD 23.07). Incorporation of simulation learning activities into problem-based discussion appeared to be an effective educational strategy for teaching nursing students to assess and manage crisis events.

  14. The European air traffic management response to volcanic ash crises: towards institutionalised aviation crisis management.

    PubMed

    Dopagne, Jacques

    2011-06-01

    A cloud of ash drifting from the erupting Eyjafjallajökull volcano in Iceland in April and May 2010 covered Europe and created an unprecedented situation. It resulted in an almost complete lockdown of European airspace in the period from 15th to 21st April, 2010: more than 100,000 flights were cancelled, 10 million people were affected and over US$1.8bn was lost by airlines globally. This paper presents the air traffic management (ATM) view of the situation. Through an analysis of the evolution of the events in the affected region, the paper will provide more details on ATM planning, reaction and follow-up actions. Furthermore, the influence of this event on the identification of further improvements needed to advance volcanic procedures internationally will be discussed. Actions undertaken since the end of the event - the establishment of the European Aviation Crisis Coordination Cell, running of the International Civil Aviation Organization VOLCEX 11/01 volcanic ash exercise and European response to the Grimsvötn eruption in May 2011 - will be discussed at the end of the paper.

  15. Few Schools Are Ready to Manage a Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolan, Thomas G.

    2006-01-01

    Most colleges and universities are poorly prepared to efficiently address and manage crises. That is the finding of a survey, the results of which were in the January/February issue of the publication, "Change." The authors point to Hurricane Katrina and the 9/11 terrorist attacks as wake-up calls to higher education and maintain both that campus…

  16. Few Schools Are Ready to Manage a Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolan, Thomas G.

    2006-01-01

    Most colleges and universities are poorly prepared to efficiently address and manage crises. That is the finding of a survey, the results of which were in the January/February issue of the publication, "Change." The authors point to Hurricane Katrina and the 9/11 terrorist attacks as wake-up calls to higher education and maintain both that campus…

  17. Natural Disaster & Crisis Management in School Districts and Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Office of Educational Facilities.

    This document provides school districts and community colleges in Florida with guidance on disaster preparedness planning and management for all types of disasters. Procedures include those for insurance coverage, emergency shelters, command centers and disaster team organization, emergency communications, security, preparation prior to disaster,…

  18. Management of Library Course Reserves and the Textbook Affordability Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollitz, John H.; Christie, Anne; Middleton, Cheryl

    2009-01-01

    Students at U.S. colleges and universities are concerned about the high cost of textbooks. Expansion of library course reserves has been suggested as one solution to this problem. The authors surveyed libraries at public universities to explore the status and management of physical course reserves and the role they play vis-a-vis textbook…

  19. Considering Time-Dependency of Social Vulnerability in Crisis Modeling and Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubrecht, C.; Steinnocher, K.; Freire, S.; Loibl, W.; Peters-Anders, J.; Ungar, J.

    2012-04-01

    Crisis and disaster management is much more than the immediate first-response actions following an incident. In many projects the main focus has been on the phase starting at the point when an unwanted event happens and lasting until the activities return to normal routines (i.e., ad hoc reaction rather than proactive mitigation). There has been less emphasis on the other phases of the disaster management cycle such as prevention, preparedness, recovery and reconstruction, even though those phases have a strong influence on the general status of a society and its citizens. Especially the potential of a crisis to escalate into a large-scale disaster is heavily dependent on the overall level of preparedness as well as on the planning of mitigation and response actions and their timely execution. There is a need for improved decision-making support that enables modeling of different crisis scenarios and their impacts according to chosen prevention and response actions. Vulnerability describing the status of a society with respect to an imposed hazard or potential impact is considered a strongly multidisciplinary concept. A central objective of vulnerability assessment is to provide indications where and how people - and more specifically, what kind of people - might be affected by a certain impact. Results should provide decision- and policy-makers with supporting information to target response and mitigation actions adequately. For assessment of the social dimension of vulnerability, population exposure mapping is usually considered the starting point. Integration of social structure and varying aspects of resilience further differentiate situation-specific vulnerability patterns on a local scale. In a disaster risk management context, assessment of human vulnerability has generally been lagging behind hazard analysis efforts. Accurately estimating population exposure is a key component of catastrophe loss modeling, one element of effective integrated risk analysis

  20. The social process of escalation: a promising focus for crisis management research.

    PubMed

    Bergström, Johan; Dekker, Sidney; Nyce, James M; Amer-Wåhlin, Isis

    2012-06-15

    This study identifies a promising, new focus for the crisis management research in the health care domain. After reviewing the literature on health care crisis management, there seems to be a knowledge-gap regarding organisational change and adaption, especially when health care situations goes from normal, to non-normal, to pathological and further into a state of emergency or crisis. Based on studies of escalating situations in obstetric care it is suggested that two theoretical perspectives (contingency theory and the idea of failure as a result of incomplete interaction) tend to simplify the issue of escalation rather than attend to its complexities (including the various power relations among the stakeholders involved). However studying the process of escalation as inherently complex and social allows us to see the definition of a situation as normal or non-normal as an exercise of power in itself, rather than representing a putatively correct response to a particular emergency. The concept of escalation, when treated this way, can help us further the analysis of clinical and institutional acts and competence. It can also turn our attention to some important elements in a class of social phenomenon, crises and emergencies, that so far have not received the attention they deserve. Focusing on organisational choreography, that interplay of potential factors such as power, professional identity, organisational accountability, and experience, is not only a promising focus for future naturalistic research but also for developing more pragmatic strategies that can enhance organisational coordination and response in complex events.

  1. Panel 2.18: logistics, information technology (IT), and telecommunications in crisis management.

    PubMed

    De Silva, Terrence; Chikersal, Jyotsna; Snoad, Nigel; Woodworth, Brent; Ghaly, Cherif; Catterall, Martin

    2005-01-01

    This is a summary of the presentations and discussion of Panel 2.18, Logistics, Information Technology, and Telecommunications in Crisis Management of the Conference, Health Aspects of the Tsunami Disaster in Asia, convened by the World Health Organization (WHO) in Phuket, Thailand, 04-06 May 2005. The topics discussed included issues related to logistics, information technology (IT), and crisis communication pertaining to the responses to the damage created by the Tsunami. It is presented in the following major sections: (1) issues; (2) lessons learned; (3) what was done well; (4) what could have been done better; and (5) conclusions and recommendations. Each major section is presented in four sub-sections: (1) needs assessments; (2) coordination; (3) filling the gaps; and (4) capacity building.

  2. Assessment of the Temperament, Motivation, and Capability of a School System District for Emergency Management/Crisis Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoff, Larry A.

    2009-01-01

    This study was a cross-sectional study of leadership and staff of a public school system in Georgia concerning their temperament type, emergency management motivation and emergency management knowledge in relation to Emergency Management/Crisis performance (ERCM). The study consisted of an inclusive questionnaire that contains questions on four…

  3. Assessment of the Temperament, Motivation, and Capability of a School System District for Emergency Management/Crisis Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoff, Larry A.

    2009-01-01

    This study was a cross-sectional study of leadership and staff of a public school system in Georgia concerning their temperament type, emergency management motivation and emergency management knowledge in relation to Emergency Management/Crisis performance (ERCM). The study consisted of an inclusive questionnaire that contains questions on four…

  4. A crisis of faith? A review of simulation in teaching team-based, crisis management skills to surgical trainees.

    PubMed

    Doumouras, Aristithes G; Keshet, Itay; Nathens, Avery B; Ahmed, Najma; Hicks, Christopher M

    2012-01-01

    Team-based training using crisis resource management (CRM) has gained popularity as a strategy to minimize the impact of medical error during critical events. The purpose of this review was to appraise and summarize the design, implementation, and efficacy of peer-reviewed, simulation-based CRM training programs for postgraduate trainees (residents). Two independent reviewers conducted a structured literature review, querying multiple medical and allied health databases from 1950 to May 2010 (MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, EBM, and PsycINFO). We included articles that (1) were written in English, (2) were published in peer-reviewed journals, (3) included residents, (4) contained a simulation component, and (5) included a team-based component. Peer-reviewed articles describing the implementation of CRM instruction were critically appraised using the Kirkpatrick framework for evaluating training programs. Fifteen studies involving a total of 404 residents met inclusion criteria; most studies reported high resident satisfaction for CRM training. In several CRM domains, residents demonstrated significant improvements after training, which did not decay over time. With regard to design, oral feedback may be equivalent to video feedback and single-day interventions may be as efficacious as multiple-day interventions for residents. No studies demonstrated a link between simulation-based CRM training and performance during real-life critical events. The findings support the utility of CRM programs for residents. A high degree of satisfaction and perceived value reflect robust resident engagement. The iteration of themes from our review provides the basis for the development of best practices in curricula design. A dearth of well-designed, randomized studies preclude the quantification of impact of simulation-based training in the clinical environment. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Counter-terrorism threat prediction architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehman, Lynn A.; Krause, Lee S.

    2004-09-01

    This paper will evaluate the feasibility of constructing a system to support intelligence analysts engaged in counter-terrorism. It will discuss the use of emerging techniques to evaluate a large-scale threat data repository (or Infosphere) and comparing analyst developed models to identify and discover potential threat-related activity with a uncertainty metric used to evaluate the threat. This system will also employ the use of psychological (or intent) modeling to incorporate combatant (i.e. terrorist) beliefs and intent. The paper will explore the feasibility of constructing a hetero-hierarchical (a hierarchy of more than one kind or type characterized by loose connection/feedback among elements of the hierarchy) agent based framework or "family of agents" to support "evidence retrieval" defined as combing, or searching the threat data repository and returning information with an uncertainty metric. The counter-terrorism threat prediction architecture will be guided by a series of models, constructed to represent threat operational objectives, potential targets, or terrorist objectives. The approach would compare model representations against information retrieved by the agent family to isolate or identify patterns that match within reasonable measures of proximity. The central areas of discussion will be the construction of an agent framework to search the available threat related information repository, evaluation of results against models that will represent the cultural foundations, mindset, sociology and emotional drive of typical threat combatants (i.e. the mind and objectives of a terrorist), and the development of evaluation techniques to compare result sets with the models representing threat behavior and threat targets. The applicability of concepts surrounding Modeling Field Theory (MFT) will be discussed as the basis of this research into development of proximity measures between the models and result sets and to provide feedback in support of model

  6. A Behavioral Framework for Managing Massive Airline Flight Disruptions through Crisis Management, Organization Development, and Organization Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Tulinda Deegan

    In this study the researcher provides a behavioral framework for managing massive airline flight disruptions (MAFD) in the United States. Under conditions of MAFD, multiple flights are disrupted throughout the airline's route network, customer service is negatively affected, additional costs are created for airlines, and governments intervene. This study is different from other studies relating to MAFD that have focused on the operational, technical, economic, financial, and customer service impacts. The researcher argues that airlines could improve the management of events that led to MAFD by applying the principles of crisis management where the entire organization is mobilized, rather than one department, adapting organization development (OD) interventions to implement change and organization learning (OL) processes to create culture of innovation, resulting in sustainable improvement in customer service, cost reductions, and mitigation of government intervention. At the intersection of crisis management, OD, and OL, the researcher has developed a new conceptual framework that enhances the resiliency of individuals and organizations in responding to unexpected-yet-recurring crises (e.g., MAFD) that impact operations. The researcher has adapted and augmented Lalonde's framework for managing crises through OD interventions by including OL processes. The OD interventions, coupled with OL, provide a framework for airline leaders to manage more effectively events that result in MAFD with the goal of improving passenger satisfaction, reducing costs, and preventing further government intervention. Further research is warranted to apply this conceptual framework to unexpected-yet-recurring crises that affect operations in other industries.

  7. [Little jobs in Bamako. Managing in times of crisis].

    PubMed

    Sanogo, M S

    1995-03-01

    As Bamako, Mali, grows, a man and two partners have set up a car wash on Independence Boulevard across from the Labor Exchange. The initial 150,000 CFA investment was to install a water faucet, build a large concrete slab, bring electricity to the location, and buy a small supply of tools. Since Bamako is expanding, vehicles are no longer a luxury and mud and dust are all over. After covering expenses and paying the communal tax, the men have enough to live on. The charge is 250 CFA for a simple wash and 1000 CFA for a wash including the engine. The owner envisions putting in a vehicle accessory store next door. Also on Independence Boulevard at the level of the ex-seat of National Union of Women in Mali, 2-3 teams of about 10 youth each carry buckets of water from the public fountain to clean cars in unregulated parking spaces for 4-6 CFAs. They operate without authorization and pay no taxes. But in this time where social unraveling is the force of the law, how does one prohibit this activity without provoking a protest movement which no one knows how to stop? The youth are not delinquents but rural and urban youth with uncertain schooling. To invest heavily in an activity which will not pay off, station managers prefer to align themselves towards the most sensible solutions. Thus, with the Malinian Society of Guardian Service and Care (SOMAGES) acting as an intermediary, gas stations have hired youth to do maintenance work. This gives youth stable employment, registration with the National Social Security Institute, and benefits of a monthly salary. Operators have hired hostesses that, they hope, will improve the reception quality at their stations. The hostesses inquire about the wanted service and clean the windshield. Their feminine presence contributes to customer loyalty.

  8. Management scenarios for the Jordan River salinity crisis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farber, E.; Vengosh, A.; Gavrieli, I.; Marie, A.; Bullen, T.D.; Mayer, B.; Holtzman, R.; Segal, M.; Shavit, U.

    2005-01-01

    Recent geochemical and hydrological findings show that the water quality of the base flow of the Lower Jordan River, between the Sea of Galilee and the Dead Sea, is dependent upon the ratio between surface water flow and groundwater discharge. Using water quality data, mass-balance calculations, and actual flow-rate measurements, possible management scenarios for the Lower Jordan River and their potential affects on its salinity are investigated. The predicted scenarios reveal that implementation of some elements of the Israel-Jordan peace treaty will have negative effects on the Jordan River water salinity. It is predicted that removal of sewage effluents dumped into the river (???13 MCM/a) will significantly reduce the river water's flow and increase the relative proportion of the saline groundwater flux into the river. Under this scenario, the Cl content of the river at its southern point (Abdalla Bridge) will rise to almost 7000 mg/L during the summer. In contrast, removal of all the saline water (16.5 MCM/a) that is artificially discharged into the Lower Jordan River will significantly reduce its Cl concentration, to levels of 650-2600 and 3000-3500 mg/L in the northern and southern areas of the Lower Jordan River, respectively. However, because the removal of either the sewage effluents or the saline water will decrease the river's discharge to a level that could potentially cause river desiccation during the summer months, other water sources must be allocated to preserve in-stream flow needs and hence the river's ecosystem. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Challenges of the management of mass casualty: lessons learned from the Jos crisis of 2001.

    PubMed

    Ozoilo, Kenneth N; Pam, Ishaya C; Yiltok, Simon J; Ramyil, Alice V; Nwadiaro, Hyacinth C

    2013-10-28

    Jos has witnessed a series of civil crises which have generated mass casualties that the Jos University Teaching Hospital has had to respond to from time to time. We review the challenges that we encountered in the management of the victims of the 2001 crisis. We reviewed the findings of our debriefing sessions following the sectarian crisis of September 2001 and identified the challenges and obstacles experienced during these periods. Communication was a major challenge, both within and outside the hospital. In the field, there was poor field triage and no prehospital care. Transportation and evacuation was hazardous, for both injured patients and medical personnel. This was worsened by the imposition of a curfew on the city and its environs. In the hospital, supplies such as fluids, emergency drugs, sterile dressings and instruments, splints, and other consumables, blood and food were soon exhausted. Record keeping was erratic. Staff began to show signs of physical and mental exhaustion as well as features of anxiety and stress. Tensions rose between different religious groups in the hospital and an attempt was made by rioters to attack the hospital. Patients suffered poor subsequent care following resuscitation and/or surgery and there was neglect of patients on admission prior to the crisis as well as non trauma medical emergencies. Mass casualties from disasters that disrupt organized societal mechanisms for days can pose significant challenges to the best of institutional disaster response plans. In the situation that we experienced, our disaster plan was impractical initially because it failed to factor in such a prolongation of both crisis and response. We recommend that institutional disaster response plans should incorporate provisions for the challenges we have enumerated and factor in peculiarities that would emanate from the need for a prolonged response.

  10. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs): a new tool in counterterrorism operations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dörtbudak, Mehmet F.

    2015-05-01

    Terrorism is not a new phenomenon to the world, yet it remains difficult to define and counter. Countering terrorism requires several measures that must be taken simultaneously; however, counterterrorism strategies of many countries mostly depend on military measures. In the aftermath of the 2001 terrorist attack on the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center, the United States (U.S.) has started and led the campaign of Global War on Terrorism. They have invaded Afghanistan and Iraq and have encountered insurgencies run by terrorist organizations, such as al-Qaeda and its affiliates. The U.S. made the utilization of Air and Space Power very intensively during these operations. In order to implement operations; Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) assets were used to collect the necessary information. Before the successful insertion of a small number of U.S. Special Operation Force (SOF) teams into Afghanistan, the U.S. Air Force attacked al-Qaeda and Taliban's targets such as infrastructure, airfields, ground forces, command-control facilities etc. As soon as the U.S. troops got on the ground and started to marshal to Kabul, the Air Force supported them by attacking jointly determined targets. The Air Force continued to carry out the missions and played a significant role to achieve the objective of operation during all the time. This is not the only example of utilization of Air and Space Power in counterterrorism and counterinsurgency operations. All around the world, many countries have also made the utilization of Air Power in different missions ranging from ISR to attacking. Thinking that terrorism has a psychological dimension and losing a pilot during operations may result in decreasing the population support to operations, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) started to be used by practitioners and took priority over other assets. Although UAVs have been on the theatre for a long time used for ISR mission in conventional conflicts, with the advent

  11. Military psychology and police psychology: mutual contributions to crisis intervention and stress management.

    PubMed

    Miller, Laurence

    2008-01-01

    Like siblings separated at birth, military psychology and police psychology have each independently addressed the cognitive, perceptual, emotional, and behavioral aspects of men and women performing extreme service in defense of their neighborhood or their country. This article reviews the major areas of commonality in the work of military and police psychologists in the areas of crisis intervention and stress management, and provides practical strategies for handling these operational and clinical challenges. The article makes specific recommendations for how police and military psychologists can cross-contribute to each other's fields for the overall enhanced provision of services to the men and women who wear uniforms of all kinds.

  12. A drinking water crisis in Lake Taihu, China: linkage to climatic variability and lake management.

    PubMed

    Qin, Boqiang; Zhu, Guangwei; Gao, Guang; Zhang, Yunlin; Li, Wei; Paerl, Hans W; Carmichael, Wayne W

    2010-01-01

    In late May, 2007, a drinking water crisis took place in Wuxi, Jiangsu Province, China, following a massive bloom of the toxin producing cyanobacteria Microcystis spp. in Lake Taihu, China's third largest freshwater lake. Taihu was the city's sole water supply, leaving approximately two million people without drinking water for at least a week. This cyanobacterial bloom event began two months earlier than previously documented for Microcystis blooms in Taihu. This was attributed to an unusually warm spring. The prevailing wind direction during this period caused the bloom to accumulate at the shoreline near the intake of the water plant. Water was diverted from the nearby Yangtze River in an effort to flush the lake of the bloom. However, this management action was counterproductive, because it produced a current which transported the bloom into the intake, exacerbating the drinking water contamination problem. The severity of this microcystin toxin containing bloom and the ensuing drinking water crisis were attributable to excessive nutrient enrichment; however, a multi-annual warming trend extended the bloom period and amplified its severity, and this was made worse by unanticipated negative impacts of water management. Long-term management must therefore consider both the human and climatic factors controlling these blooms and their impacts on water supply in this and other large lakes threatened by accelerating eutrophication.

  13. [Total quality management in times of crisis. The case of Argentina].

    PubMed

    Larroca, Norberto

    2003-01-01

    Healthcare organizations were faced with so great a challenge following the financial slump that they were forced to 'sharpen their wits' in order to survive. Integrated Quality Management (in Spanish GIC), proved the ideal instrument. GIC has four foundational elements, the application of which allow for successful management of crisis situations. They are as follows: TRAINING of human resources EVALUATION of healthcare institutions SELF-EVALUATION by institutions QUALITY ACCREDITATION of institutions All our organizations have the appropriate tools to carry out these activities which form the basis of our project: CAES (Argentinean Chamber of Healthcare Institutions) -training-, CIDCAM (Inter-institutional Committee for Quality Development in Medical Care) -evaluation and self-evaluation-, CENAS (Specialist Centre for the Standardization and Accreditation in Health Care)-accreditation-. In times of crisis, we play an active part, that is, instead of withdrawing our efforts, we do our best to achieve the best and most adequate objective in order to meet the needs of the population through Integrated Quality Management. Eventually, when the results are examined, medical care that meets the best quality standards is found to be, after all, the most economical (that is best results, better satisfaction of healthcare users and providers as well as less mistakes).

  14. A Drinking Water Crisis in Lake Taihu, China: Linkage to Climatic Variability and Lake Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Boqiang; Zhu, Guangwei; Gao, Guang; Zhang, Yunlin; Li, Wei; Paerl, Hans W.; Carmichael, Wayne W.

    2010-01-01

    In late May, 2007, a drinking water crisis took place in Wuxi, Jiangsu Province, China, following a massive bloom of the toxin producing cyanobacteria Microcystis spp. in Lake Taihu, China’s third largest freshwater lake. Taihu was the city’s sole water supply, leaving approximately two million people without drinking water for at least a week. This cyanobacterial bloom event began two months earlier than previously documented for Microcystis blooms in Taihu. This was attributed to an unusually warm spring. The prevailing wind direction during this period caused the bloom to accumulate at the shoreline near the intake of the water plant. Water was diverted from the nearby Yangtze River in an effort to flush the lake of the bloom. However, this management action was counterproductive, because it produced a current which transported the bloom into the intake, exacerbating the drinking water contamination problem. The severity of this microcystin toxin containing bloom and the ensuing drinking water crisis were attributable to excessive nutrient enrichment; however, a multi-annual warming trend extended the bloom period and amplified its severity, and this was made worse by unanticipated negative impacts of water management. Long-term management must therefore consider both the human and climatic factors controlling these blooms and their impacts on water supply in this and other large lakes threatened by accelerating eutrophication.

  15. A comparison of screen-based simulation and conventional lectures for undergraduate teaching of crisis management.

    PubMed

    Tan, G-M; Ti, L K; Tan, K; Lee, T

    2008-07-01

    In our institution, we introduced a screen-based simulator to our undergraduate lectures on medical crisis management. We hypothesised that this novel use of the screen-based simulator would be as effective as our conventional lectures. To test this we randomly divided medical students into two groups. Students in Group A were taught medical crisis management (heart failure and anaphylaxis) using a screen-based simulation program projected onto a shared screen, with a facilitator guiding the students through the scenarios. Simultaneously, students in Group B were lectured the same content without the screen-based simulation. Both groups were allotted exactly one hour Several days later, students were tested on their management of anaphylaxis using the Human Patient Simulator. A blinded marker assessed them on diagnosis, resuscitation, specific treatment, call for help and for reassessment of the patient. Students also answered a questionnaire on their experience. Sixty-four students participated in the study. Both groups had similar overall scores. However students in Group A scored better in the specific treatment category by a factor of 1.7. Students in both groups rated their learning experiences highly. This study showed that screen-based simulation was as effective as conventional lectures and might be even more effective in some areas.

  16. Strategies for success: crisis management model for remediation of at-risk students.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Anita C; Keller, Teresa; Ochart Summers, Linda; Schultz, Pamela

    2012-06-01

    Student success is a concern for all nursing schools. Accountability for NCLEX(®) pass rates, along with accountability for student attrition and progression, compel nursing schools to carefully select applicants and then actively manage their progress. One of the strategies of managing student progression is to use standardized, nationally normalized exit examinations to identify students at risk for NCLEX-RN failure. This article describes the response of one baccalaureate nursing program to an unacceptable number of exit examination failures among senior students preparing to graduate. As a unique approach to this matter, a crisis management process was used to assess the problem, to develop and implement an intervention for at-risk students, and to revise program policies to better support ongoing student success. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. The Research of the Crisis Pre-Warning Management System under the Particularity of Nationalities Universities and Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Hui

    2009-01-01

    The nationalities universities and colleges set up the crisis pre-warning management system, not only related to the management of our nationalities universities and colleges and their growth, but also related to the country's national unity plan in some way. However, because of minority students in the particularity of the national cultural…

  18. The Halcyon Days Are over. Or Are They? Implications of the Global Financial Crisis for Managers' Careers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchant, Teresa

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the implications for managers' careers of the global financial crisis. It draws on empirical research during the last period of major job cuts. Evidence comes from a mail survey of over 1000 career histories of Australian managers, with a response rate of 44%. Changes to career satisfaction, job satisfaction, job security,…

  19. The Halcyon Days Are over. Or Are They? Implications of the Global Financial Crisis for Managers' Careers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchant, Teresa

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the implications for managers' careers of the global financial crisis. It draws on empirical research during the last period of major job cuts. Evidence comes from a mail survey of over 1000 career histories of Australian managers, with a response rate of 44%. Changes to career satisfaction, job satisfaction, job security,…

  20. Putting a Lid on Crises: Issues Management Can Control a Crisis Before It Boils Over and You Get Burned.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauer, Larry D.

    1983-01-01

    Issues management is defined as a distant early warning system through which colleges and universities can develop strategies to deal with legislative, community, and internal issues before they reach a crisis point. The issues management process at Texas Christian University is described. (MLW)

  1. Characteristics and management of the 2006-2008 volcanic crisis at the Ubinas volcano (Peru)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, Marco; Thouret, Jean-Claude; Mariño, Jersy; Berolatti, Rossemary; Fuentes, José

    2010-12-01

    Ubinas volcano is located 75 km East of Arequipa and ca. 5000 people are living within 12 km from the summit. This composite cone is considered the most active volcano in southern Peru owing to its 24 low to moderate magnitude (VEI 1-3) eruptions in the past 500 years. The onset of the most recent eruptive episode occurred on 27 March 2006, following 8 months of heightened fumarolic activity. Vulcanian explosions occurred between 14 April 2006 and September 2007, at a time ejecting blocks up to 40 cm in diameter to distances of 2 km. Ash columns commonly rose to 3.5 km above the caldera rim and dispersed fine ash and aerosols to distances of 80 km between April 2006 and April 2007. Until April 2007, the total volume of ash was estimated at 0.004 km 3, suggesting that the volume of fresh magma was small. Ash fallout has affected residents, livestock, water supplies, and crop cultivation within an area of ca. 100 km 2 around the volcano. Continuous degassing and intermittent mild vulcanian explosions lasted until the end of 2008. Shortly after the initial explosions on mid April 2006 that spread ash fallout within 7 km of the volcano, an integrated Scientific Committee including three Peruvian institutes affiliated to the Regional Committee of Civil Defense for Moquegua, aided by members of the international cooperation, worked together to: i) elaborate and publish volcanic hazard maps; ii) inform and educate the population; and iii) advise regional authorities in regard to the management of the volcanic crisis and the preparation of contingency plans. Although the 2006-2008 volcanic crisis has been moderate, its management has been a difficult task even though less than 5000 people now live around the Ubinas volcano. However, the successful management has provided experience and skills to the scientific community. This volcanic crisis was not the first one that Peru has experienced but the 2006-2008 experience is the first long-lasting crisis that the Peruvian civil

  2. Crisis Team Management in a Scarce Resource Setting: Angkor Hospital for Children in Siem Reap, Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Henker, Richard Alynn; Henker, Hiroko; Eng, Hor; O'Donnell, John; Jirativanont, Tachawan

    2017-01-01

    A crisis team management (CTM) simulation course was developed by volunteers from Health Volunteers Overseas for physicians and nurses at Angkor Hospital for Children (AHC) in Siem Reap, Cambodia. The framework for the course was adapted from crisis resource management (1, 2), crisis team training (3), and TeamSTEPPs© models (4). The CTM course focused on teaching physicians and nurses on the development of team performance knowledge, skills, and attitudes. Challenges to providing this course at AHC included availability of simulation equipment, cultural differences in learning, and language barriers. The purpose of this project was to evaluate the impact of a CTM simulation course at AHC on attitudes and perceptions of participants on concepts related to team performance. Each of the CTM courses consisted of three lectures, including team performance concepts, communication, and debriefing followed by rotation through four simulation scenarios. The evaluation instrument used to evaluate the AHC CTM course was developed for Cambodian staff at AHC based on TeamSTEPPs© instruments evaluating attitude and perceptions of team performance (5). CTM team performance concepts included in lectures, debriefing sessions, and the evaluation instrument were: team structure, leadership, situation monitoring, mutual support, and communication. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to analyze pre- and post-test paired data from participants in the course. Of the 54 participants completing the three CTM courses at AHC, 27 were nurses, 6 were anesthetists, and 21 were physicians. Attitude and perception scores were found to significantly improve (p < 0.05) for team structure, leadership, situation monitoring, and communication. Team performance areas that improved the most were: discussion of team performance, communication, and exchange of information. Teaching of non-technical skills can be effective in a setting with scarce resources in a Southeastern Asian country.

  3. The social process of escalation: a promising focus for crisis management research

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background This study identifies a promising, new focus for the crisis management research in the health care domain. After reviewing the literature on health care crisis management, there seems to be a knowledge-gap regarding organisational change and adaption, especially when health care situations goes from normal, to non-normal, to pathological and further into a state of emergency or crisis. Discussion Based on studies of escalating situations in obstetric care it is suggested that two theoretical perspectives (contingency theory and the idea of failure as a result of incomplete interaction) tend to simplify the issue of escalation rather than attend to its complexities (including the various power relations among the stakeholders involved). However studying the process of escalation as inherently complex and social allows us to see the definition of a situation as normal or non-normal as an exercise of power in itself, rather than representing a putatively correct response to a particular emergency. Implications The concept of escalation, when treated this way, can help us further the analysis of clinical and institutional acts and competence. It can also turn our attention to some important elements in a class of social phenomenon, crises and emergencies, that so far have not received the attention they deserve. Focusing on organisational choreography, that interplay of potential factors such as power, professional identity, organisational accountability, and experience, is not only a promising focus for future naturalistic research but also for developing more pragmatic strategies that can enhance organisational coordination and response in complex events. PMID:22704075

  4. Cognitive Aids for Role Definition (CARD) to improve interprofessional team crisis resource management: An exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Renna, Tania Di; Crooks, Simone; Pigford, Ashlee-Ann; Clarkin, Chantalle; Fraser, Amy B; Bunting, Alexandra C; Bould, M Dylan; Boet, Sylvain

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to assess the perceived value of the Cognitive Aids for Role Definition (CARD) protocol for simulated intraoperative cardiac arrests. Sixteen interprofessional operating room teams completed three consecutive simulated intraoperative cardiac arrest scenarios: current standard, no CARD; CARD, no CARD teaching; and CARD, didactic teaching. Each team participated in a focus group interview immediately following the third scenario; data were transcribed verbatim and qualitatively analysed. After 6 months, participants formed eight new teams randomised to two groups (CARD or no CARD) and completed a retention intraoperative cardiac arrest simulation scenario. All simulation sessions were video recorded and expert raters assessed team performance. Qualitative analysis of the 16 focus group interviews revealed 3 thematic dimensions: role definition in crisis management; logistical issues; and the "real life" applicability of CARD. Members of the interprofessional team perceived CARD very positively. Exploratory quantitative analysis found no significant differences in team performance with or without CARD (p > 0.05). In conclusion, qualitative data suggest that the CARD protocol clarifies roles and team coordination during interprofessional crisis management and has the potential to improve the team performance. The concept of a self-organising team with defined roles is promising for patient safety.

  5. Value of debriefing during simulated crisis management: oral versus video-assisted oral feedback.

    PubMed

    Savoldelli, Georges L; Naik, Viren N; Park, Jason; Joo, Hwan S; Chow, Roger; Hamstra, Stanley J

    2006-08-01

    The debriefing process during simulation-based education has been poorly studied despite its educational importance. Videotape feedback is an adjunct that may enhance the impact of the debriefing and in turn maximize learning. The purpose of this study was to investigate the value of the debriefing process during simulation and to compare the educational efficacy of two types of feedback, oral feedback and videotape-assisted oral feedback, against control (no debriefing). Forty-two anesthesia residents were enrolled in the study. After completing a pretest scenario, participants were randomly assigned to receive no debriefing, oral feedback, or videotape-assisted oral feedback. The debriefing focused on nontechnical skills performance guided by crisis resource management principles. Participants were then required to manage a posttest scenario. The videotapes of all performances were later reviewed by two blinded independent assessors who rated participants' nontechnical skills using a validated scoring system. Participants' nontechnical skills did not improve in the control group, whereas the provision of oral feedback, either assisted or not assisted with videotape review, resulted in significant improvement (P < 0.005). There was no difference in improvement between oral and video-assisted oral feedback groups. Exposure to a simulated crisis without constructive debriefing by instructors offers little benefit to trainees. The addition of video review did not offer any advantage over oral feedback alone. Valuable simulation training can therefore be achieved even when video technology is not available.

