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Sample records for coupled mhd-mcnp model

  1. Gas Core Reactor Numerical Simulation Using a Coupled MHD-MCNP Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazeminezhad, F.; Anghaie, S.

    2008-01-01

    Analysis is provided in this report of using two head-on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shocks to achieve supercritical nuclear fission in an axially elongated cylinder filled with UF4 gas as an energy source for deep space missions. The motivation for each aspect of the design is explained and supported by theory and numerical simulations. A subsequent report will provide detail on relevant experimental work to validate the concept. Here the focus is on the theory of and simulations for the proposed gas core reactor conceptual design from the onset of shock generations to the supercritical state achieved when the shocks collide. The MHD model is coupled to a standard nuclear code (MCNP) to observe the neutron flux and fission power attributed to the supercritical state brought about by the shock collisions. Throughout the modeling, realistic parameters are used for the initial ambient gaseous state and currents to ensure a resulting supercritical state upon shock collisions.

  2. Using the Model Coupling Toolkit to couple earth system models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warner, J.C.; Perlin, N.; Skyllingstad, E.D.

    2008-01-01

    Continued advances in computational resources are providing the opportunity to operate more sophisticated numerical models. Additionally, there is an increasing demand for multidisciplinary studies that include interactions between different physical processes. Therefore there is a strong desire to develop coupled modeling systems that utilize existing models and allow efficient data exchange and model control. The basic system would entail model "1" running on "M" processors and model "2" running on "N" processors, with efficient exchange of model fields at predetermined synchronization intervals. Here we demonstrate two coupled systems: the coupling of the ocean circulation model Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) to the surface wave model Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN), and the coupling of ROMS to the atmospheric model Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Prediction System (COAMPS). Both coupled systems use the Model Coupling Toolkit (MCT) as a mechanism for operation control and inter-model distributed memory transfer of model variables. In this paper we describe requirements and other options for model coupling, explain the MCT library, ROMS, SWAN and COAMPS models, methods for grid decomposition and sparse matrix interpolation, and provide an example from each coupled system. Methods presented in this paper are clearly applicable for coupling of other types of models. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Long line coupling models.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Chen, Kenneth C.

    2004-03-01

    This report assembles models for the response of a wire interacting with a conducting ground to an electromagnetic pulse excitation. The cases of an infinite wire above the ground as well as resting on the ground and buried beneath the ground are treated. The focus is on the characteristics and propagation of the transmission line mode. Approximations are used to simplify the description and formulas are obtained for the current. The semi-infinite case, where the short circuit current can be nearly twice that of the infinite line, is also examined.

  4. Session on coupled atmospheric/chemistry coupled models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Anne

    1993-01-01

    The session on coupled atmospheric/chemistry coupled models is reviewed. Current model limitations, current issues and critical unknowns, and modeling activity are addressed. Specific recommendations and experimental strategies on the following are given: multiscale surface layer - planetary boundary layer - chemical flux measurements; Eulerian budget study; and Langrangian experiment. Nonprecipitating cloud studies, organized convective systems, and aerosols - heterogenous chemistry are also discussed.

  5. The Challenges to Coupling Dynamic Geospatial Models

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, N

    2006-06-23

    Many applications of modeling spatial dynamic systems focus on a single system and a single process, ignoring the geographic and systemic context of the processes being modeled. A solution to this problem is the coupled modeling of spatial dynamic systems. Coupled modeling is challenging for both technical reasons, as well as conceptual reasons. This paper explores the benefits and challenges to coupling or linking spatial dynamic models, from loose coupling, where information transfer between models is done by hand, to tight coupling, where two (or more) models are merged as one. To illustrate the challenges, a coupled model of Urbanization and Wildfire Risk is presented. This model, called Vesta, was applied to the Santa Barbara, California region (using real geospatial data), where Urbanization and Wildfires occur and recur, respectively. The preliminary results of the model coupling illustrate that coupled modeling can lead to insight into the consequences of processes acting on their own.

  6. Coupled transport in rotor models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iubini, S.; Lepri, S.; Livi, R.; Politi, A.

    2016-08-01

    Steady nonequilibrium states are investigated in a one-dimensional setup in the presence of two thermodynamic currents. Two paradigmatic nonlinear oscillators models are investigated: an XY chain and the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Their distinctive feature is that the relevant variable is an angle in both cases. We point out the importance of clearly distinguishing between energy and heat flux. In fact, even in the presence of a vanishing Seebeck coefficient, a coupling between (angular) momentum and energy arises, mediated by the unavoidable presence of a coherent energy flux. Such a contribution is the result of the ‘advection’ induced by the position-dependent angular velocity. As a result, in the XY model, the knowledge of the two diagonal elements of the Onsager matrix suffices to reconstruct its transport properties. The analysis of the nonequilibrium steady states finally allows to strengthen the connection between the two models.

  7. Coupled assimilation for an intermediated coupled ENSO prediction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Fei; Zhu, Jiang

    2010-10-01

    The value of coupled assimilation is discussed using an intermediate coupled model in which the wind stress is the only atmospheric state which is slavery to model sea surface temperature (SST). In the coupled assimilation analysis, based on the coupled wind-ocean state covariance calculated from the coupled state ensemble, the ocean state is adjusted by assimilating wind data using the ensemble Kalman filter. As revealed by a series of assimilation experiments using simulated observations, the coupled assimilation of wind observations yields better results than the assimilation of SST observations. Specifically, the coupled assimilation of wind observations can help to improve the accuracy of the surface and subsurface currents because the correlation between the wind and ocean currents is stronger than that between SST and ocean currents in the equatorial Pacific. Thus, the coupled assimilation of wind data can decrease the initial condition errors in the surface/subsurface currents that can significantly contribute to SST forecast errors. The value of the coupled assimilation of wind observations is further demonstrated by comparing the prediction skills of three 12-year (1997-2008) hindcast experiments initialized by the ocean-only assimilation scheme that assimilates SST observations, the coupled assimilation scheme that assimilates wind observations, and a nudging scheme that nudges the observed wind stress data, respectively. The prediction skills of two assimilation schemes are significantly better than those of the nudging scheme. The prediction skills of assimilating wind observations are better than assimilating SST observations. Assimilating wind observations for the 2007/2008 La Niña event triggers better predictions, while assimilating SST observations fails to provide an early warning for that event.

  8. A multilingual programming model for coupled systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, E. T.; Larson, J. W.; Norris, B.; Tobis, M.; Steder, M.; Jacob, R. L.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Wisconsin; Univ. of Chicago; The Australian National Univ.

    2008-01-01

    Multiphysics and multiscale simulation systems share a common software requirement-infrastructure to implement data exchanges between their constituent parts-often called the coupling problem. On distributed-memory parallel platforms, the coupling problem is complicated by the need to describe, transfer, and transform distributed data, known as the parallel coupling problem. Parallel coupling is emerging as a new grand challenge in computational science as scientists attempt to build multiscale and multiphysics systems on parallel platforms. An additional coupling problem in these systems is language interoperability between their constituent codes. We have created a multilingual parallel coupling programming model based on a successful open-source parallel coupling library, the Model Coupling Toolkit (MCT). This programming model's capabilities reach beyond MCT's native Fortran implementation to include bindings for the C++ and Python programming languages. We describe the method used to generate the interlanguage bindings. This approach enables an object-based programming model for implementing parallel couplings in non-Fortran coupled systems and in systems with language heterogeneity. We describe the C++ and Python versions of the MCT programming model and provide short examples. We report preliminary performance results for the MCT interpolation benchmark. We describe a major Python application that uses the MCT Python bindings, a Python implementation of the control and coupling infrastructure for the community climate system model. We conclude with a discussion of the significance of this work to productivity computing in multidisciplinary computational science.

  9. Circuit Model for Capacitive Coupling in Inductively Coupled Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, M.; Shaw, D. M.; Collins, G. J.; Sugai, H.

    1998-10-01

    A crude circuit model has been developed to illustrate and account for capacitive coupling between the rf coil and the bulk plasma in a stove top inductively coupled plasma source. The circuit model is composed of three levels of capacitance: the dielectric window capacitance, sheath capacitance contiguous to the dielectric window, and the chamber to ground sheath capacitance. The model is verified by quantitative comparison with the measured rf plasma potential in the bulk plasma body, plasma feedstock gas (argon) pressures below 2 mTorr. At higher pressures above 5 mTorr, the measured results diverge from the circuit model due to the transition from a spatially uniform electron density throughout the bulk plasma at pressures less than 2 mTorr to a less spatially uniform electron density at pressures above 5 mTorr.

  10. Convectively coupled Kelvin waves in CMIP5 coupled climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lu; Li, Tim

    2017-02-01

    This study provided a quantitative evaluation of convectively coupled Kelvin waves (CCKWs) over the Indian Ocean and the Pacific Ocean simulated by 20 coupled climate models that participated in Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5. The two leading empirical orthogonal function (EOF) modes of filtered daily precipitation anomalies are used to represent the eastward propagating CCKWs in both observations and simulations. The eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the EOF modes represent the spatial patterns and intensity of CCKWs respectively, and the lead-lag relationship between the two EOF principle components describe the phase propagation of CCKWs. A non-dimensional metric was designed in consideration of all the three factors (i.e., pattern, amplitude and phase propagation) for evaluation. The relative rankings of the models based on the skill scores calculated by the metric are conducted for the Indian Ocean and the Pacific Ocean, respectively. Two models (NorESM1-M and MPI-ESM-LR) are ranked among the best 20 % for both the regions. Three models (inmcm4, MRI-CGCM3 and HadGEM2-ES) are ranked among the worst 20 % for both the regions. While the observed CCKW amplitude is greater north of the equator in the Pacific, some models overestimate the CCKW ampliutde in the Southern Hemisphere. This bias is related to the mean state precipitation bias along the south Pacific convergence zone.

  11. Fluid Coupling in a Discrete Cochlear Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, S. J.; Lineton, B.; Ni, G.

    2011-11-01

    The interaction between the basilar membrane, BM, dynamics and the fluid coupling in the cochlea can be formulated using a discrete model by assuming that the BM is divided into a number of longitudinal elements. The form of the fluid coupling can then be understood by dividing it into a far field component, due to plane wave acoustic coupling, and a near field component, due to higher order evanescent acoustic modes. The effects of non-uniformity and asymmetry in the cross-sectional areas of the fluid chambers can also be accounted for within this formulation. The discrete model is used to calculate the effect on the coupled BM response of a short cochlear implant, which reduces the volume of one of the fluid chambers over about half its length. The passive response of the coupled cochlea at lower frequencies is shown to be almost unaffected by this change in volume.

  12. Higgs couplings in noncommutative Standard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batebi, S.; Haghighat, M.; Tizchang, S.; Akafzade, H.

    2015-06-01

    We consider the Higgs and Yukawa parts of the Noncommutative Standard Model (NCSM). We explore the NC-action to give all Feynman rules for couplings of the Higgs boson to electroweak gauge fields and fermions.

  13. Dynamic coupling of three hydrodynamic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartnack, J. N.; Philip, G. T.; Rungoe, M.; Smith, G.; Johann, G.; Larsen, O.; Gregersen, J.; Butts, M. B.

    2008-12-01

    The need for integrated modelling is evidently present within the field of flood management and flood forecasting. Engineers, modellers and managers are faced with flood problems which transcend the classical hydrodynamic fields of urban, river and coastal flooding. Historically the modeller has been faced with having to select one hydrodynamic model to cover all the aspects of the potentially complex dynamics occurring in a flooding situation. Such a single hydrodynamic model does not cover all dynamics of flood modelling equally well. Thus the ideal choice may in fact be a combination of models. Models combining two numerical/hydrodynamic models are becoming more standard, typically these models combine a 1D river model with a 2D overland flow model or alternatively a 1D sewer/collection system model with a 2D overland solver. In complex coastal/urban areas the flood dynamics may include rivers/streams, collection/storm water systems along with the overland flow. The dynamics within all three areas is of the same time scale and there is feedback in the system across the couplings. These two aspects dictate a fully dynamic three way coupling as opposed to running the models sequentially. It will be shown that the main challenges of the three way coupling are time step issues related to the difference in numerical schemes used in the three model components and numerical instabilities caused by the linking of the model components. MIKE FLOOD combines the models MIKE 11, MIKE 21 and MOUSE into one modelling framework which makes it possible to couple any combination of river, urban and overland flow fully dynamically. The MIKE FLOOD framework will be presented with an overview of the coupling possibilities. The flood modelling concept will be illustrated through real life cases in Australia and in Germany. The real life cases reflect dynamics and interactions across all three model components which are not possible to reproduce using a two-way coupling alone. The

  14. Dual coupling effective band model for polarons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchand, Dominic J. J.; Stamp, Philip C. E.; Berciu, Mona

    2017-01-01

    Nondiagonal couplings to a bosonic bath completely change polaronic dynamics, from the usual diagonally coupled paradigm of smoothly varying properties. We study, using analytic and numerical methods, a model having both diagonal Holstein and nondiagonal Su-Schrieffer-Heeger (SSH) couplings. The critical coupling found previously in the pure SSH model, at which the k =0 effective mass diverges, now becomes a transition line in the coupling constant plane—the form of the line depends on the adiabaticity parameter. Detailed results are given for the quasiparticle and ground-state properties, over a wide range of couplings and adiabaticity ratios. The new paradigm involves a destabilization, at the transition line, of the simple Holstein polaron to one with a finite ground-state momentum, but with everywhere a continuously evolving band shape. No "self-trapping transition" exists in any of these models. The physics may be understood entirely in terms of competition between different hopping terms in a simple renormalized effective band theory. The possibility of further transitions is suggested by the results.

  15. An Appraisal of Coupled Climate Model Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Sperber, K; Gleckler, P; Covey, C; Taylor, K; Bader, D; Phillips, T; Fiorino, M; Achutarao, K

    2004-02-24

    In 2002, the Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) proposed the concept for a state-of-the-science appraisal of climate models to be performed approximately every two years. Motivation for this idea arose from the perceived needs of the international modeling groups and the broader climate research community to document progress more frequently than provided by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Assessment Reports. A committee of external reviewers, which included senior researchers from four leading international modeling centers, supported the concept by stating in its review: ''The panel enthusiastically endorses the suggestion that PCMDI develop an independent appraisal of coupled model performance every 2-3 years. This would provide a useful 'mid-course' evaluation of modeling progress in the context of larger IPCC and national assessment activities, and should include both coupled and single-component model evaluations.''

  16. Simplified coupling power model for fibers fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saktioto, J.; Ali, J.; Fadhali, M.

    2009-09-01

    Fiber coupler fabrication used for an optical waveguide requires lossless power for an optimal application. The previous research coupled fibers were successfully fabricated by injecting hydrogen flow at 1 bar and fused slightly by unstable torch flame in the range of 800-1350°C. Optical parameters may vary significantly over wide range physical properties. Coupling coefficient and refractive index are estimated from the experimental result of the coupling ratio distribution from 1% to 75%. The change of geometrical fiber affects the normalized frequency V even for single mode fibers. V is derived and some parametric variations are performed on the left and right hand side of the coupling region. A partial power is modelled and derived using V, normalized lateral phase constant u, and normalized lateral attenuation constant, w through the second kind of modified Bessel function of the l order, which obeys the normal mode and normalized propagation constant b. Total power is maintained constant in order to comply with the energy conservation law. The power is integrated through V, u, and w over the pulling length of 7500 µm for 1-D. The core radius of a fiber significantly affects V and power partially at coupling region rather than wavelength and refractive index of core and cladding. This model has power phenomena in transmission and reflection for an optical switch and tunable filter.

  17. Mass functions in coupled dark energy models

    SciTech Connect

    Mainini, Roberto; Bonometto, Silvio

    2006-08-15

    We evaluate the mass function of virialized halos, by using Press and Schechter (PS) and/or Steth and Tormen (ST) expressions, for cosmologies where dark energy (DE) is due to a scalar self-interacting field, coupled with dark matter (DM). We keep to coupled DE (cDE) models known to fit linear observables. To implement the PS-ST approach, we start from reviewing and extending the results of a previous work on the growth of a spherical top-hat fluctuation in cDE models, confirming their most intriguing astrophysical feature, i.e. a significant baryon-DM segregation, occurring well before the onset of any hydrodynamical effect. Accordingly, the predicted mass function depends on how halo masses are measured. For any option, however, the coupling causes a distortion of the mass function, still at z=0. Furthermore, the z-dependence of cDE mass functions is mostly displaced, in respect to {lambda}CDM, in the opposite way of uncoupled dynamical DE. This is an aspect of the basic underlying result, that even a little DM-DE coupling induces relevant modifications in the nonlinear evolution. Therefore, without causing great shifts in linear astrophysical observables, the DM-baryon segregation induced by the coupling can have an impact on a number of cosmological problems, e.g., galaxy satellite abundance, spiral disk formation, apparent baryon shortage, entropy input in clusters, etc.

  18. Parallelization of the Coupled Earthquake Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Block, Gary; Li, P. Peggy; Song, Yuhe T.

    2007-01-01

    This Web-based tsunami simulation system allows users to remotely run a model on JPL s supercomputers for a given undersea earthquake. At the time of this reporting, predicting tsunamis on the Internet has never happened before. This new code directly couples the earthquake model and the ocean model on parallel computers and improves simulation speed. Seismometers can only detect information from earthquakes; they cannot detect whether or not a tsunami may occur as a result of the earthquake. When earthquake-tsunami models are coupled with the improved computational speed of modern, high-performance computers and constrained by remotely sensed data, they are able to provide early warnings for those coastal regions at risk. The software is capable of testing NASA s satellite observations of tsunamis. It has been successfully tested for several historical tsunamis, has passed all alpha and beta testing, and is well documented for users.

  19. Modeling partially coupled objects with smooth particle hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wingate, C.A.

    1996-10-01

    A very simple phenomenological model is presented to model objects that are partially coupled (i.e. welded or bonded) where usually the coupled interface is weaker than the bulk material. The model works by letting objects fully interact in compression and having the objects only partially interact in tension. A disconnect factor is provided to adjust the tensile interaction to simulate coupling strengths. Three cases of an example impact calculation are shown-no coupling, full coupling and partial coupling.

  20. Coupled Disturbance Modelling And Validation Of A Reaction Wheel Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhe; Aglietti, Gugliemo S.

    2012-07-01

    Microvibrations of a RWA are usually studied in either hard-mounted or coupled conditions, although coupled wheel-structure disturbances are more representative than the hard-mounted disturbances. The coupled analysis method of the wheel-structure is not as well developed as the hard-mounted one. A coupled disturbance analysis method is proposed in this paper. One of the most important factors in coupled disturbance analysis - the accelerance or dynamic mass of the wheel is measured and results are validated with an equivalent FE model. The wheel hard-mounted disturbances are also measured from a vibration measurement platform particularly designed for this study. Wheel structural modes are solved from its analytical disturbance model and validated with the test results. The wheel-speed dependent accelerance analysis method is proposed.

  1. Coupled wave model for large magnet coils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabriel, G. J.

    1980-01-01

    A wave coupled model based on field theory is evolved for analysis of fast electromagnetic transients on superconducting coils. It is expected to play a useful role in the design of protection methods against damage due to high voltages or any adverse effects that might arise from unintentional transients. The significant parameters of the coil are identified to be the turn to turn wave coupling coefficients and the travel time of an electromagnetic disturbance around a single turn. Unlike circuit theoretic inductor, the coil response evolves in discrete steps having durations equal to this travel time. It is during such intervals that high voltages are likely to occur. The model also bridges the gap between the low and high ends of the frequency spectrum.

  2. Towards Better Coupling of Hydrological Simulation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penton, D.; Stenson, M.; Leighton, B.; Bridgart, R.

    2012-12-01

    Standards for model interoperability and scientific workflow software provide techniques and tools for coupling hydrological simulation models. However, model builders are yet to realize the benefits of these and continue to write ad hoc implementations and scripts. Three case studies demonstrate different approaches to coupling models, the first using tight interfaces (OpenMI), the second using a scientific workflow system (Trident) and the third using a tailored execution engine (Delft Flood Early Warning System - Delft-FEWS). No approach was objectively better than any other approach. The foremost standard for coupling hydrological models is the Open Modeling Interface (OpenMI), which defines interfaces for models to interact. An implementation of the OpenMI standard involves defining interchange terms and writing a .NET/Java wrapper around the model. An execution wrapper such as OatC.GUI or Pipistrelle executes the models. The team built two OpenMI implementations for eWater Source river system models. Once built, it was easy to swap river system models. The team encountered technical challenges with versions of the .Net framework (3.5 calling 4.0) and with the performance of the execution wrappers when running daily simulations. By design, the OpenMI interfaces are general, leaving significant decisions around the semantics of the interfaces to the implementer. Increasingly, scientific workflow tools such as Kepler, Taverna and Trident are able to replace custom scripts. These tools aim to improve the provenance and reproducibility of processing tasks. In particular, Taverna and the myExperiment website have had success making many bioinformatics workflows reusable and sharable. The team constructed Trident activities for hydrological software including IQQM, REALM and eWater Source. They built an activity generator for model builders to build activities for particular river systems. The models were linked at a simulation level, without any daily time

  3. Nonlinear Walecka models and point-coupling relativistic models

    SciTech Connect

    Lourenco, O.; Amaral, R. L. P. G.; Dutra, M.; Delfino, A.

    2009-10-15

    We study hadronic nonlinear point-coupling (NLPC) models which reproduce numerically the binding energy, the incompressibility, and the nucleon effective mass at the nuclear matter saturation obtained by different nonlinear Walecka (NLW) models. We have investigated their behaviors as functions of the nuclear matter density to observe how they deviate from known NLW models. In our study we present a meson-exchange modified nonlinear Walecka model (MNLW) which exactly underlies a nonlinear point-coupling model (NLPC) presenting third- and fourth-order scalar density self-couplings. A discussion about naive dimensional analysis (NDA) and naturalness is also provided for a large class of NLW and NLPC models. At finite temperature, critical and flash parameters of both approaches are presented.

  4. Coupling biology and oceanography in models.

    PubMed

    Fennel, W; Neumann, T

    2001-08-01

    The dynamics of marine ecosystems, i.e. the changes of observable chemical-biological quantities in space and time, are driven by biological and physical processes. Predictions of future developments of marine systems need a theoretical framework, i.e. models, solidly based on research and understanding of the different processes involved. The natural way to describe marine systems theoretically seems to be the embedding of chemical-biological models into circulation models. However, while circulation models are relatively advanced the quantitative theoretical description of chemical-biological processes lags behind. This paper discusses some of the approaches and problems in the development of consistent theories and indicates the beneficial potential of the coupling of marine biology and oceanography in models.

  5. Four mass coupled oscillator guitar model.

    PubMed

    Popp, John E

    2012-01-01

    Coupled oscillator models have been used for the low frequency response (50 to 250 Hz) of a guitar. These 2 and 3 mass models correctly predict measured resonance frequency relationships under various laboratory boundary conditions, but did not always represent the true state of a guitar in the players' hands. The model presented has improved these models in three ways, (1) a fourth oscillator includes the guitar body, (2) plate stiffnesses and other fundamental parameters were measured directly and effective areas and masses used to calculate the responses, including resonances and phases, directly, and (3) one of the three resultant resonances varies with neck and side mass and can also be modeled as a bar mode of the neck and body. The calculated and measured resonances and phases agree reasonably well.

  6. Coupled process modeling and waste package performance

    SciTech Connect

    McGrail, B.P.; Engel, D.W.

    1992-11-01

    The interaction of borosilicate waste glasses with water has been studied extensively and reasonably good models are available that describe the reaction kinetics and solution chemical effects. Unfortunately, these models have not been utilized in performance assessment analyses, except in estimating radionuclide solubilities at the waste form surface. A geochemical model has been incorporated in the AREST code to examine the coupled processes of glass dissolution and transport within the engineering barrier system. Our calculations show that the typical assumptions used in performance assessment analyses, such as fixed solubilities or constant reaction rate at the waste form surface, do not always give conservative or realistic predictions of radionuclide release. Varying the transport properties of the waste package materials is shown to give counterintuitive effects on the release rates of some radionuclides. The use of noncoupled performance assessment models could lead a repository designer to an erroneous conclusion regarding the relative benefit of one waste package design or host rock setting over another.

  7. Coupling a terrestrial biogeochemical model to the common land model

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Xiaoying; Mao, Jiafu; Wang, Yingping; Dai, Yongjiu; Tang, Xuli

    2011-01-01

    A terrestrial biogeochemical model (CASACNP) was coupled to a land surface model (the Common Land Model, CoLM) to simulate the dynamics of carbon substrate in soil and its limitation on soil respiration. The combined model, CoLM-CASACNP, was able to predict long-term carbon sources and sinks that CoLM alone could not. The coupled model was tested using measurements of belowground respiration and surface fluxes from two forest ecosystems. The combined model simulated reasonably well the diurnal and seasonal variations of net ecosystem carbon exchange, as well as seasonal variation in the soil respiration rate of both the forest sites chosen for this study. However, the agreement between model simulations and actual measurements was poorer under dry conditions. The model should be tested against more measurements before being applied globally to investigate the feedbacks between the carbon cycle and climate change.

  8. Fluctuations in a coupled population model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakeman, E.; Hopcraft, K. I.; Matthews, J. O.

    2005-07-01

    We investigate a discrete Markov process in which the immigration of individuals into one population is controlled by the fluctuations in another. We examine the effect of coupling back the second population to the first through a similar mechanism and derive exact solutions for the generating functions of the population statistics. We show that a stationary state exists over a certain parameter range and obtain expressions for moments and correlation functions in this regime. When more than two populations are coupled, cyclically transient oscillations and periodic behaviour of correlation functions are predicted. We demonstrate that if the initial distribution of either population is stable, or more generally has a power-law tail that falls off like N-(1+α) (0 < α < 1), then for certain parameter values there exists a stationary state that is also power law but not stable. This stationary state cannot be accessed from a single multiple immigrant population model, but arises solely from the nonlinear interaction of the coupled system.

  9. Grand challenge scientific questions in coupled modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Steven

    1993-01-01

    Most convective field experiments in the past (e.g., SESAME, CCOPE, CINDE) have attempted to resolve only the immediate scales of moist convection using network arrays that spanned two or three atmospheric scales at most. Furthermore, these scales have been defined more on practical considerations (cost, manpower, etc.) than on a clear understanding of their theoretical significance. Unfortunately, this has precluded a description of the entire life cycle of MCS's and their interaction with larger scale systems, the land surface, and trace species. Fortunately, the following factors now make it possible to attempt to simulate scale contraction processes from the synoptic scale down to the cloud scale, as well as interactions between complex meteorological, land surface, precipitation, chemical, and hydrologic processes with coupled, multiscale models: the availability of new technology to sample meteorological fields at high temporal and spatial resolution over a broad region made possible by the weather observing modernization program; increased computer power and improved numerical approaches to run limited area models with nonhydrostatic precipitation physics so as to explicitly resolve MCS (Mesoscale Convective System) processes; and four dimensional assimilation of non-conventional data to provide dynamically consistent datasets for diagnostic analysis of nonlinear scale-interactive dynamics. Several examples of scale-interactive processes which present grand challenges for coupled, multiscale modeling were presented.

  10. Modeling and characterization of multiple coupled lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Alok

    1999-10-01

    A configuration-oriented circuit model for multiple coupled lines in an inhomogeneous medium is developed and presented in this thesis. This circuit model consists of a network of uncoupled transmission lines and is readily modeled with simulation tools like LIBRA© and SPICE ©. It provides an equivalent circuit representation which is simple and topologically meaningful as compared to the model based on modal decomposition. The configuration-oriented model is derived by decomposing the immittance matrices associated with an n coupled line 2n-port system. Time- and frequency- domain simulations of typical coupled line multiports are included to exemplify the utility of the model. The model is useful for the simulation and design of general single and multilayer coupled line components, such as filters and couplers, and for the investigation of signal integrity issues including crosstalk in interconnects associated with high speed digital and mixed signal electronic modules and packages. It is shown that multiconductor lossless structures in an inhomogeneous medium can be characterized by multiport time-domain reflection (MR) measurements. A synthesis technique of an equivalent lossless (non-dispersive) uniform multiconductor n coupled lines (UMCL) 2n-port system from the measured discrete time-domain reflection response is presented. This procedure is based on the decomposition of the characteristic immittance matrices of the UMCL in terms of partial mode immittance matrices. The decomposition scheme leads to the discrete transition matrix function of a UMCL 2n-port system. This in turn establishes a relationship between the normal-mode parameters of the UMCL and the measured impulse reflection and transmission response. Equivalence between the synthesis procedure presented in this thesis and the solution of a special form of an algebraic Riccati matrix equation whose solution can lead to the normal-mode parameters and a real termination network is illustrated. In

  11. Quantum Ising model coupled with conducting electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Yasufumi; Yonemitsu, Kenji

    2005-01-01

    The effect of photo-doping on the quantum paraelectric SrTiO3 is studied by using the one-dimensional quantum Ising model, where the Ising spin describes the effective lattice polarization of an optical phonon. Two types of electron-phonon couplings are introduced through the modulation of transfer integral via lattice deformations. After the exact diagonalization and the perturbation studies, we find that photo-induced low-density carriers can drastically alter quantum fluctuations when the system locates near the quantum critical point between the quantum para- and ferro-electric phases.

  12. Coupled map lattice model of jet breakup

    SciTech Connect

    Minich, R W; Schwartz, A J; Baker, E L

    2001-01-25

    An alternative approach is described to evaluate the statistical nature of the breakup of shaped charge liners. Experimental data from ductile and brittle copper jets are analyzed in terms of velocity gradient, deviation of {Delta}V from linearity, R/S analysis, and the Hurst exponent within the coupled map lattice model. One-dimensional simulations containing 600 zones of equal mass and using distinctly different force-displacement curves are generated to simulate ductile and brittle behavior. A particle separates from the stretching jet when an element of material reaches the failure criterion. A simple model of a stretching rod using brittle, semi-brittle, and ductile force-displacement curves is in agreement with the experimental results for the Hurst exponent and the phase portraits and indicates that breakup is a correlated phenomenon.

  13. Evolution model with a cumulative feedback coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimper, Steffen; Zabrocki, Knud; Schulz, Michael

    2002-05-01

    The paper is concerned with a toy model that generalizes the standard Lotka-Volterra equation for a certain population by introducing a competition between instantaneous and accumulative, history-dependent nonlinear feedback the origin of which could be a contribution from any kind of mismanagement in the past. The results depend on the sign of that additional cumulative loss or gain term of strength λ. In case of a positive coupling the system offers a maximum gain achieved after a finite time but the population will die out in the long time limit. In this case the instantaneous loss term of strength u is irrelevant and the model exhibits an exact solution. In the opposite case λ<0 the time evolution of the system is terminated in a crash after ts provided u=0. This singularity after a finite time can be avoided if u≠0. The approach may well be of relevance for the qualitative understanding of more realistic descriptions.

  14. The standard model coupled to quantum gravitodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldabe, Fermin

    2017-01-01

    We show that the renormalizable SO(4)× U(1)× SU(2)× SU(3) Yang-Mills coupled to matter and the Higgs field fits all the experimentally observed differential cross sections known in nature. This extended Standard Model reproduces the experimental gravitational differential cross sections without resorting to the graviton field and instead by exchanging SO(4) gauge fields. By construction, each SO(4) generator in quantum gravitodynamics does not commute with the Dirac gamma matrices. This produces additional interactions absent to non-Abelian gauge fields in the Standard Model. The contributions from these new terms yield differential cross sections consistent with the Newtonian and post-Newtonian interactions derived from General Relativity. Dimensional analysis of the Lagrangian shows that all its terms have total dimensionality four or less and therefore that all physical quantities in the theory renormalize by finite amounts. These properties make QGD the only renormalizable four-dimensional theory describing gravitational interactions.

  15. The CHIC Model: A Global Model for Coupled Binary Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilderjans, Tom; Ceulemans, Eva; Van Mechelen, Iven

    2008-01-01

    Often problems result in the collection of coupled data, which consist of different N-way N-mode data blocks that have one or more modes in common. To reveal the structure underlying such data, an integrated modeling strategy, with a single set of parameters for the common mode(s), that is estimated based on the information in all data blocks, may…

  16. Two-mode coupling model in a few mode fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaliteevskiy, N. A.; Korolev, A. E.; Koreshkov, K. S.; Nazarov, V. N.; Sterlingov, P. M.

    2013-06-01

    A phenomenological two-mode coupling model in few mode fibers (FMF) is developed. It uses a mode coupling coefficient and the differential modal delay as the input parameters and the split-step approach. The model is consistent with the experimental results demonstrating distributed mode coupling effects in FMF and may be used for multipath interference estimation based on statistical analysis of fluctuations.

  17. Teaching Couples Counseling: An Integrative Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Lynn L.; Burnett, Judith A.

    2005-01-01

    Traditionally, training in couples counseling has not received equal status as other counseling modalities. Recently, there is renewed interest in specific training for couples counseling as more emphasis is placed on the stability of couple relationships as an important factor for helping families and children function in a society of frequent…

  18. A fjord-glacier coupled system model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Andrés, Eva; Otero, Jaime; Navarro, Francisco; Prominska, Agnieszka; Lapazaran, Javier; Walczowski, Waldemar

    2017-04-01

    With the aim of studying the processes occurring at the front of marine-terminating glaciers, we couple a fjord circulation model with a flowline glacier dynamics model, with subglacial discharge and calving, which allows the calculation of submarine melt and its influence on calving processes. For ocean modelling, we use a general circulation model, MITgcm, to simulate water circulation driven by both fjord conditions and subglacial discharge, and for calculating submarine melt rates at the glacier front. To constrain freshwater input to the fjord, we use estimations from European Arctic Reanalysis (EAR). To determine the optimal values for each run period, we perform a sensitivity analysis of the model to subglacial discharge variability, aimed to get the best fit of model results to observed temperature and salinity profiles in the fjord for each of these periods. Then, we establish initial and boundary fjord conditions, which we vary weekly-fortnightly, and calculate the submarine melt rate as a function of depth at the calving front. These data are entered into the glacier-flow model, Elmer/Ice, which has been added a crevasse-depth calving model, to estimate the glacier terminus position at a weekly time resolution. We focus our study on the Hansbreen Glacier-Hansbukta Fjord system, in Southern Spitsbergen, Svalbard, where a large set of data are available for both glacier and fjord. The bathymetry of the entire system has been determined from ground penetrating radar and sonar data. In the fjord we have got temperature and salinity data from CTDs (May to September, 2010-2014) and from a mooring (September to May, 2011-2012). For Hansbreen, we use glacier surface topography data from the SPIRIT DEM, surface mass balance from EAR, centre line glacier velocities from stake measurements (May 2005-April 2011), weekly terminus positions from time-lapse photos (Sept. 2009-Sept. 2011), and sea-ice concentrations from time-lapse photos and Nimbus-7 SMMR and DMSP SSM

  19. Extended source model for diffusive coupling.

    PubMed

    González-Ochoa, Héctor O; Flores-Moreno, Roberto; Reyes, Luz M; Femat, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the prevailing approach to diffusion coupling phenomena which considers point-like diffusing sources, we derived an analogous expression for the concentration rate of change of diffusively coupled extended containers. The proposed equation, together with expressions based on solutions to the diffusion equation, is intended to be applied to the numerical solution of systems exclusively composed of ordinary differential equations, however is able to account for effects due the finite size of the coupled sources.

  20. Coupling approaches used in atmospheric entry models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritsevich, M. I.

    2012-09-01

    While a planet orbits the Sun, it is subject to impact by smaller objects, ranging from tiny dust particles and space debris to much larger asteroids and comets. Such collisions have taken place frequently over geological time and played an important role in the evolution of planets and the development of life on the Earth. Though the search for near-Earth objects addresses one of the main points of the Asteroid and Comet Hazard, one should not underestimate the useful information to be gleaned from smaller atmospheric encounters, known as meteors or fireballs. Not only do these events help determine the linkages between meteorites and their parent bodies; due to their relative regularity they provide a good statistical basis for analysis. For successful cases with found meteorites, the detailed atmospheric path record is an excellent tool to test and improve existing entry models assuring the robustness of their implementation. There are many more important scientific questions meteoroids help us to answer, among them: Where do these objects come from, what are their origins, physical properties and chemical composition? What are the shapes and bulk densities of the space objects which fully ablate in an atmosphere and do not reach the planetary surface? Which values are directly measured and which are initially assumed as input to various models? How to couple both fragmentation and ablation effects in the model, taking real size distribution of fragments into account? How to specify and speed up the recovery of a recently fallen meteorites, not letting weathering to affect samples too much? How big is the pre-atmospheric projectile to terminal body ratio in terms of their mass/volume? Which exact parameters beside initial mass define this ratio? More generally, how entering object affects Earth's atmosphere and (if applicable) Earth's surface? How to predict these impact consequences based on atmospheric trajectory data? How to describe atmospheric entry

  1. Lithosphere-Atmosphere-Ionosphere coupling model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachakhidze, M. K., III

    2015-12-01

    The present work offers interpretation of a mechanism of formation of hypothetic ideal electromagnetic contour, creation of which is envisaged in incoming earthquake focal zone. Model of generation of EM emissions detected before earthquake is based on physical analogues of distributed and conservative systems and focal zones. According to the model the process of earthquake preparation from the moment of appearance of cracks in the system, including completion of series of foreshocks, earthquake and aftershocks, are entirely explained by oscillating systems.According to the authors of the work electromagnetic emissions in radio diapason is more universal and reliable than other anomalous variations of various geophysical phenomena in earthquake preparation period; Besides, VLF/LF electromagnetic emissions might be declared as the main precursor of earthquake because it might turn out very useful with the view of prediction of large (M5) inland earthquakes and to govern processes going on in lithosphere-atmosphere-ionosphere coupling (LAIC) system. Based on this model, in case of electromagnetic emissions spectrum monitoring in the period that precedes earthquake it is possible to determine, with certain accuracy, the time, location and magnitude of an incoming earthquake simultaneously.The present item considers possible physical mechanisms of the geophysical phenomena, which may accompany earthquake preparation process and expose themselves several months, weeks or days prior to earthquakes. Such as: Changing of intensity of electro-telluric current in focal area; Perturbations of geomagnetic field in forms of irregular pulsations or regular short-period pulsations; Perturbations of atmospheric electric field; Irregular changing of characteristic parameters of the lower ionosphere (plasma frequency, electron concentration, height of D layer, etc.); Irregular perturbations reaching the upper ionosphere, namely F2-layer, for 2-3 days before the earthquake

  2. A critique of the chemosmotic model of energy coupling.

    PubMed

    Green, D E

    1981-04-01

    The chemosmotic model provides a framework for visualizing energy-coupled reactions (vectorial reaction sequences, membrane-dependent gradient formation, and charge separation of reacting species) and a mechanism for energy coupling (indirect coupling between the driving and driven reaction sequences mediated by a membrane potential or a protonmotive force). The mechanistic parameters of this model have been examined from four standpoints: compatibility with the experimental realities, supporting evidence that is unambiguous, compatibility with the enzymic nature of energy coupling, and the capability for generating verifiable predictions. Recent developments that have clarified the mechanism of ion transport, the nature of the protonic changes that accompany energy coupling, and the enzymic nature of energy coupling systems have made such an examination both timely and necessary. After weighing the available evidence, it has been concluded that the chemosmotic principle of indirect coupling has no basis in fact and that it is physically unsound in respect to the mechanism of energy coupling and enzymic catalysis.

  3. Madden-Julian Variability in Coupled Models

    SciTech Connect

    Sperber, K R; Gualdi, S; Li, W; Slingo, J M

    2001-12-12

    The Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) is a dominant mode of tropical variability (Madden and Julian 1971, 1972). It is manifested on a timescale of {approx}30-70 days through large-scale circulation anomalies which occur in conjunction with eastward propagating convective anomalies over the eastern hemisphere. Recent evidence has suggested that an interactive ocean may be important for the simulation of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (Flatau et al. 1997, Sperber et al. 1997, Waliser et al. 1999, Inness et al. 2002). As part of an initiative to the CLIVAR Working Group on Coupled Modeling, we examine ocean-atmosphere GCMs to ascertain the degree to which they can represent the 4-dimensional space-time structure of the MJO. The eastward propagation of convection is also examined with respect to the surface fluxes and SST, and we compare and contrast the behavior over the Indian Ocean and the western Pacific. Importantly, the results are interpreted with respect to systematic error of the mean state.

  4. An Integration and Evaluation Framework for ESPC Coupled Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    Models PI: Ben Kirtman University of Miami – RSMAS Atmospheric Sciences 4600 Rickenbacker Causeway Miami, FL 33149 Phone: (305) 421-4046...annual report. 7 ESPC Testbed: Interactive ensemble Initial prototype of multi- model interactive ensemble coupling infrastructure. Initial...get HYCOM integrated. Enhanced the interactive ensemble so that multiple atmosphere, land and ice component models can be simultaneously coupled

  5. Modeling of coupled hydro-mechanical problem for porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koudelka, T.; Krejci, T.; Broucek, M.

    2013-10-01

    The paper deals with numerical modelling of coupled hydro-mechanical problem for porous media. It is focused on coupled hydro-mechanical models for saturated - partially saturated soils. These models were implemented to the SIFEL software package and they were used for numerical simulation of a plate settlement experiment.

  6. Improved Subseasonal Prediction with Advanced Coupled Models including the 30km FIM-HYCOM Coupled Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjamin, Stan; Sun, Shan; Grell, Georg; Green, Benjamin; Bleck, Rainer; Li, Haiqin

    2017-04-01

    Extreme events for subseasonal duration have been linked to multi-week processes related to onset, duration, and cessation of blocking events or, more generally, quasi-stationary waves. Results will be shown from different sets of 32-day prediction experiments (3200 runs each) over a 16-year period for earth system processes key for subseasonal prediction for different resolution, numerics, and physics using the FIM-HYCOM coupled model. The coupled atmosphere (FIM) and ocean (HYCOM) modeling system is a relatively new coupled atmosphere-ocean model developed for subseasonal to seasonal prediction (Green et al. 2017 Mon.Wea.Rev. accepted, Bleck et al 2015 Mon. Wea. Rev.). Both component models operate on a common icosahedral horizontal grid and use an adaptive hybrid vertical coordinate (sigma-isentropic in FIM and sigma-isopycnic in HYCOM). FIM-HYCOM has been used to conduct 16 years of subseasonal retrospective forecasts following the NOAA Subseasonal (SubX) NMME protocol (32-day forward integrations), run with 4 ensemble members per week. Results from this multi-year FIM-HYCOM hindcast include successful forecasts out to 14-20 days for stratospheric warming events (from archived 10 hPa fields), improved MJO predictability (Green et al. 2017) using the Grell-Freitas (2014, ACP) scale-aware cumulus scheme instead of the Simplified Arakawa-Schubert scheme, and little sensitivity to resolution for blocking frequency. Forecast skill of metrics from FIM-HYCOM including 500 hPa heights and MJO index is at least comparable to that of the operational Climate Forecast System (CFSv2) used by the National Centers for Environmental Prediction. Subseasonal skill is improved with a limited multi-model (FIM-HYCOM and CFSv2), consistent with previous seasonal multi-model ensemble results. Ongoing work will also be reported on for adding inline aerosol/chemistry treatment to the coupled FIM-HYCOM model and for advanced approaches to subgrid-scale clouds to address regional biases

  7. Coupling Climate Models and Forward-Looking Economic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judd, K.; Brock, W. A.

    2010-12-01

    Authors: Dr. Kenneth L. Judd, Hoover Institution, and Prof. William A. Brock, University of Wisconsin Current climate models range from General Circulation Models (GCM’s) with millions of degrees of freedom to models with few degrees of freedom. Simple Energy Balance Climate Models (EBCM’s) help us understand the dynamics of GCM’s. The same is true in economics with Computable General Equilibrium Models (CGE’s) where some models are infinite-dimensional multidimensional differential equations but some are simple models. Nordhaus (2007, 2010) couples a simple EBCM with a simple economic model. One- and two- dimensional ECBM’s do better at approximating damages across the globe and positive and negative feedbacks from anthroprogenic forcing (North etal. (1981), Wu and North (2007)). A proper coupling of climate and economic systems is crucial for arriving at effective policies. Brock and Xepapadeas (2010) have used Fourier/Legendre based expansions to study the shape of socially optimal carbon taxes over time at the planetary level in the face of damages caused by polar ice cap melt (as discussed by Oppenheimer, 2005) but in only a “one dimensional” EBCM. Economists have used orthogonal polynomial expansions to solve dynamic, forward-looking economic models (Judd, 1992, 1998). This presentation will couple EBCM climate models with basic forward-looking economic models, and examine the effectiveness and scaling properties of alternative solution methods. We will use a two dimensional EBCM model on the sphere (Wu and North, 2007) and a multicountry, multisector regional model of the economic system. Our aim will be to gain insights into intertemporal shape of the optimal carbon tax schedule, and its impact on global food production, as modeled by Golub and Hertel (2009). We will initially have limited computing resources and will need to focus on highly aggregated models. However, this will be more complex than existing models with forward

  8. A New Coupled 4DVAR Assimilation System for Coupled Ocean-Wave Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blain, C. A.; Orzech, M.; Carrier, M.; Ngodock, H.; Souopgui, I.; Smith, S. R.

    2016-02-01

    The coastal ocean environment poses prediction challenges due to shortened time and space scales and highly nonlinear interactions between its wave and circulation dynamics. In-situ observations in such a region can often be scattered and/or incomplete, further stressing our ability to accurately forecast coastal parameters such as currents, wave heights and direction, and density structure. To extend predictability in these coastal environments, we have developed a coupled, four-dimensional, variational (4DVAR) assimilation system for coupled ocean-wave models. Coupling the assimilation systems for the ocean and waves insures dynamical consistency of the assimilation innovations in a highly nonlinear, continuously evolving environment. Coupled assimilation also permits observations of one process to affect the forecast of another, which can maximize our use of limited datasets. The ocean-wave assimilation system is presently coupled through three mechanisms: ocean currents, Stokes' drift, and wave radiation stress gradients, and is incorporated within the Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS). The coupled assimilation is realized by including each of these coupling terms within the adjoint and tangent linear components of the ocean-wave, 4DVAR assimilation system. The ocean-wave assimilation and forecast system is then applied to a series of twin experiments near the mouth of Chesapeake Bay. These twin experiments are designed to show how information flows from observations assimilated in to either the ocean or wave model through the coupled assimilation to influence both ocean and wave model variables. Inferred corrections from one system to another are demonstrated. As part of the coupled assimilation system, a newly developed formulation for wave error covariances is implemented. Impacts of the wave covariances on predictions from the coupled ocean-wave model system are also assessed.

  9. Tropical cyclone sensitivity to ocean coupling in the ECMWF coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogensen, Kristian S.; Magnusson, Linus; Bidlot, Jean-Raymond

    2017-05-01

    We present an investigation of the performance of the ECMWF coupled atmosphere-waves-ocean model for different ocean and atmosphere resolutions on a series of tropical cyclones in the Western Pacific with the aim to better understand the coupled feedback mechanisms in these extreme conditions. For some of the test cases, we only find little impact of coupling the atmosphere to the ocean, while in others, we observe a very large impact. To further understand these differences, we have selected two tropical cyclones (TCs) as case studies: TC Haiyan (with small impact of coupling) and TC Neoguri (with large impact of coupling). The comparison between these two cases suggests that the upper ocean stratification is the key in determining the strength of the coupled feedback. A strong coupled feedback is found whenever the ocean heat content of the upper layer is low while a very weak coupled feedback is found whenever the ocean has a thick warm mixed layer. The oceanographic response to tropical cyclones for the two storms has been compared to sea surface temperature and derived surface currents from drifting buoys and to subsurface observations from Argo and ship launched XBT's. These comparisons show that we are able to realistically reproduce the atmospheric and oceanographic interaction during tropical cyclone conditions which gives us confidence that the coupled modeling system is physically sound.

  10. A small signal coupling model for predicting the coupling between LNAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Junyu; Cui, Dasheng; Wu, Yuming

    2017-07-01

    A small signal coupling model is developed to analyze the coupling between two LNAs. The mutual inductance between the adjacent on-chip inductors is considered responsible for this coupling. A set of formulas have been derived to quantitatively predict the coupling effects. Based on our analysis, a quick estimation can be made to see which pair of inductors plays a key role in evaluating the coupling between the LNAs. Source inductors of two LNAs are placed closely while the load inductors are far apart according to the analysis. To validate the proposed theory, two 2 GHz LNAs are fabricated. The LNAs have a peak gain of 18 dB and NF of 1.4 dB. The coupling between the LNAs is -30 dB. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61401025).

  11. Time-delayed coupled logistic capacity model in population dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cáceres, Manuel O.

    2014-08-01

    This study proposes a delay-coupled system based on the logistic equation that models the interaction of a population with its varying environment. The integro-diferential equations of the model are presented in terms of a distributed time-delayed coupled logistic-capacity equation. The model eliminates the need for a prior knowledge of the maximum saturation environmental carrying capacity value. Therefore the dynamics toward the final attractor in a distributed time-delayed coupled logistic-capacity model is studied. Exact results are presented, and analytical conclusions have been done in terms of the two parameters of the model.

  12. Quark-meson coupling model with the cloudy bag

    SciTech Connect

    Nagai, S.; Miyatsu, T.; Saito, Kenji; Tsushima, Kazuo

    2008-07-01

    Using the volume coupling version of the cloudy bag model, the quark-meson coupling model is extended to study the role of pion field and the properties of nuclear matter. The extended model includes the effect of gluon exchange as well as the pion-cloud effect, and provides a good description of the nuclear matter properties. The relationship between the extended model and the EFT approach to nuclear matter is also discussed.

  13. CIDGA - Coupling of Interior Dynamic models with Global Atmosphere models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noack, Lena; Plesa, Ana-Catalina; Breuer, Doris

    2010-05-01

    Atmosphere temperatures and in particular the surface temperatures mostly depend on the solar heat flux and the atmospheric composition. The latter can be influenced by interior processes of the planet, i.e. volcanism that releases greenhouse gases such as H2O, CO2 and methane into the atmosphere and plate tectonics through which atmospheric CO2 is recycled via carbonates into the mantle. An increasing concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere results in an increase of the surface temperature. Changes in the surface temperature on the other hand may influence the cooling behaviour of the planet and hence influence its volcanic activity [Phillips et al., 2001]. This feedback relation between mantle convection and atmosphere is not very well understood, since until now mostly either the interior dynamic of a planet or its atmosphere was investigated separately. 2D or 3D mantle convection models to the authors' knowledge haven't been coupled to the atmosphere so far. We have used the 3D spherical simulation code GAIA [Hüttig et al., 2008] including partial melt production and coupled it with the atmosphere module CIDGA using a gray greenhouse model for varying H2O concentrations. This way, not only the influence of mantle dynamics on the atmosphere can be investigated, but also the recoupling effect, that the surface temperature has on the mantle dynamics. So far, we consider one-plate planets without crustal and thus volatile recycling. Phillips et al. [2001] already investigated the coupling effect of the surface temperature on mantle dynamics by using simple parameterized convection models for Venus. In their model a positive feedback mechanism has been observed, i.e., an increase of the surface temperature leads to an increase of partial melt and hence an increase of atmosphere density and surface temperature. Applying our model to Venus, we show that an increase of surface temperature leads not only to an increase of partial melt in the mantle; it also

  14. Tinamit: Making coupled system dynamics models accessible to stakeholders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malard, Julien; Inam Baig, Azhar; Rojas Díaz, Marcela; Hassanzadeh, Elmira; Adamowski, Jan; Tuy, Héctor; Melgar-Quiñonez, Hugo

    2017-04-01

    Model coupling is increasingly used as a method of combining the best of two models when representing socio-environmental systems, though barriers to successful model adoption by stakeholders are particularly present with the use of coupled models, due to their high complexity and typically low implementation flexibility. Coupled system dynamics - physically-based modelling is a promising method to improve stakeholder participation in environmental modelling while retaining a high level of complexity for physical process representation, as the system dynamics components are readily understandable and can be built by stakeholders themselves. However, this method is not without limitations in practice, including 1) inflexible and complicated coupling methods, 2) difficult model maintenance after the end of the project, and 3) a wide variety of end-user cultures and languages. We have developed the open-source Python-language software tool Tinamit to overcome some of these limitations to the adoption of stakeholder-based coupled system dynamics - physically-based modelling. The software is unique in 1) its inclusion of both a graphical user interface (GUI) and a library of available commands (API) that allow users with little or no coding abilities to rapidly, effectively, and flexibly couple models, 2) its multilingual support for the GUI, allowing users to couple models in their preferred language (and to add new languages as necessary for their community work), and 3) its modular structure allowing for very easy model coupling and modification without the direct use of code, and to which programming-savvy users can easily add support for new types of physically-based models. We discuss how the use of Tinamit for model coupling can greatly increase the accessibility of coupled models to stakeholders, using an example of a stakeholder-built system dynamics model of soil salinity issues in Pakistan coupled with the physically-based soil salinity and water flow model

  15. Coupled and uncoupled dipole models of nonlinear scattering.

    PubMed

    Balla, Naveen K; Yew, Elijah Y S; Sheppard, Colin J R; So, Peter T C

    2012-11-05

    Dipole models are one of the simplest numerical models to understand nonlinear scattering. Existing dipole model for second harmonic generation, third harmonic generation and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering assume that the dipoles which make up a scatterer do not interact with one another. Thus, this dipole model can be called the uncoupled dipole model. This dipole model is not sufficient to describe the effects of refractive index of a scatterer or to describe scattering at the edges of a scatterer. Taking into account the interaction between dipoles overcomes these short comings of the uncoupled dipole model. Coupled dipole model has been primarily used for linear scattering studies but it can be extended to predict nonlinear scattering. The coupled and uncoupled dipole models have been compared to highlight their differences. Results of nonlinear scattering predicted by coupled dipole model agree well with previously reported experimental results.

  16. Coupling of the Models of Human Physiology and Thermal Comfort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokorny, J.; Jicha, M.

    2013-04-01

    A coupled model of human physiology and thermal comfort was developed in Dymola/Modelica. A coupling combines a modified Tanabe model of human physiology and thermal comfort model developed by Zhang. The Coupled model allows predicting the thermal sensation and comfort of both local and overall from local boundary conditions representing ambient and personal factors. The aim of this study was to compare prediction of the Coupled model with the Fiala model prediction and experimental data. Validation data were taken from the literature, mainly from the validation manual of software Theseus-FE [1]. In the paper validation of the model for very light physical activities (1 met) indoor environment with temperatures from 12 °C up to 48 °C is presented. The Coupled model predicts mean skin temperature for cold, neutral and warm environment well. However prediction of core temperature in cold environment is inaccurate and very affected by ambient temperature. Evaluation of thermal comfort in warm environment is supplemented by skin wettedness prediction. The Coupled model is designed for non-uniform and transient environmental conditions; it is also suitable simulation of thermal comfort in vehicles cabins. The usage of the model is limited for very light physical activities up to 1.2 met only.

  17. Modeling of Inner Magnetosphere Coupling Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, George V.

    2011-01-01

    The Ring Current (RC) is the biggest energy player in the inner magnetosphere. It is the source of free energy for Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) wave excitation provided by a temperature anisotropy of RC ions, which develops naturally during inward E B convection from the plasmasheet. The cold plasmasphere, which is under the strong influence of the magnetospheric electric field, strongly mediates the RC-EMIC wave-particle-coupling process and ultimately becomes part of the particle and energy interplay. On the other hand, there is a strong influence of the RC on the inner magnetospheric electric and magnetic field configurations and these configurations, in turn, are important to RC dynamics. Therefore, one of the biggest needs for inner magnetospheric research is the continued progression toward a coupled, interconnected system with the inclusion of nonlinear feedback mechanisms between the plasma populations, the electric and magnetic fields, and plasma waves. As we clearly demonstrated in our studies, EMIC waves strongly interact with electrons and ions of energies ranging from approx.1 eV to approx.10 MeV, and that these waves strongly affect the dynamics of resonant RC ions, thermal electrons and ions, and the outer RB relativistic electrons. As we found, the rate of ion and electron scattering/heating in the Earth's magnetosphere is not only controlled by the wave intensity-spatial-temporal distribution but also strongly depends on the spectral distribution of the wave power. The latter is also a function of the plasmaspheric heavy ion content, and the plasma density and temperature distributions along the magnetic field lines. The above discussion places RC-EMIC wave coupling dynamics in context with inner magnetospheric coupling processes and, ultimately, relates RC studies with plasmaspheric and Superthermal Electrons formation processes as well as with outer RB physics.

  18. Ocean Data Assimilation for Coupled Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    ability to analyze and predict the upper ocean/lower atmosphere environment, using sophisticated techniques that can exploit data from all available...sources. This ability is fundamental to meeting DOD’s needs for real-time analysis and improved air/sea simulation and prediction on a variety of scales...is developing the Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS), and has already transitioned the atmospheric prediction system and

  19. Modification of Higgs couplings in minimal composite models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Da; Low, Ian; Wagner, Carlos E. M.

    2017-08-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the modifications of Higgs couplings in the S O (5 )/S O (4 ) minimal composite model. We focus on three couplings of central importance to Higgs phenomenology at the LHC: the couplings to top and bottom quarks and the coupling to two gluons. We consider three possible embeddings of the fermionic partners in 5 , 10 and 14 of S O (5 ) and find t t ¯h and b b ¯h couplings to be always suppressed in 5 and 10 , while in 14 they can be either enhanced or suppressed. Assuming partial compositeness, we analyze the interplay between the t t ¯h coupling and the top sector contribution to the Coleman-Weinberg potential for the Higgs boson, and the correlation between t t ¯h and g g h couplings. In particular, if the electroweak symmetry breaking is triggered radiatively by the top sector, we demonstrate that the ratio of the t t ¯h coupling in composite Higgs models over the Standard Model expectation is preferred to be less than the corresponding ratio of the g g h coupling.

  20. Exact solutions for a coupled nonlocal model of nanobeams

    SciTech Connect

    Marotti de Sciarra, Francesco E-mail: raffaele.barretta@unina.it; Barretta, Raffaele E-mail: raffaele.barretta@unina.it

    2014-10-06

    BERNOULLI-EULER nanobeams under concentrated forces/couples with the nonlocal constitutive behavior proposed by ERINGEN do not exhibit small-scale effects. A new model obtained by coupling the ERINGEN and gradient models is formulated in the present note. A variational treatment is developed by imposing suitable thermodynamic restrictions for nonlocal models and the ensuing differential and boundary conditions of elastic equilibrium are provided. The nonlocal elastostatic problem is solved in a closed-form for nanocantilever and clamped nanobeams.

  1. Coupling entropy of co-processing model on social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhanli

    2015-08-01

    Coupling entropy of co-processing model on social networks is investigated in this paper. As one crucial factor to determine the processing ability of nodes, the information flow with potential time lag is modeled by co-processing diffusion which couples the continuous time processing and the discrete diffusing dynamics. Exact results on master equation and stationary state are achieved to disclose the formation. In order to understand the evolution of the co-processing and design the optimal routing strategy according to the maximal entropic diffusion on networks, we propose the coupling entropy comprehending the structural characteristics and information propagation on social network. Based on the analysis of the co-processing model, we analyze the coupling impact of the structural factor and information propagating factor on the coupling entropy, where the analytical results fit well with the numerical ones on scale-free social networks.

  2. Predictive Models for Hydrodynamic Coupling Coefficients in Clay Media.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueutin, P.; Gonçalvès, J.; Violette, S.

    2007-12-01

    In charged and low permeability media (e.g. clay media) the classical Darcy's law does not describe accurately the water movement. A generalized Darcy's law, one of the coupled fluxes equations, has to be used. The identification of the coupling parameters, in clay-rocks, is crucial in order to estimate the water flow. Here, we will only focus on the electrochemical-hydraulic coupling coefficients : the intrinsic permeability k and the osmotic permeability kc. These hydrodynamic coupling coefficients can be estimated using two approaches: (i) theoretical models : • porosity/intrinsic permeability relationships, defined for a clay medium, are used to estimate the intrinsic permeability. • an electrochemical model is used to estimate the osmotic coupling coefficient. The electrical model, a triple layer model, is implemented to simulate the interactions between the charged surfaces of the clay minerals and the pore solution. (ii) experiments : • at the sample scale. • at the field scale. The measurement of these parameters is generally challenging either at the sample or at the field scale. For this reason, predictive models can be useful. The purpose of this study is to give reference values for the two coupling parameters under consideration here, using to the petrophysical properties of the medium. Different models to estimate these coupling coefficients are tested : (i) the intrinsic permeability is estimated with a pretrophysical model. In this model, the intrinsic permeability depends on the effective pore radius and the electrical formation factor. (ii) the osmotic coupling coefficient is estimated with the model developed by Revil and Leroy (2004). The comparison between three different models with the available data shows that these data are more closely reproduced using this model. Some reference values are provided for several type of clays as a fonction of some readily measurable or estimable parameters or variables, such as the porosity, the

  3. Coupled-channel scattering in 1 + 1 dimensional lattice model

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Peng

    2013-07-01

    Based on the Lippmann-Schwinger equation approach, a generalized Lüscher’s formula in 1+1 dimensions for two particles scattering in both the elastic and coupled-channel cases in moving frames is derived. A two-dimensional coupled-channel scattering lattice model is presented, which represents a two-coupled-channel resonant scattering scalars system. The Monte Carlo simulation is performed on finite lattices and in various moving frames. The two-dimensional generalized Lüscher’s formula is used to extract the scattering amplitudes for the coupled-channel system from the discrete finite-volume spectrum.

  4. Aircraft Measurements for Understanding Air-Sea Coupling and Improving Coupled Model Predictions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    measured solar /IR irradiance profiles as input to, and validation of, the Navy’s coupled ocean/atmosphere model , COAMPS. FY13 effort focused on...coupling in different stages of the MJO. The objectives of the NRL project are to obtain vertical profiles of the solar and IR irradiance ...of the NRL solar and IR broadband radiometer irradiance data from the NOAA P-3 aircraft was completed. QC’ed datasets, with documentation, of the

  5. Overview of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP)

    SciTech Connect

    Meehl, G A; Covey, C; McAvaney, B; Latif, M; Stouffer, R J

    2004-08-05

    The Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP) is designed to allow study and intercomparison of multi-model simulations of present-day and future climate. The latter are represented by idealized forcing of compounded 1% per year CO2 increase to the time of CO2 doubling near year 70 in simulations with global coupled models that contain, typically, components representing atmosphere, ocean, sea ice and land surface. Results from CMIP diagnostic subprojects were presented at the Second CMIP Workshop held at the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology in Hamburg, Germany, in September, 2003. Significant progress in diagnosing and understanding results from global coupled models has been made since the First CMIP Workshop in Melbourne, Australia in 1998. For example, the issue of flux adjustment is slowly fading as more and more models obtain stable multi-century surface climates without them. El Nino variability, usually about half the observed amplitude in the previous generation of coupled models, is now more accurately simulated in the present generation of global coupled models, though there are still biases in simulating the patterns of maximum variability. Typical resolutions of atmospheric component models contained in coupled models is now usually around 2.5 degrees latitude-longitude, with the ocean components often having about twice the atmospheric model resolution, with even higher resolution in the equatorial tropics. Some new-generation coupled models have atmospheric model resolutions of around 1.5 degrees latitude-longitude. Modeling groups now routinely run the CMIP control and 1% CO2 simulations in addition to 20th and 21st century climate simulations with a variety of forcings (e.g. volcanoes, solar variability, anthropogenic sulfate aerosols, ozone, and greenhouse gases (GHGs), with the anthropogenic forcings for future climate as well). However, persistent systematic errors noted in previous generations of global coupled models still are present

  6. Spectral classification of coupling regimes in the quantum Rabi model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossatto, Daniel Z.; Villas-Bôas, Celso J.; Sanz, Mikel; Solano, Enrique

    2017-07-01

    The quantum Rabi model is in the scientific spotlight due to the recent theoretical and experimental progress. Nevertheless, a full-fledged classification of its coupling regimes remains as a relevant open question. We propose a spectral classification dividing the coupling regimes into three regions based on the validity of perturbative criteria on the quantum Rabi model, which allows us the use of exactly solvable effective Hamiltonians. These coupling regimes are (i) the perturbative ultrastrong coupling regime which comprises the Jaynes-Cummings model, (ii) a region where nonperturbative ultrastrong and nonperturbative deep strong coupling regimes coexist, and (iii) the perturbative deep strong coupling regime. We show that this spectral classification depends not only on the ratio between the coupling strength and the natural frequencies of the unperturbed parts, but also on the energy to which the system can access. These regimes additionally discriminate the completely different behaviors of several static physical properties, namely the total number of excitations, the photon statistics of the field, and the cavity-qubit entanglement. Finally, we explain the dynamical properties which are traditionally associated with the deep strong coupling regime, such as the collapses and revivals of the state population, in the frame of the proposed spectral classification.

