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Sample records for coupled pacing improves

  1. Pajarito Aerosol Couplings to Ecosystems (PACE) Field Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dubey, M

    2016-03-01

    Laboratory (LANL) worked on the Pajarito Aerosol Couplings to Ecosystems (PACE) intensive operational period (IOP). PACE’s primary goal was to demonstrate routine Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) field operations and improve instrumental and operational performance. LANL operated the instruments efficiently and effectively with remote guidance by the instrument mentors. This was the first time a complex suite of instruments had been operated under the ARM model and it proved to be a very successful and cost-effective model to build upon.

  2. Improvement of pacing induced regional myocardial ischemia by Solcoseryl in conscious dogs with coronary stenosis.

    PubMed

    Shimada, T; Sasayama, S; Takahashi, M; Osakada, G; Kawai, C

    1984-02-01

    The effects of Solcoseryl on regional myocardial function were studied in 5 conscious dogs with partial coronary constriction, in which temporary ischemia was induced by rapid cardiac pacing. During the coronary artery constriction, the percent shortening of the ischemic segment decreased by 9%. When the heart rate was increased by pacing, the percent shortening of the ischemic segments was further reduced by 57%. On cessation of cardiac pacing, the early potentiation of dP/dt and of control segment shortening became evident and was followed by exponential decay in the subsequent several beats. In the ischemic segment, the percent shortening was significantly improved in the first post-pacing beat but was more severely depressed at five seconds. Thirty minutes after administration of Solcoseryl, the cardiac pacing was repeated in the same manner but the pacing-induced hypokinesia of the ischemic segment were less marked, the percent shortening being at an average of 9.1% during control pacing and 12.7% during the second pacing after Solcoseryl (p less than 0.05). Postpacing deterioration of the ischemic segment shortening was also significantly improved from 9.8 to 11.8% at 5 seconds (p less than 0.05). These findings indicate that Solcoseryl exerts protective effects on the ischemic myocardium by promoting a rapid recovery from ischemia, probably due to the improvement of oxygen utility through activated cellular respiration.

  3. Improvement of Right Ventricular Hemodynamics with Left Ventricular Endocardial Pacing during Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy

    PubMed Central

    HYDE, EOIN R.; BEHAR, JONATHAN M.; CROZIER, ANDREW; CLARIDGE, SIMON; JACKSON, TOM; SOHAL, MANAV; GILL, JASWINDER S.; O'NEILL, MARK D.; RAZAVI, REZA; RINALDI, CHRISTOPHER A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) with biventricular epicardial (BV‐CS) or endocardial left ventricular (LV) stimulation (BV‐EN) improves LV hemodynamics. The effect of CRT on right ventricular function is less clear, particularly for BV‐EN. Our objective was to compare the simultaneous acute hemodynamic response (AHR) of the right and left ventricles (RV and LV) with BV‐CS and BV‐EN in order to determine the optimal mode of CRT delivery. Methods Nine patients with previously implanted CRT devices successfully underwent a temporary pacing study. Pressure wires measured the simultaneous AHR in both ventricles during different pacing protocols. Conventional epicardial CRT was delivered in LV‐only (LV‐CS) and BV‐CS configurations and compared with BV‐EN pacing in multiple locations using a roving decapolar catheter. Results Best BV‐EN (optimal AHR of all LV endocardial pacing sites) produced a significantly greater RV AHR compared with LV‐CS and BV‐CS pacing (P < 0.05). RV AHR had a significantly increased standard deviation compared to LV AHR (P < 0.05) with a weak correlation between RV and LV AHR (Spearman rs = −0.06). Compromised biventricular optimization, whereby RV AHR was increased at the expense of a smaller decrease in LV AHR, was achieved in 56% of cases, all with BV‐EN pacing. Conclusions BV‐EN pacing produces significant increases in both LV and RV AHR, above that achievable with conventional epicardial pacing. RV AHR cannot be used as a surrogate for optimizing LV AHR; however, compromised biventricular optimization is possible. The beneficial effect of endocardial LV pacing on RV function may have important clinical benefits beyond conventional CRT. PMID:27001004

  4. A Fast-Start Pacing Strategy Speeds Pulmonary Oxygen Uptake Kinetics and Improves Supramaximal Running Performance

    PubMed Central

    Turnes, Tiago; Salvador, Amadeo Félix; Lisbôa, Felipe Domingos; de Aguiar, Rafael Alves; Cruz, Rogério Santos de Oliveira; Caputo, Fabrizio

    2014-01-01

    The focus of the present study was to investigate the effects of a fast-start pacing strategy on running performance and pulmonary oxygen uptake () kinetics at the upper boundary of the severe-intensity domain. Eleven active male participants (28±10 years, 70±5 kg, 176±6 cm, 57±4 mL/kg/min) visited the laboratory for a series of tests that were performed until exhaustion: 1) an incremental test; 2) three laboratory test sessions performed at 95, 100 and 110% of the maximal aerobic speed; 3) two to four constant speed tests for the determination of the highest constant speed (HS) that still allowed achieving maximal oxygen uptake; and 4) an exercise based on the HS using a higher initial speed followed by a subsequent decrease. To predict equalized performance values for the constant pace, the relationship between time and distance/speed through log-log modelling was used. When a fast-start was utilized, subjects were able to cover a greater distance in a performance of similar duration in comparison with a constant-pace performance (constant pace: 670 m±22%; fast-start: 683 m±22%; P = 0.029); subjects also demonstrated a higher exercise tolerance at a similar average speed when compared with constant-pace performance (constant pace: 114 s±30%; fast-start: 125 s±26%; P = 0.037). Moreover, the mean response time was reduced after a fast start (constant pace: 22.2 s±28%; fast-start: 19.3 s±29%; P = 0.025). In conclusion, middle-distance running performances with a duration of 2–3 min are improved and response time is faster when a fast-start is adopted. PMID:25360744

  5. A fast-start pacing strategy speeds pulmonary oxygen uptake kinetics and improves supramaximal running performance.

    PubMed

    Turnes, Tiago; Salvador, Amadeo Félix; Lisbôa, Felipe Domingos; de Aguiar, Rafael Alves; Cruz, Rogério Santos de Oliveira; Caputo, Fabrizio

    2014-01-01

    The focus of the present study was to investigate the effects of a fast-start pacing strategy on running performance and pulmonary oxygen uptake (VO2) kinetics at the upper boundary of the severe-intensity domain. Eleven active male participants (28±10 years, 70±5 kg, 176±6 cm, 57±4 mL/kg/min) visited the laboratory for a series of tests that were performed until exhaustion: 1) an incremental test; 2) three laboratory test sessions performed at 95, 100 and 110% of the maximal aerobic speed; 3) two to four constant speed tests for the determination of the highest constant speed (HS) that still allowed achieving maximal oxygen uptake; and 4) an exercise based on the HS using a higher initial speed followed by a subsequent decrease. To predict equalized performance values for the constant pace, the relationship between time and distance/speed through log-log modelling was used. When a fast-start was utilized, subjects were able to cover a greater distance in a performance of similar duration in comparison with a constant-pace performance (constant pace: 670 m±22%; fast-start: 683 m±22%; P = 0.029); subjects also demonstrated a higher exercise tolerance at a similar average speed when compared with constant-pace performance (constant pace: 114 s±30%; fast-start: 125 s±26%; P = 0.037). Moreover, the mean VO2 response time was reduced after a fast start (constant pace: 22.2 s±28%; fast-start: 19.3 s±29%; P = 0.025). In conclusion, middle-distance running performances with a duration of 2-3 min are improved and VO2 response time is faster when a fast-start is adopted.

  6. "U-Pace" Instruction: Improving Student Success by Integrating Content Mastery and Amplified Assistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reddy, Diane M.; Pfeiffer, Heidi M.; Fleming, Raymond; Ports, Katie A.; Pedrick, Laura E.; Barnack-Tavlaris, Jessica L.; Jirovec, Danielle L.; Helion, Alicia M.; Swain, Rodney A.

    2013-01-01

    "U-Pace," an instructional intervention, has potential for widespread implementation because student behavior recorded in any learning management system is used by "U-Pace" instructors to tailor coaching of student learning based on students' strengths and motivations. "U-Pace" utilizes an online learning environment…

  7. In Heart Failure Patients with Left Bundle Branch Block Single Lead MultiSpot Left Ventricular Pacing Does Not Improve Acute Hemodynamic Response To Conventional Biventricular Pacing. A Multicenter Prospective, Interventional, Non-Randomized Study

    PubMed Central

    Sterliński, Maciej; Sokal, Adam; Lenarczyk, Radosław; Van Heuverswyn, Frederic; Rinaldi, C. Aldo; Vanderheyden, Marc; Khalameizer, Vladimir; Francis, Darrel; Heynens, Joeri; Stegemann, Berthold; Cornelussen, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Recent efforts to increase CRT response by multiSPOT pacing (MSP) from multiple bipols on the same left ventricular lead are still inconclusive. Aim The Left Ventricular (LV) MultiSPOTpacing for CRT (iSPOT) study compared the acute hemodynamic response of MSP pacing by using 3 electrodes on a quadripolar lead compared with conventional biventricular pacing (BiV). Methods Patients with left bundle branch block (LBBB) underwent an acute hemodynamic study to determine the %change in LV+dP/dtmax from baseline atrial pacing compared to the following configurations: BiV pacing with the LV lead in a one of lateral veins, while pacing from the distal, mid, or proximal electrode and all 3 electrodes together (i.e. MSP). All measurements were repeated 4 times at 5 different atrioventricular delays. We also measured QRS-width and individual Q-LV durations. Results Protocol was completed in 24 patients, all with LBBB (QRS width 171±20 ms) and 58% ischemic aetiology. The percentage change in LV+dP/dtmax for MSP pacing was 31.0±3.3% (Mean±SE), which was not significantly superior to any BiV pacing configuration: 28.9±3.2% (LV-distal), 28.3±2.7% (LV-mid), and 29.5±3.0% (LV-prox), respectively. Correlation between LV+dP/dtmax and either QRS-width or Q-LV ratio was poor. Conclusions In patients with LBBB MultiSPOT LV pacing demonstrated comparable improvement in contractility to best conventional BiV pacing. Optimization of atrioventricular delay is important for the best performance for both BiV and MultiSPOT pacing configurations. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NTC01883141 PMID:27124724

  8. Gpr176 is a Gz-linked orphan G-protein-coupled receptor that sets the pace of circadian behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Masao; Murai, Iori; Kunisue, Sumihiro; Setsu, Genzui; Uchio, Naohiro; Tanaka, Rina; Kobayashi, Sakurako; Shimatani, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Hida; Chao, Hsu-Wen; Nakagawa, Yuuki; Takahashi, Yukari; Hotta, Yunhong; Yasunaga, Jun-ichirou; Matsuoka, Masao; Hastings, Michael H.; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Okamura, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) participate in a broad range of physiological functions. A priority for fundamental and clinical research, therefore, is to decipher the function of over 140 remaining orphan GPCRs. The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the brain's circadian pacemaker, governs daily rhythms in behaviour and physiology. Here we launch the SCN orphan GPCR project to (i) search for murine orphan GPCRs with enriched expression in the SCN, (ii) generate mutant animals deficient in candidate GPCRs, and (iii) analyse the impact on circadian rhythms. We thereby identify Gpr176 as an SCN-enriched orphan GPCR that sets the pace of circadian behaviour. Gpr176 is expressed in a circadian manner by SCN neurons, and molecular characterization reveals that it represses cAMP signalling in an agonist-independent manner. Gpr176 acts independently of, and in parallel to, the Vipr2 GPCR, not through the canonical Gi, but via the unique G-protein subclass Gz. PMID:26882873

  9. Right ventricular free wall pacing improves cardiac pump function in severe pulmonary arterial hypertension: a computer simulation analysis.

    PubMed

    Lumens, Joost; Arts, Theo; Broers, Bernard; Boomars, Karin A; van Paassen, Pieter; Prinzen, Frits W; Delhaas, Tammo

    2009-12-01

    In pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), duration of myofiber shortening is prolonged in the right ventricular (RV) free wall (RVfw) compared with that in the interventricular septum and left ventricular free wall. This interventricular mechanical asynchrony eventually leads to right heart failure. We investigated by computer simulation whether, in PAH, early RVfw pacing may improve interventricular mechanical synchrony and, hence, cardiac pump function. A mathematical model of the human heart and circulation was used to simulate left ventricular and RV pump mechanics and myofiber mechanics. First, we simulated cardiovascular mechanics of a healthy adult at rest. Size and mass of heart and blood vessels were adapted so that mechanical tissue load was normalized. Second, compensated PAH was simulated by increasing mean pulmonary artery pressure to 32 mmHg while applying load adaptation. Third, decompensated PAH was simulated by increasing mean pulmonary artery pressure further to 79 mmHg without further adaptation. Finally, early RVfw pacing was simulated in severely decompensated PAH. Time courses of circumferential strain in the ventricular walls as simulated were similar to the ones measured in healthy subjects (uniform strain patterns) and in PAH patients (prolonged RVfw shortening). When simulating pacing in decompensated PAH, RV pump function was best upon 40-ms RVfw preexcitation, as evidenced by maximal decrease of RV end-diastolic volume, reduced RVfw myofiber work, and most homogeneous distribution of workload over the ventricular walls. Thus our simulations indicate that, in decompensated PAH, RVfw pacing may improve RV pump function and may homogenize workload over the ventricular walls.

  10. Importance of Gradients in Membrane Properties and Electrical Coupling in Sinoatrial Node Pacing

    PubMed Central

    Inada, Shin; Zhang, Henggui; Tellez, James O.; Shibata, Nitaro; Nakazawa, Kazuo; Kamiya, Kaichiro; Kodama, Itsuo; Mitsui, Kazuyuki; Dobrzynski, Halina; Boyett, Mark R.; Honjo, Haruo

    2014-01-01

    The sinoatrial node (SAN) is heterogeneous in terms of cell size, ion channels, current densities, connexins and electrical coupling. For example, Nav1.5 (responsible for INa) and Cx43 (responsible for electrical coupling) are absent from the centre of the SAN (normally the leading pacemaker site), but present in the periphery (at SAN-atrial muscle junction). To test whether the heterogeneity is important for the functioning of the SAN, one- and two-dimensional models of the SAN and surrounding atrial muscle were created. Normal functioning of the SAN (in terms of cycle length, position of leading pacemaker site, conduction times, activation and repolarization sequences and space constants) was observed when, from the centre to the periphery, (i) cell characteristics (cell size and ionic current densities) were changed in a gradient fashion from a central-type (lacking INa) to a peripheral-type (possessing INa) and (ii) coupling conductance was increased in a gradient fashion. We conclude that the heterogeneous nature of the node is important for its normal functioning. The presence of Nav1.5 and Cx43 in the periphery may be essential for the node to be able to drive the atrial muscle: Nav1.5 provides the necessary depolarizing current and Cx43 delivers it to the atrial muscle. PMID:24759974

  11. Using "U-Pace" Instruction to Improve the Academic Performance of Economically Disadvantaged Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, R.; Stoiber, L. C.; Pfeiffer, H. M.; Kienzler, S. E.; Fleming, R. R.; Pedrick, L. E.; Barth, D. J.; Reddy, D. .

    2016-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate whether the student success associated with the "U-Pace" instructional approach, which integrates mastery-based learning with proactive instructor support in an online learning environment, would replicate for both economically disadvantaged students and students who are not economically…

  12. Protein-Pacing from Food or Supplementation Improves Physical Performance in Overweight Men and Women: The PRISE 2 Study

    PubMed Central

    Arciero, Paul J.; Edmonds, Rohan C.; Bunsawat, Kanokwan; Gentile, Christopher L.; Ketcham, Caitlin; Darin, Christopher; Renna, Mariale; Zheng, Qian; Zhang, Jun Zhu; Ormsbee, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    We recently reported that protein-pacing (P; six meals/day @ 1.4 g/kg body weight (BW), three of which included whey protein (WP) supplementation) combined with a multi-mode fitness program consisting of resistance, interval sprint, stretching, and endurance exercise training (RISE) improves body composition in overweight individuals. The purpose of this study was to extend these findings and determine whether protein-pacing with only food protein (FP) is comparable to WP supplementation during RISE training on physical performance outcomes in overweight/obese individuals. Thirty weight-matched volunteers were prescribed RISE training and a P diet derived from either whey protein supplementation (WP, n = 15) or food protein sources (FP, n = 15) for 16 weeks. Twenty-one participants completed the intervention (WP, n = 9; FP, n = 12). Measures of body composition and physical performance were significantly improved in both groups (p < 0.05), with no effect of protein source. Likewise, markers of cardiometabolic disease risk (e.g., LDL (low-density lipoprotein) cholesterol, glucose, insulin, adiponectin, systolic blood pressure) were significantly improved (p < 0.05) to a similar extent in both groups. These results demonstrate that both whey protein and food protein sources combined with multimodal RISE training are equally effective at improving physical performance and cardiometabolic health in obese individuals. PMID:27187451

  13. Pacing-induced spatiotemporal dynamics can be exploited to improve reentry termination efficacy.

    PubMed

    Krogh-Madsen, Trine; Christini, David J

    2009-08-01

    Some potentially fatal cardiac arrhythmias may be terminated by a series of premature stimuli. Monomorphic ventricular tachycardia, which may be modeled as an excitation wave traveling around in a ring, is one such arrhythmia. We investigated the mechanisms and requirements for termination of such reentry using an ionic cardiac ring model. Termination requires conduction block, which in turn is facilitated by spatial dispersion in repolarization and recovery time. When applying short series of two or three stimuli, we found that for conduction block to robustly occur, the magnitude of the spatial gradient in recovery time must exceed a critical value of 20 ms/cm. Importantly, the required spatial gradient can be induced in this homogeneous system by the dynamics of the stimulus-induced waves-we show analytically the necessary conditions. Finally, we introduce a type of pacing protocol, the "aggressive ramp," which increases the termination efficacy by exploiting such pacing-induced heterogeneities. This technique, which is straightforward to implement, may therefore have important clinical implications.

  14. Pacing-induced spatiotemporal dynamics can be exploited to improve reentry termination efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krogh-Madsen, Trine; Christini, David J.

    2009-08-01

    Some potentially fatal cardiac arrhythmias may be terminated by a series of premature stimuli. Monomorphic ventricular tachycardia, which may be modeled as an excitation wave traveling around in a ring, is one such arrhythmia. We investigated the mechanisms and requirements for termination of such reentry using an ionic cardiac ring model. Termination requires conduction block, which in turn is facilitated by spatial dispersion in repolarization and recovery time. When applying short series of two or three stimuli, we found that for conduction block to robustly occur, the magnitude of the spatial gradient in recovery time must exceed a critical value of 20 ms/cm. Importantly, the required spatial gradient can be induced in this homogeneous system by the dynamics of the stimulus-induced waves—we show analytically the necessary conditions. Finally, we introduce a type of pacing protocol, the “aggressive ramp,” which increases the termination efficacy by exploiting such pacing-induced heterogeneities. This technique, which is straightforward to implement, may therefore have important clinical implications.

  15. Keeping Pace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the struggles of two tough moms who team up to start their own company. Fed up with a lack of stylish, properly-fitting shoes for their children with cerebral palsy, they established "Keeping Pace" which currently offers a selection of stylish girls' and boys' athletic sneakers and casual dress shoes for boys, all sold…

  16. PACE Status Update

    SciTech Connect

    M., Zimring,; Hoffman, I.; Fuller, M.

    2010-08-11

    The Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) regulates Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, and the 12 Federal Home Loan Banks (the government-sponsored enterprises - GSEs). On July 6, 2010, FHFA and the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC) concluded that Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) programs 'present significant safety and soundness concerns' to the housing finance industry. This statement came after a year of discussions with state and federal agencies in which PACE, a novel mechanism for financing energy efficiency and renewable energy improvements, has gone from receiving support from the White House, canonization as one of Scientific American's 'World Changing Ideas' and legislative adoption in 24 states to questionable relevance, at least in the residential sector. Whether PACE resumes its expansion as an innovative tool for financing energy efficiency and clean generation depends on outcomes in each of the three branches of government - discussions on a PACE pilot phase among federal agencies, litigation in federal court, and legislation in Congress - all highly uncertain. This policy brief addresses the practical impacts of these possible outcomes on existing and emerging PACE programs across the United States and potential paths forward.

  17. Improved Spline Coupling For Robotic Docking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M.

    1995-01-01

    Robotic docking mechanism like one described in "Self-Aligning Mechanical and Electrical Coupling" (GSC-13430) improved. Spline coupling redesigned to reduce stresses, enchancing performance and safety of mechanism. Does not involve significant increase in size. Convex spherical surfaces on spline driver mate with concave spherical surfaces on undersides on splines in receptacle. Spherical surfaces distribute load stresses better and tolerate misalignments better than flat and otherwise shaped surfaces.

  18. Project for Program Improvement through the Utilization of Self-Paced Individualized Instruction Concepts Industrial Equipment Technology. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowley's Ridge Vocational Technical School, Forrest City, AR.

    The general objectives of an Arkansas technical school's self-paced individualized instruction program were designing, field testing, and disseminating an instructional management system with support materials that identify and justify the need for a program of instruction. Eight specific objectives have been developed to facilitate students'…

  19. Polished Downhole Transducer Having Improved Signal Coupling

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Fox, Joe

    2006-03-28

    Apparatus and methods to improve signal coupling in downhole inductive transmission elements to reduce the dispersion of magnetic energy at the tool joints and to provide consistent impedance and contact between transmission elements located along the drill string. A transmission element for transmitting information between downhole tools is disclosed in one embodiment of the invention as including an annular core constructed of a magnetically conductive material. The annular core forms an open channel around its circumference and is configured to form a closed channel by mating with a corresponding annular core along an annular mating surface. The mating surface is polished to provide improved magnetic coupling with the corresponding annular core. An annular conductor is disposed within the open channel.

  20. Coupled improvement between thermoelectric and piezoelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, David; Hewitt, Corey; Dun, Chaochao; Carroll, David

    A novel coupling effect in a thermoelectric and piezoelectric meta-structure is discussed. Thermo-piezoelectric generators (TPEGs) exhibit a synergistic effect that amplifies output voltage, and has been observed to increase piezoelectric voltages over 500% of initial values a time dependent thermoelectric/pyroelectric effect. The resulting improvement in voltage has been observed in carbon nanotubes as well as inorganics such as two-dimensional Bismuth Selenide platelets and Telluride nanorods thin-film thermoelectrics. TPEGs are built by integrating insulating layers of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) piezoelectric films between flexible thin film p-type and n-type thermoelectrics. The physical phenomena arising in the interaction between thermoelectric and piezoelectrics is discussed and a model is presented to quantify the expected coupling voltage as a function of stress, thermal gradient, and different thermoelectric materials. TPEG are ideal to capture waste heat and vibrational energy while creating larger voltages and minimizing space when compared with similar thermoelectric or piezoelectric generators.

  1. Toward Improved Support for Loosely Coupled Large Scale Simulation Workflows

    SciTech Connect

    Boehm, Swen; Elwasif, Wael R; Naughton, III, Thomas J; Vallee, Geoffroy R

    2014-01-01

    High-performance computing (HPC) workloads are increasingly leveraging loosely coupled large scale simula- tions. Unfortunately, most large-scale HPC platforms, including Cray/ALPS environments, are designed for the execution of long-running jobs based on coarse-grained launch capabilities (e.g., one MPI rank per core on all allocated compute nodes). This assumption limits capability-class workload campaigns that require large numbers of discrete or loosely coupled simulations, and where time-to-solution is an untenable pacing issue. This paper describes the challenges related to the support of fine-grained launch capabilities that are necessary for the execution of loosely coupled large scale simulations on Cray/ALPS platforms. More precisely, we present the details of an enhanced runtime system to support this use case, and report on initial results from early testing on systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  2. Selective pacing sites.

    PubMed

    Coppola, G; La Greca, C; Corrado, E; Ajello, L; Nogara, A; Ciaramitaro, G; Augugliaro, S; Novo, G; Novo, S; Assennato, P

    2015-04-01

    he right ventricular apex (RVA) has always been the most used pacing site, because it is easily accessible and provides a stable lead position with a low dislodgment rate. However, it is well-known that long-term right ventricular apical pacing may have deleterious effects on left ventricular function by inducing a iatrogenic left bundle branch block, which can have strong influences on the left ventricle hemodynamic performances. More specifically, RVA pacing causes abnormal contraction patterns and the consequent dyssynchrony may cause myocardial perfusion defects, histopathological alterations, left ventricular dilation and both systolic and diastolic left ventricular dysfunction. All these long-term changes could account for the higher morbidity and mortality rates observe in patients with chronic RVA pacing compared with atrial pacing. This observation led to the reassessment of traditional approaches and to the research of alternative pacing sites, in order to get to more physiological pattern of ventricular activation and to avoid deleterious effects. Then, attempts were made with: right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) pacing, direct His bundle pacing (DHBP), parahisian pacing (PHP) and bifocal (RVA + RVOT) pacing. For example, RVOT pacing, especially in its septal portion, is superior to the RVA pacing and it would determine a contraction pattern very similar to the spontaneous one, not only because the septal portions are the first parts to became depolarized, but also for the proximity to the normal conduction system. RVOT is preferable in terms of safety too. DHBP is an attractive alternative to RVA pacing because it leads to a synchronous depolarization of myocardial cells and, therefore, to an efficient ventricular contraction. So it would be the best technique, however the procedure requires longer average implant times and dedicated instruments and it cannot be carried out in patients affected by His bundle pathologies; furthermore, due to the His

  3. Reversal of Pacing-Induced Cardiomyopathy by Normal QRS Axis Pacing

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ji Hyun; Kim, Ju Youn; Kim, Sung-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Right ventricular apical pacing has been a commonly used method for placement of permanent pacemaker, but it is known to be associated with ventricular dyssynchrony and may lead to heart failure. Septal pacing could be an alternative method to improve this complication but the results have been conflicting; hence, other strategies are needed. This case is about a patient with pacing-induced cardiomyopathy who showed much improvement after repositioning the leads to a site different from that of normally paced QRS axis. PMID:27275181

  4. Effect of Adaptive Paced Cardiolocomotor Synchronization During Running: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Bill; Jin, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Cardiolocomotor synchronization (CLS) has been well established for individuals engaged in rhythmic activity, such as walking, running, or cycling. When frequency of the activity is at or near the heart rate, entrainment occurs. CLS has been shown in many cases to improve the efficiency of locomotor activity, improving stroke volume, reducing blood pressure variability, and lowering the oxygen uptake (VO2). Instead of a 1:1 frequency ratio of activity to heart rate, an investigation was performed to determine if different harmonic coupling at other simple integer ratios (e.g. 1:2, 2:3, 3:2) could achieve any performance benefits. CLS was ensured by pacing the stride rate according to the measured heartbeat (i.e., adaptive paced CLS, or forced CLS). An algorithm was designed that determined the simplest ratio (lowest denominator) that, when multiplied by the heart rate will fall within an individualized, predetermined comfortable pacing range for the user. The algorithm was implemented on an iPhone 4, which generated a ‘tick-tock’ sound through the iPhone’s headphones. A sham-controlled crossover study was performed with 15 volunteers of various fitness levels. Subjects ran a 3 mile (4.83 km) simulated training run at their normal pace on two consecutive days (randomized one adaptive pacing, one sham). Adaptive pacing resulted in faster runs run times, with subjects running an average of 26:03 ± 3:23 for adaptive pacing and 26:38 ± 3:31 for sham (F = 5.46, p < 0.05). The increase in heart rate from the start of the race as estimated by an exponential time constant was significantly longer during adaptive pacing, τ = 0.99 ± 0.30, compared to sham, τ = 1.53 ± 0.34 (t = -6.62, p < 0.01). Eighty-seven percent of runners found it easy to adjust their stride length to match the pacing signal with seventy-nine percent reporting that pacing helped their performance. These results suggest that adaptive paced CLS may have a beneficial effect on running performance

  5. Improved Coupling for UH-60 Performance Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romander, Ethan

    2012-01-01

    This presentation will have two parts to it. The first will consist of a review on force conservation in coupled stimulation. The second part will mainly be about the preliminary comparisons of measured/predicted blade motion. Furthermore, introduction to measurement technique and rigid body motion comparison will also be included in the presentation.

  6. Coupling device with improved thermal interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milam, Malcolm Bruce (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    The primary object of the present invention is to provide a simple, reliable, and lightweight coupling that will also have an efficient thermal interface. A further object of the invention is to provide a coupling that is capable of blind mating with little or no insertion forces. Another object of the invention is to provide a coupling that acts as a thermal regulator to maintain a constant temperature on one side of the coupling. Another object of the invention is to increase the available surface area of a coupling thus providing a larger area for the conduction of heat across the thermal interface. Another object of the invention is to provide a fluidic coupling that has no fluid passing across the interface, thus reducing the likelihood of leaks and contamination. The foregoing objects are achieved by utilizing, as in the prior art, a hot area (at an elevated temperature as compared to a cold area) with a need to remove excess heat from the hot area to a cold area. In this device, the thermal interface will occur not on a planar horizontal surface, but along a non-planar vertical surface, which will reduce the reaction forces and increase the thermal conductivity of the device. One non-planar surface is a surface on a cold pin extending from the cold area and the other non-planar surface is a surface on a hot pin extending from the hot area. The cold pin is fixed and does not move while the hot pin is a flexible member and its movement towards the cold pin will bring the two non-planar surfaces together forming the thermal interface. The actuating member for the device is a shape-memory actuation wire which is attached through an aperture to the hot pin and through another aperture to an actuation wire retainer. By properly programming the actuation wire, heat from the hot area will cause the actuation wire to bend the hot wire. Heat from the hot area will cause the actuation wire to bend the hot pin towards the cold pin forming the coupling and the desired

  7. Improved media performance in optimally coupled exchange spring layer media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, A.; Supper, N.; Ikeda, Y.; Lengsfield, B.; Moser, A.; Fullerton, E. E.

    2008-09-01

    We have studied the recording performance of perpendicular exchange spring layer (ESL)-media for hard disk drive recording. In particular, we investigated the role of interlayer coupling by varying the thickness of a nonmagnetic coupling layer (CL). We demonstrate that not only the media writeability is improved upon optimizing the CL thickness, but also that substantial recording performance improvements can be achieved due to improved media noise properties. The potential of these media structures for high areal density recording is demonstrated by performing areal density measurements, which showed a substantial improvement for optimally coupled ESL-media.

  8. Improving data transfer for model coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Liu, L.; Yang, G.; Li, R.; Wang, B.

    2015-10-01

    Data transfer, which means transferring data fields between two component models or rearranging data fields among processes of the same component model, is a fundamental operation of a coupler. Most of state-of-the-art coupler versions currently use an implementation based on the point-to-point (P2P) communication of the Message Passing Interface (MPI) (call such an implementation "P2P implementation" for short). In this paper, we reveal the drawbacks of the P2P implementation, including low communication bandwidth due to small message size, variable and big number of MPI messages, and jams during communication. To overcome these drawbacks, we propose a butterfly implementation for data transfer. Although the butterfly implementation can outperform the P2P implementation in many cases, it degrades the performance in some cases because the total message size transferred by the butterfly implementation is larger than that by the P2P implementation. To make the data transfer completely improved, we design and implement an adaptive data transfer library that combines the advantages of both butterfly implementation and P2P implementation. Performance evaluation shows that the adaptive data transfer library significantly improves the performance of data transfer in most cases and does not decrease the performance in any cases. Now the adaptive data transfer library is open to the public and has been imported into a coupler version C-Coupler1 for performance improvement of data transfer. We believe that it can also improve other coupler versions.

  9. Development and evaluation of the feasibility and effects on staff, patients, and families of a new tool, the Psychosocial Assessment and Communication Evaluation (PACE), to improve communication and palliative care in intensive care and during clinical uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There are widespread concerns about communication and support for patients and families, especially when they face clinical uncertainty, a situation most marked in intensive care units (ICUs). Therefore, we aimed to develop and evaluate an interventional tool to improve communication and palliative care, using the ICU as an example of where this is difficult. Methods Our design was a phase I-II study following the Medical Research Council Guidance for the Development and Evaluation of Complex Interventions and the (Methods of Researching End-of-life Care (MORECare) statement. In two ICUs, with over 1900 admissions annually, phase I modeled a new intervention comprising implementation training and an assessment tool. We conducted a literature review, qualitative interviews, and focus groups with 40 staff and 13 family members. This resulted in the new tool, the Psychosocial Assessment and Communication Evaluation (PACE). Phase II evaluated the feasibility and effects of PACE, using observation, record audit, and surveys of staff and family members. Qualitative data were analyzed using the framework approach. The statistical tests used on quantitative data were t-tests (for normally distributed characteristics), the χ2 or Fisher’s exact test (for non-normally distributed characteristics) and the Mann–Whitney U-test (for experience assessments) to compare the characteristics and experience for cases with and without PACE recorded. Results PACE provides individualized assessments of all patients entering the ICU. It is completed within 24 to 48 hours of admission, and covers five aspects (key relationships, social details and needs, patient preferences, communication and information status, and other concerns), followed by recording of an ongoing communication evaluation. Implementation is supported by a training program with specialist palliative care. A post-implementation survey of 95 ICU staff found that 89% rated PACE assessment as very or

  10. Coupled Facility-Payload Vibration Modeling Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carnahan, Timothy M.; Kaiser, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    A major phase of aerospace hardware verification is vibration testing. The standard approach for such testing is to use a shaker to induce loads into the payload. In preparation for vibration testing at National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Goddard Space Flight Center an analysis is performed to assess the responses of the payload. A new method of modeling the test is presented that takes into account dynamic interactions between the facility and the payload. This dynamic interaction has affected testing in the past, but been ignored or adjusted for during testing. By modeling the combined dynamics of the facility and test article (payload) it is possible to improve the prediction of hardware responses. Many aerospace test facilities work in similar way to those at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. Lessons learned here should be applicable to other test facilities with similar setups.

  11. Coupled Facility/Payload Vibration Modeling Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carnahan, Timothy M.; Kaiser, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A major phase of aerospace hardware verification is vibration testing. The standard approach for such testing is to use a shaker to induce loads into the payload. In preparation for vibration testing at NASA/GSFC there is an analysis to assess the responses of the payload. A new method of modeling the test is presented that takes into account dynamic interactions between the facility and the payload. This dynamic interaction has affected testing in the past, but been ignored or adjusted for during testing. By modeling the combination of the facility and test article (payload) it is possible to improve the prediction of hardware responses. Many aerospace test facilities work in similar way to those at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Lessons learned here should be applicable to other test facilities with similar setups.

  12. Pacing stress echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Gligorova, Suzana; Agrusta, Marco

    2005-01-01

    Background High-rate pacing is a valid stress test to be used in conjunction with echocardiography; it is independent of physical exercise and does not require drug administration. There are two main applications of pacing stress in the echo lab: the noninvasive detection of coronary artery disease through induction of a regional transient dysfunction; and the assessment of contractile reserve through peak systolic pressure/ end-systolic volume relationship at increasing heart rates to assess global left ventricular contractility. Methods The pathophysiologic rationale of pacing stress for noninvasive detection of coronary artery disease is obvious, with the stress determined by a controlled increase in heart rate, which is a major determinant of myocardial oxygen demand, and thereby tachycardia may exceed a fixed coronary flow reserve in the presence of hemodynamically significant coronary artery disease. The use of pacing stress echo to assess left ventricular contractile reserve is less established, but promising. Positive inotropic interventions are mirrored by smaller end-systolic volumes and higher end-systolic pressures. An increased heart rate progressively increases the force of ventricular contraction (Bowditch treppe or staircase phenomenon). To build the force-frequency relationship, the force is determined at different heart rate steps as the ratio of the systolic pressure (cuff sphygmomanometer)/end-systolic volume index (biplane Simpson rule). The heart rate is determined from ECG. Conclusion Two-dimensional echocardiography during pacing is a useful tool in the detection of coronary artery disease. Because of its safety and ease of repeatability noninvasive pacing stress echo can be the first-line stress test in patients with permanent pacemaker. The force-frequency can be defined as up- sloping (normal) when the peak stress pacing systolic pressure/end-systolic volume index is higher than baseline and intermediate stress values, biphasic with an

  13. Biophysical Modelling to Simulate the Response to Multisite Left Ventricular Stimulation using a Quadripolar Pacing Lead

    PubMed Central

    Niederer, SA; Shetty, AK; Plank, G; Bostock, J; Razavi, R; Smith, NP; Rinaldi, CA

    2016-01-01

    Background Response to Cardiac Resynchronisation Therapy (CRT) is reduced in patients with postero-lateral scar. Multipolar pacing leads offer the ability to select desirable pacing sites and/or stimulate from multiple pacing sites concurrently using a single lead position. Despite this potential, the clinical evaluation and identification of metrics for optimisation of multisite CRT (MCRT) has not been performed. Methods The efficacy of MCRT via a quadripolar lead with two LV pacing sites in conjunction with RV pacing was compared with single site LV pacing using a coupled electro-mechanical biophysical model of the human heart with no, mild or severe scar in the LV postero-lateral wall. Result The maximum dP/dtmax improvement from baseline was 21%, 23%, 21% for standard CRT vs 22%, 24%, 25% for MCRT for no, mild and severe scar, respectively. In the presence of severe scar there was an incremental benefit of multisite vs standard CRT (25% vs 21%, 19% relative improvement). Minimizing total activation time (analogous to QRS duration) or minimizing the activation time of short axis slices of the heart did not correlate with CRT response. The peak electrical activation wave area in the LV corresponded with CRT response with an R2 value between 0.42-0.75. Conclusion Biophysical modelling predicts that in the presence of postero-lateral scar MCRT offers an improved response over conventional CRT. Maximising the activation wave area in the LV had the most consistent correlation with CRT response, independent of pacing protocol, scar size or lead location. PMID:22040178

  14. Transferring PACE Assessments Upon Home Sale

    SciTech Connect

    National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Coughlin, Jason; Fuller, Merrian; Zimring, Mark

    2010-04-12

    A significant barrier to investing in renewable energy and comprehensive energy efficiency improvements to homes across the country is the initial capital cost. Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing is one of several new financial models broadening access to clean energy by addressing this upfront cost issue. Recently, the White House cited PACE programs as an important element of its 'Recovery through Retrofit' plan. The residential PACE model involves the creation of a special clean energy financing district that homeowners elect to opt into. Once opted in, the local government (usually at the city or county level) finances the upfront investment of the renewable energy installation and/or energy efficiency improvements. A special lien is attached to the property and the assessment is paid back as a line item on the property tax bill. As of April 2010, 17 states have passed legislation to allow their local governments to create PACE programs, two already have the authority to set up PACE programs, and over 10 additional states are actively developing enabling legislation. This policy brief analyzes one of the advantages of PACE, which is the transferability of the special assessment from one homeowner to the next when the home is sold. This analysis focuses on the potential for the outstanding lien to impact the sales negotiation process, rather than the legal nature of the lien transfer itself. The goal of this paper is to consider what implications a PACE lien may have on the home sales negotiation process so that it can be addressed upfront rather than risk a future backlash to PACE programs. If PACE programs do expand at a rapid rate, the chances are high that there will be other cases where prospective buyers uses PACE liens to negotiate lower home prices or require repayment of the lien as a condition of sale. As a result, PACE programs should highlight this issue as a potential risk factor for the sake of full disclosure. A good example of this

  15. Self-Paced Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faust, Norma Jean

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the use of self-paced units. Development suggestions include determining the form of the units, including goals, responsibilities, and definitions of terms; keeping them short; including a variety of activities; and requiring that all lessons be completed at school. Contains sample units on climatology and meteorology, the sun, and…

  16. History Teaching Project: A Project to Improve Productivity in Teaching at Carnegie-Mellon University through the Development of Self-Paced Instruction in Undergraduate History. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyer, Barry K.; And Others

    An experimental, undergraduate African-history course which used self-paced instructional techniques is described and evaluated in this project report. The project was initiated to assess the effectiveness of the Personalized System of Instruction (PSI) in undergraduate history instruction. Thirty-two students from Carnegie-Mellon University…

  17. TCP Pacing Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.

    2002-01-01

    Transmission control protocol (TCP) was conceived and designed to run over a variety of communication links, including wireless and high-bandwidth links. However, with recent technological advances in satellite and fiber-optic networks, researchers are reevaluating the flexibility of TCP. The TCP pacing and packet pair probing implementation may help overcome two of the major obstacles identified for efficient bandwidth utilization over communication links with large delay-bandwidth products.

  18. Acute hemodynamic effects of right ventricular pacing site and pacing mode in patients with congestive heart failure secondary to either ischemic or idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Gold, M R; Brockman, R; Peters, R W; Olsovsky, M R; Shorofsky, S R

    2000-05-01

    The hemodynamic effects of pacing in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) remain controversial. Early studies reported that pacing from the right ventricular (RV) apex improved acute hemodynamic parameters in patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction, but these findings were not confirmed in subsequent controlled studies. More recently, it has been proposed that pacing from the RV side of the ventricular septum improves hemodynamic function compared with intrinsic conduction or apical pacing. Either dual-chamber or ventricular pacing have been evaluated, again with inconsistent findings. To assess the effects of pacing site and mode on acute hemodynamic function, we evaluated 21 subjects with CHF and intrinsic conduction disease. Hemodynamics were compared in AAI, VVI, and DDD modes with pacing from the RV apex or high septum. The pacing rate was constant in each patient and the order of testing was randomized. In the absence of ventricular pacing (AAI mode), the mean systemic arterial pressure was 85 +/- 11 mm Hg, the right atrial pressure was 11 +/- 4 mm Hg, the pulmonary capillary wedge pressure was 18 +/- 8 mm Hg and the cardiac index was 2.4 +/- 0.7 L/min/m(2). Compared with AAI pacing, there were no improvements in any hemodynamic parameter with DDD pacing from either RV site. Hemodynamic function worsened with VVI pacing from both RV sites. Subgroup analyses of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, with prolonged PR interval, or with significant mitral regurgitation also failed to demonstrate an improvement with pacing. We conclude that pacing mode but not RV pacing site affects acute hemodynamic function. Pacing in the DDD mode prevents the deleterious effects of VVI pacing in this patient population.

  19. Enact legislation supporting residential property assessed clean energy financing (PACE)

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Devashree

    2012-11-15

    Congress should enact legislation that supports residential property assessed clean energy (PACE) programs in the nation’s states and metropolitan areas. Such legislation should require the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) to allow Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to purchase residential mortgages with PACE assessments while at the same time providing responsible underwriting standards and a set of benchmarks for residential PACE assessments in order to minimize financial risks to mortgage holders. Congressional support of residential PACE financing will improve energy efficiency, encourage job creation, and foster economic growth in the nation’s state and metropolitan areas.

  20. Biventricular Pacing (Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy)

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Executive Summary Issue In 2002, (before the establishment of the Ontario Health Technology Advisory Committee), the Medical Advisory Secretariat conducted a health technology policy assessment on biventricular (BiV) pacing, also called cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). The goal of treatment with BiV pacing is to improve cardiac output for people in heart failure (HF) with conduction defect on ECG (wide QRS interval) by synchronizing ventricular contraction. The Medical Advisory Secretariat concluded that there was evidence of short (6 months) and longer-term (12 months) effectiveness in terms of cardiac function and quality of life (QoL). More recently, a hospital submitted an application to the Ontario Health Technology Advisory Committee to review CRT, and the Medical Advisory Secretariat subsequently updated its health technology assessment. Background Chronic HF results from any structural or functional cardiac disorder that impairs the ability of the heart to act as a pump. It is estimated that 1% to 5% of the general population (all ages) in Europe have chronic HF. (1;2) About one-half of the patients with HF are women, and about 40% of men and 60% of women with this condition are aged older than 75 years. The incidence (i.e., the number of new cases in a specified period) of chronic HF is age dependent: from 1 to 5 per 1,000 people each year in the total population, to as high as 30 to 40 per 1,000 people each year in those aged 75 years and older. Hence, in an aging society, the prevalence (i.e., the number of people with a given disease or condition at any time) of HF is increasing, despite a reduction in cardiovascular mortality. A recent study revealed 28,702 patients were hospitalized for first-time HF in Ontario between April 1994 and March 1997. (3) Women comprised 51% of the cohort. Eighty-five percent were aged 65 years or older, and 58% were aged 75 years or older. Patients with chronic HF experience shortness of breath, a limited capacity

  1. Self-Paced Instruction: Hello, Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leuba, Richard J.; Flammer, Gordon H.

    1975-01-01

    Answers criticisms of self-paced instruction (SPI) by citing advantages of SPI over lecture methods. Concludes that criticisms of SPI are useful since they indicate in which areas further research should be conducted to improve this method of instruction. (MLH)

  2. 77 FR 3958 - Mortgage Assets Affected by PACE Programs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-26

    ... assumptions on the types of home improvement projects (e.g., home insulation, solar panels, geothermal energy... assets affected by Property Assessed Clean Energy (``PACE'') programs and Notice of Intent (``NOI'') to... property assessed clean energy (PACE) programs.'' In response to and compliance with the...

  3. Recurrent Coupling Improves Discrimination of Temporal Spike Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Chun-Wei; Leibold, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Despite the ubiquitous presence of recurrent synaptic connections in sensory neuronal systems, their general functional purpose is not well understood. A recent conceptual advance has been achieved by theories of reservoir computing in which recurrent networks have been proposed to generate short-term memory as well as to improve neuronal representation of the sensory input for subsequent computations. Here, we present a numerical study on the distinct effects of inhibitory and excitatory recurrence in a canonical linear classification task. It is found that both types of coupling improve the ability to discriminate temporal spike patterns as compared to a purely feed-forward system, although in different ways. For a large class of inhibitory networks, the network’s performance is optimal as long as a fraction of roughly 50% of neurons per stimulus is active in the resulting population code. Thereby the contribution of inactive neurons to the neural code is found to be even more informative than that of the active neurons, generating an inherent robustness of classification performance against temporal jitter of the input spikes. Excitatory couplings are found to not only produce a short-term memory buffer but also to improve linear separability of the population patterns by evoking more irregular firing as compared to the purely inhibitory case. As the excitatory connectivity becomes more sparse, firing becomes more variable, and pattern separability improves. We argue that the proposed paradigm is particularly well-suited as a conceptual framework for processing of sensory information in the auditory pathway. PMID:22586392

  4. Application Improvements of Slab-Coupled Optical Fiber Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadderdon, Spencer Lee

    This dissertation explores techniques for improving slab-coupled optical fiber sensor (SCOS) technology for use in specific applications and sensing configurations. SCOS are advantageous for their small size and all-dielectric composition which permit non-intrusive measurement of electric fields within compact environments; however, their small size also limits their sensitivity. This work performs a thorough analysis of the factors contributing to the performance of SCOS and demonstrates methods which improve SCOS, while maintaining its small dimensions and high level of directional sensitivity. These improvements include increasing the sensitivity by 9x, improving the frequency response to include sub 300 kHz frequencies, and developing a method to tune the resonances. The analysis shows that the best material for the slab waveguide is an electro-optic polymer because of its low RF permittivity combined with high electro-optic coefficient. Additional improvements are based on changing the crystal orientation to a transverse configuration, which enhances the sensitivity due to a combined increase in the effective electro-optic coefficient and electric field penetration into the slab. The transverse SCOS configuration not only improves the overall sensitivity but increases the directional sensitivity of the SCOS. Lithium niobate and electro-optic polymer are both experimentally shown to exhibit minimal frequency dependent sensitivity making them suitable for broad frequency applications. Simultaneous interrogation of multiple SCOS with a single tunable laser is achieved by tuning the resonant wavelengths of KTP SCOS so their resonances overlap.

  5. Communication: Improved pair approximations in local coupled-cluster methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwilk, Max; Usvyat, Denis; Werner, Hans-Joachim

    2015-03-01

    In local coupled cluster treatments the electron pairs can be classified according to the magnitude of their energy contributions or distances into strong, close, weak, and distant pairs. Different approximations are introduced for the latter three classes. In this communication, an improved simplified treatment of close and weak pairs is proposed, which is based on long-range cancellations of individually slowly decaying contributions in the amplitude equations. Benchmark calculations for correlation, reaction, and activation energies demonstrate that these approximations work extremely well, while pair approximations based on local second-order Møller-Plesset theory can lead to errors that are 1-2 orders of magnitude larger.

  6. Protein-Pacing and Multi-Component Exercise Training Improves Physical Performance Outcomes in Exercise-Trained Women: The PRISE 3 Study †

    PubMed Central

    Arciero, Paul J.; Ives, Stephen J.; Norton, Chelsea; Escudero, Daniela; Minicucci, Olivia; O’Brien, Gabe; Paul, Maia; Ormsbee, Michael J.; Miller, Vincent; Sheridan, Caitlin; He, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The beneficial cardiometabolic and body composition effects of combined protein-pacing (P; 5–6 meals/day at 2.0 g/kg BW/day) and multi-mode exercise (resistance, interval, stretching, endurance; RISE) training (PRISE) in obese adults has previously been established. The current study examines PRISE on physical performance (endurance, strength and power) outcomes in healthy, physically active women. Thirty exercise-trained women (>4 days exercise/week) were randomized to either PRISE (n = 15) or a control (CON, 5–6 meals/day at 1.0 g/kg BW/day; n = 15) for 12 weeks. Muscular strength (1-RM bench press, 1-RM BP) endurance (sit-ups, SUs; push-ups, PUs), power (bench throws, BTs), blood pressure (BP), augmentation index, (AIx), and abdominal fat mass were assessed at Weeks 0 (pre) and 13 (post). At baseline, no differences existed between groups. Following the 12-week intervention, PRISE had greater gains (p < 0.05) in SUs, PUs (6 ± 7 vs. 10 ± 7, 40%; 8 ± 13 vs. 14 ± 12, 43% ∆reps, respectively), BTs (11 ± 35 vs. 44 ± 34, 75% ∆watts), AIx (1 ± 9 vs. −5 ± 11, 120%), and DBP (−5 ± 9 vs. −11 ± 11, 55% ∆mmHg). These findings suggest that combined protein-pacing (P; 5–6 meals/day at 2.0 g/kg BW/day) diet and multi-component exercise (RISE) training (PRISE) enhances muscular endurance, strength, power, and cardiovascular health in exercise-trained, active women. PMID:27258301

  7. Improved measurement of ttZ couplings at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Baur, U.; Juste, A.; Rainwater, D.; Orr, L.H.; /Rochester U.

    2005-12-01

    We consider QCD t{bar t}Z production at the LHC with Z {yields} {bar {nu}}{nu} and all-hadronic t{bar t} decays, i.e. pp {yields} p{sub T}b{bar b}+4 jets, as a tool to measure ttZ couplings. This channel has a significantly larger cross section than those where the Z boson decays leptonically. However, t{bar t}, b{bar b} + 4 jet, t{bar t}j and t{bar t}jj production give rise to potentially large backgrounds. We show that these processes can be suppressed to an acceptable level with suitable cuts, and find that adding the p{sub T} b{bar b} + 4 jet channel to the final states used in previous ttZ couplings analyses will improve the sensitivity by 10-60%. We also discuss how the measurement of the ttZ couplings may constrain Little Higgs models.

  8. Factors influencing pacing in triathlon.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sam Sx; Peiffer, Jeremiah J; Brisswalter, Jeanick; Nosaka, Kazunori; Abbiss, Chris R

    2014-01-01

    Triathlon is a multisport event consisting of sequential swim, cycle, and run disciplines performed over a variety of distances. This complex and unique sport requires athletes to appropriately distribute their speed or energy expenditure (ie, pacing) within each discipline as well as over the entire event. As with most physical activity, the regulation of pacing in triathlon may be influenced by a multitude of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. The majority of current research focuses mainly on the Olympic distance, whilst much less literature is available on other triathlon distances such as the sprint, half-Ironman, and Ironman distances. Furthermore, little is understood regarding the specific physiological, environmental, and interdisciplinary effects on pacing. Therefore, this article discusses the pacing strategies observed in triathlon across different distances, and elucidates the possible factors influencing pacing within the three specific disciplines of a triathlon.

  9. Factors influencing pacing in triathlon

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Sam SX; Peiffer, Jeremiah J; Brisswalter, Jeanick; Nosaka, Kazunori; Abbiss, Chris R

    2014-01-01

    Triathlon is a multisport event consisting of sequential swim, cycle, and run disciplines performed over a variety of distances. This complex and unique sport requires athletes to appropriately distribute their speed or energy expenditure (ie, pacing) within each discipline as well as over the entire event. As with most physical activity, the regulation of pacing in triathlon may be influenced by a multitude of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. The majority of current research focuses mainly on the Olympic distance, whilst much less literature is available on other triathlon distances such as the sprint, half-Ironman, and Ironman distances. Furthermore, little is understood regarding the specific physiological, environmental, and interdisciplinary effects on pacing. Therefore, this article discusses the pacing strategies observed in triathlon across different distances, and elucidates the possible factors influencing pacing within the three specific disciplines of a triathlon. PMID:25258562

  10. Listening to music in the first, but not the last 1.5 km of a 5-km running trial alters pacing strategy and improves performance.

    PubMed

    Lima-Silva, A E; Silva-Cavalcante, M D; Pires, F O; Bertuzzi, R; Oliveira, R S F; Bishop, D

    2012-10-01

    We examined the effects of listening to music on attentional focus, rating of perceived exertion (RPE), pacing strategy and performance during a simulated 5-km running race. 15 participants performed 2 controlled trials to establish their best baseline time, followed by 2 counterbalanced experimental trials during which they listened to music during the first (M start) or the last (M finish) 1.5 km. The mean running velocity during the first 1.5 km was significantly higher in M start than in the fastest control condition (p<0.05), but there was no difference in velocity between conditions during the last 1.5 km (p>0.05). The faster first 1.5 m in M start was accompanied by a reduction in associative thoughts compared with the fastest control condition. There were no significant differences in RPE between conditions (p>0.05). These results suggest that listening to music at the beginning of a trial may draw the attentional focus away from internal sensations of fatigue to thoughts about the external environment. However, along with the reduction in associative thoughts and the increase in running velocity while listening to music, the RPE increased linearly and similarly under all conditions, suggesting that the change in velocity throughout the race may be to maintain the same rate of RPE increase.

  11. Improve power conversion efficiency of slab coupled optical waveguide lasers.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jiahua; Zhu, Lin; Dogan, Mehmet; Jacob, Jonah

    2014-07-28

    The slab coupled optical waveguide laser (SCOWL) is a promising candidate for high power, single mode emitter for a number of reasons, including its near diffraction limited optical quality, large modal size and near circular output pattern. Current SCOWL designs have limited electrical-optical power conversion efficiency (PCE) around 40%, which is lower than conventional RWG laser and broad area laser that are known to have much higher PCEs. To improve the SCOWL PCE, we theoretically optimize its structure by reducing Al content, increasing doping concentration and introducing a GRIN layer to prevent carrier leakage. Numerical simulations predict that an optimized SCOWL design has a maximum PCE of about 57% at room temperature.

  12. Four chamber pacing in dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Cazeau, S; Ritter, P; Bakdach, S; Lazarus, A; Limousin, M; Henao, L; Mundler, O; Daubert, J C; Mugica, J

    1994-11-01

    A 54-year-old man received a four chamber pacing system for severe congestive heart failure (NYHA functional Class IV). His ECG showed a left bundle branch block (200-msec QRS duration) with 200-msec PR interval, normal QRS axis, and 90-msec interatrial interval. An acute hemodynamic study with insertion of four temporary leads was performed prior to the implant, which demonstrated a significant increase in cardiac output and decrease of pulmonary capillary wedge pressure. A permanent pacemaker was implanted based on the encouraging results of the acute study. The right chamber leads were introduced by cephalic and subclavian approaches. The left atrium was paced with a coronary sinus lead, Medtronic SP 2188-58 model. An epicardial Medtronic 5071 lead was placed on the LV free wall. The four leads were connected to a standard bipolar DDD pacemaker, Chorus 6234. The two atrial leads were connected via a Y-connector to the atrial channel of the pacemaker with a bipolar pacing configuration. The two ventricular leads were connected in a similar fashion to the ventricular channel of the device. The right chamber leads were connected to the distal poles. The left chamber leads were connected to the proximal poles of the pacemaker. Six weeks later, the patient's clinical status improved markedly with a weight loss of 17 kg and disappearance of peripheral edema. His functional class was reduced to NYHA II. Four chamber pacing is technically feasible. In patients with evidence of interventricular dyssynchrony, this original pacing mode probably provides a mechanical activation sequence closer to the natural one.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Slow Pace for Race to Top Spending

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Michele

    2012-01-01

    Almost two years into the federal Race to the Top program, states are spending their shares of the $4 billion prize at a snail's pace--a reflection of the challenges the 12 winners face as they try to get ambitious education improvement plans off the ground. Through the end of March, the 11 states and the District of Columbia had spent just 14…

  14. Improving Higgs coupling measurements through ZZ Fusion at the ILC

    DOE PAGES

    Han, Tao; Liu, Zhen; Qian, Zhuoni; ...

    2015-06-17

    In this study, we evaluate the e-e+ → e-e+ + h process through the ZZ fusion channel at the International Linear Collider operating at 500 GeV and 1 TeV center-of-mass energies. We perform realistic simulations on the signal process and background processes. With judicious kinematic cuts, we find that the inclusive cross section can be measured to 2.9% after combining the 500 GeV at 500 fb-1 and 1 TeV at 1 ab-1 runs. A multivariate log-likelihood analysis further improves the precision of the cross section measurement to 2.3%. We discuss the overall improvement to model-independent Higgs width and coupling determinations and demonstrate the usemore » of different channels in distinguishing new physics effects in Higgs physics. Our study demonstrates the importance of the ZZ fusion channel to Higgs precision physics, which has often been neglected in the literature.« less

  15. Improving Higgs coupling measurements through ZZ Fusion at the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Tao; Liu, Zhen; Qian, Zhuoni; Sayre, Joshua

    2015-06-17

    In this study, we evaluate the e-e+ → e-e+ + h process through the ZZ fusion channel at the International Linear Collider operating at 500 GeV and 1 TeV center-of-mass energies. We perform realistic simulations on the signal process and background processes. With judicious kinematic cuts, we find that the inclusive cross section can be measured to 2.9% after combining the 500 GeV at 500 fb-1 and 1 TeV at 1 ab-1 runs. A multivariate log-likelihood analysis further improves the precision of the cross section measurement to 2.3%. We discuss the overall improvement to model-independent Higgs width and coupling determinations and demonstrate the use of different channels in distinguishing new physics effects in Higgs physics. Our study demonstrates the importance of the ZZ fusion channel to Higgs precision physics, which has often been neglected in the literature.

  16. Almanac 2013: cardiac arrhythmias and pacing.

    PubMed

    Liew, Reginald

    2013-10-01

    Important advances have been made in the past few years in the fields of clinical cardiac electrophysiology and pacing. Researchers and clinicians have a greater understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying atrial fibrillation (AF), which has transpired into improved methods of detection, risk stratification, and treatments. The introduction of novel oral anticoagulants has provided clinicians with alternative options in managing patients with AF at moderate to high thromboembolic risk and further data has been emerging on the use of catheter ablation for the treatment of symptomatic AF. Another area of intense research in the field of cardiac arrhythmias and pacing is in the use of cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) for the treatment of patients with heart failure. Following the publication of major landmark randomised controlled trials reporting that CRT confers a survival advantage in patients with severe heart failure and improves symptoms, many subsequent studies have been performed to further refine the selection of patients for CRT and determine the clinical characteristics associated with a favourable response. The field of sudden cardiac death and implantable cardioverter defibrillators also continues to be actively researched, with important new epidemiological and clinical data emerging on improved methods for patient selection, risk stratification, and management. This review covers the major recent advances in these areas related to cardiac arrhythmias and pacing.

  17. Optogenetic pacing in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Alex, Aneesh; Li, Airong; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Zhou, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Electrical stimulation is currently the gold standard for cardiac pacing. However, it is invasive and nonspecific for cardiac tissues. We recently developed a noninvasive cardiac pacing technique using optogenetic tools, which are widely used in neuroscience. Optogenetic pacing of the heart provides high spatial and temporal precisions, is specific for cardiac tissues, avoids artifacts associated with electrical stimulation, and therefore promises to be a powerful tool in basic cardiac research. We demonstrated optogenetic control of heart rhythm in a well-established model organism, Drosophila melanogaster. We developed transgenic flies expressing a light-gated cation channel, channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2), specifically in their hearts and demonstrated successful optogenetic pacing of ChR2-expressing Drosophila at different developmental stages, including the larva, pupa, and adult stages. A high-speed and ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence microscopy imaging system that is capable of providing images at a rate of 130 frames/s with axial and transverse resolutions of 1.5 and 3.9 μm, respectively, was used to noninvasively monitor Drosophila cardiac function and its response to pacing stimulation. The development of a noninvasive integrated optical pacing and imaging system provides a novel platform for performing research studies in developmental cardiology. PMID:26601299

  18. On the effectiveness of self-paced learning.

    PubMed

    Tullis, Jonathan G; Benjamin, Aaron S

    2011-02-01

    Metacognitive monitoring and control must be accurate and efficient in order to allow self-guided learners to improve their performance. Yet few examples exist in which allowing learners to control learning produces higher levels of performance than restricting learners' control. Here we investigate the consequences of allowing learners to self-pace study of a list of words on later recognition, and show that learners with control of study-time allocation significantly outperformed subjects with no control, even when the total study time was equated between groups (Experiments 1 and 2). The self-pacing group also outperformed a group for which study time was automatically allocated as a function of normative item difficulty (Experiment 2). The advantage of self-pacing was apparent only in subjects who utilized a discrepancy reduction strategy-that is, who allocated more study time to normatively difficult items. Self-pacing can improve memory performance, but only when appropriate allocation strategies are used.

