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Sample records for coupling limit analytical

  1. An analytic Pade-motivated QCD coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, H. E.; Cvetic, G.

    2010-08-04

    We consider a modification of the Minimal Analytic (MA) coupling of Shirkov and Solovtsov. This modified MA (mMA) coupling reflects the desired analytic properties of the space-like observables. We show that an approximation by Dirac deltas of its discontinuity function {rho} is equivalent to a Pade(rational) approximation of the mMA coupling that keeps its analytic structure. We propose a modification to mMA that, as preliminary results indicate, could be an improvement in the evaluation of low-energy observables compared with other analytic couplings.

  2. Analytic estimates of coupling in damping rings

    SciTech Connect

    Raubenheimer, T.O.; Ruth, R.D.

    1989-03-01

    In this paper we present analytic formulas to estimate the vertical emittance in weakly coupled electron/positron storage rings. We consider contributions from both the vertical dispersion and linear coupling of the betatron motions. In addition to simple expressions for random misalignments and rotations of the magnets, formulas are presented to calculate the vertical emittance blowup due to orbit distortions. The orbit distortions are assumed to be caused by random misalignments, but because the closed orbit is correlated from point to point, the effects must be treated differently. We consider only corrected orbits. Finally, the analytic expressions are compared with computer simulations of storage rings with random misalignments. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Strong-coupling limit of Eliashberg theory

    SciTech Connect

    Combescot, R.

    1995-05-01

    We study the strong-coupling limit of the Eliashberg theory of superconductivity, where the coupling strength {lambda} goes to infinity and the critical temperature gets large compared to a typical phonon energy. This limit is of interest because it is both universal and simple, and we may hope to obtain from this study a deeper understanding of the conventional strong-coupling regime of superconductivity. Our work on this problem is both analytical and numerical. At {ital T}=0, we find that the excitation spectrum is discrete. We interpret physically the excited states as bound states due to a type of polaronic effect. We show that one can solve the Eliashberg equations essentially analytically by working fully on the real frequency axis. At finite temperature we find a thermal smearing of the {ital T}=0 structure. Since the critical temperature is small compared to the zero-temperature gap, thermal effects can be treated as a kind of perturbation over almost all the temperature range. In this spirit, we give a simple approximate solution which reproduces almost quantitatively the exact numerical results.

  4. An investigation of helicopter dynamic coupling using an analytical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Jeffrey D.

    1995-01-01

    Many attempts have been made in recent years to predict the off-axis response of a helicopter to control inputs, and most have had little success. Since physical insight is limited by the complexity of numerical simulation models, this paper examines the off-axis response problem using an analytical model, with the goal of understanding the mechanics of the coupling. A new induced velocity model is extended to include the effects of wake distortion from pitch rate. It is shown that the inclusion of these results in a significant change in the lateral flap response to a steady pitch rate. The proposed inflow model is coupled with the full rotor/body dynamics, and comparisons are made between the model and flight test data for a UH-60 in hover. Results show that inclusion of induced velocity variations due to shaft rate improves correlation in the pitch response to lateral cycle inputs.

  5. Nucleic acid-coupled colorimetric analyte detectors

    DOEpatents

    Charych, Deborah H.; Jonas, Ulrich

    2001-01-01

    The present invention relates to methods and compositions for the direct detection of analytes and membrane conformational changes through the detection of color changes in biopolymeric materials. In particular, the present invention provide for the direct colorimetric detection of analytes using nucleic acid ligands at surfaces of polydiacetylene liposomes and related molecular layer systems.

  6. Sandplay therapy with couples within the framework of analytical psychology.

    PubMed

    Albert, Susan Carol

    2015-02-01

    Sandplay therapy with couples is discussed within an analytical framework. Guidelines are proposed as a means of developing this relatively new area within sandplay therapy, and as a platform to open a wider discussion to bring together sandplay therapy and couple therapy. Examples of sand trays created during couple therapy are also presented to illustrate the transformations during the therapeutic process.

  7. Approximate analytic solutions to coupled nonlinear Dirac equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khare, Avinash; Cooper, Fred; Saxena, Avadh

    2017-03-01

    We consider the coupled nonlinear Dirac equations (NLDEs) in 1 + 1 dimensions with scalar-scalar self-interactions g12 / 2 (ψ bar ψ) 2 + g22/2 (ϕ bar ϕ) 2 + g32 (ψ bar ψ) (ϕ bar ϕ) as well as vector-vector interactions of the form g1/22 (ψ bar γμ ψ) (ψ bar γμ ψ) + g22/2 (ϕ bar γμ ϕ) (ϕ bar γμ ϕ) + g32 (ψ bar γμ ψ) (ϕ bar γμ ϕ). Writing the two components of the assumed rest frame solution of the coupled NLDE equations in the form ψ =e - iω1 t {R1 cos ⁡ θ ,R1 sin ⁡ θ }, ϕ =e - iω2 t {R2 cos ⁡ η ,R2 sin ⁡ η }, and assuming that θ (x) , η (x) have the same functional form they had when g3 = 0, which is an approximation consistent with the conservation laws, we then find approximate analytic solutions for Ri (x) which are valid for small values of g32 / g22 and g32 / g12. In the nonrelativistic limit we show that both of these coupled models go over to the same coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equation for which we obtain two exact pulse solutions vanishing at x → ± ∞.

  8. Approximate analytic solutions to coupled nonlinear Dirac equations

    DOE PAGES

    Khare, Avinash; Cooper, Fred; Saxena, Avadh

    2017-01-30

    Here, we consider the coupled nonlinear Dirac equations (NLDEs) in 1+11+1 dimensions with scalar–scalar self-interactions g12/2(more » $$\\bar{ψ}$$ψ)2 + g22/2($$\\bar{Φ}$$Φ)2 + g23($$\\bar{ψ}$$ψ)($$\\bar{Φ}$$Φ) as well as vector–vector interactions g12/2($$\\bar{ψ}$$γμψ)($$\\bar{ψ}$$γμψ) + g22/2($$\\bar{Φ}$$γμΦ)($$\\bar{Φ}$$γμΦ) + g23($$\\bar{ψ}$$γμψ)($$\\bar{Φ}$$γμΦ). Writing the two components of the assumed rest frame solution of the coupled NLDE equations in the form ψ=e–iω1tR1cosθ,R1sinθΦ=e–iω2tR2cosη,R2sinη, and assuming that θ(x),η(x) have the same functional form they had when g3 = 0, which is an approximation consistent with the conservation laws, we then find approximate analytic solutions for Ri(x) which are valid for small values of g32/g22 and g32/g12. In the nonrelativistic limit we show that both of these coupled models go over to the same coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equation for which we obtain two exact pulse solutions vanishing at x → ±∞.« less

  9. Improving Conceptions in Analytical Chemistry: The Central Limit Theorem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez-Lopez, Margarita; Carrasquillo, Arnaldo, Jr.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the central limit theorem (CLT) and its relation to analytical chemistry. The pedagogic rational, which argues for teaching the CLT in the analytical chemistry classroom, is discussed. Some analytical chemistry concepts that could be improved through an understanding of the CLT are also described. (Contains 2 figures.)

  10. Analytic structure of eigenvalues of coupled quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Carl M.; Felski, Alexander; Hassanpour, Nima; Klevansky, S. P.; Beygi, Alireza

    2017-01-01

    By analytically continuing the coupling constant g of a coupled quantum theory, one can, at least in principle, arrive at a state whose energy is lower than the ground state of the theory. The idea is to begin with the uncoupled g = 0 theory in its ground state, to analytically continue around an exceptional point (square-root singularity) in the complex-coupling-constant plane, and finally to return to the point g = 0. In the course of this analytic continuation, the uncoupled theory ends up in an unconventional state whose energy is lower than the original ground-state energy. However, it is unclear whether one can use this analytic continuation to extract energy from the conventional vacuum state; this process appears to be exothermic but one must do work to vary the coupling constant g.

  11. Limit velocities of lamb waves: Analytic and numerical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avershieva, A. V.; Goldstein, R. V.; Kuznetsov, S. V.

    2016-09-01

    The Lamb wave propagation in elastic isotropic and orthotropic layers is studied by numerical and analytic methods. An analytic solution is obtained by using the Cauchy formalism for the entire frequency range. Numerical solutions are obtained in a neighborhood of the second limit velocity corresponding to very small frequencies. The influence of variations in the layer geometry on the dispersion curves is studied.

  12. Limits on anomalous WWγ and WWZ couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adam, I.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Ahn, S.; Aihara, H.; Alves, G. A.; Amos, N.; Anderson, E. W.; Astur, R.; Baarmand, M. M.; Babukhadia, L.; Baden, A.; Balamurali, V.; Balderston, J.; Baldin, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bantly, J.; Barberis, E.; Bartlett, J. F.; Belyaev, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bertram, I.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Biswas, N.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, P.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N. I.; Borcherding, F.; Boswell, C.; Brandt, A.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Burtovoi, V. S.; Butler, J. M.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, D.; Casilum, Z.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chang, S.-M.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chen, L.-P.; Chen, W.; Choi, S.; Chopra, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Christenson, J. H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Cobau, W. G.; Cochran, J.; Coney, L.; Cooper, W. E.; Cretsinger, C.; Cullen-Vidal, D.; Cummings, M. A.; Cutts, D.; Dahl, O. I.; Davis, K.; de, K.; del Signore, K.; Demarteau, M.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; di Loreto, G.; Draper, P.; Ducros, Y.; Dudko, L. V.; Dugad, S. R.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fahland, T.; Fatyga, M. K.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Finocchiaro, G.; Fisk, H. E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flattum, E.; Forden, G. E.; Fortner, M.; Frame, K. C.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, A. N.; Gartung, P.; Gavrilov, V.; Geld, T. L.; Genik, R. J.; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Gibbard, B.; Glenn, S.; Gobbi, B.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gómez, B.; Gómez, G.; Goncharov, P. I.; González Solís, J. L.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L. T.; Gounder, K.; Goussiou, A.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P. D.; Green, D. R.; Greenlee, H.; Grinstein, S.; Grudberg, P.; Grünendahl, S.; Guglielmo, G.; Guida, J. A.; Guida, J. M.; Gupta, A.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hahn, K. S.; Hall, R. E.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, S.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hedin, D.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hernández-Montoya, R.; Heuring, T.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hoftun, J. S.; Hsieh, F.; Hu, Ting; Hu, Tong; Huehn, T.; Ito, A. S.; James, E.; Jaques, J.; Jerger, S. A.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, J. Z.-Y.; Joffe-Minor, T.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jöstlein, H.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, C. K.; Kahn, S.; Kalbfleisch, G.; Kang, J. S.; Karmanov, D.; Karmgard, D.; Kehoe, R.; Kelly, M. L.; Kim, C. L.; Kim, S. K.; Klima, B.; Klopfenstein, C.; Kohli, J. M.; Koltick, D.; Kostritskiy, A. V.; Kotcher, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kourlas, J.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovsky, E. A.; Krane, J.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kuleshov, S.; Kunori, S.; Landry, F.; Landsberg, G.; Lauer, B.; Leflat, A.; Li, H.; Li, J.; Li-Demarteau, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y. C.; Lobkowicz, F.; Loken, S. C.; Lökös, S.; Lueking, L.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K.; Madaras, R. J.; Madden, R.; Magaña-Mendoza, L.; Manankov, V.; Mani, S.; Mao, H. S.; Markeloff, R.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M. I.; Mauritz, K. M.; May, B.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McDonald, J.; McKibben, T.; McKinley, J.; McMahon, T.; Melanson, H. L.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Miettinen, H.; Mincer, A.; Mishra, C. S.; Mokhov, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Mooney, P.; da Motta, H.; Murphy, C.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Narayanan, A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nemethy, P.; Norman, D.; Oesch, L.; Oguri, V.; Oliveira, E.; Oltman, E.; Oshima, N.; Owen, D.; Padley, P.; Para, A.; Park, Y. M.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Paterno, M.; Pawlik, B.; Perkins, J.; Peters, M.; Piegaia, R.; Piekarz, H.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Pope, B. G.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quintas, P. Z.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Ramirez, O.; Rasmussen, L.; Reucroft, S.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rockwell, T.; Roco, M.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rutherfoord, J.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Sculli, J.; Shabalina, E.; Shaffer, C.; Shankar, H. C.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shupe, M.; Singh, H.; Singh, J. B.; Sirotenko, V.; Smart, W.; Smith, E.; Smith, R. P.; Snihur, R.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Sosebee, M.; Sotnikova, N.; Souza, M.; Spadafora, A. L.; Steinbrück, G.; Stephens, R. W.; Stevenson, M. L.; Stewart, D.; Stichelbaut, F.; Stoker, D.; Stolin, V.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Streets, K.; Strovink, M.; Sznajder, A.; Tamburello, P.; Tarazi, J.; Tartaglia, M.; Thomas, T. L.; Thompson, J.; Trippe, T. G.; Tuts, P. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vititoe, D.; Volkov, A. A.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, G.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; White, A.; White, J. T.; Wightman, J. A.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wirjawan, J. V.; Womersley, J.; Won, E.; Wood, D. R.; Xu, H.; Yamada, R.; Yamin, P.; Yang, J.; Yasuda, T.; Yepes, P.; Yoshikawa, C.; Youssef, S.; Yu, J.; Yu, Y.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, Z. H.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zverev, E. G.; Zylberstejn, A.

    1998-08-01

    Limits on the anomalous WWγ and WWZ couplings are presented from a simultaneous fit to the data samples of three gauge boson pair final states in pp¯ collisions at s=1.8 TeV: Wγ production with the W boson decaying to eν or μν, W boson pair production with both of the W bosons decaying to eν or μν, and WW or WZ production with one W boson decaying to eν and the other W boson or the Z boson decaying to two jets. Assuming identical WWγ and WWZ couplings, 95% C.L. limits on the anomalous couplings of -0.30<Δκ<0.43 (λ=0) and -0.20<λ<0.20 (Δκ=0) are obtained using a form factor scale Λ=2.0 TeV. Limits found under other assumptions on the relationship between the WWγ and WWZ couplings are also presented.

  13. Analytic Thermoelectric Couple Modeling: Variable Material Properties and Transient Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, Jonathan A.; Sehirlioglu, Alp; Dynys, Fred

    2015-01-01

    To gain a deeper understanding of the operation of a thermoelectric couple a set of analytic solutions have been derived for a variable material property couple and a transient couple. Using an analytic approach, as opposed to commonly used numerical techniques, results in a set of useful design guidelines. These guidelines can serve as useful starting conditions for further numerical studies, or can serve as design rules for lab built couples. The analytic modeling considers two cases and accounts for 1) material properties which vary with temperature and 2) transient operation of a couple. The variable material property case was handled by means of an asymptotic expansion, which allows for insight into the influence of temperature dependence on different material properties. The variable property work demonstrated the important fact that materials with identical average Figure of Merits can lead to different conversion efficiencies due to temperature dependence of the properties. The transient couple was investigated through a Greens function approach; several transient boundary conditions were investigated. The transient work introduces several new design considerations which are not captured by the classic steady state analysis. The work helps to assist in designing couples for optimal performance, and also helps assist in material selection.

  14. Analytical coupling detection in the presence of noise and nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netoff, Theoden I.; Pecora, Louis M.; Schiff, Steven J.

    2004-01-01

    A rigorous analytical approach is developed to test for the existence of a continuous nonlinear functional relationship between systems. We compare the application of this nonlinear local technique to the existing analytical linear global approach in the setting of increasing additive noise. For natural systems with unknown levels of noise and nonlinearity, we propose a general framework for detecting coupling. Lastly, we demonstrate the applicability of this method to detect coupling between simultaneous, experimentally measured, intracellular voltages between neurons within a mammalian neuronal network.

  15. Hadron collider limits on anomalous WWγ couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barger, Kevin R.; Reno, M. H.

    1995-01-01

    A next-to-leading log calculation of the reactions pp and pp¯-->W+/-γX is presented including a triboson gauge coupling from non-standard-model contributions. The additional term arises by considering the standard model as a low energy effective theory. Two approaches are made for comparison. The first approach considers the triboson WWγ coupling as being uniquely fixed by tree level unitarity at high energies to its standard model form and, consequently, suppresses the non-standard-model contributions with form factors. The second approach is to ignore such considerations and calculate the contributions to non-standard-model triboson gauge couplings without such suppressions, using the first term in the momentum expansion of an effective chiral Lagrangian. It is found that at Fermilab Tevatron energies the two approaches do not differ much in quantitative results, while at large Hadron Collider (LHC) energies the two approaches give significantly different predictions for production rates. At the Tevatron and LHC, however, the sensitivity limits on the anomalous coupling of WWγ are too weak to usefully constrain parameters in the chiral Lagrangian.

  16. Design Evaluation of Wind Turbine Spline Couplings Using an Analytical Model: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Y.; Keller, J.; Wallen, R.; Errichello, R.; Halse, C.; Lambert, S.

    2015-02-01

    Articulated splines are commonly used in the planetary stage of wind turbine gearboxes for transmitting the driving torque and improving load sharing. Direct measurement of spline loads and performance is extremely challenging because of limited accessibility. This paper presents an analytical model for the analysis of articulated spline coupling designs. For a given torque and shaft misalignment, this analytical model quickly yields insights into relationships between the spline design parameters and resulting loads; bending, contact, and shear stresses; and safety factors considering various heat treatment methods. Comparisons of this analytical model against previously published computational approaches are also presented.

  17. Semi-analytical model for multispecies contaminant transport subject to rate-limited sorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Y. C.; Chen, J. S.

    2016-12-01

    Analytical models for multiple advection-dispersion equations coupled with first-order sequential decay reactions are fast and cost-effective tools for predicting the plume migration of the parent and daughter species of the decaying contaminants such as radionuclides, dissolved chlorinated solvents and nitrogen chain. However, only few analytical solutions that were solved for coupled multispecies transport equations are available in literature. For mathematical convenience, most analytical models currently used to simulate transport of the decaying contaminants assume instantaneous equilibrium between contaminant in the dissolved and sorbed phases. Research has demonstrated that rate-limited sorption can have a profound effect upon the solute transport in the subsurface environment. By making the instantaneous equilibrium sorption assumption, the potential effects of rate-limited sorption are not considered and cannot be examined. This study presents an semi-analytical model for decaying contaminant plume migration subject to rate-limited sorption. The derived semi-analytical model is applied to investigate the effects of the rate-limited sorption on the plume migration of decaying contaminants.

  18. Analytical reasoning task reveals limits of social learning in networks.

    PubMed

    Rahwan, Iyad; Krasnoshtan, Dmytro; Shariff, Azim; Bonnefon, Jean-François

    2014-04-06

    Social learning-by observing and copying others-is a highly successful cultural mechanism for adaptation, outperforming individual information acquisition and experience. Here, we investigate social learning in the context of the uniquely human capacity for reflective, analytical reasoning. A hallmark of the human mind is its ability to engage analytical reasoning, and suppress false associative intuitions. Through a set of laboratory-based network experiments, we find that social learning fails to propagate this cognitive strategy. When people make false intuitive conclusions and are exposed to the analytic output of their peers, they recognize and adopt this correct output. But they fail to engage analytical reasoning in similar subsequent tasks. Thus, humans exhibit an 'unreflective copying bias', which limits their social learning to the output, rather than the process, of their peers' reasoning-even when doing so requires minimal effort and no technical skill. In contrast to much recent work on observation-based social learning, which emphasizes the propagation of successful behaviour through copying, our findings identify a limit on the power of social networks in situations that require analytical reasoning.

