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Sample records for coupled ocean-atmosphere gcm

  1. Variability in North Atlantic heat content and heat transport in a coupled ocean-atmosphere GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, B.; Sutton, R. T.

    2002-06-01

    A coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model has been used to study the variations of North Atlantic upper ocean heat content (OHC), sea surface temperature (SST) and ocean heat transport (OHT), and the relationships between these three quantities. We find that OHC anomalies, and salinity anomalies, propagate anti-cyclonically around the North Atlantic subtropical gyre. They propagate eastward in midlatitudes and westward in low latitudes. Both the advection of mean temperature by anomalous currents and the advection of temperature anomalies by mean currents are responsible for these zonal propagations. In addition to zonal propagations, upper ocean temperature anomalies propagate southward in the eastern North Atlantic, where subduction plays a dominant role. Variability in the northward OHT in the Atlantic is primarily governed by variability in the ocean circulation rather than variability in temperatures. Fluctuations in OHT are the major cause of anomalies in OHC and SST in the Gulf Stream extension region. This is true both for interannual variability and for decadal variability. On interannual time scales, however, surface fluxes also make a significant contribution. Analysis of the relationships of OHT with OHC and SST suggests that a knowledge of OHT fluctuations could be used to predict variations in OHC, and therefore sea surface temperatures, several years in advance.

  2. The dominant mechanisms of variability in Atlantic Ocean Heat Transport in a Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, B.-W.; Sutton, R. T.

    The variability of the Atlantic meridional ocean heat transport (OHT) has been diagnosed from a simulation of a coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model (GCM), and the mechanisms responsible for this variability have been elucidated. Interannual variability is dominated by windstress-driven Ekman fluctuations, which account for 50.3% of the OHT variance. By contrast, decadal and multidecadal variability in Atlantic OHT is dominated by a mixed thermohaline/gyre mode driven by variations in buoyancy fluxes and windstress curl. It accounts for 55.6% of low pass filtered OHT variance. The North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) has a significant role in both the interannual mode and the low frequency mode, but it is not the only important driver. A notable feature of both modes is significant changes in the tropical atmosphere and ocean. We highlight a number of potential mechanisms involved in the tropical-extratropical teleconnections.

  3. Modelling the oxygen isotope distribution of ancient seawater using a coupled ocean-atmosphere GCM: Implications for reconstructing early Eocene climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tindall, Julia; Flecker, Rachel; Valdes, Paul; Schmidt, Daniela N.; Markwick, Paul; Harris, Jim

    2010-04-01

    One of the motivations for studying warm climates of the past such as the early Eocene, is the enhanced understanding this brings of possible future greenhouse conditions. Traditionally, climate information deduced from biological or chemical proxies have been used to "test" computer model simulations of past climatic conditions and hence establish some of the uncertainties associated with model-based predictions. However, extracting climate information from proxies is itself an interpretative process and discrepancies between climate information inferred from different types of proxy undermines the assumption that model-data conflicts automatically mean that the model is inherently flawed. A new approach which both acknowledges and reduces the uncertainties associated with both model and data is required. Although the oxygen isotopic ratio ( δ18O) preserved in calcareous marine fossils has been used to reconstruct past seawater temperature for several decades, significant uncertainties associated with this method persist. These include assumptions about past seawater δ18O for which no proxy exists and which is a key control on the temperature inferred from fossil carbonate. Here we present the results of an early Eocene simulation made using a state-of-the-art General Circulation Model (GCM; HadCM3) with CO 2 set at six times pre-industrial values and which has oxygen isotopes incorporated into the full hydrological cycle and hence simulates the δ18O of past seawater. This allows us to explore the implications of the different seawater δ18O correction factors commonly used for δ18O-based temperature reconstruction. It also allows us to focus model-data comparison on δ18O rather than interpret ocean temperature, an approach that reduces uncertainties in model-data comparison since the effects of both the temperature and the isotopic composition of ocean water on δ18O of carbonate are accounted for. The good agreement between model and data for both modern

  4. The Influence of Midlatitude Ocean-Atmosphere Coupling on the Low-Frequency Variability of a GCM. Part I: No Tropical SST Forcing*.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bladé, Ileana

    1997-08-01

    This study examines the extent to which the thermodynamic interactions between the midlatitude atmosphere and the underlying oceanic mixed layer contribute to the low-frequency atmospheric variability. A general circulation model, run under perpetual northern winter conditions, is coupled to a motionless constant-depth mixed layer in midlatitudes, while elsewhere the sea surface temperature (SST) is kept fixed; interannual tropical SST forcing is not included. It is found that coupling does not modify the spatial organization of the variability. The influence of coupling is manifested as a slight reddening of the spectrum of 500-mb geopotential height and a significant enhancement of the lower-tropospheric thermal variance over the oceans at very low frequencies by virtue of the mixed-layer adjustment to surface air temperature variations that occurs on those timescales. This adjustment effectively reduces the thermal damping of the atmosphere associated with surface heat fluxes (or negative oceanic feedback), thus increasing the thermal variance and the persistence of circulation anomalies.In studying the covariability between ocean and atmosphere it is found that the dominant mode of natural atmospheric variability is coupled to the leading mode of SST in each ocean, with the atmosphere leading the ocean by about one month. The cross-correlation function between oceanic and atmospheric anomalies is strongly asymmetric about zero lag. The SST structures are consistent with direct forcing by the anomalous heat fluxes implied by the concurrent surface air temperature and wind fluctuations. Additionally, composites based on large amplitude SST anomaly events contain no evidence of direct driving of atmospheric perturbations by these SST anomalies. Thus, in terms of the spatial organization of the covariability and the evolution of the coupled system from one regime to another, large-scale air-sea interaction in the model is characterized by one-way atmospheric

  5. Predictability of a coupled ocean-atmosphere model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goswami, B. N.; Shukla, J.

    1991-01-01

    A study is presented to determine the limits on the predictability of the coupled ocean-atmosphere system. Following the classical methods developed for atmospheric predictability studies, the model used is one of the simplest that realistically reproduces many of the important features of the observed interannual variability of sea surface temperature in the tropical Pacific Ocean when forced by observed wind stresses. As no reasonable analysis is available for all the fields, initial conditions for these prediction experiments were taken from a model control run in which the ocean model was forced by the observed surface winds. The atmospheric component of the coupled model is not capable of accurately simulating the large-scale components of the observed wind stress.

  6. Mesoscale Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Feedbacks in Boundary Current Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putrasahan, Dian Ariyani

    The focus of this dissertation is on studying ocean-atmosphere (OA) interactions in the Humboldt Current System (HCS) and Kuroshio Extension (KE) region using satellite observations and the Scripps Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Regional (SCOAR) model. Within SCOAR, a new technique is introduced by implementing an interactive 2-D spatial smoother within the SST-flux coupler to remove the mesoscale SST field felt by the atmosphere. This procedure allows large-scale SST coupling to be preserved while extinguishing the mesoscale eddy impacts on the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). This technique provides insights to spatial-scale dependence of OA coupling, and the impact of mesoscale features on both the ABL and the surface ocean. For the HCS, the use of downscaled forcing from SCOAR, as compared to NCEP Reanalysis 2, proves to be more appropriate in quantifying wind-driven upwelling indices along the coast of Peru and Chile. The difference in their wind stress distribution has significant impact on the wind-driven upwelling processes and total upwelling transport along the coast. Although upwelling induced by coastal Ekman transport dominates the wind-driven upwelling along coastal areas, Ekman pumping can account for 30% of the wind-driven upwelling in several coastal locations. Control SCOAR shows significant SST-wind stress coupling during fall and winter, while Smoothed SCOAR shows insignificant coupling throughout, indicating the important role of ocean mesoscale eddies on air-sea coupling in HCS. The SST-wind stress coupling however, did not produce any rectified response on the ocean eddies. Coupling between SST, wind speed and latent heat flux is insignificant on large-scale coupling and full coupling mode. On the other hand, coupling between these three variables are significant on the mesoscale for most of the model run, which suggests that mesoscale SST affects latent heat through direct flux anomalies as well as indirectly through stability changes on the

  7. Studies of regional-scale climate variability and change. Hidden Markov models and coupled ocean-atmosphere modes

    SciTech Connect

    Ghil, M.; Kravtsov, S.; Robertson, A. W.; Smyth, P.

    2008-10-14

    This project was a continuation of previous work under DOE CCPP funding, in which we had developed a twin approach of probabilistic network (PN) models (sometimes called dynamic Bayesian networks) and intermediate-complexity coupled ocean-atmosphere models (ICMs) to identify the predictable modes of climate variability and to investigate their impacts on the regional scale. We had developed a family of PNs (similar to Hidden Markov Models) to simulate historical records of daily rainfall, and used them to downscale GCM seasonal predictions. Using an idealized atmospheric model, we had established a novel mechanism through which ocean-induced sea-surface temperature (SST) anomalies might influence large-scale atmospheric circulation patterns on interannual and longer time scales; we had found similar patterns in a hybrid coupled ocean-atmosphere-sea-ice model. The goal of the this continuation project was to build on these ICM results and PN model development to address prediction of rainfall and temperature statistics at the local scale, associated with global climate variability and change, and to investigate the impact of the latter on coupled ocean-atmosphere modes. Our main results from the grant consist of extensive further development of the hidden Markov models for rainfall simulation and downscaling together with the development of associated software; new intermediate coupled models; a new methodology of inverse modeling for linking ICMs with observations and GCM results; and, observational studies of decadal and multi-decadal natural climate results, informed by ICM results.

  8. A parallel coupled oceanic-atmospheric general circulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Wehner, M.F.; Bourgeois, A.J.; Eltgroth, P.G.; Duffy, P.B.; Dannevik, W.P.

    1994-12-01

    The Climate Systems Modeling group at LLNL has developed a portable coupled oceanic-atmospheric general circulation model suitable for use on a variety of massively parallel (MPP) computers of the multiple instruction, multiple data (MIMD) class. The model is composed of parallel versions of the UCLA atmospheric general circulation model, the GFDL modular ocean model (MOM) and a dynamic sea ice model based on the Hiber formulation extracted from the OPYC ocean model. The strategy to achieve parallelism is twofold. One level of parallelism is accomplished by applying two dimensional domain decomposition techniques to each of the three constituent submodels. A second level of parallelism is attained by a concurrent execution of AGCM and OGCM/sea ice components on separate sets of processors. For this functional decomposition scheme, a flux coupling module has been written to calculate the heat, moisture and momentum fluxes independent of either the AGCM or the OGCM modules. The flux coupler`s other roles are to facilitate the transfer of data between subsystem components and processors via message passing techniques and to interpolate and aggregate between the possibly incommensurate meshes.

  9. Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere 4D-Var: Formulation and Sensitivity Analysis Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngodock, Hans; Carrier, Matthew; Xu, Liang; Amerault, Clark; Campbell, Tim; Rowley, Clark

    2016-04-01

    The US Navy is currently developing the first coupled ocean-atmosphere four-dimensional variational (4D-Var) data assimilation system to be used for short-term regional forecasting. This project merges the 4D-Var capabilities of the atmospheric component of the Coupled Ocean/Atmospheric Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS©) with the Navy Coastal Ocean Model (NCOM) through the Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF). This will provide the coupled ocean-atmosphere forecast with a fully balanced analysis that accounts for all combined observations in both primary fluids (i.e. ocean and atmosphere). In this present work, the formulation of the system is presented in detail along with a series of adjoint sensitivity analysis results using the coupled ocean-atmosphere adjoint model. The sensitivity of the atmosphere (ocean) to each ocean (atmosphere) model variable is analyzed in detail in order to illustrate the usefulness of this approach in the coupled data assimilation system.

  10. ENSO Bred Vectors in Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere General Circulation Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, S. C.; Cai, Ming; Kalnay, E.; Rienecker, M.; Yuan, G.; Toth, ZA.

    2004-01-01

    The breeding method has been implemented in the NASA Seasonal-to-Interannual Prediction Project (NSIPP) Coupled General Circulation Model (CGCM) with the goal of improving operational seasonal to interannual climate predictions through ensemble forecasting and data assimilation. The coupled instability as cap'tured by the breeding method is the first attempt to isolate the evolving ENSO instability and its corresponding global atmospheric response in a fully coupled ocean-atmosphere GCM. Our results show that the growth rate of the coupled bred vectors (BV) peaks at about 3 months before a background ENSO event. The dominant growing BV modes are reminiscent of the background ENSO anomalies and show a strong tropical response with wind/SST/thermocline interrelated in a manner similar to the background ENSO mode. They exhibit larger amplitudes in the eastern tropical Pacific, reflecting the natural dynamical sensitivity associated with the presence of the shallow thermocline. Moreover, the extratropical perturbations associated with these coupled BV modes reveal the variations related to the atmospheric teleconnection patterns associated with background ENSO variability, e.g. over the North Pacific and North America. A similar experiment was carried out with the NCEP/CFS03 CGCM. Comparisons between bred vectors from the NSIPP CGCM and NCEP/CFS03 CGCM demonstrate the robustness of the results. Our results strongly suggest that the breeding method can serve as a natural filter to identify the slowly varying, coupled instabilities in a coupled GCM, which can be used to construct ensemble perturbations for ensemble forecasts and to estimate the coupled background error covariance for coupled data assimilation.

  11. Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Modeling of the Coastal Zone

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-30

    response of the ocean/atmosphere. Results from cloud resolving LES experiments are also presented for cases with fog and stratus . 1 Report... stratus cloud layer. An example showing this effect is presented in Figure 5 where the atmospheric stratification is initialized with two different...inversion strengths. For the fog case, the boundary layer top is capped by 5 a potential temperature increase of about 8 oC, whereas the stratus case

  12. Predicting Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Modes with a Climate Modeling Hierarchy -- Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Ghil, UCLA; Andrew W. Robertson, IRI, Columbia Univ.; Sergey Kravtsov, U. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee; Padhraic Smyth, UC Irvine

    2006-08-04

    The goal of the project was to determine midlatitude climate predictability associated with tropical-extratropical interactions on interannual-to-interdecadal time scales. Our strategy was to develop and test a hierarchy of climate models, bringing together large GCM-based climate models with simple fluid-dynamical coupled ocean-ice-atmosphere models, through the use of advanced probabilistic network (PN) models. PN models were used to develop a new diagnostic methodology for analyzing coupled ocean-atmosphere interactions in large climate simulations made with the NCAR Parallel Climate Model (PCM), and to make these tools user-friendly and available to other researchers. We focused on interactions between the tropics and extratropics through atmospheric teleconnections (the Hadley cell, Rossby waves and nonlinear circulation regimes) over both the North Atlantic and North Pacific, and the ocean’s thermohaline circulation (THC) in the Atlantic. We tested the hypothesis that variations in the strength of the THC alter sea surface temperatures in the tropical Atlantic, and that the latter influence the atmosphere in high latitudes through an atmospheric teleconnection, feeding back onto the THC. The PN model framework was used to mediate between the understanding gained with simplified primitive equations models and multi-century simulations made with the PCM. The project team is interdisciplinary and built on an existing synergy between atmospheric and ocean scientists at UCLA, computer scientists at UCI, and climate researchers at the IRI.

  13. The Monsoon as a Self-regulating Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, P. J.; Clark, C.; Cherikova, G.; Fasullo, J.; Han, W.; Loschnigg, J.; Sahami, K.

    INTRODUCTION REGULATION OF THE MONSOON ANNUAL CYCLE The Climatological Annual Cycle Processes Determining the Annual Cycle of the Monsoon Role of Ocean Dynamics in the Annual Heat Balance of the Indian - Ocean Regulation of the Annual Cycle of the Monsoon: an Ocean-Atmosphere - Feedback System INTERANNUAL VARIABILITY OF THE MONSOON Modes of Interannual Variability in the Monsoon Interannual Modes in Ocean Heat Transport Interannual Regulation of the Monsoon GENERAL THEORY OF REGULATION OF THE COUPLED OCEAN-ATMOSPHERIC MONSOON - SYSTEM CONCLUSIONS REFERENCES

  14. Ocean-Atmosphere Coupled Model Simulations of Precipitation in the Central Andes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholls, Stephen D.; Mohr, Karen I.

    2015-01-01

    The meridional extent and complex orography of the South American continent contributes to a wide diversity of climate regimes ranging from hyper-arid deserts to tropical rainforests to sub-polar highland regions. In addition, South American meteorology and climate are also made further complicated by ENSO, a powerful coupled ocean-atmosphere phenomenon. Modelling studies in this region have typically resorted to either atmospheric mesoscale or atmosphere-ocean coupled global climate models. The latter offers full physics and high spatial resolution, but it is computationally inefficient typically lack an interactive ocean, whereas the former offers high computational efficiency and ocean-atmosphere coupling, but it lacks adequate spatial and temporal resolution to adequate resolve the complex orography and explicitly simulate precipitation. Explicit simulation of precipitation is vital in the Central Andes where rainfall rates are light (0.5-5 mm hr-1), there is strong seasonality, and most precipitation is associated with weak mesoscale-organized convection. Recent increases in both computational power and model development have led to the advent of coupled ocean-atmosphere mesoscale models for both weather and climate study applications. These modelling systems, while computationally expensive, include two-way ocean-atmosphere coupling, high resolution, and explicit simulation of precipitation. In this study, we use the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST), a fully-coupled mesoscale atmosphere-ocean modeling system. Previous work has shown COAWST to reasonably simulate the entire 2003-2004 wet season (Dec-Feb) as validated against both satellite and model analysis data when ECMWF interim analysis data were used for boundary conditions on a 27-9-km grid configuration (Outer grid extent: 60.4S to 17.7N and 118.6W to 17.4W).

  15. Global coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation models in LASG/IAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yongqiang, Yu; Xuehong, Zhang; Yufu, Guo

    2004-06-01

    Coupled ocean-atmospheric general circulation models are the only tools to quantitatively simulate the climate system. Since the end of the 1980s, a group of scientists in the State Key Laboratory of Numerical Modeling for Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics (LASG), Institute of Atmospheric Physics (IAP), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), have been working to develop a global OGCM and a global coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model (CGCM). From the original flux anomaly-coupling model developed in the beginning of the 1990s to the latest directly-coupling model, LASG scientists have developed four global coupled GCMs. This study summarizes the development history of these models and describes the third and fourth coupled GCMs and selected applications. Strengths and weaknesses of these models are highlighted.

  16. Dynamic Ocean-Atmosphere Coupling: A Thermostat for the Tropics

    PubMed

    Sun; Liu

    1996-05-24

    The ocean currents connecting the western tropical Pacific Ocean with the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean are driven by surface winds. The surface winds are in turn driven by the sea-surface temperature (SST) differences between these two regions. This dynamic coupling between the atmosphere and ocean may limit the SST in the tropical Pacific Ocean to below 305 kelvin even in the absence of cloud feedbacks.

  17. Upscalling processes in an ocean-atmosphere multiscale coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, S. G.; Berthet, S.; Samson, G.; Crétat, J.; Colas, F.; Echevin, V.; Jullien, S.; Hourdin, C.

    2015-12-01

    This work explores new pathways toward a better representation of the multi-scale physics that drive climate variability. We are analysing the key upscaling processes by which small-scale localized errors have a knock-on effect onto global climate. We focus on the Peru-Chilli coastal upwelling, an area known to hold among the strongest models biases in the Tropics. Our approach is based on the development of a multiscale coupling interface allowing us to couple WRF with the NEMO oceanic model in a configuration including 2-way nested zooms in the oceanic and/or the atmospheric component of the coupled model. Upscalling processes are evidenced and quantified by comparing three 20-year long simulations of a tropical channel (45°S-45°N), which differ by their horizontal resolution: 0.75° everywhere, 0.75°+0.25° zoom in the southeastern Pacific or 0.25° everywhere. This set of three 20-year long simulations was repeated with 3 different sets of parameterizations to assess the robustness of our results. Our results show that adding an embedded zoom over the southeastern Pacific only in the atmosphere cools down the SST along the Peru-Chili coast, which is a clear improvement. This change is associated with a displacement of the low-level cloud cover, which moves closer to the coast cooling further the coastal area SST. Offshore, we observe the opposite effect with a reduction of the cloud cover with higher resolution, which increases solar radiation and warms the SST. Increasing the resolution in the oceanic component show contrasting results according to the different set parameterization used in the experiments. Some experiment shows a coastal cooling as expected, whereas, in other cases, we observe a counterintuitive response with a warming of the coastal SST. Using at the same time an oceanic and an atmospheric zoom mostly combines the results obtained when using the 2-way nesting in only one component of the coupled model. In the best case, we archive by this

  18. MJO simulation in a cloud-system-resolving global ocean-atmosphere coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Wataru; Onishi, Ryo; Fuchigami, Hiromitsu; Goto, Koji; Nishikawa, Shiro; Ishikawa, Yoichi; Takahashi, Keiko

    2016-09-01

    An observed Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) propagating from the central Indian Ocean to the western Pacific from 15 December 2006 to 10 January 2007 was successfully simulated by a cloud-system-resolving global ocean-atmosphere coupled model without parameterization of cumulus convection. We found that the ocean coupling has significant impacts on the MJO simulation, e.g., strength of the moisture convergence, and the timing and strength of the westerly wind burst over the Maritime Continent. The model also generally well simulated the decay of the MJO in the western Pacific, as well as the changes in sea surface temperature. These results demonstrate that the cloud-system-resolving global ocean-atmosphere coupled model can be used for realistic MJO simulation.

  19. State and Parameter Estimation for a Coupled Ocean--Atmosphere Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghil, M.; Kondrashov, D.; Sun, C.

    2006-12-01

    The El-Nino/Southern-Oscillation (ENSO) dominates interannual climate variability and plays, therefore, a key role in seasonal-to-interannual prediction. Much is known by now about the main physical mechanisms that give rise to and modulate ENSO, but the values of several parameters that enter these mechanisms are an important unknown. We apply Extended Kalman Filtering (EKF) for both model state and parameter estimation in an intermediate, nonlinear, coupled ocean--atmosphere model of ENSO. The coupled model consists of an upper-ocean, reduced-gravity model of the Tropical Pacific and a steady-state atmospheric response to the sea surface temperature (SST). The model errors are assumed to be mainly in the atmospheric wind stress, and assimilated data are equatorial Pacific SSTs. Model behavior is very sensitive to two key parameters: (i) μ, the ocean-atmosphere coupling coefficient between SST and wind stress anomalies; and (ii) δs, the surface-layer coefficient. Previous work has shown that δs determines the period of the model's self-sustained oscillation, while μ measures the degree of nonlinearity. Depending on the values of these parameters, the spatio-temporal pattern of model solutions is either that of a delayed oscillator or of a westward propagating mode. Estimation of these parameters is tested first on synthetic data and allows us to recover the delayed-oscillator mode starting from model parameter values that correspond to the westward-propagating case. Assimilation of SST data from the NCEP-NCAR Reanalysis-2 shows that the parameters can vary on fairly short time scales and switch between values that approximate the two distinct modes of ENSO behavior. Rapid adjustments of these parameters occur, in particular, during strong ENSO events. Ways to apply EKF parameter estimation efficiently to state-of-the-art coupled ocean--atmosphere GCMs will be discussed.

  20. An equilibrium model for the coupled ocean-atmosphere boundary layer in the tropics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sui, C.-H.; Lau, K.-M.; Betts, Alan K.

    1991-01-01

    An atmospheric convective boundary layer (CBL) model is coupled to an ocean mixed-layer (OML) model in order to study the equilibrium state of the coupled system in the tropics, particularly in the Pacific region. The equilibrium state of the coupled system is solved as a function of sea-surface temperature (SST) for a given surface wind and as a function of surface wind for a given SST. It is noted that in both cases, the depth of the CBL and OML increases and the upwelling below the OML decreases, corresponding to either increasing SST or increasing surface wind. The coupled ocean-atmosphere model is solved iteratively as a function of surface wind for a fixed upwelling and a fixed OML depth, and it is observed that SST falls with increasing wind in both cases. Realistic gradients of mixed-layer depth and upwelling are observed in experiments with surface wind and SST prescribed as a function of longitude.

  1. Interdecadal variations of the thermohaline circulation in a coupled ocean-atmosphere model

    SciTech Connect

    Delworth, T.; Manabe, S.; Stouffer, R.J. )

    1993-11-01

    A fully coupled ocean-atmosphere model is shown to have irregular oscillations of the thermohaline circulation in the NOrth Atlantic Ocean with a time scale of approximately 50 years. The irregular oscillation appears to be driven by density anomalies in the sinking region of the thermohaline circulation (approximately 52[degrees]N to 72[degrees]N) combined with much smaller density anomalies of opposite sign in the broad, rising region. The spatial pattern of sea surface temperature anomalies associated with this irregular oscillation bears an encouraging resemblance to a pattern of observed interdecadal variability in the North Atlantic. The anomalies of sea surface temperature induce model surface air temperature anomalies over the northern North Atlantic, Arctic, and northwestern Europe. 21 refs., 28 figs.

  2. Response of a Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Model to Greenland Ice Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stammer, D.; Agarwal, N.; Herrmann, P.; Köhl, A.; Mechoso, C. R.

    2011-09-01

    We investigate the transient response of the global coupled ocean-atmosphere system to enhanced freshwater forcing representative of melting of the Greenland ice sheets. A 50-year long simulation by a coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (CGCM) is compared with another of the same length in which Greenland melting is prescribed. To highlight the importance of coupled atmosphere-ocean processes, the CGCM results are compared with those of two other experiments carried out with the oceanic general circulation model (OGCM). In one of these OGCM experiments, the prescribed surface fluxes of heat, momentum and freshwater correspond to the unperturbed simulation by the CGCM; in the other experiment, Greenland melting is added to the freshwater flux. The responses by the CGCM and OGCM to the Greenland melting have similar patterns in the Atlantic, albeit the former having five times larger amplitudes in sea surface height anomalies. The CGCM shows likewise stronger variability in all state variables in all ocean basins because the impact of Greenland melting is quickly communicated to all ocean basins via atmospheric bridges. We conclude that the response of the global climate to Greenland ice melting is highly dependent on coupled atmosphere-ocean processes. These lead to reduced latent heat flux into the atmosphere and an associated increase in net freshwater flux into the ocean, especially in the subpolar North Atlantic. The combined result is a stronger response of the coupled system to Greenland ice sheet melting.

  3. An equilibrium model for the coupled ocean-atmosphere boundary layer in the tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, C.-H.; Lau, K.-M.; Betts, Alan K.

    A coupled model is used to study the equilibrium state of the ocean-atmosphere boundary layer in the tropics. The atmospheric model is a one-dimensional thermodynamic model for a partially mixed, partly cloudy convective boundary layer (CBL), including the effects of cloud-top subsidence, surface momentum and heat (latent and sensible) fluxes, and realistic radiative transfer for both shortwaves and longwaves (Betts and Ridgway, 1988; 1989). The oceanic model is a thermodynamic model for a well-mixed layer, with a closure constraint based on a one-dimensional turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) equation following Kraus and Turner (1967). Results of several sets of experiments are reported in this paper. In the first two sets of experiments, with sea surface temperature (SST) specified, we solve the equilibrium state of the coupled system as a function of SST for a given surface wind (case 1) and as a function of surface wind for a given SST (case 2). In both cases the depth of the CBL and the ocean mixed layer (OML) increases and the upwelling below the OML decreases, corresponding to either increasing SST or increasing surface wind. The deepening of the equilibrium CBL is primarily linked to the increase of CBL moisture with increasing SST and surface wind. The increase of OML depth and decrease of upwelling are due to a decrease of net downward heat flux with increasing SST and the generation of TKE by increasing wind. In another two sets of experiments, we solve for the coupled ocean-atmosphere model iteratively as a function of surface wind for a fixed upwelling (case 3) and a fixed OML depth (case 4). SST falls with increasing wind in both cases, but the fall is steeper in case 4, because the OML depth is fixed, whereas in case 3 the depth is allowed to deepen and the cooling is spread over a larger mass of water. The decrease of evaporation with increasing wind in case 4 leads to a very dry and shallow CBL. Results of further experiments with surface wind and SST

  4. Wintertime atmospheric response to Atlantic multidecadal variability: effect of stratospheric representation and ocean-atmosphere coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peings, Yannick; Magnusdottir, Gudrun

    2016-08-01

    The impact of the Atlantic multidecadal variability (AMV) on the wintertime atmosphere circulation is investigated using three different configurations of the Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5). Realistic SST and sea ice anomalies associated with the AMV in observations are prescribed in CAM5 (low-top model) and WACCM5 (high-top model) to assess the dependence of the results on the representation of the stratosphere. In a third experiment, the role of ocean-atmosphere feedback is investigated by coupling CAM5 to a slab-ocean model in which the AMV forcing is prescribed through oceanic heat flux anomalies. The three experiments give consistent results concerning the response of the NAO in winter, with a negative NAO signal in response to a warming of the North Atlantic ocean. This response is found in early winter when the high-top model is used, and in late winter with the low-top model. With the slab-ocean, the negative NAO response is more persistent in winter and shifted eastward over the continent due to the damping of the atmospheric response over the North Atlantic ocean. Additional experiments suggest that both tropical and extratropical SST anomalies are needed to obtain a significant modulation of the NAO, with small influence of sea ice anomalies. Warm tropical SST anomalies induce a northward shift of the ITCZ and a Rossby-wave response that is reinforced in the mid-latitudes by the extratropical SST anomalies through eddy-mean flow interactions. This modeling study supports that the positive phase of the AMV promotes the negative NAO in winter, while illustrating the impacts of the stratosphere and of the ocean-atmosphere feedbacks in the spatial pattern and timing of this response.

  5. Improvement of the Cloud Physics Formulation in the U.S. Navy Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-30

    following tasks: 1. Investigation of aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions in COAMPS using the CIMMS bulk drizzle parameterization 2...Naval Research Laboratory’s Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS) equipped with the CIMMS bulk drizzle scheme. In an...activation parameterization, giant CCN parameterization, SGS variability) developed at CIMMS /OU will be made available to NRL and registered COAMPS users

  6. Secular Trends and Climate Drift in Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere General Circulation Models

    SciTech Connect

    Covey, C C; Gleckler, P J; Phillips, T J; Bader, D C

    2004-11-23

    Coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation models (coupled GCMs) with interactive sea ice are the primary tool for investigating possible future global warming and numerous other issues in climate science. A long-standing problem with such models is that when different components of the physical climate system are linked together, the simulated climate can drift away from observations unless constrained by ad hoc adjustments to interface fluxes. However, eleven modern coupled GCMs--including three that do not employ flux adjustments--behave much better in this respect than the older generation of models. Surface temperature trends in control run simulations (with external climate forcing such as solar brightness and atmospheric carbon dioxide held constant) are small compared with observed trends, which include 20th century climate change due to both anthropogenic and natural factors. Sea ice changes in the models are dominated by interannual variations. Deep ocean temperature and salinity trends are small enough for model control runs to extend over 1000 simulated years or more, but trends in some regions, most notably the Arctic, are inconsistent among the models and may be problematic.

  7. Climate variability in a coupled GCM. Part II: The Indian Ocean and monsoon

    SciTech Connect

    Latif, M.; Sterl, A.; Assenbaum, M.; Junge, M.M.; Maier-Reimer, E.

    1994-10-01

    We have investigated the seasonal cycle and the interannual variability of the tropical Indian Ocean circulation and the Indian summer monsoon simulated by a coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model in a 26-year integration. Although the model exhibits significant climate drift, overall, the coupled GCM simulates realistically the seasonal changes in the tropical Indian Ocean and the onset and evolution of the Indian summer monsoon. The amplitudes of the seasonal changes, however, are underestimated. The coupled GCM also simulates considerable interannual variability in the tropical Indian Ocean circulation, which is partly related to the El Nino/Southern Oscillation phenomenon and the associated changes in the Walker circulation. Changes in the surface wind stress appear to be crucial in forcing interannual variations in the Indian Ocean SST. As in the Pacific Ocean, the net surface heat flux acts as a negative feedback on the SST anomalies. The interannual variability in monsoon rainfall, simulated by the coupled GCM, is only about half as strong as observed. The reason for this is that the simulated interannual variability in the Indian monsoon appears to be related to internal processes within the atmosphere only. In contrast, an investigation based on observations shows a clear lead-lag relationship between interannual variations in the monsoon rainfall and tropical Pacific SST anomalies. Furthermore, the atmospheric GCM also fails to reproduce this lead-lag relationship between monsoon rainfall and tropical Pacific SST when run in a stand-alone integration with observed SSTs prescribed during the period 1970-1988. These results indicate that important physical processes relating tropical Pacific SST to Indian monsoon rainfall are not adequately modeled in our atmospheric GCM. Monsoon rainfall predictions appear therefore premature. 24 refs., 13 figs, 2 tabs.

  8. Simulation of global warming with a simple coupled ocean-atmosphere model

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Xiangze; Zhang Xuehong

    1994-12-31

    A highly simplified ocean-atmosphere coupling system is established based on a two-dimensional oceanic thermohaline circulation model and an energy balance atmospheric model. Transient responses of the coupled system to a radiation forcing corresponding to the doubling of the atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration have been investigated with an emphasis on the role of the model`s thermohaline circulation in the warming processes of the system. The results show that there are some significant differences between the Pacific and the Atlantic in their transient responses. On the whole, the warming in the Atlantic is slower in the surface and faster in the deep layers than those in the Pacific due to the process of the deep water formation in the northern North Atlantic, where the active convection and the downward vertical advection transport the surface thermal anomalies into the lower layers efficiently. On a hundred-year time scale, the thermohaline circulation in the North Atlantic is weakened. As a result, the warming in the upper layer of the northern North Atlantic will be further delayed because of the reduction of the northward heat transport.

  9. Stochastic modelling and predictability: analysis of a low-order coupled ocean-atmosphere model.

    PubMed

    Vannitsem, Stéphane

    2014-06-28

    There is a growing interest in developing stochastic schemes for the description of processes that are poorly represented in atmospheric and climate models, in order to increase their variability and reduce the impact of model errors. The use of such noise could however have adverse effects by modifying in undesired ways a certain number of moments of their probability distributions. In this work, the impact of developing a stochastic scheme (based on stochastic averaging) for the ocean is explored in the context of a low-order coupled (deterministic) ocean-atmosphere system. After briefly analysing its variability, its ability in predicting the oceanic flow generated by the coupled system is investigated. Different phases in the error dynamics are found: for short lead times, an initial overdispersion of the ensemble forecast is present while the ensemble mean follows a dynamics reminiscent of the combined amplification of initial condition and model errors for deterministic systems; for longer lead times, a reliable diffusive ensemble spread is observed. These different phases are also found for ensemble-oriented skill measures like the Brier score and the rank histogram. The implications of these features on building stochastic models are then briefly discussed.

  10. Data Assimilation Into a Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Model: Application to the 1997-1998 El Nino

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Tong

    1999-01-01

    As part of JPL's ocean data assimilation effort to study ocean circulation and seasonal-interannual climate variability, sea level anomaly observed by TOPEX altimeter, together with sea surface temperature and wind stress data, are assimilated into a simple coupled ocean atmosphere model of the tropical Pacific. Model-data consistency is examined. Impact of the assimilation (as initialization) on El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) forecasts is evaluated. The coupled model consists of a shallow water component with two baroclinic modes, an Ekman shear layer, a simplified mixed-layer temperature equation, and a statistical atmosphere based on dominant correlations between historical surface temperature and wind stress anomaly data. The adjoins method is used to fit the coupled model to the data over various six-month periods from late 1996 to early 1998 by optimally adjusting the initial state, model parameters, and basis functions of the statistical atmosphere. On average, the coupled model can be fitted to the data to approximately within the data and representation errors (5 cm, 0.5 C, and 10 sq m/sq m for sea level, surface temperature, and pseudo wind stress anomalies, respectively). The estimated fields resemble observed spatio-temporal structure reasonably well. Hindcasts/forecasts of the 1997/1998 El Nino initialized from forced estimated ocean states and parameters are much more realistic than those simply initialized from ocean states (see figure below). In particular, the ability of the model to produce significant warming beyond the initial state is dramatically improved. Parameter estimation, which compensates for some model errors, is found to be important to obtaining better fits of the model to data and to improving forecasts.

  11. Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Loss of Refractory Marine Dissolved Organic Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieber, D. J.; Keene, W. C.; Frossard, A. A.; Long, M. S.; Russell, L. M.; Maben, J. R.; Kinsey, J. D.; Tyssebotn, I. M.; Quinn, P.; Bates, T. S.

    2013-12-01

    Marine aerosol produced in the oceans from bursting bubbles and breaking waves is number dominated by submicron aerosol that are highly enriched in marine organic matter relative to seawater. Recent studies suggest that these organic-rich, submicron aerosol have a major impact on tropospheric chemistry and climate. It has been assumed this marine-derived aerosol organic matter is of recent origin stemming from biological activity in the photic zone. However, we deployed a marine aerosol generator on a recent cruise in the Sargasso Sea with seawater collected from 2500 m and showed that the aerosol generated from this seawater was enriched with organic matter to the same level as observed in surface Sargasso seawater, implying that the marine organic matter flux from the oceans into atmospheric aerosol is partly due to marine organic matter not of recent origin. We propose that marine aerosol production and subsequent physical and photochemical atmospheric evolution is the main process whereby old, refractory organic matter is removed from the oceans, thereby closing the carbon budget in the oceans and solving a long-standing conundrum regarding the removal mechanism for this organic matter in the sea. The implications of this study for couplings in the ocean-atmosphere cycling of organic matter will be discussed.

  12. Simulation of ENSO with a global atmospheric GCM coupled to a high-resolution, tropical Pacific ocean GCM

    SciTech Connect

    Philander, S.G.H.; Pacanowski, R.C.; Lau, N.C.; Nath, M.J. )

    1992-04-01

    A global atmospheric general circulation model (GCM) coupled to an oceanic GCM that is dynamically active only in the tropical Pacific simulates variability over a broad spectrum of frequencies. Of special interest is the simulation of a realistically irregular Southern Oscillation between warm El Nino and cold La Nino states with time scale of 5 years. The spatial structure is different in the eastern and western halves of the ocean basin. Sea surface temperature changes have their largest amplitude in the central and eastern tropical Pacific, but the low-frequency zonal wind fluctuations are displaced westward and are large over the western half of the basin. During El Nino the associated curl contributes to a pair of pronounced minima in thermocline depth, symmetrically about the equator in the west. In the east the deepening of the thermodine in response to the winds in the west has an approximate Gaussian shape centered on the equator. The low-frequency sea surface temperature and zonal wind anomalies wax and wane practically in place and in phase without significant zonal phase propagation. Thermocline depth variations have phase propagation, a property of the oceanic response to the quasi-periodic winds that force currents and excite a host of waves with periods near 5 years, This indicates that the ocean-atmosphere interactions that cause El Nino to develop at a certain time are countered and reversed by the delayed response of the ocean to earlier winds. Kelvin and Rossby waves cannot be identified in the low-frequency fluctuations of this model, but they are energetic at relatively short periods and are of vital importance to a quasi-resonant oceanic mode with a period near 7 months that is excited in the model. The similarities and differences between the results of this simulation and those with other models are discussed.

  13. Indian Ocean and Indian summer monsoon: relationships without ENSO in ocean-atmosphere coupled simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crétat, Julien; Terray, Pascal; Masson, Sébastien; Sooraj, K. P.; Roxy, Mathew Koll

    2016-10-01

    The relationship between the Indian Ocean and the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) and their respective influence over the Indo-Western North Pacific (WNP) region are examined in the absence of El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) in two partially decoupled global experiments. ENSO is removed by nudging the tropical Pacific simulated sea surface temperature (SST) toward SST climatology from either observations or a fully coupled control run. The control reasonably captures the observed relationships between ENSO, ISM and the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD). Despite weaker amplitude, IODs do exist in the absence of ENSO and are triggered by a boreal spring ocean-atmosphere coupled mode over the South-East Indian Ocean similar to that found in the presence of ENSO. These pure IODs significantly affect the tropical Indian Ocean throughout boreal summer, inducing a significant modulation of both the local Walker and Hadley cells. This meridional circulation is masked in the presence of ENSO. However, these pure IODs do not significantly influence the Indian subcontinent rainfall despite overestimated SST variability in the eastern equatorial Indian Ocean compared to observations. On the other hand, they promote a late summer cross-equatorial quadrupole rainfall pattern linking the tropical Indian Ocean with the WNP, inducing important zonal shifts of the Walker circulation despite the absence of ENSO. Surprisingly, the interannual ISM rainfall variability is barely modified and the Indian Ocean does not force the monsoon circulation when ENSO is removed. On the contrary, the monsoon circulation significantly forces the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal SSTs, while its connection with the western tropical Indian Ocean is clearly driven by ENSO in our numerical framework. Convection and diabatic heating associated with above-normal ISM induce a strong response over the WNP, even in the absence of ENSO, favoring moisture convergence over India.

  14. Dynamics and predictability of a low-order wind-driven ocean-atmosphere coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannitsem, Stéphane

    2014-04-01

    The dynamics of a low-order coupled wind-driven ocean-atmosphere system is investigated with emphasis on its predictability properties. The low-order coupled deterministic system is composed of a baroclinic atmosphere for which 12 dominant dynamical modes are only retained (Charney and Straus in J Atmos Sci 37:1157-1176, 1980) and a wind-driven, quasi-geostrophic and reduced-gravity shallow ocean whose field is truncated to four dominant modes able to reproduce the large scale oceanic gyres (Pierini in J Phys Oceanogr 41:1585-1604, 2011). The two models are coupled through mechanical forcings only. The analysis of its dynamics reveals first that under aperiodic atmospheric forcings only dominant single gyres (clockwise or counterclockwise) appear, while for periodic atmospheric solutions the double gyres emerge. In the present model domain setting context, this feature is related to the level of truncation of the atmospheric fields, as indicated by a preliminary analysis of the impact of higher wavenumber ("synoptic" scale) modes on the development of oceanic gyres. In the latter case, double gyres appear in the presence of a chaotic atmosphere. Second the dynamical quantities characterizing the short-term predictability (Lyapunov exponents, Lyapunov dimension, Kolmogorov-Sinaï (KS) entropy) displays a complex dependence as a function of the key parameters of the system, namely the coupling strength and the external thermal forcing. In particular, the KS-entropy is increasing as a function of the coupling in most of the experiments, implying an increase of the rate of loss of information about the localization of the system on its attractor. Finally the dynamics of the error is explored and indicates, in particular, a rich variety of short term behaviors of the error in the atmosphere depending on the (relative) amplitude of the initial error affecting the ocean, from polynomial ( at 2 + bt 3 + ct 4) up to exponential-like evolutions. These features are explained

  15. Ocean-atmosphere dynamics during Hurricane Ida and Nor'Ida: An application of the coupled ocean-atmosphere-wave-sediment transport (COAWST) modeling system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olabarrieta, M.; Warner, J.C.; Armstrong, B.; Zambon, J.B.; He, R.

    2012-01-01

    The coupled ocean-atmosphere-wave-sediment transport (COAWST) modeling system was used to investigate atmosphere-ocean-wave interactions in November 2009 during Hurricane Ida and its subsequent evolution to Nor'Ida, which was one of the most costly storm systems of the past two decades. One interesting aspect of this event is that it included two unique atmospheric extreme conditions, a hurricane and a nor'easter storm, which developed in regions with different oceanographic characteristics. Our modeled results were compared with several data sources, including GOES satellite infrared data, JASON-1 and JASON-2 altimeter data, CODAR measurements, and wave and tidal information from the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) and the National Tidal Database. By performing a series of numerical runs, we were able to isolate the effect of the interaction terms between the atmosphere (modeled with Weather Research and Forecasting, the WRF model), the ocean (modeled with Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS)), and the wave propagation and generation model (modeled with Simulating Waves Nearshore (SWAN)). Special attention was given to the role of the ocean surface roughness. Three different ocean roughness closure models were analyzed: DGHQ (which is based on wave age), TY2001 (which is based on wave steepness), and OOST (which considers both the effects of wave age and steepness). Including the ocean roughness in the atmospheric module improved the wind intensity estimation and therefore also the wind waves, surface currents, and storm surge amplitude. For example, during the passage of Hurricane Ida through the Gulf of Mexico, the wind speeds were reduced due to wave-induced ocean roughness, resulting in better agreement with the measured winds. During Nor'Ida, including the wave-induced surface roughness changed the form and dimension of the main low pressure cell, affecting the intensity and direction of the winds. The combined wave age- and wave steepness

  16. Parallel Computation of Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave Coupled Storm Surge Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Yamashita, T.

    2003-12-01

    Ocean-atmosphere interactions are very important in the formation and development of tropical storms. These interactions are dominant in exchanging heat, momentum, and moisture fluxes. Heat flux is usually computed using a bulk equation. In this equation air-sea interface supplies heat energy to the atmosphere and to the storm. Dynamical interaction is most often one way in which it is the atmosphere that drives the ocean. The winds transfer momentum to both ocean surface waves and ocean current. The wind wave makes an important role in the exchange of the quantities of motion, heat and a substance between the atmosphere and the ocean. Storm surges can be considered as the phenomena of mean sea-level changes, which are the result of the frictional stresses of strong winds blowing toward the land and causing the set level and the low atmospheric pressure at the centre of the cyclone can additionally raise the sea level. In addition to the rise in water level itself, another wave factor must be considered. A rise of mean sea level due to white-cap wave dissipation should be considered. In bounded bodies of water, such as small seas, wind driven sea level set up is much serious than inverted barometer effects, in which the effects of wind waves on wind-driven current play an important role. It is necessary to develop the coupled system of the full spectral third-generation wind-wave model (WAM or WAVEWATCH III), the meso-scale atmosphere model (MM5) and the coastal ocean model (POM) for simulating these physical interactions. As the component of coupled system is so heavy for personal usage, the parallel computing system should be developed. In this study, first, we developed the coupling system of the atmosphere model, ocean wave model and the coastal ocean model, in the Beowulf System, for the simulation of the storm surge. It was applied to the storm surge simulation caused by Typhoon Bart (T9918) in the Yatsushiro Sea. The atmosphere model and the ocean model have

  17. An ENSO prediction approach based on ocean conditions and ocean-atmosphere coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Yu-heng; Hu, Zeng-Zhen; Ding, Ruiqiang; Chen, Han-ching

    2017-03-01

    A simple statistical model for the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) prediction is derived based on the evolution of the ocean heat condition and the oceanic Kelvin wave propagation associated with westerly wind events (WWEs) and easterly wind surges (EWSs) in the tropical Pacific. The multivariate linear regression model solely relies on the pentad thermocline depth anomaly evolution in 25 days along with the zonal surface wind modulation. It successfully hindcasts all ENSOs except for the 2000/01 La Niña, using the pentad (or monthly) mean tropical atmosphere ocean array data since 1994 with an averaged skill (measured by anomaly correlation) of 0.62 (or 0.67) with a 6-month lead. The exception is mainly due to the long-lasting cold sea surface temperature anomalies in the subtropics resulting from the strong 1998/99 La Niña, even though the tropical warm water volume (WWV) had rebounded and turned phases after 2000. We also note that the hindcast skill is comparable using pentad or monthly mean NCEP global ocean data assimilation system data for the same time period. The hindcast skill of the proposed statistical model is better than that based on the WWV index in terms of the monthly correlation, normalized RMSEs and ENSO occurrences, which suggest that including the evolution of the subsurface ocean temperature anomaly and the WWEs/EWSs in the central tropical Pacific can enhance the ability to predict ENSO. The hindcast skill is also comparable to the predictions using other dynamical and statistical models, indicating that these processes are the keys to ENSO development. The dynamics behind the statistical model are consistent with the physical processes of ENSO development as follows: the tropical WWV resulting from the interannually-varying meridional subtropical cell transport provides a sufficient heat source. When the seasonal phase lock of ocean-atmosphere coupling triggers the positive (negative) zonal wind anomaly in boreal summer and fall, an

  18. A study on air-sea interaction on the simulated seasonal climate in an ocean-atmosphere coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, Suryun; Hong, Song-You; Park, Suhee

    2014-03-01

    This study investigates the effects of air-sea interaction upon simulated tropical climatology, focusing on the boreal summer mean precipitation and the embedded intra-seasonal oscillation (ISO) signal. Both the daily coupling of ocean-atmosphere and the diurnal variation of sea surface temperature (SST) at every time step by accounting for the ocean mixed layer and surface-energy budget at the ocean surface are considered. The ocean-atmosphere coupled model component of the global/regional integrated model system has been utilized. Results from the coupled model show better precipitation climatology than those from the atmosphere-only model, through the inclusion of SST-cloudiness-precipitation feedback in the coupled system. Cooling the ocean surface in the coupled model is mainly responsible for the improved precipitation climatology, whereas neither the coupling itself nor the diurnal variation in the SST influences the simulated climatology. However, the inclusion of the diurnal cycle in the SST shows a distinct improvement of the simulated ISO signal, by either decreasing or increasing the magnitude of spectral powers, as compared to the simulation results that exclude the diurnal variation of the SST in coupled models.

  19. Modes of North Atlantic Decadal Variability in the ECHAM1/LSG Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere General Circulation Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorita, Eduardo; Frankignoul, Claude

    1997-02-01

    The climate variability in the North Atlantic sector is investigated in a 325-yr integration of the ECHAM1/ LSG coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model. At the interannual timescale, the coupled model behaves realistically and sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies arise as a response of the oceanic surface layer to the stochastic forcing by the atmosphere, with the heat exchanges both generating and damping the SST anomalies. In the ocean interior, the temperature spectra are red up to a period of about 20 years, and substantial decadal fluctuations are found in the upper kilometer or so of the water column. Using extended empirical orthogonal function analysis, two distinct quasi-oscillatory modes of ocean-atmosphere variability are identified, with dominant periods of about 20 and 10 years, respectively. The oceanic changes in both modes reflect the direct forcing by the atmosphere through anomalous air-sea fluxes and Ekman pumping, which after some delay affects the intensity of the subtropical and subpolar gyres. The SST is also strongly modulated by the gyre currents. In the thermocline, the temperature and salinity fluctuations are in phase, as if caused by thermocline displacements, and they have no apparent connection with the thermohaline circulation. The 20-yr mode is the most energetic one; it is easily seen in the thermocline and can be found in SST data, but it is not detected in the atmosphere alone. As there is no evidence of positive ocean-atmosphere feedback, the 20-yr mode primarily reflects the passive response of the ocean to atmospheric fluctuations, which may be in part associated with climate anomalies appearing a few years earlier in the North Pacific. The 10-yr mode is more surface trapped in the ocean. Although the mode is most easily seen in the temperature variations of the upper few hundred meters of the ocean, it is also detected in the atmosphere alone and thus appears to be a coupled ocean-atmosphere mode. In both modes

  20. Numerical simulation of Typhoon Muifa (2011) using a Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) modeling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Na; Ling, Tiejun; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Yunfei; Gao, Zhiyi; Wang, Yi

    2015-04-01

    The newly developed Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) Modeling System is applied to investigate typhoon-ocean interactions in this study. The COAWST modeling system represents the state-of-the-art numerical simulation technique comprising several coupled models to study coastal and environmental processes. The modeling system is applied to simulate Typhoon Muifa (2011), which strengthened from a tropical storm to a super typhoon in the Northwestern Pacific, to explore the heat fluxes exchanged among the processes simulated using the atmosphere model WRF, ocean model ROMS and wave model SWAN. These three models adopted the same horizontal grid. Three numerical experiments with different coupling configurations are performed in order to investigate the impact of typhoon-ocean interaction on the intensity and ocean response to typhoon. The simulated typhoon tracks and intensities agree with observations. Comparisons of the simulated variables with available atmospheric and oceanic observations show the good performance of using the coupled modeling system for simulating the ocean and atmosphere processes during a typhoon event. The fully coupled simulation that includes a ocean model identifies a decreased SST as a result of the typhoon-forced entrainment. Typhoon intensity and wind speed are reduced due to the decrease of the sea surface temperature when using a coupled ocean model. The experiments with ocean coupled to atmosphere also results in decreased sea surface heat flux and air temperature. The heat flux decreases by about 29% compared to the WRF only case. The reduction of the energy induced by SST decreases, resulting in weakening of the typhoon. Coupling of the waves to the atmosphere and ocean model induces a slight increase of SST in the typhoon center area with the ocean-atmosphere interaction increased as a result of wave feedback to atmosphere.

  1. Role of the Ocean-Atmosphere interactions for the Atlantic Multidecadal Variability in an idealized coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamet, Quentin; Huck, Thierry; de Verdière, Alain Colin; Arzel, Olivier; Campin, Jean-Michel

    2015-04-01

    The role of the ocean-atmosphere interactions in the multidecadal variability of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) is investigated in an idealized coupled configuration of the MIT General Circulation Model. The flat-bottom ocean, composed of an Atlantic-like small basin, a Pacific-like large basin, and an unblocked Antarctic-like circumpolar channel, is coupled to a global atmospheric model (SPEEDY). In order to better represent the atmospheric dynamics and its interactions with the ocean, three set-ups, with horizontal resolution of about 4°, 2° and 1° (at the equator) in both the ocean and atmosphere models, are compared. They show a linearly increasing North Atlantic Oscillation-like variability. At all resolutions, the AMOC undergoes a spontaneous variability on multidecadal time scales between 30-40 yr, with an additional higher frequency in the highest resolution set-up. The AMOC variability responds to temperature anomalies along the western boundary through the thermal wind relationship. These temperature anomalies result from the propagation of large-scale baroclinic Rossby waves across the small basin. The unstable region responsible for the growth of Rossby waves through baroclinic instability, diagnosed using a temperature variance budget, shifts from the eastern boundary at coarse resolution (4°) to the western boundary at higher resolution (2° and 1°). An earlier study, performed with the same coarse resolution set-up (4°), has shown that the AMOC does not participate to the growth of Rossby waves, but passively reacts to these waves. The AMOC being mainly connected to the western boundary dynamics, its role in setting large scale baroclinic Rossby waves might be different between the coarse resolution set-ups (4°) and the higher resolution set-ups (2° and 1°). The ocean-atmosphere interactions are strongly enhanced in the highest resolution set-up (1°), with the development of a significant correlation of about 0

  2. Ocean-Atmosphere coupling and CO2 exchanges in the Southwestern Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, R.; Pezzi, L. P.; Carmargo, R.; Acevedo, O. C.

    2013-05-01

    The establishment of the INTERCONF Program (Air-Sea Interactions at the Brazil-Malvinas Confluence Zone) in 2004 and subsequent developing of projects such as the SIMTECO (Integrated System for Monitoring the Weather, the Climate and the Ocean in the South of Brazil) and ACEx (Atlantic Ocean Carbon Experiment) from 2010 in Brazil brought to light the importance of understanding the impact of the Southwestern Atlantic Ocean's mesoscale variability on the modulation of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) at the synoptic scale. Recent results of all these projects showed that the ABL modulation, as well as the ocean-atmosphere turbulent (heat, momentum and CO2) fluxes are dependent on the behavior of the ocean's surface thermal gradients, especially those found in the Brazil-Malvinas Confluence Zone and at the southern coast off Brazil during the winter. As expected, when atmospheric large scale systems are not present over the study area, stronger heat fluxes are found over regions of higher sea surface temperature (SST) including over warm core eddies shed towards the subantarctic (cold) environment. In the coastal region off southern Brazil, the wintertime propagation of the Brazilian Costal Current (La Plata Plume) acts rising the chlorophyll concentration over the continental shelf as well as diminishing considerably the SST - hence producing prominent across-shore SST gradients towards the offshore region dominated by the Brazil Current waters. Owing to that, heat fluxes are directed towards the ocean in coastal waters that are also responsible for the carbon sinking off Brazil in wintertime. All this description is dependent on the synoptic atmospheric cycle and strongly perturbed when transient systems (cold fronts, subtropical cyclones) are present in the area. However, remote sensing data used here suggest that the average condition of the atmosphere directly responding to the ocean's mesoscale variability appears to imprint a signal that extends from the

  3. Finding the driver of local ocean-atmosphere coupling in reanalyses and CMIP5 climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Barradas, Alfredo; Kalnay, Eugenia; Peña, Malaquías; BozorgMagham, Amir E.; Motesharrei, Safa

    2016-06-01

    Identification of the driver of coupled anomalies in the climate system is of great importance for a better understanding of the system and for its use in predictive efforts with climate models. The present analysis examines the robustness of a physical method proposed three decades ago to identify coupled anomalies as of atmospheric or oceanic origin by analyzing 850 mb vorticity and sea surface temperature anomalies. The method is then used as a metric to assess the coupling in climate simulations and a 30-year hindcast from models of the CMIP5 project. Analysis of the frequency of coupled anomalies exceeding one standard deviation from uncoupled NCEP/NCAR and ERA-Interim and partially coupled CFSR reanalyses shows robustness in the main results: anomalies of oceanic origin arise inside the deep tropics and those of atmospheric origin outside of the tropics. Coupled anomalies occupy similar regions in the global oceans independently of the spatiotemporal resolution. Exclusion of phenomena like ENSO, NAO, or AMO has regional effects on the distribution and origin of coupled anomalies; the absence of ENSO decreases anomalies of oceanic origin and favors those of atmospheric origin. Coupled model simulations in general agree with the distribution of anomalies of atmospheric and oceanic origin from reanalyses. However, the lack of the feedback from the atmosphere to the ocean in the AMIP simulations reduces substantially the number of coupled anomalies of atmospheric origin and artificially increases it in the tropics while the number of those of oceanic origin outside the tropics is also augmented. Analysis of a single available 30-year hindcast surprisingly indicates that coupled anomalies are more similar to AMIP than to coupled simulations. Differences in the frequency of coupled anomalies between the AMIP simulations and the uncoupled reanalyses, and similarities between the uncoupled and partially coupled reanalyses, support the notion that the nature of the

  4. Thirty-two-year ocean-atmosphere coupled downscaling of global reanalysis over the Intra-American Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haiqin; Misra, Vasubandhu

    2014-11-01

    This study examines the oceanic and atmospheric variability over the Intra-American Seas (IAS) from a 32-year integration of a 15-km coupled regional climate model consisting of the Regional Spectral Model (RSM) for the atmosphere and the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) for the ocean. It is forced at the lateral boundaries by National Centers for Environmental Prediction-Department of Energy (NCEP-DOE R-2) atmospheric global reanalysis and Simplified Ocean Data Assimilation global oceanic reanalysis. This coupled downscaling integration is a free run without any heat flux correction and is referred as the Regional Ocean-Atmosphere coupled downscaling of global Reanalysis over the Intra-American Seas (ROARS). The paper examines the fidelity of ROARS with respect to independent observations that are both satellite based and in situ. In order to provide a perspective on the fidelity of the ROARS simulation, we also compare it with the Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR), a modern global ocean-atmosphere reanalysis product. Our analysis reveals that ROARS exhibits reasonable climatology and interannual variability over the IAS region, with climatological SST errors less than 1 °C except along the coastlines. The anomaly correlation of the monthly SST and precipitation anomalies in ROARS are well over 0.5 over the Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean Sea, Western Atlantic and Eastern Pacific Oceans. A highlight of the ROARS simulation is its resolution of the loop current and the episodic eddy events off of it. This is rather poorly simulated in the CFSR. This is also reflected in the simulated, albeit, higher variance of the sea surface height in ROARS and the lack of any variability in the sea surface height of the CFSR over the IAS. However the anomaly correlations of the monthly heat content anomalies of ROARS are comparatively lower, especially over the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea. This is a result of ROARS exhibiting a bias of underestimation

  5. Surface Wind and Upper-Ocean Variability Associated with the Madden-Julian Oscillation Simulated by the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    Madden- Julian Oscillation Simulated by the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System 0601153N 73-4347-22-5 Toshiaki Shinoda, Tommy G...unlimited. Simulation of surface wind and upper-ocean variability associated with the Madden - Julian oscillation (MJO) by a regional coupled model, the...based on the comparison with the spatial variation of surface forcing fields. Indian Ocean, diurnal effects, Madden- Julian oscillation, coupled

  6. Investigation of hurricane Ivan using the coupled ocean-atmosphere-wave-sediment transport (COAWST) model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zambon, Joseph B.; He, Ruoying; Warner, John C.

    2014-01-01

    The coupled ocean–atmosphere–wave–sediment transport (COAWST) model is used to hindcast Hurricane Ivan (2004), an extremely intense tropical cyclone (TC) translating through the Gulf of Mexico. Sensitivity experiments with increasing complexity in ocean–atmosphere–wave coupled exchange processes are performed to assess the impacts of coupling on the predictions of the atmosphere, ocean, and wave environments during the occurrence of a TC. Modest improvement in track but significant improvement in intensity are found when using the fully atmosphere–ocean-wave coupled configuration versus uncoupled (e.g., standalone atmosphere, ocean, or wave) model simulations. Surface wave fields generated in the fully coupled configuration also demonstrates good agreement with in situ buoy measurements. Coupled and uncoupled model-simulated sea surface temperature (SST) fields are compared with both in situ and remote observations. Detailed heat budget analysis reveals that the mixed layer temperature cooling in the deep ocean (on the shelf) is caused primarily by advection (equally by advection and diffusion).

  7. A zonally averaged, coupled ocean-atmosphere model for paleoclimate studies

    SciTech Connect

    Stocker, T.F.; Mysak, L.A. ); Wright, D.G. )

    1992-08-01

    A zonally averaged ocean model for the thermohaline circulation is coupled to a zonally averaged, one-layer energy balance model of the atmosphere to form a climate model for paleoclimate studies. The emphasis of the coupled model is on the ocean's thermohaline circulation in the Pacific, Atlantic, and Indian oceans. Under present-day conditions, the global conveyor belt is simulated. Latitude-depth structures of modeled temperature and salinity fields, as well as depth-integrated meridional transports of heat and freshwater, compare well with estimates from observations when wind stress is included. Ekman cells are present in the upper ocean and contribute substantially to the meridional fluxes at low latitudes.The atmospheric component of the coupled climate model consists of a classical balance model. When the two components are coupled after being spun up individually, the system remains steady. If intermittent convection is operating, the coupled model shows systematic deviations of the surface salinity, which may result in reversals of the thermohaline circulation. This climate drift can be inhibited by removing intermittent convection prior to coupling. The climate model is applied to investigate the effect of excess freshwater discharge into the North Atlantic, and the influence of the parameterization of precipitation is tested. The Atlantic thermohalinc flow is sensitive to anomalous freshwater input. Reversals of the deep circulation can occur in the Atlantic, leading to a state where deep water is formed only in the Southern Ocean. A feedback mechanism is identified that may also trigger the reversal of the Pacific thermobaline circulation yielding the inverse conveyor bell as an additional steady state. In total, four different stable equilibria of the coupled model were realized.

  8. On the dependence of hindcast skill on ocean thermodynamics in a coupled ocean-atmosphere model

    SciTech Connect

    Kleeman, R. )

    1993-11-01

    Three different mechanisms for the generation of ENSO SST anomalies within a simplified tropical Pacific Ocean model are examined: thermocline depth changes, Ekman-induced upwelling anomalies, and zonal advection changes. The effect of varying the relative influence of these terms on the realism of tropical pacific coupled models is analyzed. The principal tool used to assess such realism is hindcast skill, with forced ocean and oscillatory behavior also being examined. Of the mechanisms considered, thermocline perturbations are shown to be crucially important for high coupled-model hindcast skills. Furthermore, it is concluded that the realism of the model (as measured by hindcast skill) deteriorates markedly when the influence on SST of Ekman upwelling becomes greater than a small fraction of the thermocline influence. This provides strong evidence for the hypothesis that Ekman upwelling anomalies (which are essentially a local response to wind stress anomalies) have only a small influence on the creation of real world SST anomalies. The implications of this latter point for coupled models involving ocean general circulation models is briefly discussed. It is also demonstrated that western boundary reflections provide a vital role by means of a negative feedback in ensuring realistic performance. The hindcast skill (as measured by NINO3 anomaly correlation) demonstrated by a model involving only the thermocline mechanism can be tuned to exceed that of the benchmark Cane and Zebiak model for hindcast lags up to 7 months (from 7 to 12 months the model skills are roughly equal). 47 refs., 32 figs.

  9. Large-scale ocean-atmosphere interactions in a simplified coupled model of the midlatitude wintertime circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Arthur J.

    1992-01-01

    Midlatitude ocean-atmosphere interactions are studied in simulations from a simplified coupled model that includes synoptic-scale atmospheric variability, ocean current advection of SST, and air-sea heat exchange. Although theoretical dynamical ('identical twin') predictions using this model have shown that the SST anomalies in this model indeed influence the atmosphere, it is found here that standard cross correlation and empirical orthogonal function analyses of monthly mean model output yield the standard result, familiar from observational studies, that the atmosphere forces the ocean with little or no feedback. Therefore, these analyses are inconclusive and leave open the question of whether anomalous SST is influencing the atmosphere. In contrast, it is found that compositing strong warm events of model SST is a useful indicator of ocean forcing the atmosphere. Additional evidence is presented for oceanic influence on the atmosphere, namely, that ocean current advection appears to enhance the persistence of model SST anomalies through a feedback effect that is absent when only heat flux is allowed to influence SST anomaly evolution.

  10. Multiple-century response of a coupled ocean-atmosphere model to an increase of atmospheric carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Manabe, S.; Stouffer, R.J. )

    1994-01-01

    To speculate on the future change of climate over several centuries, three 500-year integrations of a coupled ocean-atmosphere model were performed. In addition, to the standard integration in which the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide remains unchanged, two integrations are conducted. In one integration, the CO[sub 2] concentration increases by 1% yr[sup [minus]1] (compounded) until it reaches four times the initial value at the 140th year and remains unchanged thereafter. In another integration, the CO[sub 2] concentration also increases at the rate of 1% yr[sup [minus]1] until it reaches twice the initial value of the 70th year and remains unchanged thereafter. One of the most notable features of the CO[sub 2]-quadrupoling integration is the gradual disappearance of thermohaline circulations in most of the model oceans during the first 250-year period, leaving behind wind-driven cells. For example, thermohaline circulation nearly vanished in the North Atlantic during the first 200 years of the integration. In the Weddell and Ross seas, thermohaline circulation becomes weaker and shallower, thereby reducing the rate of bottom water formation and weakening the northward flow of bottom water in the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. The weakening or near disappearance of thermohaline circulation described above is attributable mainly to the capping of the model oceans by relatively fresh water in high latitudes where the excess of precipitation over evaporation increases markedly due to the enhanced poleward moisture transport in the warmer model troposphere.

  11. CO/sub 2/-induced change in a coupled ocean-atmosphere model and its paleoclimatic implications

    SciTech Connect

    Manabe, S.; Bryan, K. Jr.

    1985-11-20

    The effect of large changes of atmospheric CO/sub 2/ was studied, using the coupled ocean-atmosphere model of Bryan et al. (1982), for derivation of six climatic equilibria (cases with 1/2 to 8 times the present CO/sub 2/ concentration). An increase of atmospheric CO/sub 2/ to the level of 8 times the normal concentration is accompanied by a decrease in the meridional gradient of surface air temperature (SAT) (the CO/sub 2/-induced increase of SAT is particularly large at high latitudes), with no changes in the intensity or the latitudinal placement of the atmospheric jet. The meridional density gradient of the ocean surface water changes little because of an increased in thermal expansion coefficient of seawater with increased temperature; thus, the intensity of thermohaline circulation does not diminish as expected. On the other hand, reduction of atmospheric CO/sub 2/ causes a dramatic change in the thermohaline circulation at half the normal CO/sub 2/ concentration, the sea water is held at the freezing point from pole down to 45 deg latitude because of the formation of sea ice.

  12. Double ITCZ in Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Models: From CMIP3 to CMIP5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Liu, Hailong; Zhang, Minghua

    2015-10-01

    Recent progress in reducing the double Intertropical Convergence Zone bias in coupled climate models is examined based on multimodel ensembles of historical climate simulations from Phase 3 and Phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP3 and CMIP5). Biases common to CMIP3 and CMIP5 models include spurious precipitation maximum in the southeastern Pacific, warmer sea surface temperature (SST), weaker easterly, and stronger meridional wind divergences away from the equator relative to observations. It is found that there is virtually no improvement in all these measures from the CMIP3 ensemble to the CMIP5 ensemble models. The five best models in the two ensembles as measured by the spatial correlations are also assessed. No progress can be identified in the subensembles of the five best models from CMIP3 to CMIP5 even though more models participated in CMIP5; the biases of excessive precipitation and overestimated SST in southeastern Pacific are even worse in the CMIP5 models.

  13. Investigating the effects of a summer storm on the North Sea stratification using a regional coupled ocean-atmosphere model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gronholz, Alexandra; Gräwe, Ulf; Paul, André; Schulz, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The influence of a summer storm event in 2007 on the North Sea and its effects on the ocean stratification are investigated using a regional coupled ocean (Regional Ocean Modeling System, ROMS)-atmosphere (Weather Research & Forecasting model, WRF) modeling system. An analysis of potential energy anomaly (PEA, Φ) and its temporal development reveals that the loss of stratification due to the storm event is dominated by vertical mixing in almost the entire North Sea. For specific regions, however, a considerable contribution of depth-mean straining is observed. Vertical mixing is highly correlated with wind induced surface stresses. However, peak mixing values are observed in combination with incoming flood currents. Depending on the phase between winds and tides, the loss of stratification differs strongly over the North Sea. To study the effects of interactive ocean-atmosphere exchange, a fully coupled simulation is compared with two uncoupled ones for the same vertical mixing parameters to identify the impact of spatial resolution as well as of SST feedback. While the resulting new mixed layer depth after the storm event in the uncoupled simulation with lower spatial and temporal resolution of the surface forcing data can still be located in the euphotic zone, the coupled simulation is capable to mix the entire water column and the vertical mixing in the uncoupled simulation with higher resolution of the surface forcing data is strongly amplified. These differences might have notable implications for ecosystem modeling since it could determine the development of new phytoplankton blooms after the storm and for sediment modeling in terms of sediment mobilization. An investigation of restratification after the extreme event illustrates the persistent effect of this summer storm.

  14. Investigating the effects of a summer storm on the North Sea stratification using a regional coupled ocean-atmosphere model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gronholz, Alexandra; Gräwe, Ulf; Paul, André; Schulz, Michael

    2017-02-01

    The influence of a summer storm event in 2007 on the North Sea and its effects on the ocean stratification are investigated using a regional coupled ocean (Regional Ocean Modeling System, ROMS)-atmosphere (Weather Research & Forecasting model, WRF) modeling system. An analysis of potential energy anomaly (PEA, Φ) and its temporal development reveals that the loss of stratification due to the storm event is dominated by vertical mixing in almost the entire North Sea. For specific regions, however, a considerable contribution of depth-mean straining is observed. Vertical mixing is highly correlated with wind induced surface stresses. However, peak mixing values are observed in combination with incoming flood currents. Depending on the phase between winds and tides, the loss of stratification differs strongly over the North Sea. To study the effects of interactive ocean-atmosphere exchange, a fully coupled simulation is compared with two uncoupled ones for the same vertical mixing parameters to identify the impact of spatial resolution as well as of SST feedback. While the resulting new mixed layer depth after the storm event in the uncoupled simulation with lower spatial and temporal resolution of the surface forcing data can still be located in the euphotic zone, the coupled simulation is capable to mix the entire water column and the vertical mixing in the uncoupled simulation with higher resolution of the surface forcing data is strongly amplified. These differences might have notable implications for ecosystem modeling since it could determine the development of new phytoplankton blooms after the storm and for sediment modeling in terms of sediment mobilization. An investigation of restratification after the extreme event illustrates the persistent effect of this summer storm.

  15. On the use of ocean-atmosphere-wave models during an extreme CAO event: the importance of being coupled

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carniel, Sandro; Barbariol, Francesco; Benetazzo, Alvise; Bonaldo, Davide; Falcieri, Francesco M.; Miglietta, Mario M.; Ricchi, Antonio; Sclavo, Mauro

    2015-04-01

    During winter 2012 an extreme meteorological event stroke the whole Europe and particularly its central-southern sector. A strong and persistent spit of cold air coming from Siberian region (a Cold Air Outbreak, CAO) insisted on northern Italy and the Adriatic sea basin, leading to decreases in the sea temperatures up to 6 °C in less than two weeks, ice formation on the Venice lagoon and an exceptional snow fall in the Apennine region. In the sea the CAO was associated to a significant episode of dense water formation (DWF), a crucial phenomenon that heavily impacts the whole Adriatic Sea (from the sinking of water masses and associated ventilation of the northernmost shelf, to the flow along the western coast, until the flushing of southern Adriatic open slope and submarine canyons, with associated sediment transport and bottom reshaping). The extent of the DWF event in the Northern Adriatic sub-basin was estimated by means of coastal observatories, ad hoc measurements and, until now, results from existing one-way coupled atmosphere-ocean models. These are characterized by no SST feedback from the ocean to the atmosphere, and therefore by turbulent heat fluxes that may heavily reflect a non-consistent ocean state. The study proposes an investigation of the 2012 CAO using a fully coupled, three components, ocean-atmosphere-wave system (COAWST). Results highlight that, although the energy interplays between air and sea do not seem to significantly impact the wind forecasts, when providing heat fluxes that are consistent with the ocean temperature we find modified heat fluxes and air sea temperatures figures. Moreover, the consistent description of thermal exchanges adopted in the fully coupled model can affect the basin circulation, the quantification of dense water produced mass, and the description of its migration pathways and rates of off-shelf descent.