  7. Building Ensemble-Based Data Assimilation Systems with Coupled Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nerger, Lars

    2017-04-01

    Discussed is the construction of programs for efficient ensemble data assimilation systems based on a direct connection between a coupled simulation model and ensemble data assimilation software. The strategy allows us to set up a data assimilation program with high flexibility and parallel scalability with only small changes to the model. The direct connection is obtained by first extending the source code of the coupled model so that it is able to run an ensemble of model states. In addition, a filtering step is added using a combination of in-memory access and parallel communication to create an online-coupled ensemble assimilation program. The direct connection avoids the common need to stop and restart a whole coupled model system to perform the assimilation of observations in the analysis step of ensemble-based filter methods like ensemble Kalman or particle filters. Instead, the analysis step is performed in between time steps and is independent of the actual model coupler. This strategy allows us to perform both in-compartment (for weakly coupled assimilation) and cross-compartment (for strongly coupled assimilation) assimilation. The assimilation frequency can be kept flexible, so that assimilation of observations from different compartments can be performed at different time intervals. Using the parallel data assimilation framework (PDAF, http://pdaf.awi.de), the direct connection strategy will be exemplified for the ocean-atmosphere model ECHAM6-FESOM.

  8. Modeling Pancake Formation with a Coupled Wave-Ice Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veeramony, J.; Orzech, M.; Shi, F.; Bateman, S. P.; Calantoni, J.

    2016-12-01

    Recent results from the ONR-sponsored Arctic Sea State DRI cruise (Thomson et al., 2016, EOS, in press) suggest that small-scale pancake ice formation is an important process in the initial recovery and refreezing of the Arctic pack ice each autumn. Ocean surface waves and ambient temperature play significant roles in shaping and/or limiting the pancake growth patterns, which may either facilitate or delay the recovery of the ice pack. Here we apply a phase-resolving, coupled wave-ice system, consisting of a CFD wave model (NHWAVE) and a discrete-element ice model (LIGGGHTS), to investigate the formation processes of pancake ice under different conditions. A series of simulations is run, each beginning with a layer of disconnected ice particles floating on the ocean surface. Wave conditions and ice bonding properties are varied to examine the effects of mild versus stormy conditions, wind waves versus swell, and warmer versus colder temperatures. Model runs are limited to domains of O(1 sq km). Initial tests have shown some success in replicating qualitative results from the Sea State cruise, including the formation of irregularly shaped pancakes from the "frazil" ice layer, changes in formation processes caused by varying ambient temperature (represented through variations in ice bonding strength), occasional rafting of one pancake on top of another, and increased wave attenuation as pancakes grow larger.

  9. Coupled thermomechanical modeling using dissimilar geometries in arpeggio.

    SciTech Connect

    Kostka, Timothy D.; Templeton, Jeremy Alan

    2010-11-01

    Performing coupled thermomechanical simulations is becoming an increasingly important aspect of nuclear weapon (NW) safety assessments in abnormal thermal environments. While such capabilities exist in SIERRA, they have thus far been used only in a limited sense to investigate NW safety themes. An important limiting factor is the difficulty associated with developing geometries and meshes appropriate for both thermal and mechanical finite element models, which has limited thermomechanical analysis to simplified configurations. This work addresses the issue of how to perform coupled analyses on models where the underlying geometries and associated meshes are different and tailored to their relevant physics. Such an approach will reduce the model building effort and enable previously developed single-physics models to be leveraged in future coupled simulations. A combined-environment approach is presented in this report using SIERRA tools, with quantitative comparisons made between different options in SIERRA. This report summarizes efforts on running a coupled thermomechanical analysis using the SIERRA Arpeggio code.

  10. Unification of gauge couplings in radiative neutrino mass models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagedorn, Claudia; Ohlsson, Tommy; Riad, Stella; Schmidt, Michael A.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the possibility of gauge coupling unification in various radiative neutrino mass models, which generate neutrino masses at one- and/or two-loop level. Renormalization group running of gauge couplings is performed analytically and numerically at one- and two-loop order, respectively. We study three representative classes of radiative neutrino mass models: (I) minimal ultraviolet completions of the dimension-7 Δ L = 2 operators which generate neutrino masses at one- and/or two-loop level without and with dark matter candidates, (II) models with dark matter which lead to neutrino masses at one-loop level and (III) models with particles in the adjoint representation of SU(3). In class (I), gauge couplings unify in a few models and adding dark matter amplifies the chances for unification. In class (II), about a quarter of the models admits gauge coupling unification. In class (III), none of the models leads to gauge coupling unification. Regarding the scale of unification, we find values between 1014 GeV and 1016 GeV for models belonging to class (I) without dark matter, whereas models in class (I) with dark matter as well as models of class (II) prefer values in the range 5·1010 - 5·1014 GeV.

  11. Modeling Excitable Systems Coupled Through External Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noorbakhsh, Javad; Mehta, Pankaj

    2013-03-01

    Excitable systems are stable dynamical systems in which any input beyond a threshold results in a significant output. This behavior is ubiquitous in nature and is seen in biological systems such as Dictyostelium discoideum amoeba and neurons to oscillatory chemical reactions. In this work we will focus on transition to oscillation in populations of excitable systems coupled through an external medium and will study their synchronization. We will describe a mechanism to tune the frequency of oscillations using an external input and will study the effects of stochasticity and inhomogeneity on the collective behavior of the system. Furthermore we will include diffusion into the dynamics of the external medium and will study formation of spatial patterns, their characteristics and their robustness to different factors.

  12. Nuclear Hybrid Energy System Modeling: RELAP5 Dynamic Coupling Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Piyush Sabharwall; Nolan Anderson; Haihua Zhao; Shannon Bragg-Sitton; George Mesina

    2012-09-01

    The nuclear hybrid energy systems (NHES) research team is currently developing a dynamic simulation of an integrated hybrid energy system. A detailed simulation of proposed NHES architectures will allow initial computational demonstration of a tightly coupled NHES to identify key reactor subsystem requirements, identify candidate reactor technologies for a hybrid system, and identify key challenges to operation of the coupled system. This work will provide a baseline for later coupling of design-specific reactor models through industry collaboration. The modeling capability addressed in this report focuses on the reactor subsystem simulation.

  13. Light weakly coupled axial forces: models, constraints, and projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, Yonatan; Krnjaic, Gordan; Mishra-Sharma, Siddharth; Tait, Tim M. P.

    2017-05-01

    We investigate the landscape of constraints on MeV-GeV scale, hidden U(1) forces with nonzero axial-vector couplings to Standard Model fermions. While the purely vector-coupled dark photon, which may arise from kinetic mixing, is a well-motivated scenario, several MeV-scale anomalies motivate a theory with axial couplings which can be UV-completed consistent with Standard Model gauge invariance. Moreover, existing constraints on dark photons depend on products of various combinations of axial and vector couplings, making it difficult to isolate the effects of axial couplings for particular flavors of SM fermions. We present a representative renormalizable, UV-complete model of a dark photon with adjustable axial and vector couplings, discuss its general features, and show how some UV constraints may be relaxed in a model with nonrenormalizable Yukawa couplings at the expense of fine-tuning. We survey the existing parameter space and the projected reach of planned experiments, briefly commenting on the relevance of the allowed parameter space to low-energy anomalies in π0 and 8Be∗ decay.

  14. Light Weakly Coupled Axial Forces: Models, Constraints, and Projections

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, Yonatan; Krnjaic, Gordan; Mishra-Sharma, Siddharth; Tait, Tim P.

    2016-09-28

    We investigate the landscape of constraints on MeV-GeV scale, hidden U(1) forces with nonzero axial-vector couplings to Standard Model fermions. While the purely vector-coupled dark photon, which may arise from kinetic mixing, is a well-motivated scenario, several MeV-scale anomalies motivate a theory with axial couplings which can be UV-completed consistent with Standard Model gauge invariance. Moreover, existing constraints on dark photons depend on products of various combinations of axial and vector couplings, making it difficult to isolate the effects of axial couplings for particular flavors of SM fermions. We present a representative renormalizable, UV-complete model of a dark photon with adjustable axial and vector couplings, discuss its general features, and show how some UV constraints may be relaxed in a model with nonrenormalizable Yukawa couplings at the expense of fine-tuning. We survey the existing parameter space and the projected reach of planned experiments, briefly commenting on the relevance of the allowed parameter space to low-energy anomalies in pi^0 and 8-Be* decay.

  15. Light weakly coupled axial forces: models, constraints, and projections

    DOE PAGES

    Kahn, Yonatan; Krnjaic, Gordan; Mishra-Sharma, Siddharth; ...

    2017-05-01

    Here, we investigate the landscape of constraints on MeV-GeV scale, hidden U(1) forces with nonzero axial-vector couplings to Standard Model fermions. While the purely vector-coupled dark photon, which may arise from kinetic mixing, is a well-motivated scenario, several MeV-scale anomalies motivate a theory with axial couplings which can be UV-completed consistent with Standard Model gauge invariance. Moreover, existing constraints on dark photons depend on products of various combinations of axial and vector couplings, making it difficult to isolate the e ects of axial couplings for particular flavors of SM fermions. We present a representative renormalizable, UV-complete model of a darkmore » photon with adjustable axial and vector couplings, discuss its general features, and show how some UV constraints may be relaxed in a model with nonrenormalizable Yukawa couplings at the expense of fine-tuning. We survey the existing parameter space and the projected reach of planned experiments, brie y commenting on the relevance of the allowed parameter space to low-energy anomalies in π0 and 8Be* decay.« less

  16. Assessing extratropical impact on the tropical bias in coupled climate model with regional coupled data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, F.; Liu, Z.; Zhang, S.; Jacob, R.

    2017-04-01

    The tropical bias of double-Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) has been a persistent feature in global climate models. It remains unclear how much of it is attributed to local and remote processes, respectively. Here we assess the extratropical influence on the tropical bias in a coupled general circulation model dynamically, systematically, and quantitatively using the Regional Coupled Data Assimilation (RCDA) method. RCDA experiments show that the model's double-ITCZ bias is improved systematically when sea surface temperature, air temperature, and wind are corrected toward real-world data from the extratropics into the tropics progressively. Quantitatively, the tropical asymmetry bias in precipitation and surface temperature is reduced by 40% due to extratropical impact from outside of 25°. Coupled dynamics, as well as atmospheric and oceanic processes, play important roles in this extratropical-to-tropical teleconnection. Energetic analysis of cross-equatorial atmospheric energy transport and equatorial net energy input are used to explain the changes in the precipitation bias.

  17. Coupled land surface/hydrologic/atmospheric models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pielke, Roger; Steyaert, Lou; Arritt, Ray; Lahtakia, Mercedes; Smith, Chris; Ziegler, Conrad; Soong, Su Tzai; Avissar, Roni; Wetzel, Peter; Sellers, Piers

    1993-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: prototype land cover characteristics data base for the conterminous United States; surface evapotranspiration effects on cumulus convection and implications for mesoscale models; the use of complex treatment of surface hydrology and thermodynamics within a mesoscale model and some related issues; initialization of soil-water content for regional-scale atmospheric prediction models; impact of surface properties on dryline and MCS evolution; a numerical simulation of heavy precipitation over the complex topography of California; representing mesoscale fluxes induced by landscape discontinuities in global climate models; emphasizing the role of subgrid-scale heterogeneity in surface-air interaction; and problems with modeling and measuring biosphere-atmosphere exchanges of energy, water, and carbon on large scales.

  18. Modelling of Slag Foaming Coupled with Decarburisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sattar, M. A.; Naser, J.; Brooks, G.

    CFD models have been developed and numerical simulations have been carried out to predict the formation of foam in oxygen steelmaking. Foam was considered as a separate phase comprising a mixture of gas and liquid. Bubble break up and coalescence models have also been incorporated in a CFD model to predict the number density of individual bubble classes. A population balance equation was used to track the number density of each bubble class. Decarburization with heat generation from chemical reactions was integrated in the process. User subroutines were written in FORTRAN to incorporate the foam formation, the bubble break up and coalescence rate and decarburisation in the main program. The model predicted the foam height, bubble number density, velocity of phases, decarburization, and turbulence. The result from the model has been compared with available data from literature and found to be in reasonable agreement with the experimental and plant data.

  19. The XY model coupled to two-dimensional quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baillie, C. F.; Johnston, D. A.

    1992-09-01

    We perform Monte Carlo simulations using the Wolff cluster algorithm of the XY model on both fixed and dynamical phi-cubed graphs (i.e. without and with coupling to two-dimensional quantum gravity). We compare the numerical results with the theoretical expectation that the phase transition remains of KT type when the XY model is coupled to gravity. We also examine whether the universality we discovered in our earlier work on various Potts models with the same value of the central charge, c, carries over to the XY model, which has c=1.

  20. The Coupled Chemical and Physical Dynamics Model of MALDI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knochenmuss, Richard

    2016-06-01

    The coupled physical and chemical dynamics model of ultraviolet matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) has reproduced and explained a wide variety of MALDI phenomena. The rationale behind and elements of the model are reviewed, including the photophysics, kinetics, and thermodynamics of primary and secondary reaction steps. Experimental results are compared with model predictions to illustrate the foundations of the model, coupling of ablation and ionization, differences between and commonalities of matrices, secondary charge transfer reactions, ionization in both polarities, fluence and concentration dependencies, and suppression and enhancement effects.

  1. Finite Element Modelling of Fluid Coupling in the Coiled Cochlea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Guangjian; Elliott, S. J.; Lineton, B.; Saba, R.

    2011-11-01

    A finite element model is first used to calculate the modal pressure difference for a box model of the cochlea, which shows that the number of fluid elements across the width of the cochlea determines the accuracy with which the near field, or short wavenumber, component of the fluid coupling is reproduced. Then results are compared with the analytic results to validate the accuracy of the FE model. It is, however, the far field, or long wavelength, component of the fluid coupling that is most affected by the geometry. A finite element model of the coiled cochlea is then used to calculate fluid coupling in this case, which has similar characteristics to the uncoiled model.

  2. Modeling the dispersion in electromechanically coupled myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Thomas S. E.; Prassl, Anton J.; Plank, Gernot; Holzapfel, Gerhard A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY We present an approach to model the dispersion of fiber and sheet orientations in the myocardium. By utilizing structure parameters, an existing orthotropic and invariant-based constitutive model developed to describe the passive behavior of the myocardium is augmented. Two dispersion parameters are fitted to experimentally observed angular dispersion data of the myocardial tissue. Computations are performed on a unit myocardium tissue cube and on a slice of the left ventricle indicating that the dispersion parameter has an effect on the myocardial deformation and stress development. The use of fiber dispersions relating to a pathological myocardium had a rather big effect. The final example represents an ellipsoidal model of the left ventricle indicating the influence of fiber and sheet dispersions upon contraction over a cardiac cycle. Although only a minor shift in the pressure–volume (PV) loops between the cases with no dispersions and with fiber and sheet dispersions for a healthy myocardium was observed, a remarkably different behavior is obtained with a fiber dispersion relating to a diseased myocardium. In future simulations, this dispersion model for myocardial tissue may advantageously be used together with models of, for example, growth and remodeling of various cardiac diseases. PMID:23868817

  3. ITG sideband coupling models for zonal flows

    SciTech Connect

    Stransky, M.

    2011-05-15

    Four-wave interaction model between ITG mode and zonal flow was derived using fluid equations. In this model, the zonal flow is excited non-linearly by ITG turbulence via Reynolds stress. Numerical simulations show that the system allows for a small range above the ITG threshold where the zonal flow can stabilize an unstable ITG mode, effectively increasing {eta}{sub i} threshold, an effect which has been called the Dimits shift. However, the shift is smaller than in known cases such that in the Cyclone base.

  4. A multicomponent coupled model of glacier hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flowers, Gwenn Elizabeth

    Multiple lines of evidence suggest a causal link between subglacial hydrology and phenomena such as fast-flowing ice. This evidence includes a measured correlation between water under alpine glaciers and their motion, the presence of saturated sediment beneath Antaxctic ice streams, and geologic signatures of enhanced paleo-ice flow over deformable substrates. The complexity of the glacier bed as a three-component mixture presents an obstacle to unraveling these conundra. Inadequate representations of hydrology, in part, prevent us from closing the gap between empirical descriptions and a comprehensive consistent framework for understanding the dynamics of glacierized systems. I have developed a distributed numerical model that solves equations governing glacier surface runoff, englacial water transport, subglacial drainage, and subsurface groundwater flow. Ablation and precipitation drive the surface model through a temperature-index parameterization. Water is permitted to flow over and off the glacier, or to the bed through a system of crevasses, pipes, and fractures. A macroporous sediment horizon transports subglacial water to the ice margin or to an underlying aquifer. Governing equations are derived from the law of mass conservation and are expressed as a balance between the internal redistribution of water and external sources. Each of the four model components is represented as a two-dimensional, vertically-integrated layer that communicates with its neighbors through water exchange. Stacked together, these layers approximate a three-dimensional system. I tailor the model to Trapridge Glacier, where digital maps of the surface and bed have been derived from ice-penetrating radar data. Observations of subglacial water pressure provide additional constraints on model parameters and a basis for comparison of simulations with real data. Three classical idealizations of glacier geometry are used for simple model experiments. Equilibrium tests emphasize geometric

  5. Using a dyadic logistic multilevel model to analyze couple data.

    PubMed

    Preciado, Mariana A; Krull, Jennifer L; Hicks, Andrew; Gipson, Jessica D

    2016-02-01

    There is growing recognition within the sexual and reproductive health field of the importance of incorporating both partners' perspectives when examining sexual and reproductive health behaviors. Yet, the analytical approaches to address couple data have not been readily integrated and utilized within the demographic and public health literature. This paper seeks to provide readers unfamiliar with analytical approaches to couple data an applied example of the use of dyadic logistic multilevel modeling, a useful approach to analyzing couple data to assess the individual, partner and couple characteristics that are related to individuals' reproductively relevant beliefs, attitudes and behaviors. The use of multilevel models in reproductive health research can help researchers develop a more comprehensive picture of the way in which individuals' reproductive health outcomes are situated in a larger relationship and cultural context.

  6. Using a Dyadic Logistic Multilevel Model to Analyze Couple Data

    PubMed Central

    Preciado, Mariana A.; Krull, Jennifer L.; Hicks, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    There is growing recognition within the sexual and reproductive health field of the importance of incorporating both partners’ perspectives when examining sexual and reproductive health behaviors. Yet, the analytical approaches to address couple data have not been readily integrated and utilized within the demographic and public health literature. This paper seeks to provide readers unfamiliar with analytical approaches to couple data an applied example of the use of dyadic logistic multilevel modeling, a useful approach to analyzing couple data to assess the individual, partner, and couple characteristics that are related to individuals’ reproductively relevant beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors. The use of multilevel models in reproductive health research can help researchers develop a more comprehensive picture of the way in which individuals’ reproductive health outcomes are situated in a larger relationship and cultural context. PMID:26363432

  7. Revisiting vectorlike quark models with enhanced top Yukawa coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Michio

    2017-08-01

    We revisit a scenario with an enhanced top Yukawa coupling in vectorlike quark (VLQ) models, where the top Yukawa coupling is larger than the standard model value and the lightest VLQ has a negative Yukawa coupling. We find that the parameter space satisfying the LHC bounds of the Higgs signal strengths consistently with the precision measurements is rather wide. Because the Lagrangian parameters of the Yukawa couplings are large, such scenario can be realized in some strongly interacting theories. It also turns out that there is a noticeable relation between the contributions of the triangle and box diagrams in the g g →h h process by using the lowest order of the 1 /M expansion where M is the heavy mass running in the loops.

  8. Model coupling for multiphase flow in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmig, Rainer; Flemisch, Bernd; Wolff, Markus; Ebigbo, Anozie; Class, Holger

    2013-01-01

    Numerical models for flow and transport in porous media are valid for a particular set of processes, scales, levels of simplification and abstraction, grids etc. The coupling of two or more specialised models is a method of increasing the overall range of validity while keeping the computational costs relatively low. Several coupling concepts are reviewed in this article with a focus on the authors’ work in this field. The concepts are divided into temporal and spatial coupling concepts, of which the latter is subdivided into multi-process, multi-scale, multi-dimensional, and multi-compartment coupling strategies. Examples of applications for which these concepts can be relevant include groundwater protection and remediation, carbon dioxide storage, nuclear-waste disposal, soil dry-out and evaporation processes as well as fuel cells and technical filters.

  9. Testing coupled dark energy models with their cosmological background evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Bruck, Carsten; Mifsud, Jurgen; Morrice, Jack

    2017-02-01

    We consider a cosmology in which dark matter and a quintessence scalar field responsible for the acceleration of the Universe are allowed to interact. Allowing for both conformal and disformal couplings, we perform a global analysis of the constraints on our model using Hubble parameter measurements, baryon acoustic oscillation distance measurements, and a Supernovae Type Ia data set. We find that the additional disformal coupling relaxes the conformal coupling constraints. Moreover, we show that, at the background level, a disformal interaction within the dark sector is preferred to both Λ CDM and uncoupled quintessence, hence favoring interacting dark energy.

  10. Strong Local-Nonlocal Coupling for Integrated Fracture Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Littlewood, David John; Silling, Stewart A.; Mitchell, John A.; Seleson, Pablo D.; Bond, Stephen D.; Parks, Michael L.; Turner, Daniel Z.; Burnett, Damon J.; Ostien, Jakob; Gunzburger, Max

    2015-09-01

    Peridynamics, a nonlocal extension of continuum mechanics, is unique in its ability to capture pervasive material failure. Its use in the majority of system-level analyses carried out at Sandia, however, is severely limited, due in large part to computational expense and the challenge posed by the imposition of nonlocal boundary conditions. Combined analyses in which peridynamics is em- ployed only in regions susceptible to material failure are therefore highly desirable, yet available coupling strategies have remained severely limited. This report is a summary of the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project "Strong Local-Nonlocal Coupling for Inte- grated Fracture Modeling," completed within the Computing and Information Sciences (CIS) In- vestment Area at Sandia National Laboratories. A number of challenges inherent to coupling local and nonlocal models are addressed. A primary result is the extension of peridynamics to facilitate a variable nonlocal length scale. This approach, termed the peridynamic partial stress, can greatly reduce the mathematical incompatibility between local and nonlocal equations through reduction of the peridynamic horizon in the vicinity of a model interface. A second result is the formulation of a blending-based coupling approach that may be applied either as the primary coupling strategy, or in combination with the peridynamic partial stress. This blending-based approach is distinct from general blending methods, such as the Arlequin approach, in that it is specific to the coupling of peridynamics and classical continuum mechanics. Facilitating the coupling of peridynamics and classical continuum mechanics has also required innovations aimed directly at peridynamic models. Specifically, the properties of peridynamic constitutive models near domain boundaries and shortcomings in available discretization strategies have been addressed. The results are a class of position-aware peridynamic constitutive laws for

  11. Coupled Facility-Payload Vibration Modeling Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carnahan, Timothy M.; Kaiser, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    A major phase of aerospace hardware verification is vibration testing. The standard approach for such testing is to use a shaker to induce loads into the payload. In preparation for vibration testing at National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Goddard Space Flight Center an analysis is performed to assess the responses of the payload. A new method of modeling the test is presented that takes into account dynamic interactions between the facility and the payload. This dynamic interaction has affected testing in the past, but been ignored or adjusted for during testing. By modeling the combined dynamics of the facility and test article (payload) it is possible to improve the prediction of hardware responses. Many aerospace test facilities work in similar way to those at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. Lessons learned here should be applicable to other test facilities with similar setups.

  12. Coupled Facility/Payload Vibration Modeling Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carnahan, Timothy M.; Kaiser, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A major phase of aerospace hardware verification is vibration testing. The standard approach for such testing is to use a shaker to induce loads into the payload. In preparation for vibration testing at NASA/GSFC there is an analysis to assess the responses of the payload. A new method of modeling the test is presented that takes into account dynamic interactions between the facility and the payload. This dynamic interaction has affected testing in the past, but been ignored or adjusted for during testing. By modeling the combination of the facility and test article (payload) it is possible to improve the prediction of hardware responses. Many aerospace test facilities work in similar way to those at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Lessons learned here should be applicable to other test facilities with similar setups.

  13. The Kac Model Coupled to a Thermostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonetto, Federico; Loss, Michael; Vaidyanathan, Ranjini

    2014-08-01

    In this paper we study a model of randomly colliding particles interacting with a thermal bath. Collisions between particles are modeled via the Kac master equation while the thermostat is seen as an infinite gas at thermal equilibrium at inverse temperature . The system admits the canonical distribution at inverse temperature as the unique equilibrium state. We prove that any initial distribution approaches the equilibrium distribution exponentially fast both by computing the gap of the generator of the evolution, in a proper function space, as well as by proving exponential decay in relative entropy. We also show that the evolution propagates chaos and that the one particle marginal, in the large system limit, satisfies an effective Boltzmann-type equation.

  14. Service-Oriented Approach to Coupling Earth System Models and Modeling Frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodall, J. L.; Saint, K. D.; Ercan, M. B.; Briley, L. J.; Murphy, S.; You, H.; DeLuca, C.; Rood, R. B.

    2012-12-01

    Modeling water systems often requires coupling models across traditional Earth science disciplinary boundaries. While there has been significant effort within various Earth science disciplines (e.g., atmospheric science, hydrology, and Earth surface dynamics) to create models and, more recently, modeling frameworks, there has been less work on methods for coupling across disciplinary-specific models and modeling frameworks. We present work investigating one possible method for coupling across disciplinary-specific Earth system models and modeling frameworks: service-oriented architectures. In a service-oriented architecture, models act as distinct units or components within a system and are designed to pass well defined messages to consumers of the service. While the approach offers the potential to couple heterogeneous computational models by allowing a high degree of autonomy across models of the Earth system, there are significant scientific and technical challenges to be addressed when coupling models designed for different communities and built for different modeling frameworks. We have addressed some of these challenges through a case study where we coupled a hydrologic model compliant with the OpenMI standard with an atmospheric model compliant with the EMSF standard. In this case study, the two models were coupled through data exchanges of boundary conditions enabled by exposing the atmospheric model as a web service. A discussion of the technical and scientific challenges, some that we have addressed and others that remain open, will be presented including differences in computer architectures, data semantics, and spatial scales between the coupled models.

  15. Coupling TOUGH2 with CLM3: Developing a Coupled Land Surface andSubsurface Model

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Lehua; Jin, Jiming; Miller, Norman; Wu, Yu-Shu; Bodvarsson,Gudmundur

    2006-05-19

    An understanding of the hydrologic interactions among atmosphere, land surface, and subsurface is one of the keys to understanding the water cycling system that supports life on earth. The inherent coupled processes and complex feedback structures among subsystems make such interactions difficult to simulate. In this paper, we present a model that simulates the land surface and subsurface hydrologic response to meteorological forcing. This model combines a state-of-the-art land-surface model, the NCAR Community Land Model version 3 (CLM3), with a variably saturated groundwater model, TOUGH2, through an internal interface that includes flux and state variables shared by the two submodels. Specifically, TOUGH2 uses infiltration, evaporation, and root-uptake rates, calculated by CLM3, as source/sink terms in its simulation; CLM3 uses saturation and capillary pressure profiles, calculated by TOUGH2, as state variables in its simulation. This new model, CLMT2, preserves the best aspects of both submodels: the state-of-the-art modeling capability of surface energy and hydrologic processes (including snow, runoff, freezing/melting, evapotranspiration, radiation, and biophysiological processes) from CLM3 and the more realistic physical-process-based modeling capability of subsurface hydrologic processes (including heterogeneity, three-dimensional flow, seamless combining of unsaturated and saturated zone, and water table) from TOUGH2. The preliminary simulation results show that the coupled model greatly improved the predictions of the groundwater table, evapotranspiration, and surface temperature at a real watershed, as evaluated using 18 years of observed data. The new model is also ready to be coupled with an atmospheric simulation model, to form one of the first top of the atmosphere to deep groundwater atmosphere-land-surface-subsurface models.

  16. Energy demand analytics using coupled technological and economic models

    EPA Science Inventory

    Impacts of a range of policy scenarios on end-use energy demand are examined using a coupling of MARKAL, an energy system model with extensive supply and end-use technological detail, with Inforum LIFT, a large-scale model of the us. economy with inter-industry, government, and c...

  17. FULLY COUPLED "ONLINE" CHEMISTRY WITHIN THE WRF MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A fully coupled "online" Weather Research and Forecasting/Chemistry (WRF/Chem) model has been developed. The air quality component of the model is fully consistent with the meteorological component; both components use the same transport scheme (mass and scalar preserving), the s...

  18. Energy demand analytics using coupled technological and economic models

    EPA Science Inventory

    Impacts of a range of policy scenarios on end-use energy demand are examined using a coupling of MARKAL, an energy system model with extensive supply and end-use technological detail, with Inforum LIFT, a large-scale model of the us. economy with inter-industry, government, and c...

  19. FULLY COUPLED "ONLINE" CHEMISTRY WITHIN THE WRF MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A fully coupled "online" Weather Research and Forecasting/Chemistry (WRF/Chem) model has been developed. The air quality component of the model is fully consistent with the meteorological component; both components use the same transport scheme (mass and scalar preserving), the s...

  20. Improving data transfer for model coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Liu, L.; Yang, G.; Li, R.; Wang, B.

    2015-10-01

    Data transfer, which means transferring data fields between two component models or rearranging data fields among processes of the same component model, is a fundamental operation of a coupler. Most of state-of-the-art coupler versions currently use an implementation based on the point-to-point (P2P) communication of the Message Passing Interface (MPI) (call such an implementation "P2P implementation" for short). In this paper, we reveal the drawbacks of the P2P implementation, including low communication bandwidth due to small message size, variable and big number of MPI messages, and jams during communication. To overcome these drawbacks, we propose a butterfly implementation for data transfer. Although the butterfly implementation can outperform the P2P implementation in many cases, it degrades the performance in some cases because the total message size transferred by the butterfly implementation is larger than that by the P2P implementation. To make the data transfer completely improved, we design and implement an adaptive data transfer library that combines the advantages of both butterfly implementation and P2P implementation. Performance evaluation shows that the adaptive data transfer library significantly improves the performance of data transfer in most cases and does not decrease the performance in any cases. Now the adaptive data transfer library is open to the public and has been imported into a coupler version C-Coupler1 for performance improvement of data transfer. We believe that it can also improve other coupler versions.

  1. Concepts and models of coupled systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertsen, Maurits

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, I will especially focus on the question of the position of human agency, social networks and complex co-evolutionary interactions in socio-hydrological models. The long term perspective of complex systems' modeling typically focuses on regional or global spatial scales and century/millennium time scales. It is still a challenge to relate correlations in outcomes defined at those longer and larger scales to the causalities at the shorter and smaller scales. How do we move today to the next 1000 years in the same way that our ancestors did move from their today to our present, in the small steps that produce reality? Please note, I am not arguing long term work is not interesting or the like. I just pose the question how to deal with the problem that we employ relations with hindsight that matter to us, but not necessarily to the agents that produced the relations we think we have observed. I would like to push the socio-hydrological community a little into rethinking how to deal with complexity, with the aim to bring together the timescales of humans and complexity. I will provide one or two examples of how larger-scale and longer-term observations on water flows and environmental loads can be broken down into smaller-scale and shorter-term production processes of these same loads.

  2. Preliminary investigation of models of coupled clocks and coupled driven pendulums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeBailly, Christopher A.

    In this paper we study a phenomena observed in the 17 th century by Christiaan Huygens. He found that two pendulum clocks placed on a common support synchronized over time. We study a model of this type of coupling primarily using the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. We look at time series to get a picture of what types of synchronization occur and then once we figure out how to classify synchronization we study how varying the damping in the system affects the synchronization. We next look at what happens when driven pendulums replace the clocks. We compare phase portraits and bifurcation diagrams of the uncoupled driven pendulum to the coupled driven pendulums to get a picture of how the dynamics and chaotic tendencies of the driven pendulum change with the coupling.

  3. Dynamic Coupling of Alaska Based Ecosystem and Geophysical Models into an Integrated Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, A.; Carman, T. B.

    2012-12-01

    As scientific models and the challenges they address have grown in complexity and scope, so has interest in dynamically coupling or integrating these models. Dynamic model coupling presents software engineering challenges stemming from differences in model architectures, differences in development styles between modeling groups, and memory and run time performance concerns. The Alaska Integrated Ecosystem Modeling (AIEM) project aims to dynamically couple three independently developed scientific models so that each model can exchange run-time data with each of the other models. The models being coupled are a stochastic fire dynamics model (ALFRESCO), a permafrost model (GIPL), and a soil and vegetation model (DVM-DOS-TEM). The scientific research objectives of the AIEM project are to: 1) use the coupled models for increasing our understanding of climate change and other stressors on landscape level physical and ecosystem processes, and; 2) provide support for resource conservation planning and decision making. The objectives related to the computer models themselves are modifiability, maintainability, and performance of the coupled and individual models. Modifiability and maintainability are especially important in a research context because source codes must be continually adapted to address new scientific concepts. Performance is crucial to delivering results in a timely manner. To achieve the objectives while addressing the challenges in dynamic model coupling, we have designed an architecture that emphasizes high cohesion for each individual model and loose coupling between the models. Each model will retain the ability to run independently, or to be available as a linked library to the coupled model. Performance is facilitated by parallelism in the spatial dimension. With close collaboration among modeling groups, the methodology described here has demonstrated the feasibility of coupling complex ecological and geophysical models to provide managers with more

  4. An efficient model for coupling structural vibrations with acoustic radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frendi, A.; Maestrello, L.; Ting, L.

    1995-05-01

    In this paper, the problem of coupling between panel vibration and near and far field acoustic radiation is studied. The panel vibration is governed by the non-linear plate equations while the loading on the panel, which is the pressure difference across the panel, depends on the reflected and transmitted waves. Two models are used to solve this structural-acoustic interaction problem. One solves the three-dimensional non-linear Euler equations for the acoustic field coupled with the non-linear plate equations (the fully coupled model). The second uses the linear wave equation for the acoustic field and expresses the load as a double integral involving the panel oscillation (the decoupled model). The panel oscillation governed by a system of integro-differential equations is solved numerically and the acoustic field is then defined by an explicit formula. Numerical results are obtained using the two models for linear and non-linear panel vibration regimes excited by incident waves having different sound pressure levels. The predictions given by these two models are in good agreement, but the computational time needed for the "fully coupled model" is 60 times longer than that for "the decoupled model".

  5. Analytic Thermoelectric Couple Modeling: Variable Material Properties and Transient Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, Jonathan A.; Sehirlioglu, Alp; Dynys, Fred

    2015-01-01

    To gain a deeper understanding of the operation of a thermoelectric couple a set of analytic solutions have been derived for a variable material property couple and a transient couple. Using an analytic approach, as opposed to commonly used numerical techniques, results in a set of useful design guidelines. These guidelines can serve as useful starting conditions for further numerical studies, or can serve as design rules for lab built couples. The analytic modeling considers two cases and accounts for 1) material properties which vary with temperature and 2) transient operation of a couple. The variable material property case was handled by means of an asymptotic expansion, which allows for insight into the influence of temperature dependence on different material properties. The variable property work demonstrated the important fact that materials with identical average Figure of Merits can lead to different conversion efficiencies due to temperature dependence of the properties. The transient couple was investigated through a Greens function approach; several transient boundary conditions were investigated. The transient work introduces several new design considerations which are not captured by the classic steady state analysis. The work helps to assist in designing couples for optimal performance, and also helps assist in material selection.

  6. Fluid coupling in a discrete model of cochlear mechanics.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Stephen J; Lineton, Ben; Ni, Guangjian

    2011-09-01

    A discrete model of cochlear mechanics is introduced that includes a full, three-dimensional, description of fluid coupling. This formulation allows the fluid coupling and basilar membrane dynamics to be analyzed separately and then coupled together with a simple piece of linear algebra. The fluid coupling is initially analyzed using a wavenumber formulation and is separated into one component due to one-dimensional fluid coupling and one comprising all the other contributions. Using the theory of acoustic waves in a duct, however, these two components of the pressure can also be associated with a far field, due to the plane wave, and a near field, due to the evanescent, higher order, modes. The near field components are then seen as one of a number of sources of additional longitudinal coupling in the cochlea. The effects of non-uniformity and asymmetry in the fluid chamber areas can also be taken into account, to predict both the pressure difference between the chambers and the mean pressure. This allows the calculation, for example, of the effect of a short cochlear implant on the coupled response of the cochlea.

  7. Integrative Systems Models of Cardiac Excitation Contraction Coupling

    PubMed Central

    Greenstein, Joseph L.; Winslow, Raimond L.

    2010-01-01

    Excitation-contraction coupling in the cardiac myocyte is mediated by a number of highly integrated mechanisms of intracellular Ca2+ transport. The complexity and integrative nature of heart cell electrophysiology and Ca2+-cycling has led to an evolution of computational models that have played a crucial role in shaping our understanding of heart function. An important emerging theme in systems biology is that the detailed nature of local signaling events, such as those that occur in the cardiac dyad, have important consequences at higher biological scales. Multi-scale modeling techniques have revealed many mechanistic links between micro-scale events, such as Ca2+ binding to a channel protein, and macro-scale phenomena, such as excitation-contraction coupling gain. Here we review experimentally based multi-scale computational models of excitation-contraction coupling and the insights that have been gained through their application. PMID:21212390

  8. A Coupled Aeroelastic Model for Launch Vehicle Stability Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, Jeb S.

    2010-01-01

    A technique for incorporating distributed aerodynamic normal forces and aeroelastic coupling effects into a stability analysis model of a launch vehicle is presented. The formulation augments the linear state-space launch vehicle plant dynamics that are compactly derived as a system of coupled linear differential equations representing small angular and translational perturbations of the rigid body, nozzle, and sloshing propellant coupled with normal vibration of a set of orthogonal modes. The interaction of generalized forces due to aeroelastic coupling and thrust can be expressed as a set of augmenting non-diagonal stiffness and damping matrices in modal coordinates with no penalty on system order. While the eigenvalues of the structural response in the presence of thrust and aeroelastic forcing can be predicted at a given flight condition independent of the remaining degrees of freedom, the coupled model provides confidence in closed-loop stability in the presence of rigid-body, slosh, and actuator dynamics. Simulation results are presented that characterize the coupled dynamic response of the Ares I launch vehicle and the impact of aeroelasticity on control system stability margins.

  9. Development of a coupled pathogen-hydrologic catchment model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haydon, S.; Deletic, A.

    2006-09-01

    SummaryLarge numbers of pathogens can be mobilised from drinking water catchments during wet weather causing serious problems in management of water treatment plants. This paper presents an attempt to model pathogen discharges from large catchments. Two conceptual continuous pathogen models have been developed and evaluated using E. coli as a pathogen indicator. The first model, the EG model, describes surface and subsurface pathogen transport processes by means of wash-off and loss equations. It is coupled to an existing hydrologic model (SimHyd) that predicts flows. The second model, named ASP, takes into account only surface pathogen transport processes. It is coupled to a stormflow-baseflow separation model, and therefore is simpler than EG. The models have been tested against baseflow and storm event E. coli concentrations measured at three dissimilar catchments from southern Australia. The prediction of pathogen peak concentrations by the EG model was reasonably good; the coefficient of correlation between the measured and modelled pathogen peaks for all three catchments was r2 = 0.93. However, the ASP model was not able to model the peaks well ( r2 = 0.54). The prediction of pathogen loads was significantly better with r2 = 0.95 for the EG model and r2 = 0.89 for the ASP model. It was concluded that a slightly more complex EG model was performing better than the oversimplified ASP model.

  10. Validation of coupled atmosphere-fire behavior models

    SciTech Connect

    Bossert, J.E.; Reisner, J.M.; Linn, R.R.; Winterkamp, J.L.; Schaub, R.; Riggan, P.J.

    1998-12-31

    Recent advances in numerical modeling and computer power have made it feasible to simulate the dynamical interaction and feedback between the heat and turbulence induced by wildfires and the local atmospheric wind and temperature fields. At Los Alamos National Laboratory, the authors have developed a modeling system that includes this interaction by coupling a high resolution atmospheric dynamics model, HIGRAD, with a fire behavior model, BEHAVE, to predict the spread of wildfires. The HIGRAD/BEHAVE model is run at very high resolution to properly resolve the fire/atmosphere interaction. At present, these coupled wildfire model simulations are computationally intensive. The additional complexity of these models require sophisticated methods for assuring their reliability in real world applications. With this in mind, a substantial part of the research effort is directed at model validation. Several instrumented prescribed fires have been conducted with multi-agency support and participation from chaparral, marsh, and scrub environments in coastal areas of Florida and inland California. In this paper, the authors first describe the data required to initialize the components of the wildfire modeling system. Then they present results from one of the Florida fires, and discuss a strategy for further testing and improvement of coupled weather/wildfire models.

  11. Critical region for an Ising model coupled to causal triangulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerda-Hernández, J.

    2017-02-01

    This paper extends the results obtained by Hernández et al for the annealed Ising model coupled to two-dimensional causal dynamical triangulations. We employ the Fortuin‑Kasteleyn (FK) representation in order to determine a region in the quadrant of the parameters β,μ >0 where the critical curve for the annealed model is possibly located. This can be done by outlining a region where the model has a unique infinite-volume Gibbs measure, and a region where the finite-volume Gibbs measure does not have weak limit (in fact, does not exist if the volume is large enough). We also improve the region where the model has a one dimensional geometry with respect to the unique weak limit measure, which implies that the Ising model on causal triangulation does not have phase transition in this region. Furthermore, we provide a better approximation of the free energy for the coupled model.

  12. A coupled bubble plume-reservoir model for hypolimnetic oxygenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singleton, V. L.; Rueda, F. J.; Little, J. C.

    2010-12-01

    A model for a linear bubble plume used for hypolimnetic oxygenation was coupled with a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model to simulate the complex interaction between bubble plumes and the large-scale processes of transport and mixing. The coupled model accurately simulated the evolution of dissolved oxygen (DO) and temperature fields that occurred during two full-scale diffuser tests in a water supply reservoir. The prediction of asymmetric circulation cells laterally and longitudinally on both sides of the linear diffuser was due to the uneven reservoir bathymetry. Simulation of diffuser operation resulted in baroclinic pressure gradients, which caused vertical oscillations above the hypolimnion and contributed to distribution of plume detrainment upstream and downstream of the diffuser. On the basis of a first-order variance analysis, the largest source of uncertainty for both predicted DO and temperature was the model bathymetry, which accounted for about 90% of the overall uncertainty. Because the oxygen addition rate was 4 times the sediment oxygen uptake (SOU) rate, DO predictions were not sensitive to SOU. In addition to bathymetry, the momentum assigned to plume entrainment and detrainment is a significant source of uncertainty in the coupled model structure and appreciably affects the predicted intensity of mixing and lake circulation. For baseline runs, the entrainment and detrainment velocities were assumed to be half of the velocities through the flux face of the grid cells. Additional research on appropriate values of the plume detrainment momentum for the coupled model is required.

  13. Strong coupling phase transitions in supersymmetric grand unified models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, David B.

    1985-08-01

    The determination of the temperature at which a grand unified model becomes strongly coupled should be based upon a physical quantity such as the screening lenght rather than the ad hoc condition that the opening becomes O(1). I use a recent calculation of this screening length (the inverse electric mass) to discuss some aspects of strong coupling behavior in the cosmology of supersymmetric grand unified models. Significant effects may occur in a variety of cases. An interesting possibilit is that there may be a pair of confining and deconfining phase transitions at a temperature as low as the supersymmetry breaking scale (O(TeV)). I present illustrative examples for these effects.

  14. The Venus-Earth-Jupiter spin-orbit coupling model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, I. R. G.

    2013-12-01

    A Venus-Earth-Jupiter spin-orbit coupling model is constructed from a combination of the Venus-Earth-Jupiter tidal-torquing model and the gear effect. The new model produces net tangential torques that act upon the outer convective layers of the Sun with periodicities that match many of the long-term cycles that are found in the 10Be and 14C proxy records of solar activity.

  15. String coupling and interactions in type IIB matrix model

    SciTech Connect

    Kitazawa, Yoshihisa; Nagaoka, Satoshi

    2009-05-15

    We investigate the interactions of closed strings in a IIB matrix model. The basic interaction of the closed superstring is realized by the recombination of two intersecting strings. Such interaction is investigated in a IIB matrix model via two-dimensional noncommutative gauge theory in the IR limit. By estimating the probability of the recombination, we identify the string coupling g{sub s} in the IIB matrix model. We confirm that our identification is consistent with matrix string theory.

  16. A Fully Coupled Model for Electromechanics of the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Henian; Wong, Kwai; Zhao, Xiaopeng

    2012-01-01

    We present a fully coupled electromechanical model of the heart. The model integrates cardiac electrophysiology and cardiac mechanics through excitation-induced contraction and deformation-induced current. Numerical schemes based on finite element were implemented in a supercomputer. Numerical examples were presented using a thin cardiac tissue and a dog ventricle with realistic geometry. Performance of the parallel simulation scheme was studied. The model provides a useful tool to understand cardiovascular dynamics. PMID:23118801

  17. Midsummer Drought Pattern simulated by a coupled regional climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Lopez, Benjamin; Cabos Narvaez, William David; Sein, Dmitry; Quintanar, Arturo

    2017-04-01

    In this work, a regional climate model of limited area, in both atmospheric and coupled mode, is used to simulate the historical period over a domain including Mexico and Central America. In the atmospheric mode, the REMO atmosphere model is used, while in the coupled simulation, REMO is coupled to the MPI-OM ocean model. In all simulations, REMO is driven at the open boundaries by reanalysis data from ERA-40. Several numerical experiments are performed using three different spatial resolutions (100 km, 50 km, and 25 km). Taylor diagrams of some meteorological and oceanic variables are used to get a quantitative idea of model performance. Additionally, the observed patterns of the Midsummer Drought are compared with the simulated ones. Among the results, it is noted that the coupled model with the highest resolution has the best performance to simulate the observed pattern of the Midsummer Drought. Over the eastern Pacific warm pool region, the coupled simulation generate fields of sea surface temperature, wind, and sea level pressure gradients more consistent with independent observations that those simulated in the atmospheric mode. In particular, the wind strengthened observed in July is well reproduced in the coupled simulation, which lead to higher values of vertically integrated water vapour transport coming from both the eastern tropical Pacific and the Caribbean. Despite the increased atmospheric humidity available above this region, the simulated fluxes are divergent and therefore the precipitation is reduced in July, in agreement with the observations. This July divergence in the vertically integrated water vapour transport is not present in the atmospheric mode.

  18. A Coupled Plasma and Sheath Model for High Density Reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deepak, Bose; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present a coupled plasma and collisionless; sheath model for the simulation of high density plasma processing reactors. Due to inefficiencies in numerical schemes and the resulting computational burden, a coupled multidimensional plasma and sheath simulation has not been possible model for gas mixtures and high density reactors of practical interest. In this work we demonstrate that with a fully implicit algorithm and a refined computational mesh, a self-consistent plasma and sheath simulation is feasible. We discuss the details of the model equations, the importance of ion inertia, and the resulting sheath profiles for argon and chlorine plasmas. We find that at low operating pressures (10-30 mTorr), the charge separation occurs only within a 0.5 mm layer near the surface in a 300 mm inductively coupled plasma etch reactor. A unified model eliminates the use of off-line or loosely coupled sheath models with simplifying assumptions which generally lead to uncertainties in ion flux and sheath electrical properties.

  19. Comparison between MAVEN measurements and HELIOSARES coupled models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblanc, F.; Modolo, R.; Chaufray, J. Y.; Leclercq, L.; Curry, S.; Luhmann, J. G.; Lillis, R. J.; Hara, T.; McFadden, J. P.; Halekas, J. S.; Schneider, N. M.; Deighan, J.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2016-12-01

    Mars' MAVEN first measurements have clearly shown that heavy ion precipitation occur. One of the goals of MAVEN mission is to identify the different effects of this precipitation on Mars' atmosphere. In order to look for such effects, we will present a comparison between MAVEN observations and the results of modelling done by the HELIOSARES set of coupled models which describe the magnetosphere (hybrid magnetospheric model, LATHYS), the exosphere (Monte Carlo Exospheric General Model) and the atmosphere (LMD-GCM model). In particular, MAVEN provides the unique opportunity to couple observations of precipitation (STATIC, SWIA measurements) with observations of the exosphere (IUVS). In this work, we will present the comparison between these observations and HELIOSARES simulations and will show what can be deduced from the observations thanks to such comparison.

  20. An investigation of helicopter dynamic coupling using an analytical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Jeffrey D.

    1995-01-01

    Many attempts have been made in recent years to predict the off-axis response of a helicopter to control inputs, and most have had little success. Since physical insight is limited by the complexity of numerical simulation models, this paper examines the off-axis response problem using an analytical model, with the goal of understanding the mechanics of the coupling. A new induced velocity model is extended to include the effects of wake distortion from pitch rate. It is shown that the inclusion of these results in a significant change in the lateral flap response to a steady pitch rate. The proposed inflow model is coupled with the full rotor/body dynamics, and comparisons are made between the model and flight test data for a UH-60 in hover. Results show that inclusion of induced velocity variations due to shaft rate improves correlation in the pitch response to lateral cycle inputs.

  1. Bose-Hubbard models coupled to cavity light fields

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, A. O.; Bhaseen, M. J.; Simons, B. D.; Hohenadler, M.

    2010-02-15

    Recent experiments on strongly coupled cavity quantum electrodynamics present new directions in ''matter-light'' systems. Following on from our previous work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 135301 (2009)] we investigate Bose-Hubbard models coupled to a cavity light field. We discuss the emergence of photoexcitations or 'polaritons' within the Mott phase, and obtain the complete variational phase diagram. Exploiting connections to the super-radiance transition in the Dicke model we discuss the nature of polariton condensation within this novel state. Incorporating the effects of carrier superfluidity, we identify a first-order transition between the super-radiant Mott phase and the single component atomic superfluid. The overall predictions of mean field theory are in excellent agreement with exact diagonalization and we provide details of superfluid fractions, density fluctuations, and finite size effects. We highlight connections to recent work on coupled cavity arrays.

  2. Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and THC Seepage) Models

    SciTech Connect

    E. Gonnenthal; N. Spyoher

    2001-02-05

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the Near-Field Environment (NFE) and Unsaturated Zone (UZ) models used to evaluate the potential effects of coupled thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) processes on unsaturated zone flow and transport. This is in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport Process Model Report'', Addendum D, Attachment D-4 (Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) Management and Operating Contractor (M and O) 2000 [153447]) and ''Technical Work Plan for Nearfield Environment Thermal Analyses and Testing'' (CRWMS M and O 2000 [153309]). These models include the Drift Scale Test (DST) THC Model and several THC seepage models. These models provide the framework to evaluate THC coupled processes at the drift scale, predict flow and transport behavior for specified thermal loading conditions, and predict the chemistry of waters and gases entering potential waste-emplacement drifts. The intended use of this AMR is to provide input for the following: (1) Performance Assessment (PA); (2) Abstraction of Drift-Scale Coupled Processes AMR (ANL-NBS-HS-000029); (3) UZ Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR); and (4) Near-Field Environment (NFE) PMR. The work scope for this activity is presented in the TWPs cited above, and summarized as follows: continue development of the repository drift-scale THC seepage model used in support of the TSPA in-drift geochemical model; incorporate heterogeneous fracture property realizations; study sensitivity of results to changes in input data and mineral assemblage; validate the DST model by comparison with field data; perform simulations to predict mineral dissolution and precipitation and their effects on fracture properties and chemistry of water (but not flow rates) that may seep into drifts; submit modeling results to the TDMS and document the models. The model development, input data, sensitivity and validation studies described in

  3. Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and THC Seepage) Models

    SciTech Connect

    E. Sonnenthale

    2001-04-16

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the Near-Field Environment (NFE) and Unsaturated Zone (UZ) models used to evaluate the potential effects of coupled thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) processes on unsaturated zone flow and transport. This is in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport Process Model Report'', Addendum D, Attachment D-4 (Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) Management and Operating Contractor (M&O) 2000 [1534471]) and ''Technical Work Plan for Nearfield Environment Thermal Analyses and Testing'' (CRWMS M&O 2000 [153309]). These models include the Drift Scale Test (DST) THC Model and several THC seepage models. These models provide the framework to evaluate THC coupled processes at the drift scale, predict flow and transport behavior for specified thermal loading conditions, and predict the chemistry of waters and gases entering potential waste-emplacement drifts. The intended use of this AMR is to provide input for the following: Performance Assessment (PA); Near-Field Environment (NFE) PMR; Abstraction of Drift-Scale Coupled Processes AMR (ANL-NBS-HS-000029); and UZ Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR). The work scope for this activity is presented in the TWPs cited above, and summarized as follows: Continue development of the repository drift-scale THC seepage model used in support of the TSPA in-drift geochemical model; incorporate heterogeneous fracture property realizations; study sensitivity of results to changes in input data and mineral assemblage; validate the DST model by comparison with field data; perform simulations to predict mineral dissolution and precipitation and their effects on fracture properties and chemistry of water (but not flow rates) that may seep into drifts; submit modeling results to the TDMS and document the models. The model development, input data, sensitivity and validation studies described in this AMR are required

  4. A tightly coupled non-equilibrium model for inductively coupled radio-frequency plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Munafò, A. Alfuhaid, S. A. Panesi, M.; Cambier, J.-L.

    2015-10-07

    The objective of the present work is the development of a tightly coupled magneto-hydrodynamic model for inductively coupled radio-frequency plasmas. Non Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (NLTE) effects are described based on a hybrid State-to-State approach. A multi-temperature formulation is used to account for thermal non-equilibrium between translation of heavy-particles and vibration of molecules. Excited electronic states of atoms are instead treated as separate pseudo-species, allowing for non-Boltzmann distributions of their populations. Free-electrons are assumed Maxwellian at their own temperature. The governing equations for the electro-magnetic field and the gas properties (e.g., chemical composition and temperatures) are written as a coupled system of time-dependent conservation laws. Steady-state solutions are obtained by means of an implicit Finite Volume method. The results obtained in both LTE and NLTE conditions over a broad spectrum of operating conditions demonstrate the robustness of the proposed coupled numerical method. The analysis of chemical composition and temperature distributions along the torch radius shows that: (i) the use of the LTE assumption may lead to an inaccurate prediction of the thermo-chemical state of the gas, and (ii) non-equilibrium phenomena play a significant role close the walls, due to the combined effects of Ohmic heating and macroscopic gradients.

  5. Modelling the Auroral Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling System at Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunce, E. J.; Cowley, S.; Provan, G.

    2016-12-01

    The magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling system at Jupiter is a topic of central significance in understanding the fundamental properties of its large-scale plasma environment. Theoretical discussion of this topic typically considers the properties of the field-aligned current systems that form part of a large-scale magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling current system associated with momentum exchange between the ionosphere and the magnetosphere, communicated via the magnetic field. The current system associated with the main oval is believed to be related to centrifugally-driven outward radial transport of iogenic plasma that leads to sub-corotation in the middle magnetosphere. In addition to the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling current system, upward-directed field-aligned currents may flow at the open-closed field line boundary due to the shear between outer closed field lines and open field lines, which may relate to emission poleward of the main oval. An axi-symmetric model of the plasma flow in the jovian system, the related coupling currents, and the consequent auroral precipitation based on these combined ideas was initially devised to represent typical steady-state conditions for the system and later extended to consider auroral effects resulting from sudden compressions of the magnetosphere. More recently, the model has been extended along model magnetic field lines into the magnetosphere in order to relate them to in situ observations from the NASA Juno spacecraft at Jupiter. The field-aligned coupling currents associated with the modelled current systems produce a readily-observable azimuthal field signature that bends the field lines out of magnetic meridians. Here we show the computed azimuthal fields produced by our model auroral current system throughout the region between the ionosphere and the magnetic equator, and illustrate the results by evaluation of various model parameters (e.g. field-aligned current density, accelerating voltages, accelerated

  6. A global model of electromagnetic coupling for nutations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumberry, Mathieu; Koot, Laurence

    2012-09-01

    Nutations are small variations in the orientation of the Earth's rotation axis in space. They are caused by the gravitational torque that the Moon, the Sun, and other planets exert on the equatorial bulge. As nutations involve differential rotations between the mantle, fluid core and inner core, the motion of each of these internal regions depends on the coupling between them. In particular, a coupling of a dissipative nature is required to match observations. One possibility is electromagnetic (EM) coupling at the inner and outer core boundaries, the focus of our study. Existing EM coupling models are based on a formulation where the perturbation variables and the equations they must satisfy are defined at local geographic points on the boundary. Here, we show how EM coupling models can be cast under a global formalism, where all variables are expanded in spherical harmonics. This formulation allows a separation of the contribution from the poloidal and toroidal parts of the EM torque, and we show that, under certain conductivity scenarios, this separation is important.

  7. A computational fluid dynamics model of viscous coupling of hairs.

    PubMed

    Lewin, Gregory C; Hallam, John

    2010-06-01

    Arrays of arthropod filiform hairs form highly sensitive mechanoreceptor systems capable of detecting minute air disturbances, and it is unclear to what extent individual hairs interact with one another within sensor arrays. We present a computational fluid dynamics model for one or more hairs, coupled to a rigid-body dynamics model, for simulating both biological (e.g., a cricket cercal hair) and artificial MEMS-based systems. The model is used to investigate hair-hair interaction between pairs of hairs and quantify the extent of so-called viscous coupling. The results show that the extent to which hairs are coupled depends on the mounting properties of the hairs and the frequency at which they are driven. In particular, it is shown that for equal length hairs, viscous coupling is suppressed when they are driven near the natural frequency of the undamped system and the damping coefficient at the base is small. Further, for certain configurations, the motion of a hair can be enhanced by the presence of nearby hairs. The usefulness of the model in designing artificial systems is discussed.

  8. Asymptotic behavior of coupled linear systems modeling suspension bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Oro, Filippo; Giorgi, Claudio; Pata, Vittorino

    2015-06-01

    We consider the coupled linear system describing the vibrations of a string-beam system related to the well-known Lazer-McKenna suspension bridge model. For ɛ > 0 and k > 0, the decay properties of the solution semigroup are discussed in dependence of the nonnegative parameters γ and h, which are responsible for the damping effects.

  9. Reheating in non-minimal derivative coupling model

    SciTech Connect

    Sadjadi, H. Mohseni; Goodarzi, Parviz E-mail: p_goodarzi@ut.ac.ir

    2013-02-01

    We consider a model with non-minimal derivative coupling of inflaton to gravity. The reheating process during rapid oscillation of the inflaton is studied and the reheating temperature is obtained. Behaviors of the inflaton and produced radiation in this era are discussed.

  10. An efficient model for coupling structural vibrations with acoustic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frendi, Abdelkader; Maestrello, Lucio; Ting, LU

    1993-01-01

    The scattering of an incident wave by a flexible panel is studied. The panel vibration is governed by the nonlinear plate equations while the loading on the panel, which is the pressure difference across the panel, depends on the reflected and transmitted waves. Two models are used to calculate this structural-acoustic interaction problem. One solves the three dimensional nonlinear Euler equations for the flow-field coupled with the plate equations (the fully coupled model). The second uses the linear wave equation for the acoustic field and expresses the load as a double integral involving the panel oscillation (the decoupled model). The panel oscillation governed by a system of integro-differential equations is solved numerically and the acoustic field is then defined by an explicit formula. Numerical results are obtained using the two models for linear and nonlinear panel vibrations. The predictions given by these two models are in good agreement but the computational time needed for the 'fully coupled model' is 60 times longer than that for 'the decoupled model'.

  11. Coupled Particulate and Continuum Model for Nanoparticle Targeted Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Jifu; Wang, Shunqiang; Yang, Jie; Liu, Yaling

    2013-01-01

    Prediction of nanoparticle (NP) distribution in a vasculature involves transport phenomena at various scales and is crucial for the evaluation of NP delivery efficiency. A combined particulate and continuum model is developed to model NP transport and delivery processes. In the particulate model ligand-receptor binding kinetics is coupled with Brownian dynamics to study NP binding on a microscale. An analytical formula is derived to link molecular level binding parameters to particulate level adhesion and detachment rates. The obtained NP adhesion rates are then coupled with a convection-diffusion-reaction model to study NP transport and delivery at macroscale. The binding results of the continuum model agree well with those from the particulate model. The effects of shear rate, particle size and vascular geometry on NP adhesion are investigated. Attachment rates predicted by the analytical formula also agree reasonably well with the experimental data reported in literature. The developed coupled model that links ligand-receptor binding dynamics to NP adhesion rate along with macroscale transport and delivery processes may serve as a faster evaluation and prediction tool to determine NP distribution in complex vascular networks. PMID:23729869

  12. An efficient model for coupling structural vibrations with acoustic radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frendi, Abdelkader; Maestrello, Lucio; Ting, Lu

    1993-04-01

    The scattering of an incident wave by a flexible panel is studied. The panel vibration is governed by the nonlinear plate equations while the loading on the panel, which is the pressure difference across the panel, depends on the reflected and transmitted waves. Two models are used to calculate this structural-acoustic interaction problem. One solves the three dimensional nonlinear Euler equations for the flow-field coupled with the plate equations (the fully coupled model). The second uses the linear wave equation for the acoustic field and expresses the load as a double integral involving the panel oscillation (the decoupled model). The panel oscillation governed by a system of integro-differential equations is solved numerically and the acoustic field is then defined by an explicit formula. Numerical results are obtained using the two models for linear and nonlinear panel vibrations. The predictions given by these two models are in good agreement but the computational time needed for the 'fully coupled model' is 60 times longer than that for 'the decoupled model'.