  19. Analytical reasoning task reveals limits of social learning in networks

    PubMed Central

    Rahwan, Iyad; Krasnoshtan, Dmytro; Shariff, Azim; Bonnefon, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    Social learning—by observing and copying others—is a highly successful cultural mechanism for adaptation, outperforming individual information acquisition and experience. Here, we investigate social learning in the context of the uniquely human capacity for reflective, analytical reasoning. A hallmark of the human mind is its ability to engage analytical reasoning, and suppress false associative intuitions. Through a set of laboratory-based network experiments, we find that social learning fails to propagate this cognitive strategy. When people make false intuitive conclusions and are exposed to the analytic output of their peers, they recognize and adopt this correct output. But they fail to engage analytical reasoning in similar subsequent tasks. Thus, humans exhibit an ‘unreflective copying bias’, which limits their social learning to the output, rather than the process, of their peers’ reasoning—even when doing so requires minimal effort and no technical skill. In contrast to much recent work on observation-based social learning, which emphasizes the propagation of successful behaviour through copying, our findings identify a limit on the power of social networks in situations that require analytical reasoning. PMID:24501275

  20. Analytic energy gradients in closed-shell coupled-cluster theory with spin-orbit coupling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fan; Gauss, Jürgen

    2008-11-07

    Gradients in closed-shell coupled-cluster (CC) theory with spin-orbit coupling included in the post Hartree-Fock treatment have been implemented at the CC singles and doubles (CCSD) level and at the CCSD level augmented by a perturbative treatment of triple excitations [CCSD(T)]. The additional computational effort required in analytic energy-gradient calculations is roughly the same as that for ground-state energy calculations in the case of CCSD, and it is about twice in the case of CCSD(T) calculations. The structures, harmonic frequencies, and dipole moments of some heavy-element compounds have been calculated using the present analytic energy-gradient techniques including spin-orbit coupling. The results show that spin-orbit coupling can have a significant influence on both the equilibrium structure and the harmonic vibrational frequencies and that its inclusion is essential to obtain reliable and accurate estimates for geometrical parameters of heavy-element compounds.

  1. Analytical Limit Distributions from Random Power-Law Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaid, Irwin; Mizuno, Daisuke

    2016-07-01

    Nature is full of power-law interactions, e.g., gravity, electrostatics, and hydrodynamics. When sources of such fields are randomly distributed in space, the superposed interaction, which is what we observe, is naively expected to follow a Gauss or Lévy distribution. Here, we present an analytic expression for the actual distributions that converge to novel limits that are in between these already-known limit distributions, depending on physical parameters, such as the concentration of field sources and the size of the probe used to measure the interactions. By comparing with numerical simulations, the origin of non-Gauss and non-Lévy distributions are theoretically articulated.

  2. Analytical Prediction of Forming Limits for Thermoplastic Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azhikannickal, Elizabeth; Jain, Mukesh K.

    2005-08-01

    Commodity thermoplastics such as polypropylene and polyethylene are gaining more attention from the automotive industries for applications requiring weight and cost savings. In order to assess the feasibility of employing thermoplastic tubes for subsequent forming into automotive structural components, first an establishment of the forming limits (or the forming limit diagram) for these materials is required. An analytical model, which is able to predict the forming limits for thermoplastic tubes, is useful from the perspective of examining the effect of material properties on the forming of a given shape without numerous experimental forming trials. Knowledge of the forming limits for these materials is also useful in die design as well as process control. Since thermoplastics such as polypropylene are temperature and strain rate dependent, the proposed analytical model would be able to predict the effect of temperature and strain rate on the resulting forming limits for the tube along various loading paths. Preliminary results from the model indicate that thermoplastic tubes formed at elevated temperature undergo larger strains in both the hoop and axial directions of the tube prior to localized necking.

  3. The Analytical Limits of Modeling Short Diffusion Timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, R. W.; Kent, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    Chemical and isotopic zoning in minerals is widely used to constrain the timescales of magmatic processes such as magma mixing and crystal residence, etc. via diffusion modeling. Forward modeling of diffusion relies on fitting diffusion profiles to measured compositional gradients. However, an individual measurement is essentially an average composition for a segment of the gradient defined by the spatial resolution of the analysis. Thus there is the potential for the analytical spatial resolution to limit the timescales that can be determined for an element of given diffusivity, particularly where the scale of the gradient approaches that of the measurement. Here we use a probabilistic modeling approach to investigate the effect of analytical spatial resolution on estimated timescales from diffusion modeling. Our method investigates how accurately the age of a synthetic diffusion profile can be obtained by modeling an "unknown" profile derived from discrete sampling of the synthetic compositional gradient at a given spatial resolution. We also include the effects of analytical uncertainty and the position of measurements relative to the diffusion gradient. We apply this method to the spatial resolutions of common microanalytical techniques (LA-ICP-MS, SIMS, EMP, NanoSIMS). Our results confirm that for a given diffusivity, higher spatial resolution gives access to shorter timescales, and that each analytical spacing has a minimum timescale, below which it overestimates the timescale. For example, for Ba diffusion in plagioclase at 750 °C timescales are accurate (within 20%) above 10, 100, 2,600, and 71,000 years at 0.3, 1, 5, and 25 mm spatial resolution, respectively. For Sr diffusion in plagioclase at 750 °C, timescales are accurate above 0.02, 0.2, 4, and 120 years at the same spatial resolutions. Our results highlight the importance of selecting appropriate analytical techniques to estimate accurate diffusion-based timescales.

  4. Analytical studies on holographic superconductor in the probe limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yan; Liu, Guohua

    2017-09-01

    We investigate the holographic superconductor model constructed in the (2+1)-dimensional AdS soliton background in the probe limit. With analytical methods, we obtain the formula of critical phase transition points with respect to the scalar mass. We also generalize this formula to higher-dimensional space-time. We mention that these formulas are precise compared to numerical results. In addition, we find a correspondence between the value of the charged scalar field at the tip and the scalar operator at infinity around the phase transition points.

  5. Analytical relation between peripheral and central density limit on FTU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucella, G.; D'Arcangelo, O.; Tudisco, O.; Belli, F.; Bin, W.; Botrugno, A.; Buratti, P.; Calabrò, G.; Esposito, B.; Giovannozzi, E.; Marocco, D.; Ramogida, G.; Sattin, F.; Spizzo, G.; Zanca, P.; Zuin, M.

    2017-08-01

    The commonly adopted scaling for the maximum achievable plasma density in tokamak fusion devices, the so-called ‘Greenwald limit’, refers to the line-averaged density along a central chord and depends only on the average plasma current density. However, the Greenwald limit has been exceeded in tokamak experiments in the case of peaked density profiles, indicating that the edge density is the real parameter responsible for the density limit. Furthermore, the Greenwald limit has been obtained for fixed density profiles, so that the scaling can be very different when introducing density profile dependencies on plasma parameters. Dedicated density limit experiments were performed in recent years on the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade, exploring the high density domain in a wide range of values of plasma current, toroidal magnetic field and edge safety factor. New data were collected in the latest experimental campaigns, extending the study of the density limit towards lower values of toroidal magnetic field and plasma current. These experiments confirmed the edge nature of the density limit, as a Greenwald-like scaling was obtained for the maximum achievable line-averaged density along a peripheral chord, while a clear scaling of the maximum achievable line-averaged density along a central chord with the toroidal magnetic field only was found and successfully interpreted as due to interplay between the peripheral Greenwald limit and the specific density profile behavior when approaching the density limit. In particular, an analytical relation between the peripheral and the central density limit was derived for the first time, with the introduction of a generalized parabolic density profile with the peaking factor dependent on the plasma parameters.

  6. Analytical approximations for effective relative permeability in the capillary limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinovich, Avinoam; Li, Boxiao; Durlofsky, Louis J.

    2016-10-01

    We present an analytical method for calculating two-phase effective relative permeability, krjeff, where j designates phase (here CO2 and water), under steady state and capillary-limit assumptions. These effective relative permeabilities may be applied in experimental settings and for upscaling in the context of numerical flow simulations, e.g., for CO2 storage. An exact solution for effective absolute permeability, keff, in two-dimensional log-normally distributed isotropic permeability (k) fields is the geometric mean. We show that this does not hold for krjeff since log normality is not maintained in the capillary-limit phase permeability field (Kj=k·krj) when capillary pressure, and thus the saturation field, is varied. Nevertheless, the geometric mean is still shown to be suitable for approximating krjeff when the variance of ln⁡k is low. For high-variance cases, we apply a correction to the geometric average gas effective relative permeability using a Winsorized mean, which neglects large and small Kj values symmetrically. The analytical method is extended to anisotropically correlated log-normal permeability fields using power law averaging. In these cases, the Winsorized mean treatment is applied to the gas curves for cases described by negative power law exponents (flow across incomplete layers). The accuracy of our analytical expressions for krjeff is demonstrated through extensive numerical tests, using low-variance and high-variance permeability realizations with a range of correlation structures. We also present integral expressions for geometric-mean and power law average krjeff for the systems considered, which enable derivation of closed-form series solutions for krjeff without generating permeability realizations.

  7. Tolerance limits for short-term analytical bias and analytical imprecision derived from clinical assay specificity.

    PubMed

    Klee, G G

    1993-07-01

    I propose a method for defining tolerance limits for assay bias and assay imprecision, based on the effects of these tolerance limits on the clinical specificity of the assay. An analytical "error budget" is defined as the squared sums of the imprecision and bias errors. The maximum limit for this error budget is set at a value corresponding to a 50% increase in the false-positive rate for classifying healthy subjects. For gaussian distributions with +/- 2 SD used as decision limits, this error budget equates to 0.45 SD of combined within-person and between-person biological variation (SDBiol). To provide reasonable power for bias detection in an assay, I recommend that the SD of the assay be kept at less than half the bias limit. Then, for the gaussian distribution, the maximum bias limit should be < 0.36 SDBiol and the SD of the assay should be < 0.18 SDBiol. Procedures are provided for using the same principles to define tolerance limits for decision limits other than +/- 2 SD and for nongaussian distributions.

  8. Analytic study of a coupled Kerr-SBS system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conte, Robert; Gandarias, Maria Luz

    2017-01-01

    In order to describe the coupling between the Kerr nonlinearity and the stimulated Brillouin scattering, Mauger et al. recently proposed a system of partial differential equations in three complex amplitudes. We perform here its analytic study by two methods. The first method is to investigate the structure of singularities, in order to possibly find closed form single-valued solutions obeying this structure. The second method is to look at the infinitesimal symmetries of the system in order to build reductions to a lesser number of independent variables. Our overall conclusion is that the structure of singularities is too intricate to obtain closed form solutions by the usual methods. One of our results is the proof of the nonexistence of traveling waves.

  9. Assessment of the analytical capabilities of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, H.E.; Garbarino, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    A thorough assessment of the analytical capabilities of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry was conducted for selected analytes of importance in water quality applications and hydrologic research. A multielement calibration curve technique was designed to produce accurate and precise results in analysis times of approximately one minute. The suite of elements included Al, As, B, Ba, Be, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Li, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Se, Sr, V, and Zn. The effects of sample matrix composition on the accuracy of the determinations showed that matrix elements (such as Na, Ca, Mg, and K) that may be present in natural water samples at concentration levels greater than 50 mg/L resulted in as much as a 10% suppression in ion current for analyte elements. Operational detection limits are presented.

  10. Analytic second derivatives in closed-shell coupled-cluster theory with spin-orbit coupling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fan; Gauss, Jürgen

    2009-10-28

    The theory for geometrical second derivatives of the energy is outlined for the recently suggested two-component coupled-cluster approach using relativistic effective core potentials with spin-orbit coupling included in the post-Hartree-Fock treatment [F. Wang, J. Gauss, and C. van Wullen, J. Chem. Phys. 129, 064113 (2008)], and an implementation is reported at the coupled-cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) level as well as at the CCSD level augmented by a perturbative treatment of triple excitations [CCSD(T)]. The applicability of the developed analytic second-derivative techniques is demonstrated by computing harmonic and fundamental frequencies for PtH(2), PbH(2), and HgH(2) with the required cubic and semidiagonal quartic force fields obtained by numerical differentiation of the analytically evaluated quadratic force constants. Spin-orbit coupling effects are shown to be non-negligible for the three considered molecules and thus need to be considered in the case of high-accuracy predictions.

  11. Light trapping limits in plasmonic solar cells: an analytical investigation.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Xing; Hu, Juejun; Michel, Jurgen; Kimerling, Lionel C

    2012-07-02

    We analytically investigate the light trapping performance in plasmonic solar cells with Si/metallic structures. We consider absorption enhancements for surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) at planar Si/metal interfaces and localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) for metallic spheres in a Si matrix. We discover that the enhancement factors at Si/metal interfaces are not bound to the conventional Lambertian limit, and strong absorption can be achieved around plasmonic resonant frequencies. In addition, those enhancements are greatly reduced as the fields decay away from the Si/metal interfaces. Therefore, localized plasmonic resonances can be used as efficient light trapping schemes for ultrathin Si solar cells (< 50 nm), while photonic guided mode enhancement is more appropriate for thicker films.

  12. Synchronization of two coupled self-excited systems with multi-limit cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enjieu Kadji, H. G.; Yamapi, R.; Chabi Orou, J. B.

    2007-09-01

    We analyze the stability and optimization of the synchronization process between two coupled self-excited systems modeled by the multi-limit cycles van der Pol oscillators through the case of an enzymatic substrate reaction with ferroelectric behavior in brain waves model. The one-way and two-way couplings synchronization are considered. The stability boundaries and expressions of the synchronization time are obtained using the properties of the Hill equation. Numerical simulations validate and complement the results of analytical investigations.

  13. Analytical Insights on Theta-Gamma Coupled Neural Oscillators

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we study the dynamics of a quadratic integrate-and-fire neuron, spiking in the gamma (30–100 Hz) range, coupled to a delta/theta frequency (1–8 Hz) neural oscillator. Using analytical and semianalytical methods, we were able to derive characteristic spiking times for the system in two distinct regimes (depending on parameter values): one regime where the gamma neuron is intrinsically oscillating in the absence of theta input, and a second one in which gamma spiking is directly gated by theta input, i.e., windows of gamma activity alternate with silence periods depending on the underlying theta phase. In the former case, we transform the equations such that the system becomes analogous to the Mathieu differential equation. By solving this equation, we can compute numerically the time to the first gamma spike, and then use singular perturbation theory to find successive spike times. On the other hand, in the excitable condition, we make direct use of singular perturbation theory to obtain an approximation of the time to first gamma spike, and then extend the result to calculate ensuing gamma spikes in a recursive fashion. We thereby give explicit formulas for the onset and offset of gamma spike burst during a theta cycle, and provide an estimation of the total number of spikes per theta cycle both for excitable and oscillator regimes. PMID:23945442

  14. Wideband analytical equivalent circuit for coupled asymmetrical nonaligned slit arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molero, Carlos; Rodríguez-Berral, Raúl; Mesa, Francisco; Medina, Francisco

    2017-02-01

    Microstructured metallic devices have been extensively studied because of their interesting properties for controlling the transmission, reflection, and absorption of electromagnetic waves. A very simple implementation is an array of infinitely long parallel metal strips printed on a dielectric substrate. In the past few years, several analytical models have been reported based on the use of equivalent circuits with distributed and lumped components to account for the electrical performance of these structures. However, the proposed models are restricted to highly symmetrical configurations of the basic unit cell of the periodic structure. The purpose of this paper is to present the nontrivial extension of such circuit models to deal with nonsymmetrical structures. More specifically, a wideband equivalent-circuit model will be developed to describe the scattering properties of a pair of coupled different nonaligned slit gratings printed on a dielectric slab of arbitrary thickness. The relevant consequences of the lack of symmetry of the structures under study will be thoroughly discussed. The obtained equivalent network can be straightforwardly used to model stacked structures with an arbitrary number of nonsymmetrical striplike arrays.

  15. Wideband analytical equivalent circuit for coupled asymmetrical nonaligned slit arrays.

    PubMed

    Molero, Carlos; Rodríguez-Berral, Raúl; Mesa, Francisco; Medina, Francisco

    2017-02-01

    Microstructured metallic devices have been extensively studied because of their interesting properties for controlling the transmission, reflection, and absorption of electromagnetic waves. A very simple implementation is an array of infinitely long parallel metal strips printed on a dielectric substrate. In the past few years, several analytical models have been reported based on the use of equivalent circuits with distributed and lumped components to account for the electrical performance of these structures. However, the proposed models are restricted to highly symmetrical configurations of the basic unit cell of the periodic structure. The purpose of this paper is to present the nontrivial extension of such circuit models to deal with nonsymmetrical structures. More specifically, a wideband equivalent-circuit model will be developed to describe the scattering properties of a pair of coupled different nonaligned slit gratings printed on a dielectric slab of arbitrary thickness. The relevant consequences of the lack of symmetry of the structures under study will be thoroughly discussed. The obtained equivalent network can be straightforwardly used to model stacked structures with an arbitrary number of nonsymmetrical striplike arrays.

  16. Analytical examples, measurement models, and classical limit of quantum backflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yearsley, J. M.; Halliwell, J. J.; Hartshorn, R.; Whitby, A.

    2012-10-01

    We investigate the backflow effect in elementary quantum mechanics—the phenomenon in which a state consisting entirely of positive momenta may have negative current and the probability flows in the opposite direction to the momentum. We compute the current and flux for states consisting of superpositions of Gaussian wave packets. These are experimentally realizable but the amount of backflow is small. Inspired by the numerical results of Penz [Penz, Grübl, Kreidl, and Wagner, J. Phys. AJPHAC50305-447010.1088/0305-4470/39/2/012 39, 423 (2006)], we find two nontrivial wave functions whose current at any time may be computed analytically and which have periods of significant backflow, in one case with a backward flux equal to about 70% of the maximum possible backflow, a dimensionless number cbm≈0.04, discovered by Bracken and Melloy [Bracken and Melloy, J. Phys. AJPHAC50305-447010.1088/0305-4470/27/6/040 27, 2197 (1994)]. This number has the unusual property of being independent of ℏ (and also of all other parameters of the model), despite corresponding to an obviously quantum-mechanical effect, and we shed some light on this surprising property by considering the classical limit of backflow. We discuss some specific measurement models in which backflow may be identified in certain measurable probabilities.

  17. Semantic interaction for visual analytics: toward coupling cognition and computation.

    PubMed

    Endert, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Alex Endert's dissertation "Semantic Interaction for Visual Analytics: Inferring Analytical Reasoning for Model Steering" described semantic interaction, a user interaction methodology for visual analytics (VA). It showed that user interaction embodies users' analytic process and can thus be mapped to model-steering functionality for "human-in-the-loop" system design. The dissertation contributed a framework (or pipeline) that describes such a process, a prototype VA system to test semantic interaction, and a user evaluation to demonstrate semantic interaction's impact on the analytic process. This research is influencing current VA research and has implications for future VA research.