  6. Emergency medicine resident crisis resource management ability: a simulation-based longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Samuel; Horeczko, Timothy; Carlisle, Matthew; Barton, Joseph D; Ng, Vivienne; Al-Somali, Sameerah; Bair, Aaron E

    2014-01-01

    Simulation has been identified as a means of assessing resident physicians' mastery of technical skills, but there is a lack of evidence for its utility in longitudinal assessments of residents' non-technical clinical abilities. We evaluated the growth of crisis resource management (CRM) skills in the simulation setting using a validated tool, the Ottawa Crisis Resource Management Global Rating Scale (Ottawa GRS). We hypothesized that the Ottawa GRS would reflect progressive growth of CRM ability throughout residency. Forty-five emergency medicine residents were tracked with annual simulation assessments between 2006 and 2011. We used mixed-methods repeated-measures regression analyses to evaluate elements of the Ottawa GRS by level of training to predict performance growth throughout a 3-year residency. Ottawa GRS scores increased over time, and the domains of leadership, problem solving, and resource utilization, in particular, were predictive of overall performance. There was a significant gain in all Ottawa GRS components between postgraduate years 1 and 2, but no significant difference in GRS performance between years 2 and 3. In summary, CRM skills are progressive abilities, and simulation is a useful modality for tracking their development. Modification of this tool may be needed to assess advanced learners' gains in performance.

  7. Human behaviours in evacuation crowd dynamics: From modelling to "big data" toward crisis management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellomo, N.; Clarke, D.; Gibelli, L.; Townsend, P.; Vreugdenhil, B. J.

    2016-09-01

    This paper proposes an essay concerning the understanding of human behaviours and crisis management of crowds in extreme situations, such as evacuation through complex venues. The first part focuses on the understanding of the main features of the crowd viewed as a living, hence complex system. The main concepts are subsequently addressed, in the second part, to a critical analysis of mathematical models suitable to capture them, as far as it is possible. Then, the third part focuses on the use, toward safety problems, of a model derived by the methods of the mathematical kinetic theory and theoretical tools of evolutionary game theory. It is shown how this model can depict critical situations and how these can be managed with the aim of minimizing the risk of catastrophic events.

  8. Human behaviours in evacuation crowd dynamics: From modelling to "big data" toward crisis management.

    PubMed

    Bellomo, N; Clarke, D; Gibelli, L; Townsend, P; Vreugdenhil, B J

    2016-09-01

    This paper proposes an essay concerning the understanding of human behaviours and crisis management of crowds in extreme situations, such as evacuation through complex venues. The first part focuses on the understanding of the main features of the crowd viewed as a living, hence complex system. The main concepts are subsequently addressed, in the second part, to a critical analysis of mathematical models suitable to capture them, as far as it is possible. Then, the third part focuses on the use, toward safety problems, of a model derived by the methods of the mathematical kinetic theory and theoretical tools of evolutionary game theory. It is shown how this model can depict critical situations and how these can be managed with the aim of minimizing the risk of catastrophic events.

  9. Targeted crisis resource management training improves performance among randomized nursing and medical students.

    PubMed

    Jankouskas, Tara S; Haidet, Kim Kopenhaver; Hupcey, Judith E; Kolanowski, Ann; Murray, W Bosseau

    2011-12-01

    In this study designed with adequate statistical power to detect relevant training effects, investigators evaluated Crisis Resource Management (CRM) training during a simulated patient crisis. This study is guided by the Team Effectiveness Conceptual Model by Kozlowski and Ilgen. An experimental pretest/posttest design was used. Four-member, interdisciplinary teams, each composed of nursing and medical students, were randomly assigned to experimental or control conditions: Basic Life Support plus CRM training or Basic Life Support only, respectively. Team process (task management, teamworking, situation awareness, and interprofessional attitude) and team effectiveness (team error rate and response times) were the outcomes of interest. Experimental teams demonstrated significant improvement in team process measures compared with control teams. CRM training predicted 13% of the variance in task management (P = 0.05), 15% of the variance in teamworking (P = 0.04), and 18% of the variance in situation awareness (P = 0.03). CRM training and task management predicted 22% of the variance (P = 0.04) in team error rate; CRM training and teamworking predicted 35% of the variance (P = 0.01), while CRM training and situation awareness predicted 20% of the variance (P = 0.04) in response time to chest compressions. Both experimental and control teams demonstrated significant improvement in team effectiveness measures. CRM team training and team practice in an environment of high-fidelity simulation and facilitated debriefing have significant effects on team process and team effectiveness. The conceptual framework is potentially adaptable to additional settings and populations for team-related research and education.

  10. Intricacies in Drought Management Policy, Crisis Response and Preparedness: Linking the Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, P.; Harter, T.

    2016-12-01

    Drought per se is often misrepresented as mere water scarcity issue overlooking the complexities associated with it. In many parts of the world, the drought management policy prescriptions are often driven by crisis management rather than preventive approach. As a result, the economic, social and environmental impact of droughts continues to increase even to this day. To overcome this calamity, nations should encourage coordinated effort at both national and regional scale. An integrated approach on open data sharing, technical advancement in monitoring and robust early warning system to deliver timely information to decision makers, drought projection through high performance mathematical model and effective impact assessment procedure, implementing proactive risk management measures and preparedness with effective emergency response programs plans, will certainly increase the likelihood of drought coping capabilities. The present study focuses on knowledge augmentation for better policy framework and action for all countries that suffer from droughts. A comprehensive database at the global scale has been compiled giving information on existing drought management policies/practices and the major challenges faced by major drought distressed countries. Plausible solution is suggested towards integrating the water management policy, response and preparedness, that has been garnered through the lessons from success/failure stories of nations with effective drought management policies

  11. Strategies to Integrate America’s Local Police Agencies into Domestic Counterterrorism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    USAWC STRATEGY RESEARCH PROJECT STRATEGIES TO INTEGRATE AMERICA’S LOCAL POLICE AGENCIES INTO DOMESTIC COUNTERTERRORISM by Colonel Blair C. Alexander...Strategies to Integrate America’s Local Police Agencies into Domestic 5b. GRANT NUMBER Counterterrorism 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d...Z39-18 ABSTRACT AUTHOR: Colonel Blair C. Alexander TITLE: Strategies to Integrate America’s Local Police Agencies into Domestic Counterterrorism FORMAT

  12. U.S.-China Counterterrorism Cooperation: Issues for U.S. Policy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-06

    tone and context of counterterrorism helped to stabilize — even if it did not transform — the closer bilateral relationship pursued by President George...counterterrorism helped to stabilize — even if it did not transform — the closer bilateral relationship pursued by President Bush since late 2001. In the...Options and Implications for U.S. Policy Summits and “Strategic” Ties The counterterrorism campaign helped to stabilize U.S.-PRC relations up to the highest

  13. Educational program in crisis management for cardiac surgery teams including high realism simulation.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Louis-Mathieu; Cooper, Jeffrey B; Raemer, Daniel B; Schneider, Robert C; Frankel, Allan S; Berry, William R; Agnihotri, Arvind K

    2012-07-01

    Cardiac surgery demands effective teamwork for safe, high-quality care. The objective of this pilot study was to develop a comprehensive program to sharpen performance of experienced cardiac surgical teams in acute crisis management. We developed and implemented an educational program for cardiac surgery based on high realism acute crisis simulation scenarios and interactive whole-unit workshop. The impact of these interventions was assessed with postintervention questionnaires, preintervention and 6-month postintervention surveys, and structured interviews. The realism of the acute crisis simulation scenarios gradually improved; most participants rated both the simulation and whole-unit workshop as very good or excellent. Repeat simulation training was recommended every 6 to 12 months by 82% of the participants. Participants of the interactive workshop identified 2 areas of highest priority: encouraging speaking up about critical information and interprofessional information sharing. They also stressed the importance of briefings, early communication of surgical plan, knowing members of the team, and continued simulation for practice. The pre/post survey response rates were 70% (55/79) and 66% (52/79), respectively. The concept of working as a team improved between surveys (P = .028), with a trend for improvement in gaining common understanding of the plan before a procedure (P = .075) and appropriate resolution of disagreements (P = .092). Interviewees reported that the training had a positive effect on their personal behaviors and patient care, including speaking up more readily and communicating more clearly. Comprehensive team training using simulation and a whole-unit interactive workshop can be successfully deployed for experienced cardiac surgery teams with demonstrable benefits in participant's perception of team performance. Copyright © 2012 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Installed Base Registration of Decentralised Solar Panels with Applications in Crisis Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aarsen, R.; Janssen, M.; Ramkisoen, M.; Biljecki, F.; Quak, W.; Verbree, E.

    2015-08-01

    In case of a calamity in the Netherlands - e.g. a dike breach - parts of the nationwide electric network can fall out. In these occasions it would be useful if decentralised energy sources of the Smart Grid would contribute to balance out the fluctuations of the energy network. Decentralised energy sources include: solar energy, wind energy, combined heat and power, and biogas. In this manner, parts of the built environment - e.g. hospitals - that are in need of a continuous power flow, could be secured of this power. When a calamity happens, information about the Smart Grid is necessary to control the crisis and to ensure a shared view on the energy networks for both the crisis managers and network operators. The current situation of publishing, storing and sharing data of solar energy has been shown a lack of reliability about the current number, physical location, and capacity of installed decentralised photovoltaic (PV) panels in the Netherlands. This study focuses on decentralised solar energy in the form of electricity via PV panels in the Netherlands and addresses this challenge by proposing a new, reliable and up-to-date database. The study reveals the requirements for a registration of the installed base of PV panels in the Netherlands. This new database should serve as a replenishment for the current national voluntary registration, called Production Installation Register of Energy Data Services Netherland (EDSN-PIR), of installed decentralised PV panel installations in the Smart Grid, and provide important information in case of a calamity.

  15. Beyond police crisis intervention: moving "upstream" to manage cases and places of behavioral health vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Wood, Jennifer D; Beierschmitt, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Law enforcement officers continue to serve on the front lines as mental health interventionists, and as such have been subject to a wave of "first generation" reform designed to enhance their crisis response capabilities. Yet, this focus on crisis intervention has not answered recent calls to move "upstream" and bolster early intervention in the name of long-term recovery. This paper reports on findings from an action research project in Philadelphia aimed at exploring opportunities for enhanced upstream engagement. Study methods include spatial analyses of police mental health transportations from an eight year period (2004-2011) and qualitative data from twenty-three "framing conversations" with partners and other stakeholders, seven focus groups with police and outreach workers, five key informant interviews as well as document reviews of the service delivery system in Philadelphia. Recommendations include the need to move beyond a focus on what police can do to a wider conception of city agencies and business stakeholders who can influence vulnerable people and vulnerable spaces of the city. We argue for the need to develop shared principles and rules of engagement that clarify roles and stipulate how best to enlist city resources in a range of circumstances. Since issues of mental health, substance use and disorder are so tightly coupled, we stress the importance of establishing a data-driven approach to crime and disorder reduction in areas of the city we term "hotspots of vulnerability". In line with a recovery philosophy, such an approach should reduce opportunities for anti-social behavior among the "dually labeled" in ways consistent with "procedural justice". Furthermore, crime and disorder data flowing from police and security to behavioral health analysts could contribute to a more focused case management of "repeat utilizers" across the two systems. Our central argument is that a twin emphasis on "case management" and "place management" may provide

  16. Transfer of learning and patient outcome in simulated crisis resource management: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Boet, Sylvain; Bould, M Dylan; Fung, Lillia; Qosa, Haytham; Perrier, Laure; Tavares, Walter; Reeves, Scott; Tricco, Andrea C

    2014-06-01

    Simulation-based learning is increasingly used by healthcare professionals as a safe method to learn and practice non-technical skills, such as communication and leadership, required for effective crisis resource management (CRM). This systematic review was conducted to gain a better understanding of the impact of simulation-based CRM teaching on transfer of learning to the workplace and subsequent changes in patient outcomes. Studies on CRM, crisis management, crew resource management, teamwork, and simulation published up to September 2012 were searched in MEDLINE(®), EMBASE™, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and ERIC. All studies that used simulation-based CRM teaching with outcomes measured at Kirkpatrick Level 3 (transfer of learning to the workplace) or 4 (patient outcome) were included. Studies measuring only learners' reactions or simple learning (Kirkpatrick Level 1 or 2, respectively) were excluded. Two authors independently reviewed all identified titles and abstracts for eligibility. Nine articles were identified as meeting the inclusion criteria. Four studies measured transfer of simulation-based CRM learning into the clinical setting (Kirkpatrick Level 3). In three of these studies, simulation-enhanced CRM training was found significantly more effective than no intervention or didactic teaching. Five studies measured patient outcomes (Kirkpatrick Level 4). Only one of these studies found that simulation-based CRM training made a clearly significant impact on patient mortality. Based on a small number of studies, this systematic review found that CRM skills learned at the simulation centre are transferred to clinical settings, and the acquired CRM skills may translate to improved patient outcomes, including a decrease in mortality.

  17. Advances in crisis management of the suicidal patient: perspectives from patients.

    PubMed

    Bergmans, Yvonne; Brown, Adrienne L; Carruthers, Anne S H

    2007-02-01

    This paper discusses crisis intervention with the suicidal client from the perspective of two clients who discuss both the strengths and challenges they have encountered while in crisis. The paper then discusses a model for understanding a suicidal crisis and a template for intervention.

  18. Validation of a Self-Efficacy Instrument and Its Relationship to Performance of Crisis Resource Management Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plant, Jennifer L.; van Schaik, Sandrijn M.; Sliwka, Diane C.; Boscardin, Christy K.; O'Sullivan, Patricia S.

    2011-01-01

    Self-efficacy is thought to be important for resuscitation proficiency in that it influences the development of and access to the associated medical knowledge, procedural skills and crisis resource management (CRM) skills. Since performance assessment of CRM skills is challenging, self-efficacy is often used as a measure of competence in this…

  19. Validation of a Self-Efficacy Instrument and Its Relationship to Performance of Crisis Resource Management Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plant, Jennifer L.; van Schaik, Sandrijn M.; Sliwka, Diane C.; Boscardin, Christy K.; O'Sullivan, Patricia S.

    2011-01-01

    Self-efficacy is thought to be important for resuscitation proficiency in that it influences the development of and access to the associated medical knowledge, procedural skills and crisis resource management (CRM) skills. Since performance assessment of CRM skills is challenging, self-efficacy is often used as a measure of competence in this…

  20. Higher Educational Policy, Interest Politics and Crisis Management: Facets and Aspects of the Greek Case within the EHEA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papadakis, Nikos E.; Tsakanika, Theofano; Kyridis, Argyris

    2012-01-01

    With this paper we approach the new policy making paradigm for Europe's higher education policy, set with the Bologna Process, given emphasis to the legitimacy deficit of this political venture and the necessity of a crisis management over the implementation phase within national frames. The implementation of the Bologna's policies, using Greece…

  1. Utilizing Social Networks in Times of Crisis: Understanding, Exploring and Analyzing Critical Incident Management at Institutions of Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asselin, Martha Jo

    2012-01-01

    With the rising number of major crises on college campuses today (Security on Campus Inc., 2009), institutions of higher education can benefit from understanding of how social networks may be used in times of emergency. What is currently known about the usage of social networks is not integral to the current practices of crisis management that are…

  2. Utilizing Social Networks in Times of Crisis: Understanding, Exploring and Analyzing Critical Incident Management at Institutions of Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asselin, Martha Jo

    2012-01-01

    With the rising number of major crises on college campuses today (Security on Campus Inc., 2009), institutions of higher education can benefit from understanding of how social networks may be used in times of emergency. What is currently known about the usage of social networks is not integral to the current practices of crisis management that are…

  3. The Impact of Creativity Management in Fighting the Educational Crisis in Secondary Schools in Palestine from the Viewpoint of Headmasters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alawawdeh, Sabreen

    2016-01-01

    The study aims to identify the impact of creativity management in fighting the educational crisis in secondary schools in Palestine from the viewpoint of headmasters, researcher worked to follow the descriptive analytical method and also resorted to statistical methods, has developed a questionnaire included several paragraphs about the school…

  4. Modeling the Car Crash Crisis Management System Using HiLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hölzl, Matthias; Knapp, Alexander; Zhang, Gefei

    An aspect-oriented modeling approach to the Car Crash Crisis Management System (CCCMS) using the High-Level Aspect (HiLA) language is described. HiLA is a language for expressing aspects for UML static structures and UML state machines. In particular, HiLA supports both a static graph transformational and a dynamic approach of applying aspects. Furthermore, it facilitates methodologically turning use case descriptions into state machines: for each main success scenario, a base state machine is developed; all extensions to this main success scenario are covered by aspects. Overall, the static structure of the CCCMS is modeled in 43 classes, the main success scenarios in 13 base machines, the use case extensions in 47 static and 31 dynamic aspects, most of which are instantiations of simple aspect templates.

  5. Responding to the Medical Malpractice Insurance Crisis: A National Risk Management Information System

    PubMed Central

    Wess, Bernard P.; Jacobson, Gary

    1987-01-01

    In the process of forming a new medical malpractice reinsurance company, the authors analyzed thousands of medical malpractice cases, settlements, and verdicts. The evidence of those analyses indicated that the medical malpractice crisis is (1)emerging nation- and world-wide, (2)exacerbated by but not primarily a result of “predatory” legal action, (3)statistically determined by a small percentage of physicians and procedures, (4)overburdened with data but poor on information, (5)subject to classic forms of quality control and automation. The management information system developed to address this problem features a tiered data base architecture to accommodate medical, administrative, procedural, statistical, and actuarial analyses necessary to predict claims from untoward events, not merely to report them.

  6. GIS Based System for Post-Earthquake Crisis Managment Using Cellular Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raeesi, M.; Sadeghi-Niaraki, A.

    2013-09-01

    Earthquakes are among the most destructive natural disasters. Earthquakes happen mainly near the edges of tectonic plates, but they may happen just about anywhere. Earthquakes cannot be predicted. Quick response after disasters, like earthquake, decreases loss of life and costs. Massive earthquakes often cause structures to collapse, trapping victims under dense rubble for long periods of time. After the earthquake and destroyed some areas, several teams are sent to find the location of the destroyed areas. The search and rescue phase usually is maintained for many days. Time reduction for surviving people is very important. A Geographical Information System (GIS) can be used for decreasing response time and management in critical situations. Position estimation in short period of time time is important. This paper proposes a GIS based system for post-earthquake disaster management solution. This system relies on several mobile positioning methods such as cell-ID and TA method, signal strength method, angel of arrival method, time of arrival method and time difference of arrival method. For quick positioning, the system can be helped by any person who has a mobile device. After positioning and specifying the critical points, the points are sent to a central site for managing the procedure of quick response for helping. This solution establishes a quick way to manage the post-earthquake crisis.

  7. Risk and crisis management in intraoperative hemorrhage: Human factors in hemorrhagic critical events

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Hemorrhage is the major cause of cardiac arrest developing in the operating room. Many human factors including surgical procedures, transfusion practices, blood supply, and anesthetic management are involved in the process that leads to hemorrhage developing into a critical situation. It is desirable for hospital transfusion committees to prepare hospital regulations on 'actions to be taken to manage critical hemorrhage', and practice the implementation of these regulations by simulated drills. If intraoperative hemorrhage seems to be critical, a state of emergency should immediately be declared to the operating room staff, the blood transfusion service staff, and blood bank staff in order to organize a systematic approach to the ongoing problem and keep all responsible staff working outside the operating room informed of events developing in the operating room. To rapidly deal with critical hemorrhage, not only cooperation between anesthesiologists and surgeons but also linkage of operating rooms with blood transfusion services and a blood bank are important. When time is short, cross-matching tests are omitted, and ABO-identical red blood cells are used. When supplies of ABO-identical red blood cells are not available, ABO-compatible, non-identical red blood cells are used. Because a systematic, not individual, approach is required to prevent and manage critical hemorrhage, whether a hospital can establish a procedure to deal with it or not depends on the overall capability of critical and crisis management of the hospital. PMID:21490815

  8. Intraoperative crisis resource management during a non-intubated video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gálvez, Carlos; Rivera-Cogollos, María Jesus; Galiana-Ivars, María; Bolufer, Sergio; Martínez-Adsuar, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    The management of surgical and medical intraoperative emergencies are included in the group of high acuity (high potential severity of an event and the patient impact) and low opportunity (the frequency in which the team is required to manage the event). This combination places the patient into a situation where medical errors could happen more frequently. Although medical error are ubiquitous and inevitable we should try to establish the necessary knowledge, skills and attitudes needed for effective team performance and to guide the development of a critical event. This strategy would probably reduce the incidence of error and improve decision-making. The way to apply it comes from the application of the management of critical events in the airline industry. Its use in a surgical environment is through the crisis resource management (CRM) principles. The CRM tries to develop all the non-technical skills necessary in a critical situation, but not only that, also includes all the tools needed to prevent them. The purpose of this special issue is to appraise and summarize the design, implementation, and efficacy of simulation-based CRM training programs for a specific surgery such as the non-intubated video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery. PMID:26046052

  9. Outcomes from two forms of training for first-responder competency in cholinergic crisis management.

    PubMed

    Andreatta, Pamela; Klotz, Jessica J; Madsen, James M; Hurst, Charles G; Talbot, Thomas B

    2015-04-01

    Military and civilian first responders must be able to recognize and effectively manage mass disaster casualties. Clinical management of injuries resulting from nerve agents provides different challenges for first responders than those of conventional weapons. We evaluated the impact of a mixed-methods training program on competency acquisition in cholinergic crisis clinical management using multimedia with either live animal or patient actor examples, and hands-on practice using SimMan3G mannequin simulators. A purposively selected sample of 204 civilian and military first responders who had not previously completed nerve agent training were assessed pre- and post-training for knowledge, performance, self-efficacy, and affective state. We conducted analysis of variance with repeated measures; statistical significance p < 0.05. Both groups had significant performance improvement across all assessment dimensions: knowledge > 20%, performance > 50%, self-efficacy > 34%, and affective state > 15%. There were no significant differences between the live animal and patient actor groups. These findings could aid in the specification of training for first-responder personnel in military and civilian service. Although less comprehensive than U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense courses, the training outcomes associated with this easily distributed program demonstrate its value in increasing the competency of first responders in recognizing and managing a mass casualty cholinergic event.

  10. Training Post-9/11 Police Officers with a Counter-Terrorism Reality-Based Training Model: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biddle, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative holistic multiple-case study was to identify the optimal theoretical approach for a Counter-Terrorism Reality-Based Training (CTRBT) model to train post-9/11 police officers to perform effectively in their counter-terrorism assignments. Post-9/11 police officers assigned to counter-terrorism duties are not trained…

  11. Training Post-9/11 Police Officers with a Counter-Terrorism Reality-Based Training Model: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biddle, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative holistic multiple-case study was to identify the optimal theoretical approach for a Counter-Terrorism Reality-Based Training (CTRBT) model to train post-9/11 police officers to perform effectively in their counter-terrorism assignments. Post-9/11 police officers assigned to counter-terrorism duties are not trained…

  12. Does warm-up using mental practice improve crisis resource management performance? A simulation study.

    PubMed

    Hayter, M A; Bould, M D; Afsari, M; Riem, N; Chiu, M; Boet, S

    2013-02-01

    Mental practice (MP) is defined as the 'symbolic rehearsal of a physical activity in the absence of any gross-muscular movements' and has been used in sport and music to enhance performance. In healthcare, MP has been demonstrated to improve technical skill performance of surgical residents. However, its effect on crisis resource management (CRM) skills has yet to be determined. We aimed to investigate the effect of warm-up with MP on CRM skill performance during a simulated crisis scenario. Following ethics board approval, 40 anaesthesia residents were randomized. The intervention group performed 20 min of MP of a script based on CRM principles. The control group received a 20 min didactic teaching session on an unrelated topic. Each subject then managed a simulated cardiac arrest. Two CRM experts rated the video recordings of each performance using the previously validated Ottawa GRS. The time to start chest compressions, administer epinephrine, and give blood was recorded. There was no significant difference between the intervention and control groups: total Ottawa GRS score was 24.50 (18.63-28.88 [6.50-34.50]) (median (inter-quartile range [range]) vs 20.50 (13.00-29.13 [6.50-34.50]) (P=0.53); the time to start chest compressions 146.0 s (138.0-231.0 [115.0-323.0]) vs 162.5 s (138.0-231.0 [100.0-460.0]) (P=0.27), the time to epinephrine administration 163.0 s (151.0-187.0 [111.0-337.0]) vs 187.0 s (164.0-244.0 [115.0-310.0]) (P=0.09), and the time to blood administration 220.5 s (130.8-309.0 [92.0-485.0]) vs 252.5 (174.5-398.8 [65.0-527.0]) (P=0.48). Unlike technical skills, warm-up with MP does not seem to improve CRM skills in simulated crisis scenarios.

  13. The effectiveness of crisis resource management and team debriefing in resuscitation education of nursing students: A randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Coppens, Imgard; Verhaeghe, Sofie; Van Hecke, Ann; Beeckman, Dimitri

    2017-04-12

    The aim of this study was to investigate (i) whether integrating a course on crisis resource management principles and team debriefings in simulation training, increases self-efficacy, team efficacy and technical skills of nursing students in resuscitation settings and (ii) which phases contribute the most to these outcomes. Crisis resource management principles have been introduced in health care to optimise teamwork. Simulation training offers patient safe training opportunities. There is evidence that simulation training increases self-efficacy and team efficacy but the contribution of the different phases like crisis resource management principles, simulation training and debriefing on self-efficacy, team efficacy and technical skills is not clear. Randomised controlled trial in a convenience sample (n = 116) in Belgium. Data were collected between February 2015-April 2015. Participants in the intervention group (n = 60) completed a course on crisis resource management principles, followed by a simulation training session, a team debriefing and a second simulation training session. Participants in the control group (n = 56) only completed two simulation training sessions. The outcomes self-efficacy, team efficacy and technical skills were assessed after each simulation training. An ancillary analysis of the learning effect was conducted. The intervention group increased on self-efficacy (2.13%, p = .02) and team efficacy (9.92%, p < .001); the control group only increased significantly on team efficacy (4.5%, p = .001). The intervention group scored significantly higher on team efficacy (8.49%, p < .001) compared to the control group. Combining crisis resource management principles and team debriefings in simulation training increases self-efficacy and team efficacy. The debriefing phase contributes the most to these effects. By partnering with healthcare settings, it becomes possible to offer interdisciplinary simulation training that can

  14. Regulating Nation-State Cyber Attacks in Counterterrorism Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    zombies ,” subject to their command. Wilson continues to report that the newest trends in Botnet crimes include: malicious code (including viruses ...potential nation-state cyber-attack scenarios that may be seen in future counterterrorism operations, and whether those possible attack scenarios are...Cyber attack, International Law, China, Russia, United States, al Qaeda, Hamas, Hezbollah, FARC, Botnet, Worm, Virus , Malicious Code, Hack, jus in

  15. Quantitative evaluation of hand cranking a roller pump in a crisis management drill.

    PubMed

    Tomizawa, Yasuko; Tokumine, Asako; Ninomiya, Shinji; Momose, Naoki; Matayoshi, Toru

    2008-01-01

    The heart-lung machines for open-heart surgery have improved over the past 50 years; they rarely break down and are almost always equipped with backup batteries. The hand-cranking procedure only becomes necessary when a pump breaks down during perfusion or after the batteries have run out. In this study, the performance of hand cranking a roller pump was quantitatively assessed by an objective method using the ECCSIM-Lite educational simulator system. A roller pump connected to an extracorporeal circuit with an oxygenator and with gravity venous drainage was used. A flow sensor unit consisting of electromagnetic sensors was used to measure arterial and venous flow rates, and a built-in pressure sensor was used to measure the water level in the reservoir. A preliminary study of continuous cranking by a team of six people was conducted as a surprise drill. This system was then used at a perfusion seminar. At the seminar, 1-min hand-cranking drills were conducted by volunteers according to a prepared scenario. The data were calculated on site and trend graphs of individual performances were given to the participants as a handout. Preliminary studies showed that each person's performance was different. Results from 1-min drills showed that good performance was not related to the number of clinical cases experienced, years of practice, or experience in hand cranking. Hand cranking to maintain the target flow rate could be achieved without practice; however, manipulating the venous return clamp requires practice. While the necessity of performing hand cranking during perfusion due to pump failure is rare, we believe that it is beneficial for perfusionists and patients to include hand-cranking practice in periodic extracorporeal circulation crisis management drills because a drill allows perfusionists to mentally rehearse the procedures should such a crisis occur.

  16. The management of acute parathyroid crisis secondary to parathyroid carcinoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Rock, Kathy; Fattah, Nariman; O'Malley, Diarmuid; McDermott, Enda

    2010-01-29

    Hypercalcaemic hyperparathyroid crisis is a rare but life-threatening complication of primary hyperparathyroidism. Parathyroid carcinoma is a rare malignancy with an incidence of 0.5% to 4% of all reported cases of primary hyperparathyroidism. We report the case of a 60-year-old Caucasian man with hypercalcaemic hyperparathyroid crisis associated with parathyroid carcinoma. He presented with a classic hypercalcaemic syndrome and his serum calcium and parathyroid hormone levels were at 4.65 mmol/L and 1743 ng/L, respectively. He initially presented with a two-week history of weakness and lethargy and a one-week history of vomiting, polyuria and polydipsia. An emergency left thyroid lobectomy and left lower parathyroidectomy were performed. There was a prompt decrease in his parathyroid hormone level immediately after surgery. Histology revealed that our patient had a 4-cm parathyroid carcinoma. In patients with parathyroid carcinoma, the optimal surgical treatment is en bloc resection with ipsilateral thyroid lobectomy and removal of any enlarged or abnormal lymph nodes. Surgery is the only curative treatment. In our patient, prompt surgical intervention proved successful. At six months the patient is well with no evidence of disease recurrence. This case highlights the importance of considering a hyperparathyroid storm in the context of a parathyroid carcinoma. Parathyroid carcinoma is a rare entity and our knowledge is mainly derived from case reports and retrospective studies. This case report increases awareness of this serious and life-threatening complication. This report also illustrates how prompt and appropriate management provides the best outcome for the patient.

  17. Geographic Information System Technology Leveraged for Crisis Planning, Emergency, Response, and Disaster Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, A.; Little, M. M.

    2013-12-01

    NASA's Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC) is piloting the use of Geographic Information System (GIS) technology that can be leveraged for crisis planning, emergency response, and disaster management/awareness. Many different organizations currently use GIS tools and geospatial data during a disaster event. ASDC datasets have not been fully utilized by this community in the past due to incompatible data formats that ASDC holdings are archived in. Through the successful implementation of this pilot effort and continued collaboration with the larger Homeland Defense and Department of Defense emergency management community through the Homeland Infrastructure Foundation-Level Data Working Group (HIFLD WG), our data will be easily accessible to those using GIS and increase the ability to plan, respond, manage, and provide awareness during disasters. The HIFLD WG Partnership has expanded to include more than 5,900 mission partners representing the 14 executive departments, 98 agencies, 50 states (and 3 territories), and more than 700 private sector organizations to directly enhance the federal, state, and local government's ability to support domestic infrastructure data gathering, sharing and protection, visualization, and spatial knowledge management.The HIFLD WG Executive Membership is lead by representatives from the Department of Defense (DoD) Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Homeland Defense and Americas' Security Affairs - OASD (HD&ASA); the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), National Protection and Programs Directorate's Office of Infrastructure Protection (NPPD IP); the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) Integrated Working Group - Readiness, Response and Recovery (IWG-R3); the Department of Interior (DOI) United States Geological Survey (USGS) National Geospatial Program (NGP), and DHS Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).

  18. Is counter-terrorism policy evidence-based? What works, what harms, and what is unknown.

    PubMed

    Lum, Cynthia; Kennedy, Leslie W; Sherley, Alison

    2008-02-01

    Is counter-terrorism policy evidence-based? What works, what harms, and what is unknown. One of the central concerns surrounding counter-terrorism interventions today, given the attention and money spent on them, is whether such interventions are effective. To explore this issue, we conducted a general review of terrorism literature as well as a Campbell systematic review on counter-terrorism strategies. In this article, we summarize some of our findings from these works. Overall, we found an almost complete absence of evaluation research on counter-terrorism strategies and conclude that counter-terrorism policy is not evidence-based. The findings of this review emphasise the need for government leaders, policy makers, researchers, and funding agencies to include and insist on evaluations of the effectiveness of these programs in their agendas.

  19. Surgical crisis management skills training and assessment: a simulation[corrected]-based approach to enhancing operating room performance.