  13. Mutual coupling, channel model, and BER for curvilinear antenna arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhiyong

    This dissertation introduces a wireless communications system with an adaptive beam-former and investigates its performance with different antenna arrays. Mutual coupling, real antenna elements and channel models are included to examine the system performance. In a beamforming system, mutual coupling (MC) among the elements can significantly degrade the system performance. However, MC effects can be compensated if an accurate model of mutual coupling is available. A mutual coupling matrix model is utilized to compensate mutual coupling in the beamforming of a uniform circular array (UCA). Its performance is compared with other models in uplink and downlink beamforming scenarios. In addition, the predictions are compared with measurements and verified with results from full-wave simulations. In order to accurately investigate the minimum mean-square-error (MSE) of an adaptive array in MC, two different noise models, the environmental and the receiver noise, are modeled. The minimum MSEs with and without data domain MC compensation are analytically compared. The influence of mutual coupling on the convergence is also examined. In addition, the weight compensation method is proposed to attain the desired array pattern. Adaptive arrays with different geometries are implemented with the minimum MSE algorithm in the wireless communications system to combat interference at the same frequency. The bit-error-rate (BER) of systems with UCA, uniform rectangular array (URA) and UCA with center element are investigated in additive white Gaussian noise plus well-separated signals or random direction signals scenarios. The output SINR of an adaptive array with multiple interferers is analytically examined. The influence of the adaptive algorithm convergence on the BER is investigated. The UCA is then investigated in a narrowband Rician fading channel. The channel model is built and the space correlations are examined. The influence of the number of signal paths, number of the

  14. Model coupling for predicting a developmental patterning process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhulekar, Nimit; Oztan, Basak; Yener, Bülent

    2016-03-01

    Physics-based-theoretical models have been used to predict developmental patterning processes such as branching morphogenesis for over half a century. While such techniques are quite successful in understanding the patterning processes in organs such as the lung and the kidney, they are unable to accurately model the processes in other organs such as the submandibular salivary gland. One possible reason is the detachment of these models from data that describe the underlying biological process. This hypothesis coupled with the increasing availability of high quality data has made discrete, data-driven models attractive alternatives. These models are based on extracting features from data to describe the patterns and their time evolving multivariate statistics. These discrete models have low computational complexity and comparable or better accuracy than the continuous models. This paper presents a case study for coupling continuous-physics-based and discrete-empirical-models to address the prediction of cleft formation during the early stages of branching morphogenesis in mouse submandibular salivary glands (SMG). Given a time-lapse movie of a growing SMG, first we build a descriptive model that captures the underlying biological process and quantifies this ground truth. Tissue-scale (global) morphological features are used to characterize the biological ground truth. Second, we formulate a predictive model using the level-set method that simulates branching morphogenesis. This model successfully predicts the topological evolution, however, it is blind to the cellular organization, and cell-to-cell interactions occurring inside a gland; information that is available in the image data. Our primary objective via this study is to couple the continuous level set model with a discrete graph theory model that captures the cellular organization but ignores the forces that determine the evolution of the gland surface, i.e. formation of clefts and buds. We compared the

  15. Predictability of a coupled ocean-atmosphere model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goswami, B. N.; Shukla, J.

    1991-01-01

    A study is presented to determine the limits on the predictability of the coupled ocean-atmosphere system. Following the classical methods developed for atmospheric predictability studies, the model used is one of the simplest that realistically reproduces many of the important features of the observed interannual variability of sea surface temperature in the tropical Pacific Ocean when forced by observed wind stresses. As no reasonable analysis is available for all the fields, initial conditions for these prediction experiments were taken from a model control run in which the ocean model was forced by the observed surface winds. The atmospheric component of the coupled model is not capable of accurately simulating the large-scale components of the observed wind stress.

  16. Sources of tropical Atlantic coupled model biases derived from initialised hindcasts and partially coupled sensitivity experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deppenmeier, Anna-Lena; Hazeleger, Wilco; Haarsma, Rein; Prodhomme, Chloé; Exarchou, Eleftheria; Doblas-Reyes, Francisco J.

    2016-04-01

    State-of-the-art coupled general circulation models (CGCMs) still fail to simulate the mean state and variability of the tropical Atlantic (TA) climate correctly. We investigate the importance of air-sea interaction at different regions in the TA by means of performing partially coupled sensitivity experiments with the state-of-the-art CGCM EC-Earth3.1. All simulations are intialised from the observed climate state. By studying the initial drift in sensitivity experiments we obtain insight into the tropical dynamics and sources of model bias. We test the influence of realistic wind stress forcing over different regions of the TA on the development of SST as well as other oceanic biases. A series of hindcasts fully initialised in May and run until the end of August are performed with prescribed ERA-Interim zonal and meridional wind stresses over three different regions: firstly, we force the entire TA from 15N - 30S. Secondly, we force the equatorial band only between 5N - 5S, and finally we force the coastal area of the Angola Benguela upwelling region between 0W and the coast and between 5S - 30N. Our setup only affects the oceanic forcing and leaves the atmosphere free to adapt, such that we can identify the air-sea interaction processes in the different regions and their effect on the SST bias in the fully coupled system. The differences between forcing the entire TA and the equatorial region only are very small, which hints to the great importance of the relatively narrow equatorial region. The coastal upwelling area does not strongly affect the equatorial region in our model. We identify the equatorial band as most susceptible to errors in the wind stress forcing and, due to the strong atmosphere-ocean coupling, as source of the main biases in our model. The partially coupled experiments with initialised seasonal hindcasts appear to be a powerful tool to identify the sources of model biases and to identify relevant air-sea interaction processes in the TA.

  17. COUPLING

    DOEpatents

    Frisch, E.; Johnson, C.G.

    1962-05-15

    A detachable coupling arrangement is described which provides for varying the length of the handle of a tool used in relatively narrow channels. The arrangement consists of mating the key and keyhole formations in the cooperating handle sections. (AEC)

  18. Coupled Climate Model Appraisal a Benchmark for Future Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, T J; AchutaRao, K; Bader, D; Covey, C; Doutriaux, C M; Fiorino, M; Gleckler, P J; Sperber, K R; Taylor, K E

    2005-08-22

    The Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) has produced an extensive appraisal of simulations of present-day climate by eleven representative coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation models (OAGCMs) which were developed during the period 1995-2002. Because projections of potential future global climate change are derived chiefly from OAGCMs, there is a continuing need to test the credibility of these predictions by evaluating model performance in simulating the historically observed climate. For example, such an evaluation is an integral part of the periodic assessments of climate change that are reported by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. The PCMDI appraisal thus provides a useful benchmark for future studies of this type. The appraisal mainly analyzed multi-decadal simulations of present-day climate by models that employed diverse representations of climate processes for atmosphere, ocean, sea ice, and land, as well as different techniques for coupling these components (see Table). The selected models were a subset of those entered in phase 2 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP2, Covey et al. 2003). For these ''CMIP2+ models'', more atmospheric or oceanic variables were provided than the minimum requirements for participation in CMIP2. However, the appraisal only considered those climate variables that were supplied from most of the CMIP2+ models. The appraisal focused on three facets of the simulations of current global climate: (1) secular trends in simulation time series which would be indicative of a problematical ''coupled climate drift''; (2) comparisons of temporally averaged fields of simulated atmospheric and oceanic climate variables with available observational climatologies; and (3) correspondences between simulated and observed modes of climatic variability. Highlights of these climatic aspects manifested by different CMIP2+ simulations are briefly discussed here.

  19. Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and THC Seepage) Models

    SciTech Connect

    P. Dixon

    2004-04-05

    The purpose of this Model Report (REV02) is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) models used to evaluate the potential effects of coupled thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes on UZ flow and transport. This Model Report has been developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (Bechtel SAIC Company, LLC (BSC) 2002 [160819]). The technical work plan (TWP) describes planning information pertaining to the technical scope, content, and management of this Model Report in Section 1.12, Work Package AUZM08, ''Coupled Effects on Flow and Seepage''. The plan for validation of the models documented in this Model Report is given in Attachment I, Model Validation Plans, Section I-3-4, of the TWP. Except for variations in acceptance criteria (Section 4.2), there were no deviations from this TWP. This report was developed in accordance with AP-SIII.10Q, ''Models''. This Model Report documents the THC Seepage Model and the Drift Scale Test (DST) THC Model. The THC Seepage Model is a drift-scale process model for predicting the composition of gas and water that could enter waste emplacement drifts and the effects of mineral alteration on flow in rocks surrounding drifts. The DST THC model is a drift-scale process model relying on the same conceptual model and much of the same input data (i.e., physical, hydrological, thermodynamic, and kinetic) as the THC Seepage Model. The DST THC Model is the primary method for validating the THC Seepage Model. The DST THC Model compares predicted water and gas compositions, as well as mineral alteration patterns, with observed data from the DST. These models provide the framework to evaluate THC coupled processes at the drift scale, predict flow and transport behavior for specified thermal-loading conditions, and predict the evolution of mineral alteration and fluid chemistry around potential waste emplacement drifts. The DST THC Model is used solely for the validation of the THC

  20. A preferential vibration dissociation coupling model for nonequilibrium flowfields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgough, David E.; Carlson, Leland A.; Gally, Thomas A.

    1993-01-01

    A preferential vibration-dissociation coupling model is incorporated into a radiatively coupled viscous shock laver code that also includes chemical, radiative, and thermal nonequilibrium. Stagnation point flow profiles are obtained for various Fire 2 flight conditions and for a typical 14 km/sec AOTV case, and comparisons are made with Fire 2 experimental data. Adjustments in molecular absorption coefficients are also made for several diatomic species. Based on comparisons with experimental data, very little preferential dissociation behavior is present in the Fire 2 flight conditions.

  1. Progress in coupling models of human and coastal landscape change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brad Murray, A.; Gopalakrishnan, Sathya; McNamara, Dylan E.; Smith, Martin D.

    2013-04-01

    Humans are increasingly altering the Earth's surface, and affecting processes that shape and reshape landscapes. In many cases, humans are reacting to landscape-change processes that represent natural hazards. Thus, the landscape is reacting to humans who are reacting to the landscape. When the timescales for landscape change are comparable to those of human dynamics, human and 'natural' components of developed environments are dynamically coupled—necessitating coupling models of human and physical/biological processes to study either environmental change or human responses. Here we focus on a case study coupling models of coastal economics and physical coastline change. In this modeling, coastline change results from patterns of wave-driven sediment transport and sea-level rise, and shoreline stabilization decisions are based on the benefits of wide beaches (capitalized into property values) balanced against the costs of stabilization. This interdisciplinary modeling highlights points that may apply to other coupled human/natural systems. First, climate change, by accelerating the rates of landscape change, tends to strengthen the coupling with human dynamics. In our case study, both increasing sea-level-rise rates and changing storm patterns tend to increase shoreline change rates, which can induce more vigorous shoreline stabilization efforts. However, property values can fall dramatically as erosion rates and stabilization costs rise, which can also lead to the abandonment of expensive stabilization methods as shoreline change rates increase. Second, socio-economic change can also strengthen the human/landscape coupling. Changing costs of shoreline stabilization can alter stabilization decisions, which in turn alters patterns of coastline change. The coupled modeling illuminates the long-range effects of localized shoreline stabilization efforts; communities arrayed along a coastline are unwittingly affecting each other's erosion rates, and therefore each

  2. Modeling Endovascular MRI Coil Coupling with Transmit RF Excitation

    PubMed Central

    Venkateswaran, Madhav; Unal, Orhan; Hurley, Samuel; Samsonov, Alexey; Wang, Peng; Fain, Sean; Kurpad, Krishna

    2016-01-01

    Objective To model inductive coupling of endovascular coils with transmit RF excitation for selecting coils for MRI-guided interventions. Methods Independent and computationally efficient FEM models are developed for the endovascular coil, cable, transmit excitation and imaging domain. Electromagnetic and circuit solvers are coupled to simulate net B1+ fields and induced currents and voltages. Our models are validated using the Bloch Siegert B1+ mapping sequence for a series-tuned multimode coil, capable of tracking, wireless visualization and high resolution endovascular imaging. Results Validation shows good agreement at 24, 28 and 34 μT background RF excitation within experimental limitations. Quantitative coil performance metrics agree with simulation. A parametric study demonstrates trade off in coil performance metrics when varying number of coil turns. Tracking, imaging and wireless marker multimode coil features and their integration is demonstrated in a pig study. Conclusion Developed models for the multimode coil were successfully validated. Modeling for geometric optimization and coil selection serves as a precursor to time-consuming and expensive experiments. Specific applications demonstrated include parametric optimization, coil selection for a cardiac intervention and an animal imaging experiment. Significance Our modular, adaptable and computationally efficient modeling approach enables rapid comparison, selection and optimization of inductively-coupled coils for MRI-guided interventions. PMID:26960218

  3. Coupled fermion-kink system in Jackiw-Rebbi model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amado, A.; Mohammadi, A.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we study Jackiw-Rebbi model, in which a massless fermion is coupled to the kink of λ φ ^4 theory through a Yukawa interaction. In the original Jackiw-Rebbi model, the soliton is prescribed. However, we are interested in the back-reaction of the fermion on the soliton besides the effect of the soliton on the fermion. Also, as a particular example, we consider a minimal supersymmetric kink model in (1+1) dimensions. In this case, the bosonic self-coupling, λ , and the Yukawa coupling between fermion and soliton, g, have a specific relation, g=√{λ /2}. As the set of coupled equations of motion of the system is not analytically solvable, we use a numerical method to solve it self-consistently. We obtain the bound energy spectrum, bound states of the system and the corresponding shape of the soliton using a relaxation method, except for the zero mode fermionic state and threshold energies which are analytically solvable. With the aid of these results, we are able to show how the soliton is affected in general and supersymmetric cases. The results we obtain are consistent with the ones in the literature, considering the soliton as background.

  4. Electromagnetic modeling of edge coupled quantum well infrared photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, K. K.

    2012-06-01

    Edge coupling through a 45° facet is the standard approach in characterizing quantum well infrared photodetector materials. From the spectral responsivity, the material absorption coefficient can be deduced from a classical model. However, this classical model has not been closely examined by a rigorous theory. In this work, we apply finite element electromagnetic modeling to obtain the detector quantum efficiency under this geometry and compare the result with the classical prediction. Remarkably, we find that both models give the same result at this particular angle while they differ significantly at other angles.

  5. Mathematical model of mouse embryonic cardiomyocyte excitation-contraction coupling.

    PubMed

    Korhonen, Topi; Rapila, Risto; Tavi, Pasi

    2008-10-01

    Excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling is the mechanism that connects the electrical excitation with cardiomyocyte contraction. Embryonic cardiomyocytes are not only capable of generating action potential (AP)-induced Ca(2+) signals and contractions (E-C coupling), but they also can induce spontaneous pacemaking activity. The spontaneous activity originates from spontaneous Ca(2+) releases from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), which trigger APs via the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX). In the AP-driven mode, an external stimulus triggers an AP and activates voltage-activated Ca(2+) intrusion to the cell. These complex and unique features of the embryonic cardiomyocyte pacemaking and E-C coupling have never been assessed with mathematical modeling. Here, we suggest a novel mathematical model explaining how both of these mechanisms can coexist in the same embryonic cardiomyocytes. In addition to experimentally characterized ion currents, the model includes novel heterogeneous cytosolic Ca(2+) dynamics and oscillatory SR Ca(2+) handling. The model reproduces faithfully the experimentally observed fundamental features of both E-C coupling and pacemaking. We further validate our model by simulating the effect of genetic modifications on the hyperpolarization-activated current, NCX, and the SR Ca(2+) buffer protein calreticulin. In these simulations, the model produces a similar functional alteration to that observed previously in the genetically engineered mice, and thus provides mechanistic explanations for the cardiac phenotypes of these animals. In general, this study presents the first model explaining the underlying cellular mechanism for the origin and the regulation of the heartbeat in early embryonic cardiomyocytes.

  6. Mathematical Model of Mouse Embryonic Cardiomyocyte Excitation–Contraction Coupling

    PubMed Central

    Korhonen, Topi; Rapila, Risto; Tavi, Pasi

    2008-01-01

    Excitation–contraction (E–C) coupling is the mechanism that connects the electrical excitation with cardiomyocyte contraction. Embryonic cardiomyocytes are not only capable of generating action potential (AP)-induced Ca2+ signals and contractions (E–C coupling), but they also can induce spontaneous pacemaking activity. The spontaneous activity originates from spontaneous Ca2+ releases from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), which trigger APs via the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX). In the AP-driven mode, an external stimulus triggers an AP and activates voltage-activated Ca2+ intrusion to the cell. These complex and unique features of the embryonic cardiomyocyte pacemaking and E–C coupling have never been assessed with mathematical modeling. Here, we suggest a novel mathematical model explaining how both of these mechanisms can coexist in the same embryonic cardiomyocytes. In addition to experimentally characterized ion currents, the model includes novel heterogeneous cytosolic Ca2+ dynamics and oscillatory SR Ca2+ handling. The model reproduces faithfully the experimentally observed fundamental features of both E–C coupling and pacemaking. We further validate our model by simulating the effect of genetic modifications on the hyperpolarization-activated current, NCX, and the SR Ca2+ buffer protein calreticulin. In these simulations, the model produces a similar functional alteration to that observed previously in the genetically engineered mice, and thus provides mechanistic explanations for the cardiac phenotypes of these animals. In general, this study presents the first model explaining the underlying cellular mechanism for the origin and the regulation of the heartbeat in early embryonic cardiomyocytes. PMID:18794378

  7. Cascading load model in interdependent networks with coupled strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianwei; Li, Yun; Zheng, Qiaofang

    2015-07-01

    Considering the coupled strength between interdependent networks, we introduce a new method to define the initial load on an edge and propose a cascading load model in interdependent networks. We explore the robustness of the interdependent networks against cascading failures by two measures, i.e., the critical threshold βc quantifying the whole robustness of the interdependent networks to avoid the emergence of cascading failure, and the new proposed smallest capacity threshold βc,s quantifying the degree of the worst damage of the interdependent networks. We numerically find that the AL (high-degree nodes in network A connect high-degree ones in network B) link between two networks can greatly enhance the robust level of the interdependent networks against cascading failures. Especially we observe that the values of βc in the interdependent networks with both the DL (high-degree nodes in network A connect low-degree ones in network B) link and the RL (nodes in network A randomly connect ones in network B) link increase monotonically with the coupled strength, while the values of βc,s in the interdependent networks with three types of link patterns almost monotonically decreases with the coupled strength. In the interdependent networks with the AL, the value of βc first decreases and then increases with the coupled strength. We further explain this interesting phenomenon by a simple graph. In addition, we study the influence of the coupled strength on the efficiency of two attacks to destroy the interdependent networks. We find that, when the coupled strength between two networks is weaker, attacking the edges with the lower load is more easier to trigger the cascading propagation than attacking the nodes with the higher load, however, when the coupled strength in two networks is stronger, the case is on the contrary. Finally, we give reasonable explanations from the local perspective of the total capacity of all neighboring edges of a failed edge.

  8. Progress and challenges in coupled hydrodynamic-ecological estuarine modeling

    PubMed Central

    Ganju, Neil K.; Brush, Mark J.; Rashleigh, Brenda; Aretxabaleta, Alfredo L.; del Barrio, Pilar; Grear, Jason S.; Harris, Lora A.; Lake, Samuel J.; McCardell, Grant; O’Donnell, James; Ralston, David K.; Signell, Richard P.; Testa, Jeremy M.; Vaudrey, Jamie M.P.

    2016-01-01

    Numerical modeling has emerged over the last several decades as a widely accepted tool for investigations in environmental sciences. In estuarine research, hydrodynamic and ecological models have moved along parallel tracks with regard to complexity, refinement, computational power, and incorporation of uncertainty. Coupled hydrodynamic-ecological models have been used to assess ecosystem processes and interactions, simulate future scenarios, and evaluate remedial actions in response to eutrophication, habitat loss, and freshwater diversion. The need to couple hydrodynamic and ecological models to address research and management questions is clear, because dynamic feedbacks between biotic and physical processes are critical interactions within ecosystems. In this review we present historical and modern perspectives on estuarine hydrodynamic and ecological modeling, consider model limitations, and address aspects of model linkage, skill assessment, and complexity. We discuss the balance between spatial and temporal resolution and present examples using different spatiotemporal scales. Finally, we recommend future lines of inquiry, approaches to balance complexity and uncertainty, and model transparency and utility. It is idealistic to think we can pursue a “theory of everything” for estuarine models, but recent advances suggest that models for both scientific investigations and management applications will continue to improve in terms of realism, precision, and accuracy. PMID:27721675

  9. A bidirectional coupling procedure applied to multiscale respiratory modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuprat, A. P.; Kabilan, S.; Carson, J. P.; Corley, R. A.; Einstein, D. R.

    2013-07-01

    In this study, we present a novel multiscale computational framework for efficiently linking multiple lower-dimensional models describing the distal lung mechanics to imaging-based 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFDs) models of the upper pulmonary airways in order to incorporate physiologically appropriate outlet boundary conditions. The framework is an extension of the modified Newton's method with nonlinear Krylov accelerator developed by Carlson and Miller [1], Miller [2] and Scott and Fenves [3]. Our extensions include the retention of subspace information over multiple timesteps, and a special correction at the end of a timestep that allows for corrections to be accepted with verified low residual with as little as a single residual evaluation per timestep on average. In the case of a single residual evaluation per timestep, the method has zero additional computational cost compared to uncoupled or unidirectionally coupled simulations. We expect these enhancements to be generally applicable to other multiscale coupling applications where timestepping occurs. In addition we have developed a "pressure-drop" residual which allows for stable coupling of flows between a 3D incompressible CFD application and another (lower-dimensional) fluid system. We expect this residual to also be useful for coupling non-respiratory incompressible fluid applications, such as multiscale simulations involving blood flow. The lower-dimensional models that are considered in this study are sets of simple ordinary differential equations (ODEs) representing the compliant mechanics of symmetric human pulmonary airway trees. To validate the method, we compare the predictions of hybrid CFD-ODE models against an ODE-only model of pulmonary airflow in an idealized geometry. Subsequently, we couple multiple sets of ODEs describing the distal lung to an imaging-based human lung geometry. Boundary conditions in these models consist of atmospheric pressure at the mouth and intrapleural

  10. A Bidirectional Coupling Procedure Applied to Multiscale Respiratory Modeling.

    PubMed

    Kuprat, A P; Kabilan, S; Carson, J P; Corley, R A; Einstein, D R

    2013-07-01

    In this study, we present a novel multiscale computational framework for efficiently linking multiple lower-dimensional models describing the distal lung mechanics to imaging-based 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of the upper pulmonary airways in order to incorporate physiologically appropriate outlet boundary conditions. The framework is an extension of the Modified Newton's Method with nonlinear Krylov accelerator developed by Carlson and Miller [1, 2, 3]. Our extensions include the retention of subspace information over multiple timesteps, and a special correction at the end of a timestep that allows for corrections to be accepted with verified low residual with as little as a single residual evaluation per timestep on average. In the case of a single residual evaluation per timestep, the method has zero additional computational cost compared to uncoupled or unidirectionally coupled simulations. We expect these enhancements to be generally applicable to other multiscale coupling applications where timestepping occurs. In addition we have developed a "pressure-drop" residual which allows for stable coupling of flows between a 3D incompressible CFD application and another (lower-dimensional) fluid system. We expect this residual to also be useful for coupling non-respiratory incompressible fluid applications, such as multiscale simulations involving blood flow. The lower-dimensional models that are considered in this study are sets of simple ordinary differential equations (ODEs) representing the compliant mechanics of symmetric human pulmonary airway trees. To validate the method, we compare the predictions of hybrid CFD-ODE models against an ODE-only model of pulmonary airflow in an idealized geometry. Subsequently, we couple multiple sets of ODEs describing the distal lung to an imaging-based human lung geometry. Boundary conditions in these models consist of atmospheric pressure at the mouth and intrapleural pressure applied to the multiple sets

  11. A Bidirectional Coupling Procedure Applied to Multiscale Respiratory Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Kuprat, Andrew P.; Kabilan, Senthil; Carson, James P.; Corley, Richard A.; Einstein, Daniel R.

    2013-07-01

    In this study, we present a novel multiscale computational framework for efficiently linking multiple lower-dimensional models describing the distal lung mechanics to imaging-based 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of the upper pulmonary airways in order to incorporate physiologically appropriate outlet boundary conditions. The framework is an extension of the Modified Newton’s Method with nonlinear Krylov accelerator developed by Carlson and Miller [1, 2, 3]. Our extensions include the retention of subspace information over multiple timesteps, and a special correction at the end of a timestep that allows for corrections to be accepted with verified low residual with as little as a single residual evaluation per timestep on average. In the case of a single residual evaluation per timestep, the method has zero additional computational cost compared to uncoupled or unidirectionally coupled simulations. We expect these enhancements to be generally applicable to other multiscale coupling applications where timestepping occurs. In addition we have developed a “pressure-drop” residual which allows for stable coupling of flows between a 3D incompressible CFD application and another (lower-dimensional) fluid system. We expect this residual to also be useful for coupling non-respiratory incompressible fluid applications, such as multiscale simulations involving blood flow. The lower-dimensional models that are considered in this study are sets of simple ordinary differential equations (ODEs) representing the compliant mechanics of symmetric human pulmonary airway trees. To validate the method, we compare the predictions of hybrid CFD-ODE models against an ODE-only model of pulmonary airflow in an idealized geometry. Subsequently, we couple multiple sets of ODEs describing the distal lung to an imaging-based human lung geometry. Boundary conditions in these models consist of atmospheric pressure at the mouth and intrapleural pressure applied to the multiple

  12. A bidirectional coupling procedure applied to multiscale respiratory modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Kuprat, A.P.; Kabilan, S.; Carson, J.P.; Corley, R.A.; Einstein, D.R.

    2013-07-01

    In this study, we present a novel multiscale computational framework for efficiently linking multiple lower-dimensional models describing the distal lung mechanics to imaging-based 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFDs) models of the upper pulmonary airways in order to incorporate physiologically appropriate outlet boundary conditions. The framework is an extension of the modified Newton’s method with nonlinear Krylov accelerator developed by Carlson and Miller [1], Miller [2] and Scott and Fenves [3]. Our extensions include the retention of subspace information over multiple timesteps, and a special correction at the end of a timestep that allows for corrections to be accepted with verified low residual with as little as a single residual evaluation per timestep on average. In the case of a single residual evaluation per timestep, the method has zero additional computational cost compared to uncoupled or unidirectionally coupled simulations. We expect these enhancements to be generally applicable to other multiscale coupling applications where timestepping occurs. In addition we have developed a “pressure-drop” residual which allows for stable coupling of flows between a 3D incompressible CFD application and another (lower-dimensional) fluid system. We expect this residual to also be useful for coupling non-respiratory incompressible fluid applications, such as multiscale simulations involving blood flow. The lower-dimensional models that are considered in this study are sets of simple ordinary differential equations (ODEs) representing the compliant mechanics of symmetric human pulmonary airway trees. To validate the method, we compare the predictions of hybrid CFD–ODE models against an ODE-only model of pulmonary airflow in an idealized geometry. Subsequently, we couple multiple sets of ODEs describing the distal lung to an imaging-based human lung geometry. Boundary conditions in these models consist of atmospheric pressure at the mouth and intrapleural

  13. Acoustic Modeling Using a Three-Dimensional Coupled-Mode Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    a comparison of the 3D coupled-mode solution to a finite element method ( FEM ) solution, (2) ranging estimates from horizontal multipath in a...mode code for environments with elastic layers. RESULTS Comparison of the 3D coupled-mode solution to a FEM solution As described above, in...assumption are examined by comparing the solution from the 3D coupled-mode model to a solution obtained using a FEM model applied with the

  14. Modeling, Calibration, and Sensitivity Analysis of Coupled Land-Surface Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Gupta, H. V.; Bastidas, L. A.; Sorooshian, S.

    2002-12-01

    To better understand various land-surface hydrological processes, it is desirable and pressing to extend land-surface modeling from off-line modes to coupled modes to explore the significance of various land surface-atmospheric interactions in regulating the energy and water balance of the hydrologic cycle. While it is extremely difficult to directly test the parameterizations of a global climate model due to the complexity, a locally coupled single-column model provides a favorable environment for investigations into the complicated interactions between the land surface and the overlying atmosphere. In this research, the off-line NCAR LSM and the coupled NCAR Single-column Community Climate Model (NCAR SCCM) are used. Extensive efforts have been focused on the impacts that the coupling of the two systems may have on the sensitivities of the land-surface model to both land-surface parameters and land-surface parameterizations. Additional efforts are directed to the comparisons of results from off-line and coupled calibration experiments using the optimization algorithm MOCOM-UA and IOP data sets from the Atmosphere Radiation Measurement-Cloud and Radiation Testbed (ARM-CART) project. Possibilities of calibrating some atmospheric parameters in the coupled model are also explored. Preliminary results show that the parameterization of surface energy and water balance is crucial in coupled systems and that the land-atmosphere coupling can significantly affect the estimations of land-surface parameters. In addition, it has been found that solar radiation and precipitation play an extremely important role in a coupled land-surface model by dominating the two-way interactions within the coupled system. This study will also enable us to investigate into the feasibility of applying the parameter estimation methods used for point-validations of LSM over grid-boxes in a coupled environment, and facilitate following studies on the effects that a coupled environment would have

  15. Coupled continuum and molecular model of flow through fibrous filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shunliu; Povitsky, Alex

    2013-11-01

    A coupled approach combining the continuum boundary singularity method (BSM) and the molecular direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) is developed and validated using Taylor-Couette flow and the flow about a single fiber confined between two parallel walls. In the proposed approach, the DSMC is applied to an annular region enclosing the fiber and the BSM is employed in the entire flow domain. The parameters used in the DSMC and the coupling procedure, such as the number of simulated particles, the cell size, and the size of the coupling zone are determined by inspecting the accuracy of pressure drop obtained for the range of Knudsen numbers between zero and unity. The developed approach is used to study flowfield of fibrous filtration flows. It is observed that in the partial-slip flow regime, Kn ⩽ 0.25, the results obtained by the proposed coupled BSM-DSMC method match the solution by BSM combined with the heuristic partial-slip boundary conditions. For transition molecular-to-continuum Knudsen numbers, 0.25 < Kn ⩽ 1, the difference in pressure drop and velocity between these two approaches is significant. This difference increases with the Knudsen number that confirms the usefulness of coupled continuum and molecular methods in numerical modeling of transition low Reynolds number flows in fibrous filters.

  16. A Coupled General Circulation Model of the Archean Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, E. T.; Toon, O. B.

    2011-12-01

    We present results from a new coupled general circulation model suitable for deep paleoclimate studies. Particular interest is given to the faint young Sun paradox. The model is based on the Community Earth System Model maintained by the National Center for Atmospheric Research [1]. Prognostic atmosphere, ocean, land, ice, and hydrological cycle models are coupled. A new correlated-k radiative transfer model has been implemented allowing accurate flux calculations for anoxic atmospheres containing high concentrations of CO2 and CH4 [2, 3]. This model represents a significant improvement upon one-dimensional radiative-convective climate models used previously to study ancient climate [4]. Cloud and ice albedo feedbacks will be accurately quantified and new constraints on Archean surface temperatures will be revealed. References [1] Collins W.D. et al. "Description of the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM 3.0)." NCAR Technical Note, 2004. [2] Toon O.B., McKay, C.P., Ackerman, T.P. "Rapid Calculation of Radiative Heating Rates and Photodissociation Rates in Inhomogeneous Multiple Scattering Atmospheres." J. Geo. Res., 94(D13), 16287 - 16301, 1989. [3] Mlawer, E.J., et al. "Radiative transfer for inhomogeneous atmospheres: RRTM, a validated correlated-k model for the longwave." J. Geo. Res., 102(D14), 16663 - 16682, 1997. [4] Kasting J.F., Pollack, J.B., Crisp, D. "Effects of High CO2 Levels on Surface Temperature and Atmospheric Oxidation State of the Early Earth." J. Atm. Chem., 1, 403-428, 1984.

  17. Modeling sediment mobilization using a distributed hydrological model coupled with a bank stability model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stryker, J.; Wemple, B.; Bomblies, A.

    2017-03-01

    In addition to surface erosion, stream bank erosion and failure contributes significant sediment and sediment-bound nutrients to receiving waters during high flow events. However, distributed and mechanistic simulation of stream bank sediment contribution to sediment loads in a watershed has not been achieved. Here we present a full coupling of existing distributed watershed and bank stability models and apply the resulting model to the Mad River in central Vermont. We fully coupled the Bank Stability and Toe Erosion Model (BSTEM) with the Distributed Hydrology Soil Vegetation Model (DHSVM) to allow the simulation of stream bank erosion and potential failure in a spatially explicit environment. We demonstrate the model's ability to simulate the impacts of unstable streams on sediment mobilization and transport within a watershed and discuss the model's capability to simulate watershed sediment loading under climate change. The calibrated model simulates total suspended sediment loads and reproduces variability in suspended sediment concentrations at watershed and subbasin outlets. In addition, characteristics such as land use and road-to-stream ratio of subbasins are shown to impact the relative proportions of sediment mobilized by overland erosion, erosion of roads, and stream bank erosion and failure in the subbasins and watershed. This coupled model will advance mechanistic simulation of suspended sediment mobilization and transport from watersheds, which will be particularly valuable for investigating the potential impacts of climate and land use changes, as well as extreme events.

  18. Pathological gambling and couple: towards an integrative systemic model.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Diana; Relvas, Ana Paula

    2014-06-01

    This article is a critical literature review of pathological gambling focused in the family factors, particularly in the couple dynamics. Its main goal is to develop an explicative integrative systemic model of pathological gambling, based in these couple dynamics. To achieve that aim, a bibliography search was made, using on-line data bases (e.g., EBSCO Host) and recognized books in pathological gambling subject, as well as in the systemic approach in general. This process privileged the recent works (about 70 % of the reviewed literature was published in the last decade), however, also considered some classic works (the oldest one dates back to 1970). The guiding focus of this literature search evolves according to the following steps: (1) search of general comprehension of pathological gambling (19 references), (2) search specification to the subject "pathological gambling and family" (24 references), (3) search specification to the subject "pathological gambling and couple"(11 references), (4) search of systemic information which integrates the evidence resulted in the previous steps (4 references). The developed model is constituted by different levels of systemic complexity (social context, family of origin, couple and individual) and explains the problem as a signal of perturbation in the marital subsystem vital functions (e.g., power and control) though the regularities of marital dynamics of pathological gamblers. Furthermore, it gives theoretical evidence of the systemic familiar intervention in the pathological gambling.

  19. A Coupled Simulation Architecture for Agent-Based/Geohydrological Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaxa-Rozen, M.

    2016-12-01

    The quantitative modelling of social-ecological systems can provide useful insights into the interplay between social and environmental processes, and their impact on emergent system dynamics. However, such models should acknowledge the complexity and uncertainty of both of the underlying subsystems. For instance, the agent-based models which are increasingly popular for groundwater management studies can be made more useful by directly accounting for the hydrological processes which drive environmental outcomes. Conversely, conventional environmental models can benefit from an agent-based depiction of the feedbacks and heuristics which influence the decisions of groundwater users. From this perspective, this work describes a Python-based software architecture which couples the popular NetLogo agent-based platform with the MODFLOW/SEAWAT geohydrological modelling environment. This approach enables users to implement agent-based models in NetLogo's user-friendly platform, while benefiting from the full capabilities of MODFLOW/SEAWAT packages or reusing existing geohydrological models. The software architecture is based on the pyNetLogo connector, which provides an interface between the NetLogo agent-based modelling software and the Python programming language. This functionality is then extended and combined with Python's object-oriented features, to design a simulation architecture which couples NetLogo with MODFLOW/SEAWAT through the FloPy library (Bakker et al., 2016). The Python programming language also provides access to a range of external packages which can be used for testing and analysing the coupled models, which is illustrated for an application of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES).

  20. Coupled surface-water and ground-water model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swain, Eric D.; Wexler, Eliezer J.

    1991-01-01

    In areas with dynamic and hydraulically well connected ground-water and surface-water systems, it is desirable that stream-aquifer interaction be simulated with models of equal sophistication and accuracy. Accordingly, a new, coupled ground-water and surface-water model was developed by combining the U.S. Geological Survey models MODFLOW and BRANCH. MODFLOW is the widely used modular three-dimensional, finite-difference, ground-water model and BRANCH is a one-dimensional numerical model commonly used to simulate flow in open-channel networks. Because time steps used in ground-water modeling commonly are much longer than those used in surface-water simulations, provision has been made for handling multiple BRANCH time steps within one MODFLOW time step. Verification testing of the coupled model was done using data from previous studies and by comparing results with output from a simpler four-point implicit open-channel flow model linked with MODFLOW.

  1. Development of a coupled wave-flow-vegetation interaction model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beudin, Alexis; Kalra, Tarandeep; Ganju, Neil K.; Warner, John C.

    2017-01-01

    Emergent and submerged vegetation can significantly affect coastal hydrodynamics. However, most deterministic numerical models do not take into account their influence on currents, waves, and turbulence. In this paper, we describe the implementation of a wave-flow-vegetation module into a Coupled-Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) modeling system that includes a flow model (ROMS) and a wave model (SWAN), and illustrate various interacting processes using an idealized shallow basin application. The flow model has been modified to include plant posture-dependent three-dimensional drag, in-canopy wave-induced streaming, and production of turbulent kinetic energy and enstrophy to parameterize vertical mixing. The coupling framework has been updated to exchange vegetation-related variables between the flow model and the wave model to account for wave energy dissipation due to vegetation. This study i) demonstrates the validity of the plant posture-dependent drag parameterization against field measurements, ii) shows that the model is capable of reproducing the mean and turbulent flow field in the presence of vegetation as compared to various laboratory experiments, iii) provides insight into the flow-vegetation interaction through an analysis of the terms in the momentum balance, iv) describes the influence of a submerged vegetation patch on tidal currents and waves separately and combined, and v) proposes future directions for research and development.

  2. Development of a coupled wave-flow-vegetation interaction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beudin, Alexis; Kalra, Tarandeep S.; Ganju, Neil K.; Warner, John C.

    2017-03-01

    Emergent and submerged vegetation can significantly affect coastal hydrodynamics. However, most deterministic numerical models do not take into account their influence on currents, waves, and turbulence. In this paper, we describe the implementation of a wave-flow-vegetation module into a Coupled-Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) modeling system that includes a flow model (ROMS) and a wave model (SWAN), and illustrate various interacting processes using an idealized shallow basin application. The flow model has been modified to include plant posture-dependent three-dimensional drag, in-canopy wave-induced streaming, and production of turbulent kinetic energy and enstrophy to parameterize vertical mixing. The coupling framework has been updated to exchange vegetation-related variables between the flow model and the wave model to account for wave energy dissipation due to vegetation. This study i) demonstrates the validity of the plant posture-dependent drag parameterization against field measurements, ii) shows that the model is capable of reproducing the mean and turbulent flow field in the presence of vegetation as compared to various laboratory experiments, iii) provides insight into the flow-vegetation interaction through an analysis of the terms in the momentum balance, iv) describes the influence of a submerged vegetation patch on tidal currents and waves separately and combined, and v) proposes future directions for research and development.

  3. Coupled vibro-acoustic model updating using frequency response functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehete, D. V.; Modak, S. V.; Gupta, K.

    2016-03-01

    Interior noise in cavities of motorized vehicles is of increasing significance due to the lightweight design of these structures. Accurate coupled vibro-acoustic FE models of such cavities are required so as to allow a reliable design and analysis. It is, however, experienced that the vibro-acoustic predictions using these models do not often correlate acceptably well with the experimental measurements and hence require model updating. Both the structural and the acoustic parameters addressing the stiffness as well as the damping modeling inaccuracies need to be considered simultaneously in the model updating framework in order to obtain an accurate estimate of these parameters. It is also noted that the acoustic absorption properties are generally frequency dependent. This makes use of modal data based methods for updating vibro-acoustic FE models difficult. In view of this, the present paper proposes a method based on vibro-acoustic frequency response functions that allow updating of a coupled FE model by considering simultaneously the parameters associated with both the structural as well as the acoustic model of the cavity. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated through numerical studies on a 3D rectangular box cavity with a flexible plate. Updating parameters related to the material property, stiffness of joints between the plate and the rectangular cavity and the properties of absorbing surfaces of the acoustic cavity are considered. The robustness of the method under presence of noise is also studied.

  4. MOUNTAIN-SCALE COUPLED PROCESSES (TH/THC/THM)MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Y.S. Wu

    2005-08-24

    This report documents the development and validation of the mountain-scale thermal-hydrologic (TH), thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC), and thermal-hydrologic-mechanical (THM) models. These models provide technical support for screening of features, events, and processes (FEPs) related to the effects of coupled TH/THC/THM processes on mountain-scale unsaturated zone (UZ) and saturated zone (SZ) flow at Yucca Mountain, Nevada (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174842], Section 2.1.1.1). The purpose and validation criteria for these models are specified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Coupled Processes (Mountain-Scale TH/THC/THM, Drift-Scale THC Seepage, and Drift-Scale Abstraction) Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174842]). Model results are used to support exclusion of certain FEPs from the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) model on the basis of low consequence, consistent with the requirements of 10 CFR 63.342 [DIRS 173273]. Outputs from this report are not direct feeds to the TSPA-LA. All the FEPs related to the effects of coupled TH/THC/THM processes on mountain-scale UZ and SZ flow are discussed in Sections 6 and 7 of this report. The mountain-scale coupled TH/THC/THM processes models numerically simulate the impact of nuclear waste heat release on the natural hydrogeological system, including a representation of heat-driven processes occurring in the far field. The mountain-scale TH simulations provide predictions for thermally affected liquid saturation, gas- and liquid-phase fluxes, and water and rock temperature (together called the flow fields). The main focus of the TH model is to predict the changes in water flux driven by evaporation/condensation processes, and drainage between drifts. The TH model captures mountain-scale three-dimensional flow effects, including lateral diversion and mountain-scale flow patterns. The mountain-scale THC model evaluates TH effects on water and gas

  5. Coupled Inverted Pendula Model of Competition and Cooperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Katsutoshi; Ohta, Hiroki

    A coupled inverted pendula model of competition and cooperation is proposed to develop a purely mechanical implementation comparable to the Lotka-Volterra competition model. It is shown numerically that the proposed model can produce the four stable equilibriums analogous to ecological coexistence, two states of dominance, and scramble. The authors also propose two types of open-loop strategies to switch the equilibriums. The proposed strategies can be associated with an attack and a counter attack of agents through a metaphor of martial arts.

  6. Nonrelativistic approaches derived from point-coupling relativistic models

    SciTech Connect

    Lourenco, O.; Dutra, M.; Delfino, A.; Sa Martins, J. S.

    2010-03-15

    We construct nonrelativistic versions of relativistic nonlinear hadronic point-coupling models, based on new normalized spinor wave functions after small component reduction. These expansions give us energy density functionals that can be compared to their relativistic counterparts. We show that the agreement between the nonrelativistic limit approach and the Skyrme parametrizations becomes strongly dependent on the incompressibility of each model. We also show that the particular case A=B=0 (Walecka model) leads to the same energy density functional of the Skyrme parametrizations SV and ZR2, while the truncation scheme, up to order {rho}{sup 3}, leads to parametrizations for which {sigma}=1.

  7. Coupling lattice Boltzmann and molecular dynamics models for dense fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuis, A.; Kotsalis, E. M.; Koumoutsakos, P.

    2007-04-01

    We propose a hybrid model, coupling lattice Boltzmann (LB) and molecular dynamics (MD) models, for the simulation of dense fluids. Time and length scales are decoupled by using an iterative Schwarz domain decomposition algorithm. The MD and LB formulations communicate via the exchange of velocities and velocity gradients at the interface. We validate the present LB-MD model in simulations of two- and three-dimensional flows of liquid argon past and through a carbon nanotube. Comparisons with existing hybrid algorithms and with reference MD solutions demonstrate the validity of the present approach.

  8. Coupling lattice Boltzmann and molecular dynamics models for dense fluids.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, A; Kotsalis, E M; Koumoutsakos, P

    2007-04-01

    We propose a hybrid model, coupling lattice Boltzmann (LB) and molecular dynamics (MD) models, for the simulation of dense fluids. Time and length scales are decoupled by using an iterative Schwarz domain decomposition algorithm. The MD and LB formulations communicate via the exchange of velocities and velocity gradients at the interface. We validate the present LB-MD model in simulations of two- and three-dimensional flows of liquid argon past and through a carbon nanotube. Comparisons with existing hybrid algorithms and with reference MD solutions demonstrate the validity of the present approach.

  9. A coupled model for intragranular deformation and chemical diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Xin; Vrijmoed, Johannes; Moulas, Evangelos; Tajčmanová, Lucie

    2017-09-01

    A coupled model for chemical diffusion and mechanical deformation is developed in analogy to the studies of poroelasticity and thermoelasticity. Nondimensionalization of the governing equations yields a controlling dimensionless parameter, the Deborah number, given by the ratio of the characteristic time for pressure relaxation and concentration homogenization. Using the Deborah number two types of plausible chemical zonation are distinguished, i.e. diffusion controlled, and mechanically controlled. The transition between these two types of chemical zonation is determined at the conditions where the Deborah number equals one. We apply our model to a chemically zoned plagioclase rim in a spherical coordinate frame assuming homogeneous initial pressure. Using thermodynamic data, an experimentally derived diffusion coefficient and a viscous flow law for plagioclase, our numerical simulations show that up to ∼0.6 GPa grain-scale pressure variation is generated during the diffusion-deformation process. Due to the mechanical-chemical coupling, the pressure variations maintain the chemical zonation longer than predicted by the classical diffusion model. The fully coupled mechanical-chemical model provides an alternative explanation for the preservation of chemically zoned minerals, and may contribute to a better understanding of metamorphic processes in the deep Earth interior.

  10. Coupled land-atmosphere modeling of methane emissions with WRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, D.

    2013-12-01

    This project aims to couple a soil model for methane transport to an atmospheric model to predict methane emissions and dispersion. Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, 20 times as efficient at trapping heat in the atmosphere as the most prevalent greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide. It has been estimated that 60% of methane emissions in the earth's atmosphere come from anthropogenic sources, 17% of which comes from landfills, making landfills the third largest contributor of human-generated methane. Due to high costs and non-ideal weather conditions, field measurements of methane concentration at landfills are difficult and infrequent, so estimates of annual emissions from landfills are not very accurate. We plan to create a coupled land-atmosphere model that takes production and oxidation of methane into account when calculating methane emissions. This model will give a better understanding of how much methane is emitted annually from a given landfill and assist with monitoring efforts. It will also demonstrate the magnitude of diurnal and seasonal variations in methane emissions, which may identify errors in yearly methane emissions estimates made by extrapolating from a small number of field measurements. As a first step, an existing land-surface model, Noah, is modified to compute the transport of oxygen and methane along a 1-D soil column. Surface emissions are calculated using a gradient flux method with a boundary layer conductance that depends on the wind speed. These modifications to the land-surface model will be added to the Weather Research and Forecasting model to predict atmospheric dispersion of methane emitted by landfills. Comparisons to observations are made at two different landfill sites to validate the coupled model.

  11. Conformal Loop quantization of gravity coupled to the standard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullin, Jorge; Gambini, Rodolfo

    2016-03-01

    We consider a local conformal invariant coupling of the standard model to gravity free of any dimensional parameter. The theory is formulated in order to have a quantized version that admits a spin network description at the kinematical level like that of loop quantum gravity. The Gauss constraint, the diffeomorphism constraint and the conformal constraint are automatically satisfied and the standard inner product of the spin-network basis still holds. The resulting theory has resemblances with the Bars-Steinhardt-Turok local conformal theory, except it admits a canonical quantization in terms of loops. By considering a gauge fixed version of the theory we show that the Standard model coupled to gravity is recovered and the Higgs boson acquires mass. This in turn induces via the standard mechanism masses for massive bosons, baryons and leptons.

  12. Transient and steady state modelling of a coupled WECS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathan, G. K.; Tan, J. K.

    The paper presents a method for simulation of a wind turbine using a dc motor. The armature and field voltages of the dc motor are independently regulated to obtain torque-speed characteristics which correspond to those of a wind turbine at different wind speeds. The mass moment of inertia of the wind turbine is represented by adding a rotating mass to a parallel shaft which is positively coupled to the motor shaft. To verify the method of simulation, an American multiblade wind turbine is chosen, loaded by coupling to a centrifugal pump. Using the principle of conservation of energy and characteristics of both constituent units, two mathematical models are proposed: one for steady state operation and another for the transient state. The close comparison between the theoretical and the experimental results validates the proposed models and the method of simulation. The experimental method is described and the results of the experimental and theoretical investigation are presented.

  13. Conformal loop quantum gravity coupled to the standard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campiglia, Miguel; Gambini, Rodolfo; Pullin, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    We argue that a conformally invariant extension of general relativity coupled to the standard model is the fundamental theory that needs to be quantized. We show that it can be treated by loop quantum gravity techniques. Through a gauge fixing and a modified Higgs mechanism particles acquire mass and one recovers general relativity coupled to the standard model. The theory suggests new views with respect to the definition of the Hamiltonian constraint in loop quantum gravity, the semi-classical limit and the issue of finite renormalization in quantum field theory in quantum space-time. It also gives hints about the elimination of ambiguities that arise in quantum field theory in quantum space-time in the calculation of back-reaction.

  14. A parallel coupled oceanic-atmospheric general circulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Wehner, M.F.; Bourgeois, A.J.; Eltgroth, P.G.; Duffy, P.B.; Dannevik, W.P.

    1994-12-01

    The Climate Systems Modeling group at LLNL has developed a portable coupled oceanic-atmospheric general circulation model suitable for use on a variety of massively parallel (MPP) computers of the multiple instruction, multiple data (MIMD) class. The model is composed of parallel versions of the UCLA atmospheric general circulation model, the GFDL modular ocean model (MOM) and a dynamic sea ice model based on the Hiber formulation extracted from the OPYC ocean model. The strategy to achieve parallelism is twofold. One level of parallelism is accomplished by applying two dimensional domain decomposition techniques to each of the three constituent submodels. A second level of parallelism is attained by a concurrent execution of AGCM and OGCM/sea ice components on separate sets of processors. For this functional decomposition scheme, a flux coupling module has been written to calculate the heat, moisture and momentum fluxes independent of either the AGCM or the OGCM modules. The flux coupler`s other roles are to facilitate the transfer of data between subsystem components and processors via message passing techniques and to interpolate and aggregate between the possibly incommensurate meshes.

  15. A parallel coupled oceanic-atmospheric general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehner, Michael F.; Bourgeois, Al J.; Eltgroth, Peter G.; Duffy, Phillip B.; Dannevik, William P.

    1994-12-01

    The Climate Systems Modeling group at Lawrence Liwermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed a portable coupled oceanic-atmospheric general circulation model suitable for use on a variety of massively parallel (MPP) computers of the multiple instruction, multiple data (MIMD) class. The model is composed of parallel versions of the UCLA atmospheric general circulation model, the GFDL modular ocean model (MOM) and a dynamic sea ice model based on the Hiber formulation extracted from the OPYC ocean model. The strategy to achieve parallelism is twofold. One level of parallelism is accomplished by applying two dimensional domain decomposition techniques to each of the three constituent submodels. A second level of parallelism is attained by a concurrent execution of AGCM and OGCM/sea ice components on separate sets of processors. For this functional decomposition scheme, a flux coupling module has been written to calculate the heat, moisture and momentum fluxes independent of either the AGCM or the OGCM modules. The flux coupler's other roles are to facilitate the transfer of data between subsystem components and processors via message passing techniques and to interpolate and aggregate between the possibly incommensurate meshes.

  16. Assessing groundwater policy with coupled economic-groundwater hydrologic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, Kevin B.; Brown, Casey; Yang, Yi-Chen E.; Ahlfeld, David P.

    2014-03-01

    This study explores groundwater management policies and the effect of modeling assumptions on the projected performance of those policies. The study compares an optimal economic allocation for groundwater use subject to streamflow constraints, achieved by a central planner with perfect foresight, with a uniform tax on groundwater use and a uniform quota on groundwater use. The policies are compared with two modeling approaches, the Optimal Control Model (OCM) and the Multi-Agent System Simulation (MASS). The economic decision models are coupled with a physically based representation of the aquifer using a calibrated MODFLOW groundwater model. The results indicate that uniformly applied policies perform poorly when simulated with more realistic, heterogeneous, myopic, and self-interested agents. In particular, the effects of the physical heterogeneity of the basin and the agents undercut the perceived benefits of policy instruments assessed with simple, single-cell groundwater modeling. This study demonstrates the results of coupling realistic hydrogeology and human behavior models to assess groundwater management policies. The Republican River Basin, which overlies a portion of the Ogallala aquifer in the High Plains of the United States, is used as a case study for this analysis.

  17. Coupled channel model of the scalar isovector meson photoproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibrzycki, Ł.; Kamiński, R.

    2017-03-01

    We present the coupled channel model of the scalar isovector resonance photoproduction including the πη, KK̅ and πη' channels and calculate resulting mass distribution and the cross section in the πη channel. We show that the shape of this mass distribution, is strongly affected by the phase of background amplitude. We also discuss the effect of inclusion the πη' channel on the overall isovector photoproduction process.

  18. Eikonal solutions to optical model coupled-channel equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Khandelwal, Govind S.; Maung, Khin M.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Wilson, John W.

    1988-01-01

    Methods of solution are presented for the Eikonal form of the nucleus-nucleus coupled-channel scattering amplitudes. Analytic solutions are obtained for the second-order optical potential for elastic scattering. A numerical comparison is made between the first and second order optical model solutions for elastic and inelastic scattering of H-1 and He-4 on C-12. The effects of bound-state excitations on total and reaction cross sections are also estimated.

  19. Solvable model for chimera states of coupled oscillators.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Daniel M; Mirollo, Rennie; Strogatz, Steven H; Wiley, Daniel A

    2008-08-22

    Networks of identical, symmetrically coupled oscillators can spontaneously split into synchronized and desynchronized subpopulations. Such chimera states were discovered in 2002, but are not well understood theoretically. Here we obtain the first exact results about the stability, dynamics, and bifurcations of chimera states by analyzing a minimal model consisting of two interacting populations of oscillators. Along with a completely synchronous state, the system displays stable chimeras, breathing chimeras, and saddle-node, Hopf, and homoclinic bifurcations of chimeras.

  20. Multi-fluid simulation models for inductively coupled plasma sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundrapu, Madhusudhan; Veitzer, Seth A.; Stoltz, Peter H.; Beckwith, Kristian R. C.; Smith, Jonathan

    2017-08-01

    A numerical simulation model for Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) sources and its implementation in the USim fluid-plasma software is presented. The electric field from the external antenna is solved using the vector potential equation with a variable dielectric constant. Plasma generation and species transport are solved using a set of collisional multi-fluid equations in diffusion form. USim results are benchmarked with experiments from the literature. Density and temperature distributions show good agreement both qualitatively and quantitatively with the measurements.

  1. Reheating temperature in non-minimal derivative coupling model

    SciTech Connect

    Sadjadi, H. Mohseni; Goodarzi, Parviz E-mail: p_goodarzi@ut.ac.ir

    2013-07-01

    We consider the inflaton as a scalar field described by a non-minimal derivative coupling model with a power law potential. We study the slow roll inflation, the rapid oscillation phase, the radiation dominated and the recombination eras respectively, and estimate e-folds numbers during these epochs. Using these results and recent astrophysical data we determine the reheating temperature in terms of the spectral index and the amplitude of the power spectrum of scalar perturbations.

  2. ESTIMATING GASEOUS EXCHANGES BETWEEN THE ATMOSPHERE AND PLANTS USING A COUPLED BIOCHEMICAL DRY DEPOSITION MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    To study gaseous exchanges between the soil, biosphere and atmosphere, a biochemical model was coupled with the latest version of Meyers Multi-Layer Deposition Model. The biochemical model describes photosynthesis and respiration and their coupling with stomatal resistance for...

  3. ESTIMATING GASEOUS EXCHANGES BETWEEN THE ATMOSPHERE AND PLANTS USING A COUPLED BIOCHEMICAL DRY DEPOSITION MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    To study gaseous exchanges between the soil, biosphere and atmosphere, a biochemical model was coupled with the latest version of Meyers Multi-Layer Deposition Model. The biochemical model describes photosynthesis and respiration and their coupling with stomatal resistance for...

  4. Validation model for the transient analysis of tightly coupled reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Bahadir, T.; Henry, A.F.

    1996-12-31

    Both the static and transient analysis of tightly coupled reactors differ from those of the loosely coupled systems. In these reactors, highly absorbing regions are interspaced with low absorbing regions. That raises questions of the acceptability of diffusion theory approximations. Also, the spectral shapes change drastically throughout the core and can be altered significantly by perturbations. Accurate analysis requires at least two-dimensional, multigroup transport methods. Although, such methods can be applied for static cases, for transient analysis they would be almost impossibly expensive. Recently a transient nodal model accounting for transport corrections has been developed for tightly coupled reactors. In this model, few-group, node-averaged cross sections and discontinuity factors are edited from full-core, higher order reference results such as Monte Carlo or fine-mesh, multigroup, discrete ordinate transport solutions for various conditions expected during transients. Tables of nodal parameters are constructed, and their values as the transient proceeds are found by interpolation. Although the static part of this few-group model can be tested easily by comparing nodal results with the reference transport solution, without a time-dependent transport code (at least a two-dimensional, multigroup, discrete ordinate code), doing the analogous validation for the time-dependent problem is not possible.

  5. Strongly Coupled Models with a Higgs-like Boson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pich, Antonio; Rosell, Ignasi; José Sanz-Cillero, Juan

    2013-11-01

    Considering the one-loop calculation of the oblique S and T parameters, we have presented a study of the viability of strongly-coupled scenarios of electroweak symmetry breaking with a light Higgs-like boson. The calculation has been done by using an effective Lagrangian, being short-distance constraints and dispersive relations the main ingredients of the estimation. Contrary to a widely spread believe, we have demonstrated that strongly coupled electroweak models with massive resonances are not in conflict with experimentalconstraints on these parameters and the recently observed Higgs-like resonance. So there is room for these models, but they are stringently constrained. The vector and axial-vector states should be heavy enough (with masses above the TeV scale), the mass splitting between them is highly preferred to be small and the Higgs-like scalar should have a WW coupling close to the Standard Model one. It is important to stress that these conclusions do not depend critically on the inclusion of the second Weinberg sum rule. We wish to thank the organizers of LHCP 2013 for the pleasant conference. This work has been supported in part by the Spanish Government and the European Commission [FPA2010-17747, FPA2011- 23778, AIC-D-2011-0818, SEV-2012-0249 (Severo Ochoa Program), CSD2007-00042 (Consolider Project CPAN)], the Generalitat Valenciana [PrometeoII/2013/007] and the Comunidad de Madrid [HEPHACOS S2009/ESP-1473].

  6. A coupled multi-physics modeling framework for induced seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karra, S.; Dempsey, D. E.

    2015-12-01

    There is compelling evidence that moderate-magnitude seismicity in the central and eastern US is on the rise. Many of these earthquakes are attributable to anthropogenic injection of fluids into deep formations resulting in incidents where state regulators have even intervened. Earthquakes occur when a high-pressure fluid (water or CO2) enters a fault, reducing its resistance to shear failure and causing runaway sliding. However, induced seismicity does not manifest as a solitary event, but rather as a sequence of earthquakes evolving in time and space. Additionally, one needs to consider the changes in the permeability due to slip within a fault and the subsequent effects on fluid transport and pressure build-up. A modeling framework that addresses the complex two-way coupling between seismicity and fluid-flow is thus needed. In this work, a new parallel physics-based coupled framework for induced seismicity that couples the slip in faults and fluid flow is presented. The framework couples the highly parallel subsurface flow code PFLOTRAN (www.pflotran.org) and a fast Fourier transform based earthquake simulator QK3. Stresses in the fault are evaluated using Biot's formulation in PFLOTRAN and is used to calculate slip in QK3. Permeability is updated based on the slip in the fault which in turn influences flow. Application of the framework to synthetic examples and datasets from Colorado and Oklahoma will also be discussed.

  7. Coupled chemical and diffusion model for compacted bentonite

    SciTech Connect

    Olin, M.; Lehikoinen, J.; Muurinen, A.

    1995-12-31

    A chemical equilibrium model has been developed for ion-exchange and to a limited extent for other reactions, such as precipitation or dissolution of calcite or gypsum, in compacted bentonite water systems. The model was successfully applied to some bentonite experiments, especially as far as monovalent ions were concerned. The fitted log-binding constants for the exchange of sodium for potassium, magnesium, and calcium were 0.27, 1.50, and 2.10, respectively. In addition, a coupled chemical and diffusion model has been developed to take account of diffusion in pore water, surface diffusion and ion-exchange.d the model was applied to the same experiments as the chemical equilibrium model, and its validation was found partly successful. The above values for binding constants were used also in the coupled model. The apparent (both for anions and cations) and surface diffusion (only for cations) constants yielding the best agreement between calculated and experimental data were 3.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}11} m{sup 2}/s and 6.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}12} m{sup 2}/s, respectively. These values are questionable, however, as experimental results good enough for fitting are currently not available.

  8. A tree-parenchyma coupled model for lung ventilation simulation.

    PubMed

    Pozin, N; Montesantos, S; Katz, I; Pichelin, M; Vignon-Clementel, I; Grandmont, C

    2017-02-22

    In this article we develop a lung-ventilation model. The parenchyma is described as an elastic homogenized media. It is irrigated by a space-filling dyadic resistive pipe network, which represents the tracheo-bronchial tree. In this model the tree and the parenchyma are strongly coupled. The tree induces an extra viscous term in the system constitutive relation, which leads, in the finite element framework, to a full matrix. We consider an efficient algorithm that takes advantage of the tree structure to enable a fast matrix-vector product computation. This framework can be used to model both free and mechanically induced respiration, in health and disease. Patient-specific lung geometries acquired from CT scans are considered. Realistic Dirichlet boundary conditions can be deduced from surface registration on CT images. The model is compared to a more classical exit-compartment approach. Results illustrate the coupling between the tree and the parenchyma, at global and regional levels, and how conditions for the purely 0D model can be inferred. Different types of boundary conditions are tested, including a nonlinear Robin model of the surrounding lung structures.

  9. Lagrangian Transport in a coupled Chemistry Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppe, C.; Müller, R.; Günther, G.; Hoffmann, L.

    2012-04-01

    We describe the implementation of a Lagrangian transport core in a chemistry climate model (CCM). This is motivated by the problem that in many cases trace gas distributions in the stratosphere can not be represented properly in a classical Eulerian framework with a fixed model grid, especially in regions where strong trace gas gradients occur. Here, we focus on stratospheric water vapor, which is an important driver of surface climate change on decadal scales. In this case, the transport representation is particularly important in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL), where tropospheric air enters into the stratosphere, i.e. , where the entry level of stratospheric water vapor is determined. For this purpose, the Chemical Lagrangian Model of the Stratosphere (CLaMS) is coupled with the ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry Model (EMAC). The latter includes the ECHAM5 climate model, and a coupling interface, which allows for flexible coupling and switching between different submodels. The chemistry transport model CLaMS provides a full Lagrangian transport representation to calculate constituent transport on a set of air parcels that move along trajectories. In the Lagrangian frame of reference, different vertical velocity representations can be used to drive the trajectories: - kinematic transport in isobaric coordinates with omega as vertical velocity, - diabatic transport in isentropic coordinates, where thetadot calculated from diabatic heatingrates is used as vertical velocity. Since vertical winds in the statosphere derived with the kinematic method from the continuity equation often suffer from excessive numerical noise and errors, we expect that constituent transport using the diabatic method will improve the simulations of stratospheric water vapor. We will present preliminary results illustrating how the different transport representations influence simulated tracer distributions.

  10. Gauge coupling unification in a classically scale invariant model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haba, Naoyuki; Ishida, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Ryo; Yamaguchi, Yuya

    2016-02-01

    There are a lot of works within a class of classically scale invariant model, which is motivated by solving the gauge hierarchy problem. In this context, the Higgs mass vanishes at the UV scale due to the classically scale invariance, and is generated via the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism. Since the mass generation should occur not so far from the electroweak scale, we extend the standard model only around the TeV scale. We construct a model which can achieve the gauge coupling unification at the UV scale. In the same way, the model can realize the vacuum stability, smallness of active neutrino masses, baryon asymmetry of the universe, and dark matter relic abundance. The model predicts the existence vector-like fermions charged under SU(3) C with masses lower than 1 TeV, and the SM singlet Majorana dark matter with mass lower than 2.6 TeV.

  11. A Coupled Plasma-Sheath Model for High Density Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Deepak; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.