  18. Reactivity and analytical performance of oxygen as cell gas in inductively coupled plasma tandem mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virgilio, Alex; Amais, Renata S.; Amaral, Clarice D. B.; Fialho, Lucimar L.; Schiavo, Daniela; Nóbrega, Joaquim A.

    2016-12-01

    The reactivity and analytical performance of O2 as cell gas in inductively coupled plasma tandem mass spectrometry was investigated. Selected analytes in a wide mass range were divided in three groups according to their reactivity: G1 represents elements with high oxygen affinity (Ce, La, P, Sc, Ti, and Y), G2 contains elements that may partially react with oxygen (As, Ba, Mo, Si, Sr, and V), and G3 comprises elements expected to be less reactive towards oxygen (Al, Bi, Cu, Mg, Pb, and Pd). On-mass and mass-shift modes were evaluated by monitoring atomic and metal oxide ions, respectively. Analytical signal profiles, oxide percentages, sensitivities and limits of detection for oxygen flow rates varying from 0.1 to 1.0 mL min- 1 were also studied. Group 1 elements plus As and V presented better sensitivities and LODs when measuring oxides, which were the major species for all flow rates evaluated. Molybdenum and Si oxides presented intermediate behavior and MoO fraction was up to 47% and limit of detection was the same as that obtained in on-mass mode. For others G2 and G3 elements, on-mass mode presented higher sensitivity and better LODs, with estimated oxide contents lower than 10%. In most cases, increasing oxygen flow rates led to lower sensitivities and worse LODs.

  19. Toward Usable Interactive Analytics: Coupling Cognition and Computation

    SciTech Connect

    Endert, Alexander; North, Chris; Chang, Remco; Zhou, Michelle

    2014-09-24

    Interactive analytics provide users a myriad of computational means to aid in extracting meaningful information from large and complex datasets. Much prior work focuses either on advancing the capabilities of machine-centric approaches by the data mining and machine learning communities, or human-driven methods by the visualization and CHI communities. However, these methods do not yet support a true human-machine symbiotic relationship where users and machines work together collaboratively and adapt to each other to advance an interactive analytic process. In this paper we discuss some of the inherent issues, outlining what we believe are the steps toward usable interactive analytics that will ultimately increase the effectiveness for both humans and computers to produce insights.

  20. Analytical performance, reference values and decision limits. A need to differentiate between reference intervals and decision limits and to define analytical quality specifications.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Per Hyltoft; Jensen, Esther A; Brandslund, Ivan

    2011-12-23

    With the increasing use of decision limits (action limits, cut-off points) specified for a number of analytical components in diagnosis and for action in critical situations, formulated in national or international recommendations, the traditional interpretation of reference intervals has been uncertain, and sometimes the two concepts are being mixed up by incorporating risk calculations in the reference intervals. There is, therefore, a need to clarify the two concepts and to keep them definitely separated. Reference intervals are the 95% limits for the descriptions of the distributions of the values of analytical components measured on reference samples from reference individuals. Decision limits are based on guidelines from national and international expert groups defining specific concentrations of certain components as limits for decision about diagnosis or well-defined specific actions. Analytical quality specifications for reference intervals have been defined for bias since the 1990s, but in the recommendations specified in the clinical guidelines analytical quality specifications are only scarcely defined. The demands for negligible biases are, however, even more essential for decision limits, as the choice is no longer left to the clinician, but emerge directly from the concentration. Even a small bias will change the number of diseased individuals, so the demands for negligible biases are obvious. A view over the analytical quality as published gives a variable picture of bias for many components, but with many examples of considerable bias which must be critical--yet no specifications have been stipulated until now.

  1. Optimal limits of cavity optomechanical cooling in the strong-coupling regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yong-Chun; Shen, Yu-Feng; Gong, Qihuang; Xiao, Yun-Feng

    2014-05-01

    Laser cooling of mesoscopic mechanical resonators is of great interest for both fundamental studies and practical applications. We provide a general framework to describe the cavity-assisted back-action cooling in the strong-coupling regime. By studying the cooling dynamics, we find that the temporal evolution of mean phonon number oscillates as a function of the optomechanical coupling strength depending on frequency mixing. The further analytical result reveals that the optimal cooling limit is obtained when the system eigenmodes satisfy the frequency-matching condition. The reduced instantaneous-state cooling limits with dynamic dissipative cooling approach are also presented. Our study provides a guideline for optimizing the back-action cooling of mesoscopic mechanical resonators in the strong-coupling regime.

  2. On the calculation of resonances by means of analytic continuation in coupling constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horáček, J.; Paidarová, I.

    2010-11-01

    The method of analytic continuation in the coupling constant in combination with the use of statistical Padé approximation designed to determine resonance parameters is introduced. It is shown that standard quantum chemistry codes provide accurate data which can be used for the process of analytic continuation in coupling constant. Resonance parameters, both the energy and the width, can be inferred for real molecules with accuracy comparable to other more elaborated methods.

  3. Determining passive cooling limits in CPV using an analytical thermal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gualdi, Federico; Arenas, Osvaldo; Vossier, Alexis; Dollet, Alain; Aimez, Vincent; Arès, Richard

    2013-09-01

    We propose an original thermal analytical model aiming to predict the practical limits of passive cooling systems for high concentration photovoltaic modules. The analytical model is described and validated by comparison with a commercial 3D finite element model. The limiting performances of flat plate cooling systems in natural convection are then derived and discussed.

  4. Limits on Anomalous Spin-Spin Couplings between Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenday, Alexander G.; Cramer, Claire E.; Phillips, David F.; Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2008-12-01

    We report experimental limits on new spin-dependent macroscopic forces between neutrons. We measured the nuclear Zeeman frequencies of a He3/Xe129 maser while modulating the nuclear spin polarization of a nearby He3 ensemble in a separate glass cell. We place limits on the coupling strength of neutron spin-spin interactions mediated by light pseudoscalar particles like the axion [gpgp/(4πℏc)] at the 3×10-7 level for interaction ranges longer than about 40 cm. This limit is about 10-5 the size of the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction between neutrons.

  5. The characterization of kerogen-analytical limitations and method design

    SciTech Connect

    Larter, S.R.

    1987-04-01

    Methods suitable for high resolution total molecular characterization of kerogens and other polymeric SOM are necessary for a quantitative understanding of hydrocarbon maturation and migration phenomena in addition to being a requirement for a systematic understanding of kerogen based fuel utilization. Gas chromatographic methods, in conjunction with analytical pyrolysis methods, have proven successful in the rapid superficial characterization of kerogen pyrolysates. Most applications involve qualitative or semi-quantitative assessment of the relative concentration of aliphatic, aromatic, or oxygen-containing species in a kerogen pyrolysate. More recently, the use of alkylated polystyrene internal standards has allowed the direct determination of parameters related to the abundance of, for example, normal alkyl groups or single ring aromatic species in kerogens. The future of methods of this type for improved kerogen typing is critically discussed. The conceptual design and feasibility of methods suitable for the more complete characterization of complex geopolymers on the molecular level is discussed with practical examples.

  6. Energy demand analytics using coupled technological and economic models

    EPA Science Inventory

    Impacts of a range of policy scenarios on end-use energy demand are examined using a coupling of MARKAL, an energy system model with extensive supply and end-use technological detail, with Inforum LIFT, a large-scale model of the us. economy with inter-industry, government, and c...

  7. Energy demand analytics using coupled technological and economic models

    EPA Science Inventory

    Impacts of a range of policy scenarios on end-use energy demand are examined using a coupling of MARKAL, an energy system model with extensive supply and end-use technological detail, with Inforum LIFT, a large-scale model of the us. economy with inter-industry, government, and c...

  8. Neutron Limit on the Strongly-Coupled Chameleon Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushin, Dmitry

    2016-03-01

    One of the major open questions of cosmology is the physical origin of the dark energy. There are a few sets of theories which might explain this origin that could be tested experimentally. The chameleon dark energy theory postulates self-interacting scalar field that couples to matter. This coupling induces a screening mechanism chosen so that the field amplitude is nonzero in empty space but is greatly suppressed in regions of terrestrial matter density. On behalf of the INDEX collaboration, I will report the most stringent upper bound on the free neutron-chameleon coupling in the strongly-coupled limit of the chameleon theory using neutron interferometric techniques. In our experiment we measure neutron phase induced by chameleon field. We report a 95 % confidence level upper bound on the neutron-chameleon coupling ranging from β < 4 . 7 ×106 for a Ratra-Peebles index of n = 1 in the nonlinear scalar field potential to β < 2 . 4 ×107 for n = 6 , one order of magnitude more sensitive than the most recent free neutron limit for intermediate n. This work was supported by NIST; NSF Grants: PHY-1205342, PHY-1068712, PHY-1307426; DOE award DE-FG02-97ER41042; NSERC CREATE and DISCOVERY programs; CERC; IUCSS and IU FRS program.

  9. Analytical evaluations of coupling impedances of resistive and magnetic bellows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shobuda, Yoshihiro

    2014-03-01

    A theory is developed to calculate both the longitudinal and transverse impedances of magnetic as well as resistive bellows with cylindrical symmetry that is sandwiched between chambers with perfectly conductive metal fittings. Analytical estimations of the impedances are necessary because the skin depth is too small to make sufficiently tiny mesh sizes in current numerical codes. The impedances of bellows made of materials having both large conductivity and permeability are drastically increased owing to magnetic effects, compared with those of bellows made of perfectly conductive materials.

  10. Semantic Interaction for Visual Analytics: Toward Coupling Cognition and Computation

    SciTech Connect

    Endert, Alexander

    2014-07-01

    The dissertation discussed in this article [1] was written in the midst of an era of digitization. The world is becoming increasingly instrumented with sensors, monitoring, and other methods for generating data describing social, physical, and natural phenomena. Thus, data exist with the potential of being analyzed to uncover, or discover, the phenomena from which it was created. However, as the analytic models leveraged to analyze these data continue to increase in complexity and computational capability, how can visualizations and user interaction methodologies adapt and evolve to continue to foster discovery and sensemaking?

  11. Limitations of analytical dose calculations for small field proton radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Geng, Changran; Daartz, Juliane; Lam-Tin-Cheung, Kimberley; Bussiere, Marc; Shih, Helen A; Paganetti, Harald; Schuemann, Jan

    2017-01-07

    The purpose of the work was to evaluate the dosimetric uncertainties of an analytical dose calculation engine and the impact on treatment plans using small fields in intracranial proton stereotactic radiosurgery (PSRS) for a gantry based double scattering system. 50 patients were evaluated including 10 patients for each of 5 diagnostic indications of: arteriovenous malformation (AVM), acoustic neuroma (AN), meningioma (MGM), metastasis (METS), and pituitary adenoma (PIT). Treatment plans followed standard prescription and optimization procedures for PSRS. We performed comparisons between delivered dose distributions, determined by Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, and those calculated with the analytical dose calculation algorithm (ADC) used in our current treatment planning system in terms of dose volume histogram parameters and beam range distributions. Results show that the difference in the dose to 95% of the target (D95) is within 6% when applying measured field size output corrections for AN, MGM, and PIT. However, for AVM and METS, the differences can be as great as 10% and 12%, respectively. Normalizing the MC dose to the ADC dose based on the dose of voxels in a central area of the target reduces the difference of the D95 to within 6% for all sites. The generally applied margin to cover uncertainties in range (3.5% of the prescribed range  +  1 mm) is not sufficient to cover the range uncertainty for ADC in all cases, especially for patients with high tissue heterogeneity. The root mean square of the R90 difference, the difference in the position of distal falloff to 90% of the prescribed dose, is affected by several factors, especially the patient geometry heterogeneity, modulation and field diameter. In conclusion, implementation of Monte Carlo dose calculation techniques into the clinic can reduce the uncertainty of the target dose for proton stereotactic radiosurgery. If MC is not available for treatment planning, using MC dose distributions to

  12. Limitations of analytical dose calculations for small field proton radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Changran; Daartz, Juliane; Lam-Tin-Cheung, Kimberley; Bussiere, Marc; Shih, Helen A.; Paganetti, Harald; Schuemann, Jan

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the work was to evaluate the dosimetric uncertainties of an analytical dose calculation engine and the impact on treatment plans using small fields in intracranial proton stereotactic radiosurgery (PSRS) for a gantry based double scattering system. 50 patients were evaluated including 10 patients for each of 5 diagnostic indications of: arteriovenous malformation (AVM), acoustic neuroma (AN), meningioma (MGM), metastasis (METS), and pituitary adenoma (PIT). Treatment plans followed standard prescription and optimization procedures for PSRS. We performed comparisons between delivered dose distributions, determined by Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, and those calculated with the analytical dose calculation algorithm (ADC) used in our current treatment planning system in terms of dose volume histogram parameters and beam range distributions. Results show that the difference in the dose to 95% of the target (D95) is within 6% when applying measured field size output corrections for AN, MGM, and PIT. However, for AVM and METS, the differences can be as great as 10% and 12%, respectively. Normalizing the MC dose to the ADC dose based on the dose of voxels in a central area of the target reduces the difference of the D95 to within 6% for all sites. The generally applied margin to cover uncertainties in range (3.5% of the prescribed range  +  1 mm) is not sufficient to cover the range uncertainty for ADC in all cases, especially for patients with high tissue heterogeneity. The root mean square of the R90 difference, the difference in the position of distal falloff to 90% of the prescribed dose, is affected by several factors, especially the patient geometry heterogeneity, modulation and field diameter. In conclusion, implementation of Monte Carlo dose calculation techniques into the clinic can reduce the uncertainty of the target dose for proton stereotactic radiosurgery. If MC is not available for treatment planning, using MC dose distributions to

  13. Analytical treatment of Coriolis coupling for three-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poirier, Bill

    2005-01-01

    In a previous article [J. Chem. Phys. 108 (1998) 5216], an efficient method was presented for performing "exact" quantum calculations for the three-body rovibrational Hamiltonian, within the helicity-conserving approximation. This approach makes use of a certain three-body "effective potential," enabling the same bend angle basis set to be employed for all values of the rotational quantum numbers, J, K and M. In the present work, the method is extended to incorporate Coriolis coupling, for which the relevant matrix elements are derived exactly. These can be used to solve the full three-body rovibrational problem, in the standard Jacobi coordinate vector embedding. Generalization of the method for coupled kinetic energy operators arising from other coordinate systems, embeddings, and/or system sizes, is also discussed.

  14. Analytical polarization transfer functions for four coupled spins 12 under isotropic mixing conditions

    PubMed

    Luy; Schedletzky; Glaser

    1999-05-01

    Analytical polarization transfer functions are presented for spin systems consisting of four spins 12 with arbitrary coupling constants under isotropic mixing conditions. In addition, simplified transfer functions were derived for symmetric coupling topologies. Based on these transfer functions optimal durations for the mixing period can be determined for correlations of interest. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  15. Scaling properties of the pairing problem in the strong coupling limit

    SciTech Connect

    Barbaro, M.B.; Cenni, R.; Molinari, A.; Quaglia, M.R.

    2013-10-15

    We study the excited states of the pairing Hamiltonian providing an expansion for their energy in the strong coupling limit. To assess the role of the pairing interaction we apply the formalism to the case of a heavy atomic nucleus. We show that only a few statistical moments of the level distribution are sufficient to yield an accurate estimate of the energy for not too small values of the coupling G and we give the analytic expressions of the first four terms of the series. Further, we discuss the convergence radius G{sub sing} of the expansion showing that it strongly depends upon the details of the level distribution. Furthermore G{sub sing} is not related to the critical values of the coupling G{sub crit}, which characterize the physics of the pairing Hamiltonian, since it can exist even in the absence of these critical points. -- Highlights: •We study the excitation spectrum of the pairing Hamiltonian. •We provide an analytic expansion around the strong coupling limit. •We discuss the convergence radius of the expansion. •We connect the radius with the critical points of H.

  16. anQCD: Fortran programs for couplings at complex momenta in various analytic QCD models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, César; Cvetič, Gorazd

    2016-02-01

    We provide three Fortran programs which evaluate the QCD analytic (holomorphic) couplings Aν(Q2) for complex or real squared momenta Q2. These couplings are holomorphic analogs of the powers a(Q2)ν of the underlying perturbative QCD (pQCD) coupling a(Q2) ≡αs(Q2) / π, in three analytic QCD models (anQCD): Fractional Analytic Perturbation Theory (FAPT), Two-delta analytic QCD (2 δanQCD), and Massive Perturbation Theory (MPT). The index ν can be noninteger. The provided programs do basically the same job as the Mathematica package anQCD.m published by us previously (Ayala and Cvetič, 2015), but are now written in Fortran.

  17. Analytical polarization and coherence transfer functions for three dipolar coupled spins 12.

    PubMed

    Luy, B; Glaser, S J

    2000-02-01

    Analytical polarization and coherence transfer functions are presented for a spin system consisting of three dipolar coupled homonuclear spins 12 under energy matched conditions. Based on these transfer functions, optimal durations of Hartmann-Hahn mixing periods can be determined for arbitrary dipolar coupling constants D(12), D(13), and D(23). In addition, the dependence of the transfer efficiency on the relative size of the dipolar coupling constants is illustrated.

  18. Limits on the Axial Coupling Constant of New Light Bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piegsa, Florian M.; Pignol, Guillaume

    2012-05-01

    We report on a neutron particle physics experiment, which provides for the first time an upper limit on the strength of an axial coupling constant for a new light spin 1 boson in the millimeter range. Such a new boson would mediate a new force between ordinary fermions, like neutrons and protons. The experiment was set up at the cold neutron reflectometer Narziss at the Paul Scherrer Institute and uses Ramsey’s technique of separated oscillating fields to search for a pseudomagnetic neutron spin precession induced by this new interaction. For the axial coupling constant gA2, an upper limit of 6×10-13 (95% C.L.) was determined for an interaction range of 1 mm.

  19. Analytic model of aurorally coupled magnetospheric and ionospheric electrostatic potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornwall, John M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes modest but significant improvements on earlier studies of electrostatic potential structure in the auroral region, using the adiabatic auroral arc model. With certain simplifying assumptions, new analytic nonlinear solutions fully exhibiting the parametric dependence of potentials on magnetospheric (e.g., cross-tail potential) and ionospheric (e.g., recombination rate) parameters are found. No purely phenomenological parameters are introduced. The results are in reasonable agreement with observed average auroral potential drops, inverted-V scale sizes, and dissipation rates. The dissipation rate is quite comparable to tail energization and transport rates and should have a major effect on tail and magnetospheric dynamics. Various relations between the cross-tail potential and auroral parameters (e.g., total parallel currents and potential drops) are given which can be studied with existing data sets.

  20. Analytic formulation of derivative coupling vectors for complete active space configuration interaction wavefunctions with floating occupation molecular orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohenstein, Edward G.