  19. Diaphragm pacing: the state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Legras, Antoine; Arame, Alex; Pricopi, Ciprian; Boucherie, Jean-Claude; Badia, Alain; Panzini, Capucine Morelot

    2016-01-01

    Diaphragm pacing (DP) is an orphan surgical procedure that may be proposed in strictly selected ventilator-dependent patients to get an active diaphragm contraction. The goal is to wean from mechanical ventilation (MV) and restore permanent efficient breathing. The two validated indications, despite the lack of randomised control trials, concern patients with high-level spinal cord injuries (SCI) and central hypoventilation syndromes (CHS). To date, two different techniques exist. The first, intrathoracic diaphragm pacing (IT-DP), based on a radiofrequency method, in which the electrodes are directly placed around the phrenic nerve. The second, intraperitoneal diaphragm pacing (IP-DP) uses intradiaphragmatic electrodes implanted through laparoscopy. In both techniques, the phrenic nerves must be intact and diaphragm reconditioning is always required after implantation. No perioperative mortality has been reported and ventilator-weaning rate is about 72% to 96% in both techniques. Improvement of quality of life, by restoring a more physiological breathing, has been almost constant in patients that could be weaned. Failure or delay in recovery of effective diaphragm contractions could be due to irreversible amyotrophy or chest wall damage. Recent works have evaluated the interest of IP-DP in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). After some short series were reported in the literature, the only multicentric randomized study including 74 ALS patients was prematurely stopped because of excessive mortality in paced patients. Then, another trial analysed the place of IP-DP in peripheral diaphragm dysfunction but, given the multiple biases, the published results cannot validate that indication. Reviewing all available literature as in our experience, shows that DP is an effective method to wean selected patients dependent on ventilator and improve their daily life. Other potential indications will have to be evaluated by randomised control trials. PMID:27195135

  20. Long-term Ventricular Pacing in Treatment of Sinoatrial Block

    PubMed Central

    Bayley, T. J.

    1971-01-01

    Six patients with symptoms due to sinoatrial block are described in whom no relief or improvement in block occurred when they were treated with isoprenaline or ephedrine. All six patients were treated by ventricular cardiac pacing with complete relief of symptoms. Despite the theoretical disadvantages of parasystole and loss of accrochage in treating these patients by ventricular pacing they have survived for periods of 18 months to over five years. PMID:5567769

  1. Presentation Time Concerning System-Paced Multimedia Instructions and the Superiority of Learner Pacing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stiller, Klaus D.; Petzold, Kirstin; Zinnbauer, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The superiority of learner-paced over system-paced instructions was demonstrated in multiple experiments. In these experiments, the system-paced presentations were highly speeded, causing cognitive overload, while the learner-paced instructions allowed adjustments of the presentational flow to the learner's needs by pacing facilities, mostly…

  2. Report: Progress Made, but Improvements Needed at CTS of Asheville Superfund Site in North Carolina to Advance Cleanup Pace and Reduce Potential Exposure

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #16-P-0296, August 31, 2016. EPA Region 4 can accelerate the cleanup and completeness of work, and improve public communications, to better control human exposure to unsafe industrial contamination at the CTS site.

  3. Improving the calculation of magnetic coupling constants in MRPT methods.

    PubMed

    Spivak, Mariano; Angeli, Celestino; Calzado, Carmen J; de Graaf, Coen

    2014-09-05

    The magnetic coupling in transition metal compounds with more than one unpaired electron per magnetic center has been studied with multiconfigurational perturbation theory. The usual shortcomings of these methodologies (severe underestimation of the magnetic coupling) have been overcome by describing the Slater determinants with a set of molecular orbitals that maximally resemble the natural orbitals of a high-level multiconfigurational reference configuration interaction calculation. These orbitals have significant delocalization tails onto the bridging ligands and largely increase the coupling strengths in the perturbative calculation.

  4. Improvements in Representations of Cloud Microphysics for BBHRP and Models using Data Collected during M-PACE and TWP-ICE

    SciTech Connect

    Greg M. McFarquhar

    2010-02-22

    In our research we proposed to use data collected during the 2004 Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) and the 2006 Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) to improve retrievals of ice and mixed-phase clouds, to improve our understanding of how cloud and radiative processes affect cloud life cycles, and to develop and test methods for using ARM data more effectively in model. In particular, we proposed to: 1) use MPACE in-situ data to determine how liquid water fraction and cloud ice and liquid effective radius (r{sub ei} and r{sub ew}) vary with temperature, normalized cloud altitude and other variables for Arctic mixed-phase clouds, and to use these data to evaluate the performance of model parameterization schemes and remote sensing retrieval algorithms; 2) calculate rei and size/shape distributions using TWP-ICE in-situ data, investigate their dependence on cirrus type (oceanic or continental anvils or cirrus not directly traced to convection), and develop and test representations for MICROBASE; 3) conduct fundamental research enhancing our understanding of cloud/radiative interactions, concentrating on effects of small crystals and particle shapes and sizes on radiation; and 4) improve representations of microphysical processes for models (fall-out, effective density, mean scattering properties, rei and rew) and provide them to ARM PIs. In the course of our research, we made substantial progress on all four goals.

  5. Pacing in Children's Television Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCollum, James F., Jr.; Bryant, Jennings

    Following a content analysis, 85 children's programs were assigned a pacing index derived from the following criteria: (1) frequency of camera cuts; (2) frequency of related scene changes; (3) frequency of unrelated scene changes; (4) frequency of auditory changes; (5) percentage of active motion; (6) percentage of active talking; and (7)…

  6. Mathematics Unit Plans. PACE '94.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiles, Clyde A., Ed.; Schoon, Kenneth J., Ed.

    This booklet contains mathematics unit plans for Algebra 1, Geometry, Math for Technology, Mathematical Problem Solving, and Pre-Algebra developed by PACE (Promoting Academic Excellence In Mathematics, Science & Technology for Workers of the 21st Century). Each unit plan contains suggested timing, objectives, skills to be acquired, workplace…

  7. Science Unit Plans. PACE '94.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoon, Kenneth J., Ed.; Wiles, Clyde A., Ed.

    This booklet contains mathematics unit plans for Biology, Chemistry, and Physical Science developed by PACE (Promoting Academic Excellence In Mathematics, Science & Technology for Workers of the 21st Century). Each unit plan contains suggested timing, objectives, skills to be acquired, workplace relationships, learning activities with suggested…

  8. Did recent world record marathon runners employ optimal pacing strategies?

    PubMed

    Angus, Simon D

    2014-01-01

    We apply statistical analysis of high frequency (1 km) split data for the most recent two world-record marathon runs: Run 1 (2:03:59, 28 September 2008) and Run 2 (2:03:38, 25 September 2011). Based on studies in the endurance cycling literature, we develop two principles to approximate 'optimal' pacing in the field marathon. By utilising GPS and weather data, we test, and then de-trend, for each athlete's field response to gradient and headwind on course, recovering standardised proxies for power-based pacing traces. The resultant traces were analysed to ascertain if either runner followed optimal pacing principles; and characterise any deviations from optimality. Whereas gradient was insignificant, headwind was a significant factor in running speed variability for both runners, with Runner 2 targeting the (optimal) parallel variation principle, whilst Runner 1 did not. After adjusting for these responses, neither runner followed the (optimal) 'even' power pacing principle, with Runner 2's macro-pacing strategy fitting a sinusoidal oscillator with exponentially expanding envelope whilst Runner 1 followed a U-shaped, quadratic form. The study suggests that: (a) better pacing strategy could provide elite marathon runners with an economical pathway to significant performance improvements at world-record level; and (b) the data and analysis herein is consistent with a complex-adaptive model of power regulation.

  9. Improving the well-being of couples facing cancer: a review of couples-based psychosocial interventions.

    PubMed

    Baik, Ok Mi; Adams, Kathryn Betts

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this review article is to assess the available scientific evidence on the effects of couples-based psychosocial interventions for couples when one spouse faces cancer. For the present study, we conducted an extensive search of three electronic databases using a comprehensive search strategy. The literature search identified 14 studies evaluating couples intervention where one partner is facing cancer. Among them, eight studies concluded there was overall improvement for patients and eight studies reported overall improvement for partners, whereas an additional five studies showed partial improvement for patients and three demonstrated partial improvements for partners. Taken in the aggregate, these studies illustrated partial effectiveness--most had some positive results--but with clear limitations in terms of how many aspects of psychosocial well-being changed, lack of equal effectiveness for both patients and their partners, or limited maintenance of improvements over time, a common concern with brief psychosocial interventions. Although couples-based interventions may facilitate emotional support and dyadic coping, how these psychosocial interventions should be delivered, at what point in the illness and treatment they should be delivered, and how long they should continue remain as future challenges.

  10. MHD generator with improved network coupling electrodes to a load

    DOEpatents

    Rosa, Richard J.

    1977-01-01

    An MHD generator has a plurality of segmented electrodes extending longitudinally of a duct, whereby progressively increasing high DC voltages are derived from a set of cathode electrodes and progressively increasing low DC voltages are derived from a set of anode electrodes. First and second load terminals are respectively connected to the cathode and anode electrodes by separate coupling networks, each of which includes a number of SCR's and a number of diode rectifiers.

  11. An Unconventional Route of Left Ventricular Pacing

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Santosh Kumar; Varm, Chandra Mohan; Thakur, Ramesh; Krishna, Vinay; Goel, Amit; Kumar, Ashutosh; Jha, Mukesh Jitendra; Mishra, Vikas; Singh Syal, Karandeep

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of a rare complication of transvenous right ventricular pacing by temporary pacing wire causing iatrogenic interventricular septal perforation and left ventricular pacing in a 69-year-old man who was referred for recurrent syncope with sinus arrest. PMID:28197251

  12. Pacing in Distance Education: Something for Everyone?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shale, Doug G.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the concept of pacing as it relates to distance education. Highlights include the relationship of pacing to academic standards, activity scheduling, student independence, student interaction, effective utilization of media, course materials, learning methods, student motivation, drop-out rate, and the cost effectiveness of pacing. (LRW)

  13. Modeling Medicare Costs of PACE Populations

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, James; Karon, Sarita L.

    2000-01-01

    Historically, Medicare has paid PACE providers a monthly capitated rate equal to 95 percent of the site's county AAPCC multiplied by a PACE-specific frailty adjuster of 2.39. The Balanced Budget Act of 1997 makes PACE a permanent provider category and mandates that future Medicare payments be based upon the rate structure of the Medicare+Choice payment system, adjusted for the comparative frailty of PACE enrollees and other factors deemed to be appropriate by the Secretary of Health and Human Services. This study revisits the calculation of the PACE frailty adjuster and explores the effect of risk adjustment on that frailty adjuster. PMID:11481753

  14. 42 CFR 460.34 - Duration of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Program Agreement § 460.34 Duration of PACE program agreement. An agreement...

  15. 42 CFR 460.34 - Duration of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Program Agreement § 460.34 Duration of PACE program agreement. An agreement...

  16. 42 CFR 460.34 - Duration of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Program Agreement § 460.34 Duration of PACE program agreement. An agreement...

  17. 42 CFR 460.60 - PACE organizational structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Administrative Requirements § 460.60 PACE organizational structure. (a) A...

  18. 42 CFR 460.60 - PACE organizational structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Administrative Requirements § 460.60 PACE organizational structure. (a) A...

  19. 42 CFR 460.60 - PACE organizational structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Administrative Requirements § 460.60 PACE organizational structure. (a) A...

  20. 42 CFR 460.34 - Duration of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Program Agreement § 460.34 Duration of PACE program agreement. An agreement...

  1. 42 CFR 460.34 - Duration of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Program Agreement § 460.34 Duration of PACE program agreement. An agreement...

  2. Dual sensor VVIR mode pacing: is it worth it?

    PubMed

    Sulke, N; Tan, K; Kamalvand, K; Bostock, J; Bucknall, C

    1996-11-01

    Dual sensor ventricular demand rate responsive (VVIR mode) pacing was compared with single sensor rate responsive pacing to assess whether this new development should be more widely incorporated in modern pacemaker devices. A within patient randomized, double-blind crossover study involving ten patients, mean age 67.4 years (70% male), had Medtronic Legend Plus dual sensor VVIR pacemakers implanted for high grade AV block and chronic or persistent paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Performance values were compared to 20 healthy control subjects of a similar age and gender. Patients were both subjectively and objectively assessed after 2 weeks of out-of-hospital activity in VVIR mode (minute ventilation sensing), VVIR mode (activity sensing), VVIR mode (dual sensor), and VVI mode (no rate response). All patients were assessed for subjective preference for, and objective improvement in, any pacing modality as assessed by standardized daily activity protocols and graded exercise treadmill testing. Subjective perception of exercise capacity and functional status was significantly lower in VVI mode (P < 0.05) compared to any of the VVIR modes, which did not differ. After completion of the study 70% of patients chose VVIR as their preferred mode, with 30% expressing no preference. Forty percent preferred activity sensor VVIR mode pacing, 30% preferred dual sensor VVIR mode pacing, and 70% found either dual sensor VVIR mode, minute ventilation sensor VVIR mode, or both modalities least acceptable. No patient found activity sensing VVIR mode least acceptable. Graded treadmill testing revealed significantly lower exercise tolerance during VVI mode pacing (P < 0.01) compared to the VVIR modalities, which did not differ. Overall, chronotropic response was best with dual sensor pacing during standardized daily activity protocols and during the standard car journey. The data from this study suggest that there is no marked clinical advantage obtained from the use of dual sensor

  3. Improved performance of AR-coated DFB lasers by the introduction of gain coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Morthier, G.; Vankwikelberge, P.; David, K.; Baets, R. )

    1990-03-01

    AR-coated DFB lasers with both gain- and index-coupled distributed feedback are studied numerically with respect to mode losses, mode suppression, and spatial hole burning. The mode losses and the spatial hole burning decrease with increasing gain coupling, while the mode suppression increases. It is shown that a large improvement in performance can already be obtained for small fractions of gain coupling.

  4. Cardiac Pacing - Is Telemonitoring Now Essential?

    PubMed

    Burri, Haran

    2013-11-01

    Modern pacemakers and implantable defibrillators are able to automatically perform tests executed manually during in-office visits; such as measurement of sensing and pacing thresholds. In addition, the devices also record a wealth of diagnostic data that are of clinical relevance. The advent of wireless technology in these devices allows automatic transmission of these data that can be consulted remotely by the physician. There is now solid evidence indicating that remote device follow-up can safely reduce the number of in-office visits, thereby improving convenience for patients and caregivers alike. Remote monitoring with automatic alerts for arrhythmias, heart failure and technical issues, has been shown to dramatically reduce delay to diagnosis of these events compared with standard follow-up; potentially improving patient safety and outcome. For these reasons, remote device management is becoming the standard of care.

  5. Improvement of uniformity in a weakly magnetized inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W. H.; Cheong, H. W.; Kim, J. W.; Whang, K. W.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic fields are applied to inductively coupled plasma (ICP) to achieve high plasma densities using electromagnets. If the magnetic fields are set up such that the magnitude of magnetic flux density on the substrate decreases with both radial and axial distances from the substrate’s center (here after referred to as M-ICP-A), the plasma density increases by 237% compared with that for ICP although the non-uniformity of the plasma density for M-ICP-A (11.1%) is higher than that for ICP (10.9%). As the rate of decrease in the magnitude of magnetic flux density on the substrate increases both radially and axially, the non-uniformity in the plasma density increases further. The increase in the non-uniformity for M-ICP-A was confirmed to arise from the flute instability. To suppress the flute instability, we arranged the magnitude of magnetic flux density on the substrate to increase with increasing distance from the substrate center both radially and axially (here after referred to as M-ICP-V). In this configuration, plasma fluctuations were not observed, hence the plasma density non-uniformity was lowered to 8.1%, although the measured plasma density was higher than that for M-ICP-A. The oxide etch-rate non-uniformity in M-ICP-V (2.5%) was also lower than that for ICP (5.2%) or that for M-ICP-A (21.4%).

  6. Keeping pace with Capitol Hill

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooper, C.

    2007-01-01

    At the Capitol Hill, the legislative branch of the United States government, the work is always at pace. Working with Congress is a tough job yet, rewarding. The Congress worked hard together to serve the public interest but many big issues are one small part of what Congress does. However, many US news media do not report what the government does instead, the media report what the government argues about. The media reports the conflicts but story is always incomplete. In order for the people know what is happening to the government, contact the congressional representative to know the complete story.

  7. Tools and Trends in Self-Paced Language Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godwin-Jones, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Ever since the PLATO system of the 1960's, CALL (computer assisted language learning) has had a major focus on providing self-paced, auto-correcting exercises for language learners to practice their skills and improve their knowledge of discrete areas of language learning. The computer has been recognized from the beginning as a patient and…

  8. Direct His-bundle pacing: present and future.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Pramod M; Romanyshyn, Mary

    2004-06-01

    Direct His-bundle pacing (DHBP) produces rapid sequential multisite synchronous ventricular activation and, therefore, would be an ideal alternative to right ventricular apical (RVA) pacing. In 54 patients with cardiomyopathy, ejection fraction (EF) 0.23 +/- 0.11, persistent atrial fibrillation, and normal QRS < 120 ms. DHBP was attempted. This was successful in 39 patients. In seven patients, the effect of increasing heart rate on contractility (Treppe effect) was investigated. Twelve patients who also received a RVA lead underwent cardiopulmonary testing. After a mean follow-up of 42 months, 29 patients are still alive with EF improving from 0.23 +/- 0.11 to 0.33 +/- 0.15. Functional class improved from 3.5 to 2.2. DP/dt increased at each pacing site (P < 0.05) as the heart rate increased to 60, 100, and 120 beats/min. Rise in dP/dt by DHBP pacing at 120 beats/min was at least 170 +/- mmHg/s, greater than any other site in the ventricle (P < 0.05). Cardiopulmonary testing revealed longer exercise time (RVA 255 +/- 110 s) (His 280 +/- 104 s) (P < 0.05), higher O2 uptake (RVA 15 +/- 4 mL/kg per minute) (His 16 +/- 4 mL/kg minute) (P < 0.05), and later anaerobic threshold (RVA 126 +/- 71 s) (His 145 +/- 74 s) (P < 0.05) with DHBP compared to RVA pacing. Long-term DHBP is safe and effective in humans. DHBP is associated with a superior Treppe effect and increased cardiopulmonary reserve when compared to RVA pacing.

  9. Adaptation of naturally paced saccades

    PubMed Central

    Blangero, Annabelle; Herman, James P.; Wallman, Josh; Harwood, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    In the natural environment, humans make saccades almost continuously. In many eye movement experiments, however, observers are required to fixate for unnaturally long periods of time. The resulting long and monotonous experimental sessions can become especially problematic when collecting data in a clinical setting, where time can be scarce and subjects easily fatigued. With this in mind, we tested whether the well-studied motor learning process of saccade adaptation could be induced with a dramatically shortened intertrial interval. Observers made saccades to targets that stepped left or right either ∼250 ms or ∼1,600 ms after the saccade landed. In experiment I, we tested baseline saccade parameters to four different target amplitudes (5°, 10°, 15°, and 20°) in the two timing settings. In experiments II and III, we adapted 10° saccades via 2° intrasaccadic steps either backwards or forwards, respectively. Seven subjects performed eight separate adaptation sessions (2 intertrial timings × 2 adaptation direction × 2 session trial lengths). Adaptation proceeded remarkably similarly in both timing conditions across the multiple sessions. In the faster-paced sessions, robust adaptation was achieved in under 2 min, demonstrating the efficacy of our approach to streamlining saccade adaptation experiments. Although saccade amplitudes were similar between conditions, the faster-paced condition unexpectedly resulted in significantly higher peak velocities in all subjects. This surprising finding demonstrates that the stereotyped “main sequence” relationship between saccade amplitude and peak velocity is not as fixed as originally thought. PMID:24623511

  10. Thallium cardiac stressing by esophageal pacing

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.L.; Vacek, J.L.; Preston, D.F.; Robinson, R.G.; Feldkamp, M.J. )

    1989-09-01

    Forty-three patients were examined with the transesophageal pacing method of cardiac stressing and thallium imaging. Transesophageal cardiac pacing, using a pill electrode or a permanent pacemaker lead, is a safe alternative for patients who are physically unable to exercise. Prior studies suggest that transvenous right atrial pacing with thallium injection is equivalent to physical exercise thallium studies in the detection of coronary artery disease. The esophageal pacing bipolar electrode similarly increases heart rate without the necessity of transvenous pacing or fluoroscopy and without the adverse side effects often seen when using pharmacologic stressing agents (i.e., dipyridamole). The results compare well with cardiac catheterization, echocardiographic, and electrocardiographic results. Cardiac paced stress testing requires no sedation, is performed on an out-patient basis, and causes little if any discomfort for the patient.

  11. Finite element analysis of sucker rod couplings with guidelines for improving fatigue life

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.L.

    1997-09-01

    The response of a variety of sucker rod couplings to an applied axial load was simulated using axisymmetric finite element models. The calculations investigated three sucker rod sizes and various combinations of the slimhole, Spiralock, and Flexbar modifications to the coupling. In addition, the effect of various make-ups (assembly tightness) on the performance of coupling was investigated. An axial load was applied to the sucker rod ranging from {minus}5 ksi to 40 ksi, encompassing three load cycles identified on a modified Goodman diagram as acceptable for indefinite service life of the sucker rods. The simulations of the various coupling geometries and make-ups were evaluated with respect to how well they accomplish the two primary objectives of preloading threaded couplings: (1) to lock the threaded coupling together so that it will not loosen and eventually uncouple, and (2) to improve the fatigue resistance of the threaded connection by reducing the stress amplitude in the coupling when subjected to cyclic loading. Perhaps the most significant finding in this study was the characterization of the coupling parameters which affect two stress measures. The mean hydrostatic stress, which determines the permissible effective alternating stress, is a function of the coupling make-up. Whereas, the alternating effective stress is a function of the relative stiffnesses of the pin and box sections of the coupling and, as long as the coupling does not separate, is unaffected by the amount of circumferential displacement applied during make-up. The results of this study suggest approaches for improving the fatigue resistance of sucker rod couplings.

  12. Contribution of ultraviolet and shortwave infrared observations to atmospheric correction of PACE ocean-color imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frouin, Robert J.; Gross-Colzy, Lydwine S.

    2016-05-01

    The Pre-Aerosol, Cloud, and ocean Ecosystem (PACE) mission will carry into space a spectrometer measuring at 5 nm resolution in the ultraviolet (UV) to near infrared (NIR) and at lower resolution in spectral bands in the NIR and shortwave infrared (SWIR). These observations have great potential for improving estimates of marine reflectance in the post-EOS era. In view of this, we evaluate, using simulations with a coupled radiation transfer code, the gain in marine reflectance accuracy expected by including observations in the UV and SWIR compared with just using observations in the visible to NIR. The study is performed for the PACE threshold aggregate bands with respect to the standard set of bands used to generate ocean color products. The top-of-atmosphere (TOA) signal measured by the PACE spectrometer is simulated for a variety of realistic atmospheric and oceanic conditions. The TOA reflectance and the marine reflectance of the simulated ensemble are decomposed into principal components, and the components of the TOA reflectance sensitive to the ocean signal identified. Inverse models are constructed to retrieve the principal components of the marine reflectance, allowing a reconstruction, therefore an estimation of the marine reflectance. Theoretical performance is quantified as a function of angular geometry, aerosol properties, and water type, showing a significant improvement in retrieval accuracy when using the extended spectral range. On average over all the situations considered (including sun glint), the RMS error is reduced from 0.0037 to 0.0024 at 412 nm, from 0.0013 to 0.0007 at 665 nm, and from 0.0010 to 0.0004 at 865 nm (Case 2 waters are better handled). The performance is degraded at large zenith angles and aerosol optical thickness, is better at scattering angles around 120-130 degrees, and exhibits little dependence on aerosol single scattering albedo and aerosol scale height.

  13. Novel cable coupling technique for improved shallow distributed acoustic sensor VSPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munn, Jonathan D.; Coleman, Thomas I.; Parker, Beth L.; Mondanos, Michael J.; Chalari, Athena

    2017-03-01

    Vertical seismic profiles (VSPs) collected using fiber optic distributed acoustic sensors (DAS) are becoming increasingly common; yet, ensuring good cable coupling with the borehole wall remains a persistent challenge. Traditional cable deployment techniques used in the petroleum industry are either not possible or do not provide data of sufficient quality for shallow applications. Additionally, no direct field comparison of coupling techniques in the same borehole exists to determine the impacts of poor coupling on DAS VSP data quality. This paper addresses these issues by: (1) presenting a novel cable coupling solution using a removable and relatively inexpensive FLUTe™ flexible borehole liner; and (2) presenting field examples of DAS VSPs under different coupling conditions. The proposed coupling technique is analogous to a fully cemented deployment in that the cable is continuously coupled directly to the formation. Field experiments conducted to assess and validate the technique demonstrate a marked improvement in VSP data quality when the cable is coupled with a flexible borehole liner. Without the liner, seismic profiles are dominated by a high-amplitude cable wave and the p-wave arrival is not observed; however, with cable coupling provided by a borehole liner inflated using hydrostatic pressure, the cable wave is suppressed and clear p-wave arrivals are visible. Additional tests examining the influence of fiber optic cable structure on seismic responses demonstrate that tight buffered fibers are more sensitive to dynamic strain than loose tube fibers making them potentially better suited for certain DAS applications.

  14. A decade of nuclear pacing

    SciTech Connect

    Parsonnet, V.; Gilbert, L.; Zucker, I.R.; Werres, R.; Atherley, T.; Manhardt, M.; Cort, J.

    1984-01-01

    In April, 1973, a decade-long study was begun on nuclear-powered pacemakers. The first 15 of these were designed by the Numec Corporation under a contract from the United States Atomic Energy Commission. Altogether 151 units powered by the isotope plutonium 238 were implanted in 131 patients; the pacemakers of 4 different manufacturers were used. The last nuclear pacemaker was implanted in January, 1983. The actuarial survival at 10 years was 92%, meeting the original performance goal of the Commission of 90%. Ninety pulse generators are still in service today; 25 patients have died and 36 pulse generators have been replaced with non-nuclear units. The most common indication for replacement was an inappropriate pacing mode. This high reliability and superior performance suggest that continued use of a radioisotopic power source is justified, particularly if combined with the electronic circuits of today's dual-chambered, multiprogrammable, and multifunctional pacemakers.

  15. Identification and reliability of pacing strategies in outrigger canoeing ergometry.

    PubMed

    Sealey, Rebecca M; Spinks, Warwick L; Leicht, Anthony S; Sinclair, Wade H

    2010-03-01

    This study examined the pacing strategies utilised; and the performance reproducibility during repeated outrigger canoeing ergometer time trials. Trained female outrigger canoeists (N=11) completed four 1000m outrigger canoe ergometer time trials. There was a significant 1.5% improvement in 1000m time in trial four compared to trial one. A fast start strategy was adopted in 36 of the 44 trials (82%) followed by a deceleration during the mid stages. As trials progressed there was an increased adoption of negative pacing (fast finish) between the last two splits, indicating a learning effect of pacing strategy across repeated trials. These results demonstrate that although some performance improvement was evident between the first and fourth time trials, the 1000m outrigger ergometer time trial is a reliable test that may be used as a tool to assist with crew selection and performance monitoring. Further, on account of the variation in pacing strategy noted in the fourth trial, the authors recommend utilising one familiarisation session and one test session when assessing performance such that learning or training adaptations resulting from multiple trials do not impact on results.

  16. 42 CFR 460.186 - PACE premiums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false PACE premiums. 460.186 Section 460.186 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY...

  17. 42 CFR 460.186 - PACE premiums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false PACE premiums. 460.186 Section 460.186 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY...

  18. 42 CFR 460.186 - PACE premiums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false PACE premiums. 460.186 Section 460.186 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY...

  19. Update in cardiac arrhythmias and pacing.

    PubMed

    García-Bolao, Ignacio; Ruiz-Mateas, Francisco; Bazan, Victor; Berruezo, Antonio; Alcalde, Oscar; Leal del Ojo, Juan; Acosta, Juan; Martínez Sellés, Manuel; Mosquera, Ignacio

    2015-03-01

    This article discusses the main advances in cardiac arrhythmias and pacing published between 2013 and 2014. Special attention is given to the interventional treatment of atrial fibrillation and ventricular arrhythmias, and on advances in cardiac pacing and implantable cardioverter defibrillators, with particular reference to the elderly patient.

  20. Web Tools: Keeping Learners on Pace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kosloski, Mickey

    2016-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges in teaching technology and engineering is pacing. Some students grasp new technological concepts quickly, while others need repetition and may struggle to keep pace. This poses an obstacle for the technology and engineering teacher, and is particularly true when teaching students to build a website. However, there…

  1. 42 CFR 460.60 - PACE organizational structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false PACE organizational structure. 460.60 Section 460... ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Administrative Requirements § 460.60 PACE organizational structure. (a) A PACE... planning a change in organizational structure must notify CMS and the State administering agency,...

  2. The evolution of pace in popular movies.

    PubMed

    Cutting, James E

    2016-01-01

    Movies have changed dramatically over the last 100 years. Several of these changes in popular English-language filmmaking practice are reflected in patterns of film style as distributed over the length of movies. In particular, arrangements of shot durations, motion, and luminance have altered and come to reflect aspects of the narrative form. Narrative form, on the other hand, appears to have been relatively unchanged over that time and is often characterized as having four more or less equal duration parts, sometimes called acts - setup, complication, development, and climax. The altered patterns in film style found here affect a movie's pace: increasing shot durations and decreasing motion in the setup, darkening across the complication and development followed by brightening across the climax, decreasing shot durations and increasing motion during the first part of the climax followed by increasing shot durations and decreasing motion at the end of the climax. Decreasing shot durations mean more cuts; more cuts mean potentially more saccades that drive attention; more motion also captures attention; and brighter and darker images are associated with positive and negative emotions. Coupled with narrative form, all of these may serve to increase the engagement of the movie viewer.

  3. Improving field enhancement of 2D hollow tapered waveguides via dielectric microcylinder coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yongzhu; Xie, Xiangsheng; Li, Li; Chen, Gengyan; Guo, Lina; Lin, Xusheng

    2015-02-01

    We numerically study a novel scheme to improve the field enhancement of 2D hollow tapered waveguides (HTWs). A dielectric microcylinder is embedded into a metal-insulator-metal (MIM) HTW for resonant exciting gap surface plasmons (GSPs), which is different from the lowest propagating mode (TM0) excitation via the conventional fire-end coupling method. The physical mechanism of the field enhancement and the influence of critical parameters such as numerical aperture (NA) of the lens, permittivity of the microcylinder and the incident wavelength are discussed. The substantial improvement of the GSP excitation efficiency via dielectric microcylinder coupling shows potential in designing tapered MIM waveguides for nanofocusing and field enhancement.

  4. Significance of pacing cycle lengths in manifest entrainment of orthodromic circus movement tachycardia by ventricular pacing.

    PubMed

    Zaman, L; Castellanos, A; Saoudi, N C; Stafford, W J; Trohman, R G; Interian, A; Myerburg, R J

    1987-06-01

    The physiology of entrainment of orthodromic circus movement tachycardia (CMT) was studied using ventricular pacing during 18 episodes of induced CMT in 7 patients with atrioventricular (AV) accessory pathways. The first paced impulse was delivered as late as possible in the tachycardia cycle (mean 88 +/- 5% of the spontaneous cycle length [CL]). Entrainment was demonstrated by the following criteria: 1:1 retrograde conduction via the accessory pathway; capture of atrial, ventricular and His bundle electrograms at the pacing rate; and resumption of tachycardia at its previous rate after cessation of pacing. The number of ventricular paced impulses ranged from 5 to 14 (mean 8 +/- 3), and entrainment occurred in 2 to 7 paced cycles (mean 4 +/- 2). Orthodromic activation of a major part of the reentry circuit (manifest entrainment) was demonstrated during 9 episodes by the occurrence of His bundle electrogram preceding the first CMT QRS at the time anticipated from the last paced beat. In the 9 other episodes, persistent retrograde His bundle activation and AV nodal penetration by each paced impulse caused a delay (mean 79 +/- 25 ms) in activation of the His bundle preceding the first CMT QRS after the last paced beat. The mean pacing CL achieving manifest entrainment was 92 +/- 3% of the tachycardia CL, compared with 84 +/- 3% for retrograde AV nodal penetration (p less than 0.01). In conclusion, manifest entrainment of orthodromic CMT can be demonstrated by ventricular pacing at very long CLs; shorter CLs may cause CMT termination due to retrograde AV nodal penetration.

  5. The pace of cultural evolution.

    PubMed

    Perreault, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Today, humans inhabit most of the world's terrestrial habitats. This observation has been explained by the fact that we possess a secondary inheritance mechanism, culture, in addition to a genetic system. Because it is assumed that cultural evolution occurs faster than biological evolution, humans can adapt to new ecosystems more rapidly than other animals. This assumption, however, has never been tested empirically. Here, I compare rates of change in human technologies to rates of change in animal morphologies. I find that rates of cultural evolution are inversely correlated with the time interval over which they are measured, which is similar to what is known for biological rates. This correlation explains why the pace of cultural evolution appears faster when measured over recent time periods, where time intervals are often shorter. Controlling for the correlation between rates and time intervals, I show that (1) cultural evolution is faster than biological evolution; (2) this effect holds true even when the generation time of species is controlled for; and (3) culture allows us to evolve over short time scales, which are normally accessible only to short-lived species, while at the same time allowing for us to enjoy the benefits of having a long life history.

  6. The Pace of Cultural Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Perreault, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Today, humans inhabit most of the world’s terrestrial habitats. This observation has been explained by the fact that we possess a secondary inheritance mechanism, culture, in addition to a genetic system. Because it is assumed that cultural evolution occurs faster than biological evolution, humans can adapt to new ecosystems more rapidly than other animals. This assumption, however, has never been tested empirically. Here, I compare rates of change in human technologies to rates of change in animal morphologies. I find that rates of cultural evolution are inversely correlated with the time interval over which they are measured, which is similar to what is known for biological rates. This correlation explains why the pace of cultural evolution appears faster when measured over recent time periods, where time intervals are often shorter. Controlling for the correlation between rates and time intervals, I show that (1) cultural evolution is faster than biological evolution; (2) this effect holds true even when the generation time of species is controlled for; and (3) culture allows us to evolve over short time scales, which are normally accessible only to short-lived species, while at the same time allowing for us to enjoy the benefits of having a long life history. PMID:23024804

  7. 42 CFR 460.170 - Reinstatement in PACE.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Participant Enrollment and Disenrollment § 460.170 Reinstatement in PACE. (a) A...

  8. 42 CFR 460.180 - Medicare payment to PACE organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Payment § 460.180 Medicare payment to PACE organizations. (a) Principle...

  9. 42 CFR 460.170 - Reinstatement in PACE.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Participant Enrollment and Disenrollment § 460.170 Reinstatement in PACE. (a) A...

  10. 42 CFR 460.122 - PACE organization's appeals process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Participant Rights § 460.122 PACE organization's appeals process. For...

  11. 42 CFR 460.180 - Medicare payment to PACE organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Payment § 460.180 Medicare payment to PACE organizations. (a) Principle...

  12. 42 CFR 460.122 - PACE organization's appeals process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Participant Rights § 460.122 PACE organization's appeals process. For...

  13. 42 CFR 460.122 - PACE organization's appeals process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Participant Rights § 460.122 PACE organization's appeals process. For...

  14. 42 CFR 460.170 - Reinstatement in PACE.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Participant Enrollment and Disenrollment § 460.170 Reinstatement in PACE. (a) A...

  15. 42 CFR 460.170 - Reinstatement in PACE.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Participant Enrollment and Disenrollment § 460.170 Reinstatement in PACE. (a) A...

  16. 42 CFR 460.180 - Medicare payment to PACE organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Payment § 460.180 Medicare payment to PACE organizations. (a) Principle...

  17. COUPLING

    DOEpatents

    Frisch, E.; Johnson, C.G.

    1962-05-15

    A detachable coupling arrangement is described which provides for varying the length of the handle of a tool used in relatively narrow channels. The arrangement consists of mating the key and keyhole formations in the cooperating handle sections. (AEC)

  18. Coupling Advanced Modeling and Visualization to Improve High-Impact Tropical Weather Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Bo-Wen; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Green, Bryan

    2009-01-01

    To meet the goals of extreme weather event warning, this approach couples a modeling and visualization system that integrates existing NASA technologies and improves the modeling system's parallel scalability to take advantage of petascale supercomputers. It also streamlines the data flow for fast processing and 3D visualizations, and develops visualization modules to fuse NASA satellite data.

  19. Improving Relationship Satisfaction--Qualitative Insights Derived from Individuals Currently within a Couple Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Lester M.

    2011-01-01

    Given the prevalence of relationship breakdown, and the unequivocal association with poor outcomes, ways in which to improve relationship satisfaction are of great importance. Derived from in-depth interviews with 112 individuals in a couple relationship, this study aims to explore and understand different beliefs and perceived capabilities toward…

  20. Sensor-triggered, rate-variable cardiac pacing. Current technologies and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Benditt, D G; Milstein, S; Buetikofer, J; Gornick, C C; Mianulli, M; Fetter, J

    1987-11-01

    Conventional implantable dual-chamber cardiac pacemakers adjust heart rate and maintain normal atrial and ventricular contraction by tracking "native" atrial electrical activity and pacing the ventricles after a predetermined programmable atrioventricular delay. However, in patients with symptomatic bradyarrhythmias, optimal function of "atrial-tracking" devices may be limited by concomitant sinoatrial disease. Provision of chronotropic response during physical exertion or emotional stress may be achieved by using physiologic sensors to alter pacing rate independently of atrial activity. Additional systems using sensor technologies are being developed. Future pacing systems will have dual-chamber pacing capability and may use several sensors coupled synergistically in order to take advantage of particular strengths of each. Physiologic sensor technology may be of diagnostic value in both antitachycardia devices and implantable cardioverter and defibrillator systems.

  1. Biventricular pacing in congestive heart failure: a boost toward finer living.

    PubMed

    Luck, Jerry C; Wolbrette, Deborah L; Boehmer, John P; Ulsh, Paula J; Silber, David; Naccarelli, Gerald V

    2002-01-01

    With 550,000 new cases each year, congestive heart failure is a major medical problem. Several medical therapies, including digoxin, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and beta-blockers, have reduced the number of re-hospitalizations and slowed the progression of congestive heart failure. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, some beta-blockers, and the combination of hydralazine with nitrates have improved survival. Despite these benefits, medical therapy frequently fails to improve quality of life. Biventricular pacing has been introduced to resynchronize mechanical and electrical asynchrony frequently observed in patients with heart failure. The most recent pacing trials show an improvement in quality of life and functional class. Long-term data are needed to determine the effect of biventricular pacing on survival. The acute hemodynamic studies suggest that resynchronization pacing therapy may predict a positive long-term benefit for many patients with congestive heart failure.

  2. Determinants of Enrollment Among Applicants to PACE

    PubMed Central

    Irvin, Carol V.; Massey, Susan; Dorsey, Turahn

    1997-01-01

    During the 1970s and 1980s, a new approach to the integration of acute and long-term care(LTC) services was conceived and refined at On Lok, an organization in the Chinese community of San Francisco. Since then, On Lok and 10 Federal demonstration sites have tested this model which is today called the Program of All-inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE). This program has gained considerable political support and as a result, the 1997 Balanced Budget Agreement establishes PACE as a permanent provider under Medicare. The Federal demonstration of PACE was designed as a voluntary program. By exploiting its voluntary enrollment design, this study analyzes the determinants of program participation within a group of screened applicants. Findings of this study support the theory that the capitated payment structure of PACE creates incentives for program staff to avoid costly individuals. However, home ownership and provider attachment also act as important and significant barriers to enrollment. PMID:10345402

  3. Conservation law for self-paced movements

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Dongsung; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2016-01-01

    Optimal control models of biological movements introduce external task factors to specify the pace of movements. Here, we present the dual to the principle of optimality based on a conserved quantity, called “drive,” that represents the influence of internal motivation level on movement pace. Optimal control and drive conservation provide equivalent descriptions for the regularities observed within individual movements. For regularities across movements, drive conservation predicts a previously unidentified scaling law between the overall size and speed of various self-paced hand movements in the absence of any external tasks, which we confirmed with psychophysical experiments. Drive can be interpreted as a high-level control variable that sets the overall pace of movements and may be represented in the brain as the tonic levels of neuromodulators that control the level of internal motivation, thus providing insights into how internal states affect biological motor control. PMID:27418602

  4. Mechanical Coupling Error Suppression Technology for an Improved Decoupled Dual-Mass Micro-Gyroscope.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Wang, Xingjun; Deng, Yunpeng; Hu, Di

    2016-04-08

    This paper presents technology for the suppression of the mechanical coupling errors for an improved decoupled dual-mass micro-gyroscope (DDMG). The improved micro-gyroscope structure decreases the moment arm of the drive decoupled torque, which benefits the suppression of the non-ideal decoupled error. Quadrature correction electrodes are added to eliminate the residual quadrature error. The structure principle and the quadrature error suppression means of the DDMG are described in detail. ANSYS software is used to simulate the micro-gyroscope structure to verify the mechanical coupling error suppression effect. Compared with the former structure, simulation results demonstrate that the rotational displacements of the sense frame in the improved structure are substantially suppressed in the drive mode. The improved DDMG structure chip is fabricated by the deep dry silicon on glass (DDSOG) process. The feedback control circuits with quadrature control loops are designed to suppress the residual mechanical coupling error. Finally, the system performance of the DDMG prototype is tested. Compared with the former DDMG, the quadrature error in the improved dual-mass micro-gyroscope is decreased 9.66-fold, and the offset error is decreased 6.36-fold. Compared with the open loop sense, the feedback control circuits with quadrature control loop decrease the bias drift by 20.59-fold and the scale factor non-linearity by 2.81-fold in the ±400°/s range.

  5. Mechanical Coupling Error Suppression Technology for an Improved Decoupled Dual-Mass Micro-Gyroscope

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bo; Wang, Xingjun; Deng, Yunpeng; Hu, Di

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents technology for the suppression of the mechanical coupling errors for an improved decoupled dual-mass micro-gyroscope (DDMG). The improved micro-gyroscope structure decreases the moment arm of the drive decoupled torque, which benefits the suppression of the non-ideal decoupled error. Quadrature correction electrodes are added to eliminate the residual quadrature error. The structure principle and the quadrature error suppression means of the DDMG are described in detail. ANSYS software is used to simulate the micro-gyroscope structure to verify the mechanical coupling error suppression effect. Compared with the former structure, simulation results demonstrate that the rotational displacements of the sense frame in the improved structure are substantially suppressed in the drive mode. The improved DDMG structure chip is fabricated by the deep dry silicon on glass (DDSOG) process. The feedback control circuits with quadrature control loops are designed to suppress the residual mechanical coupling error. Finally, the system performance of the DDMG prototype is tested. Compared with the former DDMG, the quadrature error in the improved dual-mass micro-gyroscope is decreased 9.66-fold, and the offset error is decreased 6.36-fold. Compared with the open loop sense, the feedback control circuits with quadrature control loop decrease the bias drift by 20.59-fold and the scale factor non-linearity by 2.81-fold in the ±400°/s range. PMID:27070616

  6. Update on arrhythmias and cardiac pacing 2013.

    PubMed

    Almendral, Jesús; Pombo, Marta; Martínez-Alday, Jesús; González-Rebollo, José M; Rodríguez-Font, Enrique; Martínez-Ferrer, José; Castellanos, Eduardo; García-Fernández, F Javier; Ruiz-Mateas, Francisco

    2014-04-01

    This report discusses a selection of the most relevant articles on cardiac arrhythmias and pacing published in 2013. The first section discusses arrhythmias, classified as regular paroxysmal supraventricular tachyarrhythmias, atrial fibrillation, and ventricular arrhythmias, together with their treatment by means of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator. The next section reviews cardiac pacing, subdivided into resynchronization therapy, remote monitoring of implantable devices, and pacemakers. The final section discusses syncope.

  7. Optogenetic pacing in Drosophila melanogaster (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alex, Aneesh; Li, Airong; Men, Jing; Jerwick, Jason; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Zhou, Chao

    2016-03-01

    A non-invasive, contact-less cardiac pacing technology can be a powerful tool in basic cardiac research and in clinics. Currently, electrical pacing is the gold standard for cardiac pacing. Although highly effective in controlling the cardiac function, the invasive nature, non-specificity to cardiac tissues and possible tissue damage limits its capabilities. Optical pacing of heart is a promising alternative, which is non-invasive and more specific, has high spatial and temporal precision, and avoids shortcomings in electrical stimulation. Optical coherence tomography has been proved to be an effective technique in non-invasive imaging in vivo with ultrahigh resolution and imaging speed. In the last several years, non-invasive specific optical pacing in animal hearts has been reported in quail, zebrafish, and rabbit models. However, Drosophila Melanogaster, which is a significant model with orthologs of 75% of human disease genes, has rarely been studied concerning their optical pacing in heart. Here, we combined optogenetic control of Drosophila heartbeat with optical coherence microscopy (OCM) technique for the first time. The light-gated cation channel, channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) was specifically expressed by transgene as a pacemaker in drosophila heart. By stimulating the pacemaker with 472 nm pulsed laser light at different frequencies, we achieved non-invasive and more specific optical control of the Drosophila heart rhythm, which demonstrates the wide potential of optical pacing for studying cardiac dynamics and development. Imaging capability of our customized OCM system was also involved to observe the pacing effect visually. No tissue damage was found after long exposure to laser pulses, which proved the safety of optogenetic control of Drosophila heart.

  8. Sawtooth Pacing by Real-Time Auxiliary Power Control in a Tokamak Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, T. P.; Felici, F.; Sauter, O.; Graves, J. P.

    2011-06-17

    In the standard scenario of tokamak plasma operation, sawtooth crashes are the main perturbations that can trigger performance-degrading, and potentially disruption-generating, neoclassical tearing modes. This Letter demonstrates sawtooth pacing by real-time control of the auxiliary power. It is shown that the sawtooth crash takes place in a reproducible manner shortly after the removal of that power, and this can be used to precisely prescribe, i.e., pace, the individual sawteeth. In combination with preemptive stabilization of the neoclassical tearing modes, sawtooth pacing provides a new sawtooth control paradigm for improved performance in burning plasmas.

  9. The Manipulation of Pace within Endurance Sport

    PubMed Central

    Skorski, Sabrina; Abbiss, Chris R.

    2017-01-01

    In any athletic event, the ability to appropriately distribute energy is essential to prevent premature fatigue prior to the completion of the event. In sport science literature this is termed “pacing.” Within the past decade, research aiming to better understand the underlying mechanisms influencing the selection of an athlete's pacing during exercise has dramatically increased. It is suggested that pacing is a combination of anticipation, knowledge of the end-point, prior experience and sensory feedback. In order to better understand the role each of these factors have in the regulation of pace, studies have often manipulated various conditions known to influence performance such as the feedback provided to participants, the starting strategy or environmental conditions. As with all research there are several factors that should be considered in the interpretation of results from these studies. Thus, this review aims at discussing the pacing literature examining the manipulation of: (i) energy expenditure and pacing strategies, (ii) kinematics or biomechanics, (iii) exercise environment, and (iv) fatigue development. PMID:28289392

  10. An Undergraduate Intern Program at PACES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starks, Scott A.

    1997-01-01

    The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) established the Pan American Center for Earth and Environmental Studies (PACES) in 1995 to conduct basic and applied research that contributes to NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. Specifically, PACES provides a repository of remote sensing and other information that supports investigations into an improved understanding of geological, ecological and environmental processes occurring in the southwestern United States and Northern Mexico. Approximately 85% of UTEP's students come from El Paso County, a fast growing urban region representative of many large cities in the Southwest that have, or will soon have, a majority of their population composed of groups currently underrepresented in the scientific and technical workforce. UTEP's student population has an ethnic distribution (63% Hispanic, 32% Anglo, 3% African American, 1.5 % Asian American, and less than 1% Native American) that closely matches the demographics of the region it serves. Thus, UTEP has a mission to serve a multicultural population where minority students comprise the majority. Most Hispanic students at UTEP are primarily of Mexican origin. A large number are first or second-generation U.S. citizens. Characteristics that unite Hispanic students, in particular those of Mexican-origin, are a strong sense of family loyalty and a belief that all family members are responsible for contributing to the economic stability and well-being of the family. Most of their families are larger in number than the national average, and a variety of generations live together or share considerable resources. Thus, many young people feel an obligation and a desire to go to work at a young age and to continue working while in college, thereby assisting their parents and other family members. Older siblings understand that they have responsibilities to do household chores, to aid their younger siblings economically, and to assist elderly family members. This "work ethic" within the

  11. GPS/UWB/MEMS-IMU tightly coupled navigation with improved robust Kalman filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zengke; Chang, Guobin; Gao, Jingxiang; Wang, Jian; Hernandez, Alberto

    2016-12-01

    The integration of Global Positioning System (GPS) with Inertial Navigation System (INS) has been very intensively developed and widely applied in multiple areas. To further enhance the reliability and availability of GPS/INS integrated navigation in GPS challenging environment, range observation through ultra-wideband (UWB) is introduced in GPS/INS tightly coupled navigation. An improved robust Kalman filter is proposed and used to resist the influence of gross error from UWB observation in GPS/UWB/IMU tightly coupled navigation. The variance of the squared Mahalanobis distance in moving window is calculated, which brings as new judgement factor for gross errors in order to decrease the rate of false outlier identification. A simulation analysis shows that the improved robust Kalman filter is able to correctly identify gross errors and the rate of false judgment as zero. In order to validate the new robust filter, a real experiment is conducted. The results indicate that the improved robust Kalman filter used in GPS/UWB/INS tightly coupled navigation is able to remove the harmful effect of gross error in UWB observation. It clearly illustrates that the improved robust Kalman filter is very effective, and all the simulated small and large gross errors added to UWB distance observation are successfully identified.

  12. High-resolution entrainment mapping of gastric pacing: a new analytical tool.

    PubMed

    O'Grady, Gregory; Du, Peng; Lammers, Wim J E P; Egbuji, John U; Mithraratne, Pulasthi; Chen, Jiande D Z; Cheng, Leo K; Windsor, John A; Pullan, Andrew J

    2010-02-01

    Gastric pacing has been investigated as a potential treatment for gastroparesis. New pacing protocols are required to improve symptom and motility outcomes; however, research progress has been constrained by a limited understanding of the effects of electrical stimulation on slow-wave activity. This study introduces high-resolution (HR) "entrainment mapping" for the analysis of gastric pacing and presents four demonstrations. Gastric pacing was initiated in a porcine model (typical amplitude 4 mA, pulse width 400 ms, period 17 s). Entrainment mapping was performed using flexible multielectrode arrays (paced propagation was found to be anisotropic (longitudinal 2.6 +/- 1.7 vs. circumferential 4.5 +/- 0.6 mm/s; P < 0.001). In the third demonstration, a dysrhythmic episode that occurred during pacing was mapped in HR, revealing an ectopic slow-wave focus and uncoupled propagations. In the fourth demonstration, differences were observed between paced and native slow-wave amplitudes (0.24 +/- 0.08 vs. 0.38 +/- 0.14 mV; P < 0.001), velocities (6.2 +/- 2.8 vs. 11.5 +/- 4.7 mm/s; P < 0.001), and activated areas (20.6 +/- 1.9 vs. 32.8 +/- 2.6 cm(2); P < 0.001). Entrainment mapping enables an accurate quantification of the effects of gastric pacing on slow-wave activity, offering an improved method to assess whether pacing protocols are likely to achieve physiologically and clinically useful outcomes.

  13. The pace of vocabulary growth helps predict later vocabulary skill

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Meredith L.; Raudenbush, Stephen W.; Goldin-Meadow, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Children vary widely in the rate at which they acquire words—some start slow and speed up, others start fast and continue at a steady pace. Do early developmental variations of this sort help predict vocabulary skill just prior to kindergarten entry? This longitudinal study starts by examining important predictors (SES, parent input, child gesture) of vocabulary growth between 14 and 46 months (n=62), and then uses growth estimates to predict children's vocabulary at 54 months. Velocity and acceleration in vocabulary development at 30 months predicted later vocabulary, particularly for children from low socioeconomic backgrounds. Understanding the pace of early vocabulary growth thus improves our ability to predict school readiness, and may help identify children at risk for starting behind. PMID:22235920

  14. The pace of vocabulary growth helps predict later vocabulary skill.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Meredith L; Raudenbush, Stephen W; Goldin-Meadow, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Children vary widely in the rate at which they acquire words--some start slow and speed up, others start fast and continue at a steady pace. Do early developmental variations of this sort help predict vocabulary skill just prior to kindergarten entry? This longitudinal study starts by examining important predictors (socioeconomic status [SES], parent input, child gesture) of vocabulary growth between 14 and 46 months (n = 62) and then uses growth estimates to predict children's vocabulary at 54 months. Velocity and acceleration in vocabulary development at 30 months predicted later vocabulary, particularly for children from low-SES backgrounds. Understanding the pace of early vocabulary growth thus improves our ability to predict school readiness and may help identify children at risk for starting behind.

  15. Improved Helicopter Rotor Performance Prediction through Loose and Tight CFD/CSD Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ickes, Jacob C.

    Helicopters and other Vertical Take-Off or Landing (VTOL) vehicles exhibit an interesting combination of structural dynamic and aerodynamic phenomena which together drive the rotor performance. The combination of factors involved make simulating the rotor a challenging and multidisciplinary effort, and one which is still an active area of interest in the industry because of the money and time it could save during design. Modern tools allow the prediction of rotorcraft physics from first principles. Analysis of the rotor system with this level of accuracy provides the understanding necessary to improve its performance. There has historically been a divide between the comprehensive codes which perform aeroelastic rotor simulations using simplified aerodynamic models, and the very computationally intensive Navier-Stokes Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solvers. As computer resources become more available, efforts have been made to replace the simplified aerodynamics of the comprehensive codes with the more accurate results from a CFD code. The objective of this work is to perform aeroelastic rotorcraft analysis using first-principles simulations for both fluids and structural predictions using tools available at the University of Toledo. Two separate codes are coupled together in both loose coupling (data exchange on a periodic interval) and tight coupling (data exchange each time step) schemes. To allow the coupling to be carried out in a reliable and efficient way, a Fluid-Structure Interaction code was developed which automatically performs primary functions of loose and tight coupling procedures. Flow phenomena such as transonics, dynamic stall, locally reversed flow on a blade, and Blade-Vortex Interaction (BVI) were simulated in this work. Results of the analysis show aerodynamic load improvement due to the inclusion of the CFD-based airloads in the structural dynamics analysis of the Computational Structural Dynamics (CSD) code. Improvements came in the form

  16. 42 CFR 460.60 - PACE organizational structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... planning a change in organizational structure must notify CMS and the State administering agency, in... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false PACE organizational structure. 460.60 Section 460... ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Administrative Requirements § 460.60 PACE organizational structure. (a) A...

  17. Left ventricular guidewire pacing for transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Guérios, Enio E; Wenaweser, Peter; Meier, Bernhard

    2013-12-01

    Previous reports prove the safety and efficacy of cardiac pacing employing a guidewire in the left ventricle as unipolar pacing electrode. We describe the use of left ventricular guidewire pacing as an alternative to conventional transvenous temporary right ventricular pacing in the context of transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

  18. Improvements and applications of COBRA-TF for stand-alone and coupled LWR safety analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Avramova, M.; Cuervo, D.

    2006-07-01

    The advanced thermal-hydraulic subchannel code COBRA-TF has been recently improved and applied for stand-alone and coupled LWR core calculations at the Pennsylvania State Univ. in cooperation with AREVA NP GmbH (Germany)) and the Technical Univ. of Madrid. To enable COBRA-TF for academic and industrial applications including safety margins evaluations and LWR core design analyses, the code programming, numerics, and basic models were revised and substantially improved. The code has undergone through an extensive validation, verification, and qualification program. (authors)

  19. A Simulation Study of Paced TCP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulik, Joanna; Coulter, Robert; Rockwell, Dennis; Partridge, Craig

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we study the performance of paced TCP, a modified version of TCP designed especially for high delay- bandwidth networks. In typical networks, TCP optimizes its send-rate by transmitting increasingly large bursts, or windows, of packets, one burst per round-trip time, until it reaches a maximum window-size, which corresponds to the full capacity of the network. In a network with a high delay-bandwidth product, however, Transmission Control Protocol's (TCPs) maximum window-size may be larger than the queue size of the intermediate routers, and routers will begin to drop packets as soon as the windows become too large for the router queues. The TCP sender then concludes that the bottleneck capacity of the network has been reached, and it limits its send-rate accordingly. Partridge proposed paced TCP as a means of solving the problem of queueing bottlenecks. A sender using paced TCP would release packets in multiple, small bursts during a round-trip time in which ordinary TCP would release a single, large burst of packets. This approach allows the sender to increase its send-rate to the maximum window size without encountering queueing bottlenecks. This paper describes the performance of paced TCP in a simulated network and discusses implementation details that can affect the performance of paced TCP.

  20. Skin to skin interactions. Does the infant massage improve the couple functioning?

    PubMed Central

    Gnazzo, Antonio; Guerriero, Viviana; Di Folco, Simona; Zavattini, Giulio C.; de Campora, Gaia

    2015-01-01

    Transition to parenthood is a critical stage of life due to several changes the couple has to handle. A large body of studies described how transition to parenthood can be linked to the onset of depressive symptoms, as well as the perception of a low social support, and an increased stress, representing a risk for the early mother–baby relationship. Infant massage (IM) emerged as a helpful tool to improve maternal skills in interacting with the baby, and leading toward a decreasing of post-partum symptoms. However, a growing body of literature highlights that men also may experience post-partum diseases, representing an additional risk for the development of the baby. To date, no study observed the impact of the IM on both partners. The aim of the current qualitative research is to observe the impact of the IM on a single couple of parents at childbirth. Pre (Time 1) and post-intervention (Time 3) procedure has been established to observe the changes occurring over the time in the couple. In particular, each member of the couple filled out the EPDS, the BDI-II, the MSPSS, and the PSI-SF both at Time 1 and at Time 3. The treatment (Time 2) was represented by the IM training, and lasted 4 weeks. Findings revealed a decrease in depressive symptoms in both partners, as well as an improvement of their perception of stress related to parental role. No changes has been detected with respect to the perception of social support. The IM seems to be a helpful approach to prevent the establishment of pathological conditions in new parents. Although no direct measures on the child were used, the current qualitative data seem to suggest that the IM may represent a valuable tool to prevent the onset of early negative outcomes of the baby. Further investigations and empirical data are needed to improve the knowledge in this field. PMID:26441813

  1. Suppressing arrhythmias in cardiac models using overdrive pacing and calcium channel blockers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamp, A. T.; Osipov, G. V.; Collins, J. J.

    2002-09-01

    Recent findings indicate that ventricular fibrillation might arise from spiral wave chaos. Our objective in this computational study was to investigate wave interactions in excitable media and to explore the feasibility of using overdrive pacing to suppress spiral wave chaos. This work is based on the finding that in excitable media, propagating waves with the highest excitation frequency eventually overtake all other waves. We analyzed the effects of low-amplitude, high-frequency pacing in one-dimensional and two-dimensional networks of coupled, excitable cells governed by the Luo-Rudy model. In the one-dimensional cardiac model, we found narrow high-frequency regions of 1:1 synchronization between the input stimulus and the system's response. The frequencies in this region were higher than the intrinsic spiral wave frequency of cardiac tissue. When we paced the two-dimensional cardiac model with frequencies from this region, we found that spiral wave chaos could, in some cases, be suppressed. When we coupled the overdrive pacing with calcium channel blockers, we found that spiral wave chaos could be suppressed in all cases. These findings suggest that low-amplitude, high-frequency overdrive pacing, in combination with calcium channel inhibitors (e.g., class II or class IV antiarrhythmic drugs), may be useful for eliminating fibrillation.

  2. Evaluation of an 18-couple module composed of improved performance SiGe unicouples

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, C.E.; Klee, P.M.; Nakahara, J.F.; Hartman, R.F.