    2000-01-01

    High density, low pressure plasmas are used for etching and deposition in microelectronics fabrication processes. The process characteristics are strongly determined by the ion energy distribution (IED) and the ion flux arriving at the substrate that are responsible for desorption of etch products and neutral dissociation at the surface. The ion flux and energy are determined by a self- consistent modeling of the bulk plasma, where the ions and the neutral radicals are produced, and the sheath, where the ions are accelerated. Due to their widely different time scales, it is a formidable task to self-consistently resolve non-collisional sheath in a high density bulk plasma model. In this work, we first describe a coupled plasma-sheath model that attempts to resolve the non-collisional sheath in a reactor scale model. Second, we propose a semianalytical radio frequency (RF) sheath model to improve ion dynamics.

  12. A Fully Coupled Computational Model of the Silylation Process

    SciTech Connect

    G. H. Evans; R. S. Larson; V. C. Prantil; W. S. Winters

    1999-02-01

    This report documents the development of a new finite element model of the positive tone silylation process. Model development makes use of pre-existing Sandia technology used to describe coupled thermal-mechanical behavior in deforming metals. Material properties and constitutive models were obtained from the literature. The model is two-dimensional and transient and focuses on the part of the lithography process in which crosslinked and uncrosslinked resist is exposed to a gaseous silylation agent. The model accounts for the combined effects of mass transport (diffusion of silylation agent and reaction product), chemical reaction resulting in the uptake of silicon and material swelling, the generation of stresses, and the resulting material motion. The influence of stress on diffusion and reaction rates is also included.

  13. Warm stellar matter within the quark-meson-coupling model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, P. K.; Providência, C.; Menezes, D. P.

    2010-10-01

    In the present article, we investigate stellar matter obtained within the quark-meson-coupling (QMC) model for fixed temperature and with the entropy of the order of 1 or 2 Boltzmann units per baryon for neutrino-free matter and matter with trapped neutrinos. A new prescription for the calculation of the baryon effective masses in terms of the free energy is used. Comparing the results of the present work with those obtained from the nonlinear Walecka model, smaller strangeness and neutrino fractions are predicted within QMC. As a consequence, QMC has a smaller window of metastability for conversion into a low-mass blackhole during cooling.

  14. Warm stellar matter within the quark-meson-coupling model

    SciTech Connect

    Panda, P. K.; Providencia, C.; Menezes, D. P.

    2010-10-15

    In the present article, we investigate stellar matter obtained within the quark-meson-coupling (QMC) model for fixed temperature and with the entropy of the order of 1 or 2 Boltzmann units per baryon for neutrino-free matter and matter with trapped neutrinos. A new prescription for the calculation of the baryon effective masses in terms of the free energy is used. Comparing the results of the present work with those obtained from the nonlinear Walecka model, smaller strangeness and neutrino fractions are predicted within QMC. As a consequence, QMC has a smaller window of metastability for conversion into a low-mass blackhole during cooling.

  15. A 3D fully coupled wave-current-sediment model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Shen, L.; Feddy, A.; Bennis, A. C.; Mouazé, D.; Chareyre, B.

    2016-02-01

    In the framework of new energy sources, marine energy can contribute to diversification of energy mix. The study site is the Alderney Race where tidal velocities can exceed 4 meters per second. With this high current speeds, this site represents one of the best opportunities for exploitation of the tidal stream. Our aim is to investigate the influence of this high current speeds on the sediment transport. Modeling the sediment transport in the coastal environment requires an accurate prediction of current velocity and bottom shear stress. For that, the numerical wave-current model MARS-WW3 will be used to analyze the wave-current interaction and comparisons with experimental ADCP data will be presented. To simulate the non-cohesive sediment transport (such as sand, gravel or pebbles), this numerical model will be coupled with a discrete element model like YADE. In first time, the discrete model used will be validated with different tests cases. After, we will present the coupling MARS-WW3-YADE, in particular the expression and exchange of different forces exerted by the fluid flow on the sediments and by sediments on the fluid. Finally, simulations of the sediment transport will be shown and we will interest in particular to the influence of size and density of sediments. We also investigate the effects of tide and wave currents on the sediment displacement.

  16. Safer Batteries through Coupled Multiscale Modeling (ICCS 2015)

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, John A; Allu, Srikanth; Berrill, Mark A; Elwasif, Wael R; Kalnaus, Sergiy; Kumar, Abhishek; Lebrun-Grandie, Damien T; Pannala, Dr. Sreekanth; Simunovic, Srdjan

    2015-01-01

    Batteries are highly complex electrochemical systems, with performance and safety governed by coupled nonlinear electrochemical-electrical-thermal-mechanical processes over a range of spatiotemporal scales. We describe a new, open source computational environment for battery simulation known as VIBE - the Virtual Integrated Battery Environment. VIBE includes homogenized and pseudo-2D electrochemistry models such as those by Newman-Tiedemann-Gu (NTG) and Doyle- Fuller-Newman (DFN, a.k.a. DualFoil) as well as a new advanced capability known as AMPERES (Advanced MultiPhysics for Electrochemical and Renewable Energy Storage). AMPERES provides a 3D model for electrochemistry and full coupling with 3D electrical and thermal models on the same grid. VIBE/AMPERES has been used to create three-dimensional battery cell and pack models that explicitly simulate all the battery components (current collectors, electrodes, and separator). The models are used to predict battery performance under normal operations and to study thermal and mechanical response under adverse conditions.

  17. Coupling a Thermodynamic Sea Ice Model with WRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krieger, J. R.; Zhang, J.

    2009-12-01

    Sea ice plays a significant role in shaping the atmospheric dynamics of the Arctic and surrounding regions through the modification of surface characteristics such as surface roughness, heat conductivity, and albedo. These in turn have both thermodynamic impacts on the surface heat budget and direct dynamic impacts on the low-level winds. In numerical atmospheric models, the accurate treatment of sea ice is therefore of critical importance in producing realistic simulations, not only on the global scale but at local and regional scales as well. However, sea ice is an often-neglected component of mesoscale meteorological models, many times being treated as just another land cover type without the sufficient complexity necessary to properly characterize its thermodynamic effects. To address this deficiency, we have recently coupled a thermodynamic sea ice model with the latest version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model in order to improve the latter's simulation of sea ice surface temperatures, and by extension its simulation of Arctic conditions as a whole. A series of case studies was performed in which results from the coupled and unmodified versions of WRF were compared to determine the efficacy of this approach in improving weather simulations along the Beaufort and Chukchi Sea coasts in northern Alaska. In addition to surface station data, observations made as part of the SHEBA and SEDNA field campaigns and by two buoys recently deployed in the Beaufort Sea were used to verify the model output.

  18. A global coupled model of the lithosphere and mantle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iaffaldano, G.; Bunge, H.

    2004-12-01

    Understanding the dynamics of global lithospheric motion is one of the most important problems in geodynamics today. Mantle convection is commonly accepted as the driving force for plate motion but, while the kinematics of plate movement is well known from space geodetic and paleomagnetic observations, we lack a rigorous description of the coupled mantle convection-plate motion system. Here we present first results from a coupled mantle convection-global lithosphere motion model following a similar effort by Lithgow-Bertelloni and Guynn. Our plate motion code is SHELLS, a thinsheet FEM code developed by Bird which computes global plate motion and explicitly accounts for faults. The global mantle convection code is TERRA, a high-resolution 3-D FEM code developed and parallelized by Bunge and Baumgardner. We perform simple modeling experiments in which the shear tractions applied to the bottom of the lithosphere arise directly from the mantle circulation model. Our mantle circulation model includes a history of subduction and accounts, among others, for variations in mantle viscosity and strong bottom heating from the core. We find that our results are sensitive to the amount of core heating, an inference that has received renewed attention lately, and that models with stronger core heating overall are in better agreement with observations of intraplate stresses derived from the World Stress Map.

  19. The dynamics of a coupled soilscape-landscape evolution model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welivitiya, Dimuth; Willgoose, Garry; Hancock, Greg

    2016-04-01

    In this study we present results obtained from a landform evolution model coupled with SSSPAM5D soilscape evolution model. This presentation will show a number of computer animations with this coupled model using a range of widely accepted soil profile weathering models, and erosion/armouring models. The animations clearly show that subtle changes in process can result in dramatic changes in long-term equilibrium hillslope and soilscape form. We will discuss the reasons for these differences, arguing from the various mathematical and physical assumptions modelled, and infer how observed hillslope form may provide identifiable (and perhaps quantifiable) landform and soilscape signatures of landscape and soilscape process, and in particular the coupling between the landscape and the soilscape. Specifically we have simulated soilscapes using 3 depth dependent weathering functions: 1) Exponential, 2) Humped and 3) Reversed exponential. The Exponential weathering function simulates physical weathering due to thermal effects, and the weathering rate exponentially decreases with depth. The Humped function simulates chemical and/or physical weathering with moisture feedbacks, where the highest weathering rate is at a finite depth below the surface and exponentially declines with depth. The Reversed exponential function simulates chemical weathering, and the highest weathering rate is at the soil-saprolite interface and exponentially decreases both above and below the interface. Both the Humped and Reversed exponential functions can be used as approximations to chemical weathering as they can be derived analytically by solving widely accepted geochemical weathering equations. The Humped function can arise where the weathering fluid is introduced at the top of the soil profile (e.g. rainfall equilibrated with carbon dioxide in the atmosphere), while the Reversed exponential can be derived when carbon dioxide is generated within the profile (e.g. by biodegradation of soil

  20. Fully coupled "online" chemistry within the WRF model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grell, Georg A.; Peckham, Steven E.; Schmitz, Rainer; McKeen, Stuart A.; Frost, Gregory; Skamarock, William C.; Eder, Brian

    A fully coupled "online" Weather Research and Forecasting/Chemistry (WRF/Chem) model has been developed. The air quality component of the model is fully consistent with the meteorological component; both components use the same transport scheme (mass and scalar preserving), the same grid (horizontal and vertical components), and the same physics schemes for subgrid-scale transport. The components also use the same timestep, hence no temporal interpolation is needed. The chemistry package consists of dry deposition ("flux-resistance" method), biogenic emission as in [Simpson et al., 1995. Journal of Geophysical Research 100D, 22875-22890; Guenther et al., 1994. Atmospheric Environment 28, 1197-1210], the chemical mechanism from RADM2, a complex photolysis scheme (Madronich scheme coupled with hydrometeors), and a state of the art aerosol module (MADE/SORGAM aerosol parameterization). The WRF/Chem model is statistically evaluated and compared to MM5/Chem and to detailed photochemical data collected during the summer 2002 NEAQS field study. It is shown that the WRF/Chem model is statistically better skilled in forecasting O 3 than MM5/Chem, with no appreciable differences between models in terms of bias with the observations. Furthermore, the WRF/Chem model consistently exhibits better skill at forecasting the O 3 precursors CO and NO y at all of the surface sites. However, the WRF/Chem model biases of these precursors and of other gas-phase species are persistently higher than for MM5/Chem, and are most often biased high compared to observations. Finally, we show that the impact of other basic model assumptions on these same statistics can be much larger than the differences caused by model differences. An example showing the sensitivity of various statistical measures with respect to the treatment of biogenic volatile organic compounds emissions illustrates this impact.

  1. Upscalling processes in an ocean-atmosphere multiscale coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, S. G.; Berthet, S.; Samson, G.; Crétat, J.; Colas, F.; Echevin, V.; Jullien, S.; Hourdin, C.

    2015-12-01

    This work explores new pathways toward a better representation of the multi-scale physics that drive climate variability. We are analysing the key upscaling processes by which small-scale localized errors have a knock-on effect onto global climate. We focus on the Peru-Chilli coastal upwelling, an area known to hold among the strongest models biases in the Tropics. Our approach is based on the development of a multiscale coupling interface allowing us to couple WRF with the NEMO oceanic model in a configuration including 2-way nested zooms in the oceanic and/or the atmospheric component of the coupled model. Upscalling processes are evidenced and quantified by comparing three 20-year long simulations of a tropical channel (45°S-45°N), which differ by their horizontal resolution: 0.75° everywhere, 0.75°+0.25° zoom in the southeastern Pacific or 0.25° everywhere. This set of three 20-year long simulations was repeated with 3 different sets of parameterizations to assess the robustness of our results. Our results show that adding an embedded zoom over the southeastern Pacific only in the atmosphere cools down the SST along the Peru-Chili coast, which is a clear improvement. This change is associated with a displacement of the low-level cloud cover, which moves closer to the coast cooling further the coastal area SST. Offshore, we observe the opposite effect with a reduction of the cloud cover with higher resolution, which increases solar radiation and warms the SST. Increasing the resolution in the oceanic component show contrasting results according to the different set parameterization used in the experiments. Some experiment shows a coastal cooling as expected, whereas, in other cases, we observe a counterintuitive response with a warming of the coastal SST. Using at the same time an oceanic and an atmospheric zoom mostly combines the results obtained when using the 2-way nesting in only one component of the coupled model. In the best case, we archive by this

  2. Model independent predictions for rare top decays with weak coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, Alakabha; Duraisamy, Murugeswaran

    2010-04-01

    Measurements at B factories have provided important constraints on new physics in several rare processes involving the B meson. New physics, if present in the b quark sector may also affect the top sector. In an effective Lagrangian approach, we write down operators, where effects in the bottom and the top sector are related. Assuming the couplings of the operators to be of the same size as the weak coupling g of the standard model and taking into account constraints on new physics from the bottom sector as well as top branching ratios, we make predictions for the rare top decays t{yields}cV, where V={gamma}, Z. We find branching fractions for these decays within possible reach of the LHC. Predictions are also made for t{yields}sW.

  3. Modeling a synthetic multicellular clock: Repressilators coupled by quorum sensing

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Ojalvo, Jordi; Elowitz, Michael B.; Strogatz, Steven H.

    2004-01-01

    Diverse biochemical rhythms are generated by thousands of cellular oscillators that somehow manage to operate synchronously. In fields ranging from circadian biology to endocrinology, it remains an exciting challenge to understand how collective rhythms emerge in multicellular structures. Using mathematical and computational modeling, we study the effect of coupling through intercell signaling in a population of Escherichia coli cells expressing a synthetic biological clock. Our results predict that a diverse and noisy community of such genetic oscillators interacting through a quorum-sensing mechanism should self-synchronize in a robust way, leading to a substantially improved global rhythmicity in the system. As such, the particular system of coupled genetic oscillators considered here might be a good candidate to provide the first quantitative example of a synchronization transition in a population of biological oscillators. PMID:15256602

  4. Unified minimal supersymmetric model with large Yukawa couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Rattazzi, R.; Sarid, U.

    1996-02-01

    The consequences of assuming the third-generation Yukawa couplings are all large and comparable are studied in the context of the minimal sypersymmetric extension of the standard model. General aspects of the RG evolution of the parameters, theoretical constraints needed to ensure proper electroweak symmetry breaking, and experimental and cosmological bounds on low-energy parameters are presented. We also present complete and exact semianalytic solutions to the one-loop RG equations. Focusing on SU(5) or SO(10) unification, we analyze the relationship between the top and bottom masses and the superspectrum, and the phenomenological implications of the GUT conditions on scalar masses. Future experimental measurements of the superspectrum and of the strong coupling will distinguish between various GUT-scale scenarios. And if present experimental knowledge is to be accounted for most naturally, a particular set of predictions is singled out. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  5. Coupled Hydro-Mechanical Model of Bentonite Hydration and Swelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancilova, Ilona; Hokr, Milan

    2016-10-01

    This paper deals with the modelling of coupled hydro-mechanical processes at the buffer and host rock interface (bentonite and granite) in the context of the safe disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Granite, as one of the barriers, includes fractures which are the source for hydration of bentonite and its subsequent swelling. It affects the mechanical behaviour and possibly the stability of the whole system. A non-linear solution for the stress-deformation problem with swelling was developed. This solution is coupled with the non-linear diffusion problem (for unsaturated flow). The swelling is defined using a coefficient dependent on water content according to literature data, with the effective Young's modulus decreasing close to zero corresponding to the plastic state. Results confirm the expected non-uniform saturation, swelling, and stresses in bentonite and small contribution to a fracture displacement.

  6. Particle production within the quark meson coupling model

    SciTech Connect

    Panda, P. K.; Menezes, D. P.; Providencia, C.

    2009-07-15

    Quark-meson coupling (QMC) models can be successfully applied to the description of compact star properties in nuclear astrophysics as well as to nuclear matter. In the regime of hot hadronic matter very few calculations exist using the QMC model, in particular when applied to particle yields in heavy ion collisions. In the present work, we identify the free energy of the bag with the effective mass of the baryons and we calculate the particle production yields on a Au+Au collision at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) with the QMC model and compare them with results obtained previously with other relativistic models. A smaller temperature for the fireball, T=132 MeV, is obtained because of the smaller effective baryon masses predicted by QMC. QMC was also applied to the description of particle yields at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) in Pb+Pb collisions.

  7. Thermodynamics of the BMN matrix model at strong coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Miguel S.; Greenspan, Lauren; Penedones, João; Santos, Jorge E.

    2015-03-01

    We construct the black hole geometry dual to the deconfined phase of the BMN matrix model at strong 't Hooft coupling. We approach this solution from the limit of large temperature where it is approximately that of the non-extremal D0-brane geometry with a spherical S 8 horizon. This geometry preserves the SO(9) symmetry of the matrix model trivial vacuum. As the temperature decreases the horizon becomes deformed and breaks the SO(9) to the SO(6) × SO(3) symmetry of the matrix model. When the black hole free energy crosses zero the system undergoes a phase transition to the confined phase described by a Lin-Maldacena geometry. We determine this critical temperature, whose computation is also within reach of Monte Carlo simulations of the matrix model.

  8. High-resolution reactive transport: A coupled parallel hydrogeochemical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beisman, J. J.; Maxwell, R. M.; Steefel, C. I.; Sitchler, A.; Molins, S.

    2013-12-01

    Subsurface hydrogeochemical systems are an especially complex component of the terrestrial environment and play host to a multitude of interactions. Parameterizations of these interactions are perhaps the least understood component of terrestrial systems, presenting uncertainties in the predictive understanding of biogeochemical cycling and transport. Thorough knowledge of biogeochemical transport processes is critical to the quantification of carbon/nutrient fluxes in the subsurface, and to the development of effective contaminant remediation techniques. Here we present a coupled parallel hydrogeochemical model, ParCrunchFlow, as a tool to further our understanding of governing processes and interactions in natural hydrogeochemical systems. ParCrunchFlow is a coupling of the reactive transport simulator CrunchFlow with the hydrologic model ParFlow. CrunchFlow is a multicomponent reactive flow and transport code that can be used to simulate a range of important processes and environments, including reactive contaminant transport, chemical weathering, carbon sequestration, biogeochemical cycling, and water-rock interaction. ParFlow is a parallel, three-dimensional, variably-saturated, coupled surface-subsurface flow and transport code with the ability to simulate complex topography, geology, and heterogeneity. ParCrunchflow takes advantage of the efficient parallelism built into Parflow, allowing the numerical simulation of reactive transport processes in chemically and physically heterogeneous media at high spatial resolutions. This model provides an ability to further examine the interactions and feedbacks between biogeochemical systems and complex subsurface flow fields. In addition to the details of model construction, results will be presented that show floodplain nutrient cycling and the effects of heterogeneity on small-scale mixing reactions at the Department of Energy's Old Rifle Legacy site.

  9. WRF-Fire: coupled weather-wildland fire modeling with the weather research and forecasting model

    Treesearch

    Janice L. Coen; Marques Cameron; John Michalakes; Edward G. Patton; Philip J. Riggan; Kara M. Yedinak

    2012-01-01

    A wildland fire behavior module (WRF-Fire) was integrated into the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) public domain numerical weather prediction model. The fire module is a surface fire behavior model that is two-way coupled with the atmospheric model. Near-surface winds from the atmospheric model are interpolated to a finer fire grid and used, with fuel properties...

  10. A fully coupled thermal, chemical, mechanical cookoff model

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, M.L.; Baer, M.R.; Gross, R.J.

    1994-05-01

    Cookoff modeling of confined energetic materials involves the coupling of thermal, chemical and mechanical effects. In the past, modeling has focussed on the prediction of thermal runaway with little regard to the effects of mechanical behavior of the energetic material. To address the mechanical response of the energetic material, a constitutive submodel has been developed which can be incorporated into thermal-chemical-mechanical analysis. This work presents development of this submodel and its incorporation into a fully coupled one-dimensional, thermal-chemical-mechanical computer code to simulate thermal initiation of energetic materials. Model predictions include temperature, chemical species, stress, strain, solid/gas pressure, solid/gas density, yield function, and gas volume fraction. Sample results from a scaled aluminum tube filled with RDX exposed to a constant temperature bath at 500 K will be displayed. The micromechanical submodel is based on bubble mechanics which describes nucleation, decomposition, and elastic/plastic mechanical behavior. This constitutive material description requires input of temperatures and reacted fraction of the energetic material as provided by the reactive heat flow code, XCHEM, and the mechanical response is predicted using a quasistatic mechanics code, SANTOS. A parametric sensitivity analysis indicates that a small degree of decomposition causes significant pressurization of the energetic material, which implies that cookoff modeling must consider the strong interaction between thermal-chemistry and mechanics. This document consists of view graphs from the poster session.

  11. Biomass assimilation in coupled ecohydrodynamical model of the Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crispi, G.; Bournaski, E.; Crise, A.

    2003-04-01

    Data assimilation has raised new interest in the last years in the context of the environmental sciences. The swift increment of the attention paid to it in oceanography is due to the coming age of operational services for the marine environment which is going to dramatically increase the demand for accurate, timely and reliable estimates of the space and time distribution both for physical and in a near future for biogeochemical fields. Data assimilation combines information derived from measurements with knowledge of the rules that govern the evolution of the system of interest through formalization and implementation in numerical models. The importance of ocean data assimilation has been recognized by several international programmes as JGOFS, GOOS and CLIVAR. This work presents an eco-hydrodynamic model of the Mediterranean Sea developed at the Istituto Nazionale di Oceanografia e di Geofisica Sperimentale - OGS, Trieste, Italy. It includes 3-D MOM-based hydrodynamics of the Mediterranean Sea, coupled with biochemical model of Nitrogen, Phytoplankton, Zooplankton, and Detritus (NPZD). Monthly mean wind forcings are adopted to force this MOM-NPZD model. For better prediction and analysis of N, P, Z and D distributions in the sea the model needs data assimilation from biomass observations on the sea surface. Chosen approach for evaluating performances of data assimilation techniques in coupled model is the definition of a twin experiment testbed where a reference run is carried out assuming its result as the truth. We define a sampling strategy to obtain different datasets to be incorporated in another ecological model in successive runs in order to appraise the potential of the data assimilation and sampling strategy. The runs carried out with different techniques and different spatio-temporal coverages are compared in order to evaluate the sensitivity to different coverage of dataset. The discussed alternative way is to assume the ecosystem at steady state and

  12. Status of the seamless coupled modelling system ICON-ART

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Bernhard; Rieger, Daniel; Schroeter, Jenniffer; Bischoff-Gauss, Inge; Deetz, Konrad; Eckstein, Johannes; Foerstner, Jochen; Gasch, Philipp; Ruhnke, Roland; Vogel, Heike; Walter, Carolin; Weimer, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The integrated modelling framework ICON-ART [1] (ICOsahedral Nonhydrostatic - Aerosols and Reactive Trace gases) extends the numerical weather prediction modelling system ICON by modules for gas phase chemistry, aerosol dynamics and related feedback processes. The nonhydrostatic global modelling system ICON [2] is a joint development of German Weather Service (DWD) and Max Planck Institute for Meteorology (MPI-M) with local grid refinement down to grid sizes of a few kilometers. It will be used for numerical weather prediction, climate projections and for research purposes. Since January 2016 ICON runs operationally at DWD for weather forecast on the global scale with a grid size of 13 km. Analogous to its predecessor COSMO-ART [3], ICON-ART is designed to account for feedback processes between meteorological variables and atmospheric trace substances. Up to now, ICON-ART contains the dispersion of volcanic ash, radioactive tracers, sea salt aerosol, as well as ozone-depleting stratospheric trace substances [1]. Recently, we have extended ICON-ART by a mineral dust emission scheme with global applicability and nucleation parameterizations which allow the cloud microphysics to explicitly account for prognostic aerosol distributions. Also very recently an emission scheme for volatile organic compounds was included. We present first results of the impact of natural aerosol (i.e. sea salt aerosol and mineral dust) on cloud properties and precipitation as well as the interaction of primary emitted particles with radiation. Ongoing developments are the coupling with a radiation scheme to calculate the photolysis frequencies, a coupling with the RADMKA (1) chemistry and first steps to include isotopologues of water. Examples showing the capabilities of the model system will be presented. This includes a simulation of the transport of ozone depleting short-lived trace gases from the surface into the stratosphere as well as of long-lived tracers. [1] Rieger, D., et al

  13. Computational Implementation of a Coupled Plasma-Neutral Fluid Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vold, E. L.; Najmabadi, F.; Conn, R. W.

    1992-12-01

    This paper describes the computational transport of coupled plasma-neutral fluids in the edge region of a toroidally symmetric magnetic confinement device, with applications to the tokamak. The model couples neutral density in a diffusion approximation with a set of transport equations for the plasma including density, classical plasma parallel velocity, anomalous cross-field velocity, and ion and electron temperature equations. The plasma potential, gradient electric fields, drift velocity, and net poloidal velocity are computed as dependent quantities under the assumption of ambipolarity. The implementation is flexible to permit extension in the future to a fully coupled set of non-ambipolar momentum equations. The computational method incorporates sonic flow and particle recycling of ions and neutrals at the vessel boundary. A numerically generated orthogonal grid conforms to the poloidal magnetic flux surfaces. Power law differencing based on the SIMPLE relaxation method is modified to accomodate the compressible reactive plasma flow with a "semi-implicit" diffusion method. Residual corrections are applied to obtain a valid convergence to the steady state solution. Results are presented for a representative divertor tokamak in a high recycling regime, showing strongly peaked neutral and plasma densities near the divertor target. Solutions show large poloidal and radial gradients in the plasma density, potential, and temperatures. These findings may help to understand the strong turbulence experimentally observed in the plasma edge region of the tokamak.

  14. Hyperon stars in a modified quark meson coupling model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, R. N.; Sahoo, H. S.; Panda, P. K.; Barik, N.; Frederico, T.

    2016-09-01

    We determine the equation of state (EOS) of nuclear matter with the inclusion of hyperons in a self-consistent manner by using a modified quark meson coupling model where the confining interaction for quarks inside a baryon is represented by a phenomenological average potential in an equally mixed scalar-vector harmonic form. The hadron-hadron interaction in nuclear matter is then realized by introducing additional quark couplings to σ ,ω , and ρ mesons through mean-field approximations. The effect of a nonlinear ω -ρ term on the EOS is studied. The hyperon couplings are fixed from the optical potential values and the mass-radius curve is determined satisfying the maximum mass constraint of 2 M⊙ for neutron stars, as determined in recent measurements of the pulsar PSR J0348+0432. We also observe that there is no significant advantage of introducing the nonlinear ω -ρ term in the context of obtaining the star mass constraint in the present set of parametrizations.

  15. Optimizing phonon space in the phonon-coupling model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tselyaev, V.; Lyutorovich, N.; Speth, J.; Reinhard, P.-G.

    2017-08-01

    We present a new scheme to select the most relevant phonons in the phonon-coupling model, named here the time-blocking approximation (TBA). The new criterion, based on the phonon-nucleon coupling strengths rather than on B (E L ) values, is more selective and thus produces much smaller phonon spaces in the TBA. This is beneficial in two respects: first, it curbs the computational cost, and second, it reduces the danger of double counting in the expansion basis of the TBA. We use here the TBA in a form where the coupling strength is regularized to keep the given Hartree-Fock ground state stable. The scheme is implemented in a random-phase approximation and TBA code based on the Skyrme energy functional. We first explore carefully the cutoff dependence with the new criterion and can work out a natural (optimal) cutoff parameter. Then we use the freshly developed and tested scheme for a survey of giant resonances and low-lying collective states in six doubly magic nuclei looking also at the dependence of the results when varying the Skyrme parametrization.

  16. Extended Neural Metastability in an Embodied Model of Sensorimotor Coupling.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Miguel; Bedia, Manuel G; Barandiaran, Xabier E

    2016-01-01

    The hypothesis that brain organization is based on mechanisms of metastable synchronization in neural assemblies has been popularized during the last decades of neuroscientific research. Nevertheless, the role of body and environment for understanding the functioning of metastable assemblies is frequently dismissed. The main goal of this paper is to investigate the contribution of sensorimotor coupling to neural and behavioral metastability using a minimal computational model of plastic neural ensembles embedded in a robotic agent in a behavioral preference task. Our hypothesis is that, under some conditions, the metastability of the system is not restricted to the brain but extends to the system composed by the interaction of brain, body and environment. We test this idea, comparing an agent in continuous interaction with its environment in a task demanding behavioral flexibility with an equivalent model from the point of view of "internalist neuroscience." A statistical characterization of our model and tools from information theory allow us to show how (1) the bidirectional coupling between agent and environment brings the system closer to a regime of criticality and triggers the emergence of additional metastable states which are not found in the brain in isolation but extended to the whole system of sensorimotor interaction, (2) the synaptic plasticity of the agent is fundamental to sustain open structures in the neural controller of the agent flexibly engaging and disengaging different behavioral patterns that sustain sensorimotor metastable states, and (3) these extended metastable states emerge when the agent generates an asymmetrical circular loop of causal interaction with its environment, in which the agent responds to variability of the environment at fast timescales while acting over the environment at slow timescales, suggesting the constitution of the agent as an autonomous entity actively modulating its sensorimotor coupling with the world. We

  17. Extended Neural Metastability in an Embodied Model of Sensorimotor Coupling

    PubMed Central

    Aguilera, Miguel; Bedia, Manuel G.; Barandiaran, Xabier E.

    2016-01-01

    The hypothesis that brain organization is based on mechanisms of metastable synchronization in neural assemblies has been popularized during the last decades of neuroscientific research. Nevertheless, the role of body and environment for understanding the functioning of metastable assemblies is frequently dismissed. The main goal of this paper is to investigate the contribution of sensorimotor coupling to neural and behavioral metastability using a minimal computational model of plastic neural ensembles embedded in a robotic agent in a behavioral preference task. Our hypothesis is that, under some conditions, the metastability of the system is not restricted to the brain but extends to the system composed by the interaction of brain, body and environment. We test this idea, comparing an agent in continuous interaction with its environment in a task demanding behavioral flexibility with an equivalent model from the point of view of “internalist neuroscience.” A statistical characterization of our model and tools from information theory allow us to show how (1) the bidirectional coupling between agent and environment brings the system closer to a regime of criticality and triggers the emergence of additional metastable states which are not found in the brain in isolation but extended to the whole system of sensorimotor interaction, (2) the synaptic plasticity of the agent is fundamental to sustain open structures in the neural controller of the agent flexibly engaging and disengaging different behavioral patterns that sustain sensorimotor metastable states, and (3) these extended metastable states emerge when the agent generates an asymmetrical circular loop of causal interaction with its environment, in which the agent responds to variability of the environment at fast timescales while acting over the environment at slow timescales, suggesting the constitution of the agent as an autonomous entity actively modulating its sensorimotor coupling with the world. We

  18. Coupled incompressible Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics model for continuum-based modelling sediment transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahar, Gourabananda; Dhar, Anirban

    2017-04-01

    A coupled solenoidal Incompressible Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (ISPH) model is presented for simulation of sediment displacement in erodible bed. The coupled framework consists of two separate incompressible modules: (a) granular module, (b) fluid module. The granular module considers a friction based rheology model to calculate deviatoric stress components from pressure. The module is validated for Bagnold flow profile and two standardized test cases of sediment avalanching. The fluid module resolves fluid flow inside and outside porous domain. An interaction force pair containing fluid pressure, viscous term and drag force acts as a bridge between two different flow modules. The coupled model is validated against three dambreak flow cases with different initial conditions of movable bed. The simulated results are in good agreement with experimental data. A demonstrative case considering effect of granular column failure under full/partial submergence highlights the capability of the coupled model for application in generalized scenario.

  19. Strong-coupling BCS models of Josephson qubits.

    PubMed

    Alicki, R; Miklaszewski, W

    2013-01-23

    The strong-coupling version of the BCS theory for superconductors is used to derive microscopic models for all types of small Josephson junctions--charge qubit, flux qubit and phase qubit. Applied to Josephson qubits it yields a more complicated structure of the lowest-lying energy levels than that obtained from phenomenological models based on quantization of the Kirchhoff equations. In particular, highly degenerate levels emerge, which act as probability sinks for the qubit. The alternative formulae concerning spectra of superconducting qubits are presented and compared with the experimental data. In contrast to the existing theories those formulae contain microscopic parameters of the model. In particular, for the first time, the density of Cooper pairs at zero temperature is estimated for an Al-based flux qubit. Finally, the question whether small Josephson junctions can be treated as macroscopic quantum systems is briefly discussed.

  20. Computational model for amoeboid motion: Coupling membrane and cytosol dynamics.

    PubMed

    Moure, Adrian; Gomez, Hector

    2016-10-01

    A distinguishing feature of amoeboid motion is that the migrating cell undergoes large deformations, caused by the emergence and retraction of actin-rich protrusions, called pseudopods. Here, we propose a cell motility model that represents pseudopod dynamics, as well as its interaction with membrane signaling molecules. The model accounts for internal and external forces, such as protrusion, contraction, adhesion, surface tension, or those arising from cell-obstacle contacts. By coupling the membrane and cytosol interactions we are able to reproduce a realistic picture of amoeboid motion. The model results are in quantitative agreement with experiments and show how cells may take advantage of the geometry of their microenvironment to migrate more efficiently.

  1. Computational model for amoeboid motion: Coupling membrane and cytosol dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moure, Adrian; Gomez, Hector

    2016-10-01

    A distinguishing feature of amoeboid motion is that the migrating cell undergoes large deformations, caused by the emergence and retraction of actin-rich protrusions, called pseudopods. Here, we propose a cell motility model that represents pseudopod dynamics, as well as its interaction with membrane signaling molecules. The model accounts for internal and external forces, such as protrusion, contraction, adhesion, surface tension, or those arising from cell-obstacle contacts. By coupling the membrane and cytosol interactions we are able to reproduce a realistic picture of amoeboid motion. The model results are in quantitative agreement with experiments and show how cells may take advantage of the geometry of their microenvironment to migrate more efficiently.

  2. Modelling small-patterned neuronal networks coupled to microelectrode arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massobrio, Paolo; Martinoia, Sergio

    2008-09-01

    Cultured neurons coupled to planar substrates which exhibit 'well-defined' two-dimensional network architectures can provide valuable insights into cell-to-cell communication, network dynamics versus topology, and basic mechanisms of synaptic plasticity and learning. In the literature several approaches were presented to drive neuronal growth, such as surface modification by silane chemistry, photolithographic techniques, microcontact printing, microfluidic channel flow patterning, microdrop patterning, etc. This work presents a computational model fit for reproducing and explaining the dynamics exhibited by small-patterned neuronal networks coupled to microelectrode arrays (MEAs). The model is based on the concept of meta-neuron, i.e., a small spatially confined number of actual neurons which perform single macroscopic functions. Each meta-neuron is characterized by a detailed morphology, and the membrane channels are modelled by simple Hodgkin-Huxley and passive kinetics. The two main findings that emerge from the simulations can be summarized as follows: (i) the increasing complexity of meta-neuron morphology reflects the variations of the network dynamics as a function of network development; (ii) the dynamics displayed by the patterned neuronal networks considered can be explained by hypothesizing the presence of several short- and a few long-term distance interactions among small assemblies of neurons (i.e., meta-neurons).

  3. Modelling of strongly coupled particle growth and aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruy, F.; Touboul, E.

    2013-02-01

    The mathematical modelling of the dynamics of particle suspension is based on the population balance equation (PBE). PBE is an integro-differential equation for the population density that is a function of time t, space coordinates and internal parameters. Usually, the particle is characterized by a unique parameter, e.g. the matter volume v. PBE consists of several terms: for instance, the growth rate and the aggregation rate. So, the growth rate is a function of v and t. In classical modelling, the growth and the aggregation are independently considered, i.e. they are not coupled. However, current applications occur where the growth and the aggregation are coupled, i.e. the change of the particle volume with time is depending on its initial value v0, that in turn is related to an aggregation event. As a consequence, the dynamics of the suspension does not obey the classical Von Smoluchowski equation. This paper revisits this problem by proposing a new modelling by using a bivariate PBE (with two internal variables: v and v0) and by solving the PBE by means of a numerical method and Monte Carlo simulations. This is applied to a physicochemical system with a simple growth law and a constant aggregation kernel.

  4. Modelling small-patterned neuronal networks coupled to microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Massobrio, Paolo; Martinoia, Sergio

    2008-09-01

    Cultured neurons coupled to planar substrates which exhibit 'well-defined' two-dimensional network architectures can provide valuable insights into cell-to-cell communication, network dynamics versus topology, and basic mechanisms of synaptic plasticity and learning. In the literature several approaches were presented to drive neuronal growth, such as surface modification by silane chemistry, photolithographic techniques, microcontact printing, microfluidic channel flow patterning, microdrop patterning, etc. This work presents a computational model fit for reproducing and explaining the dynamics exhibited by small-patterned neuronal networks coupled to microelectrode arrays (MEAs). The model is based on the concept of meta-neuron, i.e., a small spatially confined number of actual neurons which perform single macroscopic functions. Each meta-neuron is characterized by a detailed morphology, and the membrane channels are modelled by simple Hodgkin-Huxley and passive kinetics. The two main findings that emerge from the simulations can be summarized as follows: (i) the increasing complexity of meta-neuron morphology reflects the variations of the network dynamics as a function of network development; (ii) the dynamics displayed by the patterned neuronal networks considered can be explained by hypothesizing the presence of several short- and a few long-term distance interactions among small assemblies of neurons (i.e., meta-neurons).

  5. Model for a transformer-coupled toroidal plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Rauf, Shahid; Balakrishna, Ajit; Chen Zhigang; Collins, Ken

    2012-01-15

    A two-dimensional fluid plasma model for a transformer-coupled toroidal plasma source is described. Ferrites are used in this device to improve the electromagnetic coupling between the primary coils carrying radio frequency (rf) current and a secondary plasma loop. Appropriate components of the Maxwell equations are solved to determine the electromagnetic fields and electron power deposition in the model. The effect of gas flow on species transport is also considered. The model is applied to 1 Torr Ar/NH{sub 3} plasma in this article. Rf electric field lines form a loop in the vacuum chamber and generate a plasma ring. Due to rapid dissociation of NH{sub 3}, NH{sub x}{sup +} ions are more prevalent near the gas inlet and Ar{sup +} ions are the dominant ions farther downstream. NH{sub 3} and its by-products rapidly dissociate into small fragments as the gas flows through the plasma. With increasing source power, NH{sub 3} dissociates more readily and NH{sub x}{sup +} ions are more tightly confined near the gas inlet. Gas flow rate significantly influences the plasma characteristics. With increasing gas flow rate, NH{sub 3} dissociation occurs farther from the gas inlet in regions with higher electron density. Consequently, more NH{sub 4}{sup +} ions are produced and dissociation by-products have higher concentrations near the outlet.

  6. Global Magnetospheric Simulations: coupling with ionospheric and solar wind models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapenta, Giovanni; Olshevskyi, Vyacheslav; Amaya, Jorge; Deca, Jan; Markidis, Stefano; Vapirev, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    We present results on the global fully kinetic model of the magnetosphere of the Earth. The simulations are based on the iPic3D code [1] that treats kinetically all plasma species solving implicitly the equations of motion for electrons and ions, coupled with the Maxwell equations. We present results of our simulations and discuss the coupling at the inner boundary near the Earth with models of the ionosphere and at the outer boundary with models of the arriving solar wind. The results are part of the activities of the Swiff FP7 project: www.swiff.eu [1] Stefano Markidis, Giovanni Lapenta, Rizwan-uddin, Multi-scale simulations of plasma with iPIC3D, Mathematics and Computers in Simulation, Volume 80, Issue 7, March 2010, Pages 1509-1519, ISSN 0378-4754, 10.1016/j.matcom.2009.08.038 [2] Giovanni Lapenta, Particle simulations of space weather, Journal of Computational Physics, Volume 231, Issue 3, 1 February 2012, Pages 795-821, ISSN 0021-9991, 10.1016/j.jcp.2011.03.035.

  7. Fluid Modeling of a Very High Frequency Capacitively Coupled Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyay, Rochan; Raja, Laxminarayan; Ventzek, Peter; Iwao, Toshihiko; Ishibashi, Kiyotaka; Esgee Technologies Inc. Collaboration; University of Texas at Austin Collaboration; Tokyo Electron Ltd. Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Very High Frequency Capacitively Coupled Plasma (VHF-CCP) discharges have been studied extensively for semiconductor manufacturing applications for well over a decade. Modeling of these discharges however poses significant challenges owing to complexity associated with simulation of multiple coupled phenomena (electro-static/magnetic fields and plasma physics) over different scales and the representation of these phenomena in a computational framework. We present 2D simulations of a self-consistent plasma with the electromagnetic field represented using vector and scalar potentials. For a range of operating conditions, the ratio of capacitive and inductive power, calculated using empirical correlations available in the literature, are matched by adjusting both the electrostatic and electromagnetic fields in a decoupled manner. We present results using this model that demonstrate most of the important VHF-CCP discharge phenomena reported in the literature, such as electromagnetic wave versus electrostatic heating and its impact on plasma non-uniformity, wave resonances, etc. while realizing a practically feasible computational model.

  8. Model Organisms in G Protein–Coupled Receptor Research

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Maureen M.; Bruchas, Michael R.; Ewer, John; Griffith, Leslie C.; Maiellaro, Isabella; Taghert, Paul H.; White, Benjamin H.

    2015-01-01

    The study of G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) has benefited greatly from experimental approaches that interrogate their functions in controlled, artificial environments. Working in vitro, GPCR receptorologists discovered the basic biologic mechanisms by which GPCRs operate, including their eponymous capacity to couple to G proteins; their molecular makeup, including the famed serpentine transmembrane unit; and ultimately, their three-dimensional structure. Although the insights gained from working outside the native environments of GPCRs have allowed for the collection of low-noise data, such approaches cannot directly address a receptor’s native (in vivo) functions. An in vivo approach can complement the rigor of in vitro approaches: as studied in model organisms, it imposes physiologic constraints on receptor action and thus allows investigators to deduce the most salient features of receptor function. Here, we briefly discuss specific examples in which model organisms have successfully contributed to the elucidation of signals controlled through GPCRs and other surface receptor systems. We list recent examples that have served either in the initial discovery of GPCR signaling concepts or in their fuller definition. Furthermore, we selectively highlight experimental advantages, shortcomings, and tools of each model organism. PMID:25979002

  9. Hypernuclei in the quark-meson coupling model

    SciTech Connect

    K. Tsushima, P. A. M. Guichon

    2010-07-01

    We present results of hypernuclei calculated in the latest quark-meson coupling (QMC) model, where the effect of the mean scalar field in-medium on the one-gluon exchange hyperfine interaction, is also included self-consistently. The extra repulsion associated with this increased hyperfine interaction in-medium completely changes the predictions for {\\Sigma} hypernuclei. Whereas in the earlier version of QMC they were bound by an amount similar to {\\Lambda} hypernuclei, they are unbound in the latest version of QMC, in qualitative agreement with the experimental absence of such states.

  10. Thermal modeling of absorber-coupled TES polarimeter.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.; Yefremenko, V.; Datesman, A.; Novosad, V.; Pearson, J.; Shustakova, G.; Divan, R.; Lee, J.; Chang, C. L.; McMahon, J.; Bleem, L.; Crites, A. T,; Downes, T.; Mehl, J.; Everett, W.; Meyer, S. S.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Sayer, J.; Ruhl, J.; Univ. of Chicago; Case Western Reserve Univ.; B. Verkin Inst. Low Tempemperature and Physcial Engineering

    2009-01-01

    Using experimental thermal conductivity and volume heat capacity of narrow silicon nitride beams obtained from thermal test structures and a boundary limited phonon scattering model, as well as the heat conduction equation, we analyze the thermal performance of an absorber-coupled TES polarimeter with finite element method. The polarimeter's temperature distribution, thermal power readout efficiency, and time constant are calculated. The thermal power readout efficiency of the polarimeter is up to 87% at a low signal modulation frequency, and has a 0.5 dB attenuation at 120 Hz. We also compare a preliminary optical testing result with theoretical expectation.

  11. Coupled atmosphere-ocean models of Titan's past

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, Christopher P.; Pollack, James B.; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Courtin, Regis

    1993-01-01

    The behavior and possible past evolution of fully coupled atmosphere and ocean model of Titan are investigated. It is found that Titan's surface temperature was about 20 K cooler at 4 Gyr ago and will be about 5 K warmer 0.5 Gyr in the future. The change in solar luminosity and the conversion of oceanic CH4 to C2H6 drive the evolution of the ocean and atmosphere over time. Titan appears to have experienced a frozen epoch about 3 Gyr ago independent of whether an ocean is present or not. This finding may have important implications for understanding the inventory of Titan's volatile compounds.

  12. Coupled atmosphere-ocean models of Titan's past

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, C. P.; Pollack, J. B.; Lunine, J. I.; Courtin, R.

    1993-03-01

    The behavior and possible past evolution of fully coupled atmosphere and ocean model of Titan are investigated. It is found that Titan's surface temperature was about 20 K cooler at 4 Gyr ago and will be about 5 K warmer 0.5 Gyr in the future. The change in solar luminosity and the conversion of oceanic CH4 to C2H6 drive the evolution of the ocean and atmosphere over time. Titan appears to have experienced a frozen epoch about 3 Gyr ago independent of whether an ocean is present or not. This finding may have important implications for understanding the inventory of Titan's volatile compounds.

  13. Drift dynamics in a coupled model initialized for decadal forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Gomez, Emilia; Cassou, Christophe; Ruprich-Robert, Yohan; Fernandez, Elodie; Terray, Laurent

    2016-03-01

    Drifts are always present in models when initialized from observed conditions because of intrinsic model errors; those potentially affect any type of climate predictions based on numerical experiments. Model drifts are usually removed through more or less sophisticated techniques for skill assessment, but they are rarely analysed. In this study, we provide a detailed physical and dynamical description of the drifts in the CNRM-CM5 coupled model using a set of decadal retrospective forecasts produced within CMIP5. The scope of the paper is to give some physical insights and lines of approach to, on one hand, implement more appropriate techniques of initialisation that minimize the drift in forecast mode, and on the other hand, eventually reduce the systematic biases of the models. We first document a novel protocol for ocean initialization adopted by the CNRM-CERFACS group for forecasting purpose in CMIP5. Initial states for starting dates of the predictions are obtained from a preliminary integration of the coupled model where full-field ocean surface temperature and salinity are restored everywhere to observations through flux derivative terms and full-field subsurface fields (below the prognostic ocean mixed layer) are nudged towards NEMOVAR reanalyses. Nudging is applied only outside the 15°S-15°N band allowing for dynamical balance between the depth and tilt of the tropical thermocline and the model intrinsic biased wind. A sensitivity experiment to the latitudinal extension of no-nudging zone (1°S-1°N instead of 15°, hereafter referred to as NOEQ) has been carried out. In this paper, we concentrate our analyses on two specific regions: the tropical Pacific and the North Atlantic basins. In the Pacific, we show that the first year of the forecasts is characterized by a quasi-systematic excitation of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) warm events whatever the starting dates. This, through ocean-to-atmosphere heat transfer materialized by diabatic heating

  14. Modeling G Protein-Coupled Receptors: a Concrete Possibility.

    PubMed

    Costanzi, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a large superfamily of membrane bound signaling proteins that are involved in the regulation of a wide range of physiological functions and constitute the most common target for therapeutic intervention. Due to the paucity of crystal structures, homology modeling has become a widespread technique for the construction of GPCR models, which have been applied to the study of their structure-function relationships and to the identification of lead ligands through virtual screening. Rhodopsin has been for years the only available template. However, recent breakthroughs in GPCR crystallography have led to the solution of the structures of a few additional receptors. In light of these newly elucidated crystal structures, we have been able to produce a substantial amount of data to demonstrate that accurate models of GPCRs in complex with their ligands can be constructed through homology modeling followed by fully flexible molecular docking. These results have been confirmed by our success in the first blind assessment of GPCR modeling and docking, organized in coordination with the solution of the X-ray structure of the adenosine A(2A) receptor. Taken together, these data indicate that: a) the transmembrane helical bundle can be modeled with considerable accuracy; b) predicting the binding mode of a ligand, although doable, is challenging; c) modeling of the extracellular and intracellular loops is still problematic.

  15. Homology Modeling of Class A G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Costanzi, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a large superfamily of membrane bound signaling proteins that hold great pharmaceutical interest. Since experimentally elucidated structures are available only for a very limited number of receptors, homology modeling has become a widespread technique for the construction of GPCR models intended to study the structure-function relationships of the receptors and aid the discovery and development of ligands capable of modulating their activity. Through this chapter, various aspects involved in the constructions of homology models of the serpentine domain of the largest class of GPCRs, known as class A or rhodopsin family, are illustrated. In particular, the chapter provides suggestions, guidelines and critical thoughts on some of the most crucial aspect of GPCR modeling, including: collection of candidate templates and a structure-based alignment of their sequences; identification and alignment of the transmembrane helices of the query receptor to the corresponding domains of the candidate templates; selection of one or more templates receptor; election of homology or de novo modeling for the construction of specific extracellular and intracellular domains; construction of the three-dimensional models, with special consideration to extracellular regions, disulfide bridges, and interhelical cavity; validation of the models through controlled virtual screening experiments. PMID:22323225

  16. Common problematic aspects of coupling hydrological models with groundwater flow models on the river catchment scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthel, R.

    2006-09-01

    Model coupling requires a thorough conceptualisation of the coupling strategy, including an exact definition of the individual model domains, the "transboundary" processes and the exchange parameters. It is shown here that in the case of coupling groundwater flow and hydrological models - in particular on the regional scale - it is very important to find a common definition and scale-appropriate process description of groundwater recharge and baseflow (or "groundwater runoff/discharge") in order to achieve a meaningful representation of the processes that link the unsaturated and saturated zones and the river network. As such, integration by means of coupling established disciplinary models is problematic given that in such models, processes are defined from a purpose-oriented, disciplinary perspective and are therefore not necessarily consistent with definitions of the same process in the model concepts of other disciplines. This article contains a general introduction to the requirements and challenges of model coupling in Integrated Water Resources Management including a definition of the most relevant technical terms, a short description of the commonly used approach of model coupling and finally a detailed consideration of the role of groundwater recharge and baseflow in coupling groundwater models with hydrological models. The conclusions summarize the most relevant problems rather than giving practical solutions. This paper aims to point out that working on a large scale in an integrated context requires rethinking traditional disciplinary workflows and encouraging communication between the different disciplines involved. It is worth noting that the aspects discussed here are mainly viewed from a groundwater perspective, which reflects the author's background.

  17. Coupled hydrologic and hydraulic modeling of Upper Niger River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischmann, Ayan; Siqueira, Vinícius; Paris, Adrien; Collischonn, Walter; Paiva, Rodrigo; Gossett, Marielle; Pontes, Paulo; Calmant, Stephane; Biancamaria, Sylvain; Crétaux, Jean-François; Tanimoune, Bachir

    2017-04-01

    The Upper Niger Basin is located in Western Africa, flowing from Guinea Highlands towards the Sahel region. In this area lies the seasonally inundated Niger Inland Delta, which supports important environmental services such as habitats for wildlife, climate and flood regulation, as well as large fishery and agricultural areas. In this study, we present the application of MGB-IPH large scale hydrologic and hydrodynamic model for the Upper Niger Basin, totaling c.a. 650,000 km2 and set up until the city of Niamey in Niger. The model couples hydrological vertical balance and runoff generation with hydrodynamic flood wave propagation, by allowing infiltration from floodplains into soil column as well as representing backwater effects and floodplain storage throughout flat areas such as the Inland Delta. The model is forced with TRMM 3B42 daily precipitation and Climate Research Unit (CRU) climatology for the period 2000-2010, and was calibrated against in-situ discharge gauges and validated with in-situ water level, remotely sensed estimations of flooded areas (classification of MODIS imagery) and satellite altimetry (JASON-2 mission). Model results show good predictions for calibrated daily discharge and validated water level and altimetry at stations both upstream and downstream of the delta (Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency>0.7 for all stations), as well as for flooded areas within the delta region (ENS=0.5; r2=0.8), allowing a good representation of flooding dynamics basinwide and simulation of flooding behavior of both perennial (e.g., Niger main stem) and ephemeral rivers (e.g., Niger Red Flood tributaries in Sahel). Coupling between hydrology and hydrodynamic processes indicates an important feedback between floodplain and soil water storage that allows high evapotranspiration rates even after the flood passage around the inner delta area. Also, representation of water retention in floodplain channels and distributaries in the inner delta (e.g., Diaka river

  18. Coupled Dynamic Modeling to Assess Human Impact on Watershed Hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, I. N.; Tsai, Y.; Turnbull, S.; Bomblies, A.; Zia, A.

    2014-12-01

    Humans are intrinsic to the hydrologic system, both as agents of change and as beneficiaries of ecosystem services. This connection has been underappreciated in hydrology. We present a modeling linkage framework of an agent-based land use change model with a physical-based watershed model. The coupled model framework presented constitutes part of an integrated assessment model that is being developed to study human-ecosystem interaction in Missisquoi Bay, spanning Vermont and Québec, which is experiencing high concentrations of nutrients from the Missisquoi River watershed. The integrated assessment approach proposed is comprised of linking two simulation models: the Interactive Land-Use Transition Agent-Based Model (ILUTABM) and a physically based process model, the Regional Hydro-Ecological Simulation System (RHESSys). The ILUTABM treats both landscape and landowners as agents and simulates annual land-use patterns resulting from landowners annual land-use decisions and Best Management Practices (BMPs) adaptations to landowners utilities, land productivity and perceived impacts of floods. The Missisquoi River at Swanton watershed RHESSys model (drainage area of 2,200 km2) driven by climate data was first calibrated to daily streamflows and water quality sensor data at the watershed outlet. Simulated land-use patterns were then processed to drive the calibrated RHESSys model to obtain streamflow nutrient loading realizations. Nutrients loading realizations are then examined and routed back to the ILUTAB model to obtain public polices needed to manage the Missisquoi watershed as well as the Lake Champlain in general. We infer that the applicability of this approach can be generalized to other similar watersheds. Index Terms: 0402: Agricultural systems; 1800: Hydrology; 1803: Anthropogenic effects; 1834 Human impacts; 6344: System operation and management; 6334: Regional Planning

  19. Modelling couplings between reaction, fluid flow and deformation: Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malvoisin, Benjamin; Podladchikov, Yury Y.; Connolly, James A. D.

    2016-04-01

    Mineral assemblages out of equilibrium are commonly found in metamorphic rocks testifying of the critical role of kinetics for metamorphic reactions. As experimentally determined reaction rates in fluid-saturated systems generally indicate complete reaction in less than several years, i.e. several orders of magnitude faster than field-based estimates, metamorphic reaction kinetics are generally thought to be controlled by transport rather than by processes at the mineral surface. However, some geological processes like earthquakes or slow-slip events have shorter characteristic timescales, and transport processes can be intimately related to mineral surface processes. Therefore, it is important to take into account the kinetics of mineral surface processes for modelling fluid/rock interactions. Here, a model coupling reaction, fluid flow and deformation was improved by introducing a delay in the achievement of equilibrium. The classical formalism for dissolution/precipitation reactions was used to consider the influence of the distance from equilibrium and of temperature on the reaction rate, and a dependence on porosity was introduced to model evolution of reacting surface area during reaction. The fitting of experimental data for three reactions typically occurring in metamorphic systems (serpentine dehydration, muscovite dehydration and calcite decarbonation) indicates a systematic faster kinetics close from equilibrium on the dehydration side than on the hydration side. This effect is amplified through the porosity term in the reaction rate since porosity is formed during dehydration. Numerical modelling indicates that this difference in reaction rate close from equilibrium plays a key role in microtextures formation. The developed model can be used in a wide variety of geological systems where couplings between reaction, deformation and fluid flow have to be considered.

  20. Modeling Coupled Processes in Clay Formations for Radioactive Waste Disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hui-Hai; Rutqvist, Jonny; Zheng, Liange; Sonnenthal, Eric; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

    2010-08-31

    example, the excavation-damaged zone (EDZ) near repository tunnels can modify local permeability (resulting from induced fractures), potentially leading to less confinement capability (Tsang et al., 2005). Because of clay's swelling and shrinkage behavior (depending on whether the clay is in imbibition or drainage processes), fracture properties in the EDZ are quite dynamic and evolve over time as hydromechanical conditions change. To understand and model the coupled processes and their impact on repository performance is critical for the defensible performance assessment of a clay repository. Within the Natural Barrier System (NBS) group of the Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign at DOE's Office of Nuclear Energy, LBNL's research activities have focused on understanding and modeling such coupled processes. LBNL provided a report in this April on literature survey of studies on coupled processes in clay repositories and identification of technical issues and knowledge gaps (Tsang et al., 2010). This report will document other LBNL research activities within the natural system work package, including the development of constitutive relationships for elastic deformation of clay rock (Section 2), a THM modeling study (Section 3) and a THC modeling study (Section 4). The purpose of the THM and THC modeling studies is to demonstrate the current modeling capabilities in dealing with coupled processes in a potential clay repository. In Section 5, we discuss potential future R&D work based on the identified knowledge gaps. The linkage between these activities and related FEPs is presented in Section 6.

  1. Modeling of price and profit in coupled-ring networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tangmongkollert, Kittiwat; Suwanna, Sujin

    2016-06-01

    We study the behaviors of magnetization, price, and profit profiles in ring networks in the presence of the external magnetic field. The Ising model is used to determine the state of each node, which is mapped to the buy-or-sell state in a financial market, where +1 is identified as the buying state, and -1 as the selling state. Price and profit mechanisms are modeled based on the assumption that price should increase if demand is larger than supply, and it should decrease otherwise. We find that the magnetization can be induced between two rings via coupling links, where the induced magnetization strength depends on the number of the coupling links. Consequently, the price behaves linearly with time, where its rate of change depends on the magnetization. The profit grows like a quadratic polynomial with coefficients dependent on the magnetization. If two rings have opposite direction of net spins, the price flows in the direction of the majority spins, and the network with the minority spins gets a loss in profit.

  2. Modelling blast induced damage from a fully coupled explosive charge

    PubMed Central

    Onederra, Italo A.; Furtney, Jason K.; Sellers, Ewan; Iverson, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents one of the latest developments in the blasting engineering modelling field—the Hybrid Stress Blasting Model (HSBM). HSBM includes a rock breakage engine to model detonation, wave propagation, rock fragmentation, and muck pile formation. Results from two controlled blasting experiments were used to evaluate the code’s ability to predict the extent of damage. Results indicate that the code is capable of adequately predicting both the extent and shape of the damage zone associated with the influence of point-of-initiation and free-face boundary conditions. Radial fractures extending towards a free face are apparent in the modelling output and matched those mapped after the experiment. In the stage 2 validation experiment, the maximum extent of visible damage was of the order of 1.45 m for the fully coupled 38-mm emulsion charge. Peak radial velocities were predicted within a relative difference of only 1.59% at the nearest history point at 0.3 m from the explosive charge. Discrepancies were larger further away from the charge, with relative differences of −22.4% and −42.9% at distances of 0.46 m and 0.61 m, respectively, meaning that the model overestimated particle velocities at these distances. This attenuation deficiency in the modelling produced an overestimation of the damage zone at the corner of the block due to excessive stress reflections. The extent of visible damage in the immediate vicinity of the blasthole adequately matched the measurements. PMID:26412978

  3. A coupled energy transport and hydrological model for urban canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Bou-Zeid, E.; Smith, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    Urban land-atmosphere interaction has been attracting more research efforts in order to understand the complex physics of flow and mass and heat transport in urban surfaces and the lower urban atmosphere. In this work, we developed and implemented a new physically-based single-layer urban canopy model, coupling the surface exchange of energy and the subsurface transport of water/soil moisture. The new model incorporates sub-facet heterogeneity for each urban surface (roof, wall or ground). This better simulates the energy transport in urban canopy layers, especially over low-intensity built (suburban type) terrains that include a significant fraction of vegetated surfaces. We implemented detailed urban hydrological models for both natural terrains (bare soil and vegetation) and porous engineered materials with water-holding capacity (concrete, gravel, etc). The skill of the new scheme was tested against experimental data collected through a wireless sensor network deployed over the campus of Princeton University. The model performance was found to be robust and insensitive to changes in weather conditions or seasonal variability. Predictions of the volumetric soil water content were also in good agreement with field measurements, highlighting the model capability of capturing subsurface water transport for urban lawns. The new model was also applied to a case study assessing different strategies, i.e. white versus green roofs, in the mitigation of urban heat island effect.

  4. Modelling blast induced damage from a fully coupled explosive charge.

    PubMed

    Onederra, Italo A; Furtney, Jason K; Sellers, Ewan; Iverson, Stephen

    2013-02-01

    This paper presents one of the latest developments in the blasting engineering modelling field-the Hybrid Stress Blasting Model (HSBM). HSBM includes a rock breakage engine to model detonation, wave propagation, rock fragmentation, and muck pile formation. Results from two controlled blasting experiments were used to evaluate the code's ability to predict the extent of damage. Results indicate that the code is capable of adequately predicting both the extent and shape of the damage zone associated with the influence of point-of-initiation and free-face boundary conditions. Radial fractures extending towards a free face are apparent in the modelling output and matched those mapped after the experiment. In the stage 2 validation experiment, the maximum extent of visible damage was of the order of 1.45 m for the fully coupled 38-mm emulsion charge. Peak radial velocities were predicted within a relative difference of only 1.59% at the nearest history point at 0.3 m from the explosive charge. Discrepancies were larger further away from the charge, with relative differences of -22.4% and -42.9% at distances of 0.46 m and 0.61 m, respectively, meaning that the model overestimated particle velocities at these distances. This attenuation deficiency in the modelling produced an overestimation of the damage zone at the corner of the block due to excessive stress reflections. The extent of visible damage in the immediate vicinity of the blasthole adequately matched the measurements.

  5. A fully coupled 2D model of equiaxed eutectic solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Charbon, Ch.; LeSar, R.

    1995-12-31

    We propose a model of equiaxed eutectic solidification that couples the macroscopic level of heat diffusion with the microscopic level of nucleation and growth of the eutectic grains. The heat equation with the source term corresponding to the latent heat release due to solidification is calculated numerically by means of an implicit finite difference method. In the time stepping scheme, the evolution of solid fraction is deduced from a stochastic model of nucleation and growth which uses the local temperature (interpolated from the FDM mesh) to determine the local grain density and the local growth rate. The solid-liquid interface of each grain is tracked by using a subdivision of each grain perimeter in a large number of sectors. The state of each sector (i.e. whether it is still in contact with the liquid or already captured by an other grain) and the increase of radius of each grain during one time step allows one to compute the increase of solid fraction. As for deterministic models, the results of the model are the evolution of temperature and of solid fraction at any point of the sample. Moreover the model provides a complete picture of the microstructure, thus not limiting the microstructural information to the average grain density but allowing one to compute any stereological value of interest. We apply the model to the solidification of gray cast iron.

  6. A coupled vegetation/sediment transport model for dryland environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayaud, Jerome R.; Bailey, Richard M.; Wiggs, Giles F. S.