    2016-11-01

    The floating occupation molecular orbital complete active space configuration interaction (FOMO-CASCI) method is quite promising for the study of nonadiabatic processes. Use of this method directly in nonadiabatic dynamics simulations has been limited by the lack of available first-order nonadiabatic coupling vectors. Here, an analytic formulation of these derivative coupling vectors is presented for FOMO-CASCI wavefunctions using a simple Lagrangian-based approach. The derivative coupling vectors are applied in the optimization of minimum energy conical intersections of an aqueously solvated model compound for the chromophore of the green fluorescent protein (including 100 water molecules). The computational cost of the FOMO-CASCI derivative coupling vector is shown to scale quadratically, O ( N 2 ) , with system size and is applied to systems with up to 1000 atoms.

  1. Analytic formulation of derivative coupling vectors for complete active space configuration interaction wavefunctions with floating occupation molecular orbitals.

    PubMed

    Hohenstein, Edward G

    2016-11-07

    The floating occupation molecular orbital complete active space configuration interaction (FOMO-CASCI) method is quite promising for the study of nonadiabatic processes. Use of this method directly in nonadiabatic dynamics simulations has been limited by the lack of available first-order nonadiabatic coupling vectors. Here, an analytic formulation of these derivative coupling vectors is presented for FOMO-CASCI wavefunctions using a simple Lagrangian-based approach. The derivative coupling vectors are applied in the optimization of minimum energy conical intersections of an aqueously solvated model compound for the chromophore of the green fluorescent protein (including 100 water molecules). The computational cost of the FOMO-CASCI derivative coupling vector is shown to scale quadratically, O(N(2)), with system size and is applied to systems with up to 1000 atoms.

  2. Neutron limit on the strongly-coupled chameleon field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, K.; Arif, M.; Cory, D. G.; Haun, R.; Heacock, B.; Huber, M. G.; Nsofini, J.; Pushin, D. A.; Saggu, P.; Sarenac, D.; Shahi, C. B.; Skavysh, V.; Snow, W. M.; Young, A. R.; Index Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The physical origin of the dark energy that causes the accelerated expansion rate of the Universe is one of the major open questions of cosmology. One set of theories postulates the existence of a self-interacting scalar field for dark energy coupling to matter. In the chameleon dark energy theory, this coupling induces a screening mechanism such that the field amplitude is nonzero in empty space but is greatly suppressed in regions of terrestrial matter density. However measurements performed under appropriate vacuum conditions can enable the chameleon field to appear in the apparatus, where it can be subjected to laboratory experiments. Here we report the most stringent upper bound on the free neutron-chameleon coupling in the strongly coupled limit of the chameleon theory using neutron interferometric techniques. Our experiment sought the chameleon field through the relative phase shift it would induce along one of the neutron paths inside a perfect crystal neutron interferometer. The amplitude of the chameleon field was actively modulated by varying the millibar pressures inside a dual-chamber aluminum cell. We report a 95% confidence level upper bound on the neutron-chameleon coupling β ranging from β <4.7 ×106 for a Ratra-Peebles index of n =1 in the nonlinear scalar field potential to β <2.4 ×107 for n =6 , one order of magnitude more sensitive than the most recent free neutron limit for intermediate n . Similar experiments can explore the full parameter range for chameleon dark energy in the foreseeable future.

  3. Analytic model of aurorally coupled magnetospheric and ionospheric electrostatic potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornwall, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes modest but significant improvements on earlier studies of electrostatic potential structure in the auroral region using the adiabatic auroral arc model. This model has crucial nonlinearities (connected, for example. with aurorally produced ionization) which have hampered analysis; earlier work has either been linear, which I will show is a poor approximation or, if nonlinear, either numerical or too specialized to study parametric dependencies. With certain simplifying assumptions I find new analytic nonlinear solutions fully exhibiting the parametric dependence of potentials on magnetospheric (e.g.. cross-tail potential) and ionospheric (e.g., recombination rate) parameters. No purely phenomenological parameters are introduced. The results are in reasonable agreement with observed average auroral potential drops, inverted-V scale sizes, and dissipation rates. The dissipation rate is quite comparable to tail energization and transport rates and should have a major effect on tail and magnetospheric dynamics. This paper gives various relations between the cross-tail potential and auroral parameters (e.g., total parallel currents and potential drops) which can be studied with existing data sets.

  4. Direct analyte-probed nanoextraction coupled to nanospray ionization-mass spectrometry of drug residues from latent fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Clemons, Kristina; Wiley, Rachel; Waverka, Kristin; Fox, James; Dziekonski, Eric; Verbeck, Guido F

    2013-07-01

    Here, we present a method of extracting drug residues from fingerprints via Direct Analyte-Probed Nanoextraction coupled to nanospray ionization-mass spectrometry (DAPNe-NSI-MS). This instrumental technique provides higher selectivity and lower detection limits over current methods, greatly reducing sample preparation, and does not compromise the integrity of latent fingerprints. This coupled to Raman microscopy is an advantageous supplement for location and identification of trace particles. DAPNe uses a nanomanipulator for extraction and differing microscopies for localization of chemicals of interest. A capillary tip with solvent of choice is placed in a nanopositioner. The surface to be analyzed is placed under a microscope, and a particle of interest is located. Using a pressure injector, the solvent is injected onto the surface where it dissolves the analyte, and then extracted back into the capillary tip. The solution is then directly analyzed via NSI-MS. Analyses of caffeine, cocaine, crystal methamphetamine, and ecstasy have been performed successfully.

  5. Transport zonation limits coupled nitrification-denitrification in permeable sediments.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Adam J; Glud, Ronnie N; Cardenas, M Bayani; Cook, Perran L M

    2013-01-01

    Measurement of biogeochemical processes in permeable sediments (including the hyporheic zone) is difficult because of complex multidimensional advective transport. This is especially the case for nitrogen cycling, which involves several coupled redox-sensitive reactions. To provide detailed insight into the coupling between ammonification, nitrification and denitrification in stationary sand ripples, we combined the diffusion equilibrium thin layer (DET) gel technique with a computational reactive transport biogeochemical model. The former approach provided high-resolution two-dimensional distributions of NO3(-) and (15)N-N2 gas. The measured two-dimensional profiles correlate with computational model simulations, showing a deep pool of N2 gas forming, and being advected to the surface below ripple peaks. Further isotope pairing calculations on these data indicate that coupled nitrification-denitrification is severely limited in permeable sediments because the flow and transport field limits interaction between oxic and anoxic pore water. The approach allowed for new detailed insight into subsurface denitrification zones in complex permeable sediments.

  6. Longitudinal singular response of dusty plasma medium in weak and strong coupling limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar Tiwari, Sanat; Das, Amita; Kaw, Predhiman; Sen, Abhijit

    2012-01-01

    The longitudinal response of a dusty plasma medium in both weak and strong coupling limits has been investigated in detail using analytic as well as numerical techniques. In particular, studies on singular response of the medium have been specifically investigated here. A proper Galilean invariant form of the generalized hydrodynamic fluid model has been adopted for the description of the dusty plasma medium. For weak non-linear response, analytic reductive perturbative approach has been adopted. It is well known that in the weak coupling regime for the dusty plasma medium, such an analysis leads to the Korteweg-de Vries equation (KdV) equation and predicts the existence of localized smooth soliton solutions. We show that the strongly coupled dust fluid with the correct Galilean invariant form does not follow the KdV paradigm. Instead, it reduces to the form of Hunter-Saxton equation, which does not permit soliton solutions. The system in this case displays singular response with both conservative as well as dissipative attributes. At arbitrary high amplitudes, the existence and spontaneous formation of sharply peaked cusp structures in both weak and strong coupling regimes has been demonstrated numerically.

  7. Longitudinal singular response of dusty plasma medium in weak and strong coupling limits

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar Tiwari, Sanat; Das, Amita; Kaw, Predhiman; Sen, Abhijit

    2012-01-15

    The longitudinal response of a dusty plasma medium in both weak and strong coupling limits has been investigated in detail using analytic as well as numerical techniques. In particular, studies on singular response of the medium have been specifically investigated here. A proper Galilean invariant form of the generalized hydrodynamic fluid model has been adopted for the description of the dusty plasma medium. For weak non-linear response, analytic reductive perturbative approach has been adopted. It is well known that in the weak coupling regime for the dusty plasma medium, such an analysis leads to the Korteweg-de Vries equation (KdV) equation and predicts the existence of localized smooth soliton solutions. We show that the strongly coupled dust fluid with the correct Galilean invariant form does not follow the KdV paradigm. Instead, it reduces to the form of Hunter-Saxton equation, which does not permit soliton solutions. The system in this case displays singular response with both conservative as well as dissipative attributes. At arbitrary high amplitudes, the existence and spontaneous formation of sharply peaked cusp structures in both weak and strong coupling regimes has been demonstrated numerically.

  8. Flight and Analytical Methods for Determining the Coupled Vibration Response of Tandem Helicopters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeates, John E , Jr; Brooks, George W; Houbolt, John C

    1957-01-01

    Chapter one presents a discussion of flight-test and analysis methods for some selected helicopter vibration studies. The use of a mechanical shaker in flight to determine the structural response is reported. A method for the analytical determination of the natural coupled frequencies and mode shapes of vibrations in the vertical plane of tandem helicopters is presented in Chapter two. The coupled mode shapes and frequencies are then used to calculate the response of the helicopter to applied oscillating forces.

  9. Ion energy distribution function in dual-frequency rf capacitively coupled discharges: analytical model.

    PubMed

    Olevanov, M; Proshina, O; Rakhimova, T; Voloshin, D

    2008-08-01

    An analytical approach is used to calculate an ion energy distribution function (IEDF) in a dual frequency (DF) collisionless rf discharge in argon. Three possible limit regimes for frequency relations in the DF discharge are discussed. The analytical IEDF is obtained for the intermediate-frequency case, which is most applicable in plasma-processing technologies. The analytical expressions for an ion spectrum width as well as for the minimum and maximum ion energies are derived. The analytical theory is compared with a particle-in-cell Monte Carlo numerical simulation and also with the results of a semianalytical model.

  10. Hydrogen Gas Driven Permeation through Asymmetric Membranes in Diffusion Limited and Surface Limited Regimes: Interplay between Analytical and Numerical Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisarev, A.; Bacherov, A.

    Validity of analytical solutions for the gas driven permeation of H in the Diffusion Limited Regime (DLR) and Surface Limited Regime (SLR) is analyzed by comparison with numerical calculations. Margins for analytical formulas have been established in terms of the permeation factors W = KLSp1/2/D on the inlet (W1) and outlet (W2) sides of the membrane. The DLR analytical formula gives perfect result (error less than 0.5%) if both W2 ≥ 104 and W1 ≥ 102 conditions are satisfied simultaneously. Decrease of both margins by two orders of magnitude leads to 10% error. The SLR analytical formula gives a very good result (error less than 0.5%) if both W1 ≤ 10-2 and W2W1 ≤ 10-3 conditions are satisfied simultaneously. Increase of both margins by two orders of magnitude leads to 10% error. It has been shown that the inlet side and the outlet side conditions are different in their importance for validity of the analytical formulas. In DLR the condition is softer on the inlet side and more rigid on the outlet side, while in SLR the condition is softer on the outlet side and more rigid on the inlet side.

  11. Comparison of experimental coupled helicopter rotor/body stability results with a simple analytical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, P. P.; Venkatesan, C.

    1988-01-01

    The results of an analytical study aimed at predicting the aeromechanical stability of a helicopter in ground resonance, with the inclusion of aerodynamic forces are presented. The theoretical results are found to be in good agreement with the experimental results, available in literature, indicating that the coupled rotor/fuselage system can be represented by a reasonably simple mathematical model.

  12. Analytic evaluation of the dipole Hessian matrix in coupled-cluster theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagau, Thomas-C.; Gauss, Jürgen; Ruud, Kenneth

    2013-10-01

    The general theory required for the calculation of analytic third energy derivatives at the coupled-cluster level of theory is presented and connected to preceding special formulations for hyperpolarizabilities and polarizability gradients. Based on our theory, we have implemented a scheme for calculating the dipole Hessian matrix in a fully analytical manner within the coupled-cluster singles and doubles approximation. The dipole Hessian matrix is the second geometrical derivative of the dipole moment and thus a third derivative of the energy. It plays a crucial role in IR spectroscopy when taking into account anharmonic effects and is also essential for computing vibrational corrections to dipole moments. The superior accuracy of the analytic evaluation of third energy derivatives as compared to numerical differentiation schemes is demonstrated in some pilot calculations.

  13. Quantum-limited amplification and entanglement in coupled nonlinear resonators.

    PubMed

    Eichler, C; Salathe, Y; Mlynek, J; Schmidt, S; Wallraff, A

    2014-09-12

    We demonstrate a coupled cavity realization of a Bose-Hubbard dimer to achieve quantum-limited amplification and to generate frequency entangled microwave fields with squeezing parameters well below -12  dB. In contrast to previous implementations of parametric amplifiers, our dimer can be operated both as a degenerate and as a nondegenerate amplifier. The large measured gain-bandwidth product of more than 250 MHz for the nondegenerate operation and the saturation at input photon numbers as high as 2000 per μs are both expected to be improvable even further, while maintaining wide frequency tunability of about 2 GHz. Featuring flexible control over all relevant system parameters, the presented Bose-Hubbard dimer based on lumped element circuits has significant potential as an elementary cell in nonlinear cavity arrays for quantum simulations.

  14. Superposition of scalar and residual dipolar couplings: analytical transfer functions for three spins 1/2 under cylindrical mixing conditions.

    PubMed

    Luy, B; Glaser, S J

    2001-01-01

    The superposition of scalar and residual dipolar couplings gives rise to so-called cylindrical mixing Hamiltonians in dipolar coupling spectroscopy. General analytical polarization and coherence transfer functions are presented for three cylindrically coupled spins 12 under energy-matched conditions. In addition, the transfer efficiency is analyzed as a function of the relative coupling constants for characteristic special cases.

  15. Comparison of analytic Whipple bumper shield ballistic limits with CTH simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Hertel, E.S. Jr.

    1993-05-01

    A series of CTH simulations were conducted to assess the feasibility of using the hydrodynamic code for debris cloud formation and to predict any damage due to the subsequent loading on rear structures. Six axisymmetric and one 3-dimensional simulations were conducted for spherical projectiles impacting Whipple bumper shields. The projectile diameters were chosen to correlate with two well known analytic expressions for the ballistic limit of a Whipple bumper shield. It has been demonstrated that CTH can be used to simulate the debris cloud formation, the propagation of the debris across a void region, and the secondary impact of the debris against a structure. In addition, the results from the CTH simulations were compared to the analytic estimates of the ballistic limit. At impact velocities of 10 km/s or less, the CTH predicted ballistic limit lays between the two analytic estimates. However, for impact velocities greater than 10 km/s, CTH simulations predicted a ballistic limit larger than both analytical estimates. The differences at high velocities are not well understood. Structural failure at late times due to the time integrated loading of a very diffuse debris cloud has not been considered in the CTH model. In addition, the analytic predictions are extrapolated from relatively low velocity data and the extrapolation technique may not be valid. The discrepancy between the two techniques should be investigated further.

  16. Exact analytical solutions for a diffusion problem coupled with a precipitation-dissolution reaction and feedback of porosity change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayek, Mohamed; Kosakowski, Georg; Churakov, Sergey

    2011-07-01

    We present exact analytical solutions for a one-dimensional diffusion problem coupled with the precipitation-dissolution reaction ? and feedback of porosity change. The solutions are obtained in the form of traveling waves and describe spatial and temporal evolutions of solute concentration, porosity, and mineral distribution for a set of initial and boundary conditions. The form of the solutions limits the choice of admissible boundary conditions, which might be difficult to adapt in natural systems, and thus, the solutions are of limited use for such a system. The main application of the derived solutions is therefore the benchmarking of numerical reactive transport codes for systems with strong porosity change. To test the performance of numerical codes, numerical solutions obtained by using a global implicit finite volume technique are compared to the analytical solutions. Good agreement is obtained between the analytical solutions and the numerical solutions when a sufficient spatial discretization resolves the spatial concentration gradients at any time. In the limit of fast kinetics (local equilibrium), steep concentration fronts cannot be resolved in a numerical discretization schema.

  17. Environmental coupling of selection and heritability limits evolution.

    PubMed

    Wilson, A J; Pemberton, J M; Pilkington, J G; Coltman, D W; Mifsud, D V; Clutton-Brock, T H; Kruuk, L E B

    2006-07-01

    There has recently been great interest in applying theoretical quantitative genetic models to empirical studies of evolution in wild populations. However, while classical models assume environmental constancy, most natural populations exist in variable environments. Here, we applied a novel analytical technique to a long-term study of birthweight in wild sheep and examined, for the first time, how variation in environmental quality simultaneously influences the strength of natural selection and the genetic basis of trait variability. In addition to demonstrating that selection and genetic variance vary dramatically across environments, our results show that environmental heterogeneity induces a negative correlation between these two parameters. Harsh environmental conditions were associated with strong selection for increased birthweight but low genetic variance, and vice versa. Consequently, the potential for microevolution in this population is constrained by either a lack of heritable variation (in poor environments) or by a reduced strength of selection (in good environments). More generally, environmental dependence of this nature may act to limit rates of evolution, maintain genetic variance, and favour phenotypic stasis in many natural systems. Assumptions of environmental constancy are likely to be violated in natural systems, and failure to acknowledge this may generate highly misleading expectations for phenotypic microevolution.

  18. Coupling impedance of an in-vacuum undulator. Measurement, simulation, and analytical estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Simaluk, Victor; Blednykh, Alexei; Fielder, Richard; Rehm, Guenther; Bartolini, Riccardo

    2014-07-25

    One of the important issues of the in-vacuum undulator design is the coupling impedance of the vacuum chamber, which includes tapered transitions with variable gap size. In order to get complete and reliable information on the impedance, analytical estimate, numerical simulations and beam-based measurements have been performed at Diamond Light Source, a forthcoming upgrade of which includes introducing additional insertion device (ID) straights. Moreover, the impedance of an already existing ID vessel geometrically similar to the new one has been measured using the orbit bump method. The measurement results in comparison with analytical estimations and numerical simulations are discussed in this paper.

  19. Coupling impedance of an in-vacuum undulator: Measurement, simulation, and analytical estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smaluk, Victor; Fielder, Richard; Blednykh, Alexei; Rehm, Guenther; Bartolini, Riccardo

    2014-07-01

    One of the important issues of the in-vacuum undulator design is the coupling impedance of the vacuum chamber, which includes tapered transitions with variable gap size. To get complete and reliable information on the impedance, analytical estimate, numerical simulations and beam-based measurements have been performed at Diamond Light Source, a forthcoming upgrade of which includes introducing additional insertion device (ID) straights. The impedance of an already existing ID vessel geometrically similar to the new one has been measured using the orbit bump method. The measurement results in comparison with analytical estimations and numerical simulations are discussed in this paper.