    1995-12-31

    Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) have played a major role in providing spacecraft electrical power for interplanetary exploration. Silicon Germanium alloys are the thermoelectric material employed in RTGs. Over the past several years a number of investigations have reported improvements in the figure of merit of these alloys. These improvements are attractive to mission planners because they result in enhanced RTG specific power (watts/lb) and improved efficiency which leads to lower fuel costs. This paper describes the fabrication and testing of an 18-couple module device utilizing unicouples with improved SiGe alloys. The unicouples were fabricated using materials with over a 10% improvement in the 573 to 1,273 K integrated average figure-of-merit over Cassini materials. The p-type material was fabricated by the standard vacuum casting and hot pressing method while the n-type material containing GaP was fabricated by a new method of mechanical alloying and hot isostatic pressing. The unicouples were fabricated in a similar fashion to standard unicouples except that the thermoelectric materials were bonded to the SiMo hot shoe in two thermal cycles due to the disparity of the melting points. A sufficient quantity of unicouples was fabricated to assemble an 18-couple module to evaluate the thermoelectric performance of the improved SiGe materials. The module was brought up to operating temperature following the same heatup rate as previous modules. The module was stabilized at a hot shoe temperature of 1,308 K. Initial performance was compared to the established SiGe database and found to show no improvement thermally or electrically.

  3. The formation of bronchocutaneous fistulae due to retained epicardial pacing wires: A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Patris, Vasileios; Argiriou, Michalis; Salem, Agni-Leila; Giakoumidakis, Konstantinos; Baikoussis, Nikolaos G.; Charitos, Christos

    2016-01-01

    Temporary epicardial pacing wires during open-heart surgery are routinely used both for diagnostic and treatment purposes. In complicated cases where patients are unstable or the wires are difficult to remove, the pacing wires are cut at the skin level and allowed to retract by themselves. This procedure rarely causes complications. However, there have been cases reporting that retained pacing wires are linked to the formation of sterno-bronchial fistulae, which may present a while after the date of operation and are usually infected. This review aims to study the cases presenting sterno-bronchial fistulae due to retained epicardial pacing wires and to highlight the important factors associated with these. It is important to note these complications, as fistulae may cause a variety of problems to the patient if undiagnosed and left untreated. With the aid of scans such as fistulography, fistulae can be identified and treated and will improve the patients’ health dramatically. PMID:27716700

  4. Improved algorithms and coupled neutron-photon transport for auto-importance sampling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Li, Jun-Li; Wu, Zhen; Qiu, Rui; Li, Chun-Yan; Liang, Man-Chun; Zhang, Hui; Gang, Zhi; Xu, Hong

    2017-01-01

    The Auto-Importance Sampling (AIS) method is a Monte Carlo variance reduction technique proposed for deep penetration problems, which can significantly improve computational efficiency without pre-calculations for importance distribution. However, the AIS method is only validated with several simple examples, and cannot be used for coupled neutron-photon transport. This paper presents improved algorithms for the AIS method, including particle transport, fictitious particle creation and adjustment, fictitious surface geometry, random number allocation and calculation of the estimated relative error. These improvements allow the AIS method to be applied to complicated deep penetration problems with complex geometry and multiple materials. A Completely coupled Neutron-Photon Auto-Importance Sampling (CNP-AIS) method is proposed to solve the deep penetration problems of coupled neutron-photon transport using the improved algorithms. The NUREG/CR-6115 PWR benchmark was calculated by using the methods of CNP-AIS, geometry splitting with Russian roulette and analog Monte Carlo, respectively. The calculation results of CNP-AIS are in good agreement with those of geometry splitting with Russian roulette and the benchmark solutions. The computational efficiency of CNP-AIS for both neutron and photon is much better than that of geometry splitting with Russian roulette in most cases, and increased by several orders of magnitude compared with that of the analog Monte Carlo. Supported by the subject of National Science and Technology Major Project of China (2013ZX06002001-007, 2011ZX06004-007) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (11275110, 11375103)

  5. A study on improvement of discharge characteristic by using a transformer in a capacitively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young-Cheol; Kim, Hyun-Jun; Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2015-12-15

    In a plasma discharge system, the power loss at powered line, matching network, and other transmission line can affect the discharge characteristics such as the power transfer efficiency, voltage and current at powered electrode, and plasma density. In this paper, we propose a method to reduce power loss by using a step down transformer mounted between the matching network and the powered electrode in a capacitively coupled argon plasma. This step down transformer decreases the power loss by reducing the current flowing through the matching network and transmission line. As a result, the power transfer efficiency was increased about 5%–10% by using a step down transformer. However, the plasma density was dramatically increased compared to no transformer. This can be understood by the increase in ohmic heating and the decrease in dc-self bias. By simply mounting a transformer, improvement of discharge efficiency can be achieved in capacitively coupled plasmas.

  6. Catalytic partial oxidation coupled with membrane purification to improve resource and energy efficiency in syngas production.

    PubMed

    Iaquaniello, G; Salladini, A; Palo, E; Centi, G

    2015-02-01

    Catalytic partial oxidation coupled with membrane purification is a new process scheme to improve resource and energy efficiency in a well-established and large scale-process like syngas production. Experimentation in a semi industrial-scale unit (20 Nm(3)  h(-1) production) shows that a novel syngas production scheme based on a pre-reforming stage followed by a membrane for hydrogen separation, a catalytic partial oxidation step, and a further step of syngas purification by membrane allows the oxygen-to-carbon ratio to be decreased while maintaining levels of feed conversion. For a total feed conversion of 40 %, for example, the integrated novel architecture reduces oxygen consumption by over 50 %, with thus a corresponding improvement in resource efficiency and an improved energy efficiency and economics, these factors largely depending on the air separation stage used to produce pure oxygen.

  7. Improved precipitation extremes and climatology in a regional coupled model simulation over CORDEX south Asia domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, P.; Sein, D.; Cabos, W.; Jacob, D.

    2014-12-01

    The South Asian continents are densely populated and their economy is largely dependent on agriculture which primarily depends on the summer monsoon (June-September). The region is highly vulnerable to climate variability and change. It has been well established that the SST anomalies in the Indian and the Pacific Ocean attributes to the monsoon interannual as well as intraseasonal variability. Most of the CMIP3 and CMIP5 climate models have difficulty in simulating the mean climate over South Asia. Regional Climate Models (RCMs) however simulate orographic induced precipitation better, but show limited ability to simulate mean precipitation over land and an overestimation over ocean more generally. These systematic differences between climate models and observation's may be related to poorly represented ocean dynamics and SST.For the first time a regional coupled atmosphere-ocean model is developed to study the monsoon climatology over the CORDEX South Asia domain. The REgional atmosphere MOdel REMO with 50km horizontal resolution is coupled via Oasis coupler to the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology global ocean - sea ice model MPIOM with increased resolution over the Indian Ocean (up to 20 km). Hereafter this coupled system will be called as ROM. For this study, four simulations for the period 1958-2001 are performed (i) REMO forced with ECMWF ERA40 reanalysis (ii) ROM forced with ECMWF ERA40 reanalysis (iii) REMO forced with MPI-ESM-LR CMIP5 historical simulation (iv) ROM forced with MPI-ESM-LR CMIP5 historical simulation. Differences in coupled and un-coupled RCM simulations are analyzed to investigate the effect of coupling on simulated climate, especially precipitation daily annual cycles and monthly spatial patterns. It has been observed that simulated feedback of ocean SST has positive influence on precipitation simulation of ROM both over land and ocean. The intensity of tropical cyclone is well simulated by the model ROM which improves the monsoon

  8. Towards improved capability and confidence in coupled atmospheric and wildland fire modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, Jeremy A.

    This dissertation work is aimed at improving the capability and confidence in a modernized and improved version of Los Alamos National Laboratory's coupled atmospheric and wild- land fire dynamics model, Higrad-Firetec. Higrad is the hydrodynamics component of this large eddy simulation model that solves the three dimensional, fully compressible Navier-Stokes equations, incorporating a dynamic eddy viscosity formulation through a two-scale turbulence closure scheme. Firetec is the vegetation, drag forcing, and combustion physics portion that is integrated with Higrad. The modern version of Higrad-Firetec incorporates multiple numerical methodologies and high performance computing aspects which combine to yield a unique tool capable of augmenting theoretical and observational investigations in order to better understand the multi-scale, multi-phase, and multi-physics, phenomena involved in coupled atmospheric and environmental dynamics. More specifically, the current work includes extended functionality and validation efforts targeting component processes in coupled atmospheric and wildland fire scenarios. Since observational data of sufficient quality and resolution to validate the fully coupled atmosphere-wildfire scenario simply does not exist, we instead seek to validate components of the full prohibitively convoluted process. This manuscript provides first, an introduction and background into the application space of Higrad-Firetec. Second we document the model formulation, solution procedure, and a simple scalar transport verification exercise. Third, we perform a validate model results against observational data for time averaged flow field metrics in and above four idealized forest canopies. Fourth, we carry out a validation effort for the non-buoyant jet in a crossflow scenario (to which an analogy can be made for atmosphere-wildfire interactions) comparing model results to laboratory data of both steady-in-time and unsteady-in-time metrics. Finally, an

  9. High performance patch antenna using circular split ring resonators and thin wires employing electromagnetic coupling improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelrehim, Adel A. A.; Ghafouri-Shiraz, H.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, three dimensional periodic structure composed of circular split ring resonators and thin wires is used to improve the performance of a microstrip patch antenna. The three dimensional periodic structure is placed at the top of the patch within a specific separation distance to construct the proposed antenna. The radiated electromagnetic waves intensity of the proposed antenna is improved compared with the conventional patch antenna due to the electric and magnetic coupling enhancements. These enhancements occur between the patch and the periodic structure resonators and between the different resonator pairs of the periodic structure. As a result, the electric and the magnetic fields at the top of the patch are improved, the radiated electromagnetic beam size reduces which results in a highly focused beam and hence the antenna directivity and gain are improved, while the beam are is reduced. The proposed antenna has been designed and simulated using CST microwave studio at 10 GHz. An infinite two dimensional periodicity unit cell of circular split ring resonator and thin wire is designed to resonate at a 10 GHz and simulated in CST software, the scattering parameters are extracted, the results showed that the infinite periodicity two dimensional structure has a pass band frequency response of good transmission and reflection characteristics around 10 GHz. The infinite periodicity of the two dimensional periodic structure is then truncated and multi layers of such truncated structure is used to construct a three dimensional periodic structure. A parametric analysis has been performed on the proposed antenna incorporated with the three dimensional periodic structure. The impacts of the separation distance between the patch and three dimensional periodic structures and the size of the three dimensional periodic structure on the radiation and impedance matching parameters of the proposed antenna are studied. For experimental verification, the proposed

  10. Improving Couples' Quality of Life Through a Web-Based Prostate Cancer Education Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Song, Lixin; Rini, Christine; Deal, Allison M.; Nielsen, Matthew E.; Chang, Hao; Kinneer, Patty; Teal, Randall; Johnson, David C.; Dunn, Mary W.; Mark, Barbara; Palmer, Mary H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of a newly developed web-based, couple-oriented intervention called Prostate Cancer Education and Resources for Couples (PERC). Design Quantitative, qualitative, mixed-methods approach. Setting Oncology outpatient clinics at the University of North Carolina (UNC) Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center at UNC–Chapel Hill. Sample 26 patients with localized prostate cancer (PCa) and their partners. Methods Pre- and postpilot quantitative assessments and a postpilot qualitative interview were conducted. Main Research Variables General and PCa-specific symptoms, quality of life, psychosocial factors, PERC's ease of use, and web activities. Findings Improvement was shown in some PCa-specific and general symptoms (small effect sizes for patients and small-to-medium effect sizes for partners), overall quality of life, and physical and social domains of quality of life for patients (small effect sizes). Web activity data indicated high PERC use. Qualitative and quantitative analyses indicated that participants found PERC easy to use and understand, as well as engaging, of high quality, and relevant. Overall, participants were satisfied with PERC and reported that PERC improved their knowledge about symptom management and communication as a couple. Conclusions PERC was a feasible, acceptable method of reducing the side effects of PCa treatment–related symptoms and improving quality of life. Implications for Nursing PERC has the potential to reduce the negative impacts of symptoms and enhance quality of life for patients with localized PCa and their partners, particularly for those who live in rural areas and have limited access to post-treatment supportive care. PMID:25806885

  11. A coupled phase-locked loops system for carrier tracking improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, D.; Yuen, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    A system that couples several phase-locked loops to improve carrier tracking performance is considered. It coherently combines the received carrier signals at geographically separated ground antennas to increase the total effective aperture. The received carrier's phases are automatically aligned to enhance the received carrier signal-to-noise ratio. The system's tracking performance is assessed in terms of rms phase jitter. It is shown that the phase-locked loop in the first receiver, where the carrier arraying is performed, tracks the received carrier phase using the received carrier power from all receivers.

  12. Suggested References. PACE I.D. Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergson, Rita

    During the course of the PACE I.D. Center Project, 1966-1969, staff members recorded references that they felt contributed to the general knowledge of the prevention of learning and behavior problems. More specifically, those references that implied concern for the child in his total environment were considered most relevant. The references are…

  13. Developmental Math, Flipped and Self-Paced

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weng, Pangyen

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a developmental math course design that uses flipped instruction and self-paced learning. The design was created and taught at Metropolitan State University, where most students are returning adult students with little preparation in mathematics. The author argues that this design suits the students well: the learning…

  14. PACE Yourself: A Handbook for ESL Tutors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalle, Teresa S.; Young, Laurel L.

    2003-01-01

    "PACE Yourself" is for inexperienced or volunteer tutors of ESL. This handbook does not aim to make overnight experts of novices. Rather, the authors provide an easy-to-follow guide for people who want to tutor small groups of nonnative speakers of English but do not know how. Reproducible forms, appendixes of resources, terminology, ESL…

  15. Self-Paced Physics, Course Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    Samples of the Self-Paced Physics Course materials are presented in this collection for dissemination purposes. Descriptions are included of course objectives, characteristics, structures, and content. As a two-semester course of study for science and engineering sophomores, most topics are on a level comparable to that of classical physics by…

  16. Improved method of measuring pressure coupled response for composite solid propellants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Wanxing; Wang, Ningfei; Li, Junwei; Zhao, Yandong; Yan, Mi

    2014-04-01

    Pressure coupled response is one of the main causes of combustion instability in the solid rocket motor. It is also a characteristic parameter for predicting the stability. The pressure coupled response function is usually measured by different methods to evaluate the performance of new propellant. Based on T-burner and "burning surface doubled and secondary attenuation", an improved method for measuring the pressure coupled response of composite propellant is introduced in this article. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study has also been conducted to validate the method and to understand the pressure oscillation phenomenon in T-burner. Three rounds of tests were carried out on the same batch of aluminized AP/HTPB composite solid propellant. The experimental results show that the sample propellant had a high response function under the conditions of high pressure (~11.5 MPa) and low frequency (~140 Hz). The numerically predicted oscillation frequency and amplitude are consistent with the experimental results. One practical solid rocket motor using this sample propellant was found to experience pressure oscillation at the end of burning. This confirms that the sample propellant is prone to combustion instability. Finally, acoustic pressure distribution and phase difference in T-burner were analyzed. Both the experimental and numerical results are found to be associated with similar acoustic pressure distribution. And the phase difference analysis showed that the pressure oscillations at the head end of the T-burner are 180° out of phase from those in the aft end of the T-burner.

  17. Improved gauge actions on anisotropic lattices I. Study of fundamental parameters in the weak coupling limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, S.; Saito, T.; Nakamura, A.

    2000-09-01

    On anisotropic lattices with the anisotropy ξ=a σ/a τ the following basic parameters are calculated by perturbative method: (1) the renormalization of the gauge coupling in spatial and temporal directions, g σ and g τ, (2) the Λ parameter, (3) the ratio of the renormalized and bare anisotropy η=ξ/ξ B and (4) the derivatives of the coupling constants with respect to ξ, ∂g σ-2/∂ξ and ∂g τ-2/∂ξ . We employ the improved gauge actions which consist of plaquette and six-link rectangular loops, c 0P(1×1) μν+c 1P(1×2) μν. This class of actions covers Symanzik, Iwasaki and DBW2 actions. The ratio η shows an impressive behavior as a function of c 1, i.e., η>1 for the standard Wilson and Symanzik actions, while η<1 for Iwasaki and DBW2 actions. This is confirmed non-perturbatively by numerical simulations in weak coupling regions. The derivatives ∂g -2τ/∂ξ and ∂g -2σ/∂ξ also change sign as -c 1 increases. For Iwasaki and DBW2 actions they become opposite sign to those for standard and Symanzik actions. However, their sum is independent of the type of actions due to Karsch's sum rule.

  18. Toward a More Efficient Implementation of Antifibrillation Pacing

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Dan; Moehlis, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    We devise a methodology to determine an optimal pattern of inputs to synchronize firing patterns of cardiac cells which only requires the ability to measure action potential durations in individual cells. In numerical bidomain simulations, the resulting synchronizing inputs are shown to terminate spiral waves with a higher probability than comparable inputs that do not synchronize the cells as strongly. These results suggest that designing stimuli which promote synchronization in cardiac tissue could improve the success rate of defibrillation, and point towards novel strategies for optimizing antifibrillation pacing. PMID:27391010

  19. Evaluation of Long Term Effect of RV Apical Pacing on Global LV Function by Echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Tilkar, Mahendra; Jain, Siddhant; Mondal, Subrata; Sarkar, Piyabi; Modi, Nitin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We very often face pacemaker implanted patients during follow-up with shortness of breath and effort intolerance inspite of normal clinical parameters. Aim The aim of our study is to evaluate the cause of effort intolerance and probable cause of sub-clinical Congestive Cardiac Failure (CCF) in a case of long term Right Ventricular (RV) apical pacing on global Left Ventricular (LV) function non- invasively by echocardiography. Materials and Methods We studied 54 patients (Male 42, Female 12) of complete heart block (CHB) with RV apical pacing (40 VVI and 14 DCP). Mean duration of pacing was 58+4 months. All patients underwent 24 hours Holter monitoring to determine the percentage of ventricular pacing beats. 2-D Echocardiography was done to assess the regional wall motion of abnormality and global LV ejection fraction by modified Simpson’s rule. These methods were coupled with the Doppler derived Myocardial Performance Index (MPI), tissue Doppler imaging, and mechanical regional dyssynchrony with 3-D Echocardiography. Data were analysed from 54 RV- apical paced patients and compared with age and body surface area of 60 controlled subjects (Male 46, Female 14). Results Evaluation of LV function in 54 patients demonstrated regional wall motion abnormality and Doppler study revealed both LV systolic and diastolic dysfunction compare with control subjects (regional wall motion abnormality 80±6% vs 30±3% with p-value<0.0001) which is proportional to the percentage of ventricular pacing beats (mean paced beat 78%). Global LVEF 50±4% vs 60±2% (p-valve <0.0001) and MPI 0.46 ±0.12 v/s 0.36±0.09 (p-value <0.0001). Conclusion RV–apical pacing induces iatrogenic electrical dyssynchrony which leads to remodeling of LV and produces mechanical dyssynchrony which is responsible for LV dysfunction. Alternate site of RV pacing and/or biventricular pacing should be done to maintain biventricular electrical synchrony which will preserve the LV function. PMID

  20. Coupled Integration of CSAC, MIMU, and GNSS for Improved PNT Performance.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lin; You, Zheng; Liu, Tianyi; Shi, Shuai

    2016-05-12

    Positioning, navigation, and timing (PNT) is a strategic key technology widely used in military and civilian applications. Global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) are the most important PNT techniques. However, the vulnerability of GNSS threatens PNT service quality, and integrations with other information are necessary. A chip scale atomic clock (CSAC) provides high-precision frequency and high-accuracy time information in a short time. A micro inertial measurement unit (MIMU) provides a strap-down inertial navigation system (SINS) with rich navigation information, better real-time feed, anti-jamming, and error accumulation. This study explores the coupled integration of CSAC, MIMU, and GNSS to enhance PNT performance. The architecture of coupled integration is designed and degraded when any subsystem fails. A mathematical model for a precise time aiding navigation filter is derived rigorously. The CSAC aids positioning by weighted linear optimization when the visible satellite number is four or larger. By contrast, CSAC converts the GNSS observations to range measurements by "clock coasting" when the visible satellite number is less than four, thereby constraining the error divergence of micro inertial navigation and improving the availability of GNSS signals and the positioning accuracy of the integration. Field vehicle experiments, both in open-sky area and in a harsh environment, show that the integration can improve the positioning probability and accuracy.

  1. Coupled Integration of CSAC, MIMU, and GNSS for Improved PNT Performance

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lin; You, Zheng; Liu, Tianyi; Shi, Shuai

    2016-01-01

    Positioning, navigation, and timing (PNT) is a strategic key technology widely used in military and civilian applications. Global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) are the most important PNT techniques. However, the vulnerability of GNSS threatens PNT service quality, and integrations with other information are necessary. A chip scale atomic clock (CSAC) provides high-precision frequency and high-accuracy time information in a short time. A micro inertial measurement unit (MIMU) provides a strap-down inertial navigation system (SINS) with rich navigation information, better real-time feed, anti-jamming, and error accumulation. This study explores the coupled integration of CSAC, MIMU, and GNSS to enhance PNT performance. The architecture of coupled integration is designed and degraded when any subsystem fails. A mathematical model for a precise time aiding navigation filter is derived rigorously. The CSAC aids positioning by weighted linear optimization when the visible satellite number is four or larger. By contrast, CSAC converts the GNSS observations to range measurements by “clock coasting” when the visible satellite number is less than four, thereby constraining the error divergence of micro inertial navigation and improving the availability of GNSS signals and the positioning accuracy of the integration. Field vehicle experiments, both in open-sky area and in a harsh environment, show that the integration can improve the positioning probability and accuracy. PMID:27187399

  2. Coupling NLDAS Model Output with MODIS Products for Improved Spatial Evapotranspiration Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Hogue, T.

    2008-12-01

    Given the growing concern over regional water supplies in much of the arid west, the quantification of water use by urban and agricultural landscapes is critically important. Water lost through evapotranspiration (ET) typically can not be recaptured or recycled, increasing the need for accurate accounting of ET in regional water management and planning. In this study, we investigate a method to better capture the spatial characteristics of ET by coupling operational North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS) Noah Land Surface Model (LSM) outputs and a previously developed MODIS-based Potential Evapotranspiration (PET) product. The resultant product is higher resolution (1km) than the NLDAS model ET outputs (~12.5 km) and provides improved estimates within highly heterogeneous terrain and landscapes. We undertake this study in the Southern California region which provides an excellent case study for examining the developed product's ability to estimate vegetation dynamics over rapidly growing, and highly-irrigated, urban ecosystems. General trends in both products are similar; however the coupled MODIS-NLDAS ET product shows higher spatial variability, better capturing land surface heterogeneity than the NLDAS-based ET. Improved ET representation is especially obvious during the spring season, when precipitation is muted and evaporative flux is dominant. We also quantify seasonal landscape water demand over urban landscapes in several major counties (i.e. Los Angeles, San Diego and Riverside) using the MODIS-NLDAS ET model.

  3. Abnormalities in intracellular calcium regulation and contractile function in myocardium from dogs with pacing-induced heart failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perreault, C. L.; Shannon, R. P.; Komamura, K.; Vatner, S. F.; Morgan, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    24 d of rapid ventricular pacing induced dilated cardiomyopathy with both systolic and diastolic dysfunction in conscious, chronically instrumented dogs. We studied mechanical properties and intracellular calcium (Ca2+i) transients of trabeculae carneae isolated from 15 control dogs (n = 32) and 11 dogs with pacing-induced cardiac failure (n = 26). Muscles were stretched to maximum length at 30 degrees C and stimulated at 0.33 Hz; a subset (n = 17 control, n = 17 myopathic) was loaded with the [Ca2+]i indicator aequorin. Peak tension was depressed in the myopathic muscles, even in the presence of maximally effective (i.e., 16 mM) [Ca2+] in the perfusate. However, peak [Ca2+]i was similar (0.80 +/- 0.13 vs. 0.71 +/- 0.05 microM; [Ca2+]o = 2.5 mM), suggesting that a decrease in Cai2+ availability was not responsible for the decreased contractility. The time for decline from the peak of the Cai2+ transient was prolonged in the myopathic group, which correlated with prolongation of isometric contraction and relaxation. However, similar end-diastolic [Ca2+]i was achieved in both groups (0.29 +/- 0.05 vs. 0.31 +/- 0.02 microM), indicating that Cai2+ homeostasis can be maintained in myopathic hearts. The inotropic response of the myopathic muscles to milrinone was depressed compared with the controls. However, when cAMP production was stimulated by pretreatment with forskolin, the response of the myopathic muscles to milrinone was improved. Our findings provide direct evidence that abnormal [Ca2+]i handling is an important cause of contractile dysfunction in dogs with pacing-induced heart failure and suggest that deficient production of cAMP may be an important cause of these changes in excitation-contraction coupling.

  4. 42 CFR 460.50 - Termination of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Sanctions, Enforcement Actions, and Termination § 460.50 Termination of...

  5. 42 CFR 460.50 - Termination of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Sanctions, Enforcement Actions, and Termination § 460.50 Termination of...

  6. 42 CFR 460.50 - Termination of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Sanctions, Enforcement Actions, and Termination § 460.50 Termination of...

  7. 42 CFR 460.50 - Termination of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Sanctions, Enforcement Actions, and Termination § 460.50 Termination of...

  8. 42 CFR 460.50 - Termination of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Sanctions, Enforcement Actions, and Termination § 460.50 Termination of...

  9. Applying 20/20 Hindsight to Self-Pacing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunkleberger, Gary E.

    1980-01-01

    Discussed are several suggestions for the maintenance of a science self-paced classroom. Topics include the use of computers for student self-assessment, teachers and students roles in the self-paced classroom, and laboratory setup and packaging in the self-paced science laboratory. (Author/DS)

  10. 42 CFR 460.122 - PACE organization's appeals process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) PACE organization's written appeals process. The PACE organization must have a formal written appeals... process must include written procedures for the following: (1) Timely preparation and processing of a... writing. (e) Services furnished during appeals process. During the appeals process, the PACE...

  11. Pacing, Pixels, and Paper: Flexibility in Learning Words from Flashcards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sage, Kara; Rausch, Joseph; Quirk, Abigail; Halladay, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    The present study focused on how self-control over pace might help learners successfully extract information from digital learning aids. Past research has indicated that too much control over pace can be overwhelming, but too little control over pace can be ineffective. Within the popular self-testing domain of flashcards, we sought to elucidate…

  12. State of the art of leadless pacing

    PubMed Central

    Sperzel, Johannes; Burri, Haran; Gras, Daniel; Tjong, Fleur V.Y.; Knops, Reinoud E.; Hindricks, Gerhard; Steinwender, Clemens; Defaye, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Despite undisputable benefits, conventional pacemaker therapy is associated with specific complications related to the subcutaneous device and the transvenous leads. Recently, two miniaturized leadless pacemakers, Nanostim™ (St. Jude Medical) and Micra™ (Medtronic), which can be completely implanted inside the right ventricle using steerable delivery systems, entered clinical application. The WiCS™-cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) system (wireless cardiac stimulation for CRT, EBR Systems) delivers leadless left ventricular endocardial stimulation for cardiac resynchronization. In addition to obvious cosmetic benefits, leadless pacing systems may have the potential to overcome some complications of conventional pacing. However, acute and long-term complications still remains to be determined, as well as the feasibility of device explantation years after device placement. PMID:26024918

  13. Multi-Leu PACE4 Inhibitor Retention within Cells Is PACE4 Dependent and a Prerequisite for Antiproliferative Activity.

    PubMed

    Couture, Frédéric; Ly, Kévin; Levesque, Christine; Kwiatkowska, Anna; Ait-Mohand, Samia; Desjardins, Roxane; Guérin, Brigitte; Day, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The overexpression as well as the critical implication of the proprotein convertase PACE4 in prostate cancer progression has been previously reported and supported the development of peptide inhibitors. The multi-Leu peptide, a PACE4-specific inhibitor, was further generated and its capability to be uptaken by tumor xenograft was demonstrated with regard to its PACE4 expression status. To investigate whether the uptake of this inhibitor was directly dependent of PACE4 levels, uptake and efflux from cancer cells were evaluated and correlations were established with PACE4 contents on both wild type and PACE4-knockdown cell lines. PACE4-knockdown associated growth deficiencies were established on the knockdown HepG2, Huh7, and HT1080 cells as well as the antiproliferative effects of the multi-Leu peptide supporting the growth capabilities of PACE4 in cancer cells.

  14. Multi-Leu PACE4 Inhibitor Retention within Cells Is PACE4 Dependent and a Prerequisite for Antiproliferative Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Kévin; Levesque, Christine; Kwiatkowska, Anna; Ait-Mohand, Samia; Desjardins, Roxane; Guérin, Brigitte; Day, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The overexpression as well as the critical implication of the proprotein convertase PACE4 in prostate cancer progression has been previously reported and supported the development of peptide inhibitors. The multi-Leu peptide, a PACE4-specific inhibitor, was further generated and its capability to be uptaken by tumor xenograft was demonstrated with regard to its PACE4 expression status. To investigate whether the uptake of this inhibitor was directly dependent of PACE4 levels, uptake and efflux from cancer cells were evaluated and correlations were established with PACE4 contents on both wild type and PACE4-knockdown cell lines. PACE4-knockdown associated growth deficiencies were established on the knockdown HepG2, Huh7, and HT1080 cells as well as the antiproliferative effects of the multi-Leu peptide supporting the growth capabilities of PACE4 in cancer cells. PMID:26114115

  15. The Platform-Aware Compilation Environment (PACE)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    considered several strategies and settled on an implementation of the Cytron, Lowry , and Zadeck algorithm [10]. We began an implementation of this...various code regions. To address this issue, we collaborated with Jim Browne (University of Texas) and Martin Burtcher (Texas State University) to develop...The PACE Project provided full or partial support for the following graduate students: 1. Raj Barik (Rice) 2. Thomas Barr (Rice) 3

  16. Improved computational performance of MFA using elementary metabolite units and flux coupling.

    PubMed

    Suthers, Patrick F; Chang, Young J; Maranas, Costas D

    2010-03-01

    Extending the scope of isotope mapping models becomes increasingly important in order to analyze strains and drive improved product yields as more complex pathways are engineered into strains and as secondary metabolites are used as starting points for new products. Here we present how the elementary metabolite unit (EMU) framework and flux coupling significantly decrease the computational burden of metabolic flux analysis (MFA) when applied to large-scale metabolic models. We applied these techniques to a previously published isotope mapping model of Escherichia coli accounting for 238 reactions. We find that the combined use of EMU and flux coupling analysis leads to a ten-fold decrease in the number of variables in comparison to the original isotope distribution vector (IDV) version of the model. In addition, using OptMeas the task of identifying additional measurement choices to fully specify the flows in the metabolic network required only 2% of the computation time of the one using IDVs. The observed computational savings reveal the rapid progress in performing MFA with increasingly larger isotope models with the ultimate goal of handling genome-scale models of metabolism.

  17. Recent improvements in the coupled TRAC-PF1/NEM methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, K.N.; Baratta, A.J.

    1996-12-31

    The latest released version of the coupled three-dimensional thermal-hydraulic/kinetics TRAC-PF1/NEM code has reached the level of direct industry application. To complete the development of TRAC-PF1/NEM in a production mode version, further improvements have been implemented and tested. To enhance the accuracy of neutronic nodal predictions, assembly discontinuity factors (ADFs) have been utilized in the coupled TRAC-PF1/NEM methodology. The ADFs are obtained by the CASMO-3 single-assembly spectrum/depletion calculations, and they are treated in the TRAC-PF1/NEM cross-section table generation procedure as additional homogenization parameters. Since the radial component of uncertainty (introduced by not using discontinuity factor) is dominant, the ADFs are introduced in the nodal expansion method (NEM) algorithm for each of the four radial surfaces of the node. Choosing axial node boundaries to coincide with material discontinuities allows unity discontinuity factors to be used at the two axial node surfaces. The programs developed, which extract the cross-section information from the CASMO-3 output files, have been extended to read ADF information from CASMO card image files. Subsequently, the ADFs are assembled into the NEM cross-section tables.

  18. Technique for image fusion based on nonsubsampled shearlet transform and improved pulse-coupled neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Weiwei; Liu, Jianping

    2013-01-01

    A new technique for image fusion based on nonsubsampled shearlet transform (NSST) and improved pulse-coupled neural network (PCNN) is proposed. NSST, as a novel multiscale geometric analysis tool, can be optimally efficient in representing images and capturing the geometric features of multidimensional data. As a result, NSST is introduced into the area of image fusion to complete the decompositions of source images in any scale and any direction. Then the basic PCNN model is improved to be improved PCNN (IPCNN), which is more concise and more effective. IPCNN adopts the contrast of each pixel in images as the linking strength β, and the time matrix T of subimages can be obtained via the synchronous pulse-burst property. By using IPCNN, the fused subimages can be achieved. Finally, the final fused image can be obtained by using inverse NSST. The numerical experiments demonstrate that the new technique presented in this paper is competitive in the field of image fusion in terms of both fusion performance and computational efficiency.

  19. Fundamental and methodological investigations for the improvement of elemental analysis by inductively coupled plasma mass soectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ebert, Christopher Hysjulien

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation describes a variety of studies meant to improve the analytical performance of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and laser ablation (LA) ICP-MS. The emission behavior of individual droplets and LA generated particles in an ICP is studied using a high-speed, high frame rate digital camera. Phenomena are observed during the ablation of silicate glass that would cause elemental fractionation during analysis by ICP-MS. Preliminary work for ICP torch developments specifically tailored for the improvement of LA sample introduction are presented. An abnormal scarcity of metal-argon polyatomic ions (MAr{sup +}) is observed during ICP-MS analysis. Evidence shows that MAr{sup +} ions are dissociated by collisions with background gas in a shockwave near the tip of the skimmer cone. Method development towards the improvement of LA-ICP-MS for environmental monitoring is described. A method is developed to trap small particles in a collodion matrix and analyze each particle individually by LA-ICP-MS.

  20. Improved mechanical properties of HDPE/nano-alumina composite through silane coupling agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akmil, N.; Luqman, C. A.; Ahmad, M.; Zaman, K.

    2012-11-01

    The effect of silane coupling agent to mechanical properties of HDPE/nano-alumina composite was investigated. Nano-alumina used in this study was produced by using sol-gel method. The shape and size of nano-alumina were determined by using TEM. Prior to the usage of nano alumina as a filler in the polymer matrix, (3-methacryloxypropyl) trimethoxysilane (MPS) was used to functionalize the nanoparticles due to its bifunctional nature: hydrolysable group (-Si(OCH3)3) and unsaturated carbon-carbon double bond. The XRD result shows diffraction spectrum of the synthesized nano-alumina. In order to improve the mechanical properties of the composite, nanoalumina was treated with (3-methacryloxypropyl) trimethoxysilane (MPS). A high tensile strength, is achieved at 4 wt% of MPS.

  1. 42 CFR 460.90 - PACE benefits under Medicare and Medicaid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Services § 460.90 PACE benefits under Medicare and Medicaid. If a...

  2. 42 CFR 460.32 - Content and terms of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Program Agreement § 460.32 Content and terms of PACE program agreement....

  3. 42 CFR 460.32 - Content and terms of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Program Agreement § 460.32 Content and terms of PACE program agreement....

  4. 42 CFR 460.90 - PACE benefits under Medicare and Medicaid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Services § 460.90 PACE benefits under Medicare and Medicaid. If a...

  5. 42 CFR 460.90 - PACE benefits under Medicare and Medicaid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Services § 460.90 PACE benefits under Medicare and Medicaid. If a...

  6. 42 CFR 460.90 - PACE benefits under Medicare and Medicaid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Services § 460.90 PACE benefits under Medicare and Medicaid. If a...

  7. 42 CFR 460.32 - Content and terms of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Program Agreement § 460.32 Content and terms of PACE program agreement....

  8. 42 CFR 460.32 - Content and terms of PACE program agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Program Agreement § 460.32 Content and terms of PACE program agreement....

  9. Design of a Water Coupling Bolus with Improved Flow Distribution for Multielement Superficial Hyperthermia Applicators

    PubMed Central

    Arunachalam, Kavitha; Maccarini, Paolo F; Schlorff, Jaime L.; Birkelund, Yngve; Jacobsen, Svein; Stauffer, Paul R.

    2009-01-01

    A water bolus used in superficial hyperthermia couples the electromagnetic (EM) or acoustic energy into the target tissue and cools the tissue surface to minimize thermal hotspots and patient discomfort during treatment. Parametric analyses of the fluid pressure inside the bolus computed using 3D fluid dynamics simulations are used in this study to determine a bolus design with improved flow and surface temperature distributions for large area superficial heat applicators. The simulation results are used in the design and fabrication of a 19×32 cm prototype bolus with dual input-dual output (DIDO) flow channels. Sequential thermal images of the bolus surface temperature recorded for a step change in the circulating water temperature are used to assess steady state flow and surface temperature distributions across the bolus. Modeling and measurement data indicate substantial improvement in bolus flow and surface temperature distributions when changing from the previous single input-single output (SISO) to DIDO configuration. Temperature variation across the bolus at steady state was measured to be less than 0.8°C for the DIDO bolus compared to 1.5°C for the SISO waterbolus. The new DIDO bolus configuration maintains a nearly uniform flow distribution and low variation in surface temperature over a large area typically treated in superficial hyperthermia. PMID:19848618

  10. [Performance optimization of property-improved biodiesel manufacturing process coupled with butanol extractive fermentation].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Longyun; Yang, Ying; Shi, Zhongping

    2008-11-01

    The products concentrations in traditional acetone-butanol (AB) fermentation are too low that large amount of energy has to be consumed in the distillation and product recovery process. Aiming at direct utilization of the fermentation products, in this study, optimization of property-improved biodiesel manufacturing process coupled with AB extractive fermentation was conducted, under the condition of using the biodiesel originated from waste cooking oil as the extractant and high concentrated corn flour medium. The effect of biodiesel/broth volume ratio, waste supernatant recycle ratio, and electronic carrier addition on the major process performance index was carefully investigated. Under the optimized condition, the biodiesel quality was improved with the cetane value increased from 51.4 to 54.4; "actual butanol yield" reached to a level of 18%, and waste supernatant recycle ratio exceeded 50%. In this way, elimination of energy-consuming product recovery process and realization of "energy-saving & waste minimization" industrial production target advocated by the state government, could be potentially expected.

  11. Physiological demand and pacing strategy during the new combined event in elite pentathletes.

    PubMed

    Le Meur, Yann; Dorel, Sylvain; Baup, Yann; Guyomarch, Jean Pierre; Roudaut, Christian; Hausswirth, Christophe

    2012-07-01

    To evaluate the physiological demands and effects of different pacing strategies on performance during the new combined event (CE) of the modern pentathlon (consisting of three pistol shooting sessions interspersed by three 1-km running legs). Nine elite pentathletes realised five tests: a free-paced CE during an international competition; an incremental running test to determine [Formula: see text] and its related velocity ([Formula: see text]) and three experimental time-trial CE, where the pacing strategy was manipulated (CE(ref), CE(100%), CE(105%)). CE(ref) reproduced the international competition strategy with a 170-m fast running start within the first 2 km. CE(100%) and CE(105%) imposed a constant strategy over km-1 and km-2 with a velocity of 100 and 105% of the mean speed adopted over the same sections during the international competition, respectively. Km-3 was always self-paced. The subjects ran CE(ref) at 99 ± 4% of [Formula: see text] and reached 100 ± 5, 100 ± 7, 99 ± 8% of [Formula: see text] at the end of kilometres 1, 2 and 3, respectively ([Formula: see text]: 72 ± 6 mL O(2) min(-1) kg(-1)), with a peak blood lactate concentration of 13.6 ± 1.5 mmol L(-1). No significant differences in overall performance were found between the pacing conditions (753 ± 30, 770 ± 39, 768 ± 27 s for CE(ref), CE(100%) and CE(105%), respectively, p = 0.63), but all of the shooting performance parameters were only stable in CE(ref). Completion of CE by elite pentathletes elicits a maximal aerobic contribution coupled with a high glycolytic supply. Manipulating the mean running speed over km-1 and km-2 had strong influence on the overall pacing strategy and induced minor differences in shooting performance, but it did not affect overall performance.

  12. A biophysically-based finite state machine model for analysing gastric experimental entrainment and pacing recordings

    PubMed Central

    Sathar, Shameer; Trew, Mark L.; Du, Peng; O’ Grady, Greg; Cheng, Leo K.

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal motility is coordinated by slow waves (SWs) generated by the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC). Experimental studies have shown that SWs spontaneously activate at different intrinsic frequencies in isolated tissue, whereas in intact tissues they are entrained to a single frequency. Gastric pacing has been used in an attempt to improve motility in disorders such as gastroparesis by modulating entrainment, but the optimal methods of pacing are currently unknown. Computational models can aid in the interpretation of complex in-vivo recordings and help to determine optical pacing strategies. However, previous computational models of SW entrainment are limited to the intrinsic pacing frequency as the primary determinant of the conduction velocity, and are not able to accurately represent the effects of external stimuli and electrical anisotropies. In this paper, we present a novel computationally efficient method for modelling SW propagation through the ICC network while accounting for conductivity parameters and fiber orientations. The method successfully reproduced experimental recordings of entrainment following gastric transection and the effects of gastric pacing on SW activity. It provides a reliable new tool for investigating gastric electrophysiology in normal and diseased states, and to guide and focus future experimental studies. PMID:24276722

  13. Provenance Context Entity (PaCE): Scalable Provenance Tracking for Scientific RDF Data.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Satya S; Bodenreider, Olivier; Hitzler, Pascal; Sheth, Amit; Thirunarayan, Krishnaprasad

    The Resource Description Framework (RDF) format is being used by a large number of scientific applications to store and disseminate their datasets. The provenance information, describing the source or lineage of the datasets, is playing an increasingly significant role in ensuring data quality, computing trust value of the datasets, and ranking query results. Current provenance tracking approaches using the RDF reification vocabulary suffer from a number of known issues, including lack of formal semantics, use of blank nodes, and application-dependent interpretation of reified RDF triples. In this paper, we introduce a new approach called Provenance Context Entity (PaCE) that uses the notion of provenance context to create provenance-aware RDF triples. We also define the formal semantics of PaCE through a simple extension of the existing RDF(S) semantics that ensures compatibility of PaCE with existing Semantic Web tools and implementations. We have implemented the PaCE approach in the Biomedical Knowledge Repository (BKR) project at the US National Library of Medicine. The evaluations demonstrate a minimum of 49% reduction in total number of provenance-specific RDF triples generated using the PaCE approach as compared to RDF reification. In addition, performance for complex queries improves by three orders of magnitude and remains comparable to the RDF reification approach for simpler provenance queries.

  14. Investigating the use of coupling agents to improve the interfacial properties between a resorbable phosphate glass and polylactic acid matrix.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Muhammad Sami; Ahmed, Ifty; Parsons, Andrew J; Rudd, Chris D; Walker, Gavin S; Scotchford, Colin A

    2013-09-01

    Eight different chemicals were investigated as potential candidate coupling agents for phosphate glass fibre reinforced polylactic acid composites. Evidence of reaction of the coupling agents with phosphate glass and their effect on surface wettability and glass degradation were studied along with their principle role of improving the interface between glass reinforcement and polymer matrix. It was found that, with an optimal amount of coupling agent on the surface of the glass/polymer, interfacial shear strength improved by a factor of 5. Evidence of covalent bonding between agent and glass was found for three of the coupling agents investigated, namely: 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane; etidronic acid and hexamethylene diisocyanate. These three coupling agents also improved the interfacial shear strength and increased the hydrophobicity of the glass surface. It is expected that this would provide an improvement in the macroscopic properties of full-scale composites fabricated from the same materials which may also help to retain these properties for the desired length of time by retarding the breakdown of the fibre/matrix interface within these composites.

  15. Influence of cinnamon and catnip on the stereotypical pacing of oncilla cats (Leopardus tigrinus) in captivity.

    PubMed

    Resende, Letícia de S; Pedretti Gomes, Karla C; Andriolo, Artur; Genaro, Gelson; Remy, Gabriella L; Almeida Ramos, Valdir de

    2011-01-01

    Nonhuman animals in captivity can experience environmental privation that results in their exhibiting abnormal behaviors. Environmental enrichment techniques can help improve their welfare. This study investigated the behavior of 8 zoo-housed oncilla cats (Leopardus tigrinus) in response to 2 odors (catnip and cinnamon) introduced individually into the animals' enclosures for 3 consecutive days. Proportion of scans spent engaging in stereotypical pacing were compared before, during, and after treatments. The addition of cinnamon reduced the proportion of pacing during and after enrichment (Wilcoxon: Z = 3.16, p < .001; Z = 3.16, p < .001, respectively), indicating a prolonged effect of the enrichment on the animals' behavior. Catnip appears to have elicited no significant difference in the stereotypic pacing before, during, or after the enrichment (Friedman: X(2) = 2.69; p = .260). The results highlight the potential use of cinnamon as a method of environmental enrichment for small captive-housed cats.

  16. An improved coupling model for the lithosphere-atmosphere-ionosphere system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, C. L.; Lee, L. C.; Huba, J. D.

    2014-04-01

    In our previous model for the lithosphere-atmosphere-ionosphere coupling, the background magnetic field was assumed to be perpendicular to the horizontal plane. In the present paper, we improve the calculation of currents in the atmosphere by solving the current density J directly from the current continuity equation ∇ • J = 0. The currents in the atmosphere can be solved for any arbitrary angle of magnetic field, i.e., any magnetic latitude. In addition, a large ratio (~10) of Hall to Pedersen conductivities is used to generate a large Hall electric field. The effects of atmospheric currents and electric fields on the ionosphere with lithosphere current source located at magnetic latitudes of 7.5°, 15°, 22.5°, and 30° are obtained. For upward (downward) atmospheric currents flowing into the ionosphere, the simulation results show that the westward (eastward) electric fields dominate. At magnetic latitude of 7.5° or 15°, the upward (downward) current causes the increase (decrease) of total electron content (TEC) near the source region, while the upward (downward) current causes the decrease (increase) of TEC at magnetic latitude of 22.5°or 30°. The dynamo current density required to generate the same amount of TEC variation in the improved model is found to be smaller by a factor of 30 as compared to that obtained in our earlier paper. We also calculate the ionosphere dynamics with imposed zonal westward and eastward electric field based on SAMI3 code. It is found that the eastward (westward) electric field may trigger one (two) plasma bubble(s) in the nighttime ionosphere.

  17. Fiber optic probe having fibers with endfaces formed for improved coupling efficiency and method using same

    DOEpatents

    O'Rourke, Patrick E.; Livingston, Ronald R.

    1995-01-01

    A fiber optic probe for detecting scattered light, with transmitting and receiving fibers having slanted ends and bundled together to form a bevel within the tip of the probe. The probe comprises a housing with a transparent window across its tip for protecting the transmitting and receiving fibers held therein. The endfaces of the fibers are slanted, by cutting, polishing and the like, so that they lie in a plane that is not perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the respective fiber. The fibers are held in the tip of the probe using an epoxy and oriented so that lines normal to the slanted endfaces are divergent with respect to one another. The epoxy, which is positioned substantially between the transmitting and receiving fibers, is tapered so that the transmitting fiber, the epoxy and the receiving fiber form a bevel of not more than 20 degrees. The angled fiber endfaces cause directing of the light cones toward each other, resulting in improved light coupling efficiency. A light absorber, such as carbon black, is contained in the epoxy to reduce crosstalk between the transmitting and receiving fibers.

  18. Prompt efficiency of energy harvesting by magnetic coupling of an improved bi-stable system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hai-Tao; Qin, Wei-Yang

    2016-11-01

    In order to improve the transform efficiency of bi-stable energy harvester (BEH), this paper proposes an advanced bi-stable energy harvester (ABEH), which is composed of two bi-stable beams coupling through their magnets. Theoretical analyzes and simulations for the ABEH are carried out. First, the mathematical model is established and its dynamical equations are derived. The formulas of magnetic force in two directions are given. The potential energy barrier of ABEH is reduced and the snap-through is liable to occur between potential wells. To demonstrate the ABEH’s advantage in harvesting energy, comparisons between the ABEH and the BEH are carried out for both harmonic and stochastic excitations. Our results reveal that the ABEH’s inter-well response can be elicited by a low-frequency excitation and the harvester can attain frequent jumping between potential wells at fairly weak random excitations. Thus, it can generate a higher output power. The present findings prove that the ABEH is preferable in harvesting energy and can be optimally designed such that it attains the best harvesting performance. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11172234) and the Scholarship from China Scholarship Council (Grant No. 201506290092).

  19. Improved Understanding of Natural System Processes through Coupling of Geophysical Characterization and Numerical Modeling Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, S.; Williams, K.; Scheibe, T.; Peterson, J.; Chen, J.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Sonnenthal, E.; Steefel, C.

    2006-12-01

    Numerical modeling of fluid flow and contaminant transport is often used to test hypotheses and to guide resource management. In complex natural systems, challenges are often associated with collecting sufficient information to parameterize numerical models over field relevant scales and with the development of mathematical representations of critical, coupled hydrological-biogeochemical processes. Geophysical methods can be helpful for guiding or constraining numerical models because they can provide extensive information about subsurface properties and processes. Obtaining quantitative parameter estimates from geophysical approaches can also be challenging, however, as these methods do not sample hydrological- biogeochemical properties directly and are often sensitive to various influences.Through a series of lab and field-based case studies, we will explore the benefits and current limitations of using geophysical information in conjunction with hydrological models to interrogate natural systems. We illustrate that where geophysical characterization approaches are sufficiently advanced, they can be useful for guiding model development, providing model parameter input, and for exploring the impact of heterogeneity on flow and transport processes. We also illustrate that where characterization and modeling methods are less well developed, as in the case of advanced subsurface reactive transport models or in the use of geophysical methods for monitoring biogeochemical transformations, comparison of monitoring and modeling information can lead to improvements in the use of both methods as investigative tools.

  20. Fiber optic probe having fibers with endfaces formed for improved coupling efficiency and method using same

    DOEpatents

    O`Rourke, P.E.; Livingston, R.R.

    1995-03-28

    A fiber optic probe is disclosed for detecting scattered light, with transmitting and receiving fibers having slanted ends and bundled together to form a bevel within the tip of the probe. The probe comprises a housing with a transparent window across its tip for protecting the transmitting and receiving fibers held therein. The endfaces of the fibers are slanted, by cutting, polishing and the like, so that they lie in a plane that is not perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the respective fiber. The fibers are held in the tip of the probe using an epoxy and oriented so that lines normal to the slanted endfaces are divergent with respect to one another. The epoxy, which is positioned substantially between the transmitting and receiving fibers, is tapered so that the transmitting fiber, the epoxy and the receiving fiber form a bevel of not more than 20 degrees. The angled fiber endfaces cause directing of the light cones toward each other, resulting in improved light coupling efficiency. A light absorber, such as carbon black, is contained in the epoxy to reduce crosstalk between the transmitting and receiving fibers. 3 figures.

  1. Sex differences in pacing during ‘Ultraman Hawaii’

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaidis, Pantelis T.

    2016-01-01

    Background To date, little is known for pacing in ultra-endurance athletes competing in a non-stop event and in a multi-stage event, and especially, about pacing in a multi-stage event with different disciplines during the stages. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to examine the effect of age, sex and calendar year on triathlon performance and variation of performance by events (i.e., swimming, cycling 1, cycling 2 and running) in ‘Ultraman Hawaii’ held between 1983 and 2015. Methods Within each sex, participants were grouped in quartiles (i.e., Q1, Q2, Q3 and Q4) with Q1 being the fastest (i.e., lowest overall time) and Q4 the slowest (i.e., highest overall time). To compare performance among events (i.e., swimming, cycling 1, cycling 2 and running), race time in each event was converted in z score and this value was used for further analysis. Results A between-within subjects ANOVA showed a large sex × event (p = 0.015, η2 = 0.014) and a medium performance group × event interaction (p = 0.001, η2 = 0.012). No main effect of event on performance was observed (p = 0.174, η2 = 0.007). With regard to the sex × event interaction, three female performance groups (i.e., Q2, Q3 and Q4) increased race time from swimming to cycling 1, whereas only one male performance group (Q4) revealed a similar trend. From cycling 1 to cycling 2, the two slower female groups (Q3 and Q4) and the slowest male group (Q4) increased raced time. In women, the fastest group decreased (i.e., improved) race time from swimming to cycling 1 and thereafter, maintained performance, whereas in men, the fastest group decreased race time till cycling 2 and increased it in the running. Conclusion In summary, women pace differently than men during ‘Ultraman Hawaii’ where the fastest women decreased performance on day 1 and could then maintain on day 2 and 3, whereas the fastest men worsened performance on day 1 and 2 but improved on day 3. PMID:27703854

  2. Positional Scanning Identifies the Molecular Determinants of a High Affinity Multi-Leucine Inhibitor for Furin and PACE4.

    PubMed

    Małuch, Izabela; Levesque, Christine; Kwiatkowska, Anna; Couture, Frédéric; Ly, Kévin; Desjardins, Roxane; Neugebauer, Witold A; Prahl, Adam; Day, Robert

    2017-03-24

    The proprotein convertase family of enzymes includes seven endoproteases with significant redundancy in their cleavage activity. We previously described the peptide Ac-LLLLRVK-Amba that displays potent inhibitory effects on both PACE4 and prostate cancer cell lines proliferation. Herein, the molecular determinants for PACE4 and furin inhibition were investigated by positional scanning using peptide libraries that substituted its leucine core with each natural amino acid. We determined that the incorporation of basic amino acids led to analogues with improved inhibitory potency toward both enzymes, whereas negatively charged residues significantly reduced it. All the remaining amino acids were in general well tolerated, with the exemption of the P6 position. However, not all of the potent PACE4 inhibitors displayed antiproliferative activity. The best analogues were obtained by the incorporation of the Ile residue at the P5 and P6 positions. These substitutions led to inhibitors with increased PACE4 selectivity and potent antiproliferative effects.

  3. Accurate gradient approximation for complex interface problems in 3D by an improved coupling interface method

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Yu-Chen; Chern, I-Liang; Chang, Chien C.

    2014-10-15

    Most elliptic interface solvers become complicated for complex interface problems at those “exceptional points” where there are not enough neighboring interior points for high order interpolation. Such complication increases especially in three dimensions. Usually, the solvers are thus reduced to low order accuracy. In this paper, we classify these exceptional points and propose two recipes to maintain order of accuracy there, aiming at improving the previous coupling interface method [26]. Yet the idea is also applicable to other interface solvers. The main idea is to have at least first order approximations for second order derivatives at those exceptional points. Recipe 1 is to use the finite difference approximation for the second order derivatives at a nearby interior grid point, whenever this is possible. Recipe 2 is to flip domain signatures and introduce a ghost state so that a second-order method can be applied. This ghost state is a smooth extension of the solution at the exceptional point from the other side of the interface. The original state is recovered by a post-processing using nearby states and jump conditions. The choice of recipes is determined by a classification scheme of the exceptional points. The method renders the solution and its gradient uniformly second-order accurate in the entire computed domain. Numerical examples are provided to illustrate the second order accuracy of the presently proposed method in approximating the gradients of the original states for some complex interfaces which we had tested previous in two and three dimensions, and a real molecule ( (1D63)) which is double-helix shape and composed of hundreds of atoms.

  4. An improved coupling model for the lithosphere-atmosphere-ionosphere system (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, L.; Kuo, C.; Huba, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    In order to explain the observed ionospheric TEC variations before strong earthquakes, we have developed a comprehensive model for the lithosphere-atmosphere-ionosphere (LAI) coupling [Kuo et al., 2011]. In our previous model, the dynamo current flows from the lithosphere, through the atmosphere, and into the ionosphere. The TEC variations in the ionosphere are numerically calculated based on NRL SAMI3 code. Nighttime plasma bubbles are generated for large earthquakes. However, the current in the atmosphere is obtained by first solving the electric field Ε from ▽(σΕ), where the conductivity tensor σ consists of Pedersen and Hall conductivity. The background magnetic field is assumed to be perpendicular to the horizontal plane. In the present paper, we improve the calculation of currents in the atmosphere by solving the current density J directly from the current continuity equation ▽J = 0. The currents in the atmosphere can be solved for any arbitrary angle of magnetic field, i.e., any magnetic latitude. The effects of atmospheric currents and electric fields on the ionosphere with lithosphere current source located at low magnetic altitude 15° and middle magnetic altitude 30° are obtained. For upward (downward) atmospheric currents flowing into the ionosphere, the simulation results show that the westward (eastward) electric fields dominate. At magnetic latitude 15°, the upward (downward) current causes the increase (decrease) of TEC, while the upward (downward) current causes the decrease (increase) of TEC at higher magnetic latitude 30°. The dynamo current density required to generate the same amount of TEC variation in the improved model is found to be smaller by a factor of 30 as compared to that obtained in our earlier paper. We also calculate the ionosphere dynamics with imposed zonal westward and eastward electric field based on SAMI3 code. In the nighttime ionosphere, it is found that the westward electric field may trigger two plasma bubbles

  5. Applications and Improvement of a Coupled, Global and Cloud-Resolving Modeling System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Chern, J.; Atlas, R.

    2005-01-01

    Recently Grabowski (2001) and Khairoutdinov and Randall (2001) have proposed the use of 2D CFWs as a "super parameterization" [or multi-scale modeling framework (MMF)] to represent cloud processes within atmospheric general circulation models (GCMs). In the MMF, a fine-resolution 2D CRM takes the place of the single-column parameterization used in conventional GCMs. A prototype Goddard MMF based on the 2D Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model and the Goddard finite volume general circulation model (fvGCM) is now being developed. The prototype includes the fvGCM run at 2.50 x 20 horizontal resolution with 32 vertical layers from the surface to 1 mb and the 2D (x-z) GCE using 64 horizontal and 32 vertical grid points with 4 km horizontal resolution and a cyclic lateral boundary. The time step for the 2D GCE would be 15 seconds, and the fvGCM-GCE coupling frequency would be 30 minutes (i.e. the fvGCM physical time step). We have successfully developed an fvGCM-GCE coupler for this prototype. Because the vertical coordinate of the fvGCM (a terrain-following floating Lagrangian coordinate) is different from that of the GCE (a z coordinate), vertical interpolations between the two coordinates are needed in the coupler. In interpolating fields from the GCE to fvGCM, we use an existing fvGCM finite- volume piecewise parabolic mapping (PPM) algorithm, which conserves the mass, momentum, and total energy. A new finite-volume PPM algorithm, which conserves the mass, momentum and moist static energy in the z coordinate, is being developed for interpolating fields from the fvGCM to the GCE. In the meeting, we will discuss the major differences between the two MMFs (i.e., the CSU MMF and the Goddard MMF). We will also present performance and critical issues related to the MMFs. In addition, we will present multi-dimensional cloud datasets (i.e., a cloud data library) generated by the Goddard MMF that will be provided to the global modeling community to help improve the

  6. Together - a couples' program to improve communication, coping, and financial management skills: development and initial pilot-testing.

    PubMed

    Falconier, Mariana K

    2015-04-01

    The accumulated knowledge about the negative impact of financial strain on couple's relationship functioning and the magnitude of the latest economic downturn have brought together the fields of financial counseling and couples' therapy. This article describes the development of a new interdisciplinary program that aims at helping couples under financial strain improve their financial management, communication, and dyadic coping skills. The article also reports the results from its initial pilot-testing with data collected from 18 financially distressed couples before and after participation in the program and 3 months later. Results from repeated measures ANOVAs suggest that the program may help reduce both partners' financial strain and the male negative communication and improve both partners' financial management skills and strategies to cope together with financial strain, and the male relationship satisfaction. These findings together with the high satisfaction reported by participants regarding the structure and content of the sessions and homework suggest that this program may be a promising approach to help couples experiencing financial strain. Gender differences, clinical implications, and possibilities for further research are also discussed.