  16. ENSO Simulation in Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Models: Are the Current Models Better?

    SciTech Connect

    AchutaRao, K; Sperber, K R

    2005-04-29

    Maintaining a multi-model database over a generation or more of model development provides an important framework for assessing model improvement. Using control integrations, we compare the simulation of the El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO), and its extratropical impact, in models developed for the 2007 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report with models developed in the late 1990's (the so-called Coupled Model Intercomparison Project-2 [CMIP2] models). The IPCC models tend to be more realistic in representing the frequency with which ENSO occurs, and they are better at locating enhanced temperature variability over the eastern Pacific Ocean. When compared with reanalyses, the IPCC models have larger pattern correlations of tropical surface air temperature than do the CMIP2 models during the boreal winter peak phase of El Nino. However, for sea-level pressure and precipitation rate anomalies, a clear separation in performance between the two vintages of models is not as apparent. The strongest improvement occurs for the modeling groups whose CMIP2 model tended to have the lowest pattern correlations with observations. This has been checked by subsampling the multi-century IPCC simulations in a manner to be consistent with the single 80-year time segment available from CMIP2. Our results suggest that multi-century integrations may be required to statistically assess model improvement of ENSO. The quality of the El Nino precipitation composite is directly related to the fidelity of the boreal winter precipitation climatology, highlighting the importance of reducing systematic model error. Over North America distinct improvement of El Nino forced boreal winter surface air temperature, sea-level pressure, and precipitation rate anomalies in the IPCC models occurs. This improvement, is directly proportional to the skill of the tropical El Nino forced precipitation anomalies.

  17. The sensitivity of the regional coupled ocean-atmosphere simulations over the Intra-Americas seas to the prescribed bathymetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Vasubandhu; Mishra, A.; Li, Haiqin

    2016-12-01

    This study examines the sensitivity of the coupled ocean-atmosphere climate of the Intra-Americas Seas (IAS; which includes the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea) and parts of the western tropical and sub-tropical Atlantic Ocean to the prescribed bathymetry in three independent multi-decadal, high-resolution (15 km grid interval), regional coupled ocean-atmosphere model (RCM) integrations centered over the IAS. All of these RCM integrations with different prescribed bathymetries are forced by identical global atmospheric and oceanic reanalysis at the lateral boundaries. It is observed that the model integration with a smoother and coarser bathymetry in the region (RCM-C) results in more widespread sea surface temperature (SST) bias across the IAS. We also note that the bias displayed by the RCM-C simulation is analogous to the bias in the IAS ocean circulation of some Coupled Model Intercomparison Project version 5 (CMIP5) models. The models with an intermediate bathymetry (RCM-I) and finest bathymetry (RCM-F) rectify the bias in ocean transport through the Yucatan Channel relative to RCM-C but display mixed results with respect to SST bias. The RCM-C integration uses a bathymetry with a shallower Yucatan Channel, which tends to produce unrealistically weak flow through the Yucatan Channel and a weak Loop Current. However, the stronger heat transport through the Yucatan Channel in RCM-F results in significant warming of the northwestern tropical Atlantic Ocean and associated weakening of the surface easterly atmospheric winds relative to the other RCM integrations. Due to the weaker surface wind-induced shelf currents, the area comprised of western Gulf of Mexico and southern Caribbean Sea have a severe cold SST bias over the IAS in RCM-F relative to either RCM-I or RCM-C. RCM-I on the other hand significantly warms the western Gulf of Mexico. RCM-I displays the least SST bias over the IAS and the ocean transport through the Yucatan Channel is most comparable to

  18. A regional ocean-atmosphere coupled model developed for CORDEX East Asia: assessment of Asian summer monsoon simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Liwei; Zhou, Tianjun

    2016-12-01

    In this study, a developed regional ocean-atmosphere coupled model FROALS was applied to the CORDEX East Asia domain. The performance of FROALS in the simulation of Asian summer monsoon during 1989-2010 was assessed using the metrics developed by the CLIVAR Asian-Australian Monsoon Panel Diagnostics Task Team. The results indicated that FROALS exhibited good performance in simulating Asian summer monsoon climatology. The simulated JJA mean SST biases were weaker than those of the CMIP5 multi-model ensemble mean (MMEM). The skill of FROALS approached that of CMIP5 MMEM in terms of the annual cycle of Asian summer monsoon. The simulated monsoon duration matched the observed counterpart well (with a spatial pattern correlation coefficient of 0.59). Some biases of CMIP5 MMEM were also found in FROALS, highlighting the importance of local forcing and model physics within the Asian monsoon domain. Corresponding to a strong East Asian summer monsoon, an anomalous anticyclone was found over western North Pacific in both observation and simulation. However, the simulated strength was weaker than the observed due to the responses to incorrect sea surface anomalies over the key regions. The model also accurately captured the spatial pattern of the intraseasonal variability variance and the extreme climate indices of Asian summer monsoons, although with larger amplitude. The results suggest that FROALS could be used as a dynamical downscaling tool nested within the global climate model with coarse resolution to develop high-resolution regional climate change projections over the CORDEX East Asia domain.

  19. Intrinsic Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Modes of the Asian Summer Monsoon: A Re-assessment of Monsoon-ENSO Relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, K.-M.; Wu, H. T.

    2000-01-01

    Using global rainfall and sea surface temperature (SST) data for the past two decades (1979-1998), we have investigated the intrinsic modes of Asian summer monsoon (ASM) and ENSO co-variability. Three recurring ASM rainfall-SST coupled modes were identified. The first is a basin scale mode that features SST and rainfall variability over the entire tropics (including the ASM region), identifiable with those occurring during El Nino or La Nina. This mode is further characterized by a pronounced biennial variation in ASM rainfall and SST associated with fluctuations of the anomalous Walker circulation that occur during El Nino/La Nina transitions. The second mode comprises mixed regional and basin-scale rainfall and SST signals, with pronounced intraseasonal and interannual variabilities. This mode features a SST pattern associated with a developing La Nina, with a pronounced low level anticyclone in the subtropics of the western Pacific off the coast of East Asia. The third mode depicts an east-west rainfall and SST dipole across the southern equatorial Indian Ocean, most likely stemming from coupled ocean-atmosphere processes within the ASM region. This mode also possesses a decadal time scale and a linear trend, which are not associated with El Nino/La Nina variability. Possible causes of year-to-year rainfall variability over the ASM and sub-regions have been evaluated from a reconstruction of the observed rainfall from singular eigenvectors of the coupled modes. It is found that while basin-scale SST can account for portions of ASM rainfall variability during ENSO events (up to 60% in 1998), regional processes can accounts up to 20-25% of the rainfall variability in typical non-ENSO years. Stronger monsoon-ENSO relationship tends to occur in the boreal summer immediately preceding a pronounced La Nina, i.e., 1998, 1988 and 1983. Based on these results, we discuss the possible impacts of the ASM on ENSO variability via the west Pacific anticyclone and articulate a

  20. A comparison of surface air temperature variability in three 1000-Yr. coupled ocean-atmosphere model integrations

    SciTech Connect

    Stouffer, R.J.; Hegerl, G.; Tett, S.

    2000-02-01

    This study compares the variability of surface air temperature in three long coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model integrations. It is shown that the annual mean climatology of the surface air temperatures (SAT) in all three models is realistic and the linear trends over the 1,000-yr integrations are small over most areas of the globe. Second, although there are notable differences among the models, the models' SAT variability is fairly realistic on annual to decadal timescales, both in terms of the geographical distribution and of the global mean values. A notable exception is the poor simulation of observed tropical Pacific variability. In the HadCM2 model, the tropical variability is overestimated, while in the GFDL and HAM3L models, it is underestimated. Also, the ENSO-related spectral peak in the globally averaged observed SAT differs from that in any of the models. The relatively low resolution required to integrate models for long time periods inhibits the successful simulation of the variability in this region. On timescales longer than a few decades, the largest variance in the models is generally located near sea ice margins in high latitudes, which are also regions of deep oceanic convection and variability related to variations in the thermohaline circulation. However, the exact geographical location of these maxima varies from model to model. The preferred patterns of interdecadal variability that are common to all three coupled models can be isolated by computing empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs) of all model data simultaneously using the common EOF technique. A comparison of the variance each model associated with these common EOF patterns shows that the models generally agree on the most prominent patterns of variability. However, the amplitudes of the dominant models of variability differ to some extent between the models and between the models and observations. For example, two of the models have a mode with relatively large

  1. Response of a coupled ocean-atmosphere model to increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide: Sensitivity to the rate of increase

    SciTech Connect

    Stouffer, R.J.

    1999-08-01

    The influence of differing rates of increase of the atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration on the climatic response is investigated using a coupled ocean-atmosphere model. Five transient integrations are performed each using a different constant exponential rate of CO{sub 2} increase ranging from 4% yr{sup {minus}1} to 0.25% yr{sup {minus}1}. By the time of CO{sub 2} doubling, the surface air temperature response in all the transient integrations is locally more than 50% and globally more than 35% of the equilibrium response. The land-sea contrast in the warming, which is evident in the equilibrium results, is larger in all the transient experiments. The land-sea difference in the response increases with the rate of increase in atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration. The thermohaline circulation (THC) weakens in response to increasing atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration in all the transient integrations, confirming earlier work. The results also indicate that the slower the rate of increase, the larger the weakening of the THC by the time of doubling. Two of the transient experiments are continued beyond the time of CO{sub 2} doubling with the CO{sub 2} concentration maintained at that level. The amount of weakening of the THC after the CO{sub 2} stops increasing is smaller in the experiment with the slower rate of CO{sub 2} increase, indicating that the coupled system has more time to adjust to the forcing when the rate of CO{sub 2} increase is slower. After a period of slow overturning, the THC gradually recovers and eventually regains the intensity found in the control integration, so that the equilibrium THC is very similar in the control and doubled CO{sub 2} integrations. Considering only the sea level changes due to the thermal expansion of seawater, the integration with the slowest rate of increase in CO{sub 2} concentration has the largest globally averaged sea level rise by the time of CO{sub 2} doubling. However, only a relatively small fraction of the

  2. Two Types of El Niño Events Simulated in the SNU Coupled GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, M.; Kang, I.; Kug, J.; Ham, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Recent studies have reported that there exist more than one type of El Niño. One is the cold tongue (CT) El Niño, which shows stronger sea surface temperature anomalies (SSTA) in the eastern Pacific, and the other is the warm pool (WP) El Niño, which features SSTA in the central Pacific. The WP El Niño is different from the CT El Niño, not only the action center but also developing and transition mechanisms. In addition, WP El Niño occurs more frequently in recent decades. Furthermore, Yeh et al. (2009) suggests that WP El Niño occurrence will increase in future climate under global warming . Given the importance of correct simulations and predictions of the two types of El Niño events, it is required to better understand mechanisms which control them in numerical models. The present study investigates the CT and WP El Niño events simulated by two different versions of the SNU coupled GCM (SNUCGCM). The SNUCGCM is an ocean-atmosphere coupled model which couples the SNU Atmospheric GCM (SNUAGCM) to the Modular Ocean Model ver. 2.2 (MOM 2.2) Ocean GCM developed at Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL). Two versions are control version (CNTL), second version (CTOK) includes the cumulus momentum transport parameterization and minimum entrainment rate. All two versions of the SNUCGCM used in this study reasonably simulate ENSO variability, with center of positive SSTA shifted slightly to the west compared to the observation. It is worthwhile to note that models simulate the major observed features of the WP El Niño distinguished from the CT El Niño. Furthermore, all versions of model simulate the occurrence of the CT El Niño more frequently than that of the WP El Niño as the observation. The CNTL shows interannual variability of SSTA over the tropical Pacific weaker than that in the CTOK, while the intensity of the WP El Niño event in the CNTL is stronger than that of the CTOK. In addition, the WP El Niño frequently occurs in the CNTL compared to

  3. Teleconnections of the Southern Oscillation in the tropical Atlantic sector in the OSU coupled upper ocean-atomosphere GCM

    SciTech Connect

    Hameed, S.; Meinster, A. ); Sperber, K.R. )

    1993-03-01

    The Oregon State University coupled upper ocean-atmosphere GCM has been shown to qualitatively simulate the Southern Oscillation. A composite analysis of the warm and cold events simulated in this 23-year integration has been performed. During the low phase of the Southern Oscillation, when warm anomalies occur in the eastern Pacific, the model simulates for the Atlantic region during March-May (1) a deficit of precipitation over the tropical South American continent, (2) Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico sea level pressure and sea surface temperature are in phase with the eastern Pacific anomalies, while those east of the Nordeste region are out of phase, and (3) northeast trade winds are anomalously weak and southwest trade winds are anomalously strong (as inferred from surface current anomalies). The anomalies in the oceanic processes are induced by perturbations in the atmospheric circulation over the Atlantic and are coupled to changes in the Walker circulation. During the high phase of the simulated Southern Oscillation, conditions in the atmosphere and ocean are essentially the reverse of the low phase. The model produces a response in the South American region during the opposing phases of the Southern Oscillation that is in general agreement with observations. The interannual variation of Nordeste rainfall is shown to be dominated by a few band-limited frequencies. These frequencies are found in the SST series of those regions of the Atlantic and Pacific oceans where strong correlations with Nordeste precipitation exist.

  4. Coupled ocean-atmosphere model system for studies of interannual-to-decadal climate variability over the North Pacific Basin and precipitation over the Southwestern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Chung-Chieng A.

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The ultimate objective of this research project is to make understanding and predicting regional climate easier. The long-term goals of this project are (1) to construct a coupled ocean-atmosphere model (COAM) system, (2) use it to explore the interannual-to-decadal climate variability over the North Pacific Basin, and (3) determine climate effects on the precipitation over the Southwestern United States. During this project life, three major tasks were completed: (1) Mesoscale ocean and atmospheric model; (2) global-coupled ocean and atmospheric modeling: completed the coupling of LANL POP global ocean model with NCAR CCM2+ global atmospheric model; and (3) global nested-grid ocean modeling: designed the boundary interface for the nested-grid ocean models.

  5. The impact of coastal phytoplankton blooms on ocean-atmosphere thermal energy exchange: Evidence from a two-way coupled numerical modeling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolliff, Jason K.; Smith, Travis A.; Barron, Charlie N.; deRada, Sergio; Anderson, Stephanie C.; Gould, Richard W.; Arnone, Robert A.

    2012-12-01

    A set of sensitivity experiments are performed with a two-way coupled and nested ocean-atmosphere forecasting system in order to deconvolve how dense phytoplankton stocks in a coastal embayment may impact thermal energy exchange processes. Monterey Bay simulations parameterizing solar shortwave transparency in the surface ocean as an invariant oligotrophic oceanic water type estimate consistently colder sea surface temperature (SST) than simulations utilizing more realistic, spatially varying shortwave attenuation terms based on satellite estimates of surface algal pigment concentration. These SST differences lead to an ∼88% increase in the cumulative turbulent thermal energy transfer from the ocean to the atmosphere over the three month simulation period. The result is a warmer simulated atmospheric boundary layer with respective local air temperature differences approaching ∼2°C. This study suggests that the retention of shortwave solar flux by ocean flora may directly impact even short-term forecasts of coastal meteorological variables.

  6. Impact of diurnal atmosphere-ocean coupling on tropical climate simulations using a coupled GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, Yoo-Geun; Kug, Jong-Seong; Kang, In-Sik; Jin, Fei-Fei; Timmermann, Axel

    2009-05-01

    The impacts of diurnal atmosphere-ocean (air-sea) coupling on tropical climate simulations are investigated using the SNU coupled GCM. To investigate the effect of the atmospheric and oceanic diurnal cycles on a climate simulation, a 1-day air-sea coupling interval experiment is compared to a 2-h coupling experiment. As previous studies have suggested, cold temperature biases over equatorial western Pacific regions are significantly reduced when diurnal air-sea coupling strategy is implemented. This warming is initiated by diurnal rectification and amplified further by the air-sea coupled feedbacks. In addition to its effect on the mean climatology, the diurnal coupling has also a distinctive impact on the amplitude of the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). It is demonstrated that a weakening of the ENSO magnitude is caused by reduced (increased) surface net heat fluxes into the ocean during El Nino (La Nina) events. Primarily, decreased (increased) incoming shortwave radiation during El Nino (La Nina) due to cloud shading is responsible for the net heat fluxes associated with ENSO.

  7. Simulation of medicanes over the Mediterranean Sea in a regional climate model ensemble: impact of ocean-atmosphere coupling and increased resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaertner, Miguel Ángel; González-Alemán, Juan Jesús; Romera, Raquel; Domínguez, Marta; Gil, Victoria; Sánchez, Enrique; Gallardo, Clemente; Miglietta, Mario Marcello; Walsh, Kevin J. E.; Sein, Dmitry V.; Somot, Samuel; Dell'Aquila, Alessandro; Teichmann, Claas; Ahrens, Bodo; Buonomo, Erasmo; Colette, Augustin; Bastin, Sophie; van Meijgaard, Erik; Nikulin, Grigory

    2016-11-01

    Medicanes are cyclones over the Mediterranean Sea having a tropical-like structure but a rather small size, that can produce significant damage due to the combination of intense winds and heavy precipitation. Future climate projections, performed generally with individual atmospheric climate models, indicate that the intensity of the medicanes could increase under climate change conditions. The availability of large ensembles of high resolution and ocean-atmosphere coupled regional climate model (RCM) simulations, performed in MedCORDEX and EURO-CORDEX projects, represents an opportunity to improve the assessment of the impact of climate change on medicanes. As a first step towards such an improved assessment, we analyze the ability of the RCMs used in these projects to reproduce the observed characteristics of medicanes, and the impact of increased resolution and air-sea coupling on their simulation. In these storms, air-sea interaction plays a fundamental role in their formation and intensification, a different mechanism from that of extra-tropical cyclones, where the baroclinic instability mechanism prevails. An observational database, based on satellite images combined with high resolution simulations (Miglietta et al. in Geophys Res Lett 40:2400-2405, 2013), is used as a reference for evaluating the simulations. In general, the simulated medicanes do not coincide on a case-by-case basis with the observed medicanes. However, observed medicanes with a high intensity and relatively long duration of tropical characteristics are better replicated in simulations. The observed spatial distribution of medicanes is generally well simulated, while the monthly distribution reveals the difficulty of simulating the medicanes that first appear in September after the summer minimum in occurrence. Increasing the horizontal resolution has a systematic and generally positive impact on the frequency of simulated medicanes, while the general underestimation of their intensity is

  8. Implementation of the vortex force formalism in the coupled ocean-atmosphere-wave-sediment transport (COAWST) modeling system for inner shelf and surf zone applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Nirnimesh; Voulgaris, George; Warner, John C.; Olabarrieta, Maitane

    The coupled ocean-atmosphere-wave-sediment transport modeling system (COAWST) enables simulations that integrate oceanic, atmospheric, wave and morphological processes in the coastal ocean. Within the modeling system, the three-dimensional ocean circulation module (ROMS) is coupled with the wave generation and propagation model (SWAN) to allow full integration of the effect of waves on circulation and vice versa. The existing wave-current coupling component utilizes a depth dependent radiation stress approach. In here we present a new approach that uses the vortex force formalism. The formulation adopted and the various parameterizations used in the model as well as their numerical implementation are presented in detail. The performance of the new system is examined through the presentation of four test cases. These include obliquely incident waves on a synthetic planar beach and a natural barred beach (DUCK' 94); normal incident waves on a nearshore barred morphology with rip channels; and wave-induced mean flows outside the surf zone at the Martha's Vineyard Coastal Observatory (MVCO). Model results from the planar beach case show good agreement with depth-averaged analytical solutions and with theoretical flow structures. Simulation results for the DUCK' 94 experiment agree closely with measured profiles of cross-shore and longshore velocity data from Garcez Faria et al. (1998, 2000). Diagnostic simulations showed that the nonlinear processes of wave roller generation and wave-induced mixing are important for the accurate simulation of surf zone flows. It is further recommended that a more realistic approach for determining the contribution of wave rollers and breaking induced turbulent mixing can be formulated using non-dimensional parameters which are functions of local wave parameters and the beach slope. Dominant terms in the cross-shore momentum balance are found to be the quasi-static pressure gradient and breaking acceleration. In the alongshore direction

  9. Comparison of a Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Model with and without Oceanic Eddy-Induced Advection. Part I: Ocean Spinup and Control Integrations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirst, Anthony C.; O'Farrell, Siobhan P.; Gordon, Hal B.

    2000-01-01

    The Gent and McWilliams (GM) parameterization for large-scale water transport caused by mesoscale oceanic eddies is introduced into the oceanic component of the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation global coupled ocean-atmosphere model. Parallel simulations with and without the GM scheme are performed to examine the effect of this parameterization on the model behavior for integrations lasting several centuries under conditions of constant atmospheric CO2. The solution of the version with GM shows several significant improvements over that of the earlier version. First, the generally beneficial effects of the GM scheme found previously in studies of stand-alone ocean models, including more realistic deep water properties, increased stratification, reduced high-latitude convection, elimination of fictitious horizontal diffusive heat transport, and more realistic surface fluxes in some regions, are all maintained during the coupled integration. These improvements are especially pronounced in the high-latitude Southern Ocean. Second, the magnitude of flux adjustment is reduced in the GM version, mainly because of smaller surface fluxes at high southern latitudes in the GM ocean spinup. Third, the GM version displays markedly reduced climate drift in comparison to the earlier version. Analysis in the present study verifies previous indications that changes in the pattern of convective heat flux are central to the drift in the earlier version, supporting the view that reduced convective behavior in the GM version contributes to the reduction in drift. Based on the satisfactory behavior of the GM model version, the GM coupled integration is continued for a full 1000 yr. Key aspects of the model behavior during this longer period are also presented. Interannual variability of surface air temperature in the two model versions is briefly examined using some simple measures of magnitude. The variability differs between the two versions regionally, but

  10. Roles of land surface albedo and horizontal resolution on the Indian summer monsoon biases in a coupled ocean-atmosphere tropical-channel model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samson, Guillaume; Masson, Sébastien; Durand, Fabien; Terray, Pascal; Berthet, Sarah; Jullien, Swen

    2017-03-01

    The Indian summer monsoon (ISM) simulated over the 1989-2009 period with a new 0.75° ocean-atmosphere coupled tropical-channel model extending from 45°S to 45°N is presented. The model biases are comparable to those commonly found in coupled global climate models (CGCMs): the Findlater jet is too weak, precipitations are underestimated over India while they are overestimated over the southwestern Indian Ocean, South-East Asia and the Maritime Continent. The ISM onset is delayed by several weeks, an error which is also very common in current CGCMs. We show that land surface temperature errors are a major source of the ISM low-level circulation and rainfall biases in our model: a cold bias over the Middle-East (ME) region weakens the Findlater jet while a warm bias over India strengthens the monsoon circulation over the southern Bay of Bengal. A surface radiative heat budget analysis reveals that the cold bias is due to an overestimated albedo in this desertic ME region. Two new simulations using a satellite-observed land albedo show a significant and robust improvement in terms of ISM circulation and precipitation. Furthermore, the ISM onset is shifted back by 1 month and becomes in phase with observations. Finally, a supplementary set of simulations at 0.25°-resolution confirms the robustness of our results and shows an additional reduction of the warm and dry bias over India. These findings highlight the strong sensitivity of the simulated ISM rainfall and its onset timing to the surface land heating pattern and amplitude, especially in the ME region. It also illustrates the key-role of land surface processes and horizontal resolution for improving the ISM representation, and more generally the monsoons, in current CGCMs.

  11. On the use of a coupled ocean-atmosphere-wave model during an extreme cold air outbreak over the Adriatic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricchi, Antonio; Miglietta, Mario Marcello; Falco, Pier Paolo; Benetazzo, Alvise; Bonaldo, Davide; Bergamasco, Andrea; Sclavo, Mauro; Carniel, Sandro

    2016-05-01

    An intense cold air outbreak affected the northern Adriatic Sea during winter 2012, determining an exceptional persistence of northeasterly Bora wind over the basin, which lasted for about 3 weeks. The cold air coming from the Balkans produced icing in the Venice lagoon and very intense snowfall in the Apennines Mountains and even near the coasts. In order to understand the importance and role of air-sea interactions for the evolution of the atmospheric fields, simulations with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model encompassing the whole period have been performed using sea surface temperature (SST) fields with an increasing level of complexity. Starting from a large-scale static sea temperature, the SST in the initial and boundary conditions has been progressively made more realistic. First, a more refined field, retrieved from a satellite radiometer was used; then, the same field was updated every 6 h. Next, the effect of including a simplified 1D ocean model reproducing the Oceanic Mixed Layer (OML) evolution has been tested. Finally, the potential improvements coming from a coupled description of atmosphere-ocean and atmosphere-ocean-waves interactions have been explored within the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave Sediment Transport (COAWST) modeling system. Results highlight that the energy exchange between air and sea does not significantly impact the atmospheric fields, in particular 10 m wind and 2 m temperature, also because of the geography of the basin and the predominance of synoptic-scale flow in intense events of Bora, in the northern Adriatic. However, when sensible and latent heat fluxes, which are dependent on atmospheric and oceanic variables, are analyzed, the more realistic representation of SST drastically improves the model performances.

  12. Using InterComm Enhanced ESMF to Couple TIME-GCM and CAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oehmke, R.; Wiltberger, M.; Sussman, A.; Wang, W.; Lo, N.

    2008-12-01

    This project uses the Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF) and InterComm to produce a TIME-GCM and CAM coupled model. This project will demonstrate a new ESMF capability for coupling models running as separate executables. This capability is based on the InterComm library. InterComm is a runtime library and programming model for coupling separately executing parallel (and sequential programs), and is being used as the component coupling technology within the NSF Center for Integrated Space Weather Modeling. ESMF interfaces to InterComm have been contributed to the ESMF code repository, making it easy to use InterComm to transfer data into and out of ESMF components such as CAM. This project's work to couple TIME-GCM and CAM is motivated by the goal of understanding the day-to-day behavior of the ionosphere-thermosphere system. Doing this requires unraveling the relative strengths of forcing mechanisms of the I-T system, including solar ultraviolet, extreme-ultraviolet, and X-ray fluxes, magnetospheric processes resulting in geomagnetic activity and auroral effects, and propagation of dynamical variations driven by lower atmosphere weather and middle atmosphere tides. The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Thermosphere - Ionosphere - Mesosphere -Electrodynamic - Global Circulation Model (TIME-GCM) is used to simulate this region depending on its forcing by the Sun. Recent work on improving the forcing of this model by including an improved description of the Extreme Ultra Violet (EUV) radiation has increased its ability to predict observed parameters such as satellite drag, but it does not capture all the observed hemispheric asymmetries. The implication is that forcing from the lower atmosphere, which is clearly asymmetric due to the location of continental masses, and is known to have very different dynamical features at solstices, is controlling the thermosphere. However, the TIME-GCM, with its 30-km lower boundary, does not contain these effects

  13. Transient response of the Hadley Centre coupled ocean-atmosphere model to increasing carbon dioxide. Part 3: Analysis of global-mean response using simple models

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, J.M.

    1995-03-01

    The roles of surface, atmospheric, and oceanic feedbacks in controlling the global-mean transient response of a coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model (AOGCM) to increasing carbon dioxide are investigated. The analysis employs a four-box energy balance model (EBM) and an oceanic box-diffusion model (BDM) both tuned to the simulated general circulation model response. The land-sea contrast in the surface warming is explained almost entirely by the shortwave radiative feedbacks associated with changes in cloud and surface albedo. The oceanic thermal inertia delays the response; however, the initial delay is enhanced by increases in Anarctic sea-ice cover, which substantially reduce the effective climate sensitivity of the model in the first half of the 75-year experiment. When driven by the observed anthropogenic greenhouse forcing from the pre-industrial period to present day, the energy balance model overestimates the warming observed over land. However, inclusion of the direct forcing due to anthropogenic tropospheric sulphate aerosol eliminates the land/sea contrast in the response at 1990, leaving the simulated warming over land slightly below the observed value, although the rapid warming observed during the 1980s is well reproduced. The vertical penetration of the oceanic response is small below 1000 m. Within the top 1000 m the effective diffusivities are substantially enhanced by reduced convection and thermohaline overturning, driven by increased precipitation minus evaporation at high latitudes. These changes in ocean heat transport become significant after year 30, whereupon the effective oceanic heat capacity increases substantially, although this increase is partially offset by the effect of changes in the sea-ice margin.

  14. A Coupled GCM-Cloud Resolving Modeling System to Study Precipitation Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Chern, Jiundar; Atlas, Robert; Peters-Lidard, Christa; Hou, Arthur; Lin, Xin

    2006-01-01

    Recent GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) model comparison projects have indicated that cloud resolving models (CRMs) agree with observations better than traditional single column models in simulating various types of clouds and cloud systems from different geographic locations. Current and future NASA satellite programs can provide cloud, precipitation, aerosol and other data at very fine spatial and temporal scales. It requires a coupled global circulation model (GCM) and cloud-scale model (termed a super-parameterization or multi-scale modeling framework, MMF) to use these satellite data to improve the understanding of the physical processes that are responsible for the variation in global and regional climate and hydrological systems. The use of a GCM will enable global coverage and the use of a CRM will allow for better and more sophisticated physical parameterization. NASA Satellite and field campaign cloud related data sets can provide initial conditions as well as validation for both the MMF and CRMs. Also we have implemented a Land Information System (LIS that includes the CLM and NOAH land surface models into the MMF. The Goddard MMF is based on the 2D Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model and the Goddard finite volume general circulation model (fvGCM) This modeling system has been applied and tested its performance for two different climate scenarios, El Nino (1998) and La Nina (1999). The coupled new modeling system produced more realistic propagation and intensity of tropical rainfall systems and intraseasonal oscillations, and diurnal variation of precipitation that are very difficult to forecast using even the state-of-the-art GCMs. In this talk I will present: (1) a brief review on GCE model and its applications on precipitation processes (both Microphysical and land processes) and (2) The Goddard MMF and the Major difference between two existing MMFs (CSU MMF and Goddard MMF) and preliminary results (the comparison with traditional GCMs).

  15. Coupled fvGCM-GCE Modeling System, TRMM Latent Heating and Cloud Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2004-01-01

    Recent GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) model comparison projects have indicated that cloud-resolving models (CRMs) agree with observations better than traditional single-column models in simulating various types of clouds and cloud systems from different geographic locations. Current and future NASA satellite programs can provide cloud, precipitation, aerosol and other data at very fine spatial and temporal scales. It requires a coupled global circulation model (GCM) and cloud-scale model (termed a super-parameterization or multi-scale modeling framework, MMF) to use these satellite data to imiprove the understanding of the physical processes that are responsible for the variation in global and regional climate and hydrological systems. The use of a GCM will enable global coverage, and the use of a CRM will allow for better and more sophisticated physical parameterization. NASA satellite and field campaign cloud related datasets can provide initial conditions as well as validation for both the MMF and CRMs. A seed fund is available at NASA Goddard to build a MMF based on the 2D GCE model and the Goddard finite volume general circulation model (fvGCM). A prototype MMF will be developed by the end of 2004 and production runs will be conducted at the beginning of 2005. The purpose of this proposal is to augment the current Goddard MMF and other cloud modeling activities. I this talk, I will present: (1) A summary of the second Cloud Modeling Workshop took place at NASA Goddard, (2) A summary of the third TRMM Latent Heating Workshop took place at Nara Japan, (3) A brief discussion on the Goddard research plan of using Weather Research Forecast (WRF) model, and (4) A brief discussion on the GCE model on developing a global cloud simulator.

  16. Coupled fvGCM-GCE Modeling System: TRMM Latent Heating and Cloud Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2005-01-01

    Recent GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) model comparison projects have indicated that cloud-resolving models (CRMs) agree with observations better than traditional single-column models in simulating various types of clouds and cloud systems from different geographic locations. Current and future NASA satellite programs can provide cloud, precipitation, aerosol and other data at very fine spatial and temporal scales. It requires a coupled global circulation model (GCM) and cloud-scale model (termed a super-parameterization or multi-scale modeling framework, MMF) to use these satellite data to improve the understanding of the physical processes that are responsible for the variation in global and regional climate and hydrological systems. The use of a GCM will enable global coverage, and the use of a CRM will allow for better and more sophisticated physical parameterization. NASA satellite and field campaign cloud related datasets can provide initial conditions as well as validation for both the MMF and CRMs. A seed fund is available at NASA Goddard to build a MMF based on the 2D GCE model and the Goddard finite volume general circulation model (fvGCM). A prototype MMF will be developed by the end of 2004 and production runs will be conducted at the beginning of 2005. The purpose of this proposal is to augment the current Goddard MMF and other cloud modeling activities. In this talk, I will present: (1) A summary of the second Cloud Modeling Workshop took place at NASA Goddard, (2) A summary of the third TRMM Latent Heating Workshop took place at Nara Japan, (3) A brief discussion on the GCE model on developing a global cloud simulator.

  17. Coupled fvGCM-GCE Modeling System, 3D Cloud-Resolving Model and Cloud Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2005-01-01

    Recent GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) model comparison projects have indicated that cloud-resolving models (CRMs) agree with observations better than traditional singlecolumn models in simulating various types of clouds and cloud systems from Merent geographic locations. Current and future NASA satellite programs can provide cloud, precipitation, aerosol and other data at very fine spatial and temporal scales. It requires a coupled global circulation model (GCM) and cloudscale model (termed a super-parameterization or multiscale modeling framework, MMF) to use these satellite data to improve the understanding of the physical processes that are responsible for the variation in global and regional climate and hydrological systems. The use of a GCM will enable global coverage, and the use of a CRM will allow for better and more sophisticated physical parameteridon NASA satellite and field campaign cloud related datasets can provide initial conditions as well as validation for both the MMF and CRMs. A seed fund is available at NASA Goddard to build a MMF based on the 2D Goddard cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model and the Goddard finite volume general circulation model (fvGCM). A prototype MMF in being developed and production nms will be conducted at the beginning of 2005. In this talk, I will present: (1) A brief review on GCE model and its applications on precipitation processes, (2) The Goddard MMF and the major difference between two existing MMFs (CSU MMF and Goddard MMF), (3) A cloud library generated by Goddard MMF, and 3D GCE model, and (4) A brief discussion on the GCE model on developing a global cloud simulator.

  18. Coupled fvGCM-GCE Modeling System, 3D Cloud-Resolving Model and Cloud Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2005-01-01

    Recent GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) model comparison projects have indicated that cloud- resolving models (CRMs) agree with observations better than traditional single-column models in simulating various types of clouds and cloud systems from different geographic locations. Current and future NASA satellite programs can provide cloud, precipitation, aerosol and other data at very fine spatial and temporal scales. It requires a coupled global circulation model (GCM) and cloud-scale model (termed a super-parameterization or multi-scale modeling framework, MMF) to use these satellite data to improve the understanding of the physical processes that are responsible for the variation in global and regional climate and hydrological systems. The use of a GCM will enable global coverage, and the use of a CRM will allow for better and more sophisticated physical parameterization. NASA satellite and field campaign cloud related datasets can provide initial conditions as well as validation for both the MMF and CRMs. A seed fund is available at NASA Goddard to build a MMF based on the 2D Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model and the Goddard finite volume general circulation model (fvGCM). A prototype MMF in being developed and production runs will be conducted at the beginning of 2005. In this talk, I will present: (1) A brief review on GCE model and its applications on precipitation processes, ( 2 ) The Goddard MMF and the major difference between two existing MMFs (CSU MMF and Goddard MMF), (3) A cloud library generated by Goddard MMF, and 3D GCE model, and (4) A brief discussion on the GCE model on developing a global cloud simulator.

  19. A System of Conservative Regridding for Ice-Atmosphere Coupling in a General Circulation Model (GCM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, R.; Nowicki, S.; Kelley, M.; Schmidt, G. A.

    2014-01-01

    The method of elevation classes, in which the ice surface model is run at multiple elevations within each grid cell, has proven to be a useful way for a low-resolution atmosphere inside a general circulation model (GCM) to produce high-resolution downscaled surface mass balance fields for use in one-way studies coupling atmospheres and ice flow models. Past uses of elevation classes have failed to conserve mass and energy because the transformation used to regrid to the atmosphere was inconsistent with the transformation used to downscale to the ice model. This would cause problems for two-way coupling. A strategy that resolves this conservation issue has been designed and is presented here. The approach identifies three grids between which data must be regridded and five transformations between those grids required by a typical coupled atmosphere-ice flow model. This paper develops a theoretical framework for the problem and shows how each of these transformations may be achieved in a consistent, conservative manner. These transformations are implemented in Glint2, a library used to couple atmosphere models with ice models. Source code and documentation are available for download. Confounding real-world issues are discussed, including the use of projections for ice modeling, how to handle dynamically changing ice geometry, and modifications required for finite element ice models.

  20. Technical Report Series on Global Modeling and Data Assimilation. Volume 22; A Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Radiative Model for Global Ocean Biogeochemical Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Watson W.; Suarez, Max J. (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    An ocean-atmosphere radiative model (OARM) evaluates irradiance availability and quality in the water column to support phytoplankton growth and drive ocean thermodynamics. An atmospheric component incorporates spectral and directional effects of clear and cloudy skies as a function of atmospheric optical constituents, and spectral reflectance across the air-sea interface. An oceanic component evaluates the propagation of spectral and directional irradiance through the water column as a function of water, five phytoplankton groups, and chromophoric dissolved organic matter. It tracks the direct and diffuse streams from the atmospheric component, and a third stream, upwelling diffuse irradiance. The atmospheric component of OARM was compared to data sources at the ocean surface with a coefficient of determination (r2) of 0.97 and a root mean square of 12.1%.

  1. Tropical Pacific impacts of convective momentum transport in the SNU coupled GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Daehyun; Kug, Jong-Seong; Kang, In-Sik; Jin, Fei-Fei; Wittenberg, Andrew T.

    2008-08-01

    Impacts of convective momentum transport (CMT) on tropical Pacific climate are examined, using an atmospheric (AGCM) and coupled GCM (CGCM) from Seoul National University. The CMT scheme affects the surface mainly via a convection-compensating atmospheric subsidence which conveys momentum downward through most of the troposphere. AGCM simulations—with SSTs prescribed from climatological and El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) conditions—show substantial changes in circulation when CMT is added, such as an eastward shift of the climatological trade winds and west Pacific convection. The CMT also alters the ENSO wind anomalies by shifting them eastward and widening them meridionally, despite only subtle changes in the precipitation anomaly patterns. During ENSO, CMT affects the low-level winds mainly via the anomalous convection acting on the climatological westerly wind shear over the central Pacific—so that an eastward shift of convection transfers more westerly momentum toward the surface than would occur without CMT. By altering the low-level circulation, the CMT further alters the precipitation, which in turn feeds back on the CMT. In the CGCM, CMT affects the simulated climatology by shifting the mean convection and trade winds eastward and warming the equatorial SST; the ENSO period and amplitude also increase. In contrast to the AGCM simulations, CMT substantially alters the El Nino precipitation anomaly patterns in the CGCM. Also discussed are possible impacts of the CMT-induced changes in climatology on the simulated ENSO.

  2. Atmospheric Heat Transport Feedbacks to Freshwater Forcing in the Coupled GCM GISS Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legrande, A. N.; Schmidt, G. A.

    2005-12-01

    We perform a range of North Atlantic fresh water forcing simulations in the GISS ModelE coupled GCM. Here we present results from two sets of experiments designed to explore the sensitivity of the model to varying fresh water pulses: (1) 12 relatively small simulations emulate the magnitude and placement of 8kyr event and (2) much larger and longer PhosMIP2 hosing experiments (0.1 Sv rate and 1 Sv rate). We find that within the first set of simulations, the modeled THC response to the freshwater forcing is stochastic - the largest volume of fresh water produces neither the largest response, nor the longest perturbation of THC. We evaluate the nature of modeled THC response given (1) a range of volumes, rates, and lengths of freshwater forcing; (2) two locations of fresh water input; and (3) two base states prior to the freshwater forcing. In all simulations, reduced overturning circulation in the Atlantic results in reduced northward heat transport by the ocean (OHT); we evaluate the response of heat transport in the atmosphere (AHT) and address to what extent the rest of the climate system compensates for the reduced OHT.

  3. Performance of an upper-ocean model coupled to an atmospheric GCM: preliminary results. Vol. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Pollard, D.

    1982-02-01

    A global dynamical model of the upper ocean and sea ice is coupled to the OSU atmospheric general circulation model. Preliminary results are described from a 16-month simulation with seasonally-varying insolation, and compared with both observations and the results from two earlier experiments with simpler upper-ocean models. The present ocean model consists of two vertically homogeneous layers of variable thickness: the upper layer represents the well-mixed layer and can entrain or detrain fluid locally with the lower layer, as in standard mixed-layer models. The second layer typically has thicknesses of approx.100 to approx.400 meters and crudely represents the seasonal thermocline and the part of the main thermocline involved in the subtropical gyres; it rests immiscibly on deep water of no motion where the density contrast is prescribed. Horizontal advection is predicted in both layers by the primitive momentum equations. Sea ice can form if the upper-layer temperature (SST) drops to freezing, after which the local ice thickness is predicted thermo-dynamically with ice dynamics neglected. The 16-month simulation is started from relatively realistic conditions obtained by spinning up the atmospheric and oceanic models separately. After several months of the coupled run, errors of up to 4/sup 0/C in the SST appear in the western oceans, probably due to the underestimate of the western boundary currents inherent in coarse-grid oceanic models. Equatorial upwelling and undercurrents are simulated but extend basin-wide, producing SSTs up to 6/sup 0/C too cold in the western equatorial Pacific. The large-scale seasonal variation of sea-ice thickness and extent are fairly realistic. Surface heat fluxes are compared with observations and with an earlier control integration of the atmospheric GCM, in an effort to distinguish between errors in the SST caused by the upper-ocean model and those caused by the atmospheric model. 38 refs., 11 figs.

  4. Validation Test Report for the Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere MesoscalePrediction System (COAMPS) Version 5.0: Ocean/Wave Component Validation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-31

    PLOTS (RIGHT COLUMN) OF MODEL COMPARISONS WITH UNCOUPLED COAMPS (GREEN) AND 5-WAY COUPLED (BLACK) AGAINST ENVISAT OBSERVATIONS ( PINK ), ARE SHOWN FOR 17...GREEN) AND 5-WAY COUPLED RUN (BLACK) WITH JASON1 OBSERVATIONS ( PINK ...MIDDLE). MODEL COMPARISONS (RIGHT) - UNCOUPLED (GREEN), 5 WAY COUPLED (BLACK) WITH JASON1 OBSERVATIONS ( PINK

  5. Coupling of a Simple 3-Layer Snow Model to GISS GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleinov, I.

    2001-12-01

    Appropriate simulation of the snow cover dynamics is an important issue for the General Circulation Models (GCMs). The presence of snow has a significant impact on ground albedo and on heat and moisture balance. A 3-layer snow model similar to the one proposed by Lynch-Stieglitz was developed with the purpose of using it inside the GCM developed in the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS). The water transport between the layers is modeled explicitly while the heat balance is computed implicitly between the snow layers and semi-implicitly on the surface. The processes of melting and refreezing and compactification of layers under the gravitational force are modeled appropriately. It was noticed that implicit computation of the heat transport can cause a significant under- or over-estimation of the incoming heat flux when the temperature of the upper snow layer is equal to 0 C. This may lead in particular to delayed snow melting in spring. To remedy this problem a special flux-control algorithm was added to the model, which checks computed flux for possible errors and if such are detected the heat transport is recomputed again with the appropriate corrections. The model was tested off-line with Sleepers River forcing data and exhibited a good agreement between simulated and observed quantities for snow depth, snow density and snow temperature. The model was then incorporated into the GISS GCM. Inside the GCM the model is driven completely by the data simulated by other parts of the GCM. The screening effect of the vegetation is introduced by means of masking depth. For a thin snowpack a fractional cover is implemented so that the total thickness of the the snow is never less then 10 cm (rather, the areal fraction of the snow cover decreases when it melts). The model was tested with 6 year long GCM speed-up runs. It proved to be stable and produced reasonable results for the global snow cover. In comparison to the old GISS GCM snow model (which was

  6. Modeling the Effects of Tropospheric Tides on the Ionosphere using SAMI3 Coupled with TIME-GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, S. E.; Huba, J.; Hagan, M. E.; Maute, A. I.; Basu, S.

    2009-12-01

    Recent modeling studies performed with the NCAR thermosphere-ionosphere-mesosphere-electrodynamics general circulation model (TIME-GCM) have shown that tides of tropospheric origin are capable of affecting the thermosphere and ionosphere and can explain the wave-four longitudinal structure that has been observed in the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA). The eastward propagating zonal wavenumber-3 diurnal tide (DE3) has a particularly strong signature that peaks near 110 km and penetrates into the upper thermosphere. In this study, we couple the TIME-GCM thermosphere with NRL’s comprehensive 3D ionosphere model, SAMI3, in order to investigate the impact of non-migrating tides on the E- and F-region ionosphere. SAMI3 includes a potential equation to self-consistently solve for the electric field. Simulation runs have been performed for March equinox and June solstice conditions at solar minimum (F10.7 = 75.) The SAMI3 results are compared with TIME-GCM as well as with measurements of electron density and electric fields.

  7. A Coupled GCM-Cloud Resolving Modeling System, and A Regional Scale Model to Study Precipitation Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2006-01-01

    Recent GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) model comparison projects have indicated that cloud-resolving models (CRMs) agree with observations better than traditional single-column models in simulating various types of clouds and cloud systems from different geographic locations. Current and future NASA satellite programs can provide cloud, precipitation, aerosol and other data at very fine spatial and temporal scales. It requires a coupled global circulation model (GCM) and cloud-scale model (termed a super-parameterization or multi-scale modeling framework, MMF) to use these satellite data to improve the understanding of the physical processes that are responsible for the variation in global and regional climate and hydrological systems. The use of a GCM will enable global coverage, and the use of a CRM will allow for better and more sophisticated physical parameterization. NASA satellite and field campaign cloud related datasets can provide initial conditions as well as validation for both the MMF and CRMs. The Goddard MMF is based on the 2D Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model and the Goddard finite volume general circulation model (fvGCM), and it has started production runs with two years results (1 998 and 1999).

  8. Assessment of an ensemble of ocean-atmosphere coupled and uncoupled regional climate models to reproduce the climatology of Mediterranean cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaounas, Emmanouil; Kelemen, Fanni Dora; Wernli, Heini; Gaertner, Miguel Angel; Reale, Marco; Sanchez-Gomez, Emilia; Lionello, Piero; Calmanti, Sandro; Podrascanin, Zorica; Somot, Samuel; Akhtar, Naveed; Romera, Raquel; Conte, Dario

    2016-11-01

    This study aims to assess the skill of regional climate models (RCMs) at reproducing the climatology of Mediterranean cyclones. Seven RCMs are considered, five of which were also coupled with an oceanic model. All simulations were forced at the lateral boundaries by the ERA-Interim reanalysis for a common 20-year period (1989-2008). Six different cyclone tracking methods have been applied to all twelve RCM simulations and to the ERA-Interim reanalysis in order to assess the RCMs from the perspective of different cyclone definitions. All RCMs reproduce the main areas of high cyclone occurrence in the region south of the Alps, in the Adriatic, Ionian and Aegean Seas, as well as in the areas close to Cyprus and to Atlas mountains. The RCMs tend to underestimate intense cyclone occurrences over the Mediterranean Sea and reproduce 24-40 % of these systems, as identified in the reanalysis. The use of grid nudging in one of the RCMs is shown to be beneficial, reproducing about 60 % of the intense cyclones and keeping a better track of the seasonal cycle of intense cyclogenesis. Finally, the most intense cyclones tend to be similarly reproduced in coupled and uncoupled model simulations, suggesting that modeling atmosphere-ocean coupled processes has only a weak impact on the climatology and intensity of Mediterranean cyclones.

  9. Assimilation of satellite color observations in a coupled ocean GCM-ecosystem model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarmiento, Jorge L.

    1992-01-01

    Monthly average coastal zone color scanner (CZCS) estimates of chlorophyll concentration were assimilated into an ocean global circulation model(GCM) containing a simple model of the pelagic ecosystem. The assimilation was performed in the simplest possible manner, to allow the assessment of whether there were major problems with the ecosystem model or with the assimilation procedure. The current ecosystem model performed well in some regions, but failed in others to assimilate chlorophyll estimates without disrupting important ecosystem properties. This experiment gave insight into those properties of the ecosystem model that must be changed to allow data assimilation to be generally successful, while raising other important issues about the assimilation procedure.

  10. Decadal to multi-decadal scale variability of Indian summer monsoon rainfall in the coupled ocean-atmosphere-chemistry climate model SOCOL-MPIOM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Abdul; Brönnimann, Stefan; Stickler, Alexander; Raible, Christoph C.; Muthers, Stefan; Anet, Julien; Rozanov, Eugene; Schmutz, Werner

    2017-01-01

    The present study is an effort to deepen the understanding of Indian summer monsoon rainfall (ISMR) on decadal to multi-decadal timescales. We use ensemble simulations for the period AD 1600-2000 carried out by the coupled Atmosphere-Ocean-Chemistry-Climate Model (AOCCM) SOCOL-MPIOM. Firstly, the SOCOL-MPIOM is evaluated using observational and reanalyses datasets. The model is able to realistically simulate the ISMR as well as relevant patterns of sea surface temperature and atmospheric circulation. Further, the influence of Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation (AMO), Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), and El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) variability on ISMR is realistically simulated. Secondly, we investigate the impact of internal climate variability and external climate forcings on ISMR on decadal to multi-decadal timescales over the past 400 years. The results show that AMO, PDO, and Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) play a considerable role in controlling the wet and dry decades of ISMR. Resembling observational findings most of the dry decades of ISMR occur during a negative phase of AMO and a simultaneous positive phase of PDO. The observational and simulated datasets reveal that on decadal to multi-decadal timescales the ISMR has consistent negative correlation with PDO whereas its correlation with AMO and TSI is not stationary over time.

  11. On the connection between continental-scale land surface processes and the tropical climate in a coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Hsi-Yen; Mechoso, C. R.; Xue, Yongkang; Xiao, Heng; Neelin, David; Ji, Xuan

    2013-11-15

    The impact of global tropical climate to perturbations in land surface processes (LSP) are evaluated using perturbations given by different LSP representations of continental-scale in a global climate model that includes atmosphere-ocean interactions. One representation is a simple land scheme, which specifies climatological albedos and soil moisture availability. The other representation is the more comprehensive Simplified Simple Biosphere Model, which allows for interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes. The results demonstrate that LSP processes such as interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes have strong impacts on the seasonal mean states and seasonal cycles of global precipitation, clouds, and surface air temperature. The impact is especially significant over the tropical Pacific. To explore the mechanisms for such impact, different LSP representations are confined to selected continental-scale regions where strong interactions of climate-vegetation biophysical processes are present. We find that the largest impact is mainly from LSP perturbations over the tropical African continent. The impact is through anomalous convective heating in tropical Africa due to changes in the surface heat fluxes, which in turn affect basinwide teleconnections in the Pacific through equatorial wave dynamics. The modifications in the equatorial Pacific climate are further enhanced by strong air-sea coupling between surface wind stress and upwelling, as well as effect of ocean memory. Our results further suggest that correct representations of land surface processes, land use change and the associated changes in the deep convection over tropical Africa are crucial to reducing the uncertainty when performing future climate projections under different climate change scenarios.

  12. On the connection between continental-scale land surface processes and the tropical climate in a coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, H.; Mechoso, C. R.; Xue, Y.; Xiao, H.; Neelin, J.; Ji, X.

    2013-12-01

    An evaluation is presented of the impact on tropical climate of continental-scale perturbations given by different representations of land surface processes (LSP) in a general circulation model that includes atmosphere-ocean interactions. One representation is a simple land scheme, which specifies climatological albedos and soil moisture availability. The other representation is the more comprehensive Simplified Simple Biosphere Model, which allows for interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes. The results demonstrate that such perturbations have strong impacts on the seasonal mean states and seasonal cycles of global precipitation, clouds, and surface air temperature. The impact is especially significant over the tropical Pacific Ocean. To explore the mechanisms for such impact, model experiments are performed with different LSP representations confined to selected continental-scale regions where strong interactions of climate-vegetation biophysical processes are present. The largest impact found over the tropical Pacific is mainly from perturbations in the tropical African continent where convective heating anomalies associated with perturbed surface heat fluxes trigger global teleconnections through equatorial wave dynamics. In the equatorial Pacific, the remote impacts of the convection anomalies are further enhanced by strong air-sea coupling between surface wind stress and upwelling, as well as by the effects of ocean memory. LSP perturbations over South America and Asia-Australia have much weaker global impacts. The results further suggest that correct representations of LSP, land use change, and associated changes in the deep convection over tropical Africa are crucial to reducing the uncertainty of future climate projections with global climate models under various climate change scenarios. This work is performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA

  13. Ocean-atmosphere dynamics during Hurricane Ida and Nor'Ida: An application of the coupled ocean-;atmosphere–wave–sediment transport (COAWST) modeling system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olabarrieta, Maitane; Warner, John C.; Armstrong, Brandy N.; Zambon, Joseph B.; He, Ruoying

    2012-01-01

    The coupled ocean–atmosphere–wave–sediment transport (COAWST) modeling system was used to investigate atmosphere–ocean–wave interactions in November 2009 during Hurricane Ida and its subsequent evolution to Nor'Ida, which was one of the most costly storm systems of the past two decades. One interesting aspect of this event is that it included two unique atmospheric extreme conditions, a hurricane and a nor'easter storm, which developed in regions with different oceanographic characteristics. Our modeled results were compared with several data sources, including GOES satellite infrared data, JASON-1 and JASON-2 altimeter data, CODAR measurements, and wave and tidal information from the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) and the National Tidal Database. By performing a series of numerical runs, we were able to isolate the effect of the interaction terms between the atmosphere (modeled with Weather Research and Forecasting, the WRF model), the ocean (modeled with Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS)), and the wave propagation and generation model (modeled with Simulating Waves Nearshore (SWAN)). Special attention was given to the role of the ocean surface roughness. Three different ocean roughness closure models were analyzed: DGHQ (which is based on wave age), TY2001 (which is based on wave steepness), and OOST (which considers both the effects of wave age and steepness). Including the ocean roughness in the atmospheric module improved the wind intensity estimation and therefore also the wind waves, surface currents, and storm surge amplitude. For example, during the passage of Hurricane Ida through the Gulf of Mexico, the wind speeds were reduced due to wave-induced ocean roughness, resulting in better agreement with the measured winds. During Nor'Ida, including the wave-induced surface roughness changed the form and dimension of the main low pressure cell, affecting the intensity and direction of the winds. The combined wave age- and wave steepness

  14. A Coupled GCM-Cloud Resolving Modeling System, and a Regional Scale Model to Study Precipitation Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2006-01-01

    Recent GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) model comparison projects have indicated that cloud-resolving models (CRMs) agree with observations better than traditional single-column models in simulating various types of clouds and cloud systems from different geographic locations. Current and future NASA satellite programs can provide cloud, precipitation, aerosol and other data at very fine spatial and temporal scales. It requires a coupled global circulation model (GCM) and cloud-scale model (termed a super-parameterization or multi-scale modeling framework, MMF) to use these satellite data to improve the understanding of the physical processes that are responsible for the variation in global and regional climate and hydrological systems. The use of a GCM will enable global coverage, and the use of a CRM will allow for better and more sophisticated physical parameterization. NASA satellite and field campaign cloud related datasets can provide initial conditions as well as validation for both the MMF and CFWs. The Goddard MMF is based on the 2D Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model and the Goddard finite volume general circulation model (fvGCM), and it has started production runs with two years results (1 998 and 1999). In this talk, I will present: (1) A brief review on GCE model and its applications on precipitation processes (microphysical and land processes), (2) The Goddard MMF and the major difference between two existing MMFs (CSU MMF and Goddard MMF), and preliminary results (the comparison with traditional GCMs), and (3) A discussion on the Goddard WRF version (its developments and applications).

  15. A Coupled fcGCM-GCE Modeling System: A 3D Cloud Resolving Model and a Regional Scale Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2005-01-01

    Recent GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) model comparison projects have indicated that cloud-resolving models (CRMs) agree with observations better than traditional single-column models in simulating various types of clouds and cloud systems from different geographic locations. Current and future NASA satellite programs can provide cloud, precipitation, aerosol and other data at very fine spatial and temporal scales. It requires a coupled global circulation model (GCM) and cloud-scale model (termed a super-parameterization or multi-scale modeling framework, MMF) to use these satellite data to improve the understanding of the physical processes that are responsible for the variation in global and regional climate and hydrological systems. The use of a GCM will enable global coverage, and the use of a CRM will allow for better and ore sophisticated physical parameterization. NASA satellite and field campaign cloud related datasets can provide initial conditions as well as validation for both the MMF and CRMs. The Goddard MMF is based on the 2D Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model and the Goddard finite volume general circulation model (fvGCM), and it has started production runs with two years results (1998 and 1999). Also, at Goddard, we have implemented several Goddard microphysical schemes (21CE, several 31CE), Goddard radiation (including explicity calculated cloud optical properties), and Goddard Land Information (LIS, that includes the CLM and NOAH land surface models) into a next generation regional scale model, WRF. In this talk, I will present: (1) A Brief review on GCE model and its applications on precipitation processes (microphysical and land processes), (2) The Goddard MMF and the major difference between two existing MMFs (CSU MMF and Goddard MMF), and preliminary results (the comparison with traditional GCMs), (3) A discussion on the Goddard WRF version (its developments and applications), and (4) The characteristics of the four-dimensional cloud data

  16. A Coupled GCM-Cloud Resolving Modeling System, and a Regional Scale Model to Study Precipitation Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2007-01-01

    Recent GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) model comparison projects have indicated that cloud-resolving models (CRMs) agree with observations better than traditional single-column models in simulating various types of clouds and cloud systems from different geographic locations. Current and future NASA satellite programs can provide cloud, precipitation, aerosol and other data at very fine spatial and temporal scales. It requires a coupled global circulation model (GCM) and cloud-scale model (termed a superparameterization or multi-scale modeling framework, MMF) to use these satellite data to improve the understanding of the physical processes that are responsible for the variation in global and regional climate and hydrological systems. The use of a GCM will enable global coverage, and the use of a CRM will allow for better and more sophisticated physical parameterization. NASA satellite and field campaign cloud related datasets can provide initial conditions as well as validation for both the MMF and CRMs. The Goddard MMF is based on the 2D Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model and the Goddard finite volume general circulation model (fvGCM), and it has started production runs with two years results (1998 and 1999). Also, at Goddard, we have implemented several Goddard microphysical schemes (2ICE, several 31CE), Goddard radiation (including explicitly calculated cloud optical properties), and Goddard Land Information (LIS, that includes the CLM and NOAH land surface models) into a next generatio11 regional scale model, WRF. In this talk, I will present: (1) A brief review on GCE model and its applications on precipitation processes (microphysical and land processes), (2) The Goddard MMF and the major difference between two existing MMFs (CSU MMF and Goddard MMF), and preliminary results (the comparison with traditional GCMs), and (3) A discussion on the Goddard WRF version (its developments and applications).

  17. A Coupled GCM-Cloud Resolving Modeling System, and A Regional Scale Model to Study Precipitation Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2006-01-01

    Recent GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) model comparison projects have indicated that cloud-resolving models (CRMs) agree with observations better than traditional single-column models in simulating various types of clouds and cloud systems from different geographic locations. Current and future NASA satellite programs can provide cloud, precipitation, aerosol and other data at very fine spatial and temporal scales. It requires a coupled global circulation model (GCM) and cloud-scale model (termed a super-parameterization or multi-scale modeling framework, MMF) to use these satellite data to improve the understanding of the physical processes that are responsible for the variation in global and regional climate and hydrological systems. The use of a GCM will enable global coverage, and the use of a CRM will allow for better and more sophisticated physical parameterization. NASA satellite and field campaign cloud related datasets can provide initial conditions as well as validation for both the MMF and CRMs. The Goddard MMF is based on the 2D Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model and the Goddard finite volume general circulation model (fvGCM), and it has started production runs with two years results (1998 and 1999). Also, at Goddard, we have implemented several Goddard microphysical schemes (21CE, several 31CE), Goddard radiation (including explicitly calculated cloud optical properties), and Goddard Land Information (LIS, that includes the CLM and NOAH land surface models) into a next generation regional scale model, WRF. In this talk, I will present: (1) A brief review on GCE model and its applications on precipitation processes (microphysical and land processes), (2) The Goddard MMF and the major difference between two existing MMFs (CSU MMF and Goddard MMF), and preliminary results (the comparison with traditional GCMs), and (3) A discussion on the Goddard WRF version (its developments and applications).

  18. Simulation of the tropical oceans with an ocean GCM coupled to an atmospheric mixed-layer model

    SciTech Connect

    Murtugudde, R.; Seager, R.; Busalacchi, A.

    1996-08-01

    A reduced gravity, primitive equation, ocean general circulation model (GCM) is coupled to an advective atmospheric mixed-layer (AML) model to demonstrate the importance of a nonlocal atmospheric mixed-layer parameterization for a proper simulation of surface heat fluxes and sea surface temperatures (SST). Seasonal variability of the model SSTs and the circulation are generally in good agreement with the observations in each of the tropical oceans. These results are compared to other simulations that use a local equilibrium mixed-layer model. Inclusion of the advective AML model is demonstrated to lead to a significant improvement in the SST simulation in all three oceans. Advection and diffusion of the air humidity play significant roles in determining SSTs even in the tropical Pacific where the local equilibrium assumption was previously deemed quite accurate. The main, and serious, model flaw is an inadequate representation of the seasonal cycle in the upwelling regions of the eastern Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. The results indicate that the feedback between mixed-layer depths and SSTs can amplify SST errors, implying that increased realism in the modeling of the ocean mixed layer increases the demand for realism in the representation of the surface heat fluxes. The performance of the GCM with a local-equilibrium mixed-layer model in the Atlantic is as poor as previous simple ocean model simulations of the Atlantic. The conclusion of earlier studies that the simple ocean model was at fault may, in fact, not be correct. Instead the local-equilibrium heat flux parameterization appears to have been the major source of error. Accurate SST predictions may, hence, be feasible by coupling the AML model to computationally efficient simple ocean models. 69 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab.

  19. The impacts of precipitating cloud radiative effects on ocean surface evaporation, precipitation, and ocean salinity in coupled GCM simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.-L. F.; Wang, Yi-Hui; Lee, Tong; Waliser, Duane; Lee, Wei-Liang; Yu, Jia-Yuh; Chen, Yi-Chun; Fetzer, Eric; Hasson, Audrey

    2016-08-01

    The coupled global climate model (GCM) fidelity in representing upper ocean salinity including near sea surface bulk salinity (SSS) is evaluated in this study, with a focus on the Pacific Ocean. The systematic biases in ocean surface evaporation (E) minus precipitation (P) and SSS are found to be fairly similar in the twentieth century simulations of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Phase 3 (CMIP3) and Phase 5 (CMIP5) relative to the observations. One of the potential causes of the CMIP model biases is the missing representation of the radiative effects of precipitating hydrometeors (i.e., snow) in most CMIP models. To examine the radiative effect of cloud snow on SSS, sensitivity experiments with and without such effect are conducted by the National Center for Atmospheric Research-coupled Community Earth System Model (CESM). This study investigates the difference in SSS between sensitivity experiments and its relationship with atmospheric circulation, E - P and air-sea heat fluxes. It is found that the exclusion of the cloud snow radiative effect in CESM produces weaker Pacific trade winds, resulting in enhanced precipitation, reduced evaporation, and a reduction of the upper ocean salinity in the tropical and subtropical Pacific. The latter results in an improved comparison with climatological upper ocean bulk salinity. The introduction of cloud snow also altered the budget terms that maintain the time-mean salinity in the mixed layer.

  20. A Discussion on the Errors in the Surface Heat Fluxes Simulated by a Coupled GCM.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jin-Yi; Mechoso, Carlos R.

    1999-02-01

    This paper contrasts the sea surface temperature (SST) and surface heat flux errors in the Tropical Pacific simulated by the University of California, Los Angeles, coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (CGCM) and by its atmospheric component (AGCM) using prescribed SSTs. The usefulness of such a comparison is discussed in view of the sensitivities of the coupled system.Off the equator, the CGCM simulates more realistic surface heat fluxes than the AGCM, except in the eastern Pacific south of the equator where the coupled model produces a spurious intertropical convergence zone. The AGCM errors are dominated by excessive latent heat flux, except in the stratus regions along the coasts of California and Peru where errors are dominated by excessive shortwave flux. The CGCM tends to balance the AGCM errors by either correctly decreasing the evaporation at the expense of cold SST biases or erroneously increasing the evaporation at the expense of warm SST biases.At the equator, errors in simulated SSTs are amplified by the feedbacks of the coupled system. Over the western equatorial Pacific, the CGCM produces a cold SST bias that is a manifestation of a spuriously elongated cold tongue. The AGCM produces realistic values of surface heat flux. Over the cold tongue in the eastern equatorial Pacific, the CGCM simulates realistic annual variations in SST. In the simulation, however, the relationship between variations in SST and surface latent heat flux corresponds to a negative feedback, while in the observation it corresponds to a positive feedback. Such an erroneous feature of the CGCM is linked to deficiencies in the simulation of the cross-equatorial component of the surface wind. The reasons for the success in the simulation of SST in the equatorial cold tongue despite the erroneous surface heat flux are examined.

  1. Tropical Pacific internal atmospheric dynamics and resolution in a coupled GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Hosmay; Kirtman, Ben P.

    2015-01-01

    A noise reduction technique, namely the interactive ensemble (IE) approach is adopted to reduce noise at the air-sea interface due to internal atmospheric dynamics in a state-of-the-art coupled general circulation model (CGCM). The IE technique uses multiple realization of atmospheric general circulation models coupled to a single ocean general circulation model. The ensembles mean fluxes from the atmospheric simulations are communicated to the ocean component. Each atmospheric simulation receives the same SST coming from the ocean component. The only difference among the atmospheric simulations comes from perturbed initial conditions, thus the atmospheric states are, in principle synoptically independent. The IE technique can be used to better understand the importance of weather noise forcing of natural variability such as El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). To study the impact of weather noise and resolution in the context of a CGCM, two IE experiments are performed at different resolutions. Atmospheric resolution is an important issue since the noise statistics will depend on the spatial scales resolved. A simple formulation to extract atmospheric internal variability is presented. The results are compared to their respective control cases where internal atmospheric variability is left unchanged. The noise reduction has a major impact on the coupled simulation and the magnitude of this effect strongly depends on the horizontal resolution of the atmospheric component model. Specifically, applying the noise reduction technique reduces the overall climate variability more effectively at higher resolution. This suggests that "weather noise" is more important in sustaining climate variability as resolution increases. ENSO statistics, dynamics, and phase asymmetry are all modified by the noise reduction, in particular ENSO becomes more regular with less phase asymmetry when noise is reduced. All these effects are more marked for the higher resolution case. In

  2. Sensitivity of a coupled atmosphere-dynamic upper ocean GCM to variations of CO2, solar constant, and orbital forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syktus, Jozef; Gordon, Hal; Chappell, John

    1994-07-01

    Sensitivity of a coupled atmosphere-dynamic upper ocean general circulation model (GCM) to varying CO2, solar constant, and orbital forcing was examined. Response to atmospheric CO2 concentrations ranging from 100-3500 ppm is logarithmic at all latitudes and seasons, with highest sensitivity at high latitudes, during the winter season. Solar constant response is approximately linear over the range of values +2%, but the sensitivity at high latitudes is less than for equivalent CO2 forcing. Sensitivity to 'cold northern summer' orbital forcing, which occurred at the start of the last glacial cycle, is strongly affected by CO2. For CO2 at or below the present level, perennial snow cover in the northern hemisphere expands dramatically with 'cold summer' orbital forcing, but this effect becomes very small for CO2 levels in the range 410-460 ppm. This result suggests that the Quaternary 'ice age' mode of climatic behavior may have been initiated by an atmospheric CO2 decrease below a critical value, probably around 350-450 ppm.

  3. On the Decadal Modes of Oscillation of an Idealized Ocean-atmosphere System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Vikram M.

    1990-01-01

    Axially-symmetric, linear, free modes of global, primitive equation, ocean-atmosphere models are examined to see if they contain decadal (10 to 30 years) oscillation time scale modes. A two-layer ocean model and a two-level atmospheric model are linearized around axially-symmetric basic states containing mean meridional circulations in the ocean and the atmosphere. Uncoupled and coupled, axially-symmetric modes of oscillation of the ocean-atmosphere system are calculated. The main conclusion is that linearized, uncoupled and coupled, ocean-atmosphere systems can contain axially-symmetric, free modes of variability on decadal time scales. These results have important implications for externally-forced decadal climate variability.

  4. Mechanisms of interannual ocean-atmosphere interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankignoul, C.

    1984-01-01

    Results of an investigation to study the interaction between ocean and atmosphere on the annual to decadal time scale are reported. Separate studies of the ocean response to atmospheric forcing, and of atmospheric response to ocean forcing were also conducted. The main findings are the dynamics of sea surface temperature anomalies, the role of short time scale weather fluctuations in the seasonal cycle of the upper ocean variability, and the planetary wave response to sea surface temperature anomalies. A numerical model of the ocean atmosphere continent system and a two layer quasi-geostropic ocean model is discussed.

  5. The Modular Arbitrary-Order Ocean-Atmosphere Model of the RMIB: MAOOAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Cruz, Lesley; Demaeyer, Jonathan; Vannitsem, Stéphane

    2016-04-01

    The coupled ocean-atmosphere system exhibits a decadal variability at midlatitudes, which gives rise to the North-Atlantic Oscillation (NOA). The driving mechanism behind this variability has been the subject of much interest and debate in recent years. This conundrum was addressed using several low-order coupled ocean-atmosphere models for midlatitudes, with an increasing level of physical realism: OA-QG-WS v1 [1], v2 [2], and most recently, VDDG [3]. The VDDG-model was designed to capture the key dynamics of the coupled ocean-atmosphere system, featuring a two-layer atmosphere over a shallow-water ocean layer with passively advected temperature. It incorporates both frictional coupling and an energy balance scheme which accounts for radiative and heat fluxes between ocean and atmosphere. The spectral expansion was truncated at 10 atmospheric and 8 oceanic modes, and a coupled low-frequency variability was found. We present an extended version of the VDDG model, in which an arbitrary number of atmospheric and oceanic modes can be retained. The modularity of the new model version allows one to easily modify the model physics. Using this new model, named the "Modular Arbitrary-Order Ocean-Atmosphere Model" (MAOOAM), we analyse the dependence of the model dynamics on the truncation level of the spectral expansion. Indeed, previous studies have shown that spurious behaviour may exist in low-resolution models, which can be unveiled by a comparison with their high-resolution counterparts [4]. In particular, we assess the robustness of the coupled low-frequency variability when the number of modes is increased. References [1] Vannitsem, S.: Dynamics and predictability of a low-order wind-driven ocean-atmosphere coupled model, Climate dynamics, 42, 1981-1998, 2014. [2] Vannitsem, S. and De Cruz, L.: A 24-variable low-order coupled ocean-atmosphere model: OA-QG-WS v2, Geoscientific Model Development, 7, 649-662, 2014. [3] Vannitsem, S., Demaeyer, J., De Cruz, L., and Ghil

  6. Eight centuries of north atlantic ocean atmosphere variability

    PubMed

    Black; Peterson; Overpeck; Kaplan; Evans; Kashgarian

    1999-11-26

    Climate in the tropical North Atlantic is controlled largely by variations in the strength of the trade winds, the position of the Intertropical Convergence Zone, and sea surface temperatures. A high-resolution study of Caribbean sediments provides a subdecadally resolved record of tropical upwelling and trade wind variability spanning the past 825 years. These results confirm the importance of a decadal (12- to 13-year) mode of Atlantic variability believed to be driven by coupled tropical ocean-atmosphere dynamics. Although a well-defined interdecadal mode of variability does not appear to be characteristic of the tropical Atlantic, there is evidence that century-scale variability is substantial. The tropical Atlantic may also have been involved in a major shift in Northern Hemisphere climate variability that took place about 700 years ago.

  7. A mass flux closure function in a GCM based on the Richardson number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Young-Min; Kang, In-Sik; Almazroui, Mansour

    2014-03-01

    A mass flux closure in a general circulation model (GCM) was developed in terms of the mean gradient Richardson number (GRN), which is defined as the ratio between the buoyancy and the shear-driven kinetic energy in the planetary boundary layer. The cloud resolving model (CRM) simulations using the tropical ocean and global atmosphere-coupled ocean-atmosphere response experiment forcing show that cloud-base mass flux is well correlated with the GRN. Using the CRM simulations, a mass flux closure function is formulated as an exponential function of the GRN and it is implemented in the Arakawa-Schubert convective scheme. The GCM simulations with the new mass flux closure are compared to those of the GCM with the conventional mass flux closure based on convective available potential energy. Because of the exponential function, the new closure permits convective precipitation only when the GRN has a sufficiently large value. When the GRN has a relatively small value, the convection is suppressed while the convective instability is released by large-scale precipitation. As a result, the ratio of convective precipitation to total precipitation is reduced and there is an increase in the frequency of heavy precipitation, more similar to the observations. The new closure also improves the diurnal cycle of precipitation due to a time delay of the large GRN with respect to convective instability.

  8. Continental Moisture Availability and Planetary Temperature in an Idealized GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheff, J.; Frierson, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    In CMIP-class GCMs, land tends to "dry out" with greenhouse warming outside of the high latitudes, as evaporative demand consistently increases but mean precipitation does not. Soil moisture, relative humidity, and common water-availability indices tend to decline. Yet, paleoclimate evidence is usually interpreted to imply that past greenhouse climates were generally well-watered on land, while glacial periods were generally arid - just the opposite. Motivated by this apparent discrepancy, we perform greenhouse warming experiments over a wide range of planetary temperatures with a slab-ocean atmospheric GCM coupled to a simple land-surface water/energy balance model in idealized continental geometry. We assess the results using several nondimensional measures. The mean-state terrestrial aridity strongly depends on the extent of subtropical seaways and on the prescribed ocean heat transport. Unexpectedly, the aridity responses to warming can dramatically differ from the canonical CMIP story. In very wet terrestrial settings, including much of the mid-latitudes and sometimes the tropics as well, precipitation can increase enough to stop evaporative demand from increasing at all. This is a tantalizing analog to the paleo-evidence. However, when the terrestrial tropics are drier, precipitation there declines very strongly with greenhouse warming even as tropical ocean precipitation increases, causing strong aridification. Future work will seek to understand these and other surprising results, and to explain why they do not generally occur in the full GCMs.