    2017-04-01

    Dryland regions are characterized by patchy vegetation, erodible surfaces, and erosive aeolian processes. Understanding how these constituent factors interact and shape landscape evolution is critical for managing potential environmental and anthropogenic impacts in drylands. However, modeling wind erosion on partially vegetated surfaces is a complex problem that has remained challenging for researchers. We present the new, coupled cellular automaton Vegetation and Sediment TrAnsport (ViSTA) model, which is designed to address fundamental questions about the development of arid and semiarid landscapes in a spatially explicit way. The technical aspects of the ViSTA model are described, including a new method for directly imposing oblique wind and transport directions onto a cell-based domain. Verification tests for the model are reported, including stable state solutions, the impact of drought and fire stress, wake flow dynamics, temporal scaling issues, and the impact of feedbacks between sediment movement and vegetation growth on landscape morphology. The model is then used to simulate an equilibrium nebkha dune field, and the resultant bed forms are shown to have very similar size and spacing characteristics to nebkhas observed in the Skeleton Coast, Namibia. The ViSTA model is a versatile geomorphological tool that could be used to predict threshold-related transitions in a range of dryland ecogeomorphic systems.

  7. Coupling SWAT and ANN models for enhanced daily streamflow prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noori, Navideh; Kalin, Latif

    2016-02-01

    To improve daily flow prediction in unmonitored watersheds a hybrid model was developed by combining a quasi-distributed watershed model and artificial neural network (ANN). Daily streamflow data from 29 nearby watersheds in and around the city of Atlanta, Southeastern United States, with leave-one-site-out jackknifing technique were used to build the flow predictive models during warm and cool seasons. Daily streamflow was first simulated with the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) and then the SWAT simulated baseflow and stormflow were used as inputs to ANN. Out of the total 29 test watersheds, 62% and 83% of them had Nash-Sutcliffe values above 0.50 during the cool and warm seasons, respectively (considered good or better). As the percent forest cover or the size of test watershed increased, the performances of the models gradually decreased during both warm and cool seasons. This indicates that the developed models work better in urbanized watersheds. In addition, SWAT and SWAT Calibration Uncertainty Procedure (SWAT-CUP) program were run separately for each station to compare the flow prediction accuracy of the hybrid approach to SWAT. Only 31% of the sites during the calibration and 34% of validation runs had ENASH values ⩾0.50. This study showed that coupling ANN with semi-distributed models can lead to improved daily streamflow predictions in ungauged watersheds.

  8. Wealth distribution of simple exchange models coupled with extremal dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagatella-Flores, N.; Rodríguez-Achach, M.; Coronel-Brizio, H. F.; Hernández-Montoya, A. R.

    2015-01-01

    Punctuated Equilibrium (PE) states that after long periods of evolutionary quiescence, species evolution can take place in short time intervals, where sudden differentiation makes new species emerge and some species extinct. In this paper, we introduce and study the effect of punctuated equilibrium on two different asset exchange models: the yard sale model (YS, winner gets a random fraction of a poorer player's wealth) and the theft and fraud model (TF, winner gets a random fraction of the loser's wealth). The resulting wealth distribution is characterized using the Gini index. In order to do this, we consider PE as a perturbation with probability ρ of being applied. We compare the resulting values of the Gini index at different increasing values of ρ in both models. We found that in the case of the TF model, the Gini index reduces as the perturbation ρ increases, not showing dependence with the agents number. While for YS we observe a phase transition which happens around ρc = 0.79. For perturbations ρ <ρc the Gini index reaches the value of one as time increases (an extreme wealth condensation state), whereas for perturbations greater than or equal to ρc the Gini index becomes different to one, avoiding the system reaches this extreme state. We show that both simple exchange models coupled with PE dynamics give more realistic results. In particular for YS, we observe a power low decay of wealth distribution.

  9. Perception--action coupling model for human locomotor pointing.

    PubMed

    de Rugy, A; Taga, G; Montagne, G; Buekers, M J; Laurent, M

    2002-08-01

    How do humans achieve the precise positioning of the feet during walking, for example, to reach the first step of a stairway? We addressed this question at the visuomotor integration level. Based on the optical specification of the required adaptation, a dynamical system model of the visuomotor control of human locomotor pointing was devised for the positioning of a foot on a visible target on the floor during walking. Visuomotor integration consists of directly linking optical information to a motor command that specifically modulates step length in accordance with the ongoing dynamics of locomotor pattern generation. The adaptation of locomotion emerges from a perception-action coupling type of control based on temporal information rather than on feedforward planning of movements. The proposed model reproduces experimental results obtained for human locomotor pointing.

  10. Models of radiofrequency coupling for negative ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Cavenago, M.; Petrenko, S.

    2012-02-15

    Radiofrequency heating for ICP (inductively coupled plasma) ion sources depends on the source operating pressure, the presence or absence of a Faraday shield, the driver coil geometry, the frequency used, and the magnetic field configuration: in negative ion source a magnetic filter seems necessary for H{sup -} survival. The result of single particle simulations showing the possibility of electron acceleration in the preglow regime and for reasonable driver chamber radius (15 cm) is reported, also as a function of the static external magnetic field. An effective plasma conductivity, depending not only from electron density, temperature, and rf field but also on static magnetic field is here presented and compared to previous models. Use of this conductivity and of multiphysics tools for a plasma transport and heating model is shown and discussed for a small source.

  11. Representing Icebergs In A Fully Coupled Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bügelmayer, Marianne; Roche, Didier; Renssen, Hans

    2014-05-01

    Changes in the global climate during past and current times strongly impact the Polar Regions, which in turn affect the global climate due to several mechanisms, such as albedo, topography, ablation and ice discharge. Icebergs are an important part of the climate system as they interact with the ocean, atmosphere and cryosphere. Several approaches have been taken to incorporate iceberg calving into numerical models under different climate forcings. The studies done so far have in common that the icebergs were moved by reconstructed or modelled forcing fields and that the initial size distribution of the icebergs was prescribed according to present day observations. Hence, uncertainties in the forcing fields and in the parameterization of the iceberg size may alter the results. To investigate the impact of the background forcing (atmosphere, ocean) and the pre-defined size distribution on the icebergs and consequently on the Northern hemisphere climate and the Greenland ice sheet, we have coupled an earth system model of intermediate complexity (iLOVECLIM, Roche et al., 2013) to an ice sheet/ice shelf model (GRISLI, Ritz et al., 2001) and an iceberg module (Jongma et al., 2009; Bügelmayer et al., 2014). Using this set-up, we performed 15 sensitivity experiments that differ in the applied forcing (atmosphere, ocean), the applied boundary conditions (pre-industrial, 4xCO2, 1/4 x CO2) and the initial size distribution of the icebergs. In the presented study only the Greenland ice sheet is considered. We find that, under pre-industrial conditions, the atmospheric forcing pushes the icebergs further away from their calving sites and further into the North Atlantic, whereas the ocean currents transport the bergs along the Greenland coast and southward along the Canadian coast. Although the purely atmospheric-forced bergs cause warmer oceanic conditions than the oceanic-driven bergs, the overall effect on climate and the resulting ice sheet due to variations in the

  12. Minimal coupling model of the biaxial nematic phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longa, Lech; Grzybowski, Piotr; Romano, Silvano; Virga, Epifanio

    2005-05-01

    A minimal coupling model exhibiting isotropic, uniaxial, and biaxial nematic phases is analyzed in detail and its relation to existing models known in the literature is clarified. Its intrinsic symmetry properties are exploited to restrict the relevant ranges of coupling constants. Further on, properties of the model are thoroughly investigated by means of bifurcation theory as proposed by Kayser and Raveché [Phys. Rev. A 17, 2067 (1978)] and Mulder [Phys. Rev. A 39, 360 (1989)]. As a first step toward this goal, the bifurcation theory is applied to a general formulation of density functional theory in terms of direct correlation functions. On a general formal level, the theory is then analyzed to show that the bifurcation points from the reference, high-symmetry equilibrium phase to a low-symmetry structure depend only on the properties of the one-particle distribution function and the direct pair correlation function of the reference phase. The character of the bifurcation (whether spinodal, critical, tricritical, isolated Landau point, etc.) depends, in addition, on a few higher-order direct correlation functions. Explicit analytical results are derived for the case when only the leading L=2 terms of the potential (mean-field analysis) or of the direct pair correlation function expansion in the symmetry-adapted basis are retained. Formulas are compared with the numerical calculations for the mean-field, momentum L=2 potential model, in which case they are exact. In particular, bifurcations from the isotropic and uniaxial nematic to the biaxial nematic phases are discussed. The possibility of the recently reported nematic uniaxial-nematic biaxial tricritical point [A. M. Sonnet, E. G. Virga, and G. E. Durand, Phys. Rev. E 67, 061701 (2003)] is analyzed as well.

  13. Coupled Modeling of Fault Poromechanics During Geologic CO2 Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, B.; Hager, B. H.; Juanes, R.

    2012-12-01

    Perhaps the most pressing current debate surrounding carbon capture and storage (CCS) revolves around the pressure limitations on geologic storage [Szulczewski et al., 2012]. Overpressures due to CO2 injection could fracture the caprock [Birkholzer and Zhou, 2009], trigger earthquakes [Cappa and Rutqvist, 2011], and potentially compromise the caprock by activating faults [Zoback and Gorelick, 2012]. While an alarmist view of these issues [Zoback and Gorelick, 2012] appears unwarranted, it seems clear that addressing the coupled processes of CO2 injection and fault poromechanics constitutes a pressing challenge for CCS. More generally, the fundamental link between earthquakes and groundwater flow is a first-order geoscience problem. Despite the interest that this issue has received in recent times, many aspects remain poorly understood, from the physics of the problem to the ability to perform credible fully-coupled simulations. Here, we advance our current simulation technology for forecasting fault slip and fault activation from fluid injection and withdrawal at depth. We present the development and application of a coupled multiphase-flow and reservoir-geomechanics simulator able to model the poromechanics of faults. We use a recently-discovered operator split, the fixed-stress split [Kim et al., 2011], to obtain an unconditionally-stable sequential iterative scheme for the simulation of multiphase flow and geomechanics. The geomechanics code PyLith [Aagaard et al., 2011] permits simulating faults as surfaces of discontinuity. We use the rigorous nonlinear formulation of coupled geomechanics, in which the variation in the fluid mass of each phase is tracked [Coussy, 1995]. Our approach allows us to model strong capillarity and compressibility effects, which can be important in the context of CO2 injection. We present results from several synthetic case studies to highlight the main features of our simulator, and to perform a preliminary risk assessment of leakage

  14. A Coupled Surface/Subsurface Model for Hydrological Drought Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musuuza, J. L.; Kumar, R.; Samaniego, L. E.; Fischer, T.; Kolditz, O.; Attinger, S.

    2013-12-01

    Hydrological droughts occur when storage in the ground and surface-water bodies falls below statistical average. Due to the inclusion of regional groundwater, hydrological droughts evolve relatively slowly. The atmospheric and surface components of the hydrological cycle have been widely studied, are well understood, and their prognoses are fairly accurate. In large-scale land surface models on the other hand, subsurface (groundwater) flow processes are usually assumed unidirectional and limited to the vertically-downward percolation and the horizontal runoffs. The vertical feedback from groundwater to the unsaturated zone as well as the groundwater recharge from surface waters are usually misrepresented, resulting in poor model performance during low-flow periods. The feedback is important during meteorological droughts because it replenishes soil moisture from ground- and surface water, thereby delaying the onset of agricultural droughts. If sustained for long periods however, the depletion can significantly reduce surface and subsurface storage and lead to severe hydrological droughts. We hypothesise that an explicit incorporation of the groundwater component into an existing land surface model would lead to better representation of low flows, which is critical for drought analyses. It would also improve the model performance during low-flow periods. For this purpose, we coupled the process-based mHM surface model (Samaniego et al. 2010) with MODFLOW (Harbaugh 2005) to analyse droughts in the Unstrut catchment, one of the tributaries of the Elbe. The catchment is located in one of the most drought-prone areas of Germany. We present results for stand-alone and coupled mHM simulations for the period 1970-2000. References Arlen W. Harbaugh. MODFLOW-2005, The U.S. Geological Survey Modular Ground-water Model-the Ground-water Flow Process, chapter Modelling techniques, sec. A. Ground water, pages 1:1-9:62. USGS, 2005. Luis Samaniego, Rohini Kumar, and Sabine Attinger

  15. Coupled thermal and geophysical modelling for monitoring of permafrost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rings, Jörg; Scherler, Martin; Hauck, Christian

    2010-05-01

    Geophysical methods, and especially the Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) method, are being recognised as standard tools for the detection and monitoring of permafrost. Recent advances in automated data acquisition and processing have made their application worthwhile for continuous monitoring systems even in harsh and heterogeneous terrain. ERT yields 2- and 3-dimensional data of the subsurface and is sensitive to the unfrozen water and ice content, which is complementary to the 1-dimensional temperature measurements conducted in boreholes. For future autonomous and widespread monitoring systems for permafrost, a purely geophysical approach is envisaged, because the low costs and minimal disturbance of the system to be monitored is one of the major advantages of geophysics as opposed to boreholes. However, the link between the indirectly measured geophysical property (e.g. electrical resistivity in case of ERT) of the subsurface and temperature is often non-trivial and cannot be determined without ground truth data from boreholes or extensive laboratory calibration. In this contribution, we introduce a Bayesian filtering approach of coupled geophysical and thermal modelling to predict subsurface temperatures based on ERT monitoring data without the need for borehole or laboratory data. We use sequential Bayesian filtering or particle filtering, which has the advantage of continuously providing probability distributions of state (temperature) and parameters (e.g. the link between resistivity and temperature) whenever measurements become available. A particle filter approximates these distributions by a set of discrete, weighted particles. For each particle, initial state and parameter are drawn from prior distributions and thermal conduction is modelled independently. The modelled change in temperature is transferred to change in resistivity by a linear relation, and an ERT forward model is used to simulate the system response. Then, the particles are

  16. Coupled thermo-hydro-chemical models of swelling bentonites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samper, Javier; Mon, Alba; Zheng, Liange; Montenegro, Luis; Naves, Acacia; Pisani, Bruno

    2014-05-01

    The disposal of radioactive waste in deep geological repositories is based on the multibarrier concept of retention of the waste by a combination of engineered and geological barriers. The engineered barrier system (EBS) includes the solid conditioned waste-form, the waste container, the buffer made of materials such as clay, grout or crushed rock that separate the waste package from the host rock and the tunnel linings and supports. The geological barrier supports the engineered system and provides stability over the long term during which time radioactive decay reduces the levels of radioactivity. The strong interplays among thermal (T), hydrodynamic (H), mechanical (M) and chemical (C) processes during the hydration, thermal and solute transport stages of the engineered barrier system (EBS) of a radioactive waste repository call for coupled THMC models for the metallic overpack, the unsaturated compacted bentonite and the concrete liner. Conceptual and numerical coupled THMC models of the EBS have been developed, which have been implemented in INVERSE-FADES-CORE. Chemical reactions are coupled to the hydrodynamic processes through chemical osmosis (C-H coupling) while bentonite swelling affects solute transport via changes in bentonite porosity changes (M-H coupling). Here we present THMC models of heating and hydration laboratory experiments performed by CIEMAT (Madrid, Spain) on compacted FEBEX bentonite and numerical models for the long-term evolution of the EBS for 1 Ma. The changes in porosity caused by swelling are more important than those produced by the chemical reactions during the early evolution of the EBS (t < 100 years). For longer times, however, the changes in porosity induced by the dissolution/precipitation reactions are more relevant due to: 1) The effect of iron mineral phases (corrosion products) released by the corrosion of the carbon steel canister; and 2) The hyper alkaline plume produced by the concrete liner. Numerical results show that

  17. Model-based risk analysis of coupled process steps.

    PubMed

    Westerberg, Karin; Broberg-Hansen, Ernst; Sejergaard, Lars; Nilsson, Bernt

    2013-09-01

    A section of a biopharmaceutical manufacturing process involving the enzymatic coupling of a polymer to a therapeutic protein was characterized with regards to the process parameter sensitivity and design space. To minimize the formation of unwanted by-products in the enzymatic reaction, the substrate was added in small amounts and unreacted protein was separated using size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) and recycled to the reactor. The quality of the final recovered product was thus a result of the conditions in both the reactor and the SEC, and a design space had to be established for both processes together. This was achieved by developing mechanistic models of the reaction and SEC steps, establishing the causal links between process conditions and product quality. Model analysis was used to complement the qualitative risk assessment, and design space and critical process parameters were identified. The simulation results gave an experimental plan focusing on the "worst-case regions" in terms of product quality and yield. In this way, the experiments could be used to verify both the suggested process and the model results. This work demonstrates the necessary steps of model-assisted process analysis, from model development through experimental verification. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Indian Ocean sea surface salinity variations in a coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinayachandran, P. N.; Nanjundiah, Ravi S.

    2009-08-01

    The variability of the sea surface salinity (SSS) in the Indian Ocean is studied using a 100-year control simulation of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM 2.0). The monsoon-driven seasonal SSS pattern in the Indian Ocean, marked by low salinity in the east and high salinity in the west, is captured by the model. The model overestimates runoff into the Bay of Bengal due to higher rainfall over the Himalayan-Tibetan regions which drain into the Bay of Bengal through Ganga-Brahmaputra rivers. The outflow of low-salinity water from the Bay of Bengal is too strong in the model. Consequently, the model Indian Ocean SSS is about 1 less than that seen in the climatology. The seasonal Indian Ocean salt balance obtained from the model is consistent with the analysis from climatological data sets. During summer, the large freshwater input into the Bay of Bengal and its redistribution decide the spatial pattern of salinity tendency. During winter, horizontal advection is the dominant contributor to the tendency term. The interannual variability of the SSS in the Indian Ocean is about five times larger than that in coupled model simulations of the North Atlantic Ocean. Regions of large interannual standard deviations are located near river mouths in the Bay of Bengal and in the eastern equatorial Indian Ocean. Both freshwater input into the ocean and advection of this anomalous flux are responsible for the generation of these anomalies. The model simulates 20 significant Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) events and during IOD years large salinity anomalies appear in the equatorial Indian Ocean. The anomalies exist as two zonal bands: negative salinity anomalies to the north of the equator and positive to the south. The SSS anomalies for the years in which IOD is not present and for ENSO years are much weaker than during IOD years. Significant interannual SSS anomalies appear in the Indian Ocean only during IOD years.

  19. River-Ocean Interactions: A Coupled Morphodynamic Delta Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratliff, K. M.; Hutton, E. W. H.; Murray, A. B.

    2015-12-01

    Society has become increasingly reliant on deltas for agriculture, resource extraction, transportation and trade, yet these landforms and their inhabitants have become increasingly vulnerable to submergence and natural disasters (e.g., flooding, storm surges). Although we know that many 'natural' processes influence large-scale delta morphology, we do not yet know the relative importance of anthropogenic influences (e.g., climate and land-use change) in shaping modern deltas. In particular, the processes and feedbacks that shape delta morphology over large space and timescales (i.e. timescales of multiple river avulsions and the evolution of multiple delta lobes) are not well understood. To explore the long-term combined effects of sea-level rise, subsidence and anthropogenic manipulations, we have developed a new morphodynamic delta model that links fluvial, floodplain, and deltaic dynamics over large space and timescales. Using the framework and tools of the Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System, we couple a new river and floodplain module to the Coastline Evolution Model (CEM, Ashton and Murray, 2001). In the fluvial module, cell width is assumed to be larger than the channel belt width (including natural levees that are maintained at a bankfull channel-depth above the riverbed elevation). The river course is determined using a steepest-descent methodology, and erosion and deposition along the course is modeled as a linear diffusive process. An avulsion occurs when the riverbed becomes super-elevated above the surrounding floodplain, and the new steepest-descent path to sea level is shorter than the previous course. Floodplain deposition is modeled by blanket (uniform) deposition and crevasse splay deposition (after a 'failed' avulsion; if the riverbed is super-elevated, but the new steepest path to sea level is longer than the prior path). Preliminary results indicate that anthropogenic manipulations of the river (e.g., levees) can propagate hundreds of

  20. Early Eocene's climate and ocean circulation from coupled model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Tobias; Thomas, Maik

    2014-05-01

    While proxy data provide a snapshot of climate conditions at a specific location, coupled atmosphere-ocean models are able to expand this knowledge over the globe. Therefore, they are indispensable tools for understanding past climate conditions. We model the dynamical state of atmosphere and ocean during the Early Eocene and pre-industrial times, using the coupled atmosphere-ocean model ECHAM5/MPIOM with realistic reconstructions of vegetation and CO2. The resulting simulated climate variables are compared to terrestrial and oceanic proxies. The Early Eocene climate is in the global mean warmer (~13°C) and wetter (~1 mm/d) than in pre-industrial times. Especially temperatures in the Southern Ocean, the Greenland Sea and Arctic Ocean raise by up to 25K, being in accordance with surface temperature estimates from terrestrial and marine proxy data. The oceans are hereby rendered ice-free, leading to a decrease of polar albedo and thereby facilitating polar warming. This leads to a by 5K diminished equator-to-pole temperature gradient. Warmer temperatures as well as changed bathymetry have an effect on ocean dynamics in the Early Eocene. Although deep-water formation can be found in the Greenland Sea, Weddell Sea, and Tethys Sea, it is weaker than in the pre-industrial run and the resulting circulation is shallower. This is not only visible in water transport through sea gates but also in the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), adopting its maximum at 700m depths in the Early Eocene, while maximum transport is reached in the pre-industrial control run at 1200m. Albeit a shallow and weak thermohaline circulation, a global ocean conveyor belt is being triggered, causing a transport from the areas of subduction through the Atlantic and Southern Oceans into the Indian and Pacific Oceans.

  1. Coupled mode parametric resonance in a vibrating screen model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slepyan, Leonid I.; Slepyan, Victor I.

    2014-02-01

    We consider a simple dynamic model of the vibrating screen operating in the parametric resonance (PR) mode. This model was used in the course of designing and setting of such a screen in LPMC. The PR-based screen compares favorably with conventional types of such machines, where the transverse oscillations are excited directly. It is characterized by larger values of the amplitude and by insensitivity to damping in a rather wide range. The model represents an initially strained system of two equal masses connected by a linearly elastic string. Self-equilibrated, longitudinal, harmonic forces act on the masses. Under certain conditions this results in transverse, finite-amplitude oscillations of the string. The problem is reduced to a system of two ordinary differential equations coupled by the geometric nonlinearity. Damping in both the transverse and longitudinal oscillations is taken into account. Free and forced oscillations of this mass-string system are examined analytically and numerically. The energy exchange between the longitudinal and transverse modes of free oscillations is demonstrated. An exact analytical solution is found for the forced oscillations, where the coupling plays the role of a stabilizer. In a more general case, the harmonic analysis is used with neglect of the higher harmonics. Explicit expressions for all parameters of the steady nonlinear oscillations are determined. The domains are found where the analytically obtained steady oscillation regimes are stable. Over the frequency ranges, where the steady oscillations exist, a perfect correspondence is found between the amplitudes obtained analytically and numerically. Illustrations based on the analytical and numerical simulations are presented.

  2. Model spin-orbit coupling Hamiltonians for graphene systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochan, Denis; Irmer, Susanne; Fabian, Jaroslav

    2017-04-01

    We present a detailed theoretical study of effective spin-orbit coupling (SOC) Hamiltonians for graphene-based systems, covering global effects such as proximity to substrates and local SOC effects resulting, for example, from dilute adsorbate functionalization. Our approach combines group theory and tight-binding descriptions. We consider structures with global point group symmetries D6 h, D3 d, D3 h, C6 v, and C3 v that represent, for example, pristine graphene, graphene miniripple, planar boron nitride, graphene on a substrate, and free standing graphone, respectively. The presence of certain spin-orbit coupling parameters is correlated with the absence of the specific point group symmetries. Especially in the case of C6 v—graphene on a substrate, or transverse electric field—we point out the presence of a third SOC parameter, besides the conventional intrinsic and Rashba contributions, thus far neglected in literature. For all global structures we provide effective SOC Hamiltonians both in the local atomic and Bloch forms. Dilute adsorbate coverage results in the local point group symmetries C6 v, C3 v, and C2 v, which represent the stable adsorption at hollow, top and bridge positions, respectively. For each configuration we provide effective SOC Hamiltonians in the atomic orbital basis that respect local symmetries. In addition to giving specific analytic expressions for model SOC Hamiltonians, we also present general (no-go) arguments about the absence of certain SOC terms.

  3. Affine group formulation of the Standard Model coupled to gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Ching-Yi; Ita, Eyo; Soo, Chopin

    2014-04-15

    In this work we apply the affine group formalism for four dimensional gravity of Lorentzian signature, which is based on Klauder’s affine algebraic program, to the formulation of the Hamiltonian constraint of the interaction of matter and all forces, including gravity with non-vanishing cosmological constant Λ, as an affine Lie algebra. We use the hermitian action of fermions coupled to gravitation and Yang–Mills theory to find the density weight one fermionic super-Hamiltonian constraint. This term, combined with the Yang–Mills and Higgs energy densities, are composed with York’s integrated time functional. The result, when combined with the imaginary part of the Chern–Simons functional Q, forms the affine commutation relation with the volume element V(x). Affine algebraic quantization of gravitation and matter on equal footing implies a fundamental uncertainty relation which is predicated upon a non-vanishing cosmological constant. -- Highlights: •Wheeler–DeWitt equation (WDW) quantized as affine algebra, realizing Klauder’s program. •WDW formulated for interaction of matter and all forces, including gravity, as affine algebra. •WDW features Hermitian generators in spite of fermionic content: Standard Model addressed. •Constructed a family of physical states for the full, coupled theory via affine coherent states. •Fundamental uncertainty relation, predicated on non-vanishing cosmological constant.

  4. Can a coupled meteorology–chemistry model reproduce the ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The ability of a coupled meteorology–chemistry model, i.e., Weather Research and Forecast and Community Multiscale Air Quality (WRF-CMAQ), to reproduce the historical trend in aerosol optical depth (AOD) and clear-sky shortwave radiation (SWR) over the Northern Hemisphere has been evaluated through a comparison of 21-year simulated results with observation-derived records from 1990 to 2010. Six satellite-retrieved AOD products including AVHRR, TOMS, SeaWiFS, MISR, MODIS-Terra and MODIS-Aqua as well as long-term historical records from 11 AERONET sites were used for the comparison of AOD trends. Clear-sky SWR products derived by CERES at both the top of atmosphere (TOA) and surface as well as surface SWR data derived from seven SURFRAD sites were used for the comparison of trends in SWR. The model successfully captured increasing AOD trends along with the corresponding increased TOA SWR (upwelling) and decreased surface SWR (downwelling) in both eastern China and the northern Pacific. The model also captured declining AOD trends along with the corresponding decreased TOA SWR (upwelling) and increased surface SWR (downwelling) in the eastern US, Europe and the northern Atlantic for the period of 2000–2010. However, the model underestimated the AOD over regions with substantial natural dust aerosol contributions, such as the Sahara Desert, Arabian Desert, central Atlantic and northern Indian Ocean. Estimates of the aerosol direct radiative effect (DRE) at TOA a

  5. Minimally coupled scalar field cosmology in anisotropic cosmological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, C. P.; Srivastava, Milan

    2017-02-01

    We study a spatially homogeneous and anisotropic cosmological model in the Einstein gravitational theory with a minimally coupled scalar field. We consider a non-interacting combination of scalar field and perfect fluid as the source of matter components which are separately conserved. The dynamics of cosmic scalar fields with a zero rest mass and an exponential potential are studied, respectively. We find that both assumptions of potential along with the average scale factor as an exponential function of scalar field lead to the logarithmic form of scalar field in each case which further gives power-law form of the average scale factor. Using these forms of the average scale factor, exact solutions of the field equations are obtained to the metric functions which represent a power-law and a hybrid expansion, respectively. We find that the zero-rest-mass model expands with decelerated rate and behaves like a stiff matter. In the case of exponential potential function, the model decelerates, accelerates or shows the transition depending on the parameters. The isotropization is observed at late-time evolution of the Universe in the exponential potential model.

  6. A coupled regional climate-biosphere model for climate studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bossert, J.; Winterkamp, J.; Barnes, F.; Roads, J.

    1996-04-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project has been to develop and test a regional climate modeling system that couples a limited-area atmospheric code to a biosphere scheme that properly represents surface processes. The development phase has included investigations of the impact of variations in surface forcing parameters, meteorological input data resolution, and model grid resolution. The testing phase has included a multi-year simulation of the summer climate over the Southwest United States at higher resolution than previous studies. Averaged results from a nine summer month simulation demonstrate the capability of the regional climate model to produce a representative climatology of the Southwest. The results also show the importance of strong summertime thermal forcing of the surface in defining this climatology. These simulations allow us to observe the climate at much higher temporal and spatial resolutions than existing observational networks. The model also allows us to see the full three-dimensional state of the climate and thereby deduce the dominant physical processes at any particular time.

  7. Coupled model of physical and biological processes affecting maize pollination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arritt, R.; Westgate, M.; Riese, J.; Falk, M.; Takle, E.

    2003-04-01

    Controversy over the use of genetically modified (GM) crops has led to increased interest in evaluating and controlling the potential for inadvertent outcrossing in open-pollinated crops such as maize. In response to this problem we have developed a Lagrangian model of pollen dispersion as a component of a coupled end-to-end (anther to ear) physical-biological model of maize pollination. The Lagrangian method is adopted because of its generality and flexibility: first, the method readily accommodates flow fields of arbitrary complexity; second, each element of the material being transported can be identified by its source, time of release, or other properties of interest. The latter allows pollen viability to be estimated as a function of such factors as travel time, temperature, and relative humidity, so that the physical effects of airflow and turbulence on pollen dispersion can be considered together with the biological aspects of pollen release and viability. Predicted dispersion of pollen compares well both to observations and to results from a simpler Gaussian plume model. Ability of the Lagrangian model to handle complex air flows is demonstrated by application to pollen dispersion in the vicinity of an agricultural shelter belt. We also show results indicating that pollen viability can be quantified by an "aging function" that accounts for temperature, humidity, and time of exposure.

  8. Coupled Thermal-Chemical-Mechanical Modeling of Validation Cookoff Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    ERIKSON,WILLIAM W.; SCHMITT,ROBERT G.; ATWOOD,A.I.; CURRAN,P.D.

    2000-11-27

    The cookoff of energetic materials involves the combined effects of several physical and chemical processes. These processes include heat transfer, chemical decomposition, and mechanical response. The interaction and coupling between these processes influence both the time-to-event and the violence of reaction. The prediction of the behavior of explosives during cookoff, particularly with respect to reaction violence, is a challenging task. To this end, a joint DoD/DOE program has been initiated to develop models for cookoff, and to perform experiments to validate those models. In this paper, a series of cookoff analyses are presented and compared with data from a number of experiments for the aluminized, RDX-based, Navy explosive PBXN-109. The traditional thermal-chemical analysis is used to calculate time-to-event and characterize the heat transfer and boundary conditions. A reaction mechanism based on Tarver and McGuire's work on RDX{sup 2} was adjusted to match the spherical one-dimensional time-to-explosion data. The predicted time-to-event using this reaction mechanism compares favorably with the validation tests. Coupled thermal-chemical-mechanical analysis is used to calculate the mechanical response of the confinement and the energetic material state prior to ignition. The predicted state of the material includes the temperature, stress-field, porosity, and extent of reaction. There is little experimental data for comparison to these calculations. The hoop strain in the confining steel tube gives an estimation of the radial stress in the explosive. The inferred pressure from the measured hoop strain and calculated radial stress agree qualitatively. However, validation of the mechanical response model and the chemical reaction mechanism requires more data. A post-ignition burn dynamics model was applied to calculate the confinement dynamics. The burn dynamics calculations suffer from a lack of characterization of the confinement for the flaw

  9. A coupled oscillator model of shelf and ocean tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbic, Brian K.; Garrett, Chris

    2010-04-01

    The resonances of tides in the coupled open ocean and shelf are modeled by a mechanical analogue consisting of a damped driven larger mass and spring (the open-ocean) connected to a damped smaller mass and spring (the shelf). When both masses are near resonance, the addition of even a very small mass can significantly affect the oscillations of the larger mass. The influence of the shelf is largest if the shelf is resonant with weak friction. In particular, an increase of friction on a near-resonant shelf can, perhaps surprisingly, lead to an increase in ocean tides. On the other hand, a shelf with large friction has little effect on ocean tides. Comparison of the model predictions with results from numerical models of tides during the ice ages, when lower sea levels led to a much reduced areal extent of shelves, suggests that the predicted larger tidal dissipation then is related to the ocean basins being close to resonance. New numerical simulations with a forward global tide model are used to test expectations from the mechanical analogue. Setting friction to unrealistically large values in Hudson Strait yields larger North Atlantic M2 amplitudes, very similar to those seen in a simulation with the Hudson Strait blocked off. Thus, as anticipated, a shelf with very large friction is nearly equivalent in its effect on the open ocean to the removal of the shelf altogether. Setting friction in shallow waters throughout the globe to unrealistically large values yields even larger open ocean tidal amplitudes, similar to those found in simulations of ice-age tides. It thus appears that larger modeled tides during the ice ages can be a consequence of enhanced friction in shallower water on the shelf in glacial times as well as a reduced shelf area then. Single oscillator and coupled oscillator models for global tides show that the maximum extractable power for human use is a fraction of the present dissipation rate, which is itself a fraction of global human power

  10. Acoustically-coupled flow-induced vibration of a computational vocal fold model.

    PubMed

    Daily, David Jesse; Thomson, Scott L

    2013-01-15

    The flow-induced vibration of synthetic vocal fold models has been previously observed to be acoustically-coupled with upstream flow supply tubes. This phenomenon was investigated using a finite element model that included flow-structure-acoustic interactions. The length of the upstream duct was varied to explore the coupling between model vibration and subglottal acoustics. Incompressible and slightly compressible flow models were tested. The slightly compressible model exhibited acoustic coupling between fluid and solid domains in a manner consistent with experimental observations, whereas the incompressible model did not, showing the slightly compressible approach to be suitable for simulating acoustically-coupled vocal fold model flow-induced vibration.

  11. Acoustically-coupled flow-induced vibration of a computational vocal fold model

    PubMed Central

    Daily, David Jesse; Thomson, Scott L.

    2012-01-01

    The flow-induced vibration of synthetic vocal fold models has been previously observed to be acoustically-coupled with upstream flow supply tubes. This phenomenon was investigated using a finite element model that included flow–structure–acoustic interactions. The length of the upstream duct was varied to explore the coupling between model vibration and subglottal acoustics. Incompressible and slightly compressible flow models were tested. The slightly compressible model exhibited acoustic coupling between fluid and solid domains in a manner consistent with experimental observations, whereas the incompressible model did not, showing the slightly compressible approach to be suitable for simulating acoustically-coupled vocal fold model flow-induced vibration. PMID:23585700

  12. Modeling the sound transmission between rooms coupled through partition walls by using a diffusion model.

    PubMed

    Billon, Alexis; Foy, Cédric; Picaut, Judicaël; Valeau, Vincent; Sakout, Anas

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, a modification of the diffusion model for room acoustics is proposed to account for sound transmission between two rooms, a source room and an adjacent room, which are coupled through a partition wall. A system of two diffusion equations, one for each room, together with a set of two boundary conditions, one for the partition wall and one for the other walls of a room, is obtained and numerically solved. The modified diffusion model is validated by numerical comparisons with the statistical theory for several coupled-room configurations by varying the coupling area surface, the absorption coefficient of each room, and the volume of the adjacent room. An experimental comparison is also carried out for two coupled classrooms. The modified diffusion model results agree very well with both the statistical theory and the experimental data. The diffusion model can then be used as an alternative to the statistical theory, especially when the statistical theory is not applicable, that is, when the reverberant sound field is not diffuse. Moreover, the diffusion model allows the prediction of the spatial distribution of sound energy within each coupled room, while the statistical theory gives only one sound level for each room.

  13. Properties of Coupled Oscillator Model for Bidirectional Associative Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Satoshi

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we consider the stationary state and dynamical properties of a coupled oscillator model for bidirectional associative memory. For the stationary state, we apply the replica method to obtain self-consistent order parameter equations. The theoretical results for the storage capacity and overlap agree well with the numerical simulation. For the retrieval process, we apply statistical neurodynamics to include temporal noise correlations. For the successful retrieval process, the theoretical result obtained with the fourth-order approximation qualitatively agrees with the numerical simulation. However, for the unsuccessful retrieval process, higher-order noise correlations suppress severely; therefore, the maximum value of the overlap and the relaxation time are smaller than those of the numerical simulation. The reasons for the discrepancies between the theoretical result and numerical simulation, and the validity of our analysis are discussed.

  14. Understanding Core-Mantle Coupling Through Dynamo Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreenivasan, B.

    2007-12-01

    Core-mantle interaction in the Earth is studied using convection-driven dynamo models. We begin by considering an idealized regime that supports locking of the fluid motion and magnetic field to external inhomogeneities. In perfect locking, the azimuthal velocity in the fluid core has the profile of a thermal wind imposed by the boundary. In strongly convective dynamos, the competition between buoyancy-driven and boundary-driven thermal winds determines the extent of fluid-boundary coupling. We go on to show that dynamos with weakly convecting outer layers support locking, whereas strongly convecting outer regions swamp any influence of the lateral variations at the boundary. Finally, we investigate the tomographic boundary condition to see how its individual harmonic components may affect the morphology of the geomagnetic field.

  15. Finite Hypernuclei in the Latest Quark-Meson Coupling Model

    SciTech Connect

    Pierre A. M. Guichon; Anthony W. Thomas; Kazuo Tsushima

    2007-12-12

    The most recent development of the quark-meson coupling (QMC) model, in which the effect of the mean scalar field in-medium on the hyperfine interaction is also included self-consistently, is used to compute the properties of finite hypernuclei. The calculations for $\\Lambda$ and $\\Xi$ hypernuclei are of comparable quality to earlier QMC results without the additional parameter needed there. Even more significantly, the additional repulsion associated with the increased hyperfine interaction in-medium completely changes the predictions for $\\Sigma$ hypernuclei. Whereas in the earlier work they were bound by an amount similar to $\\Lambda$ hypernuclei, here they are unbound, in qualitative agreement with the experimental absence of such states. The equivalent non-relativistic potential felt by the $\\Sigma$ is repulsive inside the nuclear interior and weakly attractive in the nuclear surface, as suggested by the analysis of $\\Sigma$-atoms.

  16. Multi-Scale Coupling in Ocean and Climate Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Zhengyu Liu, Leslie Smith

    2009-08-14

    We have made significant progress on several projects aimed at understanding multi-scale dynamics in geophysical flows. Large-scale flows in the atmosphere and ocean are influenced by stable density stratification and rotation. The presence of stratification and rotation has important consequences through (i) the conservation of potential vorticity q = {omega} {center_dot} {del} {rho}, where {omega} is the total vorticity and {rho} is the density, and (ii) the existence of waves that affect the redistribution of energy from a given disturbance to the flow. Our research is centered on quantifying the effects of potential vorticity conservation and of wave interactions for the coupling of disparate time and space scales in the oceans and the atmosphere. Ultimately we expect the work to help improve predictive capabilities of atmosphere, ocean and climate modelers. The main findings of our research projects are described.

  17. Nuclear pasta phases within the quark-meson coupling model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grams, Guilherme; Santos, Alexandre M.; Panda, Prafulla K.; Providência, Constança; Menezes, Débora P.

    2017-05-01

    In this work, the low-density regions of nuclear and neutron star matter are studied. The search for the existence of nuclear pasta phases in this region is performed within the context of the quark-meson coupling (QMC) model, which incorporates quark degrees of freedom. Fixed proton fractions are considered, as well as nuclear matter in β equilibrium at zero temperature. We discuss the recent attempts to better understand the surface energy in the coexistence phases regime and we present results that show the existence of the pasta phases subject to some choices of the surface energy coefficient. We also analyze the influence of the nuclear pasta on some neutron star properties. The equation of state containing the pasta phase will be part of a complete grid for future use in supernova simulations.

  18. A nonlinear coupled soil moisture-vegetation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shikuo; Liu, Shida; Fu, Zuntao; Sun, Lan

    2005-06-01

    Based on the physical analysis that the soil moisture and vegetation depend mainly on the precipitation and evaporation as well as the growth, decay and consumption of vegetation a nonlinear dynamic coupled system of soil moisture-vegetation is established. Using this model, the stabilities of the steady states of vegetation are analyzed. This paper focuses on the research of the vegetation catastrophe point which represents the transition between aridness and wetness to a great extent. It is shown that the catastrophe point of steady states of vegetation depends mainly on the rainfall P and saturation value v0, which is selected to balance the growth and decay of vegetation. In addition, when the consumption of vegetation remains constant, the analytic solution of the vegetation equation is obtained.

  19. Multilevel Modeling of Two Cyclical Processes: Extending Differential Structural Equation Modeling to Nonlinear Coupled Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butner, Jonathan; Amazeen, Polemnia G.; Mulvey, Genna M.

    2005-01-01

    The authors present a dynamical multilevel model that captures changes over time in the bidirectional, potentially asymmetric influence of 2 cyclical processes. S. M. Boker and J. Graham's (1998) differential structural equation modeling approach was expanded to the case of a nonlinear coupled oscillator that is common in bimanual coordination…

  20. New model of inflation with nonminimal derivative coupling of standard model Higgs boson to gravity.

    PubMed

    Germani, Cristiano; Kehagias, Alex

    2010-07-02

    In this Letter we show that there is a unique nonminimal derivative coupling of the standard model Higgs boson to gravity such that it propagates no more degrees of freedom than general relativity sourced by a scalar field, reproduces a successful inflating background within the standard model Higgs parameters, and finally does not suffer from dangerous quantum corrections.

  1. Stepwise calibration procedure for regional coupled hydrological-hydrogeological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labarthe, Baptiste; Abasq, Lena; de Fouquet, Chantal; Flipo, Nicolas

    2014-05-01

    Stream-aquifer interaction is a complex process depending on regional and local processes. Indeed, the groundwater component of hydrosystem and large scale heterogeneities control the regional flows towards the alluvial plains and the rivers. In second instance, the local distribution of the stream bed permeabilities controls the dynamics of stream-aquifer water fluxes within the alluvial plain, and therefore the near-river piezometric head distribution. In order to better understand the water circulation and pollutant transport in watersheds, the integration of these multi-dimensional processes in modelling platform has to be performed. Thus, the nested interfaces concept in continental hydrosystem modelling (where regional fluxes, simulated by large scale models, are imposed at local stream-aquifer interfaces) has been presented in Flipo et al (2014). This concept has been implemented in EauDyssée modelling platform for a large alluvial plain model (900km2) part of a 11000km2 multi-layer aquifer system, located in the Seine basin (France). The hydrosystem modelling platform is composed of four spatially distributed modules (Surface, Sub-surface, River and Groundwater), corresponding to four components of the terrestrial water cycle. Considering the large number of parameters to be inferred simultaneously, the calibration process of coupled models is highly computationally demanding and therefore hardly applicable to a real case study of 10000km2. In order to improve the efficiency of the calibration process, a stepwise calibration procedure is proposed. The stepwise methodology involves determining optimal parameters of all components of the coupled model, to provide a near optimum prior information for the global calibration. It starts with the surface component parameters calibration. The surface parameters are optimised based on the comparison between simulated and observed discharges (or filtered discharges) at various locations. Once the surface parameters

  2. Lithosphere-Atmosphere-Ionosphere Coupling model: Fundamentals and recent developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulinets, S. A.; Ouzounov, D.

    2007-05-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental studies within the frame of Lithosphere-Atmosphere-Ionosphere Coupling model (LAIC) permitted to generalize a common conception of different kinds of specific variations of geochemical, atmospheric, electromagnetic and ionospheric parameters observed before strong earthquakes. The long history of this conception (starting in 1990) and the several existing updates are mostly connected with its interdisciplinary character. LAIC is based on two simple but fundamental facts: 1) specific variations (usually increase) of radon emanation have place for every earthquake; 2) increased emanation of radon from the Earth's crust in the vicinity of active tectonic faults before an earthquake take place within the earthquake preparation area estimated by Dobrovolsky. Air ionization by radon takes place over the large territories and has a strong effect on the following processes in the atmospheric boundary layer: (1)formation of the large ion clusters due to water molecules attachment to ions; (2) latent heat release; (3) changing of boundary layer electric conductivity; (3) upward convective flux, generation of anomalous electric field; (4) air temperature increase and drop of relative humidity and (5) specific shape clouds formation. Variations of atmospheric electricity stimulated by ionization process induce variations in the ionosphere trough the global electric circuit. The simultaneous co-existence of several processes manifesting this coupling explains the variety of observed phenomena and enhances the reliability of detecting the future seismogenic signals. Interactive model improvement through data fusion using the data of satellite and ground based monitoring for the major recent earthquakes revealed new aspects of energy conversion from chemical reactions up to thermodynamics and electrodynamics.

  3. Fully Coupled Well Models for Fluid Injection and Production

    SciTech Connect

    White, Mark D.; Bacon, Diana H.; White, Signe K.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2013-08-05

    these equations varies from zero coupling to full coupling. In this paper we describe a fully coupled solution approach for well model that allows for a flexible well trajectory and screened interval within a structured hexahedral computational grid. In this scheme the nonlinear well equations have been fully integrated into the Jacobian matrix for the reservoir conservation equations, minimizing the matrix bandwidth.

  4. Examining the impacts of increased corn production on groundwater quality using a coupled modeling system

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study demonstrates the value of a coupled chemical transport modeling system for investigating groundwater nitrate contamination responses associated with nitrogen (N) fertilizer application and increased corn production. The coupled Community Multiscale Air Quality Bidirect...

  5. Examining the impacts of increased corn production on groundwater quality using a coupled modeling system

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study demonstrates the value of a coupled chemical transport modeling system for investigating groundwater nitrate contamination responses associated with nitrogen (N) fertilizer application and increased corn production. The coupled Community Multiscale Air Quality Bidirect...

  6. Phase-model analysis of coupled neuronal oscillators with multiple connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Dong-Uk; Lee, Sang-Gui; Han, Seung Kee; Kook, Hyungtae

    2006-09-01

    Synchronization of the coupled neuronal oscillators with multiple connections of different coupling nature is analyzed using the phase-model reduction method. Each coupling connection contributes to the dynamic behavior of the system in a complex nonlinear fashion. In the phase-model scheme, the contribution of the individual connections can be separated in terms of the effective coupling functions associated with each connection and a linear superposition of them provides the total effective coupling of the coupled system. The case of multiple connections with various conduction time delays is also examined, which is shown to be capable of promoting synchronization over an ensemble of spatially distributed neuronal oscillators in an efficient way.

  7. Asynchronously Coupled Models of Ice Loss from Airless Planetary Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schorghofer, N.

    2016-12-01

    Ice is found near the surface of dwarf planet Ceres, in some main belt asteroids, and perhaps in NEOs that will be explored or even mined in future. The simple but important question of how fast ice is lost from airless bodies can present computational challenges. The thermal cycle on the surface repeats on much shorter time-scales than ice retreats; one process acts on the time-scale of hours, the other over billions of years. This multi-scale situation is addressed with asynchronous coupling, where models with different time steps are woven together. The sharp contrast at the retreating ice table is dealt with with explicit interface tracking. For Ceres, which is covered with a thermally insulating dust mantle, desiccation rates are orders of magnitude slower than had been calculated with simpler models. More model challenges remain: The role of impact devolatization and the time-scale for complete desiccation of an asteroid. I will also share my experience with code distribution using GitHub and Zenodo.

  8. Coupled transport/hyperelastic model for nastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homison, Chris; Weiland, Lisa M.

    2006-03-01

    Nastic materials are high energy density active materials that mimic processes used in the plant kingdom to produce large deformations through the conversion of chemical energy. These materials utilize the controlled transport of charge and fluid across a selectively-permeable membrane to achieve bulk deformation in a process referred to in the plant kingdom as nastic movements. The nastic material being developed consists of synthetic membranes containing biological ion pumps, ion channels, and ion exchangers surrounding fluid-filled cavities embedded within a polymer matrix. In this paper the formulation of a biological transport model and its coupling with a hyperelastic finite element model of the polymer matrix is discussed. The transport model includes contributions from ion pumps, ion exchangers, and solvent flux. This work will form the basis for a feedback loop in material synthesis efforts. The goal of these studies is to determine the relative importance of the various parameters associated with both the polymer matrix and the biological transport components.

  9. Ising models of strongly coupled biological networks with multivariate interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merchan, Lina; Nemenman, Ilya

    2013-03-01

    Biological networks consist of a large number of variables that can be coupled by complex multivariate interactions. However, several neuroscience and cell biology experiments have reported that observed statistics of network states can be approximated surprisingly well by maximum entropy models that constrain correlations only within pairs of variables. We would like to verify if this reduction in complexity results from intricacies of biological organization, or if it is a more general attribute of these networks. We generate random networks with p-spin (p > 2) interactions, with N spins and M interaction terms. The probability distribution of the network states is then calculated and approximated with a maximum entropy model based on constraining pairwise spin correlations. Depending on the M/N ratio and the strength of the interaction terms, we observe a transition where the pairwise approximation is very good to a region where it fails. This resembles the sat-unsat transition in constraint satisfaction problems. We argue that the pairwise model works when the number of highly probable states is small. We argue that many biological systems must operate in a strongly constrained regime, and hence we expect the pairwise approximation to be accurate for a wide class of problems. This research has been partially supported by the James S McDonnell Foundation grant No.220020321.

  10. A simple coupled model of tropical Atlantic decadal climate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushnir, Yochanan; Seager, Richard; Miller, Jennifer; Chiang, John C. H.

    2002-12-01

    A linear, zonally averaged model of the interaction between the tropical Atlantic (TA) atmosphere and ocean is presented. A balance between evaporation and meridional heat advection in the mixed layer determines the sea surface temperature tendency. The atmosphere is a fixed-depth, sub-cloud layer in which the specific humidity anomaly is determined by a steady-state balance between evaporation, meridional advection, and a parameterized humidity exchange with the free atmosphere. When the model is integrated, forced with observed surface wind anomalies from 1965 to the present, its simulation of the observed sea surface temperature (SST) is realistic and comparable to a simulation with a full ocean GCM. A statistical representation of surface winds and their relationship to the SST gradient across the equator is used to formulate and test a coupled model of their regional variability. Forced on both sides of the equator, in the trade-wind regions, with ``white-noise'' windspeed perturbations, the SST-wind relationship in the near-equatorial region feeds back positively on existing SST anomalies and gives rise to decadal variability.

  11. High-resolution coupled ice sheet-ocean modeling using the POPSICLES model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, E. G.; Martin, D. F.; Asay-Davis, X.; Price, S. F.; Collins, W.

    2014-12-01

    It is expected that a primary driver of future change of the Antarctic ice sheet will be changes in submarine melting driven by incursions of warm ocean water into sub-ice shelf cavities. Correctly modeling this response on a continental scale will require high-resolution modeling of the coupled ice-ocean system. We describe the computational and modeling challenges in our simulations of the full Southern Ocean coupled to a continental-scale Antarctic ice sheet model at unprecedented spatial resolutions (0.1 degree for the ocean model and adaptive mesh refinement down to 500m in the ice sheet model). The POPSICLES model couples the POP2x ocean model, a modified version of the Parallel Ocean Program (Smith and Gent, 2002), with the BISICLES ice-sheet model (Cornford et al., 2012) using a synchronous offline-coupling scheme. Part of the PISCEES SciDAC project and built on the Chombo framework, BISICLES makes use of adaptive mesh refinement to fully resolve dynamically-important regions like grounding lines and employs a momentum balance similar to the vertically-integrated formulation of Schoof and Hindmarsh (2009). Results of BISICLES simulations have compared favorably to comparable simulations with a Stokes momentum balance in both idealized tests like MISMIP3D (Pattyn et al., 2013) and realistic configurations (Favier et al. 2014). POP2x includes sub-ice-shelf circulation using partial top cells (Losch, 2008) and boundary layer physics following Holland and Jenkins (1999), Jenkins (2001), and Jenkins et al. (2010). Standalone POP2x output compares well with standard ice-ocean test cases (e.g., ISOMIP; Losch, 2008) and other continental-scale simulations and melt-rate observations (Kimura et al., 2013; Rignot et al., 2013). For the POPSICLES Antarctic-Southern Ocean simulations, ice sheet and ocean models communicate at one-month coupling intervals.

  12. CFD modeling of particle dispersion and deposition coupled with particle dynamical models in a ventilated room

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guangping; Wang, Jiasong

    2017-10-01

    Two dynamical models, the traditional method of moments coupled model (MCM) and Taylor-series expansion method of moments coupled model (TECM) for particle dispersion distribution and gravitation deposition are developed in three-dimensional ventilated environments. The turbulent airflow field is modeled with the renormalization group (RNG) k-ε turbulence model. The particle number concentration distribution in a ventilated room is obtained by solving the population balance equation coupled with the airflow field. The coupled dynamical models are validated using experimental data. A good agreement between the numerical and experimental results can be achieved. Both models have a similar characteristic for the spatial distribution of particle concentration. Relative to the MCM model, the TECM model presents a more close result to the experimental data. The vortex structure existed in the air flow makes a relative large concentration difference at the center region and results in a spatial non-uniformity of concentration field. With larger inlet velocity, the mixing level of particles in the room is more uniform. In general, the new dynamical models coupled with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in the current study provide a reasonable and accurate method for the temporal and spatial evolution of particles effected by the deposition and dispersion behaviors. In addition, two ventilation modes with different inlet velocities are proceeded to study the effect on the particle evolution. The results show that with the ceiling ventilation mode (CVM), the particles can be better mixed and the concentration level is also higher. On the contrast, with the side ceiling ventilation mode (SVM), the particle concentration has an obvious stratified distribution with a relative lower level and it makes a much better environment condition to the human exposure.

  13. Modeling of magnetoelastic nanostructures with a fully coupled mechanical-micromagnetic model.

    PubMed

    Liang, Cheng-Yen; Keller, Scott M; Sepulveda, Abdon E; Bur, Alexandre; Sun, Wei-Yang; Wetzlar, Kyle; Carman, Gregory P

    2014-10-31

    Micromagnetic simulations of magnetoelastic nanostructures traditionally rely on either the Stoner-Wohlfarth model or the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) model, assuming uniform strain (and/or assuming uniform magnetization). While the uniform strain assumption is reasonable when modeling magnetoelastic thin films, this constant strain approach becomes increasingly inaccurate for smaller in-plane nanoscale structures. This paper presents analytical work intended to significantly improve the simulation of finite structures by fully coupling the LLG model with elastodynamics, i.e., the partial differential equations are intrinsically coupled. The coupled equations developed in this manuscript, along with the Stoner-Wohlfarth model and the LLG (constant strain) model are compared to experimental data on nickel nanostructures. The nickel nanostructures are 100 × 300 × 35 nm single domain elements that are fabricated on a Si/SiO2 substrate; these nanostructures are mechanically strained when they experience an applied magnetic field, which is used to generate M vs H curves. Results reveal that this paper's fully-coupled approach corresponds the best with the experimental data on coercive field changes. This more sophisticated modeling technique is critical for guiding the design process of future nanoscale strain-mediated multiferroic elements, such as those needed in memory systems.

  14. Finite element modeling of a 3D coupled foot-boot model.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Tian-Xia; Teo, Ee-Chon; Yan, Ya-Bo; Lei, Wei

    2011-12-01

    Increasingly, musculoskeletal models of the human body are used as powerful tools to study biological structures. The lower limb, and in particular the foot, is of interest because it is the primary physical interaction between the body and the environment during locomotion. The goal of this paper is to adopt the finite element (FE) modeling and analysis approaches to create a state-of-the-art 3D coupled foot-boot model for future studies on biomechanical investigation of stress injury mechanism, foot wear design and parachute landing fall simulation. In the modeling process, the foot-ankle model with lower leg was developed based on Computed Tomography (CT) images using ScanIP, Surfacer and ANSYS. Then, the boot was represented by assembling the FE models of upper, insole, midsole and outsole built based on the FE model of the foot-ankle, and finally the coupled foot-boot model was generated by putting together the models of the lower limb and boot. In this study, the FE model of foot and ankle was validated during balance standing. There was a good agreement in the overall patterns of predicted and measured plantar pressure distribution published in literature. The coupled foot-boot model will be fully validated in the subsequent works under both static and dynamic loading conditions for further studies on injuries investigation in military and sports, foot wear design and characteristics of parachute landing impact in military.

  15. On coupling fluid plasma and kinetic neutral physics models

    DOE PAGES

    Joseph, I.; Rensink, M. E.; Stotler, D. P.; ...

    2017-03-01

    The coupled fluid plasma and kinetic neutral physics equations are analyzed through theory and simulation of benchmark cases. It is shown that coupling methods that do not treat the coupling rates implicitly are restricted to short time steps for stability. Fast charge exchange, ionization and recombination coupling rates exist, even after constraining the solution by requiring that the neutrals are at equilibrium. For explicit coupling, the present implementation of Monte Carlo correlated sampling techniques does not allow for complete convergence in slab geometry. For the benchmark case, residuals decay with particle number and increase with grid size, indicating that theymore » scale in a manner that is similar to the theoretical prediction for nonlinear bias error. Progress is reported on implementation of a fully implicit Jacobian-free Newton–Krylov coupling scheme. The present block Jacobi preconditioning method is still sensitive to time step and methods that better precondition the coupled system are under investigation.« less

  16. A Tightly Coupled Non-Equilibrium Magneto-Hydrodynamic Model for Inductively Coupled RF Plasmas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-29

    conditions over a broad spectrum of operating conditions demonstrate the robustness of the proposed coupled numerical method. The analysis of chemical...by means of an implicit Finite Volume method. The results obtained in both LTE and NLTE conditions over a broad spectrum of operating conditions...flow-field and electromagnetic phenomena inside an ICP torch requires, in theory, the coupled solution of the Navier-Stokes and the Maxwell equations

  17. Coupling Radar Rainfall to Hydrological Models for Water Abstraction Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asfaw, Alemayehu; Shucksmith, James; Smith, Andrea; MacDonald, Ken

    2015-04-01

    The impacts of climate change and growing water use are likely to put considerable pressure on water resources and the environment. In the UK, a reform to surface water abstraction policy has recently been proposed which aims to increase the efficiency of using available water resources whilst minimising impacts on the aquatic environment. Key aspects to this reform include the consideration of dynamic rather than static abstraction licensing as well as introducing water trading concepts. Dynamic licensing will permit varying levels of abstraction dependent on environmental conditions (i.e. river flow and quality). The practical implementation of an effective dynamic abstraction strategy requires suitable flow forecasting techniques to inform abstraction asset management. Potentially the predicted availability of water resources within a catchment can be coupled to predicted demand and current storage to inform a cost effective water resource management strategy which minimises environmental impacts. The aim of this work is to use a historical analysis of UK case study catchment to compare potential water resource availability using modelled dynamic abstraction scenario informed by a flow forecasting model, against observed abstraction under a conventional abstraction regime. The work also demonstrates the impacts of modelling uncertainties on the accuracy of predicted water availability over range of forecast lead times. The study utilised a conceptual rainfall-runoff model PDM - Probability-Distributed Model developed by Centre for Ecology & Hydrology - set up in the Dove River catchment (UK) using 1km2 resolution radar rainfall as inputs and 15 min resolution gauged flow data for calibration and validation. Data assimilation procedures are implemented to improve flow predictions using observed flow data. Uncertainties in the radar rainfall data used in the model are quantified using artificial statistical error model described by Gaussian distribution and

  18. Coupling a geodynamic seismic cycling model to rupture dynamic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, Alice; van Dinther, Ylona

    2014-05-01

    The relevance and results of dynamic rupture scenarios are implicitly linked to the geometry and pre-existing stress and strength state on a fault. The absolute stresses stored along faults during interseismic periods, are largely unquantifiable. They are, however, pivotal in defining coseismic rupture styles, near-field ground motion, and macroscopic source properties (Gabriel et al., 2012). Obtaining these in a physically consistent manner requires seismic cycling models, which directly couple long-term deformation processes (over 1000 year periods), the self-consistent development of faults, and the resulting dynamic ruptures. One promising approach to study seismic cycling enables both the generation of spontaneous fault geometries and the development of thermo-mechanically consistent fault stresses. This seismo-thermo-mechanical model has been developed using a methodology similar to that employed to study long-term lithospheric deformation (van Dinther et al., 2013a,b, using I2ELVIS of Gerya and Yuen, 2007). We will innovatively include the absolute stress and strength values along physically consistent evolving non-finite fault zones (regions of strain accumulation) from the geodynamic model into dynamic rupture simulations as an initial condition. The dynamic rupture simulations will be performed using SeisSol, an arbitrary high-order derivative Discontinuous Galerkin (ADER-DG) scheme (Pelties et al., 2012). The dynamic rupture models are able to incorporate the large degree of fault geometry complexity arising in naturally evolving geodynamic models. We focus on subduction zone settings with and without a splay fault. Due to the novelty of the coupling, we first focus on methodological challenges, e.g. the synchronization of both methods regarding the nucleation of events, the localization of fault planes, and the incorporation of similar frictional constitutive relations. We then study the importance of physically consistent fault stress, strength, and

  19. Ocean-Atmosphere State Estimation and Targeted Observing using Coupled Model Ensembles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    1 Ocean-Atmosphere State Estimation and Targeted Observing using Coupled Model Ensembles Craig H. Bishop, PI Naval Research Laboratory...Targeted Observing using Coupled Model Ensembles 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e...forecast error covariance model for this coupled system is based solely on ensemble covariances because the pre-existing covariance model does not

  20. Acoustic Modeling Using a Three-Dimensional Coupled-Mode Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    the 3D coupled-mode solution can also be observed in the semi-analytic solution by the wider shadow behind the seamount and by the interference...propagation around a shallow-water seamount , (2) the addition of a 3D rough sea surface in the model with comparison to solution calculated with a 3D...Propagation around a conical seamount The 3D coupled-mode model described above is applied to calculate propagation around a conical seamount in shallow

  1. A coupled geomorphic and ecological model of tidal marsh evolution.

    PubMed

    Kirwan, Matthew L; Murray, A Brad

    2007-04-10

    The evolution of tidal marsh platforms and interwoven channel networks cannot be addressed without treating the two-way interactions that link biological and physical processes. We have developed a 3D model of tidal marsh accretion and channel network development that couples physical sediment transport processes with vegetation biomass productivity. Tidal flow tends to cause erosion, whereas vegetation biomass, a function of bed surface depth below high tide, influences the rate of sediment deposition and slope-driven transport processes such as creek bank slumping. With a steady, moderate rise in sea level, the model builds a marsh platform and channel network with accretion rates everywhere equal to the rate of sea-level rise, meaning water depths and biological productivity remain temporally constant. An increase in the rate of sea-level rise, or a reduction in sediment supply, causes marsh-surface depths, biomass productivity, and deposition rates to increase while simultaneously causing the channel network to expand. Vegetation on the marsh platform can promote a metastable equilibrium where the platform maintains elevation relative to a rapidly rising sea level, although disturbance to vegetation could cause irreversible loss of marsh habitat.

  2. A Coupled THMC model of FEBEX mock-up test

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Liange; Samper, Javier

    2008-09-15

    FEBEX (Full-scale Engineered Barrier EXperiment) is a demonstration and research project for the engineered barrier system (EBS) of a radioactive waste repository in granite. It includes two full-scale heating and hydration tests: the in situ test performed at Grimsel (Switzerland) and a mock-up test operating at CIEMAT facilities in Madrid (Spain). The mock-up test provides valuable insight on thermal, hydrodynamic, mechanical and chemical (THMC) behavior of EBS because its hydration is controlled better than that of in situ test in which the buffer is saturated with water from the surrounding granitic rock. Here we present a coupled THMC model of the mock-up test which accounts for thermal and chemical osmosis and bentonite swelling with a state-surface approach. The THMC model reproduces measured temperature and cumulative water inflow data. It fits also relative humidity data at the outer part of the buffer, but underestimates relative humidities near the heater. Dilution due to hydration and evaporation near the heater are the main processes controlling the concentration of conservative species while surface complexation, mineral dissolution/precipitation and cation exchanges affect significantly reactive species as well. Results of sensitivity analyses to chemical processes show that pH is mostly controlled by surface complexation while dissolved cations concentrations are controlled by cation exchange reactions.