    PubMed

    Moorthy, Krishna; Munz, Yaron; Forrest, Damien; Pandey, Vikas; Undre, Shabnam; Vincent, Charles; Darzi, Ara

    2006-07-01

    Intraoperative surgical crisis management is learned in an unstructured manner. In aviation, simulation training allows aircrews to coordinate and standardize recovery strategies. Our aim was to develop a surgical crisis simulation and evaluate its feasibility, realism, and validity of the measures used to assess performance. Surgical trainees were exposed to a bleeding crisis in a simulated operating theater. Assessment of performance consisted of a trainee's technical ability to control the bleeding and of their team/human factors skills. This assessment was performed in a blinded manner by 2 surgeons and one human factors expert. Other measures consisted of time measures such as time to diagnose the bleeding (TD), inform team members (TT), achieve control (TC), and close the laceration (TL). Blood loss was used as a surrogate outcome measures. There were considerable variations within both senior (n = 10) and junior (n = 10) trainees for technical and team skills. However, while the senior trainees scored higher than the juniors for technical skills (P = 0.001), there were no differences in human factors skills. There were also significant differences between the 2 groups for TD (P = 0.01), TC (P = 0.001), and TL (0.001). The blood loss was higher in the junior group. We have described the development of a novel simulated setting for the training of crisis management skills and the variability in performance both in between and within the 2 groups.

  20. Crisis Water Management and Ibis Breeding at Narran Lakes in Arid Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandis, K. J.; Kingsford, R. T.; Ren, S.; Ramp, D.

    2011-09-01

    Narran Lakes is a Ramsar site recognised for its importance for colonial waterbird breeding, which only occurs after large highly variable flooding events. In 2008, 74,095 pairs of ibis bred for the first time in seven years, establishing two contiguous colonies, a month apart. Most (97%) of the colony consisted of the straw-necked ibis ( Threskiornis spinicollis) with the remainder consisting of glossy ibis (2%, Plegadis falcinellus) and Australian white ibis (1%, T. molucca) . Following cessation of river flows, water levels fell rapidly in the colony site, resulting in a crisis management decision by governments to purchase and deliver water (10,423 Ml) to avert mass desertion of the colonies. There were significant differences in the reproductive success of each colony. In colony 1 60% of eggs hatched and 94% of chicks fledged, while in colony 2 40% of eggs hatched with only 17% of chicks fledging. Statistical analyses found that water depth was a significant variable in determining reproductive success. Rapid falls in water level during the chick stage in colony 2 resulted in decreased chick and overall offspring success. The results of this study identify the impact of upstream water resource development on colonial waterbird breeding and have implications for water management policies.

  1. Economic crisis and challenges for the Greek healthcare system: the emergent role of nursing management.

    PubMed

    Notara, Venetia; Koupidis, Sotirios A; Vaga, Elissavet; Grammatikopoulos, Ilias A

    2010-07-01

    Despite several reform efforts, the Greek health care system still faces problems related to misdistribution of trained health staff and finance between geographical areas. The objectives of the present study were to describe the current situation of the delivery of the healthcare service in Greece, to explore the basic implications of the economic crisis from a nursing management perspective and to examine future practices opening a debate in policy developments. The principal finding of this study was the serious shortage of trained nurses, the imbalances in nursing personnel, an excess of doctors and the complete absence of a Primary Healthcare System in civil areas provided by general doctors. It is important that health care policy makers become aware and seriously consider rearranging the Health Care System to become more effective and efficient for the population (client). Special attention should be paid to strengthening areas such as primary health care, public health and health promotion in the direction of minimizing the demand of hospital services. Any implementation of major health care reforms should consider seriously the role of the nursing management which formulates the substantial link between the health services and the patient.

  2. Crisis water management and ibis breeding at Narran Lakes in arid Australia.

    PubMed

    Brandis, K J; Kingsford, R T; Ren, S; Ramp, D

    2011-09-01

    Narran Lakes is a Ramsar site recognised for its importance for colonial waterbird breeding, which only occurs after large highly variable flooding events. In 2008, 74,095 pairs of ibis bred for the first time in seven years, establishing two contiguous colonies, a month apart. Most (97%) of the colony consisted of the straw-necked ibis (Threskiornis spinicollis) with the remainder consisting of glossy ibis (2%, Plegadis falcinellus) and Australian white ibis (1%, T. molucca). Following cessation of river flows, water levels fell rapidly in the colony site, resulting in a crisis management decision by governments to purchase and deliver water (10,423 Ml) to avert mass desertion of the colonies. There were significant differences in the reproductive success of each colony. In colony 1 60% of eggs hatched and 94% of chicks fledged, while in colony 2 40% of eggs hatched with only 17% of chicks fledging. Statistical analyses found that water depth was a significant variable in determining reproductive success. Rapid falls in water level during the chick stage in colony 2 resulted in decreased chick and overall offspring success. The results of this study identify the impact of upstream water resource development on colonial waterbird breeding and have implications for water management policies.

  3. Rapid generation of value added products for seismic crisis management, using ground and satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvi, Stefano; Atzori, Simone; Pezzo, Giuseppe; Merryman Boncori, John Peter; Tolomei, Cristiano; Antonioli, Andrea; Trasatti, Elisa; Zoffoli, Simona; Coletta, Alessandro

    2013-04-01

    Rapid generation of value added products for seismic crisis management, using ground and satellite data Stefano Salvi (1), Simone Atzori (1), Giuseppe Pezzo (1), John Peter Merryman Boncori (1), Cristiano Tolomei (1), Andrea Antonioli (1), Elisa Trasatti (1), Simona Zoffoli (2), Alessandro Coletta (2) (1): Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Centro Nazionale Terremoti, via di Vigna Murata 605, 00143 Roma, Italy (2): Agenzia Spaziale Italiana, Unità Osservazione della Terra, Viale Liegi 26, 00198, Roma, Italy The increased availability of Earth Observation optical and SAR data occurred in the last few years, has stimulated new applications in many different fields. The foreseen launch of new space platforms as the Sentinel satellites, providing good monitoring frequencies and free worldwide access to data is expected to increase the number of scientific and commercial activities exploiting EO data. In the sector of natural hazards the EO data have already demonstrated to be indispensable for the generation of information products for the prevention, and emergency management phases. In particular, the Italian Space Agency has promoted and funded, together with INGV, the development of dedicated infrastructures for the generation of advanced information products supporting different phases of the seismic and volcanic risk management cycles. These products were based mainly on SAR data from the COSMO-SkyMed 4-satellite constellation, and on optical data from commercial and scientific platforms, integrated with data from ground monitoring networks. During the last few years, such infrastructures have been tested under operational conditions and the products distributed to the Italian Civil Protection authority for validation and assessment. Here, with reference to the earthquake emergency management, we will present the infrastructure, the rapid mapping information products and some examples of activities during the latest seismic crises.

  4. The Crisis of Methamphetamine and Its Management: Preparation, Participation, and Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunniff, Judith; Cunniff, Daniel T.; Kay, Kenneth D.

    2008-01-01

    There is a drug crisis in the United States that is growing at an alarming rate. Its participants work in our businesses, government agencies, and schools. California leads the nation in drug use and until recently, Fresno County was the leader in methamphetamine production. This drug crisis is having a paralyzing effect causing loss of income,…

  5. Experiences with TRIDEC's Crisis Management Demonstrator in the Turkish NEAMWave12 exercise tsunami scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammitzsch, Martin; Necmioglu, Ocal; Lendholt, Matthias; Reißland, Sven; Schulz, Jana; Aksari, Dogan; Koseoglu, Aysegul; Ozer, Ceren; Comoglu, Mustafa; Meral Ozel, Nurcan; Wächter, Joachim

    2013-04-01

    On November 27-28, 2012, the Kandilli Observatory and Earthquake Research Institute (KOERI) joined other countries in the North-eastern Atlantic, the Mediterranean and Connected Seas (NEAM) region as participants in an international tsunami response exercise. The exercise, titled NEAMWave12, simulated widespread Tsunami Watch situations throughout the NEAM region. It is the first international exercise as such, in this region, where the UNESCO-IOC ICG/NEAMTWS tsunami warning chain has been tested to a full scale for the first time with different systems. One of the systems is developed in the project Collaborative, Complex, and Critical Decision-Support in Evolving Crises (TRIDEC) and has been validated in this exercise among others by KOERI. KOERI, representing the Tsunami National Contact (TNC) and Tsunami Warning Focal Point (TWFP) for Turkey, is one of the key partners in TRIDEC. KOERI is responsible for the operation of a National Tsunami Warning Centre (NTWC) for Turkey and establishes candidate Tsunami Watch Provider (TWP) responsibilities for the Eastern Mediterranean, Aegean, Marmara and Black Seas. Based on this profound experience KOERI is contributing valuable requirements to the overall TRIDEC system and is responsible for the definition and development of feasible tsunami-related scenarios in the context of UNESCO-IOC ICG/NEAMTWS activities. However, KOERI's, most important input focuses on testing and evaluating the TRIDEC system according to specified evaluation and validation criteria in order to meet ICG/NEAMTWS requirements. The TRIDEC system will be implemented in three phases, each with a demonstrator. Successively, the demonstrators are addressing related challenges. The first and second phase system demonstrator, deployed at KOERI's crisis management room has been designed and implemented, firstly, to support plausible scenarios for the Turkish NTWC to demonstrate the treatment of simulated tsunami threats with an essential subset of a NTWC

  6. Environmental, Disaster and Crisis Management Strategies: Interdisciplinarity and Synergy in Postgraduate Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekkas, Efthymis; Andreadakis, Emmanouil; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Antoniou, Varvara; Kapourani, Eleni; Papaspyropoulos, Konstantinos

    2017-04-01

    Environmental issues, disasters and crises have been showing an increasing complexity and interconnections in every level and aspect, thus requiring a holistic approach from simple problem solving to emergency management. Recent challenges include geographical and affected population escalation, complex or cascading disasters and interconnection of regional conflicts to transboundary social, political and environmental impact. One of the issues concerning the traditional management is competition or even antagonism between organizations, services and disciplines, from science to operations. In this context, a postgraduate program answering to these issues was designed in Greece, applying multidisciplinarity, crossdisciplinarity and interdisiplinarity, from teaching staff and tutors, to students, objects and fields of knowledge and research. The program offers a curriculum of lessons and disciplines integrating science, humanities, legislation, institutions and operations. Geosciences carry an inherent interdisciplinarity culture and a long tradition in the research of environment and disasters, along with their familiarity with the complexity of such issues. That is why the program "Environmental, Disaster and Crisis Management Strategies" was organized by the Department of Geology and Geoenvironment of the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, but involves social scientists, emergency operators, medical scientists etc. The program aims at the diffusion of basic principles and tools of all related disciplines and develops a common ground and a communication language with the least barriers, and the building of trust and understanding between all parties involved. The curriculum is designed so that professionals of all disciplines and industries are able to attend without interrupting their other activities, while pursuing their personal scientific and professional educational goals and interests through selection of lessons and thesis subject. As a result

  7. Collective learning dynamics in behavioral crowds. Comment on "Human behaviours in evacuation crowd dynamics: From modeling to "big data" toward crisis management" by Nicola Bellomo et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burini, D.

    2016-09-01

    A recent literature on crowd dynamics [9,10] has enlightened that the management of crisis situations needs models able to depict social behaviors and, in particular, the spread of emotional feelings such as stress by panic situation.

  8. Exupéry - a mobile fast response system for managing a volcanic crisis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hort, M. K.

    2009-12-01

    Despite ever increasing efforts to monitor historically active volcanoes many of those are still very poorly or unmonitored, even in highly populated areas. In case of volcanic unrest or even a volcanic crisis evaluating the situation is therefore often very difficult due to the little information that is available for that specific volcano. Over the past decades several different programs have supported volcanic crisis management efforts in third world countries from sending experts all the way to improving or even installing new networks around the volcano. One of the main problems especially when quickly upgrading networks during a crisis is that each system usually comes with its own acquisition and processing system which makes it very difficult to manage the observational network and provide an interdisciplinary interpretation of the data with respect to the activity status of the volcano. Here we present a newly developed volcano fast response system which overcomes several of these shortcomings. The core of the system is a novel database (SEISHUB) that allows for the collection of data of various kinds, i.e. simple time series data like seismic data, gas measurements, GPS measurements, as well as satellite data (SO2 flux, thermal anomaly, ground deformation). Part of the collected data may also come from an already existing network. Data from new field instruments are transmitted through a wireless network that has been specifically designed for the volcano fast response system. One of the main difficulties with such a multidisciplinary data set is an easy access to the data. This is provided through a common Web based GIS interface which allows various datalayers being simultaneously accessed through a Web Browser. The underlying software is designed in such a way that it only uses open source software, so it can be easily installed on other systems not having to deal with purchasing proprietary software. Aside from this the system provides tools to

  9. Beyond crisis resource management: new frontiers in human factors training for acute care medicine.

    PubMed

    Petrosoniak, Andrew; Hicks, Christopher M

    2013-12-01

    Error is ubiquitous in medicine, particularly during critical events and resuscitation. A significant proportion of adverse events can be attributed to inadequate team-based skills such as communication, leadership, situation awareness and resource utilization. Aviation-based crisis resource management (CRM) training using high-fidelity simulation has been proposed as a strategy to improve team behaviours. This review will address key considerations in CRM training and outline recommendations for the future of human factors education in healthcare. A critical examination of the current literature yields several important considerations to guide the development and implementation of effective simulation-based CRM training. These include defining a priori domain-specific objectives, creating an immersive environment that encourages deliberate practice and transfer-appropriate processing, and the importance of effective team debriefing. Building on research from high-risk industry, we suggest that traditional CRM training may be augmented with new training techniques that promote the development of shared mental models for team and task processes, address the effect of acute stress on team performance, and integrate strategies to improve clinical reasoning and the detection of cognitive errors. The evolution of CRM training involves a 'Triple Threat' approach that integrates mental model theory for team and task processes, training for stressful situations and metacognition and error theory towards a more comprehensive training paradigm, with roots in high-risk industry and cognitive psychology. Further research is required to evaluate the impact of this approach on patient-oriented outcomes.

  10. [Perioperative management of a case of myasthenic crisis with unexpected difficult airway].

    PubMed

    Uchida, Shinya; Nishikawa, Koichi; Mizukami, Tatsuji; Saito, Shigeru

    2009-07-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by loss of acetylcholine receptors (AChR) due primarily to the production of anti-AChR autoantibodies. We report here a case of anesthetic management of MG patient associated with difficult airway. A 58-year-old woman, 150 cm in height and 43 kg in weight, was scheduled for elective thymectomy. Preoperative evaluation using Mallampati classification, mouth opening, and thyromental distance did not predict airway difficulty. After anesthetic induction with propofol and sevoflurane, mask ventilation was performed easily. However, tracheal intubation using Macintosh type laryngoscope was unexpectedly difficult. This was largely due to transformation of the epiglottis and thereby Cormack classification was grade III. Tracheal intubation was eventually performed by blindly with a gum elastic bougie after some trials. Postoperative day two, she was diagnosed as postoperative myasthenic crisis and needed re-intubation. We used fiberscope intubation for her because it was difficult to intubate."Cannot intubate, cannot ventilate (CICV)" scenario is very rare, but it sometimes leads to serious morbidity and mortality. Therefore, we need to deal with this emergency situation by using a variety of equipments and techniques. Careful examination of the airway and a carefully considered plan for re-intubation are prerequisites for this type of surgery.

  11. Collaboration in crisis and emergency management: Identifying the gaps in the case of storm 'Alexa'.

    PubMed

    Sawalha, Ihab Hanna Salman

    2014-01-01

    Failing to collaborate in crisis and emergency situations will increase the vulnerability of organisations and societies towards potential disasters. This paper highlights the significance of effective collaboration at different levels in times of crises. The case of snow storm 'Alexa', which hit Jordan in December 2013, was considered for the purpose of this research. The impact of Alexa raised many questions regarding the country's preparedness and the capacity of its infrastructure to maintain critical business functions across various industry sectors. First, should people individually take all the responsibility to manage crises and emergencies in order to protect themselves and their belongings? Secondly, should organisations join efforts with other organisations within the same or different sectors? Thirdly, should governments seek external collaboration for the ultimate goal of securing their economies? These issues are significant as they underline the element of collaboration. This paper contributes to the understanding of the role of collaboration in times of intense difficulty and loss of control. The proposition made by this research is that an effective collaborative process is positively associated with perceptions of improved disaster risk reduction practices.

  12. [Hi-Fi simulation: Teaching crisis resource management to surgery residents].

    PubMed

    Georgescu, Mihai; Tanoubi, Issam; Drolet, Pierre; Robitaille, Arnaud; Perron, Roger; Patenaude, Jean Victor

    2015-02-01

    High-fidelity (HiFi) simulation has shown its effectiveness for teaching crisis resource management (CRM) principles, and our institutional experience in this area is mainly with anesthesiology residents. We recently added to our postgraduate curriculum a new CRM course designed to cater to the specific needs of surgical residents. This short communication describes the experience of the University of Montreal Simulation Centre (Centre d'Apprentissage des Attitudes et Habiletés Cliniques CAAHC) regarding HiFi simulationbased CRM and communication skills teaching for surgical residents. Thirty residents agreed to participate in a simulation course with pre-established scenarios and educational CRM objectives on a voluntary basis. When surveyed immediately after the activity, all residents agreed that the educational objectives were well defined (80% "strongly agree" and 20% "agree"). The survey also showed that the course was well accepted by all participants (96% "strongly agree" and 4% "agree"). Further trials with randomized groups and more reliable assessment tools are needed to validate our results. Still, integrating HiFi simulation based CRM learning in the surgical residency curriculum seems like an interesting step.

  13. An application of MC-SDSS for water supply management during a drought crisis.

    PubMed

    Jeihouni, Mehrdad; Toomanian, Ara; Alavipanah, Seyed Kazem; Shahabi, Mahmoud; Bazdar, Saba

    2015-07-01

    Climate change influences many countries' rainfall patterns and temperatures. In Iran, population growth has increased water demands. Tabriz is the capital of East Azerbaijan province, in northwestern Iran. A large proportion of the water required for this city is supplied from dams; thus, it is important to find alternatives to supply water for this city, which is the largest industrial city in northwestern Iran. In this paper, the groundwater quality was assessed using 70 wells in Tabriz Township. This work seeks to define the spatial distribution of groundwater quality parameters such as chloride, electrical conductivity (EC), pH, hardness, and sulfate using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and geostatistics; map groundwater quality for drinking purposes employing multiple-criteria decision-making (MCDM), such as the Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) and fuzzy logic, in the study area; and develop an Spatial Decision Support System (SDSS) for managing a water crisis in the region. The map produced by the AHP is more accurate than the map produced using fuzzy logic because in the AHP, priorities were assigned to each parameter based on the weights given by water quality experts. The final map indicates that the groundwater quality increases from the north to the south and from the west to the east within the study area. During critical conditions, the groundwater quality maps and the presented SDSS core can be utilized by East Azerbaijan Regional Water Company to develop an SDSS to drill new wells or to select existing wells to supply drinking water to Tabriz City.

  14. Developing an Effective Crisis Management Plan: The Role of a Project Manager.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orifici, J. Michael

    2000-01-01

    After fire and smoke damaged an upstate New York school's cafeteria, kitchen, and administrative offices, the district superintendent contacted a professional construction-management firm to begin restoration and reopen the school within days. Safety and sensitivity to building occupants' needs were paramount. (MLH)

  15. From management to mediation: local forestry management and the forestry crisis in post-socialist Russia.

    PubMed

    Eikeland, Sveinung; Eythorsson, Einar; Ivanova, Lyudmila

    2004-03-01

    The local branches of the Russian Forestry Service, the leskhozy, were known for their efficiency and management skills in the Soviet era and were one of the very few community-based "Soviet-type" institutions to survive the transition. This article examines the role of the leskhozy in the new market economy. Our analysis is based on data from interviews with informants attached to the forestry sector in the Murmansk area. In some cases their knowledge of the leskhozy stretches back to the emergence of the system in 1947. Our principal finding is that the struggle to survive as a federal body in the current legal and economic climate is forcing the leskhozy to relegate sustainable forestry management, presumably their primary raison d'être, to the lower portions of their list of priorities. Several consequences result. There is a heightened incidence of illegal logging, and corruption informs the allocation of forest areas to private interests. Stumpage prices have plummeted as timber from subsidized commercial cutting (ostensibly sanitary cutting or thinning) has flooded the markets. The root cause of these tribulations lies with the market-based harvesting permit system. Its introduction in the 1990s did little to eliminate the self-seeking practices of the old Soviet forestry management hierarchies. In the free market, local forestry managers can turn their dual responsibilities to their own advantage inasmuch as they control the allocation of harvesting permits while at the same time controlling logging practices.

  16. Sleep America: managing the crisis of adult chronic insomnia and associated conditions.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Stefanie S; Rabin, Laura A

    2012-05-01

    Chronic insomnia, a public health crisis affecting 10-15% of the U.S. population and costing billions of dollars annually, typically presents with one or more comorbid psychiatric or organic conditions. Historical classification of chronic insomnia as "secondary" to a presenting comorbid condition has resulted in under-recognition and under-treatment of both the insomnia and comorbid condition(s). Though critical in any model of comorbid disease management, chronic insomnia receives little, if any, public policy attention. We conducted a systematic review of recent empirical studies, review papers, books, government documents, press releases, advertisements, and articles pertaining to the classification, epidemiology, treatment, and physiology of sleep, insomnia, and comorbid conditions. Data were located primarily through MEDLINE, PsycINFO, SCOPUS, and PUBMED databases. Our goal was to provide an overview of the systems for classifying insomnia and available epidemiological data, and to review theoretical models regarding the etiology and maintaining factors of chronic insomnia along with research on the complex, bidirectional associations between chronic insomnia and various affective (and other) conditions. After thorough review of the literature, we propose several public policy measures as an initial step in managing chronic insomnia in the United States. These include introducing a nation-wide multi-modal educational and awareness campaign titled "Sleep America;" increasing the availability and demand for behavioral sleep medicine - the initially preferred treatment approach; and increasing the use of monitoring and enforcement activities by regulatory authorities to curtail false and misleading claims by sponsors of supplements or treatments for insomnia. Through the adoption of such measures, we hope to galvanize a national interest in healthy sleep and the evidence-based treatment of chronic insomnia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Validity evidence of non-technical skills assessment instruments in simulated anaesthesia crisis management.

    PubMed

    Jirativanont, T; Raksamani, K; Aroonpruksakul, N; Apidechakul, P; Suraseranivongse, S

    2017-07-01

    We sought to evaluate the validity of two non-technical skills evaluation instruments, the Anaesthetists' Non-Technical Skills (ANTS) behavioural marker system and the Ottawa Global Rating Scale (GRS), to apply them to anaesthesia training. The content validity, response process, internal structure, relations with other variables and consequences were described for validity evidence. Simulated crisis management sessions were initiated during which two trained raters evaluated the performance of postgraduate first-, second- and third-year (PGY-1, PGY-2 and PGY-3) anaesthesia residents. The study included 70 participants, composed of 24 PGY-1, 24 PGY-2 and 22 PGY-3 residents. Both instruments differentiated the non-technical skills of PGY-1 from PGY-3 residents (P <0.05). Inter-rater agreement was measured using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). For the ANTS instrument, the intraclass correlation coefficients for task management, team-working, situation awareness and decision-making were 0.79, 0.34, 0.81 and 0.70, respectively. For the Ottawa GRS, the intraclass correlation coefficients for overall performance, leadership, problem-solving, situation awareness, resource utilisation and communication skills were 0.86, 0.83, 0.84, 0.87, 0.80 and 0.86, respectively. The Cronbach's alpha for internal consistency of the ANTS instrument was 0.93, and was 0.96 for the Ottawa GRS. There was a high correlation between the ANTS and Ottawa GRS. The raters reported the ease of use of the Ottawa GRS compared to the ANTS. We found sufficient evidence of validity in the ANTS instrument and the Ottawa GRS for the evaluation of non-technical skills in a simulated anaesthesia setting, but the Ottawa GRS was more practical and had higher reliability.

  18. Pediatric crisis resource management training improves emergency medicine trainees' perceived ability to manage emergencies and ability to identify teamwork errors.

    PubMed

    Bank, Ilana; Snell, Linda; Bhanji, Farhan

    2014-12-01

    Improved pediatric crisis resource management (CRM) training is needed in emergency medicine residencies because of the variable nature of exposure to critically ill pediatric patients during training. We created a short, needs-based pediatric CRM simulation workshop with postactivity follow-up to determine retention of CRM knowledge. Our aims were to provide a realistic learning experience for residents and to help the learners recognize common errors in teamwork and improve their perceived abilities to manage ill pediatric patients. Residents participated in a 4-hour objectives-based workshop derived from a formal needs assessment. To quantify their subjective abilities to manage pediatric cases, the residents completed a postworkshop survey (with a retrospective precomponent to assess perceived change). Ability to identify CRM errors was determined via a written assessment of scripted errors in a prerecorded video observed before and 1 month after completion of the workshop. Fifteen of the 16 eligible emergency medicine residents (postgraduate year 1-5) attended the workshop and completed the surveys. There were significant differences in 15 of 16 retrospective pre to post survey items using the Wilcoxon rank sum test for non-parametric data. These included ability to be an effective team leader in general (P < 0.008), delegating tasks appropriately (P < 0.009), and ability to ensure closed-loop communication (P < 0.008). There was a significant improvement in identification of CRM errors through the use of the video assessment from 3 of the 12 CRM errors to 7 of the 12 CRM errors (P < 0.006). The pediatric CRM simulation-based workshop improved the residents' self-perceptions of their pediatric CRM abilities and improved their performance on a video assessment task.

  19. Deciding to institutionalize: caregiving crisis, intergenerational communication, and uncertainty management for elders and their children in Shanghai.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin

    2015-01-01

    This phenomenological study integrated crisis theory, social identity theory, and uncertainty management theory to conceptualize the decision-making process around institutionalization among nursing home residents and their children in Shanghai. I conducted face-to-face, semistructured interviews with 12 dyads of matched elders and their children (N = 24). The findings suggest that caregiving crises triggered intergenerational communication about caregiving alternatives and new arrangements, although each generation had different stances and motivations. Children finalized the decision by helping their parents to manage the uncertainties pertaining to institutionalization. This study sheds light on caregiving decision-making dynamics for the increasing aging population across cultures.

  20. Crisis resource management of the airway in a patient with Klippel-Feil syndrome, congenital deafness, and aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Khawaja, Omar M; Reed, J Taylor; Shaefi, Shahzad; Chitilian, Hovig V; Sandberg, Warren S

    2009-04-01

    Klippel-Feil syndrome is a visually arresting deformity wherein severe restriction of cervical motion predicts a difficult airway. Even minor distraction of the neck risks cervical spine or neurologic injury, so regional techniques, awake fiberoptic intubation, or awake tracheostomy are recommended anesthetic approaches. We present a case of aortic dissection in a Klippel-Feil syndrome patient for whom congenital bilateral deafness, coupled with the urgency of the surgery, mitigated against the recommended first-choice techniques. Using anesthesia crisis resource management methods, a multi-member team rehearsed predefined roles and then managed the airway via inhaled induction of anesthesia, followed by flexible fiberoptic intubation.

  1. Error Detection-Based Model to Assess Educational Outcomes in Crisis Resource Management Training: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Bouhabel, Sarah; Kay-Rivest, Emily; Nhan, Carol; Bank, Ilana; Nugus, Peter; Fisher, Rachel; Nguyen, Lily Hp

    2017-06-01

    Otolaryngology-head and neck surgery (OTL-HNS) residents face a variety of difficult, high-stress situations, which may occur early in their training. Since these events occur infrequently, simulation-based learning has become an important part of residents' training and is already well established in fields such as anesthesia and emergency medicine. In the domain of OTL-HNS, it is gradually gaining in popularity. Crisis Resource Management (CRM), a program adapted from the aviation industry, aims to improve outcomes of crisis situations by attempting to mitigate human errors. Some examples of CRM principles include cultivating situational awareness; promoting proper use of available resources; and improving rapid decision making, particularly in high-acuity, low-frequency clinical situations. Our pilot project sought to integrate CRM principles into an airway simulation course for OTL-HNS residents, but most important, it evaluated whether learning objectives were met, through use of a novel error identification model.

  2. Opportunistic research and sampling combined with fisheries and wildlife management actions or crisis response.

    PubMed

    Jessup, David A

    2003-01-01

    Currently most of the activities of state, federal, first nation, and private conservation agencies, including management of and field research on free-ranging wildlife, are not regulated under the Animal Welfare Act (AWA) and thus not subject to National Institutes of Health guidelines or routine institutional animal care and use committee (IACUC) review. However, every day thousands of fish and wildlife management activities occur across North America that provide an opportunity to take observations, measurements, biological specimens, or samples that may have research value. Most of these opportunities are secondary to ongoing and often mandated wildlife management or conservation actions. Strange as it may seem to the academic and research community, the full research potentials of these opportunities are rarely utilized. IACUCs and research institutions should strive to facilitate such research, which by its very nature is often more opportunistic than designed. They can do this by ensuring that their policies do not unnecessarily impede the rapid research responses needed, or over burden researchers with inappropriate reporting requirements designed for laboratory research. The most prominent reasons for failures to utilize wildlife research opportunities include lack of the following: personnel and expertise to collect and use the information; preparation for inevitable (or predictable) events (e.g., oil spills); resources to preserve and curate specimens; a mandate to conduct research; and recognition of the value in data or sample collection. IACUC support of open protocols and generic sampling plans can go a long way toward improving the development of useful knowledge from animals that will otherwise be lost. Opportunities to sample wildlife are categorized generally as dead sampling (road kill surveys, harvest sampling, lethal collection, and "die-offs"); live sampling (handling for marking, relocation or restocking; and captures for field or biological

  3. The humanitarian emergency in Burundi: evaluation of the operational strategy for management of nutritional crisis.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Laura; Verna, Daniel; Villeneuve, Susie L

    2008-07-01

    To evaluate the impact and appropriateness of programmes for the management and treatment of severe malnutrition in emergency situations. A central unified database was set up with all data and statistics provided by nutritional centres (NC) active in Burundi. The paper describes the case of Burundi as an example of the response of the humanitarian community to nutritional crisis. Since 1999, more than one million (1,054,210) severely malnourished patients were treated in NC established in Burundi. Peaks of beneficiaries were registered in 2000 and 2001; the admission rate started to decrease in 2002. In 2004, twenty therapeutic feeding centres (TFC) and 224 supplementary feeding centres (SFC) were active for the treatment of 127,420 beneficiaries. Nutritional programmes were present in every province with a coverage rate of 55%. The most convincing impact of the nutritional programme in Burundi was the reduction of mortality rate in children under 5 years of age; an impact on the prevalence of acute malnutrition could not be demonstrated. Children under 5 years old accounted for 62% of beneficiaries in TFC and 76% in SFC. TFC performance indicators fulfilled the minimum standards in disaster response; the performance of SFC was not so optimal with a low recovery rate (69% v. >80%) and a high non-respondent rate (16% v. <5%). With the combination of coverage and cure rate, the programme met 44% of the assessed needs in 2004. In Burundi the stabilisation of security conditions permitted a combination of humanitarian responses ranging from emergency activities to strengthening of community-based initiatives that could correct the coverage and impact limitations.

  4. Modeling Adversaries in Counterterrorism Decisions Using Prospect Theory.

    PubMed

    Merrick, Jason R W; Leclerc, Philip

    2016-04-01

    Counterterrorism decisions have been an intense area of research in recent years. Both decision analysis and game theory have been used to model such decisions, and more recently approaches have been developed that combine the techniques of the two disciplines. However, each of these approaches assumes that the attacker is maximizing its utility. Experimental research shows that human beings do not make decisions by maximizing expected utility without aid, but instead deviate in specific ways such as loss aversion or likelihood insensitivity. In this article, we modify existing methods for counterterrorism decisions. We keep expected utility as the defender's paradigm to seek for the rational decision, but we use prospect theory to solve for the attacker's decision to descriptively model the attacker's loss aversion and likelihood insensitivity. We study the effects of this approach in a critical decision, whether to screen containers entering the United States for radioactive materials. We find that the defender's optimal decision is sensitive to the attacker's levels of loss aversion and likelihood insensitivity, meaning that understanding such descriptive decision effects is important in making such decisions. © 2014 Society for Risk Analysis.

  5. When a Crisis Strikes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keebler, Barbara A.

    1989-01-01

    Urges Catholic educators to develop a crisis communication plan to ensure that all communication with the press and public is handled promptly and thoroughly by a designated spokesperson. Describes workshops which simulate real-life challenges as a means of testing crisis management plans. Offers guidelines for the development of a crisis…

  6. When Crisis Strikes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caudle, Melissa

    1994-01-01

    School crises may be categorized as emergency situations, human-made crises, natural events, medical emergencies, and mechanical crises. Central to any successful crisis-management plan are onsite and district-level crisis response teams. Plans should specify staff responsibilities; provide for communication codes, devices, and procedures;…

  7. 3 CFR 13584 - Executive Order 13584 of September 9, 2011. Developing an Integrated Strategic Counterterrorism...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) identifying and requesting relevant information from agencies, including intelligence reporting, data, and... organizations, academic sources, and finished intelligence created by the intelligence community; (iv... Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Counterterrorism Center of the Central Intelligence Agency, the Broadcast...