  9. GCM response of northern winter stationary waves and storm tracks to increasing amounts of carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, D.B.; Held, I.M. )

    1993-10-01

    The response of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) coupled ocean-atmosphere R15, 9-level GCM to gradually increasing CO[sub 2] amounts is analyzed with emphasis on the changes in the stationary waves and storm tracks in the Northern Hemisphere wintertime troposphere. A large part of the change is described by an equivalent-barotropic stationary wave with a high over eastern Canada and a low over southern Alaska. Consistent with this, the Atlantic jet weakens near the North American coast. Perpetual winter runs of an R15, nine-level atmospheric GCM with sea surface temperature, sea ice thickness, and soil moisture values prescribed from the coupled GCM results are able to reproduce the coupled model's response qualitatively. Consistent with the weakened baroclinicity associated with the stationary wave change, the Atlantic storm track weakens with increasing CO[sub 2] concentrations while the Pacific storm track does not change in strength substantially. An R15, nine-level atmospheric model linearized about the zonal time-mean state is used to analyze the contributions to the stationary wave response. With mountains, diabatic heating, and transient forcings the linear model gives a stationary wave change in qualitative agreement with the change seen in the coupled and perpetual models. Transients and diabatic heating appear to be the major forcing terms, while changes in zonal-mean basic state and topographic forcing play only a small role. A substantial part of the diabatic response is due to changes in tropical latent heating. 25 refs., 36 figs.

  10. A study of a self-generated stratospheric sudden warming and its mesospheric-lower thermospheric impacts using the coupled TIME-GCM/CCM3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.-L.; Roble, R. G.

    2002-12-01

    A stratospheric sudden warming episode was self-consistently generated in the coupled National Center for Atmospheric Research Thermosphere, Ionosphere, Mesosphere, and Electrodynamics General Circulation Model/Climate Community Model version 3 (TIME-GCM/CCM3). Taking advantage of the unique vertical range of the coupled model (ground to 500 km), we were able to study the coupling of the lower and upper atmosphere in this warming episode. Planetary wave 1 is the dominant wave component in this warming event. Analysis of the wave phase structure and the wave amplitude indicates that the wave may experience resonant amplification prior to the peak warming. The mean wind in the high-latitude winter stratopause and mesosphere decelerates and reverses to westward due to planetary wave forcing and forms a critical layer near the zero wind lines. The wind deceleration and reversal also change the filtering of gravity waves by allowing more eastward gravity waves to propagate into the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT), which causes eastward forcing and reverses the westward jet in the MLT. This also changes the meridional circulation in the upper mesosphere from poleward/downward to equatorward/upward, causing a depletion of the peak atomic oxygen layer at 97 km and significant reduction of green line airglow emission at high latitudes and midlatitudes. Planetary waves forced in situ by filtered gravity waves in the MLT grow in the warming episode. Their growth and interaction with tides create diurnal and semidiurnal variabilities in the zonal mean zonal wind.

  11. Modeling oxygenation of an ocean-atmosphere system during the Late Ordovician-Devonian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, K.

    2013-12-01

    Throughout the Earth's history, the redox state of surface environments, biogeochemical cycles, and biological innovation/extinction have been intimately related. Therefore, understanding the long-term (over millions of years) evolution of the redox state of an ocean-atmosphere system and its controlling factors is one of the fundamental topics of Earth Sciences. In particular, Early Paleozoic is marked by the prominent biological evolution/diversification events (Cambrian explosion and Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event), implying the causal linkage between ocean oxygenation and biological innovation. On the other hand, multiple lines of evidence (such as black shale deposition, low C/S ratio of buried sediments, low molybdenum isotopic value, and iron speciation data) suggest that ocean interior had been kept in low oxygen condition until the Devonian. Dahl et al. (2010) PNAS found an increase in molybdenum isotopic value from ~1.4‰ to ~2.0‰ between ~440 Ma and ~390 Ma, implying the oceanic redox transition to a well-oxygenated condition. It was proposed that this ocean oxygenation event correlates with the diversification of vascular land plants; an enhanced burial of terrigenous organic matter increases the oxygen supply rate to an ocean-atmosphere system. Although this hypothesis for a causal linkage between the diversification of land plants and oxidation event of an ocean-atmosphere system is intriguing, it remains unclear whether the radiation of land plant is necessary to cause such redox transition. Because oxygen is most likely regulated by a combination of several feedbacks in the Earth system, it is essential to evaluate the impact of plant diversification on the oxygenation state of an ocean-atmosphere system by use of a numerical model in which C-N-P-O-S coupled biogeochemical cycles between ocean-atmosphere-sediment systems are take into account. In this study, the paleoredox history of an ocean-atmosphere system during the Paleozoic is

  12. The effect of large-scale model time step and multiscale coupling frequency on cloud climatology, vertical structure, and rainfall extremes in a superparameterized GCM

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Sungduk; Pritchard, Michael S.

    2015-12-17

    The effect of global climate model (GCM) time step—which also controls how frequently global and embedded cloud resolving scales are coupled—is examined in the Superparameterized Community Atmosphere Model ver 3.0. Systematic bias reductions of time-mean shortwave cloud forcing (~10 W/m2) and longwave cloud forcing (~5 W/m2) occur as scale coupling frequency increases, but with systematically increasing rainfall variance and extremes throughout the tropics. An overarching change in the vertical structure of deep tropical convection, favoring more bottom-heavy deep convection as a global model time step is reduced may help orchestrate these responses. The weak temperature gradient approximation is more faithfully satisfied when a high scale coupling frequency (a short global model time step) is used. These findings are distinct from the global model time step sensitivities of conventionally parameterized GCMs and have implications for understanding emergent behaviors of multiscale deep convective organization in superparameterized GCMs. Lastly, the results may also be useful for helping to tune them.

  13. The effect of large-scale model time step and multiscale coupling frequency on cloud climatology, vertical structure, and rainfall extremes in a superparameterized GCM

    DOE PAGES

    Yu, Sungduk; Pritchard, Michael S.

    2015-12-17

    The effect of global climate model (GCM) time step—which also controls how frequently global and embedded cloud resolving scales are coupled—is examined in the Superparameterized Community Atmosphere Model ver 3.0. Systematic bias reductions of time-mean shortwave cloud forcing (~10 W/m2) and longwave cloud forcing (~5 W/m2) occur as scale coupling frequency increases, but with systematically increasing rainfall variance and extremes throughout the tropics. An overarching change in the vertical structure of deep tropical convection, favoring more bottom-heavy deep convection as a global model time step is reduced may help orchestrate these responses. The weak temperature gradient approximation is more faithfullymore » satisfied when a high scale coupling frequency (a short global model time step) is used. These findings are distinct from the global model time step sensitivities of conventionally parameterized GCMs and have implications for understanding emergent behaviors of multiscale deep convective organization in superparameterized GCMs. Lastly, the results may also be useful for helping to tune them.« less

  14. Estimating annual precipitation for the Colorado River Basin using oceanic-atmospheric oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalra, Ajay; Ahmad, Sajjad

    2012-06-01

    Estimating long-lead time precipitation under the stress of increased climatic variability is a challenging task in the field of hydrology. A modified Support Vector Machine (SVM) based framework is proposed to estimate annual precipitation using oceanic-atmospheric oscillations. Oceanic-atmospheric oscillations, consisting of Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO), and El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) for a period of 1900-2008, are used to generate annual precipitation estimates with a 1 year lead time. The SVM model is applied to 17 climate divisions encompassing the Colorado River Basin in the western United States. The overall results revealed that the annual precipitation in the Colorado River Basin is significantly influenced by oceanic-atmospheric oscillations. The long-term precipitation predictions for the Upper Colorado River Basin can be successfully obtained using a combination of PDO, NAO, and AMO indices, whereas coupling AMO and ENSO results in improved precipitation predictions for the Lower Colorado River Basin. The results also show that the SVM model provides better precipitation estimates compared to the Artificial Neural Network and Multivariate Linear Regression models. The annual precipitation estimates obtained using the modified SVM modeling framework may assist water managers in statistically understanding the hydrologic response in relation to large scale climate patterns within the Colorado River Basin.

  15. Quasi-two-day wave coupling of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere-ionosphere in the TIME-GCM: Two-day oscillations in the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Jia; Wang, Wenbin; Richmond, Arthur D.; Liu, Han-Li

    2012-07-01

    The Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIME-GCM) is used to simulate the quasi-two-day wave (QTDW) modulation of the ionospheric dynamo and electron density. The QTDW can directly penetrate into the lower thermosphere and modulate the neutral winds at a period of two days. The QTDW modulation of the tidal amplitudes is not evident. The QTDW in zonal and meridional winds results in a quasi-two-day oscillation (QTDO) of the dynamo electric fields at southern midlatitudes, which is mapped into the conjugate northern magnetic midlatitudes. The QTDO of the electric fields in the E region is transmitted along the magnetic field lines to the F region and leads to the QTDOs of the vertical ion drift and total electron content (TEC) at low and mid latitudes. The QTDO of the vertical ion drift near the magnetic equator leads to the 2-day oscillation of the fountain effect. The QTDO of the TEC has two peaks at ±25 magnetic latitude (Mlat) and one near the dip equator. The equatorial peak is nearly out of phase with the ones at ±25 Mlat. The vertical ion drift at midlatitudes extends the QTDW response of the TEC to midlatitudes from the Equatorial Ionospheric Anomaly (EIA). Most differently from previous reports, we discover that the QTDW winds couple into the F region ionosphere through both the fountain effect and the middle latitude dynamos.

  16. Contrasting Indian Ocean SST Variability With and Without ENSO Influence: A Coupled Atmosphere-Ocean GCM Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jin-Yi; Lau, K. M.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we perform experiments with a coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (CGCM) to examine ENSO's influence on the interannual sea surface temperature (SST) variability of the tropical Indian Ocean. The control experiment includes both the Indian and Pacific Oceans in the ocean model component of the CGCM (the Indo-Pacific Run). The anomaly experiment excludes ENSOs influence by including only the Indian Ocean while prescribing monthly-varying climatological SSTs for the Pacific Ocean (the Indian-Ocean Run). In the Indo-Pacific Run, an oscillatory mode of the Indian Ocean SST variability is identified by a multi-channel singular spectral analysis (MSSA). The oscillatory mode comprises two patterns that can be identified with the Indian Ocean Zonal Mode (IOZM) and a basin-wide warming/cooling mode respectively. In the model, the IOZM peaks about 3-5 months after ENSO reaches its maximum intensity. The basin mode peaks 8 months after the IOZM. The timing and associated SST patterns suggests that the IOZM is related to ENSO, and the basin- wide warming/cooling develops as a result of the decay of the IOZM spreading SST anomalies from western Indian Ocean to the eastern Indian Ocean. In contrast, in the Indian-Ocean Run, no oscillatory modes can be identified by the MSSA, even though the Indian Ocean SST variability is characterized by east-west SST contrast patterns similar to the IOZM. In both control and anomaly runs, IOZM-like SST variability appears to be associated with forcings from fluctuations of the Indian monsoon. Our modeling results suggest that the oscillatory feature of the IOZM is primarily forced by ENSO.

  17. Characterizing unforced multi-decadal variability of ENSO: a case study with the GFDL CM2.1 coupled GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwood, A. R.; Battisti, D. S.; Wittenberg, A. T.; Roberts, W. H. G.; Vimont, D. J.

    2016-12-01

    Large multi-decadal fluctuations of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) variability simulated in a 4000-year pre-industrial control run of GFDL CM2.1 have received considerable attention due to implications for constraining the causes of past and future changes in ENSO. We evaluated the mechanisms of this low-frequency ENSO modulation through analysis of the extreme epochs of CM2.1 as well as through the use of a linearized intermediate-complexity model of the tropical Pacific, which produces reasonable emulations of observed ENSO variability. We demonstrate that the low-frequency ENSO modulation can be represented by the simplest model of a linear, stationary process, even in the highly nonlinear CM2.1. These results indicate that CM2.1's ENSO modulation is driven by transient processes that operate at interannual or shorter time scales. Nonlinearities and/or multiplicative noise in CM2.1 likely exaggerate the ENSO modulation by contributing to the overly active ENSO variability. In contrast, simulations with the linear model suggest that intrinsically-generated tropical Pacific decadal mean state changes do not contribute to the extreme-ENSO epochs in CM2.1. Rather, these decadal mean state changes actually serve to damp the intrinsically-generated ENSO modulation, primarily by stabilizing the ENSO mode during strong-ENSO epochs. Like most coupled General Circulation Models, CM2.1 suffers from large biases in its ENSO simulation, including ENSO variance that is nearly twice that seen in the last 50 years of observations. We find that CM2.1's overly strong ENSO variance directly contributes to its strong multi-decadal modulation through broadening the distribution of epochal variance, which increases like the square of the long-term variance. These results suggest that the true spectrum of unforced ENSO modulation is likely substantially narrower than that in CM2.1. However, relative changes in ENSO modulation are similar between CM2.1, the linear model tuned to

  18. Midlatitude Ocean-Atmosphere Interactions in a Warming Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hand, Ralf; Keenlyside, Noel S.; Greatbatch, Richard J.; Omrani, Nour-Eddine

    2014-05-01

    Recent studies have shown that mid-latitude regions with strong SST gradients as they can be found in the Gulf Stream and it's extension are a key-region for midlatitude ocean-atmosphere interactions; SST variability on inter-annual to decadal timescales in this region has a distinct impact on the overlying atmosphere. Climate projections with coupled general circulation models show strong indications, that the strength and the shape of the ocean circulation might underly crucial changes in a warming climate. This work presents an analysis of the atmospheric part of a long-term (covering the period until 2300) RCP 8.5 scenario run of a coupled general circulation model (MPI-ESM-LR) with focus on the North Atlantic. The ocean component of the model shows a strong decrease in the meridional overturning circulation and a northward-shift of the boundary between the subpolar and the subtropical gyre. This leads to significant changes of the ocean surface conditions in the Gulf Stream and the Gulf Stream extension. The weakened MOC and the northward shift of the SST front leads to a weakening of the SST gradients in the historical Gulf Stream area and a strengthening of the gradients east of Newfoundland. We analysed the impact of the changes in the ocean on precipitation, a quantity which has been shown to be highly sensitive to the position of the SST front and the absolute value of SST in that region in previous studies. In winter the model shows a large region with strongly enhanced precipitation southeast off Newfoundland, likely related to a slight intensification of the North-Atlantic storm track present in the future projection. In summer the most prominent feature in terms of precipitation is a decrease in the region off the US east coast, where the historical control experiment had the strongest SST gradients, but shows weaker gradients in the future. A preliminary analysis of the hydrological cycle gives indications, that the precipitation changes are induced

  19. Multiple equilibria, natural variability, and climate transitions in an idealized ocean-atmosphere model

    SciTech Connect

    Saravanan, R.; McWilliams, J.C.

    1995-10-01

    An idealized coupled ocean-atmosphere is constructed to study climatic equilibria and variability. The model focuses on the role of large-scale fluid motions in the climate system. The atmospheric component is an eddy-resolving two-level global primitive equation model with simplified physical parameterizations. The oceanic component is a zonally averaged sector model of the thermohaline circulation. The two components exchange heat and freshwater fluxes synchonously. Coupled integrations are carried out over periods of several centuries to identify the equilibrium states of the ocean-atmosphere system. It is shown that there exist at least three types of equilibria, which are distinguished by whether they have upwelling or downwelling in the polar regions. Each oceanic circulation in the coupled model exhibits natural variability on interdecadal and longer timescales. The dominant interdecadal mode of variability is associated with the advection of oceanic temperature anomalies in the sinking regions. The sensitivity of the coupled model to climatic perturbations is studied. A rapid increase in the greenhouse gas concentrations leads to a collapse of the meridional overtuning in the ocean. Introduction of a large positive surface freshwater anomaly in the high latitudes leads to a temporary suppression of the sinking motion, followed by a rapid recovery, due primarily to the high latitude cooling associated with the reduction of oceanic heat transport. In this evolution, the secondary roles played by the atmospheric heat transport and moisture transport in destablizing the thermohaline circulation are compared, and the former is found to be dominant.

  20. Skill Assessment of a Spectral Ocean-Atmosphere Radiative Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Watson, W.; Casey, Nancy W.

    2009-01-01

    Ocean phytoplankton, detrital material, and water absorb and scatter light spectrally. The Ocean- Atmosphere Spectral Irradiance Model (OASIM) is intended to provide surface irradiance over the oceans with sufficient spectral resolution to support ocean ecology, biogeochemistry, and heat exchange investigations, and of sufficient duration to support inter-annual and decadal investigations. OASIM total surface irradiance (integrated 200 nm to 4 microns) was compared to in situ data and three publicly available global data products at monthly 1-degree resolution. OASIM spectrally-integrated surface irradiance had root mean square (RMS) difference= 20.1 W/sq m (about 11%), bias=1.6 W/sq m (about 0.8%), regression slope= 1.01 and correlation coefficient= 0.89, when compared to 2322 in situ observations. OASIM had the lowest bias of any of the global data products evaluated (ISCCP-FD, NCEP, and ISLSCP 11), and the best slope (nearest to unity). It had the second best RMS, and the third best correlation coefficient. OASIM total surface irradiance compared well with ISCCP-FD (RMS= 20.7 W/sq m; bias=-11.4 W/sq m, r=0.98) and ISLSCP II (RMS =25.2 W/sq m; bias= -13.8 W/sq m; r=0.97), but less well with NCEP (RMS =43.0 W/sq m ;bias=-22.6 W/sq m; x=0.91). Comparisons of OASIM photosynthetically available radiation (PAR) with PAR derived from SeaWiFS showed low bias (-1.8 mol photons /sq m/d, or about 5%), RMS (4.25 mol photons /sq m/d ' or about 12%), near unity slope (1.03) and high correlation coefficient (0.97). Coupled with previous estimates of clear sky spectral irradiance in OASIM (6.6% RMS at 1 nm resolution), these results suggest that OASIM provides reasonable estimates of surface broadband and spectral irradiance in the oceans, and can support studies on ocean ecosystems, carbon cycling, and heat exchange.

  1. Ocean-atmosphere interactions modulate irrigation's climate impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krakauer, Nir Y.; Puma, Michael J.; Cook, Benjamin I.; Gentine, Pierre; Nazarenko, Larissa

    2016-11-01

    Numerous studies have focused on the local and regional climate effects of irrigated agriculture and other land cover and land use change (LCLUC) phenomena, but there are few studies on the role of ocean-atmosphere interaction in modulating irrigation climate impacts. Here, we compare simulations with and without interactive sea surface temperatures of the equilibrium effect on climate of contemporary (year 2000) irrigation geographic extent and intensity. We find that ocean-atmosphere interaction does impact the magnitude of global-mean and spatially varying climate impacts, greatly increasing their global reach. Local climate effects in the irrigated regions remain broadly similar, while non-local effects, particularly over the oceans, tend to be larger. The interaction amplifies irrigation-driven standing wave patterns in the tropics and midlatitudes in our simulations, approximately doubling the global-mean amplitude of surface temperature changes due to irrigation. The fractions of global area experiencing significant annual-mean surface air temperature and precipitation change also approximately double with ocean-atmosphere interaction. Subject to confirmation with other models, these findings imply that LCLUC is an important contributor to climate change even in remote areas such as the Southern Ocean, and that attribution studies should include interactive oceans and need to consider LCLUC, including irrigation, as a truly global forcing that affects climate and the water cycle over ocean as well as land areas.

  2. Ocean-Atmosphere Interactions Modulate Irrigation's Climate Impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krakauer, Nir Y.; Puma, Michael J.; Cook, Benjamin I.; Gentine, Pierre; Nazarenko, Larissa

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have focused on the local and regional climate effects of irrigated agriculture and other land cover and land use change (LCLUC) phenomena, but there are few studies on the role of ocean- atmosphere interaction in modulating irrigation climate impacts. Here, we compare simulations with and without interactive sea surface temperatures of the equilibrium effect on climate of contemporary (year 2000) irrigation geographic extent and intensity. We find that ocean-atmosphere interaction does impact the magnitude of global-mean and spatially varying climate impacts, greatly increasing their global reach. Local climate effects in the irrigated regions remain broadly similar, while non-local effects, particularly over the oceans, tend to be larger. The interaction amplifies irrigation-driven standing wave patterns in the tropics and mid-latitudes in our simulations, approximately doubling the global-mean amplitude of surface temperature changes due to irrigation. The fractions of global area experiencing significant annual-mean surface air temperature and precipitation change also approximately double with ocean-atmosphere interaction. Subject to confirmation with other models, these findings imply that LCLUC is an important contributor to climate change even in remote areas such as the Southern Ocean, and that attribution studies should include interactive oceans and need to consider LCLUC, including irrigation, as a truly global forcing that affects climate and the water cycle over ocean as well as land areas.

  3. LOSCAR: Long-term Ocean-atmosphere-Sediment CArbon cycle Reservoir Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeebe, R. E.

    2011-06-01

    The LOSCAR model is designed to efficiently compute the partitioning of carbon between ocean, atmosphere, and sediments on time scales ranging from centuries to millions of years. While a variety of computationally inexpensive carbon cycle models are already available, many are missing a critical sediment component, which is indispensable for long-term integrations. One of LOSCAR's strengths is the coupling of ocean-atmosphere routines to a computationally efficient sediment module. This allows, for instance, adequate computation of CaCO3 dissolution, calcite compensation, and long-term carbon cycle fluxes, including weathering of carbonate and silicate rocks. The ocean component includes various biogeochemical tracers such as total carbon, alkalinity, phosphate, oxygen, and stable carbon isotopes. We have previously published applications of the model tackling future projections of ocean chemistry and weathering, pCO2 sensitivity to carbon cycle perturbations throughout the Cenozoic, and carbon/calcium cycling during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum. The focus of the present contribution is the detailed description of the model including numerical architecture, processes and parameterizations, tuning, and examples of input and output. Typical CPU integration times of LOSCAR are of order seconds for several thousand model years on current standard desktop machines. The LOSCAR source code in C can be obtained from the author by sending a request to loscar.model@gmail.com.

  4. The role of ocean-atmosphere reorganizations in glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broecker, Wallace S.; Denton, George H.

    A case is made that glacial-to-interglacial transitions involve major reorganizations of the ocean-atmosphere system. Such reorganizations constitute jumps between stable modes of operation which cause changes in the greenhouse gas content and albedo of the atmosphere. Only in this way can the rapidity of glacial terminations, the hemispheric synchroneity and symmetry of mountain glaciation, and the large polar air temperature and dustiness variations be accounted for. If these reorganizations are driven in some fashion by orbitally induced seasonal insolation changes, then the connection between insolation and climate is most likely through impacts of fresh water transport on the ocean's salinity distribution.

  5. The role of ocean-atmosphere reorganizations is glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broecker, Wallace S.; Denton, George H.

    1989-10-01

    A case is made that glacial-to-interglacial transitions involve major reorganizations of the ocean-atmosphere system. Such reorganizations constitute jumps between stable modes of operation which cause changes in the greenhouse gas content and albedo of the atmosphere. Only in this way can the rapidity of glacial terminations, the hemispheric synchroneity and symmetry of mountain glaciation, and the large polar air temperature and dustiness variations be accounted for. If these reorganizations are driven in some fashion by orbitally induced seasonal insolation changes, then the connection between insolation and climate is most likely through impacts of fresh water transport on the ocean's salinity distribution.

  6. Comparison of GCM subgrid fluxes calculated using BATS and SiB schemes with a coupled land-atmosphere high-resolution model

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Jinmei; Arritt, R.W.

    1996-12-31

    The importance of land-atmosphere interactions and biosphere in climate change studies has long been recognized, and several land-atmosphere interaction schemes have been developed. Among these, the Simple Biosphere scheme (SiB) of Sellers et al. and the Biosphere Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (BATS) of Dickinson et al. are two of the most widely known. The effects of GCM subgrid-scale inhomogeneities of surface properties in general circulation models also has received increasing attention in recent years. However, due to the complexity of land surface processes and the difficulty to prescribe the large number of parameters that determine atmospheric and soil interactions with vegetation, many previous studies and results seem to be contradictory. A GCM grid element typically represents an area of 10{sup 4}-10{sup 6} km{sup 2}. Within such an area, there exist variations of soil type, soil wetness, vegetation type, vegetation density and topography, as well as urban areas and water bodies. In this paper, we incorporate both BATS and SiB2 land surface process schemes into a nonhydrostatic, compressible version of AMBLE model (Atmospheric Model -- Boundary-Layer Emphasis), and compare the surface heat fluxes and mesoscale circulations calculated using the two schemes. 8 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Using oceanic-atmospheric oscillations for long lead time streamflow forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalra, Ajay; Ahmad, Sajjad

    2009-03-01

    We present a data-driven model, Support Vector Machine (SVM), for long lead time streamflow forecasting using oceanic-atmospheric oscillations. The SVM is based on statistical learning theory that uses a hypothesis space of linear functions based on Kernel approach and has been used to predict a quantity forward in time on the basis of training from past data. The strength of SVM lies in minimizing the empirical classification error and maximizing the geometric margin by solving inverse problem. The SVM model is applied to three gages, i.e., Cisco, Green River, and Lees Ferry in the Upper Colorado River Basin in the western United States. Annual oceanic-atmospheric indices, comprising Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO), and El Nino-Southern Oscillations (ENSO) for a period of 1906-2001 are used to generate annual streamflow volumes with 3 years lead time. The SVM model is trained with 86 years of data (1906-1991) and tested with 10 years of data (1992-2001). On the basis of correlation coefficient, root means square error, and Nash Sutcliffe Efficiency Coefficient the model shows satisfactory results, and the predictions are in good agreement with measured streamflow volumes. Sensitivity analysis, performed to evaluate the effect of individual and coupled oscillations, reveals a strong signal for ENSO and NAO indices as compared to PDO and AMO indices for the long lead time streamflow forecast. Streamflow predictions from the SVM model are found to be better when compared with the predictions obtained from feedforward back propagation artificial neural network model and linear regression.

  8. Ocean-atmosphere-wave characterisation of a wind jet (Ebro shelf, NW Mediterranean Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grifoll, Manel; Navarro, Jorge; Pallares, Elena; Ràfols, Laura; Espino, Manuel; Palomares, Ana

    2016-06-01

    In this contribution the wind jet dynamics in the northern margin of the Ebro River shelf (NW Mediterranean Sea) are investigated using coupled numerical models. The study area is characterised by persistent and energetic offshore winds during autumn and winter. During these seasons, a seaward wind jet usually develops in a ˜ 50 km wide band offshore. The COAWST (Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport) modelling system was implemented in the region with a set of downscaling meshes to obtain high-resolution meteo-oceanographic outputs. Wind, waves and water currents were compared with in situ observations and remote-sensing-derived products with an acceptable level of agreement. Focused on an intense offshore wind event, the modelled wind jet appears in a limited area offshore with strong spatial variability. The wave pattern during the wind jet is characterised by the development of bimodal directional spectra, and the ocean circulation tends to present well-defined two-layer flow in the shallower region (i.e. inner shelf). The outer shelf tends to be dominated by mesoscale dynamics such as the slope current. Due to the limited fetch length, ocean surface roughness considering sea state (wave-atmosphere coupling) modifies to a small extent the wind and significant wave height under severe cross-shelf wind events. However, the coupling effect in the wind resource assessment may be relevant due to the cubic relation between the wind intensity and power.

  9. Ocean-atmosphere processes driving Indian summer monsoon biases in CFSv2 hindcasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narapusetty, Balachandrudu; Murtugudde, Raghu; Wang, Hui; Kumar, Arun

    2016-09-01

    This paper analyzes the role of the Indian Ocean (IO) and the atmosphere biases in generating and sustaining large-scale precipitation biases over Central India (CI) during the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) in the climate forecast system version 2 (CFSv2) hindcasts that are produced by initializing the system each month from January 1982 to March 2011. The CFSv2 hindcasts are characterized by a systematic dry monsoon bias over CI that deteriorate with forecast lead-times and coexist with a wet bias in the tropical IO suggesting a large-scale interplay between coupled ocean-atmosphere and land biases. The biases evolving from spring-initialized forecasts are analyzed in detail to understand the evolution of summer biases. The northward migration of the Inter Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) that typically crosses the equator in the IO sector during April in nature is delayed in the hindcasts when the forecast system is initialized in early spring. Our analyses show that the delay in the ITCZ coexists with wind and SST biases and the associated processes project onto the seasonal evolution of the coupled ocean-atmosphere features. This delay in conjunction with the SST and the wind biases during late spring and early summer contributes to excessive precipitation over the ocean and leading to a deficit in rainfall over CI throughout the summer. Attribution of bias to a specific component in a coupled forecast system is particularly challenging as seemingly independent biases from one component affect the other components or are affected by their feedbacks. In the spring-initialized forecasts, the buildup of deeper thermocline in association with warmer SSTs due to the enhanced Ekman pumping in the southwest IO inhibits the otherwise typical northward propagation of ITCZ in the month of April. Beyond this deficiency in the forecasts, two key ocean-atmosphere coupled mechanisms are identified; one in the Arabian Sea, where a positive windstress curl bias in conjunction

  10. LOSCAR: Long-term Ocean-atmosphere-Sediment CArbon cycle Reservoir Model v2.0.4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeebe, R. E.

    2012-01-01

    The LOSCAR model is designed to efficiently compute the partitioning of carbon between ocean, atmosphere, and sediments on time scales ranging from centuries to millions of years. While a variety of computationally inexpensive carbon cycle models are already available, many are missing a critical sediment component, which is indispensable for long-term integrations. One of LOSCAR's strengths is the coupling of ocean-atmosphere routines to a computationally efficient sediment module. This allows, for instance, adequate computation of CaCO3 dissolution, calcite compensation, and long-term carbon cycle fluxes, including weathering of carbonate and silicate rocks. The ocean component includes various biogeochemical tracers such as total carbon, alkalinity, phosphate, oxygen, and stable carbon isotopes. LOSCAR's configuration of ocean geometry is flexible and allows for easy switching between modern and paleo-versions. We have previously published applications of the model tackling future projections of ocean chemistry and weathering, pCO2 sensitivity to carbon cycle perturbations throughout the Cenozoic, and carbon/calcium cycling during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum. The focus of the present contribution is the detailed description of the model including numerical architecture, processes and parameterizations, tuning, and examples of input and output. Typical CPU integration times of LOSCAR are of order seconds for several thousand model years on current standard desktop machines. The LOSCAR source code in C can be obtained from the author by sending a request to loscar.model@gmail.com.

  11. DMS cycle in the marine ocean-atmosphere system a global model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kloster, S.; Feichter, J.; Maier-Reimer, E.; Six, K. D.; Stier, P.; Wetzel, P.

    2005-08-01

    A global coupled ocean-atmosphere modeling system is established to study the production of Dimethylsulfide (DMS) in the ocean, the DMS flux to the atmosphere, and the resulting sulfur concentrations in the atmosphere. The DMS production and consumption processes in the ocean are simulated in the marine biogeochemistry model HAMOCC5, embedded in a ocean general circulation model (MPI-OM). The atmospheric model ECHAM5 is extended by the microphysical aerosol model HAM, treating the sulfur chemistry in the atmosphere and the evolution of the microphysically interacting internally- and externally mixed aerosol populations.

    We simulate a global annual mean DMS sea surface concentration of 1.8 nmol/l, a DMS emission of 28 Tg(S)/yr, a DMS burden in the atmosphere of 0.077 Tg(S), and a DMS lifetime of 1.0 days. To quantify the role of DMS in the atmospheric sulfur cycle we simulate the relative contribution of DMS-derived SO2 and SO4-2 to the total atmospheric sulfur concentrations. DMS contributes 25% to the global annually averaged SO2 column burden. For SO4-2 the contribution is 27%.

    The coupled model setup allows the evaluation of the simulated DMS quantities with measurements taken in the ocean and in the atmosphere. The simulated global distribution of DMS sea surface concentrations compares reasonably well with measurements. The comparison to SO4-2 surface concentration measurements in regions with a high DMS contribution to SO4-2 shows an overestimation by the model. This overestimation is most pronounced in the biologically active season with high DMS emissions and most likely caused by a too high simulated SO4-2 yield from DMS oxidation.

  12. Dynamics and predictability of a low-order wind-driven ocean - atmosphere model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannitsem, Stéphane

    2013-04-01

    The dynamics of a low order coupled wind-driven Ocean-Atmosphere (OA) system is investigated with emphasis on its predictability properties. The low-order coupled deterministic system is composed of a baroclinic atmosphere for which 12 dominant dynamical modes are only retained (Charney and Straus, 1980) and a wind-driven, quasi-geostrophic and reduced-gravity shallow ocean whose field is truncated to four dominant modes able to reproduce the large scale oceanic gyres (Pierini, 2011). The two models are coupled through mechanical forcings only. The analysis of its dynamics reveals first that under aperiodic atmospheric forcings only dominant single gyres (clockwise or counterclockwise) appear. This feature is expected to be related with the specific domain choice over which the coupled system is defined. Second the dynamical quantities characterizing the short-term predictability (Lyapunov exponents, Lyapunov dimension, Kolmogorov-Sinaï (KS) entropy) displays a complex dependence as a function of the key parameters of the system, namely the coupling strength and the external thermal forcing. In particular, the KS-entropy is increasing as a function of the coupling in most of the experiments, implying an increase of the rate of loss of information about the localization of the system on his attractor. Finally the dynamics of the error is explored and indicates, in particular, a rich variety of short term behaviors of the error in the atmosphere depending on the (relative) amplitude of the initial error affecting the ocean, from polynomial (at2 + bt3 + ct4) up to purely exponential evolutions. These features are explained and analyzed in the light of the recent findings on error growth (Nicolis et al, 2009). References Charney J G, Straus DM (1980) Form-Drag Instability, Multiple Equilibria and Propagating Planetary Waves in Baroclinic, Orographically Forced, Planetary Wave Systems. J Atmos Sci 37: 1157-1176. Nicolis C, Perdigao RAP, Vannitsem S (2009) Dynamics of

  13. The Flexible Global Ocean-Atmosphere-Land system model, Spectral Version 2: FGOALS-s2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Qing; Lin, Pengfei; Zhou, Tianjun; Liu, Yimin; Yu, Yongqiang; Wu, Guoxiong; He, Bian; He, Jie; Li, Lijuan; Li, Jiandong; Li, Yangchun; Liu, Hailong; Qiao, Fangli; Song, Zhenya; Wang, Bin; Wang, Jun; Wang, Pengfei; Wang, Xiaocong; Wang, Zaizhi; Wu, Bo; Wu, Tongwen; Xu, Yongfu; Yu, Haiyang; Zhao, Wei; Zheng, Weipeng; Zhou, Linjiong

    2013-05-01

    The Flexible Global Ocean-Atmosphere-Land System model, Spectral Version 2 (FGOALS-s2) was used to simulate realistic climates and to study anthropogenic influences on climate change. Specifically, the FGOALS-s2 was integrated with Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) to conduct coordinated experiments that will provide valuable scientific information to climate research communities. The performances of FGOALS-s2 were assessed in simulating major climate phenomena, and documented both the strengths and weaknesses of the model. The results indicate that FGOALS-s2 successfully overcomes climate drift, and realistically models global and regional climate characteristics, including SST, precipitation, and atmospheric circulation. In particular, the model accurately captures annual and semi-annual SST cycles in the equatorial Pacific Ocean, and the main characteristic features of the Asian summer monsoon, which include a low-level southwestern jet and five monsoon rainfall centers. The simulated climate variability was further examined in terms of teleconnections, leading modes of global SST (namely, ENSO), Pacific Decadal Oscillations (PDO), and changes in 19th-20th century climate. The analysis demonstrates that FGOALS-s2 realistically simulates extra-tropical teleconnection patterns of large-scale climate, and irregular ENSO periods. The model gives fairly reasonable reconstructions of spatial patterns of PDO and global monsoon changes in the 20th century. However, because the indirect effects of aerosols are not included in the model, the simulated global temperature change during the period 1850-2005 is greater than the observed warming, by 0.6°C. Some other shortcomings of the model are also noted.

  14. Impact of the SH sea-ice cover and ocean surface on the Southern Ocean atmospheric variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merz, N.; Sedlacek, J.; Raible, C. C.

    2012-04-01

    Satellite observations of the last 30 years have shown a slight increase in the Antarctic sea-ice area (SIA). This increase seems to be counterintuitive regarding global warming and the strong decrease observed in Arctic SIA. Thus, dynamical processes rather than thermodynamical processes would be a more plausible cause for the Southern Hemisphere (SH) sea-ice increase. This raises interest in understanding the dynamics of the Southern Ocean climate system and its recent changes. Based on ERA-40 reanalysis data and satellite-borne HadISST1 observations for 1979-2008 we detect synchronous variability in the Southern Ocean mean sea-level pressure (SLP), sea surface temperatures (SST) and sea-ice concentration (SIC) fields. The strength of the Amundsen-Sea low (ASL) is strongly connected with the phase of a dipole-pattern in SICs and SSTs identified across the Western longitudes. With the aid of a comprehensive climate model, we further investigate the one-way impact of the lower boundaries on the Southern Ocean atmosphere. Therefore, a set of sensitivity atmosphere-land-only simulations is performed forced either with inter-annually variable (the HadISST1 observations) or climatological input data of SICs and SSTs. The sensitivity experiments exhibit a clear impact of both, the SSTs and the sea-ice cover on the Southern Ocean atmospheric inter-annual variability. For example, the variability of the ASL is drastically reduced in the experiment with climatological lower boundaries. The strongest decrease is due to the missing SST variability in the mid-latitudinal Pacific suppressing the generation of the so-called Pacific South America teleconnection, an ENSO-related wave pattern significantly influencing the state of the ASL. The wave generation is inhibited due to reduced variability of the latent heat flux. Further, variable sea ice impacts the SLP variability but to a lower degree. In summary, there is clear evidence that the Southern Ocean atmospheric variability

  15. Global flood risk response to large-scale land-ocean-atmospheric interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, P. J.; Dettinger, M. D.; Jongman, B.; Sperna Weiland, F.; Winsemius, H.

    2012-12-01

    The economic consequences of flooding are huge, as exemplified by recent major floods in Thailand, Pakistan, and the Mississippi Basin. Moreover, research shows that economic flood risks are increasing around the world. Whilst much research is being carried out to assess how this may be related to socioeconomic development (increased exposure to floods) or climate change (increased hazard), the role of interannual climate variability caused by land-ocean-atmospheric interactions, is poorly understood at the global scale. To address these issues, we recently initiated a 4-year project to assess and map the impacts of large scale interannual climate variability on both flood risk (in terms of expected annual economic damages) and flood hazard at the global scale. In this contribution, we assess El Niño Southern Oscillation's (ENSO) impact on global flood risk, and discuss implications for key stakeholders. The research involves a model chain coupling the results of a hydrological model, inundation model, and flood damage model. In terms of risk, we simulate clear and significant differences in annual expected economic damage between El Niño (EN) years and non-EN years, and between La Niña (LN) and non-LN years. These are related to large-scale land-ocean atmospheric interactions, which force significant changes in flood hazard magnitudes. However, our analyses reveal asymmetrical results between ENSO modes. For example, whilst several basins in southern Africa have much higher annual floods in LN years than in neutral years, the opposite signal is less clear. We present seasonal composites of climatic and atmospheric variables to explain these differences. Moreover, we find strong correlations between ENSO indices and (simulated and observed) peak annual floods in rivers all around the world. In many regions, the strength of these relationships is greater than those between the ENSO indices and mean annual discharge. The application of these results to short and

  16. Structure and dynamics of decadal anomalies in the wintertime midlatitude North Pacific ocean-atmosphere system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jiabei; Yang, Xiu-Qun

    2016-09-01

    The structure and dynamics of decadal anomalies in the wintertime midlatitude North Pacific ocean-atmosphere system are examined in this study, using the NCEP/NCAR atmospheric reanalysis, HadISST SST and Simple Ocean Data Assimilation data for 1960-2010. The midlatitude decadal anomalies associated with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation are identified, being characterized by an equivalent barotropic atmospheric low (high) pressure over a cold (warm) oceanic surface. Such a unique configuration of decadal anomalies can be maintained by an unstable ocean-atmosphere interaction mechanism in the midlatitudes, which is hypothesized as follows. Associated with a warm PDO phase, an initial midlatitude surface westerly anomaly accompanied with intensified Aleutian low tends to force a negative SST anomaly by increasing upward surface heat fluxes and driving southward Ekman current anomaly. The SST cooling tends to increase the meridional SST gradient, thus enhancing the subtropical oceanic front. As an adjustment of the atmospheric boundary layer to the enhanced oceanic front, the low-level atmospheric meridional temperature gradient and thus the low-level atmospheric baroclinicity tend to be strengthened, inducing more active transient eddy activities that increase transient eddy vorticity forcing. The vorticity forcing that dominates the total atmospheric forcing tends to produce an equivalent barotropic atmospheric low pressure north of the initial westerly anomaly, intensifying the initial anomalies of the midlatitude surface westerly and Aleutian low. Therefore, it is suggested that the midlatitude ocean-atmosphere interaction can provide a positive feedback mechanism for the development of initial anomaly, in which the oceanic front and the atmospheric transient eddy are the indispensable ingredients. Such a positive ocean-atmosphere feedback mechanism is fundamentally responsible for the observed decadal anomalies in the midlatitude North Pacific ocean-atmosphere

  17. The role of hydrological processes in ocean-atmosphere interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, P.J.

    1994-11-01

    Earth is unique among the planets of the solar system in possessing a full hydrological cycle. The role of water in the evolution of planetary atmospheres is discussed. As the atmospheres of the planets developed and modified the early climates of the planets, only the climate trajectory of Earth intercepted the water phase transitions near the triplet point of water, thus allowing the full gamut of water forms to coexist. As a result, transitions between the water phases pervade the entire system and probably are responsible for the creation of a unique climate state. The interactions between the components of the climate system are enriched by the nonlinearity of the water phase transitions. The nonlinear character of the phase transitions of water suggests that the climate should be particularly sensitive to hydrological processes, especially in the tropics. Signatures of the nonlinearity are found in both the structures of the oceans and the atmosphere. Models of the ocean and atmospheric and oceanic data and models of the coupled system are used to perform systematic analyses of hydrological processes and their role in system interaction. The analysis is extended to consider the role of hydrological processes in the basic dynamics and thermodynamics of oceanic and atmospheric systems. The role hydrological processes play in determining the scale of the major atmospheric circulation patterns is investigated. Explanations are offered as to why large-scale convection in the tropical atmosphere is constrained to lie within the 28{degrees}C sea surface temperature contour and how hydrological processes are involved in interannual climate variability. The relative roles of thermal and haline forcing of the oceanic thermohaline circulation are discussed. Hydrological processes are considered in a global context by the development of a conceptual model of a simple planetary system. 94 refs., 38 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Ocean atmosphere thermal decoupling in the eastern equatorial Indian ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, Sudheer; Ravichandran, M.; Kumar, B. Praveen; Jampana, Raju V.; Han, Weiqing

    2016-09-01

    Eastern equatorial Indian ocean (EEIO) is one of the most climatically sensitive regions in the global ocean, which plays a vital role in modulating Indian ocean dipole (IOD) and El Niño southern oscillation (ENSO). Here we present evidences for a paradoxical and perpetual lower co-variability between sea-surface temperature (SST) and air-temperature (Tair) indicating instantaneous thermal decoupling in the same region, where signals of the strongly coupled variability of SST anomalies and zonal winds associated with IOD originate at inter-annual time scale. The correlation minimum between anomalies of Tair and SST occurs in the eastern equatorial Indian ocean warm pool region (≈70°E-100°E, 5°S-5°N), associated with lower wind speeds and lower sensible heat fluxes. At sub-monthly and Madden-Julian oscillation time scales, correlation of both variables becomes very low. In above frequencies, precipitation positively contributes to the low correlation by dropping Tair considerably while leaving SST without any substantial instant impact. Precipitation is led by positive build up of SST and post-facto drop in it. The strong semi-annual response of SST to mixed layer variability and equatorial waves, with the absence of the same in the Tair, contributes further to the weak correlation at the sub-annual scale. The limited correlation found in the EEIO is mainly related to the annual warming of the region and ENSO which is hard to segregate from the impacts of IOD.

  19. Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Modeling Using the TIME-GCM

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Modeling Using the TIME-GCM Raymond G. Roble High Altitude Observatory National Center for Atmospheric...ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) High Altitude Observatory,National Center for Atmospheric Research,,Box 3000,,Boulder,,CO, 80307 8. PERFORMING...climate model that extends from the ground, including oceans, to 500 km altitude to study global atmospheric variability and couplings. A project is

  20. Understanding the Nature of Marine Aerosols and Their Effects in the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    instruments (DASH-SP and CVI). Dr. Graham Feingold (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) collaborated with the PI on using cloud models...E-PEACE). An on-going collaboration with Dr. Daniel Partridge (University of Oxford) has involved conducting inverse modelling of aerosol-cloud

  1. Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Nested Modeling of the Adriatic Sea During Winter and Spring 2001

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-10-15

    offshore of Zadar . The 36-km COAMPS mean wind stress fails to resolve the bora fingers situated over the Gulf of Trieste and off Zadar . Where the bora blows...Adriatic. However, in the Gulf of Trieste and offshore of Zadar , fluctuating and mean wind stress values are stronger in the 4-km-resolution model. Also...the northern portion of the Gulf of Trieste, off the southern tip of the Istrian peninsula, and north of the Croatian town of Zadar . By contrast, the

  2. Development and Testing of the Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-11-01

    1970’s that numerical models based on the nonhydrostatic equations were devel- oped. Several of these models were used to study convective processes...Miller and Pearce, 1974; Schlesinger, 1975; Clark, 1977; Klemp and Wilhelmson, 1978; Clark, 1979; Tripoli and Cotton, 1982) while others studied ...operational use (Tapp and White, 1976; Carpenter, 1979) and Tripoli (1992a) has recently developed a nonhydrostatic 1 model to study scale interaction

  3. Understanding the Nature of Marine Aerosols and Their Effects in the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    leading to a peer-reviewed manuscript • Successful execution of the 2013 NiCE field experiment with the CIRPAS Twin Otter RESULTS Results are...samples collected by the CIRPAS Twin Otter between July and August 2011 during the E-PEACE field campaign. Organic acids are a critical chemical...Concentrations of sea salt crustal tracer species, oxalate, and malonate were positively correlated with low-level wind speed suggesting that an important route

  4. Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Dynamics and Predictability of MJO’s

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    2005 to 2009) wavenumber-frequency spectral density of the symmetric component (2.5N-10N) of (a) NOAA OLR (W2/m4) and (b) NCEP U10 (m2/s2). (c...166 days) NOAA OLR (shading) and NCEP U10 (contours). (b) As in (a) but from the model. The negative wind anomalies are show in dashed contours (CI...and 200 hPa and OLR from (left) NCEP and OLR from the NOAA satellite for 1980 – 1999 and (right) the 20 yr CCSM4 run. The total variance accounted

  5. Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Dynamics and Predictability of MJO’s

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    NOAA OLR (W2/m4) and (b) NCEP U10 (m2/s2). (c) Coherence squared between OLR and U10. (Right) As in (left) except from the WRF simulation. 6...Figure 3. (a) Filtered (k=0~8, w=0.006~0.055 cpd, 18-166 days) NOAA OLR (shading) and NCEP U10 (contours). (b) As in (a) but from the model. The...modes of 20-100 day 15S-15N-averaged zonal wind at 850 hPa and 200 hPa and OLR from (left) NCEP and OLR from the NOAA satellite for 1980 – 1999 and

  6. Coupled ocean-atmosphere loss of marine refractory dissolved organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieber, David J.; Keene, William C.; Frossard, Amanda A.; Long, Michael S.; Maben, John R.; Russell, Lynn M.; Kinsey, Joanna D.; Tyssebotn, Inger Marie B.; Quinn, Patricia K.; Bates, Timothy S.

    2016-03-01

    The oceans hold a massive quantity of organic carbon, nearly all of which is dissolved and more than 95% is refractory, cycling through the oceans several times before complete removal. The vast reservoir of refractory dissolved organic carbon (RDOC) is a critical component of the global carbon cycle that is relevant to our understanding of fundamental marine biogeochemical processes and the role of the oceans in climate change with respect to long-term storage and sequestration of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Here we show that RDOC includes surface-active organic matter that can be incorporated into primary marine aerosol produced by bursting bubbles at the sea surface. We propose that this process will deliver RDOC from the sea surface to the atmosphere wherein its photochemical oxidation corresponds to a potentially important and hitherto unknown removal mechanism for marine RDOC.

  7. Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Models, International Liege Colloguium on Ocean Hydrodynamics (21st)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-02

    Albuquerque, New Mexico J , Na’ 0 N plementary Notes. 1w O ;ributionlAvailability Statement. 12b. Distribution Code. CV oved for public release...ir At times nan. K . Clittae and asma viocwu niip herto fUCIs using the PE approach likein that the temporal und spatial scale mis- one memher of the

  8. Numerical simulation of large-scale ocean-atmosphere coupling and the ocean's role in climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, W. L.

    1983-01-01

    The problem of reducing model generated sigma coordinate data to pressure levels is considered. A mass consistent scheme for performing budget analyses is proposed, wherein variables interpolated to a given pressure level are weighted according to the mass between a nominal pressure level above and either a nominal pressure level below or the Earth's surface, whichever is closer. The method is applied to the atmospheric energy cycle as simulated by the OSU two level atmospheric general circulation model. The results are more realistic than sigma coordinate analyses with respect to eddy decomposition, and are in agreement with the sigma coordinate evaluation of the numerical energy sink. Comparison with less sophisticated budget schemes indicates superiority locally, but not globally.

  9. Ocean-Atmosphere Heat Exchange: Limitations of Currently Available Datasets and Potential for Future Progress (Solicited Talk)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josey, Simon

    2016-04-01

    The flux of heat between the ocean and the atmosphere is a key element of the global climate system, central to variations in the ocean heat budget and variations in surface temperature. Factors determining the heat exchange will be discussed using models and observations with an emphasis on the period 1990-2015. This period include changes associated with the potential warming hiatus and more recently the major El Nino event that developed in 2015. The ability of leading datasets to reliably estimate surface flux changes is limited by a number of factors and these will be discussed in the context of variations in other components of the climate system. Progress towards obtaining more reliable climatological estimates of the heat exchange will also be considered with reference to recent developments using residual techniques and ocean reanalyses in addition to atmospheric reanalysis, remote sensing and ship based datasets. In addition, use of surface meteorological fields to generate ocean model forcing will be examined together with recent developments using high resolution coupled ocean-atmosphere models. Finally, the potential for significant advances in regions of major uncertainty using the growing network of surface flux buoys will be discussed with a focus on two moorings now in place in the Southern Ocean.

  10. Decadal prediction of Colorado River streamflow anomalies using ocean-atmosphere teleconnections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Switanek, Matthew B.; Troch, Peter A.

    2011-12-01

    The Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) and Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) time series are used to forecast a decade ahead streamflow anomalies in the upper Colorado River at Lee's Ferry. In the instrumental record, we obtain unusually high decadal forecast skill that is statistically significant at the 95% confidence level, suggesting strong ocean-atmosphere-land teleconnection. In order to test whether such teleconnection existed in the past, we compare the retrospective forecast skill to the skills obtained using the available ocean-atmosphere teleconnection and streamflow reconstructions derived from tree rings. We find much lower skill in the reconstructed record. Using frequency analysis, we show that the streamflow and sea surface temperature oscillations in the instrumental records all have dominant low frequency periodicities (>35 years) that explain much of the total variance. However, such dominant periodicities do not appear in the power spectra of the reconstructed records of AMO, PDO and streamflow. Given that these dominant low periodicities are likely responsible for the high prediction skill in the instrumental record, it remains uncertain whether reliable decadal streamflow predictions in the upper Colorado River basin will be possible in the years ahead.

  11. The Influence of Indian Ocean Atmospheric Circulation on Warm Pool Hydroclimate During the Holocene Epoch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tierney, J.E.; Oppo, D. W.; LeGrande, A. N.; Huang, Y.; Rosenthal, Y.; Linsley, B. K.

    2012-01-01

    Existing paleoclimate data suggest a complex evolution of hydroclimate within the Indo-Pacific Warm Pool (IPWP) during the Holocene epoch. Here we introduce a new leaf wax isotope record from Sulawesi, Indonesia and compare proxy water isotope data with ocean-atmosphere general circulation model (OAGCM) simulations to identify mechanisms influencing Holocene IPWP hydroclimate. Modeling simulations suggest that orbital forcing causes heterogenous changes in precipitation across the IPWP on a seasonal basis that may account for the differences in time-evolution of the proxy data at respective sites. Both the proxies and simulations suggest that precipitation variability during the September-November (SON) season is important for hydroclimate in Borneo. The preeminence of the SON season suggests that a seasonally lagged relationship between the Indian monsoon and Indian Ocean Walker circulation influences IPWP hydroclimatic variability during the Holocene.

  12. Decadal variability of the Tropical Atlantic Ocean Surface Temperature in shipboard measurements and in a Global Ocean-Atmosphere model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Vikram M.; Delworth, Thomas

    1995-01-01

    processes may be responsible for the choice of the decadal and multidecadal timescales. Finally, it must be emphasized that the GFDL coupled ocean-atmosphere model generates the decadal and multidecadal timescale variability without any externally applied force, solar or lunar, at those timescales.

  13. Late Holocene Water Mass Change in the Norwegian Sea Caused by Different Ocean- Atmosphere Circulation Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauch, H. A.; Kandiano, E. S.

    2008-12-01

    There is common consensus that the Holocene climate history of the polar North was strongly tied to the insolation change on one the hand and the specific post-deglacial water mass evolution on the other. Using deep-sea sediment records we have investigated two crucial areas of the Norwegian Sea (Arctic Front; Voring Plateau) in order to understand the natural variability of oceanic-atmospheric change in this area since the middle Holocene. The information available from this longer time scale allows better insight for predictive purposes, since these records would then provide a longer time frame within which to evaluate any natural variability. We analyzed different foraminiferal species for O-isotope analyses and interpreted the planktic foraminiferal assemblage variations in combination with records of ice-rafted detritus (IRD) >150μm. It is shown that surface temperatures started to decrease at the Arctic Front after 6 ka, concomitant with the occurrence of IRD. This cooling trend continued into the Little Ice Age (LIA) when highest IRD input is noted. At the Voring Plateau, relatively stable and warm conditions are still recognized between 2.5 and 1 ka, in both planktic and benthic O-isotopes. Although variability among certain foraminiferal species would indicate some surface changes, the abundance of the polar species N. pachyderma (s) increased from 30% before 1 ka to 70% during the LIA. This increase is associated with highly variable isotope values through the entire water column (up to 1‰) and the sudden occurrence of basaltic IRD, presumably from Iceland. We interpret the records of the last 2.5 ka, and in particular the time of the LIA, to be the result of a major change in overall ocean-atmosphere circulation (from NAO+ to NAO-) which forced colder water masses and sea ice far into the eastern Norwegian Sea.

  14. Amplification of European Little Ice Age by sea ice-ocean-atmosphere feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehner, Flavio; Born, Andreas; Raible, Christoph C.; Stocker, Thomas F.

    2013-04-01

    The transition from the Medieval Climate Anomaly (~950-1250 AD) to the Little Ice Age (~1400-1700 AD) is believed to have been driven by an interplay of external forcing and climate system-internal variability. While the hemispheric signal seems to have been dominated by solar irradiance and volcanic eruptions, the understanding of mechanisms shaping the climate on continental scale is less robust. Examining an ensemble of transient model simulations as well as a new type of sensitivity experiments with artificial sea ice growth, we identify a sea ice-ocean-atmosphere feedback mechanism that amplifies the Little Ice Age cooling in the North Atlantic-European region and produces the temperature pattern expected from reconstructions. Initiated by increasing negative forcing, the Arctic sea ice substantially expands at the beginning of the Little Ice Age. The excess of sea ice is exported to the subpolar North Atlantic, where it melts, thereby weakening convection of the ocean. As a consequence, northward ocean heat transport is reduced, reinforcing the expansion of the sea ice and the cooling of the Northern Hemisphere. In the Nordic Seas, sea surface height anomalies cause the oceanic recirculation to strengthen at the expense of the warm Barents Sea inflow, thereby further reinforcing sea ice growth in the Barents Sea. The absent ocean-atmosphere heat flux in the Barents Sea results in an amplified cooling over Northern Europe. The positive nature of this feedback mechanism enables sea ice to remain in an expanded state for decades to centuries and explain sustained cold periods over Europe such as the Little Ice Age. Support for the feedback mechanism comes from recent proxy reconstructions around the Nordic Seas.

  15. The relative role of ocean-atmosphere interaction and African easterly waves in the generation and development of Tropical cyclones in the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabos, William; Sein, Dmitry; Hodges, Kevin; Jacob, Daniela

    2016-04-01

    We use the regionally coupled ocean - atmosphere model ROM and its atmospheric component REMO in standalone configuration in order to assess the relative role of ocean feedbacks and the African easterly waves in the simulation of tropical cyclonic activity in the Atlantic ocean. To this end, a number of coupled and uncoupled simulations forced by ERA-Interim boundary conditions have been carried out. In one set of simulations, the atmospheric domain includes the Northern Africa land masses, where the easterly waves are formed. In a second set of simulations, the easterly waves are taken from the ERA Interim reanalysis, as atmospheric domain excludes explicitly the African land masses. We study the statistics of modeled tracks of the tropical cyclones in the simulations. We found that the coupling has a strong impact on the number of tropical cyclones generated in the Northern Tropical Atlantic. In the coupled run it was close to the observations, while in the uncoupled runs the number of tropical cyclones was strongly overestimated. The coupling also influences the simulated position of the ITCZ.

  16. Observations of Recent Arctic Sea Ice Volume Loss and Its Impact on Ocean-Atmosphere Energy Exchange and Ice Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, N. T.; Markus, T.; Farrell, S. L.; Worthen, D. L.; Boisvert, L. N.

    2011-01-01

    Using recently developed techniques we estimate snow and sea ice thickness distributions for the Arctic basin through the combination of freeboard data from the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) and a snow depth model. These data are used with meteorological data and a thermodynamic sea ice model to calculate ocean-atmosphere heat exchange and ice volume production during the 2003-2008 fall and winter seasons. The calculated heat fluxes and ice growth rates are in agreement with previous observations over multiyear ice. In this study, we calculate heat fluxes and ice growth rates for the full distribution of ice thicknesses covering the Arctic basin and determine the impact of ice thickness change on the calculated values. Thinning of the sea ice is observed which greatly increases the 2005-2007 fall period ocean-atmosphere heat fluxes compared to those observed in 2003. Although there was also a decline in sea ice thickness for the winter periods, the winter time heat flux was found to be less impacted by the observed changes in ice thickness. A large increase in the net Arctic ocean-atmosphere heat output is also observed in the fall periods due to changes in the areal coverage of sea ice. The anomalously low sea ice coverage in 2007 led to a net ocean-atmosphere heat output approximately 3 times greater than was observed in previous years and suggests that sea ice losses are now playing a role in increasing surface air temperatures in the Arctic.

  17. Ocean-atmosphere forcing of centennial hydroclimatic variability in the Pacific Northwest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steinman, Byron A.; Abbott, Mark B.; Mann, Michael E.; Ortiz, Joseph D.; Feng, Song; Pompeani, David P.; Stansell, Nathan D.; Anderson, Lesleigh; Finney, Bruce P.; Bird, Broxton W.

    2014-01-01

    Reconstructing centennial timescale hydroclimate variability during the late Holocene is critically important for understanding large-scale patterns of drought and their relationship with climate dynamics. We present sediment oxygen isotope records spanning the last two millennia from 10 lakes, as well as climate model simulations, indicating that the Little Ice Age was dry relative to the Medieval Climate Anomaly in much of the Pacific Northwest of North America. This pattern is consistent with observed associations between the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), the Northern Annular Mode and drought as well as with proxy-based reconstructions of Pacific ocean-atmosphere variations over the past 1000 years. The large amplitude of centennial variability indicated by the lake data suggests that regional hydroclimate is characterized by longer-term shifts in ENSO-like dynamics, and that an improved understanding of the centennial timescale relationship between external forcing and drought conditions is necessary for projecting future hydroclimatic conditions in western North America.

  18. AMS Observations over Coastal California from the Biological and Oceanic Atmospheric Study (BOAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, K. H.; Coggon, M. M.; Hodas, N.; Negron, A.; Ortega, A. M.; Crosbie, E.; Sorooshian, A.; Nenes, A.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J.

    2015-12-01

    In July 2015, fifteen research flights were conducted on a US Navy Twin Otter aircraft as part of the Biological and Oceanic Atmospheric Study (BOAS) campaign. The flights took place near the California coast at Monterey, to investigate the effects of sea surface temperature and algal blooms on oceanic particulate emissions, the diurnal mixing of urban pollution with other airmasses, and the impacts of biological aerosols on the California atmosphere. The aircraft's payload included an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), a differential mobility analyzer, a cloud condensation nuclei counter, a counterflow virtual impactor, a cloudwater collector, and two instruments designed to detect biological aerosols - a wideband integrated biological spectrometer and a SpinCon II - as well as a number of meteorology and aerosol probes, two condensation particle counters, and instruments to measure gas-phase CO, CO2, O3, and NOx. Here, we describe in depth the objectives and outcomes of BOAS and report preliminary results, primarily from the AMS. We detail the spatial characteristics and meteorological variability of speciated aerosol components over a strong and persistent bloom of Pseudo-Nitzschia, the harmful algae that cause 'red tide', and report newly identified AMS markers for biological particles. Finally, we compare these results with data collected during BOAS over urban, forested, and agricultural environments, and describe the mixing observed between oceanic and terrestrial airmasses.

  19. Assessing the capability of EOS sensors in measuring ocean-atmosphere moisture exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. T.

    1985-01-01

    As part of the Science Synergism Studies to identify interdisciplinary Scientific studies, which could be addressed by the Environmental Observing System (EOS), the techniques being developed to measure ocean-atmosphere moisture exchanges using satellite sensors were evaluated. Studies required to use sensors proposed for EOS were examined. A method has been developed to compute the moisture flux using the wind speed, sea surface temperature, and preciptable water measured by satellite sensors. It relies on a statistical model which predicts surface-level humidity from precipitable water. The Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) measures all 3 parameters and was found to be sensitive to the annual cycle and large interannual variations such as the 1982 to 1983 El Nino. There are systematic differences between geophysical parameters measured by Nimbus/SMMR and in situ measurements. After quadratic trends and crosstalks were removed from the parameters through multivariate regressions, the latent heat fluxes computed from SMMR agree with those computed from ship reports to within 30 W/sq m. The poor quality of ship reports may be the cause of a portion of this scatter. Similar results are found using SEASAT/SMMR data. When the scatterometer winds were used instead of the SMMR winds, the difference between the satellite fluxes and the ship fluxes was reduced.

  20. Frigatebird behaviour at the ocean-atmosphere interface: integrating animal behaviour with multi-satellite data.

    PubMed

    De Monte, Silvia; Cotté, Cedric; d'Ovidio, Francesco; Lévy, Marina; Le Corre, Matthieu; Weimerskirch, Henri

    2012-12-07

    Marine top predators such as seabirds are useful indicators of the integrated response of the marine ecosystem to environmental variability at different scales. Large-scale physical gradients constrain seabird habitat. Birds however respond behaviourally to physical heterogeneity at much smaller scales. Here, we use, for the first time, three-dimensional GPS tracking of a seabird, the great frigatebird (Fregata minor), in the Mozambique Channel. These data, which provide at the same time high-resolution vertical and horizontal positions, allow us to relate the behaviour of frigatebirds to the physical environment at the (sub-)mesoscale (10-100 km, days-weeks). Behavioural patterns are classified based on the birds' vertical displacement (e.g. fast/slow ascents and descents), and are overlaid on maps of physical properties of the ocean-atmosphere interface, obtained by a nonlinear analysis of multi-satellite data. We find that frigatebirds modify their behaviours concurrently to transport and thermal fronts. Our results suggest that the birds' co-occurrence with these structures is a consequence of their search not only for food (preferentially searched over thermal fronts) but also for upward vertical wind. This is also supported by their relationship with mesoscale patterns of wind divergence. Our multi-disciplinary method can be applied to forthcoming high-resolution animal tracking data, and aims to provide a mechanistic understanding of animals' habitat choice and of marine ecosystem responses to environmental change.

  1. Behavior of the Brightness Temperature of the Ocean-Atmosphere System Under Conditions of Midlatitude and Tropical Cyclone Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grankov, A. G.; Milshin, A. A.; Novichikhin, E. P.

    2014-03-01

    We analyze the behavior of the ocean-atmosphere system characteristics based on direct (contact) and satellite microwave radiometric measurements. Some common and distinctive features of their dynamics in the mid-latitudes of the North Atlantic (in its Norwegian, Newfoundland, and Gulf Stream energy-active zones), which significanty affect the weather conditions in Europe, and in the tropical latitudes of the Atlantic (the Gulf of Mexico and the Bahamas area), which are the sources of tropical cyclogenesis, are considered.

  2. Titration of the Earth: Ocean-Atmosphere Evolution Recorded in Marine Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kah, L. C.

    2012-12-01

    feedback for understanding the temporal evolution of the ocean-atmosphere system.

  3. Long-lead probabilistic forecasting of streamflow using ocean-atmospheric and hydrological predictors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araghinejad, Shahab; Burn, Donald H.; Karamouz, Mohammad

    2006-03-01

    A geostatistically based approach with a local regression method is used to predict the magnitude of seasonal streamflow using ocean-atmospheric signals and the hydrological condition of a basin as predictors. The model characterizes the stochastic behavior of a forecast variable by generating a conditional distribution of the predicted value for different hydroclimatic conditions. The correlation structure between dependent and independent variables is represented by the variography of the predicted values in which the distance variable in the variogram is determined by measuring the distance between the predictors. This variogram in a virtual field constructed from the predictors makes it possible to predict variables as unmeasured points while considering historic information as measurement points of the field. Different types of kriging, as well as a generalized linear model regression, are used to predict data in interpolation and extrapolation modes. The forecast skill is evaluated using a linear error in probability space score for different combinations of predictors and different kriging methods. The method is applied to a case study of the Zayandeh-rud River in Isfahan, Iran. The utility of the method is demonstrated for forecasting autumn-winter and spring streamflow using the Southern Oscillation Index, the North Atlantic Oscillation, serial correlation between seasonal streamflow series, and the snow budget. The study analyzes the application of the proposed method in comparison with a K-nearest neighbor regression method. The results of this study show that the proposed method can significantly improve the long-lead probabilistic forecast skill for a nonlinear relationship between hydroclimatic predictors and streamflow in a region.

  4. Atmosphere-only GCM (ACCESS1.0) simulations with prescribed land surface temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackerley, Duncan; Dommenget, Dietmar

    2016-06-01

    General circulation models (GCMs) are valuable tools for understanding how the global ocean-atmosphere-land surface system interacts and are routinely evaluated relative to observational data sets. Conversely, observational data sets can also be used to constrain GCMs in order to identify systematic errors in their simulated climates. One such example is to prescribe sea surface temperatures (SSTs) such that 70 % of the Earth's surface temperature field is observationally constrained (known as an Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project, AMIP, simulation). Nevertheless, in such simulations, land surface temperatures are typically allowed to vary freely, and therefore any errors that develop over the land may affect the global circulation. In this study therefore, a method for prescribing the land surface temperatures within a GCM (the Australian Community Climate and Earth System Simulator, ACCESS) is presented. Simulations with this prescribed land surface temperature model produce a mean climate state that is comparable to a simulation with freely varying land temperatures; for example, the diurnal cycle of tropical convection is maintained. The model is then developed further to incorporate a selection of "proof of concept" sensitivity experiments where the land surface temperatures are changed globally and regionally. The resulting changes to the global circulation in these sensitivity experiments are found to be consistent with other idealized model experiments described in the wider scientific literature. Finally, a list of other potential applications is described at the end of the study to highlight the usefulness of such a model to the scientific community.

  5. The Oceanic, Atmospheric and Vegetation Response to Pliocene Closing of the Indonesian Passages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krebs-Kanzow, U.; Park, W.; Schneider, B.

    2010-12-01

    Tectonic changes of the Early- to Mid-Pliocene largely modified the Indonesian Passages by constricting and shallowing southerly passages between todays New Guinea and Sulawesi. While nowadays the Indonesian throughflow (ITF) of upper ocean waters from the tropical Pacific to the Indian Ocean primarily occurs through the Makassar Strait, these deepened and widened southerly passages might have been an important alternative pathway which might have influenced the ITF and its water masses and eventually climate of the Indo-Pacific. We study the climate response to changes in the geometry of the Indonesian Passages by using a global climate model (GCM). We compare control experiments using the present day topography (constricted set-up) with experiments using a topography resembling the early Pliocene situation (widened set-up). We find that circulation through the Indonesian Archipelago is considerably changed down to a depth of 1000 meters. In the constricted setting the ITF is weakened while the strength of the Pacific western boundary currents increases. Consistent with recent proxy evidence this results in cooling subsurface waters in the Indian Ocean while surface waters of the Pacific warm pool area exhibit a slight local increase in temperature. We observe strong changes in precipitation of the Indo-Pacific which is related to Sea surface temperature anomalies that do not exceed 1 °C. In particular the Australian continent experiences a pronounced aridification. Using an uncouple vegetation model we demonstrate that the simulated climate change might explain the observed Miocene to Pleistocene desertification of Australia

  6. Improvement of the Cloud Physics Formulation in the U.S. Navy Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-30

    processing of CCN in COAMPS Results from our investigation of aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions in COAMPS using the CIMMS bulk drizzle...parameterization, giant CCN parameterization) developed at CIMMS /OU will be made available to NRL and registered COAMPS users at large. Our results have

  7. Improvement of the Cloud Physics Formulation in the U.S. Navy Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-30

    3. Dynamics and microphysics of continental stratus have been simulated by the CIMMS LES and found to be in good agreement with radar-derived...large eddy simulation framework using the new CIMMS GCCN parameterization. Adding GCCN to a clean CCN background has little effect on cloud parameters...responsible for most of the transport. High resolution cloud radar observations (95 GHz W-band ARM Cloud Radar -- WACR) and the new CIMMS large eddy

  8. Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS), Version 5.0, Revision 2.0 (User’s Guide)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-03

    conditions such as wave boundary conditions, wind, tides, and storm surge. A quasi-stationary approach is used with stationary SWAN computations in a... correlation length scales are defined in NCODA v3.0. If hc_mdl is set to ‘locl’, then NCODA v3.0 will attempt to read a 2D array of correlation length...scales from a local file. It is anticipated that ‘locl’ will be used when the horizontal correlations are computed from an ensemble run of the

  9. Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS) Version 5.0, Rev. 2.0 (User’s Guide)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-03

    conditions such as wave boundary conditions, wind, tides, and storm surge. A quasi-stationary approach is used with stationary SWAN computations in a... correlation length scales are defined in NCODA v3.0. If hc_mdl is set to ‘locl’, then NCODA v3.0 will attempt to read a 2D array of correlation length...scales from a local file. It is anticipated that ‘locl’ will be used when the horizontal correlations are computed from an ensemble run of the

  10. Lagged effects of the Mistral wind on heavy precipitation through ocean-atmosphere coupling in the region of Valencia (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthou, Ségolène; Mailler, Sylvain; Drobinski, Philippe; Arsouze, Thomas; Bastin, Sophie; Béranger, Karine; Lebeaupin Brossier, Cindy

    2016-05-01

    The region of Valencia in Spain has historically been affected by heavy precipitation events (HPEs). These HPEs are known to be modulated by the sea surface temperature (SST) of the Balearic Sea. Using an atmosphere-ocean regional climate model, we show that more than 70 % of the HPEs in the region of Valencia present a SST cooling larger than the monthly trend in the Northwestern Mediterranean before the HPEs. This is linked to the breaking of a Rossby wave preceding the HPEs: a ridge-trough pattern at mid-levels centered over western France associated with a low-level depression in the Gulf of Genoa precedes the generation of a cut-off low over southern Spain with a surface depression over the Alboran Sea in the lee of the Atlas. This latter situation is favourable to the advection of warm and moist air towards the Mediterranean Spanish coast, possibly leading to HPEs. The depression in the Gulf of Genoa generates intense northerly (Mistral) to northwesterly (Tramontane/Cierzo) winds. In most cases, these intense winds trigger entrainment at the bottom of the oceanic mixed layer which is a mechanism explaining part of the SST cooling in most cases. Our study suggests that the SST cooling due to this strong wind regime then persists until the HPEs and reduces the precipitation intensity.

  11. Validation Test Report for the Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS) Version 5.0

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-27

    FOR EIGHT ADRIATIC SEA MOORINGS (VR1, VR2, VR4, VR5, VR6, CP2 , CP3, AND KB1). GREEN INDICATES THE BEST RESULTS. ............................ 27... CP2 , CP3, AND KB1). GREEN INDICATES BETTER RESULTS. ............................... 29 TABLE 1-11: UNCOUPLED MEAN DIRECTIONAL ERROR FOR EIGHT...ADRIATIC SEA MOORINGS (VR1, VR2, VR4, VR5, VR6, CP2 , CP3, AND KB1). GREEN INDICATES IMPROVED RESULTS. ............................................. 29

  12. Particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the Atlantic and Indian Ocean atmospheres during the Indian Ocean Experiment and Aerosols99: Continental sources to the marine atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crimmins, Bernard S.; Dickerson, Russell R.; Doddridge, Bruce G.; Baker, Joel E.