  3. Finite Nuclei in the Quark-Meson Coupling Model.

    PubMed

    Stone, J R; Guichon, P A M; Reinhard, P G; Thomas, A W

    2016-03-04

    We report the first use of the effective quark-meson coupling (QMC) energy density functional (EDF), derived from a quark model of hadron structure, to study a broad range of ground state properties of even-even nuclei across the periodic table in the nonrelativistic Hartree-Fock+BCS framework. The novelty of the QMC model is that the nuclear medium effects are treated through modification of the internal structure of the nucleon. The density dependence is microscopically derived and the spin-orbit term arises naturally. The QMC EDF depends on a single set of four adjustable parameters having a clear physics basis. When applied to diverse ground state data the QMC EDF already produces, in its present simple form, overall agreement with experiment of a quality comparable to a representative Skyrme EDF. There exist, however, multiple Skyrme parameter sets, frequently tailored to describe selected nuclear phenomena. The QMC EDF set of fewer parameters, derived in this work, is not open to such variation, chosen set being applied, without adjustment, to both the properties of finite nuclei and nuclear matter.

  4. Finite Nuclei in the Quark-Meson Coupling Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, J. R.; Guichon, P. A. M.; Reinhard, P. G.; Thomas, A. W.

    2016-03-01

    We report the first use of the effective quark-meson coupling (QMC) energy density functional (EDF), derived from a quark model of hadron structure, to study a broad range of ground state properties of even-even nuclei across the periodic table in the nonrelativistic Hartree-Fock+BCS framework. The novelty of the QMC model is that the nuclear medium effects are treated through modification of the internal structure of the nucleon. The density dependence is microscopically derived and the spin-orbit term arises naturally. The QMC EDF depends on a single set of four adjustable parameters having a clear physics basis. When applied to diverse ground state data the QMC EDF already produces, in its present simple form, overall agreement with experiment of a quality comparable to a representative Skyrme EDF. There exist, however, multiple Skyrme parameter sets, frequently tailored to describe selected nuclear phenomena. The QMC EDF set of fewer parameters, derived in this work, is not open to such variation, chosen set being applied, without adjustment, to both the properties of finite nuclei and nuclear matter.

  5. A coupled geomorphic and ecological model of tidal marsh evolution

    PubMed Central

    Kirwan, Matthew L.; Murray, A. Brad

    2007-01-01

    The evolution of tidal marsh platforms and interwoven channel networks cannot be addressed without treating the two-way interactions that link biological and physical processes. We have developed a 3D model of tidal marsh accretion and channel network development that couples physical sediment transport processes with vegetation biomass productivity. Tidal flow tends to cause erosion, whereas vegetation biomass, a function of bed surface depth below high tide, influences the rate of sediment deposition and slope-driven transport processes such as creek bank slumping. With a steady, moderate rise in sea level, the model builds a marsh platform and channel network with accretion rates everywhere equal to the rate of sea-level rise, meaning water depths and biological productivity remain temporally constant. An increase in the rate of sea-level rise, or a reduction in sediment supply, causes marsh-surface depths, biomass productivity, and deposition rates to increase while simultaneously causing the channel network to expand. Vegetation on the marsh platform can promote a metastable equilibrium where the platform maintains elevation relative to a rapidly rising sea level, although disturbance to vegetation could cause irreversible loss of marsh habitat. PMID:17389384

  6. Spin foam models of matter coupled to gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikovic, A.

    2002-05-01

    We construct a class of spin foam models describing matter coupled to gravity, such that the gravitational sector is described by the unitary irreducible representations of the appropriate symmetry group, while the matter sector is described by the finite-dimensional irreducible representations of that group. The corresponding spin foam amplitudes in the four-dimensional gravity case are expressed in terms of the spin network amplitudes for pentagrams with additional external and internal matter edges. We also give a quantum field theory formulation of the model, where the matter degrees of freedom are described by spin network fields carrying the indices from the appropriate group representation. In the non-topological Lorentzian gravity case, we argue that the matter representations should be appropriate SO(3) or SO(2) representations contained in a given Lorentz matter representation, depending on whether one wants to describe a massive or a massless matter field. The corresponding spin network amplitudes are given as multiple integrals of propagators which are matrix spherical functions.

  7. Global coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation models in LASG/IAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yongqiang, Yu; Xuehong, Zhang; Yufu, Guo

    2004-06-01

    Coupled ocean-atmospheric general circulation models are the only tools to quantitatively simulate the climate system. Since the end of the 1980s, a group of scientists in the State Key Laboratory of Numerical Modeling for Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics (LASG), Institute of Atmospheric Physics (IAP), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), have been working to develop a global OGCM and a global coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model (CGCM). From the original flux anomaly-coupling model developed in the beginning of the 1990s to the latest directly-coupling model, LASG scientists have developed four global coupled GCMs. This study summarizes the development history of these models and describes the third and fourth coupled GCMs and selected applications. Strengths and weaknesses of these models are highlighted.

  8. From strong to weak coupling in holographic models of thermalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grozdanov, Sašo; Kaplis, Nikolaos; Starinets, Andrei O.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the analytic structure of thermal energy-momentum tensor correlators at large but finite coupling in quantum field theories with gravity duals. We compute corrections to the quasinormal spectra of black branes due to the presence of higher derivative R 2 and R 4 terms in the action, focusing on the dual to N=4 SYM theory and Gauss-Bonnet gravity. We observe the appearance of new poles in the complex frequency plane at finite coupling. The new poles interfere with hydrodynamic poles of the correlators leading to the breakdown of hydrodynamic description at a coupling-dependent critical value of the wave-vector. The dependence of the critical wave vector on the coupling implies that the range of validity of the hydrodynamic description increases monotonically with the coupling. The behavior of the quasinormal spectrum at large but finite coupling may be contrasted with the known properties of the hierarchy of relaxation times determined by the spectrum of a linearized kinetic operator at weak coupling. We find that the ratio of a transport coefficient such as viscosity to the relaxation time determined by the fundamental non-hydrodynamic quasinormal frequency changes rapidly in the vicinity of infinite coupling but flattens out for weaker coupling, suggesting an extrapolation from strong coupling to the kinetic theory result. We note that the behavior of the quasinormal spectrum is qualitatively different depending on whether the ratio of shear viscosity to entropy density is greater or less than the universal, infinite coupling value of ℏ /4π k B . In the former case, the density of poles increases, indicating a formation of branch cuts in the weak coupling limit, and the spectral function shows the appearance of narrow peaks. We also discuss the relation of the viscosity-entropy ratio to conjectured bounds on relaxation time in quantum systems.

  9. Fully scalable implementation of a volume coupling scheme for the modeling of multiscale materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlittler, Thiago Milanetto; Cottereau, Régis

    2017-07-01

    We present in this paper a new implementation of a multi-scale, multi-model coupling algorithm, with a proposed parallelization scheme for the construction of the coupling terms between the models. This allows one to study such problems with a fully scalable algorithm on large computer clusters, even when the models and/or the coupling have a high number of degrees of freedom. As an application example, we will consider a system composed by an homogeneous, macroscopic Elastic model and an anisotropic polycrystalline material model, with a volume coupling based on the Arlequin framework.

  10. Coupled Mesoscale Modeling of the Atmosphere and Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodur, Richard

    2002-08-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) has developed the Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS^TM). COAMPS is comprised of separate atmosphere and ocean data assimilation systems. The atmospheric portion of COAMPS has been in operational use at the Fleet Numerical Meteorology and Oceanography Center (FNMOC) since 1998, and it has been found to be useful for the prediction of mesoscale weather events in the coastal zone, and in areas of significant topography. A multivariate optimum interpolation (MVOI) analysis is used to construct analyses of the atmosphere using observations from radiosondes, satellites, ships, buoys, aircraft, etc.. Using these analyses, the COAMPS atmospheric model solves the nonhydrostatic form of the primitive equations using moving, multi-nested grids and sophisticated physical parameterizations for boundary layer, precipitation, and radiation. Although the original design of COAMPS was for shared-memory, vector-processor computers, NRL recently teamed with scientists at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to adapt COAMPS for distributed-memory architecture computers. The new version of the COAMPS atmospheric model now supports distributed memory across nodes using the message-passing-interface (MPI), and shared memory across processors using OpenMP. Any arbitrary horizontal domain decomposition and number of halo points can be used for each nest. Tests have demonstrated that the atmospheric model scales to at least 200 processors. The ocean component of COAMPS uses a 3-dimensional MVOI analysis that can assimilate in-situ and remotely-sensed observations, as well as incorporate subsurface thermohaline structure through the use of the Modular Ocean Data Assimilation System (MODAS) synthetic database. The hydrostatic NRL Coastal Ocean Model (NCOM) is the COAMPS ocean model. NCOM uses a hybrid z/sigma vertical coordinate, and uses a 2-dimensional domain decomposition and MPI for use on distributed memory

  11. Coupled model of root water uptake, mucilage exudation and degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroener, Eva; Ahmed, Mutez A.; Carminati, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    Although the fact that root mucilage plays a prominent role in soil-plant water relations is becoming more and more accepted, many aspects of how mucilage distribution and root water uptake interact with each other remain unexplored. First, it is not clear how long mucilage persists in soil. Furthermore, the effects of water content and root water uptake (i.e. convective fluxes) on the diffusion of mucilage from the root surface into the soil are not included in current models of water uptake. The aims of this study were: i) to measure the effect of soil moisture on mucilage decomposition; ii) to develop a coupled model of root water uptake and mucilage diffusion and degradation during root growth. C4 root mucilage from maize was added as single pulses to a C3 soil of two different moisture levels. We have then employed the Richards Equation for water flow and an advection-dispersion equation to describe the dynamic distribution of mucilage in a single-root model. Most of the mucilage was decomposed under optimum water supply. Drought significantly suppressed mucilage mineralization. Opposed to classical solute transport models the water flow in the rhizosphere was affected by the local concentration of mucilage. Namely a higher concentration of mucilage results in (a) an increase in equilibrium water retention curve, (b) a reduction of hydraulic conductivity at a given water content and (c) a non-equilibrium water retention curve caused by swelling and shrinking dynamics of mucilage in the pore space. The dispersion coefficient, on the other hand, depends on the water content. The parameters of mucilage diffusion have been fitted to observations on real plants. The model shows that mucilage exuded in wet soils diffuses far from the roots and it is rapidly degraded. On the contrary, mucilage of plants growing in dry soil is not easily degradable and it remains at higher concentrations in a narrow region around the roots, resulting in a marked increase in water

  12. Numerical modeling of strongly-coupled dusty plasma systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasut, John Anthony

    2001-09-01

    Plasma systems occur in a variety of astrophysical and laboratory environments. Often these systems contain a dust component in addition to the plasma particles. Plasmas are generally regarded as a highly disordered state of matter and dust is often seen as a contaminant to the plasma. However, in ``strongly coupled'' dusty plasmas where the electrical potential energy between the dust particles is higher than the average kinetic energy of the particles, it is possible for the system to exist in a ``liquid'' or ``crystalline'' state. The first such crystalline states were observed experimentally in 1994 and are not yet fully understood. The spacing between the particles is typically around 100 microns, allowing the individual particles to be visually observed and tracked. Several computer models have suggested that the amount of ordering present in the system should depend only upon two dimensionless parameters: the ratio of the electrical energy to the kinetic energy and the ratio of the interparticle separation to the Debye length of the plasma. These models suggest that the method in which these two parameters are reached should have no impact upon the amount of order within the system. The results of computer modeling using a tree code known as Box_Tree, which, unlike most other computer simulations, includes all interparticle interactions, shows that the method by which these parameters are reached does have an affect on the final state of the system. Box_Tree has also been used to study Mach cones caused by particles traveling through or near a dust crystal. In addition, preliminary results on the study of finite dusty plasma systems have been obtained. These results show that particles confined in a finite plasma oscillate with a frequency that depends upon particle mass and charge.

  13. Application of the two coupled models for water quality management: facultative pond cum constructed wetland models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashauri, D. A.; Kayombo, S.

    Recent work has emphasized the potential importance of the constructed wetland systems for purification of effluents from secondary biological treatment plants for prevention of pollution to the receiving water bodies. A model for transformation of organic carbon in facultative pond (FP) was formulated and was coupled with a model of organic carbon transformation in the constructed wetland (CW) for downstream water resources management. The main essence of coupling the model was to have simultaneous simulation of PFP and CW processes. Simultaneous run of the two models imply that the disturbance on parameters in PFP will have a direct effect on CW processes. The model was formulated on the basis fundamental principle that the growth of active biomass in the system defines the transformation of organic carbon. The growth rate of microorganisms was model based on the Monod kinetic equation. The forcing functions to the model were formulated based on multiplicative function. The removal of organic carbon in the FP based on the unfiltered sample was 66% with an average concentration of 206 mg COD/l in the effluent. The removal of organic carbon in the CW was 87.5% with an average concentration of 40 mg COD/l in the effluent. The overall performance of the coupled model was 93%. The main processes of organic carbon removal in the FP and CW were due to uptake by heterotrophic bacteria followed by oxidation. It was found that 80% of the total organic carbon in the CW was due to the biological growth. Oxidation of organic carbon in the PFP was a source of high growth of algae. The constants and coefficients obtained after validation of the model reflect the simultaneous performance of the coupled model of PFP and CW.

  14. Coupling hydrodynamic and wave propagation modeling for waveform modeling of SPE.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larmat, C. S.; Steedman, D. W.; Rougier, E.; Delorey, A.; Bradley, C. R.

    2015-12-01

    The goal of the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) is to bring empirical and theoretical advances to the problem of detection and identification of underground nuclear explosions. This paper presents effort to improve knowledge of the processes that affect seismic wave propagation from the hydrodynamic/plastic source region to the elastic/anelastic far field thanks to numerical modeling. The challenge is to couple the prompt processes that take place in the near source region to the ones taking place later in time due to wave propagation in complex 3D geologic environments. In this paper, we report on results of first-principles simulations coupling hydrodynamic simulation codes (Abaqus and CASH), with a 3D full waveform propagation code, SPECFEM3D. Abaqus and CASH model the shocked, hydrodynamic region via equations of state for the explosive, borehole stemming and jointed/weathered granite. LANL has been recently employing a Coupled Euler-Lagrange (CEL) modeling capability. This has allowed the testing of a new phenomenological model for modeling stored shear energy in jointed material. This unique modeling capability has enabled highfidelity modeling of the explosive, the weak grout-filled borehole, as well as the surrounding jointed rock. SPECFEM3D is based on the Spectral Element Method, a direct numerical method for full waveform modeling with mathematical accuracy (e.g. Komatitsch, 1998, 2002) thanks to its use of the weak formulation of the wave equation and of high-order polynomial functions. The coupling interface is a series of grid points of the SEM mesh situated at the edge of the hydrodynamic code domain. Displacement time series at these points are computed from output of CASH or Abaqus (by interpolation if needed) and fed into the time marching scheme of SPECFEM3D. We will present validation tests and waveforms modeled for several SPE tests conducted so far, with a special focus on effect of the local topography.

  15. Simulating urban flow and dispersion in Beijing by coupling a CFD model with the WRF model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Yucong; Liu, Shuhua; Chen, Bicheng; Zhang, Bihui; Wang, Shu; Li, Shuyan

    2013-11-01

    The airflow and dispersion of a pollutant in a complex urban area of Beijing, China, were numerically examined by coupling a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model with a mesoscale weather model. The models used were Open Source Field Operation and Manipulation (OpenFOAM) software package and Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. OpenFOAM was firstly validated against wind-tunnel experiment data. Then, the WRF model was integrated for 42 h starting from 0800 LST 08 September 2009, and the coupled model was used to compute the flow fields at 1000 LST and 1400 LST 09 September 2009. During the WRF-simulated period, a high pressure system was dominant over the Beijing area. The WRF-simulated local circulations were characterized by mountain valley winds, which matched well with observations. Results from the coupled model simulation demonstrated that the airflows around actual buildings were quite different from the ambient wind on the boundary provided by the WRF model, and the pollutant dispersion pattern was complicated under the influence of buildings. A higher concentration level of the pollutant near the surface was found in both the step-down and step-up notches, but the reason for this higher level in each configurations was different: in the former, it was caused by weaker vertical flow, while in the latter it was caused by a downward-shifted vortex. Overall, the results of this study suggest that the coupled WRF-OpenFOAM model is an important tool that can be used for studying and predicting urban flow and dispersions in densely built-up areas.

  16. A coupled DEM-CFD method for impulse wave modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Tao; Utili, Stefano; Crosta, GiovanBattista

    2015-04-01

    Rockslides can be characterized by a rapid evolution, up to a possible transition into a rock avalanche, which can be associated with an almost instantaneous collapse and spreading. Different examples are available in the literature, but the Vajont rockslide is quite unique for its morphological and geological characteristics, as well as for the type of evolution and the availability of long term monitoring data. This study advocates the use of a DEM-CFD framework for the modelling of the generation of hydrodynamic waves due to the impact of a rapid moving rockslide or rock-debris avalanche. 3D DEM analyses in plane strain by a coupled DEM-CFD code were performed to simulate the rockslide from its onset to the impact with still water and the subsequent wave generation (Zhao et al., 2014). The physical response predicted is in broad agreement with the available observations. The numerical results are compared to those published in the literature and especially to Crosta et al. (2014). According to our results, the maximum computed run up amounts to ca. 120 m and 170 m for the eastern and western lobe cross sections, respectively. These values are reasonably similar to those recorded during the event (i.e. ca. 130 m and 190 m respectively). In these simulations, the slope mass is considered permeable, such that the toe region of the slope can move submerged in the reservoir and the impulse water wave can also flow back into the slope mass. However, the upscaling of the grains size in the DEM model leads to an unrealistically high hydraulic conductivity of the model, such that only a small amount of water is splashed onto the northern bank of the Vajont valley. The use of high fluid viscosity and coarse grain model has shown the possibility to model more realistically both the slope and wave motions. However, more detailed slope and fluid properties, and the need for computational efficiency should be considered in future research work. This aspect has also been

  17. Three-dimensional model of magnetized capacitively coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauf, Shahid; Kenney, Jason; Collins, Ken

    2009-05-01

    A three-dimensional plasma model is used to understand the characteristics of magnetized capacitively coupled plasma discharges. The simulations consider plasmas generated using high frequency (13.5 MHz) and very high frequency (162 MHz) sources, electropositive (Ar) and electronegative (O2) gases, and spatially uniform and nonuniform magnetic fields. Application of a magnetic field parallel to the electrodes is found to enhance the plasma density due to improved electron confinement and shift the plasma due to the E ×B drift. The plasma is electrically symmetric at 162 MHz so it drifts in opposite directions adjacent to the two electrodes due to the E ×B drift. On the other hand, the 13.5 MHz plasma is electrically asymmetric and it predominantly moves in one direction under the influence of the E ×B drift. The E ×B drift focuses the plasma into a smaller volume in regions with convex magnetic field lines. Conversely, the E ×B drift spreads out the plasma in regions with concave magnetic field lines. In a magnetized O2 plasma, the overall plasma is found to move in one direction due to the E ×B drift while the plasma interior moves in the opposite direction. This behavior is linked to the propensity of negative ions to reside in regions of peak plasma potential, which moves closer to the chamber center opposite to the E ×B drift direction.

  18. Film rupture in the diffuse interface model coupled to hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Thiele, U; Velarde, M G; Neuffer, K; Pomeau, Y

    2001-09-01

    The process of dewetting of a thin liquid film is usually described using a long-wave approximation yielding a single evolution equation for the film thickness. This equation incorporates an additional pressure term-the disjoining pressure-accounting for the molecular forces. Recently a disjoining pressure was derived coupling hydrodynamics to the diffuse interface model [L. M. Pismen and Y. Pomeau, Phys. Rev. E 62, 2480 (2000)]. Using the resulting evolution equation as a generic example for the evolution of unstable thin films, we examine the thickness ranges for linear instability and metastability for flat films, the families of stationary periodic and localized solutions, and their linear stability. The results are compared to simulations of the nonlinear time evolution. From this we conclude that, within the linearly unstable thickness range, there exists a well defined subrange where finite perturbations are crucial for the time evolution and the resulting structures. In the remainder of the linearly unstable thickness range the resulting structures are controlled by the fastest flat film mode assumed up to now for the entire linearly unstable thickness range. Finally, the implications for other forms of disjoining pressure in dewetting and for spinodal decomposition are discussed.

  19. Singular Vector and ENSO Predictability in a Hybrid Coupled Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaobing; Tang, Youmin

    2010-05-01

    In this study, singular vector (SV) and retrospective ENSO (El Niño and Southern Oscillation) predictions were performed respectively for the period from 1876 to 2000 using a hybrid coupled model. Emphasis was placed on exploring the relationship between SV and ENSO predictability. It is found that a defined Niño3 index from the first singular vector of sea surface temperature anomaly (SSTA) is highly correlated with the predicted Niño3 SSTA index of 6-month leads and that the first singular value (FSV) is positively correlated with the predictive skill. These results and findings improve our knowledge and understanding to the relationship between SV and predictability. It was thought that the fastest growth rate of errors to be inversely related to the prediction skill. The reasons why there is such a relationship between SV and realistic predictability include: (1) the strong signals of ENSO variability that favour the growth of initial uncertainties also have significant contributions to the predictability; (2) the averaged climate state of the tropical Pacific Ocean simultaneously effects both SV and predictability.

  20. 2 π production in the Giessen coupled-channels model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shklyar, V.; Lenske, H.; Mosel, U.

    2016-04-01

    The coupled-channels Lagrangian approach underlying the Giessen model (GiM) is extended to describe the π N →π N ,2 π N scattering in the resonance energy region. As a feasibility study we investigate single- and double-pion production up to the second resonance region. The 2 π N production has been significantly improved by using the isobar approximation with σ N and π Δ (1232 ) in the intermediate state. The three-body unitarity is maintained up to an interference pattern between the isobar subchannels. The scattering amplitudes are obtained as a solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation in the K -matrix approximation. As a first application we perform a partial-wave analysis of the π N →π N ,π0π0N reactions in the Roper resonance region. We obtain Rσ N(1440 ) =27-9+4% and Rπ Δ(1440 ) =12-3+5% for the σ N and π Δ (1232 ) decay branching ratios of N*(1440 ) , respectively. The extracted π N inelasticities and reaction amplitudes are consistent with the results from other groups.

  1. Three-dimensional model of magnetized capacitively coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rauf, Shahid; Kenney, Jason; Collins, Ken

    2009-05-15

    A three-dimensional plasma model is used to understand the characteristics of magnetized capacitively coupled plasma discharges. The simulations consider plasmas generated using high frequency (13.5 MHz) and very high frequency (162 MHz) sources, electropositive (Ar) and electronegative (O{sub 2}) gases, and spatially uniform and nonuniform magnetic fields. Application of a magnetic field parallel to the electrodes is found to enhance the plasma density due to improved electron confinement and shift the plasma due to the ExB drift. The plasma is electrically symmetric at 162 MHz so it drifts in opposite directions adjacent to the two electrodes due to the ExB drift. On the other hand, the 13.5 MHz plasma is electrically asymmetric and it predominantly moves in one direction under the influence of the ExB drift. The ExB drift focuses the plasma into a smaller volume in regions with convex magnetic field lines. Conversely, the ExB drift spreads out the plasma in regions with concave magnetic field lines. In a magnetized O{sub 2} plasma, the overall plasma is found to move in one direction due to the ExB drift while the plasma interior moves in the opposite direction. This behavior is linked to the propensity of negative ions to reside in regions of peak plasma potential, which moves closer to the chamber center opposite to the ExB drift direction.

  2. Utility of coupling nonlinear optimization methods with numerical modeling software

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, M.J.

    1996-08-05

    Results of using GLO (Global Local Optimizer), a general purpose nonlinear optimization software package for investigating multi-parameter problems in science and engineering is discussed. The package consists of the modular optimization control system (GLO), a graphical user interface (GLO-GUI), a pre-processor (GLO-PUT), a post-processor (GLO-GET), and nonlinear optimization software modules, GLOBAL & LOCAL. GLO is designed for controlling and easy coupling to any scientific software application. GLO runs the optimization module and scientific software application in an iterative loop. At each iteration, the optimization module defines new values for the set of parameters being optimized. GLO-PUT inserts the new parameter values into the input file of the scientific application. GLO runs the application with the new parameter values. GLO-GET determines the value of the objective function by extracting the results of the analysis and comparing to the desired result. GLO continues to run the scientific application over and over until it finds the ``best`` set of parameters by minimizing (or maximizing) the objective function. An example problem showing the optimization of material model is presented (Taylor cylinder impact test).

  3. Sustained rhythmic activity in gap-junctionally coupled networks of model neurons depends on the diameter of coupled dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Gansert, Juliane; Golowasch, Jorge; Nadim, Farzan

    2008-01-01

    Gap junctions are known to be important for many network functions such as synchronization of activity and the generation of waves and oscillations. Gap junctions have also been proposed to be essential for the generation of early embryonic activity. We have previously shown that the amplitude of electrical signals propagating across gap-junctionally coupled passive cables is maximized at a unique diameter. This suggests that threshold-dependent signals may propagate through gap junctions for a finite range of diameters around this optimal value. Here we examine the diameter dependence of action potential propagation across model networks of dendro-dendritically coupled neurons. The neurons in these models have passive soma and dendrites and an action potential generating axon. We show that propagation of action potentials across gap junctions occurs only over a finite range of dendritic diameters and that propagation delay depends on this diameter. Additionally, in networks of gap-junctionally coupled neurons, rhythmic activity can emerge when closed loops (re-entrant paths) occur but again only for a finite range of dendrite diameters. The frequency of such rhythmic activity depends on the length of the path and the dendrite diameter. For large networks of randomly coupled neurons, we find that the re-entrant paths that underlie rhythmic activity also depend on dendrite diameter. These results underline the potential importance of dendrite diameter as a determinant of network activity in gap-junctionally coupled networks, such as network rhythms that are observed during early nervous system development. PMID:17913989

  4. Examining the Utility of Topic Models for Linguistic Analysis of Couple Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doeden, Michelle A.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the basic utility of topic models, a computational linguistics model for text-based data, to the investigation of the process of couple therapy. Linguistic analysis offers an additional lens through which to examine clinical data, and the topic model is presented as a novel methodology within couple and family psychology that…

  5. General solutions of integrable cosmological models with non-minimal coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamenshchik, A. Yu.; Pozdeeva, E. O.; Tronconi, A.; Venturi, G.; Vernov, S. Yu.

    2017-03-01

    We study the integrable model with minimally and non-minimally coupled scalar fields and the correspondence of their general solutions. Using the model with a minimally coupled scalar field and a the constant potential as an example we demonstrate the difference between the general solutions of the corresponding models in the Jordan and the Einstein frames.

  6. Examining the Utility of Topic Models for Linguistic Analysis of Couple Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doeden, Michelle A.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the basic utility of topic models, a computational linguistics model for text-based data, to the investigation of the process of couple therapy. Linguistic analysis offers an additional lens through which to examine clinical data, and the topic model is presented as a novel methodology within couple and family psychology that…

  7. Nonlinear interaction between underwater explosion bubble and structure based on fully coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, A. M.; Wu, W. B.; Liu, Y. L.; Wang, Q. X.

    2017-08-01

    The interaction between an underwater explosion bubble and an elastic-plastic structure is a complex transient process, accompanying violent bubble collapsing, jet impact, penetration through the bubble, and large structural deformation. In the present study, the bubble dynamics are modeled using the boundary element method and the nonlinear transient structural response is modeled using the explicit finite element method. A new fully coupled 3D model is established through coupling the equations for the state variables of the fluid and structure and solving them as a set of coupled linear algebra equations. Based on the acceleration potential theory, the mutual dependence between the hydrodynamic load and the structural motion is decoupled. The pressure distribution in the flow field is calculated with the Bernoulli equation, where the partial derivative of the velocity potential in time is calculated using the boundary integral method to avoid numerical instabilities. To validate the present fully coupled model, the experiments of small-scale underwater explosion near a stiffened plate are carried out. High-speed imaging is used to capture the bubble behaviors and strain gauges are used to measure the strain response. The numerical results correspond well with the experimental data, in terms of bubble shapes and structural strain response. By both the loosely coupled model and the fully coupled model, the interaction between a bubble and a hollow spherical shell is studied. The bubble patterns vary with different parameters. When the fully coupled model and the loosely coupled model are advanced with the same time step, the error caused by the loosely coupled model becomes larger with the coupling effect becoming stronger. The fully coupled model is more stable than the loosely coupled model. Besides, the influences of the internal fluid on the dynamic response of the spherical shell are studied. At last, the case that the bubble interacts with an air

  8. Modeling biogeochemical cycles in Chesapeake Bay with a coupled physical biological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiangtao; Hood, Raleigh R.

    2006-08-01

    In this paper we describe the development and validation of a relatively simple biogeochemical model of Chesapeake Bay. This model consists of a 3-dimensional, prognostic hydrodynamic model that is coupled to an NPZD-type open ocean ecosystem model, which has been modified by adding additional compartments and parameterizations of biogeochemical processes that are important in estuarine systems. These modifications include an empirical optical model for predicting the diffuse attenuation coefficient Kd, compartments for representing oxygen and suspended sediment concentrations, and parameterizations of phosphorus limitation, denitrification, and seasonal changes in ecosystem structure and temperature effects. To show the overall performance of the coupled physical-biological model, the modeled dissolved inorganic nitrogen, phytoplankton, dissolved oxygen, total suspended solids and light attenuation coefficient in 1995 (a dry year) and 1996 (a very wet year) are examined and compared with observations obtained from the Chesapeake Bay Program. We demonstrate that this relatively simple model is capable of producing the general distribution of each field (both the mean and variability) in the main stem of the Bay. And the model is robust enough to generate reasonable results under both wet and dry conditions. Some significant discrepancies are also observed, such as overestimation of phytoplankton concentrations in shoal regions and overestimation of oxygen concentrations in deep channels, which reveal some deficiencies in the model formulation. Some potential improvements and remedies are suggested. Sensitivity studies on selected parameters are also reported.

  9. A Replica-Coupling Approach to Disordered Pinning Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toninelli, Fabio Lucio

    2008-06-01

    We consider a renewal process τ = { τ 0, τ 1,...} on the integers, where the law of τ i - τ i-1 has a power-like tail P( τ i - τ i-1 = n) = n -(α+1) L( n) with α ≥ 0 and L(·) slowly varying. We then assign a random, n-dependent reward/penalty to the occurrence of the event that the site n belongs to τ. In such generality this class of problems includes, among others, (1 + d)-dimensional models of pinning of directed polymers on a one-dimensional random defect, (1 + 1)-dimensional models of wetting of disordered substrates, and the Poland-Scheraga model of DNA denaturation. By varying the average of the reward, the system undergoes a transition from a localized phase, where τ occupies a finite fraction of {mathbb{N}} to a delocalized phase, where the density of τ vanishes. In absence of disorder (i.e., if the reward is independent of n), the transition is of first order for α > 1 and of higher order for α < 1. Moreover, for α ranging from 1 to 0, the transition ranges from first to infinite order. Presence of even an arbitrarily small (but extensive) amount of disorder is known to modify the order of transition as soon as α > 1/2 [11]. In physical terms, disorder is relevant in this situation, in agreement with the heuristic Harris criterion. On the other hand, for 0 < α < 1/2 it has been proven recently by K. Alexander [2] that, if disorder is sufficiently weak, critical exponents are not modified by randomness: disorder is irrelevant. In this work, generalizing techniques which in the framework of spin glasses are known as replica coupling and interpolation, we give a new, simpler proof of the main results of [2]. Moreover, we (partially) justify a small-disorder expansion worked out in [9] for α < 1/2, showing that it provides a free energy upper bound which improves the annealed one.

  10. Exploring coupled 4D-Var data assimilation using an idealised atmosphere-ocean model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Polly; Fowler, Alison; Lawless, Amos; Haines, Keith

    2014-05-01

    The successful application of data assimilation techniques to operational numerical weather prediction and ocean forecasting systems has led to an increased interest in their use for the initialisation of coupled atmosphere-ocean models in prediction on seasonal to decadal timescales. Coupled data assimilation presents a significant challenge but offers a long list of potential benefits including improved use of near-surface observations, reduction of initialisation shocks in coupled forecasts, and generation of a consistent system state for the initialisation of coupled forecasts across all timescales. In this work we explore some of the fundamental questions in the design of coupled data assimilation systems within the context of an idealised one-dimensional coupled atmosphere-ocean model. The system is based on the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Integrated Forecast System (IFS) atmosphere model and a K-Profile Parameterisation (KKP) mixed layer ocean model developed by the National Centre for Atmospheric Science (NCAS) climate group at the University of Reading. It employs a strong constraint incremental 4D-Var scheme and is designed to enable the effective exploration of various approaches to performing coupled model data assimilation whilst avoiding many of the issues associated with more complex models. Working with this simple framework enables a greater range and quantity of experiments to be performed. Here, we will describe the development of our simplified single-column coupled atmosphere-ocean 4D-Var assimilation system and present preliminary results from a series of identical twin experiments devised to investigate and compare the behaviour and sensitivities of different coupled data assimilation methodologies. This includes comparing fully and weakly coupled assimilations with uncoupled assimilation, investigating whether coupled assimilation can eliminate or lessen initialisation shock in coupled model forecasts, and

  11. Mathematical and Computational Modeling of Multiphysics Couplings in the Geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, M. F.

    2004-12-01

    Multiphysics couplings can happen in different ways. Aĉ_sA,A One may have different physical processes (e.g. flow, transport, reactions) occurring within the same physical domain, or one may have different physical regimes (e.g., surface/subsurface environments, fluid/structure interactions) interacting through interfaces. We will discuss both of these types of multiphysics couplings during this presentation. Of particular interest will be the development of interpolation/projection algorithms for projecting physical quantities from one space/time grid to another, the investigation of mortar and mortar-free methods for coupling multiple physical domains, and the coupling of non-conforming and conforming finite element methods.

  12. Modeling of the Coupled Magnetospheric and Neutral Wind Dynamos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thayer, Jeffrey P.

    1997-01-01

    the magnetosphere. The influence of the neutral wind was then determined not by estimating how much electric potential or current density it provides, but by determining the contribution of the neutral wind to the net electromagnetic energy transferred between the ionosphere and magnetosphere. The estimate of the net electromagnetic energy transfer and the role of the neutral winds proves to be a more fundamental quantity in studies of magnetosphere- ionosphere coupling also showed that by using electric and magnetic field measurements from the HILAT satellite, the Poynting flux could be a measurable quantity from polar-orbiting, low- altitude spacecraft. Through collaboration with Dr. Heelis and others at UTD and their expertise of the electric field measurements on the DE-B satellite, an extensive analysis was planned to determine the Poynting flux from the DE-B measurements in combination with a modeling effort to help interpret the observations taking into account the coupled magnetosphere-ionosphere.

  13. Coupling geodynamic with thermodynamic modelling for reconstructions of magmatic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rummel, Lisa; Kaus, Boris J. P.; White, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Coupling geodynamic with petrological models is fundamental for understanding magmatic systems from the melting source in the mantle to the point of magma crystallisation in the upper crust. Most geodynamic codes use very simplified petrological models consisting of a single, fixed, chemistry. Here, we develop a method to better track the petrological evolution of the source rock and corresponding volcanic and plutonic rocks by combining a geodynamic code with a thermodynamic model for magma generation and evolution. For the geodynamic modelling a finite element code (MVEP2) solves the conservation of mass, momentum and energy equations. The thermodynamic modelling of phase equilibria in magmatic systems is performed with pMELTS for mantle-like bulk compositions. The thermodynamic dependent properties calculated by pMELTS are density, melt fraction and the composition of the liquid and solid phase in the chemical system: SiO2-TiO2-Al2O3-Fe2O3-Cr2O3-FeO-MgO-CaO-Na2O-K2O-P2O5-H2O. In order to take into account the chemical depletion of the source rock with increasing melt extraction events, calculation of phase diagrams is performed in two steps: 1) With an initial rock composition density, melt fraction as well as liquid and solid composition are computed over the full upper mantle P-T range. 2) Once the residual rock composition (equivalent to the solid composition after melt extraction) is significantly different from the initial rock composition and the melt fraction is lower than a critical value, the residual composition is used for next calculations with pMELTS. The implementation of several melt extraction events take the change in chemistry into account until the solidus is shifted to such high temperatures that the rock cannot be molten anymore under upper mantle conditions. An advantage of this approach is that we can track the change of melt chemistry with time, which can be compared with natural constraints. In the thermo-mechanical code the

  14. Coupling giant impacts and long-term evolution models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golabek, G.; Jutzi, M.; Emsenhuber, A.; Gerya, T.; Asphaug, E. I.

    2015-12-01

    The crustal dichotomy [1] is the dominant geological feature on planet Mars. The exogenic approach to the origin of the crustal dichotomy [2-6] assumes that the northern lowlands correspond to a giant impact basin formed after primordial crust formation. However these simulations only consider the impact phase without studying the long-term repercussions of such a collision. The endogenic approach [7], suggesting a degree-1 mantle upwelling underneath the southern highlands [8-11], relies on a high Rayleigh number and a particular viscosity profile to form a low degree convective pattern within the geological constraints for the dichotomy formation. Such vigorous convection, however, results in continuous magmatic resurfacing, destroying the initially dichotomous crustal structure in the long-term. A further option is a hybrid exogenic-endogenic approach [12-15], which proposes an impact-induced magma ocean and subsequent superplume in the southern hemisphere. However these models rely on simple scaling laws to impose the thermal effects of the collision. Here we present the first results of impact simulations performed with a SPH code [16,17] serially coupled with geodynamical computations performed using the code I3VIS [18] to improve the latter approach and test it against observations. We are exploring collisions varying the impactor velocities, impact angles and target body properties, and are gauging the sensitivity to the handoff from SPH to I3VIS. As expected, our first results indicate the formation of a transient hemispherical magma ocean in the impacted hemisphere, and the merging of the cores. We also find that impact angle and velocity have a strong effect on the post-impact temperature field [5] and on the timescale and nature of core merger.

  15. Coupling giant impacts and long-term evolution models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golabek, G. J.; Emsenhuber, A.; Jutzi, M.; Gerya, T. V.; Asphaug, E. I.

    2015-10-01

    The crustal dichotomy [1] is the dominant geological feature on planet Mars. The exogenic approach to the origin of the crustal dichotomy [2-6] assumes that the northern lowlands correspond to a giant impact basin formed after primordial crust formation. However these simulations only consider the impact phase without studying the long-term repercussions of such a collision. The endogenic approach [7], suggesting a degree-1 mantle upwelling underneath the southern highlands [8-11], relies on a high Rayleigh number and a particular viscosity profile to form a low degree convective pattern within the geological constraints for the dichotomy formation. Such vigorous convection, however, results in continuous magmatic resurfacing, destroying the initially dichotomous crustal structure in the long-term. A further option is a hybrid exogenic-endogenic approach [12-15], which proposes an impact-induced magma ocean and subsequent superplume in the southern hemisphere. However these models rely on simple scaling laws to impose the thermal effects of the collision. Here we present the first results of impact simulations performed with a SPH code [16,17] serially coupled with geodynamical computations performed using the code I3VIS [18] to improve the latter approach and test it against observations. We are exploring collisions varying the impactor velocities, impact angles and target body properties, and are gauging the sensitivity to the handoff from SPH to I3VIS. As expected, our first results indicate the formation of a transient hemispherical magma ocean in the impacted hemisphere, and the merging of the cores. We also find that impact angle and velocity have a strong effect on the post-impact temperature field [5] and on the timescale and nature of core merger.

  16. Coupling giant impacts and longer-term evolution models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golabek, Gregor; Jutzi, Martin; Emsenhuber, Alexandre; Gerya, Taras; Asphaug, Erik

    2016-04-01

    The crustal dichotomy is the dominant geological feature on planet Mars. The exogenic approach to the origin of the crustal dichotomy assumes that the northern lowlands correspond to a giant impact basin formed after primordial crust formation. However these simulations only consider the impact phase without studying the long-term repercussions of such a collision. The endogenic approach, suggesting a degree-1 mantle upwelling underneath the southern highlands, relies on a high Rayleigh number and a particular viscosity profile to form a low degree convective pattern within the geological constraints for the dichotomy formation. Such vigorous convection, however, results in continuous magmatic resurfacing, destroying the initially dichotomous crustal structure in the long-term. A further option is a hybrid exogenic-endogenic approach, which proposes an impact-induced magma ocean and subsequent superplume in the southern hemisphere. However these models rely on simple scaling laws to impose the thermal effects of the collision. Here we present the first results of impact simulations performed with a SPH code serially coupled with geodynamical computations performed using the code I3VIS to improve the latter approach and test it against observations. We are exploring collisions varying the impactor velocities, impact angles and target body properties, and are gauging the sensitivity to the handoff from SPH to I3VIS. As expected, our first results indicate the formation of a transient hemispherical magma ocean in the impacted hemisphere, and the merging of the cores. We also find that impact angle and velocity have a strong effect on the post-impact temperature field and on the timescale and nature of core merger.

  17. Towards Coupled Giant Impact and Long Term Interior Evolution Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golabek, G.; Jutzi, M.; Gerya, T.; Asphaug, E. I.

    2014-12-01

    The crustal dichotomy is the dominant geological feature on planet Mars. The exogenic approach to the origin of the crustal dichotomy assumes that the northern lowlands correspond to a giant impact basin formed after primordial crust formation. However these simulations only consider the impact phase without studying the long-term repercussions of such a collision.The endogenic approach, suggesting a degree-1 mantle upwelling underneath the southern highlands, relies on a high Rayleigh number and a particular viscosity profile to form a low degree convective pattern within the geological constraints for the dichotomy formation. Such vigorous convection, however, results in continuous magmatic resurfacing, destroying the initially dichotomous crustal structure in the long-term.A further option is a hybrid exogenic-endogenic approach, which proposes an impact-induced magma ocean and subsequent superplume in the southern hemisphere. However these models rely on simple scaling laws to impose the thermal effects of the collision.Here we present the results of impact simulations performed with a SPH code serially coupled with geodynamical computations performed using the code I3VIS to improve the latter approach and test it against observations. We are exploring collisions varying the impactor velocities, impact angles and target body properties, and are gauging the sensitivity to the handoff from SPH to I3VIS.Our results indicate the formation of a transient hemispherical magma ocean in the impacted hemisphere, and the merging of the cores. We also find that impact angle and velocity have a strong effect on the post-impact temperature field and on the timescale and nature of core merger.

  18. Towards coupled giant impact and long term interior evolution models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golabek, G. J.; Jutzi, M.; Gerya, T. V.; Asphaug, E. I.

    2014-04-01

    The crustal dichotomy [1] is the dominant geological feature on planet Mars. The exogenic approach to the origin of the crustal dichotomy [2-6] assumes that the northern lowlands correspond to a giant impact basin formed after primordial crust formation. However these simulations only consider the impact phase without studying the long-term repercussions of such a collision. The endogenic approach [7], suggesting a degree-1 mantle upwelling underneath the southern highlands [8-11], relies on a high Rayleigh number and a particular viscosity profile to form a low degree convective pattern within the geological constraints for the dichotomy formation. Such vigorous convection, however, results in continuous magmatic resurfacing, destroying the initially dichotomous crustal structure in the long-term. A further option is a hybrid exogenic-endogenic approach [12-15], which proposes an impact-induced magma ocean and subsequent superplume in the southern hemisphere. However these models rely on simple scaling laws to impose the thermal effects of the collision. Here we present the first results of impact simulations performed with a SPH code [16,17] serially coupled with geodynamical computations performed using the code I3VIS [18] to improve the latter approach and test it against observations. We are exploring collisions varying the impactor velocities, impact angles and target body properties, and are gauging the sensitivity to the handoff from SPH to I3VIS. As expected, our first results indicate the formation of a transient hemispherical magma ocean in the impacted hemisphere, and the merging of the cores. We also find that impact angle and velocity have a strong effect on the post-impact temperature field [5] and on the timescale and nature of core merger.

  19. Towards coupled giant impact and long term interior evolution models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golabek, G.; Jutzi, M.; Gerya, T.; Asphaug, E. I.

    2013-12-01

    The crustal dichotomy [1] is the dominant geological feature on planet Mars. The exogenic approach to the origin of the crustal dichotomy [2-6] assumes that the northern lowlands correspond to a giant impact basin formed after primordial crust formation. However these simulations only consider the impact phase without studying the long-term repercussions of such a collision. The endogenic approach [7], suggesting a degree-1 mantle upwelling underneath the southern highlands [8-11], relies on a high Rayleigh number and a particular viscosity profile to form a low degree convective pattern within the geological constraints for the dichotomy formation. Such vigorous convection, however, results in continuous magmatic resurfacing, destroying the initially dichotomous crustal structure in the long-term. A further option is a hybrid exogenic-endogenic approach [12-15], which proposes an impact-induced magma ocean and subsequent superplume in the southern hemisphere. However these models rely on simple scaling laws to impose the thermal effects of the collision. Here we present the first results of impact simulations performed with a SPH code [16,17] serially coupled with geodynamical computations performed using the code I3VIS [18] to improve the latter approach and test it against observations. We are exploring collisions varying the impactor velocities, impact angles and target body properties, and are gauging the sensitivity to the handoff from SPH to I3VIS. As expected, our first results indicate the formation of a transient hemispherical magma ocean in the impacted hemisphere, and the merging of the cores. We also find that impact angle and velocity have a strong effect on the post-impact temperature field [5] and on the timescale and nature of core merger.

  20. Drift-Scale Coupled Processes (DST and TH Seepage) Models

    SciTech Connect

    J. Birkholzer; S. Mukhopadhyay

    2004-09-29

    The purpose of this report is to document drift-scale modeling work performed to evaluate the thermal-hydrological (TH) behavior in Yucca Mountain fractured rock close to waste emplacement drifts. The heat generated by the decay of radioactive waste results in rock temperatures elevated from ambient for thousands of years after emplacement. Depending on the thermal load, these temperatures are high enough to cause boiling conditions in the rock, giving rise to water redistribution and altered flow paths. The predictive simulations described in this report are intended to investigate fluid flow in the vicinity of an emplacement drift for a range of thermal loads. Understanding the TH coupled processes is important for the performance of the repository because the thermally driven water saturation changes affect the potential seepage of water into waste emplacement drifts. Seepage of water is important because if enough water gets into the emplacement drifts and comes into contact with any exposed radionuclides, it may then be possible for the radionuclides to be transported out of the drifts and to the groundwater below the drifts. For above-boiling rock temperatures, vaporization of percolating water in the fractured rock overlying the repository can provide an important barrier capability that greatly reduces (and possibly eliminates) the potential of water seeping into the emplacement drifts. In addition to this thermal process, water is inhibited from entering the drift opening by capillary forces, which occur under both ambient and thermal conditions (capillary barrier). The combined barrier capability of vaporization processes and capillary forces in the near-field rock during the thermal period of the repository is analyzed and discussed in this report.

  1. DRIFT-SCALE COUPLED PROCESSES (DST AND TH SEEPAGE) MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    J.T. Birkholzer; S. Mukhopadhyay

    2005-01-13

    The purpose of this report is to document drift-scale modeling work performed to evaluate the thermal-hydrological (TH) behavior in Yucca Mountain fractured rock close to waste emplacement drifts. The heat generated by the decay of radioactive waste results in rock temperatures elevated from ambient for thousands of years after emplacement. Depending on the thermal load, these temperatures are high enough to cause boiling conditions in the rock, giving rise to water redistribution and altered flow paths. The predictive simulations described in this report are intended to investigate fluid flow in the vicinity of an emplacement drift for a range of thermal loads. Understanding the TH coupled processes is important for the performance of the repository because the thermally driven water saturation changes affect the potential seepage of water into waste emplacement drifts. Seepage of water is important because if enough water gets into the emplacement drifts and comes into contact with any exposed radionuclides, it may then be possible for the radionuclides to be transported out of the drifts and to the groundwater below the drifts. For above-boiling rock temperatures, vaporization of percolating water in the fractured rock overlying the repository can provide an important barrier capability that greatly reduces (and possibly eliminates) the potential of water seeping into the emplacement drifts. In addition to this thermal process, water is inhibited from entering the drift opening by capillary forces, which occur under both ambient and thermal conditions (capillary barrier). The combined barrier capability of vaporization processes and capillary forces in the near-field rock during the thermal period of the repository is analyzed and discussed in this report.

  2. Two-Dimensional Coupling Model on Social Deprivation and Its Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yun

    This paper qualitatively describes the deprivation under different coupling situations of two-dimensional indicators and then establishes the two-dimensional coupling model on social deprivation, using the social welfare function approach and Foster-Greer-Thorbecke P α method. Finally, this paper applies the model to evaluate the social deprivation of 31 provinces in China under the coupling state of capita disposable income and housing price.

  3. Analysis of Neural-BOLD Coupling Through Four Models of the Neural Metabolic Demand.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Christopher W; Likova, Lora T; Nicholas, Spero C

    2015-01-01

    The coupling of the neuronal energetics to the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) response is still incompletely understood. To address this issue, we compared the fits of four plausible models of neurometabolic coupling dynamics to available data for simultaneous recordings of the local field potential and the local BOLD response recorded from monkey primary visual cortex over a wide range of stimulus durations. The four models of the metabolic demand driving the BOLD response were: direct coupling with the overall LFP; rectified coupling to the LFP; coupling with a slow adaptive component of the implied neural population response; and coupling with the non-adaptive intracellular input signal defined by the stimulus time course. Taking all stimulus durations into account, the results imply that the BOLD response is most closely coupled with metabolic demand derived from the intracellular input waveform, without significant influence from the adaptive transients and nonlinearities exhibited by the LFP waveform.

  4. Nanoscale modeling for ultrathin liquid films: Spreading and coupled layering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, David Michael

    liquid PFPE. The experimental analogue of replenishment is the one-dimensional spreading analysis. PFPEs with functional endgroups demonstrated coupled molecular layering and dewetting phenomena during the spreading analysis, while PFPEs with nonfunctional endgroups did not. All of the PFPE thin films spread via a diffusive process and had diffusion coefficients that depended on the local film thickness. A theoretical analysis is presented here for both the governing equation and the disjoining pressure driving force for the PFPE thin film spreading. For PFPEs with non-functional endgroups, a reasonable analysis is performed on the diffusion coefficient for two classes of film: submonolayer and multilayer. The diffusion coefficient of PFPEs with functional endgroups are qualitatively linked to the gradient of the film disjoining pressure. To augment this theory, both lattice-based and off-lattice Monte Carlo simulations are conducted for PFPE film models. The lattice-based model shows the existence of a critical functional endgroup interaction strength. It is also used to study the break-up of molecular layers for a spreading film via a fractal analysis. The off-lattice model is used to calculate the anisotropic pressure tensor for the model PFPE thin film and subsequently the film disjoining pressure. The model also qualitatively analyzes of the self diffusion in the film.

  5. Understanding Air-Sea Coupling Processes and Coupled Model Predictions Using GOTEX Measurements and COAMPS/NCOM and Aircraft Measurements for Understanding Air-Sea Coupling and Improving Coupled Model Predictions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    part of the Dynamics of the Madden- Julian Oscillation (DYNAMO) and ONR Litterol Littoral Air-Sea Processes (LASP) DRI. The objectives of the GOTEX... McCreary et al.1989). These studies have hypothesized that a fully-coupled model study of the gap outflow would be beneficial. Observations from...REFERENCES McCreary , J. P., H. S. Lee, and D. B. Enfield, 1989: The response of the coastal ocean to strong offshore winds: With

  6. Reliability and availability modeling of coupled communication networks - A simplified modeling approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shooman, Martin L.; Cortes, Eladio R.

    1991-01-01

    The network-complexity of LANs and of LANs that are interconnected by bridges and routers poses a challenging reliability-modeling problem. The present effort toward these problems' solution attempts to simplify them by reducing their number of states through truncation and state merging, as suggested by Shooman and Laemmel (1990). Through the use of state merging, it becomes possible to reduce the Bateman-Cortes 161 state model to a two state model with a closed-form solution. In the case of coupled networks, a technique which allows for problem-decomposition must be used.

  7. A Theoretical Model for Thin Film Ferroelectric Coupled Microstripline Phase Shifters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, R. R.; Quereshi, A. H.

    2000-01-01

    Novel microwave phase shifters consisting of coupled microstriplines on thin ferroelectric films have been demonstrated recently. A theoretical model useful for predicting the propagation characteristics (insertion phase shift, dielectric loss, impedance, and bandwidth) is presented here. The model is based on a variational solution for line capacitance and coupled strip transmission line theory.

  8. Emergencies planning and response: Coupling an exposure model with different atmospheric dispersion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, E. Y.; Colman Lerner, J. E.; Porta, A.; Jacovkis, P. M.

    2013-11-01

    Information on spatial and time dependent concentration patterns of hazardous substances, as well as on the potential effects on population, is necessary to assist in chemical emergency planning and response. To that end, some models predict transport and dispersion of hazardous substances, and others estimate potential effects upon exposed population. Taken together, both groups constitute a powerful tool to estimate vulnerable regions and to evaluate environmental impact upon affected populations. The development of methodologies and models with direct application to the context in which we live allows us to draft a more clear representation of the risk scenario and, hence, to obtain the adequate tools for an optimal response. By means of the recently developed DDC (Damage Differential Coupling) exposure model, it was possible to optimize, from both the qualitative and the quantitative points of view, the estimation of the population affected by a toxic cloud, because the DDC model has a very good capacity to couple with different atmospheric dispersion models able to provide data over time. In this way, DDC analyzes the different concentration profiles (output from the transport model) associating them with some reference concentration to identify risk zones. In this work we present a disaster scenario in Chicago (USA), by coupling DDC with two transport models of different complexity, showing the close relationship between a representative result and the run time of the models. In the same way, it becomes evident that knowing the time evolution of the toxic cloud and of the affected regions significantly improves the probability of taking the correct decisions on planning and response facing the emergency.

  9. PyMT: A Python package for model-coupling in the Earth sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutton, E.

    2016-12-01

    The current landscape of Earth-system models is not only broad in scientific scope, but also broad in type. On the one hand, the large variety of models is exciting, as it provides fertile ground for extending or linking models together in novel ways to answer new scientific questions. However, the heterogeneity in model type acts to inhibit model coupling, model development, or even model use. Existing models are written in a variety of programming languages, operate on different grids, use their own file formats (both for input and output), have different user interfaces, have their own time steps, etc. Each of these factors become obstructions to scientists wanting to couple, extend - or simply run - existing models. For scientists whose main focus may not be computer science these barriers become even larger and become significant logistical hurdles. And this is all before the scientific difficulties of coupling or running models are addressed. The CSDMS Python Modeling Toolkit (PyMT) was developed to help non-computer scientists deal with these sorts of modeling logistics. PyMT is the fundamental package the Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System uses for the coupling of models that expose the Basic Modeling Interface (BMI). It contains: Tools necessary for coupling models of disparate time and space scales (including grid mappers) Time-steppers that coordinate the sequencing of coupled models Exchange of data between BMI-enabled models Wrappers that automatically load BMI-enabled models into the PyMT framework Utilities that support open-source interfaces (UGRID, SGRID,CSDMS Standard Names, etc.) A collection of community-submitted models, written in a variety of programminglanguages, from a variety of process domains - but all usable from within the Python programming language A plug-in framework for adding additional BMI-enabled models to the framework In this presentation we intoduce the basics of the PyMT as well as provide an example of coupling

  10. Ab-initio modeling of electromechanical coupling at Si surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppe, Sandra; Müller, Stefan; Michl, Anja; Weissmüller, Jörg

    2014-08-21

    The electromechanical coupling at the silicon (100) and (111) surfaces was studied via density functional theory by calculating the response of the ionization potential and the electron affinity to different types of strain. We find a branched strain response of those two quantities with different coupling coefficients for negative and positive strain values. This can be attributed to the reduced crystal symmetry due to anisotropic strain, which partially lifts the degeneracy of the valence and conduction bands. Only the Si(111) electron affinity exhibits a monotonously linear strain response, as the conduction band valleys remain degenerate under strain. The strain response of the surface dipole is linear and seems to be dominated by volume changes. Our results may help to understand the mechanisms behind electromechanical coupling at an atomic level in greater detail and for different electronic and atomic structures.

  11. Using an empirical model of Joule heating in thermosphere-ionosphere coupled models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weimer, Daniel

    The interaction of the solar wind and the embedded Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) with the Earth's magnetic field produces auroral currents that heat the ionosphere at high-latitudes. Coupling between the ionosphere and thermosphere results in significant heating of the ther-mosphere. During major geomagnetic storms the temperature changes in the thermosphere are significant, causing the neutral atmosphere to expand upward, which in turn causes satellites in low-Earth orbit to experience a higher drag force and decreased orbital velocity. There is a real need to model and predict these variations in the thermosphere. The Weimer 2005 model of ionospheric electric potentials and field-aligned currents can be used to help solve this problem. This presentation will describe the model and how it derives the ionospheric Joule heating rates. Comparisons with neutral density derived from CHAMP and GRACE satellite measurements will also be shown. This comparison is facilitated through use of the "global nighttime minimum exospheric temperature" (Tc) in the Jacchia-Bowman 2008 (JB2008) model. It is shown that the empirical model of auroral heating can be used to quite accurately predict orbit-averaged perturbations to Tc as a function of time, given measurements of the IMF. The empirical model can also be used as a driver in physics-based, numerical Thermosphere-Ionosphere Coupled Models; present and future uses in such programs will be covered.

  12. Modeling and Simulation of Plasmonic Lithography Process with Coupling Between Electromagnetic Wave Model, Phase Field Model and Heat Transfer Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Ion Hong

    Plasmonic lithography may become a mainstream nano-fabrication technique in the future. Experimental results show that feature size with 22 nm resolution can be achieved by plasmonic lithography [1]. In Pan's experiment, a plasmonic lens is used to focus the laser energy with resolution much higher than the diffraction limit and thereby create features in the thermally sensitive material layer. The energy transport mechanisms are still not fully understood in the plasmonic lithography process. In order to predict the lithography resolution and explore the energy transport mechanisms involved in the process, customized electromagnetic wave and heat transfer models were developed in COMSOL. Parametric studies on both operating parameters and material properties were performed to optimize the lithography process. The parametric studies showed that the lithography process can be improved by either reducing the thickness of the phase change material layer or using a material with smaller real refractive index for that layer. Moreover, a phase field model was also developed in COMSOL to investigate the phase separation mechanism involved in creating features in plasmonic lithography. By including the effect of bond energy in this model, phase separation was obtained from the phase field model under isothermal conditions with speed much faster than the classical diffusion theory can predict. Mathematical transformation was applied to the phase field model, which was necessary for solving numerical issues to obtain the result of complete phase separation. Under isothermal conditions, the phase field model confirmed the fact that the speed of phase separation is determined by both particle mobility and thermodynamic driving force. The fast phase separation in the phase change material is mainly due to strong thermodynamic driving force from the bond energy. The phase field model was coupled with a heat transfer model to simulate phase separation under laser pulse heating

  13. Cosmological models with non-minimal derivative coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sushkov, Sergey

    2011-11-01

    We investigate cosmological scenarios with a non-minimal derivative coupling between the scalar field and the curvature, examining both the quintessence and the phantom cases with zero and constant potentials. In general, we find that the universe transits from one de Sitter solution to another, determined by the coupling parameter. Furthermore, according to the parameter choices and without the need for matter, we can obtain a Big Bang, an expanding universe with no beginning, a cosmological turnaround, an eternally contracting universe, a Big Crunch, a Big Rip avoidance and a cosmological bounce. This variety of behaviors reveals the capabilities of the present scenario.

  14. Finding the driver of local ocean-atmosphere coupling in reanalyses and CMIP5 climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Barradas, Alfredo; Kalnay, Eugenia; Peña, Malaquías; BozorgMagham, Amir E.; Motesharrei, Safa

    2016-06-01

    Identification of the driver of coupled anomalies in the climate system is of great importance for a better understanding of the system and for its use in predictive efforts with climate models. The present analysis examines the robustness of a physical method proposed three decades ago to identify coupled anomalies as of atmospheric or oceanic origin by analyzing 850 mb vorticity and sea surface temperature anomalies. The method is then used as a metric to assess the coupling in climate simulations and a 30-year hindcast from models of the CMIP5 project. Analysis of the frequency of coupled anomalies exceeding one standard deviation from uncoupled NCEP/NCAR and ERA-Interim and partially coupled CFSR reanalyses shows robustness in the main results: anomalies of oceanic origin arise inside the deep tropics and those of atmospheric origin outside of the tropics. Coupled anomalies occupy similar regions in the global oceans independently of the spatiotemporal resolution. Exclusion of phenomena like ENSO, NAO, or AMO has regional effects on the distribution and origin of coupled anomalies; the absence of ENSO decreases anomalies of oceanic origin and favors those of atmospheric origin. Coupled model simulations in general agree with the distribution of anomalies of atmospheric and oceanic origin from reanalyses. However, the lack of the feedback from the atmosphere to the ocean in the AMIP simulations reduces substantially the number of coupled anomalies of atmospheric origin and artificially increases it in the tropics while the number of those of oceanic origin outside the tropics is also augmented. Analysis of a single available 30-year hindcast surprisingly indicates that coupled anomalies are more similar to AMIP than to coupled simulations. Differences in the frequency of coupled anomalies between the AMIP simulations and the uncoupled reanalyses, and similarities between the uncoupled and partially coupled reanalyses, support the notion that the nature of the

  15. Finding the driver of local ocean-atmosphere coupling in reanalyses and CMIP5 climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Barradas, Alfredo; Kalnay, Eugenia; Peña, Malaquías; BozorgMagham, Amir E.; Motesharrei, Safa

    2017-04-01

    Identification of the driver of coupled anomalies in the climate system is of great importance for a better understanding of the system and for its use in predictive efforts with climate models. The present analysis examines the robustness of a physical method proposed three decades ago to identify coupled anomalies as of atmospheric or oceanic origin by analyzing 850 mb vorticity and sea surface temperature anomalies. The method is then used as a metric to assess the coupling in climate simulations and a 30-year hindcast from models of the CMIP5 project. Analysis of the frequency of coupled anomalies exceeding one standard deviation from uncoupled NCEP/NCAR and ERA-Interim and partially coupled CFSR reanalyses shows robustness in the main results: anomalies of oceanic origin arise inside the deep tropics and those of atmospheric origin outside of the tropics. Coupled anomalies occupy similar regions in the global oceans independently of the spatiotemporal resolution. Exclusion of phenomena like ENSO, NAO, or AMO has regional effects on the distribution and origin of coupled anomalies; the absence of ENSO decreases anomalies of oceanic origin and favors those of atmospheric origin. Coupled model simulations in general agree with the distribution of anomalies of atmospheric and oceanic origin from reanalyses. However, the lack of the feedback from the atmosphere to the ocean in the AMIP simulations reduces substantially the number of coupled anomalies of atmospheric origin and artificially increases it in the tropics while the number of those of oceanic origin outside the tropics is also augmented. Analysis of a single available 30-year hindcast surprisingly indicates that coupled anomalies are more similar to AMIP than to coupled simulations. Differences in the frequency of coupled anomalies between the AMIP simulations and the uncoupled reanalyses, and similarities between the uncoupled and partially coupled reanalyses, support the notion that the nature of the

  16. Topic models: A novel method for modeling couple and family text data

    PubMed Central

    Atkins, David C.; Rubin, Tim N.; Steyvers, Mark; Doeden, Michelle A.; Baucom, Brian R.; Christensen, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Couple and family researchers often collect open-ended linguistic data – either through free response questionnaire items or transcripts of interviews or therapy sessions. Because participant's responses are not forced into a set number of categories, text-based data can be very rich and revealing of psychological processes. At the same time it is highly unstructured and challenging to analyze. Within family psychology analyzing text data typically means applying a coding system, which can quantify text data but also has several limitations, including the time needed for coding, difficulties with inter-rater reliability, and defining a priori what should be coded. The current article presents an alternative method for analyzing text data called topic models (Steyvers & Griffiths, 2006), which has not yet been applied within couple and family psychology. Topic models have similarities with factor analysis and cluster analysis in that topic models identify underlying clusters of words with semantic similarities (i.e., the “topics”). In the present article, a non-technical introduction to topic models is provided, highlighting how these models can be used for text exploration and indexing (e.g., quickly locating text passages that share semantic meaning) and how output from topic models can be used to predict behavioral codes or other types of outcomes. Throughout the article a collection of transcripts from a large couple therapy trial (Christensen et al., 2004) is used as example data to highlight potential applications. Practical resources for learning more about topic models and how to apply them are discussed. PMID:22888778

  17. Embedding complex hydrology in the regional climate system - Dynamic coupling across different modelling domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butts, Michael; Drews, Martin; Larsen, Morten A. D.; Lerer, Sara; Rasmussen, Søren H.; Grooss, Jesper; Overgaard, Jesper; Refsgaard, Jens C.; Christensen, Ole B.; Christensen, Jens H.