  8. Impact of crisis resource management simulation-based training for interprofessional and interdisciplinary teams: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Fung, Lillia; Boet, Sylvain; Bould, M Dylan; Qosa, Haytham; Perrier, Laure; Tricco, Andrea; Tavares, Walter; Reeves, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Crisis resource management (CRM) abilities are important for different healthcare providers to effectively manage critical clinical events. This study aims to review the effectiveness of simulation-based CRM training for interprofessional and interdisciplinary teams compared to other instructional methods (e.g., didactics). Interprofessional teams are composed of several professions (e.g., nurse, physician, midwife) while interdisciplinary teams are composed of several disciplines from the same profession (e.g., cardiologist, anaesthesiologist, orthopaedist). Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and ERIC were searched using terms related to CRM, crisis management, crew resource management, teamwork, and simulation. Trials comparing simulation-based CRM team training versus any other methods of education were included. The educational interventions involved interprofessional or interdisciplinary healthcare teams. The initial search identified 7456 publications; 12 studies were included. Simulation-based CRM team training was associated with significant improvements in CRM skill acquisition in all but two studies when compared to didactic case-based CRM training or simulation without CRM training. Of the 12 included studies, one showed significant improvements in team behaviours in the workplace, while two studies demonstrated sustained reductions in adverse patient outcomes after a single simulation-based CRM team intervention. In conclusion, CRM simulation-based training for interprofessional and interdisciplinary teams show promise in teaching CRM in the simulator when compared to didactic case-based CRM education or simulation without CRM teaching. More research, however, is required to demonstrate transfer of learning to workplaces and potential impact on patient outcomes.

  9. [Simulation-based anaesthesia crisis resource management training. Results of a survey on learning success].

    PubMed

    Schröder, T; von Heymann, C H; Ortwein, H; Rau, J; Wernecke, K D; Spies, C

    2009-10-01

    Up to as many as 38,000 people die in German hospitals each year as a result of preventable medical errors. Anesthetic procedures are generally safer than internal medical procedures and the mortality associated with anesthesia is estimated to be 3.3-5 cases per million. However, this is still 10 times higher than the risk associated with civilian aviation for example. Up to 80% of mistakes are attributable to inadequate execution of non-technical skills (NTS) such as communication, teamwork and organization of the working environment. Training in non-technical skills through Anesthesia Crisis Resource Management (ACRM) is an integral part of the Berlin Simulation Training (BeST) curriculum. The aim of this study was to describe the subjective evaluation of change in routine clinical behavior as a result of simulator training using latent outcome variables such as "subjective evaluation of learning outcome", with special emphasis on communication. In total 235 doctors with varying levels of professional experience received BeST training between 2001 and 2004. An anonymous postal questionnaire was sent to 228 of these participants and the response rate was 64% The questionnaire contained 13 questions covering evaluation of the workshop and learning outcome with respect to communication in the operating room (OR), teamwork in the OR and medical knowledge. Following factor analysis 3 latent outcome variables (subjective evaluation of the learning outcome, workshop-related change in perception of the value of communication and general value and relevance) were generated. Logistic regression was used to determine whether there was any relationship between the latent outcome variables and a number of independent factors. It was not possible to demonstrate any relationship between the level of professional training, age or date of the workshop and the variables selected to describe subjective evaluation of behavioral change as a result of the workshop. How realistic the

  10. The New NATO Policy Guidelines on Counterterrorism: Analysis, Assessments, and Actions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    operations are increasingly dependent on local “franchises,” such as in Yemen, Somalia, the Middle East, and North Africa .4 While potentially...Counterterrorism a well-known concern, with connections stretching from South America to West and North Africa , Europe, the Balkans, Central Asia...money they invest in defense.”36 The stated aim of NATO’s Policy Guidelines on Counterterrorism is to move beyond a mere restatement of the Strategic

  11. Multiple scales modelling approaches to social interaction in crowd dynamics and crisis management. Comment on "Human behaviours in evacuation crowd dynamics: From modelling to "big data" toward crisis management" by Nicola Bellomo et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trucu, Dumitru

    2016-09-01

    In this comprehensive review concerning the modelling of human behaviours in crowd dynamics [3], the authors explore a wide range of mathematical approaches spanning over multiple scales that are suitable to describe emerging crowd behaviours in extreme situations. Focused on deciphering the key aspects leading to emerging crowd patterns evolutions in challenging times such as those requiring an evacuation on a complex venue, the authors address this complex dynamics at both microscale (individual level), mesoscale (probability distributions of interacting individuals), and macroscale (population level), ultimately aiming to gain valuable understanding and knowledge that would inform decision making in managing crisis situations.

  12. Simulated Trauma and Resuscitation Team Training course-evolution of a multidisciplinary trauma crisis resource management simulation course.

    PubMed

    Gillman, Lawrence M; Brindley, Peter; Paton-Gay, John Damian; Engels, Paul T; Park, Jason; Vergis, Ashley; Widder, Sandy

    2016-07-01

    We previously reported on a pilot trauma multidisciplinary crisis resource course titled S.T.A.R.T.T. (Simulated Trauma and Resuscitative Team Training). Here, we study the course's evolution. Satisfaction was evaluated by postcourse survey. Trauma teams were evaluated using the Ottawa global rating scale and an Advanced Trauma Life Support primary survey checklist. Eleven "trauma teams," consisting of physicians, nurses, and respiratory therapists, each completed 4 crisis simulations over 3 courses. Satisfaction remained high among participants with overall mean satisfaction being 4.39 on a 5-point Likert scale. As participants progressed through scenarios, improvements in global rating scale scores were seen between the 1st and 4th (29.8 vs 36.1 of 42, P = .022), 2nd and 3rd (28.2 vs 34.6, P = .017), and 2nd and 4th (28.2 vs 36.1, P = .003) scenarios. There were no differences in Advanced Trauma Life Support checklist with mean scores for each scenario ranging 11.3 to 13.2 of 17. The evolved Simulated Trauma and Resuscitative Team Training curriculum has maintained high participant satisfaction and is associated with improvement in team crisis resource management skills over the duration of the course. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The Study of Counterterrorism Mechanisms in Taiwan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    22 c.   Federal Bureau of Investigation, FBI ...................................22 d.   Federal...Director of National Intelligence FBI Federal Bureau of Investigation FEMA Federal Emergency Management Agency FIRA Foreign Intelligence Related Affairs...NID National Intelligence Director NSB National Security Bureau NSC National Security Council NSPD-1 National Security Directive-1 PSIA

  14. Learning crisis resource management: Practicing versus an observational role in simulation training - a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Lai, Anita; Haligua, Alexis; Dylan Bould, M; Everett, Tobias; Gale, Mark; Pigford, Ashlee-Ann; Boet, Sylvain

    2016-08-01

    Simulation training has been shown to be an effective way to teach crisis resource management (CRM) skills. Deliberate practice theory states that learners need to actively practice so that learning is effective. However, many residency programs have limited opportunities for learners to be "active" participants in simulation exercises. This study compares the effectiveness of learning CRM skills when being an active participant versus being an observer participant in simulation followed by a debriefing. Participants were randomized to two groups: active or observer. Active participants managed a simulated crisis scenario (pre-test) while paired observer participants viewed the scenario via video transmission. Then, a trained instructor debriefed participants on CRM principles. On the same day, each participant individually managed another simulated crisis scenario (post-test) and completed a post-test questionnaire. Two independent, blinded raters evaluated all videos using the Ottawa Global Rating Scale (GRS). Thirty-nine residents were included in the analysis. Normally distributed data were analyzed using paired and unpaired t-tests. Inter-rater reliability was 0.64. Active participants significantly improved from pre-test to post-test (P=0.015). There was no significant difference between the post-test performance of active participants compared to observer participants (P=0.12). We found that learning CRM principles was not superior when learners were active participants compared to being observers followed by debriefing. These findings challenge the deliberate practice theory claiming that learning requires active practice. Assigning residents as observers in simulation training and involving them in debriefing is still beneficial. Copyright © 2016 Société française d'anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Education and training initiatives for crisis management in the European Union: a web-based analysis of available programs.

    PubMed

    Ingrassia, Pier Luigi; Foletti, Marco; Djalali, Ahmadreza; Scarone, Piercarlo; Ragazzoni, Luca; Corte, Francesco Della; Kaptan, Kubilay; Lupescu, Olivera; Arculeo, Chris; von Arnim, Gotz; Friedl, Tom; Ashkenazi, Michael; Heselmann, Deike; Hreckovski, Boris; Khorram-Manesh, Amir; Khorrram-Manesh, Amir; Komadina, Radko; Lechner, Kostanze; Patru, Cristina; Burkle, Frederick M; Fisher, Philipp

    2014-04-01

    Education and training are key elements of disaster management. Despite national and international educational programs in disaster management, there is no standardized curriculum available to guide the European Union (EU) member states. European- based Disaster Training Curriculum (DITAC), a multiple university-based project financially supported by the EU, is charged with developing a holistic and highly-structured curriculum and courses for responders and crisis managers at a strategic and tactical level. The purpose of this study is to qualitatively assess the prevailing preferences and characteristics of disaster management educational and training initiatives (ETIs) at a postgraduate level that currently exist in the EU countries. An Internet-based qualitative search was conducted in 2012 to identify and analyze the current training programs in disaster management. The course characteristics were evaluated for curriculum, teaching methods, modality of delivery, target groups, and funding. The literature search identified 140 ETIs, the majority (78%) located in United Kingdom, France, and Germany. Master level degrees were the primary certificates granted to graduates. Face-to-face education was the most common teaching method (84%). Approximately 80% of the training initiatives offered multi- and cross-disciplinary disaster management content. A competency-based approach to curriculum content was present in 61% of the programs. Emergency responders at the tactical level were the main target group. Almost all programs were self-funded. Although ETIs currently exist, they are not broadly available in all 27 EU countries. Also, the curricula do not cover all key elements of disaster management in a standardized and competency-based structure. This study has identified the need to develop a standardized competency-based educational and training program for all European countries that will ensure the practice and policies that meet both the standards of care and

  16. Occupational Practitioner's Role in the Management of a Crisis: Lessons Learned from the Paris November 2015 Terrorist Attack.

    PubMed

    Descatha, Alexis; Huynh Tuong, Alice; Coninx, Pierre; Baer, Michel; Loeb, Thomas; Despréaux, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    In massive catastrophic events, occupational health practitioners are more and more frequently involved in the management of such situations. We aim to describe the multiple aspects of the role that occupational health practitioners might play, by focusing on the recent example of the Paris terrorist attack of November 2015. During and after the Paris attack, occupational practitioners, in collaboration with emergency and security professionals, were involved in psychological care, assembling information, follow-up, return-to-work, and improving in-company safety plans. Based on this experience and other industrial disasters, we distinguish three phases: the critical phase, the post-critical phase, and the anticipation phase. In the critical phase, the occupational practitioner cares for patients before the emergency professionals take charge, initiates the psychological management, and may also play an organizational role for company health aspects. In the post-critical phase, he or she would be involved in monitoring those affected by the events and participate in preventing, to the extent possible, posttraumatic stress disorder, helping victims in the return-to-work process, and improving procedures and organizing drills. In addition to their usual work of primary prevention, occupational practitioners should endeavor to improve preparedness in the anticipation phase, by taking part in contingency planning, training in first aid, and defining immediately applicable protocols. In conclusion, recent events have highlighted the essential role of occupational health services in anticipation of a crisis, management during the crisis, and follow-up.

  17. Occupational Practitioner’s Role in the Management of a Crisis: Lessons Learned from the Paris November 2015 Terrorist Attack

    PubMed Central

    Descatha, Alexis; Huynh Tuong, Alice; Coninx, Pierre; Baer, Michel; Loeb, Thomas; Despréaux, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    In massive catastrophic events, occupational health practitioners are more and more frequently involved in the management of such situations. We aim to describe the multiple aspects of the role that occupational health practitioners might play, by focusing on the recent example of the Paris terrorist attack of November 2015. During and after the Paris attack, occupational practitioners, in collaboration with emergency and security professionals, were involved in psychological care, assembling information, follow-up, return-to-work, and improving in-company safety plans. Based on this experience and other industrial disasters, we distinguish three phases: the critical phase, the post-critical phase, and the anticipation phase. In the critical phase, the occupational practitioner cares for patients before the emergency professionals take charge, initiates the psychological management, and may also play an organizational role for company health aspects. In the post-critical phase, he or she would be involved in monitoring those affected by the events and participate in preventing, to the extent possible, posttraumatic stress disorder, helping victims in the return-to-work process, and improving procedures and organizing drills. In addition to their usual work of primary prevention, occupational practitioners should endeavor to improve preparedness in the anticipation phase, by taking part in contingency planning, training in first aid, and defining immediately applicable protocols. In conclusion, recent events have highlighted the essential role of occupational health services in anticipation of a crisis, management during the crisis, and follow-up. PMID:27703965

  18. Crisis Management/Death and Dying: Coping with Terminal Illness in the International Student Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichenfield, Gregg A.; Audas, Millie

    The success of crisis intervention work with international students is highly dependent not only on the skill of the professional staff involved, but also the availability and use of other student services that may be provided to the International Student Services (ISS) Office. There are many cultural issues that must be considered when counseling…

  19. Symposium of Hope: Recovery and Resiliency after the Sandy Hook Tragedy. Crisis Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zenere, Frank J.

    2013-01-01

    On February 27 and 28, 2013, The Symposium of Hope: Recovery and Resilience after the Sandy Hook Tragedy, was held in Danbury, Connecticut. The event was hosted by the United Way of Western Connecticut and Western Connecticut State University. Frank J. Zenere, school psychologist and crisis team member in the Division of Student Services of the…

  20. Deliberative Rhetoric as a Step in Organizational Crisis Management: Exxon as a Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Darrin; Sellnow, Timothy

    1995-01-01

    Explains that when organizations face crises, their rhetorical response often follows two steps: assessment of causes leading to the crisis, and a search for potential solutions and preventive measures for the future. States that epideictic rhetoric designed to sustain or regain the organization's reputation is effective in both steps. Examines…

  1. The First 120 Minutes: A Guide to Crisis Management in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodds, Dick; Swiniarski, Donna

    The first 2 hours following a crisis can determine the public's lasting perception of an educational system or organization. Following the assumption that crises are inevitable, school administrators must be prepared to communicate quickly and accurately to avoid being judged unfairly. This book offers strategies to public-sector educators who are…

  2. Symposium of Hope: Recovery and Resiliency after the Sandy Hook Tragedy. Crisis Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zenere, Frank J.

    2013-01-01

    On February 27 and 28, 2013, The Symposium of Hope: Recovery and Resilience after the Sandy Hook Tragedy, was held in Danbury, Connecticut. The event was hosted by the United Way of Western Connecticut and Western Connecticut State University. Frank J. Zenere, school psychologist and crisis team member in the Division of Student Services of the…

  3. The First 120 Minutes: A Guide to Crisis Management in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodds, Dick; Swiniarski, Donna

    The first 2 hours following a crisis can determine the public's lasting perception of an educational system or organization. Following the assumption that crises are inevitable, school administrators must be prepared to communicate quickly and accurately to avoid being judged unfairly. This book offers strategies to public-sector educators who are…

  4. Evaluation of occupational physical load during 6-month international crisis management operation.

    PubMed

    Pihlainen, Kai; Santtila, Matti; Vasankari, Tommi; Häkkinen, Keijo; Kyröläinen, Heikki

    2017-10-02

    Generally, operational military duties are associated with a variety of stressors, such as prolonged physical activity (PA). However, limited information is available on the occupational workload or changes in PA during international military operations. Thus, the aim of the study was to investigate the changes in body composition, stress biomarkers, PA, and heart rate (HR) responses of 79 male soldiers during a 6-month international crisis management operation. Measurements were conducted 3 times in South-Lebanon during the operation. Body composition was assessed by the bioelectrical impedance method. Blood samples were analyzed for serum testosterone, sex-hormone binding globulin (SHBG), cortisol and insulin-like growth factor. Saliva sampling was used for analyzing stress biomarkers, cortisol and α-amylase. Heart rate and physical activity were monitored by a recordable belt and tri-axial accelerometer, respectively. Increases in muscle mass (39.2±4.1 vs. 39.5±4.2 kg, p < 0.05) and testosterone (15.9±4.6 vs. 17.2±4 nmol/l, p < 0.01), and reductions in PA variables (e.g., daily step count 9472±2547 vs. 8321±2720, p < 0.05) were observed during the first half (i.e., PRE-MID) of the study. The increase in muscle mass remained significant during the latter half (PRE-POST, 39.2±4.1 vs. 39.6±4.4 kg, p < 0.05), but also fat mass increased (MID-POST, 10.6±4.6 vs. 11.0±4.7 kg, p < 0.05) while SHBG (MID-POST, 31.8±12.1 vs. 26.6±13.2 nmol/l, p < 0.01) and cortisol (MID-POST, 445±116 vs. 400±123 nmol/l, p < 0.05) decreased. With the exception of increased concentration of salivary α-amylase (PRE-POST, 36.5±33.7 vs. 55.1±39.7 U/ml), the acute stress biomarkers and HR responses remained unchanged. Furthermore, the low quantity of PA, low HR values and subjective ratings of exertion refer to rather light physical workload. Due to the operatively calm nature of the working environment, the present soldiers did not express any significant signs of physical

  5. A tap water turbidity crisis in Tel Aviv, Israel, due to technical failure: toxicological and risk management issues.

    PubMed

    Winston, Gary; Lerman, Shlomo; Goldberger, Shalom; Collins, Malcolm; Leventhal, Alex

    2003-06-01

    Herein, we report on the actual events linked to an ammonia spillage into the main waterline of the Tel-Aviv metropolitan area and its surrounding municipalities. Based upon a large magnitude increase of unknown origin in the turbidity and ammonia levels of the main drinking water supply, area residents were warned of possible serious contamination and advised to refrain from drinking tap water until further notice. Turbidity was later linked only to CaCO3, which was precipitated from the water due to the rise in pH caused by the excessive ammonia levels. The source of the ammonia (a malfunction of the measurement buoy in the ammonia tank) was not identified until several days after the warning was issued. The toxicological implications of the turbidity and ammonia elevations are considered and reconciled with the management strategies that followed. Of consequence to the management of this crisis was the approach of Ministry of Health officials to regard the ammonia, from the onset, as an indicator of several possible sources of origin rather than as a contaminant. Decision-making policies were hampered by ineffective communication between the national water supplier and government health officials. An outcome of this crisis was a heightened awareness of the potential of a water crisis occurring during peace time and not only in association with terrorist activities, to which Israeli citizens are highly sensitized. Finally, the present paper may serve to guide municipal environmental and health officials more appropriately in the event of similar drinking water crises in Israel or elsewhere.

  6. Assessing Counter-Terrorism field training with multiple behavioral measures.

    PubMed

    Spiker, V Alan; Johnston, Joan H

    2013-09-01

    Development of behavioral pattern recognition and analysis skills is an essential element of Counter-Terrorism training, particularly in the field. Three classes of behavioral measures were collected in an assessment of skill acquisition during a US Joint Forces Command-sponsored course consisting of Combat Tracking and Combat Profiling segments. Measures included situational judgment tests, structured behavioral observation checklists, and qualitative assessments of the emergence of specific knowledge-skills-attitudes over the course of the training. The paper describes statistical evidence across the three types of measures that indicate that behavioral pattern recognition and analysis skills were successfully acquired by most students (a mix of Army and civilian law enforcement personnel) during the field training exercises. Implications for broader training of these critical skills are also discussed.

  7. Counter-Terrorism Contributions from the National Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Jay

    2002-04-01

    The DOD and NNSA laboratories have significant technical capabilities that can contribute to counter-terrorism and homeland security. Maximizing those contributions, however, requires that laboratory staff engage the doctrinal and operational issues of these problems as well. The broader interagency community needs support in these components of the problem as much as in the technical components. The speaker's experiences as director of the DoD Defense Threat Reduction Agency, established in 1998 to address DoD's role in defense against weapons of mass destruction in all venues, have given him a somewhat unique perspective on this problem. Examples of issues identified in scenario play at Cabinet level in the last Admistration will be given to illustrate the breadth of this problem, as will the speaker's assessment of the grand challenges in deterring use of WMD against the Homeland.

  8. Recognizing and managing a malignant hyperthermia crisis: guidelines from the European Malignant Hyperthermia Group.

    PubMed

    Glahn, K P E; Ellis, F R; Halsall, P J; Müller, C R; Snoeck, M M J; Urwyler, A; Wappler, F

    2010-10-01

    Survival from a malignant hyperthermia (MH) crisis is highly dependent on early recognition and prompt action. MH crises are very rare and an increasing use of total i.v. anaesthesia is likely to make it even rarer, leading to the potential risk of reduced awareness of MH. In addition, dantrolene, the cornerstone of successful MH treatment, is unavailable in large areas around the world thereby increasing the risk of MH fatalities in these areas. The European Malignant Hyperthermia Group collected and reviewed all guidelines available from the various MH centres in order to provide a consensus document. The guidelines consist of two textboxes: Box 1 on recognizing MH and Box 2 on the treatment of an MH crisis.

  9. From crowd modeling to safety problems. Comment on "Human behaviours in evacuation crowd dynamics: From modelling to "big data" toward crisis management" by Nicola Bellomo et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elaiw, Ahmed

    2016-09-01

    Paper [3] presents a survey and a critical analysis on models of crowd dynamics derived to support crisis management related to safety problems. This is an important topic which can have an important impact on the wellbeing of our society. We are very interested in this topic as we operate in a country, Saudi Arabia, where huge crowds can be present and that stress conditions can be occasionally induced by non predictable events. In these situations the problem of crisis management is of fundamental importance.

  10. Hypertensive Crisis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Hypertensive Crisis: When You Should Call 9-1-1 for ... 18,2017 Know the two types of HBP crisis to watch for A hypertensive ( high blood pressure ) ...

  11. Assessment of health-care waste management in a humanitarian crisis: A case study of the Gaza Strip.

    PubMed

    Caniato, Marco; Tudor, Terry Louis; Vaccari, Mentore

    2016-12-01

    Health-care waste management requires technical, financial and human resources, and it is a challenge for low- and middle income countries, while it is often neglected in protracted crisis or emergency situations. Indeed, when health, safety, security or wellbeing of a community is threatened, solid waste management usually receives limited attention. Using the Gaza Strip as the case study region, this manuscript reports on health-care waste management within the context of a humanitarian crisis. The study employed a range of methods including content analyses of policies and legislation, audits of waste arisings, field visits, stakeholder interviews and evaluation of treatment systems. The study estimated a production from clinics and hospitals of 683kg/day of hazardous waste in the Gaza Strip, while the total health-care waste production was 3357 kg/day. A number of challenges was identified including lack of clear definitions and regulations, limited accurate data on which to base decisions and strategies and poor coordination amongst key stakeholders. Hazardous and non-hazardous waste was partially segregated and treatment facilities hardly used, and 75% of the hazardous waste was left untreated. Recommendations for mitigating these challenges posed to patients, staff and the community in general are suggested. The outputs are particularly useful to support decision makers, and re-organize the system according to reliable data and sound assumptions. The methodology can be replicated in other humanitarian settings, also to other waste flows, and other sectors of environmental sanitation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Framework See-Think as a Tool for Crowdsourcing Support - Case Study on Crisis Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netek, R.; Panek, J.

    2016-06-01

    See-Think-Do is a framework originally used as an approach focused on a service and product marketing on the Internet. Customers can be classified into three groups according to their involvement from potential users to real customers. The article presents an idea of public involvement in community mapping in three levels: "See"—almost any user; "Think"—potential contributors; and "Do"—interested users. The case study implements the See-Think-Do framework as an awareness-based approach used for The Crisis Map of the Czech Republic. It is an Ushahidi-based crowdsourcing platform for sharing spatial and multimedia information during crisis situations, e.g. disaster floods in 2013. While the current crisis projects use public mapping just at the onset of the disaster, according to See-Think-Do any user can be considered as a potential contributor even during the dormant period. The focus is put on the "See" and "Think" groups of contributors, which are currently ignored. The objective of this paper is to summarize approaches (social networks, mass-media, emailing, gamification, …) and tools (GIT/GIS, ICT, multimedia) for increasing the awareness about the project within the resting phase. That recruits a higher number of both active and passive users during the disaster. It allows the training in ICT, cartographical, spatial and GIS skills in a non-stressful way and the targeting on specific operators. Volunteers from the "Think" group may be used for data processing or rectification, GIS professionals from the "Do" group for data verification. The results refer that contributors with already established skills and required literacy (interface, data uploading) provide data faster and more accurate, the usability of the project increases based on users' comments.

  13. Myasthenic Crisis

    PubMed Central

    Wendell, Linda C.; Levine, Joshua M.

    2011-01-01

    Myasthenic crisis is a complication of myasthenia gravis characterized by worsening of muscle weakness, resulting in respiratory failure that requires intubation and mechanical ventilation. Advances in critical care have improved the mortality rate associated with myasthenic crisis. This article reviews the epidemiology of myasthenic crisis and discusses patient evaluation. Therapeutic options including mechanical ventilation and pharmacological and surgical treatments are also discussed. PMID:23983833

  14. Phaeochromocytoma [corrected] crisis.

    PubMed

    Whitelaw, B C; Prague, J K; Mustafa, O G; Schulte, K-M; Hopkins, P A; Gilbert, J A; McGregor, A M; Aylwin, S J B

    2014-01-01

    Phaeochromocytoma [corrected] crisis is an endocrine emergency associated with significant mortality. There is little published guidance on the management of phaeochromocytoma [corrected] crisis. This clinical practice update summarizes the relevant published literature, including a detailed review of cases published in the past 5 years, and a proposed classification system. We review the recommended management of phaeochromocytoma [corrected] crisis including the use of alpha-blockade, which is strongly associated with survival of a crisis. Mechanical circulatory supportive therapy (including intra-aortic balloon pump or extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation) is strongly recommended for patients with sustained hypotension. Surgical intervention should be deferred until medical stabilization is achieved. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. K-12 School Leaders and School Crisis: An Exploration of Principals' School Crisis Competencies and Preparedness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarty, Sean P.

    2012-01-01

    On any given day, principals could find themselves faced with a situation that could define their roles as crisis leaders. This dissertation research offers an exploratory study in the field of crisis response and educational leadership. From experts in the field of crisis response, the author compiled a list of crisis management competencies…

  16. Crowd dynamics and safety. Reply to comments on "Human behaviours in evacuation crowd dynamics: From modelling to "big data" toward crisis management"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellomo, N.; Clarke, D.; Gibelli, L.; Townsend, P.; Vreugdenhil, B. J.

    2016-09-01

    The survey [13] presents an overview and critical analysis of the existing literature on the modeling of crowd dynamics related to crisis management toward the search of safety conditions. Out of this general review some rationale on research perspectives have been brought to the attention of the reader.

  17. Perceptions of Teachers and Staff regarding the Impact of the Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM) Model for School-Based Crisis Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Julie Q.

    2007-01-01

    The Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM) Model for crisis intervention was developed for use with emergency service personnel. Research regarding the use of the CISM Model has been conducted among civilians and high-risk occupation groups with mixed results. The purpose of this study is to examine the effectiveness of the CISM Model for…

  18. [Crisis intervention].

    PubMed

    Stein, Claudius

    2012-01-01

    The Austrian Program for Suicide Prevention defines as Point 2: "Support and treatment". The suicide-preventive outcome of the development of psychotherapeutic-psychosocial care in Austria has been proved. This means, that the further development of institutions with focus on crisis intervention is a central agenda of Suicide prevention Austria (SUPRA). First, in this article are defined the terms crisis and crisis intervention, also the close connection to programs of suicide prevention is pointed out. Furthermore general aims and standards for crisis intervention are defined and the current situation of crisis intervention in Austria is described. Finally recommendations for practical aims and their implementation in the context of SUPRA are made.

  19. Transforming Crisis Management: Field Studies on the Efforts to Migrate from System-Centric to Network-Centric Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharosa, Nitesh; van Zanten, Bart; Janssen, Marijn; Groenleer, Martijn

    Governments are searching for ways to improve information sharing between autonomous agencies. During crises, information demand and supply are often unbalanced, leading to situations in which relief workers are faced with incorrect, outdated or incomplete information. To address such challenges, network-centric operations (NCO), which involves information sharing with the socio-technical network as the central enabling mechanism, has been proposed. Yet, NCO is ill-understood and it is unclear whether the promised benefits can be realized in practice. In this paper we address the gap between the concept and reality of NCO. The necessary capabilities for NCO are identified using literature research and potential benefits are analyzed using field research. We found that NCO is not a silver bullet for overcoming the inherent problems of crisis management and could even reinforce existing problems. Our findings suggest that NCO is difficult to implement and needs to be complemented with capability development in the information and cognitive domain.

  20. Validation of a self-efficacy instrument and its relationship to performance of crisis resource management skills.

    PubMed

    Plant, Jennifer L; van Schaik, Sandrijn M; Sliwka, Diane C; Boscardin, Christy K; O'Sullivan, Patricia S

    2011-12-01

    Self-efficacy is thought to be important for resuscitation proficiency in that it influences the development of and access to the associated medical knowledge, procedural skills and crisis resource management (CRM) skills. Since performance assessment of CRM skills is challenging, self-efficacy is often used as a measure of competence in this area. While self-efficacy may influence performance, the true relationship between self-efficacy and performance in this setting has not been delineated. We developed an instrument to measure pediatric residents' self-efficacy in CRM skills and assessed its content validity, internal structure, and relationship to other variables. After administering the instrument to 125 pediatric residents, critical care fellows and faculty, we performed an exploratory factor analysis within a confirmatory factor analysis as well as a known group comparison. The analyses specified four factors that we defined as: situation awareness, team management, environment management, and decision making. Pediatric residents reported lower self-efficacy than fellows and faculty in each factor. We also examined the correlation between self-efficacy and performance scores for a subset of 30 residents who led video recorded simulated resuscitations and had their performances rated by three observers. We found a significant, positive correlation between residents' self-efficacy in situation awareness and environment management and their overall performance of CRM skills. Our findings suggest that in a specific context, self-efficacy as a form of self-assessment may be informative with regards to performance.

  1. The Australian Incident Monitoring Study. Crisis management--validation of an algorithm by analysis of 2000 incident reports.

    PubMed

    Runciman, W B; Webb, R K; Klepper, I D; Lee, R; Williamson, J A; Barker, L

    1993-10-01

    Anaesthetists are called upon to manage complex life-threatening crises at a moment's notice. As there is evidence that this may require cognitive tasking beyond the information-processing capacity of the human brain, it was decided to try and develop a generic crisis management algorithm analogous to the "Phase I" immediate response routine used by airline pilots. Such an algorithm, based on the mnemonic "COVER ABCD, A SWIFT CHECK", was developed and refined over 3 meetings, each attended by 60-100 anaesthetists and aviation psychologists. It was validated against 1301 relevant incidents among the first 2000 incidents reported to the Australian Incident Monitoring Study. It proved sufficiently robust and safe to recommend its general use as an initial response to any incident or crisis which occurs when a patient is breathing gas from an anesthetic machine. It requires a limited knowledge base and is easily learnt and rehearsed during the anaesthetist's working day. It will provide a functional diagnosis in over 99% of cases and will correct 62% of the problems in 40-60 seconds. In the remaining 37% it will allow the anaesthetist to proceed with a "sub-algorithm", confident in the knowledge that some important step has not been missed. In just over 30% of incidents this will be for a problem familiar to all anaesthetists (e.g. laryngospasm, bradycardia); in just over 6% it will be for a less common, more complex, but finite, set of problems (3% cardiac arrest, 1% air embolism, 1% anaphylaxis, 1% for the remaining desaturations); in less than 1% diagnosis and correction will require a more complex checklist (e.g. for malignant hyperthermia, pneumothorax). The next stage, the development of specific sub-algorithms and a structured team approach for ongoing problems, is in progress.

  2. Using Crisis Simulations in Public Relations Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veil, Shari R.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Students will demonstrate research, decision making, team building, and public speaking skills, while applying issues management and crisis communication concepts in a realistic setting. Courses: Introduction to Public Relations, Public Relations Cases, Crisis Communication.

  3. Using Crisis Simulations in Public Relations Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veil, Shari R.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Students will demonstrate research, decision making, team building, and public speaking skills, while applying issues management and crisis communication concepts in a realistic setting. Courses: Introduction to Public Relations, Public Relations Cases, Crisis Communication.

  4. Psychological interventions for terroristic trauma: prevention, crisis management, and clinical treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Miller, Laurence

    2011-01-01

    Terrorist attacks combine features of a criminal assault, a mass casualty disaster and an act of war Accordingly, this article presents a model for prevention, response and recovery from the psychological impact of a terror attack. The nature of terrorism is delineated and the various psychological effects are described, including diagnostic clinical syndromes, as well as individual reactions. Interventions in the immediate aftermath of a terrorist attack include on-scene crisis intervention, short-term psychological stabilization, and longer-term psychotherapeutic approaches. Special techniques are described for individuals, families, children, and large groups of survivors and responders. Finally, the ways that mental health clinicians can serve as valuable consultants to community recovery efforts are discussed.