    2004-03-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), mutagenic compounds predominantly derived from combustion, have been used as markers of combustion sources to the atmosphere. Marine aerosol collected aboard the NOAA R/V Ronald Brown during the Aerosols99 and the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX) projects was analyzed for PAHs to assess the continental impact of combustion-derived particulate matter on the Atlantic and Indian Ocean atmospheres. PAH concentrations in the Atlantic and southern Indian Ocean atmospheres were consistent and low, ranging from <0.45 pg/m3 for coronene to 30 pg/m3 for 9, 10-dimethylanthracene. PAH concentrations increased ten fold as the ship crossed the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) into the northern Indian Ocean, indicating an increased anthropogenic influence. PAH concentrations over the northern Indian Ocean atmosphere were approximately an order of magnitude greater than those in the northern Atlantic Ocean atmosphere. PAH composition profiles over the northern Indian Ocean were specific to wind regimes and influenced by a combination of biomass and fossil fuel combustion. This was supported by significant correlations between select PAHs and organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), SO4-2 and K+ for particular wind regimes. Indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene/EC ratios used as a combustion source marker suggest that fossil fuel combustion, rather than biomass burning, is the predominant source of PAHs to the Northern Hemisphere Indian Ocean atmosphere. Interestingly, fossil fuel consumption in the Indian sub-continent is a fraction of that in Europe and the United States but the soot and PAH levels in the adjacent Northern Indian Ocean atmosphere are significantly greater than those in the Northern Atlantic atmosphere.

  13. Sensitivity of the Tropical Ocean-Atmosphere to Seasonal and Long-Term Climate Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K.-M.; Lau, K.-M.

    1999-01-01

    Since the pioneer works of Bjerknes (1966,1969) many studies have been conducted to understand the El Nino and Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon. These studies have led to a basic understanding of the dynamics of El Nino. Central to the couple dynamics of ENSO is the delayed action oscillator theory (Suarez and Schopf 1988), which successfully describes the cyclic feature of El Nino. While the oscillatory feature of El Nino is reasonably well understood, the irregularity of El Nino, the effect of monsoon on ENSO, and the response of coupled system to the global warming are still under debate. In the present study, we attempt to provide some theoretical understanding of possible impacts of seasonal cycle, monsoon, and climate changes on ENSO using intermediate coupled model.

  14. Maps of clouds modeled with the IPSL Titan 3D-GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgalat, J.; Rannou, P.; Lebonnois, S.

    2011-10-01

    A new climate model for Titan's atmosphere has been developed at the IPSL. This model uses the current version of the LMDZ General Circulation Model (GCM) dynamical core with the physics part of the 2D Titan's IPSL-GCM. First simulations made at the LMD (Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique) used a version of the model with coupled haze microphysics only. We update the model with the implementation of the clouds microphysics scheme inherited frome the previous 2D version. The model is now fully coupled with clouds processes and is a full 3D extension of the Titan IPSL-GCM ([2], [3]). Currently the model is not optimized and is demanding in term of computational time (approximatively 17 days of execution for one Titan's year simulation) and the model can not be used with its full capacities. Therefore all the microphysics is still computed as zonal averages. Nevertheless, new simulations performed including clouds, shows some encouraging results. The lack of asymmetry of the clouds coverage in the results of the 2D simulations. seems to vanish using the new model which tends to show that dissipation process in the 2D model was too strong. With this new model, we intented to get a better tool to understand Titan's climate and to interpret the large amount of data collected by the probes.

  15. Maps of clouds modeled with the IPSL Titan 3D-GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgalat, J.; Rannou, P.; Lebonnois, S.

    2012-09-01

    A new climate model for Titan's atmosphere has been developed at the IPSL. This model uses the current version of the LMDZ General Circulation Model (GCM) dynamical core with the physics part of the 2D Titan's IPSL-GCM. First simulations made at the LMD (Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique) used a version of the model with coupled haze microphysics only. We update the model with the implementation of the clouds microphysics scheme inherited from the previous 2D version. The model is now fully coupled with clouds processes and is a full 3D extension of the Titan IPSL-GCM ([2], [3]). Currently the model is not optimized and is demanding in term of computational time (approximatively 17 days of execution for one Titan's year simulation) and the model can not be used with its full capacities. Therefore all the microphysics is still computed as zonal averages. Nevertheless, new simulations performed including clouds, shows some encouraging results. The lack of asymmetry of the clouds coverage in the results of the 2D simulations seems to vanish using the new model which tends to show that dissipation process in the 2D model was too strong. With this new model, we intented to get a better tool to understand Titan's climate and to interpret the large amount of data collected by the probes.

  16. Rapid ocean wave teleconnections linking Antarctic salinity anomalies to the equatorial ocean-atmosphere system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, C. P.; Wells, N. C.; Blaker, A. T.; Sinha, B.; Ivchenko, V. O.

    2009-04-01

    The coupled climate model FORTE is used to investigate rapid ocean teleconnections between the Southern Ocean and equatorial Pacific Ocean. Salinity anomalies located throughout the Southern Ocean generate barotropic signals that propagate along submerged topographic features and result in the growth of baroclinic energy anomalies around Indonesia and the tropical Pacific. Anomalies in the Ross, Bellingshausen and Amundsen Seas exchange the most barotropic kinetic energy between high and low latitudes. In the equatorial Pacific, baroclinic Kelvin waves are excited which propagate eastwards along the thermocline, resulting in SST anomalies in the central and eastern Pacific. SST anomalies are subsequently amplified to magnitudes of 1.25°C by air-sea interaction, which could potentially influence other coupled Pacific phenomena.

  17. Flying the TRMM Satellite in a GCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Xin; Fowler, Laura D.; Randall, David A.

    2001-01-01

    By incorporating the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) satellite orbital information into the Colorado State University General Circulation Model (CSU GCM), we are able to 'fly' a satellite in the GCM, and sample the simulated atmosphere in the same way as the TRMM sensors sample the real atmosphere. The TRMM-sampled statistics for precipitation and radiative fluxes at annual, intraseasonal, monthly-mean and seasonal-mean diurnal time scales are evaluated by comparing the satellite-sampled against fully-sampled simulated atmospheres. The sampling rates of the TRMM sensors are significantly affected by the sensors' swath widths. The TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) and the Visible Infrared Scanner (VIRS) sample each 2.25 x 2.25 degree grid box in the Tropics and subtropics about once per day, but at a different local time every day, while the Precipitation Radar (PR) and the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) sensor visit each grid box about once every three days and twice per day, respectively. Besides inadequate samplings resulting from sensors' swath widths, there is a large, systematic diurnal undersampling associated with TRMM's orbital geometry for grid boxes away from the Equator. When only one month of TRMM data are used, this diurnal undersampling can lead to more daytime samples relative to nighttime samples in one hemisphere, and more nighttime samples relative to daytime samples in the other hemisphere. The resulting sampling biases (3-6 W m(exp-2)) are very pronounced in outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) over the subtropical land masses. The sampling errors in OLR monthly- and seasonal-means are less than 8 W m(exp-2) (5%) for each 2.25 x 2.25 degree grid box. The OLR monthly- and seasonal-means are not sensitive to diurnal undersamplings associated with the TRMM orbits and sensors' swath widths. However, this is not the case for total precipitation. Diurnal undersampling could produce errors as large as 20% in the Tropics and 40

  18. Collaborative project. Ocean-atmosphere interaction from meso- to planetary-scale. Mechanics, parameterization, and variability

    SciTech Connect

    Saravanan, Ramalingam; Small, Justin

    2015-12-01

    Most climate models are currently run with grid spacings of around 100km, which, with today’s computing power, allows for long (up to 1000 year) simulations, or ensembles of simulations to explore climate change and variability. However this grid spacing does not resolve important components of the weather/climate system such as atmospheric fronts and mesoscale systems, and ocean boundary currents and eddies. The overall aim of this project has been to look at the effect of these small-scale features on the weather/climate system using a suite of high and low resolution climate models, idealized models and observations. High-resolution global coupled integrations using CAM/CESM were carried out at NCAR by the lead PI. At TAMU, we have complemented the work at NCAR by analyzing datasets from the high-resolution (28km) CESM integrations (Small et al., 2014) as well as very high resolution (9km, 3km) runs using a coupled regional climate (CRCM) carried out locally. The main tasks carried out were: 1. Analysis of surface wind in observations and high-resolution CAM/CCSM simulations 2. Development of a feature-tracking algorithm for studying midlatitude air-sea interaction by following oceanic mesoscale eddies and creating composites of the atmospheric response overlying the eddies. 3. Applying the Lagrangian analysis technique in the Gulf Stream region to compare data from observational reanalyses, global CESM coupled simulations, 9km regional coupled simulations and 3km convection-resolving regional coupled simulations. Our main findings are that oceanic mesoscale eddies influence not just the atmospheric boundary layer above them, but also the lower portions of the free troposphere above the boundary layer. Such a vertical response could have implications for a remote influence of Gulf Stream oceanic eddies on North Atlantic weather patterns through modulation of the storm track, similar to what has been noted in the North Pacific. The coarse resolution

  19. Tropical ocean-atmosphere interaction, the Pacific cold tongue, and the El Nino-Southern Oscillation

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, F.F.

    1996-10-04

    The tropical Pacific basin allows strong feedbacks among the trade winds, equatorial zonal sea surface temperature contrast, and upper ocean heat content. Coupled atmosphere-ocean dynamics produce both the strong Pacific cold tongue climate state and the El Nino-Southern Oscillation phenomenon. A simple paradigm of the tropical climate system is presented, capturing the basic physics of these two important aspects of the tropic Pacific and basic features of the climate states of the Atlantic and Indian ocean basins. 21 refs., 3 figs.

  20. A review of the Southern Oscillation - Oceanic-atmospheric circulation changes and related rainfall anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kousky, V. E.; Kagano, M. T.; Cavalcanti, I. F. A.

    1984-01-01

    The region of South America is emphasized in the present consideration of the Southern Oscillation (SO) oceanic and atmospheric circulation changes. The persistence of climate anomalies associated with El Nino-SO events is due to strong atmosphere-ocean coupling. Once initiated, the SO follows a certain sequence of events with clearly defined effects on tropical and subtropical rainfall. Excessive rainfall related to the SO in the central and eastern Pacific, Peru, Ecuador, and southern Brazil, are complemented by drought in Australia, Indonesia, India, West Africa, and northeast Brazil. El Nino-SO events are also associated with dramatic changes in the tropospheric flow pattern over a broad area of both hemispheres.

  1. Usefulness of AIRS-Derived OLR, Temperature, Water Vapor and Cloudiness Anomaly Trends for GCM Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molnar, Gyula I.; Susskind, Joel; Iredell, Lena F.

    2010-01-01

    Mainly due to their global nature, satellite observations can provide a very useful basis for GCM validations. In particular, satellite sounders such as AIRS provide 3-D spatial information (most useful for GCMs), so the question arises: can we use AIRS datasets for climate variability assessments? We show that the recent (September 2002 February 2010) CERES-observed negative trend in OLR of approx.-0.1 W/sq m/yr averaged over the globe is found in the AIRS OLR data as well. Most importantly, even minute details (down to 1 x 1 degree GCM-scale resolution) of spatial and temporal anomalies and trends of OLR as observed by CERES and computed based on AIRS-retrieved surface and atmospheric geophysical parameters over this time period are essentially the same. The correspondence can be seen even in the very large spatial variations of these trends with local values ranging from -2.6 W/sq m/yr to +3.0 W/sq m/yr in the tropics, for example. This essentially perfect agreement of OLR anomalies and trends derived from observations by two different instruments, in totally independent and different manners, implies that both sets of results must be highly accurate, and indirectly validates the anomalies and trends of other AIRS derived products as well. These products show that global and regional anomalies and trends of OLR, water vapor and cloud cover over the last 7+ years are strongly influenced by EI-Nino-La Nina cycles . We have created climate parameter anomaly datasets using AIRS retrievals which can be compared directly with coupled GCM climate variability assessments. Moreover, interrelationships of these anomalies and trends should also be similar between the observed and GCM-generated datasets, and, in cases of discrepancies, GCM parameterizations could be improved based on the relationships observed in the data. First, we assess spatial "trends" of variability of climatic parameter anomalies [since anomalies relative to the seasonal cycle are good proxies of

  2. Tropical North Atlantic ocean-atmosphere interactions synchronize forest carbon losses from hurricanes and Amazon fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yang; Randerson, James T.; Morton, Douglas C.

    2015-08-01

    We describe a climate mode synchronizing forest carbon losses from North and South America by analyzing time series of tropical North Atlantic sea surface temperatures (SSTs), landfall hurricanes and tropical storms, and Amazon fires during 1995-2013. Years with anomalously high tropical North Atlantic SSTs during March-June were often followed by a more active hurricane season and a larger number of satellite-detected fires in the southern Amazon during June-November. The relationship between North Atlantic tropical cyclones and southern Amazon fires (r = 0.61, p < 0.003) was stronger than links between SSTs and either cyclones or fires alone, suggesting that fires and tropical cyclones were directly coupled to the same underlying atmospheric dynamics governing tropical moisture redistribution. These relationships help explain why seasonal outlook forecasts for hurricanes and Amazon fires both failed in 2013 and may enable the design of improved early warning systems for drought and fire in Amazon forests.

  3. From GCM grid cell to agricultural plot: scale issues affecting modelling of climate impact

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Christian; Sultan, Benjamin; Balme, Maud; Sarr, Benoit; Traore, Seydou; Lebel, Thierry; Janicot, Serge; Dingkuhn, Michael

    2005-01-01

    General circulation models (GCM) are increasingly capable of making relevant predictions of seasonal and long-term climate variability, thus improving prospects of predicting impact on crop yields. This is particularly important for semi-arid West Africa where climate variability and drought threaten food security. Translating GCM outputs into attainable crop yields is difficult because GCM grid boxes are of larger scale than the processes governing yield, involving partitioning of rain among runoff, evaporation, transpiration, drainage and storage at plot scale. This study analyses the bias introduced to crop simulation when climatic data is aggregated spatially or in time, resulting in loss of relevant variation. A detailed case study was conducted using historical weather data for Senegal, applied to the crop model SARRA-H (version for millet). The study was then extended to a 10°N–17° N climatic gradient and a 31 year climate sequence to evaluate yield sensitivity to the variability of solar radiation and rainfall. Finally, a down-scaling model called LGO (Lebel–Guillot–Onibon), generating local rain patterns from grid cell means, was used to restore the variability lost by aggregation. Results indicate that forcing the crop model with spatially aggregated rainfall causes yield overestimations of 10–50% in dry latitudes, but nearly none in humid zones, due to a biased fraction of rainfall available for crop transpiration. Aggregation of solar radiation data caused significant bias in wetter zones where radiation was limiting yield. Where climatic gradients are steep, these two situations can occur within the same GCM grid cell. Disaggregation of grid cell means into a pattern of virtual synoptic stations having high-resolution rainfall distribution removed much of the bias caused by aggregation and gave realistic simulations of yield. It is concluded that coupling of GCM outputs with plot level crop models can cause large systematic errors due to

  4. Internal ocean-atmosphere variability drives megadroughts in Western North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coats, S.; Smerdon, J. E.; Cook, B. I.; Seager, R.; Cook, E. R.; Anchukaitis, K. J.

    2016-09-01

    Multidecadal droughts that occurred during the Medieval Climate Anomaly represent an important target for validating the ability of climate models to adequately characterize drought risk over the near-term future. A prominent hypothesis is that these megadroughts were driven by a centuries-long radiatively forced shift in the mean state of the tropical Pacific Ocean. Here we use a novel combination of spatiotemporal tree ring reconstructions of Northern Hemisphere hydroclimate to infer the atmosphere-ocean dynamics that coincide with megadroughts over the American West and find that these features are consistently associated with 10-30 year periods of frequent cold El Niño-Southern Oscillation conditions and not a centuries-long shift in the mean of the tropical Pacific Ocean. These results suggest an important role for internal variability in driving past megadroughts. State-of-the-art climate models from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5, however, do not simulate a consistent association between megadroughts and internal variability of the tropical Pacific Ocean, with implications for our confidence in megadrought risk projections.

  5. Feedbacks between Hydrological Processes in Tropical South America and Large-Scale Ocean-Atmospheric Phenomena.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poveda, Germán; Mesa, Oscar J.

    1997-10-01

    The hydroclimatology of tropical South America is strongly coupled to low-frequency large-scale oceanicand atmospheric phenomena occurring over the Pacific and the Atlantic Oceans. In particular, El Niño-SouthernOscillation (ENSO) affects climatic and hydrologic conditions on timescales ranging from seasons to decades.With some regional differences in timing and amplitude, tropical South America exhibits negative rainfall andstreamflow anomalies in association with the low-warm phase of the Southern Oscillation (El Niño), and positiveanomalies with the high-cold phase. Such dependence is illustrated in the hydroclimatology of Colombia throughseveral empirical analyses: correlation, empirical orthogonal functions, principal component, and spectral analysis, and discussion of the major physical mechanisms. Observations show that ENSO's effect on river dischargesoccurs progressively later for rivers toward the east in Colombia and northern South America. Also, the impactsof La Niña are more pronounced than those of El Niño. Evidence is also presented to show that processes arisingfrom land-atmosphere interactions in tropical South America affect sea surface temperatures in the Caribbeanand the north tropical Atlantic. A hypothesis is formulated to explain these feedback mechanisms throughperturbations in precipitation, soil moisture, and evapotranspiration over the continent. To begin with, the occurrence of both phases of ENSO affects all those fields. The proposed mechanisms would constitute the `land-atmosphere' bridge connecting Pacific and Atlantic SST anomalies.

  6. Comparison of the hydrological impact driven by RCM-, GCM- and NCEP- simulated and bias corrected precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Yukun; Chen, Hua; Xu, Chongyu; Hu, Kang

    2016-04-01

    Statistical downscaling methods are a common tool to compensate for the gaps between large-scale climate model simulations and station-scale observations. This study evaluates the performance of the raw precipitation from National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP), outputs of Global Climate Model (GCM)-NorESM and corresponding Regional Climate Model (RCM)-the East Asian regional climate model driven by WRF model driven with NorESM. Meanwhile, their bias-corrected series by four different bias correction methods are simultaneously evaluated in order to find whether NCEP with observation coupled or RCM with modified spatial distribution of surface climate can have a better performance than GCM on analyzing hydrological impact. The Xin'anjiang lumped hydrological model is used to assess the hydrological impacts by simulating the streamflows in Xiangjiang basin with the corresponding observed, model-simulated and bias-corrected precipitation as input. The results show that hydrological simulations using the RCM and NCEP historical precipitation do not have a better agreement with observed runoff than using raw GCM data as input in this case study. However, when the raw precipitation of climate models is bias-corrected, an obvious improvement is obtained from all the climate models, and the bias-corrected RCM precipitation gives the best fitness in the runoff simulations. Comparing different bias correction methods with the same climate model, the method with occurrence and intensity adjustment outperforms other methods in the runoff simulation. It can be inferred that without bias correction, it can be hardly concluded that NCEP or RCM brings an improvement of precipitation simulation from GCM for driving hydrological models. However, the RCM precipitation corrected by a proper bias correction method provides better runoff simulation results over other climate datasets.

  7. Relative roles of land- and ocean-atmosphere interactions in Asian-Pacific thermal contrast variability at the precessional band

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue; Jian, ZhiMin; Zhao, Ping; Xiao, Dong; Chen, JunMing

    2016-01-01

    In a 250-kyr transient simulation of the Community Earth System Model (CESM), we identified a precessional forced seesaw of the summer middle-upper tropospheric eddy temperature between Asia and the North Pacific as the paleo-APO (Asian-Pacific oscillation). The paleo-APO variability is out of phase with the precession parameter. Corresponding to a positive paleo-APO phase, both the subtropical anticyclonic circulation over the North Pacific and the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) strengthen. Summer anomalous sea surface temperature shows a western cold-eastern warm pattern over the extratropical North Pacific and a zonal positive-negative-positive pattern over the tropical Pacific. The variations in the simulated paleo-APO and East Asian southerly wind at the precessional band agree well with the geological proxies at the Dongge, Sanbao, Linzhu, and Hulu caves in China, which also implies that these proxies may well reflect the variability in the southerly wind over East Asia. Sensitivity experiments further reveal that the reduced precession parameter may enhance the positive paleo-APO phase and the associated EASM because of the response of the land-atmosphere interactions to the precessional insolation changes. The effect of the ocean-atmosphere interactions on the paleo-APO is secondary. PMID:27381940

  8. Carbon-isotope composition of Lower Cretaceous fossil wood: Ocean-atmosphere chemistry and relation to sea-level change

    SciTech Connect

    Groecke, D.R.; Hesselbo, S.P.; Jenkyns, H.C.

    1999-02-01

    The carbon-isotope composition of fossil wood fragments, collected through a biostratigraphically well-constructed Aptian (Lower Cretaceous) shallow-marine siliciclastic succession on the Isle of Wight, southern Britain, shows distinct variations with time. The results indicate that the stratigraphic signature of {delta}{sup 13}C{sub wood} through the Aptian was influenced primarily by fluctuations in the isotopic composition of CO{sub 2} in the global ocean-atmosphere system, as registered in marine carbonates elsewhere, and was not governed by local paleoenvironmental and/or paleoecological factors. Negative and positive excursions in {delta}{sup 13}C{sub wood} through the lower Aptian occur in phase with inferred transgressions and regressions, respectively -- a pattern that contrasts with that observed in many previous studies for different time intervals. The relationship between {delta}{sup 13}C variations and relative sea-level change is tentatively interpreted as a response to various climatic and eustatic factors, relating to rapid sea-floor spreading, thermal uplift of ocean floor, emplacement of plateaus, volcanic CO{sub 2} emissions, weathering, and sedimentary rate.

  9. Relative roles of land- and ocean-atmosphere interactions in Asian-Pacific thermal contrast variability at the precessional band.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Jian, ZhiMin; Zhao, Ping; Xiao, Dong; Chen, JunMing

    2016-07-06

    In a 250-kyr transient simulation of the Community Earth System Model (CESM), we identified a precessional forced seesaw of the summer middle-upper tropospheric eddy temperature between Asia and the North Pacific as the paleo-APO (Asian-Pacific oscillation). The paleo-APO variability is out of phase with the precession parameter. Corresponding to a positive paleo-APO phase, both the subtropical anticyclonic circulation over the North Pacific and the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) strengthen. Summer anomalous sea surface temperature shows a western cold-eastern warm pattern over the extratropical North Pacific and a zonal positive-negative-positive pattern over the tropical Pacific. The variations in the simulated paleo-APO and East Asian southerly wind at the precessional band agree well with the geological proxies at the Dongge, Sanbao, Linzhu, and Hulu caves in China, which also implies that these proxies may well reflect the variability in the southerly wind over East Asia. Sensitivity experiments further reveal that the reduced precession parameter may enhance the positive paleo-APO phase and the associated EASM because of the response of the land-atmosphere interactions to the precessional insolation changes. The effect of the ocean-atmosphere interactions on the paleo-APO is secondary.

  10. Multi-model GCM ensemble simulations of idealized tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, K. A.; Jablonowski, C.; Ullrich, P. A.; Kent, J.; Lauritzen, P. H.; Taylor, M.; Nair, R.

    2013-12-01

    As General Circulation Models (GCMs) are now capable of running operationally at higher horizontal resolutions than ever before, such models have become a tool of choice for the evaluation of tropical cyclones in current and future climate conditions. GCM horizontal resolutions in the range between 10-50 km are now computationally achievable for seasonal or multi-year simulations and there is growing confidence that high-resolution global models provide reliable representations of many characteristics of tropical storms. However, model design choices are an important source of uncertainty. This is widely documented for physical parameterization suites, but it is less recognized for the dynamical component of models and the physics-dynamics coupling. The study offers a first look into these structural uncertainties. This study focuses on dynamical core model intercomparisons. In particular, it looks at the results of the Dynamical Core Model Intercomparison Project (DCMIP) that took place at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in August 2012. The analysis is focused on the evaluation of an idealized tropical storm and uncertainties triggered by the choice of model dynamical core formulation in various global models. These models include the four dynamical cores available in NCAR's Community Atmosphere Model (Finite-Volume (FV), Spectral-Element (SE) and the Eulerian and semi-Lagrangian spectral transform dynamical cores), the NOAA model FIM, the model ICON (Max-Planck Institute and German Weather Service), GFDL's FV3 model on the cubed-sphere grid, ECMWF's Integrated Forecasting System (IFS) and the model PUMA from the University of Hamburg.

  11. MAD-VenLA: a microphysical modal representation of clouds for the IPSL Venus GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilbon, Sabrina; Määttänen, Anni; Burgalat, Jérémie; Montmessin, Franck; Stolzenbach, Aurélien; Bekki, Slimane

    2016-10-01

    Venus is enshrouded by 20km-thick clouds, which are composed of sulfuric acid-water solution droplets. Clouds play a crucial role on the climate of the planet. Our goal is to study the formation and evolution of Venusian clouds with microphysical models. The goal of this work is to develop the first full 3D microphysical model of Venus coupled with the IPSL Venus GCM and the photochemical model included (Lebonnois et al. 2010, Stolzenbach et al. 2016).Two particle size distribution representations are generally used in cloud modeling: sectional and modal. The term 'sectional' means that the continuous particle size distribution is divided into a discrete set of size intervals called bins. In the modal approach, the particle size distribution is approximated by a continuous parametric function, typically a log-normal, and prognostic variables are distribution or distribution-integrated parameters (Seigneur et al. 1986, Burgalat et al. 2014). These two representations need to be compared to choose the optimal trade-off between precision and computational efficiency. At high radius resolution, sectional models are computationally too demanding to be integrated in GCMs. That is why, in other GCMs, such as the IPSL Titan GCM, the modal scheme is used (Burgalat et al. 2014).The Venus Liquid Aerosol cloud model (VenLA) and the Modal Dynamics of Venusian Liquid Aerosol cloud model (MAD-VenLA) are respectively the sectional and the modal model discussed here and used for defining the microphysical cloud module to be integrated in the IPSL Venus GCM. We will compare the two models with the key microphysical processes in 0D setting: homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation, condensation/evaporation and coagulation. Then, MAD-VenLA will be coupled with the IPSL VGCM. The first results of the complete VGCM with microphysics coupled with chemistry will be presented.

  12. Collecting TIME-GCM Output Along TIMED Satellite Tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartsough, C. S.; Hagan, M. E.; Roble, R. G.

    2001-12-01

    The CEDAR/TIMED research effort focuses on increasing our understanding of the physical processes which affect and control the energetics and dynamics of the mesosphere and low er thermosphere. Use of upper-atmosphere models such as NCAR TIME-GCM can aid scientists in the interpretation of both satellite and ground-based observations. Our goals are (1) to make TIME-GCM model output readily available for researchers to use in their studies, and (2) to use the CEDAR/TIMED data to improve and upgrade the TIME-GCM model. We are preparing samples of TIME-GCM output to make available to the community via the Web. The data will be in netCDF format and accessible from the CEDAR database. Data will be sampled along the instrument observing tracks to facilitate direct comparisons with the TIMED instrument data. The data made available will approximately cover a 60-day period. The altitude range and fields to be made available will vary with each instrument, but will include neutral temperatures and winds, ion temperatures and drifts, and basic constituents, over approximately 50-300 km. Similar products will be made available for the CEDAR ground-based component of TIMED, including the NSF CEDAR Class 1 Facilities. We will present some sample data files and describe the Web site layout which researchers can use to access the TIME-GCM output as it becomes available.

  13. Impact of cloud microphysics on the CSU GCM atmospheric moisture budget

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, L.D.; Randall, D.A.

    1993-12-31

    In this article, we present the first maps of the global distribution of the cloud liquid and ice water contents of the atmosphere. It is shown that the cloud microphysics package produces realistic distributions of both moisture variables. We axe presently adapting the present model so that long-term simulations with the CSU GCM may be made. In the near future, we plan to couple the cloud liquid and ice water contents prognosed by the cloud microphysics package with the cloud fraction and cloud optical properties.

  14. The Bisa GEM-Mars GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neary, Lori; Daerden, Frank

    2013-04-01

    GEM-Mars is a three-dimensional general circulation model of the Mars atmosphere extending from the surface to approximately 170 km based on the latest version of the GEM (Global Environmental Mesoscale) model, the operational data assimilation and weather forecasting system for Canada [Côté et al., 1998]. The dynamical core is an implicit two-time-level semi-Lagrangian scheme on an Arakawa C-grid with a terrain-following, log-hydrostatic-pressure vertical coordinate discretized on a Charney-Phillips grid. The model has both a hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic formulation, providing a single platform for simulations on a variety of horizontal scales. The model code is fully parallelized using OMP and MPI. The GCM includes the relevant physical processes such as CO2 condensation, planetary boundary layer mixing, gravity wave drag and surface parameterizations. A simple water cycle, basic gas-phase chemistry and passive tracers are also included in the model. Because of the vertical extent of the model, UV heating, non-LTE effects and molecular diffusion are also included. Dust is prescribed using the MGS scenario for total opacities and a Conrath profile shape. In the dust radiative transfer code, dust optical properties are based on the Wolff et al [2006, 2009] data. Temperatures in the lower and middle atmosphere have been evaluated using TES [Smith, 2004] and MCS [Kleinbohl et al. 2009] data. Winds and atmospheric circulation (mass stream functions) have been compared with the literature and show a good correspondence to other Mars GCMs. In parallel, active lifting and settling of size-distributed dust has also been implemented. The soil model has been improved to better match surface and near-surface temperatures from the Viking Landers, Phoenix [Davy et al. 2010], and TES. Near-surface winds and friction velocities have been compared with the literature and show reasonable performance. Condensation of CO2 in surface ice has been validated using CO2 ice mass

  15. An Intense Ocean-Atmosphere Interaction during the Holocene Optimum: Evidence from Sub-alpine Lake Sediments in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandasamy, S.; Chen, C. A.; Lou, J. Y.; Kao, S.

    2009-12-01

    The Holocene climate reconstructions indicate an optimum climate in terms of either temperature or precipitation or both between ca. 10.5 and 4.5 calendar thousand years before the Present (ka BP). This so called Holocene optimum (HO) exhibits a time lagged phenomenon across the East Asia where the interaction of summer and winter modes of East Asian monsoon (EAM) has produced diverse climatic and environmental finger prints for the entire Holocene (the past ~11.5 ka). Yet, we lack evidence for the role of ocean and atmosphere during the HO given the fact that quantification of such input in the continental archives has not been done earlier, especially on the land-ocean-atmosphere interface. To fulfill this gap, a sediment core (~1.7 m) raised from Retreat Lake in northeastern Taiwan was studied for Relative Grey Index (RGI), bulk density, water content, total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen, and selected major and trace elements, including indicator elements for sea salt input (Br, Cl and Na). Time series of RGI shows high values (>80) ~170-155 cm and top ~45 cm of the core due to the presence of white, dense, minerogenic sediments with low water and TOC contents. Such an association of parameters indicates cool-wet and warm-dry climates and respectively corresponds to early Holocene (~10.3-8.6 ka BP) and late Holocene (since 4.5 ka BP). By contrast, sediments ~155-45 cm of the core show low RGI values (mostly <50) due to the presence of dark, less dense, peaty sediments with high water and TOC contents, indicating the warmest perhaps the wettest climate (HO) ~8.6-4.5 ka BP. Interestingly, the peaty sediments of HO show very high Br concentrations of up to 230 μg g-1, almost all values are >150 μg g-1. These values are ~7-12 times higher than Br values found in early and late Holocene sediments (0-20 μg g-1) as well as source rock Br values. Depth profiles of Br, Cl, and Na mimic each other and Br shows a linear relationship with Cl and Na in sediments of

  16. Ocean-atmospheric linkages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rintoul, Stephen R.

    1992-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the role of the ocean in the global carbon cycle on the time scale of decades to centuries. The input rate of CO2 to the atmosphere due to fossil fuel burning and deforestation has continued to increase over the last century. To balance the global carbon budget, a sink is required whose magnitude is changing on similar time scales. We have sought to identify aspects of the ocean system that are capable of responding on decadal time scales, to examine our present ability to model such changes, and to pinpoint ways in which this ability could be improved. Many other important aspects of the ocean's role in global change are not addressed, including the importance of oceanic heat transport and thermal inertia to the climate system, biogeochemical cycling of elements other than carbon, and the importance of the ocean as a source or sink of trace gases.

  17. Optimization studies on GCM for iodine waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Nenoff, Tina Maria

    2014-09-01

    We are purusing an understand of the durability and materials processability of the low temperature sintering Bi-Si oxide Glass Composite Material (GCM)1 Waste Form for iodine capture materials. The chemical and physical controls over iodine release from candidate 129I waste forms must be quantified to predict long-term waste form effectiveness.

  18. Develop Plan for Analysis of the Effluent from GCM Production.

    SciTech Connect

    Nenoff, Tina M.; Mowry, Curtis D.

    2015-08-24

    This milestone is focused on developing a plan for the analysis of the effluent from the Sandia low temperature sintering Bi-Si-Zn oxide glass composite material (GCM) waste form for the long term storage of iodine and its capture materials.

  19. A stochastic precipitation disaggregation scheme for GCM applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Xiaogang; Sorooshian, Soroosh

    1994-01-01

    In the surface hydrologic parameterization of general circulation models (GCMs), it is commonly assumed that the precipitation processes are homogeneous over a GCM grid square and that the precipitation intensity is uniformly distributed. Based on evidence that the spatial distribution of precipitation within a GCM grid square is crucial for the land surface hydrology parameterization, a few researchers have explored the impacts of assuming that the precipitation is exponentially distributed. This paper explores the suitability of the aforementioned assumptions. First, a statistical analysis is conducted of historical precipitation data for three GCM grids in different regions of the United States. The analysis suggests that neither the uniform nor the exponential distribution assumption may be suitable at the GCM grid scale and, that instead, the spatial variability in precipitation is characterized by statistical patterns that are inhomogeneous. These patterns vary from grid to grid and are induced by the interaction between atmospheric conditions and various land surface characteristics, such as topographical features, surface properties, etc. Within the same grid square, however, the statistical patterns are generally constant from year to year. Based on this analysis, a computationally viable (i.e., usable with GCMs) stochastic precipitation disaggregation scheme that utilizes these stable statistical patterns is proposed. The method was used to generate spatially distributed hourly rainfall for a summer season in the southwestern region of the continental United States. Analysis of the results shows that the methodology preserves the seasonal characteristics of spatial variability in precipitation that is observed in the long-term historical data.

  20. Snow complexity representation and GCM climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutra, Emanuel; Viterbo, Pedro; Miranda, Pedro M. A.; Balsamo, Gianpaolo

    2010-05-01

    Accurate simulations of the snow cover strongly impact on the quality of weather and climate predictions as the solar radiation absorption at land-atmosphere interface is modified by a factor up to 4 in response to snow presence (albedo effect). In Northern latitudes and Mountainous regions snow acts also as an important energy and water reservoir and a correct representation of snow mass and snow density is crucial for temperature predictions at all time-scales, with direct consequences for soil hydrology (thermal insulation effect). Three different complexity snow schemes implemented in the ECMWF land surface scheme HTESSEL are tested within the EC-EARTH framework. The snow schemes are: 1) OLD, the original HTESSEL single bulk layer snow scheme (same as in the ERA-40 and ERA-Interim reanalysis); 2) OPER, a new snow scheme in operations since September 2009, with a liquid water reservoir and revised formulations of snow density, fractional cover and snow albedo; and 3) ML3, a multi-layer version of OPER. All three snow schemes in HTESSEL are energy- and mass- balance models. The multi-layer snow scheme, ML3, was validated in offline mode covering several spatial and temporal scales: (i) site simulations for several observation locations from the Snow Models intercomparison project-2 (SnowMip2) and (ii) global simulations driven by the meteorological forcing from the Global Soil Wetness Project-2 (GSWP2) and the ECMWF ERA-Interim re-analysis. On point locations ML3 improve snow mass simulations, while on a global scale the impacts are residual pointing to the need of coupled atmosphere simulations. The 3 schemes are compared in the framework of the atmospheric model of EC-EARTH, based on the current seasonal forecast system of ECMWF. The standard configuration runs at T159 horizontal spectral resolution with 62 vertical levels. Three member ensembles of 30 years (1979-2008) simulations, with prescribed SSTs and sea ice, were performed for each of the snow schemes

  1. COUPLING

    DOEpatents

    Frisch, E.; Johnson, C.G.

    1962-05-15

    A detachable coupling arrangement is described which provides for varying the length of the handle of a tool used in relatively narrow channels. The arrangement consists of mating the key and keyhole formations in the cooperating handle sections. (AEC)

  2. Trace element content of sedimentary pyrite as a new proxy for deep-time ocean-atmosphere evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Large, Ross R.; Halpin, Jacqueline A.; Danyushevsky, Leonid V.; Maslennikov, Valeriy V.; Bull, Stuart W.; Long, John A.; Gregory, Daniel D.; Lounejeva, Elena; Lyons, Timothy W.; Sack, Patrick J.; McGoldrick, Peter J.; Calver, Clive R.

    2014-03-01

    Sedimentary pyrite formed in the water column, or during diagenesis in organic muds, provides an accessible proxy for seawater chemistry in the marine rock record. Except for Mo, U, Ni and Cr, surprisingly little is known about trace element trends in the deep time oceans, even though they are critical to developing better models for the evolution of the Earth's atmosphere and evolutionary pathways of life. Here we introduce a novel approach to simultaneously quantify a suite of trace elements in sedimentary pyrite from marine black shales. These trace element concentrations, at least in a first-order sense, track the primary elemental abundances in coeval seawater. In general, the trace element patterns show significant variation of several orders of magnitude in the Archaean and Phanerozoic, but less variation on longer wavelengths in the Proterozoic. Certain trace elements (e.g., Ni, Co, As, Cr) have generally decreased in the oceans through the Precambrian, other elements (e.g., Mo, Zn, Mn) have generally increased, and a further group initially increased and then decreased (e.g., Se and U). These changes appear to be controlled by many factors, in particular: 1) oxygenation cycles of the Earth's ocean-atmosphere system, 2) the composition of exposed crustal rocks, 3) long term rates of continental erosion, and 4) cycles of ocean anoxia. We show that Ni and Co content of seawater is affected by global Large Igneous Province events, whereas redox sensitive trace elements such as Se and Mo are affected by atmosphere oxygenation. Positive jumps in Mo and Se concentrations prior to the Great Oxidation Event (GOE1, c. 2500 Ma) suggest pulses of oxygenation may have occurred as early as 2950 Ma. A flat to declining pattern of many biologically important nutrient elements through the mid to late Proterozoic may relate to declining atmosphere O2, and supports previous models of nutrient deficiency inhibiting marine evolution during this period. These trace elements (Mo

  3. Evidence for a Progressive Change of Interglacial Climate Conditions Forced by Different Ocean-Atmosphere Circulation Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauch, H. A.; Kandiano, E. S.; Helmke, J. P.

    2005-12-01

    quite comparable to the two younger periods, the weakest penetration of warm surface water into the northern high latitudes. In summary, a stepwise, northward expansion of polar-directed heat transfer from one interglaciation to the next youngest is proposed, marking the Holocene a time with the strongest impact on north-polar warming. A fundamental difference in ocean-atmosphere circulation with consequences on high-latitude precipitation-runoff rates and seas-ice drift patterns seems to be the likely forcing behind the unprecedented situation found for the Holocene.

  4. New Planetary Energy Balance, Ocean-Atmosphere Interaction and their Effects on Extreme Events in North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karrouk, Mohammed-Said

    2016-04-01

    Global warming has now reached the energetic phase of H2O's return to the ground after the saturation of the atmosphere in evaporation since the 80s and 90s of the last century, which were characterized by severe droughts, mainly in Africa. This phase is the result of the accumulation of thermal energy exchanges in the Earth-Ocean-Atmosphere system that resulted in the thrust reversal of the energy balance toward the poles. This situation is characterized by a new thermal distribution: above the ocean, the situation is more in surplus compared to the mainland, or even opposite when the balance is negative on the land, and in the atmosphere, warm thermal advection easily reach the North Pole (planetary crests), as well as cold advection push deep into North Africa and the Gulf of Mexico (planetary valleys). This "New Ground Energy Balance" establishes a "New Meridian Atmospheric Circulation (MAC)" with an undulating character throughout the year, including the winter characterized by intense latitudinal very active energy exchanges between the surplus areas (tropical) and the deficit (polar) on the one hand, and the atmosphere, the ocean and the continent on the other. The excess radiation balance increases the potential evaporation of the atmosphere and provides a new geographical distribution of H2O worldwide: the excess water vapor is easily converted by cold advection (polar vortex) to heavy rains that cause floods or snow storms that paralyze the normal functioning of human activities, which creates many difficulties for users and leaves damage and casualties, but ensures water availability missing since a long time in many parts of the world, in Africa, Europe and America. The new thermal distribution reorganizes the geography of atmospheric pressure: the ocean energy concentration is transmitted directly to the atmosphere, and the excess torque is pushed northward. The Azores anticyclone is strengthened and is a global lock by the Atlantic ridge at Greenland

  5. Arctic Ocean Atmosphere Sea Ice Snowpack (OASIS) Interactions Affecting Atmospheric Biogeochemistry, Climate and Ecosystems in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beine, H.

    2006-12-01

    The Arctic Ocean is central to the understanding of climate and global environmental change. As a critical component of the Earth system, the Arctic region both influences and responds rapidly to natural variations and to human-induced perturbations, such as warming, contaminant accumulation, and associated impacts. While it is clear that there are dramatic changes occurring in the Arctic, the interactions between the air and surfaces are still not understood. The international, multidisciplinary Ocean-Atmosphere-Sea Ice-Snowpack (OASIS) program addresses the knowledge gaps and coordinates studies of Arctic atmosphere-surface interactions and associated feedbacks to the climate system. OASIS is planned as a long term science program for the next decade. OASIS is linked to a number of international organizations and activities, including AMAP, the IGBP programs IGAC under the AICI (Air Ice Chemical Interactions) activity, and SOLAS (Surface Ocean Lower Atmosphere Study), and the WCRP project CliC (Climate and Cryosphere). The abundant snowpack in the Arctic is not just a white cover: an array of intriguing reactions has been observed within and on snowpacks and sea-ice during springtime Arctic sunrise that dramatically influences the composition of the atmosphere. Building on these discoveries, the OASIS research approach is aimed at a better understanding of air-surface chemical exchange in the context of a changing climate. Fundamental physical, chemical, and biologically-mediated chemical exchange processes will be studied to answer questions such as: Will climate change increase or decrease the amount of mercury deposited in the Arctic? How will warming affect regional and global climate? How are sea ice and snow chemistry and physics changing? What is the role of biological processes in producing reactive atmospheric gases? What is the role of sea-salt in ozone depletion? What are ecological and human health impacts of toxic materials such as mercury and

  6. Comparison of CHAMP and TIME-GCM nonmigrating tidal signals in the thermospheric zonal wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häusler, K.; Lühr, H.; Hagan, M. E.; Maute, A.; Roble, R. G.

    2010-02-01

    Four years (2002-2005) of continuous accelerometer measurements taken onboard the CHAMP satellite (orbit altitude ˜400 km) offer a unique opportunity to investigate the thermospheric zonal wind on a global scale. Recently, we were able to relate the longitudinal wave-4 structure in the zonal wind at equatorial latitudes to the influence of nonmigrating tides and in particular to the eastward propagating diurnal tide with zonal wave number 3 (DE3). The DE3 tide is primarily excited by latent heat release in the tropical troposphere in deep convective clouds. In order to investigate the mechanisms that couple the tidal signals to the upper thermosphere, we undertook a comparison with the thermosphere-ionosphere-mesosphere-electrodynamics general circulation model (TIME-GCM) developed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). We ran the model for a day in March, June, September, and December and applied the same processing steps to the model output as was done for the CHAMP tidal analysis. The main results of the comparison can be summarized as follows: (1) TIME-GCM simulations do not correctly reproduce the observed intra-annual variations of DE3 and the eastward propagating diurnal tide with zonal wave number 2 (DE2). (2) Simulations of DE3 for June are more successful. Both TIME-GCM and CHAMP show an increase in DE3 amplitudes with decreasing solar flux level. (3) The amplitudes of the simulated westward propagating diurnal tide with zonal wave number 2 (DW2) and the standing diurnal tide (D0) increase with increasing solar flux in June. The predicted dependence of DW2 and DO on solar flux is also observed by CHAMP.

  7. Investigating TIME-GCM Atmospheric Tides for Different Lower Boundary Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haeusler, K.; Hagan, M. E.; Lu, G.; Forbes, J. M.; Zhang, X.; Doornbos, E.

    2013-12-01

    It has been recently established that atmospheric tides generated in the lower atmosphere significantly influence the geospace environment. In order to extend our knowledge of the various coupling mechanisms between the different atmospheric layers, we rely on model simulations. Currently there exist two versions of the Global Scale Wave Model (GSWM), i.e. GSWM02 and GSWM09, which are used as a lower boundary (ca. 30 km) condition for the Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIME-GCM) and account for the upward propagating atmospheric tides that are generated in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. In this paper we explore the various TIME-GCM upper atmospheric tidal responses for different lower boundary conditions and compare the model diagnostics with tidal results from satellite missions such as TIMED, CHAMP, and GOCE. We also quantify the differences between results associated with GSWM02 and GSWM09 forcing and results of TIMEGCM simulations using Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Application (MERRA) data as a lower boundary condition.

  8. Studies of African wave disturbances with the GISS GCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Druyan, Leonard M.; Hall, Timothy M.

    1994-01-01

    Simulations made with the general circulation model of the NASA/Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS GCM) run at 4 deg latitude by 5 deg longitude horizontal resolution are analyzed to determine the model's representation of African wave disturbances. Waves detected in the model's lower troposphere over northern Africa during the summer monsoon season exhibit realistic wavelengths of about 2200 km. However, power spectra of the meridional wind show that the waves propagate westward too slowly, with periods of 5-10 days, about twice the observed values. This sluggishness is most pronounced during August, consistent with simulated 600-mb zonal winds that are only about half the observed speeds of the midtropospheric jet. The modeled wave amplitudes are strongest over West Africa during the first half of the summer but decrease dramatically by September, contrary to observational evidence. Maximum amplitudes occur at realistic latitudes, 12 deg - 20 deg N, but not as observed near the Atlantic coast. Spectral analyses suggest some wave modulation of precipitation in the 5-8 day band, and compositing shows that precipitation is slightly enhanced east of the wave trough, coincident with southerly winds. Extrema of low-level convergence west of the wave troughs, coinciding with northerly winds, were not preferred areas for simulated precipitation, probably because of the drying effect of this advection, as waves were generally north of the humid zone. The documentation of African wave disturbances in the GISS GCM is a first step toward considering wave influences in future GCM studies of Sahel drought.

  9. Coral Evidence for Abrupt Changes in Ocean-Atmosphere Dynamics in the SW Pacific since 1565 AD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendy, E. J.; Gagan, M. K.; McCulloch, M. T.; Lough, J. M.

    2004-12-01

    A coral-based multi-tracer approach can give an overview of the whole tropical ocean-atmosphere system. Key indicators are sea surface temperature (SST), which sets climate boundary conditions, sea surface salinity (SSS), which provides a measure of energy transfer through the evaporation-precipitation balance, and river runoff, which can establish the strength and variability of precipitation. We present palaeoenvironmental records from eight massive { \\it Porites} coral colonies, spanning 120 to 420 years of continuous growth, collected from the central Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Stable isotopes (\\delta18O and \\delta13C), Sr/Ca, U/Ca, and Ba/Ca ratios were measured in 5-year increments and a record of annual UV luminescence was developed. By replicating the measurements between colonies we demonstrate how faithfully corals record changes in their environment over decadal-to-centennial timescales, constructing composite records in a manner analogous to dendroclimatology and confidence intervals for each proxy. The competing environmental influences affecting a number of tracers can be distinguished by comparison between the SST-tracers (Sr/Ca, U/Ca, \\delta18O), the freshwater flux tracers (\\Delta\\delta18O, Ba/Ca and luminescence) and tracers of water mass characteristics (\\delta18O, \\delta13C, and \\Delta14C). The coral palaeothermometers Sr/Ca and U/Ca ratios, measured in tandem with \\delta18O, allow the separation of SST changes from changes in seawater \\delta18O, thereby resolving SSS. The composite Sr/Ca and U/Ca are in excellent agreement back to 1565, and capture the 20th century warming trend, up to the 1980s when the cores were collected. The most remarkable feature of the 420-year record is that SSTs were consistently as warm as the second half of the 20th century from the early 18th and through most of the 19th centuries. Changes in the evaporation-precipitation balance dominate the \\delta18O record. A striking 0.2\\permil\\ shift from the

  10. Chemistry-Climate Interactions in the GISS GCM. Part 1; Tropospheric Chemistry Model Description and Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shindell, Drew T.; Grenfell, J. Lee; Rind, David; Price, Colin; Grewe, Volker; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A tropospheric chemistry module has been developed for use within the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) general circulation model (GCM) to study interactions between chemistry and climate change. The model uses a simplified chemistry scheme based on CO-NOx-CH4 chemistry, and also includes a parameterization for emissions of isoprene, the most important non-methane hydrocarbon. The model reproduces present day annual cycles and mean distributions of key trace gases fairly well, based on extensive comparisons with available observations. Examining the simulated change between present day and pre-industrial conditions, we find that the model has a similar response to that seen in other simulations. It shows a 45% increase in the global tropospheric ozone burden, within the 25% - 57% range seen in other studies. Annual average zonal mean ozone increases by more than 125% at Northern Hemisphere middle latitudes near the surface. Comparison of model runs that allow the calculated ozone to interact with the GCM's radiation and meteorology with those that do not shows only minor differences for ozone. The common usage of ozone fields that are not calculated interactively seems to be adequate to simulate both the present day and the pre-industrial ozone distributions. However, use of coupled chemistry does alter the change in tropospheric oxidation capacity, enlarging the overall decrease in OH concentrations from the pre-industrial to the present by about 10% (-5.3% global annual average in uncoupled mode, -5.9% in coupled mode). This indicates that there may be systematic biases in the simulation of the pre-industrial to present day decrease in the oxidation capacity of the troposphere (though a 10% difference is well within the total uncertainty). Global annual average radiative forcing from pre-industrial to present day ozone change is 0.32 W/sq m. The forcing seems to be increased by about 10% when the chemistry is coupled to the GCM. Forcing values greater

  11. A review of recent research on improvement of physical parameterizations in the GLA GCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sud, Y. C.; Walker, G. K.

    1990-01-01

    A systematic assessment of the effect of a series of improvements in physical parameterizations of the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres (GLA) general circulation model (GCM) are summarized. The implementation of the Simple Biosphere Model (SiB) in the GCM is followed by a comparison of SiB GCM simulations with that of the earlier slab soil hydrology GCM (SSH-GCM) simulations. In the Sahelian context, the biogeophysical component of desertification was analyzed for SiB-GCM simulations. Cumulus parameterization is found to be the primary determinant of the organization of the simulated tropical rainfall of the GLA GCM using Arakawa-Schubert cumulus parameterization. A comparison of model simulations with station data revealed excessive shortwave radiation accompanied by excessive drying and heating to the land. The perpetual July simulations with and without interactive soil moisture shows that 30 to 40 day oscillations may be a natural mode of the simulated earth atmosphere system.

  12. GCM Simulations of the Tropical Hydrogen Distribution Observed by Mars Odyssey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mischna, M. A.; Richardson, M. I.

    2005-01-01

    The age and nature of the tropical hydrogen deposits on Mars remain uncertain. Competing theories suggest that the deposits are composed of either ancient, hydrated minerals or recently emplaced water ice. We use the GFDL Mars GCM with a fully coupled atmosphere-regolith water cycle to explore which of these hypotheses is best supported by model results. Such a conclusion can be drawn from the resultant trends in subsurface ice evolution during various obliquity and polar cap conditions. Our results suggest that the tropical hydrogen distribution is best explained by recent emplacement of ice through either exposure of the south polar ice cap or by burial of tropical surface ice from the most recent high obliquity excursions.

  13. Long Lead-Time Forecasting of Snowpack and Precipitation in the Upper Snake River Basin using Pacific Oceanic-Atmospheric Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, S.; Tootle, G.; Parkinson, S.; Holbrook, P.; Blestrud, D.

    2012-12-01

    Water managers and planners in the western United States are challenged with managing resources for various uses, including hydropower. Hydropower is especially important throughout the Upper Snake River Basin, where a series of hydropower projects provide a low cost renewable energy source to the region. These hydropower projects include several dams that are managed by Idaho Power Company (IPC). Planners and managers rely heavily on forecasts of snowpack and precipitation to plan for hydropower availability and the need for other generation sources. There is a pressing need for improved snowpack and precipitation forecast models in the Upper Snake River Basin. This research investigates the ability of Pacific oceanic-atmospheric data and climatic variables to provide skillful long lead-time (three to nine months) forecasts of snowpack and precipitation, and examines the benefits of segregating the warm and cold phases of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) to reduce the temperature variability within the target dataset. Singular value decomposition (SVD) was used to identify regions of Pacific Ocean sea surface temperatures (SST) and 500mbar geopotential heights (Z500) for various lead times (three, six, and nine months) that were teleconnected with snowpack and precipitation stations in Upper Snake River Basin headwaters. The identified Pacific Ocean SST and Z500 regions were used to create indices that became predictors in a non-parametric forecasting model. The majority of forecasts resulted in positive statistical skill, which indicated an improvement of the forecast over the climatology forecast (no-skill forecast). The results from the forecasts models indicated that derived indices from the SVD analysis resulted in improved forecast skill when compared to forecasts using established climate indices. Segregation of the cold phase PDO years resulted in the identification of different regions in the Pacific Ocean and vastly improved skill for the nine month

  14. The hypoparathyroidism-associated mutation in Drosophila Gcm compromises protein stability and glial cell formation

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Xiao; Lu, Lu; Zhuge, Chun-Chun; Chen, Xuebing; Zhai, Yuanfen; Cheng, Jingjing; Mao, Haian; Yang, Chang-Ching; Tan, Bertrand Chin-Ming; Lee, Yi-Nan; Chien, Cheng-Ting; Ho, Margaret S.

    2017-01-01

    Differentiated neurons and glia are acquired from immature precursors via transcriptional controls exerted by factors such as proteins in the family of Glial Cells Missing (Gcm). Mammalian Gcm proteins mediate neural stem cell induction, placenta and parathyroid development, whereas Drosophila Gcm proteins act as a key switch to determine neuronal and glial cell fates and regulate hemocyte development. The present study reports a hypoparathyroidism-associated mutation R59L that alters Drosophila Gcm (Gcm) protein stability, rendering it unstable, and hyperubiquitinated via the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). GcmR59L interacts with the Slimb-based SCF complex and Protein Kinase C (PKC), which possibly plays a role in its phosphorylation, hence altering ubiquitination. Additionally, R59L causes reduced Gcm protein levels in a manner independent of the PEST domain signaling protein turnover. GcmR59L proteins bind DNA, functionally activate transcription, and induce glial cells, yet at a less efficient level. Finally, overexpression of either wild-type human Gcmb (hGcmb) or hGcmb carrying the conserved hypoparathyroidism mutation only slightly affects gliogenesis, indicating differential regulatory mechanisms in human and flies. Taken together, these findings demonstrate the significance of this disease-associated mutation in controlling Gcm protein stability via UPS, hence advance our understanding on how glial formation is regulated. PMID:28051179

  15. Implementation of the vortex force formalism in the coupled ocean-atmosphere-wave-sediment transport (COAWST) modeling system for inner shelf and surf zone applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kumar, Nirnimesh; Voulgaris, George; Warner, John C.; Olabarrieta, Maitane

    2012-01-01

    Model results from the planar beach case show good agreement with depth-averaged analytical solutions and with theoretical flow structures. Simulation results for the DUCK' 94 experiment agree closely with measured profiles of cross-shore and longshore velocity data from and . Diagnostic simulations showed that the nonlinear processes of wave roller generation and wave-induced mixing are important for the accurate simulation of surf zone flows. It is further recommended that a more realistic approach for determining the contribution of wave rollers and breaking induced turbulent mixing can be formulated using non-dimensional parameters which are functions of local wave parameters and the beach slope. Dominant terms in the cross-shore momentum balance are found to be the quasi-static pressure gradient and breaking acceleration. In the alongshore direction, bottom stress, breaking acceleration, horizontal advection and horizontal vortex forces dominate the momentum balance. The simulation results for the bar/rip channel morphology case clearly show the ability of the modeling system to reproduce horizontal and vertical circulation patterns similar to those found in laboratory studies and to numerical simulations using the radiation stress representation. The vortex force term is found to be more important at locations where strong flow vorticity interacts with the wave-induced Stokes flow field. Outside the surf zone, the three-dimensional model simulations of wave-induced flows for non-breaking waves closely agree with flow observations from MVCO, with the vertical structure of the simulated flow varying as a function of the vertical viscosity as demonstrated by Lentz et al. (2008).

  16. Performance of a Dynamic Initialization Scheme in the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System for Tropical Cyclones (COAMPS-TC)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    hypotenuse of the black right triangle indicates the approximate location of the ocean surface. 654 W E A T H E R A N D F O R E C A S T I N G VOLUME 26...become a category 4 hurricane with maximum sustained winds of 115 kt at 0600 UTC 19 August. After passing approxi- mately 125 n mi west of Bermuda , Bill

  17. The Impact of Coastal Phytoplankton Blooms on Ocean-Atmosphere Thermal Energy Exchange: Evidence from a Two-Way Coupled Numerical Modeling System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-25

    utilizing more realistic, spatially varying shortwave attenuation terms based on satellite estimates of surface algal pigment concentration. These SST... pigment concentration. These SST differences lead to an ~88% increase in the cumulative turbulent thermal energy transfer from the ocean to the atmosphere...divides total solar shortwave into Photosynthetically Available Radiation (PAR; 350-700 nm) and longer (>700 nm) spectral components. The depth

  18. Air-Sea Interaction in the Ligurian Sea: Assessment of a Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Model Using In Situ Data from LASIE07

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    the warm bias in the CAO run. When the 1D mixed layer simulation with observed ODAS forcing is compared with the actual ODAS temperature and turbulence...year. The region where the ocean’s heat gain is a minimum is actually in the same coastal zone discussed above, because of the large sensible and...models: Recent developments in the UK. North Sea Dynamics, J. Sundemann and W. Lenz, Eds., Springer, 299–317. Grandi, V., A. Carta , L. Gualdesi, F

  19. Investigating vegetation-climate interactions during glacial times using the IPSL GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woillez, Marie-Noelle; Kageyama, Masa; Krinner, Gerhard

    2010-05-01

    Vegetation plays an important role in the climate system, through its impact on albedo, rugosity and water fluxes. Only few GCM studies have investigated the climatic impact of vegetation changes in glacial times, some using a fixed glacial vegetation based on pollinic reconstructions (e.g. Crowley & Baum 1997; Wyputta & McAvaney 2001) and some others using vegetation models ( Kubatzki & Claussen 1998; Levis & Foley 1999; Crucifix & Hewitt 2005), but seldom with a full atmosphere-vegetation coupling. Moreover, most of these simulations have been run with fixed sea surface temperatures, thus inhibiting potential oceanic retroactions. Here we force two different vegetation models, ORCHIDEE and BIOME4, with outputs from the IPSL_CM4 Atmosphere-Ocean General Circulation Model (AOGCM). Two different glacial climates are used: with and without collapsed Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC).The state with a collapsed AMOC results from an imposed additional freshwater flux in the North Atlantic ocean. Then, the different resulting vegetations are used to force the AOGCM. The new climatic states are compared with data and with results from other simulations performed in the PMIP2 project. If time allows we will also show the results from a fully coupled glacial simulation IPSL_CM4-ORCHIDEE and compare the results to those obtained in forced mode.

  20. A novel mutation in the GCM2 gene causing severe congenital isolated hypoparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Daniel; Kirwin, Susan M.; Sol-Church, Katia; Levine, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the GCM2 gene in three siblings with congenital hypoparathyroidism and perform functional analysis. Materials and methods We sequenced the GCM2 gene by PCR and analyzed the functional consequence of the mutation by transient transfection studies. Haplotype analysis was performed. Results We identified a nucleotide change, c.408C>A, in exon 3 that is predicted to truncate the Gcm2 protein (p.Tyr136Ter). All three affected siblings were homozygous and both parents were heterozygous for the mutation. Transfection studies revealed the mutant mRNA but not expression of the Gcm2 protein. Haplotype analysis revealed that the two mutant GCM2 alleles shared genotypes on chromosome 6p24.2. Conclusions We describe the first GCM2 mutation in exon 3 in patients with severe congenital hypoparathyroidism. Informative genetic markers could not exclude identity by descent for the mutant alleles. Gcm2 protein was not detected after transfection, suggesting that complete lack of Gcm2 action accounts for severe hypoparathyroidism. PMID:23155703

  1. Ocean-Atmosphere interaction observed from comparison of the ENSO signatures in the time series of J2 and the Earth's spin rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, L.; Fang, M.; Zang, X.; Zheng, D.; Hager, B. H.; Wunsch, C.; Ding, X.

    2003-12-01

    Significant interannual variations have been observed from the multi-satillite SLR solutions of the Earth's oblateness, known as the J2 time series, by the Texas CSR group (Cheng & Tapley, submitted) with a time span from 1975 to the present, as well as by our independent analysis of the Godard series (courtesy of Ben Chao for the data) with a time span from 1979 to the present. These variations are closely related to the ENSO events as evidenced by their apparent correlation, not perfect though, with the Southern Oscillation Index. Our preliminary analysis shows that the ENSO signature in the atmospheric circulation is not adequate to account for up to 50% of the interannuals in the J2 series. In contrast, the atmosphere contributes better than 80% of the observed time variation of the Earth's rotation rate i.e. the length of day (LOD) at the ENSO time scale, mostly from the thermally driven eastward wind fields (e.g. Zheng et al, 2003). We normalize the LOD and J2 series by making the maxima in both data sets units, and make a comparison. A strong correlation is found between the LOD and J2. It is apparently due to a common cause from the ENSO. At the same time, noticeable differences are observed, especially with the phases. These differences are ultimately attributed to the ocean-atmosphere interaction during the ENSO events. As a preliminary study, we calculate the oceanic contribution to the interannuals of LOD and J2 by running a high-resolution state-of-art self-consistent and volume conserving ocean numerical model with realistic atmospheric forcing. A simple model for the ocean-atmospheric interaction will be employed to calculate the changes in the wind and pressure fields. Solid Earth deformation induced by the bottom pressure change is also considered in the modeling. Correlation analysis are conducted between the "fully model" ENSO driven LOD and J2. Comparisons between the observed and modeled correltions will be presented.

  2. THOR: an open-source exo-GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosheintz, Luc; Mendonça, João; Käppeli, Roger; Lukas Grimm, Simon; Mishra, Siddhartha; Heng, Kevin

    2015-12-01

    In this talk, I will present THOR, the first fully conservative, GPU-accelerated exo-GCM (general circulation model) on a nearly uniform, global grid that treats shocks and is non-hydrostatic. THOR will be freely available to the community as a standard tool.Unlike most GCMs THOR solves the full, non-hydrostatic Euler equations instead of the primitive equations. The equations are solved on a global three-dimensional icosahedral grid by a second order Finite Volume Method (FVM). Icosahedral grids are nearly uniform refinements of an icosahedron. We've implemented three different versions of this grid. FVM conserves the prognostic variables (density, momentum and energy) exactly and doesn't require a diffusion term (artificial viscosity) in the Euler equations to stabilize our solver. Historically FVM was designed to treat discontinuities correctly. Hence it excels at resolving shocks, including those present in hot exoplanetary atmospheres.Atmospheres are generally in near hydrostatic equilibrium. We therefore implement a well-balancing technique recently developed at the ETH Zurich. This well-balancing ensures that our FVM maintains hydrostatic equilibrium to machine precision. Better yet, it is able to resolve pressure perturbations from this equilibrium as small as one part in 100'000. It is important to realize that these perturbations are significantly smaller than the truncation error of the same scheme without well-balancing. If during the course of the simulation (due to forcing) the atmosphere becomes non-hydrostatic, our solver continues to function correctly.THOR just passed an important mile stone. We've implemented the explicit part of the solver. The explicit solver is useful to study instabilities or local problems on relatively short time scales. I'll show some nice properties of the explicit THOR. An explicit solver is not appropriate for climate study because the time step is limited by the sound speed. Therefore, we are working on the first fully

  3. Collaborative project. Ocean-atmosphere interaction from meso-to planetary-scale. Mechanisms, parameterization, and variability

    SciTech Connect

    Small, Richard; Bryan, Frank; Tribbia, Joseph; Park, Sungsu; Dennis, John; Saravanan, R.; Schneider, Niklas; Kwon, Young-Oh

    2015-06-11

    This project aims to improve long term global climate simulations by resolving ocean mesoscale activity and the corresponding response in the atmosphere. The main computational objectives are; i) to perform and assess Community Earth System Model (CESM) simulations with the new Community Atmospheric Model (CAM) spectral element dynamical core; ii) use static mesh refinement to focus on oceanic fronts; iii) develop a new Earth System Modeling tool to investigate the atmospheric response to fronts by selectively filtering surface flux fields in the CESM coupler. The climate research objectives are 1) to improve the coupling of ocean fronts and the atmospheric boundary layer via investigations of dependency on model resolution and stability functions: 2) to understand and simulate the ensuing tropospheric response that has recently been documented in observations: and 3) to investigate the relationship of ocean frontal variability to low frequency climate variability and the accompanying storm tracks and extremes in high resolution simulations. This is a collaborative multi-institution project consisting of computational scientists, climate scientists and climate model developers. It specifically aims at DOE objectives of advancing simulation and predictive capability of climate models through improvements in resolution and physical process representation.

  4. Mars Ozone Absorption Line Shapes from Infrared Heterodyne Spectra Applied to GCM-Predicted Ozone Profiles and to MEX/SPICAM Column Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fast, Kelly E.; Kostiuk, T.; Annen, J.; Hewagama, T.; Delgado, J.; Livengood, T. A.; Lefevre, F.

    2008-01-01

    We present the application of infrared heterodyne line shapes of ozone on Mars to those produced by radiative transfer modeling of ozone profiles predicted by general circulation models (GCM), and to contemporaneous column abundances measured by Mars Express SPICAM. Ozone is an important tracer of photochemistry Mars' atmosphere, serving as an observable with which to test predictions of photochemistry-coupled GCMs. Infrared heterodyne spectroscopy at 9.5 microns with spectral resolving power >1,000,000 is the only technique that can directly measure fully-resolved line shapes of Martian ozone features from the surface of the Earth. Measurements were made with Goddard Space Flight Center's Heterodyne instrument for Planetary Wind And Composition (HIPWAC) at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) on Mauna Kea, Hawaii on February 21-24 2008 UT at Ls=35deg on or near the MEX orbital path. The HIPWAC observations were used to test GCM predictions. For example, a GCM-generated ozone profile for 60degN 112degW was scaled so that a radiative transfer calculation of its absorption line shape matched an observed HIPWAC absorption feature at the same areographic position, local time, and season. The RMS deviation of the model from the data was slightly smaller for the GCM-generated profile than for a line shape produced by a constant-with-height profile, even though the total column abundances were the same, showing potential for testing and constraining GCM ozone-profiles. The resulting ozone column abundance from matching the model to the HIPWAC line shape was 60% higher than that observed by SPICAM at the same areographic position one day earlier and 2.5 hours earlier in local time. This could be due to day-to-day, diurnal, or north polar region variability, or to measurement sensitivity to the ozone column and its distribution, and these possibilities will be explored. This work was supported by NASA's Planetary Astronomy Program.

  5. A GCM simulation of the climate 6000 years ago

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, N.M.J.; Valdes, P.J.

    1997-01-01

    Two 10-yr integrations of the UGAMP GCM are presented. Each has a full seasonal cycle, T42 resolution, interactive land and sea ice, and prescribed sea surface temperatures. They differ in that one integration represents present day climate (PD) and the other has a perturbed orbit and reduced atmospheric concentrations of CO{sub 2} appropriate to the climate of 6000 years ago (6 kyr, hereafter 6K). the 6K integration produces enhanced continental warmth during summer and cold during winter. Changes in atmospheric temperature gradients brought about by the surface response lead to altered jet stream structures and transient eddy activity, which in turn affect precipitation patterns. Tropical {open_quotes}monsoon{close_quotes}-type circulation patterns are also affected, also leading to altered precipitation. Many of the changes in hydrology mimic the geological record remarkably well: the Sahel is much wetter, as are the midwestern United States and the Mediterranean regions; California and northern Europe are drier. Processes leading to the model`s surface responses in both temperature and hydrology are described in detail. Finally, the sensitivity of the results to an alternative, objective definition of the 6k calendar is investigated. The sensitivity is found to be smaller than the overall signal to the extent that the principal conclusions are no altered. 35 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Equatorial Mountain Torques and Cold Surges in a GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lott, Francois; Mailler, Sylvain

    2014-05-01

    The dynamical relations between the equatorial atmospheric angular momentum, the equatorial mountain torque and the cold surges are analysed in a General Circultaion Model (GCM). First we show that the global equatorial atmospheric momentum budget is very well closed in the model which is a clear benefit when we compare with results from the NCEP reanalysis. We then confirm that the equatorial torques due to the Tibetan plateau, the Rockies and the Andes are well related to the cold surges developping over South Eastern China, North America, and the Southern South America respectively. For all these mountains, a peack in the Equatorial mountain torque component that points locally toward the pole preceeds by few days the development of the cold surges, yielding a predictive interest to our results. We also analyse the contributions to the torques of the parameterized mountain stresses and find that they contribute substantially. In experiments without the parameterized stresses, we also find that the explicit terms partly compensate the parameterized contributions to the torque, and the cold surges are not much affected. This shows that the cold surges can be well captured by models, providing that the synoptic conditions prior to their onset are well represented. The compensation between torques is nevertheless not complete and some weekening of the cold surges is found when the mountain forcings are reduced. This illustrates how the exact torques are needed at a given time to produce the correct synoptic scale dynamics at a later stage.

  7. GCM studies of intermediate and deep waters in the Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, Keith; Wu, Peili

    1998-12-01

    Results from GCM simulations of the Mediterranean thermohaline circulation are presented under repeating year wind and surface buoyancy forcings and the reproduction of important physical processes is discussed. It is shown that baroclinic eddies are critical to the effective dispersal of Levantine intermediate water (LIW) throughout the eastern Mediterranean basin. These develop rapidly even in a 1/4 degree model which does not resolve the deformation radius, provided horizontal friction is small enough. It is shown that LIW enters the Adriatic basin and pre-conditions deep water formation which would not otherwise occur due to low surface salinity in winter. The dispersal of Adriatic deep waters is modelled, and it is shown that the introduction of the Gent and McWilliams advective scheme greatly improves the distribution of deep waters in the eastern basin by permitting the formation of dense overflow waters from the Otranto straits. This is achieved with very small parametrised advection that still permits the formation of baroclinic eddies unlike most applications which use the scheme to replace eddies. Results from a 100-year climate simulation are then presented in which the thermohaline circulation has reached equilibrium conditions. Dense water formation in both eastern and western basin still occur after 100 years. While the eastern basin water masses are reasonably realistic, the western basin is a little too cold and fresh, suggesting that insufficient LIW is reaching the deep water formation site in the northwest basin. Further work is needed in this area.

  8. GCM studies of the influence of vegetation on the general circulation: The role of albedo in modulating climate change. [GCM (general circulation model)

    SciTech Connect

    Dirmeyer, P.A.

    1992-01-01

    An atmospheric general circulation model (GCM) coupled to a simple biosphere model is used to examine the role of vegetation change on climate. Various biomes are substituted to simulate degradation of vegetation. It is found that albedo change plays a distinct role in the local decrease of rainfall. Changes in vegetation morphology and physiology do not cause catastrophic decreases in precipitation. Simulations of Amazon deforestation show that the climate response is very dependent on the amount of change in albedo between rainforest and degraded grass. Precipitation drops as albedo increases. The change in plant physiology decreases evapotranspiration, but moisture convergence increases to offset the drying. This compensation is a result of cloud feedback in this model, and does not occur when cloudiness is prescribed. Experiments with idealized boundary conditions show a similar dependence of rainfall on albedo in cases of tropical deforestation, subtropical desertification, and mid-latitude deforestation. In the topics, rainfall decreases over land only when reflectivity is increased, even when the rainforest is left intact. The monsoon precipitation of the subtropical experiment fails when savannah is replaced by high-albedo desert. When low-albedo desert is used, the decrease in summer rainfall is small. When mid-latitude forest is replaced by grassland, precipitation patterns shift, but net rainfall remains unchanged. Additional simulations of mid-latitude drought show that low soil moisture leads to moderate spring and summer droughts, but dry soil combined with dormant vegetation produces extremely severe droughts. Soil moisture deficits were more persistent when vegetation did not go dormant.

  9. Revisiting the role of the Gcm transcription factor, from master regulator to Swiss army knife.

    PubMed

    Cattenoz, Pierre B; Giangrande, Angela

    2016-10-01

    Master genes are known to induce the differentiation of a multipotent cell into a specific cell type. These molecules are often transcription factors that switch on the regulatory cascade that triggers cell specification. Gcm was first described as the master gene of the glial fate in Drosophila as it induces the differentiation of neuroblasts into glia in the developing nervous system. Later on, Gcm was also shown to regulate the differentiation of blood, tendon and peritracheal cells as well as that of neuronal subsets. Thus, the glial master gene is used in at least 4 additional systems to promote differentiation. To understand the numerous roles of Gcm, we recently reported a genome-wide screen of Gcm direct targets in the Drosophila embryo. This screen provided new insight into the role and mode of action of this powerful transcription factor, notably on the interactions between Gcm and major differentiation pathways such as the Hedgehog, Notch and JAK/STAT. Here, we discuss the mode of action of Gcm in the different systems, we present new tissues that require Gcm and we revise the concept of 'master gene'.