  20. Validation of analytical methods involved in dissolution assays: acceptance limits and decision methodologies.

    PubMed

    Rozet, E; Ziemons, E; Marini, R D; Boulanger, B; Hubert, Ph

    2012-11-02

    Dissolution tests are key elements to ensure continuing product quality and performance. The ultimate goal of these tests is to assure consistent product quality within a defined set of specification criteria. Validation of an analytical method aimed at assessing the dissolution profile of products or at verifying pharmacopoeias compliance should demonstrate that this analytical method is able to correctly declare two dissolution profiles as similar or drug products as compliant with respect to their specifications. It is essential to ensure that these analytical methods are fit for their purpose. Method validation is aimed at providing this guarantee. However, even in the ICHQ2 guideline there is no information explaining how to decide whether the method under validation is valid for its final purpose or not. Are the entire validation criterion needed to ensure that a Quality Control (QC) analytical method for dissolution test is valid? What acceptance limits should be set on these criteria? How to decide about method's validity? These are the questions that this work aims at answering. Focus is made to comply with the current implementation of the Quality by Design (QbD) principles in the pharmaceutical industry in order to allow to correctly defining the Analytical Target Profile (ATP) of analytical methods involved in dissolution tests. Analytical method validation is then the natural demonstration that the developed methods are fit for their intended purpose and is not any more the inconsiderate checklist validation approach still generally performed to complete the filing required to obtain product marketing authorization.

  1. Gravitational lensing from compact bodies: Analytical results for strong and weak deflection limits

    SciTech Connect

    Amore, Paolo; Cervantes, Mayra; De Pace, Arturo; Fernandez, Francisco M.

    2007-04-15

    We develop a nonperturbative method that yields analytical expressions for the deflection angle of light in a general static and spherically symmetric metric. The method works by introducing into the problem an artificial parameter, called {delta}, and by performing an expansion in this parameter to a given order. The results obtained are analytical and nonperturbative because they do not correspond to a polynomial expression in the physical parameters. Already to first order in {delta} the analytical formulas obtained using our method provide at the same time accurate approximations both at large distances (weak deflection limit) and at distances close to the photon sphere (strong deflection limit). We have applied our technique to different metrics and verified that the error is at most 0.5% for all regimes. We have also proposed an alternative approach which provides simpler formulas, although with larger errors.

  2. An analytic radiative transfer model for a coupled atmosphere and leaf canopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Shunlin; Strahler, Alan H.

    1995-01-01

    A new analytical radiative transfer model of a leaf canopy is developed that approximates multiple-scattering radiance by a four-stream formulation. The canopy model is coupled to a homogeneous atmospheric model as well as a non-Lambertian lower boundary soil surface. The same four-stream formulation is also used for the calculation of multiple scattering in the atmosphere. Comparisons of radiance derived from the four-stream model with those calculated by an iterative numerical solution of the radiative transfer equation show that the analytic model has a very high accuracy, even with a turbid atmosphere and a very dense canopy in which multiple scattering dominates. Because the coupling of canopy and atmospheric models fully accommodates anisotropic surface reflectance and atmospheric scattering and its effect on directional radiance, the model is especially useful for application to directional radiance and measurements obtained by remote sensing. Retrieval of biophysical parameters using this model is under investigation.

  3. Experimental and analytical investigation of dynamic characteristics of extension-twist-coupled composite tubular spars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lake, Renee C.; Izadpanah, Amir P.; Baucom, Robert M.

    1993-01-01

    The results from a study aimed at improving the dynamic and aerodynamic characteristics of composite rotor blades through the use of extension-twist coupling are presented. A set of extension-twist-coupled composite spars was manufactured with four plies of graphite-epoxy cloth prepreg. These spars were noncircular in cross-section design and were therefore subject to warping deformations. Three different cross-sectional geometries were developed: D-shape, square, and flattened ellipse. Three spars of each type were fabricated to assess the degree of repeatability in the manufacturing process of extension-twist-coupled structures. Results from free-free vibration tests of the spars were compared with results from normal modes and frequency analyses of companion shell-finite-element models. Five global modes were identified within the frequency range from 0 to 2000 Hz for each spar. The experimental results for only one D-shape spar could be determined, however, and agreed within 13.8 percent of the analytical results. Frequencies corresponding to the five global modes for the three square spars agreed within 9.5, 11.6, and 8.5 percent of the respective analytical results and for the three elliptical spars agreed within 4.9, 7.7, and 9.6 percent of the respective analytical results.

  4. Developing a coupled analytical model for analyzing salt intrusion in alluvial estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savenije, H.; CAI, H.; Gisen, J.

    2013-12-01

    A predictive assessment technique to estimate the salt intrusion length and longitudinal salinity distribution in estuaries is important for policy makers and managers to maintain a healthy estuarine environment. In this study, the salt intrusion model of Savenije (2005, 2012) is applied and coupled to an explicit solution for tidal dynamics developed by Cai and Savenije (2013). The objective of the coupling is to reduce the number of calibration parameters, which subsequently strengthens the reliability of the salt intrusion model. Moreover, the fully analytical treatment allows assessing the effect of model forcing (i.e., tide and river discharge) and geometry adjustments (e.g., by dredging) on system performance. The coupled model has been applied to a wide range of estuaries, and the result shows that the correspondence between analytical estimations and observations is very good. As a result, the coupled model is a useful tool for decision makers to obtain first order estimates of salt intrusion in estuaries based on a minimum of information required. References Savenije, H.H.G. (2005), Salinity and Tides in Alluvial Estuaries, Elsevier. Savenije, H.H.G. (2012), Salinity and Tides in Alluvial Estuaries, completely revised 2nd edition, www.salinityandtides.com. Cai, H., and H. H. G. Savenije (2013), Asymptotic behavior of tidal damping in alluvial estuaries, Journal of Geophysical Research, submitted.

  5. A simple analytical platform based on thin-layer chromatography coupled with paper-based analytical device for determination of total capsaicinoids in chilli samples.

    PubMed

    Dawan, Phanphruk; Satarpai, Thiphol; Tuchinda, Patoomratana; Shiowatana, Juwadee; Siripinyanond, Atitaya

    2017-01-01

    A new analytical platform based on the use of thin-layer chromatography (TLC) coupled with paper-based analytical device (PAD) was developed for the determination of total capsaicinoids in chilli samples. This newly developed TLC-PAD is simple and low-cost without any requirement of special instrument or skillful person. The analysis consisted of two steps, i.e., extraction of capsaicinoids from chilli samples by using ethanol as solvent and separation of capsaicinoids by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and elution of capsaicinoids from the TLC plate with in situ colorimetric detection of capsaicinoids on the PAD. For colorimetric detection, Folin-Ciocalteu reagent was used to detect phenolic functional group of capsaicinoids yielding the blue color. The blue color on the PAD was imaged by a scanner followed by evaluation of its grayscale intensity value by ImageJ program. This newly developed TLC-PAD method provided a linear range from 50 to 1000mgL(-1) capsaicinoids with the limit of detection as low as 50mgL(-1) capsaicinoids. The proposed method was applied to determine capsaicinoids in dried chilli and seasoning powder samples and the results were in good agreement with those obtained by HPLC method.

  6. Analytic gradients for the state-specific multireference coupled cluster singles and doubles model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochnow, Eric; Evangelista, Francesco A.; Schaefer, Henry F.; Allen, Wesley D.; Gauss, Jürgen

    2009-08-01

    The general theory of analytic energy gradients is presented for the state-specific multireference coupled cluster method introduced by Mukherjee and co-workers [Mol. Phys. 94, 157 (1998)], together with an implementation within the singles and doubles approximation, restricted to two closed-shell determinants and Hartree-Fock orbitals. Expressions for the energy gradient are derived based on a Lagrangian formalism and cast in a density-matrix notation suitable for implementation in standard quantum-chemical program packages. In the present implementation, we exploit a decomposition of the multireference coupled cluster gradient expressions, i.e., lambda equations and the corresponding density matrices, into a so-called single-reference part for each reference determinant and a coupling term. Our implementation exhibits the proper scaling, i.e., O(dN6) with d as the number of reference determinants and N as the number of orbitals, and it is thus suitable for large-scale applications. The applicability of our multireference coupled cluster gradients is illustrated by computations for the equilibrium geometry of the 2,6-isomers of pyridyne and the pyridynium cation. The results are compared to those from single-reference coupled cluster calculations and are discussed with respect to the future perspectives of multireference coupled cluster theory.

  7. Analytic gradients for the state-specific multireference coupled cluster singles and doubles model.

    PubMed

    Prochnow, Eric; Evangelista, Francesco A; Schaefer, Henry F; Allen, Wesley D; Gauss, Jürgen

    2009-08-14

    The general theory of analytic energy gradients is presented for the state-specific multireference coupled cluster method introduced by Mukherjee and co-workers [Mol. Phys. 94, 157 (1998)], together with an implementation within the singles and doubles approximation, restricted to two closed-shell determinants and Hartree-Fock orbitals. Expressions for the energy gradient are derived based on a Lagrangian formalism and cast in a density-matrix notation suitable for implementation in standard quantum-chemical program packages. In the present implementation, we exploit a decomposition of the multireference coupled cluster gradient expressions, i.e., lambda equations and the corresponding density matrices, into a so-called single-reference part for each reference determinant and a coupling term. Our implementation exhibits the proper scaling, i.e., O(dN6) with d as the number of reference determinants and N as the number of orbitals, and it is thus suitable for large-scale applications. The applicability of our multireference coupled cluster gradients is illustrated by computations for the equilibrium geometry of the 2,6-isomers of pyridyne and the pyridynium cation. The results are compared to those from single-reference coupled cluster calculations and are discussed with respect to the future perspectives of multireference coupled cluster theory.

  8. Transportation dynamics on coupled networks with limited bandwidth

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Hu, Mao-Bin; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2016-01-01

    The communication networks in real world often couple with each other to save costs, which results in any network does not have a stand-alone function and efficiency. To investigate this, in this paper we propose a transportation model on two coupled networks with bandwidth sharing. We find that the free-flow state and the congestion state can coexist in the two coupled networks, and the free-flow path and congestion path can coexist in each network. Considering three bandwidth-sharing mechanisms, random, assortative and disassortative couplings, we also find that the transportation capacity of the network only depends on the coupling mechanism, and the fraction of coupled links only affects the performance of the system in the congestion state, such as the traveling time. In addition, with assortative coupling, the transportation capacity of the system will decrease significantly. However, the disassortative coupling has little influence on the transportation capacity of the system, which provides a good strategy to save bandwidth. Furthermore, a theoretical method is developed to obtain the bandwidth usage of each link, based on which we can obtain the congestion transition point exactly. PMID:27966624

  9. Transportation dynamics on coupled networks with limited bandwidth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming; Hu, Mao-Bin; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2016-12-01

    The communication networks in real world often couple with each other to save costs, which results in any network does not have a stand-alone function and efficiency. To investigate this, in this paper we propose a transportation model on two coupled networks with bandwidth sharing. We find that the free-flow state and the congestion state can coexist in the two coupled networks, and the free-flow path and congestion path can coexist in each network. Considering three bandwidth-sharing mechanisms, random, assortative and disassortative couplings, we also find that the transportation capacity of the network only depends on the coupling mechanism, and the fraction of coupled links only affects the performance of the system in the congestion state, such as the traveling time. In addition, with assortative coupling, the transportation capacity of the system will decrease significantly. However, the disassortative coupling has little influence on the transportation capacity of the system, which provides a good strategy to save bandwidth. Furthermore, a theoretical method is developed to obtain the bandwidth usage of each link, based on which we can obtain the congestion transition point exactly.

  10. Transportation dynamics on coupled networks with limited bandwidth.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Hu, Mao-Bin; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2016-12-14

    The communication networks in real world often couple with each other to save costs, which results in any network does not have a stand-alone function and efficiency. To investigate this, in this paper we propose a transportation model on two coupled networks with bandwidth sharing. We find that the free-flow state and the congestion state can coexist in the two coupled networks, and the free-flow path and congestion path can coexist in each network. Considering three bandwidth-sharing mechanisms, random, assortative and disassortative couplings, we also find that the transportation capacity of the network only depends on the coupling mechanism, and the fraction of coupled links only affects the performance of the system in the congestion state, such as the traveling time. In addition, with assortative coupling, the transportation capacity of the system will decrease significantly. However, the disassortative coupling has little influence on the transportation capacity of the system, which provides a good strategy to save bandwidth. Furthermore, a theoretical method is developed to obtain the bandwidth usage of each link, based on which we can obtain the congestion transition point exactly.

  11. Optical absorption in the strong-coupling limit of Eliashberg theory

    SciTech Connect

    Combescot, R.; Dolgov, O.V.; Rainer, D.; Shulga, S.V.

    1996-02-01

    We calculate the optical conductivity of superconductors in the strong-coupling limit. In this anomalous limit the typical energy scale is set by the coupling energy, and other energy scales such as the energy of the bosons mediating the attraction are negligibly small. We find a universal frequency dependence of the optical absorption which is dominated by bound states and differs significantly from the weak-coupling results. A comparison with absorption spectra of superconductors with enhanced electron-phonon coupling shows that typical features of the strong-coupling limit are already present at intermediate coupling. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  12. Analytical models for well-mixed populations of cooperators and defectors under limiting resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Requejo, R. J.; Camacho, J.

    2012-06-01

    In the study of the evolution of cooperation, resource limitations are usually assumed just to provide a finite population size. Recently, however, agent-based models have pointed out that resource limitation may modify the original structure of the interactions and allow for the survival of unconditional cooperators in well-mixed populations. Here, we present analytical simplified versions of two types of agent-based models recently published: one in which the limiting resource constrains the ability of reproduction of individuals but not their survival, and a second one where the limiting resource is necessary for both reproduction and survival. One finds that the analytical models display, with a few differences, the same qualitative behavior of the more complex agent-based models. In addition, the analytical models allow us to expand the study and identify the dimensionless parameters governing the final fate of the system, such as coexistence of cooperators and defectors, or dominance of defectors or of cooperators. We provide a detailed analysis of the occurring phase transitions as these parameters are varied.

  13. An analytical model of sub-Alfvénic moon-plasma interactions with application to the hemisphere coupling effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Sven

    2015-09-01

    We develop a new analytical model of the Alfvén wing that is generated by the interaction between a planetary moon's ionosphere and its magnetospheric environment. While preceding analytical approaches assumed the obstacle's height-integrated ionospheric conductivities to be spatially constant, the model presented here can take into account a continuous conductance profile that follows a power law. The electric potential in the interaction region, determining the electromagnetic fields of the Alfvén wing, can then be calculated from an Euler-type differential equation. In this way, the model allows to include a realistic representation of the "suspension bridge"-like conductance profile expected for the moon's ionosphere. The major drawback of this approach is its restriction to interaction scenarios where the ionospheric Pedersen conductance is large compared to the Hall conductance, and thus, the Alfvénic perturbations are approximately symmetric between the planet-facing and the planet-averted hemispheres of the moon. The model is applied to the hemisphere coupling effect observed at Enceladus, i.e., to the surface currents and the associated magnetic discontinuities that arise from a north-south asymmetry of the obstacle to the plasma flow. We show that the occurrence of this effect is very robust against changes in the conductance profile of Enceladus' plume, and we derive upper limits for the strength of the magnetic field jumps generated by the hemisphere coupling effect. During all 11 reported detections of the hemisphere coupling currents at Enceladus, the observed magnetic field jumps were clearly weaker than the proposed limits. Our findings are also relevant for future in situ studies of putative plumes at the Jovian moon Europa.

  14. A conceptual model for establishing tolerance limits for analytic bias and imprecision based on variations in population test distributions.

    PubMed

    Klee, G

    1997-04-25

    A conceptual model is proposed for defining analytic bias limits utilizing the variations found in cumulative test value distributions. The model is based on the propositions that changes in analytic bias are more important than analytic imprecision in medical diagnoses and that analytic bias alters clinical specificity more than clinical sensitivity. The rationale for these propositions are presented along with a step-by-step procedure for estimating bias tolerance limits. These concepts are illustrated with an example using prostate-specific antigen. A second protocol is provided to define analytic imprecision tolerance limits, based on the quality control performance characteristics required to maintain the bias tolerance limits. This model can be applied to most chemistry, immunoassay, and hematologic quantitative assays. The relationship of this procedure to the published procedures using biologic variation for defining analytic tolerance limits is discussed.

  15. Couples' Shared Beliefs About Aging and Implications for Future Functional Limitations.

    PubMed

    Mejía, Shannon T; Gonzalez, Richard

    2017-08-01

    Individual beliefs are known to be predictive of health. This study examines the co-construction of couple norms and links couples' shared beliefs about aging to future individuals' and couples' functional limitations. Data from the 2008 and 2014 waves of the Health and Retirement Study (1,231 couples; age range = 51-90) were analyzed using latent variables that estimated shared and individual variance in beliefs about aging in 2008 and functional limitations at follow-up in 2014. Spouses' individual processes of physical activity and disease burden were modeled to contribute to couples' shared beliefs about aging and subsequent functional limitations. Models progressively controlled for indicators of partner selection, couples' shared health experiences, and similarities and differences in age. Couples' beliefs about aging predicted future functional limitations. The effect magnitude decreased but remained significant in all models. Physical activity predicted couples' future functional limitations but was largely explained by shared health experiences and similarities and differences in age for wives and husbands, respectively. Disease burden contributed to couples' shared beliefs about aging. Husbands' contributions were explained by partner selection, but wives' contributions remained significant in all models. The effect of couples' shared beliefs on change in couples' functional limitations was explained by couples' shared health experiences. Beliefs about aging and health occur within the context of close relationships and shared experiences. Knowledge of couples' beliefs and health is necessary to support their individual and collective efforts to age successfully together.

  16. Analytical modeling provides new insight into complex mutual coupling between surface loops at ultrahigh fields.

    PubMed

    Avdievich, N I; Pfrommer, A; Giapitzakis, I A; Henning, A

    2017-10-01

    Ultrahigh-field (UHF) (≥7 T) transmit (Tx) human head surface loop phased arrays improve both the Tx efficiency (B1(+) /√P) and homogeneity in comparison with single-channel quadrature Tx volume coils. For multi-channel arrays, decoupling becomes one of the major problems during the design process. Further insight into the coupling between array elements and its dependence on various factors can facilitate array development. The evaluation of the entire impedance matrix Z for an array loaded with a realistic voxel model or phantom is a time-consuming procedure when performed using electromagnetic (EM) solvers. This motivates the development of an analytical model, which could provide a quick assessment of the Z-matrix. In this work, an analytical model based on dyadic Green's functions was developed and validated using an EM solver and bench measurements. The model evaluates the complex coupling, including both the electric (mutual resistance) and magnetic (mutual inductance) coupling. Validation demonstrated that the model does well to describe the coupling at lower fields (≤3 T). At UHFs, the model also performs well for a practical case of low magnetic coupling. Based on the modeling, the geometry of a 400-MHz, two-loop transceiver array was optimized, such that, by simply overlapping the loops, both the mutual inductance and the mutual resistance were compensated at the same time. As a result, excellent decoupling (below -40 dB) was obtained without any additional decoupling circuits. An overlapped array prototype was compared (signal-to-noise ratio, Tx efficiency) favorably to a gapped array, a geometry which has been utilized previously in designs of UHF Tx arrays. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. All-coupling polaron optical response: Analytic approaches beyond the adiabatic approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimin, S. N.; Tempere, J.; Devreese, J. T.