  5. Evaluating remote sensing image fusion algorithms for use in humanitarian crisis management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witharana, Chandi; Civco, Daniel L.

    2012-10-01

    This study investigated how different fusion algorithms performed when applied to very high spatial resolution (VHSR) satellite images that encompass ongoing- and post-crisis scenes. The evaluation entailed twelve fusion algorithms. The selected algorithms were applied to GeoEye-1 satellite images taken over three different geographical settings representing natural and anthropogenic crises that had occurred in the recent past: earthquake-damaged sites in Haiti, flood-impacted sites in Pakistan, and armed-conflicted areas and internally displaced persons (IDP) camps in Sri Lanka. Spectral quality metrics included correlation coefficient, peak signal-to-noise ratio index, mean structural similarity index, spectral angle mapper, and relative dimensionless global error in synthesis. The spatial integrity of fused images was assessed using Canny edge correspondence and high-pass correlation coefficient. Under each metric, fusion methods were ranked and best competitors were identified. In this study, the Ehlers fusion, wavelet-PCA fusion (WVPCA), and the high-pass filter fusion algorithms reported the best values for the majority of spectral quality indices. Under spatial metrics, the University of New Brunswick and Gram-Schmidt fusion algorithms reported the optimum values. The color normalization sharpening and subtractive resolution merge algorithms exhibited the highest spectral distortions where as the WV-PCA algorithm showed the weakest spatial improvement. In conclusion, we recommend the University of New Brunswick algorithm if visual image interpretation is involved, whereas the high-pass filter fusion is recommended if semi- or fully-automated feature extraction is involved, for pansharpening VHSR satellite images of ongoing and post crisis sites

  6. Use of CLYC spectrometer in counter-terrorism applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ing, H.; Smith, M. B.; Koslowsky, M. R.; Andrews, H. R.

    2015-05-01

    A new scintillator crystal, now known as CLYC (Cs2LiYCl6:Ce), has been under development for over 15 years (1). It was primarily of interest for radiation detection applications because of its good energy resolution for gamma rays (< 4% for 662 keV gamma rays) and its capability for detection of thermal neutrons. The pulse shapes of the signals from the two radiations are different, which allow them to be separated electronically, permitting simultaneous detection of gamma rays and neutrons. The crystal is now commercially available. Early investigations of the neutron response by the current authors (2) revealed that CLYC also responds to fast neutrons. In fact, the good energy resolution of the response under monoenergetic neutron irradiations showed that CLYC was an excellent high-energy neutron spectrometer. This discovery has great impact on the field of neutron spectroscopy, which has numerous, although often specialized, applications. This presentation focuses on applications in counter-terrorism scenarios where neutrons may be involved. The relative importance of the fast neutron response of CLYC, compared to the thermal and gamma-ray response, will be discussed for these scenarios.

  7. Effect of sleep deprivation after a night shift duty on simulated crisis management by residents in anaesthesia. A randomised crossover study.

    PubMed

    Arzalier-Daret, Ségolène; Buléon, Clément; Bocca, Marie-Laure; Denise, Pierre; Gérard, Jean-Louis; Hanouz, Jean-Luc

    2017-09-04

    Sleep deprivation has been associated with an increased incidence of medical errors and can jeopardise patients' safety during medical crisis management. The aim of the study was to assess the effect of sleep deprivation on the management of simulated anaesthesia crisis by residents in anaesthesiology. A randomised, comparative, monocentric crossover study involving 48 residents in anaesthesia was performed on a high fidelity patient simulator. Each resident was evaluated in a sleep-deprived state (deprived group, after a night shift duty) and control state (control group, after a night of sleep). Performance was assessed through points obtained during crisis scenario 1 (oesophageal intubation followed by anaphylactic shock) and scenario 2 (anaesthesia-related bronchospasm followed by ventricular tachycardia). Sleep periods were recorded by actigraphy. Two independent observers assessed the performances. The primary endpoint of the study was the score obtained for each scenario. Resident's crisis management performance is associated with sleep deprivation (scenario 1: control=39 [33-42] points vs. deprived=26 [19-40] points, P=0.02; scenario 2: control=21 [17-24] vs. deprived=14 [12-19], P=0.01). The main errors observed were: error in drug administration and dose, delay in identification of hypotension, and missing communication with the surgical team about situation. The present study showed that sleep deprivation is associated with impairment of performance to manage crisis situations by residents in anaesthesia. Copyright © 2017 Société française d'anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Phases of Recognition and Management of Financial Crisis in Public Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, L. R.

    Based in part on interviews conducted in 32 municipalities, this paper is intended to provide information to public managers, policy analysts, and others on methods for improving the management of retrenchment. A model summarizes how public organizations recognize and attempt to manage financial crises and prolonged financial stress. Some cutback…

  9. [Crisis intervention].

    PubMed

    Sonneck, G

    1986-10-31

    The main aspects of crisis intervention are an immediate onset without time-consuming referrals, activities of the helper always keeping in mind the biopycho-social context, and assistance for selfhelp. Helping people in crises minds to find out and develop the possibilities of the afflicted person aiming that he can overcome his crisis by himself, gaining maturity and reaching a less crisis-prone life style.

  10. Before Crisis Hits: Building a Strategic Crisis Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Larry L.; Millar, Dan P.

    This guide offers suggestions to college administrators for dealing with a variety of emergency or crisis situations that could affect a community college's effectiveness. The authors used the Institute for Crisis Management's (ICM) four types of crises in higher education as the framework for the guide. The four types of crises are: (1) sudden;…

  11. Sustainable use of flatfish resources: Addressing the credibility crisis in mixed fisheries management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijnsdorp, A. D.; Daan, N.; Dekker, W.; Poos, J. J.; Van Densen, W. L. T.

    2007-02-01

    Many flatfish species are caught in mixed demersal trawl fisheries and managed by Total Allowable Catch (TAC). Despite decades of fisheries management, several major stocks are severely depleted. Using the Common Fisheries Policy (CFP) as an example, the failure of mixed-fisheries management is analysed by focussing on: the management system; the role of science; the role of managers and politicians; the response of fisheries to management. Failure of the CFP management could be ascribed to: incorrect management advice owing to bias in stock assessments; the tendency of politicians to set the TAC well above the recommended level; and non-compliance of the fisheries with the management regulations. We conclude that TAC management, although apparently successful in some single-species fisheries, inevitably leads to unsustainable exploitation of stocks caught in mixed demersal fisheries as it promotes discarding of over-quota catch and misreporting of catches, thereby corrupting the basis of the scientific advice and increasing the risk of stock collapse. This failure in mixed demersal fisheries has resulted in the loss of credibility of both scientists and managers, and has undermined the support of fishermen for management regulations. An approach is developed to convert the TAC system into a system that controls the total allowable effort (TAE). The approach takes account of the differences in catch efficiency between fleets as well as seasonal changes in the distribution of the target species and can also be applied in the recovery plans for rebuilding specific components of the demersal fish community, such as plaice, cod and hake.

  12. Decision-making in crisis: Applying a healthcare triage methodology to business continuity management.

    PubMed

    Moore, Bethany; Bone, Eric A

    2017-01-01

    The concept of triage in healthcare has been around for centuries and continues to be applied today so that scarce resources are allocated according to need. A business impact analysis (BIA) is a form of triage in that it identifies which processes are most critical, which to address first and how to allocate limited resources. On its own, however, the BIA provides only a roadmap of the impacts and interdependencies of an event. When disaster strikes, organisational decision-makers often face difficult decisions with regard to allocating limited resources between multiple 'mission-critical' functions. Applying the concept of triage to business continuity provides those decision-makers navigating a rapidly evolving and unpredictable event with a path that protects the fundamental priorities of the organisation. A business triage methodology aids decision-makers in times of crisis by providing a simplified framework for decision-making based on objective, evidence-based criteria, which is universally accepted and understood. When disaster strikes, the survival of the organisation depends on critical decision-making and quick actions to stabilise the incident. This paper argues that organisations need to supplement BIA processes with a decision-making triage methodology that can be quickly applied during the chaos of an actual event.

  13. Generalized Cartographic and Simultaneous Representation of Utility Networks for Decision-Support Systems and Crisis Management in Urban Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, T.; König, G.

    2015-10-01

    Cartographic visualizations of crises are used to create a Common Operational Picture (COP) and enforce Situational Awareness by presenting relevant information to the involved actors. As nearly all crises affect geospatial entities, geo-data representations have to support location-specific analysis throughout the decision-making process. Meaningful cartographic presentation is needed for coordinating the activities of crisis manager in a highly dynamic situation, since operators' attention span and their spatial memories are limiting factors during the perception and interpretation process. Situational Awareness of operators in conjunction with a COP are key aspects in decision-making process and essential for making well thought-out and appropriate decisions. Considering utility networks as one of the most complex and particularly frequent required systems in urban environment, meaningful cartographic presentation of multiple utility networks with respect to disaster management do not exist. Therefore, an optimized visualization of utility infrastructure for emergency response procedures is proposed. The article will describe a conceptual approach on how to simplify, aggregate, and visualize multiple utility networks and their components to meet the requirements of the decision-making process and to support Situational Awareness.

  14. 78 FR 38574 - Technical Amendments to Counter-Terrorism Sanctions Regulations Implemented by OFAC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-27

    ... Office of Foreign Assets Control 31 CFR Parts 594, 595, and 597 Technical Amendments to Counter-Terrorism... is amending the Global Terrorism Sanctions Regulations and the Terrorism Sanctions Regulations (the.... The Terrorism Sanctions Regulations, 31 CFR part 595 (the ``TSR''), implement Executive Order 12947...

  15. Securitisation, Counterterrorism and the Silencing of Dissent: The Educational Implications of "Prevent"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, Aislinn

    2016-01-01

    This paper outlines some of the implications of counterterrorist legislation, including Prevent, for the pedagogical relationship and for educational institutions. The concept of "radicalisation", central to the Prevent Strategy, is one that is contested in the field of counterterrorism, yet educators are now expected to identify and…

  16. Securitisation, Counterterrorism and the Silencing of Dissent: The Educational Implications of "Prevent"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, Aislinn

    2016-01-01

    This paper outlines some of the implications of counterterrorist legislation, including Prevent, for the pedagogical relationship and for educational institutions. The concept of "radicalisation", central to the Prevent Strategy, is one that is contested in the field of counterterrorism, yet educators are now expected to identify and…

  17. Homeland Security and Counterterrorism Research and Development: Funding, Organization, and Oversight

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-04-19

    DARPA). The Department of Energy’s (DOE) counterterrorism R&D includes work on security, materials, detection of toxic agents, genomic sequencing...information analysis (including information analysis tools and research in cybersecurity ). It is unclear how DHS will set priorities for its support

  18. Sins of the Father: Revisiting Best Practices of Public Relations and Crisis Management through Case Study Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancox, Melissa K. Gibson; Allen, Jennifer R.

    2007-01-01

    This article examines a 2004 crisis event that occurred when the president of a small private Catholic college was accused of sexually molesting boys earlier in his career. It discusses the crisis response of college officials with the institution's various publics, including students, faculty, alumni, and the media. Our purpose is twofold. First,…

  19. Sins of the Father: Revisiting Best Practices of Public Relations and Crisis Management through Case Study Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancox, Melissa K. Gibson; Allen, Jennifer R.

    2007-01-01

    This article examines a 2004 crisis event that occurred when the president of a small private Catholic college was accused of sexually molesting boys earlier in his career. It discusses the crisis response of college officials with the institution's various publics, including students, faculty, alumni, and the media. Our purpose is twofold. First,…

  20. Avoiding a crisis of motivation for ocean management under global environmental change.

    PubMed

    Mumby, Peter J; Sanchirico, James N; Broad, Kenneth; Beck, Michael W; Tyedmers, Peter; Morikawa, Megan; Okey, Thomas A; Crowder, Larry B; Fulton, Elizabeth A; Kelso, Denny; Kleypas, Joanie A; Munch, Stephan B; Glynn, Polita; Matthews, Kathryn; Lubchenco, Jane

    2017-04-27

    Climate change and ocean acidification are altering marine ecosystems and, from a human perspective, creating both winners and losers. Human responses to these changes are complex, but may result in reduced government investments in regulation, resource management, monitoring and enforcement. Moreover, a lack of peoples' experience of climate change may drive some towards attributing the symptoms of climate change to more familiar causes such as management failure. Taken together, we anticipate that management could become weaker and less effective as climate change continues. Using diverse case studies, including the decline of coral reefs, coastal defences from flooding, shifting fish stocks and the emergence of new shipping opportunities in the Arctic, we argue that human interests are better served by increased investments in resource management. But greater government investment in management does not simply mean more of "business-as-usual." Management needs to become more flexible, better at anticipating and responding to surprise, and able to facilitate change where it is desirable. A range of technological, economic, communication and governance solutions exists to help transform management. While not all have been tested, judicious application of the most appropriate solutions should help humanity adapt to novel circumstances and seek opportunity where possible. © 2017 The Authors. Global Change Biology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Campus Crisis Response at Viberg College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaker, Rachel; Viars, Jamie

    2014-01-01

    This fictional case study examines crisis response in higher education settings. Information about current crisis response procedures, plans, and trends was gathered from informational interviews, current crisis management literature, and multiple college and university websites. The information was synthesized into a fictional case study using…

  2. Campus Crisis Response at Viberg College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaker, Rachel; Viars, Jamie

    2014-01-01

    This fictional case study examines crisis response in higher education settings. Information about current crisis response procedures, plans, and trends was gathered from informational interviews, current crisis management literature, and multiple college and university websites. The information was synthesized into a fictional case study using…

  3. Applying the emergency risk management process to tackle the crisis of antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Dominey-Howes, Dale; Bajorek, Beata; Michael, Carolyn A.; Betteridge, Brittany; Iredell, Jonathan; Labbate, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    We advocate that antibiotic resistance be reframed as a disaster risk management problem. Antibiotic-resistant infections represent a risk to life as significant as other commonly occurring natural disasters (e.g., earthquakes). Despite efforts by global health authorities, antibiotic resistance continues to escalate. Therefore, new approaches and expertise are needed to manage the issue. In this perspective we: (1) make a call for the emergency management community to recognize the antibiotic resistance risk and join in addressing this problem; (2) suggest using the risk management process to help tackle antibiotic resistance; (3) show why this approach has value and why it is different to existing approaches; and (4) identify public perception of antibiotic resistance as an important issue that warrants exploration. PMID:26388864

  4. Applying the emergency risk management process to tackle the crisis of antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Dominey-Howes, Dale; Bajorek, Beata; Michael, Carolyn A; Betteridge, Brittany; Iredell, Jonathan; Labbate, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    We advocate that antibiotic resistance be reframed as a disaster risk management problem. Antibiotic-resistant infections represent a risk to life as significant as other commonly occurring natural disasters (e.g., earthquakes). Despite efforts by global health authorities, antibiotic resistance continues to escalate. Therefore, new approaches and expertise are needed to manage the issue. In this perspective we: (1) make a call for the emergency management community to recognize the antibiotic resistance risk and join in addressing this problem; (2) suggest using the risk management process to help tackle antibiotic resistance; (3) show why this approach has value and why it is different to existing approaches; and (4) identify public perception of antibiotic resistance as an important issue that warrants exploration.

  5. Modeling social crowds. Comment on "Human behaviours in evacuation crowd dynamics: From modelling to "big data" toward crisis management" by Nicola Bellomo et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poyato, David; Soler, Juan

    2016-09-01

    The study of human behavior is a complex task, but modeling some aspects of this behavior is an even more complicated and exciting idea. From crisis management to decision making in evacuation protocols, understanding the complexity of humans in stress situations is more and more demanded in our society by obvious reasons [5,6,8,12]. In this context, [4] deals with crowd dynamics with special attention to evacuation.

  6. Population-production-pollution nexus based air pollution management model for alleviating the atmospheric crisis in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Zeng, X T; Tong, Y F; Cui, L; Kong, X M; Sheng, Y N; Chen, L; Li, Y P

    2017-04-13

    In recent years, increscent emissions in the city of Beijing due to expanded population, accelerated industrialization and inter-regional pollutant transportation have led to hazardous atmospheric pollution issues. Although a number of anthropogenic control measures have been put into use, frequent/severe haze events have still challenged regional governments. In this study, a hybrid population-production-pollution nexus model (PPP) is proposed for air pollution management and air quality planning (AMP) with the aim to coordinate human activities and environmental protection. A fuzzy-stochastic mixed quadratic programming method (FSQ) is developed and introduced into a PPP for tackling atmospheric pollution issues with uncertainties. Based on the contribution of an index of population-production-pollution, a hybrid PPP-based AMP model that considers employment structure, industrial layout pattern, production mode, pollutant purification efficiency and a pollution mitigation scheme have been applied in Beijing. Results of the adjustment of employment structure, pollution mitigation scheme, and green gross domestic product under various environmental regulation scenarios are obtained and analyzed. This study can facilitate the identification of optimized policies for alleviating population-production-emission conflict in the study region, as well as ameliorating the hazardous air pollution crisis at an urban level.

  7. Some aspects of computer aided decision making for the crisis management of unstable slopes

    SciTech Connect

    Faure, R.M.; Pairault, T.; Pham, M.; Bernardeau-Moreau, A.; Fayolle, G.; Robinson, J.C.; Foucheyrand, G.

    1995-12-31

    The authors present here the developments in their risk management research; software tools based on object oriented techniques, an image and graphics based man-machine interface, a new algorithm which allows the quick construction of a GIS, strong links with analysis software with the possibility of using fuzzy logic reasoning. The case of the threatening landslide at Sechilienne (Isere, France), studied using these tools, is briefly presented. The authors will show that is management is facilitated through the use of networks as in the WASSS project approach.

  8. Beyond police crisis intervention: Moving “upstream” to manage cases and places of behavioral health vulnerability

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Jennifer; Beierschmitt, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Law enforcement officers continue to serve on the front lines as mental health interventionists, and as such have been subject to a wave of “first generation” reform designed to enhance their crisis response capabilities. Yet, this focus on crisis intervention has not answered recent calls to move “upstream” and bolster early intervention in the name of long-term recovery. This paper reports on findings from an action research project in Philadelphia aimed at exploring opportunities for enhanced upstream engagement. Study methods include spatial analyses of police mental health transportations from an eight year period (2004–2011) and qualitative data from twenty-three “framing conversations” with partners and other stakeholders, seven focus groups with police and outreach workers, five key informant interviews as well as document reviews of the service delivery system in Philadelphia. Recommendations include the need to move beyond a focus on what police can do to a wider conception of city agencies and business stakeholders who can influence vulnerable people and vulnerable spaces of the city. We argue for the need to develop shared principles and rules of engagement that clarify roles and stipulate how best to enlist city resources in a range of circumstances. Since issues of mental health, substance use and disorder are so tightly coupled, we stress the importance of establishing a data-driven approach to crime and disorder reduction in areas of the city we term “hotspots of vulnerability”. In line with a recovery philosophy, such an approach should reduce opportunities for anti-social behavior among the “dually labeled” in ways consistent with “procedural justice”. Furthermore, crime and disorder data flowing from police and security to behavioral health analysts could contribute to a more focused case management of “repeat utilizers” across the two systems. Our central argument is that a twin emphasis on “case management” and

  9. Crisis Management of Tohoku; Japan Earthquake and Tsunami, 11 March 2011

    PubMed Central

    Zaré, M; Afrouz, S Ghaychi

    2012-01-01

    The huge earthquake in 11 March 2012 which followed by a destructive tsunami in Japan was largest recorded earthquake in the history. Japan is pioneer in disaster management, especially earthquakes. How this developed country faced this disaster, which had significant worldwide effects? The humanitarian behavior of the Japanese people amazingly wondered the word’s media, meanwhile the management of government and authorities showed some deficiencies. The impact of the disaster is followed up after the event and the different impacts are tried to be analyzed in different sectors. The situation one year after Japan 2011 earthquake and Tsunami is overviewed. The reason of Japanese plans failure was the scale of tsunami, having higher waves than what was assumed, especially in the design of the Nuclear Power Plant. Japanese authorities considered economic benefits more than safety and moral factors exacerbate the situation. Major lessons to be learnt are 1) the effectiveness of disaster management should be restudied in all hazardous countries; 2) the importance of the high-Tech early-warning systems in reducing risk; 3) Reconsidering of extreme values expected/possible hazard and risk levels is necessary; 4) Morality and might be taken as an important factor in disaster management; 5) Sustainable development should be taken as the basis for reconstruction after disaster. PMID:23113189

  10. Crisis or Crossroads? The Discipline of Educational Management in the 1990s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Tony

    1999-01-01

    The widespread shift to self-management has enhanced the importance of effective leadership within educational institutions and the parallel need for theory and research to establish what constitutes good practice. Rapid and multiple policy changes underscore the need to review the discipline. Opportunities and challenges are discussed. (57…

  11. Decline and Fall: Crisis Financial Manager Tries to Fix Detroit Schools' Budget

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aarons, Dakarai I.

    2009-01-01

    Robert C. Bobb, the state-appointed emergency financial manager of the Detroit public school system, may have the biggest "turnaround" job in the nation. The district, with an annual budget of $1.2 billion, has a deficit projected to be $259 million and growing. Over the past 10 years, about half of the district's students have left,…

  12. Suicide and Sudden Loss: Crisis Management in the Schools. Highlights: An ERIC/CAPS Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Rosemary

    This digest considers how counselors and educators can cope with the emotional needs of suicide survivors and prevent future suicides among students. It discusses self-destructive tendencies in youth and behavioral manifestations of loss; offers suggestions to counselors for managing the first 48 hours following a suicide or loss and lists…

  13. Decline and Fall: Crisis Financial Manager Tries to Fix Detroit Schools' Budget

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aarons, Dakarai I.

    2009-01-01

    Robert C. Bobb, the state-appointed emergency financial manager of the Detroit public school system, may have the biggest "turnaround" job in the nation. The district, with an annual budget of $1.2 billion, has a deficit projected to be $259 million and growing. Over the past 10 years, about half of the district's students have left,…

  14. Be Prepared: Training Is Essential for Effective Risk/Crisis Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beodeker, Robert J.

    1999-01-01

    Offers 12 specific techniques for planning campus activities and training volunteers and other personnel to minimize risks at campus events. These include anticipating legal and insurance issues, assessing potential risks, using case studies to explore complexities of risk management, instituting training in emergency procedures, involving…

  15. Economic Crisis, Technology and the Management of Education: The Case of Distributed Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartley, David

    2016-01-01

    The 2008 crash has been likened to that of 1929. Does it have consequences for the management of education, and in particular for distributed leadership? Informed by evolutionary economics, it is argued that 2008 marked the end of the installation period of a major technological innovation, namely ICT. In the aftermath of the crash, a period of…

  16. Economic Crisis, Technology and the Management of Education: The Case of Distributed Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartley, David

    2016-01-01

    The 2008 crash has been likened to that of 1929. Does it have consequences for the management of education, and in particular for distributed leadership? Informed by evolutionary economics, it is argued that 2008 marked the end of the installation period of a major technological innovation, namely ICT. In the aftermath of the crash, a period of…

  17. Saudi Counter-Terrorism Strategy: Identifying and Applying Lessons Learned

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    politics and clashing political views. For example, in the 18 th century, the French masses rose against the absolute monarchy of Louis XVI and Marie ... Antoinette for their decadence during a fiscal crisis. The commoners wanted their government to change; therefore they filled the streets with their

  18. Nursing in Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulcher, Roxanne

    2007-01-01

    Both the nation's health-care and nursing education systems are in crisis. While the care provided by registered nurses (RNs) is essential to patients' recovery from acute illness and to the effective management of their chronic conditions, the United States is experiencing a nursing shortage that is anticipated to increase as baby boomers age and…

  19. Wanted: Crisis President

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fain, Paul

    2007-01-01

    As the events of Virginia Tech tragedy recede in time, leaders of other colleges and universities are sure to look at Virginia Tech president Charles W. Steger's performance and question the readiness of presidents to act like corporate executives, take visible control of a campus in crisis, manage the onslaught of cameras and microphones, and…

  20. Coping with Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ries, Eric

    1997-01-01

    Discusses ways to manage crises such as homicides, suicides, natural calamities, and improprieties to minimize their negative impact and enhance the school's reputation. Suggestions include developing and practicing a crisis plan, keeping people informed, remembering the victims, and dealing with the media. (JOW)

  1. Wanted: Crisis President

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fain, Paul

    2007-01-01

    As the events of Virginia Tech tragedy recede in time, leaders of other colleges and universities are sure to look at Virginia Tech president Charles W. Steger's performance and question the readiness of presidents to act like corporate executives, take visible control of a campus in crisis, manage the onslaught of cameras and microphones, and…

  2. Midlife Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crow, Mary Lynn

    1987-01-01

    Indicates that women experiencing a midlife crisis pass through five recognizable stages: (1) feeling trapped, (2) the first change, (3) multiple changes, (4) rational planning, and (5) implementing the plan. (NKA)

  3. C3I for Crisis, Emergency and Consequence Management (C3I pour la gestion des crises, des urgences et de leurs consequences)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    May 2009 C3I for Crisis, Emergency and Consequence Management (C3I pour la gestion des crises , des urgences et de leurs conséquences) Research and...consequence management. ES - 2 RTO-MP-IST-086 C3I pour la gestion des crises , des urgences et de leurs conséquences (RTO-MP-IST-086...contre-terrorisme, de sécurité nationale/publique et de réponse collective face aux situations d’urgence (à la fois gestion des crises et gestion de leurs

  4. The influence of the environmental management system on the environmental impact of seaport companies during an economic crisis: Lithuanian case study.

    PubMed

    Anne, Olga; Burskyte, Vilma; Stasiskiene, Zaneta; Balciunas, Arunas

    2015-01-01

    Freight handling in EU ports fell by more than 12 % during the global economic crisis in 2008-2009 after almost a decade of continuous growth. The decrease of freight handling in the Klaipeda seaport, the only port in Lithuania, was 6.7 % and happened due to the dominant outward movement of goods (mainly oil products). The Klaipeda seaport, due to its peculiarity, is the only ice-free port in the northern part of Baltic Sea. The present study explores the environmental impact of Klaipeda seaport activities from 2001 to 2011. Moreover, it compares the environmental effectiveness of environmental protection strategies used in the four biggest companies that, in fact, cover about 88 % of total activities (except general cargo) of the seaport. The first group of targeted companies used an environmental protection strategy to implement an ISO 14001-based environmental management system, and the second group selected to follow environmental management practices without certification. The paper analyses the development of the companies' activities in regard to the change of environmental effectiveness. The paper evaluates the pressure of the economic crisis on the companies' activities and its influence on environmental decisions, with particular interest in the ability of different environmental protection systems to resist and handle the expected performance. The study identified a significant decrease in companies' activities during the crisis period. However, the economic activities and environmental effectiveness demonstrated similar short-term tendencies in regard to the environmental strategy selection but differed in long-term perspective.

  5. The Managing Emergencies in Paediatric Anaesthesia global rating scale is a reliable tool for simulation-based assessment in pediatric anesthesia crisis management.

    PubMed

    Everett, Tobias C; Ng, Elaine; Power, Daniel; Marsh, Christopher; Tolchard, Stephen; Shadrina, Anna; Bould, Matthew D

    2013-12-01

    The use of simulation-based assessments for high-stakes physician examinations remains controversial. The Managing Emergencies in Paediatric Anaesthesia course uses simulation to teach evidence-based management of anesthesia crises to trainee anesthetists in the United Kingdom (UK) and Canada. In this study, we investigated the feasibility and reliability of custom-designed scenario-specific performance checklists and a global rating scale (GRS) assessing readiness for independent practice. After research ethics board approval, subjects were videoed managing simulated pediatric anesthesia crises in a single Canadian teaching hospital. Each subject was randomized to two of six different scenarios. All 60 scenarios were subsequently rated by four blinded raters (two in the UK, two in Canada) using the checklists and GRS. The actual and predicted reliability of the tools was calculated for different numbers of raters using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and the Spearman-Brown prophecy formula. Average measures ICCs ranged from 'substantial' to 'near perfect' (P ≤ 0.001). The reliability of the checklists and the GRS was similar. Single measures ICCs showed more variability than average measures ICC. At least two raters would be required to achieve acceptable reliability. We have established the reliability of a GRS to assess the management of simulated crisis scenarios in pediatric anesthesia, and this tool is feasible within the setting of a research study. The global rating scale allows raters to make a judgement regarding a participant's readiness for independent practice. These tools may be used in the future research examining simulation-based assessment. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. When a Crisis Hits, Will Your School Be Ready?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decker, Robert H.

    This guidebook describes the components involved in proactively developing a comprehensive crisis-management plan. Chapter 1 explains the philosophical underpinnings of a crisis-management plan and discusses the importance of vision and staff development. Chapter 2 answers the questions: Why do we need a crisis-management plan? Who needs to be…

  7. Preparing for a crisis: crisis team development.

    PubMed

    Calarco, C

    1999-02-01

    Emergency preparedness in the school setting necessitates the formation and development of a Crisis Team that will be prepared to assume critical roles in the event of a crisis. This paper discusses the school Crisis Team, including member identification and responsibilities, and the relationship of the Crisis Team to the school crisis plan and policies.

  8. National Drought Policy: Shifting the Paradigm from Crisis to Risk-based Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhite, D. A.; Sivakumar, M. K.; Stefanski, R.

    2011-12-01

    Drought is a normal part of climate for virtually all of the world's climatic regimes. To better address the risks associated with this hazard and societal vulnerability, there must be a dramatic paradigm shift in our approach to drought management in the coming decade in the light of the increasing frequency of droughts and projections of increased severity and duration of these events in the future for many regions, especially in the developing world. Addressing this challenge will require an improved awareness of drought as a natural hazard, the establishment of integrated drought monitoring and early warning systems, a higher level of preparedness that fully incorporates risk-based management, and the adoption of national drought policies that are directed at increasing the coping capacity and resilience of populations to future drought episodes. The World Meteorological Organization (WMO), in partnership with other United Nations' agencies, the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska, NOAA, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and other partners, is currently launching a program to organize a High Level Meeting on National Drought Policy (HMNDP) in March 2013 to encourage the development of national drought policies through the development of a compendium of key policy elements. The key objectives of a national drought policy are to: (1) encourage vulnerable economic sectors and population groups to adopt self-reliant measures that promote risk management; (2) promote sustainable use of the agricultural and natural resource base; and (3) facilitate early recovery from drought through actions consistent with national drought policy objectives. The key elements of a drought policy framework are policy and governance, including political will; addressing risk and improving early warnings, including vulnerability analysis, impact assessment, and communication; mitigation and preparedness, including the application of effective and

  9. Preliminary evaluation of a “formulation-driven cognitive behavioral guided self-help (fCBT-GSH)” for crisis and transitional case management clients

    PubMed Central

    Naeem, Farooq; Johal, Rupinder K; Mckenna, Claire; Calancie, Olivia; Munshi, Tariq; Hassan, Tariq; Nasar, Amina; Ayub, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Background Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is found to be effective for common mental disorders and has been delivered in self-help and guided self-help formats. Crisis and transitional case management (TCM) services play a vital role in managing clients in acute mental health crises. It is, therefore, an appropriate setting to try CBT in guided self-help format. Methods This was a preliminary evaluation of a formulation-driven cognitive behavioral guided self-help. Thirty-six (36) consenting participants with a diagnosis of nonpsychotic illness, attending crisis and the TCM services in Kingston, Canada, were recruited in this study. They were randomly assigned to the guided self-help plus treatment as usual (TAU) (treatment group) or to TAU alone (control group). The intervention was delivered over 8–12 weeks. Assessments were completed at baseline and 3 months after baseline. The primary outcome was a reduction in general psychopathology, and this was done using Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation – Outcome Measure. The secondary outcomes included a reduction in depression, measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and reduction in disability, measured using the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0. Findings Participants in the treatment group showed statistically significant improvement in overall psychopathology (P<0.005), anxiety and depression (P<0.005), and disability (P<0.005) at the end of the trial compared with TAU group. Conclusion A formulation-driven cognitive behavioral guided self-help was feasible for the crisis and TCM clients and can be effective in improving mental health, when compared with TAU. This is the first report of a trial of guided self-help for clients attending crisis and TCM services. PMID:28331328

  10. Preliminary evaluation of a "formulation-driven cognitive behavioral guided self-help (fCBT-GSH)" for crisis and transitional case management clients.

    PubMed

    Naeem, Farooq; Johal, Rupinder K; Mckenna, Claire; Calancie, Olivia; Munshi, Tariq; Hassan, Tariq; Nasar, Amina; Ayub, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is found to be effective for common mental disorders and has been delivered in self-help and guided self-help formats. Crisis and transitional case management (TCM) services play a vital role in managing clients in acute mental health crises. It is, therefore, an appropriate setting to try CBT in guided self-help format. This was a preliminary evaluation of a formulation-driven cognitive behavioral guided self-help. Thirty-six (36) consenting participants with a diagnosis of nonpsychotic illness, attending crisis and the TCM services in Kingston, Canada, were recruited in this study. They were randomly assigned to the guided self-help plus treatment as usual (TAU) (treatment group) or to TAU alone (control group). The intervention was delivered over 8-12 weeks. Assessments were completed at baseline and 3 months after baseline. The primary outcome was a reduction in general psychopathology, and this was done using Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation - Outcome Measure. The secondary outcomes included a reduction in depression, measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and reduction in disability, measured using the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0. Participants in the treatment group showed statistically significant improvement in overall psychopathology (P<0.005), anxiety and depression (P<0.005), and disability (P<0.005) at the end of the trial compared with TAU group. A formulation-driven cognitive behavioral guided self-help was feasible for the crisis and TCM clients and can be effective in improving mental health, when compared with TAU. This is the first report of a trial of guided self-help for clients attending crisis and TCM services.