  7. Differential Effects of Ventricular Pacing Sites of Contraction Synchrony and Global Cardiac Performance

    PubMed Central

    Alhammouri, Mohammed; Kim, Hyung Kook; Mokhtar, Yasser; Cannesson, Maxime; Tanabe, Masaki; Gorcsan, John; Schwartzman, David; Pinsky, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Quantification of left ventricular (LV) dyssynchrony allows for objective measures of resynchronization therapy (CRT) effectiveness. We tested the hypothesis that site of LV pacing, fusion beats and baseline contractility alter contraction synchrony as quantified by regional and global measures of LV performance. Methods and Results In 8 open-chested pentobarbital-anesthetized canine preparations we compared the effects of right atrial (RA), RA-high right ventricular (RV) free wall, as a model of left bundle branch block contraction pattern, RA-LV apex (LVa), RA-LV free wall (LVfw), and RA-RV-apical LV (CRTa) and RA-RV-free wall LV (CRTfw), as CRT. LV pressure-volume loops recorded using high-fidelity pressure and conductance catheters and echocardiographic angle-corrected color-coded strain imaging of mid-LV short axis views analyzed radial strain from six segments. To control for contractile state esmolol-induced beta blockage was studied, and in 5 dogs to control for RA and ventricular pacing fusion beat artifacts, repeat studies were done following AV node ablation. RA-RV pacing reduced stroke work (SW) (57±18 to 33±13* mmHg·mL,*p<0.05 vs RA pacing), decreased LV end-diastolic volume and induced marked radial dyssynchrony (maximal time difference between peak segmental strain) from 31±15 to 234±60* ms. Changes in radial dyssynchrony correlated significantly with changes in SW (r=−0.53, p<0.01). Dyssynchrony improved with both CRTa and CRTfw (69*±31 and 98*±63 ms, respectively) while SW only improved with CRTa (62±22* and 37±13 mmHg·mL, respectively * p<0.05 vs RV pacing). CRTa also tended to increased LV end-diastolic volume over RA-RV. Esmolol slowed HR from 118±10 to 108±10 beats/min* and tended to decrease contractility (end-systolic elastance (Ees) from 12.1±7.9 to 8.9±3.9 mmHg/ml, p=0.167) but did not alter the degree of RV-pacing induced dyssynchrony. AV ablation had no effect on the observed apical and free wall contraction

  8. Improved sphaleron decoupling condition and the Higgs coupling constants in the real singlet-extended standard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuyuto, Kaori; Senaha, Eibun

    2014-07-01

    We improve the sphaleron decoupling condition in the real singlet-extended standard model (SM). The sphaleron energy is obtained using the finite-temperature one-loop effective potential with daisy resummation. For moderate values of the model parameters, the sphaleron decoupling condition is found to be vC/TC>(1.1-1.2), where TC denotes a critical temperature and vC is the corresponding vacuum expectation value of the doublet Higgs field at TC. We also investigate the deviation of the triple Higgs boson coupling from its standard model value in the region where the improved sphaleron decoupling condition is satisfied. As a result of the improvement, the deviation of the triple Higgs boson coupling gets more enhanced. In a typical case, if the Higgs couplings to the gauge bosons/fermions deviate from the SM values by about 3 (10)%, the deviation of the triple Higgs boson coupling can be as large as about 16 (50)%, which is about 4 (8)% larger than that based on the conventional criterion vC/TC>1.

  9. Far field pacing supersedes anti-tachycardia pacing in a generic model of excitable media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittihn, Philip; Luther, Gisela; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Krinsky, Valentin; Parlitz, Ulrich; Luther, Stefan

    2008-10-01

    Removing anchored spirals from obstacles is an important step in terminating cardiac arrhythmia. Conventional anti-tachycardia pacing (ATP) has this ability, but only under very restrictive conditions. In a generic model of excitable media, we demonstrate that for unpinning spiral waves from obstacles this profound limitation of ATP can be overcome by far field pacing (FFP). More specifically, an argument is presented for why FFP includes and thus can only extend the capabilities of ATP in the configurations considered. By numerical simulations, we show that in the model there exists a parameter region in which unpinning is possible by FFP but not by ATP. The relevance of this result regarding clinical applications is discussed.

  10. Distant electric coupling between nitrate reduction and sulphide oxidation investigated by an improved nitrate microscale biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzocchi, U.; Revsbech, N. P.; Nielsen, L. P.; Risgaard-Petersen, N.

    2012-04-01

    Bacteria are apparently able to transmit electrons to other bacteria (Summers et al. 2010) or to electrodes (Malvankar et al. 2011) by some kind of nanowires (Reguera et al. 2005, Gorbi et al. 2006). Lately it has been shown that such transfer may occur over distances of centimetres in sediments, thereby coupling sulphide oxidation in deeper layers with oxygen reduction near the surface (Nielsen 2011). The finding of these long-distance electrical connections originated from analysis of O2, H2S, and pH profiles measured with microsensors. Nitrate is thermodynamically almost as good an electron acceptor as O2, and we therefore set up an experiment to investigate whether long-distance electron transfer also happens with NO3-. Aquaria were filled with sulphidic marine sediment from Aarhus Bay that was previously used to show long-distance electron transfer to O2. The aquaria were equipped with a lid so that they could be completely filled without a gas phase. Anoxic seawater with 300 μM NO3- was supplied at a constant rate resulting in a steady state concentration in the aquatic phase of 250 μM NO3-. The reservoir with the nitrate-containing water was kept anoxic by bubbling it with a N2/CO2 mixture and was kept at an elevated temperature. The water was cooled on the way to the aquaria to keep the water in the aquaria undersaturated with gasses, so that bubble formation by denitrification in the sediment could be minimised. Profiles of NO3-, H2S, and pH were measured as a function of time (2 months) applying commercial sensors for H2S and pH and an improved microscale NO3- biosensor developed in our laboratory. The penetration of NO3- in the sediment was 4-5 mm after 2 months, whereas sulphide only could be detected below 8-9 mm depth. The electron acceptor and electron donor were thus separated by 4-5 mm, indicating long distance electron transfer. A pH maximum of about 8.6 pH units at the NO3- reduction zone similar to a pH maximum observed in the O2 reduction

  11. Achievement Monitoring of Individually Paced Instruction. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinsky, Paul D.

    A study was made to monitor achievement of individually paced instruction. The project concentrated on designing testing procedures in group paced instructional programs to provide information to student, teachers, parents and administrators which could be used in both a formative and summative evaluation. The three objectives of the project were:…

  12. Self-Paced Learning in Civil E.T.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharples, Kent

    1977-01-01

    Briefly reports on the structure and evaluation of an individually-paced, two year civil engineering technology curriculum sponsored by a National Science Foundation grant. The written modules progress linearly with support media presentations. Students in the self-paced program generally outperformed lecture-based students on cognitive…

  13. Social Interaction in Self-Paced Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Terry; Upton, Lorne; Dron, Jon; Malone, Judi; Poelhuber, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a case study of a self-paced university course that was originally designed to support independent, self-paced study at distance. We developed a social media intervention, in design-based research terms, that allows these independent students to contribute archived content to enhance the course, to engage in discussions…

  14. Is Self-Paced Instruction Really Worth It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberson, J. A.; Crowe, C. T.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a self-paced, learning-for-mastery course in undergraduate fluid mechanics. Includes the method of course assessment, method of student evaluation, and a description of the instructor's role and work load. Summarizes aspects of self-paced instruction considered favorable and unfavorable. (GS)

  15. Prediction of Procrastination in a Self-Pacing Instructional System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ely, Donald D.; Hampton, John D.

    The objective of the study was to predict potential procrastinators in a self-pacing instructional system. Seventy-five entering college freshmen were randomly selected to participate in a large scale individually-paced program. Those students (25) who procrastinated were classified as "no-start-procrastinators" (NSP); the remainder (52) were…

  16. Accelerating the "Pace" against Illiteracy: Parent and Child Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noe, Roger

    1989-01-01

    In 1980, Kentucky reported the nation's lowest percentage of adults, aged 25 and older, who had graduated from high school. Legislators were inundated with recommendations for reform. The result was the enactment of the Parent and Child Education (PACE) pilot program (1986). In the PACE program, parents without high school diplomas attend classes…

  17. Diaphragm Pacing as a Rehabilitative Tool for Patients With Pompe Disease Who Are Ventilator-Dependent: Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, David D.; Martin, A. Daniel; Lottenberg, Lawrence; Islam, Saleem; Lawson, Lee Ann; Onders, Raymond P.; Byrne, Barry J.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Pompe disease is an inherited disorder notable for severe, progressive ventilatory compromise. Although ventilatory failure has been attributed to myofiber dysfunction secondary to diaphragmatic glycogen accumulation, neural involvement of the phrenic motor system is also a prominent feature. Direct diaphragm pacing supplements respiratory function in other disorders of the phrenic motor system. Accordingly, it is hypothesized that augmented neuromuscular activity via diaphragm pacing would promote weaning from mechanical ventilation in patients with Pompe disease who are unresponsive to conventional, muscle-directed treatments. Case Description Three patients with Pompe disease developed diaphragm paresis that resulted in chronic mechanical ventilation dependence. After preoperative inspiratory muscle strengthening exercises failed to improve function, fine-wire pacing electrodes were laparoscopically implanted into the diaphragm. Diaphragm conditioning was initiated the first postoperative week and consisted of gradual increases in stimulation parameters, lengthening of stimulation sessions, and ventilator weaning. Ventilation and intramuscular electromyographic activity were recorded periodically during conditioning to quantify diaphragm neuromuscular function. Outcomes During paced breathing without mechanical ventilation, tidal volumes increased, and 2 patients were weaned from daytime ventilator dependence within the first 3 months of pacing, which has been sustained over the long-term. A third patient reduced reliance on daytime ventilation, but weaning was delayed by malacia of the large airways. In all patients, pacing appeared to facilitate spontaneous phrenic motor unit activity during independent breathing without ventilator or pacer support. Discussion The findings are consistent with the view that diaphragm pacing has potential rehabilitative value to reduce reliance on mechanical ventilation in people with Pompe disease, but

  18. Coupling of Helmholtz resonators to improve acoustic liners for turbofan engines at low frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, L. W.

    1975-01-01

    An analytical and test program was conducted to evaluate means for increasing the effectiveness of low frequency sound absorbing liners for aircraft turbine engines. Three schemes for coupling low frequency absorber elements were considered. These schemes were analytically modeled and their impedance was predicted over a frequency range of 50 to 1,000 Hz. An optimum and two off-optimum designs of the most promising, a parallel coupled scheme, were fabricated and tested in a flow duct facility. Impedance measurements were in good agreement with predicted values and validated the procedure used to transform modeled parameters to hardware designs. Measurements of attenuation for panels of coupled resonators were consistent with predictions based on measured impedance. All coupled resonator panels tested showed an increase in peak attenuation of about 50% and an increase in attenuation bandwidth of one one-third octave band over that measured for an uncoupled panel. These attenuation characteristics equate to about 35% greater reduction in source perceived noise level (PNL), relative to the uncoupled panel, or a reduction in treatment length of about 24% for constant PNL reduction. The increased effectiveness of the coupled resonator concept for attenuation of low frequency broad spectrum noise is demonstrated.

  19. Use of external magnetic fields in hohlraum plasmas to improve laser-coupling

    DOE PAGES

    Montgomery, D. S.; Albright, B. J.; Barnak, D. H.; ...

    2015-01-13

    Efficient coupling of laser energy into hohlraum targets is important for indirect drive ignition. Laser-plasma instabilities can reduce coupling, reduce symmetry, and cause preheat. We consider the effects of an external magnetic field on laser-energy coupling in hohlraum targets. Experiments were performed at the Omega Laser Facility using low-Z gas-filled hohlraum targets which were placed in a magnetic coil with Bz ≤ 7.5-T. We found that an external field Bz = 7.5-T aligned along the hohlraum axis results in up to a 50% increase in plasma temperature as measured by Thomson scattering. As a result, the experiments were modeled usingmore » the 2-D magnetohydrodynamics package in HYDRA and were found to be in good agreement.« less

  20. Improved extraction of hydrologic information from geophysical data through coupled hydrogeophysical inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Hinnell, A.C.; Ferre, T.P.A.; Vrugt, J.A.; Huisman, J.A.; Moysey, S.; Rings, J.; Kowalsky, M.B.

    2009-11-01

    There is increasing interest in the use of multiple measurement types, including indirect (geophysical) methods, to constrain hydrologic interpretations. To date, most examples integrating geophysical measurements in hydrology have followed a three-step, uncoupled inverse approach. This approach begins with independent geophysical inversion to infer the spatial and/or temporal distribution of a geophysical property (e.g. electrical conductivity). The geophysical property is then converted to a hydrologic property (e.g. water content) through a petrophysical relation. The inferred hydrologic property is then used either independently or together with direct hydrologic observations to constrain a hydrologic inversion. We present an alternative approach, coupled inversion, which relies on direct coupling of hydrologic models and geophysical models during inversion. We compare the abilities of coupled and uncoupled inversion using a synthetic example where surface-based electrical conductivity surveys are used to monitor one-dimensional infiltration and redistribution.

  1. DOA Estimation under Unknown Mutual Coupling and Multipath with Improved Effective Array Aperture

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuexian; Trinkle, Matthew; Ng, Brian W.-H.

    2015-01-01

    Subspace-based high-resolution direction of arrival (DOA) estimation significantly deteriorates under array manifold perturbation and rank deficiency of the covariance matrix due to mutual coupling and multipath propagation, respectively. In this correspondence, the unknown mutual coupling can be circumvented by the proposed method without any passive or active calibration process, and the DOA of the coherent signals can be accurately estimated accordingly. With a newly constructed matrix, the deficient rank can be restored, and the effective array aperture can be extended compared with conventional spatial smoothing. The proposed method achieves a good robustness and DOA estimation accuracy with unknown mutual coupling. The simulation results demonstrate the validity and efficiency of the proposed method. PMID:26670235

  2. Improvements to dry coupled ultrasound for wall thickness and weld inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, C.; Dixon, S.; Palmer, S. B.

    2000-05-01

    There are many ultrasonic applications where liquid couplants are undesirable. Automated scanning systems need complex couplant delivery and recovery systems in order to prevent either contamination or degradation to the test object. Soft materials such as rubbers can be used as a shoe to dry-couple the ultrasound from a piezoelectric transducer into the part but this can have relatively poor performance, particularly at high frequency where attenuation in the shoe material is large. The present paper describes results from a dual approach to tackle the problems associated with dry coupling. Various rubbers are examined for their ultrasonic properties and additional amplification is used to compensate for high frequency losses. As a result we have established that standard rubbers can be used as dry couplant materials for zero-degree longitudinal wave applications and it has even been possible to produce dry-coupled angled shear waves transducers suitable for flaw detection.

  3. Use of external magnetic fields in hohlraum plasmas to improve laser-coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, D. S.; Albright, B. J.; Barnak, D. H.; Chang, P. Y.; Davies, J. R.; Fiksel, G.; Froula, D. H.; Kline, J. L.; MacDonald, M. J.; Sefkow, A. B.; Yin, L.; Betti, R.

    2015-01-13

    Efficient coupling of laser energy into hohlraum targets is important for indirect drive ignition. Laser-plasma instabilities can reduce coupling, reduce symmetry, and cause preheat. We consider the effects of an external magnetic field on laser-energy coupling in hohlraum targets. Experiments were performed at the Omega Laser Facility using low-Z gas-filled hohlraum targets which were placed in a magnetic coil with Bz ≤ 7.5-T. We found that an external field Bz = 7.5-T aligned along the hohlraum axis results in up to a 50% increase in plasma temperature as measured by Thomson scattering. As a result, the experiments were modeled using the 2-D magnetohydrodynamics package in HYDRA and were found to be in good agreement.

  4. Improved representations of coupled soil-canopy processes in the CABLE land surface model (Subversion revision 3432)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haverd, Vanessa; Cuntz, Matthias; Nieradzik, Lars P.; Harman, Ian N.

    2016-09-01

    CABLE is a global land surface model, which has been used extensively in offline and coupled simulations. While CABLE performs well in comparison with other land surface models, results are impacted by decoupling of transpiration and photosynthesis fluxes under drying soil conditions, often leading to implausibly high water use efficiencies. Here, we present a solution to this problem, ensuring that modelled transpiration is always consistent with modelled photosynthesis, while introducing a parsimonious single-parameter drought response function which is coupled to root water uptake. We further improve CABLE's simulation of coupled soil-canopy processes by introducing an alternative hydrology model with a physically accurate representation of coupled energy and water fluxes at the soil-air interface, including a more realistic formulation of transfer under atmospherically stable conditions within the canopy and in the presence of leaf litter. The effects of these model developments are assessed using data from 18 stations from the global eddy covariance FLUXNET database, selected to span a large climatic range. Marked improvements are demonstrated, with root mean squared errors for monthly latent heat fluxes and water use efficiencies being reduced by 40 %. Results highlight the important roles of deep soil moisture in mediating drought response and litter in dampening soil evaporation.

  5. Out-coupling membrane for large-size organic light-emitting panels with high efficiency and improved uniformity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Lei; Wang, Lu-Wei; Zhou, Lei; Zhang, Fang-hui

    2016-12-01

    An out-coupling membrane embedded with a scattering film of SiO2 spheres and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) plastic was successfully developed for 150 × 150 mm2 green OLEDs. Comparing with a reference OLED panel, an approximately 1-fold enhancement in the forward emission was obtained with an out-coupling membrane adhered to the surface of the external glass substrate of the panel. Moreover, it was verified that the emission color at different viewing angles can be stabilized without apparent spectral distortion. Particularly, the uniformity of the large-area OLEDs was greatly improved. Theoretical calculation clarified that the improved performance of the lighting panels is primarily attributed to the effect of particle scattering.

  6. A New Model of Orbital Pacing for Pliocene Glaciations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbert, T.; Dowsett, H. J.; Caballero-Gill, R. P.

    2015-12-01

    The earth's climate system has gone through major changes over time that serve as natural experiments to test our understanding of linkages and feedbacks that may come into play if the Earth continues to warm, as expected from greenhouse gas forcing. Our project investigates patterns of climate change between the northern and southern hemispheres during the mid-Pliocene epoch (~3-4 Myr ago) when the overall climate state was warmer than today. Critically, evidence suggests that the amount of ice on Antarctica was similar to today, but that there was little or no permanent ice on land in the northern hemisphere. Most climate scientists have therefore supposed that orbitally-paced climate change would initiate in the region around the Antarctic, and be driven primarily by the 41,000 year obliquity cycle. Using distributed data sets on both sea surface temperature and the combination of deep sea temperature and global ice volume recorded by ð18O, we find a pervasive influence of eccentricity/precession on Pliocene paleoclimate that has been under-appreciated. We tentatively constrain the phase of the climate response by calibrating temperature patterns to the precessional "clock" of the Mediterranean sapropel sequence. Large Pliocene glacial events were paced by precession, and coincide with minimum northern hemisphere summer insolation. This mode is in many ways the opposite of the late Pleistocene, where climate positively follows the envelope of northern hemisphere precession. In the Pliocene case, glacial periods instead followed the lower envelope of precession and nodes of low precessional variance supported peak interglacial conditions. The observations can be explained by positing that during the warmer Pliocene, the high latitudes of the northern hemisphere could only support cryosphere expansion during times of minimal summer insolation. While the presence of ice-rafted debris in the North Atlantic and North Pacific unambiguously confirm a northern

  7. Altering embryonic cardiac dynamics with optical pacing.

    PubMed

    Peterson, L M; McPheeters, M; Barwick, L; Gu, S; Rollins, A M; Jenkins, M W

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have shown that altering blood flow early in development leads to congenital heart defects. In these studies the perturbations to hemodynamics were very gross manipulations (vessel ligation, conotruncal banding, etc.) that would be inappropriate for probing the delicate mechanisms responsible for mechanically-transduced signaling. Also, these perturbations lacked feedback from a monitoring system to determine the exact degree of alteration and the location of its effect. Here, we employed optical pacing (OP) to alter the heart rate in quail embryos and optical coherence tomography (OCT) to measure the resultant shear forces on the endocardium. OP is a new technique utilizing pulsed 1.851 µm infrared laser light to noninvasively capture the heart rate to the pulse frequency of the laser without the use of exogenous agents. To measure shear stress on the endocardium, we extended our previous OCT algorithms to enable the production of 4-D shear maps. 4-D shear maps allowed observation of the spatial and temporal distribution of shear stress. Employing both OCT and OP, we were able to develop perturbation protocols that increase regurgitant flow and greatly modify the oscillatory shear index (OSI) in a region of the heart tube where future valves will develop. Regurgitant flow has been linked with valve development and precise perturbations may allow one to determine the role of hemodynamics in valvulogenesis.

  8. Pushing the Pace of Tree Species Migration

    PubMed Central

    Lazarus, Eli D.; McGill, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    Plants and animals have responded to past climate changes by migrating with habitable environments, sometimes shifting the boundaries of their geographic ranges by tens of kilometers per year or more. Species migrating in response to present climate conditions, however, must contend with landscapes fragmented by anthropogenic disturbance. We consider this problem in the context of wind-dispersed tree species. Mechanisms of long-distance seed dispersal make these species capable of rapid migration rates. Models of species-front migration suggest that even tree species with the capacity for long-distance dispersal will be unable to keep pace with future spatial changes in temperature gradients, exclusive of habitat fragmentation effects. Here we present a numerical model that captures the salient dynamics of migration by long-distance dispersal for a generic tree species. We then use the model to explore the possible effects of assisted colonization within a fragmented landscape under a simulated tree-planting scheme. Our results suggest that an assisted-colonization program could accelerate species-front migration rates enough to match the speed of climate change, but such a program would involve an environmental-sustainability intervention at a massive scale. PMID:25162663

  9. Interaction between spiral and paced waves in cardiac tissue

    PubMed Central

    Agladze, Konstantin; Kay, Matthew W.; Krinsky, Valentin; Sarvazyan, Narine

    2010-01-01

    For prevention of lethal arrhythmias, patients at risk receive implantable cardioverter-defibrillators, which use high-frequency antitachycardia pacing (ATP) to convert tachycardias to a normal rhythm. One of the suggested ATP mechanisms involves paced-induced drift of rotating waves followed by their collision with the boundary of excitable tissue. This study provides direct experimental evidence of this mechanism. In monolayers of neonatal rat cardiomyocytes in which rotating waves of activity were initiated by premature stimuli, we used the Ca2+-sensitive indicator fluo 4 to observe propagating wave patterns. The interaction of the spiral tip with a paced wave was then monitored at a high spatial resolution. In the course of the experiments, we observed spiral wave pinning to local heterogeneities within the myocyte layer. High-frequency pacing led, in a majority of cases, to successful termination of spiral activity. Our data show that 1) stable spiral waves in cardiac monolayers tend to be pinned to local heterogeneities or areas of altered conduction, 2) overdrive pacing can shift a rotating wave from its original site, and 3) the wave break, formed as a result of interaction between the spiral tip and a paced wave front, moves by a paced-induced drift mechanism to an area where it may become unstable or collide with a boundary. The data were complemented by numerical simulations, which was used to further analyze experimentally observed behavior. PMID:17384124

  10. Interaction between spiral and paced waves in cardiac tissue.

    PubMed

    Agladze, Konstantin; Kay, Matthew W; Krinsky, Valentin; Sarvazyan, Narine

    2007-07-01

    For prevention of lethal arrhythmias, patients at risk receive implantable cardioverter-defibrillators, which use high-frequency antitachycardia pacing (ATP) to convert tachycardias to a normal rhythm. One of the suggested ATP mechanisms involves paced-induced drift of rotating waves followed by their collision with the boundary of excitable tissue. This study provides direct experimental evidence of this mechanism. In monolayers of neonatal rat cardiomyocytes in which rotating waves of activity were initiated by premature stimuli, we used the Ca(2+)-sensitive indicator fluo 4 to observe propagating wave patterns. The interaction of the spiral tip with a paced wave was then monitored at a high spatial resolution. In the course of the experiments, we observed spiral wave pinning to local heterogeneities within the myocyte layer. High-frequency pacing led, in a majority of cases, to successful termination of spiral activity. Our data show that 1) stable spiral waves in cardiac monolayers tend to be pinned to local heterogeneities or areas of altered conduction, 2) overdrive pacing can shift a rotating wave from its original site, and 3) the wave break, formed as a result of interaction between the spiral tip and a paced wave front, moves by a paced-induced drift mechanism to an area where it may become unstable or collide with a boundary. The data were complemented by numerical simulations, which was used to further analyze experimentally observed behavior.

  11. The road to right ventricular septal pacing: techniques and tools.

    PubMed

    Mond, Harry G

    2010-07-01

    Prolonged right ventricular (RV) apical pacing is associated with progressive left ventricular dysfunction due to dysynchronous ventricular activation and contraction. RV septal pacing allows a narrower QRS compared to RV apical pacing, which might reflect a more physiological and synchronous ventricular activation. Previous clinical studies, which did not consistently achieve RV septal pacing, were not confirmatory and need to be repeated. This review summarizes the anatomy of the RV septum, the radiographic appearances of pacing leads in the RV, the electrocardiograph correlates of RV septal lead positioning, and the techniques and tools required for implantation of an active-fixation lead onto the RV septum. Using the described techniques and tools, conventional active-fixation leads can now be reliably secured to either the RV outflow tract septum or mid-RV septum with very low complication rates and good long-term performance. Even though physiologic and hemodynamic studies on true RV septal pacing have not been completed, the detrimental effects of long-term RV apical pacing are significant enough to suggest that it is now time to leave the RV apex and secure all RV leads onto the septum.

  12. 42 CFR 460.24 - Limit on number of PACE program agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Organization Application and Waiver Process § 460.24 Limit on number...

  13. 42 CFR 460.24 - Limit on number of PACE program agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Organization Application and Waiver Process § 460.24 Limit on number...

  14. 42 CFR 460.24 - Limit on number of PACE program agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Organization Application and Waiver Process § 460.24 Limit on number...

  15. 42 CFR 460.24 - Limit on number of PACE program agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Organization Application and Waiver Process § 460.24 Limit on number...

  16. Improved simulation of tropospheric ozone by a global-multi-regional two-way coupling model system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yingying; Lin, Jintai; Chen, Jinxuan; Hu, Lu

    2016-02-01

    from 0.53 to 0.68, and it reduces the mean model bias from 10.8 to 6.7 ppb. Regionally, the coupled system reduces the bias by 4.6 ppb over Europe, 3.9 ppb over North America and 3.1 ppb over other regions. The two-way coupling brings O3 vertical profiles much closer to the HIPPO (for remote areas) and MOZAIC (for polluted regions) data, reducing the tropospheric (0-9 km) mean bias by 3-10 ppb at most MOZAIC sites and by 5.3 ppb for HIPPO profiles. The two-way coupled simulation also reduces the global tropospheric column ozone by 3.0 DU (9.5 %, annual mean), bringing them closer to the OMI data in all seasons. Additionally, the two-way coupled simulation also reduces the global tropospheric mean hydroxyl radical by 5 % with improved estimates of methyl chloroform and methane lifetimes. Simulation improvements are more significant in the Northern Hemisphere, and are mainly driven by improved representation of spatial inhomogeneity in chemistry/emissions. Within the nested domains, the two-way coupled simulation reduces surface ozone biases relative to typical GEOS-Chem one-way nested simulations, due to much improved LBCs. The bias reduction is 1-7 times the bias reduction from the global to the one-way nested simulation. Improving model representations of small-scale processes is important for understanding the global and regional tropospheric chemistry.

  17. Improved validation of IDP ensembles by one-bond Cα-Hα scalar couplings.

    PubMed

    Gapsys, Vytautas; Narayanan, Raghavendran L; Xiang, ShengQi; de Groot, Bert L; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2015-11-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are best described by ensembles of conformations and a variety of approaches have been developed to determine IDP ensembles. Because of the large number of conformations, however, cross-validation of the determined ensembles by independent experimental data is crucial. The (1)JCαHα coupling constant is particularly suited for cross-validation, because it has a large magnitude and mostly depends on the often less accessible dihedral angle ψ. Here, we reinvestigated the connection between (1)JCαHα values and protein backbone dihedral angles. We show that accurate amino-acid specific random coil values of the (1)JCαHα coupling constant, in combination with a reparameterized empirical Karplus-type equation, allow for reliable cross-validation of molecular ensembles of IDPs.

  18. G protein-coupled receptors: signalling and regulation by lipid agonists for improved glucose homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Moran, Brian M; Flatt, Peter R; McKillop, Aine M

    2016-04-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play a pivotal role in cell signalling, controlling many processes such as immunity, growth, cellular differentiation, neurological pathways and hormone secretions. Fatty acid agonists are increasingly recognised as having a key role in the regulation of glucose homoeostasis via stimulation of islet and gastrointestinal GPCRs. Downstream cell signalling results in modulation of the biosynthesis, secretion, proliferation and anti-apoptotic pathways of islet and enteroendocrine cells. GPR40 and GPR120 are activated by long-chain fatty acids (>C12) with both receptors coupling to the Gαq subunit that activates the Ca(2+)-dependent pathway. GPR41 and GPR43 are stimulated by short-chain fatty acids (C2-C5), and activation results in binding to Gαi that inhibits the adenylyl cyclase pathway attenuating cAMP production. In addition, GPR43 also couples to the Gαq subunit augmenting intracellular Ca(2+) and activating phospholipase C. GPR55 is specific for cannabinoid endogenous agonists (endocannabinoids) and non-cannabinoid fatty acids, which couples to Gα12/13 and Gαq proteins, leading to enhancing intracellular Ca(2+), extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK) phosphorylation and Rho kinase. GPR119 is activated by fatty acid ethanolamides and binds to Gαs utilising the adenylate cyclase pathway, which is dependent upon protein kinase A. Current research indicates that GPCR therapies may be approved for clinical use in the near future. This review focuses on the recent advances in preclinical diabetes research in the signalling and regulation of GPCRs on islet and enteroendocrine cells involved in glucose homoeostasis.

  19. Improving the Mass-Limited Performance of Routine NMR Probes using Coupled Coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsden, Brian; Lim, Victor; Taber, Bob; Zens, Albert

    2016-07-01

    We report a method to convert, on demand, a general use dual-broadband probe to a high performance mass-limited probe for both high band and low band nuclei. This technology uses magnetic coupling of inductors to achieve this capability. The method offers a cost effective way of increasing the performance of routine NMR probes without having to change probes or increase the overall foot print of the spectrometer.

  20. Improving the Mass-Limited Performance of Routine NMR Probes using Coupled Coils.

    PubMed

    Marsden, Brian; Lim, Victor; Taber, Bob; Zens, Albert

    2016-07-01

    We report a method to convert, on demand, a general use dual-broadband probe to a high performance mass-limited probe for both high band and low band nuclei. This technology uses magnetic coupling of inductors to achieve this capability. The method offers a cost effective way of increasing the performance of routine NMR probes without having to change probes or increase the overall foot print of the spectrometer.

  1. Improving the physics of a coupled physical biogeochemical model of the North Atlantic through data assimilation: Impact on the ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berline, Léo; Brankart, Jean-Michel; Brasseur, Pierre; Ourmières, Yann; Verron, Jacques

    2007-01-01

    Several studies on coupled physical-biogeochemical models have shown that major deficiencies in the biogeochemical fields arise from the deficiencies in the physical flow fields. This paper examines the improvement of the physics through data assimilation, and the subsequent impact on the ecosystem response in a coupled model of the North Atlantic. Sea surface temperature and sea surface height data are assimilated with a sequential method based on the SEEK filter adapted to the coupling needs. The model domain covers the Atlantic from 20°S to 70°N at eddy-permitting resolution. The biogeochemical model is a NPZD-DOM model based on the P3ZD formulation. The results of an annual assimilated simulation are compared with an annual free simulation. With assimilation, the representation of the mixed layer depth is significantly improved in mid latitudes, even though the mixed layer depth is generally overestimated compared to the observations. The representation of the mean and variance of the currents is also significantly improved. The nutrient input in the euphotic zone is used to assess the data assimilation impact on the ecosystem. Data assimilation results in a 50% reduction of the input due to vertical mixing in mid-latitudes, and in a four- to six-fold increase of the advective fluxes in mid-latitudes and subtropics. Averaged zonally, the net impact is a threefold increase for the subtropical gyre, and a moderate (20-30%) decrease at mid and high latitudes. Surface chlorophyll concentration increases along the subtropical gyre borders, but little changes are detected at mid and high latitudes. An increase of the primary production appears along the Gulf Stream path, but it represents only 12% on average for mid and high latitudes. In the subtropical gyre centre, primary production is augmented but stays underestimated (20% of observations). These experiments show the benefits of physical data assimilation in coupled physical-biogeochemical applications.

  2. Studies on the coupling transformer to improve the performance of microwave ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, Anuraag E-mail: vspandit12@gmail.com Pandit, V. S. E-mail: vspandit12@gmail.com

    2014-06-15

    A 2.45 GHz microwave ion source has been developed and installed at the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre to produce high intensity proton beam. It is operational and has already produced more than 12 mA of proton beam with just 350 W of microwave power. In order to optimize the coupling of microwave power to the plasma, a maximally flat matching transformer has been used. In this paper, we first describe an analytical method to design the matching transformer and then present the results of rigorous simulation performed using ANSYS HFSS code to understand the effect of different parameters on the transformed impedance and reflection and transmission coefficients. Based on the simulation results, we have chosen two different coupling transformers which are double ridged waveguides with ridge widths of 24 mm and 48 mm. We have fabricated these transformers and performed experiments to study the influence of these transformers on the coupling of microwave to plasma and extracted beam current from the ion source.

  3. Studies on the coupling transformer to improve the performance of microwave ion source.

    PubMed

    Misra, Anuraag; Pandit, V S

    2014-06-01

    A 2.45 GHz microwave ion source has been developed and installed at the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre to produce high intensity proton beam. It is operational and has already produced more than 12 mA of proton beam with just 350 W of microwave power. In order to optimize the coupling of microwave power to the plasma, a maximally flat matching transformer has been used. In this paper, we first describe an analytical method to design the matching transformer and then present the results of rigorous simulation performed using ANSYS HFSS code to understand the effect of different parameters on the transformed impedance and reflection and transmission coefficients. Based on the simulation results, we have chosen two different coupling transformers which are double ridged waveguides with ridge widths of 24 mm and 48 mm. We have fabricated these transformers and performed experiments to study the influence of these transformers on the coupling of microwave to plasma and extracted beam current from the ion source.

  4. The Use of Organic Coupling Agents to Improve the Durability of Steel/epoxy Joints in the Presence of Moisture.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denicola, Anthony John, Jr.

    Despite the unique combination of properties epoxy resins possess, their versatility for structural bonding of metal substrates has not been fully utilized. The use of epoxy resins (and in general all adhesives) has been limited to non-load bearing or low load bearing applications. One of the primary reasons is the bond sensitivity of these resins to water or to high humidity. Recognizing this limitation, this study was undertaken with the goal of developing organic coupling agents which will chemically bond to the surface of steel via a chelate bond. B-diketone coupling agents were synthesized and tested. The coupling agents were applied from organic solution to the surface of a modified napkin ring torsion joint. The joints were bonded with epoxy resin adhesives and water immersed. The bond durability of the adhesive system was determined by subjecting the joints to a shear load. An ammonium citrate pretreatment was developed for use with the B-diketone agents. Optimization studies of the citrate pretreatment and coupling agent concentration were undertaken. The B-diketone coupling agents significantly improved the bond durability of low temperature cured epoxy systems. Polyfunctional mercaptoester coupling agents were also synthesized and evaluated. The effect of functionality, ring size, citrate pretreatment, and atmosphere on bond durability were examined. The mercaptoesters were found to be far superior to the B-diketones in improving bond durability. Low temperature and high temperature cured resins were examined. XPS analysis of 1018 steel treated with the mercaptoesters indicates the formation of polymeric coupling agent layers, approximately 100 (ANGSTROM) thick, on the steel surface. The results also indicate chelate bonding to the steel surface. A two step strength decay curve is observed for the mercaptoester treated systems, irrespective of the mercaptoester or the curing agent used. Plasticization of the mercaptoester layer at the early stages of

  5. Fast Paced, Low Cost Projects at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson-Morgan, Lisa; Clinton, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    What does an orbiting microsatellite, a robotic lander and a ruggedized camera and telescope have in common? They are all fast paced, low cost projects managed by Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) teamed with successful industry partners. MSFC has long been synonymous with human space flight large propulsion programs, engineering acumen and risk intolerance. However, there is a growing portfolio/product line within MSFC that focuses on these smaller, fast paced projects. While launching anything into space is expensive, using a managed risk posture, holding to schedule and keeping costs low by stopping at egood enough f were key elements to their success. Risk is defined as the possibility of loss or failure per Merriam Webster. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) defines risk using procedural requirement 8705.4 and establishes eclasses f to discern the acceptable risk per a project. It states a Class D risk has a medium to significant risk of not achieving mission success. MSFC, along with industry partners, has created a niche in Class D efforts. How did the big, cautious MSFC succeed on these projects that embodied the antithesis of its heritage in human space flight? A key factor toward these successful projects was innovative industry partners such as Dynetics Corporation, University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAHuntsville), Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU APL), Teledyne Brown Engineering (TBE), Von Braun Center for Science and Innovation (VCSI), SAIC, and Jacobs. Fast Affordable Satellite Technology (FastSat HSV01) is a low earth orbit microsatellite that houses six instruments with the primary scientific objective of earth observation and technology demonstration. The team was comprised of Dynetics, UAHuntsvile, SAIC, Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and VCSI with the United States Air Force Space Test Program as the customer. The team completed design, development, manufacturing, environmental test and integration in

  6. An improvement in mass flux convective parameterizations and its impact on seasonal simulations using a coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsayed Yousef, Ahmed; Ehsan, M. Azhar; Almazroui, Mansour; Assiri, Mazen E.; Al-Khalaf, Abdulrahman K.

    2015-11-01

    A new closure and a modified detrainment for the simplified Arakawa-Schubert (SAS) cumulus parameterization scheme are proposed. In the modified convective scheme which is named as King Abdulaziz University (KAU) scheme, the closure depends on both the buoyancy force and the environment mean relative humidity. A lateral entrainment rate varying with environment relative humidity is proposed and tends to suppress convection in a dry atmosphere. The detrainment rate also varies with environment relative humidity. The KAU scheme has been tested in a single column model (SCM) and implemented in a coupled global climate model (CGCM). Increased coupling between environment and clouds in the KAU scheme results in improved sensitivity of the depth and strength of convection to environmental humidity compared to the original SAS scheme. The new scheme improves precipitation simulation with better representations of moisture and temperature especially during suppressed convection periods. The KAU scheme implemented in the Seoul National University (SNU) CGCM shows improved precipitation over the tropics. The simulated precipitation pattern over the Arabian Peninsula and Northeast African region is also improved.

  7. An improvement in mass flux convective parameterizations and its impact on seasonal simulations using a coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsayed Yousef, Ahmed; Ehsan, M. Azhar; Almazroui, Mansour; Assiri, Mazen E.; Al-Khalaf, Abdulrahman K.

    2017-02-01

    A new closure and a modified detrainment for the simplified Arakawa-Schubert (SAS) cumulus parameterization scheme are proposed. In the modified convective scheme which is named as King Abdulaziz University (KAU) scheme, the closure depends on both the buoyancy force and the environment mean relative humidity. A lateral entrainment rate varying with environment relative humidity is proposed and tends to suppress convection in a dry atmosphere. The detrainment rate also varies with environment relative humidity. The KAU scheme has been tested in a single column model (SCM) and implemented in a coupled global climate model (CGCM). Increased coupling between environment and clouds in the KAU scheme results in improved sensitivity of the depth and strength of convection to environmental humidity compared to the original SAS scheme. The new scheme improves precipitation simulation with better representations of moisture and temperature especially during suppressed convection periods. The KAU scheme implemented in the Seoul National University (SNU) CGCM shows improved precipitation over the tropics. The simulated precipitation pattern over the Arabian Peninsula and Northeast African region is also improved.

  8. Non-invasive cardiac pacing with image-guided focused ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Marquet, Fabrice; Bour, Pierre; Vaillant, Fanny; Amraoui, Sana; Dubois, Rémi; Ritter, Philippe; Haïssaguerre, Michel; Hocini, Mélèze; Bernus, Olivier; Quesson, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Currently, no non-invasive cardiac pacing device acceptable for prolonged use in conscious patients exists. High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) can be used to perform remote pacing using reversibility of electromechanical coupling of cardiomyocytes. Here we described an extracorporeal cardiac stimulation device and study its efficacy and safety. We conducted experiments ex vivo and in vivo in a large animal model (pig) to evaluate clinical potential of such a technique. The stimulation threshold was determined in 10 different ex vivo hearts and different clinically relevant electrical effects such as consecutive stimulations of different heart chambers with a single ultrasonic probe, continuous pacing or the inducibility of ventricular tachycardia were shown. Using ultrasonic contrast agent, consistent cardiac stimulation was achievable in vivo for up to 1 hour sessions in 4 different animals. No damage was observed in inversion-recovery MR sequences performed in vivo in the 4 animals. Histological analysis revealed no differences between stimulated and control regions, for all ex vivo and in vivo cases. PMID:27827415

  9. Non-invasive cardiac pacing with image-guided focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquet, Fabrice; Bour, Pierre; Vaillant, Fanny; Amraoui, Sana; Dubois, Rémi; Ritter, Philippe; Haïssaguerre, Michel; Hocini, Mélèze; Bernus, Olivier; Quesson, Bruno

    2016-11-01

    Currently, no non-invasive cardiac pacing device acceptable for prolonged use in conscious patients exists. High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) can be used to perform remote pacing using reversibility of electromechanical coupling of cardiomyocytes. Here we described an extracorporeal cardiac stimulation device and study its efficacy and safety. We conducted experiments ex vivo and in vivo in a large animal model (pig) to evaluate clinical potential of such a technique. The stimulation threshold was determined in 10 different ex vivo hearts and different clinically relevant electrical effects such as consecutive stimulations of different heart chambers with a single ultrasonic probe, continuous pacing or the inducibility of ventricular tachycardia were shown. Using ultrasonic contrast agent, consistent cardiac stimulation was achievable in vivo for up to 1 hour sessions in 4 different animals. No damage was observed in inversion-recovery MR sequences performed in vivo in the 4 animals. Histological analysis revealed no differences between stimulated and control regions, for all ex vivo and in vivo cases.

  10. Continued obliquity pacing of East Asian summer precipitation after the mid-Pleistocene transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tao; Liu, Fei; Abels, Hemmo A.; You, Chen-Feng; Zhang, Zeke; Chen, Jun; Ji, Junfeng; Li, Laifeng; Li, Le; Liu, Hou-Chun; Ren, Chao; Xia, Renyuan; Zhao, Liang; Zhang, Wenfang; Li, Gaojun

    2017-01-01

    Records from natural archives show that the strength of the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) strongly depends on the orbital configuration of the Earth. However, the dominant orbital cycles driving EASM have been found to be spatially different. Speleothem stable oxygen isotopic records from southern China, which are believed to reflect large-scale changes in the Asian monsoon system, are dominated by climatic precession cycles. Further north, on the Chinese Loess Plateau (CLP), loess-and-paleosol sequences, which are argued to be controlled by monsoon intensity, are in pace with global ice volume changes dominated by obliquity, and after the mid-Pleistocene transition by 100-kyr cycles. To understand these critical discrepancies, here we apply a novel proxy based on the trace metal compositions of pedogenic carbonate in the eolian deposits on the CLP to reconstruct summer precipitation over the last 1.5 million years. Our reconstructions show that summer precipitation on the CLP is dominantly forced by obliquity not in pace with the ice-volume-imprinted loess-paleosol sequences before and after the mid-Pleistocene transition or with the precession-paced speleothem oxygen isotopic records. Coupled with climate model results, we suggest that the obliquity-driven variations of summer precipitation may originate from the gradient of boreal insolation that modulates the thermal contrast between the Asian continent and surrounding oceans.

  11. Chemical coupling of thiolated chitosan to preformed liposomes improves mucoadhesive properties

    PubMed Central

    Gradauer, Kerstin; Vonach, Caroline; Leitinger, Gerd; Kolb, Dagmar; Fröhlich, Eleonore; Roblegg, Eva; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas; Prassl, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Aim To develop mucoadhesive liposomes by anchoring the polymer chitosan-thioglycolic acid (chitosan-TGA) to the liposomal surface to target intestinal mucosal membranes. Methods Liposomes consisting of phosphatidylcholine (POPC) and a maleimide-functionalized lipid were incubated with chitosan-TGA, leading to the formation of a thioether bond between free SH-groups of the polymer and maleimide groups of the liposome. Uncoated and newly generated thiomer-coated liposomes were characterized according to their size, zeta potential, and morphology using photon correlation spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The release behavior of calcitonin and the fluorophore/quencher-couple ANTS/DPX (8-aminonaphthalene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid/p-xylene-bis- pyridinium bromide) from coated and uncoated liposomes, was investigated over 24 hours in simulated gastric and intestinal fluids. To test the mucoadhesive properties of thiomer-coated and uncoated liposomes in-vitro, we used freshly excised porcine small intestine. Results Liposomes showed a concentration-dependent increase in size – from approximately 167 nm for uncoated liposomes to 439 nm for the highest thiomer concentration used in this study. Likewise, their zeta potentials gradually increased from about −38 mV to +20 mV, clearly indicating an effective coupling of chitosan-TGA to the surface of liposomes. As a result of mucoadhesion tests, we found an almost two-fold increase in the mucoadhesion of coupled liposomes relative to uncoupled ones. With fluorescence microscopy, we saw a tight adherence of coated particles to the intestinal mucus. Conclusion Taken together, our current results indicate that thiomer-coated liposomes possess a high potential to be used as an oral drug-delivery system. PMID:22679365

  12. Work-family enrichment among dual-earner couples: can work improve our family life?

    PubMed

    Dunn, Marianne G; O'Brien, Karen M

    2013-10-01

    The extent to which resources generated at work and positive affect were associated with enrichment in the family domain among 107 dual-earner couples was investigated. Grounded in work-family enrichment theory (Greenhaus & Powell, 2006), this study examined the indirect effect of workplace organizational support on family satisfaction through positive affect at work. Organizational support for work-family management was associated with positive affect at work for both women and men, and positive affect at work was related to family satisfaction for women. One interpersonal effect emerged: women's positive affect at work was associated with family satisfaction for men. Implications for theory, practice, research, and workplace policy are discussed.

  13. AV delay optimization and management of DDD paced patients with dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Guardigli, G; Ansani, L; Percoco, G F; Toselli, T; Spisani, P; Braggion, G; Antonioli, G E

    1994-11-01

    Ten DDD paced patients, suffering from dilated cardiomyopathy in the NYHA functional classes III or IV were studied by means of Doppler echocardiography at different programmed values of atrioventricular (AV) delay (200, 150, 120, 100, and 80 msec). The following variables were evaluated: LV diameter, ejection fraction, mitral and aortic flow velocity integrals, and stroke volume. During VDD pacing, a resting AV delay associated with the best diastolic filling and systolic function was identified and programmed individually. Shortening of the AV delay to about 100 msec was associated with a gradual and progressive improvement. Further decrease caused an impairment of systolic function. The patients were clinically and hemodynamically reevaluated after 2 months of follow-up. A reduction of NYHA class and an improvement of LV function were consistently found. The reported data suggest that programming of an optimal AV delay may improve myocardial function in DDD paced patients with congestive heart failure. This result may be the consequence of an optimization of left ventricular filling and a better use of the Frank-Starling law.

  14. Using Individualized Self-Paced Instruction When Teaching Elementary Accounting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Glenna D.; Echord, Barbara S.

    1981-01-01

    A study was conducted to see if junior college and high school students do as well in learning elementary accounting through an individualized self-paced approach as through the traditional teacher-led method. (CT)

  15. 42 CFR 460.180 - Medicare payment to PACE organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE... risk adjustment model. (5) CMS may adjust the monthly capitation amount to take into account...

  16. Critical role of inhomogeneities in pacing termination of cardiac reentry.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sitabhra; Stein, Kenneth M.; Christini, David J.

    2002-09-01

    Reentry around nonconducting ventricular scar tissue, a cause of lethal arrhythmias, is typically treated by rapid electrical stimulation from an implantable cardioverter defibrillator. However, the dynamical mechanisms of termination (success and failure) are poorly understood. To elucidate such mechanisms, we study the dynamics of pacing in one- and two-dimensional models of anatomical reentry. In a crucial realistic difference from previous studies of such systems, we have placed the pacing site away from the reentry circuit. Our model-independent results suggest that with such off-circuit pacing, the existence of inhomogeneity in the reentry circuit is essential for successful termination of tachycardia under certain conditions. Considering the critical role of such inhomogeneities may lead to more effective pacing algorithms. (c) 2002 American Institute of Physics.

  17. Critical role of inhomogeneities in pacing termination of cardiac reentry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Sitabhra; Stein, Kenneth M.; Christini, David J.

    2002-09-01

    Reentry around nonconducting ventricular scar tissue, a cause of lethal arrhythmias, is typically treated by rapid electrical stimulation from an implantable cardioverter defibrillator. However, the dynamical mechanisms of termination (success and failure) are poorly understood. To elucidate such mechanisms, we study the dynamics of pacing in one- and two-dimensional models of anatomical reentry. In a crucial realistic difference from previous studies of such systems, we have placed the pacing site away from the reentry circuit. Our model-independent results suggest that with such off-circuit pacing, the existence of inhomogeneity in the reentry circuit is essential for successful termination of tachycardia under certain conditions. Considering the critical role of such inhomogeneities may lead to more effective pacing algorithms.

  18. The PACES Summer Science Trek: A Pre-College Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michelle B.

    1997-01-01

    The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) received five-year funding to form the Pan American Center for Earth and Environmental Studies (PACES) in July 1995. PACES has as its goals to conduct research contributing to NASA's Mission to Planet Earth and to develop skilled scientists and engineers. PACES seeks to gain a more comprehensive understanding of geological, ecological and environmental processes and changes taking place in the southwestern United States and northern Mexico region. The PACES center has collaborative ties with two NASA field center (Goddard Space Flight Center and Ames Research Center) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The original proposal contained no provision for outreach programs. However, at a meeting in the fall of 1995, Dan Goldin, NASA Administrator, issued the challenge that in order to accomplish NASA's goals to educate more of the citizenry in science and engineering, the Centers should take a broader perspective aimed at younger children.

  19. Surface plasmon coupling dynamics in InGaN/GaN quantum-well structures and radiative efficiency improvement

    PubMed Central

    Fadil, Ahmed; Iida, Daisuke; Chen, Yuntian; Ma, Jun; Ou, Yiyu; Petersen, Paul Michael; Ou, Haiyan

    2014-01-01

    Surface plasmonics from metal nanoparticles have been demonstrated as an effective way of improving the performance of low-efficiency light emitters. However, reducing the inherent losses of the metal nanoparticles remains a challenge. Here we study the enhancement properties by Ag nanoparticles for InGaN/GaN quantum-well structures. By using a thin SiN dielectric layer between Ag and GaN we manage to modify and improve surface plasmon coupling effects, and we attribute this to the improved scattering of the nanoparticles at the quantum-well emission wavelength. The results are interpreted using numerical simulations, where absorption and scattering cross-sections are studied for different sized particles on GaN and GaN/SiN substrates. PMID:25242090

  20. Testing cloud microphysics parameterizations in NCAR CAM5 with ISDAC and M-PACE observations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu X.; Lin W.; Xie, S.; Boyle, J.; Klein, S. A.; Shi, X.; Wang, Z.; Ghan, S. J.; Earle, M.; Liu, P. S. K.; Zelenyuk, A.

    2011-12-24

    Arctic clouds simulated by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5) are evaluated with observations from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) and Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), which were conducted at its North Slope of Alaska site in April 2008 and October 2004, respectively. Model forecasts for the Arctic spring and fall seasons performed under the Cloud-Associated Parameterizations Testbed framework generally reproduce the spatial distributions of cloud fraction for single-layer boundary-layer mixed-phase stratocumulus and multilayer or deep frontal clouds. However, for low-level stratocumulus, the model significantly underestimates the observed cloud liquid water content in both seasons. As a result, CAM5 significantly underestimates the surface downward longwave radiative fluxes by 20-40 W m{sup -2}. Introducing a new ice nucleation parameterization slightly improves the model performance for low-level mixed-phase clouds by increasing cloud liquid water content through the reduction of the conversion rate from cloud liquid to ice by the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen process. The CAM5 single-column model testing shows that changing the instantaneous freezing temperature of rain to form snow from -5 C to -40 C causes a large increase in modeled cloud liquid water content through the slowing down of cloud liquid and rain-related processes (e.g., autoconversion of cloud liquid to rain). The underestimation of aerosol concentrations in CAM5 in the Arctic also plays an important role in the low bias of cloud liquid water in the single-layer mixed-phase clouds. In addition, numerical issues related to the coupling of model physics and time stepping in CAM5 are responsible for the model biases and will be explored in future studies.

  1. The impact of the perception of rhythmic music on self-paced oscillatory movements.

    PubMed

    Peckel, Mathieu; Pozzo, Thierry; Bigand, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Inspired by theories of perception-action coupling and embodied music cognition, we investigated how rhythmic music perception impacts self-paced oscillatory movements. In a pilot study, we examined the kinematic parameters of self-paced oscillatory movements, walking and finger tapping using optical motion capture. In accordance with biomechanical constraints accounts of motion, we found that movements followed a hierarchical organization depending on the proximal/distal characteristic of the limb used. Based on these findings, we were interested in knowing how and when the perception of rhythmic music could resonate with the motor system in the context of these constrained oscillatory movements. In order to test this, we conducted an experiment where participants performed four different effector-specific movements (lower leg, whole arm and forearm oscillation and finger tapping) while rhythmic music was playing in the background. Musical stimuli consisted of computer-generated MIDI musical pieces with a 4/4 metrical structure. The musical tempo of each song increased from 60 BPM to 120 BPM by 6 BPM increments. A specific tempo was maintained for 20 s before a 2 s transition to the higher tempo. The task of the participant was to maintain a comfortable pace for the four movements (self-paced) while not paying attention to the music. No instruction on whether to synchronize with the music was given. Results showed that participants were distinctively influenced by the background music depending on the movement used with the tapping task being consistently the most influenced. Furthermore, eight strategies put in place by participants to cope with the task were unveiled. Despite not instructed to do so, participants also occasionally synchronized with music. Results are discussed in terms of the link between perception and action (i.e., motor/perceptual resonance). In general, our results give support to the notion that rhythmic music is processed in a motoric

  2. The Efficacy of Self-Paced Study in Multitrial Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Jonge, Mario; Tabbers, Huib K.; Pecher, Diane; Jang, Yoonhee; Zeelenberg, René

    2015-01-01

    In 2 experiments we investigated the efficacy of self-paced study in multitrial learning. In Experiment 1, native speakers of English studied lists of Dutch-English word pairs under 1 of 4 imposed fixed presentation rate conditions (24 × 1 s, 12 × 2 s, 6 × 4 s, or 3 × 8 s) and a self-paced study condition. Total study time per list was equated for…

  3. Feasibility of Leadless Cardiac Pacing Using Injectable Magnetic Microparticles

    PubMed Central

    Rotenberg, Menahem Y.; Gabay, Hovav; Etzion, Yoram; Cohen, Smadar

    2016-01-01

    A noninvasive, effective approach for immediate and painless heart pacing would have invaluable implications in several clinical scenarios. Here we present a novel strategy that utilizes the well-known mechano-electric feedback of the heart to evoke cardiac pacing, while relying on magnetic microparticles as leadless mechanical stimulators. We demonstrate that after localizing intravenously-injected magnetic microparticles in the right ventricular cavity using an external electromagnet, the application of magnetic pulses generates mechanical stimulation that provokes ventricular overdrive pacing in the rat heart. This temporary pacing consistently managed to revert drug-induced bradycardia, but could only last up to several seconds in the rat model, most likely due to escape of the particles between the applied pulses using our current experimental setting. In a pig model with open chest, MEF-based pacing was induced by banging magnetic particles and has lasted for a longer time. Due to overheating of the electromagnet, we intentionally terminated the experiments after 2 min. Our results demonstrate for the first time the feasibility of external leadless temporary pacing, using injectable magnetic microparticles that are manipulated by an external electromagnet. This new approach can have important utilities in clinical settings in which immediate and painless control of cardiac rhythm is required. PMID:27091192

  4. PACE and the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA)

    SciTech Connect

    Zimring, Mark; Fuller, Merrian

    2010-03-17

    The FHFA regulates Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, and the 12 Federal Home Loan Banks (the government-sponsored enterprises - GSEs). On June 18, 2009, James B. Lockhart III, then Director of FHFA, released a letter expressing concern about the negative impact of energy loan tax assessment programs (ELTAPs) - also known as Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) programs - on both the housing finance system and homeowner program participants. Subsequently, a number of PACE proponents responded to the concerns laid out in the FHFA letter. In early Fall 2009, word circulated that FHFA was planning to follow its June letter with guidance to other agencies, possibly including Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, discouraging them from buying loans on properties subject to PACE-type assessment liens. This triggered a second round of stakeholder letters, several of which were addressed to President Obama. On October 18, 2009, the White House, in what some believe was an attempt to obviate the need for FHFA guidance, released a Policy Framework for PACE Financing Programs that outlined best practices guidance for homeowner and lender protection. As of February 2010, FHFA and the GSEs have agreed to monitor PACE programs and work with stakeholders and the Administration to consider additional guidance beyond the Policy Framework and to collect more information on PACE program efficacy and risks. A summary of the communications timeline and highlights of the communications are provided.

  5. The Pace of Perceivable Extreme Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, X.; Gan, T. Y.

    2015-12-01

    When will the signal of obvious changes in extreme climate emerge over climate variability (Time of Emergence, ToE) is a key question for planning and implementing measures to mitigate the potential impact of climate change to natural and human systems that are generally adapted to potential changes from current variability. We estimated ToEs for the magnitude, duration and frequency of global extreme climate represented by 24 extreme climate indices (16 for temperature and 8 for precipitation) with different thresholds of the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio based on projections of CMIP5 global climate models under RCP8.5 and RCP4.5 for the 21st century. The uncertainty of ToE is assessed by using 3 different methods to calculate S/N for each extreme index. Results show that ToEs of the projected extreme climate indices based on the RCP4.5 climate scenarios are generally projected to happen about 20 years later than that for the RCP8.5 climate scenarios. Under RCP8.5, the projected magnitude, duration and frequency of extreme temperature on Earth will all exceed 2 standard deviations by 2100, and the empirical 50th percentile of the global ToE for the frequency and magnitude of hot (cold) extreme are about 2040 and 2054 (2064 and 2054) for S/N > 2, respectively. The 50th percentile of global ToE for the intensity of extreme precipitation is about 2030 and 2058 for S/N >0.5 and S/N >1, respectively. We further evaluated the exposure of ecosystems and human societies to the pace of extreme climate change by determining the year of ToE for various extreme climate indices projected to occur over terrestrial biomes, marine realms and major urban areas with large populations. This was done by overlaying terrestrial, ecoregions and population maps with maps of ToE derived, to extract ToEs for these regions. Possible relationships between GDP per person and ToE are also investigated by relating the mean ToE for each country and its average value of GDP per person.

  6. Inductively Coupling Plasma (ICP) Treatment of Propylene (PP) Surface and Adhesion Improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yenchun; Fu, Yenpei

    2009-12-01

    Study on increasing the roughness of the polymer substrate surface to enhance the adhesion with the copper layer in an inductively coupling plasma (ICP) process was carried out. The microstructure of the polymer substrate surfaces, which were exposed to different kinds of plasma treatment, was identified by scanning electron microscopy(SEM) analysis, peel strength of the copper coating and water surface contact angle. The adhesion of the substrate was largely enhanced by plasma treatment and the copper deposited coating reached a value of 7.68 kgf/m in verifying the adhesion of the copper coating with polymer material. The quality of the line/space 50/50 μm produced in the laboratory was examined by the pressure cooker test and proved to meet the requirement.

  7. Instructor-paced vs. self-paced skiing modes in older recreational alpine skiers.

    PubMed

    Scheiber, Peter; Seifert, John G; Müller, Erich

    2011-04-01

    Parallel ski steering (PSS), carving in long radii (CLR), and individual technique (IT) skiing modes are mainly used throughout instructor-guided skiing of older recreational skiers. The aims of this study were (a) to determine differences in the physiologic response of older skiers to PSS, CLR, and IT skiing modes, (b) to quantify correlations between rate of perceived exertion (RPE) and the physiologic response, and (c) to analyze the relationship between aerobic capacity, skiing skills, and the blood lactate (LA) response during instructor-guided skiing. Twenty recreational skiers (61.1 ± 5.6 years) performed instructor-paced (PSS and CLR) and self-paced (IT) skiing modes. Heart rate (HR), LA, mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), and RPE were determined during skiing. Skiers skiing skills were judged by expert ski instructors. The aerobic capacity was tested by a physical work capacity test (PWC130) test. Heart rate was lower for PSS (106 ± 15 b · min(-1)), compared to CLR (118 ± 16 b · min(-1)) and IT (120 ± 15 b · min(-1)) skiing modes, both p < 0.001. Lactate levels were 1.45 ± 0.50 mmol · L(-1) for PSS, 1.67 ± 0.61 mmol · L(-1) for CLR, and 2.00 ± 0.74 mmol · L(-1) for IT skiing modes, all p < 0.004. Individual reductions in LA concentrations from 3.9 to 2.6 mmol · L were found, for IT and PSS skiing modes, respectively. No significant correlations were determined between any physiologic variable and RPE. Weak correlations were found between LA and PWC130 results (R2 < 0.114) and between LA and skiing skills (R2 < 0.132). In conclusion, significant reductions in the physiologic response were determined for PSS and CLR, compared with IT skiing modes. Instructor-paced skiing modes may minimize the risk of premature fatigue of skiers with high physiological responses. Those skiers may not perceive their disproportionate higher stress compared with skiers on the low end.