    2016-09-01

    In the present work, the problem of an all-coupling analytic description for the optical conductivity of the Fröhlich polaron is treated, with the goal being to bridge the gap in the validity range that exists between two complementary methods: on the one hand, the memory-function formalism and, on the other hand, the strong-coupling expansion based on the Franck-Condon picture for the polaron response. At intermediate coupling, both methods were found to fail as they do not reproduce diagrammatic quantum Monte Carlo results. To resolve this, we modify the memory-function formalism with respect to the Feynman-Hellwarth-Iddings-Platzman approach in order to take into account a nonquadratic interaction in a model system for the polaron. The strong-coupling expansion is extended beyond the adiabatic approximation by including in the treatment nonadiabatic transitions between excited polaron states. The polaron optical conductivity that we obtain at T =0 by combining the two extended methods agrees well, both qualitatively and quantitatively, with the diagrammatic quantum Monte Carlo results in the whole available range of the electron-phonon coupling strength.

  18. Overtone Mobility Spectrometry: Part 5. Simulations and Analytical Expressions Describing Overtone Limits

    PubMed Central

    Ewing, Michael A.; Zucker, Steven M.; Valentine, Stephen J.; Clemmer, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Mathematical expressions for the analytical duty cycle associated with different overtones in overtone mobility spectrometry are derived from the widths of the transmitted packets of ions under different instrumental operating conditions. Support for these derivations is provided through ion trajectory simulations. The outcome of the theory and simulations indicates that under all operating conditions there exists a limit or maximum observable overtone that will result in ion transmission. Implications of these findings on experimental design are discussed. PMID:23468094

  19. The Prevalence of Older Couples With ADL Limitations and Factors Associated With ADL Help Receipt

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Huei-Wern; Feld, Sheila; Dunkle, Ruth E.; Schroepfer, Tracy; Lehning, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    Using the Andersen-Newman model, we investigated the prevalence of Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) limitations in married couples, and couple characteristics associated with ADL help receipt. In this sample of 3,235 couples age 65+ in the 2004 Health and Retirement Study, 74.3%, 22.1% and 3.6% were couples in which neither, one or two partners had limitations, respectively. Logistic regression results indicate help receipt was associated with certain health needs in the couple, but not with their predisposing characteristics or enabling resources. Social workers could target couples most in need of assistance by assessing both partners’ health problems. PMID:25036802

  20. On Application of Analytical Model for Drain-Coupling Split-Gate Flash: Analytical Solution to Source-Side Injection Multilevel Programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu-Hsiung; Wu, Meng-Chyi; Chu, Wen-Ting; Lin, Chrong-Jong; Lin, Yung-Tao; Wang, Chung S.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we present an analytical solution for evaluating the ramped-pulse programming behaviors of the drain-coupling source-side injection split-gate flash for multilevel charge storage. Starting with the programming model, the relations of the storage charge, read current and peak lateral field to the ramped-pulse programming time are analytically expressed as functions of electrical, technological and physical parameters and agree well with experimental results. The program speed and program accuracy, including the effects of electrical bias and process variations, are analytically estimated.

  1. New limits on coupled dark energy from Planck

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Jun-Qing

    2013-11-01

    Recently, the Planck collaboration has released the first cosmological papers providing the high resolution, full sky, maps of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature anisotropies. It is crucial to understand that whether the accelerating expansion of our universe at present is driven by an unknown energy component (Dark Energy) or a modification to general relativity (Modified Gravity). In this paper we study the coupled dark energy models, in which the quintessence scalar field nontrivially couples to the cold dark matter, with the strength parameter of interaction β. Using the Planck data alone, we obtain that the strength of interaction between dark sectors is constrained as β < 0.102 at 95% confidence level, which is tighter than that from the WMAP9 data alone. Combining the Planck data with other probes, like the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO), Type-Ia supernovae ''Union2.1 compilation'' and the CMB lensing data from Planck measurement, we find the tight constraint on the strength of interaction β < 0.052 (95% C.L.). Interestingly, we also find a non-zero coupling β = 0.078±0.022 (68% C.L.) when we use the Planck, the ''SNLS'' supernovae samples, and the prior on the Hubble constant from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) together. This evidence for the coupled dark energy models mainly comes from a tension between constraints on the Hubble constant from the Planck measurement and the local direct H{sub 0} probes from HST.

  2. Sound energy decay in coupled spaces using a parametric analytical solution of a diffusion equation.

    PubMed

    Luizard, Paul; Polack, Jean-Dominique; Katz, Brian F G

    2014-05-01

    Sound field behavior in performance spaces is a complex phenomenon. Issues regarding coupled spaces present additional concerns due to sound energy exchanges. Coupled volume concert halls have been of increasing interest in recent decades because this architectural principle offers the possibility to modify the hall's acoustical environment in a passive way by modifying the coupling area. Under specific conditions, the use of coupled reverberation chambers can provide non-exponential sound energy decay in the main room, resulting in both high clarity and long reverberation which are antagonistic parameters in a single volume room. Previous studies have proposed various sound energy decay models based on statistical acoustics and diffusion theory. Statistical acoustics assumes a perfectly uniform sound field within a given room whereas measurements show an attenuation of energy with increasing source-receiver distance. While previously proposed models based on diffusion theory use numerical solvers, the present study proposes a heuristic model of sound energy behavior based on an analytical solution of the commonly used diffusion equation and physically justified approximations. This model is validated by means of comparisons to scale model measurements and numerical geometrical acoustics simulations, both applied to the same simple concert hall geometry.

  3. Coupling functions for NM total intensity and different multiplicities: Analytical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lev, Dorman

    Coupling functions for NM total intensity and different multiplicities play important role when we by observed data of cosmic ray (CR) variations on the ground based detectors (mostly neutron monitors and muon telescopes) tried to determine the primary variations of CR energy spectrum out of the Earth’s atmosphere and magnetosphere, into interplanetary space. This is especially important for forecasting expected radiation hazards from solar CR, because by determined primary solar CR energy spectrum in the interplanetary space it is possible to determine effective time of solar CR ejection into solar wind, source function and the diffusion coefficient of solar CR propagation in space in dependence of particle energy and distance from the Sun. Coupling functions are important also for investigations of Forbush effect and precursory effects for forecasting dangerous interplanetary shock waves. We check obtained results for coupling functions by latitude expedition experimental data. We found how coupling functions depend from the level of solar activity and pressure on the level of observations. Obtained results are presented in the analytical forms that are convenient to use for any NM at any place on the Earth.

  4. Analytical Method for Forming Limit Diagram Prediction with Application to a Magnesium ZEK100-O Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Junying; Hector, Louis G.; Lin, Jianping; Carter, Jon T.

    2013-11-01

    A significant barrier to broader implementation of magnesium alloys is their poor room temperature formability, a consequence of the anisotropic response of the Mg hexagonal closed-packed (hcp) crystal structure. Additions of rare earth (RE) elements, such as in the ZEK100 alloys, weaken the texture and improve formability. Room temperature forming limit analyses of RE-containing Mg alloys, particularly Mg ZEK100, have not been explored to any significant extent in the literature. In this paper, strain-based forming limit diagrams (FLDs) are derived for an Mg ZEK100-O alloy (Zn1.34Zr0.23Nd0.182, wt.%) using an analytical method that combines the vertex theory of Storen and Rice (J Mech Phys Solids, 23:421-441, 1979), the anisotropic yield criterion of Barlat and Lian (Int J Plast, 5:51-66, 1989), and a hardening law. The method does not rely on assumptions about pre-existing defects, is broadly applicable to sheet alloys exhibiting in-plane anisotropy requiring a higher-order yield criterion, and requires only minimal experimental inputs. Results from the analytical method are compared with experimentally derived FLDs based upon the well-known Nakajima test and tensile deformation, and with predictions from an existing analytical method for FLDs. Close agreement between the experimentally derived FLDs and the present theoretical method was obtained. Sheet materials where the theoretical method does not apply are also discussed.

  5. Meta-Analytic Approaches for Multistressor Dose-Response Function Development: Strengths, Limitations, and Case Studies.

    PubMed

    Levy, Jonathan I; Fabian, M Patricia; Peters, Junenette L

    2015-06-01

    For many policy analyses, including but not limited to cumulative risk assessments, it is important to characterize the individual and joint health effects of multiple stressors. With an increasing focus on psychosocial and other nonchemical stressors, this often includes epidemiological meta-analysis. Meta-analysis has limitations if epidemiological studies do not include all of the stressors of interest or do not provide multivariable outputs in a format necessary for risk assessment. Given these limitations, novel analytical methods are often needed to synthesize the published literature or to build upon available evidence. In this article, we discuss three recent case studies that highlight the strengths and limitations of meta-analytic approaches and other research synthesis techniques for human health risk assessment applications. First, a literature-based meta-analysis within a risk assessment context informed the design of a new epidemiological investigation of the differential toxicity of fine particulate matter constituents. Second, a literature synthesis for an effects-based cumulative risk assessment of hypertension risk factors led to a decision to develop new epidemiological associations using structural equation modeling. Third, discrete event simulation modeling was used to simulate the impact of changes in the built environment on environmental exposures and associated asthma outcomes, linking literature meta-analyses for key associations with a simulation model to synthesize all of the model components. These case studies emphasize the importance of conducting epidemiology with a risk assessment application in mind, the need for interdisciplinary collaboration, and the value of advanced analytical methods to synthesize epidemiological and other evidence for risk assessment applications.

  6. Lattice QCD phase diagram in and away from the strong coupling limit.

    PubMed

    de Forcrand, Ph; Langelage, J; Philipsen, O; Unger, W

    2014-10-10

    We study lattice QCD with four flavors of staggered quarks. In the limit of infinite gauge coupling, "dual" variables can be introduced, which render the finite-density sign problem mild and allow a full determination of the μ-T phase diagram by Monte Carlo simulations, also in the chiral limit. However, the continuum limit coincides with the weak coupling limit. We propose a strong-coupling expansion approach towards the continuum limit. We show first results, including the phase diagram and its chiral critical point, from this expansion truncated at next-to-leading order.

  7. Analytical Model and Optimized Design of Power Transmitting Coil for Inductively Coupled Endoscope Robot.

    PubMed

    Ke, Quan; Luo, Weijie; Yan, Guozheng; Yang, Kai

    2016-04-01

    A wireless power transfer system based on the weakly inductive coupling makes it possible to provide the endoscope microrobot (EMR) with infinite power. To facilitate the patients' inspection with the EMR system, the diameter of the transmitting coil is enlarged to 69 cm. Due to the large transmitting range, a high quality factor of the Litz-wire transmitting coil is a necessity to ensure the intensity of magnetic field generated efficiently. Thus, this paper builds an analytical model of the transmitting coil, and then, optimizes the parameters of the coil by enlarging the quality factor. The lumped model of the transmitting coil includes three parameters: ac resistance, self-inductance, and stray capacitance. Based on the exact two-dimension solution, the accurate analytical expression of ac resistance is derived. Several transmitting coils of different specifications are utilized to verify this analytical expression, being in good agreements with the measured results except the coils with a large number of strands. Then, the quality factor of transmitting coils can be well predicted with the available analytical expressions of self- inductance and stray capacitance. Owing to the exact estimation of quality factor, the appropriate coil turns of the transmitting coil is set to 18-40 within the restrictions of transmitting circuit and human tissue issues. To supply enough energy for the next generation of the EMR equipped with a Ø9.5×10.1 mm receiving coil, the coil turns of the transmitting coil is optimally set to 28, which can transfer a maximum power of 750 mW with the remarkable delivering efficiency of 3.55%.

  8. Analytical Energy Gradients for Excited-State Coupled-Cluster Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wladyslawski, Mark; Nooijen, Marcel

    The equation-of-motion coupled-cluster (EOM-CC) and similarity transformed equation-of-motion coupled-cluster (STEOM-CC) methods have been firmly established as accurate and routinely applicable extensions of single-reference coupled-cluster theory to describe electronically excited states. An overview of these methods is provided, with emphasis on the many-body similarity transform concept that is the key to a rationalization of their accuracy. The main topic of the paper is the derivation of analytical energy gradients for such non-variational electronic structure approaches, with an ultimate focus on obtaining their detailed algebraic working equations. A general theoretical framework using Lagrange's method of undetermined multipliers is presented, and the method is applied to formulate the EOM-CC and STEOM-CC gradients in abstract operator terms, following the previous work in [P.G. Szalay, Int. J. Quantum Chem. 55 (1995) 151] and [S.R. Gwaltney, R.J. Bartlett, M. Nooijen, J. Chem. Phys. 111 (1999) 58]. Moreover, the systematics of the Lagrange multiplier approach is suitable for automation by computer, enabling the derivation of the detailed derivative equations through a standardized and direct procedure. To this end, we have developed the SMART (Symbolic Manipulation and Regrouping of Tensors) package of automated symbolic algebra routines, written in the Mathematica programming language. The SMART toolkit provides the means to expand, differentiate, and simplify equations by manipulation of the detailed algebraic tensor expressions directly. The Lagrangian multiplier formulation establishes a uniform strategy to perform the automated derivation in a standardized manner: A Lagrange multiplier functional is constructed from the explicit algebraic equations that define the energy in the electronic method; the energy functional is then made fully variational with respect to all of its parameters, and the symbolic differentiations directly yield the explicit

  9. The E⊗e dynamic Jahn-Teller problem: A new insight from the strong coupling limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Tohru; Chibotaru, Liviu F.; Ceulemans, Arnout

    2005-02-01

    Correct boundary conditions for the E⊗e dynamic Jahn-Teller problem are considered explicitly for the first time to obtain approximate analytical solutions in the strong coupling limit. Numerical solutions for the decoupled equations using the finite difference method are also presented. The numerical solutions for the decoupled equations exhibit avoided crossings in the weak coupling region, which explains the oscillating behavior of the solutions obtained by Longuet-Higgins et al. for the coupled equations. The obtained analytical energy expressions show improved agreement with the numerical calculations as compared with the previous treatment in which the potentials were assumed to be harmonic. We demonstrate that the pseudorotational energy j2/(2g2), where g is the dimensionless vibronic coupling constant, and j total angular momentum: j=±1/2,±3/2,…, in the conventional strong coupling expression for the vibronic levels of the lower sheet is exact. Non-Hermitian first-order perturbation theory gives the energy which is correct up to 1/g4. The asymptotic behavior of the wave function at the origin does not influence the corrected energy up to order of 1/g4. At the same time the treatment of the upper sheet with correct boundary conditions gives solutions which are entirely different from the corresponding Slonczewski's solutions. Besides, the correct boundary conditions enable us to evaluate the nonadiabatic coupling between the lower and upper potential sheets. The energy correction due to the nonadiabatic coupling is estimated to be of order 1/g6.

  10. Analytic properties of the OCP and ionic mixtures in the strongly coupled fluid state

    SciTech Connect

    DeWitt, H.E.

    1993-12-02

    Exact results for the Madelung constants and first order anharmonic energies are given for the inverse power potentials with the Coulomb potential as the softest example. Similar exact results are obtained using the analysis of Rosenfeld on the {Gamma} {yields} {infinity} limit for the OCP internal energy, direct correlation function, screening function, and bridge functions. Knowing these exact limits for the fluid phase of the OCP allows one to determine the nature of the thermal corrections to the strongly coupled results. Solutions of the HNC equation modified with the hard sphere bridge function give an example.

  11. Analytic model of near-field radio-frequency sheaths. I. Tenuous plasma limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ippolito, D. A.; Myra, J. R.

    2009-02-01

    An analytic model is derived for electromagnetic radio-frequency (rf) wave propagation in a waveguide filled by a tenuous plasma with a slightly tilted equilibrium magnetic field B, i.e., by=By/B≪1. The calculation includes the self-consistent coupling between the rf fields and the sheaths at the sheath-plasma interface and can be used to describe antenna sheath formation in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. The sheaths are treated as thin vacuum regions separating the plasma and metal wall. It is shown that (i) the launched fast wave is coupled parasitically to the slow wave by the magnetic field structure when by≠0 and by the sheath boundary condition, (ii) the sheath voltage Vsh is dependent on the wave parity (the "antenna phasing"), and (iii) integrating the vacuum rf fields, Vvac=-∫dzE∥(vac), gives an overestimate of the sheath voltage. An expression for the self-consistent Vsh including plasma effects and satisfying the Child-Langmuir law is obtained.

  12. Analytical performance and clinical decision limit of a new release for cardiac troponin I assay.

    PubMed

    Moretti, M; Pieretti, B; Sisti, D; Rocchi, Mb; Gasperoni, S

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac troponins (cTns) are the 'gold standard' biomarker for the diagnosis and prognosis of acute coronary syndrome. Analytical performance is critical at low concentrations of cTn, and many of the current assays do not meet the guideline requirement of a 10% coefficient of variation (CV) at the 99th percentile concentrations. The aim of the study was to establish if the newly released Access® AccuTnI®+3 (AccuTnI+3) cardiac troponin I assay (Beckman Coulter Inc., Brea, CA, USA) reached this objective. All AccuTnI+3 assays were performed on UniCel® DxI800 analyzer (Beckman Coulter Inc). Limit of Blank (LoB), Limit of Detection (LoD) and Limit of Quantitation (LoQ) were determined according to Clinical Laboratory Standard Institute EP17-A and EP5-A2 protocols. The 99th percentile upper reference limit (URL) was determined by analysing serum samples from 330 apparently healthy blood donors (260 men, 70 women, age range 18-70 years, median age 36 years). LoB and LoD values were 2.6 and 12 ng/L, respectively. The 10% CV was at 18 ng/L (95% confidence interval [CI] 8-25). The 99th percentile URL was 22 ng/L (95% CI 11-34). The newly released assay has improved low-end analytical performance and reaches the goal of having a total imprecision ≤ 10% at 99th percentile of a healthy reference population (guideline acceptable). With this assay, it is now possible to utilize the 99th percentile as decision level for myocardial injury detection. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  13. New coupling limits, dynamical symmetries and microscopic operators of IBM/TQM

    SciTech Connect

    Paar, V.

    1985-01-15

    A new particle-core basis having approximate supersymmetric (SUSY) features associated with SU(3) dynamical symmetry is introduced. The SUSY and CO-SUSY limits of IBFM/PTQM appear for the characteristic intermediate coupling strengths GAMMA/delta = +- (GAMMA/delta)/sub SUSY/. The CO-SUSY limit is a truncated analog of the Stephens rotation-aligned scheme. A paradox was found in the relation of the SUSY and truncated strong coupling (TSC) limits to the strong coupling limit of the Bohr-Mottelson model.

  14. Communication: Analytic gradients for the complex absorbing potential equation-of-motion coupled-cluster method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benda, Zsuzsanna; Jagau, Thomas-C.

    2017-01-01

    The general theory of analytic energy gradients is presented for the complex absorbing potential equation-of-motion coupled-cluster (CAP-EOM-CC) method together with an implementation within the singles and doubles approximation. Expressions for the CAP-EOM-CC energy gradient are derived based on a Lagrangian formalism with a special focus on the extra terms arising from the presence of the CAP. Our implementation allows for locating minima on high-dimensional complex-valued potential energy surfaces and thus enables geometry optimizations of resonance states of polyatomic molecules. The applicability of our CAP-EOM-CC gradients is illustrated by computations of the equilibrium structures and adiabatic electron affinities of the temporary anions of formaldehyde, formic acid, and ethylene. The results are compared to those obtained from standard EOM-CC calculations and the advantages of CAP methods are emphasized.