    2014-12-01

    To improve our understanding of the impacts of feedback between the atmosphere and the terrestrial water cycle including groundwater and to improve the integration of water resource management modelling for climate adaption we have developed a dynamically coupled climate-hydrological modelling system. The OpenMI modelling interface is used to couple a comprehensive hydrological modelling system, MIKE SHE running on personal computers, and a regional climate modelling system, HIRHAM running on a high performance computing platform. The coupled model enables two-way interaction between the atmosphere and the groundwater via the land surface and can represent the lateral movement of water in both the surface and subsurface and their interactions, not normally accounted for in climate models. Meso-scale processes are important for climate in general and rainfall in particular. Hydrological impacts are assessed at the catchment scale, the most important scale for water management. Feedback between groundwater, the land surface and the atmosphere occurs across a range of scales. Recognising this, the coupling was developed to allow dynamic exchange of water and energy at the catchment scale embedded within a larger meso-scale modelling domain. We present the coupling methodology used and describe the challenges in representing the exchanges between models and across scales. The coupled model is applied to one-way and two-way coupled simulations for a managed groundwater-dominated catchment, the Skjern River, Denmark. These coupled model simulations are evaluated against field observations and then compared with uncoupled climate and hydrological model simulations. Exploratory simulations show significant differences, particularly in the summer for precipitation and evapotranspiration the coupled model including groundwater and the RCM where groundwater is neglected. However, the resulting differences in the net precipitation and the catchment runoff in this groundwater

  18. Development of An Unstructured Storm Surge-waves-tide Coupled Model And Its Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, X.

    2015-12-01

    An unstructured storm surge-waves-tide coupled model, which was coupled through the Model Coupling Toolkit (MCT), was developed based on the ADCIRC (Advanced Circulation model) ocean model and SWAN (Simulating Waves Nearshore) wave model. The developed coupled model has high resolution in the coast area and can be run efficiently. By comparing with the existing ADCIRC and SWAN coupled model, which was coupled directly not through the MCT, the newly developed one can increase the simulation efficiency by 26.4 percent, when the computational grid and coupling processes of the two coupled model were the same. The coupled model was used to simulate the storm surge and waves during the process of typhoon "Usagi" which formed in the western Pacific on September 17, 2013 and made landfall at Shanwei in Guangdong province. Three numerical experiments were done in the simulation to study the effect of wave-current interaction on the storm surge and waves. Results show that the coupled model can simulate the storm surge and waves well when considering the wave induced radiation stress, the wave effect on the wind stress drag coefficient and the modulation of current and water level on the waves. During the process of typhoon "Usagi" the effect of wave radiation stress can result in a maximum of 0.75m increase in the extreme storm surge, and the wave induced wind stress can cause a -0.82~0.49m change of the extreme storm surge near the coastal area. This study is valuable to the study of hurricane storm surge disaster assessment and the development of the operational storm surge prediction technique.

  19. Strongly-coupled Josephson junction array for simulation of frustrated one-dimensional spin models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhengwei; Du, Lianghui; Zhou, Xingxiang; Han, Yongjian; Guo, Guangcan

    2013-03-01

    We study the capacitance-coupled Josephson-junction array beyond the small-coupling limit. We find that, when the scale of the system is large, its Hamiltonian can be obtained without the small-coupling approximation and the system can be used to simulate strongly frustrated one-dimensional Ising spin problems. To engineer the system Hamiltonian for an ideal theoretical model, we apply a dynamical-decoupling technique to eliminate undesirable couplings in the system. Using a six-site junction array as an example, we numerically evaluate the system to show that it exhibits important characteristics of the frustrated spin model.

  20. Online coupled regional meteorology chemistry models in Europe: current status and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baklanov, A.; Schlünzen, K.; Suppan, P.; Baldasano, J.; Brunner, D.; Aksoyoglu, S.; Carmichael, G.; Douros, J.; Flemming, J.; Forkel, R.; Galmarini, S.; Gauss, M.; Grell, G.; Hirtl, M.; Joffre, S.; Jorba, O.; Kaas, E.; Kaasik, M.; Kallos, G.; Kong, X.; Korsholm, U.; Kurganskiy, A.; Kushta, J.; Lohmann, U.; Mahura, A.; Manders-Groot, A.; Maurizi, A.; Moussiopoulos, N.; Rao, S. T.; Savage, N.; Seigneur, C.; Sokhi, R. S.; Solazzo, E.; Solomos, S.; Sørensen, B.; Tsegas, G.; Vignati, E.; Vogel, B.; Zhang, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Online coupled mesoscale meteorology atmospheric chemistry models have undergone a rapid evolution in recent years. Although mainly developed by the air quality modelling community, these models are also of interest for numerical weather prediction and regional climate modelling as they can consider not only the effects of meteorology on air quality, but also the potentially important effects of atmospheric composition on weather. Two ways of online coupling can be distinguished: online integrated and online access coupling. Online integrated models simulate meteorology and chemistry over the same grid in one model using one main time step for integration. Online access models use independent meteorology and chemistry modules that might even have different grids, but exchange meteorology and chemistry data on a regular and frequent basis. This article offers a comprehensive review of the current research status of online coupled meteorology and atmospheric chemistry modelling within Europe. Eighteen regional online coupled models developed or being used in Europe are described and compared. Topics discussed include a survey of processes relevant to the interactions between atmospheric physics, dynamics and composition; a brief overview of existing online mesoscale models and European model developments; an analysis on how feedback processes are treated in these models; numerical issues associated with coupled models; and several case studies and model performance evaluation methods. Finally, this article highlights selected scientific issues and emerging challenges that require proper consideration to improve the reliability and usability of these models for the three scientific communities: air quality, numerical meteorology modelling (including weather prediction) and climate modelling. This review will be of particular interest to model developers and users in all three fields as it presents a synthesis of scientific progress and provides recommendations for

  1. Correction of biased climate simulated by biased physics through parameter estimation in an intermediate coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuefeng; Zhang, Shaoqing; Liu, Zhengyu; Wu, Xinrong; Han, Guijun

    2016-09-01

    Imperfect physical parameterization schemes are an important source of model bias in a coupled model and adversely impact the performance of model simulation. With a coupled ocean-atmosphere-land model of intermediate complexity, the impact of imperfect parameter estimation on model simulation with biased physics has been studied. Here, the biased physics is induced by using different outgoing longwave radiation schemes in the assimilation and "truth" models. To mitigate model bias, the parameters employed in the biased longwave radiation scheme are optimized using three different methods: least-squares parameter fitting (LSPF), single-valued parameter estimation and geography-dependent parameter optimization (GPO), the last two of which belong to the coupled model parameter estimation (CMPE) method. While the traditional LSPF method is able to improve the performance of coupled model simulations, the optimized parameter values from the CMPE, which uses the coupled model dynamics to project observational information onto the parameters, further reduce the bias of the simulated climate arising from biased physics. Further, parameters estimated by the GPO method can properly capture the climate-scale signal to improve the simulation of climate variability. These results suggest that the physical parameter estimation via the CMPE scheme is an effective approach to restrain the model climate drift during decadal climate predictions using coupled general circulation models.

  2. Inverse modeling of global atmospheric carbon dioxide by Global Eulerian-Lagrangian Coupled Atmospheric Model (GELCA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirai, T.; Ishizawa, M.; Zhuravlev, R.; Ganshin, A.; Belikov, D.; Saito, M.; Oda, T.; Valsala, V.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; Tans, P. P.; Maksyutov, S. S.

    2013-12-01

    Global monthly CO2 flux distributions for 2001-2011 were estimated using an atmospheric inverse modeling system, which is based on combination of two transport models, called GELCA (Global Eulerian-Lagrangian Coupled Atmospheric model). This coupled model approach has several advantages over inversions to a single model alone: the use of Lagrangian particle dispersion model (LPDM) to simulate the transport in the vicinity of the observation points enables us to avoid numerical diffusion of Eulerian models, and is suitable to represent observations at high spatial and temporal resolutions. The global background concentration field generated by an Eulerian model is used as time-variant boundary conditions for an LPDM that performs backward simulations from each receptor point (observation event). In the GELCA inversion system, National Institute for Environmental Studies-Transport Model (NIES-TM) version 8.1i was used as an Eulerian global transport model coupled with FLEXPART version 8.0 as an LPDM. The meteorological fields for driving both models were taken from JMA Climate Data Assimilation System (JCDAS) with a spatial resolution of 1.25° x 1.25°, 40 vertical levels and a temporal resolution of 6 hours. Our prior CO2 fluxes consist of daily terrestrial biospheric fluxes, monthly oceanic fluxes, monthly biomass burning emissions, and monthly fossil fuel CO2 emissions. We employed a Kalman Smoother optimization technique with fixed lag of 3 months, estimating monthly CO2 fluxes for 42 land and 22 ocean regions. We have been using two different global networks of CO2 observations. The Observation Package (ObsPack) data products contain more measurement information in space and time than the NOAA global cooperative air sampling network which basically consists of approximately weekly sampling at background sites. The global total flux and its large-scale distribution optimized with two different global observation networks agreed overall with other previous

  3. The construction of a model of the process of couples' forgiveness in emotion-focused therapy for couples.

    PubMed

    Meneses, Catalina Woldarsky; Greenberg, Leslie S

    2011-10-01

    This study explored how forgiveness unfolds in the context of emotion-focused couples therapy (EFT-C) in eight cases of women betrayed by their partners. Forgiveness was defined as a process involving the reduction in negative feelings and the giving out of undeserved compassion. This was measured by changes in the pre- and posttreatment scores on the Enright Forgiveness Inventory, the Unfinished Business Resolution Scale, and a single item directly asking respondents to indicate their degree of forgiveness. A task analysis was performed to rigorously track the steps leading to forgiveness using videotapes of therapy sessions for eight couples. The performance of the four couples who forgave were compared with each other and then contrasted with the performance of another four couples who did not reach forgiveness at the end of therapy. Based on these observations, a model of the process of forgiveness in EFT-C and a process rating system were developed. © 2011 American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy.

  4. Topic models: a novel method for modeling couple and family text data.

    PubMed

    Atkins, David C; Rubin, Timothy N; Steyvers, Mark; Doeden, Michelle A; Baucom, Brian R; Christensen, Andrew

    2012-10-01

    Couple and family researchers often collect open-ended linguistic data-either through free-response questionnaire items, or transcripts of interviews or therapy sessions. Because participants' responses are not forced into a set number of categories, text-based data can be very rich and revealing of psychological processes. At the same time, it is highly unstructured and challenging to analyze. Within family psychology, analyzing text data typically means applying a coding system, which can quantify text data but also has several limitations, including the time needed for coding, difficulties with interrater reliability, and defining a priori what should be coded. The current article presents an alternative method for analyzing text data called topic models (Steyvers & Griffiths, 2006), which has not yet been applied within couple and family psychology. Topic models have similarities to factor analysis and cluster analysis in that they identify underlying clusters of words with semantic similarities (i.e., the "topics"). In the present article, a nontechnical introduction to topic models is provided, highlighting how these models can be used for text exploration and indexing (e.g., quickly locating text passages that share semantic meaning) and how output from topic models can be used to predict behavioral codes or other types of outcomes. Throughout the article, a collection of transcripts from a large couple-therapy trial (Christensen et al., 2004) is used as example data to highlight potential applications. Practical resources for learning more about topic models and how to apply them are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. A hydrodynamics-reaction kinetics coupled model for evaluating bioreactors derived from CFD simulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Ding, Jie; Guo, Wan-Qian; Ren, Nan-Qi

    2010-12-01

    Investigating how a bioreactor functions is a necessary precursor for successful reactor design and operation. Traditional methods used to investigate flow-field cannot meet this challenge accurately and economically. Hydrodynamics model can solve this problem, but to understand a bioreactor in sufficient depth, it is often insufficient. In this paper, a coupled hydrodynamics-reaction kinetics model was formulated from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code to simulate a gas-liquid-solid three-phase biotreatment system for the first time. The hydrodynamics model is used to formulate prediction of the flow field and the reaction kinetics model then portrays the reaction conversion process. The coupled model is verified and used to simulate the behavior of an expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) reactor for biohydrogen production. The flow patterns were visualized and analyzed. The coupled model also demonstrates a qualitative relationship between hydrodynamics and biohydrogen production. The advantages and limitations of applying this coupled model are discussed.

  6. A poroelastic model coupled to a fluid network with applications in lung modelling.

    PubMed

    Berger, Lorenz; Bordas, Rafel; Burrowes, Kelly; Grau, Vicente; Tavener, Simon; Kay, David

    2016-01-01

    We develop a lung ventilation model based on a continuum poroelastic representation of lung parenchyma that is strongly coupled to a pipe network representation of the airway tree. The continuous system of equations is discretized using a low-order stabilised finite element method. The framework is applied to a realistic lung anatomical model derived from computed tomography data and an artificially generated airway tree to model the conducting airway region. Numerical simulations produce physiologically realistic solutions and demonstrate the effect of airway constriction and reduced tissue elasticity on ventilation, tissue stress and alveolar pressure distribution. The key advantage of the model is the ability to provide insight into the mutual dependence between ventilation and deformation. This is essential when studying lung diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and pulmonary fibrosis. Thus the model can be used to form a better understanding of integrated lung mechanics in both the healthy and diseased states. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Higgs boson couplings in multi-doublet models with natural flavour conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagyu, Kei

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the deviation in the couplings of the standard model (SM) like Higgs boson (h) with a mass of 125 GeV from the prediction of the SM in multi-doublet models within the framework where flavour changing neutral currents at the tree level are naturally forbidden. After we present the general expressions for the modified gauge and Yukawa couplings for h, we show the correlation between the deviation in the Yukawa coupling for the tau lepton hτ+τ- and that for the bottom quark hb b bar under the assumption of a non-zero deviation in the hVV (V = W , Z) couplings in two Higgs doublet models (2HDMs) and three Higgs doublet models (3HDMs) as simple examples. We clarify the possible allowed prediction of the deviations in the 3HDMs which cannot be explained in the 2HDMs even taking into account the one-loop electroweak corrections to the Yukawa coupling.

  8. Coupled Particle Transport and Pattern Formation in a Nonlinear Leaky-Box Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barghouty, A. F.; El-Nemr, K. W.; Baird, J. K.

    2009-01-01

    Effects of particle-particle coupling on particle characteristics in nonlinear leaky-box type descriptions of the acceleration and transport of energetic particles in space plasmas are examined in the framework of a simple two-particle model based on the Fokker-Planck equation in momentum space. In this model, the two particles are assumed coupled via a common nonlinear source term. In analogy with a prototypical mathematical system of diffusion-driven instability, this work demonstrates that steady-state patterns with strong dependence on the magnetic turbulence but a rather weak one on the coupled particles attributes can emerge in solutions of a nonlinearly coupled leaky-box model. The insight gained from this simple model may be of wider use and significance to nonlinearly coupled leaky-box type descriptions in general.

  9. Progress and Challenges in Coupled Ice-Sheet/Climate Modeling with CESM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fyke, J. G.; Sacks, W.; Vizcaino, M.; Lipscomb, W. H.; Price, S. F.

    2014-12-01

    Bidirectional coupling of ice sheet models and climate models opens the door to research of ice-sheet/climate interaction at a global scale. However, difficulties encountered in achieving this coupling have proven non-trivial and include both: 1) Technical challenges. Ocean and atmosphere model components cannot easily handle dynamic boundaries; land surface model components cannot easily simulate exposed glacial ice, firn evolution, or evolving land surfaces; coupling infrastructure cannot easily accept new earth system components; and ice sheet models typically operate at an order of magnitude higher spatial resolution than climate models and on regional domains, and require very long integrations to reach an equilibrium state. 2) Scientific challenges. The glaciological modeling and climate modeling communities often work on topics that cover very different spatiotemporal scales; carry out research using very different models and with very different modeling paradigms; and do not consider coupled ice-sheet/climate behavior across the various ice-sheet/climate physical interfaces. These technical and scientific challenges are being tackled within the Community Earth System Model. The resulting coupled architecture ("CESM-CISM") is now capable of simulating the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) in the climate system. The model includes a relatively sophisticated representation of surface mass balance (SMB), explicit resolution of important ice-sheet climate communication pathways, and prognostic ice dynamics. First results, underpinned by modelled SMB validation, have explored changes in GrIS mean SMB and its variability, partially-coupled GrIS evolution, and emergence of an anthropogenic signal in SMB under RCP8.5 climate forcing. Ongoing work with the evolving CESM-CISM will set the stage for fully-coupled simulations of Greenland in past and future climates, and also for potential integration of the Antarctic ice sheet into a true coupled modeling framework.

  10. Identification of a coupled flapping/inflow model for the PUMA helicopter from flight test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du Val, Ronald; Bruhis, Ofer; Green, John

    1989-01-01

    A model validation procedure is applied to a coupled flapping/inflow model of a PUMA helicopter blade. The structure of the baseline model is first established. Model structure and flight test data are checked for consistency. Parameters of the model are then identified from the flight test data.

  11. Modeling TGF-mediated flow dynamics in a system of three coupled nephrons.

    PubMed

    Bayram, Saziye

    2012-03-01

    This paper focuses on a mathematical model of a system of three closely coupled nephrons and accompanying analytical and computational analysis. In our previous modeling efforts, we have shown how coupling magnifies the tendency of many coupled identical nephrons to oscillate owing to tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) mechanism. However, in this study, our focus is on the coupled nonidentical nephrons and their dynamics due to the TGF system. Our detailed analytical and computational results suggest that systems of three nonidentical nephrons coupled to their nearest neighbors are prone to be found in an oscillatory state, relative to a single-nephron case with the same properties; however, their steady-state regions are not necessarily as small as it was predicted from the system of many coupled identical nephrons cases.

  12. Full wave propagation modelling in view to integrated ICRH wave coupling/RF sheaths modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquot, Jonathan; Bobkov, Volodymyr; Colas, Laurent; Heuraux, Stéphane; Křivská, Alena; Lu, Lingfeng; Noterdaeme, Jean-Marie

    2015-12-01

    RF sheaths rectification can be the reason for operational limits for Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) heating systems via impurity production or excessive heat loads. To simulate this process in realistic geometry, the Self-consistent Sheaths and Waves for Ion Cyclotron Heating (SSWICH) code is a minimal set of coupled equations that computes self-consistently wave propagation and DC plasma biasing. The present version of its wave propagation module only deals with the Slow Wave assumed to be the source of RF sheath oscillations. However the ICRF power coupling to the plasma is due to the fast wave (FW). This paper proposes to replace this one wave equation module by a full wave module in either 2D or 3D as a first step towards integrated modelling of RF sheaths and wave coupling. Since the FW is propagative in the main plasma, Perfectly Matched Layers (PMLs) adapted for plasmas were implemented at the inner side of the simulation domain to absorb outgoing waves and tested numerically with tilted B0 in Cartesian geometry, by either rotating the cold magnetized plasma dielectric tensors in 2D or rotating the coordinate vector basis in 3D. The PML was further formulated in cylindrical coordinates to account for for the toroidal curvature of the plasma. Toroidal curvature itself does not seem to change much the coupling. A detailed 3D geometrical description of Tore Supra and ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) antennas was included in the coupling code. The full antenna structure was introduced, since its toroidal symmetry with respect to the septum plane is broken (FS bars, toroidal phasing, non-symmetrical structure). Reliable convergence has been obtained with the density profile up to the leading edge of antenna limiters. Parallel electric field maps have been obtained as an input for the present version of SSWICH.

  13. Modelling soil-plant-atmosphere interactions by coupling the regional weather model WRF to mechanistic plant models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, C.; Hoffmann, P.; Priesack, E.

    2012-04-01

    Climate change causes altering distributions of meteorological factors influencing plant growth and its interactions between the land surface and the atmosphere. Recent studies show, that uncertainties in regional and global climate simulations are also caused by lacking descriptions of the soil-plant-atmosphere system. Therefore, we couple a mechanistic soil-plant model to a regional climate and forecast model. The detailed simulation of the water and energy exchanges, especially the transpiration of grassland and forests stands, are the key features of the modelling framework. The Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) (Skamarock 2008) is an open source mesoscale numerical weather prediction model. The WRF model was modified in a way, to either choose its native, static land surface model NOAH or the mechanistic eco-system model Expert-N 5.0 individually for every single grid point within the simulation domain. The Expert-N 5.0 modelling framework provides a highly modular structure, enabling the development and use of a large variety of different plant and soil models, including heat transfer, nitrogen uptake/turnover/transport as well as water uptake/transport and crop management. To represent the key landuse types grassland and forest, we selected two mechanistic plant models: The Hurley Pasture model (Thornley 1998) and a modified TREEDYN3 forest simulation model (Bossel 1996). The models simulate plant growth, water, nitrogen and carbon flows for grassland and forest stands. A mosaic approach enables Expert-N to use high resolution land use data e.g. CORINE Land Cover data (CLC, 2006) for the simulation, making it possible to simulate different land use distributions within a single grid cell. The coupling results are analyzed for plausibility and compared with the results of the default land surface model NOAH (Fei Chen and Jimy Dudhia 2010). We show differences between the mechanistic and the static model coupling, with focus on the feedback effects

  14. Scenario Analysis With Economic-Energy Systems Models Coupled to Simple Climate Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, D. A.; Kotamarthi, V. R.; Foster, I. T.; Franklin, M.; Zhu, E.; Patel, D. M.

    2008-12-01

    Here, we compare two scenarios based on Stanford University's Energy Modeling Forum Study 22 on global cooperative and non-cooperative climate policies. In the former, efficient transition paths are implemented including technology Research and Development effort, energy conservation programs, and price signals for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In the non-cooperative case, some countries try to relax their regulations and be free riders. Total emissions and costs are higher in the non-cooperative scenario. The simulations, including climate impacts, run to the year 2100. We use the Argonne AMIGA-MARS economic-energy systems model, the Texas AM University's Forest and Agricultural Sector Optimization Model (FASOM), and the University of Illinois's Integrated Science Assessment Model (ISAM), with offline coupling between the FASOM and AMIGA-MARS and an online coupling between AMIGA-MARS and ISAM. This set of models captures the interaction of terrestrial systems, land use, crops and forests, climate change, human activity, and energy systems. Our scenario simulations represent dynamic paths over which all the climate, terrestrial, economic, and energy technology equations are solved simultaneously Special attention is paid to biofuels and how they interact with conventional gasoline/diesel fuel markets. Possible low-carbon penetration paths are based on estimated costs for new technologies, including cellulosic biomass, coal-to-liquids, plug-in electric vehicles, solar and nuclear energy. We explicitly explore key uncertainties that affect mitigation and adaptation scenarios.

  15. Coupled model of INM-IO global ocean model, CICE sea ice model and SCM OIAS framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayburin, Ruslan; Rashit, Ibrayev; Konstantin, Ushakov; Vladimir, Kalmykov; Gleb, Dyakonov

    2015-04-01

    Status of coupled Arctic model of ocean and sea ice is presented. Model consists of INM IO global ocean component of high resolution, Los Alamos National Laboratory CICE sea ice model and a framework SCM OIAS for the ocean-ice-atmosphere-land coupled modeling on massively-parallel architectures. Model is currently under development at the Institute of Numerical Mathematics (INM), Hydrometeorological Center (HMC) and P.P. Shirshov Institute of Oceanology (IO). Model is aimed at modeling of intra-annual variability of hydrodynamics in Arctic and. The computational characteristics of the world ocean-sea ice coupled model governed by SCM OIAS are presented. The model is parallelized using MPI technologies and currently can use efficiently up to 5000 cores. Details of programming implementation, computational configuration and physical phenomena parametrization are analyzed in terms of intercoupling complex. Results of five year computational experiment of sea ice, snow and ocean state evolution in Arctic region on tripole grid with horizontal resolution of 3-5 kilometers, closed by atmospheric forcing field from repeating "normal" annual course taken from CORE1 experiment data base are presented and analyzed in terms of the state of vorticity and warm Atlantic water expansion.

  16. Linking Tectonics and Surface Processes through SNAC-CHILD Coupling: Preliminary Results Towards Interoperable Modeling Frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, E.; Kelbert, A.; Peckham, S. D.

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate that code coupling can be an efficient and flexible method for modeling complicated two-way interactions between tectonic and surface processes with SNAC-CHILD coupling as an example. SNAC is a deep earth process model (a geodynamic/tectonics model), built upon a scientific software framework called StGermain and also compatible with a model coupling framework called Pyre. CHILD is a popular surface process model (a landscape evolution model), interfaced to the CSDMS (Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System) modeling framework. We first present proof-of-concept but non-trivial results from a simplistic coupling scheme. We then report progress towards augmenting SNAC with a Basic Model Interface (BMI), a framework-agnostic standard interface developed by CSDMS that uses the CSDMS Standard Names as controlled vocabulary for model communication across domains. Newly interfaced to BMI, SNAC will be easily coupled with CHILD as well as other BMI-compatible models. In broader context, this work will test BMI as a general and easy-to-implement mechanism for sharing models between modeling frameworks and is a part of the NSF-funded EarthCube Building Blocks project, "Earth System Bridge: Spanning Scientific Communities with Interoperable Modeling Frameworks."

  17. Simulation of atmospheric carbon dioxide variability with a global coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Y.; Maksyutov, S.; Mukai, H.; Thoning, K.; Tans, P.

    2010-11-01

    This study assesses the advantages of using a coupled atmospheric-tracer transport model, comprising a global Eulerian model and a global Lagrangian particle dispersion model, for reproducibility of tracer gas variation affected by near field around observation sites. The ability to resolve variability in atmospheric composition on an hourly time scale and a spatial scale of several kilometers would be beneficial for analyzing data from continuous ground-based monitoring and upcoming space-based observations. The coupled model yields increased horizontal resolution of transport and fluxes, and has been tested in regional-scale studies of atmospheric chemistry. By applying the Lagrangian component to the global domain, we extend this approach to the global scale, thereby enabling global inverse modeling and data assimilation. To validate the coupled model, we compare model-simulated CO2 concentrations with continuous observations at two sites operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, USA and one site operated by National Institute for Environmental Studies, Japan. As the purpose of this study is limited to demonstration of the new modeling approach, we select a small subset of 3 sites to highlight use of the model in various geographical areas. To explore the capability of the coupled model in simulating synoptic-scale meteorological phenomena, we calculate the correlation coefficients and variance ratios between deseasonalized model-simulated and observed CO2 concentrations. Compared with the Eulerian model alone, the coupled model yields improved agreement between modeled and observed CO2 concentrations.

  18. Development of an unstructured-grid wave-current coupled model and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xingru; Yin, Baoshu; Yang, Dezhou

    2016-08-01

    An unstructured grid wave-current coupled model was developed by coupling the SWAN (Simulating Waves Nearshore) wave model and ADCIRC (Advanced Circulation model) ocean model through the Model Coupling Toolkit (MCT). The developed coupled model has high spatial resolution in the coastal area and is efficient for computation. The efficiency of the newly developed SWAN + ADCIRC model was compared with that of the widely-used SWAN + ADCIRC coupled model, in which SWAN and ADCIRC are coupled directly rather than through the MCT. Results show that the directly-coupled model is more efficient when the total number of computational cores is small, but the MCT-coupled model begin to run faster than the directly-coupled model when more computational cores are used. The MCT-coupled model maintains the scalability longer and can increase the simulation efficiency more than 35% by comparing the minimum wall clock time of one day simulation in the test runs. The MCT-coupled SWAN + ADCIRC model was used to simulate the storm surge and waves during the typhoon Usagi which formed in the western Pacific on September 17, 2013 and landed at Shanwei, China. Three numerical experiments were performed to investigate the effect of wave-current interaction on the storm surge and waves. The results show that the coupled model can better simulate the storm surge and waves when considering the wave-induced radiation stress, the wave effect on the wind stress drag coefficient and the modulation of current and water level on waves. During the typhoon Usagi, the effect of wave radiation stress could result in a maximum of 0.75 m increase in the extreme storm surge, and the wave induced wind stress could cause a -0.82∼0.48 m change of the extreme storm surge near the coastal area. Besides, the radiation stress forced currents cannot be ignored either in the study of mass transport at coastal zones. Results of this study are useful for understanding the wave-current interaction processes and

  19. Study of a misaligned flexibly coupled shaft system having nonlinear bearings and cyclic coupling stiffness—Theoretical model and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redmond, I.

    2010-03-01

    A model which enables dynamic analysis of flexibly coupled misaligned shafts is presented. The model is setup to account for both angular and parallel misalignment in the presence of mass unbalance and incorporates a coupling having angular, torsional and axial flexibility. Among the important features is the ability to simulate both nonlinear bearing stiffness and coupling angular-stiffness anisotropy. The equations of motion are derived for the linear system, extended to include nonlinear bearing effects and subsequently transformed into non-dimensional form for general application. A series of numerical analyses are performed and the influence of important system parameters assessed thereby providing insight to the resulting static and dynamic forces and motions. Angular and parallel misalignments are shown to produce fundamentally different system response. It is found that the static preload induced by both types of misalignment can play a key role in producing complex vibration resulting from it's interaction with rotating-element anisotropy and bearing nonlinear properties. Bearing static forces are altered and rotating elements are subjected to alternating forces which could affect fatigue life. Bearing forces can be further modified by the application of transmitted torque. The potential for great variability in system response is shown to exist due to the participation of numerous influential variables.

  20. Weak coupling polaron and Landau-Zener scenario: Qubits modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jipdi, M. N.; Tchoffo, M.; Fokou, I. F.; Fai, L. C.; Ateuafack, M. E.

    2017-06-01

    The paper presents a weak coupling polaron in a spherical dot with magnetic impurities and investigates conditions for which the system mimics a qubit. Particularly, the work focuses on the Landau-Zener (LZ) scenario undergone by the polaron and derives transition coefficients (transition probabilities) as well as selection rules for polaron's transitions. It is proven that, the magnetic impurities drive the polaron to a two-state superposition leading to a qubit structure. We also showed that the symmetry deficiency induced by the magnetic impurities (strong magnetic field) yields to the banishment of transition coefficients with non-stacking states. However, the transition coefficients revived for large confinement frequency (or weak magnetic field) with the orbital quantum numbers escorting transitions. The polaron is then shown to map a qubit independently of the number of relevant states with the transition coefficients lifted as LZ probabilities and given as a function of the electron-phonon coupling constant (Fröhlich constant).

  1. ENSO Simulation in Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Models: Are the Current Models Better?

    SciTech Connect

    AchutaRao, K; Sperber, K R

    2005-04-29

    Maintaining a multi-model database over a generation or more of model development provides an important framework for assessing model improvement. Using control integrations, we compare the simulation of the El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO), and its extratropical impact, in models developed for the 2007 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report with models developed in the late 1990's (the so-called Coupled Model Intercomparison Project-2 [CMIP2] models). The IPCC models tend to be more realistic in representing the frequency with which ENSO occurs, and they are better at locating enhanced temperature variability over the eastern Pacific Ocean. When compared with reanalyses, the IPCC models have larger pattern correlations of tropical surface air temperature than do the CMIP2 models during the boreal winter peak phase of El Nino. However, for sea-level pressure and precipitation rate anomalies, a clear separation in performance between the two vintages of models is not as apparent. The strongest improvement occurs for the modeling groups whose CMIP2 model tended to have the lowest pattern correlations with observations. This has been checked by subsampling the multi-century IPCC simulations in a manner to be consistent with the single 80-year time segment available from CMIP2. Our results suggest that multi-century integrations may be required to statistically assess model improvement of ENSO. The quality of the El Nino precipitation composite is directly related to the fidelity of the boreal winter precipitation climatology, highlighting the importance of reducing systematic model error. Over North America distinct improvement of El Nino forced boreal winter surface air temperature, sea-level pressure, and precipitation rate anomalies in the IPCC models occurs. This improvement, is directly proportional to the skill of the tropical El Nino forced precipitation anomalies.

  2. Brane models with a Ricci-coupled scalar field

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanos, C.; Dimitriadis, A.; Tamvakis, K.

    2006-08-15

    We consider the problem of a scalar field, nonminimally coupled to gravity through a -{xi}{phi}{sup 2}R term, in the presence of a brane. Exact solutions, for a wide range of values of the coupling parameter {xi}, for both {phi}-dependent and {phi}-independent brane tension, are derived and their behavior is studied. In the case of a Randall-Sundrum geometry, a class of the resulting scalar field solutions exhibits a folded-kink profile. We go beyond the Randall-Sundrum geometry studying general warp factor solutions in the presence of a kink scalar. Analytic and numerical results are provided for the case of a brane or for smooth geometries, where the scalar field acts as a thick brane. It is shown that finite geometries with warp factors that asymptotically decrease exponentially are realizable for a wide range of parameter values. We also study graviton localization in our setup and find that the localizing potential for gravitons with the characteristic volcanolike profile develops a local maximum located at the origin for high values of the coupling {xi}.

  3. Modelling the Effects of Electrical Coupling between Unmyelinated Axons of Brainstem Neurons Controlling Rhythmic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Michael J.; Soffe, Stephen R.; Willshaw, David J.; Roberts, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Gap junctions between fine unmyelinated axons can electrically couple groups of brain neurons to synchronise firing and contribute to rhythmic activity. To explore the distribution and significance of electrical coupling, we modelled a well analysed, small population of brainstem neurons which drive swimming in young frog tadpoles. A passive network of 30 multicompartmental neurons with unmyelinated axons was used to infer that: axon-axon gap junctions close to the soma gave the best match to experimentally measured coupling coefficients; axon diameter had a strong influence on coupling; most neurons were coupled indirectly via the axons of other neurons. When active channels were added, gap junctions could make action potential propagation along the thin axons unreliable. Increased sodium and decreased potassium channel densities in the initial axon segment improved action potential propagation. Modelling suggested that the single spike firing to step current injection observed in whole-cell recordings is not a cellular property but a dynamic consequence of shunting resulting from electrical coupling. Without electrical coupling, firing of the population during depolarising current was unsynchronised; with coupling, the population showed synchronous recruitment and rhythmic firing. When activated instead by increasing levels of modelled sensory pathway input, the population without electrical coupling was recruited incrementally to unpatterned activity. However, when coupled, the population was recruited all-or-none at threshold into a rhythmic swimming pattern: the tadpole “decided” to swim. Modelling emphasises uncertainties about fine unmyelinated axon physiology but, when informed by biological data, makes general predictions about gap junctions: locations close to the soma; relatively small numbers; many indirect connections between neurons; cause of action potential propagation failure in fine axons; misleading alteration of intrinsic firing

  4. Coupled Dynamic Modeling of Floating Wind Turbine Systems: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wayman, E. N.; Sclavounos, P. D.; Butterfield, S.; Jonkman, J.; Musial, W.

    2006-03-01

    This article presents a collaborative research program that the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have undertaken to develop innovative and cost-effective floating and mooring systems for offshore wind turbines in water depths of 10-200 m. Methods for the coupled structural, hydrodynamic, and aerodynamic analysis of floating wind turbine systems are presented in the frequency domain. This analysis was conducted by coupling the aerodynamics and structural dynamics code FAST [4] developed at NREL with the wave load and response simulation code WAMIT (Wave Analysis at MIT) [15] developed at MIT. Analysis tools were developed to consider coupled interactions between the wind turbine and the floating system. These include the gyroscopic loads of the wind turbine rotor on the tower and floater, the aerodynamic damping introduced by the wind turbine rotor, the hydrodynamic damping introduced by wave-body interactions, and the hydrodynamic forces caused by wave excitation. Analyses were conducted for two floater concepts coupled with the NREL 5-MW Offshore Baseline wind turbine in water depths of 10-200 m: the MIT/NREL Shallow Drafted Barge (SDB) and the MIT/NREL Tension Leg Platform (TLP). These concepts were chosen to represent two different methods of achieving stability to identify differences in performance and cost of the different stability methods. The static and dynamic analyses of these structures evaluate the systems' responses to wave excitation at a range of frequencies, the systems' natural frequencies, and the standard deviations of the systems' motions in each degree of freedom in various wind and wave environments. This article in various wind and wave environments. This article explores the effects of coupling the wind turbine with the floating platform, the effects of water depth, and the effects of wind speed on the systems' performance. An economic feasibility analysis of the two concepts

  5. Hydrodynamic planetary thermosphere model: 2. Coupling of an electron transport/energy deposition model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Feng; Solomon, Stanley C.; Qian, Liying; Lei, Jiuhou; Roble, Raymond G.

    2008-07-01

    An electron transport/energy deposition model is expanded to include atomic nitrogen and is coupled with a 1-D hydrodynamic thermosphere model. The coupled model is used to investigate the response of the Earth's thermosphere under extreme solar EUV conditions and is compared with previous studies. It is found that (1) the parameterization of Swartz and Nisbet (1972) underestimates the ambient electron heating by photoelectrons significantly in the upper thermosphere of the Earth under conditions with greater than 3 times the present solar EUV irradiance; (2) the transition of the Earth's thermosphere from a hydrostatic equilibrium regime to a hydrodynamic regime occurs at a smaller solar EUV flux condition when enhanced, more realistic, and self-consistent, ambient electron heating by photoelectrons is accounted for; (3) atomic nitrogen becomes the dominant neutral species in the upper thermosphere (competing against atomic oxygen) under extreme solar EUV conditions, and the electron impact processes of atomic nitrogen are important for both the chemistry and energetics in the corresponding thermosphere/ionosphere; (4) N+ remains a minor ion compared to O+, even when atomic nitrogen dominates the exobase; and (5) adiabatic cooling does not play an important role in electron gas energy budget. These findings highlight the importance of an electron transport/energy deposition model when investigating the thermosphere and ionosphere of terrestrial planets in their early evolutionary stages.

  6. Stochastic modelling and predictability: analysis of a low-order coupled ocean–atmosphere model

    PubMed Central

    Vannitsem, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing interest in developing stochastic schemes for the description of processes that are poorly represented in atmospheric and climate models, in order to increase their variability and reduce the impact of model errors. The use of such noise could however have adverse effects by modifying in undesired ways a certain number of moments of their probability distributions. In this work, the impact of developing a stochastic scheme (based on stochastic averaging) for the ocean is explored in the context of a low-order coupled (deterministic) ocean–atmosphere system. After briefly analysing its variability, its ability in predicting the oceanic flow generated by the coupled system is investigated. Different phases in the error dynamics are found: for short lead times, an initial overdispersion of the ensemble forecast is present while the ensemble mean follows a dynamics reminiscent of the combined amplification of initial condition and model errors for deterministic systems; for longer lead times, a reliable diffusive ensemble spread is observed. These different phases are also found for ensemble-oriented skill measures like the Brier score and the rank histogram. The implications of these features on building stochastic models are then briefly discussed. PMID:24842037

  7. Stochastic modelling and predictability: analysis of a low-order coupled ocean-atmosphere model.

    PubMed

    Vannitsem, Stéphane

    2014-06-28

    There is a growing interest in developing stochastic schemes for the description of processes that are poorly represented in atmospheric and climate models, in order to increase their variability and reduce the impact of model errors. The use of such noise could however have adverse effects by modifying in undesired ways a certain number of moments of their probability distributions. In this work, the impact of developing a stochastic scheme (based on stochastic averaging) for the ocean is explored in the context of a low-order coupled (deterministic) ocean-atmosphere system. After briefly analysing its variability, its ability in predicting the oceanic flow generated by the coupled system is investigated. Different phases in the error dynamics are found: for short lead times, an initial overdispersion of the ensemble forecast is present while the ensemble mean follows a dynamics reminiscent of the combined amplification of initial condition and model errors for deterministic systems; for longer lead times, a reliable diffusive ensemble spread is observed. These different phases are also found for ensemble-oriented skill measures like the Brier score and the rank histogram. The implications of these features on building stochastic models are then briefly discussed.

  8. Tunable quantum chaos in the Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev model coupled to a thermal bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yiming; Zhai, Hui; Zhang, Pengfei

    2017-07-01

    The Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev (SYK) model describes Majorana fermions with random interaction, which displays many interesting properties such as non-Fermi liquid behavior, quantum chaos, emergent conformal symmetry and holographic duality. Here we consider a SYK model or a chain of SYK models with N Majorana fermion modes coupled to another SYK model with N 2 Majorana fermion modes, in which the latter has many more degrees of freedom and plays the role as a thermal bath. For a single SYK model coupled to the thermal bath, we show that although the Lyapunov exponent is still proportional to temperature, it monotonically decreases from 2 π/β ( β = 1 /( k B T), T is temperature) to zero as the coupling strength to the thermal bath increases. For a chain of SYK models, when they are uniformly coupled to the thermal bath, we show that the butterfly velocity displays a crossover from a √{T} -dependence at relatively high temperature to a linear T-dependence at low temperature, with the crossover temperature also controlled by the coupling strength to the thermal bath. If only the end of the SYK chain is coupled to the thermal bath, the model can introduce a spatial dependence of both the Lyapunov exponent and the butterfly velocity. Our models provide canonical examples for the study of thermalization within chaotic models.

  9. Evaluation of Model Coupling Frameworks for Use by the Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System (CSDMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peckham, S. D.; Syvitski, J. P.

    2007-12-01

    The Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System (CSDMS) is a recently NSF-funded project that represents an effort to bring together a diverse community of surface dynamics modelers and model users. Key goals of the CSDMS project are to (1) promote open-source code sharing and re-use, (2) to develop a review process for code contributions, (3) promote recognition of contributors, (4) develop a "library" of low-level software tools and higher-level models that can be linked as easily as possible into new applications and (5) provide resources to simplify the efforts of surface dynamics modelers. The architectural framework of CSDMS is being designed to allow code contributions to be in any of several different programming languages (language independence), to support a migration towards parallel computation and to support multiple operating systems (platform independence). In addition, the architecture should permit structured, unstructured and adaptive grids. A variety of different "coupling frameworks" are currently in use or under development in support of similar projects in other communities. One of these, ESMF (Earth System Modeling Framework), is primarily centered on Fortran90, structured grids and Unix-based platforms. ESMF has significant buy-in from the climate modeling community in the U.S.; a closely-related framework called OASIS4 has been adopted by many climate modelers in Europe. OpenMI has emerged from the hydrologic community in Europe and is likely to be adopted for the NSF-funded CUAHSI project. OpenMI is primarily centered on the Windows platform and a programming language called "C-sharp" and is not oriented toward parallel computing. A third, DOE-funded framework called CCA (Common Component Architecture) achieves language interoperability using a tool called Babel. It fully supports parallel computation and virtually any operating system. CCA has also been shown to be interoperable with ESMF and MCT (Model Coupling Toolkit) and would appear

  10. Seasonal climate hindcasts with Eta model nested in CPTEC coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilotto, Isabel L.; Chou, Sin Chan; Nobre, Paulo

    2012-12-01

    This work evaluates the added value of the downscaling technique employed with the Eta model nested in the CPTEC atmospheric general circulation model and in the CPTEC coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model (CGCM). The focus is on the austral summer season, December-January-February, with three members each year. Precipitation, latent heat flux, and shortwave radiation flux at the surface hindcast by the models are compared with observational data and model analyses. The global models generally overestimate the precipitation over South America and tropical Atlantic. The CGCM and the nested Eta (Eta + C) both produce a split in the ITCZ precipitation band. The Eta + C produces better precipitation pattern for the studied season. The Eta model reduces the excessive latent heat flux generated by these global models, in particular the Eta + C. Comparison against PIRATA buoys data shows that the Eta + C results in the smallest precipitation and shortwave radiation forecast errors. The Eta + C comparatively best results are though as a consequence of both: the regional model resolution/physics and smaller errors on the lateral boundary conditions provided by the CGCM.

  11. Advancing Coupled Human-Earth System Models: The Integrated Ecosystem Demography Model (iED) Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurtt, G. C.; Chini, L. P.; Clarke, L.; Calvin, K. V.; Chambers, J. Q.; Dubayah, R.; Dolan, K.; Edmonds, J. A.; Fisk, J. P.; Flanagan, S.; Frolking, S.; Janetos, A. C.; LePage, Y.; Morton, D. C.; Patel, P.; Rourke, O.; Sahajpal, R.; Thomson, A. M.; Wise, M.; Ying, Q.

    2012-12-01

    Recent studies with integrated assessment models, models linking human and natural systems at a global scale, highlight the importance of terrestrial systems in climate stabilization efforts. Here we introduce a new modeling framework iED, designed to link advanced remote sensing data (active and passive.), height-structured terrestrial ecosystem dynamics (ED), gridded land-use change projections (GLM), and integrated assessment modeling (GCAM) into a single coupled modeling framework with unprecedented spatial resolution and process-level detail. Our research aims to reduce uncertainties associated with forest modeling within integrated assessments, and to quantify the impacts of climate change on forest growth, mortality, and productivity for integrated assessments of terrestrial carbon management. iED is being used to address key science questions including: (1) What are the opportunities for land-use strategies such as afforestation or woody bioenergy crop production to contribute to stabilization of atmospheric CO2 concentrations? (2) How could potentially altered disturbance rates from tropical cyclones and Amazonian fires affect vegetation, carbon stocks and fluxes, and the development of climate change mitigation strategies? (3) What are the linked remote sensing/ecosystem modeling requirements for improving integrated assessments of climate mitigation strategies? With its strong connections to data and conceptual linkages to other models in development, iED is also designed to inform the next generation of remote sensing and integrated Earth system modeling efforts.

  12. A Model for Reintegrating Couples and Family Therapy Training in Psychiatric Residency Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rait, Douglas; Glick, Ira

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors propose a family-systems training model for general residency training programs in psychiatry based on the couples and family therapy training program in Stanford's Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. Methods: The authors review key elements in couples and family therapy training. Examples are drawn from the…

  13. A New Model of Sensorimotor Coupling in the Development of Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westermann, Gert; Miranda, Eduardo Reck

    2004-01-01

    We present a computational model that learns a coupling between motor parameters and their sensory consequences in vocal production during a babbling phase. Based on the coupling, preferred motor parameters and prototypically perceived sounds develop concurrently. Exposure to an ambient language modifies perception to coincide with the sounds from…

  14. A New Model of Sensorimotor Coupling in the Development of Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westermann, Gert; Miranda, Eduardo Reck

    2004-01-01

    We present a computational model that learns a coupling between motor parameters and their sensory consequences in vocal production during a babbling phase. Based on the coupling, preferred motor parameters and prototypically perceived sounds develop concurrently. Exposure to an ambient language modifies perception to coincide with the sounds from…

  15. Modeling of inter-neuronal coupling medium and its impact on neuronal synchronization

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Muhammad; Hong, Keum-Shik

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, modeling of the coupling medium between two neurons, the effects of the model parameters on the synchronization of those neurons, and compensation of coupling strength deficiency in synchronization are studied. Our study exploits the inter-neuronal coupling medium and investigates its intrinsic properties in order to get insight into neuronal-information transmittance and, there from, brain-information processing. A novel electrical model of the coupling medium that represents a well-known RLC circuit attributable to the coupling medium’s intrinsic resistive, inductive, and capacitive properties is derived. Surprisingly, the integration of such properties reveals the existence of a natural three-term control strategy, referred to in the literature as the proportional integral derivative (PID) controller, which can be responsible for synchronization between two neurons. Consequently, brain-information processing can rely on a large number of PID controllers based on the coupling medium properties responsible for the coherent behavior of neurons in a neural network. Herein, the effects of the coupling model (or natural PID controller) parameters are studied and, further, a supervisory mechanism is proposed that follows a learning and adaptation policy based on the particle swarm optimization algorithm for compensation of the coupling strength deficiency. PMID:28486505

  16. Revised Interseismic Coupling Models for the North Island, New Zealand, Using FEM-Derived Green's Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, C. A.; Wallace, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    The Hikurangi subduction margin adjacent to the North Island, New Zealand, displays a variation in interseismic coupling behavior along strike, with shallow coupling in the north and deeper coupling in the south (Wallace et al., 2012). With new information such as an improved interface geometry, a New Zealand-wide seismic velocity model and an increased density and duration of geodetic networks, it is now possible to provide a much more detailed picture of interseismic coupling at the Hikurangi margin than in previous studies. In previous work (Williams and Wallace, 2015), we examined the effects of material property variations on slip estimates for slow slip events (SSEs) along the Hikurangi margin, and found that in cases where the slip is deep or there is good geodetic coverage above the slipping region, heterogeneous models generally predict about 20% less slip than elastic half-space models. Based on those results, we anticipate that interseismic coupling models that account for elastic heterogeneity will also predict similarly lower slip deficit rates in such regions. To explore these ideas, we are developing a new interseismic coupling model for the North Island. We use a New Zealand-wide seismic velocity model (Eberhart-Phillips et al., 2010) to provide elastic properties and an improved Hikurangi interface geometry (Williams et al., 2013) as the basis for our subduction geometry. In addition to the Hikurangi subduction interface, we generate finite element meshes for 20 additional faults that compose the North Island portion of the elastic block model of Wallace et al. (2012). We generate Green's functions for all faults using the PyLith finite element code (Aagaard et al., 2013), and then use the Defnode geodetic inversion code (McCaffrey, 1995; 2002) to invert for block rotation poles and interseismic coupling. Our revised coupling model should provide better constraints on interseismic coupling in the North Island, and should thus provide a better

  17. From global circulation to flood loss: Coupling models across the scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felder, Guido; Gomez-Navarro, Juan Jose; Bozhinova, Denica; Zischg, Andreas; Raible, Christoph C.; Ole, Roessler; Martius, Olivia; Weingartner, Rolf

    2017-04-01

    The prediction and the prevention of flood losses requires an extensive understanding of underlying meteorological, hydrological, hydraulic and damage processes. Coupled models help to improve the understanding of such underlying processes and therefore contribute the understanding of flood risk. Using such a modelling approach to determine potentially flood-affected areas and damages requires a complex coupling between several models operating at different spatial and temporal scales. Although the isolated parts of the single modelling components are well established and commonly used in the literature, a full coupling including a mesoscale meteorological model driven by a global circulation one, a hydrologic model, a hydrodynamic model and a flood impact and loss model has not been reported so far. In the present study, we tackle the application of such a coupled model chain in terms of computational resources, scale effects, and model performance. From a technical point of view, results show the general applicability of such a coupled model, as well as good model performance. From a practical point of view, such an approach enables the prediction of flood-induced damages, although some future challenges have been identified.

  18. Simulating carbon exchange using a regional atmospheric model coupled to an advanced land-surface model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ter Maat, H. W.; Hutjes, R. W. A.

    2008-10-01

    A large scale mismatch exists between our understanding and quantification of ecosystem atmosphere exchange of carbon dioxide at local scale and continental scales. This paper will focus on the carbon exchange on the regional scale to address the following question: What are the main controlling factors determining atmospheric carbon dioxide content at a regional scale? We use the Regional Atmospheric Modelling System (RAMS), coupled with a land surface scheme simulating carbon, heat and momentum fluxes (SWAPS-C), and including also sub models for urban and marine fluxes, which in principle include the main controlling mechanisms and capture the relevant dynamics of the system. To validate the model, observations are used which were taken during an intensive observational campaign in the central Netherlands in summer 2002. These included flux-site observations, vertical profiles at tall towers and spatial fluxes of various variables taken by aircraft. The coupled regional model (RAMS-SWAPS-C) generally does a good job in simulating results close to reality. The validation of the model demonstrates that surface fluxes of heat, water and CO2 are reasonably well simulated. The comparison against aircraft data shows that the regional meteorology is captured by the model. Comparing spatially explicit simulated and observed fluxes we conclude that in general simulated latent heat fluxes are underestimated by the model to the observations which exhibit large standard deviation for all flights. Sensitivity experiments demonstrated the relevance of the urban emissions of carbon dioxide for the carbon balance in this particular region. The same test also show the relation between uncertainties in surface fluxes and those in atmospheric concentrations.

  19. Wind waves modelling on the water body with coupled WRF and WAVEWATCH III models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, Alexandra; Troitskaya, Yuliya; Kandaurov, Alexander; Baydakov, Georgy; Vdovin, Maxim; Papko, Vladislav; Sergeev, Daniil

    2015-04-01

    Simulation of ocean and sea waves is an accepted instrument for the improvement of the weather forecasts. Wave modelling, coupled models modelling is applied to open seas [1] and is less developed for moderate and small inland water reservoirs and lakes, though being of considerable interest for inland navigation. Our goal is to tune the WAVEWATCH III model to the conditions of the inland reservoir and to carry out the simulations of surface wind waves with coupled WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting) and WAVEWATCH III models. Gorky Reservoir, an artificial lake in the central part of the Volga River formed by a hydroelectric dam, was considered as an example of inland reservoir. Comparing to [2] where moderate constant winds (u10 is up to 9 m/s) of different directions blowing steadily all over the surface of the reservoir were considered, here we apply atmospheric model WRF to get wind input to WAVEWATCH III. WRF computations were held on the Yellowstone supercomputer for 4 nested domains with minimum scale of 1 km. WAVEWATCH III model was tuned for the conditions of the Gorky Reservoir. Satellite topographic data on altitudes ranged from 56,6° N to 57,5° N and from 42.9° E to 43.5° E with increments 0,00833 ° in both directions was used. 31 frequencies ranged from 0,2 Hz to 4 Hz and 30 directions were considered. The minimal significant wave height was changed to the lower one. The waves in the model were developing from some initial seeding spectral distribution (Gaussian in frequency and space, cosine in direction). The range of the observed significant wave height in the numerical experiment was from less than 1 cm up to 30 cm. The field experiments were carried out in the south part of the Gorky reservoir from the boat [2, 3]. 1-D spectra of the field experiment were compared with those obtained in the numerical experiments with different parameterizations of flux provided in WAVEWATCH III both with constant wind input and WRF wind input. For all the

  20. Report of the proceedings of the Colloquium and Workshop on Multiscale Coupled Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Steven E. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The Colloquium and Workshop on Multiscale Coupled Modeling was held for the purpose of addressing modeling issues of importance to planning for the Cooperative Multiscale Experiment (CME). The colloquium presentations attempted to assess the current ability of numerical models to accurately simulate the development and evolution of mesoscale cloud and precipitation systems and their cycling of water substance, energy, and trace species. The primary purpose of the workshop was to make specific recommendations for the improvement of mesoscale models prior to the CME, their coupling with cloud, cumulus ensemble, hydrology, air chemistry models, and the observational requirements to initialize and verify these models.

  1. An efficient broadband coupled-mode model using the Hamiltonian method for modal solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, XueFeng; Luo, WenYu; Wang, HaoZhong; Hu, ChangQing

    2017-09-01

    A numerically efficient broadband, range-dependent propagation model is proposed, which incorporates the Hamiltonian method into the coupled-mode model DGMCM. The Hamiltonian method is highly efficient for finding broadband eigenvalues, and DGMCM is an accurate model for range-dependent propagation in the frequency domain. Consequently, the proposed broadband model combining the Hamiltonian method and DGMCM has significant virtue in terms of both efficiency and accuracy. Numerical simulations are also provided. The numerical results indicate that the proposed model has a better performance over the broadband model using the Fourier synthesis and COUPLE, while retaining the same level of accuracy.

  2. The phonon-coupling model for Skyrme forces

    SciTech Connect

    Lyutorovich, N.; Tselyaev, V.; Speth, J. Krewald, S.; Reinhard, P.-G.

    2016-11-15

    A short review on the self-consistent RPA based on the energy-density functional of the Skyrme type is given. We also present an extension of the RPA where the coupling of phonons to the single-particle states is considered. Within this approach we present numerical results which are compared with data. The self-consistent approach is compared with the Landau–Migdal theory. Here we derive from the self-consistent ph interaction, the Landau–Migdal parameters as well as their density dependence. In the Appendix a new derivation of the reduced matrix elements of the ph interaction is presented.

  3. Nucleon scattering on actinides using a dispersive optical model with extended couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soukhovitskiĩ, E. Sh.; Capote, R.; Quesada, J. M.; Chiba, S.; Martyanov, D. S.

    2016-12-01

    The Tamura coupling model [Rev. Mod. Phys. 37, 679 (1965), 10.1103/RevModPhys.37.679] has been extended to consider the coupling of additional low-lying rotational bands to the ground-state band. Rotational bands are built on vibrational bandheads (even-even targets) or single-particle bandheads (odd-A targets) including both axial and nonaxial deformations. These additional excitations are introduced as a perturbation to the underlying axially symmetric rigid-rotor structure of the ground-state rotational band. Coupling matrix elements of the generalized optical model are derived for extended multiband transitions in even-even and odd-A nuclei. Isospin symmetric formulation of the optical model is employed. A coupled-channels optical-model potential (OMP) containing a dispersive contribution is used to fit simultaneously all available optical experimental databases including neutron strength functions for nucleon scattering on 232Th,233,235,238U, and 239Pu nuclei. Quasielastic (p ,n ) scattering data on 232Th and 238U to the isobaric analog states of the target nucleus are also used to constrain the isovector part of the optical potential. Lane consistent OMP is derived for all actinides if corresponding multiband coupling schemes are defined. For even-even (odd-A ) actinides almost all low-lying collective levels below 1 MeV (0.5 MeV) of excitation energy are coupled. OMP parameters show a smooth energy dependence and energy-independent geometry. A phenomenological optical-model potential that couples multiple bands in odd-A actinides is published for a first time. Calculations using the derived OMP potential reproduce measured total cross-section differences between several actinide pairs within experimental uncertainty for incident neutron energies from 50 keV up to 150 MeV. The importance of extended coupling is studied. Multiband coupling is stronger in even-even targets owing to the collective nature of the coupling; the impact of extended coupling on

  4. Simulation of seasonal anomalies of atmospheric circulation using coupled atmosphere-ocean model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstykh, M. A.; Diansky, N. A.; Gusev, A. V.; Kiktev, D. B.

    2014-03-01

    A coupled atmosphere-ocean model intended for the simulation of coupled circulation at time scales up to a season is developed. The semi-Lagrangian atmospheric general circulation model of the Hydrometeorological Centre of Russia, SLAV, is coupled with the sigma model of ocean general circulation developed at the Institute of Numerical Mathematics, Russian Academy of Sciences (INM RAS), INMOM. Using this coupled model, numerical experiments on ensemble modeling of the atmosphere and ocean circulation for up to 4 months are carried out using real initial data for all seasons of an annual cycle in 1989-2010. Results of these experiments are compared to the results of the SLAV model with the simple evolution of the sea surface temperature. A comparative analysis of seasonally averaged anomalies of atmospheric circulation shows prospects in applying the coupled model for forecasts. It is shown with the example of the El Niño phenomenon of 1997-1998 that the coupled model forecasts the seasonally averaged anomalies for the period of the nonstationary El Niño phase significantly better.

  5. The Thirring interaction in the two-dimensional axial-current-pseudoscalar derivative coupling model

    SciTech Connect

    Belvedere, L.V. . E-mail: armflavio@if.uff.br

    2006-12-15

    We reexamine the two-dimensional model of massive fermions interacting with a massless pseudoscalar field via axial-current derivative coupling. The hidden Thirring interaction in the axial-derivative coupling model is exhibited compactly by performing a canonical field transformation on the Bose field algebra and the model is mapped into the Thirring model with an additional vector-current-scalar derivative interaction (Schroer-Thirring model). The Fermi field operator is rewritten in terms of the Mandelstam soliton operator coupled to a free massless scalar field. The charge sectors of the axial-derivative model are mapped into the charge sectors of the massive Thirring model. The complete bosonized version of the model is presented. The bosonized composite operators of the quantum Hamiltonian are obtained as the leading operators in the Wilson short distance expansions.

  6. Characterization and modelling of inter-core coupling in coherent fiber bundles.

    PubMed

    Perperidis, Antonios; Parker, Helen E; Karam-Eldaly, Ahmed; Altmann, Yoann; Dhaliwal, Kevin; Thomson, Robert R; Tanner, Michael G; McLaughlin, Stephen

    2017-05-15

    Recent developments in optical endomicroscopy (OEM) and associated fluorescent SmartProbes present a need for sensitive imaging with high detection performance. Inter-core coupling within coherent fiber bundles is a well recognized limitation, affecting the technology's imaging capabilities. Fiber cross coupling has been studied both experimentally and within a theoretical framework (coupled mode theory), providing (i) insights on the factors affecting cross talk, and (ii) recommendations for optimal fiber bundle design. However, due to physical limitations, such as the tradeoff between cross coupling and core density, cross coupling can be suppressed yet not eliminated through optimal fiber design. This study introduces a novel approach for measuring, analyzing and quantifying cross coupling within coherent fiber bundles, in a format that can be integrated into a linear model, which in turn can enable computational compensation of the associated blurring introduced to OEM images.

  7. Testing of a coupled model of the HBV model and a glacier retreat model on a Himalayan basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LI, Hong; Xu, Chongyu; Beldring, Stein; Melvold, Kjetil; Jain, Sharad

    2014-05-01

    The Himalayan glaciers are source of numerous large Asian river systems, including the Indus, Ganges, and Brahmaputra, which provide water for 1.5 billion people. This region is among areas that are the most sensitive to climate change. Shrinking of the glaciers is expected to significantly affect hydrologic responses of glaciated basins. Retreat of glaciers in these basins is predicted to cause severe water crisis in these basins. However, glacier behaviours are not well represented in most current hydrological models. The objective of the present study is to test performance of a coupled model consisting of a hydrological model and a glacier retreat model. The hydrological model is a distributed HBV model, simulating runoff response to water input into catchment. The glacier retreat model is a distributed glacier-specific model, Δh-parameterization describing ice redistribution caused by glacier movement. The Beas River basin in the Northern India is selected as focus area because of its high representativeness of the Himalayan basins and availability of data. This study will not only improve the HBV model for hydrological studies in glaciated catchments, but also contribute to improved understanding and modelling of glacier hydrology. The coupled model will be a useful tool for water resources projections and hydropower planning in a far future on highly glaciated basins.

  8. Coupling centrifuge modeling and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to determine contaminant retardation in clays.