  10. A statistical study of the regional impact of deforestation on climate in the LMD GCM

    SciTech Connect

    Polcher, J.; Laval, K.

    1994-09-01

    The present study uses the general circulation model of the Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique (LMD-GCM) coupled to the land-surface, vegetation model SECHIBA. The impact of deforestation on climate is discussed. Replacing tropical forests by degraded pastures changes albedo, the roughness length and the hydrological properties of the surface. The experiment was carried out over eleven years using the observed sea surface temperature from 1978 to 1988, which includes two major El Nino events. The discussion of the results in this study is limited to the regional impact of deforestation. The changes found for the surface fluxes in Amazonia, Africa, and Indonesia are examined in detail and compared in order to understand the impact on temperature. Special attention is paid to feedback mechanisms which compensate for the surface changes and to the statistical significant of these results within athe tropical variability of climate. It is shown that the relatively small regional impact of deforestation in this study is statistically significant and largely independent of the El Nino-Southern Oscillation phenomenon. 27 refs., 7 figs., 11 tabs.

  11. GCM simulations of Titan's middle and lower atmosphere and comparison to observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lora, Juan M.; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Russell, Joellen L.

    2015-04-01

    Simulation results are presented from a new general circulation model (GCM) of Titan, the Titan Atmospheric Model (TAM), which couples the Flexible Modeling System (FMS) spectral dynamical core to a suite of external/sub-grid-scale physics. These include a new non-gray radiative transfer module that takes advantage of recent data from Cassini-Huygens, large-scale condensation and quasi-equilibrium moist convection schemes, a surface model with "bucket" hydrology, and boundary layer turbulent diffusion. The model produces a realistic temperature structure from the surface to the lower mesosphere, including a stratopause, as well as satisfactory superrotation. The latter is shown to depend on the dynamical core's ability to build up angular momentum from surface torques. Simulated latitudinal temperature contrasts are adequate, compared to observations, and polar temperature anomalies agree with observations. In the lower atmosphere, the insolation distribution is shown to strongly impact turbulent fluxes, and surface heating is maximum at mid-latitudes. Surface liquids are unstable at mid- and low-latitudes, and quickly migrate poleward. The simulated humidity profile and distribution of surface temperatures, compared to observations, corroborate the prevalence of dry conditions at low latitudes. Polar cloud activity is well represented, though the observed mid-latitude clouds remain somewhat puzzling, and some formation alternatives are suggested.

  12. Simulation of monsoon intraseasonal oscillations in a coarse-resolution aquaplanet GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajayamohan, R. S.; Khouider, Boualem; Majda, Andrew J.

    2014-08-01

    The skill of the global climate models (GCMs) to realistically simulate the monsoon intraseasonal oscillations (MISOs) is related to the sensitivity of their convective parameterization schemes. Here we show that by coupling a simple multicloud parameterization to a coarse-resolution aquaplanet GCM, realistic MISOs can be simulated. We conduct three different simulations with a fixed nonhomogeneous sea surface temperature mimicking the Indian Ocean/western Pacific warm pool (WP) centered at the three latitudes 5°N, 10°N, and 15°N, respectively, to replicate the seasonal migration of the Tropical Convergence Zone (TCZ). This results in the generation of mean circulation resembling the monsoonal flow pattern in boreal summer. Succession of eastward propagating Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) disturbances with phase speed, amplitude, and structure similar to summer MJOs are simulated when the WP is at 5°N. When the WP is located over 10°N, northward and eastward propagating MISOs are simulated. This case captures the meridional seesaw of convection between continental and oceanic TCZ observed during boreal summer over South Asia. Westward propagating Rossby wave-like disturbances are simulated when the WP is over 15°N congruous with the synoptic disturbances seen over the monsoon trough. The initiation of intraseasonal oscillations in the model can occur internally through organization of convective events above the WP associated with internal dynamics.

  13. Do GCM's predict the climate.... Or the low frequency weather?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovejoy, S.; Schertzer, D.; Varon, D.

    2012-04-01

    control runs (i.e. without climate forcing) of GCM based climate forecasting systems including those of the Institut Pierre Simon Laplace (Paris) and the Earth Forecasting System (Hamburg). In order for these systems to go beyond simply predicting low frequency weather i.e. in order for them to predict the climate, they need appropriate climate forcings and/ or new internal mechanisms of variability. Using statistical scaling techniques we examine the scale dependence of fluctuations from forced and unforced GCM outputs, including from the ECHO-G and EFS simulations in the Millenium climate reconstruction project and compare this with data, multiproxies and paleo data. Our general conclusion is that the models systematically underestimate the multidecadal, multicentennial scale variability.

  14. Smagorinsky-type diffusion in a high-resolution GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer-Rolffs, Urs; Becker, Erich

    2013-04-01

    The parametrization of the (horizontal) momentum diffusion is a paramount component of a Global Circulation Model (GCM). Aside from friction in the boundary layer, a relevant fraction of kinetic energy is dissipated in the free atmosphere, and it is known that a linear harmonic turbulence model is not sufficient to obtain a reasonable simulation of the kinetic energy spectrum. Therefore, often empirical hyper-diffusion schemes are employed, regardless of disadvantages like the violation of energy conservation and the second law of thermodynamics. At IAP we have developed an improved parametrization of the horizontal diffusion that is based on Smagorinsky's nonlinear and energy conservation formulation. This approach is extended by the dynamic Smagorinsky model (DSM) of M. Germano. In this new scheme, the mixing length is no longer a prescribed parameter but calculated dynamically from the resolved flow such as to preserve scale invariance for the horizontal energy cascade. The so-called Germano identity is solved by a tensor norm ansatz which yields a positive definite frictional heating. We present results from an investigation using the DSM as a parametrization of horizontal diffusion in a high-resolution version of the Kühlungborn Mechanistic general Circulation Model (KMCM) with spectral truncation at horizontal wavenumber 330. The DSM calculates the Smagorinsky parameter cS independent from the resolution scale. We find that this method yields an energy spectrum that exhibits a pronounced transition from a synoptic -3 to a mesoscale -5-3 slope at wavenumbers around 50. At the highest wavenumber end, a behaviour similar to that often obtained by tuning the hyper-diffusion is achieved self-consistently. This result is very sensitive to the explicit choice of the test filter in the DSM.

  15. The Effect of Saharan Dust on North Atlantic Hydroclimate and Tropical Cyclones in a High-Resolution GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strong, J. D.; Vecchi, G. A.

    2015-12-01

    Climate of the tropical North Atlantic and West Africa is sensitive to dust optical properties as shown by our previous work (Strong et al., 2015) using a fully coupled global climate model (GCM). However, that study was limited by the relatively coarse resolution of the GCM which could not resolve explicitly sub-scale processes important to the simulation of tropical cyclones (TCs).Using simulations with the higher resolution, fully coupled GFDL Climate Model 2.5, Forecast-oriented Low Ocean Resolution version (CM2.5-FLOR), for several realistic sets of optical properties, we investigate the climatic response across the tropical Atlantic basin to an idealized aerosol radiative forcing from Saharan-born mineral dust, comparable to the observed changes between the 1960s and 1990s, with a focus on the hydrological cycle and TCs. CM2.5-FLOR has a higher resolution atmosphere which is able to resolve TCs and has been shown to accurately reproduce the observed tropical cyclone climatology.In the first part, we will show that the sign of the radiative response at the top of the atmosphere (ToA) changes between the more absorbing dust and more scattering dust simulations, in agreement with previous studies. Conversely, the radiative response at the surface is generally comparable between sets of optical properties. These differences result in opposing regional hydrologic and thermodynamic effects of dust both in the atmosphere and in the upper ocean. In the second part, the effect of Saharan-born mineral dust on TCs will be analyzed. In all simulations, dust causes a decrease in tropical cyclone activity in the North Atlantic with the largest response occurring in the most absorbing and scattering optical regimes. We also note significant changes in the West Pacific in these simulations. The changes in tropical cyclone activity are found to not be explained by common genesis potential indexes, but a relationship between accumulated cyclone energy and ToA radiative flux

  16. Using the Model Coupling Toolkit to couple earth system models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warner, J.C.; Perlin, N.; Skyllingstad, E.D.

    2008-01-01

    Continued advances in computational resources are providing the opportunity to operate more sophisticated numerical models. Additionally, there is an increasing demand for multidisciplinary studies that include interactions between different physical processes. Therefore there is a strong desire to develop coupled modeling systems that utilize existing models and allow efficient data exchange and model control. The basic system would entail model "1" running on "M" processors and model "2" running on "N" processors, with efficient exchange of model fields at predetermined synchronization intervals. Here we demonstrate two coupled systems: the coupling of the ocean circulation model Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) to the surface wave model Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN), and the coupling of ROMS to the atmospheric model Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Prediction System (COAMPS). Both coupled systems use the Model Coupling Toolkit (MCT) as a mechanism for operation control and inter-model distributed memory transfer of model variables. In this paper we describe requirements and other options for model coupling, explain the MCT library, ROMS, SWAN and COAMPS models, methods for grid decomposition and sparse matrix interpolation, and provide an example from each coupled system. Methods presented in this paper are clearly applicable for coupling of other types of models. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Climatic Forcings of the Last Major Glacial Inception: A GCM Simulation of 115.5 Ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essig, M.; Oglesby, R.; Otieno, F.; Bromwich, D.

    2007-12-01

    The onset of Northern Hemisphere glaciation at around 115.5 Ka is thought to have been caused by a number of factors. Two of the most important of these are a reduction in atmospheric CO2 from approximately 380 ppm to 180 ppm, and changes in the earth's eccentricity, precession, and obliquity due to Milankovitch orbital cycles. We used the NCAR CCSM3 GCM in fully coupled mode to simulate the climate at 115.5 ka B.P. The fully-coupled mode includes dynamical atmospheric and oceanic components, as well as sophisticated land surface and sea ice schemes. Sea level and the distribution of the continents were held at present-day values, since they changed little between 0 Ka and 115.5 Ka. Thus, our model simulation can also be thought of as examining the roles of lowered CO2 and orbital configuration in driving glacial inception. In particular, we hypothesize that these climatic forcings will lead to a succession of cool summers and warm wet winters in key regions of the high latitude Northern Hemisphere. In turn, we expect this will be conducive to building the perennial snow pack that is an essential precursor to the Laurentide and Fenno-Scandinavian ice sheets. Though the simulation is still underway at this writing, preliminary results from the first 100 years of the run suggest that this does indeed take place. Key results from the completed run will be presented at the meeting, along with an assessment of how they differ from a present-day CCSM3 control run. Furthermore, in glacial inception regions the performance of both the control run and an existing CCSM3 preindustrial simulation are being compared to ERA40 reanalyses as an additional test of model fidelity. The model simulation is also being verified using all available data from geologic record for the time around 115.5 Ka.

  18. Contributions to the implementation of the Arakawa-Schubert cumulus parameterization in the GLA GCM. [GCM (general circulation model)

    SciTech Connect

    Sud, Y.C.; Chao, W.C.; Walker, G.K. )

    1991-07-01

    Several integrations were made with a coarse version of the GLA GCM, which has the Arakawa-Schubert cumulus parameterization, predicted fractional cloud cover, and a parameterization of evaporation of falling rainfall. All model simulation experiments started from ECMWF analysis for 15 December 1982 and were integrated until 31 January 1983 using climatological boundary conditions. The first ten days of model integrations show that the model-simulated tropics dries and warms as a result of excessive precipitation. Three types of model development-cum-analysis studies were made with the cumulus scheme. First, the Critical Cloud Work Function (CCWF) dataset for different sigma layers were reworked using the Cloud Work Function (CWF) database of lord et al. as representative of time-average CWF and not the actual CCWF values as in the Arakawa-Schubert implementation of cumulus convection. The experiments with the new CCWF dataset helped to delineate influence of changing CCWF on model simulations. Larger values of CCWF partially alleviated the problem of excessive heating and drying during spinup and sharpened the tropical ITCZ (Intertropical Convergence Zone). Second, by comparing two simulations, one with and one without cumulus convection, the role of cumulus convection in maintaining observed tropical rainfall and 850 mb easterly winds is clarified. Third, relations between cloud radii and cumulus entrainment parameter, [lambda], realistic upper and lower bounds on [lambda] were obtained. This improvement had a great impact on the time evolution of tropical temperature and humidity simulation. It also suppressed excessive rainfall during spinup. Finally, by invoking [lambda][sub min] = 0.0002 m[sup [minus]1] (R[sub max] = 1.00 km) another simulation was made. In this simulation, not only the excessive initial rainfall was virtually eliminated, but a more realistic vertical distribution of specific humidity in the tropics was produced. 22 refs., 29 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Comparison of paleoclimate data with GCM`s results and modern climate changes

    SciTech Connect

    Selyakov, K.I.

    1996-12-31

    Three types of data: paleoclimate reconstructions, GCM results, and observations on modern climate change are compared. The paleoanolag hypothesis (PH), which implies that regional patterns of climate change depends mostly on the mean global temperature change, is the basis for this study. Paleoclimate reconstructions for the Mid-Holocene, Eemeian, Mid-Pliocene are used to test the PH. Besides, the results of the GCM models, data on modern climate changes are scaled on the basis of PH. It was shown that the disagreement between paleo- and GCM data is in the difference in describing the equator-pole temperature changes. Precipitation anomalies in GCM data are not in agreement with paleoclimates. Temperature anomalies of the modern warming (1980-s) agree to some extent with paleodata.

  20. Analysis of cloud radiative forcing and feedback in a climate GCM. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lacis, A.

    1996-12-31

    The principal objectives of the research supported at the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program for a three year period commencing September 1990, were: (1) to improve and validate the radiation parameterizations in the GISS GCM through model intercomparisons with line-by-line calculations and through comparisons with ARM observations; (2) to improve the GISS GCM diagnostic output to enable more effective comparisons to global cloud/radiation data sets; and (3) to use ARM data to develop improved parameterization of clouds in the GCM and to study the interaction of dynamics and radiation. The ARM Program support has made it possible to establish and support an active and productive research group at GISS specializing in radiative transfer and cloud process modeling in support of improving the performance of a climate GCM.

  1. The Nonlinear Response of the Equatorial Pacific Ocean-Atmosphere System to Periodic Variations in Insolation and its Association with the Abrupt Climate Transitions during the Quaternary.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, P. G.

    2015-12-01

    The evidences of climate changes during the Quaternary are abundant but the physical mechanisms behind the climate transitions are controversial. The theory of Milankovitch takes into account the periodic orbital variations and the solar radiation received by the Earth as the main explanation for the glacial-interglacial cycles. However, some gaps in the theory still remain. In this study, we propose elucidating some of these gaps by approaching the Equatorial Pacific Ocean as a large oscillator, capable of triggering climate changes in different temporal scales. A mathematical model representing El Ninõ-like phenomena, based on Duffing equation and modulated by the astronomical cycle of 100 ka, was used to simulate the variability of the equatorial Pacific climate system over the last 2 Ma. The physical configuration of the Pacific Ocean, expressed in the equation, explains the temporal limit of the glacial-interglacial cycles. According to the simulation results, consistent with paleoclimate records, the amplification of the effects of the gradual variation of the Earth's orbit eccentricity - another unclear question - is due to the feedback mechanism of the Pacific ocean-atmosphere system, which responds non-linearly to small variations in insolation forcing and determines the ENSO-like phase (warm or cold) at different time scales and different intensities. The approach proposed here takes into account that the abrupt transitions between the ENSO-like phases, and the consequent changes in the sea surface temperature (SST) along the Equatorial Pacific Ocean, produce reactions that act as secondary causes of the temperature fluctuations that result in a glaciation (or deglaciation) - as the drastic change on the rate of evaporation/precipitation around the globe, and the increase (or decrease) of the atmospheric CO2 absorption by the phytoplankton. The transitional behavior between the warm and the cold phases, according to the presented model, is enhanced as

  2. GCM Simulations of the Aerosol Indirect Effect: Sensitivity to Cloud Parameterization and Aerosol Burden

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Surabi; DelGenio, Anthony D.; Koch, Dorothy; Tselioudis, George; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We describe the coupling of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) general circulation model (GCM) to an online sulfur chemistry model and source models for organic matter and sea-salt that is used to estimate the aerosol indirect effect. The cloud droplet number concentration is diagnosed empirically from field experiment datasets over land and ocean that observe droplet number and all three aerosol types simultaneously; corrections are made for implied variations in cloud turbulence levels. The resulting cloud droplet number is used to calculate variations in droplet effective radius, which in turn allows us to predict aerosol effects on cloud optical thickness and microphysical process rates. We calculate the aerosol indirect effect by differencing the top-of-the-atmosphere net cloud radiative forcing for simulations with present-day vs. pre-industrial emissions. Both the first (radiative) and second (microphysical) indirect effects are explored. We test the sensitivity of our results to cloud parameterization assumptions that control the vertical distribution of cloud occurrence, the autoconversion rate, and the aerosol scavenging rate, each of which feeds back significantly on the model aerosol burden. The global mean aerosol indirect effect for all three aerosol types ranges from -1.55 to -4.36 W m(exp -2) in our simulations. The results are quite sensitive to the pre-industrial background aerosol burden, with low pre-industrial burdens giving strong indirect effects, and to a lesser extent to the anthropogenic aerosol burden, with large burdens giving somewhat larger indirect effects. Because of this dependence on the background aerosol, model diagnostics such as albedo-particle size correlations and column cloud susceptibility, for which satellite validation products are available, are not good predictors of the resulting indirect effect.

  3. Effects of Cloud-Microphysics on Tropical Atmospheric Hydrologic Processes in the GEOS GCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, K. M.; Wu, H. T.; Sud, Y. C.; Walker, G. K.

    2004-01-01

    The sensitivity of tropical atmospheric hydrologic processes to cloud-microphysics is investigated using the NASA GEOS GCM. Results show that a faster autoconversion - rate produces more warm rain and less clouds at all levels. Fewer clouds enhances longwave cooling and reduces shortwave heating in the upper troposphere, while more warm rain produces increased condensation heating in the lower troposphere. This vertical heating differential destablizes the tropical atmosphere, producing a positive feedback resulting in more rain over the tropics. The feedback is maintained via a two-cell secondary circulation. The lower cell is capped by horizontal divergence and maximum cloud detrainment near the melting/freezing, with rising motion in the warm rain region connected to descending motion in the cold rain region. The upper cell is found above the freezing/melting level, with longwave-induced subsidence in the warm rain and dry regions, coupled to forced ascent in the deep convection region. The tropical large scale circulation is found to be very sensitive to the radiative-dynamic effects induced by changes in autoconversion rate. Reduced cloud-radiation processes feedback due to a faster autoconversion rate results in intermittent but more energetic eastward propagating Madden and Julian Oscillations (MJO). Conversely,-a slower autconversion rate, with increased cloud radiation produces MJO's with more realistic westward propagating transients, resembling a supercloud cluster structure. Results suggests that warm rain and associated low and mid level clouds, i.e., cumulus congestus, may play a critical role in regulating the time-intervals of deep convections and hence the fundamental time scales of the MJO.

  4. GCM Simulations of the Aerosol Indirect Effect: Sensitivity to Cloud Parameterization and Aerosol Burden

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Surabi; DelGenio, Anthony D.; Koch, Dorothy; Tselioudis, George; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We describe the coupling of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) general circulation model (GCM) to an online sulfur chemistry model and source models for organic matter and sea-salt that is used to estimate the aerosol indirect effect. The cloud droplet number concentration is diagnosed empirically from field experiment datasets over land and ocean that observe droplet number and all three aerosol types simultaneously; corrections are made for implied variations in cloud turbulence levels. The resulting cloud droplet number is used to calculate variations in droplet effective radius, which in turn allows us to predict aerosol effects on cloud optical thickness and microphysical process rates. We calculate the aerosol indirect effect by differencing the top-of-the-atmosphere net cloud radiative forcing for simulations with present-day vs. pre-industrial emissions. Both the first (radiative) and second (microphysical) indirect effects are explored. We test the sensitivity of our results to cloud parameterization assumptions that control the vertical distribution of cloud occurrence, the autoconversion rate, and the aerosol scavenging rate, each of which feeds back significantly on the model aerosol burden. The global mean aerosol indirect effect for all three aerosol types ranges from -1.55 to -4.36 W/sq m in our simulations. The results are quite sensitive to the pre-industrial background aerosol burden, with low pre-industrial burdens giving strong indirect effects, and to a lesser extent to the anthropogenic aerosol burden, with large burdens giving somewhat larger indirect effects. Because of this dependence on the background aerosol, model diagnostics such as albedo-particle size correlations and column cloud susceptibility, for which satellite validation products are available, are not good predictors of the resulting indirect effect.

  5. An improved standardization procedure to remove systematic low frequency variability biases in GCM simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrotra, Rajeshwar; Sharma, Ashish

    2012-12-01

    The quality of the absolute estimates of general circulation models (GCMs) calls into question the direct use of GCM outputs for climate change impact assessment studies, particularly at regional scales. Statistical correction of GCM output is often necessary when significant systematic biasesoccur between the modeled output and observations. A common procedure is to correct the GCM output by removing the systematic biases in low-order moments relative to observations or to reanalysis data at daily, monthly, or seasonal timescales. In this paper, we present an extension of a recently published nested bias correction (NBC) technique to correct for the low- as well as higher-order moments biases in the GCM-derived variables across selected multiple time-scales. The proposed recursive nested bias correction (RNBC) approach offers an improved basis for applying bias correction at multiple timescales over the original NBC procedure. The method ensures that the bias-corrected series exhibits improvements that are consistently spread over all of the timescales considered. Different variations of the approach starting from the standard NBC to the more complex recursive alternatives are tested to assess their impacts on a range of GCM-simulated atmospheric variables of interest in downscaling applications related to hydrology and water resources. Results of the study suggest that three to five iteration RNBCs are the most effective in removing distributional and persistence related biases across the timescales considered.

  6. The seasonal cycle of energetics from the GLAS/UMD climate GCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straus, David M.; Shukla, J.

    1988-01-01

    The annual cycle of atmospheric energetics from a 2-year integration of the GLAS/UMD Climate GCM is computed and compared to results from the European Centre analyses of the GWE year, and to previously published results on a global basis. All calculations are done in the mixed space-time domain. The main conclusions are: (1) the seasonal cycle of today's eddy kinetic energy (in both hemispheres), and of the transient eddy available potential energy and the potential-to-kinetic energy conversions (mean and eddy) in the Northern Hemisphere are well simulated by the GCM; (2) the GCM's tendency to have anomalously large mean u-winds at upper levels in high latitudes leads to excessive wintertime values of mean kinetic and available potential energies, and causes distortions in the GCM latitude-height distribution of kinetic energy and of many of the conversions; (3) the eddy conversion of available potential-to-kinetic energy obtained from the ageostrophic wind in these analyses; and (4) the conversions in the Southern Hemisphere are not well simulated by the GCM, although the observations are somewhat questionable.

  7. The Tropical Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere in the GEOS-2 GCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pawson, S.; Takacs, L.; Molod, A.; Nebuda, S.; Chen, M.; Rood, R.; Read, W. L.; Fiorino, M.

    1999-01-01

    The structure of the tropical upper troposphere and lower stratosphere in the GEOS-2 General Circulation Model (GCM) is discussed. The emphasis of this study is on the reality of monthly-mean temperature and water vapor distributions in the model, compared to reasonable observational estimates. It is shown that although the zonal-mean temperature is in good agreement with observations, the GCM supports an excessive zonal asymmetry near the tropopause compared to the ECMWF Reanalyses. In reality there is a QBO-related variability in the zonally averaged lower stratospheric temperature which is not captured by the model. The observed upper tropospheric temperature and humidity fields show variations related to those in the sea surface temperature, which are not incorporated in the GCM; nevertheless, there is some interannual variability in the GCM, indicating a component arising from internal processes. The model is too moist in the middle troposphere (500 hPa) but too dry in the upper troposphere, suggesting that there is too little vertical transport or too much drying in the GCM. Transport into the stratosphere shows a pronounced annual cycle, with drier air entering the tropical stratosphere when the tropopause is coldest in northern winter; while the alternating dry and moist air masses can be traced ascending through the tropical lower stratosphere, the progression of the anomalies is too rapid.

  8. Ensemble Predictions of Future Snowfall Scenarios in the Karakorum and Hindu-Kush Mountains Using Downscaled GCM Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosier, T. M.; Hill, D. F.; Sharp, K. V.

    2014-12-01

    Climate change is affecting the seasonality and mass of snow, and impacting the water resources of hundreds of millions of people who depend on streamflow originating in High Asia. Global climate model (GCM) outputs are the primary forcing data used to investigate future projections of changes in snow and glacier processes; however, these processes occur at a much finer spatial scale than the resolution of current GCMs. To facilitate studying the cryosphere in High Asia, we developed a software package to downscale monthly GCM data to 30-arcseconds for any global land area. Using this downscaling package, we produce an ensemble of downscaled GCM data from 2020-2100, corresponding to representative concentration pathways (RCPs) 4.5 and 8.5. We then use these data to model changes to snowfall in the Karakorum and Hindu Kush (KHK) region, which is located in High Asia. The ensemble mean of these data predict that total annual snowfall in 2095 will decrease by 22% under RCP 4.5 and 46% under RCP 8.5, relative to 1950-2000 climatological values. For both scenarios, the changes in snowfall are dependent on elevation, with the maximum decreases in snowfall occurring at approximately 2,300 m. While total snowfall decreases, an interesting feature of snowfall change for the RCP 8.5 scenario is that the ensemble mean projection shows an increase in snowfall for elevations between 3,000- 5,000 m relative to historic values. These fine-scale spatial, temporal, and elevation-dependent patterns of changes in projected snowfall significantly affect the energy balance of the snowpack, in turn affecting timing of melt and discharge. Therefore, our work can be coupled with a glacio-hydrological model to assess effects of these snowfall patterns on other processes or compared to existing model results to assess treatment of snow processes in the existing model. Our method is designed to downscale climate data for any global land area, allowing for the production of these fine

  9. STOIC: An Assessment of Coupled Model Climatology and Variability in Tropical Ocean Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Davey, M.K.; Sperber, K.R.; Huddleston, M

    2000-08-30

    The tropics are regions of strong ocean-atmosphere interaction on seasonal and interannual timescales, so a good representation of observed tropical behavior is a desirable objective for coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation models (CGCMs). To broaden and update previous assessments (Mechoso et al. 1995, Neelin et al. 1992), two complementary projects were initiated by the CLIVAR Working Group on Seasonal to Interannual Prediction (WGSIP): the El Nino Simulation Intercomparison Project (ENSIP, by Mojib Latif) and STOIC (Study of Tropical Oceans In Coupled models). The aim was to compare models against observations to identify common weaknesses and strengths. Results from ENSIP concentrating on the equatorial Pacific have been described by Latif et al. (2000), hereafter ENSIP2000. A detailed report on STOIC is available via anonymous ftp at email.meto.gov.uk/pub/cr/ ''stoic'' and is summarized in Davey et al. (2000). The STOIC analyses extend beyond the equatorial Pacific, to examine behavior in all three tropical ocean regions.

  10. Parameterization of turbulence and the planetary boundary layer in the GLA Fourth Order GCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfand, H. M.

    1985-01-01

    A new scheme has been developed to model the planetary boundary layer in the GLAS Fourth Order GCM through explicit resolution of its vertical structure into two or more vertical layers. This involves packing the lowest layers of the GCM close to the ground and developing new parameterization schemes that can express the turbulent vertical fluxes of heat, momentum and moisture at the earth's surface and between the layers that are contained with the PBL region. Offline experiments indicate that the combination of the modified level 2.5 second-order turbulent closure scheme and the 'extended surface layer' similarity scheme should work well to simulate the behavior of the turbulent PBL even at the coarsest vertical resolution with which such schemes will conceivably be used in the GLA Fourth Order GCM.

  11. The Annual Cycle of SST in the Eastern Tropical Pacific, Diagnosed in an Ocean GCM*.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, William S.; Rothstein, Lewis M.; Chen, Dake

    1998-05-01

    The annual onset of the east Pacific cold tongue is diagnosed in an ocean GCM simulation of the tropical Pacific. The model uses a mixed-layer scheme that explicitly simulates the processes of vertical exchange of heat and momentum with the deeper layers of the ocean; comparison with observations of temperature and currents shows that many important aspects of the model fields are realistic. As previous studies have found, the heat balance in the eastern tropical Pacific is notoriously complicated, and virtually every term in the balance plays a significant role at one time or another. However, despite many complications, the three-dimensional ocean advection terms in the cold tongue region tend to cancel each other in the annual cycle and, to first order, the variation of SST can be described as simply following the variation of net solar radiation at the sea surface (sun minus clouds). The cancellation is primarily between cooling due to equatorial upwelling and warming due to tropical instability waves, both of which are strongest in the second half of the year (when the winds are stronger). Even near the equator, where the ocean advection is relatively intense, the terms associated with cloudiness variations are among the largest contributions to the SST balance. The annual cycle of cloudiness transforms the semiannual solar cycle at the top of the atmosphere into a largely 1 cycle yr1 variation of insolation at the sea surface. However, the annual cycle of cloudiness appears closely tied to SST in coupled feedbacks (positive for low stratus decks and negative for deep cumulus convection), so the annual cycle of SST cannot be fully diagnosed in an ocean-only modeling context as in the present study. Zonal advection was found to be a relatively small influence on annual equatorial cold tongue variations; in particular, there was little direct (oceanic) connection between the Peru coastal upwelling and equatorial annual cycles. Meridional advection driven by

  12. Global Climate Simulation in a Multi-scale Modeling Framework: Sensitivity to GCM- Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, P. B.; Bala, G.; Gleckler, P. J.; Taylor, K. E.; Mirin, A. A.; Wickett, M. E.

    2006-12-01

    We investigate sensitivity of the simulated climate in the NCAR CAM3 atmospheric climate model to increases in horizontal spatial resolution, and to use an alternative representation of unresolved motions. In the Multi-scale Modeling Framework (MMF), cloud parameterizations in are replaced by a two-dimensional Cloud System Resolving Model (CSRM) that is embedded in each column of the general circulation model (GCM. Here we investigate both the resolution-sensitivity of the baseline version (that employing parameterizations) of the CAM3 atmospheric model as well as the sensitivity to decreasing the horizontal grid size of the GCM in an MMF version of the same model. Generally speaking, climate quantities related to clouds, precipitation, and radiative fluxes are more sensitive to treatment of subgrid scale processes than to GCM grid size. Simulated top-of-atmosphere cloud radiative forcings and related radiative fluxes are substantially improved in the MMF simulations; aspects of simulated precipitation and the simulated MJO are also substantially improved. In both the MMF and parameterized simulations, the large-scale climate shows less sensitivity to GCM resolution than has been seen in some other models, particularly the NCAR CCM3, a predecessor to CAM3. However, comparison to published simulations using CAM3 with Eulerian spectral dynamics indicates that that CAM3 configuration has very similar sensitivities to horizontal resolution as the Finite Volume dynamics version used here; comparison to MMF simulations with different GCM grid sizes confirms that parameterized physics influences resolution-sensitivity more than dynamical formulation does. Because the MMF is based more closely on first-principles physics than parameterizations are, one need not retune model parameters when the horizontal resolution of the GCM is changed in the MMF.

  13. North Atlantic and Arctic Ocean Climate Change in Pliocene Simulations Using the GISS ModelE2-R GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandler, M. A.; Sohl, L. E.; Jonas, J.; Kelley, M.; Rind, D.

    2013-12-01

    As part of the Pliocene Model Intercomparison Project (PlioMIP) Experiment 2, twelve research groups simulated the middle Pliocene climate using fully coupled versions of their ocean-atmosphere GCMs. Under the conditions prescribed by PlioMIP Experiment 2 (especially 25 meters of sea level rise, 405 ppm CO2, and reduced ice sheets) most coupled GCMs still underestimate ocean temperatures in the North Atlantic and Arctic Ocean regions. The GISS ModelE (AR5-version) originally produced the coolest results in these regions out of all the Pliocene simulations, with a greatly decreased AMOC and colder temperatures than modern in a large portion of the North Atlantic. However, improvements in the formulation of mesoscale mixing in the GISS ModelE, which have been incorporated in a more recent model update, led to significant changes in the simulation of the Pliocene (Chandler et al., 2013), including a warmer North Atlantic ocean, decreased Arctic sea ice, increased Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) relative to the control run, and generally a more favorable comparison to proxy data. Despite these results, the relative role of the various forcings and the numerous boundary condition changes was not analyzed. Zhang et al. (2013) did show that the increase in ocean heat transport is small compared to the change in the AMOC and was not likely to be the direct cause of the North Atlantic warming. Furthermore, using a subset of the PlioMIP models they showed that the role of ocean heat flux in the models, in general, is not strongly correlated to either the strengthening of the Pliocene AMOC or the warming of the North Atlantic. We have now run a series of sensitivity tests with the newer version of the GISS model and will discuss the relative effects of Pliocene CO2, ice sheets (Greenland and Antarctica separately), orbit, vegetation and the change in the mesoscale mixing parameterization as a means of better understanding the role of various factors that

  14. Use of Ocean Remote Sensing Data to Enhance Predictions with a Coupled General Circulation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rienecker, Michele M.

    1999-01-01

    Surface height, sea surface temperature and surface wind observations from satellites have given a detailed time sequence of the initiation and evolution of the 1997/98 El Nino. The data have beet complementary to the subsurface TAO moored data in their spatial resolution and extent. The impact of satellite observations on seasonal prediction in the tropical Pacific using a coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model will be presented.

  15. a Dynamically Interactive Column Physics Model Suitable for Diagnosing Regional Climate Variability and GCM Errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardeshmukh, P.

    2002-12-01

    formula are obtained empirically from a separate dry linear Primitive Equation (PE) model forced by steady idealized diabatic heating. The ability of this dynamical coupling formula to determine local vertical velocities from the history of local diabatic heating rates is tested in a linear PE model forced by oscillating 3-dimensional heating fields. The formula works surprisingly well over a wide range of spatial and temporal heating scales, even passing the hard test of correctly reproducing the phase shift and amplication of the response for near-resonant heating. This success suggests that to obtain the correct advective tendencies, detailed knowledge of the vertical and temporal structure of the diabatic forcing is necessary, but that of its horizontal structure is not. The single column model with vertical velocities coupled to the local temperature and humidity in this manner effectively eliminates the spurious SCM instabilities alluded to above. Such a dynamically interactive SCM would be useful in increasing the realism of simple "Box"-type models of regional climate variability. It is also argued that future SCM diagnoses of GCM physics would benefit from such a coupling.

  16. Regional Climate Simulation with a Variable Resolution Stretched Grid GCM: The Regional Down-Scaling Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox-Rabinovitz, Michael S.; Takacs, Lawrence L.; Suarez, Max; Sawyer, William; Govindaraju, Ravi C.

    1999-01-01

    The results obtained with the variable resolution stretched grid (SG) GEOS GCM (Goddard Earth Observing System General Circulation Models) are discussed, with the emphasis on the regional down-scaling effects and their dependence on the stretched grid design and parameters. A variable resolution SG-GCM and SG-DAS using a global stretched grid with fine resolution over an area of interest, is a viable new approach to REGIONAL and subregional CLIMATE studies and applications. The stretched grid approach is an ideal tool for representing regional to global scale interactions. It is an alternative to the widely used nested grid approach introduced a decade ago as a pioneering step in regional climate modeling. The GEOS SG-GCM is used for simulations of the anomalous U.S. climate events of 1988 drought and 1993 flood, with enhanced regional resolution. The height low level jet, precipitation and other diagnostic patterns are successfully simulated and show the efficient down-scaling over the area of interest the U.S. An imitation of the nested grid approach is performed using the developed SG-DAS (Data Assimilation System) that incorporates the SG-GCM. The SG-DAS is run with withholding data over the area of interest. The design immitates the nested grid framework with boundary conditions provided from analyses. No boundary condition buffer is needed for the case due to the global domain of integration used for the SG-GCM and SG-DAS. The experiments based on the newly developed versions of the GEOS SG-GCM and SG-DAS, with finer 0.5 degree (and higher) regional resolution, are briefly discussed. The major aspects of parallelization of the SG-GCM code are outlined. The KEY OBJECTIVES of the study are: 1) obtaining an efficient DOWN-SCALING over the area of interest with fine and very fine resolution; 2) providing CONSISTENT interactions between regional and global scales including the consistent representation of regional ENERGY and WATER BALANCES; 3) providing a high

  17. Ocean and atmosphere feedbacks affecting AMOC hysteresis in a GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, L. C.; Smith, R. S.; Wood, R. A.

    2016-10-01

    Theories suggest that the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) can exhibit a hysteresis where, for a given input of fresh water into the north Atlantic, there are two possible states: one with a strong overturning in the north Atlantic (on) and the other with a reverse Atlantic cell (off). A previous study showed hysteresis of the AMOC for the first time in a coupled general circulation model (Hawkins et al. in Geophys Res Lett. doi: 10.1029/2011GL047208, 2011). In this study we show that the hysteresis found by Hawkins et al. (2011) is sensitive to the method with which the fresh water input is compensated. If this compensation is applied throughout the volume of the global ocean, rather than at the surface, the region of hysteresis is narrower and the off states are very different: when the compensation is applied at the surface, a strong Pacific overturning cell and a strong Atlantic reverse cell develops; when the compensation is applied throughout the volume there is little change in the Pacific and only a weak Atlantic reverse cell develops. We investigate the mechanisms behind the transitions between the on and off states in the two experiments, and find that the difference in hysteresis is due to the different off states. We find that the development of the Pacific overturning cell results in greater atmospheric moisture transport into the North Atlantic, and also is likely responsible for a stronger Atlantic reverse cell. These both act to stabilize the off state of the Atlantic overturning.

  18. Nonparametric methods for modeling GCM and scenario uncertainty in drought assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Subimal; Mujumdar, P. P.

    2007-07-01

    Hydrologic implications of global climate change are usually assessed by downscaling appropriate predictors simulated by general circulation models (GCMs). Results from GCM simulations are subjected to a number of uncertainties due to incomplete knowledge about the underlying geophysical processes of global change (GCM uncertainties) and due to uncertain future scenarios (scenario uncertainties). With a relatively small number of GCMs available and a finite number of scenarios simulated by them, uncertainties in the hydrologic impacts at a smaller spatial scale become particularly pronounced. In this paper, a methodology is developed to address such uncertainties for a specific problem of drought impact assessment with results from GCM simulations. Samples of a drought indicator are generated with downscaled precipitation from available GCMs and scenarios. Since it is very unlikely that such small samples resulting from GCM scenarios fit a known parametric distribution, nonparametric methods such as kernel density estimation and orthonormal series methods are used to determine the probability distribution function (PDF) of the drought indicator. Principal component analysis, fuzzy clustering, and statistical regression are used for downscaling the mean sea level pressure (MSLP) output from the GCMs to precipitation at a smaller spatial scale. Reanalysis data from the National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) are used in relating precipitation with MSLP. The information generated through the PDF of the drought indicator in a future year may be used in long-term planning decisions. The methodology is demonstrated with a case study of the drought-prone Orissa meteorological subdivision in India.

  19. Combined assimilation of hydrography and TOPEX data into an Indian Ocean GCM using the adjoint method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marotzke, T. L. J.

    1997-01-01

    To study seasonal circulation and meridional heat transport of the Indian Ocean by synthesizing dynamics with data, climatological monthly temperatures and salinities, surface heat and freshewater fluxes, and wind stresses, together with monthly ensembles of three years (93-95) of TOPEX-derived surface geostrophic velocity anomalies, are assimilated into an Indian Ocean GCM.

  20. Pluto's Atmosphere and Surface Ices as Simulated by the PlutoWRF GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toigo, A. D.; French, R. G.; Gierasch, P. J.; Richardson, M. I.; Guzewich, S.

    2013-12-01

    The PlutoWRF general circulation model (GCM) was built to examine the large-scale structure and dynamics of the atmosphere, the nature and propagation of waves within the atmosphere, and the exchanges of volatiles between the atmosphere and the surface. We seek to provide an comprehensive framework for the study of the increasingly rich observational data sets (including stellar occultations of the atmosphere) and to provide context and analysis of observations from the New Horizons mission. The PlutoWRF GCM is based on the planetary adaptation of the NCAR Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. It is a compressible, nonhydrostatic model where we have added physics to treat radiative transfer following Zhu et al. (2013), a bulk nitrogen cycle including condensation of surface ice, and cycles of additional trace volatile species. Existing subsurface heat diffusion, surface layer exchange and boundary layer mixing schemes have been adapted to Pluto. Boundary conditions for initial ice distribution and surface pressure are taken from energy balance and non-GCM volatile transport models constrained by observations. In this work we focus on the performance of the PlutoWRF GCM compared with our linear tidal model (Toigo et al., 2010), and will examine the generation and propagation of large-scale gravity waves associated with diurnal sublimation and condensation.

  1. Regional climate change predictions from the Goddard Institute for Space Studies high resolution GCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, Robert G.; Hewitson, B. C.

    1991-01-01

    A new diagnostic tool is developed for examining relationships between the synoptic scale circulation and regional temperature distributions in GCMs. The 4 x 5 deg GISS GCM is shown to produce accurate simulations of the variance in the synoptic scale sea level pressure distribution over the U.S. An analysis of the observational data set from the National Meteorological Center (NMC) also shows a strong relationship between the synoptic circulation and grid point temperatures. This relationship is demonstrated by deriving transfer functions between a time-series of circulation parameters and temperatures at individual grid points. The circulation parameters are derived using rotated principal components analysis, and the temperature transfer functions are based on multivariate polynomial regression models. The application of these transfer functions to the GCM circulation indicates that there is considerable spatial bias present in the GCM temperature distributions. The transfer functions are also used to indicate the possible changes in U.S. regional temperatures that could result from differences in synoptic scale circulation between a 1XCO2 and a 2xCO2 climate, using a doubled CO2 version of the same GISS GCM.

  2. Determine Minimum Silver Flake Addition to GCM for Iodine Loaded AgZ

    SciTech Connect

    Garino, Terry J.; Nenoff, Tina M.; Rodriguez, Mark A.

    2014-04-01

    The minimum amount of silver flake required to prevent loss of I{sub 2} during sintering in air for a SNL Glass Composite Material (GCM) Waste Form containing AgI-MOR (ORNL, 8.7 wt%) was determined to be 1.1 wt% Ag. The final GCM composition prior to sintering was 20 wt% AgI-MOR, 1.1 wt% Ag, and 80 wt% Bi-Si oxide glass. The amount of silver flake needed to suppress iodine loss was determined using thermo gravimetric analysis with mass spectroscopic off-gas analysis. These studies found that the ratio of silver to AgI-MOR required is lower in the presence of the glass than without it. Therefore an additional benefit of the GCM is that it serves to inhibit some iodine loss during processing. Alternatively, heating the AgI-MOR in inert atmosphere instead of air allowed for densified GCM formation without I{sub 2} loss, and no necessity for the addition of Ag. The cause of this behavior is found to be related to the oxidation of the metallic Ag to Ag{sup +} when heated to above ~300{degrees}C in air. Heating rate, iodine loading levels and atmosphere are the important variables that determine AgI migration and results suggest that AgI may be completely incorporated into the mordenite structure by the 550{degrees}C sintering temperature.

  3. Sensitivity of CO2 Simulation in a GCM to the Convective Transport Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Z.; Pawson, S.; Collatz, G. J.; Gregg, W. W.; Kawa, S. R.; Baker, D.; Ott, L.

    2014-01-01

    Convection plays an important role in the transport of heat, moisture and trace gases. In this study, we simulated CO2 concentrations with an atmospheric general circulation model (GCM). Three different convective transport algorithms were used. One is a modified Arakawa-Shubert scheme that was native to the GCM; two others used in two off-line chemical transport models (CTMs) were added to the GCM here for comparison purposes. Advanced CO2 surfaced fluxes were used for the simulations. The results were compared to a large quantity of CO2 observation data. We find that the simulation results are sensitive to the convective transport algorithms. Overall, the three simulations are quite realistic and similar to each other in the remote marine regions, but are significantly different in some land regions with strong fluxes such as Amazon and Siberia during the convection seasons. Large biases against CO2 measurements are found in these regions in the control run, which uses the original GCM. The simulation with the simple diffusive algorithm is better. The difference of the two simulations is related to the very different convective transport speed.

  4. Understanding and Improving CRM and GCM Simulations of Cloud Systems with ARM Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xiaoqing

    2014-02-25

    The works supported by this ASR project lay the solid foundation for improving the parameterization of convection and clouds in the NCAR CCSM and the climate simulations. We have made a significant use of CRM simulations and ARM observations to produce thermodynamically and dynamically consistent multi-year cloud and radiative properties; improve the GCM simulations of convection, clouds and radiative heating rate and fluxes using the ARM observations and CRM simulations; and understand the seasonal and annual variation of cloud systems and their impacts on climate mean state and variability. We conducted multi-year simulations over the ARM SGP site using the CRM with multi-year ARM forcing data. The statistics of cloud and radiative properties from the long-term CRM simulations were compared and validated with the ARM measurements and value added products (VAP). We evaluated the multi-year climate simulations produced by the GCM with the modified convection scheme. We used multi-year ARM observations and CRM simulations to validate and further improve the trigger condition and revised closure assumption in NCAR GCM simulations that demonstrate the improvement of climate mean state and variability. We combined the improved convection scheme with the mosaic treatment of subgrid cloud distributions in the radiation scheme of the GCM. The mosaic treatment of cloud distributions has been implemented in the GCM with the original convection scheme and enables the use of more realistic cloud amounts as well as cloud water contents in producing net radiative fluxes closer to observations. A physics-based latent heat (LH) retrieval algorithm was developed by parameterizing the physical linkages of observed hydrometeor profiles of cloud and precipitation to the major processes related to the phase change of atmospheric water.

  5. On Simulating the Mid-western-us Drought of 1988 with a GCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sud, Y. C.; Mocko, D. M.; Lau, William K.-M.; Atlas, R.

    2002-01-01

    The primary cause of the midwestern North American drought in the summer of 1988 has been identified to be the La Nina SST anomalies. Yet with the SST anomalies prescribed, this drought has not been simulated satisfactorily by any general circulation model. Seven simulation-experiments, each containing an ensemble of 4-sets of simulations, were conducted with the GEOS GCM for both 1987 and 1988. All simulations started from January 1 and continued through the end of August. In the first baseline case, Case 1, only the SST anomalies and some vegetation parameters were prescribed, while everything else (such as soil moisture, snow-cover, and clouds) was interactive. The GCM did produce some of the circulation features of a drought over North America, but they could only be identified on the planetary scales. The 1988 minus 1987 precipitation differences show that the GCM was successful in simulating reduced precipitation in the mid-west, but the accompanying circulation anomalies were not well simulated, leading one to infer that the GCM has simulated the drought for the wrong reason. To isolate the causes for this unremarkable circulation, analyzed winds and soil moisture were prescribed in Case 2 and Case 3 as continuous updates by direct replacement of the GCM-predicted fields. These cases show that a large number of simulation biases emanate from wind biases that are carried into the North American region from surroundings regions. Inclusion of soil moisture also helps to ameliorate the strong feedback, perhaps even stronger than that of the real atmosphere, between soil moisture and precipitation. Case 2 simulated one type of surface temperature anomaly pattern, whereas Case 3 with the prescribed soil moisture produced another.

  6. AgI-MOR Loading Effect on the Durability of the Sandia Low Temperature Sintering GCM Waste Form

    SciTech Connect

    Nenoff, Tina Maria; Brady, Patrick Vane.; Mowry, Curtis D.; Garino, Terry J.

    2014-09-01

    Herein, we study the durability of the Sandia Bi-Si oxide Glass Composite Material (GCM) waste form when formulated with different weight percent levels of AgI-MOR. The post-iodine exposure AgI-MOR material was provided to SNL by ORNL. Durability results for the GCM fabricated with 22 and 25% AgI-MOR indicate releases of Ag and I at the same low rates as 15% AgI-MOR GCM, and by the same mechanism. Iodine and Ag release is controlled by the low solubility of an amorphous, hydrated silver iodide, not by the surface-controlled dissolution of I2- loaded Ag-Mordenite. Based on this data, we postulate that much higher loading levels of AgIMOR are probable in this GCM waste form, and limits will govern by retention of mechanical integrity of the GCM versus the solubility of silver iodide.

  7. The albedo of temperate and boreal forest and the Northern Hemisphere climate: A sensitivity experiment using the LMD GCM

    SciTech Connect

    Chalita, S.; Le Treut, H.

    1994-09-01

    A deforestation experiment is performed using the Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique Atmospheric General Circulation Model (LMD GCM) to determine the climatic role of the largest vegetation formation in the Northern Hemisphere, localized mostly north of latitude 45{degree}N, which is called the temperate and boreal forest. For this purpose, an iterative albedo scheme based on vegetation type, snow age, snowfall rate and area of snow cover, is developed for snow-covered surfaces. The results show a cooling of Northern Hemisphere soil and an increase in the snow cover when the forest is removed, as found by previous similar experiments. In our study this cooling is related to different causes, depending on the season. It is linked to modifications in the soil radiative properties, like surface albedo, due to the disappearance of forest, and consequently, to a greater exposure of the snow-covered soil underneath. It is also related to alterations in the hydrological cycle, observed mainly in summer and autumn at middle latitudes. The model shows a strong sensitivity to the coupled surface albedo - soil temperature - fractional snow cover response in the spring. A later and longer snowmelt season is also detected. This study adds to our understanding of climatic variation on longer time scales, since it is widely accepted that the formation and disappearance of different vegetation formations is closely related to climatic evolution patterns, in particular on the time scale of the glacial oscillations. 32 refs., 12 figs.

  8. A study of the effect of synoptic scale processes in GCM modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Gerald F.

    1989-01-01

    Research was conducted to help modeling groups at NASA to develop better weather forecasting and general circulation models (GCM) for activities relating to the meteorological uses of satellite data. The focus was on the physical processes that were being simulated by models: radiative effects and latent heat release associated with clouds; orographic influences; and heat transfer at the ocean and ice surfaces. An attempt was made to deduce the role of diabatic heating in North Atlantic cyclogenesis and in the global heat budget. Inferences were made in four studies: heat budget statistics from GCM assimilations; dynamics of north Atlantic cyclones; Cage-type energy budget calculations; and grid scale cloud formation. Mechanisms that were responsible for the variability and structure of the atmospheric on a hemispheric scale were studied by a hybrid of statistical analysis and theoretical modeling. Variability and structure are both related to synoptic scale processes through baroclinic and barotropic energy transformations.

  9. Nonmigrating Diurnal Tidal Variability in Mesopause Region Winds: TIDI, TIME-GCM and GSWM Comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberheide, J.; Hagan, M. E.; Wu, Q.; Ortland, D. A.; Killeen, T. L.; Roble, R. G.; Niciejewski, R.; Skinner, W.

    2004-12-01

    We compare nonmigrating diurnal wind estimates determined from measurements made by the TIMED Doppler Inteferometer (TIDI) instrument on the Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite with predictions from the NCAR Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIME-GCM) and the Global-Scale Wave Model (GSWM). The models account for two different nonmigrating tidal sources. The GSWM includes tropospheric latent heat release associate with deep tropical convection, while the TIME-GCM includes nonlinear interactions between quasi-stationary planetary waves and migrating tides. The model and measurement comparisons suggest that both sources are important to the interpretation of the TIDI tidal winds. We contrast the true model tidal results with estimates that we determine from the subsets of model wind predictions that represent what TIDI would observe if it flew through the model atmospheres. These contrasts allow us to quantify the sampling issues associated determining tidal signatures from the slowly precessing TIMED TIDI satellite data.

  10. Realistic Solar and Infra-Red Radiative Forcing within a Venus GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C.; Richardson, M. I.

    2011-12-01

    Recent updates to the VenusFMS General Circulation Model have included a realistic Radiative Transfer Model (RTM) based upon on the Hadley Centre two-stream flux solver and constrained by a Discrete Ordinate model (Lee and Richardson, 2011). This RTM is capable of simulating the radiative fluxes in a Venus atmosphere modeled using 4 scattering cloud modes and 9 gases. In the current configuration the RTM is fast enough to compete with the Newtonian Relaxation approach used in earlier Venus GCMs (e.g. Lee et al. (2007), while providing much more accurate heating rates within the atmosphere and allowing interactive radiative forcing in the GCM. We show that the new RTM compares well with a DISORT/TWOSTR based solver using fewer spectral bands in the calculation (47 in the GCM versus 350 bands with DISORT/TWOSTR). We show that the RTM is capable of calculating solar and Infra-Red (IR) fluxes and therefore provides a consistent radiative heating for use in Venus GCMs. Previous heating parameterizations for Venus GCMs have used Newtonian Relaxation with prescribed heating rates or have calculated only some components of the radiative forcing, for example by calculating IR cooling rates and prescribing solar heating rates. The updated Venus GCM is then used to generate a super-rotating atmospheric circulation maintained by momentum transporting eddies. The underlying mechanism driving these eddies is described and the sensitivity of the circulation to the radiative forcing is discussed. Finally, we compare the atmospheric circulation and momentum transport to prior work conducted with this GCM using a simpler Newtonian Relaxation method (Lee and Richardson, 2010).

  11. Assessment of the NASA GISS CMIP5 ModelE GCM Simulated Clouds and TOA Radiation Budgets Using CERES-MODIS, CALIPSO/CloudSat, and ISCCP Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanfield, R. E.; Dong, X.; Xi, B.; Kennedy, A. D.; Del Genio, A. D.; Minnis, P.; Loeb, N. G.; Doelling, D.

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate the GISS ModelE simulated global clouds and TOA radiation budgets, we have collected and processed NASA CERES and MODIS observations during the period 2000-2005. In detail, the 1x1 degree resolution monthly averaged SYN1 cloud product has been used with combined observations from both Terra and Aqua satellites, and degraded to a 2x2.5 degree grid box to match the GCM spatial resolution. The monthly means of the CERES EBAF radiation dataset have been used in this study, where the EBAF data are temporally interpolated using geostationary observations to infer the diurnal signal between CERES measurements. The GISS ModelE products were downloaded from the CMIP5 (Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5) being prepared for the IPCC-AR5. The model shows a high degree of accuracy in cloud fractions and radiation budgets when compared globally, however large differences are observed between the observations and the model when examined regionally. In particular, cloud fraction can be greatly underestimated or overestimated while Ice water path and liquid water path values are largely overestimated by the model in the southern mid-latitudes. This study examines these differences and the impact they have on the radiation budget. To determine whether these biases are caused by the microphysics or dynamics within the GCM, results will be partitioned by atmospheric states determined by Self Organizing Maps trained by reanalysis data.

  12. Climatology of terdiurnal tide in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere from TIMED SABER/TIDI, ground-based sodium lidar and NCAR TIME-GCM model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, J.; Wu, Q.; Xu, J.; Liu, H.; Hagan, M. E.; Maute, A. I.; Yuan, T.; She, C.; Russell, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, we investigate the nature of the terdiurnal tide (8 hour period) in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT), using the Colorado State University (CSU) temperature/wind sodium lidar data set (41N, 105W) (5 years, 2002 to 2006), Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) temperature and Doppler interferometer (TIDI) wind measurement for 7 years (2003 to 2009) both onboard of Thermosphere-ionosphere-Mesosphere-Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite, and the Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model runs (TIME-GCM). The seasonal variability and global structure of the terdiurnal tide will be provided. The amplitude of the terdiurnal tide depends heavily on season, latitude and altitude. For example, at northern mid-latitude, the maximum amplitudes in horizontal wind (20 m/s) and temperature (8 K) appear at 100 km in late winter from the lidar measurement, while it is the weakest in summer. SABER measurement reveals that the maximum of the terdiurnal tide temperature above 100 km occurs near equinox at mid-latitude. TIDI wind finds that the maximum amplitude in meridional wind at mid-latitude is before and after the solstice. The vertical wavelength of the terdiurnal tide will be estimated. The comparison between the TIME-GCM and the observations will enhance our understandings of the excitation, propagation and dissipation of the terdiurnal tide in the atmosphere. This will benefit our future study of the terdiurnal tidal impact in the thermosphere/ionosphere coupling.

  13. Regional Climate Simulation with a Variable Resolution Stretch Grid GCM: The 1998 Summer Drought

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox-Rabinovitz, Michael; Stein, Uri; Takacs, Lawrence; Govindaraju, Ravi; Suarez, Max

    1999-01-01

    The variable resolution stretched grid(SG) GCM based on the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) GCM, has been developed and tested in a regional climate simulation mode. The GEOS SG-GCM is used for simulation of the 1988 summer drought over the U.S. Midwest. Within the stretched grid, the region of interest with a uniform about 60 km resolution is a rectangle over the U.S. Outside the region, the grid intervals increase or stretch with a constant stretching factor (as a geometric progression). The results of two-month simulation for the anomalous climate event of the U.S. drought of 1988, are validated against data analysis fields and diagnostics. The event has been chosen by the Project to Inter-compare Regional Climate Simulations(PIRCS). The efficient regional down-scaling as well as the positive impact of fine regional resolution, are obtained. More specifically, the precipitation, 500 hPa, and low-level jet patterns and characteristics are well represented in the simulation. The SG-concept appeared to be a promising candidate for regional and subregional climate studies and applications.

  14. Comparison of stochastic MOS corrections for GCM and RCM simulated precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widmann, Martin; Eden, Jonathan; Maraun, Douglas; Vrac, Mathieu

    2014-05-01

    In order to assess to what extent regional climate models (RCMs) yield better representations of climatic states than general circulation models (GCMs) the output of the two model types is usually directly compared with observations and the value added through RCMs has been clearly demonstrated. RCM output is often bias-corrected and in some cases bias correction methods can also be applied to GCMs. The question thus arises what the added value of RCMs in this setup is, i.e. whether bias-corrected RCMs perform better than bias-corrected GCMs. Here we present some first results from such a comparison. We used a stochastic Model Output Statistics (MOS) method, which can be seen as a general version of bias correction, to estimate daily precipitation at 465 UK stations between 1961-2000 using simulated precipitation from the RACMO2 and CCLM RCMs and from the ECHAM5 GCM as predictors. The MOS method uses logistic regression to model rainfall occurrence and a Gamma distribution for the wet-day distribution. All model parameters are made linearly dependent on the predictors, i.e. the simulated precipitation. The fitting and validation of the statistical model requires the daily, large-scale weather states in the RCM and GCM to represent the actual, historic weather situation. For the RCMs this is achieved by using simulations driven by reanalysis data; RACMO2 is just driven at the boundaries, whereas in CCLM the circulation within the model domain is additionally kept close to the reanalysis through spectral nudging. For the GCM we have used a simulation nudged towards ERA40. The model validation is done in a cross-validation setup and is based on Brier scores for occurrence and quantile scores for the estimated probability distributions. The comparison of the validation skills for the two RCM cases shows some improved skill if spectral nudging is used, indicating that on daily timescales RCMs can generate internal variability that needs to be kept in mind when designing

  15. An evolutionary conserved interaction between the Gcm transcription factor and the SF1 nuclear receptor in the female reproductive system.

    PubMed

    Cattenoz, Pierre B; Delaporte, Claude; Bazzi, Wael; Giangrande, Angela

    2016-11-25

    NR5A1 is essential for the development and for the function of steroid producing glands of the reproductive system. Moreover, its misregulation is associated with endometriosis, which is the first cause of infertility in women. Hr39, the Drosophila ortholog of NR5A1, is expressed and required in the secretory cells of the spermatheca, the female exocrine gland that ensures fertility by secreting substances that attract and capacitate the spermatozoids. We here identify a direct regulator of Hr39 in the spermatheca: the Gcm transcription factor. Furthermore, lack of Gcm prevents the production of the secretory cells and leads to female sterility in Drosophila. Hr39 regulation by Gcm seems conserved in mammals and involves the modification of the DNA methylation profile of mNr5a1. This study identifies a new molecular pathway in female reproductive system development and suggests a role for hGCM in the progression of reproductive tract diseases in humans.

  16. El Nino-southern oscillation: A coupled response to the greenhouse effect?

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, De-Zheng

    1997-11-01

    The purpose of this article to elucidate the link between the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and radiative forcing (of which the greenhouse effect is a major part). A unified theory for the tropical Pacific climate is developed by considering the response of the coupled ocean-atmosphere to a changing radiative forcing. The hypothesis is that both the zonal surface sea temperature (SST) gradients and ENSO are a coupled response to the strong radiative heating or the tropical warmth. Owing to ocean-atmosphere interaction, the stronger the radiative heating, the larger the zonal SST gradients. When the SST gradients exceed a critical value, however, the ocean-atmosphere interaction in the cold-tongue region is too strong for the coupled system to hold steady. Consequently, the coupled system enters an oscillatory state. These coupled dynamics are examined in a simple mathematical model whose behavior is consistent with the hypothesis. With a linear temperature profile throughout the depth of subsurface ocean, the model predicts that both the magnitude and period of the oscillation increase with increases in radiative forcing or the greenhouse effect. The increase in the magnitude of the oscillation largely comes from an enhancement of the magnitude of the cold anomalies, while the increase in the period mostly comes from a prolonged duration of the warm events. With a profile in which the lapse rate decreases with depth, the sensitivity is more moderate. The simplicity of the model prevents a quantitative simulation of the sensitivity of ENSO to increases in the greenhouse effect, but qualitatively the model results support the empirical interpretation of the prolonged duration of the 1990-1995 ENSO event. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  17. A multi-scale methodology for comparing GCM and RCM results over the Eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuels, Rana; Krichak, Simon; Breitgand, Joseph; Alpert, Pinhas

    2010-05-01

    The importance of skillful climate modeling is increasingly being realized as results are being incorporated into environmental, economic, and even business planning. Global circulation models (GCMs) employed by the IPCC provide results at spatial scales of hundreds of kilometers, which is useful for understanding global trends but not appropriate for use as input into regional and local impacts models used to inform policy and development. To address this shortcoming, regional climate models (RCMs) which dynamically downscale the results of the GCMs are used. In this study we present first results of a dynamically downscaled RCM focusing on the Eastern Mediterranean region. For the historical 1960-2000 time period, results at a spatial scale of both 25 km and 50 km are compared with historical station data from 5 locations across Israel as well as with the results of 3 GCM models (ECHAM5, NOAA GFDL, and CCCMA) at annual, monthly and daily time scales. Results from a recently completed Japanese GCM at a spatial scale of 20 km are also included. For the historical validation period, we show that as spatial scale increases the skill in capturing annual and inter-annual temperature and rainfall also increases. However, for intra-seasonal rainfall characteristics important for hydrological and agricultural planning (eg. dry and wet spells, number of rain days) the GCM results (including the 20 km Japanese model) capture the historical trends better than the dynamically downscaled RegCM. For future scenarios of temperature and precipitation changes, we compare results across the models for the available time periods, generating a range of future trends.

  18. Comparison of GCM- and RCM-simulated precipitation following stochastic postprocessing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eden, Jonathan M.; Widmann, Martin; Maraun, Douglas; Vrac, Mathieu

    2014-10-01

    In order to assess to what extent regional climate models (RCMs) yield better representations of climatic states than general circulation models (GCMs), the output of each is usually directly compared with observations. RCM output is often bias corrected, and in some cases correction methods can also be applied to GCMs. This leads to the question of whether bias-corrected RCMs perform better than bias-corrected GCMs. Here the first results from such a comparison are presented, followed by discussion of the value added by RCMs in this setup. Stochastic postprocessing, based on Model Output Statistics (MOS), is used to estimate daily precipitation at 465 stations across the United Kingdom between 1961 and 2000 using simulated precipitation from two RCMs (RACMO2 and CCLM) and, for the first time, a GCM (ECHAM5) as predictors. The large-scale weather states in each simulation are forced toward observations. The MOS method uses logistic regression to model precipitation occurrence and a Gamma distribution for the wet day distribution, and is cross validated based on Brier and quantile skill scores. A major outcome of the study is that the corrected GCM-simulated precipitation yields consistently higher validation scores than the corrected RCM-simulated precipitation. This seems to suggest that, in a setup with postprocessing, there is no clear added value by RCMs with respect to downscaling individual weather states. However, due to the different ways of controlling the atmospheric circulation in the RCM and the GCM simulations, such a strong conclusion cannot be drawn. Yet the study demonstrates how challenging it is to demonstrate the value added by RCMs in this setup.

  19. Sensitivity of the equilibrium surface temperature of a GCM to systematic changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oglesby, Robert J.; Saltzman, Barry

    1990-01-01

    The equilibrium response of surface temperature to atmospheric CO2 concentration, for six values between 100 and 1000 ppm, is calculated from a series of GCM experiments. This response is nonlinear, showing greater sensitivity for lower values of CO2 than for the higher values. It is suggested that changes in CO2 concentration of a given magnitude (e.g., 100 ppm) played a larger role in the Pleistocene ice-age-type temperature variations than in causing global temperature changes due to anthropogenic increases.

  20. Assessment of recent resolution and parameterization changes in the GLA fourth order GCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfand, H. M.; Sud, Y. C.; Takacs, L. L.; Jusem, J. C.; Molod, A. M.

    1988-01-01

    The Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres' fourth-order GCM is under evaluation for the impact on model integrations of enhanced horizontal and vertical resolution, as well as the effects of such novel parameterization schemes as that of gravity-wave-drag, the Arakawa-Schubert (1974) cumulus parameterization, and an explicitly-resolved planetary boundary layer. While the doubling of the GMC's horizontal resolution to 2 deg in latitude and 2.5 deg in longitude has improved the model's predictive skill for 6-7 day forecasts, systematic errors associated with the model's climate drift lead to a deterioration in predictions for longer forecasts.

  1. The effect of a gravity wave drag parameterization scheme on GLA fourth order GCM forecasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfand, H. M.; Jusem, J. C.; Pfaendtner, J.; Tenenbaum, J.; Kalnay, E.

    1987-01-01

    Ten-day forecast experiments have been performed to determined whether the introduction of a simple orographic gravity wave drag scheme into a fourth-order GCM would reduce the climate drift of the fine resolution model and improve the model's medium range predictive skill. Error reduction due to the gravity waves is found in stratospheric predictions, where the improvement is confined mainly to the zonal mean component. Improvements are noted in the Northern Hemisphere climatology, where low level westerlies are weakened and shifted poleward, and in the Southern Hemisphere, where the roaring forties and fifties are better simulated.

  2. Interannual Atmospheric Variability Simulated by a Mars GCM: Impacts on the Polar Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridger, Alison F. C.; Haberle, R. M.; Hollingsworth, J. L.

    2003-01-01

    It is often assumed that in the absence of year-to-year dust variations, Mars weather and climate are very repeatable, at least on decadal scales. Recent multi-annual simulations of a Mars GCM reveal however that significant interannual variations may occur with constant dust conditions. In particular, interannual variability (IAV) appears to be associated with the spectrum of atmospheric disturbances that arise due to baroclinic instability. One quantity that shows significant IAV is the poleward heat flux associated with these waves. These variations and their impacts on the polar heat balance will be examined here.

  3. Polar predictability: exploring the influence of GCM and regional model uncertainty on future ice sheet climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reusch, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    Evaluating uncertainty in GCMs and regional-scale forecast models is an essential step in the development of climate change predictions. Polar-region skill is particularly important due to the potential for changes affecting both local (ice sheet) and global (sea level) environments through more frequent/intense surface melting and changes in precipitation type/amount. High-resolution, regional-scale models also use GCMs as a source of boundary/initial conditions in future scenarios, thus inheriting a measure of GCM-derived externally-driven uncertainty. We examine inter- and intramodel uncertainty through statistics from decadal climatologies and analyses of variability based on self-organizing maps (SOMs), a nonlinear data analysis tool. We evaluate a 19-member CMIP5 subset and the 30-member CESM1.0-CAM5-BGC Large Ensemble (CESMLE) during polar melt seasons (boreal/austral summer) for recent (1981-2000) and future (2081-2100, RCP 8.5) decades. Regional-model uncertainty is examined with a subset of these GCMs driving Polar WRF simulations. Decadal climatologies relative to a reference (recent: the ERA-Interim reanalysis; future: a skillful modern GCM) identify model uncertainty in bulk, e.g., BNU-ESM is too warm, CMCC-CM too cold. While quite useful for model screening, diagnostic benefit is often indirect. SOMs extend our diagnostics by providing a concise, objective summary of model variability as a set of generalized patterns. Joint analysis of reference and test models summarizes the variability of multiple realizations of climate (all the models), benchmarks each model versus the reference (frequency analysis helps identify the patterns behind GCM bias), and places each GCM in a common context. Joint SOM analysis of CESMLE members shows how initial conditions contribute to differences in modeled climates, providing useful information about internal variability, such as contributions from each member to overall uncertainty using pattern frequencies. In the

  4. Functional Conservation of the Glide/Gcm Regulatory Network Controlling Glia, Hemocyte, and Tendon Cell Differentiation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Cattenoz, Pierre B; Popkova, Anna; Southall, Tony D; Aiello, Giuseppe; Brand, Andrea H; Giangrande, Angela

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput screens allow us to understand how transcription factors trigger developmental processes, including cell specification. A major challenge is identification of their binding sites because feedback loops and homeostatic interactions may mask the direct impact of those factors in transcriptome analyses. Moreover, this approach dissects the downstream signaling cascades and facilitates identification of conserved transcriptional programs. Here we show the results and the validation of a DNA adenine methyltransferase identification (DamID) genome-wide screen that identifies the direct targets of Glide/Gcm, a potent transcription factor that controls glia, hemocyte, and tendon cell differentiation in Drosophila. The screen identifies many genes that had not been previously associated with Glide/Gcm and highlights three major signaling pathways interacting with Glide/Gcm: Notch, Hedgehog, and JAK/STAT, which all involve feedback loops. Furthermore, the screen identifies effector molecules that are necessary for cell-cell interactions during late developmental processes and/or in ontogeny. Typically, immunoglobulin (Ig) domain-containing proteins control cell adhesion and axonal navigation. This shows that early and transiently expressed fate determinants not only control other transcription factors that, in turn, implement a specific developmental program but also directly affect late developmental events and cell function. Finally, while the mammalian genome contains two orthologous Gcm genes, their function has been demonstrated in vertebrate-specific tissues, placenta, and parathyroid glands, begging questions on the evolutionary conservation of the Gcm cascade in higher organisms. Here we provide the first evidence for the conservation of Gcm direct targets in humans. In sum, this work uncovers novel aspects of cell specification and sets the basis for further understanding of the role of conserved Gcm gene regulatory cascades.

  5. Functional Conservation of the Glide/Gcm Regulatory Network Controlling Glia, Hemocyte, and Tendon Cell Differentiation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Cattenoz, Pierre B.; Popkova, Anna; Southall, Tony D.; Aiello, Giuseppe; Brand, Andrea H.; Giangrande, Angela

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput screens allow us to understand how transcription factors trigger developmental processes, including cell specification. A major challenge is identification of their binding sites because feedback loops and homeostatic interactions may mask the direct impact of those factors in transcriptome analyses. Moreover, this approach dissects the downstream signaling cascades and facilitates identification of conserved transcriptional programs. Here we show the results and the validation of a DNA adenine methyltransferase identification (DamID) genome-wide screen that identifies the direct targets of Glide/Gcm, a potent transcription factor that controls glia, hemocyte, and tendon cell differentiation in Drosophila. The screen identifies many genes that had not been previously associated with Glide/Gcm and highlights three major signaling pathways interacting with Glide/Gcm: Notch, Hedgehog, and JAK/STAT, which all involve feedback loops. Furthermore, the screen identifies effector molecules that are necessary for cell-cell interactions during late developmental processes and/or in ontogeny. Typically, immunoglobulin (Ig) domain–containing proteins control cell adhesion and axonal navigation. This shows that early and transiently expressed fate determinants not only control other transcription factors that, in turn, implement a specific developmental program but also directly affect late developmental events and cell function. Finally, while the mammalian genome contains two orthologous Gcm genes, their function has been demonstrated in vertebrate-specific tissues, placenta, and parathyroid glands, begging questions on the evolutionary conservation of the Gcm cascade in higher organisms. Here we provide the first evidence for the conservation of Gcm direct targets in humans. In sum, this work uncovers novel aspects of cell specification and sets the basis for further understanding of the role of conserved Gcm gene regulatory cascades. PMID:26567182

  6. Coupled atmosphere-ocean-wave simulations of a storm event over the Gulf of Lion and Balearic Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Renault, Lionel; Chiggiato, Jacopo; Warner, John C.; Gomez, Marta; Vizoso, Guillermo; Tintore, Joaquin

    2012-01-01

    The coastal areas of the North-Western Mediterranean Sea are one of the most challenging places for ocean forecasting. This region is exposed to severe storms events that are of short duration. During these events, significant air-sea interactions, strong winds and large sea-state can have catastrophic consequences in the coastal areas. To investigate these air-sea interactions and the oceanic response to such events, we implemented the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport Modeling System simulating a severe storm in the Mediterranean Sea that occurred in May 2010. During this event, wind speed reached up to 25 m.s-1 inducing significant sea surface cooling (up to 2°C) over the Gulf of Lion (GoL) and along the storm track, and generating surface waves with a significant height of 6 m. It is shown that the event, associated with a cyclogenesis between the Balearic Islands and the GoL, is relatively well reproduced by the coupled system. A surface heat budget analysis showed that ocean vertical mixing was a major contributor to the cooling tendency along the storm track and in the GoL where turbulent heat fluxes also played an important role. Sensitivity experiments on the ocean-atmosphere coupling suggested that the coupled system is sensitive to the momentum flux parameterization as well as air-sea and air-wave coupling. Comparisons with available atmospheric and oceanic observations showed that the use of the fully coupled system provides the most skillful simulation, illustrating the benefit of using a fully coupled ocean-atmosphere-wave model for the assessment of these storm events.