  11. Crisis Data Management: A Forum Guide to Collecting and Managing Data about Displaced Students. NFES 2010-804

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Forum on Education Statistics, 2010

    2010-01-01

    In the aftermath of hurricanes Katrina and Rita, the immediate demand for data about displaced students overwhelmed many school districts that had gained or lost students because of the disasters. The scale of these crises and their effects on school operations and management were in many ways unprecedented. This guide reflects "lessons…

  12. Creating wi-fi bluetooth mesh network for crisis management applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Tekreeti, Safa; Adams, Christopher; Al-Jawad, Naseer

    2010-04-01

    This paper proposes a wireless mesh network implementation consisting of both Wi-Fi Ad-Hoc networks as well as Bluetooth Piconet/Scatternet networks, organised in an energy and throughput efficient structure. This type of networks can be easily constructed for Crises management applications, for example in an Earthquake disaster. The motivation of this research is to form mesh network from the mass availability of WiFi and Bluetooth enabled electronic devices such as mobile phones and PC's that are normally present in most regions were major crises occurs. The target of this study is to achieve an effective solution that will enable Wi-Fi and/or Bluetooth nodes to seamlessly configure themselves to act as a bridge between their own network and that of the other network to achieve continuous routing for our proposed mesh networks.

  13. Pulmonary hypertensive crisis and its efficient management. A Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Khan, Karima Karam; Khan, Fazal Hameed

    2017-06-01

    There is a staggering upsurge in the incidence of plagiarism of scientific literature. Literature shows divergent views about the factors that make plagiarism reprehensible. This review explores the causes and remedies for the perennial academic problem of plagiarism. Data sources were searched for full text English language articles published from 2000 to 2015. Data selection was done using medical subject headline (MeSH) terms plagiarism, unethical writing, academic theft, retraction, medical field, and plagiarism detection software. Data extraction was undertaken by selecting titles from retrieved references and data synthesis identified key factors leading to plagiarism such as unawareness of research ethics, poor writing skills and pressure or publish mantra. Plagiarism can be managed by a balance among its prevention, detection by plagiarism detection software, and institutional sanctions against proven plagiarists. Educating researchers about ethical principles of academic writing and institutional support in training writers about academic integrity and ethical publications can curtail plagiarism.

  14. Thyrotoxic crisis presenting with jaundice.

    PubMed

    Wickramasinghe, R D S S; Luke, W A N V; Sebastiampillai, B S; Gunathilake, M P M L; Premaratna, R

    2016-06-23

    Thyrotoxic crisis is a medical emergency requiring early diagnosis and urgent management, which can be challenging due to its diverse clinical presentations. While common presentations include fever, sweating, palpitations, tremors and confusion, presence of jaundice is rare. We report a 35-year-old male who presented with jaundice due to cholestasis along with other features of thyrotoxic crisis due to Graves' disease. He had a good clinical recovery with resolution of cholestasis following treatment for thyrotoxic crisis. Jaundice can be a rare manifestation of thyrotoxic crisis, and should be considered in the differential diagnosis when other clinical features of thyrotoxic crisis are present. However secondary causes of jaundice should be looked into and excluded.

  15. After the data breach: Managing the crisis and mitigating the impact.

    PubMed

    Brown, Hart S

    2016-01-01

    Historically, the unauthorised access and theft of information was a tactic used between countries as part of espionage campaigns, during times of conflict as well as for personal and criminal purposes. The consumers of the information were relatively isolated and specific. As information became stored and digitised in larger quantities in the 1980s the ability to access mass amounts of records at one time became possible. The expertise needed to remotely access and exfiltrate the data was not readily available and the number of markets to monetise the data was limited. Over the past ten years, shadow networks have been used by criminals to collaborate on hacking techniques, exchange hacking advice anonymously and commercialise data on the black market. The intersection of these networks along with the unintentional losses of information have resulted in 5,810 data breaches made public since 2005 (comprising some 847,807,830 records) and the velocity of these events is increasing. Organisations must be prepared for a potential breach event to maintain cyber resiliency. Proper management of a breach response can reduce response costs and can serve to mitigate potential reputational losses.

  16. An Intelligence-Sharing Continuum: Next Generation Requirements for U.S. Counterterrorism Efforts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    for U.S. Counterterrorism Efforts 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) David Carabin 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval...Postgraduate School Monterey, CA 93943-5000 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING /MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) N/A...information and intelligence appear to be falling short of expectations. The NCTC was established to be the primary government organization responsible

  17. US Counterterrorism vs the New Terrorism: Leadership and Strategy are the Keys to Success

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-04-01

    in Khartoum and export companies for gum , sunflower and sesame products helped to make money for worldwide training and operations efforts.18 Prior to... chewed out by his superior if he gets higher authority out of bed. It includes the contingencies that occur to no one, but also those that everyone...9/11 provided the last ingredient needed for war, the will of the people, and forced US leadership to use counterterrorism against the new terrorism

  18. U.S.-China Counterterrorism Cooperation: Issues for U.S. Policy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-08

    Xinjiang further complicated China’s demands for foreign support for its counterterrorism means. Despite China’s attempt to deflect interest from local...the incident had a connection to terrorists in Pakistan, but the sophistication of that attempt remained disputable.87 Also in March, soon after...analyst claimed that threats increased in Xinjiang with coordinated multiple bombings, crude home-made bombs, female attackers, and “ suicide bombers

  19. Homeland Security and Counterterrorism Research and Development: Funding, Organization, and Oversight

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-07-21

    The Department of Energy’s (DOE) counterterrorism R&D includes work on security, materials, detection of toxic agents, genomic sequencing, DNA-based...private and government computers. The House Science Committee held a hearing on May 14, 2003 on cybersecurity R&D. DHS estimated FY2003 R&D funding...monitor the release of pathogens and agents), and information analysis (including tools and cybersecurity research). It is unclear how DHS will set

  20. The presentation, management and prevention of crisis in sickle cell disease in Africa.

    PubMed

    Fleming, A F

    1989-03-01

    About 120,000 infants are born each year with sickle cell disease (SCD) in Africa. The majority have Hb SS, but Hb SC and Hb S/beta+ thalassaemia are common in west Africa. The development of Plasmodium falciparum and P. malariae is partially inhibited in the Hb SS red cells, but malaria precipitates both haemolytic and infarctive crises, and is the commonest and most important cause of morbidity and mortality. The pneumococcus is likely to be the second major infectious cause of sickness and death. In one rural community, there were less than 2% of the expected number of subjects with SCD surviving beyond 5 years of age. Genetic factors improving prognosis include (1) the Senegal beta chain haplotype, which is linked to a high level of Hb F, and (2) alpha+ thalassaemia. Of environmental factors improving prognosis, the family is of first importance. The commonest age of presentation is 1-3 years. Children present with anaemic crises (malaria, splenic sequestration, folate deficiency, and possibly aplastic), infarctive crises (hand-foot syndrome, bone-pain, pulmonary and abdominal) or acute infections (malaria, pneumonia, septicaemia, meningitis, osteomyelitis). Tragically, many patients in central Africa have been infected by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) through blood transfusions; they present with generalised lymphadenopathy and other features of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The principles of management are (1) to ensure freedom from malaria, (2) to continue folic acid supplements, (3) to give blood transfusions only when anaemia endangers life, (4) to control pain, (5) to restore hydration, and (6) to prescribe broad spectrum antibiotics in large dosage and without delay, but only when there are definite indications, such as fever (greater than 39 degrees C), acute pulmonary disease, meningitis, and acute osteomyelitis. The advent of HIV and AIDS makes the control of SCD of even greater importance. Principles of control are (1) early

  1. Phase transitions between lower and higher level management learning in times of crisis: an experimental study based on synergetics.

    PubMed

    Liening, Andreas; Strunk, Guido; Mittelstadt, Ewald

    2013-10-01

    Much has been written about the differences between single- and double-loop learning, or more general between lower level and higher level learning. Especially in times of a fundamental crisis, a transition between lower and higher level learning would be an appropriate reaction to a challenge coming entirely out of the dark. However, so far there is no quantitative method to monitor such a transition. Therefore we introduce theory and methods of synergetics and present results from an experimental study based on the simulation of a crisis within a business simulation game. Hypothesized critical fluctuations - as a marker for so-called phase transitions - have been assessed with permutation entropy. Results show evidence for a phase transition during the crisis, which can be interpreted as a transition between lower and higher level learning.

  2. The TRIDEC System-of-Systems; Choreography of large-scale concurrent tasks in Natural Crisis Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häner, R.; Wächter, J.

    2012-04-01

    The project Collaborative, Complex, and Critical Decision-Support in Evolving Crises (TRIDEC), co-funded by the European Commission in its Seventh Framework Programme aims at establishing a network of dedicated, autonomous legacy systems for large-scale concurrent management of natural crises utilising heterogeneous information resources. TRIDEC's architecture reflects the System-of- Systems (SoS) approach which is based on task-oriented systems, cooperatively interacting as a collective in a common environment. The design of the TRIDEC-SoS follows the principles of service-oriented and event-driven architectures (SOA & EDA) exceedingly focusing on a loose coupling of the systems. The SoS approach in combination with SOA and EDA has the distinction of being able to provide novel and coherent behaviours and features resulting from a process of dynamic self-organisation. Self-organisation is a process without the need for a central or external coordinator controlling it through orchestration. It is the result of enacted concurrent tasks in a collaborative environment of geographically distributed systems. Although the individual systems act completely autonomously, their interactions expose emergent structures of evolving nature. Particularly, the fact is important that SoS are inherently able to evolve on all facets of intelligent information management. This includes adaptive properties, e.g. seamless integration of new resource types or the adoption of new fields in natural crisis management. In the case of TRIDEC with various heterogeneous participants involved, concurrent information processing is of fundamental importance because of the achievable improvements regarding cooperative decision making. Collaboration within TRIDEC will be implemented with choreographies and conversations. Choreographies specify the expected behaviour between two or more participants; conversations describe the message exchange between all participants emphasising their logical

  3. "Relaaax, I Remember the Recession in the Early 1980s...": Organizational Storytelling as a Crisis Management Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopp, David M.; Nikolovska, Irena; Desiderio, Katie P.; Guterman, Jeffrey T.

    2011-01-01

    In this conceptual paper, we consider organizational storytelling as a communications tool in which stories are used to reduce the stress and anxiety of organizational members during a crisis. While there is much consensus among organizational scholars detailing storytelling's active role in such processes as organizational learning and…

  4. "Relaaax, I Remember the Recession in the Early 1980s...": Organizational Storytelling as a Crisis Management Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopp, David M.; Nikolovska, Irena; Desiderio, Katie P.; Guterman, Jeffrey T.

    2011-01-01

    In this conceptual paper, we consider organizational storytelling as a communications tool in which stories are used to reduce the stress and anxiety of organizational members during a crisis. While there is much consensus among organizational scholars detailing storytelling's active role in such processes as organizational learning and…

  5. Out of the Frying Pan: Into the Fire of Post-Global Financial Crisis (GFC) University Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galbraith, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A downturn in enrolments of international students following the Global Financial Crisis is causing publicised stress among Australian universities that have come to rely on associated income. How to survive the financial consequences is currently receiving urgent attention within the sector. This paper models the problem of developing responses…

  6. Out of the Frying Pan: Into the Fire of Post-Global Financial Crisis (GFC) University Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galbraith, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A downturn in enrolments of international students following the Global Financial Crisis is causing publicised stress among Australian universities that have come to rely on associated income. How to survive the financial consequences is currently receiving urgent attention within the sector. This paper models the problem of developing responses…

  7. Common Errors in School Crisis Response: Learning from Our Mistakes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornell, Dewey G.; Sheras, Peter L.

    1998-01-01

    Describes five school crises. In each case example, errors in crisis management by school staff exacerbated the crisis and resulted in deleterious consequences for the school, its students, and the surrounding community. Identifies common themes of leadership, teamwork, and responsibility that are critical to successful crisis management.…

  8. Common Errors in School Crisis Response: Learning from Our Mistakes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornell, Dewey G.; Sheras, Peter L.

    1998-01-01

    Describes five school crises. In each case example, errors in crisis management by school staff exacerbated the crisis and resulted in deleterious consequences for the school, its students, and the surrounding community. Identifies common themes of leadership, teamwork, and responsibility that are critical to successful crisis management.…

  9. Adult emergency department patients with sickle cell pain crisis: a learning collaborative model to improve analgesic management.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Paula; Artz, Nicole; Mark Courtney, D; Martinovich, Zoran; Weiss, Kevin B; Zvirbulis, Elena; Hafner, John W

    2010-04-01

    The objectives were to report the baseline (prior to quality improvement interventions) patient and visit characteristics and analgesic management practices for each site participating in an emergency department (ED) sickle cell learning collaborative. A prospective, multisite longitudinal cohort study in the context of a learning-collaborative model was performed in three midwestern EDs. Each site formed a multidisciplinary team charged with improving analgesic management for patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). Each team developed a nurse-initiated analgesic protocol for SCD patients (implemented after a baseline data collection period of 3.5 months at one site and 10 months at the other two sites). All sites prospectively enrolled adults with an acute pain crisis and SCD. All medical records for patients meeting study criteria were reviewed. Demographic, health services, and analgesic management data were abstracted, including ED visit frequency data, ED disposition, arrival and discharge pain score, and name and route of initial analgesic administered. Ten interviews per quarter per site were conducted with patients within 14 days of their ED discharge, and subjects were queried about the highest level of pain acceptable at discharge. The primary outcome variable was the time to initial analgesic administration. Variable data were described as means and standard deviations (SDs) or medians and interquartile ranges (IQR) for nonnormal data. A total of 155 patients met study criteria (median age = 32 years, IQR = 24-40 years) with a total of 701 ED visits. Eighty-six interviews were conducted. Most patients (71.6%) had between one and three visits to the ED during the study period. However, after removing Site 3 from the analysis because of the short data enrollment period (3.5 months), which influenced the mean number of visits for the entire cohort, 52% of patients had between one and three ED visits over 10 months, 21% had four to nine visits, and 27% had

  10. Crisis Warning and Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-08-01

    Davis B. Bobrow 9. PERFORMING CmOANlZATION N^Mt AND ADORaSi Department of Government and Politics University of Maryland College Park...and Integration Tasks, 3) Data Set Inventory, 4) Intensive Events Data - 1963-1965, and 5) Chinese Perceptions of Political Symbols. I I DD .STM...Kringcn ana « uniquely pertinent set of semantic information on political symbols described .n Ap- pendix E. Orientation of these materials to our

  11. Civil Liberty Woes When Dealing with Uncivil Foes: The Effect of Civil Liberties and Human Right on Counterterrorism Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-15

    Elizabeth Rindskopf Parker, “Civil Liberties in the Struggle Against Terror,” In Legal Issues in the Struggle Against Terror, edited by John Norton Moore...Right, 43. 14 Ibid, 43-44. 15 Matthew Dalton , "EU Court’s Ruling Deals a Blow to Counterterror Efforts: Saudi Buisnessman’s Removal From List is... Dalton , "EU Court’s Ruling Deals a Blow to Counterterror Efforts” 9 European allies’ emphasis on protecting civil liberties and human rights over the

  12. Crisis Inventory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-08-01

    involved Egypt and Israel on opposing sides, as well as other opposing pairs such as Syria and Israel . The advantage of organ- izing the cases in...West municipalities. An agreement to end the blockade was reached in May 1949. Crisis: Costa Rica- Nicaragua Dates: 12/3/48-1/30/49 Country Pair...Costa Rica- Nicaragua In the midst of domestic political turmoil in Costa Rica, Rafael Calderon - previously a Presidential candidate in Costa Rica

  13. Crisis behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Grinspoon, L.

    1984-04-01

    The Department of Defense has rules and procedures to minimize the opportunity for error and improper behavior among those with access to strategic weapons, but no psychiatric screening system can predict with assurance who will or will not behave rationally during a crisis. Personal problems and institutional decision-making pressures may destroy nuclear deterrence. Certain features of military life, including drug and alcohol abuse, heavy responsibility, tension, and group decision making, can destreoy rationality. 12 references.

  14. Use of a clinical pathway to improve the acute management of vaso-occlusive crisis pain in pediatric sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Ender, Katherine L; Krajewski, Jennifer A; Babineau, John; Tresgallo, Mary; Schechter, William; Saroyan, John M; Kharbanda, Anupam

    2014-04-01

    The most common, debilitating morbidity of sickle cell disease (SCD) is vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC) pain. Although guidelines exist for its management, they are generally not well-followed, and research in other pediatric diseases has shown that clinical pathways improve care. The purpose of our study was to determine whether a clinical pathway improves the acute management of sickle cell vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC) pain in the pediatric emergency department (PED). Pain management practices were prospectively investigated before and after the initiation of a clinical pathway in the PED of an urban, tertiary care center with 50,000 ED visits per year and approximately 200 active sickle cell patients. The pathway included instructions for triage, monitoring, medication administration, and timing of assessments and interventions. Data were eligible from 35 pre-pathway and 33 post-pathway visits. Primary outcome was time interval to administration of first analgesic medication. Statistical analysis was by Student's t-test, using natural-log-transformed data for outcomes with skewed distribution curves. Time interval to first analgesic improved from 74 to 42 minutes (P = 0.012) and to first opioid from 94 to 46 minutes (P = 0.013). The percentage of patients who received ketorolac increased from 57% to 82% (P = 0.03). Decrease in time interval to subsequent pain score assessment was not statistically significant (110 to 72 minutes (P = 0.07)), and change in pain score was not different (P = 0.25). The use of a clinical pathway for sickle cell VOC in the PED can improve important aspects of pain management and merits further investigation and implementation. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Mandating doctors to attend counter-terrorism workshops is medically unethical

    PubMed Central

    Summerfield, Derek

    2016-01-01

    This is a brief exploration of the ethical issues raised for psychiatrists, and for universities, schools and wider society, by the demand that they attend mandatory training as part of the UK government's Prevent counter-terrorism strategy. The silence on this matter to date on the part of the General Medical Council, medical Royal Colleges, and the British Medical Association is a failure of ethical leadership. There is also a civil liberties issue, reminiscent of the McCarthyism of 1950s USA. We should refuse to attend. PMID:27087993

  16. Mandating doctors to attend counter-terrorism workshops is medically unethical.

    PubMed

    Summerfield, Derek

    2016-04-01

    This is a brief exploration of the ethical issues raised for psychiatrists, and for universities, schools and wider society, by the demand that they attend mandatory training as part of the UK government's Prevent counter-terrorism strategy. The silence on this matter to date on the part of the General Medical Council, medical Royal Colleges, and the British Medical Association is a failure of ethical leadership. There is also a civil liberties issue, reminiscent of the McCarthyism of 1950s USA. We should refuse to attend.

  17. Crisis Leadership: Using Military Lessons, Organizational Experiences, and the Power of Influence To Lessen the Impact of Chaos on the People You Lead.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klann, Gene

    Managing a crisis and providing leadership in a crisis are not the same activity. Crisis leadership principally deals with how leaders handle the human response to a crisis, including their own. This book, in discussing crisis leadership, focuses on three questions: (1) Will the leader address the crisis head-on, take action to fix it, and, if…

  18. Caring capacity in the management of the nutrition crisis in infants, young children and women in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Igbedioh, S O

    1996-01-01

    Nigeria's nutrition crisis has been shown to have a considerable negative impact on infants, young children and women. Available evidence suggests that 'caring capacity' when properly planned and targeted at the most-at-risk can help. Strategies that can achieve this care are increasing women's income and control over income, increasing investment in women's education and improving access to credit facilities. Others are the aggressive promotion of gender-biased labour saving technology, increasing women's access to basic health and family planning services and implementing reforms in land ownership while instituting social security for women.

  19. Discussing Terrorism: A Pupil-Inspired Guide to UK Counter-Terrorism Policy Implementation in Religious Education Classrooms in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quartermaine, Angela

    2016-01-01

    My research into pupils' perceptions of terrorism and current UK counter-terrorism policy highlights the need for more detailed and accurate discussions about the implementation of the educational aims, in particular those laid out by the Prevent Strategy. Religious education (RE) in England is affected by these aims, specifically the challenging…

  20. Discussing Terrorism: A Pupil-Inspired Guide to UK Counter-Terrorism Policy Implementation in Religious Education Classrooms in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quartermaine, Angela

    2016-01-01

    My research into pupils' perceptions of terrorism and current UK counter-terrorism policy highlights the need for more detailed and accurate discussions about the implementation of the educational aims, in particular those laid out by the Prevent Strategy. Religious education (RE) in England is affected by these aims, specifically the challenging…

  1. Leadership in a (permanent) crisis.

    PubMed

    Heifetz, Ronald; Grashow, Alexander; Linsky, Marty

    2009-01-01

    The current economic crisis is not just another rough spell. Today's mix of urgency, high stakes, and uncertainty will continue even after the recession ends. The immediate crisis--which we will get through with policy makers' expert technical adjustments--sets the stage for a sustained, or even permanent, crisis, a relentless series of challenges no one has encountered before. Instead of hunkering down and relying on their familiar expertise to deal with the sustained crisis, people in positions of authority--whether they are CEOs or managers heading up a company initiative--must practice what the authors call adaptive leadership. They must, of course, tackle the underlying causes of the crisis, but they must also simultaneously make the changes that will allow their organizations to thrive in turbulent environments. Adaptive leadership is an improvisational and experimental art, requiring some new practices. Like Julie Gilbert, who overcame internal resistance to reorient Best Buy toward female purchasers, adaptive leaders get things done to meet today's challenges and then modify those things to thrive in tomorrow's world. They also embrace disequilibrium, using turbulence as an opportunity to build crucial new capacities, as Paul Levy did to rescue Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center from a profound financial crisis. Finally, adaptive leaders, such as Egon Zehnder, the founder of an executive search firm, draw out the leadership skills that reside deep in the organization, recognizing the interdependence of all employees and mobilizing everyone to generate solutions.

  2. Governing during an Institutional Crisis: 10 Fundamental Principles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    In today's world, managing a campus crisis poses special challenges for an institution's governing board, which may operate some distance removed from the immediate events giving rise to the crisis. In its most challenging form, a campus crisis--a shooting, a natural disaster, a fraternity hazing death, the arrest of a prominent campus…

  3. Governing during an Institutional Crisis: 10 Fundamental Principles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    In today's world, managing a campus crisis poses special challenges for an institution's governing board, which may operate some distance removed from the immediate events giving rise to the crisis. In its most challenging form, a campus crisis--a shooting, a natural disaster, a fraternity hazing death, the arrest of a prominent campus…

  4. What Should This Fight Be Called? Metaphors of Counterterrorism and Their Implications.

    PubMed

    Kruglanski, Arie W; Crenshaw, Martha; Post, Jerrold M; Victoroff, Jeff

    2007-12-01

    This monograph examines from a psychological perspective the use of metaphors in framing counterterrorism. Four major counterterrorism metaphors are considered, namely those of war, law enforcement, containment of a social epidemic, and a process of prejudice reduction. The war metaphor is as follows: Wars are fought by states; the enemy is thus an identifiable entity whose interests fundamentally oppose your own. The conflict is zero-sum-the outcome will be victory for one side or the other-and there is no compromise. The war metaphor is totalistic and extreme. Arguably, it was adopted in light of the immensity of damage and national hurt produced by the 9/11 attack. It has insinuated itself into the public discourse about counterterrorism, and it has guided policy, but it has also met challenges because of lack of fit and the availability of counteranalogies with different lessons of history. Some of the drawbacks of the war metaphor are addressable in the law enforcement metaphor of counterterrorism. Unlike war's special status and circumscribed duration, law enforcement is an ongoing concern that must compete for resources with other societal needs. A major advantage of law enforcement over warfare is its focused nature-targeting the actual terrorists, with less likelihood of injuring innocent parties. Yet despite its advantages, the law enforcement metaphor exhibits a partial mismatch with the realities of terrorism. Its complete and uncritical adoption may temporarily hamper terrorists' ability to launch attacks without substantially altering their motivation to do so. The public health epidemiological model was usefully applied to the epidemic of terror that followed the 9/11 attacks. It utilizes a partition between (a) an external agent, (b) a susceptible host, (c) an environment that brings them together, and (d) the vector that enables transmission of the disease. In the specific application to jihadist terrorism, the agent refers to the militant Islamist

  5. Crisis Paper No. 33. The Energy Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atlantic Information Centre for Teachers, London (England).

    This Crisis Paper is thirty-third in a series which expands the analysis of the crisis under discussion to provide a multi-national view of the issue by quoting comment from a selection of newspapers and journals of several countries. A brief introduction outlines the history and background of the energy crisis, emphasizing the underestimated…

  6. Crisis Paper No. 33. The Energy Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atlantic Information Centre for Teachers, London (England).

    This Crisis Paper is thirty-third in a series which expands the analysis of the crisis under discussion to provide a multi-national view of the issue by quoting comment from a selection of newspapers and journals of several countries. A brief introduction outlines the history and background of the energy crisis, emphasizing the underestimated…

  7. Organisational socialisation in a crisis context.

    PubMed

    Lalonde, Carole

    2010-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to highlight the dimensions characterising the socialisation process in a crisis context. Based on the definition of organisational socialisation advanced by Van Maanen and Schein (1979) and employed later by Jones (1986), a crisis is presented as a passage from a 'normal' situation to an 'exceptional' situation. A crisis represents a socialisation context in the sense that it is a novel state in which actors must develop a different way of mobilising their knowledge, utilising their skills, and practicing their trade or profession. The paper discusses certain findings that have emerged from the literature on organisational socialisation, as well as from the testimony of actors who participated in efforts to manage the Quebec ice-storm crisis of early 1998. It is hoped that this exploratory study's data will give rise to fruitful interaction between the field of organisational socialisation and that of crisis management.

  8. Energy Crisis vs. Extension Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liles, Harold R.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses what steps were taken by the Cooperative Extension Service in Oklahoma, after the energy crisis began, to help landowners make better decisions regarding oil and gas leases. Oklahoma's Extension educational efforts in mineral rights management have been successful because they met the needs of the people. (EM)

  9. The Energy Crisis: A Continuing Disaster

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savage, David

    1976-01-01

    To school business managers, the energy crisis is a continuing economic disaster as energy costs continue to climb and schools are without money to make necessary renovations to reduce energy consumption. (Author/IRT)

  10. Special Operations Forces Interagency Counterterrorism Reference Manual, Second Edition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    Civil-Military Coordination Center ( CMCC ) is typically located within a secured, military-controlled facility. Access is limited to the key HN...United States of America www.state.gov/r/pa/prs/ps/2008/07/107063.htm Civil-Military Cooperation Center Civil-Military Coordination Center ( CMCC ...Operations Task Force (DoD) CMCC . Civil-Military Coordination Center CMM. Conflict Management and Mitigation (USAID) CMO. Civil-Military Operations (DoD) CMOC

  11. Thyrotoxic crisis presenting as status epilepticus.

    PubMed Central

    Safe, A. F.; Griffiths, K. D.; Maxwell, R. T.

    1990-01-01

    A 30 year old male patient with thyrotoxic crisis presenting as status epilepticus is reported. The aetiology, manifestations and management of this medical emergency are discussed. The importance of prompt, vigorous and comprehensive treatment of thyrotoxic crisis is emphasized. Rapid control of hyperthyroidism as well as other supportive measures are essential if the high fatality rate is to be reduced. Comprehensive management reduces mortality from 90% to 20%. PMID:2349191

  12. [Crisis and crisis therapy (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Culberg, J

    1978-02-01

    A psychic crisis is defined as a reaction to external events where the individual is unable to cope with these events by means of his usual adaptive mechanisms and earlier experiences. Examples of a traumatic crisis is the death of a near relative, the sudden onset of a severe illness, a sudden infidelity in marriage etc. So called transitional life situations may also elicit crisis reaction, i.e. the birth of a first child, retirement from work etc. A psychic crisis is often overdetermined from experiences in early childhood. The more "pure" crisis reactions are often seen in medical or surgical clinics while the psychiatrists usually meet the overdetermined crisis reaction. Four different phases of the crisis reaction are described. The goal of crisis therapy is to support the individual's and his surroundings own resources. It is not to replace the loss or to help the individual deny the emotional impact of what has happened. The function of the therapist can often be described in terms of "containing function" and "vicarious hope". Listening to a client in acute crisis often evokes feelings of anxiety and helplessness in the therapist. He often feels seduced to behave omnipotently, helping the patient to suppress the feelings of sorrow and anger. He may also be overprotective or may avoid discussing the pertinent feelings. The antitherapeutic risks of crisis psychotherapy are discussed and also illustrated with examples from the author's research on reactions of mothers to the birth of stillborn children.

  13. Hypercalcemic crisis: a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Shazia; Kuraganti, Gayatri; Steenkamp, Devin

    2015-03-01

    Hypercalcemia is a common metabolic perturbation. However, hypercalcemic crisis is an unusual endocrine emergency, with little clinical scientific data to support therapeutic strategy. We review the relevant scientific English literature on the topic and review current management strategies after conducting a PubMed, MEDLINE, and Google Scholar search for articles published between 1930 and June 2014 using specific keywords: "hypercalcemic crisis," "hyperparathyroid crisis," "parathyroid storm," "severe primary hyperparathyroidism," "acute hyperparathyroidism," and "severe hypercalcemia" for articles pertaining to the diagnosis, epidemiology, clinical presentation, and treatment strategies. Despite extensive clinical experience, large and well-designed clinical studies to direct appropriate clinical care are lacking. Nonetheless, morbidity and mortality rates have substantially decreased since early series reported almost universal fatality. Improved outcomes can be attributed to modern diagnostic capabilities, leading to earlier diagnosis, along with the recognition that primary hyperparathyroidism is the most common etiology for hypercalcemic crisis. Hypercalcemic crisis is an unusual endocrine emergency that portends excellent outcomes if rapid diagnosis, medical treatment, and definitive surgical treatment are expedited. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A Survey of the Pain Management of Acute Painful Crisis among Patients with Sickle Cell Disease at Two Centres in Jamaica

    PubMed Central

    Augier, R; Jenkins, S; Bortolusso Ali, S; Tennant, I; Williams-Johnson, J; Reid, M

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this survey was to establish the pain management approaches to acute painful crisis (APC) in sickle cell patients at two healthcare facilities and to compare with available guidelines. Methods: A multi-centre observational survey of the management of APC in sickle cell patients was conducted. Data were collected at the Sickle Cell Unit (SCU), Tropical Medicine Research Institute (TMRI) and Accident and Emergency Department (A&E), University Hospital of the West Indies. Results: One hundred episodes of uncomplicated APC involving 81 patients managed at the SCU clinic and 64 episodes at the A&E in a total of 28 patients were included in the data set. Drugs used at the SCU included oral morphine, codeine and paracetamol and intramuscular diclofenac. At the A&E, parenteral morphine and pethidine were most commonly used. At the SCU, the mean time to initiation of analgesics was 38 minutes (IQR 25 to 50 minutes); at the A&E, this was 111 minutes (IQR 50 to 150 minutes). At the SCU, the mean duration of stay (DOS) was 2.9 hours (IQR 1.9 to 3.8 hours) with 94% of the patients being discharged home. At the A&E, the mean DOS was 13.0 hours (IQR 8.3 to 16.9 hours) with 93% of the patients being discharged home. The A&E patient group contained multiple high frequency presenters. Documentation of pain severity scores was inconsistent. Conclusion The findings of the survey indicate that the management of APC at the two centres is substantially different. Further study is required to investigate patient satisfaction, centre preference and analgesic therapy efficacy. PMID:25314283

  15. Sickle Cell Crisis (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Sickle Cell Crisis (Pain Crisis) KidsHealth > For Teens > Sickle Cell ... drepanocíticas (Crisis de dolor) What Is a Sickle Cell Crisis? Sickle cell disease changes the shape of ...

  16. Think crisis-think female: the glass cliff and contextual variation in the think manager-think male stereotype.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Michelle K; Haslam, S Alexander; Hersby, Mette D; Bongiorno, Renata

    2011-05-01

    The "think manager-think male" (TMTM) association underlies many gender inequalities in the workplace. However, research into the "glass cliff" has demonstrated that the suitability of male and female managers varies as a function of company performance such that in times of poor performance people may "think female" (Ryan & Haslam, 2005, 2007). Three studies examined gender and managerial stereotypes in the context of companies that are doing well or doing badly. Study 1 reproduced TMTM associations for descriptions of managers of successful companies but demonstrated a reversal for managers of unsuccessful companies. Study 2 examined the prescriptive nature of these stereotypes. No TMTM relationship was found for ideal managers of successful companies, but ideal managers of unsuccessful companies were associated with the female stereotype. Study 3 suggested that women may be favored in times of poor performance, not because they are expected to improve the situation, but because they are seen to be good people managers and can take the blame for organizational failure. Together, the studies illustrate the importance of context as a moderator of the TMTM association. Practical and theoretical implications for gender discrimination in the workplace are discussed.