  8. Understanding Air-Sea Coupling Processes and Coupled Model Predictions Using GOTEX Measurements and COAMPS/NCOM and Aircraft Measurements for Understanding Air-Sea Coupling and Improving Coupled Model Predictions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    part of the Dynamics of the Madden- Julian Oscillation (DYNAMO) and ONR Litterol Littoral Air-Sea Processes (LASP) DRI. The objectives of the GOTEX... McCreary et al.1989). These studies have hypothesized that a fully-coupled model study of the gap outflow would be beneficial. Observations from...REFERENCES McCreary , J. P., H. S. Lee, and D. B. Enfield, 1989: The response of the coastal ocean to strong offshore winds: With

  9. Coupling Protein Side-Chain and Backbone Flexibility Improves the Re-design of Protein-Ligand Specificity.

    PubMed

    Ollikainen, Noah; de Jong, René M; Kortemme, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between small molecules and proteins play critical roles in regulating and facilitating diverse biological functions, yet our ability to accurately re-engineer the specificity of these interactions using computational approaches has been limited. One main difficulty, in addition to inaccuracies in energy functions, is the exquisite sensitivity of protein-ligand interactions to subtle conformational changes, coupled with the computational problem of sampling the large conformational search space of degrees of freedom of ligands, amino acid side chains, and the protein backbone. Here, we describe two benchmarks for evaluating the accuracy of computational approaches for re-engineering protein-ligand interactions: (i) prediction of enzyme specificity altering mutations and (ii) prediction of sequence tolerance in ligand binding sites. After finding that current state-of-the-art "fixed backbone" design methods perform poorly on these tests, we develop a new "coupled moves" design method in the program Rosetta that couples changes to protein sequence with alterations in both protein side-chain and protein backbone conformations, and allows for changes in ligand rigid-body and torsion degrees of freedom. We show significantly increased accuracy in both predicting ligand specificity altering mutations and binding site sequences. These methodological improvements should be useful for many applications of protein-ligand design. The approach also provides insights into the role of subtle conformational adjustments that enable functional changes not only in engineering applications but also in natural protein evolution.

  10. Coupling Protein Side-Chain and Backbone Flexibility Improves the Re-design of Protein-Ligand Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Ollikainen, Noah; de Jong, René M.; Kortemme, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between small molecules and proteins play critical roles in regulating and facilitating diverse biological functions, yet our ability to accurately re-engineer the specificity of these interactions using computational approaches has been limited. One main difficulty, in addition to inaccuracies in energy functions, is the exquisite sensitivity of protein–ligand interactions to subtle conformational changes, coupled with the computational problem of sampling the large conformational search space of degrees of freedom of ligands, amino acid side chains, and the protein backbone. Here, we describe two benchmarks for evaluating the accuracy of computational approaches for re-engineering protein-ligand interactions: (i) prediction of enzyme specificity altering mutations and (ii) prediction of sequence tolerance in ligand binding sites. After finding that current state-of-the-art “fixed backbone” design methods perform poorly on these tests, we develop a new “coupled moves” design method in the program Rosetta that couples changes to protein sequence with alterations in both protein side-chain and protein backbone conformations, and allows for changes in ligand rigid-body and torsion degrees of freedom. We show significantly increased accuracy in both predicting ligand specificity altering mutations and binding site sequences. These methodological improvements should be useful for many applications of protein – ligand design. The approach also provides insights into the role of subtle conformational adjustments that enable functional changes not only in engineering applications but also in natural protein evolution. PMID:26397464

  11. Improvement in magnetic field immunity of externally-coupled transcutaneous energy transmission system for a totally implantable artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takahiko; Koshiji, Kohji; Homma, Akihiko; Tatsumi, Eisuke; Taenaka, Yoshiyuki

    2008-01-01

    Transcutaneous energy transmission (TET) that uses electromagnetic induction between the external and internal coils of a transformer is the most promising method to supply driving energy to a totally implantable artificial heart without invasion. Induction-heating (IH) cookers generate magnetic flux, and if a cooker is operated near a transcutaneous transformer, the magnetic flux generated will link with the external and internal coils of the transcutaneous transformer. This will affect the performance of the TET and the artificial heart system. Hence, it is necessary to improve the magnetic field immunity of the TET system. During operation of the system, if the transcutaneous transformer is in close proximity to an IH cooker, the electric power generated by the cooker and coupled to the transformer can drive the artificial heart system. To prevent this coupling, the external coil was shielded with a conductive shield that had a slit in it. This reduces the coupling between the transformer and the magnetic field generated by the induction cooker. However, the temperature of the shield increased due to heating by eddy currents. The temperature of the shield can be reduced by separating the IH cooker and the shield.

  12. Design, synthesis, and structure-activity relationship studies of a potent PACE4 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Kwiatkowska, Anna; Couture, Frédéric; Levesque, Christine; Ly, Kévin; Desjardins, Roxane; Beauchemin, Sophie; Prahl, Adam; Lammek, Bernard; Neugebauer, Witold; Dory, Yves L; Day, Robert

    2014-01-09

    PACE4 plays an important role in the progression of prostate cancer and is an attractive target for the development of novel inhibitor-based tumor therapies. We previously reported the design and synthesis of a novel, potent, and relatively selective PACE4 inhibitor known as a Multi-Leu (ML) peptide. In the present work, we examined the ML peptide through detailed structure-activity relationship studies. A variety of ML-peptide analogues modified at the P8-P5 positions with leucine isomers (Nle, DLeu, and DNle) or substituted at the P1 position with arginine mimetics were tested for their inhibitory activity, specificity, stability, and antiproliferative effect. By incorporating d isomers at the P8 position or a decarboxylated arginine mimetic, we obtained analogues with an improved stability profile and excellent antiproliferative properties. The DLeu or DNle residue also has improved specificity toward PACE4, whereas specificity was reduced for a peptide modified with the arginine mimetic, such as 4-amidinobenzylamide.

  13. Spontaneous Velocity Effect of Musical Expression on Self-Paced Walking

    PubMed Central

    Buhmann, Jeska; Desmet, Frank; Moens, Bart; Van Dyck, Edith; Leman, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The expressive features of music can influence the velocity of walking. So far, studies used instructed (and intended) synchronization. But is this velocity effect still present with non-instructed (spontaneous) synchronization? To figure that out, participants were instructed to walk in their own comfort tempo on an indoor track, first in silence and then with tempo-matched music. We compared velocities of silence and music conditions. The results show that some music has an activating influence, increasing velocity and motivation, while other music has a relaxing influence, decreasing velocity and motivation. The influence of musical expression on the velocity of self-paced walking can be predicted with a regression model using only three sonic features explaining 56% of the variance. Phase-coherence between footfall and beat did not contribute to the velocity effect, due to its implied fixed pacing. The findings suggest that the velocity effect depends on vigor entrainment that influences both stride length and pacing. Our findings are relevant for preventing injuries, for gait improvement in walking rehabilitation, and for improving performance in sports activities. PMID:27167064

  14. Coupling the Biophysical and Social Dimensions of Wildfire Risk to Improve Wildfire Mitigation Planning.

    PubMed

    Ager, Alan A; Kline, Jeffrey D; Fischer, A Paige

    2015-08-01

    We describe recent advances in biophysical and social aspects of risk and their potential combined contribution to improve mitigation planning on fire-prone landscapes. The methods and tools provide an improved method for defining the spatial extent of wildfire risk to communities compared to current planning processes. They also propose an expanded role for social science to improve understanding of community-wide risk perceptions and to predict property owners' capacities and willingness to mitigate risk by treating hazardous fuels and reducing the susceptibility of dwellings. In particular, we identify spatial scale mismatches in wildfire mitigation planning and their potential adverse impact on risk mitigation goals. Studies in other fire-prone regions suggest that these scale mismatches are widespread and contribute to continued wildfire dwelling losses. We discuss how risk perceptions and behavior contribute to scale mismatches and how they can be minimized through integrated analyses of landscape wildfire transmission and social factors that describe the potential for collaboration among landowners and land management agencies. These concepts are then used to outline an integrated socioecological planning framework to identify optimal strategies for local community risk mitigation and improve landscape-scale prioritization of fuel management investments by government entities.

  15. Testing a four-dimensional variational data assimilation method using an improved intermediate coupled model for ENSO analysis and prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Chuan; Wu, Xinrong; Zhang, Rong-Hua

    2016-07-01

    A four-dimensional variational (4D-Var) data assimilation method is implemented in an improved intermediate coupled model (ICM) of the tropical Pacific. A twin experiment is designed to evaluate the impact of the 4D-Var data assimilation algorithm on ENSO analysis and prediction based on the ICM. The model error is assumed to arise only from the parameter uncertainty. The "observation" of the SST anomaly, which is sampled from a "truth" model simulation that takes default parameter values and has Gaussian noise added, is directly assimilated into the assimilation model with its parameters set erroneously. Results show that 4D-Var effectively reduces the error of ENSO analysis and therefore improves the prediction skill of ENSO events compared with the non-assimilation case. These results provide a promising way for the ICM to achieve better real-time ENSO prediction.

  16. Improvements in G protein-coupled receptor purification yield light stable rhodopsin crystals.

    PubMed

    Salom, David; Le Trong, Isolde; Pohl, Ehmke; Ballesteros, Juan A; Stenkamp, Ronald E; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Lodowski, David T

    2006-12-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent the largest family of transmembrane signaling proteins and are the target of approximately half of all therapeutic agents. Agonist ligands bind their cognate GPCRs stabilizing the active conformation that is competent to bind G proteins, thus initiating a cascade of intracellular signaling events leading to modification of the cell activity. Despite their biomedical importance, the only known GPCR crystal structures are those of inactive rhodopsin forms. In order to understand how GPCRs are able to transduce extracellular signals across the plasma membrane, it is critical to determine the structure of these receptors in their ligand-bound, active state. Here, we report a novel combination of purification procedures that allowed the crystallization of rhodopsin in two new crystal forms and can be applicable to the purification and crystallization of other membrane proteins. Importantly, these new crystals are stable upon photoactivation and the preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of both photoactivated and ground state rhodopsin crystals are also reported.

  17. Improved dynamics and gravitational collapse of tachyon field coupled with a barotropic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marto, João; Tavakoli, Yaser; Moniz, Paulo Vargas

    2015-01-01

    We consider a spherically symmetric gravitational collapse of a tachyon field with an inverse square potential, which is coupled with a barotropic fluid. By employing an holonomy correction imported from loop quantum cosmology (LQC), we analyze the dynamics of the collapse within a semiclassical description. Using a dynamical system approach, we find that the stable fixed points given by the standard general relativistic setting turn into saddle points in the present context. This provides a new dynamics in contrast to the black hole and naked singularities solutions appearing in the classical model. Our results suggest that classical singularities can be avoided by quantum gravity effects and are replaced by a bounce. By a thorough numerical studies we show that, depending on the barotropic parameter γ, there exists a class of solutions corresponding to either a fluid or a tachyon dominated regimes. Furthermore, for the case γ 1, we find an interesting tracking behavior between the tachyon and the fluid leading to a dust-like collapse. In addition, we show that, there exists a threshold scale which determines when an outward energy flux emerges, as a nonsingular black hole is forming, at the corresponding collapse final stages.

  18. Rapid Recovery in Sub-Optimal Readers in Wales through a Self-Paced Computer-Based Reading Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Phil; Hughes, Antony; Phillips, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    Basic literacy skills underlie much future adult functioning, and are targeted in children through a variety of means. Children with identified special needs in reading were exposed to a self-paced computer-based reading programme that focused on improving phonetic ability. Exposure was limited to three, 40-minute sessions a week, for 10 weeks.…

  19. Improved Dyson series expansion for steady-state quantum transport beyond the weak coupling limit: divergences and resolution.

    PubMed

    Thingna, Juzar; Zhou, Hangbo; Wang, Jian-Sheng

    2014-11-21

    We present a general theory to calculate the steady-state heat and electronic currents for nonlinear systems using a perturbative expansion in the system-bath coupling. We explicitly demonstrate that using the truncated Dyson-series leads to divergences in the steady-state limit, thus making it impossible to be used for actual applications. In order to resolve the divergences, we propose a unique choice of initial condition for the reduced density matrix, which removes the divergences at each order. Our approach not only allows us to use the truncated Dyson-series, with a reasonable choice of initial condition, but also gives the expected result that the steady-state solutions should be independent of initial preparations. Using our improved Dyson series we evaluate the heat and electronic currents up to fourth-order in system-bath coupling, a considerable improvement over the standard quantum master equation techniques. We then numerically corroborate our theory for archetypal settings of linear systems using the exact nonequilibrium Green's function approach. Finally, to demonstrate the advantage of our approach, we deal with the nonlinear spin-boson model to evaluate heat current up to fourth-order and find signatures of cotunnelling process.

  20. Improved Dyson series expansion for steady-state quantum transport beyond the weak coupling limit: Divergences and resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Thingna, Juzar; Zhou, Hangbo; Wang, Jian-Sheng

    2014-11-21

    We present a general theory to calculate the steady-state heat and electronic currents for nonlinear systems using a perturbative expansion in the system-bath coupling. We explicitly demonstrate that using the truncated Dyson-series leads to divergences in the steady-state limit, thus making it impossible to be used for actual applications. In order to resolve the divergences, we propose a unique choice of initial condition for the reduced density matrix, which removes the divergences at each order. Our approach not only allows us to use the truncated Dyson-series, with a reasonable choice of initial condition, but also gives the expected result that the steady-state solutions should be independent of initial preparations. Using our improved Dyson series we evaluate the heat and electronic currents up to fourth-order in system-bath coupling, a considerable improvement over the standard quantum master equation techniques. We then numerically corroborate our theory for archetypal settings of linear systems using the exact nonequilibrium Green's function approach. Finally, to demonstrate the advantage of our approach, we deal with the nonlinear spin-boson model to evaluate heat current up to fourth-order and find signatures of cotunnelling process.

  1. G protein–coupled receptor 21 deletion improves insulin sensitivity in diet-induced obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Osborn, Olivia; Oh, Da Young; McNelis, Joanne; Sanchez-Alavez, Manuel; Talukdar, Saswata; Lu, Min; Li, PingPing; Thiede, Lucinda; Morinaga, Hidetaka; Kim, Jane J.; Heinrichsdorff, Jan; Nalbandian, Sarah; Ofrecio, Jachelle M.; Scadeng, Miriam; Schenk, Simon; Hadcock, John; Bartfai, Tamas; Olefsky, Jerrold M.

    2012-01-01

    Obesity-induced inflammation is a key component of systemic insulin resistance, which is a hallmark of type 2 diabetes. A major driver of this inflammation/insulin resistance syndrome is the accumulation of proinflammatory macrophages in adipose tissue and liver. We found that the orphan GPCR Gpr21 was highly expressed in the hypothalamus and macrophages of mice and that whole-body KO of this receptor led to a robust improvement in glucose tolerance and systemic insulin sensitivity and a modest lean phenotype. The improvement in insulin sensitivity in the high-fat diet–fed (HFD-fed) Gpr21 KO mouse was traced to a marked reduction in tissue inflammation caused by decreased chemotaxis of Gpr21 KO macrophages into adipose tissue and liver. Furthermore, mice lacking macrophage expression of Gpr21 were protected from HFD-induced inflammation and displayed improved insulin sensitivity. Results of in vitro chemotaxis studies in human monocytes suggested that the defect in chemotaxis observed ex vivo and in vivo in mice is also translatable to humans. Cumulatively, our data indicate that GPR21 has a critical function in coordinating macrophage proinflammatory activity in the context of obesity-induced insulin resistance. PMID:22653059

  2. Thermal reliability and performance improvement of close-coupled catalytic converter

    SciTech Connect

    Hijikata, Toshihiko; Kurachi, Hiroshi; Katsube, Fumio; Honacker, H. van

    1996-09-01

    This paper proposes a high temperature catalytic converter design using a ceramic substrate and intumescent matting. It also describes the improvement of converter performance using an advanced thin wall ceramic substrate. Due to future tightening of emission regulations and improvement of fuel economy, higher exhaust gas temperatures are suggested. Therefore, reduction of thermal reliability of an intumescent mat will be a concern because the catalytic converter will be exposed to high temperatures. For this reason, a new design converter has been developed using a dual cone structure for both the inlet and outlet cones. This minimizes heat conduction through the cone and decreases the temperature affecting the mat area. This design converter, without the use of a heat-shield, reduces the converter surface temperature to 441 C despite a catalyst bed temperature of 1,050 C. The long term durability of the converter is demonstrated by the hot vibration test. Since the new design converter does not need a heat-shield, the catalyst diameter can be enlarged by the width of the air gap used in the current design converter. By using an advanced thin wall ceramic substrate, such as 0.11 mm/620 kcpsm (4 mil/400 cpsi), it is possible to improve emission performance and pressure drop compared with the conventional 0.16 mm/620 kcpsm (6 mil/400 cpsi) ceramic substrate.

  3. Using a Coupled Lake Model with WRF to Improve High-Resolution Regional Climate Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallard, M.; Bullock, R.; Nolte, C. G.; Alapaty, K.; Otte, T.; Gula, J.

    2012-12-01

    Lakes can play a significant role in regional climate by modifying air masses through fluxes of heat and moisture and by modulating inland extremes in temperature. Representing these effects becomes more important as regional climate modeling efforts employ finer grid spacing in order to simulate smaller scales. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model does not simulate lakes explicitly. Instead, lake points are treated as ocean points, with sea surface temperatures (SSTs) interpolated from the nearest neighboring ocean point in the driving coarse-scale fields. This can result in substantial errors for inland lakes such as the Great Lakes. Although prescribed lake surface temperatures (LSTs) can be used for retrospective modeling applications, this may not be desirable for applications involving downscaling future climate scenarios from a global climate model (GCM). In such downscaling simulations, lakes that impact the regional climate in the area of interest may not be resolved by the coarser global input fields. Explicitly simulating the LST would allow WRF to better represent interannual variability in regions significantly affected by lakes, and the influence of such variability on temperature and precipitation patterns. Therefore, coupling a lake model to WRF may lead to more reliable assessments of the impacts of extreme events on human health and the environment. We employ a version of WRF coupled to the Freshwater Lake model, FLake (Gula and Peltier 2012). FLake is a 1D bulk lake model which provides updated LSTs and ice coverage throughout the integration. This two-layer model uses a temperature-depth profile which includes a homogeneous mixed layer at the surface and a thermocline below. The shape of the thermocline is assumed, based on past theoretical and observational studies. Therefore, additional variables required for FLake to run are minimal, and it does not require tuning for individual lakes. These characteristics are advantageous for a

  4. A Unified Air-Sea Interface for Fully Coupled Atmosphere-Wave-Ocean Models for Improving Intensity Prediction of Tropical Cyclones

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    A Unified Air-Sea Interface for Fully Coupled Atmosphere-Wave-Ocean Models for Improving Intensity Prediction of Tropical Cyclones Annual Progress...interaction and its impact on rapid intensity changes in tropical cyclones (TCs), and to develop a physically based and computationally efficient...Coupled Atmosphere-Wave-Ocean Models for Improving Intensity Prediction of Tropical Cyclones 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  5. Optimization of Printed Antennas Using Genetic Algorithm Coupled with Improved Cavity Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathi, Vahid; Ehteshami, Nasrin; Ghobadi, C.

    2012-06-01

    An accurate electromagnetic optimization tool for designing rectangular and circular microstrip antennas is proposed. This optimization method is based on the improved cavity model analysis in conjunction with the well-known genetic algorithm, which is employed to optimize the dimensions and feed point location of rectangular and circular microstrip antennas. Results obtained by this technique agree quite well with the measured data and the data obtained by the FEM based software HFSS by ANSOFT. This technique can be fruitfully used in microwave CAD applications.

  6. Improved light olefin yield from methyl bromide coupling over modified SAPO-34 molecular sieves.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Aihua; Sun, Shouli; Komon, Zachary J A; Osterwalder, Neil; Gadewar, Sagar; Stoimenov, Peter; Auerbach, Daniel J; Stucky, Galen D; McFarland, Eric W

    2011-02-21

    As an alternative to the partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas followed by methanol synthesis and the subsequent generation of olefins, we have studied the production of light olefins (ethylene and propylene) from the reaction of methyl bromide over various modified microporous silico-aluminophosphate molecular-sieve catalysts with an emphasis on SAPO-34. Some comparisons of methyl halides and methanol as reaction intermediates in their conversion to olefins are presented. Increasing the ratio of Si/Al and incorporation of Co into the catalyst framework improved the methyl bromide yield of light olefins over that obtained using standard SAPO-34.

  7. Interindividual comparison of different sensor principles for rate adaptive pacing.

    PubMed

    Malinowski, K

    1998-11-01

    In recent years a multitude of rate adaptive sensor systems based on different sensor signals have been developed to adapt the pacing rate to the physical load of the patient. In contrast to those systems the closed loop stimulation (CLS) represents a new concept, which regards the pacemaker as part of the cardiocirculatory system. The pacemaker converts the regulating information of the circulatory center into a heart rate. This study compares the closed loop stimulation and the different sensor systems that evaluate external parameters for rate adaptive pacing with a control group. To this end, 27 patients and 15 patients with a healthy sinus node (control group) were subjected to physical and mental stress tests. The recorded results were analyzed with regard to the maximum rates reached during stress. The results show that none of the studied sensor-controlled systems was able to determine an adequate pacing rate under all of the various load states. The dual sensor systems experience problems in balancing the input of the two sensor signals when calculating the pacing rate. The evaluation of a single external parameter, such as the acceleration of the upper body with the accelerometer, also failed to provide an adequate pacing rate in many stress situations. In contrast to all sensor systems, CLS achieved a heart rate in agreement with those of the reference group in all physical and mental stress situations.

  8. T wave alternans during exercise and atrial pacing in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohnloser, S. H.; Klingenheben, T.; Zabel, M.; Li, Y. G.; Albrecht, P.; Cohen, R. J.

    1997-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Evidence is accumulating that microvolt T wave alternans (TWA) is a marker of increased risk for ventricular tachyarrhythmias. Initially, atrial pacing was used to elevate heart rate and elicit TWA. More recently, a noninvasive approach has been developed that elevates heart rate using exercise. METHODS AND RESULTS: In 30 consecutive patients with a history of ventricular tachyarrhythmias, the spectral method was used to detect TWA during both atrial pacing and submaximal exercise testing. The concordance rate for the presence or absence of TWA using the two measurement methods was 84%. There was a patient-specific heart rate threshold for the detection of TWA that averaged 100 +/- 14 beats/min during exercise compared with 97 +/- 9 beats/min during right atrial pacing (P = NS). Beyond this threshold, there was a significant and comparable increase in level of TWA with decreasing pacing cycle length and increasing exercise heart rates. CONCLUSIONS: The present study is the first to demonstrate that microvolt TWA can be assessed reliably and noninvasively during exercise stress. There is a patient-specific heart rate threshold beyond which TWA continues to increase with increasing heart rates. Heart rate thresholds for the onset of TWA measured during atrial pacing and exercise stress were comparable, indicating that heart rate alone appears to be the main factor of determining the onset of TWA during submaximal exercise stress.

  9. Nanocellulose-based Translucent Diffuser for Optoelectronic Device Applications with Dramatic Improvement of Light Coupling.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Tassi, Nancy G; Zhu, Hongli; Fang, Zhiqiang; Hu, Liangbing

    2015-12-09

    Nanocellulose is a biogenerated and biorenewable organic material. Using a process based on 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO)/NaClO/NaBr system, a highly translucent and light-diffusive film consisting of many layers of nanocellulose fibers and wood pulp microfibers was made. The film demonstrates a combination of large optical transmittance of ∼90% and tunable diffuse transmission of up to ∼78% across the visible and near-infrared spectra. The detailed characterizations of the film indicate the combination of high optical transmittance and haze is due to the film's large packing density and microstructured surface. The superior optical properties make the film a translucent light diffuser and applicable for improving the efficiencies of optoelectronic devices such as thin-film silicon solar cells and organic light-emitting devices.

  10. Sputter-deposited TiN electrode coatings for superior sensing and pacing performance.

    PubMed

    Schaldach, M; Hubmann, M; Weikl, A; Hardt, R

    1990-12-01

    The sensing and pacing performance of pacemaker electrodes is characterized by the electrochemical properties of the electrode/tissue interface affecting tissue reactions and the kinetics of the ionic exchange. The usually smooth metallic electrode surface results in a high pass filter characteristic. To better match the electrode's filter characteristic to the spectral content of the depolarization signal, various combinations of electrode shape, material and surface structure have been researched. The electrode with sputter-deposited TiN coating presented in this report has been designed to meet the demand for low acute as well as chronic thresholds and superior sensing performance not only with respect to spontaneous activity but also regarding the detection of the evoked response. The clinical results obtained with this electrode prove the excellent pacing and sensing properties resulting from minimized polarization losses and optimized filtering of the signal to be detected, respectively. The acute and chronic clinical advantages over previous concepts are attributed mainly to the biocompatibility of the material used and the microcrystalline surface structure achieved by the coating process. The design concept of the new electrode is presented together with the clinical results obtained. While the advancements in microelectronics and battery technology have certainly formed the basis for the development of pulse generators featuring an ever increasing versatility of functions at the same or even smaller pacemaker dimensions, from a point of view of pacing system performance the development of improved electrode concepts as the one presented must be regarded as equally indispensable.

  11. Pacing strategy during the initial phase of the run in triathlon: influence on overall performance.

    PubMed

    Hausswirth, Christophe; Le Meur, Yann; Bieuzen, Francois; Brisswalter, Jeanick; Bernard, Thierry

    2010-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the best pacing strategy to adopt during the initial phase of a short distance triathlon run for highly trained triathletes. Ten highly trained male triathletes completed an incremental running test to determine maximal oxygen uptake, a 10-km control run at free pace and three individual time-trial triathlons (1.5-km swimming, 40-km cycling, 10-km running) in a randomised order. Swimming and cycling speeds were imposed as identical to the first triathlon performed and the first run kilometre was done alternatively 5% faster (Tri-Run(+5%)), 5% slower (Tri-Run(-5%)) and 10% slower (Tri-Run(-10%)) than the control run (C-Run). The subjects were instructed to finish the 9 remaining kilometres as quickly as possible at a free self-pace. Tri-Run(-5%) resulted in a significantly faster overall 10-km performance than Tri-Run(+5%) and Tri-Run(-10%) (p < 0.05) but no significant difference was observed with C-Run (p > 0.05) (2,028 +/- 78 s vs. 2,000 +/- 72 s, 2,178 +/- 121 s and 2,087 +/- 88 s, for Tri-Run(-5%), C-Run, Tri-Run(+5%) and Tri-Run(-10%), respectively). Tri-Run(+5%) strategy elicited higher values for oxygen uptake, ventilation, heart rate and blood lactate at the end of the first kilometre than the three other conditions. After 5 and 9.5 km, these values were higher for Tri-Run(-5%) (p < 0.05). The present results showed that the running speed achieved during the cycle-to-run transition is crucial for the improvement of the running phase as a whole. Triathletes would benefit to automate a pace 5% slower than their 10-km control running speed as both 5% faster and 10% slower running speeds over the first kilometre involved weaker overall performances.

  12. Tropical pacing of Antarctic sea ice increase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    One reason why coupled climate model simulations generally do not reproduce the observed increase in Antarctic sea ice extent may be that their internally generated climate variability does not sync with the observed phases of phenomena like the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and ENSO. For example, it is unlikely for a free-running coupled model simulation to capture the shift of the PDO from its positive to negative phase during 1998, and the subsequent ~15 year duration of the negative PDO phase. In previously presented work based on atmospheric models forced by observed tropical SSTs and stratospheric ozone, we demonstrated that tropical variability is key to explaining the wind trends over the Southern Ocean during the past ~35 years, particularly in the Ross, Amundsen and Bellingshausen Seas, the regions of the largest trends in sea ice extent and ice season duration. Here, we extend this idea to coupled model simulations with the Community Earth System Model (CESM) in which the evolution of SST anomalies in the central and eastern tropical Pacific is constrained to match the observations. This ensemble of 10 "tropical pacemaker" simulations shows a more realistic evolution of Antarctic sea ice anomalies than does its unconstrained counterpart, the CESM Large Ensemble (both sets of runs include stratospheric ozone depletion and other time-dependent radiative forcings). In particular, the pacemaker runs show that increased sea ice in the eastern Ross Sea is associated with a deeper Amundsen Sea Low (ASL) and stronger westerlies over the south Pacific. These circulation patterns in turn are linked with the negative phase of the PDO, characterized by negative SST anomalies in the central and eastern Pacific. The timing of tropical decadal variability with respect to ozone depletion further suggests a strong role for tropical variability in the recent acceleration of the Antarctic sea ice trend, as ozone depletion stabilized by late 1990s, prior to the most

  13. Mutual coupling of hydrologic and hydrodynamic models - a viable approach for improved large-scale inundation estimates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoch, Jannis; Winsemius, Hessel; van Beek, Ludovicus; Haag, Arjen; Bierkens, Marc

    2016-04-01

    Due to their increasing occurrence rate and associated economic costs, fluvial floods are large-scale and cross-border phenomena that need to be well understood. Sound information about temporal and spatial variations of flood hazard is essential for adequate flood risk management and climate change adaption measures. While progress has been made in assessments of flood hazard and risk on the global scale, studies to date have made compromises between spatial resolution on the one hand and local detail that influences their temporal characteristics (rate of rise, duration) on the other. Moreover, global models cannot realistically model flood wave propagation due to a lack of detail in channel and floodplain geometry, and the representation of hydrologic processes influencing the surface water balance such as open water evaporation from inundated water and re-infiltration of water in river banks. To overcome these restrictions and to obtain a better understanding of flood propagation including its spatio-temporal variations at the large scale, yet at a sufficiently high resolution, the present study aims to develop a large-scale modeling tool by coupling the global hydrologic model PCR-GLOBWB and the recently developed hydrodynamic model DELFT3D-FM. The first computes surface water volumes which are routed by the latter, solving the full Saint-Venant equations. With DELFT3D FM being capable of representing the model domain as a flexible mesh, model accuracy is only improved at relevant locations (river and adjacent floodplain) and the computation time is not unnecessarily increased. This efficiency is very advantageous for large-scale modelling approaches. The model domain is thereby schematized by 2D floodplains, being derived from global data sets (HydroSHEDS and G3WBM, respectively). Since a previous study with 1way-coupling showed good model performance (J.M. Hoch et al., in prep.), this approach was extended to 2way-coupling to fully represent evaporation

  14. Pacing during an ultramarathon running event in hilly terrain

    PubMed Central

    Cole-Hunter, Tom; Wiegand, Aaron N.; Solomon, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The dynamics of speed selection as a function of distance, or pacing, are used in recreational, competitive, and scientific research situations as an indirect measure of the psycho-physiological status of an individual. The purpose of this study was to determine pacing on level, uphill and downhill sections of participants in a long (>80 km) ultramarathon performed on trails in hilly terrain. Methods Fifteen ultramarathon runners competed in a  173 km event (five finished at  103 km) carrying a Global-Positioning System (GPS) device. Using the GPS data, we determined the speed, relative to average total speed, in level (LEV), uphill (UH) and downhill (DH) gradient categories as a function of total distance, as well as the correlation between overall performance and speed variability, speed loss, and total time stopped. Results There were no significant differences in normality, variances or means in the relative speed in 173-km and 103-km participants. Relative speed decreased in LEV, UH and DH. The main component of speed loss occurred between 5% and 50% of the event distance in LEV, and between 5% and 95% in UH and DH. There were no significant correlations between overall performance and speed loss, the variability of speed, or total time stopped. Conclusions Positive pacing was observed at all gradients, with the main component of speed loss occurring earlier (mixed pacing) in LEV compared to UH and DH. A speed reserve (increased speed in the last section) was observed in LEV and UH. The decrease in speed and variability of speed were more important in LEV and DH than in UH. The absence of a significant correlation between overall performance and descriptors of pacing is novel and indicates that pacing in ultramarathons in trails and hilly terrain differs to other types of running events. PMID:27812406

  15. Permanent pacemaker malfunction: diagnostic aspects of temporary pacing.

    PubMed Central

    Berman, N D

    1980-01-01

    A temporary pacing electrode can function as a diagnostic as well as a therapeutic tool. This is illustrated in two patients whose permanent pacemakers unexpectedly failed. In the first patient a demand pacemaker was inhibited by a magnet rather than converting to the asynchronous mode. In the second the pacemaker appeared to be producing low-voltage potentials not detectable on the surface electrocardiogram. The presence of a temporary pacing electrode can be useful for defining the cause of pacemaker failure and the nature of any associated arrhythmias. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 3 PMID:7260759

  16. Removal of epicardial pacing wires: an expanded role for nurses.

    PubMed

    Wollan, D L

    1995-01-01

    Temporary epicardial pacing wire removal (EPWR) is a procedure performed postoperatively on open heart surgery patients once the cardiac rhythm is stable. Historically, EPWR is performed by the cardiovascular surgeon, however policies of certain institutions permit nurses to carry out this procedure. In the last twelve months at Sioux Valley Hospital (SVH), a team of five telemetry nurses have been removing epicardial pacing wires (EPW) safely and effectively. The purpose of this article is to inform nurses how to safely remove EPWs postoperatively. In addition, a Standard of Care (SOC) describes the nurse's role in EPWR.

  17. Ecosystem function in waste stabilisation ponds: Improving water quality through a better understanding of biophysical coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadouani, Anas; Reichwaldt, Elke S.; Coggins, Liah X.; Ivey, Gregory N.; Ghisalberti, Marco; Zhou, Wenxu; Laurion, Isabelle; Chua, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    Wastewater stabilisation ponds (WSPs) are highly productive systems designed to treat wastewater using only natural biological and chemical processes. Phytoplankton, microbial communities and hydraulics play important roles for ecosystem functionality of these pond systems. Although WSPs have been used for many decades, they are still considered as 'black box' systems as very little is known about the fundamental ecological processes which occur within them. However, a better understanding of how these highly productive ecosystems function is particularly important for hydrological processes, as treated wastewater is commonly discharged into streams, rivers, and oceans, and subject to strict water quality guidelines. WSPs are known to operate at different levels of efficiency, and treatment efficiency of WSPs is dependent on physical (flow characteristics and sludge accumulation and distribution) and biological (microbial and phytoplankton communities) characteristics. Thus, it is important to gain a better understanding of the role and influence of pond hydraulics and vital microbial communities on pond performance and WSP functional stability. The main aim of this study is to investigate the processes leading to differences in treatment performance of WSPs. This study uses a novel and innovative approach to understand these factors by combining flow cytometry and metabolomics to investigate various biochemical characteristics, including the metabolite composition and microbial community within WSPs. The results of these analyses will then be combined with results from the characterisation of pond hydrodynamics and hydraulic performance, which will be performed using advanced hydrodynamic modelling and advanced sludge profiling technology. By understanding how hydrodynamic and biological processes influence each other and ecosystem function and stability in WSPs, we will be able to propose ways to improve the quality of the treatment using natural processes, with

  18. DiPALS: Diaphragm Pacing in patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis - a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Christopher J; Bradburn, Mike J; Maguire, Chin; Cooper, Cindy L; Baird, Wendy O; Baxter, Susan K; Cohen, Judith; Cantrill, Hannah; Dixon, Simon; Ackroyd, Roger; Baudouin, Simon; Bentley, Andrew; Berrisford, Richard; Bianchi, Stephen; Bourke, Stephen C; Darlison, Roy; Ealing, John; Elliott, Mark; Fitzgerald, Patrick; Galloway, Simon; Hamdalla, Hisham; Hanemann, C Oliver; Hughes, Philip; Imam, Ibrahim; Karat, Dayalan; Leek, Roger; Maynard, Nick; Orrell, Richard W; Sarela, Abeezar; Stradling, John; Talbot, Kevin; Taylor, Lyn; Turner, Martin; Simonds, Anita K; Williams, Tim; Wedzicha, Wisia; Young, Carolyn; Shaw, Pamela J

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease resulting in death, usually from respiratory failure, within 2-3 years of symptom onset. Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) is a treatment that when given to patients in respiratory failure leads to improved survival and quality of life. Diaphragm pacing (DP), using the NeuRx/4(®) diaphragm pacing system (DPS)™ (Synapse Biomedical, Oberlin, OH, USA), is a new technique that may offer additional or alternative benefits to patients with ALS who are in respiratory failure. OBJECTIVE The Diaphragm Pacing in patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (DiPALS) trial evaluated the effect of DP on survival over the study duration in patients with ALS with respiratory failure. DESIGN The DiPALS trial was a multicentre, parallel-group, open-label, randomised controlled trial incorporating health economic analyses and a qualitative longitudinal substudy. PARTICIPANTS Eligible participants had a diagnosis of ALS (ALS laboratory-supported probable, clinically probable or clinically definite according to the World Federation of Neurology revised El Escorial criteria), had been stabilised on riluzole for 30 days, were aged ≥ 18 years and were in respiratory failure. We planned to recruit 108 patients from seven UK-based specialist ALS or respiratory centres. Allocation was performed using 1 : 1 non-deterministic minimisation. INTERVENTIONS Participants were randomised to either standard care (NIV alone) or standard care (NIV) plus DP using the NeuRX/4 DPS. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES The primary outcome was overall survival, defined as the time from randomisation to death from any cause. Secondary outcomes were patient quality of life [assessed by European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions, three levels (EQ-5D-3L), Short Form questionnaire-36 items and Sleep Apnoea Quality of Life Index questionnaire]; carer quality of life (EQ-5D-3L and Caregiver Burden Inventory); cost-utility analysis and health

  19. Improved transmission performance resulting from the reduced chirp of a semiconductor laser coupled to an external high-Q resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Cartledge, J.C. )

    1990-05-01

    The coupling of a Fabry--Perot laser to an external high-{ital Q} resonator, whose resonance frequencies are not altered by changes in the carrier density, yields a dynamic single-longitudinal-mode laser with a significantly reduced transient frequency chirp. The improvement in the receiver sensitivity due to the reduced chirp is examined for NRZ and RZ intensity modulation, direct detection systems operating in the 1.55-{mu}m wavelength region with conventional single-mode optical fiber. The methodology involves a solving modified rate equations numerically for the optical power and phase of the external resonator laser in response to an injected current waveform, modeling the signal transmission properties of single-mode optical fibers by convolution and modulus squared operations, and using a truncated pulse train approximation to evaluate the probability of error in the presence of intersymbol interference, shot noise, APD multiplication noise, and preamplifier circuit noise.

  20. Closely Coupled Multi-Mode Radiators: A New Concept for Improving the Performance of Electrically Small Antennas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    experimentally verify the effect of asymmetry on improving the omni-directionality. Asymmetric coupled loop antenna on  PEC ground. P1 LL CC P2 Ls Zo Zh Zh ( f...phase shifter in (a).(Here, Zo = 50 Ω, Zh = 115 Ω, Ls = 50 mm, L = 23 nH, and C = 3.3 pF.) Fig. 4. Simulated and measured VSWR of the antenna combined...antenna in Fig. 1 obtained by feeding its two ports using the ideal feed network shown in the inset. P1 LL CC P2 Ls Ls Zo Zh Zh (a) (b) 0.5 1.0 1.5

  1. Centrifugal dryers keep pace with the market

    SciTech Connect

    Fiscor, S.

    2008-03-15

    New plant design and upgrades create a shift in dewatering strategies. The article describes recent developments. Three major manufacturers supply centrifugal dryers - TEMA, Centrifugal & Mechanical Industries (CMI) and Ludowici. CMI introduced a line of vertical centrifugal dryers. TEMA improved the techniques by developing a horizontal vibratory centrifuge (HVC) which simplified maintenance. 3 figs., 1 photo.

  2. Different horse's paces during hippotherapy on spatio-temporal parameters of gait in children with bilateral spastic cerebral palsy: A feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Fabiane Nunes; Pinho, Alexandre Severo do; Kleiner, Ana Francisca Rozin; Salazar, Ana Paula; Eltz, Giovana Duarte; de Oliveira Junior, Alcyr Alves; Cechetti, Fernanda; Galli, Manuela; Pagnussat, Aline Souza

    2016-12-01

    Hippotherapy is often carried out for the rehabilitation of children with Cerebral Palsy (CP), with the horse riding at a walking pace. This study aimed to explore the immediate effects of a hippotherapy protocol using a walk-trot pace on spatio-temporal gait parameters and muscle tone in children with Bilateral Spastic CP (BS-CP). Ten children diagnosed with BS-CP and 10 healthy aged-matched children (reference group) took part in this study. The children with BS-CP underwent two sessions of hippotherapy for one week of washout between them. Two protocols (lasting 30min) were applied on separate days: Protocol 1: the horse's pace was a walking pace; and Protocol 2: the horse's pace was a walk-trot pace. Children from the reference group were not subjected to treatment. A wireless inertial measurement unit measured gait spatio-temporal parameters before and after each session. The Modified Ashworth Scale was applied for muscle tone measurement of hip adductors. The participants underwent the gait assessment on a path with surface irregularities (ecological context). The comparisons between BS-CP and the reference group found differences in all spatio-temporal parameters, except for gait velocity. Within-group analysis of children with BS-CP showed that the swing phase did not change after the walk pace and after the walk-trot pace. The percentage of rolling phase and double support improved after the walk-trot. The spasticity of the hip adductors was significantly reduced as an immediate result of both protocols, but this decrease was more evident after the walk-trot. The walk-trot protocol is feasible and is able to induce an immediate effect that improves the gait spatio-temporal parameters and the hip adductors spasticity.

  3. Improved Measurement Performance of Inorganic Elements in Coal by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Coupled with Internal Standardization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Shunchun; Xu, Jialong; Bai, Kaijie; Lu, Jidong

    2015-11-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy was employed to determine the inorganic elements in coal. To improve the measurement's accuracy and precision, a new internal standardization scheme, which we named changed internal standardization, was compared with the traditional internal standardization and no internal standardization for the analysis of inorganic elements. The new internal standardization scheme used the atomic line of carbon at 247.86 nm and the molecular band of CN at 388.34 nm and C2 at 516.32 nm to normalize the lines of inorganic elements that were distributed in the same spectral channel. The performance of the utilization of the new internal standardization scheme was evaluated using a set of coal samples, including twenty calibration samples and five validation samples. The results show that the coefficients of determination R2 and the slope of calibration models coupled with changed internal standardization are better than that of the calibration models coupled with fixed internal standardization and no internal standardization. Moreover, the measurement accuracy and reproducibility of changed internal standardization for the analysis of five validation samples also yielded further improvement. The results that we obtained suggest that changed internal standardization could compensate for the matrix effects, as well as the influence of the difference in the spectral response of the light collection system. supported by Open Research Fund of State Key Laboratory of Pulsed Power Laser Technology of China (No. SKL2013KF03), National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51206055, 51476061), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (No. 2014ZZ0014), the New Star of Pearl River on Science and Technology of Guangzhou, China (No. 2014J2200054), the Key Laboratory of Efficient and Clean Energy Utilization of Guangdong Higher Education Institutes of China (No. KLB10004) and Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Efficient and

  4. Improved Modeling of Land-Atmosphere Interactions using a Coupled Version of WRF with the Land Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, Jonathan L.; LaCasse, Katherine M.; Santanello, Joseph A., Jr.; Lapenta, William M.; Petars-Lidard, Christa D.

    2007-01-01

    The exchange of energy and moisture between the Earth's surface and the atmospheric boundary layer plays a critical role in many hydrometeorological processes. Accurate and high-resolution representations of surface properties such as sea-surface temperature (SST), vegetation, soil temperature and moisture content, and ground fluxes are necessary to better understand the Earth-atmosphere interactions and improve numerical predictions of weather and climate phenomena. The NASA/NWS Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPORT) Center is currently investigating the potential benefits of assimilating high-resolution datasets derived from the NASA moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and the Goddard Space Flight Center Land Information System (LIS). The LIS is a software framework that integrates satellite and ground-based observational and modeled data along with multiple land surface models (LSMs) and advanced computing tools to accurately characterize land surface states and fluxes. The LIS can be run uncoupled to provide a high-resolution land surface initial condition, and can also be run in a coupled mode with WRF to integrate surface and soil quantities using any of the LSMs available in LIS. The LIS also includes the ability to optimize the initialization of surface and soil variables by tuning the spin-up time period and atmospheric forcing parameters, which cannot be done in the standard WRF. Among the datasets available from MODIS, a leaf-area index field and composite SST analysis are used to improve the lower boundary and initial conditions to the LIS/WRF coupled model over both land and water. Experiments will be conducted to measure the potential benefits from using the coupled LIS/WRF model over the Florida peninsula during May 2004. This month experienced relatively benign weather conditions, which will allow the experiments to focus on the local and mesoscale

  5. Characterization and comparison of polysaccharides from Lycium barbarum in China using saccharide mapping based on PACE and HPTLC.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ding-Tao; Cheong, Kit-Leong; Deng, Yong; Lin, Peng-Cheng; Wei, Feng; Lv, Xiao-Jie; Long, Ze-Rong; Zhao, Jing; Ma, Shuang-Cheng; Li, Shao-Ping

    2015-12-10

    Water-soluble polysaccharides from 51 batches of fruits of L. barbarum (wolfberry) in China were investigated and compared using saccharide mapping, partial acid hydrolysis, single and composite enzymatic digestion, followed by polysaccharide analysis by using carbohydrate gel electrophoresis (PACE) analysis and high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) analysis, respectively. Results showed that multiple PACE and HPTLC fingerprints of partial acid and enzymatic hydrolysates of polysaccharides from L. barbarum in China were similar, respectively. In addition, results indicated that β-1,3-glucosidic, α-1,4-galactosiduronic and α-1,5-arabinosidic linkages existed in polysaccharides from L. barbarum collected in China, and the similarity of polysaccharides in L. barbarum collected from different regions of China was pretty high, which are helpful for the improvement of the performance of polysaccharides from L. barbarum in functional/health foods area. Furthermore, polysaccharides from Panax notoginseng, Angelica sinensis, and Astragalus membranaceus var. mongholicus were successfully distinguished from those of L. barbarum based on their PACE fingerprints. These results were beneficial to improve the quality control of polysaccharides from L. barabrum and their products, which suggested that saccharide mapping based on PACE and HPTLC analysis could be a routine approach for quality control of polysaccharides.

  6. Perceptions of control over work: psychophysiological responses to self-paced and externally-paced tasks in an adult population sample.

    PubMed

    Steptoe, A; Evans, O; Fieldman, G

    1997-04-01

    This experiment tested the hypothesis that perceptions of control over work pace would modulate cardiovascular reactions to mental stress tests. One hundred and thirty two adults aged 30-65 years (64 men and 68 women) were randomized to self-paced and externally-paced task conditions. The self-paced group carried out visual matrix problem solving and mirror tracing tasks at their own pace. Work pace requirements were imposed on the externally-paced group, with performance requirements being set to equate those in the self-paced condition. This was done to equate work demands. Blood pressure (assessed with the Finapres), heart rate, cardiac baroreceptor reflex sensitivity, skin conductance, respiration rate and tidal volume were monitored. Behavioural performance of the mirror tracing task was comparable in the two conditions, but the externally-paced group attempted more problems and made more errors on the visual matrix task. Systolic blood pressure reactions to mirror drawing were greater in the external than self-paced conditions (mean increases of 27.5 +/- 16.1 vs. 23.1 +/- 18.5 mmHg, P < 0.025), and electrodermal responsivity was also heightened in the externally-paced group (P < 0.05). No differences were recorded in diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, baroreflex sensitivity or respiratory parameters. Results are discussed in relation to the literature on control and physiological stress responsivity, and their implications for understanding the health consequences of lack of control at work are considered.

  7. Individualized Self-Pacing (ISP)--A Success Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collings, Melvin R.

    1979-01-01

    Examines Fullerton College's individualized self-pacing (ISP) program. Reviews twelve ISP objectives including provision of enrollment/scheduling flexibility; lists twenty-two class offerings, including basic business math, business English, and business machines. Compares costs, learning, and course completion in ISP and traditional programs.…

  8. Self-Paced Physics, Segments 19-23.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    Five study segments of the Self-Paced Physics Course materials are presented in this fourth problems and solutions book used as a part of student course work. The subject matter is related to electric charges, insulators, Coulomb's law, electric fields, lines of force, solid angles, conductors, motion of charged particles, dipoles, electric flux,…

  9. Design Recommendations for Self-Paced Online Faculty Development Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rizzuto, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    An increased need for self-paced, online professional development opportunities in higher education has emerged from a variety of factors including dispersed geographic locations of faculty, full teaching loads, and institutional evaluation requirements. This article is a report of the examination of the design and evaluation of a self-paced…

  10. Computers Help 2000 Students Self-Pace Their Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorber, Michael A.

    Illinois State University operates a self-paced, competency-based teacher education program known as the Professional Sequence. It is based on the General Model of Instruction used at other universities and is organized around a series of self-instructional packages. Student progress is charted by a set of computer programs called the Surveillance…

  11. The Print and Computer Enlargement System--PACE. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morford, Ronald A.

    The Print and Computer Enlargement (PACE) System is being designed as a portable computerized reading and writing system that enables a low-vision person to read regular print and then create and edit text using large-print computerized output. The design goal was to develop a system that: weighed no more than 12 pounds so it could be easily…

  12. Self-Paced Physics [Talking Book Cassette Tapes].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    As one of three audiovisual media in the U. S. Naval Academy Self-Paced Physics Course, 16 cassette tapes relating to lectures of mechanics, electricity, and magnetism are prepared for enriching and supplementary purposes. The material is designed to be used in combination with the talking book where illustrations, formulas, behavioral objectives,…

  13. The Pace of Vocabulary Growth Helps Predict Later Vocabulary Skill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Meredith L.; Raudenbush, Stephen W.; Goldin-Meadow, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Children vary widely in the rate at which they acquire words--some start slow and speed up, others start fast and continue at a steady pace. Do early developmental variations of this sort help predict vocabulary skill just prior to kindergarten entry? This longitudinal study starts by examining important predictors (socioeconomic status [SES],…

  14. Self-Paced Physics, Segments 11-14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    Four segments of the Self-Paced Physics Course materials are presented in this problems and solutions book for use as the third part of student course work. The subject-matter topics are related to impulses, inelastic and elastic collisions, two-dimensional collision problems, universal constant of gravitation, gravitational acceleration and…

  15. PACE Model Gives Advertising Campaign-Centered Curriculum (Commentary).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thayer, Frank

    1990-01-01

    Describes PACE (Portfolio, Assignments, Content, and Evaluation), an advertising curriculum model in which students work on real advertising campaigns. Explains that students form account groups which locate products needing promotional assistance. Identifies the goals of the curriculum to be competent writing and practical understanding of…

  16. Self-Paced Physics, Segments 6-10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    Five segments of the Self-Paced Physics Course materials are presented in this problems and solutions book for use as the second part of student course work. The subject-matter topics are related to circular motion, work, power, kinetic energy, potential energy, conservative forces, conservation of energy, spring problems, center of mass, and…

  17. Self-Paced Instruction in SPSS with Multitutor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wides, Jeffrey W.

    More than a dozen CAI modules which teach the uninitiated user how to use the interactive Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) are described. The modules are based on the principle of incrementally increasing difficulty, self pacing, and student involvement. The first half of the set introduces the student to interactive computing,…

  18. A Self-Paced Program in Freshman Composition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, William E.

    Developed in response to the heterogeneous student population of a two-year, open door college, a self-paced freshman English course at Brazosport College (Texas) still operates within the traditional contact hour and three semester hours credit requirements, but serves students in unique, individual ways. Students may enroll only if placed by…

  19. Self-Paced Physics, Segments 32-36.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    Five study segments of the Self-Paced Physics Course materials are presented in this seventh problems and solutions book used as a part of student course work. The content is related to magnetic fields, magnetic moments, forces on charged particles in magnetic fields, electron volts, cyclotron, electronic charge to mass ratio, current-carrying…

  20. The Effects of Self-Paced Blended Learning of Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balentyne, Phoebe; Varga, Mary Alice

    2016-01-01

    As online and blended learning gain more popularity in education, it becomes more important to understand their effects on student learning. The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of self-paced blended learning of mathematics on the attitudes and achievement of 26 high ability middle school students, and investigate the relationship…

  1. Library Skills for Teachers: A Self-Paced Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mech, Terrence

    Designed to introduce education students to the basic library resources in the field, this self-paced workbook assumes a basic knowledge of the library and its resources. Each section in the eight-chapter workbook discusses a particular type of reference material and sample entries are provided when appropriate. Eleven assignments (two multiple…

  2. Basic Library Skills: A Self-Paced Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tierney, Judith

    This self-paced workbook is designed to introduce college students to the resources and facilities of the library and to providing the knowledge and skills necessary to do basic library research. Two introductory chapters include a library-specific tour with floor plans (the D. Leonard Corgan Library, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania) and information…

  3. Immediate emergency department external cardiac pacing for prehospital bradyasystolic arrest.

    PubMed

    White, J M; Nowak, R M; Martin, G B; Best, R; Carden, D L; Tomlanovich, M C

    1985-04-01

    Approximately 25% of patients in prehospital cardiac arrest present in bradyasystolic rhythms, and their long-term prognosis is very poor. Our study was undertaken to determine the utility of immediate emergency department (ED) external cardiac pacing in this situation. Twenty patients presenting with bradyasystolic prehospital cardiac arrest were entered in the study. All received the usual advanced cardiac life support therapy, but also were externally paced immediately using an automated external defibrillator and pacemaker (AEDP). Only two of 20 patients showed evidence of electrical capture, and none developed pulses with pacing. Four of the 20 patients developed a sinus rhythm and blood pressure during resuscitation. Three survived to leave the ED, but none survived to leave the hospital. An increase in the rate of bradycardia and pulseless idioventricular rhythms that was independent of electrical capture or pharmacologic therapy was noted occasionally. Although survival was not enhanced using the AEDP, the device was reliable, easy to use, and free of complications. External cardiac pacing warrants further investigation in the prehospital setting.

  4. "Set the Pace": Nutrition Education DVD for Head Start Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adedze, Pascasie; Orr, Robin A.; Chapman-Novakofski, Karen; Donovan, Sharon M.

    2013-01-01

    Childhood overweight remains a major public health problem and innovative nutrition education programs are still needed. Thus, the "Set the Pace" is a nutrition education DVD for Head Start parents which provides visual nutrition education and physical activities to incorporate in their daily routines. (Contains 1 table.)

  5. PACES: A Model of Student Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Mark D.; Tarabochia, Dawn W.; Koltz, Rebecca L.

    2015-01-01

    School counselors design, deliver, and evaluate comprehensive, developmental school counseling programs that are focused on enhancing student development and success. A model of student well-being, known as PACES, is defined and described that consists of five distinct and interactive domains: physical, affective, cognitive, economic, and social.…

  6. Self-Paced Physics, Segments 28-31.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    Four study segments of the Self-Paced Physics Course materials are presented in this sixth problems and solutions book used as a part of student course work. The subject matter is related to electric currents, current densities, resistances, Ohm's law, voltages, Joule heating, electromotive forces, single loop circuits, series and parallel…

  7. Self-Paced Physics, Segments 24-27.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    Four study segments of the Self-Paced Physics Course materials are presented in this fifth problems and solutions book used as a part of student course work. The subject matter is related to work in electric fields, potential differences, parallel plates, electric potential energies, potential gradients, capacitances, and capacitor circuits.…

  8. Self-Paced Physics, Segments 37-40.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    Four study segments of the Self-Paced Physics Course materials are presented in this eighth problems and solutions book used as a part of course assignments. The content is related to magnetic induction, Faraday's law, induced currents, Lenz's law, induced electromotive forces, time-varying magnetic fields, self-inductance, inductors,…

  9. Hardware packet pacing using a DMA in a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Dong; Heidelberger, Phillip; Vranas, Pavlos

    2013-08-13

    Method and system for hardware packet pacing using a direct memory access controller in a parallel computer which, in one aspect, keeps track of a total number of bytes put on the network as a result of a remote get operation, using a hardware token counter.

  10. Attendance at Lectures and Films in Self-Paced Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, K. Anthony

    Attendance at guest lectures, instructor lectures, and films in self-paced introductory psychology courses was examined in two experiments with 180 students in an introductory psychology class at Utah State University. In the first experiment, students were given no points, one point credit toward interviews, or one point credit toward the final…

  11. Improving homology modeling of G-protein coupled receptors through multiple-template derived conserved inter-residue interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, Rajan; Heim, Andrew J.; Li, Zhijun

    2015-05-01

    Evidenced by the three-rounds of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) Dock competitions, improving homology modeling methods of helical transmembrane proteins including the GPCRs, based on templates of low sequence identity, remains an eminent challenge. Current approaches addressing this challenge adopt the philosophy of "modeling first, refinement next". In the present work, we developed an alternative modeling approach through the novel application of available multiple templates. First, conserved inter-residue interactions are derived from each additional template through conservation analysis of each template-target pairwise alignment. Then, these interactions are converted into distance restraints and incorporated in the homology modeling process. This approach was applied to modeling of the human β2 adrenergic receptor using the bovin rhodopsin and the human protease-activated receptor 1 as templates and improved model quality was demonstrated compared to the homology model generated by standard single-template and multiple-template methods. This method of "refined restraints first, modeling next", provides a fast and complementary way to the current modeling approaches. It allows rational identification and implementation of additional conserved distance restraints extracted from multiple templates and/or experimental data, and has the potential to be applicable to modeling of all helical transmembrane proteins.

  12. Cardiac resynchronization therapy and atrial overdrive pacing for the treatment of central sleep apnoea

    PubMed Central

    Lüthje, Lars; Renner, Bernd; Kessels, Roger; Vollmann, Dirk; Raupach, Tobias; Gerritse, Bart; Tasci, Selcuk; Schwab, Jörg O.; Zabel, Markus; Zenker, Dieter; Schott, Peter; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Unterberg-Buchwald, Christina; Andreas, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Aims The combined therapeutic impact of atrial overdrive pacing (AOP) and cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) on central sleep apnoea (CSA) in chronic heart failure (CHF) so far has not been investigated. We aimed to evaluate the effect of CRT alone and CRT + AOP on CSA in CHF patients and to compare the influence of CRT on CHF between CSA positive and CSA negative patients. Methods and results Thirty patients with CRT indication underwent full night polysomnography, echocardiography, exercise testing, and neurohumoral evaluation before and 3 months after CRT implantation. In CSA positive patients (60%), two additional sleep studies were conducted after 3 months of CRT, with CRT alone or CRT + AOP, in random order. Cardiac resynchronization therapy resulted in significant improvements of NYHA class, left ventricular ejection fraction, N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide, VO2max, and quality of life irrespective of the presence of CSA. Cardiac resynchronization therapy also reduced the central apnoea–hypopnoea index (AHI) (33.6 ± 14.3 vs. 23.8 ± 16.9 h−1; P < 0.01) and central apnoea index (17.3 ± 14.1 vs. 10.9 ± 13.9 h−1; P < 0.01) without altering sleep stages. Cardiac resynchronization therapy with atrial overdrive pacing resulted in a small but significant additional decrease of the central AHI (23.8 ± 16.9 vs. 21.5 ± 16.9 h−1; P < 0.01). Conclusion In this study, CRT significantly improved CSA without altering sleep stages. Cardiac resynchronization therapy with atrial overdrive pacing resulted in a significant but minor additional improvement of CSA. Positive effects of CRT were irrespective of the presence of CSA. PMID:19147446

  13. Pacing control of sawtooth and ELM oscillations in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauret, M.; Lennholm, M.; de Baar, M. R.; Heemels, W. P. M. H.

    2016-12-01

    In tokamak plasmas, the sawtooth oscillation (ST) and the edge-localized-mode (ELM) are characterized by a phase of a slow evolution of the plasma conditions, followed by a crash-like instability that resets the plasma conditions when certain criteria of the plasma conditions are satisfied. Typically, the crashes induce losses of heat and energetic particles and may also trigger secondary instabilities. As the amplitude of the crash-like perturbation scales with the period between two crashes, period control of these oscillations is important for operations of large fusion facilities such as ITER and DEMO. In several present-day experimental facilities, a pacing control algorithm has been successfully applied for controlling the sawtooth period and the ELM period. However, a formal analysis has been lacking so far, which therefore forms the objective of the present paper. For this purpose, a reset model for the sawtooth period is introduced and, after a proper transformation a nonlinear discrete-time system is obtained, which is used for the formal analysis of pacing control. By representing the model in a Lur’e (or Lurie) form, we can derive conditions under which global asymptotic stability of the closed-loop (pacing) period control system is guaranteed. Moreover, we will show that the controller exhibits inherent robustness for model uncertainties. We envision that the analytical results in the area of pacing control of the sawtooth are also applicable to pacing period control of the ELM oscillation period. The presented reset model also explains why in recent experiments the sawtooth period locks with a periodically modulated power.