    PubMed

    Timms, Wendy; Hendry, M Jim; Muise, Jason; Kerrich, Robert

    2009-02-15

    Quantifying the retardation (Rd) of reactive solutes as they migrate through low-permeability clay-rich media is difficult, thus motivating this study to assess the viability of combining centrifuge modeling and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) techniques. An influent solution containing Cl-, trace metals, and lanthanide species flowed at 1.0 mL x h(-1) through an undisturbed clay-rich core sample (33 mm diameter x 50 mm long) mounted in a UFA Beckman centrifuge operating at 3000 rpm (N factor = 876 g). During the 87 day experiment the hydraulic conductivity of the core was 3.4 x 10(-10) m x s(-1). Effluent breakthrough data indicate the Rd of Tl to be 10; incomplete breakthrough (non-steady-state) data for 145Nd and 171Yb suggest Rd values of >75 and >85, respectively. At the completion of the transport experiment, longitudinal sections of the core solid were analyzed for 145Nd and 171Yb using a Cetac laser ablation system coupled with an ICP-MS. The longitudinal core sections yielded Rd values of >10000 for 145Nd and 171Yb. This study demonstrates coupling these techniques can provide Rd values for a wide range of reactive solutes with relatively rapid testing of small-scale, low hydraulic conductivity core samples.

  9. Mechanisms of Excitation-Contraction Coupling in an Integrative Model of the Cardiac Ventricular Myocyte

    PubMed Central

    Greenstein, Joseph L.; Hinch, Robert; Winslow, Raimond L.

    2006-01-01

    It is now well established that characteristic properties of excitation-contraction (EC) coupling in cardiac myocytes, such as high gain and graded Ca2+ release, arise from the interactions that occur between L-type Ca2+ channels (LCCs) and nearby ryanodine-sensitive Ca2+ release channels (RyRs) in localized microdomains. Descriptions of Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release (CICR) that account for these local mechanisms are lacking from many previous models of the cardiac action potential, and those that do include local control of CICR are able to reconstruct properties of EC coupling, but require computationally demanding stochastic simulations of ∼105 individual ion channels. In this study, we generalize a recently developed analytical approach for deriving simplified mechanistic models of CICR to formulate an integrative model of the canine cardiac myocyte which is computationally efficient. The resulting model faithfully reproduces experimentally measured properties of EC coupling and whole cell phenomena. The model is used to study the role of local redundancy in L-type Ca2+ channel gating and the role of dyad configuration on EC coupling. Simulations suggest that the characteristic steep rise in EC coupling gain observed at hyperpolarized potentials is a result of increased functional coupling between LCCs and RyRs. We also demonstrate mechanisms by which alterations in the early repolarization phase of the action potential, resulting from reduction of the transient outward potassium current, alters properties of EC coupling. PMID:16214852

  10. Analog quantum simulation of the Rabi model in the ultra-strong coupling regime.

    PubMed

    Braumüller, Jochen; Marthaler, Michael; Schneider, Andre; Stehli, Alexander; Rotzinger, Hannes; Weides, Martin; Ustinov, Alexey V

    2017-10-03

    The quantum Rabi model describes the fundamental mechanism of light-matter interaction. It consists of a two-level atom or qubit coupled to a quantized harmonic mode via a transversal interaction. In the weak coupling regime, it reduces to the well-known Jaynes-Cummings model by applying a rotating wave approximation. The rotating wave approximation breaks down in the ultra-strong coupling regime, where the effective coupling strength g is comparable to the energy ω of the bosonic mode, and remarkable features in the system dynamics are revealed. Here we demonstrate an analog quantum simulation of an effective quantum Rabi model in the ultra-strong coupling regime, achieving a relative coupling ratio of g/ω ~ 0.6. The quantum hardware of the simulator is a superconducting circuit embedded in a cQED setup. We observe fast and periodic quantum state collapses and revivals of the initial qubit state, being the most distinct signature of the synthesized model.An analog quantum simulation scheme has been explored with a quantum hardware based on a superconducting circuit. Here the authors investigate the time evolution of the quantum Rabi model at ultra-strong coupling conditions, which is synthesized by slowing down the system dynamics in an effective frame.

  11. Effective field theory of weakly coupled inflationary models

    SciTech Connect

    Gwyn, Rhiannon; Palma, Gonzalo A.; Sakellariadou, Mairi; Sypsas, Spyros E-mail: gpalmaquilod@ing.uchile.cl E-mail: spyridon.sypsas@kcl.ac.uk

    2013-04-01

    The application of Effective Field Theory (EFT) methods to inflation has taken a central role in our current understanding of the very early universe. The EFT perspective has been particularly useful in analyzing the self-interactions determining the evolution of co-moving curvature perturbations (Goldstone boson modes) and their influence on low-energy observables. However, the standard EFT formalism, to lowest order in spacetime differential operators, does not provide the most general parametrization of a theory that remains weakly coupled throughout the entire low-energy regime. Here we study the EFT formulation by including spacetime differential operators implying a scale dependence of the Goldstone boson self-interactions and its dispersion relation. These operators are shown to arise naturally from the low-energy interaction of the Goldstone boson with heavy fields that have been integrated out. We find that the EFT then stays weakly coupled all the way up to the cutoff scale at which ultraviolet degrees of freedom become operative. This opens up a regime of new physics where the dispersion relation is dominated by a quadratic dependence on the momentum ω ∼ p{sup 2}. In addition, provided that modes crossed the Hubble scale within this energy range, the predictions of inflationary observables — including non-Gaussian signatures — are significantly affected by the new scales characterizing it.

  12. Simulating High Flux Isotope Reactor Core Thermal-Hydraulics via Interdimensional Model Coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, Adam R

    2014-05-01

    A coupled interdimensional model is presented for the simulation of the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of the High Flux Isotope Reactor core at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The model consists of two domains a solid involute fuel plate and the surrounding liquid coolant channel. The fuel plate is modeled explicitly in three-dimensions. The coolant channel is approximated as a twodimensional slice oriented perpendicular to the fuel plate s surface. The two dimensionally-inconsistent domains are linked to one another via interdimensional model coupling mechanisms. The coupled model is presented as a simplified alternative to a fully explicit, fully three-dimensional model. Involute geometries were constructed in SolidWorks. Derivations of the involute construction equations are presented. Geometries were then imported into COMSOL Multiphysics for simulation and modeling. Both models are described in detail so as to highlight their respective attributes in the 3D model, the pursuit of an accurate, reliable, and complete solution; in the coupled model, the intent to simplify the modeling domain as much as possible without affecting significant alterations to the solution. The coupled model was created with the goal of permitting larger portions of the reactor core to be modeled at once without a significant sacrifice to solution integrity. As such, particular care is given to validating incorporated model simplifications. To the greatest extent possible, the decrease in solution time as well as computational cost are quantified versus the effects such gains have on the solution quality. A variant of the coupled model which sufficiently balances these three solution characteristics is presented alongside the more comprehensive 3D model for comparison and validation.

  13. Quantitative coupled-mode model for a metal-dielectric-metal waveguide with a side-coupled cavity.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Ying; Zhou, Hongkun; Liu, Haitao

    2014-10-01

    The Fabry-Perot model is proposed to analyze the wavelength-selective transmission behaviors of the metal-dielectric-metal waveguide with a rectangular side-coupled cavity. The guided modes propagating in the waveguide and the cavity are extracted by the aperiodic Fourier modal method (a-FMM). The scattering coefficients that appeared in the model are calculated by the a-FMM and the normal-mode theory. The applications of such structure in the wavelength-selective filter and the refractive index sensor are also discussed. Our model is shown to accurately predict the fully vectorial data and thus can provide reliable and quantitative analysis of this kind of device.

  14. Progress and Challenges in Coupled Hydrodynamic-Ecological Estuarine Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerical modeling has emerged over the last several decades as a widely accepted tool for investigations in environmental sciences. In estuarine research, hydrodynamic and ecological models have moved along parallel tracks with regard to complexity, refinement, computational po...

  15. Progress and Challenges in Coupled Hydrodynamic-Ecological Estuarine Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerical modeling has emerged over the last several decades as a widely accepted tool for investigations in environmental sciences. In estuarine research, hydrodynamic and ecological models have moved along parallel tracks with regard to complexity, refinement, computational po...

  16. Exploring the Influence of Topography on Belowground C Processes Using a Coupled Hydrologic-Biogeochemical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Y.; Davis, K. J.; Eissenstat, D. M.; Kaye, J. P.; Duffy, C.; Yu, X.; He, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Belowground carbon processes are affected by soil moisture and soil temperature, but current biogeochemical models are 1-D and cannot resolve topographically driven hill-slope soil moisture patterns, and cannot simulate the nonlinear effects of soil moisture on carbon processes. Coupling spatially-distributed physically-based hydrologic models with biogeochemical models may yield significant improvements in the representation of topographic influence on belowground C processes. We will couple the Flux-PIHM model to the Biome-BGC (BBGC) model. Flux-PIHM is a coupled physically-based land surface hydrologic model, which incorporates a land-surface scheme into the Penn State Integrated Hydrologic Model (PIHM). The land surface scheme is adapted from the Noah land surface model. Because PIHM is capable of simulating lateral water flow and deep groundwater, Flux-PIHM is able to represent the link between groundwater and the surface energy balance, as well as the land surface heterogeneities caused by topography. The coupled Flux-PIHM-BBGC model will be tested at the Susquehanna/Shale Hills critical zone observatory (SSHCZO). The abundant observations, including eddy covariance fluxes, soil moisture, groundwater level, sap flux, stream discharge, litterfall, leaf area index, above ground carbon stock, and soil carbon efflux, make SSHCZO an ideal test bed for the coupled model. In the coupled model, each Flux-PIHM model grid will couple a BBGC cell. Flux-PIHM will provide BBGC with soil moisture and soil temperature information, while BBGC provides Flux-PIHM with leaf area index. Preliminary results show that when Biome- BGC is driven by PIHM simulated soil moisture pattern, the simulated soil carbon is clearly impacted by topography.

  17. Dispersive coupled-channels optical-model potential with soft-rotator couplings for Cr, Fe, and Ni isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rui; Sun, Weili; Soukhovitskiĩ, E. Sh.; Quesada, J. M.; Capote, R.

    2013-05-01

    An approximate Lane-consistent dispersive coupled-channels optical potential is derived that describes nucleon-induced reactions on even iron isotopes. Realistic saturated couplings for 54,56,58Fe nuclei are built using nuclear wave functions of the soft-rotator model with the Hamiltonian parameters adjusted to reproduce the energy of the low-lying collective levels of these isotopes. E2- and E3-transition probabilities between low-lying collective levels are well reproduced. The comprehensive experimental database used in the fitting process includes all scattering data for neutron and proton scattering up to 200 MeV on iron nuclei. The derived potential is shown to be applicable to Ni and Cr isotopes, assuming the applicability of the soft-rotator model to these nuclei and to the odd 57Fe nucleus within the rigid-rotor model. The approximate Lane consistency of the derived potential is validated by describing the quasielastic (p,n) scattering with excitation of isobaric analog states. Elastic and inelastic analyzing powers for both neutron- and proton-induced reactions are shown to be in good agreement with experimental data, demonstrating the reliability of the derived dispersive spin-orbit potential.

  18. Comparison of a coupled atmosphere-ocean (WRF-ROMS) model with an atmosphere only model (WRF) of two North Atlantic hurricanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooney, P.; Mulligan, F. J.; Bruyere, C. L.; Bonnlander, B.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the ability of a coupled regional atmosphere-ocean modeling system to simulate two extreme events in the North Atlantic. In this study we use the Coupled-Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST; Warner et al., 2010) modeling system with only the atmosphere and ocean models activated. COAWST couples the atmosphere model (Weather Research and Forecasting model; WRF) to the ocean model (Regional Ocean Modeling System; ROMS) with the Model Coupling Toolkit. Results from the coupled system are compared with atmosphere only simulations of North Atlantic storms to evaluate the performance of the coupled modeling system. Two extreme events (Hurricane Katia and Hurricane Irene) were chosen to assess the level of improvement (or otherwise) arising from coupling WRF with ROMS. These two hurricanes involve different dynamics and present different challenges to the modeling system. Modelled storm tracks, storm intensities and sea surface temperatures are compared with observations to appraise the coupled modeling system's simulation of these two extreme events.

  19. Coupled hydro-mechanical model for expansive clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koudelka, Tomáš; Krejčí, Tomáš; Kruis, Jaroslav

    2017-07-01

    The paper deals with the hydro-mechanical model for expansive clayey soils. The complex model is based on the hypoplasticity, which parameters are influenced by suction, and additionally on Schrefler's model for saturated-unsaturated water flow in deforming porous medium. The model has been implemented into the open source software SIFEL and selected results of a simple numerical example are presented in the last section of the paper.

  20. MASSIVELY PARALLEL FULLY COUPLED IMPLICIT MODELING OF COUPLED THERMAL-HYDROLOGICAL-MECHANICAL PROCESSES FOR ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Podgorney; Hai Huang; Derek Gaston

    2010-02-01

    Development of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) will require creation of a reservoir of sufficient volume to enable commercial-scale heat transfer from the reservoir rocks to the working fluid. A key assumption associated with reservoir creation/stimulation is that sufficient rock volumes can be hydraulically fractured via both tensile and shear failure, and more importantly by reactivation of naturally existing fractures (by shearing) to create the reservoir. The advancement of EGS greatly depends on our understanding of the dynamics of the intimately coupled rock-fracture-fluid system and our ability to reliably predict how reservoirs behave under stimulation and production. In order to increase our understanding of how reservoirs behave under these conditions, we have developed a physics-based rock deformation and fracture propagation simulator by coupling a discrete element model (DEM) for fracturing with a continuum multiphase flow and heat transport model. In DEM simulations, solid rock is represented by a network of discrete elements (often referred as particles) connected by various types of mechanical bonds such as springs, elastic beams or bonds that have more complex properties (such as stress-dependent elastic constants). Fracturing is represented explicitly as broken bonds (microcracks), which form and coalesce into macroscopic fractures when external load is applied. DEM models have been applied to a very wide range of fracturing processes from the molecular scale (where thermal fluctuations play an important role) to scales on the order of 1 km or greater. In this approach, the continuum flow and heat transport equations are solved on an underlying fixed finite element grid with evolving porosity and permeability for each grid cell that depends on the local structure of the discrete element network (such as DEM particle density). The fluid pressure gradient exerts forces on individual elements of the DEM network, which therefore deforms and

  1. Using a Coupled Lake Model with WRF for Dynamical Downscaling

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is used to downscale a coarse reanalysis (National Centers for Environmental Prediction–Department of Energy Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project reanalysis, hereafter R2) as a proxy for a global climate model (GCM) to examine...

  2. Using a Coupled Lake Model with WRF for Dynamical Downscaling

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is used to downscale a coarse reanalysis (National Centers for Environmental Prediction–Department of Energy Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project reanalysis, hereafter R2) as a proxy for a global climate model (GCM) to examine...

  3. Oceanic factors controlling the Indian summer monsoon onset in a coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prodhomme, Chloé; Terray, Pascal; Masson, Sébastien; Boschat, Ghyslaine; Izumo, Takeshi

    2015-02-01

    Despite huge socio-economical impacts, the predictability of the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) onset remains drastically limited by the inability of both current forced and coupled models to reproduce a realistic monsoon seasonal cycle. In the SINTEX-F2 coupled model, the mean ISM onset estimated with rainfall or thermo-dynamical indices is delayed by approximately 13 days, but it occurs 6 days early in the atmosphere-only component of the coupled model. This 19 days lag between atmospheric-only and coupled runs, which is well above the observed standard-deviation of the ISM onset (10 days in the observations), suggests a crucial role of the coupling, including Sea Surface Temperatures (SST) biases, on the delayed mean onset in the coupled model. On the other hand, the key-factors governing the interannual variability of the ISM onset date are also fundamentally different in the atmospheric and coupled experiments and highlight the importance of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and ocean-atmosphere coupling for a realistic simulation of the variability of the ISM onset date. At both interannual and seasonal timescales, we demonstrate the importance of the meridional gradients of tropospheric temperature, moisture and vertical shear of zonal wind in the Indian Ocean for a realistic ISM onset simulation. Taking into account that the tropical tropospheric temperature and the vertical shear are not only controlled by local processes, but also by large-scale processes, we need to examine not only the Indian Ocean SST biases, but also those in others tropical basins in order to understand the delay of the mean onset date in the coupled model. During April and May, the main tropical SST biases in the coupled model are a strong warm bias in the Indian, Pacific and Atlantic Oceans, associated with an important excess of equatorial precipitations, and thus a warmer equatorial free troposphere. In order to identify the keys tropical SST regions influencing the mean ISM

  4. Effect of model-form definition on uncertainty quantification in coupled models of mid-frequency range simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Buren, Kendra L.; Ouisse, Morvan; Cogan, Scott; Sadoulet-Reboul, Emeline; Maxit, Laurent

    2017-09-01

    In the development of numerical models, uncertainty quantification (UQ) can inform appropriate allocation of computational resources, often resulting in efficient analysis for activities such as model calibration and robust design. UQ can be especially beneficial for numerical models with significant computational expense, such as coupled models, which require several subsystem models to attain the performance of a more complex, inter-connected system. In the coupled model paradigm, UQ can be applied at either the subsystem model level or the coupled model level. When applied at the subsystem level, UQ is applied directly to the physical input parameters, which can be computationally expensive. In contrast, UQ at the coupled level may not be representative of the physical input parameters, but comes at the benefit of being computationally efficient to implement. To be physically meaningful, analysis at the coupled level requires information about how uncertainty is propagated through from the subsystem level. Herein, the proposed strategy is based on simulations performed at the subsystem level to inform a covariance matrix for UQ performed at the coupled level. The approach is applied to a four-subsystem model of mid-frequency vibrations simulated using the Statistical Modal Energy Distribution Analysis, a variant of the Statistical Energy Analysis. The proposed approach is computationally efficient to implement, while simultaneously capturing information from the subsystem level to ensure the analysis is physically meaningful.

  5. A Coupled Finite-Volume Model for 2-D Surface and 3-D Subsurface Flows

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Surface-subsurface interactions are an intrinsic component of the hydrologic response within a watershed; therefore, hydrologic modeling tools should consider these interactions to provide reliable predictions, especially during rainfall-runoff processes. This paper presents a fully implicit coupled...

  6. The feminist/emotionally focused therapy practice model: an integrated approach for couple therapy.

    PubMed

    Vatcher, C A; Bogo, M

    2001-01-01

    Emotionally focused therapy (EFT) is a well-developed, empirically tested practice model for couple therapy that integrates systems, experiential, and attachment theories. Feminist family therapy theory has provided a critique of biased assumptions about gender at play in traditional family therapy practice and the historical absence of discussions of power in family therapy theory. This article presents an integrated feminist/EFT practice model for use in couple therapy, using a case from practice to illustrate key concepts. Broadly, the integrated model addresses gender roles and individual emotional experience using a systemic framework for understanding couple interaction. The model provides practitioners with a sophisticated, comprehensive, and relevant practice approach for working with the issues and challenges emerging for contemporary heterosexual couples.

  7. YAC 1.2.0: new aspects for coupling software in Earth system modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanke, Moritz; Redler, René; Holfeld, Teresa; Yastremsky, Maxim

    2016-08-01

    A lightweight software library has been developed to realise the coupling of Earth system model components. The software provides parallelised two-dimensional neighbourhood search, interpolation, and communication for the coupling between any two model components. The software offers flexible coupling of physical fields defined on regular and irregular grids on the sphere without a priori assumptions about grid structure or grid element types. All supported grids can be combined with any of the supported interpolations. We describe the new aspects of our approach and provide an overview of the implemented functionality and of some algorithms we use. Preliminary performance measurements for a set of realistic use cases are presented to demonstrate the potential performance and scalability of our approach. YAC 1.2.0 is now used for the coupling of the model components in the Icosahedral Nonhydrostatic (ICON) general circulation model.

  8. Gauge invariant one-loop corrections to Higgs boson couplings in nonminimal Higgs models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanemura, Shinya; Kikuchi, Mariko; Sakurai, Kodai; Yagyu, Kei

    2017-08-01

    We comprehensively evaluate renormalized Higgs boson couplings at one-loop level in nonminimal Higgs models such as the Higgs singlet model (HSM) and the four types of two Higgs doublet models (THDMs) with a softly broken Z2 symmetry. The renormalization calculation is performed in the on-shell scheme improved by using the pinch technique to eliminate the gauge dependence in the renormalized couplings. We first review the pinch technique for scalar boson two-point functions in the standard model (SM), the HSM and the THDMs. We then discuss the difference in the results of the renormalized Higgs boson couplings between the improved on-shell scheme and the ordinal one with a gauge dependence appearing in mixing parameters of scalar bosons. Finally, we widely investigate how we can identify the HSM and the THDMs focusing on the pattern of deviations in the renormalized Higgs boson couplings from predictions in the SM.

  9. An ice-ocean coupled model for the Northern Hemisphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Abe; Preller, Ruth

    1992-01-01

    The Hibler ice model has been modified and adapted to a domain that includes most of the sea ice-covered areas in the Northern Hemisphere. This model, joined with the Cox ocean model, is developed as an enhancement to the U.S. Navy's sea ice forecasting, PIPS, and is termed PIPS2.0. Generally, the modeled ice edge is consistent with the Navy-NOAA Joint Ice Center weekly analysis, and the modeled ice thickness distribution agrees with submarine sonar data in the central Arctic basin.

  10. Multiscale modelling of coupled Ca2+ channels using coloured stochastic Petri nets.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Heiner, Monika

    2013-08-01

    Stochastic modelling of coupled Ca2+ channels is a challenge, especially when the coupling of the channels, as determined by their spatial arrangement relative to each other, has to be considered at multiple spatial scales. In this study, the authors address this problem using coloured stochastic Petri nets (SPNc) as high-level description to generate continuous-time Markov chains. The authors develop several models with increasing complexity. They first apply SPNc to model single clusters of coupled Ca2+ channels arranged in a regular or irregular lattice, where they describe how to represent the geometrical arrangement of Ca2+ channels relative to each other using colours. They then apply this modelling idea to construct more complex models by modelling spatially arranged clusters of channels. The authors' models can be easily reproduced and adapted to different scenarios.

  11. A coupled dynamical-radiational model of stratocumulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Weizuo

    1990-05-01

    A model dealing with interactions between the air and low stratiform clouds is presented based on the mixed-layer model Lilly (1968) pioneered and on Deardorff's three dimensional numerical model results. Its main new aspects lie in 1) consideration of the natures of both the atmosphere and cloud; 2) a new entrainment velocity scheme with few arbitrary assumptions; 3) transition from one-mixed layer to two-mixed layer model; and 4) parameterization of radiation and precipitation calculations. The model results for radiation, moisture, and heat turbulent fluxes turn out to be in good agreement with those calculated or observed by Kawa (1988), Nicholls (1984), and Schmets et al. (1981) in California, the North Sea, and the North Atlantic, respectively. Basically, this paper furnishes the theoretical basis for a model to address questions concerning the time-evolution of thermodynamical profiles both in cloud and out of cloud. The applications of this model wil be in a separate paper.

  12. Coupled fvGCM-GCE Modeling System, 3D Cloud-Resolving Model and Cloud Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2005-01-01

    Recent GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) model comparison projects have indicated that cloud-resolving models (CRMs) agree with observations better than traditional singlecolumn models in simulating various types of clouds and cloud systems from Merent geographic locations. Current and future NASA satellite programs can provide cloud, precipitation, aerosol and other data at very fine spatial and temporal scales. It requires a coupled global circulation model (GCM) and cloudscale model (termed a super-parameterization or multiscale modeling framework, MMF) to use these satellite data to improve the understanding of the physical processes that are responsible for the variation in global and regional climate and hydrological systems. The use of a GCM will enable global coverage, and the use of a CRM will allow for better and more sophisticated physical parameteridon NASA satellite and field campaign cloud related datasets can provide initial conditions as well as validation for both the MMF and CRMs. A seed fund is available at NASA Goddard to build a MMF based on the 2D Goddard cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model and the Goddard finite volume general circulation model (fvGCM). A prototype MMF in being developed and production nms will be conducted at the beginning of 2005. In this talk, I will present: (1) A brief review on GCE model and its applications on precipitation processes, (2) The Goddard MMF and the major difference between two existing MMFs (CSU MMF and Goddard MMF), (3) A cloud library generated by Goddard MMF, and 3D GCE model, and (4) A brief discussion on the GCE model on developing a global cloud simulator.

  13. Coupled fvGCM-GCE Modeling System, 3D Cloud-Resolving Model and Cloud Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2005-01-01

    Recent GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) model comparison projects have indicated that cloud- resolving models (CRMs) agree with observations better than traditional single-column models in simulating various types of clouds and cloud systems from different geographic locations. Current and future NASA satellite programs can provide cloud, precipitation, aerosol and other data at very fine spatial and temporal scales. It requires a coupled global circulation model (GCM) and cloud-scale model (termed a super-parameterization or multi-scale modeling framework, MMF) to use these satellite data to improve the understanding of the physical processes that are responsible for the variation in global and regional climate and hydrological systems. The use of a GCM will enable global coverage, and the use of a CRM will allow for better and more sophisticated physical parameterization. NASA satellite and field campaign cloud related datasets can provide initial conditions as well as validation for both the MMF and CRMs. A seed fund is available at NASA Goddard to build a MMF based on the 2D Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model and the Goddard finite volume general circulation model (fvGCM). A prototype MMF in being developed and production runs will be conducted at the beginning of 2005. In this talk, I will present: (1) A brief review on GCE model and its applications on precipitation processes, ( 2 ) The Goddard MMF and the major difference between two existing MMFs (CSU MMF and Goddard MMF), (3) A cloud library generated by Goddard MMF, and 3D GCE model, and (4) A brief discussion on the GCE model on developing a global cloud simulator.

  14. Coupled fvGCM-GCE Modeling System, 3D Cloud-Resolving Model and Cloud Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2005-01-01

    Recent GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) model comparison projects have indicated that cloud- resolving models (CRMs) agree with observations better than traditional single-column models in simulating various types of clouds and cloud systems from different geographic locations. Current and future NASA satellite programs can provide cloud, precipitation, aerosol and other data at very fine spatial and temporal scales. It requires a coupled global circulation model (GCM) and cloud-scale model (termed a super-parameterization or multi-scale modeling framework, MMF) to use these satellite data to improve the understanding of the physical processes that are responsible for the variation in global and regional climate and hydrological systems. The use of a GCM will enable global coverage, and the use of a CRM will allow for better and more sophisticated physical parameterization. NASA satellite and field campaign cloud related datasets can provide initial conditions as well as validation for both the MMF and CRMs. A seed fund is available at NASA Goddard to build a MMF based on the 2D Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model and the Goddard finite volume general circulation model (fvGCM). A prototype MMF in being developed and production runs will be conducted at the beginning of 2005. In this talk, I will present: (1) A brief review on GCE model and its applications on precipitation processes, ( 2 ) The Goddard MMF and the major difference between two existing MMFs (CSU MMF and Goddard MMF), (3) A cloud library generated by Goddard MMF, and 3D GCE model, and (4) A brief discussion on the GCE model on developing a global cloud simulator.

  15. Coupled fvGCM-GCE Modeling System, 3D Cloud-Resolving Model and Cloud Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2005-01-01

    Recent GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) model comparison projects have indicated that cloud-resolving models (CRMs) agree with observations better than traditional singlecolumn models in simulating various types of clouds and cloud systems from Merent geographic locations. Current and future NASA satellite programs can provide cloud, precipitation, aerosol and other data at very fine spatial and temporal scales. It requires a coupled global circulation model (GCM) and cloudscale model (termed a super-parameterization or multiscale modeling framework, MMF) to use these satellite data to improve the understanding of the physical processes that are responsible for the variation in global and regional climate and hydrological systems. The use of a GCM will enable global coverage, and the use of a CRM will allow for better and more sophisticated physical parameteridon NASA satellite and field campaign cloud related datasets can provide initial conditions as well as validation for both the MMF and CRMs. A seed fund is available at NASA Goddard to build a MMF based on the 2D Goddard cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model and the Goddard finite volume general circulation model (fvGCM). A prototype MMF in being developed and production nms will be conducted at the beginning of 2005. In this talk, I will present: (1) A brief review on GCE model and its applications on precipitation processes, (2) The Goddard MMF and the major difference between two existing MMFs (CSU MMF and Goddard MMF), (3) A cloud library generated by Goddard MMF, and 3D GCE model, and (4) A brief discussion on the GCE model on developing a global cloud simulator.

  16. One-loop radiative correction to the triple Higgs coupling in the Higgs singlet model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Shi-Ping; Zhu, Shou-hua

    2017-01-01

    Though the 125 GeV Higgs boson is consistent with the standard model (SM) prediction until now, the triple Higgs coupling can deviate from the SM value in the physics beyond the SM (BSM). In this paper, the radiative correction to the triple Higgs coupling is calculated in the minimal extension of the SM by adding a real gauge singlet scalar. In this model there are two scalars h and H and both of them are mixing states of the doublet and singlet. Provided that the mixing angle is set to be zero, namely the SM limit, h is the pure left-over of the doublet and its behavior is the same as that of the SM at the tree level. However the loop corrections can alter h-related couplings. In this SM limit case, the effect of the singlet H may show up in the h-related couplings, especially the triple h coupling. Our numerical results show that the deviation is sizable. For λΦS = 1 (see text for the parameter definition), the deviation δhhh(1) can be 40%. For λΦS = 1.5, the δhhh(1) can reach 140%. The sizable radiative correction is mainly caused by three reasons: the magnitude of the coupling λΦS, light mass of the additional scalar and the threshold enhancement. The radiative corrections for the hVV, hff couplings are from the counter-terms, which are the universal correction in this model and always at O(1%). The hZZ coupling, which can be precisely measured, may be a complementarity to the triple h coupling to search for the BSM. In the optimal case, the triple h coupling is very sensitive to the BSM physics, and this model can be tested at future high luminosity hadron colliders and electron-positron colliders.

  17. Insights on the role of accurate state estimation in coupled model parameter estimation by a conceptual climate model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiaolin; Zhang, Shaoqing; Lin, Xiaopei; Li, Mingkui

    2017-03-01

    The uncertainties in values of coupled model parameters are an important source of model bias that causes model climate drift. The values can be calibrated by a parameter estimation procedure that projects observational information onto model parameters. The signal-to-noise ratio of error covariance between the model state and the parameter being estimated directly determines whether the parameter estimation succeeds or not. With a conceptual climate model that couples the stochastic atmosphere and slow-varying ocean, this study examines the sensitivity of state-parameter covariance on the accuracy of estimated model states in different model components of a coupled system. Due to the interaction of multiple timescales, the fast-varying atmosphere with a chaotic nature is the major source of the inaccuracy of estimated state-parameter covariance. Thus, enhancing the estimation accuracy of atmospheric states is very important for the success of coupled model parameter estimation, especially for the parameters in the air-sea interaction processes. The impact of chaotic-to-periodic ratio in state variability on parameter estimation is also discussed. This simple model study provides a guideline when real observations are used to optimize model parameters in a coupled general circulation model for improving climate analysis and predictions.

  18. Extension of NHWAVE to Couple LAMMPS for Modeling Wave Interactions with Arctic Ice Floes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    Interactions with Arctic Ice Floes Fengyan Shi and James T. Kirby Center for Applied Coastal Research Department of Civil and Environmental...Award Number: N00014-14-1-0569 http://www.coastal.udel.edu/~fyshi LONG-TERM GOALS 1. Developing and testing a tightly-coupled wave- ice model...wave interactions with arctic ice floes. 2. Using the coupled NHWAVE and LAMMPS/LIGGGHTS models to investigate the relative importance of key

  19. Field-aligned currents calculated based on the upgraded Prairie View Magnetosphere- ionosphere Coupling Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romashets, E.; Huang, T.

    2006-12-01

    Using the experimental magnetic field and the newly defined Eular Potentials, we upgraded Prairie View Magnetosphere-ionosphere Coupling Model that was originally created in the frame of IGRF. The electric fields in the ionosphere and the field-aligned currents in the magnetosphere are calculated with the upgraded magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling model, and a preliminary comparison of the calculations with the measurements from ST5 will be presented.

  20. Development of a coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical model in discontinuous media for carbon sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Yilin; Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Carroll, Kenneth C.; Xu, Zhijie; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Bonneville, Alain

    2013-06-22

    Geomechanical alteration of porous media is generally ignored for most shallow subsurface applications, whereas CO2 injection, migration, and trapping in deep saline aquifers will be controlled by coupled multifluid flow, energy transfer, and geomechanical processes. The accurate assessment of the risks associated with potential leakage of injected CO2 and the design of effective injection systems requires that we represent these coupled processes within numerical simulators. The objectives of this study were to develop a coupled thermal-hydro-mechanical model into a single software, and to examine the coupling of thermal, hydrological, and geomechanical processes for simulation of CO2 injection into the subsurface for carbon sequestration. A numerical model is developed to couple nonisothermal multiphase hydrological and geomechanical processes for prediction of multiple interconnected processes for carbon sequestration in deep saline aquifers. The geomechanics model was based on Rigid Body-Spring Model (RBSM), one of the discrete methods to model discontinuous rock system. Poisson’s effect that was often ignored by RBSM was considered in the model. The simulation of large-scale and long-term coupled processes in carbon capture and storage projects requires large memory and computational performance. Global Array Toolkit was used to build the model to permit the high performance simulations of the coupled processes. The model was used to simulate a case study with several scenarios to demonstrate the impacts of considering coupled processes and Poisson’s effect for the prediction of CO2 sequestration.

  1. Field experiment and Modeling full coupling hydrologic model with mircotopography in typical watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Long; Zhu, Yongshu; Xu, Ruchao; Yu, Zhongbo; Chen, Li

    2015-04-01

    With high human activties and landscape remodeling, the various landuse and micropography are newly added in scienctific sight. In order to quanify the solpo effect in high resolution sub-grid system, three-dimensional Richards' equations and the two-dimensional diffusion wave equations are chosen to solve the output difference between hydro-flows, The difficulty of quantitating surface water and groundwater interaction and parameterizing the microtopography with the help of multi-scale observation experiments. For three-dimensional coupling mechanism in surface-subsurface system, we design real-time observations on water flow at Hydrologic Response Units (HRU) located on various landuse and outlet in Meilin experimental watershed. The continuously observed data disclose the principle of runoff yield spatially and temporally, and show the surface runoff redistribution, unsaturated soil water dynamics, shallow groundwater response to typical rainfall-runoff events on complex microtopographic slope. A surface storage function with elevation various is embeded into diffuse wave equations to describe microtopographic effect. we improve for paramterizing microtopography in subelements and evaluate the strength of microtopography and couple length at soil-water interface impacting the hydrologic modeling. Based on observed conclusions, a full physical based distributed model system is established at Meilin watershed to quantify the hydrodynamic processes of overland flow, soil water saturation, and groundwater level and analyze dynamic exchanges among them in simulation. The relationships between the various saturation area (VSA) and runoff yield and flow confluence in each typical event are quantified statistically. With the field work and simulations, we demostrated the approach to describe complex hydrologic processes in human-interrupted watershed. Keywords: micropography, coupling mechanism, various saturation area, surface storage

  2. A constitutive model for representing coupled creep, fracture, and healing in rock salt

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, K.S.; Bodner, S.R.; Munson, D.E.; Fossum, A.F.

    1996-03-01

    The development of a constitutive model for representing inelastic flow due to coupled creep, damage, and healing in rock salt is present in this paper. This model, referred to as Multimechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture model, has been formulated by considering individual mechanisms that include dislocation creep, shear damage, tensile damage, and damage healing. Applications of the model to representing the inelastic flow and fracture behavior of WIPP salt subjected to creep, quasi-static loading, and damage healing conditions are illustrated with comparisons of model calculations against experimental creep curves, stress-strain curves, strain recovery curves, time-to-rupture data, and fracture mechanism maps.

  3. Molecular dynamics techniques for modeling G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    McRobb, Fiona M; Negri, Ana; Beuming, Thijs; Sherman, Woody

    2016-10-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute a major class of drug targets and modulating their signaling can produce a wide range of pharmacological outcomes. With the growing number of high-resolution GPCR crystal structures, we have the unprecedented opportunity to leverage structure-based drug design techniques. Here, we discuss a number of advanced molecular dynamics (MD) techniques that have been applied to GPCRs, including long time scale simulations, enhanced sampling techniques, water network analyses, and free energy approaches to determine relative binding free energies. On the basis of the many success stories, including those highlighted here, we expect that MD techniques will be increasingly applied to aid in structure-based drug design and lead optimization for GPCRs.

  4. Coupled cluster Green function: Model involving single and double excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Bhaskaran-Nair, Kiran; Kowalski, Karol; Shelton, William A.

    2016-04-14

    In this paper we report on the parallel implementation of the coupled-cluster (CC) Green function formulation (GF-CC) employing single and double excitations in the cluster operator (GF-CCSD). The detailed description of the underlying algorithm is provided, including the structure of ionization-potential- and electron-affinity-type intermediate tensors which enable to formulate GF-CC approach in a computationally feasible form. Several examples including calculations of ionization-potentials and electron a*ffinities for benchmark systems, which are juxtaposed against the experimental values, provide an illustration of the accuracies attainable in the GFCCSD simulations. We also discuss the structure of the CCSD self energies and discuss approximation that are geared to reduce the computational cost while maintaining the pole structure of the full GF-CCSD approach.

  5. Radion Couplings to Bulk Fields in the Randall-Sundrum Model

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2002-05-23

    The radion may be the lightest new state present in the Randall-Sundrum(RS) model. We examine the couplings of the radion to the Standard Model(SM) fields in the scenario where they propagate in the bulk and expand into Kaluza-Klein towers. These couplings are then contrasted with those of the more familiar case where the SM fields are confined to the TeV brane. We find that the couplings of the radion to both gg and {gamma}{gamma} can be significantly different in these two cases. Implications for radion collider phenomenology are discussed.

  6. Synchronization of oscillators in a Kuramoto-type model with generic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasov, Vladimir; Macau, Elbert E. N.; Pikovsky, Arkady

    2014-06-01

    We study synchronization properties of coupled oscillators on networks that allow description in terms of global mean field coupling. These models generalize the standard Kuramoto-Sakaguchi model, allowing for different contributions of oscillators to the mean field and to different forces from the mean field on oscillators. We present the explicit solutions of self-consistency equations for the amplitude and frequency of the mean field in a parametric form, valid for noise-free and noise-driven oscillators. As an example, we consider spatially spreaded oscillators for which the coupling properties are determined by finite velocity of signal propagation.

  7. Mathematical modeling of intrinsic Josephson junctions with capacitive and inductive couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmonov, I. R.; Shukrinov, Yu M.; Zemlyanaya, E. V.; Sarhadov, I.; Andreeva, O.

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the current voltage characteristics (CVC) of intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJ) with two types of couplings between junctions: capacitive and inductive. The IJJ model is described by a system of coupled sine-Gordon equations which is solved numerically by the 4th order Runge-Kutta method. The method of numerical simulation and numerical results are presented. The magnetic field distribution is calculated as the function of coordinate and time at different values of the bias current. The influence of model parameters on the CVC is studied. The behavior of the IJJ in dependence on coupling parameters is discussed.

  8. Random-phase approximation based on relativistic point-coupling models

    SciTech Connect

    Niksic, T.; Vretenar, D.; Ring, P.

    2005-07-01

    The matrix equations of the random-phase approximation (RPA) are derived for the point-coupling Lagrangian of the relativistic mean-field (RMF) model. Fully consistent RMF plus (quasiparticle) RPA illustrative calculations of the isoscalar monopole, isovector dipole, and isoscalar quadrupole response of spherical medium-heavy and heavy nuclei test the phenomenological effective interactions of the point-coupling RMF model. A comparison with experiment shows that the best point-coupling effective interactions accurately reproduce not only ground-state properties but also data on excitation energies of giant resonances.

  9. An electromechanical coupling model of a bending vibration type piezoelectric ultrasonic transducer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Shi, Shengjun; Chen, Weishan

    2016-03-01

    An electromechanical coupling model of a bending vibration type piezoelectric ultrasonic transducer is proposed. The transducer is a Langevin type transducer which is composed of an exponential horn, four groups of PZT ceramics and a back beam. The exponential horn can focus the vibration energy, and can enlarge vibration amplitude and velocity efficiently. A bending vibration model of the transducer is first constructed, and subsequently an electromechanical coupling model is constructed based on the vibration model. In order to obtain the most suitable excitation position of the PZT ceramics, the effective electromechanical coupling coefficient is optimized by means of the quadratic interpolation method. When the effective electromechanical coupling coefficient reaches the peak value of 42.59%, the optimal excitation position (L1=22.52 mm) is found. The FEM method and the experimental method are used to validate the developed analytical model. Two groups of the FEM model (the Group A center bolt is not considered, and but the Group B center bolt is considered) are constructed and separately compared with the analytical model and the experimental model. Four prototype transducers around the peak value are fabricated and tested to validate the analytical model. A scanning laser Doppler vibrometer is employed to test the bending vibration shape and resonance frequency. Finally, the electromechanical coupling coefficient is tested indirectly through an impedance analyzer. Comparisons of the analytical results, FEM results and experiment results are presented, and the results show good agreement.

  10. Comparing Longitudinal Coupling and Temporal Delay in a Transmission-Line Model of the Cochlea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homer, Martin; Szalai, Robert; Champneys, Alan; Epp, Bastian

    2011-11-01

    In this paper we compare and contrast the effects of longitudinal coupling and temporal delay on a fluid-structure transmission-line model of the mammalian cochlea. This work is based on recent reports that, in order to qualitatively explain experimental data, models of the basilar membrane impedance must include an exponential term that represents a time-delayed feedback. There are also models that include, e.g., a spatial feed-forward mechanism, whose solution is often approximated by replacing the feed-forward coupling by an exponential term. We show that there is no direct equivalence between the time-delay and the longitudinal coupling mechanisms, although qualitatively similar results can be achieved, albeit in very different regions of parameter space. An investigation of the steady-state outputs shows that both models can display sharp tuning, but that the time-delay model requires negative damping for such an effect to occur. Conversely, the longitudinal coupling model provides the most promising results with small positive damping. These results are extended by a careful stability analysis. We find that, whereas a small time delay can stabilize an unstable transmission-line model (with negative damping), that the longitudinal coupling model is stable when the damping is positive. The techniques developed in the paper are directed towards a more comprehensive analysis of nonlinear models.

  11. Sea State Dependent Air-Sea Fluxes in Coupled Atmosphere-Wave-Ocean Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meixner, J.; Liu, B.; Kim, H. S. S.; Chawla, A.; Mehra, A.; Reichl, B. G.; Ginis, I.; Hara, T.

    2016-12-01

    Air-sea fluxes of heat and momentum affect hurricane, tropical and extratropical storm intensities. Sea surface waves are an important processes to account for in modeling air-sea fluxes because wind stress and upper ocean mixing, through Langmuir turbulence and Stoke's drift, are sea-state dependent. We present a three-way coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean model which accounts for sea-state dependent air/sea fluxes. The wave model, WAVEWATCH III, calculates the wind stress, which is highly dependent on the high-frequency part of the wave spectrum. The high frequency part of the wave spectrum or tail is chosen so that the drag coefficient is reduced for wind speeds greater than 20 m/s as in the FY2016 operational version of HWRF. To demonstrate the impact of including waves in the coupled model, we show results comparing the two-way coupled atmosphere-ocean model to the three way coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean model for hurricane/tropical/extratropical storms. It is indicated that by including the reduced drag coefficients as well as other surface wave related coupling processes, storm intensities are better predicted in the three-way coupled HWRF system.

  12. Coupled wave-ocean modeling system experiments in the Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clementi, Emanuela; Oddo, Paolo; Korres, Gerasimos; Pinardi, Nadia; Drudi, Massimiliano; Tonani, Marina; Grandi, Alessandro; Adani, Mario

    2015-04-01

    Wind waves and oceanic circulation processes are of major interest in determining accurate sea state predictions and their interactions are very important for individual dynamic processes. This work presents a coupled wave-current numerical modelling system composed by the ocean circulation model NEMO (Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean) and the third generation wave model WaveWatchIII (WW3) implemented in the Mediterranean Sea with 1/16° horizontal resolution and forced by ECMWF atmospheric fields. In order to evaluate the performance of the coupled model, two sets of numerical experiments have been performed and described in this work. A first set of experiments has been built by coupling the wave and circulation models that hourly exchange the following fields: the sea surface currents and air-sea temperature difference are transferred from NEMO model to WW3 model modifying respectively the mean momentum transfer of waves and the wind speed stability parameter; while the neutral drag coefficient computed by WW3 model is passed to NEMO that computes the turbulent component. Five years (2009-2013) numerical experiments have been carried out in both uncoupled and coupled modes. In order to validate the modelling system, numerical results have been compared with coastal and drifting buoys and remote sensing data. Comparison results demonstrate that the WW3 model can fairly reproduce the observed wave characteristics and show that the wave-current interactions improve the representation of the wave spectrum. Minor improvements have been reached by comparing coupled and uncoupled circulation NEMO model results with observations. A second set of numerical experiments has been performed by considering NEMO model one-way coupled with WW3 model. The hydrodynamic model receives from the wave model the neutral drag coefficient and a set of wave fields used to calculate the wave-induced vertical mixing according to Qiao et al. (2010) formulation. Two experiments

  13. Modelling surface water flood risk using coupled numerical and physical modelling techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, D. L.; Pattison, I.; Yu, D.

    2015-12-01

    Surface water (pluvial) flooding occurs due to intense precipitation events where rainfall cannot infiltrate into the sub-surface or drain via storm water systems. The perceived risk appears to have increased in recent years with pluvial flood events seeming more severe and frequent within the UK. Surface water flood risk currently accounts for one third of all UK flood risk, with approximately two million people living in urban areas being at risk of a 1 in 200 year flood event. Surface water flooding research often focuses upon using 1D, 2D or 1D-2D coupled numerical modelling techniques to understand the extent, depth and severity of actual or hypothetical flood scenarios. Although much research has been conducted using numerical modelling, field data available for model calibration and validation is limited due to the complexities associated with data collection in surface water flood conditions. Ultimately, the data which numerical models are based upon is often erroneous and inconclusive. Physical models offer an alternative and innovative environment to collect data within. A controlled, closed system allows independent variables to be altered individually to investigate cause and effect relationships. Despite this, physical modelling approaches are seldom used in surface water flooding research. Scaled laboratory experiments using a 9m2, two-tiered physical model consisting of: (i) a mist nozzle type rainfall simulator able to simulate a range of rainfall intensities similar to those observed within the United Kingdom, and; (ii) a fully interchangeable, scaled plot surface have been conducted to investigate and quantify the influence of factors such as slope, impermeability, building density/configuration and storm dynamics on overland flow and rainfall-runoff patterns within a range of terrestrial surface conditions. Results obtained within the physical modelling environment will be compared with numerical modelling results using FloodMap (Yu & Lane, 2006

  14. A zonally averaged, coupled ocean-atmosphere model for paleoclimate studies

    SciTech Connect

    Stocker, T.F.; Mysak, L.A. ); Wright, D.G. )

    1992-08-01

    A zonally averaged ocean model for the thermohaline circulation is coupled to a zonally averaged, one-layer energy balance model of the atmosphere to form a climate model for paleoclimate studies. The emphasis of the coupled model is on the ocean's thermohaline circulation in the Pacific, Atlantic, and Indian oceans. Under present-day conditions, the global conveyor belt is simulated. Latitude-depth structures of modeled temperature and salinity fields, as well as depth-integrated meridional transports of heat and freshwater, compare well with estimates from observations when wind stress is included. Ekman cells are present in the upper ocean and contribute substantially to the meridional fluxes at low latitudes.The atmospheric component of the coupled climate model consists of a classical balance model. When the two components are coupled after being spun up individually, the system remains steady. If intermittent convection is operating, the coupled model shows systematic deviations of the surface salinity, which may result in reversals of the thermohaline circulation. This climate drift can be inhibited by removing intermittent convection prior to coupling. The climate model is applied to investigate the effect of excess freshwater discharge into the North Atlantic, and the influence of the parameterization of precipitation is tested. The Atlantic thermohalinc flow is sensitive to anomalous freshwater input. Reversals of the deep circulation can occur in the Atlantic, leading to a state where deep water is formed only in the Southern Ocean. A feedback mechanism is identified that may also trigger the reversal of the Pacific thermobaline circulation yielding the inverse conveyor bell as an additional steady state. In total, four different stable equilibria of the coupled model were realized.

  15. Coupled modeling of transport and biogeochemical processes in aquifers - Model requirements, strength and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, K.

    2003-12-01

    Microbially mediated geochemical changes in aquifers may trigger a series of secondary reactions that include aqueous and surface complexation, ion exchange, and mineral dissolution-precipitation. Due to the coupled nature and the multitude of processes involved it is often difficult to identify the reactions controlling the system's overall evolution. Numerical models can be a useful component for identifying gaps and inconsistencies in conceptual models and for performing a more quantitative investigation of these systems. Suitable computer codes must allow for a general description of transport and reaction processes to facilitate the investigation of site-specific conditions. In recent years significant advances have been made in terms of model generality and applicability. Major advances include the consideration of mass balance equations for reactants and reaction products, the integration of biodegradation and thermodynamic models, and the development of novel approaches for simulating biogeochemical processes and reactive transport under variably saturated conditions. MIN3P is one of the codes capable of simulating coupled biogeochemical and hydrological processes on an increasingly mechanistic level. The simulation of column experiments and a hypothetical case study at the field scale illustrate how reactive transport modeling can be used. Modeling column experiments can be particularly fruitful, because detailed data can be collected to support the mechanistic approach. However, analysis of conceptual models is also beneficial on the field scale. The case study considered here describes natural attenuation of a petroleum hydrocarbon spill in an unconfined aquifer by multiple electron acceptors. The simulations also consider geochemical reactions triggered by contaminant degradation including the re-oxidation of reaction products during transport away from the source area. Comparing the results to contaminant plumes described in the literature suggests

  16. Coupling of the atmospheric mesoscale model FOOT3DK to a photosynthesis model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyers, M.; Zacharias, S.; Kerschgens, M.

    2009-09-01

    The interdisciplinary project SFB Transregio 32 aims at monitoring and modelling of patterns in soil-vegetation-atmosphere systems. Field and aircraft measurements show temporal and spatial small scale variability of CO2 and H2O fluxes, which are associated with small scale vegetation structures of varying photosynthetic activity. Within the subproject D1 of the SFB Transregio 32 the influence of surface heterogenities on atmospheric fluxes is simulated using the atmospheric mesoscale model FOOT3DK. Simulations are performed for the TR32 investigation area near Selhausen, located in North-Rhine-Westphalia, Germany, with a horizontal resolution up to 100 m. Since in the original model set-up no carbon cycle is included, FOOT3DK is coupled to a photosynthesis model, which consists of a C3 single-leaf model following Farquhar et al. (1980). Big-leaf approaches tend to overestimate photosynthesis activity, therefore an extended big-leaf model (de Pury and Farquhar, 1997) is used for the upscaling from leaf to canopy scale. In this so-called sun/shade model the canopy is divided into sunlit and shaded fractions and the net CO2 fluxes are calculated for both fractions separately. For the validation simulations with the stand-alone version of the photosynthesis model are compared with field measurements for wheat and sugarbeet. Despite some slight overestimations simulated CO2 fluxes exhibit a good overall agreement with measured values. The general diurnal variation as well as local extrema (e.g. caused by clouds) are reproduced well. High resolution simulations of the coupled FOOT3DK-photosynthesis model show reasonable results. While the diurnal cycle is matched well, the magnitudes of the simulated CO2 fluxes are considerably overestimated compared to measurements. The overestimations are probably caused by the ratio of photosynthetic active radiation to incoming solar radiation, which currently is assumed to be constant. To investigate the influence of small scale

  17. Analytical coupled vibroacoustic modeling of membrane-type acoustic metamaterials: plate model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yangyang; Huang, Guoliang; Zhou, Xiaoming; Hu, Gengkai; Sun, Chin-Teh

    2014-12-01

    By considering the elastic membrane's dissipation, the membrane-type acoustic metamaterial (MAM) has been demonstrated to be a super absorber for low-frequency sound. In the paper, a theoretical vibroacoustic plate model is developed to reveal the sound energy absorption mechanism within the MAM under a plane normal incidence. Based on the plate model in conjunction with the point matching method, the in-plane strain energy of the membrane due to the resonant and antiresonant motion of the attached masses can be accurately captured by solving the coupled vibroacoustic integrodifferential equation. The sound absorption ability of the MAM is quantitatively determined, which is also in good agreement with the prediction from the finite element method. In particular, microstructure effects including eccentricity of the attached masses, the depth, thickness, and loss factor of the membrane on sound absorption peak values are discussed.

  18. A model of coupled oscillators applied to the aerosol-cloud-precipitation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feingold, G.; Koren, I.

    2013-11-01

    We simulate the aerosol-cloud-precipitation system as a collection of cloud elements, each coupled through physically based interactions with adjacent clouds. The equations describing the individual clouds follow from the predator-prey model of Koren and Feingold (2011) with the addition of coupling terms that derive from the flow of air between the components resulting from surface divergence or convergence of flows associated with the life cycle of an individual cell. It is shown that some degree of coupling might stabilize clouds that would ordinarily become unstable. Varying the degree of coupling strength has significant influence on the system. For weak coupling, the clouds behave as independent oscillators with little influence on one another. As the local coupling strength increases, a point is reached at which the system becomes highly synchronized, similar to the Sakaguchi et al. (1987) model. Individual cloud oscillators in close proximity to one another can be both in-phase or out-of-phase depending on the choice of the time constant for the delay in communication between components. For the case considered, further increases in coupling strength result in reduced order and eventually unstable growth. Finally it is demonstrated that the set of coupled oscillators mimics qualitatively the spatial structure and synchronized behaviour of both closed and open-cellular cloud fields observed in satellite imagery, and produced by numerically intensive large eddy simulation.

  19. An integrated hydrologic modeling framework for coupling SWAT with MODFLOW

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), MODFLOW, and Energy Balance based Evapotranspiration (EB_ET) models are extensively used to estimate different components of the hydrological cycle. Surface and subsurface hydrological processes are modeled in SWAT but limited to the extent of shallow aquif...

  20. Comparison of vibration dissociation coupling and radiative heat transfer models for AOTV/AFE flowfields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Leland A.; Bobskill, Glenn J.; Greendyke, Robert B.

    1988-01-01

    A series of detailed studies comparing various vibration dissociation coupling models, reaction systems and rates, and radiative heating models has been conducted for the nonequilibrium stagnation region of an AFE/AOTV vehicle. Atomic and molecular nonequilibrium radiation correction factors have been developed and applied to various absorption coefficient step models, and a modified vibration dissociation coupling model has been shown to yield good vibration/electronic temperature and concentration profiles. While results indicate sensitivity to the choice of vibration dissociation coupling model and to the nitrogen electron impact ionization rate, by proper combinations accurate flowfield and radiative heating results can be obtained. These results indicate that nonequilibrium effects significantly affect the flowfield and the radiative heat transfer. However, additional work is needed in ionization chemistry and absorption coefficient modeling.

  1. Controlled flavour changing neutral couplings in two Higgs Doublet models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Joao M.; Botella, Francisco J.; Branco, Gustavo C.; Cornet-Gomez, Fernando; Nebot, Miguel

    2017-09-01

    We propose a class of two Higgs doublet models where there are flavour changing neutral currents (FCNC) at tree level, but under control due to the introduction of a discrete symmetry in the full Lagrangian. It is shown that in this class of models, one can have simultaneously FCNC in the up and down sectors, in contrast to the situation encountered in the renormalisable and minimal flavour violating 2HDM models put forward by Branco et al. (Phys Lett B 380:119, 1996). The intensity of FCNC is analysed and it is shown that in this class of models one can respect all the strong constraints from experiment without unnatural fine-tuning. It is pointed out that the additional sources of flavour and CP violation are such that they can enhance significantly the generation of the Bbaryon asymmetry of the Universe, with respect to the standard model.

  2. A Coupled Vegetation-Crust Model for Patchy Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinast, Shai; Ashkenazy, Yosef; Meron, Ehud

    2016-03-01

    A new model for patchy landscapes in drylands is introduced. The model captures the dynamics of biogenic soil crusts and their mutual interactions with vegetation growth. The model is used to identify spatially uniform and spatially periodic solutions that represent different vegetation-crust states, and map them along the rainfall gradient. The results are consistent extensions of the vegetation states found in earlier models. A significant difference between the current and earlier models of patchy landscapes is found in the bistability range of vegetated and unvegetated states; the incorporation of crust dynamics shifts the onset of vegetation patterns to a higher precipitation value and increases the biomass amplitude. These results can shed new light on the involvement of biogenic crusts in desertification processes that involve vegetation loss.

  3. Mathematical modeling of gap junction coupling and electrical activity in human β-cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loppini, Alessandro; Braun, Matthias; Filippi, Simonetta; Gram Pedersen, Morten

    2015-12-01

    Coordinated insulin secretion is controlled by electrical coupling of pancreatic β-cells due to connexin-36 gap junctions. Gap junction coupling not only synchronizes the heterogeneous β-cell population, but can also modify the electrical behavior of the cells. These phenomena have been widely studied with mathematical models based on data from mouse β-cells. However, it is now known that human β-cell electrophysiology shows important differences to its rodent counterpart, and although human pancreatic islets express connexin-36 and show evidence of β-cell coupling, these aspects have been little investigated in human β-cells. Here we investigate theoretically, the gap junction coupling strength required for synchronizing electrical activity in a small cluster of cells simulated with a recent mathematical model of human β-cell electrophysiology. We find a lower limit for the coupling strength of approximately 20 pS (i.e., normalized to cell size, ˜2 pS pF-1) below which spiking electrical activity is asynchronous. To confront this theoretical lower bound with data, we use our model to estimate from an experimental patch clamp recording that the coupling strength is approximately 100-200 pS (10-20 pS pF-1), similar to previous estimates in mouse β-cells. We then investigate the role of gap junction coupling in synchronizing and modifying other forms of electrical activity in human β-cell clusters. We find that electrical coupling can prolong the period of rapid bursting electrical activity, and synchronize metabolically driven slow bursting, in particular when the metabolic oscillators are in phase. Our results show that realistic coupling conductances are sufficient to promote synchrony in small clusters of human β-cells as observed experimentally, and provide motivation for further detailed studies of electrical coupling in human pancreatic islets.

  4. Numerical modeling of coupled water flow and heat transport in soil and snow

    Treesearch

    Thijs J. Kelleners; Jeremy Koonce; Rose Shillito; Jelle Dijkema; Markus Berli; Michael H. Young; John M. Frank; William Massman

    2016-01-01

    A one-dimensional vertical numerical model for coupled water flow and heat transport in soil and snow was modified to include all three phases of water: vapor, liquid, and ice. The top boundary condition in the model is driven by incoming precipitation and the surface energy balance. The model was applied to three different terrestrial systems: A warm desert bare...

  5. Cascading failures coupled model of interdependent double layered public transit network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lin; Fu, Bai-Bai; Li, Shu-Bin

    2016-06-01

    Taking urban public transit network as research perspective, this work introduces the influences of adjacent stations on definition of station initial load, the connected edge transit capacity, and the coupled capacity to modify traditional load-capacity cascading failures (CFs) model. Furthermore, we consider the coupled effect of lower layered public transit network on the CFs of upper layered public transit network, and construct CFs coupled model of double layered public transit network with “interdependent relationship”. Finally, taking Jinan city’s public transit network as example, we give the dynamics simulation analysis of CFs under different control parameters based on measurement indicator of station cascading failures ratio (abbreviated as CF) and the scale of time-step cascading failures (abbreviated as TCFl), get the influencing characteristics of various control parameters, and verify the feasibility of CFs coupled model of double layered public transit network.

  6. Excitonic Coupling and Femtosecond Relaxation of Zinc Porphyrin Oligomers Linked with Triazole Bridge: Dynamics and Modeling.

    PubMed

    Bukreev, Alexey; Mikhailov, Konstantin; Shelaev, Ivan; Gostev, Fedor; Polevaya, Yuliya; Tyurin, Vladimir; Beletskaya, Irina; Umansky, Stanislav; Nadtochenko, Victor

    2016-03-31

    The synthesis of new zinc porphyrin oligomers linked by a triazole bridge was carried out via "click" reaction. A split in the porphyrin oligomer B-band was observed. It was considered as evidence of exciton-excitonic coupling. The relaxation of excited states in Q-band porphyrin oligomers was studied by the femtosecond laser spectroscopy technique with a 20 fs pump pulse. The transient oscillations of two B-band excitonic peaks have a π-radian shift. For explanation of the coherent oscillation, a theoretical model was developed. The model considered the combination of the exciton-excitonic coupling between porphyrin rings in dimer and weak exciton-vibronic coupling in one porphyrin ring. By varying the values of the structural parameters of porphyrins (the strength values of this couplings and measure of symmetry breaking), we obtained correspondence between the experimental data (phase shift and amplitudes of the spectrum oscillations) and the predictions of the model developed here.

  7. Emergent Central Pattern Generator Behavior in Gap-Junction-Coupled Hodgkin-Huxley Style Neuron Model

    PubMed Central

    Memelli, Heraldo; Solomon, Irene C.

    2012-01-01

    Most models of central pattern generators (CPGs) involve two distinct nuclei mutually inhibiting one another via synapses. Here, we present a single-nucleus model of biologically realistic Hodgkin-Huxley neurons with random gap junction coupling. Despite no explicit division of neurons into two groups, we observe a spontaneous division of neurons into two distinct firing groups. In addition, we also demonstrate this phenomenon in a simplified version of the model, highlighting the importance of afterhyperpolarization currents (IAHP) to CPGs utilizing gap junction coupling. The properties of these CPGs also appear sensitive to gap junction conductance, probability of gap junction coupling between cells, topology of gap junction coupling, and, to a lesser extent, input current into our simulated nucleus. PMID:23365558

  8. Emergent central pattern generator behavior in gap-junction-coupled Hodgkin-Huxley style neuron model.

    PubMed

    Horn, Kyle G; Memelli, Heraldo; Solomon, Irene C

    2012-01-01

    Most models of central pattern generators (CPGs) involve two distinct nuclei mutually inhibiting one another via synapses. Here, we present a single-nucleus model of biologically realistic Hodgkin-Huxley neurons with random gap junction coupling. Despite no explicit division of neurons into two groups, we observe a spontaneous division of neurons into two distinct firing groups. In addition, we also demonstrate this phenomenon in a simplified version of the model, highlighting the importance of afterhyperpolarization currents (I(AHP)) to CPGs utilizing gap junction coupling. The properties of these CPGs also appear sensitive to gap junction conductance, probability of gap junction coupling between cells, topology of gap junction coupling, and, to a lesser extent, input current into our simulated nucleus.

  9. Improved modeling of photoluminescent and electroluminescent coupling in multijunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, Dongchen; Geisz, John F.; Steiner, Myles A.; Garcia, Ivan; Friedman, Daniel J.; Green, Martin A.

    2015-12-01

    The performance of tandem stacks of Group III-V multijunction solar cells continues to improve rapidly, both through improved performance of the individual cells in the stack and through increase in the number of stacked cells. As the radiative efficiency of these individual cells increases, radiative coupling between the stacked cells becomes an increasingly important factor not only in cell design, but also in accurate efficiency measurement and in determining performance of cells and systems under varying spectral conditions in the field. Past modeling has concentrated on electroluminescent coupling between the cells, although photoluminescent coupling is shown to be important for cells operating near their maximum power point voltage or below or when junction defect recombination is significant. Extension of earlier models is proposed to allow this non-negligible component of luminescent coupling to be included. The refined model is validated by measurement of the closely related external emission from both single and double junction cells.

  10. An equilibrium model for the coupled ocean-atmosphere boundary layer in the tropics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sui, C.-H.; Lau, K.-M.; Betts, Alan K.

    1991-01-