  15. An analytical model for predicting transport in a coupled vadose/phreatic system

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasko, D.

    1997-05-01

    A simple analytical model is presented for predicting the transport of a contaminant in both the unsaturated (vadose) and saturated (phreatic) zones following a surficial spill. The model incorporates advection, dispersion, adsorption, and first-order decay in both zones and couples the transport processes at the water table. The governing equation is solved by using the method of Laplace transforms, with numerical inversion of the Laplace space equation for concentration. Because of the complexity of the functional form for the Laplace space solution, a numerical methodology using the real and imaginary parts of a Fourier series was implemented. To reduce conservatism in the model, dilution at the water table was also included. Verification of the model is demonstrated by its ability to reproduce the source history at the surface and to replicate appropriate one-dimensional transport through either the vadose or phreatic zone. Because of its simplicity and lack of detailed input data requirements, the model is recommended for scoping calculations.

  16. Development of analytical methods for multiplex bio-assay with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ornatsky, Olga I; Kinach, Robert; Bandura, Dmitry R; Lou, Xudong; Tanner, Scott D; Baranov, Vladimir I; Nitz, Mark; Winnik, Mitchell A

    2008-01-01

    Advances in the development of highly multiplexed bio-analytical assays with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) detection are discussed. Use of novel reagents specifically designed for immunological methods utilizing elemental analysis is presented. The major steps of method development, including selection of elements for tags, validation of tagged reagents, and examples of multiplexed assays, are considered in detail. The paper further describes experimental protocols for elemental tagging of antibodies, immunostaining of live and fixed human leukemia cells, and preparation of samples for ICP-MS analysis. Quantitative analysis of surface antigens on model cell lines using a cocktail of seven lanthanide labeled antibodies demonstrated high specificity and concordance with conventional immunophenotyping.

  17. Development of analytical methods for multiplex bio-assay with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Ornatsky, Olga I.; Kinach, Robert; Bandura, Dmitry R.; Lou, Xudong; Tanner, Scott D.; Baranov, Vladimir I.; Nitz, Mark; Winnik, Mitchell A.

    2008-01-01

    Advances in the development of highly multiplexed bio-analytical assays with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) detection are discussed. Use of novel reagents specifically designed for immunological methods utilizing elemental analysis is presented. The major steps of method development, including selection of elements for tags, validation of tagged reagents, and examples of multiplexed assays, are considered in detail. The paper further describes experimental protocols for elemental tagging of antibodies, immunostaining of live and fixed human leukemia cells, and preparation of samples for ICP-MS analysis. Quantitative analysis of surface antigens on model cell lines using a cocktail of seven lanthanide labeled antibodies demonstrated high specificity and concordance with conventional immunophenotyping. PMID:19122859

  18. Analytical transformed harmonic oscillator basis for continuum discretized coupled channels calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Moro, A. M.; Arias, J. M.; Gomez-Camacho, J.; Perez-Bernal, F.

    2009-11-15

    A new method for continuum discretization in continuum-discretized coupled-channels calculations is proposed. The method is based on an analytic local-scale transformation of the harmonic-oscillator wave functions proposed for other purposes in a recent work [Karatagladis et al., Phys. Rev. C 71, 064601 (2005)]. The new approach is compared with the standard method of continuum discretization in terms of energy bins for the reactions d+{sup 58}Ni at 80 MeV, {sup 6}Li+{sup 40}Ca at 156 MeV, and {sup 6}He+{sup 208}Pb at 22 MeV and 240 MeV/nucleon. In all cases very good agreement between both approaches is found.

  19. Resonant modes in metal/insulator/metal metamaterials: An analytical study on near-field couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shaojie; Xiao, Shiyi; Zhou, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Metamaterials (MTMs) in a metal/insulator/metal (MIM) configuration have drawn much attention recently, but the resonances in such systems are still not fully understood. Here, we employ a rigorous mode expansion method to analytically study the resonance properties of a model MIM MTM where the top metallic layer consists of an array of metallic stripes. Our analyses, supported by full-wave simulations and microwave experiments, provide a unified platform to understand the resonances in such systems, in which two previously established models are found valid only at certain extreme conditions. In particular, the resonance in such a system undergoes a transition from a vertical Fabry-Pérot type to a transverse type as the spacer thickness shrinks, and the resonance frequency saturates at a particular value in the thin-spacer limit. Finally, we derive a set of analytical formulas to describe how the essential properties (i.e., resonance frequency and quality factor) of the resonance depend on the structural details of the system and verify these analytical relationships by full-wave simulations in MIM systems with complex microstructures.

  20. An analytical model of multi-component single frequency capacitively coupled plasma and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikia, Partha; Bhuyan, Heman; Favre, Mario; Wyndham, Edmund; Veloso, Felipe

    2016-09-01

    An analytical model describing the hydrogen added argon capacitively coupled plasma (CPP) is pesented and its predictions are tested with the experimental results. In the analytical model, it is found that the radio frequency (rf) current density, electron temperature and density, as well as the density of ion in multi-component plasma collectively influence the normalized sheath potential and thickness. As for low pressure rf plasma, the sheath potential is the qualitative measure of the DC self bias, the trend of variation of DC self bias with hydrogen addition is predicted in this model. The behavior of single frequency multi-component CPP is experimentally studied by a homogeneous discharge model using discharge parameters. In the experiment with hydrogen added argon plasma, the rf power as well as the working pressures are varied. The addition of hydrogen to the argon discharge leads to a decrease of electron density and DC self bias. It also results an increase of electron temperature. Agreements of the experimental results with theoretical predictions are obtained at different experimental conditions. The results obtained in this investigation could be useful for reproducibility, consistency and understanding of a particular processing application. Authors acknowledge FONDECYT grant 3160179 and 1130228. Additional funding from Conicyt PIA program ACT1108 is also acknowledged.

  1. An analytical model of multi-component radio frequency capacitively coupled plasma and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikia, Partha; Bhuyan, Heman; Favre, Mario; Wyndham, Edmundo; Veloso, Felipe

    2017-01-01

    An analytical model describing the hydrogen added argon radio frequency capacitively coupled plasma is presented and its predictions are tested with the experimental results. In the analytical model, it is found that the rf current density, electron temperature and density, as well as the density of light ion in multi-component plasma collectively influence the normalized sheath thickness and potential. As for low pressure rf plasma, the sheath potential is the qualitative measure of the DC self bias, the change of DC self bias with hydrogen addition is predicted in this model. The values of electron density and temperature as a function of hydrogen content in the discharge is calculated on the basis of a homogeneous discharge model using the rms values of current and voltage as well as by rf compensated Langmuir probe at different experimental conditions. In the experiment with hydrogen added argon plasma, the rf power as well as the working pressures are varied. The presence of hydrogen in the argon discharge leads to the decrease of electron density and increase of electron temperature. The measured DC self bias for the hydrogen added argon plasma is found lower than the pristine argon plasma. This decrease of DC self bias with hydrogen addition is in accordance with predictions of the theoretical model.

  2. Data analytics for continuous renal replacement therapy: historical limitations and recent technology advances.

    PubMed

    Clark, William R; Garzotto, Francesco; Neri, Mauro; Lorenzin, Anna; Zaccaria, Marta; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-10-10

    Dialysis is a highly quantitative therapy involving large volumes of both clinical and technical data. While automated data collection has been implemented for chronic dialysis, this has not been done for acute kidney injury patients treated with continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). After a brief review of the fundamental aspects of electronic medical records (EMRs), a new tool designed to provide clinicians with individualized CRRT treatment data is analyzed, with emphasis on its quality assurance capabilities. The first platform addressing the problem of data collection and management with current CRRT machines (Sharesource system; Baxter Healthcare) is described. The system provides connectivity for the Prismaflex CRRT machine and enables both EMR connectivity and therapy analytics with 2 basic components: the connect module and the report module. The enormous amount of data in CRRT should be collected and analyzed to enable adequate clinical decisions. Current CRRT technology presents significant limitations with consequent lack of rigorous analysis of technical data and relevant feedback. From a quality assurance perspective, these limitations preclude any systematic assessment of prescription and delivery trends that may be adversely affecting clinical outcomes. A detailed assessment of current practice limitations is provided together with several possible ways to address such limitations by a new technical tool.

  3. Limits imposed by nonlinear coupling on rotation sensitivity of a semiconductor ring laser gyroscope.

    PubMed

    Khandelwal, Arpit; Syed, Azeemuddin; Nayak, Jagannath

    2016-07-01

    The sensitivity of a monolithically integrated semiconductor ring laser gyro is severely limited by the high value of the lock-in threshold. In this work, we calculate the lock-in threshold using perturbation theory and coupled mode theory analysis. It is shown that gyro sensitivity is limited to an input rotation rate of 108  deg / h due to nonlinear coupling between the countertraveling modes. This coupling arises due to the backreflection of modes from moving index gratings, induced by rotation. Lock-in threshold is directly proportional to the strength of nonlinear coupling and spatial overlap of the modes' energy densities with periodic index perturbations.

  4. Directional Surface Plasmon Coupled Luminescence for Analytical Sensing Applications: Which Metal, What Wavelength, What Observation Angle?

    PubMed Central

    Aslan, Kadir; Geddes, Chris D.

    2009-01-01

    The ability of luminescent species in the near-field to both induce and couple to surface plasmons has been known for many years, with highly directional emission from films (Surface Plasmon Coupled Luminescence, SPCL) facilitating the development of sensitive near-field assay sensing platforms, to name but just one application. Because of the near-field nature of the effect, only luminescent species (fluorescence, chemiluminescence and phosphorescence) within a few hundred nanometers from the surface play a role in coupling, which in terms of biosensing, provides for limited penetration into optically dense media, such as in whole blood. Another attractive feature is the highly polarized and angular dependent emission which allows both fixed angle and wavelength dependent emission angles to be realized at high polarization ratios. In this paper, a generic procedure based on theoretical Fresnel calculations, which outlines the step-by-step selection of an appropriate metal for SPCL applications is presented. It is also shown that 11 different metals have differing properties in different spectral regions and offer either fixed angle or wavelength-dependent angular shifts in emission. In addition, it is shown that both chemiluminescence and phosphorescence can also be observed in a highly directional manner similar to coupled fluorescence. PMID:19601619

  5. Analytical Kinematics and Coupled Vibrations Analysis of Mechanical System Operated by Solar Array Drive Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sattar, M.; Wei, C.; Jalali, A.; Sattar, R.

    2017-07-01

    To address the impact of solar array (SA) anomalies and vibrations on performance of precision space-based operations, it is important to complete its accurate jitter analysis. This work provides mathematical modelling scheme to approximate kinematics and coupled micro disturbance dynamics of rigid load supported and operated by solar array drive assembly (SADA). SADA employed in analysis provides a step wave excitation torque to activate the system. Analytical investigations into kinematics is accomplished by using generalized linear and Euler angle coordinates, applying multi-body dynamics concepts and transformations principles. Theoretical model is extended, to develop equations of motion (EoM), through energy method (Lagrange equation). The main emphasis is to research coupled frequency response by determining energies dissipated and observing dynamic behaviour of internal vibratory systems of SADA. The disturbance model captures discrete active harmonics of SADA, natural modes and vibration amplifications caused by interactions between active harmonics and structural modes of mechanical assembly. The proposed methodology can help to predict true micro disturbance nature of SADA operating rigid load. Moreover, performance outputs may be compared against actual mission requirements to assess precise spacecraft controller design to meet next space generation stringent accuracy goals.

  6. Analytical study of index-coupled herd behavior in financial markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, Yonatan; Shapira, Yoash; Schwartz, Moshe

    2016-12-01

    Herd behavior in financial markets had been investigated extensively in the past few decades. Scholars have argued that the behavioral tendency of traders and investors to follow the market trend, notably reflected in indices both on short and long time scales, is substantially affecting the overall market behavior. Research has also been devoted to revealing these behaviors and characterizing the market herd behavior. In this paper we present a simple herd behavior model for the dynamics of financial variables by introducing a simple coupling mechanism of stock returns to the index return, deriving analytic expressions for statistical properties of the returns. We found that several important phenomena in the stock market, namely the correlations between stock market returns and the exponential decay of short-term autocorrelations, are derived from our model. These phenomena have been given various explanations and theories, with herd market behavior being one of the leading. We conclude that the coupling mechanism, which essentially encapsulates the herd behavior, indeed creates correlation and autocorrelation. We also show that this introduces a time scale to the system, which is the characteristic time lag between a change in the index and its effect on the return of a stock.

  7. Analytical investigation of the spectra of coupled polaritons on double periodic metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kats, Alexandre V.; Nikitin, Alexey Y.

    2003-11-01

    The results of analytical and numerical investigation of the surface plasmon-polaritons (SPP)dispersion relation on double periodical high reflecting surfaces (two-dimensional photonic crystals)are presented. The formalism is developed for gratings formed by the modulation of either optical properties or the relief of the medium. The coupling between SPP existing on the non-modulated boundary leads to the mini-gaps arising at the Brillouin-zone boundaries. The dependence of the dispersion relation upon the parameters of the problem (amplitude of the modulation, an angle between the elementary translations,etc.) is calculated for different types of symmetry that corresponds to the coupling from two to six polaritons. The specific values of the parameters corresponding to existence of the standing polariton modes, vanishing of the polariton group velocity are found. The distribution of surface charges for corresponding polariton modes is presented. The ratio between the polariton dispersion relation and the light diffraction under the condition of the polariton excitation is discussed as well. The results obtained can be used to design the two-dimensional photonic crystals with specific and given properties.

  8. Reference limits for biochemical and hematological analytes of dairy cows one week before and one week after parturition.

    PubMed

    Quiroz-Rocha, Gerardo F; LeBlanc, Stephen J; Duffield, Todd F; Wood, Darren; Leslie, Ken E; Jacobs, Robert M

    2009-04-01

    Since dairy cows during the transition period have multiple endocrine and metabolic changes, it is necessary to determine the reference limits of laboratory analytes in normal transition cows. Reference limits for the weeks before and after calving were determined in dairy cows. Animals that had adverse clinical outcomes after calving and cows that were culled or had mastitis within the first 7 days after calving were excluded. All biochemical analytes (beta-hydroxybutyrate, fatty acids, glucose, cholesterol, urea, calcium, and phosphorus) were statistically different between precalving and postcalving groups. The hematological analytes were not significantly different except for eosinophils. The data from precalving and postcalving cows were significantly different from reference limits in a university-associated laboratory derived from early- and mid-lactation cows. Different reference limits for precalving and postcalving dairy cows should be determined for biochemical analytes to ensure appropriate interpretation of results.

  9. Reference limits for biochemical and hematological analytes of dairy cows one week before and one week after parturition

    PubMed Central

    Quiroz-Rocha, Gerardo F.; LeBlanc, Stephen J.; Duffield, Todd F.; Wood, Darren; Leslie, Ken E.; Jacobs, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    Since dairy cows during the transition period have multiple endocrine and metabolic changes, it is necessary to determine the reference limits of laboratory analytes in normal transition cows. Reference limits for the weeks before and after calving were determined in dairy cows. Animals that had adverse clinical outcomes after calving and cows that were culled or had mastitis within the first 7 days after calving were excluded. All biochemical analytes (β-hydroxybutyrate, fatty acids, glucose, cholesterol, urea, calcium, and phosphorus) were statistically different between precalving and postcalving groups. The hematological analytes were not significantly different except for eosinophils. The data from precalving and postcalving cows were significantly different from reference limits in a university-associated laboratory derived from early- and mid-lactation cows. Different reference limits for precalving and postcalving dairy cows should be determined for biochemical analytes to ensure appropriate interpretation of results. PMID:19436445

  10. Determination of the upper and lower limits of the mechanistic stoichiometry of incompletely coupled fluxes. Stoichiometry of incompletely coupled reactions.

    PubMed

    Beavis, A D; Lehninger, A L

    1986-07-15

    A rationale is formulated for the design of experiments to determine the upper and lower limits of the mechanistic stoichiometry of any two incompletely coupled fluxes J1 and J2. Incomplete coupling results when there is a branch at some point in the sequence of reactions or processes coupling the two fluxes. The upper limit of the mechanistic stoichiometry is given by the minimum value of dJ2/dJ1 obtained when the fluxes are systematically varied by changes in steps after the branch point. The lower limit is given by the maximum value of dJ2/dJ1 obtained when the fluxes are varied by changes in steps prior to the branch point. The rationale for determining these limits is developed from both a simple kinetic model and from a linear nonequilibrium thermodynamic treatment of coupled fluxes, using the mechanistic approach [Westerhoff, H. V. & van Dam, K. (1979) Curr. Top. Bioenerg. 9, 1-62]. The phenomenological stoichiometry, the flux ratio at level flow and the affinity ratio at static head of incompletely coupled fluxes are defined in terms of mechanistic conductances and their relationship to the mechanistic stoichiometry is discussed. From the rationale developed, experimental approaches to determine the mechanistic stoichiometry of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation are outlined. The principles employed do not require knowledge of the pathway or the rate of transmembrane leaks or slippage and may also be applied to analysis of the stoichiometry of other incompletely coupled systems, including vectorial H+/O and K+/O translocation coupled to mitochondrial electron transport.

  11. Results and limits in the 1-D analytical modeling for the asymmetric DG SOI MOSFET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobianu, O.; Glesner, M.

    2008-05-01

    This paper presents the results and the limits of 1-D analytical modeling of electrostatic potential in the low-doped p type silicon body of the asymmetric n-channel DG SOI MOSFET, where the contribution to the asymmetry comes only from p- and n-type doping of polysilicon used as the gate electrodes. Solving Poisson's equation with boundary conditions based on the continuity of normal electrical displacement at interfaces and the presence of a minimum electrostatic potential by using the Matlab code we have obtained a minimum potential with a slow variation in the central zone of silicon with the value pinned around 0.46 V, where the applied VGS voltage varies from 0.45 V to 0.95 V. The paper states clearly the validity domain of the analytical solution and the important effect of the localization of the minimum electrostatic potential value on the potential variation at interfaces as a function of the applied VGS voltage.

  12. Atom-dimer scattering length for fermions with different masses: Analytical study of limiting cases

    SciTech Connect

    Alzetto, F.; Leyronas, X.; Combescot, R.

    2010-12-15

    We consider the problem of obtaining the scattering length for a fermion colliding with a dimer, formed from a fermion identical to the incident one and another different fermion. This is done in the universal regime where the range of interactions is short enough that the scattering length a for nonidentical fermions is the only relevant quantity. This is the generalization to fermions with different masses of the problem solved long ago by Skorniakov and Ter-Martirosian for particles with equal masses. We solve this problem analytically in the two limiting cases where the mass of the solitary fermion is very large or very small compared to the mass of the two other identical fermions. This is done for both the value of the scattering length and the function entering the Skorniakov-Ter-Martirosian integral equation, for which simple explicit expressions are obtained.

  13. Limit on second class polar vector couplings in semileptonic weak interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Holstein, B.R.