  14. The Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE): an innovative long-term care model in the United States.

    PubMed

    Mui, A C

    2001-01-01

    This article examines the long-term care service system in the United States, its problems, and an improved long-term care model. Problematic quality of care in institutional settings and fragmentation of service coordination in community-based settings are two major issues in the traditional long-term care system. The Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE) has been emerging since the 1970s to address these issues, particularly because most frail elders prefer community-based to institutional care. The Balanced Budget Act of 1997 made PACE a permanent provider type under Medicare and granted states the option of paying a capitation rate for PACE services under Medicaid. The PACE model is a managed long-term care system that provides frail elders alternatives to nursing home life. The PACE program's primary goals are to maximize each frail elderly participant's autonomy and continued community residence, and to provide quality care at a lower cost than Medicare, Medicaid, and private-pay participants, who pay in the traditional fee-for-service system. In exchange for Medicare and Medicaid fixed monthly payments for each participating frail elder, PACE service systems provide a continuum of long-term care services, including hospital and nursing home care, and bear full financial risk. Integration of acute and long-term care services in the PACE model allows care of frail elders with multiple problems by a single service organization that can provide a full range of services. PACE's range of services and organizational features are discussed.

  15. DDDR pacing for symptomatic patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Achterberg, H.J.; Scheffer, M.G.; van Mechelen, R.; Kofflard, M.J.M.; ten Cate, F.J.

    2002-01-01

    Background Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) is a primary cardiac disorder with a heterogeneous expression. When medical therapy fails in patients with symptomatic HOCM, three additional therapeutic strategies exist: ventricular septal myectomy, alcohol-induced percutaneous transluminal septal myocardial ablation (PTSMA) of the first septal branch of the anterior descending artery and pacemaker implantation. In this paper we present the results of seven patients in whom a dual-chamber pacemaker was implanted to reduce the gradient in the left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) and to relieve their symptoms. Methods In patients with drug refractory symptomatic HOCM, not eligible for surgery, pacemaker therapy was recommended. Symptomatic HOCM was defined as symptoms of angina and dyspnoea, functional class NYHA 3-4 and a resting LVOT gradient during Doppler echocardiography of more than 2.75 m/s (30 mmHg). In these patients, a dual-chamber pacemaker was implanted with a right ventricular lead positioned in the right ventricular apex and an atrial lead positioned in the right atrial appendage. In all patients the AV setting was programmed between 50 and 100 ms, using Doppler echocardiography to determine the optimal filling and to ensure ventricular capture. Results A statistically significant reduction of the LVOT gradient was observed in all patients. The pre-implantation gradient in the LVOT measured by Doppler echocardiography varied from 3-5.8 m/s with a mean of 4.7±1.1 m/s. The post-implantation gradient varied from 1.4-2.6 m/s with a mean of 1.9±0.4 m/s (p<0.001). Symptomatic improvement was present in all patients. NYHA functional class went from 3-4 (mean 3.1±0.5) pre-implantation to 1-2 mean (1.3±0.4) after implantation (p<0.001). During a mean follow-up of 2.3±1.1 years, the improvement in functional class was maintained. Conclusion Our preliminary results demonstrate that dual-chamber pacing is an effective and safe treatment for

  16. Effect of Environmental and Feedback Interventions on Pacing Profiles in Cycling: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Michael J.; Clark, Bradley; Welvaert, Marijke; Skorski, Sabrina; Garvican-Lewis, Laura A.; Saunders, Philo; Thompson, Kevin G.

    2016-01-01

    In search of their optimal performance athletes will alter their pacing strategy according to intrinsic and extrinsic physiological, psychological and environmental factors. However, the effect of some of these variables on pacing and exercise performance remains somewhat unclear. Therefore, the aim of this meta-analysis was to provide an overview as to how manipulation of different extrinsic factors affects pacing strategy and exercise performance. Only self-paced exercise studies that provided control and intervention group(s), reported trial variance for power output, disclosed the type of feedback received or withheld, and where time-trial power output data could be segmented into start, middle and end sections; were included in the meta-analysis. Studies with similar themes were grouped together to determine the mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) between control and intervention trials for: hypoxia, hyperoxia, heat-stress, pre-cooling, and various forms of feedback. A total of 26 studies with cycling as the exercise modality were included in the meta-analysis. Of these, four studies manipulated oxygen availability, eleven manipulated heat-stress, four implemented pre-cooling interventions and seven studies manipulated various forms of feedback. Mean power output (MPO) was significantly reduced in the middle and end sections (p < 0.05), but not the start section of hypoxia and heat-stress trials compared to the control trials. In contrast, there was no significant change in trial or section MPO for hyperoxic or pre-cooling conditions compared to the control condition (p > 0.05). Negative feedback improved overall trial MPO and MPO in the middle section of trials (p < 0.05), while informed feedback improved overall trial MPO (p < 0.05). However, positive, neutral and no feedback had no significant effect on overall trial or section MPO (p > 0.05). The available data suggests exercise regulation in hypoxia and heat-stress is delayed in the

  17. Improve the Strength of PLA/HA Composite Through the Use of Surface Initiated Polymerization and Phosphonic Acid Coupling Agent

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tongxin; Chow, Laurence C.; Frukhtbeyn, Stanislav A.; Ting, Andy Hai; Dong, Quanxiao; Yang, Mingshu; Mitchell, James W.

    2011-01-01

    Bioresorbable composite made from degradable polymers, e.g., polylactide (PLA), and bioactive calcium phosphates, e.g., hydroxyapatite (HA), are clinically desirable for bone fixation, repair and tissue engineering because they do not need to be removed by surgery after the bone heals. However, preparation of PLA/HA composite from non-modified HA usually results in mechanical strength reductions due to a weak interface between PLA and HA. In this study, a calcium-phosphate/phosphonate hybrid shell was developed to introduce a greater amount of reactive hydroxyl groups onto the HA particles. Then, PLA was successfully grafted on HA by surface-initiated polymerization through the non-ionic surface hydroxyl groups. Thermogravimetric analysis indiated that the amount of grafted PLA on HA can be up to 7 %, which is about 50 % greater than that from the literature. PLA grafted HA shows significantly different pH dependent ζ-potential and particle size profiles from those of uncoated HA. By combining the phosphonic acid coupling agent and surface initiated polymerization, PLA could directly link to HA through covalent bond so that the interfacial interaction in the PLA/HA composite can be significantly improved. The diametral tensile strength of PLA/HA composite prepared from PLA-grafted HA was found to be over twice that of the composite prepared from the non-modified HA. Moreover, the tensile strength of the improved composite was 23 % higher than that of PLA alone. By varying additional variables, this approach has the potential to produce bioresorbable composites with improved mechanical properties that are in the range of natural bones, and can have wide applications for bone fixation and repair in load-bearing areas. PMID:22399838

  18. 42 CFR 460.132 - Quality assessment and performance improvement plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Quality Assessment and Performance Improvement § 460.132...

  19. 42 CFR 460.132 - Quality assessment and performance improvement plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Quality Assessment and Performance Improvement § 460.132...

  20. 42 CFR 460.132 - Quality assessment and performance improvement plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Quality Assessment and Performance Improvement § 460.132...

  1. Environmental Coupling Modulates the Attractors of Rhythmic Coordination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kudo, Kazutoshi; Park, Hyeonsaeng; Kay, Bruce A.; Turvey, M. T.

    2006-01-01

    A simple instance of coupling behavior to the environment is oscillating the hands in pace with metronome beats. This environmental coupling can be weaker (1 beat per cycle) or stronger (2 beats per cycle). The authors examined whether strength of environmental coupling enhanced the stability of in-phase bimanual coordination. Detuning by…

  2. Continuous renal replacement therapy. Keeping pace with changes in technology and technique.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Ian

    2002-01-01

    The rapidly changing nature of new technologies and techniques in acute health care means it can be difficult keeping pace. Most facilities, large or small, are usually in continuous evaluation of a new technology. Published reviews and professional group guidelines can assist the process of change for continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) technologies and techniques. The current techniques and technologies are a mixed application of old and new technologies providing a combination of convective and diffusive solute clearance methods. There are a variety of anticoagulation approaches. New, purpose-built CRRT machines offer many advantages over old technology but their costs can be prohibitive and users do not always meet them with rapid behavioral change. Reading journal publications and texts, scientific meetings, education and training, Internet web site review/participation, quality improvement activities and an accurate local data base are the keys to keeping pace with changes and identifying whether a benefit can be anticipated and demonstrated. Possible changes for the future of techniques and technologies may be in the areas of modified approaches to continuous therapy with tailored approaches for specific patient care settings. Improved membrane characteristics for wider indications and the bio-artificial kidney are emerging along with blood pump and circuit design improvements, with new machine/operator interfaces.

  3. 42 CFR 460.150 - Eligibility to enroll in a PACE program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Participant Enrollment and Disenrollment § 460.150 Eligibility to enroll in...

  4. 42 CFR 460.150 - Eligibility to enroll in a PACE program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Participant Enrollment and Disenrollment § 460.150 Eligibility to enroll in...

  5. 42 CFR 460.150 - Eligibility to enroll in a PACE program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Participant Enrollment and Disenrollment § 460.150 Eligibility to enroll in...

  6. 42 CFR 460.150 - Eligibility to enroll in a PACE program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Participant Enrollment and Disenrollment § 460.150 Eligibility to enroll in...

  7. Effects of pacing magnitudes and forms on bistability width in a modeled ventricular tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaodong; Liu, Xuemei; Zheng, Lixian; Mi, Yuanyuan; Qian, Yu

    2013-07-01

    Bistability in periodically paced cardiac tissue is relevant to cardiac arrhythmias and its control. In the present paper, one-dimensional tissue of the phase I Luo-Rudy model is numerically investigated. The effects of various parameters of pacing signals on bistability width are studied. The following conclusions are obtained: (i) Pacing can be classified into two types: pulsatile and sinusoidal types. Pulsatile pacing reduces bistability width as its magnitude is increased. Sinusoidal pacing increases the width as its amplitude is increased. (ii) In a pacing period the hyperpolarizing part plays a more important role than the depolarizing part. Variations of the hyperpolarizing ratio in a period evidently change the width of bistability and its variation tendency. (iii) A dynamical mechanism is proposed to qualitatively explain the phenomena, which reveals the reason for the different effects of pulsatile and sinusoidal pacing on bistability. The methods for changing bistability width by external pacing may help control arrhythmias in cardiology.

  8. Lunar plasma measurement by MAP-PACE onboard KAGUYA (SELENE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yoshifumi

    Low energy charged particles around the Moon were vigorously observed by Moon orbiting satellites and plasma instrumentation placed on the lunar surface in 1960s and 1970s. Though there were some satellites that explored the Moon afterwards, most of them were dedicated to the global mapping of the lunar surface. KAGUYA(SELENE) is a Japanese lunar orbiter that studies the origin and evolution of the Moon by means of global mapping of element abundances, mineralogical composition, and surface geographical mapping from 100km altitude. KAGUYA was successfully launched on 14 September 2007 by HIIA launch vehicle from Tanegashima Space Center in Japan. KAGUYA was inserted into a circular lunar polar orbit of 100km altitude and started continuous observation in mid-December 2007. One of the fourteen science instruments MAP-PACE (MAgnetic field and Plasma experiment - Plasma energy Angle and Composition Experiment) was developed for the comprehensive three-dimensional plasma measurement around the Moon. MAP-PACE consists of 4 sensors: ESA (Electron Spectrum Analyzer)-S1, ESA-S2, IMA (Ion Mass Analyzer), and IEA (Ion Energy Analyzer). ESA-S1 and S2 measure the distribution function of low energy electrons below 15keV. IMA and IEA measure the distribution function of low energy ions below 28keV/q. IMA has an ability to discriminate the ion mass with high mass resolution. PACE sensors have been measuring solar wind, plasmas in the wake region of the Moon and plasmas in the Earth's magnetosphere. ESA sensors have discovered electron heating over magnetic anomalies on the lunar surface. ESA sensors have also observed electrons accelerated from the lunar surface in the wake region. PACE ion sensors have discovered new features of low energy ions around the Moon. IMA has discovered the existence of alkali ions that are originated from the lunar surface or lunar atmosphere and are picked up by the solar wind. IEA and IMA sensors discovered solar wind reflection by the Moon. PACE

  9. Mediterranean fluvial response to long-term Quaternary climate change: Improving chronologies by coupling OSL and U-series techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candy, Ian; Pope, Richard

    2010-05-01

    Many studies have attempted to understand the relationship between Late Quaternary climate change and Mediterranean river activity over the last 200,000 years (Macklin et al., 2002). The long-terrace records associated with most large river systems and the thick aggradation of fan sediments associated with smaller catchments in southern Europe and north Africa make the Mediterranean an ideal region to test this relationship. Such studies have been further enhanced by recent improvements in optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and U-series dating techniques which are widely applicable in this region. Despite the fact that combining these two techniques provides the best potential method for constructing high precision chronologies this has rarely been done. In this paper we discuss the problems and advantages of producing "coupled" chronologies with reference to examples from southern Spain and Crete. In both of these examples the use of U-series and OSL dating has allowed the age of terrace aggradation and terrace abandonment (incision) to be constrained, consequently our understanding of fluvial "response" is greatly improved. The paper concludes by discussing further problems in terms of constructing fluvial chronologies which need to be considered and the problems of understanding the climate history of the region in which the catchment is found. Macklin, M.G., Fuller, I.C., Lewin, J., Maas, G.S., Passmore, D.G., Rose, J., Woodward, J.C., Black, S., Hamlin, R.H.B., Rowan, J.S., 2002. Correlation of fluvial sequences in the Mediterranean basin over the last 200 ka and their relationship to climate change. Quaternary Science Reviews, 21, 1633 - 1641.

  10. Winds, Mountains, and Wildland Fire: Improved Understanding of Coupled Atmosphere-Topography-Fire Interactions Through Large-Eddy Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz-Esparza, D.; Sauer, J.; Linn, R.

    2015-12-01

    Anomalous and unexpected fire behavior in complex terrain continues to result in substantial loss of property and extremely dangerous conditions for firefighting field personnel. We briefly discuss proposed hypotheses of fire interactions with atmospheric flows over complex terrain that can lead to poorly-understood and potentially catastrophic scenarios. Then, our recent results of numerical investigations via large-eddy simulation of coupled atmosphere-topography-fire phenomenology with the Los Alamos National Laboratory, HiGrad-Firetec model are presented as an example of the potential for increased understanding of these complex processes. This investigation focuses on the influence of downslope surface wind enhancement through stably stratified flow over an isolated hill, and the resulting dramatic changes in fire behavior including spread rate, and intensity. Implications with respect to counter-intuitive fire behavior and extreme fire events are discussed. This work demonstrates a tremendous opportunity to immediately create safer and more effective policy for field personnel through improved predictability of atmospheric conditions over complex terrain

  11. Improving the air coupling of bulk piezoelectric transducers with wedges of power-law profiles: a numerical study.

    PubMed

    Remillieux, Marcel C; Anderson, Brian E; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Ulrich, T J

    2014-07-01

    An air-coupled ultrasonic transducer is created by bonding a bulk piezoelectric element onto the surface of a thick plate with a wedge of power-law profile. The wedge is used to improve the ultrasonic radiation efficiency. The power-law profile provides a smooth, impedance-matching transition for the mechanical energy to be transferred from the thick plate to the air, through the large-amplitude flexural waves observed in the thinnest region of the wedge. The performance of the proposed transducer is examined numerically and compared to that of a design where the piezoelectric element is isolated and where it is affixed to a thin plate of uniform thickness. The numerical analysis is first focused on the free-field radiation of the transducers. Then, time-reversal experiments are simulated by placing the transducers inside a cavity of arbitrary shape with some perfectly reflecting boundaries. In addition to time-reversal mirrors, the proposed concept could be integrated in the design of phased arrays and parametric arrays.

  12. Fabrication of Silicon Backshorts with Improved Out-of-Band Rejection for Waveguide-Coupled Superconducting Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowe, Erik J.; Bennett, Charles L.; Chuss, David T.; Denis, Kevin L.; Eimer, Joseph; Lourie, Nathan; Marriage, Tobias; Moseley, Samuel H.; Rostem, Karwan; Stevenson, Thomas R.; Towner, Deborah; U-yen, Kongpop; Wollack, Edward J.

    2012-01-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) is a ground-based instrument that will measure the polarization of the cosmic microqave background to search for gravitational waves form a posited epoch of inflation early in the universe's history. This measurement will require integration of superconducting transition-edge sensors with microwave waveguide inputs with good conrol of systematic errors, such as unwanted coupling to stray signals at frequencies outside of a precisely defined microwave band. To address these needs we will present work on the fabrication of silicon quarter-wave backshorts for the CLASS 40GHz focal plane. The 40GHz backshort consists of three degeneratively doped silicon wafers. Two spacer wafers are micromachined with through wafer vins to provide a 2.0mm long square waveguide. The third wafer acts as the backshort cap. The three wafers are bonded at the wafer level by Au-Au thermal compression bonding then aligned and flip chip bonded to the CLASS detector at the chip level. The micromachining techniques used have been optimized to create high aspect ratio waveguides, silicon pillars, and relief trenches with the goal of providing improved out of band signal rejection. We will discuss the fabrication of integrated CLASS superconducting detectors with silicon quarter wave backshorts and present current measurement results.

  13. Improving carbohydrate production of Chlorella sorokiniana NIES-2168 through semi-continuous process coupled with mixotrophic cultivation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Chiu, Sheng-Yi; Ho, Shih-Hsin; Liu, Zhuo; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Chang, Ting-Ting; Chang, Kuan-Fu; Chang, Jo-Shu; Ren, Nan-Qi; Kondo, Akihiko

    2016-08-01

    Biofuels from microalgae is now a hot issue of great potential. However, achieving high starch productivity with photoautotrophic microalgae is still challenging. A feasible approach to enhance the growth and target product of microalgae is to conduct mixotrophic cultivation. The appropriate acetate addition combined with CO2 supply as dual carbon sources (i.e., mixotrophic cultivation) could enhance the cell growth of some microalgae species, but the effect of acetate-mediated mixotrophic culture mode on carbohydrate accumulation in microalgae remains unclear. Moreover, there is still lack of the information concerning how to increase the productivity of carbohydrates from microalgae under acetate-amended mixotrophic cultivation and how to optimize the engineering strategies to achieve the goal. This study was undertaken to develop an optimal acetate-contained mixotrophic cultivation system coupled with effective operation strategies to markedly improve the carbohydrate productivity of Chlorella sorokiniana NIES-2168. The optimal carbohydrate productivity of 695 mg/L/d was obtained, which is the highest value ever reported. The monosaccharide in the accumulated carbohydrates is mainly glucose (i.e., 85-90%), which is very suitable for bio-alcohols fermentation. Hence, by applying the optimal process developed in this study, C. sorokiniana NIES-2168 has a high potential to serve as a feedstock for subsequent biofuels conversion.

  14. Coupling the NASA-CASA ecosystem model with a hydrologic routing algorithm for improved water management in Yosemite National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teaby, A.; Johnson, E. R.; Griffin, M.; Carrillo, C.; Kannan, T.; Shupe, J. W.; Schmidt, C.

    2013-12-01

    Historic trends reveal extreme precipitation variability within the Yosemite National Park (YNP) geographic region. While California obtains greater than half of its annual water supply from the Sierra Nevada, snowpack, precipitation, and runoff can fluctuate between less than 50% and greater than 200% of climatological averages. Advances in hydrological modeling are crucial to improving water-use efficiency at the local, state, and national levels. The NASA Carnegie Ames Stanford Approach (CASA) is a global simulation model that combines multi-year satellite, climate, and other land surface databases to estimate biosphere-atmosphere exchange of energy, water, and trace gases from plants and soils. By coupling CASA with a Hydrological Routing Algorithm known as HYDRA, it is possible to calculate current water availability and observe hydrological trends within YNP. Satellite-derived inputs such as surface evapotranspiration, temperature, precipitation, land cover, and elevation were included to create a valuable decision support tool for YNP's water resource managers. These results will be of enhanced importance given current efforts to restore 81 miles of the Merced River within the park's boundary. Validations of model results were conducted using in situ stream gage measurements. The model accurately simulated observed streamflow values, achieving a relatively strong Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency coefficient. This geospatial assessment provides a standardized method which may be repeated in both national and international water-stressed regions.

  15. Effects of Modality and Pace on Achievement, Mental Effort, and Positive Affect in Multimedia Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Izmirli, Serkan; Kurt, Adile Askim

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the effects of instruction given with different multimedia modalities (written text + animation or narration + animation) on the academic achievement, cognitive load, and positive affect in different paces (learner-paced or system-paced); 97 freshmen university students divided into four groups taught in…

  16. A Study of Instructional Methods Used in Fast-Paced Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Seon-Young; Olszewski-Kubilius, Paula

    2006-01-01

    This study involved 15 secondary-level teachers who taught fast-paced classes at a university based summer program and similar regularly paced classes in their local schools in order to examine how teachers differentiate or modify instructional methods and content selections for fast-paced classes. Interviews were conducted with the teachers…

  17. Unintended Outcomes of University-Community Partnerships: Building Organizational Capacity with PACE International Partners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, Kate; Clark, Lindie; Hammersley, Laura; Baker, Michaela; Rawlings-Sanaei, Felicity; D'ath, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Professional and Community Engagement (PACE) at Macquarie University provides experiential opportunities for students and staff to contribute to more just, inclusive and sustainable societies by engaging in activities with partner organizations. PACE International offers a range of opportunities with partners overseas. Underpinning PACE is a…

  18. What Pace Is Best? Assessing Adults' Learning from Slideshows and Video

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sage, Kara

    2014-01-01

    When acquiring information from a 2D platform, self-control and/or optimal pacing may help reduce cognitive load and enhance learning outcomes. In the present research, adults viewed novel action sequences via one of four learning media: (1) self-paced slideshows, where viewers advanced through slides at their own pace by clicking a mouse, (2)…

  19. Society for the Teaching of Psychology and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee: U-Pace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EDUCAUSE, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The Society for the Teaching of Psychology and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (UWM) partnered to disseminate U-Pace, a technology-enabled instructional model that promotes student success through deeper learning. UWM developed U-Pace in 2006 for an Introduction to Psychology course and, over time, evidence indicates that U-Pace not only…

  20. Time to Learn: Pacing and the External Framing of Teachers' Work 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoadley, Ursula

    2003-01-01

    The article reports research in two South African grade 3 classrooms, one located within a disadvantaged school and one in an affluent suburban school. The research examines the pacing rules of different transmission practices: weak pacing (a slower rate of transmission) is associated with pedagogy in the working-class school, and strong pacing (a…

  1. An improved pore-network model including viscous coupling effects using direct simulation by the lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Chiyu; Raeini, Ali Q.; Wang, Yihang; Blunt, Martin J.; Wang, Moran

    2017-02-01

    Viscous coupling during simultaneous flow of different fluid phases has a significant impact on their flow through porous media. In this work, a new multiscale strategy is proposed for multiphase flow in porous media. We use the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) to simulate two-phase flow at pore scale and obtain empirical terms for the viscous coupling inside individual pores. The empirical coupling terms are then used in a pore-network model to efficiently simulate two-phase flow through porous media at core scale. It is shown that including viscous coupling leads to better predictions of relative permeability.

  2. Changes in Mood in New Enrollees at a Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE)

    PubMed Central

    Seaton, Stephanie M.; Sutcliffe, Siobhan; Austin, Shane

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To examine changes in mood after 9 months of enrollment in a Program of All- Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE). DESIGN Cohort Study SETTING Alexian Brothers PACE–St. Louis, Missouri PARTICIPANTS Newly enrolled patients aged 55 or older, living in the PACE service area, eligible for nursing home care, and able to live safely in the community with continuous care for at least 9 months (n=182). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS)-15 score at the pre- admission evaluation (PAE) and the 9 month evaluation (9ME). RESULTS Of the 182 patients evaluated, 27% (n=49) met the definition of depression as defined by the GDS-15 score of ≥6 at the PAE. At the 9ME, only 11% of patients met the depression criteria (p<0.001). Of the patients who met the criteria for depression at the PAE, 80% of patients (n=39) no longer met this criteria at the 9ME (p=0.029). Similar findings were observed by age, sex, and race. Greater improvement was observed among those who were depressed at the PAE; the depressed cohort improved by 5.0 points (p<0.001) on the GDS-15 scale from the PAE to the 9ME, whereas the non-depressed cohort improved by 0.6 points (p=0.003). CONCLUSION The use of PACE as an alternative intervention may be a good option to improve mood in older adults. PMID:26260643

  3. Optimal pacing for running 400- and 800-m track races

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reardon, James

    2013-06-01

    We present a toy model of anaerobic glycolysis that utilizes appropriate physiological and mathematical consideration while remaining useful to the athlete. The toy model produces an optimal pacing strategy for 400-m and 800-m races that is analytically calculated via the Euler-Lagrange equation. The calculation of the optimum v(t) is presented in detail, with an emphasis on intuitive arguments in order to serve as a bridge between the basic techniques presented in undergraduate physics textbooks and the more advanced techniques of control theory. Observed pacing strategies in 400-m and 800-m world-record races are found to be well-fit by the toy model, which allows us to draw a new physiological interpretation for the advantages of common weight-training practices.

  4. Factors affecting the regulation of pacing: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Mauger, Alexis R

    2014-01-01

    During prolonged dynamic and rhythmic exercise, muscular pain and discomfort arises as a result of an increased concentration of deleterious metabolites. Sensed by peripheral nociceptors and transmitted via afferent feedback to the brain, this provides important information regarding the physiological state of the muscle. These sensations ultimately contribute to what is termed “exercise-induced pain”. Despite being well recognized by athletes and coaches, and suggested to be integral to exercise performance, this construct has largely escaped attention in experimental work. This perspective article highlights the current understanding of pacing in endurance performance, and the causes of exercise-induced pain. A new perspective is described, which proposes how exercise-induced pain may be a contributing factor in helping individuals to regulate their work rate during exercise and thus provides an important construct in pacing. PMID:25228823

  5. Overexpression of connexin 43 using a retroviral vector improves electrical coupling of skeletal myoblasts with cardiac myocytes in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Tolmachov, Oleg; Ma, Yu-Ling; Themis, Michael; Patel, Pravina; Spohr, Hilmar; MacLeod, Kenneth T; Ullrich, Nina D; Kienast, Yvonne; Coutelle, Charles; Peters, Nicholas S

    2006-01-01

    Background Organ transplantation is presently often the only available option to repair a damaged heart. As heart donors are scarce, engineering of cardiac grafts from autologous skeletal myoblasts is a promising novel therapeutic strategy. The functionality of skeletal muscle cells in the heart milieu is, however, limited because of their inability to integrate electrically and mechanically into the myocardium. Therefore, in pursuit of improved cardiac integration of skeletal muscle grafts we sought to modify primary skeletal myoblasts by overexpression of the main gap-junctional protein connexin 43 and to study electrical coupling of connexin 43 overexpressing myoblasts to cardiac myocytes in vitro. Methods To create an efficient means for overexpression of connexin 43 in skeletal myoblasts we constructed a bicistronic retroviral vector MLV-CX43-EGFP expressing the human connexin 43 cDNA and the marker EGFP gene. This vector was employed to transduce primary rat skeletal myoblasts in optimised conditions involving a concomitant use of the retrovirus immobilising protein RetroNectin® and the polycation transduction enhancer Transfectam®. The EGFP-positive transduced cells were then enriched by flow cytometry. Results More than four-fold overexpression of connexin 43 in the transduced skeletal myoblasts, compared with non-transduced cells, was shown by Western blotting. Functionality of the overexpressed connexin 43 was demonstrated by microinjection of a fluorescent dye showing enhanced gap-junctional intercellular transfer in connexin 43 transduced myoblasts compared with transfer in non-transduced myoblasts. Rat cardiac myocytes were cultured in multielectrode array culture dishes together with connexin 43/EGFP transduced skeletal myoblasts, control non-transduced skeletal myoblasts or alone. Extracellular field action potential activation rates in the co-cultures of connexin 43 transduced skeletal myoblasts with cardiac myocytes were significantly higher than

  6. Pacing a chaotic plasma with a music signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardo, W. B.; Rosa, E.; Ticos, C. M.; Walkenstein, J. A.; Monti, M.

    2001-06-01

    An experimental plasma system is driven with a music signal output from a cd player. With the plasma in the periodic regime, optical detection of the light discharge allows the music to be heard from a loudspeaker. That does not happen when the plasma is chaotic, in which case we hear a noise-like hiss typical of chaos. Modulation is observed in the periodic paced plasma, but is not so obvious when the plasma is chaotic.

  7. What skills are tested in the new PACES examination?

    PubMed

    Elder, Andrew; McManus, Chris; McAlpine, Lawrence; Dacre, Jane

    2011-03-01

    The MRCP(UK) PACES examination has been sat by almost 40,000 candidates in 10 countries around the world since its introduction in 2001. The examination assesses skills of relevance to the practice and delivery of high quality clinical care and is the leading international postgraduate summative assessment of this kind. In 2009, the examination was revised, and this article describes those revisions, focussing on the clinical skills assessed.

  8. Systemic venous atrium stimulation in transvenous pacing after mustard procedure

    PubMed Central

    Puntrello, Calogero; Lucà, Fabiana; Rubino, Gaspare; Rao, Carmelo Massimiliano; Gelsomino, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a young woman corrected with a Mustard procedure undergoing successful transvenous double chamber pacemaker implantation with the atrial lead placed in the systemic venous channel. The case presented demonstrates that, when the systemic venous atrium is separate from the left atrial appendage, the lead can be easily and safely placed in the systemic venous left atrium gaining satisfactory sensing and pacing thresholds despite consisting partially of pericardial tissue. PMID:25276305

  9. A new orthogonal lead for P synchronous pacing.

    PubMed

    Goldreyer, B N; Olive, A L; Leslie, J; Cannom, D S; Wyman, M G

    1981-11-01

    P synchronous pacing has long been identified as advantageous for patients with atrioventricular conduction defects and intact sinus node function. Prior endocavitary systems have been infrequently employed, because of unreliable P wave sensing from standard ring electrodes in the atrium or the requirement for a second atrial sensing lead. A single endocardial lead employing a unipolar ventricular stimulating electrode and an orthogonal P wave sensing design was developed and tested in 22 patients undergoing electrophysiologic study or pacemaker implantation. Thirteen centimeters from the stimulating tip of a standard permanent pacing lead, three or four electrodes with a surface area of one millimeter squared, equidistant from the tip, were placed circumferentially about the catheter. With the catheter tip normally placed in the right ventricular apex, atrial sensing electrodes were positioned in the mid-high lateral right atrium, adjacent to, but not affixed to, the right atrial wall. Bipolar orthogonal leads X and Y were obtained. In 22 patients, during sinus rhythm, atrial electrogram voltages in the X axis of 2.47 plus or minus 1.6 millivolts and 2.32 plus or minus 1.6 millivolts in the Y axis were recorded. QRS voltages of 0.078 millivolts and 0.073 millivolts, respectively, allowed dramatic ability to discriminate P from QRS complexes (P/QRS equals 32/1). There was no change in QRS or unipolar ventricular pacing. A single catheter designed for P synchronous pacing employing circumferentially placed atrial sensing electrodes has demonstrated unique atrial sensing voltages with excellent QRS signal rejection.

  10. Solar thermal electricity in 1998: An IEA/SolarPACES summary of status and future prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Tyner, C.E.; Kolb, G.J.; Meinecke, W.; Trieb, F.

    1998-07-01

    Research and development activities sponsored by countries within the International Energy Agency`s solar thermal working group. SolarPACES, have helped reduce the cost of solar thermal systems to one-fifth that of the early pilot plants. Continued technological improvements are currently being proven in next-generation demonstration plants. These advances, along with cost reductions made possible by scale-up to larger production and construction of a succession of power plants, have made solar thermal systems the lowest-cost solar energy in the world and promise cost-competitiveness with fossil-fuel plants in the future. Solar thermal technologies are appropriate for a wide range of applications, including dispatchable central-station power plants where they can meet peak-load to near-base-load needs of a utility, and distributed, modular power plants for both remote and grid-connected applications. In this paper, the authors present the collective position of the SolarPACES community on solar electricity-generating technology. They discuss the current status of the technology and likely near-term improvements; the needs of target markets; and important technical and financial issues that must be resolved for success in near-term global markets.

  11. Combined obliquity and precession pacing of late Pleistocene deglaciations.

    PubMed

    Huybers, Peter

    2011-12-08

    Milankovitch proposed that Earth resides in an interglacial state when its spin axis both tilts to a high obliquity and precesses to align the Northern Hemisphere summer with Earth's nearest approach to the Sun. This general concept has been elaborated into hypotheses that precession, obliquity or combinations of both could pace deglaciations during the late Pleistocene. Earlier tests have shown that obliquity paces the late Pleistocene glacial cycles but have been inconclusive with regard to precession, whose shorter period of about 20,000 years makes phasing more sensitive to timing errors. No quantitative test has provided firm evidence for a dual effect. Here I show that both obliquity and precession pace late Pleistocene glacial cycles. Deficiencies in time control that have long stymied efforts to establish orbital effects on deglaciation are overcome using a new statistical test that focuses on maxima in orbital forcing. The results are fully consistent with Milankovitch's proposal but also admit the possibility that long Southern Hemisphere summers contribute to deglaciation.

  12. Unilateral Laryngeal Pacing System and Its Functional Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiping; Peng, Weiwei; Zhang, Fei; Shi, Baker Y.

    2017-01-01

    Goal. To establish a reliable instrumental system for synchronized reactivation of a unilaterally paralyzed vocal fold and evaluate its functional feasibility. Methods. Unilateral vocal fold paralysis model was induced by destruction of the left recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) in anesthetized dogs. With a micro controller-based electronic system, electromyography (EMG) signals from cricothyroid (CT) muscle on the ipsilateral side were recorded and used to trigger pacing of paralyzed vocalis muscles. The dynamic movement of vocal folds was continuously monitored using an endoscope, and the opening and closing of the glottis were quantified with customized imaging processing software. Results. The recorded video images showed that left side vocal fold was obviously paralyzed after destructing the RLN. Using the pacing system with feedback triggering EMG signals from the ipsilateral CT muscle, the paralyzed vocal fold was successfully reactivated, and its movement was shown to be synchronized with the healthy side. Significance. The developed unilateral laryngeal pacing system triggered by EMG from the ipsilateral side CT muscle could be successfully used in unilateral vocal fold paralysis with the advantage of avoiding disturbance to the healthy side muscles. PMID:28203464

  13. Speed, pacing strategy and aerodynamic drafting in Thoroughbred horse racing.

    PubMed

    Spence, Andrew J; Thurman, Andrew S; Maher, Michael J; Wilson, Alan M

    2012-08-23

    Choice of pacing strategy and the benefit of aerodynamic drafting are thought to be key determinants of racing performance. These effects have largely been analysed without reference to final outcome, in small datasets with low temporal resolution, and a focus on human swimming, cycling and running. Here, we determined the position and speed of 44,803 racehorses, once per second, in 3,357 races ranging in length from 1006 to 4225 m (50.9-292.9 seconds duration) using a validated radio tracking system. We find that aerodynamic drafting has a marked effect on horse performance, and hence racing outcome. Furthermore, we demonstrate that race length-dependent pacing strategies are correlated with the fastest racing times, with some horses reaching a maximum speed in excess of 19 m s(-1). The higher speeds seen with certain pacing strategies may arise due to the nature of pack racing itself, or may be a reflection of individual capabilities, that is, corresponding to horses that perform well in roles suited to their 'front-running' or 'chaser' personality traits.

  14. Tropical birds have a slow pace of life

    PubMed Central

    Wiersma, Popko; Muñoz-Garcia, Agustí; Walker, Amy; Williams, Joseph B.

    2007-01-01

    Tropical birds are relatively long-lived and produce few offspring, which develop slowly and mature relatively late in life, the slow end of the life-history axis, whereas temperate birds lie at the opposite end of this continuum. We tested the hypothesis that tropical birds have evolved a reduced basal metabolic rate (BMR). We measured BMR of 69 species of tropical birds, the largest data set amassed on metabolic rates of tropical birds, and compared these measurements with 59 estimates of BMR for temperate birds. Our analyses included conventional least squares regression, regressions based on phylogenetic independent contrasts, and a comparison of BMR of 13 phylogenetically matched pairs, one species from the tropics and one from northerly temperate areas. Our triptych showed that tropical birds had a reduced BMR, compelling evidence for a connection between the life history of tropical birds and a slow pace of life. Further, tropical migrants breeding in temperate habitats had a lower BMR than did temperate residents, suggesting that these migrants have physiological traits consistent with a slow pace of life. In addition, we determined that tropical birds had a lower cold-induced peak metabolic rate and thermogenic metabolic scope than temperate species, a finding that is consistent with the hypothesis that their environment has not selected for high levels of thermogenesis, or alternatively, that a slow pace of life may be incompatible with high thermogenic capacity. We conclude that physiological function correlates with the suite of life-history traits. PMID:17517640

  15. Improving Electron Transport Simulation in Mesoscopic Systems by Coupling a Classical Monte Carlo Algorithm to a Wigner Function Solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-García, J.; Martín, F.; Oriols, X.; Suñé, J.

    increase the simulation domains without paying a penalty in efficiency. We have modeled this coupling by using the Monte Carlo distribution of carriers in k-space in the cells adjacent to the QW as boundary conditions for the step-by-step solution of the Liouville equation, while the Wigner distribution function at the edges of the QW dictates carrier injection to the classical regions. By introducing in our tool a Poisson solver, necessary for self-consistency, we have simulated the I-V characteristic of RTD's with typical physical parameters. Realistic simulation boxes of 300nm have been considered. These are much higher than those of previous works, while the times required to achieve convergence are similar. The main qualitative features of actual devices are reproduced by means of our tool, i.e., oscillatory behavior and current plateau in the negative differential resistance region. By analyzing the potential profile and electron density distribution at various applied bias it is seen that charge accumulation in the well is maximum at resonance and no spurious or discontinuities have been found at the boundaries of the QW, which reveals that the coupling model is well-behaved. We are currently comparing the simulation results to experimental data provided by other authors. Our preliminary results seem to indicate that allowing physical parameters to slightly vary from nominal values (parameter dispersion is unavoidable at the length scales we are dealing with), a reasonable fit between simulated and experimental results is possible. The main conclusion of the work is that within the framework of the Wigner distribution function, we have developed a tool that provides improvement over previous simulators since realistic device dimensions can be considered without efficiency degradation. This allows to obtain more accurate simulated results and make the tool a potential candidate to aid in RTD device design and fabrication. This work has been supported by the Direcci

  16. Effectiveness of paced walking to music at home for patients with COPD.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chiung-Fang; Maa, Suh-Hwa; Shyu, Yea-Ing Lotus; Lai, Yu-Te; Hung, Tsung-Chieh; Chen, Hao-Cheng

    2012-08-01

    The use of rhythmic music is beneficial in assisting with the exercise intensity at home. This paper investigated the effects of paced walking to music at home with an 80% VO(2) peak for patients with COPD. A prospective randomized clinical trial consisting of a treatment group (n = 20) assigned to a 12-week period of paced walking to music at home, while the patients in the control group (n = 21) were only given educational information. The treatment response was measured based on the patient's score in the maximal exercise capacity test using the incremental shuttle walking test (ISWT), lung function, health- related quality of life (HRQOL) using the Saint George Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) and their health care utilization during baseline, 4, 8, 12 and 16 weeks. The treatment group increased their distance in the ISWT from 243.5 ± 135.4 at baseline to 16 weeks (306.0 ± 107.3, p < 0.001), Borg RPE-D decreased from 2.2 ± 1.3 at baseline to 0.8 ± 1.1 (p < 0.001) at 16 weeks, and Borg RPE-L decreased from 1.2 ± 1.4 at baseline to 0.3 ± 0.7 (p < 0.05) at 16 weeks, and improved all of the domains of the SGRQ, compared to the control group. The paced walking to music at home program helps patients to achieve a higher-intensity exercise. It is easily incorporated into the care of COPD patients, providing them with a convenient, safe and enjoyable exercise.

  17. Integrating Pharmacophore into Membrane Molecular Dynamics Simulations to Improve Homology Modeling of G Protein-coupled Receptors with Ligand Selectivity: A2A Adenosine Receptor as an Example.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lingxiao; Guan, Mengxin; Jin, Hongwei; Liu, Zhenming; Zhang, Liangren

    2015-12-01

    Homology modeling has been applied to fill in the gap in experimental G protein-coupled receptors structure determination. However, achievement of G protein-coupled receptors homology models with ligand selectivity remains challenging due to structural diversity of G protein-coupled receptors. In this work, we propose a novel strategy by integrating pharmacophore and membrane molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to improve homology modeling of G protein-coupled receptors with ligand selectivity. To validate this integrated strategy, the A2A adenosine receptor (A2A AR), whose structures in both active and inactive states have been established, has been chosen as an example. We performed blind predictions of the active-state A2A AR structure based on the inactive-state structure and compared the performance of different refinement strategies. The blind prediction model combined with the integrated strategy identified ligand-receptor interactions and conformational changes of key structural elements related to the activation of A2 A AR, including (i) the movements of intracellular ends of TM3 and TM5/TM6; (ii) the opening of ionic lock; (iii) the movements of binding site residues. The integrated strategy of pharmacophore with molecular dynamics simulations can aid in the optimization in the identification of side chain conformations in receptor models. This strategy can be further investigated in homology modeling and expand its applicability to other G protein-coupled receptor modeling, which should aid in the discovery of more effective and selective G protein-coupled receptor ligands.

  18. Impairment-Based 3-D Robotic Intervention Improves Upper Extremity Work Area in Chronic Stroke: Targeting Abnormal Joint Torque Coupling With Progressive Shoulder Abduction Loading

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Michael D.; Sukal-Moulton, Theresa M.; Dewald, Julius P. A.

    2010-01-01

    The implementation of a robotic system (ACT3D) that allowed for a quantitative measurement of abnormal joint torque coupling in chronic stroke survivors and, most importantly, a quantitative means of initiating and progressing an impairment-based intervention, is described. Individuals with chronic moderate to severe stroke (n = 8) participated in this single-group pretest-posttest design study. Subjects were trained over eight weeks by progressively increasing the level of shoulder abduction loading experienced by the participant during reaching repetitions as performance improved. Reaching work area was evaluated pre- and postintervention for ten different shoulder abduction loading levels along with isometric single-joint strength and a qualitative clinical assessment of impairment. There was a significant effect of session (pre versus post) with an increase in reaching work area, despite no change in single-joint strength. This data suggests that specifically targeting the abnormal joint torque coupling impairment through progressive shoulder abduction loading is an effective strategy for improving reaching work area following hemiparetic stroke. Application of robotics, namely, the ACT3D, allowed for quantitative control of the exercise parameters needed to directly target the synergistic coupling impairment. The targeted reduction of abnormal joint torque coupling is likely the key factor explaining the improvements in reaching range of motion achieved with this intervention. PMID:20657711

  19. Novel Insights into Structure-Activity Relationships of N-Terminally Modified PACE4 Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kwiatkowska, Anna; Couture, Frédéric; Levesque, Christine; Ly, Kévin; Beauchemin, Sophie; Desjardins, Roxane; Neugebauer, Witold; Dory, Yves L; Day, Robert

    2016-02-04

    PACE4 plays important roles in prostate cancer cell proliferation. The inhibition of this enzyme has been shown to slow prostate cancer progression and is emerging as a promising therapeutic strategy. In previous work, we developed a highly potent and selective PACE4 inhibitor, the multi-Leu (ML) peptide, an octapeptide with the sequence Ac-LLLLRVKR-NH2 . Here, with the objective of developing a useful compound for in vivo administration, we investigate the effect of N-terminal modifications. The inhibitory activity, toxicity, stability, and cell penetration properties of the resulting analogues were studied and compared to the unmodified inhibitor. Our results show that the incorporation of a polyethylene glycol (PEG) moiety leads to a loss of antiproliferative activity, whereas the attachment of a lipid chain preserves or improves it. However, the lipidated peptides are significantly more toxic when compared with their unmodified counterparts. Therefore, the best results were achieved not by the N-terminal extension but by the protection of both ends with the d-Leu residue and 4-amidinobenzylamide, which yielded the most stable inhibitor, with an excellent activity and toxicity profile.

  20. Is Conventional Cardiac Pacing Harmful in Patients with Normal Ventricular Function?

    PubMed Central

    de Sá, Luiz Antonio Batista; Rassi, Salvador; Batista, Márcia Andery Ludovico

    2013-01-01

    Background Right ventricular pacing may be deleterious in patients with left ventricular dysfunction, but in patients with normal function the impact of this stimulation triggering clinically relevant ventricular dysfunction is not fully established. Objectives To evaluate the clinical, echocardiographic findings of patients with previously normal left ventricular function underwent implantation of a pacemaker. Methods Observational, cross-sectional study with 20 patients, who underwent implantation of pacemaker, prospectively followed-up, with the following inclusion criteria: normal left ventricular function defined by echocardiography and ventricular pacing higher than 90%. Were evaluated functional class (FC) (New York Heart Association), 6-minute walk test (6MWT), B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), echocardiographic assessment (conventional and dyssynchrony parameters), and quality of life questionnaire (QLQ) (SF-36). The assessment was performed at ten days (t1), four months (t2), eight months (t3), 12 months (t4) and 24 months (t5). Results Conventional echocardiographic parameters and dyssynchrony parameters showed statistically significant variation over time. The 6MWT, FC, and BNP showed worsening at the end of two years. QLQ showed initial improvement and worsening at the end of two years. Conclusion The implantation of conventional pacemaker was associated with worsening in functional class, worsening in walk test, increased BNP levels, increased duration of QRS, and worsening in some domains of the QLQ at the end of two years. There were no changes in echocardiography measurements (conventional and asynchrony measures). PMID:24145393

  1. Event-related potential practice effects on the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (PASAT)

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Jeffrey M.; Fox, Alison M.

    2012-01-01

    Practice can change the nature and quality of a stimulus-response relationship. The current study observed the effects of repeated administration of the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (PASAT) in 12 healthy individuals, in an effort to establish distinct profiles associated with novel and practiced processing. Over four training sessions the mean number of correct responses on this demanding test of attention significantly improved and was approaching ceiling for most task conditions. Behavioural improvements were associated with significantly reduced amplitude of late Processing Negativity, a frontally distributed component of the event-related potential waveform associated with voluntary, limited-capacity activity within higher-order attentional systems. These results suggest that PASAT performance became more efficient as practice seemingly eased the strategic planning and coordination requirements the task places on frontally-mediated executive attention resources. The findings of the current study extend our understanding of the functional and behavioural mechanisms underlying the effects of practice. PMID:23717344

  2. Optimization of Density and Radiated Power Evolution Control using Magnetic ELM Pace-making in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Canik, John; Maingi, Rajesh; Sontag, Aaron C; Bell, R. E.; Gates, D.A.; Gerhardt, S.P.; Kugel, H.; LaBlanc, B. P.; Menard, J.; Paul, S.F.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Soukhanovskii, V. A.

    2010-01-01

    Recent experiments at the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) have shown that lithium coating of the plasma facing components leads to improved energy confinement, and also the complete suppression of edge-localized modes (ELMs). Due to the lack of ELMs, however, such plasmas suffer from density and radiated power that increase throughout the discharge, often leading to a radiative collapse. Previous experiments have shown that ELMs can be controllably restored into these lithium-conditioned discharges using 3D magnetic perturbations, which reduces impurity accumulation. The use of magnetic ELM pace-making has been optimized to control the evolution of the density and impurity content. Short duration large amplitude 3D field pulses are used, so that the threshold field for destabilization is reached and ELMs triggered quickly, and the field is then removed. A second improvement was made by adding a negative-going pulse to each of the triggering pulses to counteract the vessel eddy currents and reduce time-averaged rotation braking. With these improvements to the triggering waveform, the frequency of the triggered ELMs was increased to over 60 Hz, reducing the average ELM size. The optimum frequency for attaining impurity control while minimizing energy confinement reduction was determined: fairly low frequency ELMs (20 Hz triggering) are sufficient to keep the total radiation fraction below 25% throughout the discharge and avoid radiative collapse, with little reduction in the plasma stored energy. When combined with improved particle fueling, the ELM-pacing technique has been successful in achieving stationary conditions in the line-averaged electron density and total radiated power.

  3. An Autopsy Case of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis with Diaphragm Pacing

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Hisashi; Kamei, Tetsumasa; Odake, Sanae; Nakano, Masayuki; Okeda, Riki; Kohriki, Shunsaku; Kawachi, Jun; Onders, Raymond P.; Yoshii, Fumihito

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory insufficiency is a critical problem in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients. We herein present the case of an autopsied patient with sporadic ALS who underwent diaphragm pacing (DP). The pathology showed several localized adhesions with a markedly atrophied diaphragm. A marked loss of motor neurons with Bunina bodies and phosphorylated TDP-43 positive inclusions was found in the spinal cord and primary motor cortex. Mild hyalinization and a few multinucleated giant cells were present around the electrode tracks in the diaphragm. However, no infiltration of inflammatory cells was detected. Our findings suggest that full-time DP might not cause severe damage to adjacent diaphragm tissue. PMID:27904119

  4. Dual-demand pacing for reciprocating atrioventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed Central

    Krikler, D; Curry, P; Buffet, J

    1976-01-01

    By using programmed electrical stimulation of the heart and studying the initiation and termination of reciprocating atrioventricular tachycardia two patients with the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome were shown to respond rapidly and consistently to fixed-rate pacing. A demand pacemaker was implanted in each patient, having been modified so as to switch into the fixed-rate mode whenever the tachycardia began, thereby terminating the arrhythmia. This appears to be a promising form of treatment in patients with otherwise intractable paroxysmal tachycardia who have been shown by careful study to respond in this way. PMID:1268586

  5. An Autopsy Case of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis with Diaphragm Pacing.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hisashi; Kamei, Tetsumasa; Odake, Sanae; Nakano, Masayuki; Okeda, Riki; Kohriki, Shunsaku; Kawachi, Jun; Onders, Raymond P; Yoshii, Fumihito

    Respiratory insufficiency is a critical problem in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients. We herein present the case of an autopsied patient with sporadic ALS who underwent diaphragm pacing (DP). The pathology showed several localized adhesions with a markedly atrophied diaphragm. A marked loss of motor neurons with Bunina bodies and phosphorylated TDP-43 positive inclusions was found in the spinal cord and primary motor cortex. Mild hyalinization and a few multinucleated giant cells were present around the electrode tracks in the diaphragm. However, no infiltration of inflammatory cells was detected. Our findings suggest that full-time DP might not cause severe damage to adjacent diaphragm tissue.

  6. Finding the sweet spot for non-apical RV pacing - "love's labor's lost or much ado about nothing:" a new angiographic technique to accomplish accurate physiological RV septal pacing in under 5 minutes from venous cannulation (or bust).

    PubMed

    Srivatsa, Sanjay S

    2014-03-01

    Right ventricular septal pacing has been long touted as a more physiologic alternative to right ventricular apical pacing. This article reviews the physiologic and clinical evidence for right ventricular septal versus apical pacing, and presents a novel angiographic technique for efficient attainment of the optimal septal pacing site. The reasons for equivocal clinical findings in septal versus apical pacing studies are discussed, and a new strategy for non-apical pacing clinical trial design utilizing comparative anatomic assessment of septal pacing site versus clinical outcome is proposed.

  7. Diastolic Function in Paced Children with Cardiac Defects: Septum vs Apex

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Michel Cabrera; Morejon, Adel Eladio Gonzalez; Serrano, Giselle Ricardo; Ramos, Dunia Barbara Benitez

    2015-01-01

    In children with structural congenital heart disease (CHD), the effects of chronic ventricular pacing on diastolic function are not well known. On the other hand, the beneficial effect of septal pacing over apical pacing is still controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different right ventricular (RV) pacing site on left ventricular (LV) diastolic function in children with cardiac defects. Twenty-nine pediatric patients with complete atrioventricular block (CAVB) and CHD undergoing permanent pacing were prospectively studied. Pacing sites were RV apex (n = 16) and RV septum (n = 13). Echocardiographic assessment was performed before pacemaker implantation and after it, during a mean follow‑up of 4.9 years. Compared to RV septum, transmitral E-wave was significantly affected in RV apical pacing (95.38 ± 9.19 vs 83 ± 18.75, p = 0.038). Likewise, parameters at the lateral annular tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) were significantly affected in children paced at the RV apex. The E´ wave correlated inversely with TDI lateral myocardial performance index (Tei index) (R2= 0.9849, p ≤ 0.001). RV apex pacing (Odds ratio, 0.648; confidence interval, 0.067-0.652; p = 0.003) and TDI lateral Tei index (Odds ratio, 31.21; confidence interval, 54.6-177.4; p = 0.025) predicted significantly decreased LV diastolic function. Of the two sites studied, RV septum prevents pacing-induced reduction of LV diastolic function. PMID:26352178

  8. Effects of continuous low-frequency pacing on immature canine diaphragm.

    PubMed

    Marzocchi, M; Brouillette, R T; Klemka-Walden, L M; Heller, S L; Weese-Mayer, D E; Brozanski, B S; Caliendo, J; Daood, M; Ilbawi, M N; Hunt, C E

    1990-09-01

    Although diaphragm pacing has been shown to be a practical method of supporting ventilation in children, its usefulness has been limited because of concern that continuous (24 h/day) diaphragm pacing would fatigue and damage the diaphragm. We examined the functional and structural effects of continuous low-frequency diaphragm pacing on the left hemidiaphragm of five immature dogs aged 65 +/- 2 (SD) days at onset of pacing. Stimulus parameters approximated those required to pace infants: frequency 11.1 Hz, inspiratory time 810 ms, and respiratory rate 20 breaths/min. Animals were paced 24 h/day for 24-28 days. Paced tidal volumes and airway occlusion pressures were unchanged at low (less than 15 Hz) stimulus frequencies but were reduced at high (greater than 20 Hz) stimulus frequencies. Although histologically the paced hemidiaphragms appeared normal, histochemical studies showed a conversion from a mixture of type I (54%) and type II (46%) fibers to a uniform population of type I fibers with high oxidative enzyme activity. Transformation of muscle type was also demonstrated by pyrophosphate gel electrophoresis; fast and slow isomyosin bands were noted in control specimens, whereas only slow isomyosin was identified in paced specimens. Thus, in immature dogs, continuous low-frequency pacing affects both function and structure of the diaphragm.

  9. Higher sympathetic nerve activity during ventricular (VVI) than during dual-chamber (DDD) pacing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, J. A.; Morillo, C. A.; Eckberg, D. L.; Ellenbogen, K. A.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We determined the short-term effects of single-chamber ventricular pacing and dual-chamber atrioventricular (AV) pacing on directly measured sympathetic nerve activity. BACKGROUND: Dual-chamber AV cardiac pacing results in greater cardiac output and lower systemic vascular resistance than does single-chamber ventricular pacing. However, it is unclear whether these hemodynamic advantages result in less sympathetic nervous system outflow. METHODS: In 13 patients with a dual-chamber pacemaker, we recorded the electrocardiogram, noninvasive arterial pressure (Finapres), respiration and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (microneurography) during 3 min of underlying basal heart rate and 3 min of ventricular and AV pacing at rates of 60 and 100 beats/min. RESULTS: Arterial pressure was lowest and muscle sympathetic nerve activity was highest at the underlying basal heart rate. Arterial pressure increased with cardiac pacing and was greater with AV than with ventricular pacing (change in mean blood pressure +/- SE: 10 +/- 3 vs. 2 +/- 2 mm Hg at 60 beats/min; 21 +/- 5 vs. 14 +/- 2 mm Hg at 100 beats/min; p < 0.05). Sympathetic nerve activity decreased with cardiac pacing and the decline was greater with AV than with ventricular pacing (60 beats/min -40 +/- 11% vs. -17 +/- 7%; 100 beats/min -60 +/- 9% vs. -48 +/- 10%; p < 0.05). Although most patients showed a strong inverse relation between arterial pressure and muscle sympathetic nerve activity, three patients with severe left ventricular dysfunction (ejection fraction < or = 30%) showed no relation between arterial pressure and sympathetic activity. CONCLUSIONS: Short-term AV pacing results in lower sympathetic nerve activity and higher arterial pressure than does ventricular pacing, indicating that cardiac pacing mode may influence sympathetic outflow simply through arterial baroreflex mechanisms. We speculate that the greater incidence of adverse outcomes in patients treated with single-chamber ventricular

  10. The Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verlinde, J.; Harrington, J. Y.; McFarquhar, G. M.; Yannuzzi, V. T.; Avramov, A.; Greenberg, S.; Johnson, N.; Zhang, G.; Poellot, M. R.; Mather, J. H.; Turner, D. D.; Eloranta, E. W.; Zak, B. D.; Prenni, A. J.; Daniel, J. S.; Kok, G. L.; Tobin, D. C.; Holz, R.; Sassen, K.; Spangenberg, D.; Minnis, P.; Tooman, T. P.; Ivey, M. D.; Richardson, S. J.; Bahramann, C. P.

    2007-01-01

    The Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE) was conducted September 27 through October 22, 2004 on the North Slope of Alaska. The primary objective was to collect a data set suitable to study interactions between microphysics, dynamics and radiative transfer in mixed-phase Arctic clouds. Observations taken during the 1997/1998 Surface Heat and Energy Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA) experiment revealed that Arctic clouds frequently consist of one (or more) liquid layers precipitating ice. M-PACE sought to investigate the physical processes of these clouds utilizing two aircraft (an in situ aircraft to characterize the microphysical properties of the clouds and a remote sensing aircraft to constraint the upwelling radiation) over the Department of Energy s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) on the North Slope of Alaska. The measurements successfully documented the microphysical structure of Arctic mixed-phase clouds, with multiple in situ profiles collected in both single-layer and multi-layer clouds over two ground-based remote sensing sites. Liquid was found in clouds with temperatures down to -30 C, the coldest cloud top temperature below -40 C sampled by the aircraft. Remote sensing instruments suggest that ice was present in low concentrations, mostly concentrated in precipitation shafts, although there are indications of light ice precipitation present below the optically thick single-layer clouds. The prevalence of liquid down to these low temperatures could potentially be explained by the relatively low measured ice nuclei concentrations.

  11. The Transfer Functions of Cardiac Tissue during Stochastic Pacing

    PubMed Central

    de Lange, Enno; Kucera, Jan P.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The restitution properties of cardiac action potential duration (APD) and conduction velocity (CV) are important factors in arrhythmogenesis. They determine alternans, wavebreak, and the patterns of reentrant arrhythmias. We developed a novel approach to characterize restitution using transfer functions. Transfer functions relate an input and an output quantity in terms of gain and phase shift in the complex frequency domain. We derived an analytical expression for the transfer function of interbeat intervals (IBIs) during conduction from one site (input) to another site downstream (output). Transfer functions can be efficiently obtained using a stochastic pacing protocol. Using simulations of conduction and extracellular mapping of strands of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes, we show that transfer functions permit the quantification of APD and CV restitution slopes when it is difficult to measure APD directly. We find that the normally positive CV restitution slope attenuates IBI variations. In contrast, a negative CV restitution slope (induced by decreasing extracellular [K+]) amplifies IBI variations with a maximum at the frequency of alternans. Hence, it potentiates alternans and renders conduction unstable, even in the absence of APD restitution. Thus, stochastic pacing and transfer function analysis represent a powerful strategy to evaluate restitution and the stability of conduction. PMID:19134481

  12. Data reproducibility of pace strategy in a laboratory test run

    PubMed Central

    de França, Elias; Xavier, Ana Paula; Hirota, Vinicius Barroso; Côrrea, Sônia Cavalcanti; Caperuto, Érico Chagas

    2016-01-01

    This data paper contains data related to a reproducibility test for running pacing strategy in an intermittent running test until exhaustion. Ten participants underwent a crossover study (test and retest) with an intermittent running test. The test was composed of three-minute sets (at 1 km/h above Onset Blood Lactate Accumulation) until volitional exhaustion. To assess pace strategy change, in the first test participants chose the rest time interval (RTI) between sets (ranging from 30 to 60 s) and in the second test the maximum RTI values were either the RTI chosen in the first test (maximum RTI value), or less if desired. To verify the reproducibility of the test, rating perceived exertion (RPE), heart rate (HR) and blood plasma lactate concentration ([La]p) were collected at rest, immediately after each set and at the end of the tests. As results, RTI, RPE, HR, [La]p and time to exhaustion were not statistically different (p>0.05) between test and retest, as well as they demonstrated good intraclass correlation. PMID:27081672

  13. Self-paced model learning for robust visual tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wenhui; Gu, Jason; Ma, Xin; Li, Yibin

    2017-01-01

    In visual tracking, learning a robust and efficient appearance model is a challenging task. Model learning determines both the strategy and the frequency of model updating, which contains many details that could affect the tracking results. Self-paced learning (SPL) has recently been attracting considerable interest in the fields of machine learning and computer vision. SPL is inspired by the learning principle underlying the cognitive process of humans, whose learning process is generally from easier samples to more complex aspects of a task. We propose a tracking method that integrates the learning paradigm of SPL into visual tracking, so reliable samples can be automatically selected for model learning. In contrast to many existing model learning strategies in visual tracking, we discover the missing link between sample selection and model learning, which are combined into a single objective function in our approach. Sample weights and model parameters can be learned by minimizing this single objective function. Additionally, to solve the real-valued learning weight of samples, an error-tolerant self-paced function that considers the characteristics of visual tracking is proposed. We demonstrate the robustness and efficiency of our tracker on a recent tracking benchmark data set with 50 video sequences.