  7. A GCM investigation of impact of aerosols on the precipitation in Amazon during the dry to wet transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yu; Liou, K. N.; Jiang, J. H.; Fu, R.; Lu, Sarah; Xue, Y.

    2016-06-01

    The climatic effects of aerosols on the precipitation over the Amazon during the dry to wet transition period have been investigated using an atmospheric general circulation model, NCEP/AGCM, and the aerosol climatology data. We found increased instability during the dry season and delayed wet season onset with aerosols included in the model simulation, leading to the delay of the maximum precipitation over the Amazon by about half a month. In particular, our GCM simulations show that surface solar flux is reduced in the Amazon due to the absorption and scattering of the solar radiation by aerosols, leading to decreased surface temperature. Reduced surface solar flux is balanced by decreases in both surface sensible heat and latent heat fluxes. During the wet season, the subtropical system over the Amazon has a shallower convection. With the inclusion of aerosols in the simulation, precipitation in the rainy season over the Amazon decreases in the major rainfall band, which partially corrects the overestimate of the simulated precipitation in that region. The reduced surface temperature by aerosols is also coupled with a warming in the middle troposphere, leading to increased atmosphere stability and moisture divergence over the Amazon. However, during the dry season when the convective system is stronger over the Amazon, rainfall increases in that region due to the warming of the air over the upper troposphere produced by biomass burning aerosols, which produces an anomalous upward motion and a convergence of moisture flux over the Amazon and draws the moisture and precipitation further inland. Therefore, aerosol effects on precipitation depend on the large-scale atmospheric stability, resulting in their different roles over the Amazon during the dry and wet seasons.

  8. Improved Upper Ocean/Sea Ice Modeling in the GISS GCM for Investigating Climate Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This project built on our previous results in which we highlighted the importance of sea ice in overall climate sensitivity by determining that for both warming and cooling climates, when sea ice was not allowed to change, climate sensitivity was reduced by 35-40%. We also modified the GISS 8 deg x lO deg atmospheric GCM to include an upper-ocean/sea-ice model involving the Semtner three-layer ice/snow thermodynamic model, the Price et al. (1986) ocean mixed layer model and a general upper ocean vertical advection/diffusion scheme for maintaining and fluxing properties across the pycnocline. This effort, in addition to improving the sea ice representation in the AGCM, revealed a number of sensitive components of the sea ice/ocean system. For example, the ability to flux heat through the ice/snow properly is critical in order to resolve the surface temperature properly, since small errors in this lead to unrestrained climate drift. The present project, summarized in this report, had as its objectives: (1) introducing a series of sea ice and ocean improvements aimed at overcoming remaining weaknesses in the GCM sea ice/ocean representation, and (2) performing a series of sensitivity experiments designed to evaluate the climate sensitivity of the revised model to both Antarctic and Arctic sea ice, determine the sensitivity of the climate response to initial ice distribution, and investigate the transient response to doubling CO2.

  9. Improved Upper Ocean/Sea Ice Modeling in the GISS GCM for Investigating Climate Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This project built on our previous results in which we highlighted the importance of sea ice in overall climate sensitivity by determining that for both warming and cooling climates, when sea ice was not allowed to change, climate sensitivity was reduced by 35-40%. We also modified the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) 8 deg x lO deg atmospheric General Circulation Model (GCM) to include an upper-ocean/sea-ice model involving the Semtner three-layer ice/snow thermodynamic model, the Price et al. (1986) ocean mixed layer model and a general upper ocean vertical advection/diffusion scheme for maintaining and fluxing properties across the pycnocline. This effort, in addition to improving the sea ice representation in the AGCM, revealed a number of sensitive components of the sea ice/ocean system. For example, the ability to flux heat through the ice/snow properly is critical in order to resolve the surface temperature properly, since small errors in this lead to unrestrained climate drift. The present project, summarized in this report, had as its objectives: (1) introducing a series of sea ice and ocean improvements aimed at overcoming remaining weaknesses in the GCM sea ice/ocean representation, and (2) performing a series of sensitivity experiments designed to evaluate the climate sensitivity of the revised model to both Antarctic and Arctic sea ice, determine the sensitivity of the climate response to initial ice distribution, and investigate the transient response to doubling CO2.

  10. Quantifying Precipitation Variability on Titan Using a GCM and Implications for Observed Geomorphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faulk, Sean P.; Mitchell, Jonathan L.; Moon, Seulgi; Lora, Juan Manuel

    2016-10-01

    Titan's zonal-mean precipitation behavior has been widely investigated using general circulation models (GCMs), but the spatial and temporal variability of rainfall in Titan's active hydrologic cycle is less well understood. We conduct statistical analyses of rainfall, diagnosed from GCM simulations of Titan's atmosphere, to determine storm intensity and frequency. Intense storms of methane have been proposed to be critical for enabling mechanical erosion of Titan's surface, as indicated by observations of dendritic valley networks. Using precipitation outputs from the Titan Atmospheric Model (TAM), a GCM shown to realistically simulate many features of Titan's atmosphere, we quantify the precipitation variability within eight separate latitude bins for a variety of initial surface liquid distributions. We find that while the overall wettest regions are indeed the poles, the most intense rainfall generally occurs in the high mid-latitudes, between 45-67.5 degrees, consistent with recent geomorphological observations of alluvial fans concentrated at those latitudes. We also find that precipitation rates necessary for surface erosion, as estimated by Perron et al. (2006) J. Geophys. Res. 111, E11001, frequently occur at all latitudes, with recurrence intervals of less than one Titan year. Such analysis is crucial towards understanding the complex interaction between Titan's atmosphere and surface and defining the influence of precipitation on observed geomorphology.

  11. Comparisons Between TIME-GCM/MERRA Simulations and LEO Satellite Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagan, M. E.; Haeusler, K.; Forbes, J. M.; Zhang, X.; Doornbos, E.; Bruinsma, S.; Lu, G.

    2014-12-01

    We report on yearlong National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) thermosphere-ionosphere-mesosphere-electrodynamics general circulation model (TIME-GCM) simulations where we utilize the recently developed lower boundary condition based on 3-hourly MERRA (Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Application) reanalysis data to account for tropospheric waves and tides propagating upward into the model domain. The solar and geomagnetic forcing is based on prevailing geophysical conditions. The simulations show a strong day-to-day variability in the upper thermospheric neutral temperature tidal fields, which is smoothed out quickly when averaging is applied over several days, e.g. up to 50% DE3 amplitude reduction for a 10-day average. This is an important result with respect to tidal diagnostics from satellite observations where averaging over multiple days is inevitable. In order to assess TIME-GCM performance we compare the simulations with measurements from the Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE), Challenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) and Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites.

  12. A New CO2 Transmittance Parameterization and Its Impact on the GLA GCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wobus, R.; Wui, M. L. C.; Susskind, J.

    1985-01-01

    The Wu-Kaplan radiation parameterization (Krishnamurthy, 1982) used in the GLA Global Circulation Model (GCM) was improved by replacing its fixed tables of CO2 transmittance in the 15 micron band with models developed by regression on line-by-line transmittances. The transmittances between layers are modeled as products of effective sublayer transmittances. The GLA GCM was integrated for 20 days starting at OZ, January 21, 1979, using the transmittance model. In the control run the fixed table of 15 micron CO2 transmittances is used. The effect of the change of initial cooling rate is illustrated by a map of the difference of 50 mb temperature after 6 hours. The cooling is reduced over high topography, where the fixed table underestimates the transmittance, and is reduced slightly throughout the tropics and the north polar area where the stratosphere is relatively cold. Over elevated topography the surface cooling increases, also as expected. The stratospheric temperature increases over a degree in the arctic and smaller amounts over Antarctica and elsewhere. Tropospheric equilibrium temperature response is obscured by time dependent differences in synoptic disturbances.

  13. Wavy structures of temperature and density in the polar thermosphere simulated by a whole atmosphere GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Miyoshi, Yasunobu

    Using a whole atmosphere general circulation model (GCM), which includes all the atmospheric regions from the ground to the exobase, we have performed numerical simulations to investigate generation mechanisms of wavy structures in the polar thermosphere during low solar and geomagnetically quiescent periods. Some observations showed existence of disturbances and waves in the upper thermosphere not only during geomagnetically active periods but also the quiescent conditions. Our previous simulations (Fujiwara and Miyoshi, 2006) also indicated that longitudinally-extent wavy structures were generated in the polar upper thermosphere, while wavy structures were found in the vicinity of the solar terminator in the mid-and low-latitude regions even when geomagnetically quiescent periods. In the present study, we discuss effects of the offset between the geographic and geomagnetic coordinates on producing the wavy structures in the vicinity of the auroral oval and the polar cap region. In addition, variations with periods of 2-3 hours due to atmospheric gravity waves, which would be originated in the lower atmosphere, were found in the polar upper thermosphere from the GCM simulations (Miyoshi and Fujiwara, 2008; Fujiwara and Miyoshi, 2010). The interactions between these wavy structures and disturbances due to the lower atmospheric effects are also discussed here.

  14. Post-impact climate conditions on early Mars: preliminary results from GCM simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steakley, Kathryn; Murphy, Jim; Kahre, Melinda A.; Haberle, Robert

    2016-10-01

    Observations imply that liquid water was stable on Mars' surface during the late Noachian/early Hesperian era, with valley networks forming roughly 3.5-3.75 billion years ago, possibly from precipitation and runoff (Fassett & Head 2008, Icarus 195, 61; Hynek et al., 2010, JGR Planets, 115, E09008). Climate models, however, struggle to reproduce such warm conditions (Forget et al., 2013, Icarus 21, 81). Volcanism and impacts have been suggested as mechanisms of either inducing a warm and wet environment or causing local melting in a cold and wet environment. Comets and asteroids are capable of injecting into the atmosphere both kinetic energy from the impact and water from the object itself and from vaporized surface and subsurface ice. Segura et al. (2008, JGR Planets 113, E11007) find using a 1-D atmospheric model that significant rainfall and periods of above-freezing temperatures lasting months to years can follow impacts of objects between 30 and 100 km in diameter. We revisit this work utilizing a 3-D global climate model (GCM) to consider the effects of dynamics, topography, global surface ice variations, etc. We present preliminary results from the NASA ARC Mars GCM investigating global temperature and precipitation behavior in a post-impact, early Mars environment.

  15. A Two-Habit Ice Cloud Optical Property Parameterization for GCM Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yi, Bingqi; Yang, Ping; Minnis, Patrick; Loeb, Norman; Kato, Seiji

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel ice cloud optical property parameterization based on a two-habit ice cloud model that has been proved to be optimal for remote sensing applications. The two-habit ice model is developed with state-of-the-art numerical methods for light scattering property calculations involving individual columns and column aggregates with the habit fractions constrained by in-situ measurements from various field campaigns. Band-averaged bulk ice cloud optical properties including the single-scattering albedo, the mass extinction/absorption coefficients, and the asymmetry factor are parameterized as functions of the effective particle diameter for the spectral bands involved in the broadband radiative transfer models. Compared with other parameterization schemes, the two-habit scheme generally has lower asymmetry factor values (around 0.75 at the visible wavelengths). The two-habit parameterization scheme was widely tested with the broadband radiative transfer models (i.e. Rapid Radiative Transfer Model, GCM version) and global circulation models (GCMs, i.e. Community Atmosphere Model, version 5). Global ice cloud radiative effects at the top of the atmosphere are also analyzed from the GCM simulation using the two-habit parameterization scheme in comparison with CERES satellite observations.

  16. An evaluation of the effects of cloud parameterization in the R42L9 GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tongwen; Wang, Zaizhi; Liu, Yimin; Yu, Rucong; Wu, Guoxiong

    2004-04-01

    Cloud is one of the uncertainty factors influencing the performance of a general circulation model (GCM). Recently, the State Key Laboratory of Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics, Institute of Atmospheric Physics (LASG/IAP) has developed a new version of a GCM (R42L9). In this work, roles of cloud parameterization in the R42L9 are evaluated through a comparison between two 20-year simulations using different cloud schemes. One scheme is that the cloud in the model is diagnosed from relative humidity and vertical velocity, and the other one is that diagnostic cloud is replaced by retrieved cloud amount from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP), combined with the amounts of high-, middle-, and low-cloud and heights of the cloud base and top from the NCEP. The boreal winter and summer seasonal means, as well as the annual mean, of the simulated top-of-atmosphere shortwave radiative flux, surface energy fluxes, and precipitation are analyzed in comparison with the observational estimates and NCEP reanalysis data. The results show that the scheme of diagnostic cloud parameterization greatly contributes to model biases of radiative budget and precipitation. When our derived cloud fractions are used to replace the diagnostic cloud amount, the top-of-atmosphere and surface radiation fields are better estimated as well as the spatial pattern of precipitation. The simulations of the regional precipitation, especially over the equatorial Indian Ocean in winter and the Asia-western Pacific region in summer, are obviously improved.

  17. Regional climate change predictions from the Goddard Institute for Space Studies high resolution GCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, Robert G.; Hewitson, Bruce

    1990-01-01

    Model simulations of global climate change are seen as an essential component of any program aimed at understanding human impact on the global environment. A major weakness of current general circulation models (GCMs), however, is their inability to predict reliably the regional consequences of a global scale change, and it is these regional scale predictions that are necessary for studies of human/environmental response. This research is directed toward the development of a methodology for the validation of the synoptic scale climatology of GCMs. This is developed with regard to the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) GCM Model 2, with the specific objective of using the synoptic circulation form a doubles CO2 simulation to estimate regional climate change over North America, south of Hudson Bay. This progress report is specifically concerned with validating the synoptic climatology of the GISS GCM, and developing the transfer function to derive grid-point temperatures from the synoptic circulation. Principal Components Analysis is used to characterize the primary modes of the spatial and temporal variability in the observed and simulated climate, and the model validation is based on correlations between component loadings, and power spectral analysis of the component scores. The results show that the high resolution GISS model does an excellent job of simulating the synoptic circulation over the U.S., and that grid-point temperatures can be predicted with reasonable accuracy from the circulation patterns.

  18. GCM (general circulation model)-data intercomparison: The good news and the bad

    SciTech Connect

    Grotch, S.L.

    1990-09-01

    General circulation models (GCMs) are being actively used to assess possible climate change due to increasing greenhouse gas concentrations. Because such simulations provide detailed climatic predictions at a wide range of scales, they are of particular interest to those making regional assessments of climatic change. It is especially important that workers using the results of such simulations be aware of some of the limitations of these results. In this study some of the positive results from these model simulations will be shown and some of the deficiencies will also be highlighted. Following an introductory section describing the nature of GCM climate simulations the issue of the spatial scales of such simulations is examined. A comparison of the results of seven GCM simulations of the current climate and the predictions of these models for the changes due to a doubling of CO{sub 2} will be discussed. In these intercomparisons, the spatial scale over which the results are compared varies from global to zonal (longitudinally averaged at a given latitude) to individual slices through the data along specified latitudes or longitudes. Finally, the dangers and pitfalls of relying on simple averages will be highlighted. 19 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Effect of altered boundary conditions on GCM studies of the climate of the last glacial maximum

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, W.T.; Peltier, W.R.

    1993-05-21

    The authors address a problem discovered recently with global climate model results for the last glacial maximum. Bard, et. al. pointed out a mismatch in boundary conditions entered into the model. Ice sheet conditions were derived from CLIMAP based on a time 18000 radiocarbon years ago. It was assumed that radiocarbon and sidereal dates coincide. However it was recently shown that the sidereal data of the last glacial maximum is nearer 21kbp. The authors perform model calculations to attempt to evaluate the seriousness of this mismatch in terms of calculated results from the global climate model runs for the last glacial maximum. The authors find that one result of the timing mismatch is a sizable difference in northern hemisphere summer and Eurasian winter climates. These changes should have a major impact on circulation patterns in the GCM simulations. In addition new ice sheet model programs are available now which appear to improve on CLIMAP models. The authors urge that these GCM simulations be rerun.

  20. The natural history of the WRKY–GCM1 zinc fingers and the relationship between transcription factors and transposons

    PubMed Central

    Babu, M. Madan; Iyer, Lakshminarayan M.; Balaji, S.; Aravind, L.

    2006-01-01

    WRKY and GCM1 are metal chelating DNA-binding domains (DBD) which share a four stranded fold. Using sensitive sequence searches, we show that this WRKY–GCM1 fold is also shared by the FLYWCH Zn-finger domain and the DBDs of two classes of Mutator-like element (MULE) transposases. We present evidence that they share a stabilizing core, which suggests a possible origin from a BED finger-like intermediate that was in turn ultimately derived from a C2H2 Zn-finger domain. Through a systematic study of the phyletic pattern, we show that this WRKY–GCM1 superfamily is a widespread eukaryote-specific group of transcription factors (TFs). We identified several new members across diverse eukaryotic lineages, including potential TFs in animals, fungi and Entamoeba. By integrating sequence, structure, gene expression and transcriptional network data, we present evidence that at least two major global regulators belonging to this superfamily in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Rcs1p and Aft2p) have evolved from transposons, and attained the status of transcription regulatory hubs in recent course of ascomycete yeast evolution. In plants, we show that the lineage-specific expansion of WRKY–GCM1 domain proteins acquired functional diversity mainly through expression divergence rather than by protein sequence divergence. We also use the WRKY–GCM1 superfamily as an example to illustrate the importance of transposons in the emergence of new TFs in different lineages. PMID:17130173

  1. Reduction of future monsoon precipitation over China: comparison between a high resolution RCM simulation and the driving GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, X.; Shi, Y.; Song, R.; Giorgi, F.; Wang, Y.; Zhang, D.

    2008-08-01

    Multi-decadal high resolution climate change simulations over East Asia are performed using the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) Regional Climate Model, RegCM3, nested within the NASA/NCAR global model FvGCM. Two sets of simulations are conducted at 20-km grid spacing for present day and future climate (IPCC A2 scenario). The mean precipitation change during the monsoon season (May to September) over China is analyzed and intercompared between the RegCM and FvGCM. Simulation of the present day precipitation by the RegCM shows a better performance than that of the driving FvGCM in terms of both spatial pattern and amount. The main improvement of the RegCM is the removal of an artificial precipitation center over the eastern edge of the Tibetan Plateau simulated by the FvGCM. The FvGCM simulates a predominant increase of precipitation over the region, whereas the RegCM shows extended areas of decrease. The causes of these differences are investigated and explained in terms of the different topographical forcing on circulation and moisture flux in the two models. We also find that the RegCM-simulated changes are in better agreement with observed precipitation trends over East Asia. It is suggested that high resolution models are needed to better investigate future climate projections over China and East Asia.

  2. The Role of Continental-scale Landmass in Monsoons-A GCM Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Winston

    2008-01-01

    It was argued by Chao and Chen (2001) that land-sea thermal contrast on the continental scale is not a necessary condition for monsoons and that a monsoon is an ITCZ that have moved into the subtropics in its annual cycle of latitudinal movement. Chao and Chen supported their contention by GCM experiments in which they replaced landmass by ocean and were able to generate monsoons. However, land-sea thermal contrast does exist and must play a role in monsoonal rainfall distribution. Land-sea thermal contrast is one facet of continental-scale landmass. The other important characteristic of landmass is its topography. In this article the roles of landmass in monsoonal rainfall distribution and in middle latitude storm tracks are examined through GCM experiments. Comparison of a set of two GCM experiments in which the sea surface temperature (SST) from observations is prescribed from observations with and without a six-month delay reveals the role of Land-sea thermal contrast. Another set of experiments, which repeats the first set but with topography of all landmass reduced to zero, reveals the role of topography of landmass. These experiments confirm that land-sea thermal contrast is not a necessary condition for monsoons and that a monsoon should be viewed as an ITCZ displaced into the subtropics, instead of a continent-sized giant sea breeze. However, land-sea thermal contrast does have influence on the distribution of monsoonal rainfall. The temperature rise over south Asia as the season moves into summer helps the Asian monsoon to start early. However, this role is not the same as that of the land-sea thermal contrast as in the conventional explanation for the cause of monsoon. The heated landmass in summer contributes to the displacement of ITCZ into the subtropics. Also, the heated landmass in summer, by drawing moisture toward itself, limits the range of the summer storm tracks in the middle latitude oceans. On the ether hand, in winter the landmass does not

  3. Regional Climate Simulation of the Anomalous Events of 1998 using a Stretched-Grid GCM with Multiple Areas of Interest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox-Rabinovitz, M. S.; Takacs, L. L.; Govindaraju, R. C.; Atlas, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The GEOS (Goddard Earth Observing System) stretched-grid (SG) GCM developed and thoroughly tested over the last few years, is used for simulating the major anomalous regional climate events of 1998. The anomalous regional climate events are simulated simultaneously during the 13 months long (November-1997 - December-1998) SG-GCM simulation due to using the new SG-design with multiple (four) areas of interest. The following areas/regions of interest (one at each global quadrant) are implemented: U.S./Northern Mexico, the El-Nino/Brazil area, India-China, and Eastern Indian Ocean/Australia.

  4. Climatology and variability of the Indonesian Throughflow in an eddy-permitting oceanic GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hailong; Li, Wei; Zhang, Xuehong

    2005-07-01

    A quasi-global eddy permitting oceanic GCM, LICOM1.0, is run with the forcing of ERA40 daily wind stress from 1958 to 2001. The modelled Indonesian Throughflow (ITF) is reasonable in the aspects of both its water source and major pathways. Compared with the observation, the simulated annual mean and seasonal cycle of the ITF transport are fairly realistic. The interannual variation of the tropical Pacific Ocean plays a more important role in the interannual variability of the ITF transport. The relationship between the ITF and the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) also reflects the influence of ENSO. However, the relationship between the ITF transport and the interannual anomalies in the Pacific and Indian Oceans vary with time. During some years, (e.g., 1994), the effect of a strong IOD on the ITF transport is more than that from ENSO.

  5. Joining Australia to Antarctica GCM implications for the Cenozoic record of Antarctic glaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oglesby, Robert J.

    1991-07-01

    A previous GCM study concerning the formation and maintenance of Antarctic glaciation is expanded to include the joining of Australia to Antarctica; the two continents were physically connected prior to about 40 million years ago. It has been proposed that the increased continentality resulting from the enlarged landmass inhibited glaciation by increasing the degree of summer heating. However, simulations with the NCAR CCM1 suggest little change in the net Antarctic snow accumulation when Australia is joined to Antarctica, even under extreme variations in SST and topography. If anything, there is a slight increase in the net accumulation with the larger landmass. The climate of Australia does change markedly, consistent with the roughly 30° poleward shift in latitude. These results may not be inconsistent with paleoclimatic data from the early Cenozoic and the Cretaceous, with temperate flora and fauna along the coast, and large ice sheets inland.

  6. Sampling the NCAR TIEGCM, TIME-GCM, and GSWM models for CEDAR and TIMED related studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberheide, J.; Hagan, M. E.; Roble, R. G.; Lu, G.

    2003-04-01

    The instruments on the TIMED satellite and a complement of ground based CEDAR instruments will provide invaluable diagnostics of mesosphere, lower thermosphere, and E-region ionosphere (MLTI, ca. 60-180 km) forcings, dynamics, and energetics. The interpretation of these diagnostics and elucidation of the impact of the associated processes on the MLTI requires complementary modeling initiatives. We make samples of the NCAR/HAO TIME-GCM, TIEGCM, and GSWM model outputs available to the community via the web. The model results are sampled in a way to provide winds, temperatures, and trace constituents that would be measured by the TIMED instruments if the satellite flew through the model atmosphere. We also provide an analogous product for the CEDAR ground-based component of TIMED.

  7. Weather Regimes in the Pacific from a GCM. Part II: Dynamics and Stability.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannachi, A.

    1997-05-01

    The Pacific weather regimes found by Haines and Hannachi from a GCM perpetual January 10-year run, identified as ±Pacific-North American (PNA), are examined for stability both within a model-derived EOF phase space and the full phase space for the 500-mb flow level. The authors also examine the behavior of the 500-mb streamfunction tendency based on the barotropic vorticity equation model projected onto the EOF phase space. Normal mode and nonnormal mode analysis of these regimes are performed. It is shown in particular that the +PNA state is less stable than the PNA, which can explain previous results concerning the greater robustness in finding the PNA state as a fixed point in the attractor. Of particular interest is the local character of the +PNA regime, which indicates fast growth rates within the EOF phase space of the order 3-4 days.

  8. EdGCM: Research Tools for Training the Climate Change Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandler, M. A.; Sohl, L. E.; Zhou, J.; Sieber, R.

    2011-12-01

    Climate scientists employ complex computer simulations of the Earth's physical systems to prepare climate change forecasts, study the physical mechanisms of climate, and to test scientific hypotheses and computer parameterizations. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 4th Assessment Report (2007) demonstrates unequivocally that policy makers rely heavily on such Global Climate Models (GCMs) to assess the impacts of potential economic and emissions scenarios. However, true climate modeling capabilities are not disseminated to the majority of world governments or U.S. researchers - let alone to the educators who will be training the students who are about to be presented with a world full of climate change stakeholders. The goal is not entirely quixotic; in fact, by the mid-1990's prominent climate scientists were predicting with certainty that schools and politicians would "soon" be running GCMs on laptops [Randall, 1996]. For a variety of reasons this goal was never achieved (nor even really attempted). However, around the same time NASA and the National Science Foundation supported a small pilot project at Columbia University to show the potential of putting sophisticated computer climate models - not just "demos" or "toy models" - into the hands of non-specialists. The Educational Global Climate Modeling Project (EdGCM) gave users access to a real global climate model and provided them with the opportunity to experience the details of climate model setup, model operation, post-processing and scientific visualization. EdGCM was designed for use in both research and education - it is a full-blown research GCM, but the ultimate goal is to develop a capability to embed these crucial technologies across disciplines, networks, platforms, and even across academia and industry. With this capability in place we can begin training the skilled workforce that is necessary to deal with the multitude of climate impacts that will occur over the coming decades. To

  9. Contributions to the implementation of the Arakawa-Schubert cumulus parameterization in the GLA GCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sud, Y. C.; Chao, Winston C.; Walker, G. K.

    1991-01-01

    The roles of the Critical Cloud Work Function (CCWF) data set and the upper and lower bounds on entrainment by cumulus plumes in the Arakawa-Schubert cumulus parameterization (ASCP) in the GLA GCM (Geller et al., 1988) were investigated in two sets of experiments. It was found that the horizontal and vertical distribution of cumulus heating can be altered in ASCP by adjusting these parameters. These changes can have a strong influence on the vertical structure of condensation heating, water vapor distribution, temperature, and rainfall. The CCWF is an important limiting parameter that controls the onset of different cloud types; increasing the threshold values of CCWF for all clouds tends to concentrate the rainfall into a narrower ITCZ and affects the rainfall during the initial adjustment period.

  10. Regional Climate Simulation Experiments with a Variable Resolution Stretched Grid GCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takacs, Lawrence L.; Stein, Uri; Govindaraju, Ravi C.

    1999-01-01

    The variable resolution stretched grid (SG) version of the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) GCM has been recently developed and tested in a regional climate simulation mode. The SG-approach is an alternative to the widely used nested grid approach introduced a decade ago as a pioneering step to regional climate modeling. The region of interest with a uniform about 60 km resolution used in experiments is a rectangle over the U.S. The results of one annual as well as two-month simulations for the anomalous climate event of the U.S. drought of 1988, are validated against data analysis fields and diagnostics. The efficient regional down-scaling as well as the positive impact of fine regional resolution, are obtained. The SG-concept appeared to be a promising candidate for regional and subregional climate studies and applications.

  11. Developing a global mixed-canopy, height-variable vegetation structure dataset for estimating global vegetation albedo and biomass in the NASA Ent Terrestrial Biosphere Model and GISS GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes, C.; Kiang, N. Y.; Yang, W.; Ni-Meister, W.; Schaaf, C.; Aleinov, I. D.; Jonas, J.; Zhao, F. A.; Yao, T.; Wang, Z.; Sun, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Processes determining biosphere-atmosphere coupling are strongly influenced by vegetation structure. Thus, ecosystem carbon sequestration and evapotranspiration affecting global carbon and water balances will depend upon the spatial extent of vegetation, its vertical structure, and its physiological variability. To represent this globally, Dynamic Global Vegetation Models (DGVMs) coupled to General Circulation Models (GCMs) make use of satellite and/or model-based vegetation classifications often composed by homogeneous communities. This work aims at developing a new Global Vegetation Structure Dataset (GVSD) by incorporating varying vegetation heights for mixed plant communities to be used as input to the Ent Terrestrial Biosphere Model (TBM), the DGVM coupled to the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) GCM. Information sources include the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) land cover and plant functional types (PFTs) (Friedl et al., 2010), vegetation height from the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) on board ICESat (Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite) (Simard et al., 2011; Tang et al., 2014) along with the Global Data Sets of Vegetation Leaf Area Index (LAI)3g (Zhu et al. 2013). Further PFT partitioning is performed according to a climate classification utilizing the Climate Research Unit (CRU) and the NOAA Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC) data. Final products are a GVSD consisting of mixed plant communities (e.g. mixed forests, savannas, mixed PFTs) following the Ecosystem Demography model (Moorcroft et al., 2001) approach represented by multi-cohort community patches at the sub-grid level of the GCM, which are ensembles of identical individuals whose differences are represented by PFTs, canopy height, density and vegetation structure sensitivity to allometric parameters. To assess the sensitivity of the GISS GCM to vegetation structure, we produce a range of estimates of Ent TBM biomass and plant

  12. Developing a global mixed-canopy, height-variable vegetation structure dataset for estimating global vegetation albedo by a clumped canopy radiative transfer scheme in the NASA Ent Terrestrial Biosphere Model and GISS GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes, Carlo; Kiang, Nancy Y.; Ni-Meister, Wenge; Yang, Wenze; Schaaf, Crystal; Aleinov, Igor; Jonas, Jeffrey A.; Zhao, Feng; Yao, Tian; Wang, Zhuosen; Sun, Qingsong; Carrer, Dominique

    2016-04-01

    Processes determining biosphere-atmosphere coupling are strongly influenced by vegetation structure. Thus, ecosystem carbon sequestration and evapotranspiration affecting global carbon and water balances will depend upon the spatial extent of vegetation, its vertical structure, and its physiological variability. To represent this globally, Dynamic Global Vegetation Models (DGVMs) coupled to General Circulation Models (GCMs) make use of satellite and/or model-based vegetation classifications often composed by homogeneous communities. This work aims at developing a new Global Vegetation Structure Dataset (GVSD) by incorporating varying vegetation heights for mixed plant communities to be used as boundary conditions to the Analytical Clumped Two-Stream (ACTS) canopy radiative transfer scheme (Ni-Meister et al., 2010) incorporated into the NASA Ent Terrestrial Biosphere Model (TBM), the DGVM coupled to the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) GCM. Information sources about land surface and vegetation characteristics obtained from a number of earth observation platforms and algorithms include the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) land cover and plant functional types (PFTs) (Friedl et al., 2010), soil albedo derived from MODIS (Carrer et al., 2014), along with vegetation height from the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) on board ICESat (Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite) (Simard et al., 2011; Tang et al., 2014). Three widely used Leaf Area Index (LAI) products are compared as input to the GVSD and ACTS forcing in terms of vegetation albedo: Global Data Sets of Vegetation (LAI)3g (Zhu et al. 2013), Beijing Normal University LAI (Yuan et al., 2011), and MODIS MOD15A2H product (Yang et al., 2006). Further PFT partitioning is performed according to a climate classification utilizing the Climate Research Unit (CRU; Harris et al., 2013) and the NOAA Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC; Scheider et al., 2014) data. Final

  13. The Stochastic Multicloud Model as part of an operational convection parameterisation in a comprehensive GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Karsten; Jakob, Christian; Möbis, Benjamin

    2015-04-01

    An adequate representation of convective processes in numerical models of the atmospheric circulation (general circulation models, GCMs) remains one of the grand challenges in atmospheric science. In particular, the models struggle with correctly representing the spatial distribution and high variability of tropical convection. It is thought that this model deficiency partly results from formulating current convection parameterisation schemes in a purely deterministic manner. Here, we use observations of tropical convection to inform the design of a novel convection parameterisation with stochastic elements. The novel scheme is built around the Stochastic MultiCloud Model (SMCM, Khouider et al 2010). We present the progress made in utilising SMCM-based estimates of updraft area fractions at cloud base as part of the deep convection scheme of a GCM. The updraft area fractions are used to yield one part of the cloud base mass-flux used in the closure assumption of convective mass-flux schemes. The closure thus receives a stochastic component, potentially improving modeled convective variability and coherence. For initial investigations, we apply the above methodology to the operational convective parameterisation of the ECHAM6 GCM. We perform 5-year AMIP simulations, i.e. with prescribed observed SSTs. We find that with the SMCM, convection is weaker and more coherent and continuous from timestep to timestep compared to the standard model. Total global precipitation is reduced in the SMCM run, but this reduces i) the overall error compared to observed global precipitation (GPCP) and ii) middle tropical tropospheric temperature biases compared to ERA-Interim. Hovmoeller diagrams indicate a slightly higher degree of convective organisation compared to the base case and Wheeler-Kiladis frequency wavenumber diagrams indicate slightly more spectral power in the MJO range.

  14. Simulation of Anomalous Regional Climate Events with a Variable Resolution Stretched Grid GCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox-Rabinovitz, Michael S.

    1999-01-01

    The stretched-grid approach provides an efficient down-scaling and consistent interactions between global and regional scales due to using one variable-resolution model for integrations. It is a workable alternative to the widely used nested-grid approach introduced over a decade ago as a pioneering step in regional climate modeling. A variable-resolution General Circulation Model (GCM) employing a stretched grid, with enhanced resolution over the US as the area of interest, is used for simulating two anomalous regional climate events, the US summer drought of 1988 and flood of 1993. The special mode of integration using a stretched-grid GCM and data assimilation system is developed that allows for imitating the nested-grid framework. The mode is useful for inter-comparison purposes and for underlining the differences between these two approaches. The 1988 and 1993 integrations are performed for the two month period starting from mid May. Regional resolutions used in most of the experiments is 60 km. The major goal and the result of the study is obtaining the efficient down-scaling over the area of interest. The monthly mean prognostic regional fields for the stretched-grid integrations are remarkably close to those of the verifying analyses. Simulated precipitation patterns are successfully verified against gauge precipitation observations. The impact of finer 40 km regional resolution is investigated for the 1993 integration and an example of recovering subregional precipitation is presented. The obtained results show that the global variable-resolution stretched-grid approach is a viable candidate for regional and subregional climate studies and applications.

  15. From GCM Output to Local Hydrologic and Ecological Impacts: Integrating Climate Change Projections into Conservation Lands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, S. B.; Micheli, L.; Flint, L. E.; Flint, A. L.; Thorne, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    Assessment of climate change resilience, vulnerability, and adaptation options require downscaling of GCM outputs to local scales, and conversion of temperature and precipitation forcings into hydrologic and ecological responses. Recent work in the San Francisco Bay Area, and California demonstrate a practical approach to this process. First, climate futures (GCM x Emissions Scenario) are screened using cluster analysis for seasonal precipitation and temperature, to select a tractable subset of projections that still represent the range of climate projections. Second, monthly climate projections are downscaled to 270m and the Basin Characterization Model (BCM) applied, to generate fine-scale recharge, runoff, actual evapotranspiration (AET), and climatic water deficit (CWD) accounting for soils, bedrock geology, topography, and local climate. Third, annual time-series are used to derive 30-year climatologies and recurrence intervals of extreme events (including multi-year droughts) at the scale of small watersheds and conservation parcels/networks. We take a "scenario-neutral" approach where thresholds are defined for system "failure," such as water supply shortfalls or drought mortality/vegetation transitions, and the time-window for hitting those thresholds is evaluated across all selected climate projections. San Francisco Bay Area examples include drought thresholds (CWD) for specific vegetation-types that identify leading/trailing edges and local refugia, evaluation of hydrologic resources (recharge and runoff) provided by conservation lands, and productivity of rangelands (AET). BCM outputs for multiple futures are becoming available to resource managers through on-line data extraction tools. This approach has wide applicability to numerous resource management issues.

  16. WINDII observations and TIME-GCM simulations of O(1S) polar spirals during geomagnetic disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Gordon G.; Roble, Raymond G.; Cho, Young-Min

    2013-05-01

    daytime O(1S) emission at 557.7 nm observed at 250 km with the Wind Imaging Interferometer (WINDII) is dominantly excited by photoelectron impact on atomic oxygen, so the volume emission rate is normally a measure of the atomic oxygen concentration. Daily polar maps of the 250 km volume emission rate during geomagnetic disturbances display polar spirals extending out of the auroral region and down to the equator. Since the local time is fixed for a given latitude for a single day, the spiral maps form a spatio-temporal pattern in which the longitudinal variations cannot be distinguished from those in universal time. Simulations for 2 January 1993 implemented with the National Center for Atmospheric Research Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIME-GCM) using the equivalent satellite perspective show a remarkably similar spiral pattern. Hourly universal time simulations reveal a rapid equatorward expansion of the spirals during this modest geomagnetic event of Kp = 4.7, which are mirrored in the meridional and vertical winds. Simulations of the electron density show that the emission within the spirals is caused by the recombination of O2+ ions with electrons, and not the atomic oxygen enhancement itself. All of this strongly suggests that the spirals are in fact large-scale Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances (TIDs), and comparisons of the WINDII data made with TID observations reported in the literature, including those made on the same day, support this conclusion. The TIME-GCM simulations suggest that a component of the spirals originates in the lower atmosphere and appears at thermospheric heights.

  17. Temperature Dependence of Low Cloud Optical Thickness in the GISS GCM: Contributing Mechanisms and Climate Implications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tselioudis, George; Delgenio, Anthony D.; Kovari, William, Jr.; Yao, Mao-Sung

    1998-12-01

    A current-climate simulation of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) GCM, which includes interactive cloud optical properties that depend on the predicted cloud water content, is analyzed to document the variations of low cloud optical thickness with temperature in the model atmosphere. It is found that low cloud optical thickness decreases with temperature in the warm subtropical and tropical latitudes and increases with temperature in the cold midlatitude regions. This behavior is in agreement with the results of two observational studies that analyzed satellite data from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project and Special Sensor Microwave/Imager datasets. The increase of low cloud optical thickness with temperature in the midlatitudes is due to vertical extent and cloud water increases, whereas the decrease with temperature in the warm latitudes is due to decreases in cloud water content and happens despite increases in cloud vertical extent. The cloud processes that produce the cloud property changes in the model also vary with latitude. In the midlatitude regions relative-humidity-induced increases of cloud vertical extent with temperature dominate, whereas in the Tropics increases in cloud-top entrainment and precipitation with temperature produce decreases of cloud water content, whose effect on optical thickness outweighs the effect of entrainment-induced increases of cloud vertical extent with temperature. Doubled-CO2 simulations with the GISS GCM suggest that even though low cloud optical thickness changes have little effect on the global climate sensitivity of the model, they redistribute the temperature change and reduce the high-latitude amplification of the greenhouse warming. It is also found that the current-climate variations of low cloud optical thickness with temperature reproduce qualitatively but overestimate quantitatively the changes in optical thickness with climate warming.

  18. A GCM Recent History of Northern Martian Polar Layered Deposits: Contribution from Past Equatorial Ice Reservoirs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levrard, B.; Laskar, J.; Montmessin, F.; Forget, F.

    2005-01-01

    Polar layered deposits are exposed in the walls of the troughs cutting the north polar cap of Mars. They consist of alternating ice and dust layers or layers of an ice-dust mixture with varying proportions and are found throughout the cap. Layers thickness ranges from meters to several tens of meters with an approximately 30 meter dominant wavelength. Although their formation processes is not known, they are presumed to reflect changes in ice and dust stability over orbital and axial variations. Intensive 3-D LMD GCM simulations of the martian water cycle have been thus performed to determine the annual rates of exchange of surface ice between the northern cap and tropical areas for a wide range of obliquity and orbital parameters values.These rates have been employed to reconstruct an history of the northern cap and test simple models of dust-ice layers formation over the last 10 Ma orbital variations. We use the 3-D water cycle model simulated by the 3-D LMD GCM with an intermediate grid resolution (7.5 longitude x 5.625 latitude) and 25 vertical levels. The dust opacity is constant and set to 0,15. No exchange of ice with regolith is allowed. The evolution of the northern cap over obliquity and orbital changes (eccentricity, Longitude of perihelion) has been recently described with this model. High summer insolation favors transfer of ice from the northern pole to the Tharsis and Olympus Montes, while at low obliquity, unstable equatorial ice is redeposited in high-latitude and polar areas of both hemisphere. The disappearance of the equatorial ice reservoir leads to a poleward recession of icy high latitude reservoirs, providing an additional source for the cap accumulation during each obliquity or orbital cycle. Furthering the efforts, a quantitative evolution of ice reservoirs is here investigated for various astronomical conditions.

  19. Longwave Band-by-band Cloud Radiative Effect and its Application in GCM Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Xianglei; Cole, Jason N. S.; He, Fei; Potter, Gerald L.; Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Lee, Dongmin; Suarez, Max; Loeb, Norman G.

    2012-01-01

    The cloud radiative effect (CRE) of each longwave (LW) absorption band of a GCM fs radiation code is uniquely valuable for GCM evaluation because (1) comparing band-by-band CRE avoids the compensating biases in the broadband CRE comparison and (2) the fractional contribution of each band to the LW broadband CRE (f(sub CRE)) is sensitive to cloud top height but largely insensitive to cloud fraction, presenting thus a diagnostic metric to separate the two macroscopic properties of clouds. Recent studies led by the first author have established methods to derive such band ]by ]band quantities from collocated AIRS and CERES observations. We present here a study that compares the observed band-by-band CRE over the tropical oceans with those simulated by three different atmospheric GCMs (GFDL AM2, NASA GEOS-5, and CCCma CanAM4) forced by observed SST. The models agree with observation on the annual ]mean LW broadband CRE over the tropical oceans within +/-1W/sq m. However, the differences among these three GCMs in some bands can be as large as or even larger than +/-1W/sq m. Observed seasonal cycles of f(sub CRE) in major bands are shown to be consistent with the seasonal cycle of cloud top pressure for both the amplitude and the phase. However, while the three simulated seasonal cycles of f(sub CRE) agree with observations on the phase, the amplitudes are underestimated. Simulated interannual anomalies from GFDL AM2 and CCCma CanAM4 are in phase with observed anomalies. The spatial distribution of f(sub CRE) highlights the discrepancies between models and observation over the low-cloud regions and the compensating biases from different bands.

  20. GCM Simulations of Neoproterozoic "Snowball Earth" Conditions: Implications for the Environmental Limits on Terrestrial Metazoans and Their Extraterrestrial Analogues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohl, L. E.; Chandler, M. A.

    2001-01-01

    The Neoproterozoic Snowball Earth intervals provide excellent opportunities to examine the environmental limits on terrestrial metazoans. A series of GCM simulations was run in order to quantify climatic conditions during these intervals. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  1. An evolutionary conserved interaction between the Gcm transcription factor and the SF1 nuclear receptor in the female reproductive system

    PubMed Central

    Cattenoz, Pierre B.; Delaporte, Claude; Bazzi, Wael; Giangrande, Angela

    2016-01-01

    NR5A1 is essential for the development and for the function of steroid producing glands of the reproductive system. Moreover, its misregulation is associated with endometriosis, which is the first cause of infertility in women. Hr39, the Drosophila ortholog of NR5A1, is expressed and required in the secretory cells of the spermatheca, the female exocrine gland that ensures fertility by secreting substances that attract and capacitate the spermatozoids. We here identify a direct regulator of Hr39 in the spermatheca: the Gcm transcription factor. Furthermore, lack of Gcm prevents the production of the secretory cells and leads to female sterility in Drosophila. Hr39 regulation by Gcm seems conserved in mammals and involves the modification of the DNA methylation profile of mNr5a1. This study identifies a new molecular pathway in female reproductive system development and suggests a role for hGCM in the progression of reproductive tract diseases in humans. PMID:27886257

  2. Ocean-Atmosphere Interaction in Climate Changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. Timothy

    1999-01-01

    The diagram, which attests the El Nino teleconnection observed by the NASA Scatterometer (NSCAT) in 1997, is an example of the results of our research in air-sea interaction - the core component of our three-part contribution to the Climate Variability Program. We have established an interplay among scientific research, which turns spacebased data into knowledge, a push in instrument technology, which improves observations of climate variability, and an information system, which produces and disseminates new data to support our scientific research. Timothy Liu led the proposal for advanced technology, in response to the NASA Post-2002 Request for Information. The sensor was identified as a possible mission for continuous ocean surface wind measurement at higher spatial resolution, and with the unique capability to measure ocean surface salinity. He is participating in the Instrument Incubator Program to improve the antenna technology, and is initiating a study to integrate the concept on Japanese missions. He and his collaborators have set up a system to produce and disseminate high level (gridded) ocean surface wind/stress data from NSCAT and European missions. The data system is being expanded to produce real-time gridded ocean surface winds from Quikscat, and precipitation and evaporation from the Tropical Rain Measuring Mission. It will form the basis for a spacebased data analysis system which will include momentum, heat and water fluxes. The study on 1997 El Nino teleconnection illustrates our interdisciplinary and multisensor approach to study climate variability. The diagram shows that the collapse of trade wind and the westerly wind anomalies in the central equatorial Pacific led to the equatorial ocean warming. The equatorial wind anomalies are connected to the anomalous cyclonic wind pattern in the northeast Pacific. The anomalous warming along the west coast of the United States is the result of the movement of the pre-existing warm sea surface temperature anomalies with the cyclonic wind anomalies toward the coast. The results led to a new study which identifies decadal ocean variations in the Northeast Pacific. Three studies of oceanic responses to wind forcing caused by the seasonal change of monsoons, the passage of a typhoon, and the 1997 El Nino, were successfully conducted. Besides wind forcing, we continue to examine new techniques for estimating thermal and hydrologic fluxes, through the inverse ocean mixed-layer model, through divergence of atmospheric water transport, and by direct retrieval from radiances observed by microwave radiometers. Greenhouse warming has been linked to water vapor measured by two spaceborne sensors in two studies. In the first study, strong baroclinicity and deep convection were found to transport water vapor to the upper atmosphere and increase greenhouse trapping over the storm tracks of the North Pacific and Atlantic. In another study, the annual cycle of greenhouse warming were related to sea surface temperature (SST) and integrated water vapor, and the latitudinal dependence of the magnitudes and phases of the annual cycles were compared.

  3. Ocean-atmosphere trace gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Lucy J; Archer, Stephen D; Beale, Rachael

    2012-10-07

    The oceans contribute significantly to the global emissions of a number of atmospherically important volatile gases, notably those containing sulfur, nitrogen and halogens. Such gases play critical roles not only in global biogeochemical cycling but also in a wide range of atmospheric processes including marine aerosol formation and modification, tropospheric ozone formation and destruction, photooxidant cycling and stratospheric ozone loss. A number of marine emissions are greenhouse gases, others influence the Earth's radiative budget indirectly through aerosol formation and/or by modifying oxidant levels and thus changing the atmospheric lifetime of gases such as methane. In this article we review current literature concerning the physical, chemical and biological controls on the sea-air emissions of a wide range of gases including dimethyl sulphide (DMS), halocarbons, nitrogen-containing gases including ammonia (NH(3)), amines (including dimethylamine, DMA, and diethylamine, DEA), alkyl nitrates (RONO(2)) and nitrous oxide (N(2)O), non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC) including isoprene and oxygenated (O)VOCs, methane (CH(4)) and carbon monoxide (CO). Where possible we review the current global emission budgets of these gases as well as known mechanisms for their formation and loss in the surface ocean.

  4. Toward a Simple Probabilistic GCM Emulator for Integrated Assessment of Climate Change Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sue Wing, I.; Tebaldi, C.; Nychka, D. W.; Winkler, J.

    2014-12-01

    Climate emulators can bridge spatial scales in integrated assessment in ways that allow us to take advantage of the evolving understanding of the impacts of climate change. The spatial scales at which climate impacts occur are much finer than those of the "damage functions" in integrated assessment models (IAMs), which incorporate reduced form climate models to project changes in global mean temperature, and estimate aggregate damages directly from that. Advancing the state of IA modeling requires methods to generate—in a flexible and computationally efficient manner—future changes in climate variables at the geographic scales at which individual impact endpoints can be resolved. The state of the art uses outputs of global climate models (GCMs) forced by warming scenarios to drive impact calculations. However, downstream integrated assessments are perforce "locked-in" to the particular GCM x warming scenario combinations that generated the meteorological fields of interest—it is not possible assess risk due to the absence of probabilities over warming scenarios or model uncertainty. The availability of reduced-form models which can efficiently simulate the envelope of the response of multiple GCMs to a given amount of warming provides us with capability to create probabilistic projections of fine-scale of meteorological changes conditional on global mean temperature change to drive impact calculations in ways that permit risk assessments. This presentation documents a prototype probabilistic climate emulator for use as a GCM diagnostic tool and a driver of climate change impact assessments. We use a regression-based approach to construct multi-model global patterns for changes in temperature and precipitation from the CMIP3 archive. Crucially, regression residuals are used to derive a spatial covariance function of the model- and scenario-dependent deviations from the average pattern. By sampling from this manifold we can rapidly generate many realizations of

  5. Projections of the Ganges-Brahmaputra precipitation: downscaled from GCM predictors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pervez, Md Shahriar; Henebry, Geoffrey M.

    2014-01-01

    Downscaling Global Climate Model (GCM) projections of future climate is critical for impact studies. Downscaling enables use of GCM experiments for regional scale impact studies by generating regionally specific forecasts connecting global scale predictions and regional scale dynamics. We employed the Statistical Downscaling Model (SDSM) to downscale 21st century precipitation for two data-sparse hydrologically challenging river basins in South Asia—the Ganges and the Brahmaputra. We used CGCM3.1 by Canadian Center for Climate Modeling and Analysis version 3.1 predictors in downscaling the precipitation. Downscaling was performed on the basis of established relationships between historical Global Summary of Day observed precipitation records from 43 stations and National Center for Environmental Prediction re-analysis large scale atmospheric predictors. Although the selection of predictors was challenging during the set-up of SDSM, they were found to be indicative of important physical forcings in the basins. The precipitation of both basins was largely influenced by geopotential height: the Ganges precipitation was modulated by the U component of the wind and specific humidity at 500 and 1000 h Pa pressure levels; whereas, the Brahmaputra precipitation was modulated by the V component of the wind at 850 and 1000 h Pa pressure levels. The evaluation of the SDSM performance indicated that model accuracy for reproducing precipitation at the monthly scale was acceptable, but at the daily scale the model inadequately simulated some daily extreme precipitation events. Therefore, while the downscaled precipitation may not be the suitable input to analyze future extreme flooding or drought events, it could be adequate for analysis of future freshwater availability. Analysis of the CGCM3.1 downscaled precipitation projection with respect to observed precipitation reveals that the precipitation regime in each basin may be significantly impacted by climate change

  6. Using HDO/H2O dynamics to constrain GCM convective processes during the MJO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuinenburg, Obbe; Risi, Camille; Lacour, Jean-Lionel; Schneider, Matthias

    2014-05-01

    This research aims to improve the convective processes during the MJO and other modes of intra-seasonal variability in the LMDZ atmospheric models, by making use of joint HDO and H2O (vapor) measurements. The joint use of HDO/H2O yields additional information compared to sole humidity measurements. In addition to atmospheric drying and wetting derived from the humidity measurements, the HDO measurements provide enrichment and depletion information. This information is used to distinguish between different moistening and drying processes. For example, a separation can be made between atmospheric moistening due to ocean surface evaporation and due to rain re-evaporation, as the re-evaporating moisture is more depleted in HDO than the surface evaporation. We use IASI and TES satellite HDO and H2O measurements and determine their evolution in the troposphere (700 to 400 hPa) during the MJO. Moreover, these evolutions are compared to the isotope enabled LMDZ GCM, which is forced with reanalysis wind fields. In this nudged mode, sensitivity tests of key parameters (cold pool representation, entrainment rate, precipitation efficiency, droplet size and fall speed, etc.) in the convection scheme are performed and compared with the measurements. Initial results suggest that over the Indian ocean, there is a difference between the lower- and mid-tropospheric HDO-H2O dynamics for MJO events. In the lower troposphere (at 700 hPa), the dynamics of HDO and H2O are exactly out of phase, following a curve which indicates surface moistening by surface evaporation throughout the MJO event. At 500 hPa, the measurements indicate the main moisture source is surface evaporation before the MJO peak and rain re-evaporation during the 10 days after the MJO peak. Over the maritime continent, the dynamics are the same in the lower and mid-troposphere. The predominant source is surface evaporation before the event, and re-evaporation during the 10 days after the event. The model captures the

  7. The Impact of Sea Ice Concentration Accuracies on Climate Model Simulations with the GISS GCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, Claire L.; Rind, David; Healy, Richard J.; Martinson, Douglas G.; Zukor, Dorothy J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Goddard Institute for Space Studies global climate model (GISS GCM) is used to examine the sensitivity of the simulated climate to sea ice concentration specifications in the type of simulation done in the Atmospheric Modeling Intercomparison Project (AMIP), with specified oceanic boundary conditions. Results show that sea ice concentration uncertainties of +/- 7% can affect simulated regional temperatures by more than 6 C, and biases in sea ice concentrations of +7% and -7% alter simulated annually averaged global surface air temperatures by -0.10 C and +0.17 C, respectively, over those in the control simulation. The resulting 0.27 C difference in simulated annual global surface air temperatures is reduced by a third, to 0.18 C, when considering instead biases of +4% and -4%. More broadly, least-squares fits through the temperature results of 17 simulations with ice concentration input changes ranging from increases of 50% versus the control simulation to decreases of 50% yield a yearly average global impact of 0.0107 C warming for every 1% ice concentration decrease, i.e., 1.07 C warming for the full +50% to -50% range. Regionally and on a monthly average basis, the differences can be far greater, especially in the polar regions, where wintertime contrasts between the +50% and -50% cases can exceed 30 C. However, few statistically significant effects are found outside the polar latitudes, and temperature effects over the non-polar oceans tend to be under 1 C, due in part to the specification of an unvarying annual cycle of sea surface temperatures. The +/- 7% and 14% results provide bounds on the impact (on GISS GCM simulations making use of satellite data) of satellite-derived ice concentration inaccuracies, +/- 7% being the current estimated average accuracy of satellite retrievals and +/- 4% being the anticipated improved average accuracy for upcoming satellite instruments. Results show that the impact on simulated temperatures of imposed ice concentration

  8. New Concepts for Refinement of Cumulus Parameterization in GCM's the Arakawa-Schubert Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sud, Y. C.; Walker, G. K.; Lau, William (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Several state-of-the-art models including the one employed in this study use the Arakawa-Schubert framework for moist convection, and Sundqvist formulation of stratiform. clouds, for moist physics, in-cloud condensation, and precipitation. Despite a variety of cloud parameterization methodologies developed by several modelers including the authors, most of the parameterized cloud-models have similar deficiencies. These consist of: (a) not enough shallow clouds, (b) too many deep clouds; (c) several layers of clouds in a vertically demoralized model as opposed to only a few levels of observed clouds, and (d) higher than normal incidence of double ITCZ (Inter-tropical Convergence Zone). Even after several upgrades consisting of a sophisticated cloud-microphysics and sub-grid scale orographic precipitation into the Data Assimilation Office (DAO)'s atmospheric model (called GEOS-2 GCM) at two different resolutions, we found that the above deficiencies remained persistent. The two empirical solutions often used to counter the aforestated deficiencies consist of a) diffusion of moisture and heat within the lower troposphere to artificially force the shallow clouds; and b) arbitrarily invoke evaporation of in-cloud water for low-level clouds. Even though helpful, these implementations lack a strong physical rationale. Our research shows that two missing physical conditions can ameliorate the aforestated cloud-parameterization deficiencies. First, requiring an ascending cloud airmass to be saturated at its starting point will not only make the cloud instantly buoyant all through its ascent, but also provide the essential work function (buoyancy energy) that would promote more shallow clouds. Second, we argue that training clouds that are unstable to a finite vertical displacement, even if neutrally buoyant in their ambient environment, must continue to rise and entrain causing evaporation of in-cloud water. These concepts have not been invoked in any of the cloud

  9. GCM simulations of volcanic aerosol forcing. I - Climate changes induced by steady-state perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, James B.; Rind, David; Lacis, Andrew; Hansen, James E.; Sato, Makiko; Ruedy, Reto

    1993-01-01

    The response of the climate system to a temporally and spatially constant amount of volcanic particles is simulated using a general circulation model (GCM). The optical depth of the aerosols is chosen so as to produce approximately the same amount of forcing as results from doubling the present CO2 content of the atmosphere and from the boundary conditions associated with the peak of the last ice age. The climate changes produced by long-term volcanic aerosol forcing are obtained by differencing this simulation and one made for the present climate with no volcanic aerosol forcing. The simulations indicate that a significant cooling of the troposphere and surface can occur at times of closely spaced multiple sulfur-rich volcanic explosions that span time scales of decades to centuries. The steady-state climate response to volcanic forcing includes a large expansion of sea ice, especially in the Southern Hemisphere; a resultant large increase in surface and planetary albedo at high latitudes; and sizable changes in the annually and zonally averaged air temperature.

  10. Combined radiative effects of cloud overlap and horizontal inhomogeneity simulated by a GCM Column Radiation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oreopoulos, L.; Barker, H. W.; Chou, M.-D.; Cahalan, R. F.; Khairoutdinov, M.

    2003-04-01

    We examine the ability of a shortwave Column Radiation Model (CORAM) used in NASA-Goddard GCMs to simulate successfully radiative fluxes and heating rates of Cloud Resolving Model (CRM) fields by using only mean cloud optical depth and cloud fraction for each vertical layer. Our standard of comparison are the Independent Column Approximation (ICA) estimates from the same CORAM, calculated by averaging results of individual columns of the cloud field. We show that one of the main features of the CORAM, mainly the scaling of cloud optical depth and cloud fraction is beneficial to the performance of the model relative to an approach that would mix the clear and cloudy fluxes of a partially cloudy layer. More sophisticated approaches that also use horizontal cloud variability information can further improve performance of the basic algorithm, but not in all cases or on a consistent basis. Some of these new generation algorithms have been tested on CRM cloud fields before, but here we introduce new versions encompassing concepts about the radiative treatment of vertical cloud overlap that have appeared only recently in the literature. While some of the algorithms are quite successful in approximating the correct (ICA) boundary fluxes or integrated atmospheric absorptance, they do not necessarily capture the correct vertical distribution of heating which may be of equal or greater importance in GCM simulations. Our results stress the importance of using an expanded dataset of 3D cloud field input in order to evaluate more accurately the performance quality of multilayer radiation routines.

  11. GCM simulations of the climate of 6 kyr BP: Mean changes and interdecadal variability

    SciTech Connect

    Hewitt, C.D.; Mitchell, J.F.B.

    1996-12-01

    A simulation of the climate for 6 kyr BP, using the Hadley Centre`s atmospheric GCM with prescribed SSTs is described. The control simulation successfully reproduces the large-scale features of the present-day climate and has realistic atmospheric interannual variability. The anomaly simulation for 6 kyr BP produces a climate with an enhanced Northern Hemisphere seasonal cycle, and, in particular, a strengthened African-Asian summer monsoon. Integrated over the full annual cycle, the land surface of the southern Tropics dries while the northern Tropics get wetter, and the high northern latitudes also dry. The model simulates large regional interdecadal differences in the response at 6 kyr BP highlighting the need to allow for and account for variability on long, that is, at least decadal, timescales. The authors describe the consequences of part of the experimental design employed, whereby the SSTs for the 6 kyr BP simulation are the same as in the control as recommended by the Paleoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project, in particular, the potential importance of ocean and sea ice feedbacks. 49 refs., 14 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. An analysis of strong wind events simulated in a GCM near Casey in the Antarctic

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, B.F.; Simmonds, I. )

    1993-02-01

    Strong wind events occurring near Casey (Antarctica) in a long July GCM simulation have been studied to determine the relative roles played by the synoptic situation and the katabatic flow in producing these episodes. It has been found that the events are associated with strong katabatic and strong gradient flow operating together. Both components are found to increase threefold on average for these strong winds, and although the geostrophic flow is the stronger, it rarely produces strong winds without katabatic flow becoming stronger than it is in the mean. The two wind components do not flow in the same direction; indeed, there is some cancellation between them, since katabatic flow acts in a predominant downslope direction, while the geostrophic wind acts across slope. The stronger geostrophic flow is associated with higher-than-average pressures over the continent and the approach of a strong cyclonic system toward the coast and a blocking system downstream. The anomalous synoptic patterns leading up to the occasions display a strong wavenumber 4 structure. The very strong katabatic flow appears to be related to the production of a supply of cold air inland from Casey by the stronger-than-average surface temperature inversions inland a few days before the strong winds occur. The acceleration of this negatively buoyant air mass down the steep, ice-sheet escarpment results in strong katabatic flow near the coast. 24 refs., 11 figs.

  13. Impact of the ongoing Amazonian deforestation on local precipitation: A GCM simulation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, G. K.; Sud, Y. C.; Atlas, R.

    1995-01-01

    Numerical simulation experiments were conducted to delineate the influence of in situ deforestation data on episodic rainfall by comparing two ensembles of five 5-day integrations performed with a recent version of the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres General Circulation Model (GCM) that has a simple biosphere model (SiB). The first set, called control cases, used the standard SiB vegetation cover (comprising 12 biomes) and assumed a fully forested Amazonia, while the second set, called deforestation cases, distinguished the partially deforested regions of Amazonia as savanna. Except for this difference, all other initial and prescribed boundary conditions were kept identical in both sets of integrations. The differential analyses of these five cases show the following local effects of deforestation. (1) A discernible decrease in evapotranspiration of about 0.80 mm/d (roughly 18%) that is quite robust in the averages for 1-, 2-, and 5-day forecasts. (2) A decrease in precipitation of about 1.18 mm/d (roughly 8%) that begins to emerge even in 1-2 day averages and exhibits complex evolution that extends downstream with the winds. (3) A significant decrease in the surface drag force (as a consequence of reduced surface roughness of deforested regions) that, in turn, affects the dynamical structure of moisture convergence and circulation. The surface winds increase significantly during the first day, and thereafter the increase is well maintained even in the 2- and 5-day averages.

  14. Refinement, Validation and Application of Cloud-Radiation Parameterization in a GCM

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Graeme L. Stephens

    2009-04-30

    The research performed under this award was conducted along 3 related fronts: (1) Refinement and assessment of parameterizations of sub-grid scale radiative transport in GCMs. (2) Diagnostic studies that use ARM observations of clouds and convection in an effort to understand the effects of moist convection on its environment, including how convection influences clouds and radiation. This aspect focuses on developing and testing methodologies designed to use ARM data more effectively for use in atmospheric models, both at the cloud resolving model scale and the global climate model scale. (3) Use (1) and (2) in combination with both models and observations of varying complexity to study key radiation feedback Our work toward these objectives thus involved three corresponding efforts. First, novel diagnostic techniques were developed and applied to ARM observations to understand and characterize the effects of moist convection on the dynamical and thermodynamical environment in which it occurs. Second, an in house GCM radiative transfer algorithm (BUGSrad) was employed along with an optimal estimation cloud retrieval algorithm to evaluate the ability to reproduce cloudy-sky radiative flux observations. Assessments using a range of GCMs with various moist convective parameterizations to evaluate the fidelity with which the parameterizations reproduce key observable features of the environment were also started in the final year of this award. The third study area involved the study of cloud radiation feedbacks and we examined these in both cloud resolving and global climate models.

  15. GCM sensitivity to 1982 - 1983 equatorial Pacific sea surface temperature anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fennessy, M. J.; Marx, L.; Shukla, J.

    1984-01-01

    The response of the GLAS climate model to the much larger 1982-83 sea surface temperatures (SST) anomalies is discussed. Two separate 75 day experiments (control and anomaly simulation pairs) were started from observed initial conditions on 16 Dec. 1982 and initial conditions on 16 Dec. 1979 taken from a 2 year model control run after one year of simulation, respectively. The January control and anomaly SST fields used in both experiments are given. Notable is the greatly extended region of very warm (approximately equal to 29 C) SST water in the anomaly simulation. The January SST anomaly field is representative of the other months of the experiments, all of which had a much larger region of very warm SST in the anomaly simulation than in the previously noted general circulation model studies. The model used is an improved version of the GLAS B-grid GCM used by Shukla and Wallace (1983). The most important physical change in the model is the inclusion of the surface flux parameterization of Deardorff (1972) as modified by Randall (1976). An important improvement in the model simulations is the removal of the climate drift towards unrealistically high temperatures in the tropics, which was moted by Shukla and Wallace (1983).

  16. Cloud Simulations in Response to Turbulence Parameterizations in the GISS Model E GCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, Mao-Sung; Cheng, Ye

    2013-01-01

    The response of cloud simulations to turbulence parameterizations is studied systematically using the GISS general circulation model (GCM) E2 employed in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's (IPCC) Fifth Assessment Report (AR5).Without the turbulence parameterization, the relative humidity (RH) and the low cloud cover peak unrealistically close to the surface; with the dry convection or with only the local turbulence parameterization, these two quantities improve their vertical structures, but the vertical transport of water vapor is still weak in the planetary boundary layers (PBLs); with both local and nonlocal turbulence parameterizations, the RH and low cloud cover have better vertical structures in all latitudes due to more significant vertical transport of water vapor in the PBL. The study also compares the cloud and radiation climatologies obtained from an experiment using a newer version of turbulence parameterization being developed at GISS with those obtained from the AR5 version. This newer scheme differs from the AR5 version in computing nonlocal transports, turbulent length scale, and PBL height and shows significant improvements in cloud and radiation simulations, especially over the subtropical eastern oceans and the southern oceans. The diagnosed PBL heights appear to correlate well with the low cloud distribution over oceans. This suggests that a cloud-producing scheme needs to be constructed in a framework that also takes the turbulence into consideration.

  17. Complete Initial Scoping Tests on the Incorporation of Novel Loaded Iodine Getters into GCM.

    SciTech Connect

    Nenoff, Tina M.; Garino, Terry J.; Croes, Kenneth James

    2015-08-18

    This study encompasses initial scoping tests on the incorporation of a novel iodine loaded getter material into the Sandia developed low temperature sintering glass ceramic material (GCM) waste form. In particular, we studied the PNNL Ag-I-Aerogel. Optical microscopy indicates inhomogenous samples based on particle sizes and variations in color (AgI vs Ag/AgO on silica). TGA/MS data when heated in air indicates loss of iodine and organics (CO2) between 250-450°C a total of ~15wt% loss, with additional / small iodine loss when during 550°C hold for 1 hr. TGA/MS data when heated in N2 indicates less organic and slightly less iodine loss below 550°C, with no loss of iodine in 550°C 1 hour hold. Furthermore, a substantial mass loss of sulfur containing compounds is observed (m/e of 34 and 36) between 150 – 550°C in both air and N2 sintering atmospheres. In an effort to capture iodine lost to volatilization during heating (at temps below glass sintering temperature of 550°C), we added 5 wt% Ag flake to the AgIaerogel. Resulting data indicates the iodine is retained with the addition of the Ag flake, resulting in only a small iodine loss (< 1wt%) at ~350°C. No method of curtailing loss of sulfur containing compounds due to heating was successful in this scoping study.

  18. A stochastic model for tropical cyclone tracks based on Reanalysis data and GCM output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, K.; Nakano, S.; Ueno, G.

    2014-12-01

    In the present study, we try to express probability distribution of tropical cyclone (TC) trajectories estimated on the basis of GCM output. The TC tracks are mainly controlled by the atmospheric circulation such as the trade winds and the Westerlies as well as are influenced to move northward by the Beta effect. The TC tracks, which calculated with trajectory analysis, would thus correspond to the movement of TCs due to the atmospheric circulation. Comparing the result of the trajectory analysis from reanalysis data with the Best Track (BT) of TC in the present climate, the structure of the trajectory seems to be similar to the BT. However, here is a significant problem for the calculation of a trajectory in the reanalysis wind field because there are many rotation elements including TCs in the reanalysis data. We assume that a TC would move along the steering current and the rotations would not have a great influence on the direction of moving. We are designing a state-space model based on the trajectory analysis and put an adjustment parameter for the moving vector. Here, a simple track generation model is developed. This model has a possibility to gain the probability distributions of calculated TC tracks by fitting to the BT using data assimilation. This work was conducted under the framework of the "Development of Basic Technology for Risk Information on Climate Change" supported by the SOUSEI Program of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology.

  19. Global ocean circulation and equator-pole heat transport as a function of ocean GCM resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Covey, C.

    1994-06-01

    To determine whether resolution of smaller scales is necessary to simulate large-scale ocean climate correctly, I examine results from a global ocean GCM run with horizontal grid spacings spanning a range from coarse resolutions traditionally used in climate modeling to nearly the highest resolution attained with today`s computers. The experiments include four cases employing 4{degrees}, 2{degrees}, 1{degrees} and 1/2{degrees} spacing in latitude and longitude, which were run with minimal differences among them, i.e., in a controlled experiment. Two additional cases-1/2{degrees} spacing with a more scale-selective sub-gridscale mixing of heat and momentum, and approximate 1/4{degrees} spacing-are also included. The 1/4{degrees} run resolves most of the observed mesoscale eddy energy in the ocean. Several artificial constraints on the model tend to minimize differences among the different resolution cases. Nevertheless, for quantities of interest to global climate studies,the simulations show significant changes as resolution increases.

  20. Establishing the Scientific Value of Multiple GCM-RCM Simulation Programs: The Example of NARCCAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mearns, L. O.; Dominguez, F.; Gutowski, W. J., Jr.; Hammerling, D.; Leung, L. R.; Pryor, S. C.; Sain, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    There have been a number of multiple GCM-RCM programs, covering Europe, North America, and now, through CORDEX, most regions of the world. Standard metrics of success for these programs include number of publications, number of users of the data, and number of citations to the program. However, these metrics do not necessarily reflect the scientific value of the program, for example, what new scientific knowledge has been developed. We began to carefully consider how one does establish the scientific value of such programs. We thought that establishing the scientific value of the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP) would be a good way to examine this issue. We present in this paper our assessment of the value of the climate science research produced through the program. These studies include articles that evaluate the current climates of the NARCCAP simulations, analyze the future climate projections, explore temperature and precipitation extremes and apply new statistical techniques to the analyses. A number of articles apply weighting techniques to the ensemble and quantify the uncertainty represented by the ensemble. Of particular interest is determining what we have learned about future climate projections based on the use of higher resolution dynamically generated future climate information. We will evaluate all research articles and major reports (aside from those regarding impacts) that used the NARCCAP database, and we will assess the major research advances indicated in this literature.

  1. Performance of Goddard Earth Observing System GCM Column Radiation Models under Heterogeneous Cloud Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oreopoulos, L.; Chou, M.-D.; Khairoutdinov, M.; Barker, H. W.; Cahalan, R. F.

    2003-01-01

    We test the performance of the shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) Column Radiation Models (CORAMs) of Chou and collaborators with heterogeneous cloud fields from a global single-day dataset produced by NCAR's Community Atmospheric Model with a 2-D CRM installed in each gridbox. The original SW version of the CORAM performs quite well compared to reference Independent Column Approximation (ICA) calculations for boundary fluxes, largely due to the success of a combined overlap and cloud scaling parameterization scheme. The absolute magnitude of errors relative to ICA are even smaller for the LW CORAM which applies similar overlap. The vertical distribution of heating and cooling within the atmosphere is also simulated quite well with daily-averaged zonal errors always below 0.3 K/d for SW heating rates and 0.6 K/d for LW cooling rates. The SW CORAM's performance improves by introducing a scheme that accounts for cloud inhomogeneity. These results suggest that previous studies demonstrating the inaccuracy of plane-parallel models may have unfairly focused on worst scenario cases, and that current radiative transfer algorithms of General Circulation Models (GCMs) may be more capable than previously thought in estimating realistic spatial and temporal averages of radiative fluxes, as long as they are provided with correct mean cloud profiles. However, even if the errors of the particular CORAMs are small, they seem to be systematic, and the impact of the biases can be fully assessed only with GCM climate simulations.

  2. Global Carbon Cycle Modeling in GISS ModelE2 GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleinov, I. D.; Kiang, N. Y.; Romanou, A.; Romanski, J.

    2014-12-01

    Consistent and accurate modeling of the Global Carbon Cycle remains one of the main challenges for the Earth System Models. NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) ModelE2 General Circulation Model (GCM) was recently equipped with a complete Global Carbon Cycle algorithm, consisting of three integrated components: Ent Terrestrial Biosphere Model (Ent TBM), Ocean Biogeochemistry Module and atmospheric CO2 tracer. Ent TBM provides CO2 fluxes from the land surface to the atmosphere. Its biophysics utilizes the well-known photosynthesis functions of Farqhuar, von Caemmerer, and Berry and Farqhuar and von Caemmerer, and stomatal conductance of Ball and Berry. Its phenology is based on temperature, drought, and radiation fluxes, and growth is controlled via allocation of carbon from labile carbohydrate reserve storage to different plant components. Soil biogeochemistry is based on the Carnegie-Ames-Stanford (CASA) model of Potter et al. Ocean biogeochemistry module (the NASA Ocean Biogeochemistry Model, NOBM), computes prognostic distributions for biotic and abiotic fields that influence the air-sea flux of CO2 and the deep ocean carbon transport and storage. Atmospheric CO2 is advected with a quadratic upstream algorithm implemented in atmospheric part of ModelE2. Here we present the results for pre-industrial equilibrium and modern transient simulations and provide comparison to available observations. We also discuss the process of validation and tuning of particular algorithms used in the model.