  17. [Privatization in healthcare management: an adverse effect of the economic crisis and a symptom of bad governance. SESPAS report 2014].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Martínez, Fernando I; Abellán-Perpiñán, José María; Oliva-Moreno, Juan

    2014-06-01

    It is often asserted that public management of healthcare facilities is inefficient. On the basis of that unproven claim, it is argued that privatization schemes are needed. In this article we review the available evidence, in Spain and other countries, on the application of private management mechanisms to publicly funded systems similar to the Spanish national health system. The evidence suggests that private management of healthcare services is not necessarily better than public management, nor vice versa. Ownership-whether public or private-of health care centers does not determine their performance which, on the contrary, depends on other factors, such as the workplace culture or the practice of suitable monitoring by the public payer. Promoting competition among centers (irrespective of the specific legal form of the management arrangements), however, could indeed lead to improvements under some circumstances. Therefore, it is advisable to cease the narrow-minded debate on the superiority of one or other model in order to focus on improving healthcare services management per se. Understanding that good governance affects health policies, the management of health care organizations, and clinical practice is, undoubtedly, an essential requirement but may not necessarily lead to policies that stimulate the solvency of the system. Copyright © 2013 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Developing a health system approach to disaster management: A qualitative analysis of the core literature to complement the WHO Toolkit for assessing health-system capacity for crisis management

    PubMed Central

    Bayntun, Claire; Rockenschaub, Gerald; Murray, Virginia

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND The World Health Organisation's (WHO) sixty-fourth World Health Assembly in May 2011 adopted a resolution on ‘strengthening national health emergency and disaster management capacities and resilience of health systems’. Disaster management is a topical issue globally and countries are being encouraged to improve their disaster preparedness, along with growing international commitment to strengthening health systems. Lessons identified from disasters have not been effectively collated; essential experience is forgotten. METHODS This paper describes the analysis of the worldwide experience of disasters through a health systems approach. A systematic search of the core literature from January 2000 to November 2011 was conducted. Components drawn from the WHO’s Global assessment of national health sector emergency preparedness and response baseline survey were combined with WHO’s six health system building blocks (or levers) to act as the initial analysis anchors, with a further grounded theory qualitative analysis of the literature allowing the identification of emerging themes and insights. The priority areas identified by this literature review were then compared with the topics covered by the new expert-consensus-derived Toolkit for assessing health-system capacity for crisis management developed by the WHO Regional Office for Europe. FINDINGS 143 publications identified from a literature search were analysed and appraised. Themes and examples from the literature demonstrate how health system strengthening should contribute to disaster management. Priority areas under-represented in the WHO Toolkit and identified by the qualitative analysis are discussed. INTERPRETATION Collation and analysis of the disaster management literature identifies how health system strengthening can promote resilience and efficient recovery in the face of disasters. These findings support and complement the WHO Toolkit. Countries can use the literature evidence with the

  19. United States Counterterrorism Strategy In the Trans-Sahara and the Rise of Salafi-Jihadism In the Sahel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    oep/gpq030. 8 Thomas Dempsey, “Counterterrorism in African Failed States: Challenges and Potential Solutions.” Strategic Studies Institute (April 2006...boko.haram.trains.child.soldiers/48224.htm. 141 Thomas Fessey, “Boko Haram Attack: What Happened in Baga?,” BBC News, February 2, 2015. http...187 Andy Morgan , “What Do the Tuareg Want?,” Al Jazeera, January 9, 2014. http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/opinion/2014/01/what-do

  20. Fentanyl Buccal Tablet: A New Breakthrough Pain Medication in Early Management of Severe Vaso-Occlusive Crisis in Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    De Franceschi, Lucia; Mura, Paolo; Schweiger, Vittorio; Vencato, Elisa; Quaglia, Francesca Maria; Delmonte, Letizia; Evangelista, Maurizio; Polati, Enrico; Olivieri, Oliviero; Finco, Gabriele

    2016-07-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a worldwide distributed hereditary red cell disorder. The principal clinical manifestations of SCD are the chronic hemolytic anemia and the acute vaso-occlusive crisis (VOCs), which are mainly characterized by ischemic/reperfusion tissue injury. Pain is the main symptom of VOCs, and its management is still a challenge for hematologists, requiring a multidisciplinary approach. We carried out a crossover study on adult SCD patients, who received two different types of multimodal analgesia during two separate severe VOCs with time interval between VOCs of at least 6 months. The first VOC episode was treated with ketorolac (0.86 mg/kg/day) and tramadol (7.2 mg/kg/day) (TK treatment). In the second VOC episode, fentanyl buccal tablet (FBT; 100 μg) was introduced in a single dose after three hours from the beginning of TK analgesia (TKF treatment). We focused on the first 24 hours of acute pain management. The primary efficacy measure was the time-weighted-sum of pain intensity differences (SPID24). The secondary efficacy measures included the pain intensity difference (PID), the total pain relief (TOTPAR), and the time-wighted sum of anxiety (SAID24). SPID24 was significantly higher in TKF than in TK treatment. All the secondary measures were significantly ameliorated in TKF compared to TK treatment, without major opioid side effects. Patients satisfaction was higher with TKF treatment than with TK one. We propose that VOCs might require breakthrough pain drug strategy as vaso-occlusive phenomena and enhanced vasoconstriction promoting acute ischemic pain component exacerbate the continuous pain of VOCs. FBT might be a powerful and feasible tool in early management of acute pain during VOCs in emergency departments. © 2015 World Institute of Pain.

  1. A fire safety engineering perspective on crowd evacuation dynamics. Comment on "Human behaviours in evacuation crowd dynamics: From modelling to "big data" toward crisis management" by Nicola Bellomo et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronchi, Enrico

    2016-09-01

    The review presented by Bellomo et al. [1] addresses the modelling approaches employed to represent human behaviour in evacuation in a comprehensive manner. The authors discuss crowd evacuation modelling in light of crisis management, a relevant and current topic given the recent escalation of terrorist threats all over the world. The need for designing buildings for rapid evacuation using crowd evacuation models has been recently raised in important forums [2]. This research area is strictly linked to the field of Fire Safety Engineering.

  2. The 2011-2012 eruption of Cordón Caulle volcano (Southern Andes): Evolution, crisis management and current hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva Parejas, C.; Lara, L. E.; Bertin, D.; Amigo, A.; Orozco, G.

    2012-04-01

    A new kind of integrated approach was for first time achieved during the eruptive crisis of Cordón Caulle volcano (Southern Andes, 40.59°S, 72.12°W) in Chile. The monitoring network of SERNAGEOMIN around the volcano detected the increasing precursory seismicity, alerting the imminence of an eruption about 5 hours before its onset, on June 4, 2011. In addition, SERNAGEOMIN generated daily forecasts of tephra dispersal and fall (ASHFALL advection-diffusion model), and prepared simulations of areas affected by the possible occurrence of lahars and pyroclastic flows. Models were improved with observed effects on the field and satellite imagery, resulting in a good correlation. The information was timely supplied to the authorities as well as recommendations in order to better precise the vulnerable areas. Eruption has initially occurred from a couple of overlapped cones located along the eastern fault scarp of the Pleistocene-Holocene extensional graben of Cordón Caulle. Eruptive products have virtually the same bulk composition as those of the historical 1921 and 1960 eruptions, corresponding to phenocryst-poor rhyodacites (67-70 % SiO2). During the first eruptive stage, a ca. 15-km strong Plinian column lasting 27 hours emitted 0.2-0.4 km3 of magma (DRE). Thick tephra deposits have been accumulated in Chile and Argentina, whereas fine particles and aerosols dispersion disrupted air navigation across the Southern Hemisphere. The second ongoing eruptive stage, which started in mid-June, has been characterized by lava emission already covering a total area comparable to the 1960 lava flows with a total estimated volume <0.25 km3 (at the end of December 2011). Weak but persistent plumes have caused preventive flight suspensions in Chile and Argentina until the end of the year. Main current hazards at Cordón Caulle volcano are fine tephra fallout, secondary lahars, minor explosions and lava flow front collapse. Even if this case can be considered successful from the

  3. Coasts in Crisis

    SciTech Connect

    Hinrichsen, D.

    1996-11-01

    Coastal areas are staggering under an onslaught of human activity. We are presently in the process of destroying 70 percent of the world`s 600,000 square kilometers of coral reefs, an ecosystem containing some 200,000 different species and rivaling tropical rain forests in biodiversity. A combination of pollution, habitat destruction, and gross overfishing has led to the collapse of major fisheries and paved the way for malnutrition and disease in regions where people fish for subsistence. Globally, little is being done to manage the crisis of our coasts. Management strategies, if they exist at all, often deal with economic development along a wafer-thin strip of coastal land. Resource degradation is ignored, and watershed management is mostly rhetoric. Although some 55 countries have drawn up coastal management plans, only a handful have been properly implemented. Coasts must be managed in an integrated manner that takes into account the full range of human activities. Initiating this process is costly, time-consuming, and difficult. Yet we have more than three decades of accumulated experience to draw on.

  4. Partnerships for effective campus crisis responses.

    PubMed

    Ingemann, Mira; Jackson, LaTrelle; Pittman, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Violence on college campuses has spurred administrators and campus safety officials to devise effective crisis management and threat assessment strategies. The college community lends itself to a systematic multi-component model of crisis intervention primarily due to its self-contained and widespread interconnected social networks. The CISM model for a crisis response is an empirically supported program that would inform practice prior to, during, and following university-based crises. Ultimately, best practices in the world of academia should rest on a foundation of detailed preparation, interdepartmental collaboration and coordination, extensive specialized training, and periodic review of campus protocols to assess for systemic changes.

  5. [Suicide crisis, psychological suffering and advanced age].

    PubMed

    Hazif-Thomas, Cyril; Bordage, Catherine; Cornec, Gwenole; Berrouiguet, Sofian; Walter, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Bound to the idea of a crisis and the brutal intrusion of psychological suffering, the suicide drama rarely lends itself to a direct analysis which can highlight the different stages of its process. Taking into account increasing quantities of scientific data from current research and the spirit of crisis interventions is fundamental for allowing hopes of effective prevention. Speaking the same language by using the same conceptual basis, that of the suicide crisis, is a prerequisite in pedagogical terms for the current care management of suicidal patients.

  6. Teaching Crisis Creatively.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regan, JoAnne Howland

    1982-01-01

    Describes a creative approach to teaching the application of crisis theory to nursing students. Students experience crisis themselves, evaluate their own and others' coping mechanisms, and learn to recognize the various physical and psychological symptoms of people in crisis. (Author/CT)

  7. An emerging crisis across northern prairie refuges: Prevalence of invasive plants and a plan for adaptive management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grant, T.A.; Flanders-Wanner, B.; Shaffer, T.L.; Murphy, R.K.; Knutsen, G.A.

    2009-01-01

    In the northern Great Plains, native prairies managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) can be pivotal in conservation of North America's biological diversity. From 2002 to 2006, we surveyed 7,338 belt transects to assess the general composition of mixed-grass and tallgrass prairie vegetation across five "complexes" (i.e., administrative groupings) of national wildlife refuges managed by the Service in North Dakota and South Dakota. Native grasses and forbs were common (mean frequency of occurrence 47%-54%) on two complexes but uncommon (4%-13%) on two others. Conversely, an introduced species of grass, smooth brome (Bromus inermis), accounted for 45% to 49% of vegetation on two complexes and another species, Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis) accounted for 27% to 36% of the vegetation on three of the complexes. Our data confirm prior suspicions of widespread invasion by introduced species of plants on Service-owned tracts of native prairie, changes that likely stem in part from a common management history of little or no disturbance (e.g., defoliation by grazing or fire). However, variability in the degree and type of invasion among prairie tracts suggests that knowledge of underlying causes (e.g., edaphic or climatic factors, management histories) could help managers more effectively restore prairies. We describe an adaptive management approach to acquire such knowledge while progressing with restoration. More specifically, we propose to use data from inventories of plant communities on Service-owned prairies to design and implement, as experiments, optimal restoration strategies. We will then monitor these experiments and use the results to refine future strategies. This comprehensive, process-oriented approach should yield reliable and robust recommendations for restoration and maintenance of native prairies in the northern Great Plains. ??2009 by the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System.

  8. Responding to the multidrug-resistant tuberculosis crisis: mainstreaming programmatic management to the Philippine National Tuberculosis Programme.

    PubMed

    Quelapio, M I D; Mira, N R C; Orillaza-Chi, R B; Belen, V; Muñez, N; Belchez, R; Egos, G E; Evangelista, M; Vianzon, R; Tupasi, T E

    2010-06-01

    The Philippines ranks eighth among 27 priority countries for multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB). To describe a model of public-private partnership in MDR-TB management. An exploratory study of integrating MDR-TB management initiated in private-public mix DOTS into the National TB Programme (NTP). Recognising that MDR-TB was a threat to DOTS, the Tropical Disease Foundation initiated MDR-TB management in 1999. An official mandate for the integration of MDR-TB services into the NTP was issued by the Department of Health in 2008. With an increased government budget augmented by support from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, 1294 MDR-TB patients were placed on treatment from 1999 to 2008. The treatment success rate improved from 64% in 1999 to 75% in 2005. There are now five MDR-TB treatment centres with 181 treatment sites in Metro Manila, and three culture centres. People trained include 12 master trainers, 31 trainers, 25 treatment centre and 381 treatment site staff. Mainstreaming into the NTP of this unique model of MDR-TB management through a dynamic public-private collaboration can be considered best practice in implementation science of an evidence-based intervention leading to change in health care policy and practice.

  9. Crisis Revisited: An Analysis of Strategies Used by Tylenol in the Second Tampering Episode.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, James A.

    1988-01-01

    Illustrates how Johnson & Johnson's crisis communication management adhered to many of the recommended guidelines for managing contingency planning, for mobilizing a crisis communication effort, and for post-crisis communication. Reveals the advantageous use of flexible, proactive, and corollary communication strategies. (MS)

  10. Crisis Revisited: An Analysis of Strategies Used by Tylenol in the Second Tampering Episode.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, James A.

    1988-01-01

    Illustrates how Johnson & Johnson's crisis communication management adhered to many of the recommended guidelines for managing contingency planning, for mobilizing a crisis communication effort, and for post-crisis communication. Reveals the advantageous use of flexible, proactive, and corollary communication strategies. (MS)

  11. Unrelieved pain: a crisis.

    PubMed

    Sessle, Barry

    2011-01-01

    Despite many recent advances in the past 40 years in the understanding of pain mechanisms, and in pain diagnosis and management, considerable gaps in knowledge remain, with chronic pain present in epidemic proportions in most countries. It is often unrelieved and is associated with significant socioeconomic burdens. Several opportunities and approaches to address this crisis are identified in the present article. Most crucial is the need to increase pain awareness, enhance pain education, improve access to pain care and increase pain research resources. Given the variability among countries in health care policies and programs, resources and educational programs, many of the approaches and strategies outlined will need to be tailored to each country's socioeconomic and educational situation.

  12. [Emergency preparedness based on coherent integration of crisis response resources: workshop on mass casualty management in Bethlehem in June 1999].

    PubMed

    Amblard, J; Fleury, M; Ruolt, N

    2002-01-01

    In June 1999, the Humanitarian Action Division of the Foreign Affairs Department organized a training course on the mass casualty management within the framework of religious festivities related to the Bethlehem 2000 project. This initiative was undertaken at the request of the Palestinian Authority and the General Consulate of France in Jerusalem. Palestinian and French specialists in the field worked together in three workshops devoted to rescue, search and first aid; medical outposts and triage; and emergency and surgical care in referring hospitals.

  13. 'HTA for Crisis': sharing experiences during the 7th EBHC Symposium.

    PubMed

    Wladysiuk, Magdalena; Tabor, Anna; Godman, Brian

    2013-02-01

    The Central and Eastern European Society of Technology Assessment in Health Care was founded in Krakow, Poland in 2003. On October 8th and 9th, the 7th symposium took place titled 'HTA for Crisis'. This meeting was attended by over 250 decision makers, evidence-based specialists, healthcare managers, commercial company personnel and experts. The symposium was principally divided into four main themes: insurance in times of crisis; importance of pricing of health services in times of crisis; managing welfare benefits in times of crisis and Health Technology Assessment in crisis-laden countries. The symposium finished by debating potential ways forward for healthcare systems in times of crisis.

  14. Learning Crisis Unit through Post-Crisis: Characteristics and Mechanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chebbi, Hela; Pündrich, Aline Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to identify the characteristics that a crisis unit should have to achieve effective learning after crisis. Literature has identified many relations between learning organizations and crisis; yet, there is a dearth of research on specific studies about crisis units and their post-crisis learning features. Thus, this paper…

  15. Learning Crisis Unit through Post-Crisis: Characteristics and Mechanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chebbi, Hela; Pündrich, Aline Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to identify the characteristics that a crisis unit should have to achieve effective learning after crisis. Literature has identified many relations between learning organizations and crisis; yet, there is a dearth of research on specific studies about crisis units and their post-crisis learning features. Thus, this paper…

  16. An Italian version of the Ottawa Crisis Resource Management Global Rating Scale: a reliable and valid tool for assessment of simulation performance.

    PubMed

    Franc, Jeffrey Micheal; Verde, Manuela; Gallardo, Alba Ripoll; Carenzo, Luca; Ingrassia, Pier Luigi

    2016-06-16

    Objective measurement of simulation performance requires a validated and reliable tool. However, no published Italian language assessment tool is available. Translation of a published English language tool, the Ottawa Crisis Resource Management Global Rating Scale (GRS), may lead to a validated and reliable tool. After developing an Italian language translation of the English language tool, the study measured the reliability of the new tool by comparison with the English language tool used independently in the same simulation scenarios. In addition, the validity of the Italian language tool was measured by comparison to a skills score also applied independently. The correlation coefficient between the Italian language overall GRS and the English language overall GRS was 0.82 (adjusted 95 % confidence interval: 0.62-0.92). The correlation coefficient between the Italian language overall GRS and the skill score was 0.85 (adjusted 95 % confidence interval 0.68-0.94). This study demonstrated that the Italian language GRS has acceptable reliability when compared with the English language tool, suggesting that it can be used reliably to evaluate the performance during simulated emergencies. The study also suggests that the tool has acceptable validity for assessing the simulation performance. The study suggests that the Italian language GRS translation has reasonable reliability when compared with the English language GRS and reasonable validity when compared with the assessment of the skills scores. Data suggest that the instrument is adequately reliable for informal and formative type of examinations, but may require further confirmation before use for high-stake examinations such as licensing.

  17. Risk management in transfusion after the HIV blood contamination crisis in France: the impact of the precautionary principle.

    PubMed

    Hergon, Eric; Moutel, Grégoire; Duchange, Nathalie; Bellier, Lucile; Rouger, Philippe; Hervé, Christian

    2005-10-01

    The importance of the precautionary principle in public health was highlighted in France after the HIV contamination of blood products used for transfusion. However, the definition of this principle, its objectives, the way in which it should be applied, and its consequences had not been considered previously. The question as to whether the application of the precautionary principle is appropriate remains unanswered. The aim of this study was to analyze the interpretations of the application of the precautionary principle to determine its consequences in terms of risk management and patient rights. This was accomplished by interviewing persons involved in transfusion medicine. We conducted 33 interviews and describe the issues enunciated for and against the application of the precautionary principle. The precautionary principle concept was confusing to the respondents. A major issue emerging from the interviews was that the precautionary principle was perceived more as a means of protecting the decision maker than as a means of protecting the patient. Taken to its extreme, the use of the precautionary principle could prejudice sound medical decision making. However, it was felt that it also can lead to the introduction of measures that update and gradually reduce risks associated with transfusion.

  18. WSSX - A Joint U.S.-Russian Nuclear Counter-Terrorism Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Crites, T R

    2002-09-25

    In 1994, the U. S. and Russian Federation governments formally agreed to exchange information on the safety and security of nuclear weapons. This agreement included three major elements, called Technical Working Groups (TWGs). TWG C deals with counter-terrorism. Its four assigned actions and U.S./Russian experience are reviewed in this paper. Although active exchange programs were created under TWGs A and B, involving workshops and laboratory-to-laboratory development projects, little work was initiated in TWG C, due to the sensitive nature of this information. After 9/11, however, it became clear that much could be gained by having each country share information to help solve the problem of nuclear proliferation among terrorist groups. Government-to-government meetings have reaffirmed the initial agreement to exchange information on this topic, and a number of joint project proposals are now under discussion. The Joint Steering Committee that oversees this exchange has approved approximately 20 projects. They include such topics as terrorist threat scenario development, detection of nuclear material and explosives in transportation containers, analysis of material mass and configuration, and consequence mitigation. It is expected that the joint development of these capabilities will enhance our ability to respond to a nuclear threat and to facilitate mutual assistance, should either party experience a nuclear terrorist event.

  19. Pheochromocytoma crisis is not a surgical emergency.

    PubMed

    Scholten, Anouk; Cisco, Robin M; Vriens, Menno R; Cohen, Jenny K; Mitmaker, Elliot J; Liu, Chienying; Tyrrell, J Blake; Shen, Wen T; Duh, Quan-Yang

    2013-02-01

    Pheochromocytoma crisis is a feared and potentially lethal complication of pheochromocytoma. We sought to determine the best treatment strategy for pheochromocytoma crisis patients and hypothesized that emergency resection is not indicated. Retrospective cohort study (1993-2011); literature review (1944-2011). Tertiary referral center. There were 137 pheochromocytoma patients from our center and 97 pheochromocytoma crisis patients who underwent adrenalectomy from the literature. Medical management of pheochromocytoma crisis; adrenalectomy. Perioperative complications, conversion, and mortality. In our database, 25 patients (18%) presented with crisis. After medical stabilization and α-blockade, 15 patients were discharged and readmitted for elective surgery and 10 patients were operated on urgently during the same hospitalization. None underwent emergency surgery. Postoperatively, patients who underwent elective surgery had shorter hospital stays (1.7 vs 5.7 d, P = 0.001) and fewer postoperative complications (1 of 15 [7%] vs 5 of 10 [50%], P = 0.045) and were less often admitted to the intensive care unit (1 of 15 [7%] vs 5 of 10 [50%], P = 0.045) in comparison with urgently operated patients. There was no mortality. Review of the literature (n = 97) showed that crisis patients who underwent elective or urgent surgery vs emergency surgery had less intraoperative (13 of 31 [42%] vs 20 of 25 [80%], P < 0.001) and postoperative complications (15 of 45 [33%] vs 15 of 21 [71%], P = 0.047) and a lower mortality (0 of 64 vs 6 of 33 [18%], P = 0.002). Management of patients presenting with pheochromocytoma crisis should include initial stabilization of the acute crisis followed by sufficient α-blockade before surgery. Emergency resection of pheochromocytoma is associated with high surgical morbidity and mortality.

  20. Hospitalist management of vaso-occlusive pain crisis in patients with sickle cell disease using a pathway of care.

    PubMed

    Allen Liles, Edmund; Kirsch, Jonathan; Gilchrist, Michael; Adem, Mukhtar

    2014-04-01

    Patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) suffer from intermittent vaso-occlusive pain crises (VOCs). These crises lead to frequent hospitalizations, significant morbidity, and increased mortality risk. Care pathways can enhance efficiency and quality of care. Our study sought to evaluate the development and implementation of a care pathway for patients with SCD experiencing VOCs. The University of North Carolina (UNC) Comprehensive Sickle Cell Program provides all levels of care for a large population of patients with sickle cell anemia. All patients admitted to UNC Hospitals with SCD VOCs from January 2009 through June 2011 were evaluated. During this time period, we also assessed sequential prospective cohorts during progressive phases of developing and implementing a quality improvement and pathway of care program for this patient population in our study. The developed pathway entailed geographic localization for VOC patients, a single group of faculty physicians caring for these patients, and early use of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) to achieve pain control. Physicians from the UNC Hospital Medicine Program were responsible for the initiatives. Cohorts were compared to a baseline historical control. Outcomes of interest included patient length of stay (LOS) in the hospital, 30-day readmission rate, need for transfusion, incidence of acute chest syndrome, use of naloxone, and use of PCA. Compared with an historical baseline cohort, the development and implementation of a VOC care pathway for patients with SCD led to reduction in average hospital LOS by 1.44 days (P < 0.05) and an increase in use of PCAs (P < 0.05). Patient readmission rates, number of transfusions, incidence of acute chest syndrome, and use of naloxone did not significantly change. Hospitalist-led management of patients with SCD VOCs using a care pathway that emphasizes early, aggressive PCA-based pain control is associated with reduced hospital LOS. The LOS reduction seen in our study is

  1. Coral reefs in crisis.

    PubMed

    Hinrichsen, D

    1997-01-01

    This article reports on the crisis facing reefs throughout the world and the struggle to save them. Coral reefs, one of the biological wonders of the world, are among the largest and oldest living communities of plants and animals on earth, having been evolved between 200 and 450 million years ago. Located mostly in the Pacific region, most established coral reefs are now dead and only the upper layer is covered by a thin changeable skin of living coral. Reefs, over the years, have been the main source of animal protein for over 1 billion people in Asia. Countries near the coastlines, which relied on the seas, have resorted to dynamite fishing, poisoning and other illegal and dangerous techniques. Overpopulation and pollution has caused the deteriorating conditions of the 600,000 sq. km of coral reefs worldwide. Despite these conditions, the government has ignored this problem as they struggle to develop their economies at the expense of common resources. In addition, this article narrates the efforts that are exerted by governments in promoting coral reef protection and management of these coastal resources, setting the Apo Island in the Philippines as an example of good management and sustainability.

  2. Development and Reliability of the Comprehensive Crisis Plan Checklist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aspiranti, Kathleen B.; Pelchar, Taylor K.; McCLeary, Daniel F.; Bain, Sherry K.; Foster, Lisa N.

    2011-01-01

    It is of vital importance that children are educated in a safe environment. Every school needs to have a well-developed crisis management document containing plans for prevention, intervention, and postvention. We developed the Comprehensive Crisis Plan Checklist (CCPC) to serve as a valuable tool that can be used to assist practitioners with…

  3. Development and Reliability of the Comprehensive Crisis Plan Checklist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aspiranti, Kathleen B.; Pelchar, Taylor K.; McCLeary, Daniel F.; Bain, Sherry K.; Foster, Lisa N.

    2011-01-01

    It is of vital importance that children are educated in a safe environment. Every school needs to have a well-developed crisis management document containing plans for prevention, intervention, and postvention. We developed the Comprehensive Crisis Plan Checklist (CCPC) to serve as a valuable tool that can be used to assist practitioners with…

  4. Crisis Begets Change: Hurricane Recovery at Gulf Coast Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Mahauganee Dawn

    2012-01-01

    Despite a growing body of literature on campus crisis management and the breadth of research on organizational change, little is known about organizational changes prompted by campus crisis. The purpose of this study is to examine the changes made to the operational profiles of Gulf Coast institutions during the process of recovering from major…

  5. Mapping a Crisis, One Text Message at a Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauduy, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    An interactive mapping project is revolutionizing the way crises are reported and managed, and is spotlighting the value of citizen journalism. The project, called Ushahidi, which means testimony in Swahili, uses crowdsourcing (gathering information from a large number of people) to map crisis information. This crisis mapping tool has since been…

  6. Crisis Begets Change: Hurricane Recovery at Gulf Coast Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Mahauganee Dawn

    2012-01-01

    Despite a growing body of literature on campus crisis management and the breadth of research on organizational change, little is known about organizational changes prompted by campus crisis. The purpose of this study is to examine the changes made to the operational profiles of Gulf Coast institutions during the process of recovering from major…

  7. Mapping a Crisis, One Text Message at a Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauduy, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    An interactive mapping project is revolutionizing the way crises are reported and managed, and is spotlighting the value of citizen journalism. The project, called Ushahidi, which means testimony in Swahili, uses crowdsourcing (gathering information from a large number of people) to map crisis information. This crisis mapping tool has since been…

  8. School Crisis Teams within an Incident Command System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickerson, Amanda B.; Brock, Stephen E.; Reeves, Melissa A.

    2006-01-01

    Despite the increasing attention given to the need for schools to be prepared to respond in a variety of crisis situations, there is a lack of information about how to coordinate with multiple agencies following a crisis. This article describes the U. S. Department of Homeland Security's (2004) National Incident Management System and its Incident…

  9. Qualitative Investigation of the Wellness Recovery Action Plan in a UK NHS Crisis Care Setting.

    PubMed

    Ashman, Michael; Halliday, Vanessa; Cunnane, Joseph G

    2017-07-01

    Crisis theory suggests that in addition to presenting a threat to mental well-being, crises are also opportunities where successful interventions can lead to successful outcomes. UK mental health crisis teams aim to reduce hospital admission by treating people at home and by building resilience and supporting learning from crisis, yet data on repeat crisis episodes suggest this could be improved. This qualitative study sought to explore the Wellness Recovery Action Plan (WRAP) as a means of supporting resilience-building and maximising the opportunity potential of crisis. The following themes emerged: The meaning of crisis; Engaging with the WRAP process; WRAP and self-management; and Changes and transformations. This research suggests that WRAP has potential in supporting recovery from crisis, revealing insights into the nature of crisis which can inform the further development of crisis services.

  10. Transforming Counterterrorism Training in the FBI: Preserving Institutional Memory and Enhancing Knowledge Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    and capitalizing upon unchartered territory to build market share. In the work entitled, Blue Ocean Strategy , W. Chan Kim and Renee Mauborgne delineate...prevent company growth, profit, and success. The following tools outlined in Blue Ocean Strategy , specifically the Four Actions Framework, Strategy...Renewal in Government. Washington, D.C., Brookings Institution Press, 2005. Kim, W. Chan and Renee Mauborgne. Blue Ocean Strategy . Boston: Harvard

  11. Counterterrorism: DOD Should Enhance Management of and Reporting on Its Global Train and Equip Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-01

    and Equip program, to build the capacity of its foreign partners to counter terrorism . Funding allocated for this program totals $2.3 billion since...funds allocated in fiscal years 2006 through 2013— indicate some progress in building capability to combat terrorism and conduct stability...Global Train and Equip program, to build the capacity of its foreign partners to counter terrorism . Congress originally authorized a temporary program

  12. Educational Technology in Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fainholc, Beatriz

    2008-01-01

    The presentation of the historical epistemological path is needed to understand and reconsider the discipline of Educational Technology in articulation to contributions of rupturistic theorists in order to reach to a critical proposal and a revision of its field. This field is facing a deep crisis within a time of world crisis, specially in the…

  13. Creativity in Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roff, Glenn

    This paper suggests that educational resources and opportunities currently in operation in rural Australia are brought forward during times of crisis. The paper discusses five aspects of education in rural Australia that are a response to the perceived sense of crisis and that have improved the general and comparative quality of rural education,…

  14. Maintenance Crisis vs Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haggard, Susie

    Industrial maintenance in Northeast Georgia is facing an acute crisis. Contributing factors are economic development that is depleting the work force, aging of the population, downsizing of the military, and lack of technical school graduates. Solutions to the crisis fall into three categories: short-term, mid-term, and long-term. For short-term…

  15. Maintenance Crisis vs Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haggard, Susie

    Industrial maintenance in Northeast Georgia is facing an acute crisis. Contributing factors are economic development that is depleting the work force, aging of the population, downsizing of the military, and lack of technical school graduates. Solutions to the crisis fall into three categories: short-term, mid-term, and long-term. For short-term…

  16. Educational Technology in Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fainholc, Beatriz

    2008-01-01

    The presentation of the historical epistemological path is needed to understand and reconsider the discipline of Educational Technology in articulation to contributions of rupturistic theorists in order to reach to a critical proposal and a revision of its field. This field is facing a deep crisis within a time of world crisis, specially in the…

  17. Crisis, grief and loss.

    PubMed

    Evans, J V

    1993-09-01

    At one time or another, many of us experience a life-threatening crisis that proves to be a turning point in our lives. I had such a crisis while working as a medic on the oil-rig Vinland, offshore of Nova Scotia, in 1984.