  14. Improvement of the Cloud Physics Formulation in the U.S. Navy Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-30

    following tasks: 1. Investigation of aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions in COAMPS using the CIMMS bulk drizzle parameterization 2...Naval Research Laboratory’s Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS) equipped with the CIMMS bulk drizzle scheme. In an...activation parameterization, giant CCN parameterization, SGS variability) developed at CIMMS /OU will be made available to NRL and registered COAMPS users

  15. Sexual behavior regulated (paced) by the female induces conditioned place preference.

    PubMed

    Paredes, R G; Alonso, A

    1997-02-01

    The possibility that female-paced coital behavior induces a reward state of sufficient intensity and duration to induce conditioning was evaluated by the conditioned-place-preference paradigm. Ovariectomized female rats, treated with estradiol benzoate and progesterone, regulated (paced) their coital interactions with a stud male through a 2-compartment chamber in which only the female could freely move from one compartment to the other. The females that paced their coital interactions showed a clear place preference. In contrast, no change in preference was observed in the females that could not pace their coital contacts. The change in preference in the females that paced their coital interactions was similar to that produced by an injection of morphine (1 mg/kg). These results suggest that coital interactions in females can induce a reward state when the females can control the pace of the sexual interaction.

  16. Pacing a data transfer operation between compute nodes on a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Blocksome, Michael A.

    2011-09-13

    Methods, systems, and products are disclosed for pacing a data transfer between compute nodes on a parallel computer that include: transferring, by an origin compute node, a chunk of an application message to a target compute node; sending, by the origin compute node, a pacing request to a target direct memory access (`DMA`) engine on the target compute node using a remote get DMA operation; determining, by the origin compute node, whether a pacing response to the pacing request has been received from the target DMA engine; and transferring, by the origin compute node, a next chunk of the application message if the pacing response to the pacing request has been received from the target DMA engine.

  17. Spatial discordance and phase reversals during alternate pacing in discrete-time kinematic and cardiomyocyte ionic models.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Seth H

    2015-10-01

    Alternans, a beat-to-beat alternation in the cardiac action potential duration (APD), is a dynamical instability linked with the initiation of arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death, and arises via a period-doubling bifurcation when myocytes are stimulated at fast rates. In this study, we analyze the stability of a propagating electrical wave in a one-dimensional cardiac myocyte model in response to an arrhythmogenic rhythm known as alternate pacing. Using a discrete-time kinematic model and complex frequency (Z) domain analysis, we derive analytical expressions to predict phase reversals and spatial discordance in the interbeat interval (IBI) and APD, which, importantly, cannot be predicted with a model that neglects the influence of cell coupling on repolarization. We identify key dimensionless parameters that determine the transition from spatial concordance to discordance. Finally, we show that the theoretical predictions agree closely with numerical simulations of an ionic myocyte model, over a wide range of parameters, including variable IBI, altered ionic current gating, and reduced cell coupling. We demonstrate a novel approach to predict instability in cardiac tissue during alternate pacing and further illustrate how this approach can be generalized to more detail models of myocyte dynamics.

  18. The pacing stress test: thallium-201 myocardial imaging after atrial pacing. Diagnostic value in detecting coronary artery disease compared with exercise testing

    SciTech Connect

    Heller, G.V.; Aroesty, J.M.; Parker, J.A.; McKay, R.G.; Silverman, K.J.; Als, A.V.; Come, P.C.; Kolodny, G.M.; Grossman, W.

    1984-05-01

    Many patients suspected of having coronary artery disease are unable to undergo adequate exercise testing. An alternate stress, pacing tachycardia, has been shown to produce electrocardiographic changes that are as sensitive and specific as those observed during exercise testing. To compare thallium-201 imaging after atrial pacing stress with thallium imaging after exercise stress, 22 patients undergoing cardiac catheterization were studied with both standard exercise thallium imaging and pacing thallium imaging. Positive ischemic electrocardiographic changes (greater than 1 mm ST segment depression) were noted in 11 of 16 patients with coronary artery disease during exercise, and in 15 of the 16 patients during atrial pacing. One of six patients with normal or trivial coronary artery disease had a positive electrocardiogram with each test. Exercise thallium imaging was positive in 13 of 16 patients with coronary artery disease compared with 15 of 16 patients during atrial pacing. Three of six patients without coronary artery disease had a positive scan with exercise testing, and two of these same patients developed a positive scan with atrial pacing. Of those patients with coronary artery disease and an abnormal scan, 85% showed redistribution with exercise testing compared with 87% during atrial pacing. Segment by segment comparison of thallium imaging after either atrial pacing or exercise showed that there was a good correlation of the location and severity of the thallium defects (r . 0.83, p . 0.0001, Spearman rank correlation). It is concluded that the location and presence of both fixed and transient thallium defects after atrial pacing are closely correlated with the findings after exercise testing.

  19. Sign language users' education and employment levels: keeping pace with changes in the general Australian population?

    PubMed

    Willoughby, Louisa

    2011-01-01

    This article draws on data from the 2006 Australian census to explore the education and employment outcomes of sign languages users living in Victoria, Australia, and to compare them with outcomes reported in the general population. Census data have the advantage of sampling the entire population on the one night, avoiding problems of population comparability and sampling errors that may affect survey-based research. The analysis shows that sign language users are approaching parity with the general population on some measures of educational attainment, but there remains a gap in employment levels and particularly income. Sign language users aged 25-44 years show higher attainment than those in the 45-64 age group, suggesting that educational reforms in the last 30 years are having a positive impact on both education and employment levels. However, younger sign language users are still struggling to keep pace with improvements in certain employment outcomes that are seen in the general population.

  20. PACES Participation in Educational Outreach Programs at the University of Texas at El Paso

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodge, Rebecca L.

    1997-01-01

    The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) is involved in several initiatives to improve science education within the El Paso area public schools. These include outreach efforts into the K- 12 classrooms; training programs for in-service teachers; and the introduction of a strong science core curricula within the College of Education. The Pan American Center for Earth and Environmental Studies (PACES), a NASA-funded University Research Center, will leverage off the goals of these existing initiatives to provide curriculum support materials at all levels. We will use currently available Mission to Planet Earth (MTPE) materials as well as new materials developed specifically for this region, in an effort to introduce the Earth System Science perspective into these programs. In addition, we are developing curriculum support materials and classes within the Geology and Computer Departments, to provide education in the area of remote sensing and GIS applications at the undergraduate and graduate levels.

  1. Meta-Analysis of Single-Case Research Design Studies on Instructional Pacing.

    PubMed

    Tincani, Matt; De Mers, Marilyn

    2016-11-01

    More than four decades of research on instructional pacing has yielded varying and, in some cases, conflicting findings. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to synthesize single-case research design (SCRD) studies on instructional pacing to determine the relative benefits of brisker or slower pacing. Participants were children and youth with and without disabilities in educational settings, excluding higher education. Tau-U, a non-parametric statistic for analyzing data in SCRD studies, was used to determine effect size estimates. The article extraction yielded 13 instructional pacing studies meeting contemporary standards for high quality SCRD research. Eleven of the 13 studies reported small to large magnitude effects when two or more pacing parameters were compared, suggesting that instructional pacing is a robust instructional variable. Brisker instructional pacing with brief inter-trial interval (ITI) produced small increases in correct responding and medium to large reductions in challenging behavior compared with extended ITI. Slower instructional pacing with extended wait-time produced small increases in correct responding, but also produced small increases in challenging behavior compared with brief wait-time. Neither brief ITI nor extended wait-time meets recently established thresholds for evidence-based practice, highlighting the need for further instructional pacing research.

  2. Understanding the relation between urbanization and the eco-environment in China's Yangtze River Delta using an improved EKC model and coupling analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yabo; Wang, Shaojian; Zhou, Chunshan

    2016-11-15

    Better understanding the relationship between urbanization (U) and the eco-environment (E) is necessary to coordinate the development of them. Using a comprehensive index system for U and E with statistic data, and an improved environmental Kuznets curve (EKC) model and dynamic coordination coupling degree (CCD) model, this study addressed the relationship between U and E in the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) in the period 1980-2013. The main conclusions were as follows: (1) Economic urbanization and eco-environment endowment were the highest weighted factors in the U and E system respectively, and thus constitute the key factors. (2) Differentiated inverted-U curves were shown to exist in the relation between U and E across the cities studied, thereby confirming the improved EKC hypothesis. We further found economically developed areas to have higher urbanization levels than less developed areas at the point at which the curve inflects, less developed areas have higher eco-environmental pressure at inflection. Before the appearance of the inflection point, a striking positive correlation was observed between eco-environmental pressure and the urbanization level, while a negative correlation was found to follow it. (3) A dynamic coordination coupling relation was found to exist between U and E, which conforms to an S-shaped curve. The coordination coupling process in the YRD has gradually moved from a "low-grade symbiosis" stage into a "break-in development" stage, but the pattern of coordination belonging to the eco-environment part of the relation was found to always show some lag. The dynamic CCD model showed a difference in the spatial distribution of CCD, presenting higher values in the periphery of the region, and lower values in the center during the study period. The improved EKC and coupling analysis detailed in this study may help Chinese decision makers to formulate sustainable measures to balance urbanization development and eco-environment protection.

  3. Percutaneously injectable fetal pacemaker: electronics, pacing thresholds, and power budget.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Adriana; Chmait, Ramen; Bar-Cohen, Yaniv; Zheng, Kaihui; Loeb, Gerald E

    2012-01-01

    We are developing a cardiac pacemaker that is designed to be implanted percutaneously into a fetus to treat complete heart block and consequent hydrops fetalis, which is otherwise fatal. One of the most significant considerations for this device is the technical challenges presented by the battery and charging system. The size of the device is limited to about 3 mm in diameter; batteries on this scale have very small charge capacities. The smaller capacity means that the device needs to be designed so that it uses as little current as possible and so that its battery can be recharged wirelessly. We determined the pacing thresholds for a simple relaxation oscillator that can be assembled from discrete, surface mount components and analyzed the power consumption of the device given different electrode configurations and stimulus parameters. An inductive recharging system will be required for some patients; it is feasible within the package constraints and under development.

  4. Seasonal Pacing - Match Importance Affects Activity in Professional Soccer.

    PubMed

    Link, Daniel; de Lorenzo, Michael F

    2016-01-01

    This research explores the influence of match importance on player activity in professional soccer. Therefore, we used an observational approach and analyzed 1,211 matches of German Bundesliga and 2nd Bundesliga. The importance measurement employed is based on post season consequences of teams involved in a match. This means, if a match result could potentially influence the final rank, and this rank would lead to different consequences for a team, such as qualification for Champions League opposed to qualification for Europe League, then this match is classified as important; otherwise not. Activity was quantified by TOTAL DISTANCE COVERED, SPRINTS, FAST RUNS, DUELS, FOULS and ATTEMPTS. Running parameters were recorded using a semi-automatic optical tracking system, while technical variables were collected by professional data loggers. Based on our importance classification, low important matches occurred at the beginning of round 29. A two-way ANOVA indicates significantly increased FAST RUNS (+4%, d = 0.3), DUELS (+16%, d = 1.0) and FOULS (+36%, d = 1.2) in important matches compared to low important ones. For FAST RUNS and FOULS, this effect only exists in Bundesliga. A comparison of the two leagues show that TOTAL DISTANCE COVERED (+3%, d = 0.9), SPRINTS (+25%, d = 1.4) and FAST RUNS (+15%, d = 1.4) are higher compared to 2nd Bundesliga, whilst FOULS is less in Bundesliga (-7%, d = 0.3). No difference in player activity was found between matches at the beginning of a season (round 1-6) and at the end of a season (round 29-34). We conclude that match importance influences player activity in German professional soccer. The most reasonable explanation is a conscious or unconscious pacing strategy, motivated by preserving abilities or preventing injury. Since this tendency mainly exists in Bundesliga, this may suggest that more skilled players show a higher awareness for the need of pacing.

  5. Seasonal Pacing - Match Importance Affects Activity in Professional Soccer

    PubMed Central

    Link, Daniel; de Lorenzo, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    This research explores the influence of match importance on player activity in professional soccer. Therefore, we used an observational approach and analyzed 1,211 matches of German Bundesliga and 2nd Bundesliga. The importance measurement employed is based on post season consequences of teams involved in a match. This means, if a match result could potentially influence the final rank, and this rank would lead to different consequences for a team, such as qualification for Champions League opposed to qualification for Europe League, then this match is classified as important; otherwise not. Activity was quantified by TOTAL DISTANCE COVERED, SPRINTS, FAST RUNS, DUELS, FOULS and ATTEMPTS. Running parameters were recorded using a semi-automatic optical tracking system, while technical variables were collected by professional data loggers. Based on our importance classification, low important matches occurred at the beginning of round 29. A two-way ANOVA indicates significantly increased FAST RUNS (+4%, d = 0.3), DUELS (+16%, d = 1.0) and FOULS (+36%, d = 1.2) in important matches compared to low important ones. For FAST RUNS and FOULS, this effect only exists in Bundesliga. A comparison of the two leagues show that TOTAL DISTANCE COVERED (+3%, d = 0.9), SPRINTS (+25%, d = 1.4) and FAST RUNS (+15%, d = 1.4) are higher compared to 2nd Bundesliga, whilst FOULS is less in Bundesliga (-7%, d = 0.3). No difference in player activity was found between matches at the beginning of a season (round 1–6) and at the end of a season (round 29–34). We conclude that match importance influences player activity in German professional soccer. The most reasonable explanation is a conscious or unconscious pacing strategy, motivated by preserving abilities or preventing injury. Since this tendency mainly exists in Bundesliga, this may suggest that more skilled players show a higher awareness for the need of pacing. PMID:27281051

  6. The Influence of Collective Behavior on Pacing in Endurance Competitions

    PubMed Central

    Renfree, Andrew; Crivoi do Carmo, Everton; Martin, Louise; Peters, Derek M.

    2015-01-01

    A number of theoretical models have been proposed in recent years to explain pacing strategies observed in individual competitive endurance events. These have typically related to the internal regulatory processes that inform the making of decisions relating to muscular work rate. Despite a substantial body of research which has investigated the influence of collective group dynamics on individual behaviors in various animal species, this issue has not been comprehensively studied in individual athletic events. This is somewhat surprising given that athletes often directly compete in close proximity to one another, and that collective behavior has also been observed in other human environments including pedestrian interactions and financial market trading. Whilst the reasons for adopting collective behavior are not fully understood, collective behavior is thought to result from individual agents following simple local rules that result in seemingly complex large systems that act to confer some biological advantage to the collective as a whole. Although such collective behaviors may generally be beneficial, competitive endurance events are complicated by the fact that increasing levels of physiological disruption as activity progresses may compromise the ability of some individuals to continue to interact with other group members. This could result in early fatigue and relative underperformance due to suboptimal utilization of physiological resources by some athletes. Alternatively, engagement with a collective behavior may benefit all due to a reduction in the complexity of decisions to be made and a subsequent reduction in cognitive loading and mental fatigue. This paper seeks evidence for collective behavior in previously published analyses of pacing behavior and proposes mechanisms through which it could potentially be either beneficial, or detrimental to individual performance. It concludes with suggestions for future research to enhance understanding of this

  7. Effect of pacing rate and intensity on mechanical alternans amplitude.

    PubMed

    Sideris, D A; Nanas, J N; Papalambrou, J; Moulopoulos, S D

    1981-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to report the effect of variations in stimulus frequency (SF) and intensity (SI) of right ventricular pacing on the left ventricular mechanical alternans (MA) amplitude, (MAA) which is defined as 100 (S-W)/S, where S is the ventricular pressure of the strong beat and W that of the weak beat. In 30 dogs the right ventricle was paced at SF ranging from the sinus frequency up to 400/min and at SI ranging from threshold up to 270 mA, while the left ventricular pressure was recorded. Increasing SF at near threshold values of SI resulted in an increase of MAA up to a maximal value. Further increase in SF might cause a diminution of MAA. A slight raise in SI than could increase abruptly MAA. Further increase in SI while keeping a constant SF caused a reduction in MAA which was an approximate logarithmic function of SI. Digoxin, adrenaline or calcium reduced or abolished MA, even in experiments which left atrial and mean aortic pressure were kept constant by suitably placed open-air reservoirs. Pindolol increased MAA. Raising the height of the atrial constant pressure reservoir induced the MAA, while lowering its height increased the MAA. Changing the height of the aortic constant pressure reservoir did not produce consistent changes in MAA. The effects of SF and SI on the MAA could possibly be explained on the basis of the hypothesis that the MA is a complex oscillatory phenomenon. A different number of myocardial fibers contracting at each systole depending on SF and SI may play a role in the genesis of MA and may explain the present findings. It is concluded that, in addition to hemodynamic and inotropic factors, stimulating the ventricles at a high SI may ameliorate the MA at a given heart rate.

  8. Head-to-head running race simulation alters pacing strategy, performance, and mood state.

    PubMed

    Tomazini, Fabiano; Pasqua, Leonardo A; Damasceno, Mayara V; Silva-Cavalcante, Marcos D; de Oliveira, Fernando R; Lima-Silva, Adriano E; Bertuzzi, Rômulo

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the influence of the presence and absence of competitors on pacing, overall running performance, and mood state during a self-paced 3-km run. Nine recreational runners participated in this study. They performed the following tests: a) an incremental test to exhaustion to measure the respiratory compensation point (RCP), maximal oxygen uptake, and peak treadmill speed; b) a submaximal speed constant test to measure running economy; and c) two 3-km running time trials performed collectively (COL, head-to-head competition) or individually (IND, performed alone) to establish pacing and running performance. The COL condition was formed of a group of four runners or five runners. Runners were grouped by matched performance times and to retain head-to-head characteristics.A mood state profile questionnaire was completed before and after the 3-km running time trial. The overall performance was better in the COL than in the IND (11.75 ± 0.05 min vs. 12.25 ± 0.06 min, respectively; p = 0.04). The running speeds during the first 500 m were significantly greater in COL (16.8 ± 2.16 km·h−1) than in IND (15.3 ± 2.45 km·h−1) (p = 0.03).The gain in running speed from IND to COL during the first 400 m (i.e. running speed in COL less running speed in IND) was significantly correlated with the RCP (r = 0.88; p = 0.05). The vigor score significantly decreased from pre- to post-running in COL (p=0.05), but not in IND (p=0.20). Additionally, the post running vigor was significantly higher in IND compared to COL (p = 0.03).These findings suggested that the presence of competitors induces a fast start, which results in an improved overall performance and reduced post-exercise vigor scores, compared to an individual run.

  9. Fusion beat in patients with heart failure treated with left ventricular pacing: may ECG morphology relate to mechanical synchrony? A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Gianfranchi, Lorella; Bettiol, Katia; Sassone, Biagio; Verlato, Roberto; Corbucci, Giorgio; Alboni, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    Background Electrical fusion between left ventricular pacing and spontaneous right ventricular activation is considered the key to resynchronisation in sinus rhythm patients treated with single-site left ventricular pacing. Aim Use of QRS morphology to optimize device programming in patients with heart failure (HF), sinus rhythm (SR), left bundle branch block (LBBB), treated with single-site left ventricular pacing. Methods and Results We defined the "fusion band" (FB) as the range of AV intervals within which surface ECG showed an intermediate morphology between the native LBBB and the fully paced right bundle branch block patterns. Twenty-four patients were enrolled. Echo-derived parameters were collected in the FB and compared with the basal LBBB condition. Velocity time integral and ejection time did not improve significantly. Diastolic filling time, ejection fraction and myocardial performance index showed a statistically significant improvement in the FB. Interventricular delay and mitral regurgitation progressively and significantly decreased as AV delay shortened in the FB. The tissue Doppler asynchrony index (Ts-SD-12-ejection) showed a non significant decreasing trend in the FB. The indications provided by the tested parameters were mostly concordant in that part of the FB corresponding to the shortest AV intervals. Conclusion Using ECG criteria based on the FB may constitute an attractive option for a safe, simple and rapid optimization of resynchronization therapy in patients with HF, SR and LBBB. PMID:18167164

  10. Improved measurement of the triple gauge-boson couplings γWW and ZWW in e+e- collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ALEPH Collaboration; Schael, S.; Barate, R.; Brunelière, R.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Jézéquel, S.; Lees, J.-P.; Martin, F.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.-N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Trocmé, B.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Martinez, M.; Pacheco, A.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Filippis, N.; de Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Barklow, T.; Buchmüller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Clerbaux, B.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kado, M.; Mato, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Teubert, F.; Valassi, A.; Videau, I.; Badaud, F.; Dessagne, S.; Falvard, A.; Fayolle, D.; Gay, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Pallin, D.; Pascolo, J. M.; Perret, P.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Kraan, A. C.; Nilsson, B. S.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.-C.; Machefert, F.; Rougé, A.; Videau, H.; Ciulli, V.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bossi, F.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Kennedy, J.; Lynch, J. G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Thompson, A. S.; Wasserbaech, S.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Cameron, W.; Davies, G.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nowell, J.; Rutherford, S. A.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Thompson, J. C.; White, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.; Bowdery, C. K.; Clarke, D. P.; Ellis, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Pearson, M. R.; Robertson, N. A.; Smizanska, M.; van der Aa, O.; Delaere, C.; Leibenguth, G.; Lemaitre, V.; Blumenschein, U.; Hölldorfer, F.; Jakobs, K.; Kayser, F.; Müller, A.-S.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmeling, S.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Ziegler, T.; Bonissent, A.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Payre, P.; Tilquin, A.; Ragusa, F.; David, A.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Hüttmann, K.; Lütjens, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Settles, R.; Villegas, M.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Jacholkowska, A.; Serin, L.; Veillet, J.-J.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Boccali, T.; Foà, L.; Giammanco, A.; Giassi, A.; Ligabue, F.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Awunor, O.; Blair, G. A.; Cowan, G.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Misiejuk, A.; Strong, J. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Norton, P. R.; Tomalin, I. R.; Ward, J. J.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Boumediene, D.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M.-C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Tuchming, B.; Vallage, B.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hodgson, P. N.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Hess, J.; Ngac, A.; Prange, G.; Borean, C.; Giannini, G.; He, H.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Armstrong, S. R.; Berkelman, K.; Cranmer, K.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y.; González, S.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P. A.; Nielsen, J.; Pan, Y. B.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wu, J.; Lan Wu, Sau; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.; Dissertori, G.

    2005-05-01

    Triple gauge-boson couplings γWW and ZWW involving single-photon, single-W and W-pair production are determined using data samples collected at LEP with the ALEPH detector at centre-of-mass energies between 183 and 209 GeV. The integrated luminosity used is 700 pb-1 for the single-photon measurement and 683 pb-1 for the W channels. Restricting the measurement to C- and P-conserving terms and applying local SU(2)L×U(1)Y gauge invariance, the measured values of the parameters g1Z, κγ and λγ are: g1Z=1.001±0.027(stat)±0.013(syst), κγ=0.971±0.055(stat)±0.030(syst), λγ=-0.012±0.027(stat)±0.011(syst) for single-parameter fits, where the two other parameters are fixed to their Standard Model values. Results are also presented for the cases where two or all three couplings are allowed to vary. An additional analysis using W-pair events is performed to measure the unconstrained real and imaginary parts of all 14 triple gauge-boson couplings and to perform an indirect search for a techni-ρ resonance. No deviations from the Standard Model expectations are observed and the lower limit on the techni-ρ mass is set to 600 GeV/c2 at 95% confidence level.

  11. Improved Measurement of 3J(H αi, N i+1 ) Coupling Constants in H 2O Dissolved Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löhr, Frank; Schmidt, Jürgen M.; Maurer, Steffen; Rüterjans, Heinz

    2001-11-01

    A modification to the recently proposed α/β-HN(CO)CA-J TROSY pulse sequence (P. Permi et al., J. Magn. Reson.146, 255-259 (2000)) makes it possible to determine 3J(Hαi, Ni+1) coupling constants from a single E.COSY-type cross-peak pattern rather than from two 1Hα spin-state-edited subspectra. Advantages are increased 15N resolution, critical to extracting accurate 1Hα-15N coupling constants, and minimized differential relaxation due to nested 13Cα and 15N evolution periods. Application of the improved pulse sequence to Desulfovibrio vulgaris flavodoxin results in 3J(Hαi, Ni+1) values being systematically larger than those obtained with the original scheme. Parametrization of the coupling dependence on the protein backbone torsion angle ψ yields the Karplus relation 3J(Hαi, Ni+1)=-1.00 cos2(ψ-120°)+0.65 cos(ψ-120°)-0.15 Hz, with a residual root-mean-square difference of 0.13 Hz between measured and back-calculated coupling constants. The curve compares with data derived from ubiquitin (A. C. Wang and A. Bax, J. Am. Chem. Soc.117, 1810-1813 (1995)), although spanning a slightly larger range of J values in flavodoxin. The orientation of the Ala39/Ser40 peptide link, forming a type-II β-turn in flavodoxin, is twisted against X-ray-derived torsions by approximately 10° in the NMR structure as evident from the analysis of φ- and ψ-related 3J coupling constants. The remaining deviation of some experimental values from the prediction is likely to be due to strong hydrogen bonding, substituent effects, or the additional dependence on the adjacent torsions φ.

  12. Ab Initio and Improved Empirical Potentials for the Calculation of the Anharmonic Vibrational States and Intramolecular Mode Coupling of N-Methylacetamide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregurick, Susan K.; Chaban, Galina M.; Gerber, R. Benny; Kwak, Dochou (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The second-order Moller-Plesset ab initio electronic structure method is used to compute points for the anharmonic mode-coupled potential energy surface of N-methylacetamide (NMA) in the trans(sub ct) configuration, including all degrees of freedom. The vibrational states and the spectroscopy are directly computed from this potential surface using the Correlation Corrected Vibrational Self-Consistent Field (CC-VSCF) method. The results are compared with CC-VSCF calculations using both the standard and improved empirical Amber-like force fields and available low temperature experimental matrix data. Analysis of our calculated spectroscopic results show that: (1) The excellent agreement between the ab initio CC-VSCF calculated frequencies and the experimental data suggest that the computed anharmonic potentials for N-methylacetamide are of a very high quality; (2) For most transitions, the vibrational frequencies obtained from the ab initio CC-VSCF method are superior to those obtained using the empirical CC-VSCF methods, when compared with experimental data. However, the improved empirical force field yields better agreement with the experimental frequencies as compared with a standard AMBER-type force field; (3) The empirical force field in particular overestimates anharmonic couplings for the amide-2 mode, the methyl asymmetric bending modes, the out-of-plane methyl bending modes, and the methyl distortions; (4) Disagreement between the ab initio and empirical anharmonic couplings is greater than the disagreement between the frequencies, and thus the anharmonic part of the empirical potential seems to be less accurate than the harmonic contribution;and (5) Both the empirical and ab initio CC-VSCF calculations predict a negligible anharmonic coupling between the amide-1 and other internal modes. The implication of this is that the intramolecular energy flow between the amide-1 and the other internal modes may be smaller than anticipated. These results may have

  13. A two-dimensional coupled flow-mass transport model based on an improved unstructured finite volume algorithm.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianzhong; Song, Lixiang; Kursan, Suncana; Liu, Yi

    2015-05-01

    A two-dimensional coupled water quality model is developed for modeling the flow-mass transport in shallow water. To simulate shallow flows on complex topography with wetting and drying, an unstructured grid, well-balanced, finite volume algorithm is proposed for numerical resolution of a modified formulation of two-dimensional shallow water equations. The slope-limited linear reconstruction method is used to achieve second-order accuracy in space. The algorithm adopts a HLLC-based integrated solver to compute the flow and mass transport fluxes simultaneously, and uses Hancock's predictor-corrector scheme for efficient time stepping as well as second-order temporal accuracy. The continuity and momentum equations are updated in both wet and dry cells. A new hybrid method, which can preserve the well-balanced property of the algorithm for simulations involving flooding and recession, is proposed for bed slope terms approximation. The effectiveness and robustness of the proposed algorithm are validated by the reasonable good agreement between numerical and reference results of several benchmark test cases. Results show that the proposed coupled flow-mass transport model can simulate complex flows and mass transport in shallow water.

  14. Methods for improving electromechanical coupling coefficient in two dimensional electric field excited AlN Lamb wave resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chengliang; Soon, Bo Woon; Zhu, Yao; Wang, Nan; Loke, Samuel Pei Hao; Mu, Xiaojing; Tao, Jifang; Gu, Alex Yuandong

    2015-06-01

    An AlN piezoelectric Lamb-wave resonator, which is excited by two dimensional electric field, is reported in this paper. Rhombus-shape electrodes are arranged on AlN thin film in a checkered formation. When out-of-phase alternating currents are applied to adjacent checkers, two dimensional acoustic Lamb waves are excited in the piezoelectric layer along orthogonal directions, achieving high electromechanical coupling coefficient, which is comparable to film bulk acoustic resonators. The electromechanical coupling coefficient of the 285.3 MHz resonator presented in this paper is 5.33%, which is the highest among AlN based Lamb-wave resonators reported in literature. Moreover, the spurious signal within a wide frequency range is significantly suppressed to be 90% lower than that of the resonance mode. By varying the electrode dimension and inter-electrode distance, resonators having different resonant frequencies can be fabricated on a single wafer, making single-chip broadband filters, duplexers, and multiplexers possible.

  15. Improvement of light collection efficiency of lens-coupled YAG screen TV system for a high-voltage electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Tanji, T; Hibino, M; Schauer, P; Autrata, R

    2000-06-15

    A new lens coupling television (TV) system using a YAG (Yttrium Aluminum Garnet: Y(3)Al(5)O(12) : Ce(3+)) single crystal screen has been developed for a high-voltage electron microscope (HVEM), and its performance is examined. The system, using a combination of YAG and lenses, is less damaged by high-energy electron irradiation and reduces the influence of X-rays on the image. YAG screens have not been used for lens-coupling systems, because the high refractive index (n = 1.84) of YAG results in a low light collection efficiency for emitted light. This disadvantage is overcome by combining a thin YAG disk screen (thickness; 100 microm) with a glass hemisphere whose refractive index is 1.81. We found that the light intensity is almost the same as that obtained with a conventional P22 powder screen and lenses system. The resolution is about 55 microm on the YAG screen, and this value is 1.3 times higher than that measured by the conventional system. Shading and distortion do not affect TV observation. Detection quantum efficiency, obtained after correction of the channel mixing effect, is about 0.1.

  16. Coupling Laser Diode Thermal Desorption with Acoustic Sample Deposition to Improve Throughput of Mass Spectrometry-Based Screening.

    PubMed

    Haarhoff, Zuzana; Wagner, Andrew; Picard, Pierre; Drexler, Dieter M; Zvyaga, Tatyana; Shou, Wilson

    2016-02-01

    The move toward label-free screening in drug discovery has increased the demand for mass spectrometry (MS)-based analysis. Here we investigated the approach of coupling acoustic sample deposition (ASD) with laser diode thermal desorption (LDTD)-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). We assessed its use in a cytochrome P450 (CYP) inhibition assay, where a decrease in metabolite formation signifies CYP inhibition. Metabolite levels for 3 CYP isoforms were measured as CYP3A4-1'-OH-midazolam, CYP2D6-dextrorphan, and CYP2C9-4'-OH-diclofenac. After incubation, samples (100 nL) were acoustically deposited onto a stainless steel 384-LazWell plate, then desorbed by an infrared laser directly from the plate surface into the gas phase, ionized by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI), and analyzed by MS/MS. Using this method, we achieved a sample analysis speed of 2.14 s/well, with bioanalytical performance comparable to the current online solid-phase extraction (SPE)-based MS method. An even faster readout speed was achieved when postreaction sample multiplexing was applied, where three reaction samples, one for each CYP, were transferred into the same well of the LazWell plate. In summary, LDTD coupled with acoustic sample deposition and multiplexing significantly decreased analysis time to 0.7 s/sample, making this MS-based approach feasible to support high-throughput screening (HTS) assays.

  17. Improved feedback control of wall stabilized kink modes with different plasma-wall couplings and mode rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Q.; Levesque, J. P.; Stoafer, C. C.; Bialek, J.; Byrne, P.; Hughes, P. E.; Mauel, M. E.; Navratil, G. A.; Rhodes, D. J.

    2016-04-01

    A new algorithm for feedback control of rotating, wall-stabilized kink modes in the High Beta Tokamak-Extended Pulse (HBT-EP) device maintains an accurate phase shift between the perturbation and the measured rotating mode through current control, with control power emphasizing fast rotation and phase jumps over fast amplitude changes. In HBT-EP, wall-stabilized kink modes become unstable above the ideal wall stability limit, and feedback suppression is aimed at delaying the onset of discharge disruption through reduction of the kink mode amplitude. Performance of the new feedback algorithm is tested under different experimental conditions, including variation of the plasma-wall coupling, insertion of a ferritic wall, changing mode rotation frequency over the range of 4-8 kHz using an internal biased electrode, and adjusting the feedback phase-angle to accelerate, amplify, or suppress the mode. We find the previously reported excitation of the slowly rotating mode at high feedback gain in HBT-EP is mitigated by the current control scheme. We also find good agreement between the observed and predicted changes to the mode rotation frequency and amplitude. When ferritic material is introduced, or the plasma-wall coupling becomes weaker as the walls are retracted from plasma, the feedback gain needs to be increased to achieve the same level of suppression. When mode rotation is slowed by a biased electrode, the feedback system still achieves mode suppression, and demonstrates wide bandwidth effectiveness.

  18. Coupled assimilation of satellite and ground based ozone data in order to improve modeling of Air Quality over Europe (POGEQA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupont, R.; Attié, J. L.; El Amraoui, L.; Josse, B.; Joly, M.; Jaumoillé, E.

    2012-04-01

    The POGEQA (Observation of Air Quality from a Geostationary Platform) project aims at defining optimal characteristics for a future instrument in geostationary orbit complementing current observations for Air Quality monitoring and forecasting. In this context, we perform simulations of key pollutants (e.g. ozone and carbon monoxide) in the lowermost troposphere at relevant spatial (less than 20 km) and temporal (one hour) scales using a sophisticated chemical data assimilation system used at Météo-France, MOCAGE-PALM. This study investigates the interest of coupled satellite (IASI) and ground-based (AIRBASE) data assimilation in monitoring air quality, with focus on lower troposphere measurements of ozone. We compare the performance of MOCAGE-PALM in four configurations: Free Run (no assimilation), Ground-Based assimilation Run, Satellite assimilation Run and coupled Ground-Based and Satellite assimilation Run. We discuss each configuration and compare lower troposphere simulation of ozone with in situ data . Finally, in the context of assessing the added value of the proposed geostationary satellite platform MAGEAQ (Monitoring the Atmosphere from Geostationary orbit for European Air Quality), we identify needs for each observing platforms in order to better estimate lower troposphere ozone concentrations and monitor Air Quality.

  19. Coupling a land surface model with a crop growth model to improve ET flux estimations in the Upper Ganges basin, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsarouchi, G. M.; Buytaert, W.; Mijic, A.

    2014-06-01

    Land surface models are tools that represent energy and water flux exchanges between land and the atmosphere. Although much progress has been made in adding detailed physical processes into these models, there is much room left for improved estimates of evapotranspiration fluxes, by including a more reasonable and accurate representation of crop dynamics. Recent studies suggest a strong land surface-atmosphere coupling over India and since this is one of the most intensively cultivated areas in the world, the strong impact of crops on the evaporative flux cannot be neglected. In this study we dynamically couple the land surface model JULES with the crop growth model InfoCrop. JULES in its current version does not simulate crop growth. Instead, it treats crops as natural grass, while using prescribed vegetation parameters. Such simplification might lead to modelling errors. Therefore we developed a coupled modelling scheme that simulates dynamically crop development and parameterised it for the two main crops of the study area, wheat and rice. This setup is used to examine the impact of inter-seasonal land cover changes in evapotranspiration fluxes of the Upper Ganges river basin (India). The sensitivity of JULES with regard to the dynamics of the vegetation cover is evaluated. Our results show that the model is sensitive to the changes introduced after coupling it with the crop model. Evapotranspiration fluxes, which are significantly different between the original and the coupled model, are giving an approximation of the magnitude of error to be expected in LSMs that do not include dynamic crop growth. For the wet season, in the original model, the monthly Mean Error ranges from 7.5 to 24.4 mm m-1, depending on different precipitation forcing. For the same season, in the coupled model, the monthly Mean Error's range is reduced to 7-14 mm m-1. For the dry season, in the original model, the monthly Mean Error ranges from 10 to 17 mm m-1, depending on different

  20. Coupling a land-surface model with a crop growth model to improve ET flux estimations in the Upper Ganges basin, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsarouchi, G. M.; Buytaert, W.; Mijic, A.

    2014-10-01

    Land-Surface Models (LSMs) are tools that represent energy and water flux exchanges between land and the atmosphere. Although much progress has been made in adding detailed physical processes into these models, there is much room left for improved estimates of evapotranspiration fluxes, by including a more reasonable and accurate representation of crop dynamics. Recent studies suggest a strong land-surface-atmosphere coupling over India and since this is one of the most intensively cultivated areas in the world, the strong impact of crops on the evaporative flux cannot be neglected. In this study we dynamically couple the LSM JULES with the crop growth model InfoCrop. JULES in its current version (v3.4) does not simulate crop growth. Instead, it treats crops as natural grass, while using prescribed vegetation parameters. Such simplification might lead to modelling errors. Therefore we developed a coupled modelling scheme that simulates dynamically crop development and parametrized it for the two main crops of the study area, wheat and rice. This setup is used to examine the impact of inter-seasonal land cover changes in evapotranspiration fluxes of the Upper Ganges River basin (India). The sensitivity of JULES with regard to the dynamics of the vegetation cover is evaluated. Our results show that the model is sensitive to the changes introduced after coupling it with the crop model. Evapotranspiration fluxes, which are significantly different between the original and the coupled model, are giving an approximation of the magnitude of error to be expected in LSMs that do not include dynamic crop growth. For the wet season, in the original model, the monthly Mean Error ranges from 7.5 to 24.4 mm month-1, depending on different precipitation forcing. For the same season, in the coupled model, the monthly Mean Error's range is reduced to 5.4-11.6 mm month-1. For the dry season, in the original model, the monthly Mean Error ranges from 10 to 17 mm month-1, depending on

  1. PACE Continuous Innovation Indicators-a novel tool to measure progress in cancer treatments.

    PubMed

    Paddock, Silvia; Brum, Lauren; Sorrow, Kathleen; Thomas, Samuel; Spence, Susan; Maulbecker-Armstrong, Catharina; Goodman, Clifford; Peake, Michael; McVie, Gordon; Geipel, Gary; Li, Rose

    2015-01-01

    Concerns about rising health care costs and the often incremental nature of improvements in health outcomes continue to fuel intense debates about 'progress' and 'value' in cancer research. In times of tightening fiscal constraints, it is increasingly important for patients and their representatives to define what constitutes 'value' to them. It is clear that diverse stakeholders have different priorities. Harmonisation of values may be neither possible nor desirable. Stakeholders lack tools to visualise or otherwise express these differences and to track progress in cancer treatments based on variable sets of values. The Patient Access to Cancer care Excellence (PACE) Continuous Innovation Indicators are novel, scientifically rigorous progress trackers that employ a three-step process to quantify progress in cancer treatments: 1) mine the literature to determine the strength of the evidence supporting each treatment; 2) allow users to weight the analysis according to their priorities and values; and 3) calculate Evidence Scores (E-Scores), a novel measure to track progress, based on the strength of the evidence weighted by the assigned value. We herein introduce a novel, flexible value model, show how the values from the model can be used to weight the evidence from the scientific literature to obtain E-Scores, and illustrate how assigning different values to new treatments influences the E-Scores. The Indicators allow users to learn how differing values lead to differing assessments of progress in cancer research and to check whether current incentives for innovation are aligned with their value model. By comparing E-Scores generated by this tool, users are able to visualise the relative pace of innovation across areas of cancer research and how stepwise innovation can contribute to substantial progress against cancer over time. Learning from experience and mapping current unmet needs will help to support a broad audience of stakeholders in their efforts to

  2. Integrating mobile technology with routine dietetic practice: the case of myPace for weight management.

    PubMed

    Harricharan, Michelle; Gemen, Raymond; Celemín, Laura Fernández; Fletcher, David; de Looy, Anne E; Wills, Josephine; Barnett, Julie

    2015-05-01

    The field of Mobile health (mHealth), which includes mobile phone applications (apps), is growing rapidly and has the potential to transform healthcare by increasing its quality and efficiency. The present paper focuses particularly on mobile technology for body weight management, including mobile phone apps for weight loss and the available evidence on their effectiveness. Translation of behaviour change theory into weight management strategies, including integration in mobile technology is also discussed. Moreover, the paper presents and discusses the myPace platform as a case in point. There is little clinical evidence on the effectiveness of currently available mobile phone apps in enabling behaviour change and improving health-related outcomes, including sustained body weight loss. Moreover, it is unclear to what extent these apps have been developed in collaboration with health professionals, such as dietitians, and the extent to which apps draw on and operationalise behaviour change techniques has not been explored. Furthermore, presently weight management apps are not built for use as part of dietetic practice, or indeed healthcare more widely, where face-to-face engagement is fundamental for instituting the building blocks for sustained lifestyle change. myPace is an innovative mobile technology for weight management meant to be embedded into and to enhance dietetic practice. Developed out of systematic, iterative stages of engagement with dietitians and consumers, it is uniquely designed to complement and support the trusted health practitioner-patient relationship. Future mHealth technology would benefit if engagement with health professionals and/or targeted patient groups, and behaviour change theory stood as the basis for technology development. Particularly, integrating technology into routine health care practice, rather than replacing one with the other, could be the way forward.

  3. Effects of Pacing and Cognitive Style across Dynamic and Non-Dynamic Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffler, Tim N.; Schwartz, Ruth N.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of self-pacing versus system-pacing were examined in different versions of a computer-based learning environment (static pictures/animations). The role of cognitive style was also considered. While the variables investigated did not have a direct impact on either learning outcome or cognitive load, significant interaction effects were…

  4. The Relationship between Successful Completion and Sequential Movement in Self-Paced Distance Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Janine M.

    2016-01-01

    A course design question for self-paced courses includes whether or not technological measures should be used in course design to force students to follow the sequence intended by the course author. This study examined learner behavior to understand whether the sequence of student assignment submissions in a self-paced distance course is related…

  5. Keeping Pace with K-12 Online & Blended Learning: An Annual Review of Policy and Practice, 2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, John; Murin, Amy; Vashaw, Lauren; Gemin, Butch; Rapp, Chris

    2013-01-01

    This is the 10th annual "Keeping Pace" report. "Keeping Pace" has several goals: (1) add to the body of knowledge about online education policy and practice, and make recommendations for advances; (2) serve as a reference source for information about programs and policies across the country, both for policymakers and…

  6. Ratchet-traction effect: an underdiagnosed mechanism of pacing lead dislodgement.

    PubMed

    Vijay, Sudarshan Kumar; Dwivedi, Sudhanshu Kumar; Chandra, Sharad; Saran, Ram Kirti

    2014-01-01

    Pacing lead dislodgement contributes substantially, to the list of causes of early pacemaker failure. Reel's syndrome is a rare cause of pacemaker failure, resulting from the dislodging of pacing electrodes by manipulation of the pulse generator by the patient. We describe here an intriguing case of pacemaker lead dislodgement by a novel and frequently underdiagnosed mechanism that mimicked the fluoroscopic diagnosis of reel's syndrome.

  7. The effect of work pace on workload, motor variability and fatigue during simulated light assembly work.

    PubMed

    Bosch, T; Mathiassen, S E; Visser, B; de Looze, M P; van Dieën, J H

    2011-02-01

    This study investigated the effect of work pace on workload, motor variability and fatigue during light assembly work. Upper extremity kinematics and electromyography (EMG) were obtained on a cycle-to-cycle basis for eight participants during two conditions, corresponding to "normal" and "high" work pace according to a predetermined time system for engineering. Indicators of fatigue, pain sensitivity and performance were recorded before, during and after the task. The level and variability of muscle activity did not differ according to work pace, and manifestations of muscle fatigue or changed pain sensitivity were not observed. In the high work pace, however, participants moved more efficiently, they showed more variability in wrist speed and acceleration, but they also made more errors. These results suggest that an increased work pace, within the range addressed here, will not have any substantial adverse effects on acute motor performance and fatigue in light, cyclic assembly work. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: In the manufacturing industry, work pace is a key issue in production system design and hence of interest to ergonomists as well as engineers. In this laboratory study, increasing the work pace did not show adverse effects in terms of biomechanical exposures and muscle fatigue, but it did lead to more errors. For the industrial engineer, this observation suggests that an increase in work pace might diminish production quality, even without any noticeable fatigue being experienced by the operators.

  8. Web 2.0 and Social Media Connecting Learners in Self-Paced Study: Practitioners' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiessen, Janice

    2016-01-01

    Distance learners determine the time and place for their studies--those engaged in self-paced study may also choose the rate at which they proceed through their courses. However, it is difficult to incorporate purposeful learner-learner interaction into self-paced study. A multiple-case study included three open universities with in-house design…

  9. Locating the Business. PACE Revised. Level 1. Unit 7. Research & Development Series No. 240AB7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashmore, M. Catherine; Pritz, Sandra G.

    This lesson on locating a business, the seventh in a series of 18 units, is part of the first level of a comprehensive entrepreneurship curriculum entitled: A Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship (PACE). (Designed for use with secondary students, the first level of PACE introduces students to the concepts involved in…

  10. Protecting the Business. PACE Revised. Level 1. Unit 18. Research & Development Series No. 240AB18.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashmore, M. Catherine; Pritz, Sandra G.

    This unit on protecting a business, the 18th in a series of 18 units, is part of the first level of a comprehensive entrepreneurship curriculum entitled: A Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship (PACE). (Designed for use with secondary students, the first level of PACE introduces students to the concepts involved in entrepreneurship…

  11. Managing Sales Efforts. PACE Revised. Level 1. Unit 14. Research & Development Series No. 240AB14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashmore, M. Catherine; Pritz, Sandra G.

    This lesson on managing sales efforts, the 14th in a series of 18 units, is part of the first level of a comprehensive entrepreneurship curriculum entitled: A Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship (PACE). (Designed for use by secondary students, the first level of PACE introduces students to the concepts involved in entrepreneurship…

  12. Obtaining Technical Assistance. PACE Revised. Level 1. Unit 4. Research & Development Series No. 240AB4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashmore, M. Catherine; Pritz, Sandra G.

    This lesson on obtaining technical assistance, the fourth in a series of 18 units, is part of the first level of a comprehensive entrepreneurship curriculum entitled: A Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship (PACE). (Designed for use with secondary students, the first level of PACE introduces students to the concepts involved in…

  13. Which Students Benefit from Self-Paced Mastery Instruction and Why.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stinard, Thomas A.; Dolphin, Warren D.

    1981-01-01

    The determinants of achievement were compared under conventional and self-paced mastery examination schedules in an anatomy/physiology course. General scholastic ability did not interact with method, but prior preparation in science did. Students with less science preparation showed greater achievement under self-paced mastery testing than their…

  14. Beyond a Unitary Conception of Pedagogic Pace: Quantitative Measurement and Ethnographic Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lefstein, Adam; Snell, Julia

    2013-01-01

    English education policy-makers have targeted classroom time as a key area for regulation and intervention, with "brisk pace" widely accepted as a feature of good teaching practice. We problematise this conventional wisdom through an exploration of objective and subjective dimensions of lesson pace in a corpus of 30 Key Stage 2 literacy…

  15. Financing the Business. PACE Revised. Level 1. Unit 8. Research & Development Series No. 240AB8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashmore, M. Catherine; Pritz, Sandra G.

    This lesson on financing a business, the eighth in a series of 18 units, is part of the first level of a comprehensive entrepreneurship curriculum entitled: A Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship (PACE). (Designed for use with secondary students, the first level of PACE introduces students to the concepts involved in…

  16. Managing the Finances. PACE Revised. Level 1. Unit 16. Research & Development Series No. 240AB16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashmore, M. Catherine; Pritz, Sandra G.

    This lesson on competent financial management, the 16th in a series of 18 units, is part of the first level of a comprehensive entrepreneurship curriculum entitled: A Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship (PACE). (Designed for use with secondary students, the first level of PACE introduces students to the concepts involved in…

  17. Self-Paced Economics Instruction: A Large-Scale Disaggregated Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soper, John C.; Thorton, Richard M.

    1976-01-01

    This paper reports on an evaluation of the Sterling Institute self-paced macroeconomics course at Northern Illinois University. Results show that a completely self-paced teaching format for macroeconomics is inferior to a well-directed, concept-oriented, graduate-student instructed, lecture-discussion taught course. (Author/RM)

  18. How Pacing of Multimedia Instructions Can Influence Modality Effects: A Case of Superiority of Visual Texts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stiller, Klaus D.; Freitag, Annika; Zinnbauer, Peter; Freitag, Christian

    2009-01-01

    "Present text accompanying pictures aurally to promote learning" is a well established principle of instructional design. But recently, it was shown that under certain conditions visual texts can be preferable. Instructional pacing seems to be one of these conditions that mediate effects. Especially, enabling learners to pace an…

  19. Coating barium titanate nanoparticles with polyethylenimine improves cellular uptake and allows for coupled imaging and gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Dempsey, Christopher; Lee, Isac; Cowan, Katie; Suh, Junghae

    2015-01-01

    Barium titanate nanoparticles (BT NP) belong to a class of second harmonic generating (SHG) nanoprobes that have recently demonstrated promise in biological imaging. Unfortunately, BT NPs display low cellular uptake efficiencies, which may be a problem if cellular internalization is desired or required for a particular application. To overcome this issue, while concomitantly developing a particle platform that can also deliver nucleic acids into cells, we coated the BT NPs with the cationic polymer polyethylenimine (PEI) – one of the most effective nonviral gene delivery agents. Coating of BT with PEI yielded complexes with positive zeta potentials and resulted in an 8-fold increase in cellular uptake of the BT NPs. Importantly, we were able to achieve high levels of gene delivery with the BT-PEI/DNA complexes, supporting further efforts to generate BT platforms for coupled imaging and gene therapy. PMID:23973999

  20. The Potential of Soft Soil Improvement Through a Coupled Technique Between Electro Kinetic and Alkaline Activation of Soft Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, G. E.; Ismail, H. B.; Huat, B. K.; Afshin, A.; Azhar, A. T. S.

    2016-07-01

    Soil stabilization techniques have been in development for decades with different rates of success. Alkaline activation of soft soil is one of those techniques that has proved to deliver some of the best shear strength values with minor drawbacks in comparison with conventional soil stabilization methods. However, environmental considerations have not been taken into account, as major mineral glassy phase activators are poisoning alkaline solutions, such as sodium-, potassium-hydroxide, and sodium-, potassium-silicate, which poses serious hazards to man and environment. This paper addresses the ways of discarding the involvement of the aforementioned alkaline solutions in soft soil stabilization by investigating the potential of a coupled electro kinetic alkaline activation technique for soft soil strengthening, through which the provision of alkaline pH is governed by electro kinetic potential. Uncertainties in regard to the dissolution of aluminosilicate as well as the dominance of acidic front are challenges that need to be overcome.

  1. Improved energy coupling into the gain region of the Ni-like Pd transient collisional x-ray laser

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R; Dunn, J; Filevich, J; Moon, S; Nilsen, J; Keenan, R; Shlyaptsev, V; Rocca, J; Hunter, J; Shepherd, R; Booth, R; Marconi, M

    2004-10-05

    We present within this paper a series of experiments, which yield new observations to further our understanding of the transient collisional x-ray laser medium. We use the recently developed technique of picosecond x-ray laser interferometry to probe the plasma conditions in which the x-ray laser is generated and propagates. This yields two dimensional electron density maps of the plasma taken at different times relative to the peak of the 600ps plasma-forming beam. In another experimental campaign, the output of the x-ray laser plasma column is imaged with a spherical multilayer mirror onto a CCD camera to give a two-dimensional intensity map of the x-ray laser output. Near-field imaging gives insights into refraction, output intensity and spatial mode structure. Combining these images with the density maps gives an indication of the electron density at which the x-ray laser is being emitted at (yielding insights into the effect of density gradients on beam propagation). Experimental observations coupled with simulations predict that most effective coupling of laser pump energy occurs when the duration of the main heating pulse is comparable to the gain lifetime ({approx}10ps for Ni-like schemes). This can increase the output intensity by more than an order of magnitude relative to the case were the same pumping energy is delivered within a shorter heating pulse duration (< 3ps). We have also conducted an experiment in which the output of the x-ray laser was imaged onto the entrance slit of a high temporal resolution streak camera. This effectively takes a one-dimensional slice of the x-ray laser spatial profile and sweeps it in time. Under some conditions we observe rapid movement of the x-ray laser ({approx} 3 {micro}m/ps) towards the target surface.

  2. Improvement of Mitochondria Extract from Saccharomyces cerevisiae Characterization in Shotgun Proteomics Using Sheathless Capillary Electrophoresis Coupled to Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Marianne; Gahoual, Rabah; Enkler, Ludovic; Becker, Hubert Dominique; Chicher, Johana; Hammann, Philippe; François, Yannis-Nicolas; Kuhn, Lauriane; Leize-Wagner, Emmanuelle

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we describe the characterization of a quantity-limited sample (100 ng) of yeast mitochondria by shotgun bottom-up proteomics. Sample characterization was carried out by sheathless capillary electrophoresis, equipped with a high sensitivity porous tip and coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (CESI–MS-MS) and concomitantly with a state-of-art nano flow liquid chromatography coupled to a similar mass spectrometry (MS) system (nanoLC–MS-MS). With single injections, both nanoLC–MS-MS and CESI–MS-MS 60 min-long separation experiments allowed us to identify 271 proteins (976 unique peptides) and 300 proteins (1,765 unique peptides) respectively, demonstrating a significant specificity and complementarity in identification depending on the physicochemical separation employed. Such complementary, maximizing the number of analytes detected, presents a powerful tool to deepen a biological sample's proteomic characterization. A comprehensive study of the specificity provided by each separating technique was also performed using the different properties of the identified peptides: molecular weight, mass-to-charge ratio (m/z), isoelectric point (pI), sequence coverage or MS–MS spectral quality enabled to determine the contribution of each separation. For example, CESI–MS-MS enables to identify larger peptides and eases the detection of those having extreme pI without impairing spectral quality. The addition of peptides, and therefore proteins identified by both techniques allowed us to increase significantly the sequence coverages and then the confidence of characterization. In this study, we also demonstrated that the two yeast enolase isoenzymes were both characterized in the CESI–MS-MS data set. The observation of discriminant proteotypic peptides is facilitated when a high number of precursors with high-quality MS–MS spectra are generated. PMID:26860395

  3. Improving the WRF model's simulation over sea ice surface through coupling with a complex thermodynamic sea ice model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Y.; Huang, J.; Luo, Y.; Zhao, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Sea ice plays an important role in the air-ice-ocean interaction, but it is often represented simply in many regional atmospheric models. The Noah sea ice model, which has been widely used in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, exhibits cold bias in simulating the Arctic sea ice temperature when validated against the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) in situ observations. According to sensitivity tests, this bias is attributed not only to the simulation of snow depth and turbulent fluxes but also to the heat conduction within snow and ice. Compared with the Noah sea ice model, the high-resolution thermodynamic snow and ice model (HIGHTSI) has smaller bias in simulating the sea ice temperature. HIGHTSI is further coupled with the WRF model to evaluate the possible added value from better resolving the heat transport and solar penetration in sea ice from a complex thermodynamic sea ice model. The cold bias in simulating the surface temperature over sea ice in winter by the original Polar WRF is reduced when HIGHTSI rather than Noah is coupled with the WRF model, and this also leads to a better representation of surface upward longwave radiation and 2 m air temperature. A discussion on the impact of specifying sea ice thickness in the WRF model is presented. Consistent with previous research, prescribing the sea ice thickness with observational information would result in the best simulation among the available methods. If no observational information is available, using an empirical method based on the relationship between sea ice concentration and sea ice thickness could mimic the large-scale spatial feature of sea ice thickness. The potential application of a thermodynamic sea ice model in predicting the change in sea ice thickness in a RCM is limited by the lack of sea ice dynamic processes in the model and the coarse assumption on the initial value of sea ice thickness.

  4. Simulating Aerosol Indirect Effects with Improved Aerosol-Cloud- Precipitation Representations in a Coupled Regional Climate Model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yang; Leung, L. Ruby; Fan, Jiwen

    2016-04-27

    This is a collaborative project among North Carolina State University, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California at San Diego to address the critical need for an accurate representation of aerosol indirect effect in climate and Earth system models. In this project, we propose to develop and improve parameterizations of aerosol-cloud-precipitation feedbacks in climate models and apply them to study the effect of aerosols and clouds on radiation and hydrologic cycle. Our overall objective is to develop, improve, and evaluate parameterizations to enable more accurate simulations of these feedbacks in high resolution regional and global climate models.

  5. Clinical evaluation of peak endocardial acceleration as a sensor for rate responsive pacing.

    PubMed

    Greco, Enrico Maria; Ferrario, Marco; Romano, Salvatore

    2003-04-01

    An innovative control parameter for rate responsive (RR) pacing that uses a sensor to measure mechanical vibrations generated by the myocardium during the isovolumetric contraction phase (peak endocardial acceleration [PEA]), has been devised by SORIN Biomedica (BEST Living System). To assess the physiological sensitivity of the pacemaker sensor along with reliability of the algorithm to supply appropriate pacing rates three different relationships were examined (linear regression analysis): (1) recorded deltaPEA exercise steps against the calculated energy cost of exercise (MET), (2) exercise pacing rates against predicted values, and (3) deltaPEA against exercise pacing rates. Fifteen patients (mean age 68 +/- 12 years) in NYHA Class I-II, implanted with the BEST Living System (Living 1 DDDR pacemaker) for advanced AVB and/or SSS, underwent one of the following maximal exercise stress protocols: bicycle (25 W, 2-minute steps) or Bruce or Chronotropic Assessment Exercise Protocol (CAEP). Pacing rates for each step were matched against those predicted by a reliable and tested custom software called Pacing Rate Profile Software (PRPS). The PRPS is based on the oxygen pulse reserve (OPR) method (OPR = VO2 reserve divided by heart rate reserve), American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) formulas for calculating workload/metabolic requirements, and data derived from the Weber functional classes. On the basis of certain patient, data the PRPS then supplies appropriate metabolic pacing rate profiles. In all 15 patients linear regression analysis of deltaPEA against MET, as evaluated during the exercise protocol steps, showed a high correlation (r = 0.97). Likewise, a high correlation was also obtained between PRPS predicted heart rates and exercise pacing rates (r = 0.96) and PEA against exercise pacing rates (r = 0.96). The results of this study show that, through PEA dynamic monitoring, the SORIN Best Living System produces physiological pacing rates that are

  6. Cripto recruits Furin and PACE4 and controls Nodal trafficking during proteolytic maturation.

    PubMed

    Blanchet, Marie-Hélène; Le Good, J Ann; Mesnard, Daniel; Oorschot, Viola; Baflast, Stéphane; Minchiotti, Gabriella; Klumperman, Judith; Constam, Daniel B

    2008-10-08

    The glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteoglycan Cripto binds Nodal and its type I receptor Alk4 to activate Smad2,3 transcription factors, but a role during Nodal precursor processing has not been described. We show that Cripto also binds the proprotein convertases Furin and PACE4 and localizes Nodal processing at the cell surface. When coexpressed as in early embryonic cells, Cripto and uncleaved Nodal already associated during secretion, and a Cripto-interacting region in the Nodal propeptide potentiated the effect of proteolytic maturation on Nodal signalling. Disruption of the trans-Golgi network (TGN) by brefeldin A blocked secretion, but export of Cripto and Nodal to the cell surface was not inhibited, indicating that Nodal is exposed to extracellular convertases before entering the TGN/endosomal system. Density fractionation and antibody uptake experiments showed that Cripto guides the Nodal precursor in detergent-resistant membranes to endocytic microdomains marked by GFP-Flotillin. We conclude that Nodal processing and endocytosis are coupled in signal-receiving cells.

  7. Improving interannual prediction skill in a changing climate via the identi cation of compensating coupled model errors

    SciTech Connect

    Tziperman, Eli; MacMartin, Douglas

    2013-08-31

    Significant progress can be made through a truly interdisciplinary effort, combining the expertise from climate dynamics and from engineering control. We believe that this novel approach can make a unique and valuable contribution, and help the climate community deliver improved models for the potential response of the Earth's climate to increased greenhouse gas levels.