  3. The equilibrium response to idealized thermal forcings in a comprehensive GCM: implications for recent tropical expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, R. J.; Sherwood, S. C.; Norris, J. R.; Zender, C. S.

    2012-05-01

    Several recent studies have shown the width of the tropical belt has increased over the last several decades. The mechanisms driving tropical expansion are not well known and the recent expansion is underpredicted by state-of-the art GCMs. We use the CAM3 GCM to investigate how tropical width responds to idealized atmospheric heat sources, focusing on zonal displacement of the tropospheric jets. The heat sources include global and zonally restricted lower-tropospheric warmings and stratospheric coolings, which coarsely represent possible impacts of ozone or aerosol changes. Similar to prior studies with simplified GCMs, we find that stratospheric cooling - particularly at high-latitudes - shifts jets poleward and excites Northern and Southern Annular Mode (NAM/SAM)-type responses. We also find, however, that modest heating of the midlatitude boundary layer drives a similar response; heating at high latitudes provokes a weaker, equatorward shift and tropical heating produces no shift. Over 70 % of the variance in annual mean jet displacements across 27 experiments is accounted for by a newly proposed "Expansion Index", which compares mid-latitude tropospheric warming to that at other latitudes. We find that previously proposed factors, including tropopause height and tropospheric stability, do not fully explain the results. Results suggest recently observed tropical expansion could have been driven not only by stratospheric cooling, but also by mid-latitude heating sources due for example to ozone or aerosol changes.

  4. The Glide/Gcm fate determinant controls initiation of collective cell migration by regulating Frazzled

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Tripti; Kumar, Arun; Cattenoz, Pierre B.; VijayRaghavan, K; Giangrande, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Collective migration is a complex process that contributes to build precise tissue and organ architecture. Several molecules implicated in cell interactions also control collective migration, but their precise role and the finely tuned expression that orchestrates this complex developmental process are poorly understood. Here, we show that the timely and threshold expression of the Netrin receptor Frazzled triggers the initiation of glia migration in the developing Drosophila wing. Frazzled expression is induced by the transcription factor Glide/Gcm in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, the glial determinant also regulates the efficiency of collective migration. NetrinB but not NetrinA serves as a chemoattractant and Unc5 contributes as a repellant Netrin receptor for glia migration. Our model includes strict spatial localization of a ligand, a cell autonomously acting receptor and a fate determinant that act coordinately to direct glia toward their final destination. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15983.001 PMID:27740455

  5. Simulation of the Asian summer monsoon with the CCC GCM-1

    SciTech Connect

    Zwiers, F.W. )

    1993-03-01

    The climate literature contains a considerable amount of indirect evidence that there is a connection between the size of the spring Tibetan snowpack and the strength of the subsequent Asian summer monsoon. This paper reports on a study that was conducted to search for evidence of a direct snow-monsoon interaction in a simulated climatology derived from two long integrations of the Canadian Climate Centre's GCM version 1. Statistical methods based on a combination of empirical orthogonal function analysis and canonical correlation analysis were the primary investigative tools. Only a weak signal was found. It is therefore concluded that either the simulated variability of the snow on Tibet is too small, the model does not react appropriately to the simulated variability, or the true natural snow-monsoon mechanism is weak and any snow-monsoon connection relies upon a third factor. The first possibility is considered to be remote: the model simulates substantial interannual variability of Tibetan snow. The second and third possibilities are more likely. In particular, the physical mechanism that is thought to connect Tibetan snow with the Asian monsoon may not be properly simulated in the model.

  6. The development and validation of a simple snow model for the GISS GCM

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch-Stieglitz, M.

    1994-12-01

    Five years of meteorological and hydrological data from a typical New England watershed where winter snow cover is significant were used to drive and validate two off-line land surface schemes suitable for use in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) general circulation model (GCM): a baseline scheme that does not model the physics of a snowpack and therefore, neglects the insulating properties of snow cover; and a modified scheme in which a three-layer snowpack is modeled. Comparing baseline model results with validation data reveals several model deficiencies. Surface radiation temperatures could not adequately be modeled and the ground froze to unreasonable depths. Furthermore, because of ground cooling resulting from large surface heat fluxes to the atmosphere from the uninsulated surface, deeper model layers did not unfreeze until midsummer. As such, the normal hydrologic processes of runoff, ground water infiltration, and movement, etc., are compromised for a good part of the year. With the inclusion of a simple three-layer snow model into the baseline model, not only are the ground and surface radiation temperatures adequately modeled but all the features of snowpack ripening that characterize pack growth/ablation are simulated.

  7. A thermosphere-ionosphere-mesosphere-electrodynamics general circulation model (time-GCM): Equinox solar cycle minimum simulations (30-500 km)

    SciTech Connect

    Roble, R.G.; Ridley, E.C.

    1994-03-15

    A new simulation model of the mesosphere, thermosphere, and ionosphere with coupled electrodynamics has been developed and used to calculate the global circulation, temperature and compositional structure between 30-500 km for equinox, solar cycle minimum, geomagnetic quiet conditions. The model incorporates all of the features of the NCAR thermosphere-ionosphere-electrodynamics general circulation model (TIE-GCM) but the lower boundary has been extended downward from 97 to 30 km (10 mb) and it includes the physical and chemical processes appropriate for the mesosphere and upper stratosphere. The first simulation used Rayleigh friction to represent gravity wave drag in the middle atmosphere and although it was able to close the mesospheric jets it severely damped the diurnal tide. Reduced Rayleigh friction allowed the tide to penetrate to thermospheric heights but did not close the jets. A gravity wave parameterization developed by Fritts and Lu allows both features to exist simultaneously with the structure of tides and mean flow dependent upon the strength of the gravity wave source. The model calculates a changing dynamic structure with the mean flow and diurnal tide dominant in the mesosphere, the in-situ generated semi-diurnal tide dominating the lower thermosphere and an in-situ generated diurnal tide in the upper thermosphere. The results also show considerable interaction between dynamics and composition, especially atomic oxygen between 85 and 120 km. 31 refs., 3 figs.

  8. A GCM study of effects of radiative forcing of sulfate aerosol on large scale circulation and rainfall in East Asia during boreal spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Maeng-Ki; Lau, William K. M.; Kim, Kyu-Myong; Lee, Woo-Seop

    2007-12-01

    The effect of sulfate aerosol radiative forcing on spring rainfall in East Asia are studied based on numerical simulations with the NASA finite-volume General Circulation Model (fvGCM) forced with monthly varying three-dimensional aerosol distribution from the Goddard Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport model (GOCART). Result shows that radiative forcing of sulfate aerosol leads to cooling of the land surface and reduction in rainfall over central East Asia. The maximum reduction in precipitation is shifted northward relative to the maximum aerosol loading region as a result of dynamical feedback. The anomalous thermal gradient by aerosol cooling near the land surface, reduces the baroclinicity of the atmosphere, leading to a deceleration of the upper level westerly flow. The westerly deceleration induces, through ageostrophic wind adjustment, anomalous meridional secondary circulation at the entrance region of the East Asian jetstream, with strong sinking motion and suppressed precipitation near 30°N, coupled to weak rising motion and moderately enhanced precipitation over southern China and the South China Sea. These results suggest that the radiative forcing of aerosol through induced dynamical feedback with the atmospheric water cycle, may be a causal factor in the observed spring precipitation trend over East Asia.

  9. Evolution of the Antarctic polar vortex in spring: Response of a GCM to a prescribed Antarctic ozone hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boville, B. A.; Kiehl, J. T.; Briegleb, B. P.

    1988-01-01

    The possible effect of the Antartic ozone hole on the evolution of the polar vortex during late winter and spring using a general circulation model (GCM) is examined. The GCM is a version of the NCAR Community Climate Model whose domain extends from the surface to the mesosphere and is similar to that described on Boville and Randel (1986). Ozone is not a predicted variable in the model. A zonally averaged ozone distribution is specified as a function of latitude, pressure and month for the radiation parameterization. Rather that explicitly address reasons for the formation of the ozone hole, researchers postulate its existence and ask what effect it has on the subsequent evolution of the vortex. The evolution of the model when an ozone hole is imposed is then discussed.

  10. Understanding the Propagation of GCM and Downscaling Uncertainty for Projecting Crop Yield: A Nationwide Analysis over India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, T.; Murari, H. V.; H, V.; Karmakar, S.; Ghosh, S.; Soora, N. K.

    2015-12-01

    General Circulation Models (GCM) play an important role in assessing the impacts of climate change at global scale; however, coarser resolution limits their direct application at regional scale. To understand the climate variability at regional scale, different downscaling techniques (such as dynamical and statistical) have been developed which use the GCM outputs as boundary condition to produce finer resolution climate projections. Although, both dynamical and statistical downscaling techniques have proven to be able to capture the climate variability at regional scale; there are certain uncertainties lying in their projections especially for a region like India which have complex terrain and climatic pattern. Here, the uncertainties, resulting from the use of multiple GCM and downscaling models, are quantified with the assessment of impacts on regional crop yield. Two crop models with different complexity-Decision Support System for Agro-technology Transfer (DSSAT) and Infocrop, are used, forced by dynamically (CORDEX, COordinated Regional climate Downscaling EXperiment) and statistically (Kannan and Ghosh, 2011; Salvi et al., 2013) downscaled data derived from multiple GCM's. Advantage of these crop models is their ability to capture complexity of Indian condition. Yields of major crops in India, such as, rice, wheat and maize have been considered in the crop model and the impacts of climate change are assessed on their yields. The uncertainties in projected crop yields are also quantified, which must be incorporated for deriving vulnerability and risk maps for crop-climate assessments. This may further help to determine different crop management practices in order to reduce adverse impacts of climate change in future.

  11. Demonstrate Scale-up Procedure for Glass Composite Material (GCM) for Incorporation of Iodine Loaded AgZ.

    SciTech Connect

    Nenoff, Tina M.; Garino, Terry J.; Croes, Kenneth James; Rodriguez, Mark A.

    2015-07-01

    Two large size Glass Composite Material (GCM) waste forms containing AgI-MOR were fabricated. One contained methyl iodide-loaded AgI-MOR that was received from Idaho National Laboratory (INL, Test 5, Beds 1 – 3) and the other contained iodine vapor loaded AgIMOR that was received from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL, SHB 2/9/15 ). The composition for each GCM was 20 wt% AgI-MOR and 80 wt% Ferro EG2922 low sintering temperature glass along with enough added silver flake to prevent any I2 loss during the firing process. The silver flake amounts were 1.2 wt% for the GCM with the INL AgI-MOR and 3 wt% for the GCM contained the ORNL AgI-MOR. The GCMs, nominally 100 g, were first uniaxially pressed to 6.35 cm (2.5 inch) diameter disks then cold isostatically pressed, before firing in air to 550°C for 1hr. They were cooled slowly (1°C/min) from the firing temperature to avoid any cracking due to temperature gradients. The final GCMs were ~5 cm in diameter (~2 inches) and non-porous with densities of ~4.2 g/cm³. X-ray diffraction indicated that they consisted of the amorphous glass phase with small amounts of mordenite and AgI. Furthermore, the presence of the AgI was confirmed by X-ray fluorescence. Methodology for the scaled up production of GCMs to 6 inch diameter or larger is also presented.

  12. Global catalogue of microorganisms (gcm): a comprehensive database and information retrieval, analysis, and visualization system for microbial resources

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Throughout the long history of industrial and academic research, many microbes have been isolated, characterized and preserved (whenever possible) in culture collections. With the steady accumulation in observational data of biodiversity as well as microbial sequencing data, bio-resource centers have to function as data and information repositories to serve academia, industry, and regulators on behalf of and for the general public. Hence, the World Data Centre for Microorganisms (WDCM) started to take its responsibility for constructing an effective information environment that would promote and sustain microbial research data activities, and bridge the gaps currently present within and outside the microbiology communities. Description Strain catalogue information was collected from collections by online submission. We developed tools for automatic extraction of strain numbers and species names from various sources, including Genbank, Pubmed, and SwissProt. These new tools connect strain catalogue information with the corresponding nucleotide and protein sequences, as well as to genome sequence and references citing a particular strain. All information has been processed and compiled in order to create a comprehensive database of microbial resources, and was named Global Catalogue of Microorganisms (GCM). The current version of GCM contains information of over 273,933 strains, which includes 43,436bacterial, fungal and archaea species from 52 collections in 25 countries and regions. A number of online analysis and statistical tools have been integrated, together with advanced search functions, which should greatly facilitate the exploration of the content of GCM. Conclusion A comprehensive dynamic database of microbial resources has been created, which unveils the resources preserved in culture collections especially for those whose informatics infrastructures are still under development, which should foster cumulative research, facilitating the

  13. A fetal variant in the GCM1 gene is associated with pregnancy induced hypertension in a predominantly hispanic population.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Melissa L; Brueggmann, Doerthe; Desmond, Daniel H; Mandeville, John E; Goodwin, T Murphy; Ingles, Sue Ann

    2011-08-30

    The aim of the study was to determine whether polymorphism in the GCM1 gene is associated with pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH) in a case-control study of mother-baby dyads. Predominantly Hispanic women, ages 15-45, with (n=136) and without (n=169) PIH were recruited. We genotyped four polymorphisms in the GCM1 gene and examined the association with PIH using both logistic regression and likelihood expectation maximization (LEM) to adjust for intra-familial correlation between genotypes. Maternal genotype was not associated with PIH for any polymorphisms examined. Fetal genotype, however, was associated with maternal risk of PIH. Mothers carrying a fetus with ≥1 copy of the minor (C) allele for rs9349655 were less likely to develop PIH than women carrying a fetus with the GG genotype (parity-adjusted OR=0.44, 95% Cl: 0.21, 0.94). The trend of decreasing risk with increasing C alleles was also statistically significant (OR(trend)=0.41 95% Cl: 0.20, 0.85). The minor alleles for the other three SNPs also appear to be associated with protection. Multilocus analyses of fetal genotypes showed that the protective effect of carrying minor alleles at rs9349655 and rs13200319 (non-significant) remained unchanged when adjusting for genotypes at the other loci. However, the apparent (non-significant) effect of rs2816345 and rs2518573 disappeared when adjusting for rs9349655. In conclusion, we found that a fetal GCM1 polymorphism is significantly associated with PIH in a predominantly Hispanic population. These results suggest that GCM1 may represent a fetal-effect gene, where risk to the mother is conferred only through carriage by the fetus.

  14. Importance of Winds and Soil Moistures to the US Summertime Drought of 1988: A GCM Simulation Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mocko, David M.; Sud, Y. C.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The climate version of NASA's GEOS 2 GCM did not simulate a realistic 1988 summertime drought in the central United States (Mocko et al., 1999). Despite several new upgrades to the model's parameterizations, as well as finer grid spacing from 4x5 degrees to 2x2.5 degrees, no significant improvements were noted in the model's simulation of the U.S. drought.

  15. A fetal variant in the GCM1 gene is associated with pregnancy induced hypertension in a predominantly hispanic population

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Melissa L; Brueggmann, Doerthe; Desmond, Daniel H; Mandeville, John E; Goodwin, T Murphy; Ingles, Sue Ann

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether polymorphism in the GCM1 gene is associated with pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH) in a case-control study of mother-baby dyads. Predominantly Hispanic women, ages 15-45, with (n=136) and without (n=169) PIH were recruited. We genotyped four polymorphisms in the GCM1 gene and examined the association with PIH using both logistic regression and likelihood expectation maximization (LEM) to adjust for intra-familial correlation between genotypes. Maternal genotype was not associated with PIH for any polymorphisms examined. Fetal genotype, however, was associated with maternal risk of PIH. Mothers carrying a fetus with ≥1 copy of the minor (C) allele for rs9349655 were less likely to develop PIH than women carrying a fetus with the GG genotype (parity-adjusted OR=0.44, 95% Cl: 0.21, 0.94). The trend of decreasing risk with increasing C alleles was also statistically significant (ORtrend=0.41 95% Cl: 0.20, 0.85). The minor alleles for the other three SNPs also appear to be associated with protection. Multilocus analyses of fetal genotypes showed that the protective effect of carrying minor alleles at rs9349655 and rs13200319 (non-significant) remained unchanged when adjusting for genotypes at the other loci. However, the apparent (non-significant) effect of rs2816345 and rs2518573 disappeared when adjusting for rs9349655. In conclusion, we found that a fetal GCM1 polymorphism is significantly associated with PIH in a predominantly Hispanic population. These results suggest that GCM1 may represent a fetal-effect gene, where risk to the mother is conferred only through carriage by the fetus. PMID:21915358

  16. Multi-GCM Projections of Global Drought Conditions With Use of the Palmer Drought Indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovsky, M.; Svoboda, M.; Trnka, M.; Hayes, M.; Wilhite, D.; Zalud, Z.

    2007-12-01

    We use two Palmer Drought Indices (the PDSI and Z-index) to assess the drought conditions in future climates as projected by seven Global Climate Models (GCMs). Both indices are based on precipitation and temperature data (this makes them more suitable for climate change impact studies compared to the Standardized Precipitation Index, which is based only on precipitation) and the available water content of the soil. In contrast to the PDSI, the Z-index does not account for any persistence within the climate; rather, it characterizes the immediate (for a given week or month) conditions. The indices are calculated by computer programs available from the National Drought Mitigation Center and the Computer Science and Engineering Department, both located at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. To allow for the assessment of climate change impacts, we modified the original computer code: the indices (which we named "relative" drought indices) are now calibrated using the present climate weather series and then applied to the future climate weather series. The resultant time series thus displays the drought conditions in terms of the present climate. The relative drought indices are applied to gridded (whole globe) GCM-simulated surface monthly weather series (available from the IPCC database), and the available water content is based on soil- texture-based water holding capacity global data developed by Webb et al. (1993, Global Biogeochem. Cycles 7: 97-108). The indices are calibrated with 1991-2020 period (considered to be the present climate) and then applied to two future periods: 2031-2060 and 2060-2099. To quantify impacts of climate change on the drought conditions, we analyze shifts in the grid-specific means of the drought indices and in the frequency of months belonging to drought spells. The drought spell is defined here as continuous periods in which the index does not exceed -1, and falls below -3 for at least one month. Results obtained by single GCMs

  17. Evaluating the Impact of Localized GCM Grid Refinement on Regional Tropical Cyclone Climatology and Synoptic Variability using Variable-Resolution CAM-SE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarzycki, C.; Jablonowski, C.

    2013-12-01

    Using General Circulation Models (GCMs) to resolve sub-synoptic features in climate simulations has traditionally been difficult due to a multitude of atmospheric processes operating at subgrid scales requiring significant parameterization. For example, at traditional GCM horizontal grid resolutions of 50-300 km, tropical cyclones are generally under-resolved. This paper explores a novel variable-resolution global modeling approach that allows for high spatial resolutions in areas of interest, such as low-latitude ocean basins where tropical cyclogenesis occurs. Such multi-resolution GCM designs allow for targeted use of computing resources at the regional level while maintaining a globally-continuous model domain and may serve to bridge the gap between GCMs with uniform grids and boundary-forced limited area models. A statically-nested, variable-resolution option has recently been introduced into the Community Atmosphere Model's (CAM) Spectral Element (SE) dynamical core. A 110 km CAM-SE grid with a 28 km nest over the Atlantic Ocean has been coupled to land, ocean, and ice components within the Community Earth System Model (CESM). We present the results of a multi-decadal climate simulation using Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) protocols, which force the model with historical sea surface temperatures and airborne chemical species. To investigate whether refinement improves the representation of tropical cyclones, we compare Atlantic storm statistics to observations with specific focus paid to intensity profiles and track densities. The resolution dependance of both cyclone structure and objective detection between refined and unrefined basins is explored. In addition, we discuss the potential impact of using variable-resolution grids on the large-scale synoptic interannual variability by comparing refined grid simulations to reanalysis data as well as an unrefined, globally-uniform CAM-SE simulation with identical forcing. We also evaluate the

  18. Supporting New Missions by Observing Simulation Experiments in WACCM-X/GEOS-5 and TIME-GCM: Initial Design, Challenges and Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudin, V. A.; England, S.; Liu, H.; Solomon, S. C.; Immel, T. J.; Maute, A. I.; Burns, A. G.; Foster, B.; Wu, Q.; Goncharenko, L. P.

    2013-12-01

    We examine the capability of novel configurations of community models, WACCM-X and TIME-GCM, to support current and forthcoming space-borne missions to monitor the dynamics and composition of the Mesosphere-Thermosphere-Ionosphere (MTI) system. In these configurations the lower atmosphere of WACCM-X is constrained by operational analyses and/or short-term forecasts provided by the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-5) of Global Modeling and Assimilation Office at NASA/GSFC. With the terrestrial weather of GEOS-5 and updated model physics the simulations in the MTI are capable to reproduce observed signatures of the perturbed wave dynamics and ion-neutral coupling during recent stratospheric warming events, short-term, annual and year-to-year variability of prevailing flows, planetary waves, tides, and composition. These 'terrestrial-weather' driven simulations with day-to-day variable solar and geomagnetic inputs can provide background state (first guess) and error statistics for the inverse algorithms of new NASA missions, ICON and GOLD at locations and time of observations in the MTI region. With two different viewing geometries (sun-synchronous and geostationary) of instruments, ICON and GOLD will provide complimentary global observations of temperature, winds and constituents to constrain the first-principle forecast models. This paper will discuss initial design of Observing Simulation Experiments (OSE) in WACCM-X/GEOS-5 and TIME-GCM. As recognized, OSE represent an excellent learning tool for designing and evaluating observing capabilities of novel sensors. They can guide on how to integrate/combine information from different instruments. The choice of assimilation schemes, forecast and observational errors will be discussed along with challenges and perspectives to constrain fast-varying tidal dynamics and their effects in models by combination of sun-synchronous and geostationary observations of ICON and GOLD. We will also discuss how correlative space

  19. Biogeophysical consequences of a tropical deforestation scenario: A GCM simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Sud, Y.C.; Lau, W.K.M.; Walker, G.K.

    1996-12-01

    Two 3-year (1979-1982) integrations were carried out with a version of the GLA GCM that contains the Simple Biosphere Model (SiB) for simulating land-atmosphere interactions. The control case used the usual SiB vegetation cover (comprising 12 vegetation types), while its twin, the deforestation case, imposed a scenario in which all tropical rainforests were entirely replaced by grassland. Except for this difference, all other initial and prescribed boundary conditions were kept identical in both integrations. An intercomparison of the integrations shows that tropical: deforestation decreases evapotranspiration and increases land surface outgoing longwave radiation and sensible heat flux, thereby warming and drying the planetary boundary layer. This happens despite the reduced absorption of solar radiation due to higher surface albedo of the deforested land. Produces significant and robust local as well as global climate changes. The local effect includes significant changes (mostly reductions) in precipitation and diabatic heating, while the large-scale effect is to weaken the Hadley circulation but invigorate the southern Ferrel cell, drawing larger air mass from the indirect polar cells. Decreases the surface stress (drag force) owing to reduced surface roughness of deforested land, which in turn intensifies winds in the planetary boundary layer, thereby affecting the dynamic structure of moisture convergence. The simulated surface winds are about 70% stronger and are accompanied by significant changes in the power spectrum of the annual cycle of surface and PBL winds and precipitation. Our results broadly confirm several findings of recent tropical deforestation simulation experiments. In addition, some global-scale climatic influences of deforestation not identified in earlier studies are delineated. 57 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Impact of the ongoing Amazonian deforestation on local precipitation: A GCM simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, G.K.; Sud, Y.C.; Atlas, R.

    1995-03-01

    Numerical simulation experiments were conducted to delineate the influence of in situ deforestation data on episodic rainfall by comparing two ensembles of five 5-day integrations performed with a recent version of the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres GCM that has a simple biosphere model (SiB). The first set, called control cases, used the standard SiB vegetation cover (comprising 12 biomes) and assumed a fully forested Amazonia, while the second set, called deforestation cases, distinguished the partially deforested regions of Amazonia as savanna. Except for this difference, all other initial and prescribed boundary conditions were kept identical in both sets of integrations. The differential analyses of these five cases show the following local effects of deforestation. (1) A discernible decrease in evapotranspiration of about 0.80 mm d{sup {minus}1} (roughly 18%) that is quite robust in the averages for 1-, 2-, and 5-day forecasts. (2) A decrease in precipitation of about 1.18 mm d{sup {minus}1} (roughly 8%) that begins to emerge even in 1-2-day averages and exhibits complex evolution that extends downstream with the winds. A larger decrease in precipitation as compared to evapotranspiration produces some drying and warming. The precipitation differences are consistent with the decrease in atmospheric moisture flux convergence and are consistent with earlier simulation studies of local climate change due to large-scale deforestation. (3) A significant decrease in the surface drag force (as a consequence of reduced surface roughness of deforested regions) that, in turn, affects the dynamical structure of moisture convergence and circulation. The surface winds increase significantly during the first day, and thereafter the increase is well maintained even in the 2- and 5-day averages. 34 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Adapting the GISS Climate GCM to Model Extra-Solar Climate Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacis, A. A.

    2013-12-01

    Hundreds of extra-solar planets have been discovered by NASA's Kepler mission, some potentially habitable, most exhibiting extremes in climate beyond current modeling experience. Zero-order assessment of the stellar type and the planet's distance from the star serves to identify the ballpark of whether silicon dioxide is likely to be in gaseous or liquid phase in the planet's atmosphere, or a part of the solid planetary ground surface. A lot of first-order modeling would involve assessing the chemical limitations to establish the likely chemical composition of the planetary atmosphere. For a more detailed analysis of the prevailing climate on an extra-solar planet a 3-D global climate model would be required. We begin the Extra-Solar Climate Model development by starting the with GISS Climate GCM by having key model parameters be expressed in physics based terms rather than Earth specific parameters. Examples of such key parameters are: the Planet's mass and radius, mass and composition of the atmosphere, Star-Planet distance, rotation rate and orbital parameters, stellar spectral distribution, land topography, and land-ocean distribution. These are parameters that are more or less straight forward to redefine for extra-solar conditions that are not greatly different for what may be considered as the ';habitable' zone. We present extreme climate simulations ranging from snowball Earth conditions to near-runaway greenhouse conditions. The objective of this modeling study is the development of a more physically based climate model that will be adaptable for assessing habitable climate regimes on newly discovered extra-solar planets, and will also facilitate the study terrestrial climate system analysis in paleoclimate applications.

  2. GCM Studies on the Interactions Between Photosynthesis and Climate at Diurnal to Decadal Time Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collatz, G. James; Bounoua, Lahouari; Sellers, Piers; Los, Sietse; Randall, David; Berry, Joseph; Tucker, Compton J.

    1998-01-01

    Transpiration, a major component of total evaporation from vegetated surfaces, is an unavoidable consequence of photosynthetic carbon fixation. Because of limiting soil moisture and competition for solar radiation plants invest most of their fixed carbon into structural and hydraulic functions (roots and stems) and solar radiation absorption (leaves). These investments permit individuals to overshadow competitors and provide for transport of water from the soil to the leaves where photosynthesis and transpiration occur. Often low soil moisture or high evaporative demand limit the supply of water to leaves reducing photosynthesis and thus transpiration. The absorption of solar radiation for photosynthesis and dissipation of this energy via radiation, heat, mass and momentum fluxes represents the link between photosynthesis and climate. Recognition of these relationships has led to the development of hydro/energy balance models that are based on the physiological ecology of photosynthesis. We discuss an approach to study vegetation-climate interactions using photosynthesis-centric models embedded in a GCM. The rate at which a vegetated area transpires and photosynthesizes is determined by the physiological state of the vegetation, its amount and its type. The latter two are specified from global satellite data collected since 1982. Climate simulations have been carried out to study how this simulated climate system responds to changes in radiative forcing, physiological capacity, atmospheric CO2, vegetation type and variable vegetation cover observed from satellites during the 1980's. Results from these studies reveal significant feedbacks between the vegetation activity and climate. For example, vegetation cover and physiological activity increases cause the total latent heat flux and precipitation to increase while mean and maximum air temperatures decrease. The reverse occurs if cover or activity'decreases. In general climate response of a particular region was

  3. Diagnosing Warm Season Precipitation Over the GCIP Region from a GCM and Reanalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oglesby, Robert; Marshall, Susan; Roads, John; Robertson, Franklin R.

    2000-01-01

    A 45 year simulation using a global general circulation model (GCM), the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate Model v.3 (CCM3), forced with observed sea surface temperatures (SST), and 39 years of global National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) reanalyses were analyzed to determine Mississippi River basin warm season (May, June, July or MJJ) wet and dry year composites in the water and energy budgets. Years that have increased MJJ soil moisture over the GEWEX (Global Water and Energy Experiment) Continental Interior Project (GCIP) region also have high precipitation, lower surface temperature, decreased Bowen ratio, and reduced 500 hPa geopotential height (essentially reduced MJJ ridging). The reverse is true for years that have reduced MJJ soil moisture. Wet years are also accompanied by a general increase in moisture transport from the Gulf of Mexico into the central U.S. There is some indication (though weaker) that soil moisture may then affect precipitation and other quantities and be affected in turn by 500 hPa geopotential heights. The correlations are somewhat low, however, demonstrating the difficulty in providing definitive physical links between the remote and local effects. Analysis of two individual years with an extreme wet event (1993) and an extreme dry event (1988) yields the same general relationships as with the wet and dry composites. The composites from this study are currently serving as the basis for a series of experiments aimed at determining the predictability of the land surface and remote SST on the Mississippi River basin and other large-scale river basins.

  4. Grid-based performance evaluation of GCM-RCM combinations for rainfall reproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danandeh Mehr, Ali; Kahya, Ercan

    2016-03-01

    Prior to hydrological assessment of climate change at catchment scale, an applied methodology is necessary to evaluate the performance of climate models available for a given catchment. This study presents a grid-based performance evaluation approach as well as an intercomparison framework to evaluate the uncertainty of climate models for rainfall reproduction. For this purpose, we used outputs of two general circulation models (GCMs), namely ECHAM5 and CCSM3, downscaled by a regional climate model (RCM), namely RegCM3, over ten small to mid-size catchments in Rize Province, Turkey. To this end, five rainfall-borne climatic statistics are computed from the outputs of ECHAM5-RegCM3 and CCSM3-RegCM3 combinations in order to compare with those of observations in the province for the reference period 1961-1990. Performance of each combination is tested by means of scatter diagram, bias, mean absolute bias, root mean squared error, and model performance index (MPI) measures. Our results indicated that ECHAM5-RegCM3 overestimates the total monthly rainfall observations whereas CCSM3-RegCM3 tends to underestimate. In terms of maximum monthly and annual maximum rainfall reproduction, ECHAM5-RegCM3 shows higher performance than CCSM3-RegCM3, particularly in the coastland areas. In contrast, CCSM3-RegCM3 outperforms ECHAM5-RegCM3 in reproducing the number of rainy days, especially in the inland areas. The results also revealed that if a GCM-RCM combination performs well for a portion (statistic) of a catchment, it is not necessarily appropriate for the other portions (statistics). Moreover, the MPI measure demonstrated the superiority of ECHAM5-RegCM3 to CCSM3-RegCM3 up to 33 % excelling for annual rainfall reproduction in Rize Province.

  5. Evaluation of the atmospheric transport in a GCM using radon measurements: sensitivity to cumulus convection parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, K.; Wan, H.; Zhang, M.; Wang, B.

    2008-05-01

    The radioactive species radon (222Rn) has long been used as a test tracer for the numerical simulation of large scale transport processes. In this study, radon transport experiments are carried out using an atmospheric GCM with a finite-difference dynamical core, the van Leer type FFSL advection algorithm, and two state-of-the-art cumulus convection parameterization schemes. Measurements of surface concentration and vertical distribution of radon collected from the literature are used as references in model evaluation. The simulated radon concentrations using both convection schemes turn out to be consistent with earlier studies with many other models. Comparison with measurements indicates that at the locations where significant seasonal variations are observed in reality, the model can reproduce both the monthly mean surface radon concentration and the annual cycle quite well. At those sites where the seasonal variation is not large, the model is able to give a correct magnitude of the annual mean. In East Asia, where radon simulations are rarely reported in the literature, detailed analysis shows that our results compare reasonably well with the observations. The most evident changes caused by the use of a different convection scheme are found in the vertical distribution of the tracer. The scheme associated with weaker upward transport gives higher radon concentration up to about 6 km above the surface, and lower values in higher altitudes. In the lower part of the atmosphere results from this scheme does not agree as well with the measurements as the other scheme. Differences from 6 km to the model top are even larger, although we are not yet able to tell which simulation is better due to the lack of observations at such high altitudes.

  6. Evaluation of the atmospheric transport in a GCM using radon measurements: sensitivity to cumulus convection parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, K.; Wan, H.; Zhang, M.; Wang, B.

    2008-02-01

    The radioactive species radon (222Rn) has long been used as a test tracer for the numerical simulation of large scale transport processes. In this study, radon transport experiments are carried out using an atmospheric GCM with a finite-difference dynamical core, the van Leer type FFSL advection algorithm and two state-of-the-art cumulus convection parameterization schemes. Measurements of surface concentration and vertical distribution of radon collected from literature are used as references in model evaluation. The simulated radon concentrations using both convection schemes turn out to be consistent with earlier studies with many other models. Comparison with measurements indicates that at the locations where significant seasonal variations are observed in reality, the model can reproduce both the monthly mean surface radon concentration and the annual cycle quite well. At those sites where the seasonal variation is not large, the model is able to give a correct magnitude of the annual mean. In East Asia, where radon simulations are rarely reported in literature, detailed analysis shows that our results compare reasonably well with the observations. The most evident changes caused by the use of a different convection scheme are found in the vertical distribution of the tracer. The scheme associated with a weaker upward transport gives higher radon concentration up to about 6 km above the surface, and lower values in higher altitudes. In the lower part of the atmosphere results from this scheme does not agree as well with the measurements as the other scheme. Differences from 6 km to the model top are even larger, although we are not yet able to tell which simulation is better due to the lack of observations at such high altitudes.

  7. Allowing for Horizontally Heterogeneous Clouds and Generalized Overlap in an Atmospheric GCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, D.; Oreopoulos, L.; Suarez, M.

    2011-01-01

    While fully accounting for 3D effects in Global Climate Models (GCMs) appears not realistic at the present time for a variety of reasons such as computational cost and unavailability of 3D cloud structure in the models, incorporation in radiation schemes of subgrid cloud variability described by one-point statistics is now considered feasible and is being actively pursued. This development has gained momentum once it was demonstrated that CPU-intensive spectrally explicit Independent Column Approximation (lCA) can be substituted by stochastic Monte Carlo ICA (McICA) calculations where spectral integration is accomplished in a manner that produces relatively benign random noise. The McICA approach has been implemented in Goddard's GEOS-5 atmospheric GCM as part of the implementation of the RRTMG radiation package. GEOS-5 with McICA and RRTMG can handle horizontally variable clouds which can be set via a cloud generator to arbitrarily overlap within the full spectrum of maximum and random both in terms of cloud fraction and layer condensate distributions. In our presentation we will show radiative and other impacts of the combined horizontal and vertical cloud variability on multi-year simulations of an otherwise untuned GEOS-5 with fixed SSTs. Introducing cloud horizontal heterogeneity without changing the mean amounts of condensate reduces reflected solar and increases thermal radiation to space, but disproportionate changes may increase the radiative imbalance at TOA. The net radiation at TOA can be modulated by allowing the parameters of the generalized overlap and heterogeneity scheme to vary, a dependence whose behavior we will discuss. The sensitivity of the cloud radiative forcing to the parameters of cloud horizontal heterogeneity and comparisons of CERES-derived forcing will be shown.

  8. The equilibrium response to idealized thermal forcings in a comprehensive GCM: implications for recent tropical expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, R. J.; Sherwood, S. C.; Norris, J. R.; Zender, C. S.

    2011-12-01

    Several recent studies have shown the width of the tropical belt has increased over the last several decades. The mechanisms driving tropical expansion are not well known and the recent expansion is underpredicted by state-of-the art GCMs. We use the CAM3 GCM to investigate how tropical width responds to idealized atmospheric heat sources, focusing on zonal displacement of the tropospheric jets (TJ). The heat sources include global and zonally restricted lower-tropospheric warmings and stratospheric coolings, which coarsely represent possible impacts of ozone or aerosol changes. Similar to prior studies with simplified GCMs, we find that stratospheric cooling-particularly at high-latitudes-shifts jets poleward and excites Northern and Southern Annular Mode (NAM/SAM)-type responses. We also find, however, that modest heating of the midlatitude boundary layer drives a similar response; heating at high latitudes provokes a weaker, equatorward shift and tropical heating produces no shift. Responses to stratospheric cooling are consistent with a wave-mean flow interaction involving increased wave refraction, and downward propagation of the stratospheric wind anomaly. Over 70% of the variance in annual mean jet displacements across 27 experiments, however, is accounted for by a newly proposed "Expansion Index", which compares mid-latitude tropospheric warming to that at other latitudes. We find that previously proposed factors, including tropopause height and tropospheric stability, do not fully explain the results. Results suggest recently observed tropical expansion could have been driven not only by stratospheric cooling, but also by mid-latitude heating sources due for example to ozone or aerosol changes.

  9. The Equilibrium Response to Idealized Thermal Forcings in a Comprehensive GCM: Implications for Recent Tropical Expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, R. J.; Sherwood, S. C.; Norris, J. R.; Zender, C. S.

    2011-12-01

    Several recent studies have shown the width of the tropical belt has increased over the last several decades. The mechanisms driving tropical expansion are not well known and the recent expansion is underpredicted by state-of-the art GCMs. We use the CAM3 GCM to investigate how tropical width responds to idealized atmospheric heat sources, focusing on zonal displacement of the tropospheric jets (TJ). The heat sources include global and zonally restricted lower-tropospheric warmings and stratospheric coolings, which coarsely represent possible impacts of ozone or aerosol changes. Similar to prior studies with simplified GCMs, we find that stratospheric cooling--particularly at high-latitudes--shifts jets poleward and excites Northern and Southern Annular Mode (NAM/SAM)-type responses. We also find, however, that modest heating of the midlatitude boundary layer drives a similar response; heating at high latitudes provokes a weaker, equatorward shift and tropical heating produces no shift. Responses to stratospheric cooling are consistent with a wave-mean flow interaction involving increased wave refraction, and downward propagation of the stratospheric wind anomaly. Over 70% of the variance in annual mean jet displacements across 27 experiments, however, is accounted for by a newly proposed "Expansion Index", which compares mid-latitude tropospheric warming to that at other latitudes. We find that previously proposed factors, including tropopause height and tropospheric stability, do not fully explain the results. Results suggest recently observed tropical expansion could have been driven not only by stratospheric cooling, but also by mid-latitude heating sources due for example to ozone or aerosol changes

  10. Thermal structure of the upper atmosphere of Venus simulated by a ground-to-thermosphere GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilli, G.; Lebonnois, S.; González-Galindo, F.; López-Valverde, M. A.; Stolzenbach, A.; Lefèvre, F.; Chaufray, J. Y.; Lott, F.

    2017-01-01

    We present here the thermal structure of the upper atmosphere of Venus predicted by a full self-consistent Venus General Circulation Model (VGCM) developed at Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique (LMD) and extended up to the thermosphere of the planet. Physical and photochemical processes relevant at those altitudes, plus a non-orographic GW parameterisation, have been added. All those improvements make the LMD-VGCM the only existing ground-to-thermosphere 3D model for Venus: a unique tool to investigate the atmosphere of Venus and to support the exploration of the planet by remote sounding. The aim of this paper is to present the model reference results, to describe the role of radiative, photochemical and dynamical effects in the observed thermal structure in the upper mesosphere/lower thermosphere of the planet. The predicted thermal structure shows a succession of warm and cold layers, as recently observed. A cooling trend with increasing latitudes is found during daytime at all altitudes, while at nighttime the trend is inverse above about 110 km, with an atmosphere up to 15 K warmer towards the pole. The latitudinal variation is even smaller at the terminator, in agreement with observations. Below about 110 km, a nighttime warm layer whose intensity decreases with increasing latitudes is predicted by our GCM. A comparison of model results with a selection of recent measurements shows an overall good agreement in terms of trends and order of magnitude. Significant data-model discrepancies may be also discerned. Among them, thermospheric temperatures are about 40-50 K colder and up to 30 K warmer than measured at terminator and at nighttime, respectively. The altitude layer of the predicted mesospheric local maximum (between 100 and 120 km) is also higher than observed. Possible interpretations are discussed and several sensitivity tests performed to understand the data-model discrepancies and to propose future model improvements.

  11. Lunar tidal effects during the 2013 stratospheric sudden warming as simulated by the TIME-GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maute, A. I.; Forbes, J. M.; Zhang, X.; Fejer, B. G.; Yudin, V. A.; Pedatella, N. M.

    2015-12-01

    Stratospheric Sudden Warmings (SSW) are associated with strong planetary wave activity in the winterpolar stratosphere which result in a very disturbed middle atmosphere. The changes in the middle atmospherealter the propagation conditions and the nonlinear interactions of waves and tides, and result in SSW signals in the upper atmosphere in e.g., neutral winds, electric fields, ionospheric currents and plasma distribution. The upper atmosphere changes can be significant at low-latitudes even during medium solar flux conditions. Observationsalso reveal a strong lunar signal during SSW periods in the low latitude vertical drifts and in ionospheric quantities. Forbes and Zhang [2012] demonstrated that during the 2009 SSW period the Pekeris resonance peak of the atmosphere was altered such that the M2 and N2 lunar tidal componentsgot amplified. This study focuses on the effect of the lunar tidal forcing on the thermosphere-ionosphere system during theJanuary 2013 SSW period. We employthe NCAR Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIME-GCM)with a nudging scheme using the Whole-Atmosphere-Community-Climate-Model-Extended (WACCM-X)/Goddard Earth Observing System Model, Version 5 (GEOS5) results to simulate the effects of meteorological forcing on the upper atmosphere. Additionally lunar tidal forcingis included at the lower boundary of the model. To delineate the lunar tidal effects a base simulation without lunar forcingis employed. Interestingly, Jicamarca observations of that period reveal a suppression of the daytime vertical drift before and after the drift enhancement due the SSW. The simulation suggests that the modulation of the vertical driftmay be caused by the interplay of the migrating solar and lunar semidiurnal tide, and therefore can only be reproduced by the inclusion of both lunar and solar tidal forcings in the model. In this presentation the changes due to the lunar tidal forcing will be quantified, and compared

  12. Climate Simulations with a Variable-Resolution GCM: Stretched Cubed-Sphere High Resolution Atmospheric Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, C. Y.; Harris, L.; Lin, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    Variable-resolution GCM with enhanced resolution over the region of interest is an adaptive approach to self-consistent interactions between global and regional phenomena. A stretched cubed-sphere High Resolution Atmosphere Model (HiRAM) is constructed using the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) finite-volume dynamical core. The horizontal grid spacing in the stretched cubed-sphere is smoothly transformed from the center of highest-resolution region to the center of coarsest-resolution region. Three 30-yr AMIP type simulations were performed in this study; one C384 uniformed cubed-sphere grid, and two stretched cubed-sphere grid with stretching factor 2.5. Two stretched-grid experiments further set the center of highest-resolution region in Taiwan (C384R2.5TW) and Oklahoma City (C384R2.5OKC), respectively. The horizontal resolution in this C384R2.5 stretched grid ranges from 10km to 65km. Three climate simulations were compared against re-analysis data to understand the effect of horizontal resolution on both the simulated global climate and regional features. The global mean climatology in stretched-grid AMIP simulations shows no unrealistic drift comparing to the uniform-grid simulation and observation. Regional orographic precipitation is better simulated in the high-resolution region. High resolution also shows improvement in typhoon/hurricane simulation. In western Pacific basin, high resolution improves simulated typhoon intensity. For weak and moderate typhoons, there is no strong trend with enhancing resolution. But for strong typhoon, there is high correlation between enhancing resolution with typhoon intensity. By comparing simulations with IBTrACS (International Best Track Archieve for Climate Stewardship) in different basins, HiRAM demonstrates the reduction of simulated typhoon/hurricane numbers with enhancement of horizontal resolution.

  13. Running GCM physics and dynamics on different grids: Algorithm and tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molod, A.

    2006-12-01

    The major drawback in the use of sigma coordinates in atmospheric GCMs, namely the error in the pressure gradient term near sloping terrain, leaves the use of eta coordinates an important alternative. A central disadvantage of an eta coordinate, the inability to retain fine resolution in the vertical as the surface rises above sea level, is addressed here. An `alternate grid' technique is presented which allows the tendencies of state variables due to the physical parameterizations to be computed on a vertical grid (the `physics grid') which retains fine resolution near the surface, while the remaining terms in the equations of motion are computed using an eta coordinate (the `dynamics grid') with coarser vertical resolution. As a simple test of the technique a set of perpetual equinox experiments using a simplified lower boundary condition with no land and no topography were performed. The results show that for both low and high resolution alternate grid experiments, much of the benefit of increased vertical resolution for the near surface meridional wind (and mass streamfield) can be realized by enhancing the vertical resolution of the `physics grid' in the manner described here. In addition, approximately half of the increase in zonal jet strength seen with increased vertical resolution can be realized using the `alternate grid' technique. A pair of full GCM experiments with realistic lower boundary conditions and topography were also performed. It is concluded that the use of the `alternate grid' approach offers a promising way forward to alleviate a central problem associated with the use of the eta coordinate in atmospheric GCMs.

  14. Coupled interactions of organized deep convection over the tropical western pacific

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, X.; Raman, S.

    1996-04-01

    The relationship between sea surface temperature (SST) and deep convection is complex. In general, deep convection occurs more frequently and with more intensity as SSTs become higher. This theory assumes that the atmospheric stability is sufficiently reduced to allow the onset of moist convection. However, the amount and intensity of convection observed tends to decrease with increasing SST because very warm SSTs. A reason for such decrease is the enhancements to surface fluxes of heat and moisture out of the ocean surface because of the vertical overturning associated with deep convection. Early studies used the radiative-convective models of the atmosphere to examine the role of the convective exchange of heat and moisture in maintaining the vertical temperature profile. In this paper we use a Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS) to simulate a squall line over a tropical ocean global atmosphere/coupled ocean atmosphere response experiment (TOGA/COARE) area and to investigate how the ocean cooling mechanisms associated with organized deep convection act to limit tropical SSTs.

  15. Iodine confinement into metal-organic frameworks (MOFs)-low temperature sintering glasses to form novel glass composite material (GCM) alternative waste forms.

    SciTech Connect

    Nenoff, Tina Maria; Garino, Terry J.; Sava, Dorina Florentina

    2010-11-01

    The safe handling of reprocessed fuel addresses several scientific goals, especially when considering the capture and long-term storage of volatile radionuclides that are necessary during this process. Despite not being a major component of the off-gas, radioiodine (I{sub 2}) is particularly challenging, because it is a highly mobile gas and {sup 129}I is a long-lived radionuclide (1.57 x 10{sup 7} years). Therefore, its capture and sequestration is of great interest on a societal level. Herein, we explore novel routes toward the effective capture and storage of iodine. In particular, we report on the novel use of a new class of porous solid-state functional materials (metal-organic frameworks, MOFs), as high-capacity adsorbents of molecular iodine. We further describe the formation of novel glass-composite material (GCM) waste forms from the mixing and sintering of the I{sub 2}-containing MOFs with Bi-Zn-O low-temperature sintering glasses and silver metal flakes. Our findings indicate that, upon sintering, a uniform monolith is formed, with no evidence of iodine loss; iodine is sequestered during the heating process by the in situ formation of AgI. Detailed materials characterization analysis is presented for the GCMs. This includes powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), thermal analysis (thermogravimetric analysis (TGA)), and chemical durability tests including aqueous leach studies (product consistency test (PCT)), with X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) of the PCT leachate.

  16. Formation of the Martian Polar Layered Terrains: Quantifying Polar Water Ice and Dust Surface Deposition During Current and Past Orbital Epochs with the NASA Ames GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmett, J. A.; Murphy, J. R.

    2016-09-01

    The NASA Ames GCM will be used to quantify net annual polar deposition rates of water ice and dust on Mars during current and past orbital epochs to investigate the formation history, structure, and stratigraphy of the polar layered terrains.

  17. The Effect of Atmosphere-Ocean-Wave Interactions and Model Resolution on Hurricane Katrina in a Coupled Regional Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patricola, C. M.; Chang, P.; Saravanan, R.; Montuoro, R.

    2012-04-01

    The sensitivity of simulated strength, track, and structure of Hurricane Katrina to atmospheric model resolution, cumulus parameterization, and initialization time, as well as mesoscale ocean-atmosphere interactions with and without small-scale ocean-wave effect, are investigated with a fully coupled regional climate model. The atmosphere, ocean, and wave components are represented by the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF), Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS), and Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN) model. Uncoupled atmosphere-only simulations with horizontal resolutions of 1, 3, 9, and 27 km show that while the simulated cyclone track is highly sensitive to initialization time, its dependence on model resolution is relatively weak. Using NCEP/CFSR reanalysis as initial and boundary conditions, WRF, even at low resolution, is able to track Katrina accurately for 3 days before it made landfall on August 29, 2005. Katrina's strength, however, is much more difficult to reproduce and exhibits a strong dependence on model resolution. At its lowest resolution (27 km), WRF is only capable of simulating a maximum strength of Category 2 storm. Even at 1 km resolution, the simulated Katrina only reaches Category 4 storm intensity. Further WRF experiments with and without cumulus parameterization reveal minor changes in strength. None of the WRF-only simulations capture the observed rapid intensification of Katrina to Category 5 when it passed over a warm Loop-Current eddy (LCE) in the Gulf of Mexico, suggesting that mesoscale ocean-atmosphere interactions involving LCEs may play a crucial role in Katrina's rapid intensification. Coupled atmosphere-ocean simulations are designed and carried out to investigate hurricane Katrina-LCE interactions with and without considering small-scale ocean wave processes in order to fully understand the dynamical ocean-atmosphere processes in the observed rapid cyclone intensification.

  18. Comparisons of model simulations of climate variability with data, Task 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in our investigations aimed at diagnosing low frequency variations of climate in General Circulation Models. We have analyzed three versions of the Oregon State University General Circulation Model (OSU GCM). These are: (1) the Slab Model in which the ocean is treated as a static heat reservoir of fixed depth, (2) the coupled upper ocean-atmosphere model in which the ocean dynamics are calculated in two layers of variable depths representing the mixed layers and the thermocline; this model is referred to OSU2 in the following discussion, and (3) the coupled full ocean-atmosphere model in which the ocean is represented by six layers of variable depth; this model is referred to as OSU6 GCM in the discussion.

  19. Comparisons of model simulations of climate variability with data, Task 2. [Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-31

    Significant progress has been made in our investigations aimed at diagnosing low frequency variations of climate in General Circulation Models. We have analyzed three versions of the Oregon State University General Circulation Model (OSU GCM). These are: (1) the Slab Model in which the ocean is treated as a static heat reservoir of fixed depth, (2) the coupled upper ocean-atmosphere model in which the ocean dynamics are calculated in two layers of variable depths representing the mixed layers and the thermocline; this model is referred to OSU2 in the following discussion, and (3) the coupled full ocean-atmosphere model in which the ocean is represented by six layers of variable depth; this model is referred to as OSU6 GCM in the discussion.

  20. Stable Water Isotope Dynamics Can Constrain GCM Convective Processes during the MJO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuinenburg, O.; Risi, C. M.; Lacour, J. L.; Schneider, M.

    2014-12-01

    This research aims to improve the representation of convective processes during the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) and other modes of intra-seasonal variability in the LMDZ atmospheric models, by making use of joint δD and H2O (vapor) measurements. In addition to atmospheric drying and wetting derived from the humidity measurements, the additional δD measurements provide enrichment and depletion information. This information is used to distinguish between different moistening and drying processes. For example, moistening due to ocean surface evaporation and due to rain re-evaporation can be distinguished, as re-evaporating moisture is more depleted in δD than surface evaporation.We use mid-tropospheric IASI satellite δD and H2O measurements to determine the humidity and δD evolution during about eight MJO events from 2010-2012 (including those monitored during the CINDY/DYNAMO campaign). Moreover, these evolutions are compared to the standard isotope enabled LMDZ GCM, as well as to sensitivity tests of key parameters (cold pool representation, precipitation efficiency, droplet size and fall speed, etc.) in the convection scheme.The IASI measurements over the Indian ocean suggest that from 20 days to 5 days before the MJO peak, the main moisture source is oceanic surface evaporation, which is advected upwards by shallow convection. During the 5 days around the MJO peak, the moisture evolution is dominated by deep convection. Most inter-event variability occurs 5 to 10 days after the event, when 75% of the events are dominated by large scale condensation, while convection dominate the remaining quarter of the events. After this, the advection of relatively dry and enriched air brings back the state to the mean. Over the Maritime continent, similar δD-H2O dynamics occur, but the variability of advected moisture dominates the inter-event variability.The model captures the δD and H2O dynamics of the MJO reasonably well. However, over the Indian ocean, the timing

  1. Dynamical Downscaling of GCM Simulations: Toward the Improvement of Forecast Bias over California

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, H S

    2008-09-24

    The effects of climate change will mostly be felt on local to regional scales. However, global climate models (GCMs) are unable to produce reliable climate information on the scale needed to assess regional climate-change impacts and variability as a result of coarse grid resolution and inadequate model physics though their capability is improving. Therefore, dynamical and statistical downscaling (SD) methods have become popular methods for filling the gap between global and local-to-regional climate applications. Recent inter-comparison studies of these downscaling techniques show that both downscaling methods have similar skill in simulating the mean and variability of present climate conditions while they show significant differences for future climate conditions (Leung et al., 2003). One difficulty with the SD method is that it relies on predictor-predict and relationships, which may not hold in future climate conditions. In addition, it is now commonly accepted that the dynamical downscaling with the regional climate model (RCM) is more skillful at the resolving orographic climate effect than the driving coarser-grid GCM simulations. To assess the possible societal impacts of climate changes, many RCMs have been developed and used to provide a better projection of future regional-scale climates for guiding policies in economy, ecosystem, water supply, agriculture, human health, and air quality (Giorgi et al., 1994; Leung and Ghan, 1999; Leung et al., 2003; Liang et al., 2004; Kim, 2004; Duffy et al., 2006). Although many regional climate features, such as seasonal mean and extreme precipitation have been successfully captured in these RCMs, obvious biases of simulated precipitation remain, particularly the winter wet bias commonly seen in mountain regions of the Western United States. The importance of regional climate research over California is not only because California has the largest population in the nation, but California has one of the most

  2. Simple but accurate GCM-free approach for quantifying anthropogenic climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovejoy, S.

    2014-12-01

    We are so used to analysing the climate with the help of giant computer models (GCM's) that it is easy to get the impression that they are indispensable. Yet anthropogenic warming is so large (roughly 0.9oC) that it turns out that it is straightforward to quantify it with more empirically based methodologies that can be readily understood by the layperson. The key is to use the CO2 forcing as a linear surrogate for all the anthropogenic effects from 1880 to the present (implicitly including all effects due to Greenhouse Gases, aerosols and land use changes). To a good approximation, double the economic activity, double the effects. The relationship between the forcing and global mean temperature is extremely linear as can be seen graphically and understood without fancy statistics, [Lovejoy, 2014a] (see the attached figure and http://www.physics.mcgill.ca/~gang/Lovejoy.htm). To an excellent approximation, the deviations from the linear forcing - temperature relation can be interpreted as the natural variability. For example, this direct - yet accurate approach makes it graphically obvious that the "pause" or "hiatus" in the warming since 1998 is simply a natural cooling event that has roughly offset the anthropogenic warming [Lovejoy, 2014b]. Rather than trying to prove that the warming is anthropogenic, with a little extra work (and some nonlinear geophysics theory and pre-industrial multiproxies) we can disprove the competing theory that it is natural. This approach leads to the estimate that the probability of the industrial scale warming being a giant natural fluctuation is ≈0.1%: it can be dismissed. This destroys the last climate skeptic argument - that the models are wrong and the warming is natural. It finally allows for a closure of the debate. In this talk we argue that this new, direct, simple, intuitive approach provides an indispensable tool for communicating - and convincing - the public of both the reality and the amplitude of anthropogenic warming

  3. Satellite Remote Sensing of Tropical Precipitation and Ice Clouds for GCM Verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, K. Franklin

    2001-01-01

    This project, supported by the NASA New Investigator Program, has primarily been funding a graduate student, Darren McKague. Since August 1999 Darren has been working part time at Raytheon, while continuing his PhD research. Darren is planning to finish his thesis work in May 2001, thus some of the work described here is ongoing. The proposed research was to use GOES visible and infrared imager data and SSM/I microwave data to obtain joint distributions of cirrus cloud ice mass and precipitation for a study region in the Eastern Tropical Pacific. These joint distributions of cirrus cloud and rainfall were to be compared to those from the CSU general circulation model to evaluate the cloud microphysical amd cumulus parameterizations in the GCM. Existing algorithms were to be used for the retrieval of cloud ice water path from GOES (Minnis) and rainfall from SSM/I (Wilheit). A theoretical study using radiative transfer models and realistic variations in cloud and precipitation profiles was to be used to estimate the retrieval errors. Due to the unavailability of the GOES satellite cloud retrieval algorithm from Dr. Minnis (a co-PI), there was a change in the approach and emphasis of the project. The new approach was to develop a completely new type of remote sensing algorithm - one to directly retrieve joint probability density functions (pdf's) of cloud properties from multi-dimensional histograms of satellite radiances. The usual approach is to retrieve individual pixels of variables (i.e. cloud optical depth), and then aggregate the information. Only statistical information is actually needed, however, and so a more direct method is desirable. We developed forward radiative transfer models for the SSM/I and GOES channels, originally for testing the retrieval algorithms. The visible and near infrared ice scattering information is obtained from geometric ray tracing of fractal ice crystals (Andreas Macke), while the mid-infrared and microwave scattering is computed

  4. Sensitivity of Global Modeling Initiative CTM predictions of Antarctic ozone recovery to GCM and DAS generated meteorological fields

    SciTech Connect

    Rotman, D; Bergmann, D

    2003-12-04

    We use the Global Modeling Initiative chemistry and transport model to simulate the evolution of stratospheric ozone between 1995 and 2030, using boundary conditions consistent with the recent World Meteorological Organization ozone assessment. We compare the Antarctic ozone recovery predictions of two simulations, one driven by meteorological data from a general circulation model (GCM), the other using the output of a data assimilation system (DAS), to examine the sensitivity of Antarctic ozone recovery predictions to the characteristic dynamical differences between GCM and DAS-generated meteorological data. Although the age of air in the Antarctic lower stratosphere differs by a factor of 2 between the simulations, we find little sensitivity of the 1995-2030 Antarctic ozone recovery between 350 K and 650 K to the differing meteorological fields, particularly when the recovery is specified in mixing ratio units. Relative changes are smaller in the DAS-driven simulation compared to the GCM-driven simulation due to a surplus of Antarctic ozone in the DAS-driven simulation which is not consistent with observations. The peak ozone change between 1995 and 2030 in both simulations is {approx}20% lower than photochemical expectations, indicating that changes in ozone transport at 450 K between 1995 and 2030 constitute a small negative feedback. Total winter/spring ozone loss during the base year (1995) of both simulations and the rate of ozone loss during August and September is somewhat weaker than observed. This appears to be due to underestimates of Antarctic Cl{sub y} at the 450 K potential temperature level.

  5. The Impacts of an Observationally-Based Cloud Fraction and Condensate Overlap Parameterization on a GCM's Cloud Radiative Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Lee, Dongmin; Norris, Peter; Yuan, Tianle

    2011-01-01

    It has been shown that the details of how cloud fraction overlap is treated in GCMs has substantial impact on shortwave and longwave fluxes. Because cloud condensate is also horizontally heterogeneous at GCM grid scales, another aspect of cloud overlap should in principle also be assessed, namely the vertical overlap of hydrometeor distributions. This type of overlap is usually examined in terms of rank correlations, i.e., linear correlations between hydrometeor amount ranks of the overlapping parts of cloud layers at specific separation distances. The cloud fraction overlap parameter and the rank correlation of hydrometeor amounts can be both expressed as inverse exponential functions of separation distance characterized by their respective decorrelation lengths (e-folding distances). Larger decorrelation lengths mean that hydrometeor fractions and probability distribution functions have high levels of vertical alignment. An analysis of CloudSat and CALIPSO data reveals that the two aspects of cloud overlap are related and their respective decorrelation lengths have a distinct dependence on latitude that can be parameterized and included in a GCM. In our presentation we will contrast the Cloud Radiative Effect (CRE) of the GEOS-5 atmospheric GCM (AGCM) when the observationally-based parameterization of decorrelation lengths is used to represent overlap versus the simpler cases of maximum-random overlap and globally constant decorrelation lengths. The effects of specific overlap representations will be examined for both diagnostic and interactive radiation runs in GEOS-5 and comparisons will be made with observed CREs from CERES and CloudSat (2B-FLXHR product). Since the radiative effects of overlap depend on the cloud property distributions of the AGCM, the availability of two different cloud schemes in GEOS-5 will give us the opportunity to assess a wide range of potential cloud overlap consequences on the model's climate.

  6. Glacial meltwater cooling of the Gulf of Mexico - GCM implications for Holocene and present-day climates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oglesby, Robert J.; Maasch, Kirk A.; Saltzman, Barry

    1989-01-01

    The NCAR Community Climate Model GCM is presently used to investigate the possible effects on regional and hemispheric climates of reduced SSTs in the Gulf of Mexico, in view of delta-O-18 records and terrestrial evidence for at least two major glacial meltwater discharges after the last glacial maximum. Three numerical experiments have been conducted with imposed gulfwide SST coolings of 3, 6, and 12 C; in all cases, significant reductions arise in the North Atlantic storm-track intensity, together with a strong decrease in transient eddy water vapor transport out of the Gulf of Mexico. Other statistically significant changes occur across the Northern Hemisphere.

  7. Usefulness of AIRS-Derived OLR, Temperature, Water Vapor and Cloudiness Anomaly Time-series for GCM Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molnar, Gyula; Susskind, Joel; Iredell, Lena

    2010-01-01

    The ROBUST nature (biases are not as important as previous GCM-evaluations suggest) of the AIRS-observations-generated ARC-maps and ATs as well as their interrelations suggest that they could be a useful tool to select CGCMs which may be considered the reliable, i.e., to be trusted even for longer-term climate drift/change predictions (even on the regional scale). Get monthly gridded CGCM time-series of atmospheric variables coinciding with the timeframe of the AIRS analyses for at least 5-6 years and do the actual evaluations of ARC-maps and ATs for the coinciding time periods.

  8. Response of the CNRM-CM5 coupled model to an enhanced Greenland fresh water flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogel, P.; Hamon, M.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the transient response of the CNRM-CM5 coupled Ocean-Atmosphere model to a strong freshwater forcing around the Greenland coasts. We perturb a 50-year long ensemble of simulation with high-emission of Greenhouse gas (GHG) scenario (RCP8.5). The 5 members of the reference simulation are compared to 5 members of a similar simulation in which the freshwater perturbation is applied. We add 0,00275 Sv to the freshwater fluxes at the Ocean-Atmosphere interface representing 5 times the present estimated melting of the Greenland ice. We highlight that such a freshwater forcing has significant impacts only in the north Atlantic basin where a rapid increase of the sea level rise occurs in the first 30 years, followed by a stagnation period. In the others areas, we point out that the effects of the perturbation is not significant compared to the regional variability. We show relations between sea-level and the meridional overturning circulation (MOC), and attempt to characterize the mechanisms at stake in the CNRM-CM5 model. We thus focus on the effects of the freshwater forcing on the oceanic processes in the North Atlantic basin, especially on the temperature and salinity variability in the subpolar gyre.

  9. Sequencing and Analysis of the Pseudomonas fluorescens GcM5-1A Genome: A Pathogen Living in the Surface Coat of Bursaphelenchus xylophilus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yingnan; Zhao, Boguang; Yin, Tongming

    2015-01-01

    It is known that several bacteria are adherent to the surface coat of pine wood nematode (Bursaphelenchus xylophilus), but their function and role in the pathogenesis of pine wilt disease remains debatable. The Pseudomonas fluorescens GcM5-1A is a bacterium isolated from the surface coat of pine wood nematodes. In previous studies, GcM5-1A was evident in connection with the pathogenicity of pine wilt disease. In this study, we report the de novo sequencing of the GcM5-1A genome. A 600-Mb collection of high-quality reads was obtained and assembled into sequence contigs spanning a 6.01-Mb length. Sequence annotation predicted 5,413 open reading frames, of which 2,988 were homologous to genes in the other four sequenced P. fluorescens isolates (SBW25, WH6, Pf0-1 and Pf-5) and 1,137 were unique to GcM5-1A. Phylogenetic studies and genome comparison revealed that GcM5-1A is more closely related to SBW25 and WH6 isolates than to Pf0-1 and Pf-5 isolates. Towards study of pathogenesis, we identified 79 candidate virulence factors in the genome of GcM5-1A, including the Alg, Fl, Waa gene families, and genes coding the major pathogenic protein fliC. In addition, genes for a complete T3SS system were identified in the genome of GcM5-1A. Such systems have proved to play a critical role in subverting and colonizing the host organisms of many gram-negative pathogenic bacteria. Although the functions of the candidate virulence factors need yet to be deciphered experimentally, the availability of this genome provides a basic platform to obtain informative clues to be addressed in future studies by the pine wilt disease research community. PMID:26517369

  10. A GCM study of the response of the atmospheric water cycle of West Africa and the Atlantic to Saharan dust radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, K. M.; Kim, K. M.; Sud, Y. C.; Walker, G. K.

    2009-10-01

    The responses of the atmospheric water cycle and climate of West Africa and the Atlantic to radiative forcing of Saharan dust are studied using the NASA finite volume general circulation model (fvGCM), coupled to a mixed layer ocean. We find evidence of an "elevated heat pump" (EHP) mechanism that underlines the responses of the atmospheric water cycle to dust forcing as follow. During the boreal summer, as a result of large-scale atmospheric feedback triggered by absorbing dust aerosols, rainfall and cloudiness are enhanced over the West Africa/Eastern Atlantic ITCZ, and suppressed over the West Atlantic and Caribbean region. Shortwave radiation absorption by dust warms the atmosphere and cools the surface, while longwave has the opposite response. The elevated dust layer warms the air over West Africa and the eastern Atlantic. As the warm air rises, it spawns a large-scale onshore flow carrying the moist air from the eastern Atlantic and the Gulf of Guinea. The onshore flow in turn enhances the deep convection over West Africa land, and the eastern Atlantic. The condensation heating associated with the ensuing deep convection drives and maintains an anomalous large-scale east-west overturning circulation with rising motion over West Africa/eastern Atlantic, and sinking motion over the Caribbean region. The response also includes a strengthening of the West African monsoon, manifested in a northward shift of the West Africa precipitation over land, increased low-level westerly flow over West Africa at the southern edge of the dust layer, and a near surface westerly jet underneath the dust layer over the Sahara. The dust radiative forcing also leads to significant changes in surface energy fluxes, resulting in cooling of the West African land and the eastern Atlantic, and warming in the West Atlantic and Caribbean. The EHP effect is most effective for moderate to highly absorbing dusts, and becomes minimized for reflecting dust with single scattering albedo at 0

  11. Examining the contributions to the longitudinal variation of the low latitude upward ExB drift as simulated by TIME-GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maute, A.; Richmond, A. D.; Hagan, M. E.; Roble, R. G.

    2010-12-01

    In the last several years space-borne observations of ionospheric and thermospheric densities as well as neutral winds have shown that there is a strong longitudinal variation even during geomagnetically quiet times. Studies have confirmed that many of these variations can be connected to the propagation of non-migrating tides which are excited in the troposphere. One mechanism to get the tidal signature from the lower thermosphere up to F-region altitude is via electrodynamic coupling due to wind driven current. It is therefore important to understand what is contributing to the longitudinal variation of the upward ExB drift at different local times. Sources of longitudinal variation include not only the neutral wind but also gravity-driven current, the geomagnetic field configuration and the conductivities. In this study we analyze the relative importance of these different sources using results from the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation model (TIME-GCM) forced by the Global Scale Wave Model (GSWM02) at the lower boundary (ca. 30 km). We focus on geomagnetic quiescent conditions. The model can reproduce part of the observed longitudinal variation. We find that the importance of the different sources strongly depends on the local time. As expected, the neutral winds below 120 km contribute the most to the longitudinal variation, but mainly during the day. However, even during the day neutral winds above 120 km are very important. The relative importance of zonal and meridional winds depends on the altitude and the local time. The upward drift at night is very sensitive to changes in the geomagnetic field configuration; however, this effect is minor during the day.

  12. A GCM Study of Responses of the Atmospheric Water Cycle of West Africa and the Atlantic to Saharan Dust Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, K. M.; Kim, K. M.; Sud, Y. C.; Walker, G. K.

    2009-01-01

    The responses of the atmospheric water cycle and climate of West Africa and the Atlantic to radiative forcing of Saharan dust are studied using the NASA finite volume general circulation model (fvGCM), coupled to a mixed layer ocean. We find evidence of an "elevated heat pump" (EHP) mechanism that underlines the responses of the atmospheric water cycle to dust forcing as follow. During the boreal summerr, as a result of large-scale atmospheric feedback triggered by absorbing dust aerosols, rainfall and cloudiness are ehanIed over the West Africa/Eastern Atlantic ITCZ, and suppressed over the West Atlantic and Caribbean region. Shortwave radiation absorption by dust warms the atmosphere and cools the surface, while longwave has the opposite response. The elevated dust layer warms the air over West Africa and the eastern Atlantic. As the warm air rises, it spawns a large-scale onshore flow carrying the moist air from the eastern Atlantic and the Gulf of Guinea. The onshore flow in turn enhances the deep convection over West Africa land, and the eastern Atlantic. The condensation heating associated with the ensuing deep convection drives and maintains an anomalous large-scale east-west overturning circulation with rising motion over West Africa/eastern Atlantic, and sinking motion over the Caribbean region. The response also includes a strengthening of the West African monsoon, manifested in a northward shift of the West Africa precipitation over land, increased low-level westerlies flow over West Africa at the southern edge of the dust layer, and a near surface westerly jet underneath the dust layer overr the Sahara. The dust radiative forcing also leads to significant changes in surface energy fluxes, resulting in cooling of the West African land and the eastern Atlantic, and warming in the West Atlantic and Caribbean. The EHP effect is most effective for moderate to highly absorbing dusts, and becomes minimized for reflecting dust with single scattering albedo at0

  13. Evaluating GCM land surface hydrology parameterizations by computing river discharges using a runoff routing model: Application to the Mississippi basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liston, G. E.; Sud, Y. C.; Wood, E. F.

    1994-01-01

    To relate general circulation model (GCM) hydrologic output to readily available river hydrographic data, a runoff routing scheme that routes gridded runoffs through regional- or continental-scale river drainage basins is developed. By following the basin overland flow paths, the routing model generates river discharge hydrographs that can be compared to observed river discharges, thus allowing an analysis of the GCM representation of monthly, seasonal, and annual water balances over large regions. The runoff routing model consists of two linear reservoirs, a surface reservoir and a groundwater reservoir, which store and transport water. The water transport mechanisms operating within these two reservoirs are differentiated by their time scales; the groundwater reservoir transports water much more slowly than the surface reservior. The groundwater reservior feeds the corresponding surface store, and the surface stores are connected via the river network. The routing model is implemented over the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Continental-Scale International Project Mississippi River basin on a rectangular grid of 2 deg X 2.5 deg. Two land surface hydrology parameterizations provide the gridded runoff data required to run the runoff routing scheme: the variable infiltration capacity model, and the soil moisture component of the simple biosphere model. These parameterizations are driven with 4 deg X 5 deg gridded climatological potential evapotranspiration and 1979 First Global Atmospheric Research Program (GARP) Global Experiment precipitation. These investigations have quantified the importance of physically realistic soil moisture holding capacities, evaporation parameters, and runoff mechanisms in land surface hydrology formulations.

  14. Air-sea coupling in the Hawaiian Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, J. M.; Powell, B.; Mattheus, D.

    2014-12-01

    A coupled numerical model is used to investigate the ocean-atmosphere interaction in the lee of the Hawaiian archipelago. The wind curl generated by the island blocking of the trade winds is known to give rise to ocean eddies; however, the impact of the sea surface temperature (SST) and velocity fronts associated with these eddies on the atmosphere is less understood. The main coupling mechanisms are: (i) changes in the near-surface stability and surface stress, (ii) vertical transfer of momentum from higher atmospheric levels to the ocean surface due to an increase of the turbulence in the boundary layer, (iii) secondary circulations associated with perturbations in the surface atmospheric pressure over the SST fronts, and (iv) the impact of the oceanic eddy currents on the net momentum transferred between the atmosphere and the ocean. To assess the relative contribution from each process, a coupled simulation between the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) and the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) models is conducted for the main Hawaiian Islands. The impact of the coupling, the perturbation of the mean wind pattern, and the different spatial scales involved in the air-sea exchanges of momentum and heat are explored.

  15. Applications and Improvement of a Coupled, Global and Cloud-Resolving Modeling System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Chern, J.; Atlas, R.