  18. Creativity in Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roff, Glenn

    This paper suggests that educational resources and opportunities currently in operation in rural Australia are brought forward during times of crisis. The paper discusses five aspects of education in rural Australia that are a response to the perceived sense of crisis and that have improved the general and comparative quality of rural education,…

  19. Calibrating Fundamental British Values: How Head Teachers Are Approaching Appraisal in the Light of the Teachers' Standards 2012, Prevent and the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act, 2015

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Revell, Lynn; Bryan, Hazel

    2016-01-01

    In requiring that teachers should "not undermine fundamental British values (FBV)," a phrase originally articulated in the Home Office counter-terrorism document, Prevent, the Teachers' Standards has brought into focus the nature of teacher professionalism. Teachers in England are now required to promote FBV within and outside school,…

  20. Calibrating Fundamental British Values: How Head Teachers Are Approaching Appraisal in the Light of the Teachers' Standards 2012, Prevent and the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act, 2015

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Revell, Lynn; Bryan, Hazel

    2016-01-01

    In requiring that teachers should "not undermine fundamental British values (FBV)," a phrase originally articulated in the Home Office counter-terrorism document, Prevent, the Teachers' Standards has brought into focus the nature of teacher professionalism. Teachers in England are now required to promote FBV within and outside school,…

  1. How Long Is a Minute? The Importance of a Measured Plan of Response to Crisis Situations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickel, Perry S.

    2010-01-01

    Physical interventions for special education students in crisis remains a controversial concept. The first minute of a crisis situation represents the most crucial time to prevent injury or the exacerbation of injury. Although preventing violence and escalation of negative emotions is the first step in crisis management, school staff also must be…

  2. The Efficacy of Crisis Intervention Training for Educators: A Preliminary Study from the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forthun, Larry F.; McCombie, Jeffrey W.

    2011-01-01

    Professional development in crisis intervention skills can help address the growing needs of schools to train faculty to respond to students in acute crisis. Unlike traditional methods of classroom management, crisis intervention training teaches specific strategies to de-escalate conflict while at the same time addressing the underlying…

  3. 5 CFR 550.409 - Evacuation payments during a pandemic health crisis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... health crisis. 550.409 Section 550.409 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL... during a pandemic health crisis. (a) An agency may order one or more employees to evacuate from their... the employee) during a pandemic health crisis without regard to whether the agency and the employee...

  4. How Long Is a Minute? The Importance of a Measured Plan of Response to Crisis Situations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickel, Perry S.

    2010-01-01

    Physical interventions for special education students in crisis remains a controversial concept. The first minute of a crisis situation represents the most crucial time to prevent injury or the exacerbation of injury. Although preventing violence and escalation of negative emotions is the first step in crisis management, school staff also must be…

  5. Reviewing the definition of crisis in dementia care

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Crisis is a term frequently used in dementia care lacking a standardized definition. This article systematically reviews existing definitions of crisis in dementia care literature to create a standardized definition that can be utilized for research, policy and clinical practice. Methods We systematically searched for articles containing definitions of crisis in the context of dementia care. We created an operational framework of crisis based on retrieved definitions. Recommendations to address crisis situations were reviewed and classified according to care settings. Results Abstracts and titles of 1,113 articles, screened from PubMed and EMBASE, were narrowed down to 27 articles. After review, crisis in dementia was defined as a process where a stressor causes an imbalance requiring an immediate decision to be made which leads to a desired outcome and therefore a resolution of the crisis. If the crisis is not resolved, the cycle continues. Recommendations for resolving crisis involving persons with dementia and their caregivers include awareness therapy after diagnosis and increased contact with general practitioners, case manager consultations, caregiver support and education. Furthermore, nursing home staff should be attuned to the environmental, physical and psychological needs of persons with dementia. Conclusions This is the first article to review the definition of crisis in the context of dementia care. A review of the literature indicated that the definition of a crisis is idiosyncratic. Therefore, it is difficult to prevent or plan for all crises. We used an operational framework to compile types of crisis stressors and recommendations from the crisis literature based on three different perspectives; the person with the dementia, the caregiver and the healthcare providers. PMID:23374634

  6. Outcome of Extended Thymectomy in Myasthenia Crisis Patient.

    PubMed

    Aftabuddin, M; Bhandari, S

    2016-07-01

    Myasthenic crisis is a life-threatening condition. We studied the demographic, frequency, causes and clinical presentation of isolated Myasthenic crisis, steps of treatment and to review our experience of extended thymectomy on patients with at least one episode myasthenic crisis. A prospective and retrospective study was conducted on patients with at least one episode of myasthenic crisis, from March 2010 to September 2014, at the Department of Cardiac Surgery, BSMMU, Dhaka, Bangladesh who were referred for thymectomy. Eighteen patients (13.6% of the total 132 patients with myasthenia gravis were admitted with single to multiple episodes of myasthenic crisis, median crisis was 2.5 episodes. Mean age of the patient was 35.5 (18-72) years with male predominance. All eighteen patients had undergone extended thymectomy after completion of 5 cycle plasmapheresis, of which 2 had experienced postoperative respiratory crisis, required invasive ventilator support for median 14 days. One patient required invasive ventilator support after third post operative day. Six patients had thymoma and 12 had thymic hyperplasia. Three patients needed Intravenous immunoglobin. Nine patients needed post operative anti acetylcholinesterase inhibitor after median 2.5 post days. Post thymectomy remission and decreases the frequency of myasthenic crisis was seen in follow up and post operative medication requirement reduced significantly as compared to the preoperative requirement. This report highlights that the patients who had extended thymectomy after episodes of myasthenia crisis are benefitted even in the histhopathology report does not confirmed thymoma. After thymectomy, there was remission of myasthenic crisis. Patients with myasthenic crisis should have judicious drug adjustments under supervision and should be treated aggressively during impending myasthenic crisis. With modern management of myasthenia gravis, early surgery with myasthenic crisis is safe with good long

  7. Reviewing the definition of crisis in dementia care.

    PubMed

    MacNeil Vroomen, Janet; Bosmans, Judith E; van Hout, Hein P J; de Rooij, Sophia E

    2013-02-01

    Crisis is a term frequently used in dementia care lacking a standardized definition. This article systematically reviews existing definitions of crisis in dementia care literature to create a standardized definition that can be utilized for research, policy and clinical practice. We systematically searched for articles containing definitions of crisis in the context of dementia care. We created an operational framework of crisis based on retrieved definitions. Recommendations to address crisis situations were reviewed and classified according to care settings. Abstracts and titles of 1,113 articles, screened from PubMed and EMBASE, were narrowed down to 27 articles. After review, crisis in dementia was defined as a process where a stressor causes an imbalance requiring an immediate decision to be made which leads to a desired outcome and therefore a resolution of the crisis. If the crisis is not resolved, the cycle continues. Recommendations for resolving crisis involving persons with dementia and their caregivers include awareness therapy after diagnosis and increased contact with general practitioners, case manager consultations, caregiver support and education. Furthermore, nursing home staff should be attuned to the environmental, physical and psychological needs of persons with dementia. This is the first article to review the definition of crisis in the context of dementia care. A review of the literature indicated that the definition of a crisis is idiosyncratic. Therefore, it is difficult to prevent or plan for all crises. We used an operational framework to compile types of crisis stressors and recommendations from the crisis literature based on three different perspectives; the person with the dementia, the caregiver and the healthcare providers.

  8. Pain management trend of vaso-occulsive crisis (VOC) at a community hospital emergency department (ED) for patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Susumu; Khan, Isra'a; Mushtaq, Rao; Sanikommu, Srinivasa Reddy; Mbeumo, Carline; LaChance, Jenny; Roebuck, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Pain management at the emergency department (ED) for vaso-occulsive crisis (VOC) for patients with sickle cell disease has not been optimum, with a long delay in giving the initial analgesic. We conducted a retrospective survey over a 7-year period to determine our ED's timing in giving pain medication to patients with VOC as a quality improvement project. We compared different periods, children vs adults, and the influence of gender in the analgesic administration timing. This is a retrospective chart review of three different periods: (1) years 2007-2008, (2) years 2011-2012, and (3) year 2013. We extracted relevant information from ED records. Data were analyzed using Student t test, chi-square analysis, and the Kruskal-Wallis test. There was a progressive improvement in the time interval to the 1st analgesic over these three periods. Children received analgesics more quickly than adults in all periods. Male adult patients received pain medication faster than female adult patients, although initial pain scores were higher in female than in male patients. Progressively fewer pediatric patients utilized ED over these three periods, but no difference for adult patients was observed. The proportion of pediatric patients admitted to the hospital increased with each period. The progressive decrease in both the number of patients and the number of visits to the ED by children suggested that the collective number of VOC in children has decreased, possibly secondary to the dissemination of hydroxyurea use. We failed to observe the same trend in adult patients. The need for IV access, and ordering laboratory tests or imaging studies tends to delay analgesic administration. Delay in administration of the first analgesic was more pronounced for female adult patients than male adult patients in spite of their higher pain score. Health care providers working in ED should make conscious efforts to respect pain in women as well as pain in men. Though not proven from this study

  9. Consumer experience of formal crisis-response services and preferred methods of crisis intervention.

    PubMed

    Boscarato, Kara; Lee, Stuart; Kroschel, Jon; Hollander, Yitzchak; Brennan, Alice; Warren, Narelle

    2014-08-01

    The manner in which people with mental illness are supported in a crisis is crucial to their recovery. The current study explored mental health consumers' experiences with formal crisis services (i.e. police and crisis assessment and treatment (CAT) teams), preferred crisis supports, and opinions of four collaborative interagency response models. Eleven consumers completed one-on-one, semistructured interviews. The results revealed that the perceived quality of previous formal crisis interventions varied greatly. Most participants preferred family members or friends to intervene. However, where a formal response was required, general practitioners and mental health case managers were preferred; no participant wanted a police response, and only one indicated a preference for CAT team assistance. Most participants welcomed collaborative crisis interventions. Of four collaborative interagency response models currently being trialled internationally, participants most strongly supported the Ride-Along Model, which enables a police officer and a mental health clinician to jointly respond to distressed consumers in the community. The findings highlight the potential for an interagency response model to deliver a crisis response aligned with consumers' preferences.

  10. [Intraoperative crisis and surgical Apgar score].

    PubMed

    Oshiro, Masakatsu; Sugahara, Kazuhiro

    2014-03-01

    Intraoperative crisis is an inevitable event to anesthesiologists. The crisis requires effective and coordinated management once it happened but it is difficult to manage the crises properly under extreme stressful situation. Recently, it is reported that the use of surgical crisis checklists is associated with significant improvement in the management of operating-room crises in a high-fidelity simulation study. Careful preoperative evaluation, proper intraoperative management and using intraoperative crisis checklists will be needed for safer perioperative care in the future. Postoperative complication is a serious public health problem. It reduces the quality of life of patients and raises medical cost. Careful management of surgical patients is required according to their postoperative condition for preventing postoperative complications. A 10-point surgical Apgar score, calculated from intraoperative estimated blood loss, lowest mean arterial pressure, and lowest heart rate, is a simple and available scoring system for predicting postoperative complications. It undoubtedly predicts higher than average risk of postoperative complications and death within 30 days of surgery. Surgical Apgar score is a bridge between proper intraoperative and postoperative care. Anesthesiologists should make effort to reduce the postoperative complication and this score is a tool for it.

  11. Are you ready? Crisis leadership in a hyper-VUCA environment.

    PubMed

    Alkhaldi, Khaldoon H; Austin, Meredith L; Cura, Boris A; Dantzler, Darrell; Holland, Leslie; Maples, David L; Quarrelles, Jamie C; Weinkle, Robert K; Marcus, Leonard J

    The current hyper-volatile, -uncertain, -complex, and -ambiguous (VUCA) threat environment demands a more cohesive support structure for crisis leaders who may be faced with crises of increasing magnitude and frequency and, in some instances, multiple crisis events simultaneously. The project team investigates the perceptions of crisis leaders regarding establishing a crisis leader advisor position for crisis leaders to benefit from their experience while prosecuting crisis response activities. The team linked hyper-VUCA crises, crisis response frameworks, meta-leadership, crisis leader attributes, and advisor attributes. The overall goal of the project is to increase the ability of the crisis leaders to more effectively and efficiently navigate crisis events resulting in more efficient and effective response and recovery. Three research questions were developed to assess the following: thoughts of integrating a crisis leader advisor position; development of a crisis leader advisor certification program; and attributes of crisis leader advisors. A qualitative research methodology using a phenomenological approach was employed. Forty-one participants were purposefully selected and administered a short, on-line survey consisting of 11 questions. Data were analyzed using percentage analysis, weighted sums, and inductive thematic analysis. The project team found an overwhelming support for the crisis leader advisor position and the crisis leader advisor certification program. Additionally, experience and trustworthiness ranked among the top sought after attributes of a crisis leader advisor. The team recommendations included (1) implement a crisis leaders advisor guide/framework; (2) create a formal crisis leader advisor position in national incident management system; (3) implement a crisis leader advisor certification framework; (4) benchmark established advisor programs; and (5) implement a framework to match leaders and advisors.

  12. Are you ready? Crisis leadership in a hyper-VUCA environment.

    PubMed

    Alkhaldi, Khaldoon H; Austin, Meredith L; Cura, Boris A; Dantzler, Darrell; Holland, Leslie; Maples, David L; Quarrelles, Jamie C; Weinkle, Robert K; Marcus, Leonard J

    The current hyper-volatile, -uncertain, -complex, and -ambiguous (VUCA) threat environment demands a more cohesive support structure for crisis leaders who may be faced with crises of increasing magnitude and frequency and, in some instances, multiple crisis events simultaneously. The project team investigates the perceptions of crisis leaders regarding establishing a crisis leader advisor position for crisis leaders to benefit from their experience while prosecuting crisis response activities. The team linked hyper-VUCA crises, crisis response frameworks, meta-leadership, crisis leader attributes, and advisor attributes. The overall goal of the project is to increase the ability of the crisis leaders to more effectively and efficiently navigate crisis events resulting in more efficient and effective response and recovery. Three research questions were developed to assess the following: thoughts of integrating a crisis leader advisor position; development of a crisis leader advisor certification program; and attributes of crisis leader advisors. A qualitative research methodology using a phenomenological approach was employed. Forty-one participants were purposefully selected and administered a short, on-line survey consisting of 11 questions. Data were analyzed using percentage analysis,weighted sums, and inductive thematic analysis. The project team found an overwhelming support for the crisis leader advisor position and the crisis leader advisor certification program. Additionally, experience and trustworthiness ranked among the top sought after attributes of a crisis leader advisor. The team recommendations included (1) implement a crisis leaders advisor guide/framework; (2) create a formal crisis leader advisor position in national incident management system; (3) implement a crisis leader advisor certification framework; (4) benchmark established advisor programs; and (5) implement a framework to match leaders and advisors.

  13. National Crisis Management and Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    who, what, when, where). I f a match was found, then the parser would h igh l igh t that port ion of the message as being relevant to determine the...Existence of hunger, malnutrition , famine 01 = attr ibutable primarily to crop fa i lure 02 = attr ibutable primarily to drought 03 = attr ibutable

  14. Lessons learned in crisis management.

    PubMed

    Olson, Chris

    2014-01-01

    This paper will explore lessons learned following a series of natural and man-made disasters affecting the Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Company and/or its subsidiaries. The company employs a team of certified continuity professionals who are charged with overseeing resilience on behalf of the enterprise and leading recovery activities wherever and whenever necessary.

  15. Managing Parent Involvement during Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merriman, Lynette S.

    2008-01-01

    In the wake of 9/11, Hurricane Katrina, and the Virginia Tech shooting tragedy, it is no surprise that concern for students' safety is the primary reason attributed to parents' increased involvement. Parents and university administrators share in their commitment to student safety. However, college and university staff who assume responsibility…

  16. Managing Parent Involvement during Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merriman, Lynette S.

    2008-01-01

    In the wake of 9/11, Hurricane Katrina, and the Virginia Tech shooting tragedy, it is no surprise that concern for students' safety is the primary reason attributed to parents' increased involvement. Parents and university administrators share in their commitment to student safety. However, college and university staff who assume responsibility…

  17. Husserl's Crisis as a crisis of psychology.

    PubMed

    Feest, Uljana

    2012-06-01

    This paper places Husserl's mature work, The Crisis of the European Sciences, in the context of his engagement with--and critique of--experimental psychology at the time. I begin by showing (a) that Husserl accorded psychology a crucial role in his philosophy, i.e., that of providing a scientific analysis of subjectivity, and (b) that he viewed contemporary psychology--due to its naturalism--as having failed to pursue this goal in the appropriate manner. I then provide an analysis of Husserl's views about naturalism and scientific philosophy. Some central themes of the Crisis are traced back to Husserl's earlier work and to his relationship with his teacher, Franz Brentano, with whom he disagreed about the status of "inner perception" as the proper scientific method for a phenomenological analysis. The paper then shows that Husserl was well aware of at least one publication about the crisis of psychology (Bühler's 1927 book), and it teases out some aspects of the complicated relationship between Husserl and members of the Würzburg School of thought psychology: The latter had drawn on Husserl's writings, but Husserl felt that they had misunderstood his central thesis. I conclude by placing Husserl's work in the wider context of scientific, cultural, and political crisis-discourses at the time.

  18. Vermont School Crisis Guide, 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vermont Department of Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The 2004 Vermont School Crisis Guide has been revised to improve its use by School Crisis Teams and Public Safety Committees. The Guide is now organized by roles so users can quickly locate their responsibilities in a crisis. The Crisis Guide pages can be used to document pertinent information (time, witnesses) immediately after an emergency…

  19. Out of the healthcare crisis.

    PubMed

    Siriwardena, A Niroshan

    2011-01-01

    W Edwards Deming's Out of the Crisis, was first published almost three decades ago.(1) It was a bestseller and remains a classic text written by one of the foremost quality improvement experts of the 20th century. It is a book which certainly warrants re-examination in light of today's challenges for health care. This discussion paper reviews what Deming can teach us about causes of failure in management, including health care, what can be done to remedy them and how to avert problems in future.

  20. Crisis intervention for nurses.

    PubMed

    Chase, Emily

    2013-06-01

    Cancer diagnoses and treatments can be crisis-causing events that overwhelm the usual coping abilities of patients and their families. Oncology nurses constantly are observing and attending to patients' diverse needs, ranging from biomedical to emotional, social, and psychological. Nurses have the chance to be first responders in times of patient crises, as they are in the position to recognize the crisis, respond effectively, and transform the crisis into a pivotal learning experience. This article discusses a way to think about patient and family crises that empowers nurses to respond in a manner appropriate to the cultural context and respectful of the individual space of the patient.

  1. A control theoretical approach to crowd management. Comment on "Human behaviours in evacuation crowd dynamics: From modelling to "big data" toward crisis management" by Nicola Bellomo et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borzí, Alfio; Caponigro, Marco

    2016-09-01

    The formulation of mathematical models for crowd dynamics is one current challenge in many fields of applied sciences. It involves the modelization of the complex behavior of a large number of individuals. In particular, the difficulty lays in describing emerging collective behaviors by means of a relatively small number of local interaction rules between individuals in a crowd. Clearly, the individual's free will involved in decision making processes and in the management of the social interactions cannot be described by a finite number of deterministic rules. On the other hand, in large crowds, this individual indeterminacy can be considered as a local fluctuation averaged to zero by the size of the crowd. While at the microscopic scale, using a system of coupled ODEs, the free will should be included in the mathematical description (e.g. with a stochastic term), the mesoscopic and macroscopic scales, modeled by PDEs, represent a powerful modelling tool that allows to neglect this feature and provide a reliable description. In this sense, the work by Bellomo, Clarke, Gibelli, Townsend, and Vreugdenhil [2] represents a mathematical-epistemological contribution towards the design of a reliable model of human behavior.

  2. Crisis intervention: program evaluation.

    PubMed

    Simington, J A; Cargill, L; Hill, W

    1996-11-01

    Crisis intervention is based upon crisis theory and is defined as a short-term active mode of therapy that focuses on solving the client's immediate problem and reestablishing psychological equilibrium. The crisis intervention program was the first phase in the development of a broader mental health program with advancement decisions being based upon evaluation results of this initial phase. An evaluation methodology using the Stufflebeam Goal-Stakeholder Model (1980) was designed and implemented. A satisfaction survey was conducted to develop a database relative to the program's process. The Mental Health Category Measure, and the Crisis Call Outcome Rating Scale were used to capture outcome data. Analysis of the qualitative and quantitative data indicate that stakeholders are satisfied with the program. outcome data demonstrates that the program produces the intended outcomes. Triangulation, a method of comparing the qualitative and quantitative findings revealed consistency, and thus provides confidence in the accuracy of the findings.

  3. Midlife crisis: a debate.

    PubMed

    Freund, Alexandra M; Ritter, Johannes O

    2009-01-01

    Without doubt, the midlife crisis is the most popular concept describing middle adulthood. Facing the limitation of the time until death, men in particular are believed to pause from actively pursuing their goals and review their achievements, take stock of what they have and have not yet accomplished, at times taking drastic measures to fulfill their dreams. This paper critically discusses the concept of a midlife crisis and the relevant empirical evidence, presenting arguments for and against a strict, a moderate, and a lenient conceptualization of the midlife crisis. Although a strict and even moderate definition of the midlife crisis does not seem tenable on empirical and theoretical grounds, a lenient conceptualization has the potential to stimulate new research directions exemplifying processes of the interaction of social expectations on the one hand and personal goals on the other, and their importance for developmental regulation.

  4. The Literature of Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Mark S.

    1971-01-01

    Examines current books and articles on educational problems, which the author refers to as literature of crisis," and concludes that these works should be read along with other genres of literature which examine human problems of communication and commitment. (VJ)

  5. Crisis -- A Leadership Opportunity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    true. Crisis develops as an organization’s values, beliefs, culture, or behavior becomes incongruent with its operating environment. A leader, who is...an organization’s values, beliefs, culture, and behaviors ; while the other reflects its changing environment. In the beginning, as the plates...a random, cataclysmic event that can strike without warning. However, crisis occurs when an organization’s values, beliefs, culture, or behaviors

  6. Public perception and stakeholder involvement in the crisis management of sediment-related disasters and their mitigation: the case of the Stože debris flow in NW Slovenia.

    PubMed

    Mikoš, Matjaz

    2011-04-01

    Sediments can pose a threat to humans not only when these deposits are polluted but also due to their large quantities. This physical aspect of sediments as a risk will be shown on a case study of a sediment-related disaster that occurred in the mountainous part of Slovenia, Central Europe in 2000. In November 2000, after a long wet period a large debris landslide had been triggered on the Stože slope and stopped in the channel of the Mangart creek. Such an event took the majority of local inhabitants and emergency staff by surprise. Nevertheless, they had just organized the first mitigation measures when, after 35 hours, they were surprised by an even larger debrisflowinitiated as the second phase of the same mass movement event. Within a few minutes, the wet debris flow had devastated the alpine valley of the Koritnica River and killed 7 people in the village of Log pod Mangartom. This paper deals with crisis management and first mitigation measures under this very tense situation of searching for dead bodies. The uncertainty about possible new debris flows drove all inhabitants out of the village by a decision of the civil protection unit, and also other activities of the emergency relief units were overshadowed by the 7 victims. One of the main problems and challenges at the same time was the over 700,000 m³ of wet debris flow deposits in the area of the village of Log pod Mangartom within the Triglav National park, which posed a direct threat of flooding during the first heavy rainfalls in spring 2001, and which were about to be removed to make place for future debris flows. The understanding about what really happened or about the immediate triggering factors was different among the professionals in charge for relief action and for preparing a final remediation plan. The first phase during and immediately after the disaster (relief intervention of emergency units especially those for civil protection) can be described as Concern-Driven Crisis Management or

  7. Implications of Organizational Planning for Crisis Relocation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    AD-A 23 956 IMPLICATIONS OF ORGANIZATIDNAL PLANNING FOR CRISIS RELOCATION(U) NORTH CAROLINA DEPT OF CRIME CONTROL AND PUBLIC SAFETY RALEIG.. M A...policies of the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Division of Emergency Management North Carolina Department of Crime Control and Public Safety...North Carolina Department of Crime Control and Work Unit 0 4412 1 Public Safety, 116 W.Jones St. ,Raleigh, NC 27611 II. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND

  8. Economic crisis and nursing in Spain.

    PubMed

    Zabalegui, Adelaida; Cabrera, Esther

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of the present study is to describe the economic context in Spain and its impact on the health care sector and in nursing schools. The global economic crisis is affecting nursing in Spain. This study analyses and compares indicators related to health care and nursing schools among European countries. Some new strategies to cope with the challenges arising from the health care crisis are suggested. Health care costs are increasing as a result of the ageing of the Spanish population, immigration, chronicity of health problems and new medical technology. Nursing education has changed in 2010 from a 3-year diploma programme to a 4-year University degree in Nursing. This change requires new resources involving staff, facilities and equipment, all of which are lacking because of the economic crisis in Spain. The worldwide economic crisis has affected Spain more than it has other European Union (EU) countries. This global crisis has an impact on the health care sector as well on nursing schools. It is essential for nursing management to develop creative approaches to maintain cost effective patient care. New programmes and technology must be carefully evaluated in terms of cost effectiveness before being implemented. All health care professionals should be well informed and have a solid understanding of this situation.

  9. Crisis GIS: Preparing for the Next Volcanic Crisis in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, D. W.; Robinson, J. E.; Schilling, S. P.; Schaefer, J. R.; Kimberly, P.; Trusdell, F. A.; Guffanti, M. C.; Mayberry, G. C.; Cameron, C. E.; Smith, J. G.; McIntire, J. A.; Snedigar, S.; Ewert, J. W.

    2004-12-01

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) specialists from the Volcano Hazards Program (VHP) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), including personnel at Menlo Park, California, the Cascades Volcano Observatory in Vancouver, Washington, the Alaska Volcano Observatory in Anchorage and Fairbanks, Alaska, the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory in Hawaii National Park, Hawaii, and the Smithsonian Institution Global Volcanism Program in Washington, DC, are developing a GIS response plan in the event of a volcano crisis. This plan, referred to as "Crisis GIS", outlines how VHP can ensure rapid, reliable delivery of spatial and ancillary information for data analysis and visualization at any required location during a volcanic crisis or event within the United States. An effective Crisis GIS needs the capacity to store multiple, large datasets, including: base layer data, elevation data, geologic maps, hazard assessment maps, satellite data, and aerial photography for volcanoes around the U.S. It must be readily accessible by VHP GIS specialists stationed around the Nation. Such a GIS should also support installations of monitoring instruments and telemetry equipment that relay monitoring signals, and provision of updates to public officials, the media, and the public during a crisis. GIS technology has proven to be an invaluable tool for crisis response. Recently, GIS was applied as part of the response efforts to two large-scale crises: the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, and the Southern California wildfires of Fall 2003. In each case, GIS was used to organize large quantities of spatial data and to produce electronic and paper maps that illustrated hazards, supported decision making, and communicated developing situations to responsible emergency-management authorities and to the populace affected (Kant, 2002, and Pratt, 2003). VHP GIS specialists are currently testing the software and hardware employed in recent major crisis response efforts and are learning to adapt

  10. [Risk and crisis management by anesthesiologists regarding 'Guidelines for Actions Against Intraoperative Critical Hemorrhage' published by the Japanese Society of Anesthesiologists and the Japan Society of Transfusion Medicine and Cell Therapy].

    PubMed

    Irita, Kazuo; Yoshimura, Hayashi; Sakaguchi, Yoshiro; Takamatsu, Chihiro; Tokuda, Kentaro

    2008-09-01

    According to a survey of anesthesia-related critical incidents by the Japanese Society of Anesthesiologists, hemorrhage was the major cause of cardiac arrest developing in the operating room. To deal with critical hemorrhage swiftly, not only cooperation between anesthesiologists and surgeons but also the linkage of operating rooms with transfusion management divisions and the blood center is important. It is desirable for the hospital transfusion committee to prepare hospital regulations on 'actions to be taken to manage critical hemorrhage', and practice the implementation of these guidelines by simulated drills. When critical hemorrhage occurs, a person in charge is appointed, and an emergency is declared (call for manpower and notification of the emergency to the transfusion management divisions). A person in charge comprehensively assesses the hemostatic condition, hemodynamics, laboratory data, and blood product supply system, and consults the operator regarding the continuation of surgery or changing surgical procedures. When time is short, the cross-matching test is omitted, and the ABO-identical blood is used. When a supply of the identical ABO-type blood is not available, compatible blood type is used. The evolving concept of hemostatic resuscitation seems to be important to prevent coagulopathy, which easily develops during massive hemorrhage. Anesthesiologists should be aware of the risk of such an emergency transfusion and procedures to be taken to switch to transfusion of the ABO-identical blood. Establishment of a hospital emergency transfusion system depends on the overall capability of the critical and crisis management systems of the hospital.

  11. Crisis as opportunity: international health work during the economic depression.

    PubMed

    Borowy, Iris

    2008-01-01

    The economic depression of the 1930s represented the most important economic and social crisis of its time. Surprisingly, its effect on health did not show in available morbidity and mortality rates. In 1932, the League of Nations Health Organisation embarked on a six-point program addressing statistical methods of measuring the effect and its influence on mental health and nutrition and establishing ways to safeguard public health through more efficient health systems. Some of these studies resulted in considerations of general relevance beyond crisis management. Unexpectedly, the crisis offered an opportunity to reconsider key concepts of individual and public health.

  12. Crisis and emergency risk communication as an integrative model.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Barbara; W Seeger, Matthew

    2005-01-01

    This article describes a model of communication known as crisis and emergency risk communication (CERC). The model is outlined as a merger of many traditional notions of health and risk communication with work in crisis and disaster communication. The specific kinds of communication activities that should be called for at various stages of disaster or crisis development are outlined. Although crises are by definition uncertain, equivocal, and often chaotic situations, the CERC model is presented as a tool health communicators can use to help manage these complex events.

  13. When Crisis Strikes on Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Wendy Ann, Ed.

    This handbook aids in planning for effective crisis communication at institutions of higher education. The book opens with a behind-the-scenes look at a particular crisis--the 1990 murders of five students at the University of Florida. This first section offers tested advice from a campus communicator, an account of the crisis and the…

  14. When Crisis Strikes on Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Wendy Ann, Ed.

    This handbook aids in planning for effective crisis communication at institutions of higher education. The book opens with a behind-the-scenes look at a particular crisis--the 1990 murders of five students at the University of Florida. This first section offers tested advice from a campus communicator, an account of the crisis and the…

  15. Keeping Cool in a Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padgett, Raven

    2006-01-01

    Many schools are able to avoid disasters by creating a strong, deliberate crisis plan and knowing how to implement it effectively. Good crisis preparedness requires leadership from the top, a critical mass of trained staff members, careful planning, and excellent communication. This article discusses how to prepare for a crisis.

  16. What Are the Attributes and Duties of the School Crisis Intervention Team?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gullatt, David E.; Long, Douglas

    1996-01-01

    Physical measures such as weapons checks and metal detectors are inadequate to forestall school violence. The key to managing crises is a trained, broad-based crisis-intervention team and a crisis-management plan. Team responsibilities include developing an intervention plan, coordinating with community services, educating and training staff, and…

  17. College Football and Public Crisis: Appropriate Actions and Justifications after the Kennedy Assassination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Robert S.

    This paper contends that domestic response to John F. Kennedy's assassination took two basic forms in the United States: active crisis management and retreat. According to the paper, while government, churches, and the media engaged in active crisis management, businesses and schools closed, and the public retreated to mourn rather than to…

  18. The Sino-Vietnamese Crisis, 1975-1979: An Historical Case Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-01

    central qutesti-n. J international crisis management case studies done by Allen Whiting, Ole HlA i, Alexander George, and Richard Smoke form a base for...an historical case study that addresses these central’questions. International crisis management case studies done by Allen Whiting, Ole Holsti

  19. Crisis communication. Lessons from 9/11.

    PubMed

    Argenti, Paul

    2002-12-01

    The sheer enormity of last year's terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon gave new meaning to the term "crisis management." Suddenly, companies near Ground Zero, as well as those more than a thousand miles away, needed a plan. Because the disasters disrupted established channels not only between businesses and customers but between businesses and employees, internal crisis-communications strategies that could be quickly implemented became a key responsibility of top management. Without these strategies, employees' trauma and confusion might have immobilized their firms and set their customers adrift. In this article, executives from a range of industries talk about how their companies, including Morgan Stanley, Oppenheimer Funds, American Airlines, Verizon, the New York Times, Dell, and Starbucks, went about restoring operations and morale. From his interviews with these individuals, author and management professor Paul Argenti was able to distill a number of lessons, each of which, he says, may "serve as guideposts for any company facing a crisis that undermines its employees' composure, confidence, or concentration." His advice to senior executives includes: Maintain high levels of visibility, so that employees are certain of top management's command of the situation and concern; establish contingency communication channels and work sites; strive to keep employees focused on the business itself, because a sense of usefulness enhances morale and good morale enhances usefulness; and ensure that employees have absorbed the firm's values, which will guide them as they cope with the unpredictable. The most forward-thinking leaders realize that managing a crisis-communications program requires the same dedication and resources they give to other dimensions of their business. More important, they realize that their employees always come first.

  20. [Psychological containment put to the test by a crisis].

    PubMed

    Grison-Curinier, Juliete; Limongi, Marc; Bocoum, Amadou

    2014-01-01

    In the first-time admission unit, psychological containment is based essentially on receivingthe patient in crisis. While the management of the crisis is inseparable from containment, the drawing up of the patient's history, centred on observation, transfer and the clinical aspect, is a key stage in the patient's care. In an institution, the nursing team will, through its creativity, invent the care, seeking a possible alliance.