  8. Coupling dairy manure storage with injection to improve nitrogen management: whole-farm simulation using the integrated farm system Model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Application of livestock manure to farm soils represents a priority nutrient management concern in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. Historically strong emphasis has been placed on adding manure storage to dairy operations, and, there has been recognition that manure application methods can be improved....

  9. Coupling landscape water storage and supplemental irrigation to increase productivity and improve environmental stewardship in the US Midwest

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agriculture must expand production for a growing population while simultaneously reducing its environmental impacts. These goals need not be in tension with one another. Here we outline a vision for improving both the productivity and environmental performance of agriculture in the US Corn Belt. Mea...

  10. Modeling Floodplain Dynamics: Can the Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta keep pace with 21st Century Sea Level Rise?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, K. G.; Overeem, I.

    2013-12-01

    The low-lying Ganges-Brahmaputra (G-B) Delta in Bangladesh is densely populated (~1200 people/km2) and could be flooded within the next century by rapid sea level rise and increased monsoonal rains. The G-B Rivers currently transport 1*109 tons of sediment from their basins in the Himalaya Mountains to the delta each year, with ~90% of the annual sediment load delivered during the Asian summer monsoon. Sediment distribution across the delta's surface by floods and coastal storms has kept pace with the rate of relative sea level rise along the Bengal coast, enabling the delta to maintain a positive elevation. However, ensemble Community Climate System Model experiments predict 11% higher monsoonal rainfall for the next century, potentially leading to extreme flooding events in the delta. Stratigraphic reconstructions show that sedimentation in the upper G-B floodplain was more than doubled under the Early Holocene enhanced monsoonal regime, suggesting that the delta may withstand an increase in monsoon intensity, flooding, and tropical cyclones that are currently predicted. Whether the G-B floodplains and coastal areas will ultimately drown under predicted sea level rise and monsoon intensification depends on a balance of aggradation, eustatic sea level rise and subsidence. To improve predictions of climatic forcing on aggradation rates in the lower G-B floodplain and coastal plain, direct sedimentation measurements collected in 2008 and 2012 in the lower delta are paired with a series of model components coupled within the Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System (CSDMS) Modeling Tool (CMT). We use three separate numerical models to simulate river basin sediment flux, floodplain sedimentation, and tidal-plain aggradation. The model inputs are based on available 20Th century climate and river gauge data, and outputs are compared to modern sedimentation rates within the G-B tidal delta and highly cultivated central coastal plain. The models are then used to test

  11. Coupling Fe0 nano particles with living and dead Azolla filicoloides to improve removal of methylene blue from aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakhshaee, Roohan

    2015-11-01

    Fe0 nano particles (FNPs) were connected to the cell wall of the dead and living Azolla filicoloides as an aquatic fern, individually. FNPs mean size was decreased due to the stabilization, especially using the living one. It was compared the results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), saturation magnetization (Ms), zeta potential (ZP) and thermal analysis (DSC and TGA) of the dead and living Azolla connected to FNPs, and also the findings of potentiometric titration (PT) of the cell wall's pectin of the dead and living Azolla. It was confirmed (by XRD and XPS) that Fe0 nano particles when were connected to the living Azolla did not produce Fe3O4 due to oxidation unlike the bare FNPs and the connected form to the dead Azolla, by reason of the more stabilization (more surface protection) of nano iron particles after connecting to the living Azolla. To adsorb methylene blue by these agents at the optimum pre-treatment pH 10 and adsorption pH 8, the parameters of equilibrium sorption, rate constant of second-order sorption and activation energy were obtained as: living Azolla-FNPs > dead Azolla-FNPs > FNPs > dead Azolla, while, their thermodynamic parameters (ΔG°, ΔH° and ΔS°) had the reverse arrangement. It was also studied the various factors rule such as photoperiod and the presence of heavy metals on the living Azolla growth coupled with FNPs and its MB removal ability.

  12. A flow microslot NMR probe coupled with a capillary isotachophoresis system exhibits improved properties compared to solenoid designs.

    PubMed

    Gogiashvili, Mikheil; Telfah, Ahmad; Lambert, Jörg; Hergenröder, Roland

    2017-03-01

    We report on the hyphenation of capillary isotachophoresis (cITP) separations with online nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) detection using a planar microslot waveguide probe design. While cITP is commonly coupled with a solenoidal microcoil NMR probe, the structural information provided is limited by broad resonances and poor spectral resolution due to the magnetic field created by the separation current. The microslot probe design described herein allows the separation capillary to be oriented parallel to the static magnetic field, B 0, eliminating the spectral broadening produced by the secondary magnetic field induced by the separation current. This allows high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the charged analytes to be obtained in online mode, whereas conventional solenoidal capillary NMR designs must resort to the stopped flow mode. The potential of the microslot probe for hyphenated electrophoretic separations is demonstrated by performing cITP focusing and online NMR detection of the (1)H NMR spectrum of a system containing spermine and aniline. Graphical Abstract High resolution NMR spectra in flow capillarelectrophoretic separations with microslot NMR probe.

  13. Improvements in Fabrication of 3D SU-8 Prisms for Low-Coupling-Loss Interconnections Between Fibers and Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Minh-Hang; Chu, Thi-Xuan; Nguyen, Long; Nguyen, Hai-Binh; Lee, Chun-Wei; Tseng, Fan-Gang; Chen, Te-Chang; Lee, Ming-Chang

    2016-11-01

    Fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) SU-8 (an epoxy-based negative photoresist from MicroChem) prisms as low-loss couplers for interconnection between optical components, particularly optical fibers and silicon-on-isolator waveguides (SOI WGs), which have mismatched mode sizes, has been investigated. With an interfacial structure formed by a 3D SU-8 prism partly overlaying an SOI WG end with a portion of buried oxide (BOX) removed under the interface, low-loss coupling is ensured and the transmission efficiency can reach 70%. To fabricate these 3D SU-8 prisms, a simple method with two photolithography steps was used for SU-8 hinges and CYTOP (an amorphous fluoropolymer from AGC Chemicals) prism windows, with mild soft and hard bakes, to define the prism profiles with diluted SU-8 filled in the CYTOP prism windows. A buffered oxide etchant is used to remove BOX parts under the interfaces. Some of the fabricated structures were tested, demonstrating the contribution of overlaying SU-8 prisms to the transmission efficiency of optical interconnections between fibers and SOI WGs.

  14. An improved thin-layer chromatography/mass spectrometry coupling using a surface sampling probe electrospray ion trap system

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Michael J; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2004-01-01

    A combined surface sampling probe/electrospray emitter coupled with an ion trap mass spectrometer was used for the direct read out of unmodified reversed-phase C18 thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plates. The operation of the surface sampling electrospray ionization interface in positive and negative ionization modes was demonstrated through the direct analysis of TLC plates on which a commercial test mix comprised of four dye compounds viz., rhodamine B, fluorescein, naphthol blue black, and fast green FCF, and an extract of the caffeine-containing plant Ilex vomitoria, were spotted and developed. Acquisition of full-scan mass spectra and automated collection of MS/MS product ion spectra while scanning a development lane along the surface of a TLC plate demonstrated the advantages of using an ion trap in this combination. Details of the sampling system, benefits of analyzing a developed lane in both positive ion and negative ion modes, levels of detection while surface scanning, surface scan speed effects, and the utility of three-dimensional data display, are also discussed.

  15. Validation of determination of plasma metabolites derived from thyme bioactive compounds by improved liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rubió, Laura; Serra, Aida; Macià, Alba; Borràs, Xenia; Romero, Maria-Paz; Motilva, Maria-José

    2012-09-15

    In the present study, a selective and sensitive method, based on microelution solid-phase extraction (μSPE) plate and ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) was validated and applied to determine the plasma metabolites of the bioactive compounds of thyme. For validation process, standards of the more representative components of the phenolic and monoterpene fractions of thyme were spiked in plasma samples and then the quality parameters of the method were studied. Extraction recoveries (%R) of the studied compounds were higher than 75%, and the matrix effect (%ME) was lower than 18%. The LODs ranged from 1 to 65 μg/L, except for the thymol sulfate metabolite, which was 240 μg/L. This method was then applied for the analysis of rat plasma obtained at different times, from 0 to 6h, after an acute intake of thyme extract (5 g/kg body weight). Different thyme metabolites were identified and were mainly derived from rosmarinic acid (coumaric acid sulfate, caffeic acid sulfate, ferulic acid sulfate, hydroxyphenylpropionic acid sulfate, dihydroxyphenylpropionic acid sulfate and hydroxybenzoic acid) and thymol (thymol sulfate and thymol glucuronide). The most abundant thyme metabolites generated were hydroxyphenylpropionic acid sulfate and thymol sulfate, their respective concentrations in plasma being 446 and 8464 μM 1h after the intake of the thyme extract.

  16. C-3 epimers of sugar amino acids as foldameric building blocks: improved synthesis, useful derivatives, coupling strategies.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Adrienn; Csordás, Barbara; Zsoldos-Mády, Virág; Pintér, István; Farkas, Viktor; Perczel, András

    2017-02-01

    To obtain key sugar derivatives for making homooligomeric foldamers or α/β-chimera peptides, economic and multigram scale synthetic methods were to be developed. Though described in the literature, the cost-effective making of both 3-amino-3-deoxy-ribofuranuronic acid (H-t X-OH) and its C-3 epimeric stereoisomer, the 3-amino-3-deoxy-xylofuranuronic acid (H-c X-OH) from D-glucose is described here. The present synthetic route elaborated is (1) appropriate for large-scale synthesis; (2) reagent costs reduced (e.g. by a factor of 400); (3) yields optimized are ~80% or higher for all six consecutive steps concluding -t X- or -c X- and (4) reaction times shortened. Thus, a new synthetic route step-by-step optimized for yield, cost, time and purification is given both for D-xylo and D-ribo-amino-furanuronic acids using sustainable chemistry (e.g. less chromatography with organic solvents; using continuous-flow reactor). Our study encompasses necessary building blocks (e.g. -X-OMe, -X-O(i)Pr, -X-NHMe, Fmoc-X-OH) and key coupling reactions making -Aaa-t X-Aaa- or -Aaa-t X-t X-Aaa- type "inserts". Completed for both stereoisomers of X, including the newly synthesized Fmoc-c X-OH, producing longer oligomers for drug design and discovery is more of a reality than a wish.

  17. Long-term follow-up of pacing of the conditioned diaphragm in quadriplegia.

    PubMed

    Elefteriades, John A; Quin, Jacquelyn A; Hogan, James F; Holcomb, Wade G; Letsou, George V; Chlosta, William F; Glenn, William W W L

    2002-06-01

    The authors have previously shown that conditioning of the diaphragm for continuous bilateral pacing is a feasible and effective means of ventilation in patients with complete respiratory paralysis from high cervical (above C3) quadriplegia. The present study reports the long-term results of continuous diaphragmatic pacing. Twelve quadriplegia patients underwent bilateral phrenic nerve pacemaker placement and diaphragm conditioning from 1981 to 1987. Pacing was initiated at 11 Hz and progressively decreased to 7.1 Hz. A pulse train duration of 1.3 seconds for adults and 0.9 seconds for children was used. Long-term follow-up information obtained included pacing status (full-time, part-time, or mechanical ventilation), ventilation parameters, and social circumstances. Of the 12 patients, 6 continued to pace full time (mean 14.8 years); all were living at home. Three patients paced for an average of 1.8 years before stopping; two were institutionalized. One patient who paced full time for 6.5 years before lapsing to part time, lived at home. Two patients were deceased; one paced continuously for 10 years before his demise, the other stopped pacing after 1 year. Patients who stopped full-time pacing did so mainly for reasons of inadequate social or financial support or associated medical problems. All patients demonstrated normal tidal volumes and arterial blood gases while pacing full time. Despite theoretical concerns about long-term nerve damage, no patient lost the ability to pace the phrenic nerve. Threshold currents did not increase over time (original/follow-up: 0.46/0.47 for right, 0.45/0.46 for left), nor did maximal currents (original/follow-up: 1.16/1.14 for right, 1.37/1.26 for left). This follow-up confirms that quadriplegic patients are able to meet long-term, full-time ventilation requirements using phrenic nerve stimulation of the conditioned diaphragm. Careful review of diaphragmatic pacing candidates with respect to associated medical conditions

  18. Improved feedback control of wall-stabilized kink modes with different plasma-wall couplings and mode rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Q.; Levesque, J. P.; Stoafer, C. C.; Rhodes, D. J.; Hughes, P. E.; Byrne, P. J.; Mauel, M. E.; Navratil, G. A.

    2015-11-01

    The HBT-EP tokamak can excite strong, saturated kink modes whose growth rates and rotation frequencies evolve on a millisecond timescale. To control such modes, HBT-EP uses a GPU-based feedback system in a low latency architecture. When feedback is applied, the mode amplitude and rotation frequency can change quickly. We describe an improved algorithm that captures the rapid phase changes in the mode while also removing transient amplitude jumps. Additionally, the control coil driving signal is implemented using a current-controller instead of a voltage-controller. The feedback performance is improved and has been tested under more unstable regimes, including different wall configurations and plasmas slowed by a bias probe. Feedback suppression is observed in all cases and the feedback parameters' dependency on different experimental conditions is studied. Supported by U.S. DOE Grant DE-FG02-86ER53222.

  19. Orbitally paced phosphogenesis in Mediterranean shallow marine carbonates during the middle Miocene Monterey event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auer, Gerald; Hauzenberger, Christoph A.; Reuter, Markus; Piller, Werner E.

    2015-04-01

    During the Oligo-Miocene major phases of phosphogenesis occurred in the Earth's oceans. Particularly in the Mediterranean region phosphate-rich sediments are well-known during this time. However, most phosphate-rich beds represent condensed or allochthonous hemipelagic deposits, formed by a complex interplay of physical and chemical enrichment processes. These underlying processes limit the application of these records for the study of a possible Milankovitch-scale climate control on Miocene phosphogenesis. In this regard the middle Miocene "Monterey event" is of particular interest, as it represents a documented phase of phosphogenesis coupled with a prominent carbon isotope excursion containing nine orbitally paced carbon isotope maxima (CM-events). The Oligo-Miocene shallow marine Decontra section located on the Maiella Platform (central Apennines, Italy), is a widely continuous carbonate succession in a mostly outer to middle neritic setting. Of particular interest are the well-winnowed grain- to packstones of the Middle Miocene Bryozoan Limestone, were occurrences of authigenic phosphate grains coincide with the Monterey event. The depositional setting of the Bryozoan Limestone allows to resolve the influence of orbital forcing on phosphogenesis, within a bio-, chemo- and cyclostratigraphically constrained stratigraphic model. LA-ICP-MS analyses revealed a significant enrichment of Uranium in the studied authigenic phosphate grains compared to the surrounding carbonate sediment. Notably, the Uranium enrichment allowed the use of natural gamma radiation (GR) as a proxy for the qualitative estimation of autochthonous phosphate content within the section, based on the absence of any other major gamma ray sources within the sediment. Time series analyses of high-resolution GR data indicate a strong influence of the 405kyr long-eccentricity cycle on natural gamma radiation in the Bryozoan Limestone. Our results link maxima in the GR record and thus phosphate

  20. Paleoclimatology: Second clock supports orbital pacing of the ice ages

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, R.A.

    1997-05-02

    For a while, it looked as if a water-filled crack in the Nevada desert might doom the accepted explanation of the ice ages. Twenty years ago, the so-called astronomical theory had carried the day. Oceanographers had found evidence implying that the march of ice ages over the last million years was paced by the cyclical stretching and squeezing of Earth`s orbit around the sun, which would have altered the way sunlight fell on the planet`s surface. But in 1988, researchers scuba diving in Nevada`s Devils Hole came up with a climate record--captured in carbonate deposits in the crack-that seemed to contradict this chronology. This article discusses the findings and the puzzles that still remain. The records of sea-level change in Barbados coral appear to be right and the astronomical theory is on solid ground using a new clock based on the radioactive decay of uranium-235 to protactinium-231. However, the Devils Hole record also seems to be correct.

  1. Sex Differences in Time Perception during Self-paced Running

    PubMed Central

    HANSON, NICHOLAS J.; BUCKWORTH, JANET

    2016-01-01

    Time perception during exercise may be affected by chosen intensity, and may also affect enjoyment of exercise and subsequent long-term adherence. However, little is known about how individuals perceive the passage of time during exercise, or if factors such as sex are influential. The purpose of this study was to determine if there are sex related differences in perception of time during a bout of exercise in experienced runners. Twenty-two recreational runners (11 men, 11 women) participated in a bout of treadmill running where they were allowed to select their intensity. Sixty second prospective time estimations were taken before, during (at 33%, 66% and 90% of the completed distance), and after the run. Heart rate (HR) was also recorded throughout. The women (M = 91.9, SD = 3.3) ran at a significantly higher percentage of their maximum HR than the men (M = 86.5, SD = 6.4; p = 0.022), choosing to run at a higher relative intensity than the men when given the opportunity to self-pace. The women had relatively lower time estimations overall, showing that they perceived time to be passing by more slowly compared to the men. These results may help to explain sex related differences in exercise adherence. PMID:27766135

  2. Bioelectromagnetic localization of a pacing catheter in the heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesola, K.; Nenonen, J.; Fenici, R.; Lötjönen, J.; Mäkijärvi, M.; Fenici, P.; Korhonen, P.; Lauerma, K.; Valkonen, M.; Toivonen, L.; Katila, T.

    1999-10-01

    The accuracy of localizing source currents within the human heart by non-invasive magneto- and electrocardiographic methods was investigated in 10 patients. A non-magnetic stimulation catheter inside the heart served as a reference current source. Biplane fluoroscopic imaging with lead ball markers was used to record the catheter position. Simultaneous multichannel magnetocardiographic (MCG) and body surface potential mapping (BSPM) recordings were performed during catheter pacing. Equivalent current dipole localizations were computed from MCG and BSPM data, employing standard and patient-specific boundary element torso models. Using individual models with the lungs included, the average MCG localization error was 7±3 mm, whereas the average BSPM localization error was 25±4 mm. In the simplified case of a single homogeneous standard torso model, an average error of 9±3 mm was obtained from MCG recordings. The MCG localization accuracies obtained in this study imply that the capability of multichannel MCG to locate dipolar sources is sufficient for clinical purposes, even without constructing individual torso models from x-ray or from magnetic resonance images.

  3. Bioelectromagnetic localization of a pacing catheter in the heart.

    PubMed

    Pesola, K; Nenonen, J; Fenici, R; Lötjönen, J; Mäkijärvi, M; Fenici, P; Korhonen, P; Lauerma, K; Valkonen, M; Toivonen, L; Katila, T

    1999-10-01

    The accuracy of localizing source currents within the human heart by non-invasive magneto- and electrocardiographic methods was investigated in 10 patients. A non-magnetic stimulation catheter inside the heart served as a reference current source. Biplane fluoroscopic imaging with lead ball markers was used to record the catheter position. Simultaneous multichannel magnetocardiographic (MCG) and body surface potential mapping (BSPM) recordings were performed during catheter pacing. Equivalent current dipole localizations were computed from MCG and BSPM data, employing standard and patient-specific boundary element torso models. Using individual models with the lungs included, the average MCG localization error was 7+/-3 mm, whereas the average BSPM localization error was 25+/-4 mm. In the simplified case of a single homogeneous standard torso model, an average error of 9+/-3 mm was obtained from MCG recordings. The MCG localization accuracies obtained in this study imply that the capability of multichannel MCG to locate dipolar sources is sufficient for clinical purposes, even without constructing individual torso models from x-ray or from magnetic resonance images.

  4. Subtilisin-like proprotein convertase PACE4 is required for skeletal muscle differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, Keizo; Masuda, Tetsuya; Yoshikawa, Chihiro; Nagahama, Masami; Matsuda, Yoshiko; Tsuji, Akihiko

    2009-09-01

    Most growth factors stimulate myoblast proliferation and prevent differentiation, whereas insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) promote myoblast differentiation through the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway. Subtilisin-like proprotein convertases (SPCs) are involved in cell growth and differentiation via activation of pro-growth factors. However, the role of SPCs in myogenesis remains poorly understood. Here we show that PACE4, a member of the SPC family, plays a critical role in myogenic differentiation of C2C12 cells. PACE4 mRNA levels increased markedly during myogenesis, whereas the expression of other member of SPC family, furin and PC6, remained unchanged. The expression pattern of pro-IGF-II, which is processed extracellularly by SPCs, was similar to that of PACE4. The expression of shRNA targeting PACE4, but not furin, suppressed the expression of the muscle-specific myosin light chain (MLC). Interestingly, reduced expression of MLC was restored following treatment with recombinant mature IGF-II. Finally, we demonstrated that the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 blocked the induction of PACE4 mRNA, a result not observed when another myogenic differentiation inhibitor, SB203580 (p38 MAP kinase inhibitor), was employed, indicating the presence of a positive feedback loop regulating PACE4 expression. These results suggest that PACE4 plays an important role in myogenic differentiation through its association with the IGF-II pathway.

  5. Cardiomyopathy induced by artificial cardiac pacing: myth or reality sustained by evidence?

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Andrés Di Leoni; Borges, Anibal Pires; Albuquerque, Luciano Cabral; Sussenbach, Carolina Pelzer; da Rosa, Priscila Raupp; Piantá, Ricardo Medeiros; Wiehe, Mario; Goldani, Marco Antônio

    2014-01-01

    Implantable cardiac pacing systems are a safe and effective treatment for symptomatic irreversible bradycardia. Under the proper indications, cardiac pacing might bring significant clinical benefit. Evidences from literature state that the action of the artificial pacing system, mainly when the ventricular lead is located at the apex of the right ventricle, produces negative effects to cardiac structure (remodeling, dilatation) and function (dissinchrony). Patients with previously compromised left ventricular function would benefit the least with conventional right ventricle apical pacing, and are exposed to the risk of developing higher incidence of morbidity and mortality for heart failure. However, after almost 6 decades of cardiac pacing, just a reduced portion of patients in general would develop these alterations. In this context, there are not completely clear some issues related to cardiac pacing and the development of this cardiomyopathy. Causality relationships among QRS widening with a left bundle branch block morphology, contractility alterations within the left ventricle, and certain substrates or clinical (previous systolic dysfunction, structural heart disease, time from implant) or electrical conditions (QRS duration, percentage of ventricular stimulation) are still subjecte of debate. This review analyses contemporary data regarding this new entity, and discusses alternatives of how to use cardiac pacing in this context, emphasizing cardiac resynchronization therapy. PMID:25372916

  6. Kinematic hand parameters in front crawl at different paces of swimming.

    PubMed

    Samson, Mathias; Monnet, Tony; Bernard, Anthony; Lacouture, Patrick; David, Laurent

    2015-11-05

    The aim of this study was to investigate the evolution of kinematic hand parameters (sweepback angle, angle of attack, velocity, acceleration and orientation of the hand relative to the absolute coordinate system) throughout an aquatic stroke and to study the possible modifications caused by a variation of the swimming pace. Seventeen competitive swimmers swam at long distance, middle distance and sprint paces. Parameters were calculated from the trajectory of seven markers on the hand measured with an optoelectronic system. Results showed that kinematic hand parameters evolve differently depending on the pace. Angle of attack, sweepback angle, acceleration and orientation of the hand do not vary significantly. The velocity of the hand increases when the pace increases, but only during the less propulsive phases (entry and stretch and downsweep to catch). The more the pace increases and the more the absolute durations of the entry and stretch and downsweep to catch phases decrease. Absolute durations of the insweep and upsweep phases remain constant. During these phases, the propulsive hand forces calculated do not vary significantly when the pace increases. The increase of swimming pace is then explained by the swimmer's capacity to maintain propulsive phases rather than increasing the force generation within each cycle.

  7. 77 FR 60732 - PACE Select Advisors Trust and UBS Global Asset Management (Americas) Inc.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-04

    ... COMMISSION PACE Select Advisors Trust and UBS Global Asset Management (Americas) Inc.; Notice of Application... requirements. The requested order would supersede two prior orders.\\1\\ \\1\\ PaineWebber PACE Select Advisors...) and 21666 (Jan. 11, 1996) (order). Applicants: PACE Select Advisors Trust (the ``Trust'') and...

  8. A Closer Look at Split Visual Attention in System- and Self-Paced Instruction in Multimedia Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt-Weigand, Florian; Kohnert, Alfred; Glowalla, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    Two experiments examined visual attention distribution in learning from text and pictures. Participants watched a 16-step multimedia instruction on the formation of lightning. In Experiment 1 (N=90) the instruction was system-paced (fast, medium, slow pace), while it was self-paced in Experiment 2 (N=31). In both experiments the text modality was…

  9. Coupled expression of Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase and catalase in cassava improves tolerance against cold and drought stresses.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jia; Duan, Xiaoguang; Yang, Jun; Beeching, John R; Zhang, Peng

    2013-06-01

    Recently we reported that the joint expression of cassava Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (MeCu/ZnSOD) and catalase (MeCAT1) prolonged the shelf life of cassava storage-roots by the stabilization of reactive oxygen species (ROS) homeostasis after harvest. Since oxidative damage is a major feature of plants exposed to environmental stresses, transgenic cassava showing increased expression of the cytosolic MeCu/ZnSOD and the peroxisomal MeCAT1 should have improved resistance against other abiotic stresses. After cold treatment, the transgenic cassava maintained higher SOD and CAT activities and lower malendialdehyde content than those of wild type plants (WT). Detached leaves of transgenic cassava also showed slower transpirational water loss than those of WT. When plants were not watered for 30 d, transgenic lines exhibited a significant increase in water retention ability, accumulated 13% more proline and 12% less malendialdehyde than WT's, and showed enhanced activity of SOD and CAT. These results imply that manipulation of the antioxidative mechanism allows the development of staple crops with improved tolerance to abiotic stresses.

  10. 42 CFR 460.132 - Quality assessment and performance improvement plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Quality Assessment and Performance Improvement § 460.132 Quality assessment and performance improvement plan. (a) Basic rule. A PACE organization must have a written quality... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Quality assessment and performance improvement...

  11. Brief exposure to a self-paced computer-based reading programme and how it impacts reading ability and behaviour problems.

    PubMed

    Hughes, J Antony; Phillips, Gordon; Reed, Phil

    2013-01-01

    Basic literacy skills underlie much future adult functioning, and are targeted in children through a variety of means. Children with reading problems were exposed either to a self-paced computer programme that focused on improving phonetic ability, or underwent a classroom-based reading intervention. Exposure was limited to 3 40-min sessions a week, for six weeks. The children were assessed in terms of their reading, spelling, and mathematics abilities, as well as for their externalising and internalising behaviour problems, before the programme commenced, and immediately after the programme terminated. Relative to the control group, the computer-programme improved reading by about seven months in boys (but not in girls), but had no impact on either spelling or mathematics. Children on the programme also demonstrated fewer externalising and internalising behaviour problems than the control group. The results suggest that brief exposure to a self-paced phonetic computer-teaching programme had some benefits for the sample.

  12. Coupled Ethical–Epistemic Analysis of Public Health Research and Practice: Categorizing Variables to Improve Population Health and Equity

    PubMed Central

    Katikireddi, S. Vittal; Valles, Sean A

    2015-01-01

    The categorization of variables can stigmatize populations, which is ethically problematic and threatens the central purpose of public health: to improve population health and reduce health inequities. How social variables (e.g., behavioral risks for HIV) are categorized can reinforce stigma and cause unintended harms to the populations practitioners and researchers strive to serve. Although debates about the validity or ethical consequences of epidemiological variables are familiar for specific variables (e.g., ethnicity), these issues apply more widely. We argue that these tensions and debates regarding epidemiological variables should be analyzed simultaneously as ethical and epistemic challenges. We describe a framework derived from the philosophy of science that may be usefully applied to public health, and we illustrate its application. PMID:25393193

  13. Coupled Ethical-Epistemic Analysis of Public Health Research and Practice: Categorizing Variables to Improve Population Health and Equity.

    PubMed

    Katikireddi, S Vittal; Valles, Sean A

    2015-01-01

    The categorization of variables can stigmatize populations, which is ethically problematic and threatens the central purpose of public health: to improve population health and reduce health inequities. How social variables (e.g., behavioral risks for HIV) are categorized can reinforce stigma and cause unintended harms to the populations practitioners and researchers strive to serve. Although debates about the validity or ethical consequences of epidemiological variables are familiar for specific variables (e.g., ethnicity), these issues apply more widely. We argue that these tensions and debates regarding epidemiological variables should be analyzed simultaneously as ethical and epistemic challenges. We describe a framework derived from the philosophy of science that may be usefully applied to public health, and we illustrate its application.

  14. Improvement of l-lactic acid productivity from sweet sorghum juice by repeated batch fermentation coupled with membrane separation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Meng, Hongyu; Cai, Di; Wang, Bin; Qin, Peiyong; Wang, Zheng; Tan, Tianwei

    2016-07-01

    In order to efficiently produce l-lactic acid from non-food feedstocks, sweet sorghum juice (SSJ), which is rich of fermentable sugars, was directly used for l-lactic acid fermentation by Lactobacillus rhamnosus LA-04-1. A membrane integrated repeated batch fermentation (MIRB) was developed for productivity improvement. High-cell-density fermentation was achieved with a final cell density (OD620) of 42.3, and the CCR effect was overcomed. When SSJ (6.77gL(-1) glucose, 4.51gL(-1) fructose and 50.46gL(-1) sucrose) was used as carbon source in MIRB process, l-lactic acid productivity was increased significantly from 1.45gL(-1)h(-1) (batch 1) to 17.55gL(-1)h(-1) (batch 6). This process introduces an effective way to produce l-lactic acid from SSJ.

  15. Effects of home-based pulmonary rehabilitation with a metronome-guided walking pace in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-soon; Kim, Changhwan; Jin, Young-Soo; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Lee, Sang-Do; Yang, Yun Jun; Park, Yong Bum

    2013-05-01

    Despite documented efficacy and recommendations, pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has been underutilized. Home-based PR was proposed as an alternative, but there were limited data. The adequate exercise intensity was also a crucial issue. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of home-based PR with a metronome-guided walking pace on functional exercise capacity and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in COPD. The subjects participated in a 12-week home-based PR program. Exercise intensity was initially determined by cardiopulmonary exercise test, and was readjusted (the interval of metronome beeps was reset) according to submaximal endurance test. Six-minute walk test, pulmonary function test, cardiopulmonary exercise test, and St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) were done before and after the 12-week program, and at 6 months after completion of rehabilitation. Thirty-three patients participated in the program. Six-minute walking distance was significantly increased (48.8 m; P = 0.017) and the SGRQ score was also improved (-15; P < 0.001) over the six-month follow-up period after rehabilitation. There were no significant differences in pulmonary function and peak exercise parameters. We developed an effective home-based PR program with a metronome-guided walking pace for COPD patients. This rehabilitation program may improve functional exercise capacity and HRQOL.

  16. Obliquity-paced Pliocene West Antarctic ice sheet oscillations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naish, T.; Powell, R.; Levy, R.; Wilson, G.; Scherer, R.; Talarico, F.; Krissek, L.; Niessen, F.; Pompilio, M.; Wilson, T.; Carter, L.; DeConto, R.; Huybers, P.; McKay, R.; Pollard, D.; Ross, J.; Winter, D.; Barrett, P.; Browne, G.; Cody, R.; Cowan, E.; Crampton, J.; Dunbar, G.; Dunbar, N.; Florindo, F.; Gebhardt, C.; Graham, I.; Hannah, M.; Hansaraj, D.; Harwood, D.; Helling, D.; Henrys, S.; Hinnov, L.; Kuhn, G.; Kyle, P.; Laufer, A.; Maffioli, P.; Magens, D.; Mandernack, K.; McIntosh, W.; Millan, C.; Morin, R.; Ohneiser, C.; Paulsen, T.; Persico, D.; Raine, I.; Reed, J.; Riesselman, C.; Sagnotti, L.; Schmitt, D.; Sjunneskog, C.; Strong, P.; Taviani, M.; Vogel, S.; Wilch, T.; Williams, T.

    2009-01-01

    Thirty years after oxygen isotope records from microfossils deposited in ocean sediments confirmed the hypothesis that variations in the Earth's orbital geometry control the ice ages, fundamental questions remain over the response of the Antarctic ice sheets to orbital cycles. Furthermore, an understanding of the behaviour of the marine-based West Antarctic ice sheet (WAIS) during the 'warmer-than-present' early-Pliocene epoch (???5-3 Myr ago) is needed to better constrain the possible range of ice-sheet behaviour in the context of future global warming. Here we present a marine glacial record from the upper 600 m of the AND-1B sediment core recovered from beneath the northwest part of the Ross ice shelf by the ANDRILL programme and demonstrate well-dated, ???40-kyr cyclic variations in ice-sheet extent linked to cycles in insolation influenced by changes in the Earth's axial tilt (obliquity) during the Pliocene. Our data provide direct evidence for orbitally induced oscillations in the WAIS, which periodically collapsed, resulting in a switch from grounded ice, or ice shelves, to open waters in the Ross embayment when planetary temperatures were up to ???3??C warmer than today and atmospheric CO 2 concentration was as high as ???400 p.p.m.v. (refs 5, 6). The evidence is consistent with a new ice-sheet/ice-shelf model that simulates fluctuations in Antarctic ice volume of up to +7 m in equivalent sea level associated with the loss of the WAIS and up to +3 m in equivalent sea level from the East Antarctic ice sheet, in response to ocean-induced melting paced by obliquity. During interglacial times, diatomaceous sediments indicate high surface-water productivity, minimal summer sea ice and air temperatures above freezing, suggesting an additional influence of surface melt under conditions of elevated CO2. ??2009 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  17. Growth, innovation, scaling, and the pace of life in cities.

    PubMed

    Bettencourt, Luís M A; Lobo, José; Helbing, Dirk; Kühnert, Christian; West, Geoffrey B

    2007-04-24

    Humanity has just crossed a major landmark in its history with the majority of people now living in cities. Cities have long been known to be society's predominant engine of innovation and wealth creation, yet they are also its main source of crime, pollution, and disease. The inexorable trend toward urbanization worldwide presents an urgent challenge for developing a predictive, quantitative theory of urban organization and sustainable development. Here we present empirical evidence indicating that the processes relating urbanization to economic development and knowledge creation are very general, being shared by all cities belonging to the same urban system and sustained across different nations and times. Many diverse properties of cities from patent production and personal income to electrical cable length are shown to be power law functions of population size with scaling exponents, beta, that fall into distinct universality classes. Quantities reflecting wealth creation and innovation have beta approximately 1.2 >1 (increasing returns), whereas those accounting for infrastructure display beta approximately 0.8 <1 (economies of scale). We predict that the pace of social life in the city increases with population size, in quantitative agreement with data, and we discuss how cities are similar to, and differ from, biological organisms, for which beta<1. Finally, we explore possible consequences of these scaling relations by deriving growth equations, which quantify the dramatic difference between growth fueled by innovation versus that driven by economies of scale. This difference suggests that, as population grows, major innovation cycles must be generated at a continually accelerating rate to sustain growth and avoid stagnation or collapse.

  18. Growth, innovation, scaling, and the pace of life in cities

    PubMed Central

    Bettencourt, Luís M. A.; Lobo, José; Helbing, Dirk; Kühnert, Christian; West, Geoffrey B.

    2007-01-01

    Humanity has just crossed a major landmark in its history with the majority of people now living in cities. Cities have long been known to be society's predominant engine of innovation and wealth creation, yet they are also its main source of crime, pollution, and disease. The inexorable trend toward urbanization worldwide presents an urgent challenge for developing a predictive, quantitative theory of urban organization and sustainable development. Here we present empirical evidence indicating that the processes relating urbanization to economic development and knowledge creation are very general, being shared by all cities belonging to the same urban system and sustained across different nations and times. Many diverse properties of cities from patent production and personal income to electrical cable length are shown to be power law functions of population size with scaling exponents, β, that fall into distinct universality classes. Quantities reflecting wealth creation and innovation have β ≈1.2 >1 (increasing returns), whereas those accounting for infrastructure display β ≈0.8 <1 (economies of scale). We predict that the pace of social life in the city increases with population size, in quantitative agreement with data, and we discuss how cities are similar to, and differ from, biological organisms, for which β<1. Finally, we explore possible consequences of these scaling relations by deriving growth equations, which quantify the dramatic difference between growth fueled by innovation versus that driven by economies of scale. This difference suggests that, as population grows, major innovation cycles must be generated at a continually accelerating rate to sustain growth and avoid stagnation or collapse. PMID:17438298

  19. Obliquity-paced Pliocene West Antarctic ice sheet oscillations.

    PubMed

    Naish, T; Powell, R; Levy, R; Wilson, G; Scherer, R; Talarico, F; Krissek, L; Niessen, F; Pompilio, M; Wilson, T; Carter, L; DeConto, R; Huybers, P; McKay, R; Pollard, D; Ross, J; Winter, D; Barrett, P; Browne, G; Cody, R; Cowan, E; Crampton, J; Dunbar, G; Dunbar, N; Florindo, F; Gebhardt, C; Graham, I; Hannah, M; Hansaraj, D; Harwood, D; Helling, D; Henrys, S; Hinnov, L; Kuhn, G; Kyle, P; Läufer, A; Maffioli, P; Magens, D; Mandernack, K; McIntosh, W; Millan, C; Morin, R; Ohneiser, C; Paulsen, T; Persico, D; Raine, I; Reed, J; Riesselman, C; Sagnotti, L; Schmitt, D; Sjunneskog, C; Strong, P; Taviani, M; Vogel, S; Wilch, T; Williams, T

    2009-03-19

    Thirty years after oxygen isotope records from microfossils deposited in ocean sediments confirmed the hypothesis that variations in the Earth's orbital geometry control the ice ages, fundamental questions remain over the response of the Antarctic ice sheets to orbital cycles. Furthermore, an understanding of the behaviour of the marine-based West Antarctic ice sheet (WAIS) during the 'warmer-than-present' early-Pliocene epoch ( approximately 5-3 Myr ago) is needed to better constrain the possible range of ice-sheet behaviour in the context of future global warming. Here we present a marine glacial record from the upper 600 m of the AND-1B sediment core recovered from beneath the northwest part of the Ross ice shelf by the ANDRILL programme and demonstrate well-dated, approximately 40-kyr cyclic variations in ice-sheet extent linked to cycles in insolation influenced by changes in the Earth's axial tilt (obliquity) during the Pliocene. Our data provide direct evidence for orbitally induced oscillations in the WAIS, which periodically collapsed, resulting in a switch from grounded ice, or ice shelves, to open waters in the Ross embayment when planetary temperatures were up to approximately 3 degrees C warmer than today and atmospheric CO(2) concentration was as high as approximately 400 p.p.m.v. (refs 5, 6). The evidence is consistent with a new ice-sheet/ice-shelf model that simulates fluctuations in Antarctic ice volume of up to +7 m in equivalent sea level associated with the loss of the WAIS and up to +3 m in equivalent sea level from the East Antarctic ice sheet, in response to ocean-induced melting paced by obliquity. During interglacial times, diatomaceous sediments indicate high surface-water productivity, minimal summer sea ice and air temperatures above freezing, suggesting an additional influence of surface melt under conditions of elevated CO(2).

  20. Are postglacial sediment yields of mountain headwaters out of pace?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Many high mountains have been sculpted by strong glacial erosion during the Pleistocene that resulted in valley widening and overdeepening and the formation of glacial cirques, U-shaped valleys, and widespread glacial deposits. The retreat of glacial ice exposes oversteepened hillslopes that are susceptible to rockfalls, deep-seated landsliding, gully erosion, and debris flows, and can also result in valley aggradation and reworking of valley deposits through debris flow activity and fluvial processes. It has been argued that sediment fluxes caused by these processes remain elevated even several thousand years after the retreat of valley glaciers. Yet, our knowledge on the response times of postglacial mountain systems to Pleistocene glacial erosion remains insufficient. Here I represent an approach to calculate the response times of postglacial geomorphic systems to Pleistocene glacial erosion based on reservoir theory and the compilation of postglacial sediment budgets in alpine systems. The study is conducted in the Kananaskis Country in the Canadian Rocky Mountains, in which sediment budgets of 5 headwater basins have been complied. The sediment budgets show that sediment delivery from formerly glaciated headwaters is limited indicated by average postglacial sediment delivery ratios (SDR) ranging between 0 and 0.3. The low SDRs are controlled by the glacial history of the headwater and suggest that the response times of sediment flux in alpine headwater basins is in the order of 100-500 kyr. Thus postglacial adjustment of alpine sediment flux exceeds the recurrence interval of the large ice ages during the Pleistocene suggesting that mountain headwaters in the Canadian Rockies are out of pace with respect to glacially-induced changes.

  1. Cloud Retrieval Information Content Studies with the Pre-Aerosol, Cloud and ocean Ecosystem (PACE) Ocean Color Imager (OCI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coddington, Odele; Platnick, Steven; Pilewskie, Peter; Schmidt, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    The NASA Pre-Aerosol, Cloud and ocean Ecosystem (PACE) Science Definition Team (SDT) report released in 2012 defined imager stability requirements for the Ocean Color Instrument (OCI) at the sub-percent level. While the instrument suite and measurement requirements are currently being determined, the PACE SDT report provided details on imager options and spectral specifications. The options for a threshold instrument included a hyperspectral imager from 350-800 nm, two near-infrared (NIR) channels, and three short wave infrared (SWIR) channels at 1240, 1640, and 2130 nm. Other instrument options include a variation of the threshold instrument with 3 additional spectral channels at 940, 1378, and 2250 nm and the inclusion of a spectral polarimeter. In this work, we present cloud retrieval information content studies of optical thickness, droplet effective radius, and thermodynamic phase to quantify the potential for continuing the low cloud climate data record established by the MOderate Resolution and Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) missions with the PACE OCI instrument (i.e., non-polarized cloud reflectances and in the absence of midwave and longwave infrared channels). The information content analysis is performed using the GEneralized Nonlinear Retrieval Analysis (GENRA) methodology and the Collection 6 simulated cloud reflectance data for the common MODIS/VIIRS algorithm (MODAWG) for Cloud Mask, Cloud-Top, and Optical Properties. We show that using both channels near 2 microns improves the probability of cloud phase discrimination with shortwave-only cloud reflectance retrievals. Ongoing work will extend the information content analysis, currently performed for dark ocean surfaces, to different land surface types.

  2. Gas Chromatography Coupled to Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry for Improvement of Data Reliability.

    PubMed

    Schwemer, Theo; Rüger, Christopher P; Sklorz, Martin; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2015-12-15

    Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) offers the advantage of molecular ion information with low fragmentation. Hyphenating APCI to gas chromatography (GC) and ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) enables an improved characterization of complex mixtures. Data amounts acquired by this system are very huge, and existing peak picking algorithms are usually extremely time-consuming, if both gas chromatographic and ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometric data are concerned. Therefore, automatic routines are developed that are capable of handling these data sets and further allow the identification and removal of known ionization artifacts (e.g., water- and oxygen-adducts, demethylation, dehydrogenation, and decarboxylation). Furthermore, the data quality is enhanced by the prediction of an estimated retention index, which is calculated simply from exact mass data combined with a double bond equivalent correction. This retention index is used to identify mismatched elemental compositions. The approach was successfully tested for analysis of semivolatile components in heavy fuel oil and diesel fuel as well as primary combustion particles emitted by a ship diesel research engine. As a result, 10-28% of the detected compounds, mainly low abundant species, classically assigned by using only the mass spectrometric information, were identified as not valid and removed. Although GC separation is limited by the slow acquisition rate of the FT-ICR MS (<1 Hz), a database driven retention time comparison, as commonly used for low resolution GC/MS, can be applied for revealing isomeric information.

  3. Coupling chemical transport model source attributions with positive matrix factorization: application to two IMPROVE sites impacted by wildfires.

    PubMed

    Sturtz, Timothy M; Schichtel, Bret A; Larson, Timothy V

    2014-10-07

    Source contributions to total fine particle carbon predicted by a chemical transport model (CTM) were incorporated into the positive matrix factorization (PMF) receptor model to form a receptor-oriented hybrid model. The level of influence of the CTM versus traditional PMF was varied using a weighting parameter applied to an object function as implemented in the Multilinear Engine (ME-2). The methodology provides the ability to separate features that would not be identified using PMF alone, without sacrificing fit to observations. The hybrid model was applied to IMPROVE data taken from 2006 through 2008 at Monture and Sula Peak, Montana. It was able to separately identify major contributions of total carbon (TC) from wildfires and minor contributions from biogenic sources. The predictions of TC had a lower cross-validated RMSE than those from either PMF or CTM alone. Two unconstrained, minor features were identified at each site, a soil derived feature with elevated summer impacts and a feature enriched in sulfate and nitrate with significant, but sporadic contributions across the sampling period. The respective mean TC contributions from wildfires, biogenic emissions, and other sources were 1.18, 0.12, and 0.12 ugC/m(3) at Monture and 1.60, 0.44, and 0.06 ugC/m(3) at Sula Peak.

  4. Coupling landscape water storage and supplemental irrigation to increase productivity and improve environmental stewardship in the U.S. Midwest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, John M.; Griffis, Timothy J.; Ochsner, Tyson E.

    2012-05-01

    Agriculture must increase production for a growing population while simultaneously reducing its environmental impacts. These goals need not be in tension with one another. Here we outline a vision for improving both the productivity and environmental performance of agriculture in the U.S. Midwest, also known as the Corn Belt. Mean annual precipitation has increased throughout the region over the past 50 years, consistent with climate models that attribute the increase to a warming troposphere. Stream gauge data indicate that higher precipitation has been matched or exceeded by higher stream flows, contributing to flooding, soil loss, and excessive nutrient flux to the Gulf of Mexico. We propose increasing landscape hydrologic storage through construction of ponds and restoration of wetlands to retain water for supplemental irrigation while also reducing flood risks. Primary productivity is proportional to transpiration, and analysis shows that in the U.S. Midwest both can be sustainably increased with supplemental irrigation. The proposed strategy should reduce interannual yield variability by limiting losses due to transient drought, while facilitating adoption of cropping systems that "perennialize" the landscape to take advantage of the full potential growing season. When implemented in concert, these practices should reduce the riverine nitrogen export that is a primary cause of hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico. Erosive sediment losses should also be reduced through the combination of enhanced hydrologic storage and increased vegetative cover. Successful implementation would require watershed-scale coordination among producers and landowners. An obvious mechanism to encourage this is governmental farm policy.

  5. An Approach to Endovascular Ventricular Pacing in a Patient with Ebstein Anomaly and a Mechanical Tricuspid Valve.

    PubMed

    Zipse, Matthew M; Groves, Daniel W; Khanna, Amber D; Nguyen, Duy Thai

    2016-03-01

    In the presence of a mechanical tricuspid valve, endocardial right ventricular pacing is contraindicated, and permanent pacing is usually achieved via a surgically implanted epicardial lead. In a patient with Ebstein anomaly, a mechanical tricuspid valve, and complete heart block, transvenous pacing was achieved by implantation of a pace-sense lead in a coronary sinus ventricular branch. Noninvasive cardiac imaging can provide information regarding anatomic variation in patients with congenital heart disease or when there are challenges to lead placement. With careful planning and execution, endovascular pacing in patients with a mechanical tricuspid valve is feasible and can safely be performed.

  6. Almanac 2013: cardiac arrhythmias and pacing--an editorial overview of selected research that has driven recent advances in clinical cardiology.

    PubMed

    Liew, Reginald

    2014-04-01

    Important advances have been made in the past few years in the fields of clinical cardiac electrophysiology and pacing. Researchers and clinicians have a greater understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying atrial fibrillation (AF), which has transpired into improved methods of detection, risk stratification, and treatments. The introduction of novel oral anticoagulants has provided clinicians with alternative options in managing patients with AF at moderate to high thromboembolic risk and further data has been emerging on the use of catheter ablation for the treatment of symptomatic AF. Another area of intense research in the field of cardiac arrhythmias and pacing is in the use of cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) for the treatment of patients with heart failure. Following the publication of major landmark randomised controlled trials reporting that CRT confers a survival advantage in patients with severe heart failure and improves symptoms, many subsequent studies have been performed to further refine the selection of patients for CRT and determine the clinical characteristics associated with a favourable response. The field of sudden cardiac death and implantable cardioverter defibrillators also continues to be actively researched, with important new epidemiological and clinical data emerging on improved methods for patient selection, risk stratification, and management.This review covers the major recent advances in these areas related to cardiac arrhythmias and pacing.

  7. Self-Paced Mathematics Instruction: How Effective Has it Been in Secondary and Postsecondary Schools?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoen, Harold L.

    1976-01-01

    Seventeen studies of self-paced instruction in algebra, geometry, trigonometry, and college mathematics courses are reviewed. In general these studies did not find the individualized programs to be superior to theregular instruction with which they were compared. (SD)

  8. The Examination of Exposures of Pleistocene Sediments in the Field: A Self-Paced Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keene, Peter

    1982-01-01

    Describes a self-paced field exercise which takes college geomorphology students through a step-by-step study of the origin and environment of pleistocene deposits. The exercise could also be adapted for use at the secondary level. (AM)

  9. Acquired tricuspid valve stenosis associated with two ventricular endocardial pacing leads in a dog.

    PubMed

    Tompkins, Emily; Dulake, Michelle I; Ghaffari, Shadie; Nakamura, Reid K

    2015-01-01

    Acquired tricuspid valve stenosis (TVS) is a rare complication of endocardial pacing lead implantation in humans that has only been described once previously in the veterinary literature in a dog with excessive lead redundancy. A 12 yr old terrier presented with right-sided congestive heart failure 6 mo after implantation of a second ventricular endocardial pacing lead. The second lead was placed due to malfunction of the first lead, which demonstrated abnormally low impedance. Transthoracic echocardiography identified hyperechoic tissue associated with the pacing leads as they crossed the tricuspid valve annulus as well as a stenotic tricuspid inflow pattern via spectral Doppler interrogation. Medical management was ultimately unsuccessful and the dog was euthanized 6 wk after TVS was diagnosed. The authors report the first canine case of acquired TVS associated with two ventricular endocardial pacing leads.

  10. Photovoltaics (PV) as an Eligible Measure in Residential PACE Programs: Benefits and Challenges (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Coughlin, J.

    2010-06-01

    Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing is one of several new financial models broadening access to clean energy by addressing the barrier of initial capital cost. The majority of the PACE programs in the market today include PV as an eligible measure. PV appeals to homeowners as a way to reduce utility bills, self-generate sustainable power, increase energy independence and demonstrate a commitment to the environment. If substantial state incentives for PV exist, PV projects can be economic under PACE, especially when partnered with good net metering policies. At the same time, PV is expensive relative to other eligible measures with a return on investment horizon that might exceed program targets. This fact sheet reviews the benefits and potential challenges of including PV in PACE programs.

  11. Improving the Thermochemical Energy Storage Performance of the Mn2 O3 /Mn3 O4 Redox Couple by the Incorporation of Iron.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Alfonso J; Serrano, David P; Pizarro, Patricia; Coronado, Juan M

    2015-06-08

    Redox cycles of manganese oxides (Mn2 O3 /Mn3 O4 ) are a promising alternative for thermochemical heat storage systems coupled to concentrated solar power plants as manganese oxides are abundant and inexpensive materials. Although their cyclability for such a purpose has been proved, sintering processes, related to the high-temperature conditions at which charge-discharge cycles are performed, generally cause a cycle-to-cycle decrease in the oxidation rate of Mn3 O4 . To guarantee proper operation, both reactions should present stable reaction rates. In this study, it has been demonstrated that the incorporation of Fe, which is also an abundant material, into the manganese oxides improves the redox performance of this system by increasing the heat storage density, narrowing the redox thermal hysteresis, and, above all, stabilizing and enhancing the oxidation rate over long-term operation, which counteracts the negative effects caused by sintering, although its presence is not avoided.

  12. Boosting bit rates and error detection for the classification of fast-paced motor commands based on single-trial EEG analysis.

    PubMed

    Blankertz, Benjamin; Dornhege, Guido; Schäfer, Christin; Krepki, Roman; Kohlmorgen, Jens; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Kunzmann, Volker; Losch, Florian; Curio, Gabriel

    2003-06-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) involve two coupled adapting systems--the human subject and the computer. In developing our BCI, our goal was to minimize the need for subject training and to impose the major learning load on the computer. To this end, we use behavioral paradigms that exploit single-trial EEG potentials preceding voluntary finger movements. Here, we report recent results on the basic physiology of such premovement event-related potentials (ERP). 1) We predict the laterality of imminent left- versus right-hand finger movements in a natural keyboard typing condition and demonstrate that a single-trial classification based on the lateralized Bereitschaftspotential (BP) achieves good accuracies even at a pace as fast as 2 taps/s. Results for four out of eight subjects reached a peak information transfer rate of more than 15 b/min; the four other subjects reached 6-10 b/min. 2) We detect cerebral error potentials from single false-response trials in a forced-choice task, reflecting the subject's recognition of an erroneous response. Based on a specifically tailored classification procedure that limits the rate of false positives at, e.g., 2%, the algorithm manages to detect 85% of error trials in seven out of eight subjects. Thus, concatenating a primary single-trial BP-paradigm involving finger classification feedback with such secondary error detection could serve as an efficient online confirmation/correction tool for improvement of bit rates in a future BCI setting. As the present variant of the Berlin BCI is designed to achieve fast classifications in normally behaving subjects, it opens a new perspective for assistance of action control in time-critical behavioral contexts; the potential transfer to paralyzed patients will require further study.

  13. Infants' Visual Attention to Baby DVDs as a Function of Program Pacing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gola, Alice Ann Howard; Calvert, Sandra L.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effects of program pacing, defined as the rate of scene and character change per minute, on infants' visual attention to video presentations. Seventy-two infants (twenty-four 6-month-olds, twenty-four 9-month-olds, twenty-four 12-month-olds) were exposed to one of two sets of high- and low-paced commercial infant DVDs. Each…

  14. Permanent pacing is a risk factor for the development of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Freudenberger, Ronald S; Wilson, Alan C; Lawrence-Nelson, Janet; Hare, Joshua M; Kostis, John B

    2005-03-01

    No previous study has examined the importance of right ventricular pacing as a risk factor for the development of heart failure (HF) in subjects without a history of HF. A cohort study of patients who underwent initial pacemaker implantation (n = 11,426) was conducted to test the hypothesis that patients with ventricular dyssynchrony created by permanent pacing would develop HF, as shown by new HF hospitalizations or HF-related deaths, at a higher rate than matched controls.

  15. The effect of visitor number and spice provisioning in pacing expression by jaguars evaluated through a case study.

    PubMed

    Vidal, L S; Guilherme, F R; Silva, V F; Faccio, M C S R; Martins, M M; Briani, D C

    2016-06-01

    Captive animals exhibit stereotypic pacing in response to multiple causes, including the inability to escape from human contact. Environmental enrichment techniques can minimize pacing expression. By using an individual-based approach, we addressed whether the amount of time two males and a female jaguar (Panthera onca) devote to pacing varied with the number of visitors and tested the effectiveness of cinnamon and black pepper in reducing pacing. The amount of time that all jaguars engaged in pacing increased significantly with the number of visitors. Despite the difference between the males regarding age and housing conditions, both devoted significantly less time to pacing following the addition of both spices, which indicates their suitability as enrichment techniques. Mean time devoted to pacing among the treatments did not differ for the female. Our findings pointed out to the validity of individual-based approaches, as they can reveal how suitable olfactory stimuli are to minimizing stereotypies irrespective of particular traits.

  16. PACE4 regulates proliferation, migration and invasion in human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feifei; Wang, Lin; Pan, Jihong

    2015-01-01

    PACE4 is one of the proprotein convertases (PC) that participate in the post-translational activation of inactive proteins, leading to mature, biologically active proteins. The processing reactions occur in pairs of basic amino acids. PACE4 is an extracellular PC that binds to growth factors and several components of the extracellular matrix contributing to tumor progression. In the present study, the PACE4 gene was silenced by small interfering RNA (siRNA), and the knockdown human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells showed significantly reduced proliferation, migration and invasion rates. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that downregulation of PACE4 increases the percentage of cells arrested at the G0/G1 phase. Moreover, the expression of genes involved in cell growth, invasion and adhesion, i.e., IGF-2, MMP9 and MPZL2 was significantly decreased following siRNA-mediated silencing of PACE4. Taken together, these results indicate that PACE4 plays an important role in human breast cancer, and that it might represent a novel target for breast cancer therapy.

  17. The microenvironment patterns the pluripotent mouse epiblast through paracrine Furin and Pace4 proteolytic activities.

    PubMed

    Mesnard, Daniel; Donnison, Martyn; Fuerer, Christophe; Pfeffer, Peter L; Constam, Daniel B

    2011-09-01

    The fate of pluripotent cells in early mouse embryos is controlled by graded Nodal signals that are activated by the endoproteases Furin and Pace4. Soluble forms of Furin and Pace4 cleave proNodal in vitro and after secretion in transfected cells, but direct evidence for paracrine activity in vivo is elusive. Here, we show that Furin and Pace4 are released by the extraembryonic microenvironment, and that they cleave a membrane-bound reporter substrate in adjacent epiblast cells and activate Nodal to maintain pluripotency. Secreted Pace4 and Furin also stimulated mesoderm formation, whereas endoderm was only induced by Pace4, correlating with a difference in the spatiotemporal distribution of these proteolytic activities. Our analysis of paracrine Furin and Pace4 activities and their in vivo functions significantly advances our understanding of how the epiblast is patterned by its microenvironment. Adding cell-cell communication to the pleiotropic portfolio of these proteases provides a new framework to study proprotein processing also in other relevant contexts.

  18. Active avoidance but not activity pacing is associated with disability in fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Karsdorp, Petra A; Vlaeyen, Johan W S

    2009-12-15

    Activity pacing has been suggested as a behavioural strategy that may protect patients with fibromyalgia (FM) against activity dysregulation and disability. The aim of the present study was to empirically test whether the construct of activity pacing is distinct from other behavioural strategies assessed with the Chronic Pain Coping Inventory (CPCI), such as guarding, resting, asking for assistance, relaxation, task persistence, exercise/stretch, seeking social support, and coping self-statements. The second objective was to test whether pacing was associated with physical disability when controlling for pain catastrophizing, pain severity and the other behavioural strategies as measured with CPCI. A random sample of patients with FM (N=409) completed the CPCI, the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS), the Physical Index of the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ-PH) and the Pain Disability Index (PDI). The results demonstrated that the Dutch version of the CPCI including the pacing subscale has adequate internal consistency and construct validity. Moreover, guarding and asking for assistance, but not pacing, were associated with disability. These findings are in line with fear-avoidance models and suggest that specifically active avoidance behaviours are detrimental in FM. The authors recommend developing cognitive-behavioural and exposure-based interventions and challenge the idea that pacing as an intervention is essential in pain self-management programs.

  19. Time pacing: competing in markets that won't stand still.

    PubMed

    Eisenhardt, K M; Brown, S L

    1998-01-01

    Most companies change in reaction to events such as moves by the competition, shifts in technology, or new customer demands. In fairly stable markets, "event pacing" is an effective way to deal with change. But successful companies in rapidly changing, intensely competitive industries take a different approach. They change proactively, through regular deadlines. The authors call this strategy time pacing. Like a metronome, time pacing creates a rhythm to which managers can synchronize the speed and intensity of their efforts. For example, 3M dictates that 25% of its revenues every year will come from new products, Netscape introduces a new product about every six months, and Intel adds a new fabrication facility to its operations approximately every nine months. Time pacing creates a relentless sense of urgency around meeting deadlines and concentrates people on a common set of goals. Its predictability also provides people with a sense of control in otherwise chaotic markets. The authors show how companies such as Banc One, Cisco Systems, Dell Computer, Emerson Electric, Gillette, Intel, Netscape, Shiseido, and Sony implement the two essentials of time pacing. The first is managing transitions--the shift, for example, from one new-product-development project to the next. The second is setting the right rhythm for change. Companies that march to the rhythm of time pacing build momentum, and companies that effectively manage transitions sustain that momentum without missing important beats.

  20. A Pilot Study on the Effects of Slow Paced Breathing on Current Food Craving.

    PubMed

    Meule, Adrian; Kübler, Andrea

    2017-03-01

    Heart rate variability biofeedback (HRV-BF) involves slow paced breathing (approximately six breaths per minute), thereby maximizing low-frequent heart rate oscillations and baroreflex gain. Mounting evidence suggests that HRV-BF promotes symptom reductions in a variety of physical and mental disorders. It may also positively affect eating behavior by reducing food cravings. The aim of the current study was to investigate if slow paced breathing can be useful for attenuating momentary food craving. Female students performed paced breathing either at six breaths per minute (n = 32) or at nine breaths per minute (n = 33) while watching their favorite food on the computer screen. Current food craving decreased during a first resting period, increased during paced breathing, and decreased during a second resting period in both conditions. Although current hunger increased in both conditions during paced breathing as well, it remained elevated after the second resting period in the nine breaths condition only. Thus, breathing rate did not influence specific food craving, but slow paced breathing appeared to have a delayed influence on state hunger. Future avenues are suggested for the study of HRV-BF in the context of eating behavior.