    2005-01-01

    Recently Grabowski (2001) and Khairoutdinov and Randall (2001) have proposed the use of 2D CFWs as a "super parameterization" [or multi-scale modeling framework (MMF)] to represent cloud processes within atmospheric general circulation models (GCMs). In the MMF, a fine-resolution 2D CRM takes the place of the single-column parameterization used in conventional GCMs. A prototype Goddard MMF based on the 2D Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model and the Goddard finite volume general circulation model (fvGCM) is now being developed. The prototype includes the fvGCM run at 2.50 x 20 horizontal resolution with 32 vertical layers from the surface to 1 mb and the 2D (x-z) GCE using 64 horizontal and 32 vertical grid points with 4 km horizontal resolution and a cyclic lateral boundary. The time step for the 2D GCE would be 15 seconds, and the fvGCM-GCE coupling frequency would be 30 minutes (i.e. the fvGCM physical time step). We have successfully developed an fvGCM-GCE coupler for this prototype. Because the vertical coordinate of the fvGCM (a terrain-following floating Lagrangian coordinate) is different from that of the GCE (a z coordinate), vertical interpolations between the two coordinates are needed in the coupler. In interpolating fields from the GCE to fvGCM, we use an existing fvGCM finite- volume piecewise parabolic mapping (PPM) algorithm, which conserves the mass, momentum, and total energy. A new finite-volume PPM algorithm, which conserves the mass, momentum and moist static energy in the z coordinate, is being developed for interpolating fields from the fvGCM to the GCE. In the meeting, we will discuss the major differences between the two MMFs (i.e., the CSU MMF and the Goddard MMF). We will also present performance and critical issues related to the MMFs. In addition, we will present multi-dimensional cloud datasets (i.e., a cloud data library) generated by the Goddard MMF that will be provided to the global modeling community to help improve the

  16. Madden-Julian Variability in Coupled Models

    SciTech Connect

    Sperber, K R; Gualdi, S; Li, W; Slingo, J M

    2001-12-12

    The Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) is a dominant mode of tropical variability (Madden and Julian 1971, 1972). It is manifested on a timescale of {approx}30-70 days through large-scale circulation anomalies which occur in conjunction with eastward propagating convective anomalies over the eastern hemisphere. Recent evidence has suggested that an interactive ocean may be important for the simulation of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (Flatau et al. 1997, Sperber et al. 1997, Waliser et al. 1999, Inness et al. 2002). As part of an initiative to the CLIVAR Working Group on Coupled Modeling, we examine ocean-atmosphere GCMs to ascertain the degree to which they can represent the 4-dimensional space-time structure of the MJO. The eastward propagation of convection is also examined with respect to the surface fluxes and SST, and we compare and contrast the behavior over the Indian Ocean and the western Pacific. Importantly, the results are interpreted with respect to systematic error of the mean state.

  17. A GCM case study on the maintenance of short-term subtropical wind maxima in the summer hemisphere during SOP-1, FGGE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurrell, James W.; Vincent, Dayton G.

    1992-01-01

    In order to substantiate earlier findings of pronounced short-term deviations in Southern Hemisphere tropical convection during the first Special Observing Period (SOP-1) of FGGE, the hypothesis that the observed summertime subtropical wind maxima were strengthened by episodes of enhanced tropical divergence is numerically tested using a fourth-order GCM. FGGE observational data for January 6-20, 1979 suggested that strong convection over the South Pacific helped to maintain a nearby subtropical jet. The dominant term in the zonal momentum budget was the Coriolis force applied to the diabatically driven meridional circulation. The present GCM study simulates these processes to a reasonable degree of accuracy. Experimental reduction of the latent energy supplied to the GCM is used to substantiate that summertime subtropical westerly maxima are largely forced by divergent outflow from the tropics.

  18. First detection of Mars atmospheric hydroxyl: CRISM Near-IR measurement versus LMD GCM simulation of OH Meinel band emission in the Mars polar winter atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clancy, R. Todd; Sandor, Brad J.; García-Muñoz, Antonio; Lefèvre, Franck; Smith, Michael D.; Wolff, Michael J.; Montmessin, Franck; Murchie, Scott L.; Nair, Hari

    2013-09-01

    de Météorologie Dynamique) photochemical GCM (global climate model), employing detailed photochemistry (e.g. Lefèvre, F., Lebonnois, S., Montmessin, F., Forget, F. [2004]. J. Geophys. Res. (Planets) 109, E07004. http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2004JE002268) and energy transfer processes (excitation and quenching) developed for Mars Meinel OH band nightglow by García Muñoz et al. (García Muñoz, A., McConnell, J.C., McDade, I.C., Melo, S.M.L. [2005]. Icarus 176, 75-95). Modeled versus observed OH emission behavior agrees within measurement uncertainties with the assumptions of a Bates-Nicolet (H + O3) source for excited OH production, and 'collisional-cascade' quenching of the OH vibrational population by CO2. 'Sudden-death' quenching of excited OH by CO2 leads to 100× less OH emission than observed. The combined agreement between LMD GCM simulated and CRISM observed O2(1Δg) and Meinel OH polar nightglow behaviors represents a significant demonstration of the LMD model capability to couple odd oxygen and hydrogen photochemistry and transport by the Mars global circulation in a realistic fashion.

  19. First detection of Mars atmospheric hydroxyl: CRISM Near-IR measurement versus LMD GCM simulation of OH Meinel band emission in the Mars polar winter atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd Clancy, R.; Sandor, Brad J.; García-Muñoz, Antonio; Lefèvre, Franck; Smith, Michael D.; Wolff, Michael J.; Montmessin, Franck; Murchie, Scott L.; Nair, Hari

    2013-09-01

    de Météorologie Dynamique) photochemical GCM (global climate model), employing detailed photochemistry (e.g. Lefèvre, F., Lebonnois, S., Montmessin, F., Forget, F. [2004]. J. Geophys. Res. (Planets) 109, E07004. http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2004JE002268) and energy transfer processes (excitation and quenching) developed for Mars Meinel OH band nightglow by García Muñoz et al. (García Muñoz, A., McConnell, J.C., McDade, I.C., Melo, S.M.L. [2005]. Icarus 176, 75-95). Modeled versus observed OH emission behavior agrees within measurement uncertainties with the assumptions of a Bates-Nicolet (H + O3) source for excited OH production, and ‘collisional-cascade’ quenching of the OH vibrational population by CO2. ‘Sudden-death’ quenching of excited OH by CO2 leads to 100× less OH emission than observed. The combined agreement between LMD GCM simulated and CRISM observed O2(1Δg) and Meinel OH polar nightglow behaviors represents a significant demonstration of the LMD model capability to couple odd oxygen and hydrogen photochemistry and transport by the Mars global circulation in a realistic fashion.

  20. Global three-dimensional simulation and radiative forcing of various aerosol species with GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemura, Toshihiko; Okamoto, Hajime; Numaguti, Atusi; Suzuki, Kentaroh; Higurashi, Akiko; Nakajima, Teruyuki

    2001-02-01

    A global three-dimensional transport model that can simultaneously treat main tropospheric aerosols, i.e., carbonaceous (organic and black carbons), sulfate, soil dust, and sea salt, is developed. It is coupled with a Center for Climate System Research (CCSR)/National Institute for Enviormental Studies (NIES) atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM), and the meteorological field of wind, temperature, and specific humidity can be nudged by reanalysis data. Simulated results are compared with not only observations for aerosol concentrations but also the optical thickness and Angstrom exponent retrieved from remote sensing data such as National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)/Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). A general agreement is found between simulated results and observations spatially seasonally, and quantitatively. The present model is also coupled with the radiative process over both the solar and thermal regions. The annual and global mean radiative forcing by anthropogenic aerosols from fossil fuel sources is estimated to be -0.5 W m-2 over the clear sky for the direct effect and -2.0 W m-2 for the indirect effect.

  1. Climate Simulations based on a different-grid nested and coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dan; Ji, Jinjun; Li, Yinpeng

    2002-05-01

    An atmosphere-vegetation interaction model (A VIM) has been coupled with a nine-layer General Cir-culation Model (GCM) of Institute of Atmospheic Physics/State Key Laboratory of Numerical Modeling for Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics (IAP/LASG), which is rhomboidally truncated at zonal wave number 15, to simulate global climatic mean states. A VIM is a model having inter-feedback between land surface processes and eco-physiological processes on land. As the first step to couple land with atmosphere completely, the physiological processes are fixed and only the physical part (generally named the SVAT (soil-vegetation-atmosphere-transfer scheme) model) of AVIM is nested into IAP/LASG L9R15 GCM. The ocean part of GCM is prescribed and its monthly sea surface temperature (SST) is the climatic mean value. With respect to the low resolution of GCM, i.e., each grid cell having lon-gitude 7.5° and latitude 4.5°, the vegetation is given a high resolution of 1.5° by 1.5° to nest and couple the fine grid cells of land with the coarse grid cells of atmosphere. The coupling model has been integrated for 15 years and its last ten-year mean of outputs was chosen for analysis. Compared with observed data and NCEP reanalysis, the coupled model simulates the main characteris-tics of global atmospheric circulation and the fields of temperature and moisture. In particular, the simu-lated precipitation and surface air temperature have sound results. The work creates a solid base on coupling climate models with the biosphere.

  2. A GCM study of El Nino-Southern Oscillation and its relation with the seasonal cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Heng

    The main objectives in this dissertation are to examine the impact of the seasonal cycle on El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), and to provide a quantitative validation of the mechanisms for the impact proposed by previous studies. Hypothesis-validation studies are performed in the control environment provided by ENSO events simulated with a coupled general circulation model (CGCM). Using this approach the simulated seasonal cycle and interannual variability can be separated and artificially modified in view of the aspect selected for examination. The CGCM used in this study is the tropical Pacific version of the UCLA CGCM. An analysis of the energy balance in the tropical Pacific Ocean in simulations by the CGCM and by its OGCM component with forcing based on observational data address the irregularities of ENSO. The results suggest that ENSO irregular features manifested in the evolution of energy components on interannual time scales are due to the impacts of seasonal cycle-ENSO interactions. The impact on ENSO of the seasonal cycle in the upper ocean current system and thermocline structure is tested with uncoupled OGCM by shifting the phase relation between the seasonal and interannual components of the surface forcing. It is found that such a shift can significantly affect the evolution of heat content anomalies in the equatorial eastern basin. The impact is primarily due to changes in the anomalous zonal advection of temperature. The following hypotheses about the impact on ENSO of the atmospheric seasonal cycle are validated in a coupled setup with the CGCM: (1) the seasonal warming of the cold tongue during January-April favors the initial growth of warm events; (2) the northward migration of the convergence zone in the western part of the basin during April-May plays a significant role in the initial growth of warm events; and (3) the southward migration of the convergence zone in the western part of the basin during December-January favors the demise of

  3. The Aggregate Representation of Terrestrial Land Covers Within Global Climate Models (GCM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuttleworth, W. James; Sorooshian, Soroosh

    1996-01-01

    This project had four initial objectives: (1) to create a realistic coupled surface-atmosphere model to investigate the aggregate description of heterogeneous surfaces; (2) to develop a simple heuristic model of surface-atmosphere interactions; (3) using the above models, to test aggregation rules for a variety of realistic cover and meteorological conditions; and (4) to reconcile biosphere-atmosphere transfer scheme (BATS) land covers with those that can be recognized from space; Our progress in meeting these objectives can be summarized as follows. Objective 1: The first objective was achieved in the first year of the project by coupling the Biosphere-Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (BATS) with a proven two-dimensional model of the atmospheric boundary layer. The resulting model, BATS-ABL, is described in detail in a Masters thesis and reported in a paper in the Journal of Hydrology Objective 2: The potential value of the heuristic model was re-evaluated early in the project and a decision was made to focus subsequent research around modeling studies with the BATS-ABL model. The value of using such coupled surface-atmosphere models in this research area was further confirmed by the success of the Tucson Aggregation Workshop. Objective 3: There was excellent progress in using the BATS-ABL model to test aggregation rules for a variety of realistic covers. The foci of attention have been the site of the First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project Field Experiment (FIFE) in Kansas and one of the study sites of the Anglo-Brazilian Amazonian Climate Observational Study (ABRACOS) near the city of Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil. These two sites were selected because of the ready availability of relevant field data to validate and initiate the BATS-ABL model. The results of these tests are given in a Masters thesis, and reported in two papers. Objective 4: Progress far exceeded original expectations not only in reconciling BATS land covers with those that can be

  4. Downward Wave Coupling Changes in Response to Future Climate Change, Two Way Atmosphere/Ocean Coupling and QBO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellyanto Lubis, Sandro; Matthes, Katja; Harnik, Nili; Omrani, Nour-Eddine

    2014-05-01

    Wave reflection in the stratosphere can impact the troposphere via a well-defined, high latitude meridional waveguide that is bounded above by a vertical reflecting surface. Such wave reflection is known as downward wave coupling (DWC). Recent studies have shown that stratospheric ozone affects DWC, affecting wave propagation and subsequent wave-mean flow interaction in the Southern Hemisphere. However the factors controlling DWC in the Northern Hemisphere are still unclear. There is new evidence that the frequency of Major Stratospheric Warming (MSW) is significantly influenced by the QBO and two-way ocean/ atmosphere interaction. However the resulting impact on DWC has thus far not been investigated. Here we examine the impact of future climate change, two way atmosphere/ ocean coupling, and the QBO on wave geometry and DWC using different CESM-WACCM model experiments. A transient simulation of present and future climate (1955-2099), with green house gases (GHG) and ozone depleting substances (ODS) following the RCP 8.5 scenario, shows the largest reduction in the DWC over last few decades of the simulation. This reduction is associated with an absence of the vertical reflecting surface and statistically insignificant downward wave reflection. Comparison to an experiment with GHG/ODS fixed at 1960s levels, shows no indication of DWC-changes. The lack of a DWC response is associated with insignificant changes of the background wind states, whose vertical structure directly impacts the DWC. The comparison of this experiment with simulations with and without QBO nudging shows that the QBO strengthens the DWC. This can be explained by the fact that our nonQBO simulation has a permanent, strong QBO-like east phase, which dampens the DWC. Comparison of experiments with dynamically-coupled and fixed SSTs shows that the background zonal wind is strengthened significantly when the ocean/atmosphere interaction is removed. However, no apparent strengthening of DWC is seen

  5. The impact of tropical wind data on the analysis and forcasts of the GLA GCM for the global weather experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paegle, Jan; Baker, W. E.

    1985-01-01

    It is well-known that divergent wind estimates are much more dependent upon the analysis system than are estimates of the rotational wind. This conclusion is supported in recent analyses of FGGE SOP1 data produced by the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres (GLA), the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) and the European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF). These analyses differ in the forecast models that are used for the four-dimensional assimilation, in the data rejection criteria, and, to a certain extent, in the data density. Because the final divergent wind is a product of both model constraints and observation, it is relevant to inquire how much of each goes into the final product. We presently investigate this question through a systematic analysis of tropical data that are sampled at different densities by the GLA GCM.

  6. The influence of tropical wind data on the analysis and forecasts of the GLAS GCM for the Global Weather Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paegle, J.; Baker, W. E.

    1985-01-01

    Several densities of tropical divergent wind data were included in a fourth-order GCM to examine the effects on the accuracy of the model predictions. The experiments covered assimilation of all available tropical wind data, no tropical wind data between 20 deg N and 20 deg S, only westerly tropical wind data and only easterly tropical wind data. The predictions were all made for the 200 mb upper troposphere. Elimination of tropical data produced excessively strong upper tropospheric westerlies which in turn amplified the globally integrated rotational flow kinetic energy by around 10 percent and doubled the global divergent flow kinetic energy. Retaining only easterly wind data, ameliorated most of the error. Inclusion of all the tropical wind data however, did not lead to overall positive effects, as the data were linked to tropical wave energetics and ageostrophic winds which were already assimilated in the model.

  7. GCM response to Late Precambrian (˜590 Ma) ice—covered continents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baum, Steven K.; Crowley, Thomas J.

    Recent coupled energy balance/ice sheet modeling studies indicate that ice-covered continents can be simulated for the Late Precambrian with 6% solar constant reduction. We examine the ocean mixed layer response to such an ice sheet with the GENESIS 2 general circulation model and CO2 levels varying from 0.5-2.5 times present. The ocean ices over completely at 0.5-1.0X present levels, with the final phase of sea ice growth occurring within a single model year. A qualitatively different 2.5X CO2 solution is close to equilibrium and yields open water between ˜25 °N and ˜25 °S paleolatitude. The prevailing wind patterns suggest that an equatorial Pacific-type circulation may have developed in part of the Neoproterozoic ocean.

  8. GCM Simulations of Tropical Ice Accumulations: Implications for Cold-based Glaciers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haberle, R. M.; Montmessin, F.; Forget, F.; Levrard, B.; Head, J. W., III; Laskar, J.

    2004-01-01

    Each of the three Tharsis Montes shield volcanoes on Mars has fan-shaped deposits on their flanks. A detailed analysis of the multiple facies of the Arsia Mons deposits, coupled with field observations of polar glaciers in Antarctica, shows that they are consistent with deposition from cold-based mountain glaciers. Key features of these glaciers are: (1) they formed only on the western flank of each volcano, (2) enough ice accumulated to cause them to flow but without basal melting, (3) there were multiple advances and retreats, (4) the last major glaciation was more than several million years ago, (5) the areal extent of the deposits they left behind decreases northward, (6) together the deposits range in elevation from a low of 1.5 to a high of 8.5 km, and (7) there are no signs that significant accumulation is occurring today.

  9. Sensitivity of a GCM simulation to inclusion of inland water surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Bonan, G.B.

    1995-11-01

    A land surface model that includes a subgrid parameterization for inland water (lake, swamp, marsh) was coupled to a modified version of the NCAR CCM2. The coupled model was run for 5 yr with and without inland water subgrid points to determine the importance of inland water for global climate simulation. In July, the inclusion of these water bodies resulted in a spatially consistent signal in which high inland water regions were 2{degrees}-3{degrees}C cooler, had increased latent heat flux (10-45 W m{sup -2}), and decreased sensible heat flux (5-30 W m{sup -2}) compared to the simulation without these water bodies. These changes were statistically significant in the lake region of northwest Canada, the Great Lakes region of North America, the swamp and marsh region of the Siberian lowlands, and the lake region of East Africa, but were not significantly different in the swamp and marsh region of Finland and northwest Russia. The effect on Northern Hemisphere January air temperature was difficult to interpret due to large interannual variability. In tropical lake regions (East Africa), the response to lakes was less in the rainy season (January) than in the dry season (July). Precipitation was unchanged in both months except for the Great Lakes region where precipitation increased in January. These changes in temperature, precipitation, and surface fluxes were consistent with mesoscale modeling studies of the effects of lakes on climate and tended to bring the model closer to observations. In particular, the summer cooling in North America helped reduce a large warm temperature bias in the model, but did not eliminate the bias. The lakes had little effect on atmospheric moisture, radiation, or zonal circulation. These results show that subgrid-scale inland water bodies can be successfully added to global land surface models for use with GCMs. 35 refs., 7 figs., 7 tabs.

  10. The MJO Transition from Shallow to Deep Convection in CloudSat/CALIPSO Data and GISS GCM Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DelGenio, Anthony G.; Chen, Yonghua; Kim, Daehyun; Yao, Mao-Sung

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between convective penetration depth and tropospheric humidity is central to recent theories of the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO). It has been suggested that general circulation models (GCMs) poorly simulate the MJO because they fail to gradually moisten the troposphere by shallow convection and simulate a slow transition to deep convection. CloudSat and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) data are analyzed to document the variability of convection depth and its relation to water vapor during the MJO transition from shallow to deep convection and to constrain GCM cumulus parameterizations. Composites of cloud occurrence for 10MJO events show the following anticipatedMJO cloud structure: shallow and congestus clouds in advance of the peak, deep clouds near the peak, and upper-level anvils after the peak. Cirrus clouds are also frequent in advance of the peak. The Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EarthObserving System (EOS) (AMSR-E) columnwater vapor (CWV) increases by;5 mmduring the shallow- deep transition phase, consistent with the idea of moisture preconditioning. Echo-top height of clouds rooted in the boundary layer increases sharply with CWV, with large variability in depth when CWV is between;46 and 68 mm. International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project cloud classifications reproduce these climatological relationships but correctly identify congestus-dominated scenes only about half the time. A version of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies Model E2 (GISS-E2) GCM with strengthened entrainment and rain evaporation that produces MJO-like variability also reproduces the shallow-deep convection transition, including the large variability of cloud-top height at intermediate CWV values. The variability is due to small grid-scale relative humidity and lapse rate anomalies for similar values of CWV. 1.

  11. Paleo-Permafrost Distribution Downscaled in South America: Examination of the GCM-based maps with the observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, K.; Trombotto, D.; Bigelow, N. H.; Marchenko, S. S.; Romanovsky, V. E.; Walsh, J. E.; Hendricks, A.; Yoshikawa, K.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we show our attempt to compare the potential regional frozen ground distribution in South America for the present-day, mid-Holocene and the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), downscaled from the outputs of the sets of global climate model (GCM)s, participating in recent Paleoclimate Model Intercomparison Project (PMIP2 and PMIP3). Due to relatively small portion of the terrestrial areas compared to that of the Northern Hemisphere, the frozen ground distribution in the Southern Hemisphere has not been intensively surveyed and/or mapped, except for the Andes. This scale and recognition gap is one of the reasons why the GCM results have not been widely used in investigations and applications in geography or geomorphology, although field surveys in these disciplines have intensively been conducted in the middle latitude in South America, from the Andes through Patagonia to Tierra del Fuego, to evidence the periglacial processes and to determine the distribution, and their change, in the Quaternary. The PMIP2 downscaled regional maps successfully showed the likely presence of frozen ground, such as permafrost in the Andes for 0ka, whereas the original coarse-resolution global maps failed. However, it still showed insufficient and/or incorrect classifications, e.g., lowland in Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego that are not underlain by permafrost today but were in 21ka, failed to produce the LGM permafrost. The mid-latitude mountains with the Pleistocene permafrost evidence, such as Extra-Andean Mountains and Ventania, also failed to be reproduced. This discrepancy in the PMIP2 products is likely due to the regional warm bias in South America, in contrast to the cool bias on hemispheric scales, which has been improved in PMIP3 products.

  12. Model Validation Through SOM-based Pattern Analysis: Evaluating HadAM3 GCM Hindcasts Over Southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewitson, B.; Collins, D.

    2001-05-01

    The decomposition of the time-space structure in atmospheric data has long been a core analysis technique for feature identification and interpretation. Most common of these methods has been EOF analysis and cluster analysis. However, the linear and orthogonal nature of these methods inherently imposes some restrictions on the results. Nonlinear Primary Component Analysis may be used to extend EOF techniques, while Self Organizing Maps (SOMs) may be used to extend clustering techniques. Such technique developments are of particular importance for improving seasonal forecasting by evaluating the shorter time frame of model performance (as opposed to the more common temporal means and anomalies). In this analysis SOMs are applied to time series of spatial fields from the NCEP reanalysis and the HadAM3 GCM forced with observed SSTs. Using 6-hourly data the SOM finds reference vectors that span the high-dimensional input data space, and forms a mapping of this high-dimensional space to a 2-dimensional lattice. In effect the procedure identifies arch-types in the data. The original data fields may then be associated with the reference vectors, in effect performing a clustering of the data against the reference vectors identified. The 2-dimensional mapping may then be used to effectively visualize the ordered relations of the input data. In this manner the relative frequency of occurrence of synoptic events may be determined, as well as the temporal evolution of synoptic events, and the velocity of the synoptic evolution. Using this approach the GCM data for the summer season over southern Africa (DJF) is evaluated against the NCEP reanalysis for the same period. This allows bias and error in the model to be identified in terms of circulation modes and evolution.

  13. Incorporation of New Convective Ice Microphysics into the NASA GISS GCM and Impacts on Cloud Ice Water Path (IWP) Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsaesser, Greg; Del Genio, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    The CMIP5 configurations of the GISS Model-E2 GCM simulated a mid- and high latitude ice IWP that decreased by 50 relative to that simulated for CMIP3 (Jiang et al. 2012; JGR). Tropical IWP increased by 15 in CMIP5. While the tropical IWP was still within the published upper-bounds of IWP uncertainty derived using NASA A-Train satellite observations, it was found that the upper troposphere (200 mb) ice water content (IWC) exceeded the published upper-bound by a factor of 2. This was largely driven by IWC in deep-convecting regions of the tropics.Recent advances in the model-E2 convective parameterization have been found to have a substantial impact on tropical IWC. These advances include the development of both a cold pool parameterization (Del Genio et al. 2015) and new convective ice parameterization. In this presentation, we focus on the new parameterization of convective cloud ice that was developed using data from the NASA TC4 Mission. Ice particle terminal velocity formulations now include information from a number of NASA field campaigns. The new parameterization predicts both an ice water mass weighted-average particle diameter and a particle cross sectional area weighted-average size diameter as a function of temperature and ice water content. By assuming a gamma-distribution functional form for the particle size distribution, these two diameter estimates are all that are needed to explicitly predict the distribution of ice particles as a function of particle diameter.GCM simulations with the improved convective parameterization yield a 50 decrease in upper tropospheric IWC, bringing the tropical and global mean IWP climatologies into even closer agreement with the A-Train satellite observation best estimates.

  14. On the effects of constraining atmospheric circulation in a coupled atmosphere-ocean Arctic regional climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Peter; Döscher, Ralf; Koenigk, Torben

    2016-06-01

    Impacts of spectral nudging on simulations of Arctic climate in coupled simulations have been investigated in a set of simulations with a regional climate model (RCM). The dominantly circumpolar circulation in the Arctic lead to weak constraints on the lateral boundary conditions (LBCs) for the RCM, which causes large internal variability with strong deviations from the driving model. When coupled to an ocean and sea ice model, this results in sea ice concentrations that deviate from the observed spatial distribution. Here, a method of spectral nudging is applied to the atmospheric model RCA4 in order to assess the potentials for improving results for the sea ice concentrations when coupled to the RCO ocean-sea ice model. The spectral nudging applied to reanalysis driven simulations significantly improves the generated sea ice regarding its temporal evolution, extent and inter-annual trends, compared to simulations with standard LBC nesting. The method is furthermore evaluated with driving data from two CMIP5 GCM simulations for current and future conditions. The GCM biases are similar to the RCA4 biases with ERA-Interim, however, the spectral nudging still improves the surface winds enough to show improvements in the simulated sea ice. For both GCM downscalings, the spectrally nudged version retains a larger sea ice extent in September further into the future. Depending on the sea ice formulation in the GCM, the temporal evolution of the regional sea ice model can deviate strongly.

  15. Atlas of Seasonal Means Simulated by the NSIPP 1 Atmospheric GCM. Volume 17

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suarez, Max J. (Editor); Bacmeister, Julio; Pegion, Philip J.; Schubert, Siegfried D.; Busalacchi, Antonio J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This atlas documents the climate characteristics of version 1 of the NASA Seasonal-to-Interannual Prediction Project (NSIPP) Atmospheric General Circulation Model (AGCM). The AGCM includes an interactive land model (the Mosaic scheme), and is part of the NSIPP coupled atmosphere-land-ocean model. The results presented here are based on a 20-year (December 1979-November 1999) "ANIIP-style" integration of the AGCM in which the monthly-mean sea-surface temperature and sea ice are specified from observations. The climate characteristics of the AGCM are compared with the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) and the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF) reanalyses. Other verification data include Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSNM) total precipitable water, the Xie-Arkin estimates of precipitation, and Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) measurements of short and long wave radiation. The atlas is organized by season. The basic quantities include seasonal mean global maps and zonal and vertical averages of circulation, variance/covariance statistics, and selected physics quantities.

  16. Dynamics of coupled human-landscape systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, B. T.; McNamara, D. E.

    2007-11-01

    A preliminary dynamical analysis of landscapes and humans as hierarchical complex systems suggests that strong coupling between the two that spreads to become regionally or globally pervasive should be focused at multi-year to decadal time scales. At these scales, landscape dynamics is dominated by water, sediment and biological routing mediated by fluvial, oceanic, atmospheric processes and human dynamics is dominated by simplifying, profit-maximizing market forces and political action based on projection of economic effect. Also at these scales, landscapes impact humans through patterns of natural disasters and trends such as sea level rise; humans impact landscapes by the effect of economic activity and changes meant to mitigate natural disasters and longer term trends. Based on this analysis, human-landscape coupled systems can be modeled using heterogeneous agents employing prediction models to determine actions to represent the nonlinear behavior of economic and political systems and rule-based routing algorithms to represent landscape processes. A cellular model for the development of New Orleans illustrates this approach, with routing algorithms for river and hurricane-storm surge determining flood extent, five markets (home, labor, hotel, tourism and port services) connecting seven types of economic agents (home buyers/laborers, home developers, hotel owners/ employers, hotel developers, tourists, port services developer and port services owners/employers), building of levees or a river spillway by political agents and damage to homes, hotels or port services within cells determined by the passage or depth of flood waters. The model reproduces historical aspects of New Orleans economic development and levee construction and the filtering of frequent small-scale floods at the expense of large disasters.

  17. Impact of nucleation schemes on cirrus cloud formation in a GCM with sectional microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardeen, C.; Gettelman, A.; Jensen, E. J.; Heymsfield, A.; Delanoe, J.; Deng, M.

    2012-12-01

    We have implemented a sectional microphysics scheme for ice clouds based upon the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres (CARMA) in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5), which allows for a size resolved treatment of ice particle nucleation, condensational growth, coagulation, sedimentation and detrainment. Detrained and in situ formed ice particles are tracked separately in the model allowing for different microphysical assumptions and separate analysis. Cloud ice from CAM5/CARMA simulations compare better with satellite observations than those with the standard CAM5 two-moment microphysics. CAM5/CARMA has a prognostic treatment for snow, which results in improved ice mass and representation of a melting layer that is absent in CAM5. Here we explore the sensitivity of the simulations to different nucleation schemes including: homogeneous freezing based on Koop et al. (2000), homogeneous freezing based upon Aerosols Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) chamber measurement (Möhler et al., 2010), heterogeneous nucleation with dust aerosols, and heterogeous nucleation with glassy aerosols (Murray et al. 2010). The initial size for detrained ice particles in CAM5/CARMA is temperature dependent based upon a fits to observations from Heymsfield et al. (2010). We explore the sensitivity of the model to different choices for these fits. Results from these simulations are compared to retrievals of water vapor from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), ice cloud properties from CloudSat-CALIPSO observations (Delanoë and Hogan, 2010; Deng et al. 2010) and to aircraft observations from several field campaigns including: the Costa Rica Aura Validation Experiment (CR-AVE), the Tropical Composition, Cloud and Climate Coupling (TC4), the Mid-latitude Airborne Cirrus Properties Experiment (MACPEX) and the Airborne Tropical Tropopause Experiment (ATTREX).

  18. Sensitivity of Middle Atmospheric Temperature and Circulation in the UIUC Mesosphere-Stratosphere-Troposphere GCM to the Treatment of Subgrid-Scale Gravity-Wave Breaking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Fanglin; Schlesinger, Michael E.; Andranova, Natasha; Zubov, Vladimir A.; Rozanov, Eugene V.; Callis, Lin B.

    2003-01-01

    The sensitivity of the middle atmospheric temperature and circulation to the treatment of mean- flow forcing due to breaking gravity waves was investigated using the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 40-layer Mesosphere-Stratosphere-Troposphere General Circulation Model (MST-GCM). Three GCM experiments were performed. The gravity-wave forcing was represented first by Rayleigh friction, and then by the Alexander and Dunkerton (AD) parameterization with weak and strong breaking effects of gravity waves. In all experiments, the Palmer et al. parameterization was included to treat the breaking of topographic gravity waves in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. Overall, the experiment with the strong breaking effect simulates best the middle atmospheric temperature and circulation. With Rayleigh friction and the weak breaking effect, a large warm bias of up to 60 C was found in the summer upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere. This warm bias was linked to the inability of the GCM to simulate the reversal of the zonal winds from easterly to westerly crossing the mesopause in the summer hemisphere. With the strong breaking effect, the GCM was able to simulate this reversal, and essentially eliminated the warm bias. This improvement was the result of a much stronger meridional transport circulation that possesses a strong vertical ascending branch in the summer upper mesosphere, and hence large adiabatic cooling. Budget analysis indicates that 'in the middle atmosphere the forces that act to maintain a steady zonal-mean zonal wind are primarily those associated with the meridional transport circulation and breaking gravity waves. Contributions from the interaction of the model-resolved eddies with the mean flow are small. To obtain a transport circulation in the mesosphere of the UIUC MST-GCM that is strong enough to produce the observed cold summer mesopause, gravity-wave forcing larger than 100 m/s/day in magnitude is required near the summer mesopause. In

  19. Correction of biased climate simulated by biased physics through parameter estimation in an intermediate coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuefeng; Zhang, Shaoqing; Liu, Zhengyu; Wu, Xinrong; Han, Guijun

    2016-09-01

    Imperfect physical parameterization schemes are an important source of model bias in a coupled model and adversely impact the performance of model simulation. With a coupled ocean-atmosphere-land model of intermediate complexity, the impact of imperfect parameter estimation on model simulation with biased physics has been studied. Here, the biased physics is induced by using different outgoing longwave radiation schemes in the assimilation and "truth" models. To mitigate model bias, the parameters employed in the biased longwave radiation scheme are optimized using three different methods: least-squares parameter fitting (LSPF), single-valued parameter estimation and geography-dependent parameter optimization (GPO), the last two of which belong to the coupled model parameter estimation (CMPE) method. While the traditional LSPF method is able to improve the performance of coupled model simulations, the optimized parameter values from the CMPE, which uses the coupled model dynamics to project observational information onto the parameters, further reduce the bias of the simulated climate arising from biased physics. Further, parameters estimated by the GPO method can properly capture the climate-scale signal to improve the simulation of climate variability. These results suggest that the physical parameter estimation via the CMPE scheme is an effective approach to restrain the model climate drift during decadal climate predictions using coupled general circulation models.

  20. A GCM investigation of dust aerosol impact on the regional climate of North Africa and South/East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Y.; Xue, Y.; De Sales, F.; Liou, K. N.

    2016-04-01

    The climatic effects of dust aerosols in North Africa and South/East Asia have been investigated using an atmospheric general circulation model, NCEP/GCM/SSiB (Simplified Simple Biosphere Model) and the three-dimensional aerosol data simulated by the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model. GCM simulations show that due to the scattering and absorption of solar radiation by dust particles, surface temperature decreases over both regions, accompanied by a reduced sensible heat flux. However, precipitation responses are different in these two regions. Due to differences in dust location and the associated heating with respect to the rainfall band and circulation, the effect of dust could either enhance or suppress precipitation. Over the North Africa region where dust particles are mainly located to the north of rainfall band, heating of the air column by dust particles forces a stronger ascent motion over dust layers, which induces an anomalous subsidence (or a weakened upward motion) and suppressed cyclonic circulation to its south where precipitation reduces. Furthermore, both humidity and cloud decrease due to the heating in the middle troposphere (semi-direct effect). In South/East Asia, dust particles are located in the upper troposphere over the major rainfall band during the monsoon season, especially Southwest India and the coastal area of Bay of Bengal. Heating of the air column increases upward motion and strengthens cyclonic circulation. Humidity also increases due to the draw-in of the low level moist air. Therefore, cloud and precipitation increase over South/East Asia associated with dust effect. During the pre-monsoon season, when dust particles are located to the north of the monsoon rainfall band, the heating effect results in shifting precipitation northward. The heating of air column due to dust particles, not surface cooling, plays the major role in precipitation changes. The anomalous upward motion over dust regions will

  1. Development of a coupled wave-flow-vegetation interaction model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beudin, Alexis; Kalra, Tarandeep; Ganju, Neil Kamal; Warner, John C.

    2017-01-01

    Emergent and submerged vegetation can significantly affect coastal hydrodynamics. However, most deterministic numerical models do not take into account their influence on currents, waves, and turbulence. In this paper, we describe the implementation of a wave-flow-vegetation module into a Coupled-Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) modeling system that includes a flow model (ROMS) and a wave model (SWAN), and illustrate various interacting processes using an idealized shallow basin application. The flow model has been modified to include plant posture-dependent three-dimensional drag, in-canopy wave-induced streaming, and production of turbulent kinetic energy and enstrophy to parameterize vertical mixing. The coupling framework has been updated to exchange vegetation-related variables between the flow model and the wave model to account for wave energy dissipation due to vegetation. This study i) demonstrates the validity of the plant posture-dependent drag parameterization against field measurements, ii) shows that the model is capable of reproducing the mean and turbulent flow field in the presence of vegetation as compared to various laboratory experiments, iii) provides insight into the flow-vegetation interaction through an analysis of the terms in the momentum balance, iv) describes the influence of a submerged vegetation patch on tidal currents and waves separately and combined, and v) proposes future directions for research and development.

  2. Development of a coupled wave-flow-vegetation interaction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beudin, Alexis; Kalra, Tarandeep S.; Ganju, Neil K.; Warner, John C.

    2017-03-01

    Emergent and submerged vegetation can significantly affect coastal hydrodynamics. However, most deterministic numerical models do not take into account their influence on currents, waves, and turbulence. In this paper, we describe the implementation of a wave-flow-vegetation module into a Coupled-Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) modeling system that includes a flow model (ROMS) and a wave model (SWAN), and illustrate various interacting processes using an idealized shallow basin application. The flow model has been modified to include plant posture-dependent three-dimensional drag, in-canopy wave-induced streaming, and production of turbulent kinetic energy and enstrophy to parameterize vertical mixing. The coupling framework has been updated to exchange vegetation-related variables between the flow model and the wave model to account for wave energy dissipation due to vegetation. This study i) demonstrates the validity of the plant posture-dependent drag parameterization against field measurements, ii) shows that the model is capable of reproducing the mean and turbulent flow field in the presence of vegetation as compared to various laboratory experiments, iii) provides insight into the flow-vegetation interaction through an analysis of the terms in the momentum balance, iv) describes the influence of a submerged vegetation patch on tidal currents and waves separately and combined, and v) proposes future directions for research and development.

  3. Helix coupling

    DOEpatents

    Ginell, William S.

    1989-04-25

    A coupling for connecting helix members in series, which consists of a pair of U-shaped elements, one of which is attached to each helix end with the "U" sections of the elements interlocked. The coupling is particularly beneficial for interconnecting helical Nitinol elements utilized in thermal actuators or engines. Each coupling half is attached to the associated helix at two points, thereby providing axial load while being easily removed from the helix, and reusable.

  4. Helix coupling

    DOEpatents

    Ginell, W.S.

    1982-03-17

    A coupling for connecting helix members in series, which consists of a pair of U-shaped elements, one of which is attached to each helix end with the U sections of the elements interlocked. The coupling is particularly beneficial for interconnecting helical Nitinol elements utilized in thermal actuators or engines. Each coupling half is attached to the associated helix at two points, thereby providing axial load while being easily removed from the helix, and reusable.

  5. Impact of GCM boundary forcing on regional climate modeling of West African summer monsoon precipitation and circulation features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kebe, Ibourahima; Sylla, Mouhamadou Bamba; Omotosho, Jerome Adebayo; Nikiema, Pinghouinde Michel; Gibba, Peter; Giorgi, Filippo

    2017-03-01

    In this study, the latest version of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics Regional Climate Model (RegCM4) driven by three CMIP5 Global Climate Models (GCMs) is used at 25 km grid spacing over West Africa to investigate the impact of lateral boundary forcings on the simulation of monsoon precipitation and its relationship with regional circulation features. We find that the RegCM4 experiments along with their multimodel ensemble generally reproduce the location of the main precipitation characteristics over the region and improve upon the corresponding driving GCMs. However, the provision of different forcing boundary conditions leads to substantially different precipitation magnitudes and spatial patterns. For instance, while RegCM4 nested within GFDL-ESM-2M and HadGEM2-ES exhibits some underestimations of precipitation and an excessively narrow Intertropical Convergence Zone, the MPI-ESM-MR driven run produces precipitation spatial distribution and magnitudes more similar to observations. Such a superior performance originates from a much better simulation of the interactions between baroclinicity, temperature gradient and African Easterly Jet along with an improved connection between the Isentropic Potential Vorticity, its gradient and the African Easterly Waves dynamics. We conclude that a good performing GCM in terms of monsoon dynamical features (in this case MPI-ESM-MR) is needed to drive RCMs in order to achieve a better representation of the West Africa summer monsoon precipitation.

  6. Initial results from Ensemble Data Assimilation of radiances and retrieved temperatures from TES and MCS in an Martian GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C.; Richardson, M. I.

    2010-12-01

    Direct observations of the Martian atmosphere are used to constrain the evolution of a Martian General Circulation Model (MarsWRF) using an ensemble Kalman filter data assimilation framework (DART). We use radiance observations from the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) and temperature profiles from TES and the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) to constrain the evolution of the simulated Martian atmosphere during similar seasons of each mission. We describe the observations being ingested into the model and the preprocessing necessary to ingest these observations efficiently and accurately into the assimilation system. We test the sensitivity of the assimilation system by including surface visual albedo and infra-red emissivity, and atmospheric total dust loading, in the state vector. We allow DART to modify these unobserved state vector components using only the temperature or radiance observations and information gained from the ensemble of simulated circulations. Finally, we identify and discuss the biases and model limitations revealed by the assimilation, and describe the modifications made to the GCM to improve its ensemble mean skill (accuracy) and ensemble variance to better assimilate the available observations.

  7. Warm Rain Processes over the Tropical Oceans and Implications on Climate Change: Results from TRMM and GEOS GCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K. M.; Wu, H. T.

    2004-01-01

    In this talk, we will first show results from TRMM data regarding the characteristics of warm rains over the tropical oceans, and the dependence of rate of warm rain production on sea surface temperature. Results lead to the hypothesis that warm rain production efficiency, i.e., autoconversion, may be increased in a warm climate. We use the GEOS-II GCM to test this hypothesis. Our modeling results show that in a climate with increased rate of autoconversion, the total rain amount is increased, with warm rain contributing to larger portion of the increase. The abundant rainout of warm precipitation causes a reduction of low and middle cloud amount due to rainout, and reduced high clouds due to less water vapor available for ice-phase convection. However, clod radiation feedback caused by the increased rainfall efficiency, leads to differential vertical heating/cooling producing a more unstable atmosphere, allowing, more intense, but isolated penetrative convection, with contracted anvils to develop. Results also show that increased autoconversion reduces the convective adjustment time scale, resulting in faster recycling of atmospheric water. Most interestingly, the increased low level heating associated with warm rain leads to more energetic Madden and Julian oscillations in the tropics, with well-defined eastward propagation. While reducing the autoconversion leads to an abundant mix of westward and eastward tropical disturbances on daily to weekly time scales. The crucial link of precipitation microphysical processes to climate change including the effects of aerosols will be discussed.

  8. Warm Rain Processes Over the Tropical Oceans and Implications on Climate Change: Results from TRMM and GOES GCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K. M.; Wu, H. T.

    2004-01-01

    In this talk, we will first show results from TRMM data regarding the characteristics of warm rains over the tropical oceans, and the dependence of rate of warm rain production on sea surface temperature. Results lead to the hypothesis that warm rain production efficiency, i.e., autoconversion, may be increased in a warm climate. We use the GEOS-II GCM to test this hypothesis. Our modeling results show that in a climate with increased rate of autoconversion, the total rain amount is increased, with warm rain contributing to a larger portion of the increase. The abundant rainout of warm precipitation causes a reduction of low and middle cloud amount due to rainout, and reduced high clouds due to less water vapor available for ice-phase convection. However, clod radiation feedback caused by the increased rainfall efficiency, leads to differential vertical heating/cooling producing a more unstable atmosphere, allowing, more intense, but isolated penetrative convection, with contracted anvils to develop. Results also show that increased autoconversion reduces the convective adjustment time scale, resulting in faster recycling of atmospheric water. Most interestingly, the increased low level heating associated with warm rain leads to more energetic Madden and Julian oscillations in the tropics, with well-defined eastward propagation. While reducing the autoconversion leads to an abundant mix of westward and eastward tropical disturbances on daily to weekly time scales. The crucial link of precipitation microphysical processes to climate change including the effects of aerosols will be discussed.

  9. Wave analysis in the atmosphere of Venus below 100-km altitude, simulated by the LMD Venus GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebonnois, Sébastien; Sugimoto, Norihiko; Gilli, Gabriella

    2016-11-01

    A new simulation of Venus atmospheric circulation obtained with the LMD Venus GCM is described and the simulated wave activity is analyzed. Agreement with observed features of the temperature structure, static stability and zonal wind field is good, such as the presence of a cold polar collar, diurnal and semi-diurnal tides. At the resolution used (96 longitudes × 96 latitudes), a fully developed superrotation is obtained both when the simulation is initialized from rest and from an atmosphere already in superrotation, though winds are still weak below the clouds (roughly half the observed values). The atmospheric waves play a crucial role in the angular momentum budget of the Venus's atmospheric circulation. In the upper cloud, the vertical angular momentum is transported by the diurnal and semi-diurnal tides. Above the cloud base (approximately 1 bar), equatorward transport of angular momentum is done by polar barotropic and mid- to high-latitude baroclinic waves present in the cloud region, with frequencies between 5 and 20 cycles per Venus day (periods between 6 and 23 Earth days). In the middle cloud, just above the convective layer, a Kelvin type wave (period around 7.3 Ed) is present at the equator, as well as a low-latitude Rossby-gravity type wave (period around 16 Ed). Below the clouds, large-scale mid- to high-latitude gravity waves develop and play a significant role in the angular momentum balance.

  10. An offline constrained data assimilation technique for aerosols: Improving GCM simulations over South Asia using observations from two satellite sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraskar, Ankit; Bhushan, Mani; Venkataraman, Chandra; Cherian, Ribu

    2016-05-01

    Aerosol properties simulated by general circulation models (GCMs) exhibit large uncertainties due to biases in model processes and inaccuracies in aerosol emission inputs. In this work, we propose an offline, constrained optimization based procedure to improve these simulations by assimilating them with observational data. The proposed approach explicitly incorporates the non-negativity constraint on the aerosol optical depth (AOD) which is a key metric to quantify aerosol distributions. The resulting optimization problem is quadratic programming in nature and can be easily solved by available optimization routines. The utility of the approach is demonstrated by performing offline assimilation of GCM simulated aerosol optical properties and radiative forcing over South Asia (40-120 E, 5-40 N), with satellite AOD measurements from two sensors, namely Moderate Resolution Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MODIS) and Multi-Angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR). Uncertainty in observational data used in the assimilation is computed by developing different error bands around regional AOD observations, based on their quality assurance flags. The assimilation, evaluated on monthly and daily scales, compares well with Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) observations as determined by goodness of fit statistics. Assimilation increased both model predicted atmospheric absorption and clear sky radiative forcing by factors consistent with recent estimates in literature. Thus, the constrained assimilation algorithm helps in systematically reducing uncertainties in aerosol simulations.

  11. Simulation of Subgrid Orographic Convection and Precipitation with 2-D Cloud-Resolving Models Embedded in a GCM Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, J.; Arakawa, A.

    2015-12-01

    Through explicitly resolved cloud-scale processes by embedded 2-D cloud-resolving models (CRMs), the Multiscale Modeling Framework (MMF) known as the superparameterization has been reasonably successful to simulate various atmospheric events over a wide range of time scales. One thing to be justified is, however, if the influence of complex 3-D topography can be adequately represented by the embedded 2-D CRMs. In this study, simulations are performed in the presence of a variety of topography with embedded 3-D and 2-D CRMs in a single-column inactive GCM. Through the comparison between these simulations, it is demonstrated that the 2-D representation of topography is able to simulate the statistics of precipitation due to 3-D topography reasonably well as long as the topographic characteristics, such as the mean and standard deviation, are closely recognized. It is also shown that the use of two perpendicular sets of 2-D representations tends to reduce the error due to a 2-D representation.

  12. Implementation of the NCAR Community Land Model (CLM) in the NASA/NCAR finite-volume Global Climate Model (fvGCM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radakovich, Jon D.; Wang, Guiling; Chern, Jiundar; Bosilovich, Michael G.; Lin, Shian-Jiann; Nebuda, Sharon; Shen, Bo-Wen

    2002-01-01

    In this study, the NCAR CLM version 2.0 land-surface model was integrated into the NASA/NCAR fvGCM. The CLM was developed collaboratively by an open interagency/university group of scientists and based on well-proven physical parameterizations and numerical schemes that combine the best features of BATS, NCAR-LSM, and IAP94. The CLM design is a one-dimensional point model with 1 vegetation layer, along with sub-grid scale tiles. The features of the CLM include 10-uneven soil layers with water, ice, and temperature states in each soil layer, and five snow layers, with water flow, refreezing, compaction, and aging allowed. In addition, the CLM utilizes two-stream canopy radiative transfer, the Bonan lake model and topographic enhanced streamflow based on TOPMODEL. The DAO fvGCM uses a genuinely conservative Flux-Form Semi-Lagrangian transport algorithm along with terrain- following Lagrangian control-volume vertical coordinates. The physical parameterizations are based on the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM-2). For our purposes, the fvGCM was run at 2 deg x 2.5 deg horizontal resolution with 55 vertical levels. The 10-year climate from the fvGCM with CLM2 was intercompared with the climate from fvGCM with LSM, ECMWF and NCEP. We concluded that the incorporation of CLM2 did not significantly impact the fvGCM climate from that of LSM. The most striking difference was the warm bias in the CLM2 surface skin temperature over desert regions. We determined that the warm bias can be partially attributed to the value of the drag coefficient for the soil under the canopy, which was too small resulting in a decoupling between the ground surface and the canopy. We also discovered that the canopy interception was high compared to observations in the Amazon region. A number of experiments were then performed focused on implementing model improvements. In order to correct the warm bias, the drag coefficient for the soil under the canopy was considered a function of LAI (Leaf

  13. Microphysics of Clouds with the Relaxed Arakawa-Schubert Scheme (McRAS). Part II: Implementation and Performance in GEOS II GCM.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sud, Y. C.; Walker, G. K.

    1999-09-01

    A prognostic cloud scheme named the Microphysics of Clouds with the Relaxed Arakawa-Schubert Scheme (McRAS) and the Simple Biosphere Model have been implemented in a version of the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) II GCM at a 4° latitude × 5° longitude × 20 sigma-layer resolution. The McRAS GCM was integrated for 50 months. The integration was initialized with the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts analysis of observations for 1 January 1987 and was forced with the observed sea surface temperatures and sea-ice distribution; on land, the permanent ice and vegetation properties (biomes and soils) were climatological, while the soil moisture and snow cover were prognostic. The simulation shows that the McRAS GCM yields realistic structures of in-cloud water and ice, and cloud-radiative forcing (CRF) even though the cloudiness has some discernible systematic errors. The simulated intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ) has a realistic time mean structure and seasonal cycle. The simulated CRF is sensitive to vertical distribution of cloud water, which can be affected hugely with the choice of minimum in-cloud water for the onset of autoconversion or critical cloud water amount that regulates the autoconversion itself. The generation of prognostic cloud water is accompanied by reduced global precipitation and interactive CRF. These feedbacks have a profound effect on the ITCZ. Even though somewhat weaker than observed, the McRAS GCM simulation produces robust 30-60-day oscillations in the 200-hPa velocity potential. Comparisons of CRFs and precipitation produced in a parallel simulation with the GEOS II GCM are included.Several seasonal simulations were performed with the McRAS-GEOS II GCM for the summer (June-July-August) and winter (December-January-February) periods to determine how the simulated clouds and CRFs would be affected by (i) advection of clouds, (ii) cloud-top entrainment instability, (iii) cloud water inhomogeneity correction, and

  14. Parameterization of GCM subgrid nonprecipitating cumulus and stratocumulus clouds using stochastic/phenomenological methods. Annual technical progress report, 1 December 1992--30 November 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Stull, R.B.

    1993-08-27

    This document is a progress report to the USDOE Atmospheric Radiation and Measurement Program (ARM). The overall project goal is to relate subgrid-cumulus-cloud formation, coverage, and population characteristics to statistical properties of surface-layer air, which in turn are modulated by heterogeneous land-usage within GCM-grid-box-size regions. The motivation is to improve the understanding and prediction of climate change by more accurately describing radiative and cloud processes.

  15. Use of a GCM to Explore Sampling Issues in Connection with Satellite Remote Sensing of the Earth Radiation Budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowler, Laura D.; Wielicki, Bruce A.; Randall, David A.; Branson, Mark D.; Gibson, Gary G.; Denn, Fredrick M.

    2000-01-01

    Collocated in time and space, top-of-the-atmosphere measurements of the Earth radiation budget (ERB) and cloudiness from passive scanning radiometers, and lidar- and radar-in-space measurements of multilayered cloud systems, are the required combination to improve our understanding of the role of clouds and radiation in climate. Experiments to fly multiple satellites "in formation" to measure simultaneously the radiative and optical properties of overlapping cloud systems are being designed. Because satellites carrying ERB experiments and satellites carrying lidars- or radars-in space have different orbital characteristics, the number of simultaneous measurements of radiation and clouds is reduced relative to the number of measurements made by each satellite independently. Monthly averaged coincident observations of radiation and cloudiness are biased when compared against more frequently sampled observations due, in particular, to the undersampling of their diurnal cycle, Using the Colorado State University General Circulation Model (CSU GCM), the goal of this study is to measure the impact of using simultaneous observations from the Earth Observing System (EOS) platform and companion satellites flying lidars or radars on monthly averaged diagnostics of longwave radiation, cloudiness, and its cloud optical properties. To do so, the hourly varying geographical distributions of coincident locations between the afternoon EOS (EOS-PM) orbit and the orbit of the ICESAT satellite set to fly at the altitude of 600 km, and between the EOS PM orbit and the orbits of the PICASSO satellite proposed to fly at the altitudes of 485 km (PICA485) or 705 km (PICA705), are simulated in the CSU GCM for a 60-month time period starting at the idealistic July 1, 2001, launch date. Monthly averaged diagnostics of the top-of-the-atmosphere, atmospheric, and surface longwave radiation budgets and clouds accumulated over grid boxes corresponding to satellite overpasses are compared against

  16. Global Radiative Forcing of Coupled Tropospheric Ozone and Aerosols in a Unified General Circulation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liao, Hong; Seinfeld, John H.; Adams, Peter J.; Mickley, Loretta J.

    2008-01-01

    Global simulations of sea salt and mineral dust aerosols are integrated into a previously developed unified general circulation model (GCM), the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) GCM II', that simulates coupled tropospheric ozone-NOx-hydrocarbon chemistry and sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon, primary organic carbon, and secondary organic carbon aerosols. The fully coupled gas-aerosol unified GCM allows one to evaluate the extent to which global burdens, radiative forcing, and eventually climate feedbacks of ozone and aerosols are influenced by gas-aerosol chemical interactions. Estimated present-day global burdens of sea salt and mineral dust are 6.93 and 18.1 Tg with lifetimes of 0.4 and 3.9 days, respectively. The GCM is applied to estimate current top of atmosphere (TOA) and surface radiative forcing by tropospheric ozone and all natural and anthropogenic aerosol components. The global annual mean value of the radiative forcing by tropospheric ozone is estimated to be +0.53 W m(sup -2) at TOA and +0.07 W m(sup -2) at the Earth's surface. Global, annual average TOA and surface radiative forcing by all aerosols are estimated as -0.72 and -4.04 W m(sup -2), respectively. While the predicted highest aerosol cooling and heating at TOA are -10 and +12 W m(sup -2) respectively, surface forcing can reach values as high as -30 W m(sup -2), mainly caused by the absorption by black carbon, mineral dust, and OC. We also estimate the effects of chemistry-aerosol coupling on forcing estimates based on currently available understanding of heterogeneous reactions on aerosols. Through altering the burdens of sulfate, nitrate, and ozone, heterogeneous reactions are predicted to change the global mean TOA forcing of aerosols by 17% and influence global mean TOA forcing of tropospheric ozone by 15%.

  17. Developing paleoclimate, historical and GCM based future scenarios of moisture indices for upper sub-basins in the Canadian Rockies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauchyn, D.; Lapp, S. L.; St. Jacques, J.; Vanstone, J. R.; MacDonald, R. J.; Byrne, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    The 20th century hydroclimatology of the Pacific Northwest has been linked to natural recurring large-scale climate patterns such as the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Tree-ring proxy data analyses carried out in western North America has proven valuable to quantify natural climate variation over centuries to millennia. This presentation describes an ongoing project linking dendro climate records and GCM (Global Climate Model) scenarios to the GENESYS (Generate Earth Systems Science input) Model. GENESYS is a fine-scale physically-based, spatial hydrometeorological model that has been shown to provide reasonable estimates of hydrometeorological conditions in complex terrain of mountain watersheds. Reconstructions of moisture indices and snowpack, from the GENESYS model output, for mountain regions in western Canada provide records of drought for the past 200-800 yrs. We are able to mine these long reconstructions for much more information about the frequency / duration of positive (wet) and negative (dry) moisture anomalies during difference phases of PDO and ENSO, as reconstructed from tree-ring datasets. As well, by comparing these moisture reconstructions to temperature reconstructions of the region we are able to identify warm/cool drought periods. These reconstructions reflect the seasonal changes in moisture relative to both the instrumental and future time periods. The large-scale climate patterns will also be derived from multiple GCMs, for the 21st century, as tools to better understand projections of future moisture variability. Decision makers responsible for adaptation to climate variability and change may use our forecasts of persistent departures from mean hydroclimate to plan for watershed scale adaptation.

  18. Exploring the faint young Sun problem and the possible climates of the Archean Earth with a 3-D GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charnay, B.; Forget, F.; Wordsworth, R.; Leconte, J.; Millour, E.; Codron, F.; Spiga, A.

    2013-09-01

    Different solutions have been proposed to solve the "faint young Sun problem," defined by the fact that the Earth was not fully frozen during the Archean despite the fainter Sun. Most previous studies were performed with simple 1-D radiative convective models and did not account well for the clouds and ice-albedo feedback or the atmospheric and oceanic transport of energy. We apply a global climate model (GCM) to test the different solutions to the faint young Sun problem. We explore the effect of greenhouse gases (CO2 and CH4), atmospheric pressure, cloud droplet size, land distribution, and Earth's rotation rate. We show that neglecting organic haze, 100 mbar of CO2 with 2 mbar of CH4 at 3.8 Ga and 10 mbar of CO2 with 2 mbar of CH4 at 2.5 Ga allow a temperate climate (mean surface temperature between 10°C and 20°C). Such amounts of greenhouse gases remain consistent with the geological data. Removing continents produces a warming lower than +4°C. The effect of rotation rate is even more limited. Larger droplets (radii of 17 μm versus 12 μm) and a doubling of the atmospheric pressure produce a similar warming of around +7°C. In our model, ice-free water belts can be maintained up to 25°N/S with less than 1 mbar of CO2 and no methane. An interesting cloud feedback appears above cold oceans, stopping the glaciation. Such a resistance against full glaciation tends to strongly mitigate the faint young Sun problem.

  19. GCM Study of Interannual Variability of Indian Summer Monsoon: the Impact of Anomalous Spring Eurasian Snow Cover.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jiayu

    A recently improved version of the COLA GCM, which simulates the Indian monsoon circulation and precipitation pattern closely, together with snow data derived from SMMR observations, were used to investigate the effect of anomalous spring Eurasian snow cover on the interannual variability of the Indian summer monsoon. We have successfully simulated the observed evidence that excessive winter/spring Eurasian snow cover is associated with a delay in monsoon onset, weak monsoon circulation, and an extended monsoon withdrawal period. JJAS simulated precipitation shows a reduction of about one standard deviation of model natural variation over the Indian region as well as a significant increase over the eastern portion of China. A study of the physical mechanisms involved reveals: (1) Energy used in melting excessive snow reduces the surface temperature over a broad region centered on the Tibetan Plateau. Reduced surface sensible heat flux reduces the mid-tropospheric temperature gradient between Tibet and equatorial Indian Ocean, resulting in a weakening of the Indian summer monsoon circulation. (2) North of Tibet, an anomalous low induced by the excessive springtime Mongolian snow cover is superimposed on the summertime central Asian trough, resulting in the deepening of the trough and the creation of a stronger-than-normal east Asian westerly jet. South of this jet, an upper-tropospheric anomalous anticyclonic circulation provides favorable conditions for convective precipitation over the southeastern part of China. Due to heating anomalies, weaker secondary circulation is accompanied by mass readjustment. Abnormal stationary wave propagation induced by an anomalous divergence field has an abnormal impact on remote regions. The use of the Plumb flux is extended to indicate the propagation of the stationary wave anomaly. Results clearly demonstrate that North America can be influenced by Tibetan anomalous snow cover via atmospheric teleconnection during the spring and

  20. The source of discrepancies in aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions between GCM and A-Train retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michibata, Takuro; Suzuki, Kentaroh; Sato, Yousuke; Takemura, Toshihiko

    2016-12-01

    Aerosol-cloud interactions are one of the most uncertain processes in climate models due to their nonlinear complexity. A key complexity arises from the possibility that clouds can respond to perturbed aerosols in two opposite ways, as characterized by the traditional "cloud lifetime" hypothesis and more recent "buffered system" hypothesis. Their importance in climate simulations remains poorly understood. Here we investigate the response of the liquid water path (LWP) to aerosol perturbations for warm clouds from the perspective of general circulation model (GCM) and A-Train remote sensing, through process-oriented model evaluations. A systematic difference is found in the LWP response between the model results and observations. The model results indicate a near-global uniform increase of LWP with increasing aerosol loading, while the sign of the response of the LWP from the A-Train varies from region to region. The satellite-observed response of the LWP is closely related to meteorological and/or macrophysical factors, in addition to the microphysics. The model does not reproduce this variability of cloud susceptibility (i.e., sensitivity of LWP to perturbed aerosols) because the parameterization of the autoconversion process assumes only suppression of rain formation in response to increased cloud droplet number, and does not consider macrophysical aspects that serve as a mechanism for the negative responses of the LWP via enhancements of evaporation and precipitation. Model biases are also found in the precipitation microphysics, which suggests that the model generates rainwater readily even when little cloud water is present. This essentially causes projections of unrealistically frequent and light rain, with high cloud susceptibilities to aerosol perturbations.

  1. TIME-GCM study of the ionospheric equatorial vertical drift changes during the 2006 stratospheric sudden warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maute, A.; Hagan, M. E.; Richmond, A. D.; Roble, R. G.

    2014-02-01

    This modeling study quantifies the daytime low-latitude vertical E×B drift changes in the longitudinal wave number 1 (wn1) to wn4 during the major extended January 2006 stratospheric sudden warming (SSW) period as simulated by the National Center for Atmospheric Research thermosphere-ionosphere-mesosphere electrodynamics general circulation model (TIME-GCM), and attributes the drift changes to specific tides and planetary waves (PWs). The largest drift amplitude change (approximately 5 m/s) is seen in wn1 with a strong temporal correlation to the SSW. The wn1 drift is primarily caused by the semidiurnal westward propagating tide with zonal wave number 1 (SW1), and secondarily by a stationary planetary wave with zonal wave number 1 (PW1). SW1 is generated by the nonlinear interaction of PW1 and the migrating semidiurnal tide (SW2) at high latitude around 90-100 km. The simulations suggest that the E region PW1 around 100-130 km at the different latitudes has different origins: at high latitudes, the PW1 is related to the original stratospheric PW1; at midlatitudes, the model indicates PW1 is due to the nonlinear interaction of SW1 and SW2 around 95-105 km; and at low latitudes, the PW1 might be caused by the nonlinear interaction between DE2 and DE3. The time evolution of the simulated wn4 in the vertical E×B drift amplitude shows no temporal correlation with the SSW. The wn4 in the low-latitude vertical drift is attributed to the diurnal eastward propagating tide with zonal wave number 3 (DE3), and the contributions from SE2, TE1, and PW4 are negligible.

  2. Increased plasma mRNAs of placenta-specific 1 (PLAC1) and glial cells-missing 1 (GCM1) in mothers with pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Fujito, Naoya; Samura, Osamu; Miharu, Norio; Tanigawa, Miho; Hyodo, Maki; Kudo, Yoshiki

    2006-03-01

    In this study we have investigated whether quantitative analysis of placental mRNAs in maternal plasma provides a way to monitor placental status. We measured plasma concentrations of human chorionic gonadotropin beta-subunit (betahCG) and human placental lactogen (hPL) mRNAs as previously reported mRNAs and pregnancy associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A), placenta-specific 1 (PLAC1) and glial cells-missing 1 (GCM1) mRNAs, which have not been measured during the course of normal pregnancy. Firstly, peripheral blood was obtained at various times from healthy pregnant women to clarify the time course of placental mRNAs. Secondly, blood was obtained from women with pre-eclampsia and gestational age-matched controls to examine whether placental mRNAs change in pre-eclampsia. Plasma was separated from these samples for extraction of RNA, followed by reverse transcription polymerse chain reaction analysis. Median concentrations of PLAC1 and GCM1 mRNA in plasma of pre-eclamptic subjects respectively were 1625 and 2141 copies/ml, significantly higher than 195 and 881 copies/ml, the values for controls (Mann-Whitney test, p<0.001). No significant difference was seen in hPL, betahCG, or PAPP-A mRNA concentration between pre-eclamptic and control groups. Plasma PLAC1 and GCM1 mRNAs appear promising as noninvasively measurable molecular markers for pre-eclampsia.

  3. Upper Atmospheric Response to the April 2010 Storm as Observed by GOCE, CHAMP, and GRACE and Modeled by TIME-GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagan, Maura; Häusler, Kathrin; Lu, Gang; Forbes, Jeffrey; Zhang, Xiaoli; Doornbos, Eelco; Bruinsma, Sean

    2014-05-01

    We present the results of an investigation of the upper atmosphere during April 2010 when it was disturbed by a fast-moving coronal mass ejection. Our study is based on comparative analysis of observations made by the Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE), Challenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP), and Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites and a set of simulations with the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) thermosphere-ionosphere-mesosphere-electrodynamics general circulation model (TIME-GCM). We compare and contrast the satellite observations with TIME-GCM results from a realistic simulation based on prevailing meteorological and solar geomagnetic conditions. We diagnose the comparative importance of the upper atmospheric signatures attributable to meteorological forcing with those attributable to storm effects by diagnosing a series of complementary control TIME-GCM simulations. These results also quantify the extent to which lower and middle atmospheric sources of upper atmospheric variability precondition its response to the solar geomagnetic storm.

  4. Study of the thermospheric and ionospheric response to the 2009 sudden stratospheric warming using TIME-GCM and GSM TIP models: First results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimenko, M. V.; Klimenko, V. V.; Bessarab, F. S.; Korenkov, Yu N.; Liu, Hanli; Goncharenko, L. P.; Tolstikov, M. V.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a study of mesosphere and low thermosphere influence on ionospheric disturbances during 2009 major sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) event. This period was characterized by extremely low solar and geomagnetic activity. The study was performed using two first principal models: thermosphere-ionosphere-mesosphere electrodynamics general circulation model (TIME-GCM) and global self-consistent model of thermosphere, ionosphere, and protonosphere (GSM TIP). The stratospheric anomalies during SSW event were modeled by specifying the temperature and density perturbations at the lower boundary of the TIME-GCM (30 km altitude) according to data from European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. Then TIME-GCM output at 80 km was used as lower boundary conditions for driving GSM TIP model runs. We compare models' results with ground-based ionospheric data at low latitudes obtained by GPS receivers in the American longitudinal sector. GSM TIP simulation predicts the occurrence of the quasi-wave vertical structure in neutral temperature disturbances at 80-200 km altitude, and the positive and negative disturbances in total electron content at low latitude during the 2009 SSW event. According to our model results the formation mechanisms of the low-latitude ionospheric response are the disturbances in the n(O)/n(N2) ratio and thermospheric wind. The change in zonal electric field is key mechanism driving the ionospheric response at low latitudes, but our model results do not completely reproduce the variability in zonal electric fields (vertical plasma drift) at low latitudes.

  5. Coupled Climate Model Appraisal a Benchmark for Future Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, T J; AchutaRao, K; Bader, D; Covey, C; Doutriaux, C M; Fiorino, M; Gleckler, P J; Sperber, K R; Taylor, K E

    2005-08-22

    The Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) has produced an extensive appraisal of simulations of present-day climate by eleven representative coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation models (OAGCMs) which were developed during the period 1995-2002. Because projections of potential future global climate change are derived chiefly from OAGCMs, there is a continuing need to test the credibility of these predictions by evaluating model performance in simulating the historically observed climate. For example, such an evaluation is an integral part of the periodic assessments of climate change that are reported by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. The PCMDI appraisal thus provides a useful benchmark for future studies of this type. The appraisal mainly analyzed multi-decadal simulations of present-day climate by models that employed diverse representations of climate processes for atmosphere, ocean, sea ice, and land, as well as different techniques for coupling these components (see Table). The selected models were a subset of those entered in phase 2 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP2, Covey et al. 2003). For these ''CMIP2+ models'', more atmospheric or oceanic variables were provided than the minimum requirements for participation in CMIP2. However, the appraisal only considered those climate variables that were supplied from most of the CMIP2+ models. The appraisal focused on three facets of the simulations of current global climate: (1) secular trends in simulation time series which would be indicative of a problematical ''coupled climate drift''; (2) comparisons of temporally averaged fields of simulated atmospheric and oceanic climate variables with available observational climatologies; and (3) correspondences between simulated and observed modes of climatic variability. Highlights of these climatic aspects manifested by different CMIP2+ simulations are briefly discussed here.

  6. Nonadiabatic Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryachko, Eugene S.

    The general features of the nonadiabatic coupling and its relation to molecular properties are surveyed. Some consequences of the [`]equation of motion', formally expressing a [`]smoothness' of a given molecular property within the diabatic basis, are demonstrated. A particular emphasis is made on the relation between a [`]smoothness' of the electronic dipole moment and the generalized Mulliken-Hush formula for the diabatic electronic coupling.

  7. (abstract) Role of Long Equatorial Wave Reflection in the Low-Frequency Variability Observed During the TOPEX/POSEIDON Period: Data Analysis and Coupled Model Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boulanger, J. P.; Perigaud, C.; Fu, L. L.

    1996-01-01

    The analysis of TOPEX/POSEIDON sea level and ERS-1 zonal wind stress data gives evidence that first mode meridonal long Rossby waves fully reflected into Kelvin waves at the equatorial western Pacific boundary at different periods including the January-June 1994 period. The evolution of the conditions (zonal wind stress, sea surface temperature and sea level anomalies) in the central Pacific suggests that this reflection may have played a role in the reversal of cold to warm anomalies observed in the central Pacific in June-July 1994. To investigate the actual role of reflected Kelvin waves observed by TOPEX/POSEIDON, a simple ocean-atmosphere coupled model is designed. Starting from these initial conditions, several simulations are run for testing the role western bundary reflection evidenced in TOPEX/POSEIDON data. Coupled mechanisms are suggested to explain the low-frequency variability observed during this period.

  8. A comparison of a GCM simulation of the seasonal cycle of the atmosphere with observation. I - Mean fields and the annual harmonic. II - Stationary waves and transient fluctuations. [general circulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straus, David M.; Shukla, J.

    1988-01-01

    The seasonal cycle of a GCM is analyzed in terms of the behavior of the monthly and seasonal mean fields and the structure of the annual harmonic. The GCM is found to be successful in simulating the Northern Hemisphere sea-level pressure and 200-mb heights over eastern continents and oceans and in the entire Southern Hemisphere. Problems in the simulation include an anomalously deep Aleutian low and low values of the height over Europe in winter. The GCM fails to show the observed amplitude of the annual harmonic in 200-mb temperature over Antarctica. In the second section, the seasonal dependence of the stationary and transient eddies of the GCM are presented for a two-year annual cycle. The accuracy of the wave and eddy simulations is analyzed.

  9. El Nino-southern oscillation simulated in an MRI atmosphere-ocean coupled general circulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Nagai, T.; Tokioka, T.; Endoh, M.; Kitamura, Y. )

    1992-11-01

    A coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (GCM) was time integrated for 30 years to study interannual variability in the tropics. The atmospheric component is a global GCM with 5 levels in the vertical and 4[degrees]latitude X 5[degrees] longitude grids in the horizontal including standard physical processes (e.g., interactive clouds). The oceanic component is a GCM for the Pacific with 19 levels in the vertical and 1[degrees]x 2.5[degrees] grids in the horizontal including seasonal varying solar radiation as forcing. The model succeeded in reproducing interannual variations that resemble the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) with realistic seasonal variations in the atmospheric and oceanic fields. The model ENSO cycle has a time scale of approximately 5 years and the model El Nino (warm) events are locked roughly in phase to the seasonal cycle. The cold events, however, are less evident in comparison with the El Nino events. The time scale of the model ENSO cycle is determined by propagation time of signals from the central-eastern Pacific to the western Pacific and back to the eastern Pacific. Seasonal timing is also important in the ENSO time scale: wind anomalies in the central-eastern Pacific occur in summer and the atmosphere ocean coupling in the western Pacific operates efficiently in the first half of the year.

  10. Convergence of methods for coupling of microscopic and mesoscopic reaction-diffusion simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flegg, Mark B.; Hellander, Stefan; Erban, Radek

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, three multiscale methods for coupling of mesoscopic (compartment-based) and microscopic (molecular-based) stochastic reaction-diffusion simulations are investigated. Two of the three methods that will be discussed in detail have been previously reported in the literature; the two-regime method (TRM) and the compartment-placement method (CPM). The third method that is introduced and analysed in this paper is called the ghost cell method (GCM), since it works by constructing a "ghost cell" in which molecules can disappear and jump into the compartment-based simulation. Presented is a comparison of sources of error. The convergent properties of this error are studied as the time step Δt (for updating the molecular-based part of the model) approaches zero. It is found that the error behaviour depends on another fundamental computational parameter h, the compartment size in the mesoscopic part of the model. Two important limiting cases, which appe