    1984-02-01

    Although a great deal of experimental work has succeeded in limiting a possible second class axial coupling to about ten percent of the size of weak magnetism, published limits on the size of a possible second class polar vector current are one order of magnitude less sensitive. We summarize the present situation and demonstrate that muon capture provides the strictest present limit.

  14. Sensitivity and noise in GC-MS: Achieving low limits of detection for difficult analytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fialkov, Alexander B.; Steiner, Urs; Lehotay, Steven J.; Amirav, Aviv

    2007-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) instrument limit of detection (LOD) is typically listed by major vendors as that of octafluoronaphthalene (OFN). Most current GC-MS instruments can achieve LODs in the low femtogram range. However, GC-MS LODs for realistic analytes in actual samples are often a few orders of magnitude higher than OFN's. Users seldom encounter 1 pg LOD in the single ion monitoring mode in their applications. We define this detectability difference as the "OFN gap." In this paper, we demonstrate and discuss how the OFN gap can be significantly reduced by the use of GC-MS with supersonic molecular beams (SMB). Experimental results were obtained with a recently developed GC-MS with SMB named 1200-SMB, that is based on the conversion of the Varian 1200 system into a GC-MS-MS with SMB. With this 1200-SMB system, the LOD of all types of analytes, including OFN, in real samples is significantly improved through the combination of: (a) enhanced molecular ion; (b) elimination of vacuum background noise; (c) elimination of mass independent noise; (d) elimination of ion source peak tailing and degradation; (e) significantly increased range of thermally labile and low volatility compounds that are amenable for analysis through lower sample elution temperatures; (f) reduced column bleed and ghost peaks through sample elution at lower temperatures; (g) improved compatibility with large volume injections; and (h) reduced matrix interferences through the combination of enhanced molecular ion and MS-MS. As a result, the 1200-SMB LODs of common and/or difficult compounds are much closer to its OFN LOD, even in complex matrices. We crossed the <1 fg OFN LOD milestone to achieve the lowest LOD to date using GC-MS, but more importantly, we attained LOD of 2 fg for diazinon, a common pesticide analyte. In another example, we achieved an LOD of 10 fg for underivatized testosterone, which is not amenable in traditional GC-MS analysis, and conducted many analyses

  15. Analytic derivative couplings for spin-flip configuration interaction singles and spin-flip time-dependent density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xing; Herbert, John M.

    2014-08-14

    We revisit the calculation of analytic derivative couplings for configuration interaction singles (CIS), and derive and implement these couplings for its spin-flip variant for the first time. Our algorithm is closely related to the CIS analytic energy gradient algorithm and should be straightforward to implement in any quantum chemistry code that has CIS analytic energy gradients. The additional cost of evaluating the derivative couplings is small in comparison to the cost of evaluating the gradients for the two electronic states in question. Incorporation of an exchange-correlation term provides an ad hoc extension of this formalism to time-dependent density functional theory within the Tamm-Dancoff approximation, without the need to invoke quadratic response theory or evaluate third derivatives of the exchange-correlation functional. Application to several different conical intersections in ethylene demonstrates that minimum-energy crossing points along conical seams can be located at substantially reduced cost when analytic derivative couplings are employed, as compared to use of a branching-plane updating algorithm that does not require these couplings. Application to H{sub 3} near its D{sub 3h} geometry demonstrates that correct topology is obtained in the vicinity of a conical intersection involving a degenerate ground state.

  16. Analytic derivative couplings for spin-flip configuration interaction singles and spin-flip time-dependent density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xing; Herbert, John M

    2014-08-14

    We revisit the calculation of analytic derivative couplings for configuration interaction singles (CIS), and derive and implement these couplings for its spin-flip variant for the first time. Our algorithm is closely related to the CIS analytic energy gradient algorithm and should be straightforward to implement in any quantum chemistry code that has CIS analytic energy gradients. The additional cost of evaluating the derivative couplings is small in comparison to the cost of evaluating the gradients for the two electronic states in question. Incorporation of an exchange-correlation term provides an ad hoc extension of this formalism to time-dependent density functional theory within the Tamm-Dancoff approximation, without the need to invoke quadratic response theory or evaluate third derivatives of the exchange-correlation functional. Application to several different conical intersections in ethylene demonstrates that minimum-energy crossing points along conical seams can be located at substantially reduced cost when analytic derivative couplings are employed, as compared to use of a branching-plane updating algorithm that does not require these couplings. Application to H3 near its D(3h) geometry demonstrates that correct topology is obtained in the vicinity of a conical intersection involving a degenerate ground state.

  17. Study of uranium matrix interference on ten analytes using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazi, A. A.; Qamar, Sajid; Atta, M. A.

    1993-08-01

    Maximum allowable concentrations of 12 elements in uranium hexafluoride feed for enrichment to reactor grade material (about 3%), vary from 1 to 100 ppm ( μg/g). Using an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer, 51 lines of ten of these elements (B, Cr, Mo, P, Sb, Si, Ta, Ti, V and W) have been studied with a uranium matrix to investigate the matrix interference on the basis of signal to background (SBR), and background to background ratios (BBR). Detection limits and limits of quantitative determination (LQDs) were calculated for these elements in a uranium matrix using SBR and relative standard deviation of the background signal (RSD B) approach. In almost all cases, the uranium matrix interference reduces the SBRs to the extent that direct trace analysis is impossible. A uranium sample having known concentrations of impurities (around LQDs) was directly analysed with results that showed reasonable accuracy and precision.

  18. Comparison of limited measurements of the OTEC-1 plume with analytical-model predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Paddock, R.A.; Ditmars, J.D.

    1981-07-01

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) requires significant amounts of warm surface waters and cold deep waters for power production. Because these waters are returned to the ocean as effluents, their behavior may affect plant operation and impact the environment. The OTEC-1 facility tested 1-MWe heat exchangers aboard the vessel Ocean Energy Converter moored off the island of Hawaii. The warm and cold waters used by the OTEC-1 facility were combined prior to discharge from the vessel to create a mixed discharge condition. A limited field survey of the mixed discharge plume using fluorescent dye as a tracer was conducted on April 11, 1981, as part of the environmental studies at OTEC-1 coordinated by the Marine Sciences Group at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Results of that survey were compared with analytical model predictions of plume behavior. Although the predictions were in general agreement with the results of the plume survey, inherent limitations in the field measurements precluded complete description of the plume or detailed evaluation of the models.

  19. Probing subdiffraction limit separations with plasmon coupling microscopy: concepts and applications.

    PubMed

    Wu, Linxi; Reinhard, Björn M

    2014-06-07

    Due to their advantageous material properties, noble metal nanoparticles are versatile tools in biosensing and imaging. A characteristic feature of gold and silver nanoparticles is their ability to sustain localized surface plasmons that provide both large optical cross-sections and extraordinary photophysical stability. Plasmon coupling microscopy takes advantage of the beneficial optical properties and utilizes electromagnetic near-field coupling between individual noble metal nanoparticle labels to resolve subdiffraction limit separations in an all-optical fashion. This Tutorial provides an introduction into the physical concepts underlying distance dependent plasmon coupling, discusses potential experimental implementation of plasmon coupling microscopy, and reviews applications in the area of biosensing and imaging.

  20. Probing Subdiffraction Limit Separations with Plasmon Coupling Microscopy: Concepts and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Linxi

    2014-01-01

    Due to their advantageous materials properties, noble metal nanoparticles are versatile tools in biosensing and imaging. A characteristic feature of gold and silver nanoparticles is their ability to sustain localized surface plasmons that provide both large optical cross-sections and extraordinary photophysical stability. Plasmon Coupling Microscopy takes advantage of the beneficial optical properties and utilizes electromagnetic near-field coupling between individual noble metal nanoparticle labels to resolve subdiffraction limit separations in an all-optical fashion. This Tutorial provides an introduction into the physical concepts underlying distance dependent plasmon coupling, discusses potential experimental implementations of Plasmon Coupling Microscopy, and reviews applications in the area of biosensing and imaging. PMID:24390574

  1. Graphene oxide modification of plexciton states in the strong coupling limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedele, Stefano; Murphy, Antony; Pollard, Robert; Rice, James

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate that gold nanorod arrays support LSPR modes which coincide with Frankel excitons in an organic J-aggregate complex forming plexciton hybrid states when tuned to within the strong coupling limit. The addition of graphene oxide modifies the strong coupling resonance conditions and Rabi frequency. This demonstrates that the formation of exciton-plasmon plexciton states in the strong coupling limit can be modified and potentially controlled through the introduction of graphene oxide which can have implications for energy harvesting or biosensor device design.

  2. A technique coupling the analyte electrodeposition followed by in-situ stripping with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for analysis of samples with high NaCl contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čánský, Zdeněk; Rychlovský, Petr; Petrová, Zuzana; Matousek, J. P.

    2007-03-01

    A technique coupling the analyte electrodeposition followed by in-situ stripping with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry has been developed for determination of lead and cadmium in samples with high salt contents. To separate the analyte from the sample matrix, the analyte was in-situ quantitatively electrodeposited on a platinum sampling capillary serving as the cathode (sample volume, 20 μL). The spent electrolyte containing the sample matrix was then withdrawn, the capillary with the analyte deposited was washed with deionized water and the analyte was stripped into a chemically simple electrolyte (5 g/L NH 4H 2PO 4) by reversing the polarity of the electrodeposition circuit. Electrothermal atomization using a suitable optimized temperature program followed. A fully automated manifold was designed for this coupled technique and the appropriate control software was developed. The operating conditions for determination of Pb and Cd in samples with high contents of inorganic salts were optimized, the determination was characterized by principal analytical parameters and its applicability was verified on analyses of urine reference samples. The absolute limits of detection for lead and cadmium (3 σ criterion) in a sample containing 30 g/L NaCl were 8.5 pg and 2.3 pg, respectively (peak absorbance) and the RSD values amounted to 1.6% and 1.9% for lead (at the 40 ng mL - 1 level) and cadmium (at the 4.0 ng mL - 1 level), respectively. These values (and also the measuring sensitivity) are superior to the results attained in conventional electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric determination of Pb and Cd in pure solutions (5 g/L NH 4H 2PO 4). The sensitivity of the Pb and Cd determination is not affected by the NaCl concentration up to a value of 100 g/L, demonstrating an efficient matrix removal during the electrodeposition step.

  3. Analytic Couple Modeling Introducing Device Design Factor, Fin Factor, Thermal Diffusivity Factor, and Inductance Factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, Jon; Sehirlioglu, Alp; Dynys, Fred

    2014-01-01

    A set of convenient thermoelectric device solutions have been derived in order to capture a number of factors which are previously only resolved with numerical techniques. The concise conversion efficiency equations derived from governing equations provide intuitive and straight-forward design guidelines. These guidelines allow for better device design without requiring detailed numerical modeling. The analytical modeling accounts for factors such as i) variable temperature boundary conditions, ii) lateral heat transfer, iii) temperature variable material properties, and iv) transient operation. New dimensionless parameters, similar to the figure of merit, are introduced including the device design factor, fin factor, thermal diffusivity factor, and inductance factor. These new device factors allow for the straight-forward description of phenomenon generally only captured with numerical work otherwise. As an example a device design factor of 0.38, which accounts for thermal resistance of the hot and cold shoes, can be used to calculate a conversion efficiency of 2.28 while the ideal conversion efficiency based on figure of merit alone would be 6.15. Likewise an ideal couple with efficiency of 6.15 will be reduced to 5.33 when lateral heat is accounted for with a fin factor of 1.0.

  4. An Analytical Solution of Radiative Transfer in the Coupled Atmosphere-Ocean System with Rough Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Zhonghai; Charlock, Thomas P.; Rutledge, Ken; Knut Stamnes; Wang, Yingjian

    2006-01-01

    Using the efficient discrete-ordinate method, we present an analytical solution for radiative transfer in the coupled atmosphere-ocean system with rough air-water interface. The theoretical formulations of the radiative transfer equation and solution are described. The effects of surface roughness on radiation field in the atmosphere and ocean are studied and compared with measurements. The results show that ocean surface roughness has significant effects on the upwelling radiation in the atmosphere and the downwelling radiation in the ocean. As wind speed increases, the angular domain of sunglint broadens, the surface albedo decreases, and the transmission to ocean increases. The downward radiance field in the upper ocean is highly anisotropic, but this anisotropy decreases rapidly as surface wind increases and as depth in ocean increases. The effects of surface roughness on radiation also depend greatly on both wavelength and angle of incidence (i.e., solar elevation); these effects are significantly smaller throughout the spectrum at high sun. The model-observation discrepancies may indicate that the Cox-Munk surface roughness model is not sufficient for high wind conditions.

  5. A class of analytical solutions for multidimensional multispecies diffusive transport coupled with precipitation-dissolution reactions and porosity changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayek, Mohamed; Kosakowski, Georg; Jakob, Andreas; Churakov, Sergey V.

    2012-03-01

    One of the challenging problems in mathematical geosciences is the determination of analytical solutions of nonlinear partial differential equations describing transport processes in porous media. We are interested in diffusive transport coupled with precipitation-dissolution reactions. Several numerical computer codes that simulate such systems have been developed. Analytical solutions, if they exist, represent an important tool for verification of numerical solutions. We present a methodology for deriving such analytical solutions that are exact and explicit in space and time variables. They describe transport of several aqueous species coupled to precipitation and dissolution of a single mineral in one, two, and three dimensions. As an application, we consider explicit analytical solutions for systems containing one or two solute species that describe the evolution of solutes and solid concentrations as well as porosity. We use one of the proposed analytical solutions to test numerical solutions obtained from two conceptually different reactive transport codes. Both numerical implementations could be verified with the help of the analytical solutions and show good agreement in terms of spatial and temporal evolution of concentrations and porosities.

  6. Analytic evaluation of the nonadiabatic coupling vector between excited states using equation-of-motion coupled-cluster theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajti, Attila; Szalay, Péter G.

    2009-09-01

    Theory and implementation for evaluation of the nonadiabatic coupling vector between excited electronic states described by equation-of-motion excitation energy coupled-cluster singles and doubles (EOMEE-CCSD) method is presented. Problems arising from the non-Hermitian nature of the theory are discussed in detail. The performance of the new approach is demonstrated by the nice agreement of the nonadiabatic coupling curves for LiH obtained at the EOMEE-CCSD and MR-CISD levels. Using the tools developed we also present a computational procedure to evaluate the interstate coupling constants used in vibronic coupling theories. As an application of this part of the implementation we present simulation of the electronic absorption spectrum of the pyrazine molecule within the linear vibronic coupling model.

  7. Analytic evaluation of the nonadiabatic coupling vector between excited states using equation-of-motion coupled-cluster theory.

    PubMed

    Tajti, Attila; Szalay, Péter G

    2009-09-28

    Theory and implementation for evaluation of the nonadiabatic coupling vector between excited electronic states described by equation-of-motion excitation energy coupled-cluster singles and doubles (EOMEE-CCSD) method is presented. Problems arising from the non-Hermitian nature of the theory are discussed in detail. The performance of the new approach is demonstrated by the nice agreement of the nonadiabatic coupling curves for LiH obtained at the EOMEE-CCSD and MR-CISD levels. Using the tools developed we also present a computational procedure to evaluate the interstate coupling constants used in vibronic coupling theories. As an application of this part of the implementation we present simulation of the electronic absorption spectrum of the pyrazine molecule within the linear vibronic coupling model.

  8. Trace analysis of energetic materials via direct analyte-probed nanoextraction coupled to direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Clemons, Kristina; Dake, Jeffrey; Sisco, Edward; Verbeck, Guido F

    2013-09-10

    Direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry (DART-MS) has proven to be a useful forensic tool for the trace analysis of energetic materials. While other techniques for detecting trace amounts of explosives involve extraction, derivatization, solvent exchange, or sample clean-up, DART-MS requires none of these. Typical DART-MS analyses directly from a solid sample or from a swab have been quite successful; however, these methods may not always be an optimal sampling technique in a forensic setting. For example, if the sample were only located in an area which included a latent fingerprint of interest, direct DART-MS analysis or the use of a swab would almost certainly destroy the print. To avoid ruining such potentially invaluable evidence, another method has been developed which will leave the fingerprint virtually untouched. Direct analyte-probed nanoextraction coupled to nanospray ionization-mass spectrometry (DAPNe-NSI-MS) has demonstrated excellent sensitivity and repeatability in forensic analyses of trace amounts of illicit drugs from various types of surfaces. This technique employs a nanomanipulator in conjunction with bright-field microscopy to extract single particles from a surface of interest and has provided a limit of detection of 300 attograms for caffeine. Combining DAPNe with DART-MS provides another level of flexibility in forensic analysis, and has proven to be a sufficient detection method for trinitrotoluene (TNT), RDX, and 1-methylaminoanthraquinone (MAAQ).

  9. Development of a comprehensive analytical method for phosphate metabolites in plants by ion chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Yoko; Mitsuhashi, Naoto; Kokaji, Tetsuo; Miyakoda, Hidekazu; Mimura, Tetsuro

    2005-08-26

    This paper describes the development of a practical method for the analysis of phosphorus compounds with a focus on sugar phosphates from the model higher plant Arabidopsis thaliana by ion chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (IC-ESI-MS-MS). After the analytical separation, the potassium hydroxide eluent was converted to water with an anion suppressor allowing the effluent from the IC to be connected to the mass spectrometer directly. In the optimized method, 17 phosphorous compounds (adenosine diphosphate (ADP), fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, fructose 2,6-bisphosphate, fructose 6-phosphate, galactose 1-phosphate, glucose 1-phosphate, glucose 1,6-bisphosphate, glucose 6-phosphate, mannose 6-phosphate, phosphoenol pyrvate, 3-phosphoglyceric acid, ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate, ribulose 5-phosphate, ribose 5-phosphate, sucrose 6-phosophate and uridine 5'-diphosphate-glucose (UDPG)) were determined. The linearity of response for these phosphorous compounds over the concentration range of 0 and 10 microM was better than 0.9993 in all cases. The minimum detection limit was between 0.01 and 2.50 microM for a 25 microL injection, and recovery rates for standard addition to the sample were within the range from 93% to 110%.

  10. Analytical characterisation of a capacitively coupled plasma torch with a central tube electrode.

    PubMed

    Cordos, E A; Frentiu, T; Rusu, A M; Angel, S D; Fodor, A; Ponta, M

    1999-04-01

    A new type of radiofrequency capacitively coupled plasma torch is presented. The torch electrode geometry is coaxial with a tubular central electrode and one or two outer ring electrodes. The argon plasma is generated at 275 W radiofrequency power and 27.12 MHz and it has a very good stability and a low gas consumption of 0.4 l min(-1). The nebulized sample is introduced through the tubular electrode into the core of the annular shaped plasma thus achieving a better atomisation and a lower background. The limits of detection for 20 elements are in the range of ng ml(-1) and the dynamic range between 2.5 and 3.5. The best results are obtained with the torch with two outer ring electrodes.

  11. Analytical Kerr-Sen dilaton-axion black hole lensing in the weak deflection limit

    SciTech Connect

    Gyulchev, Galin N.; Yazadjiev, Stoytcho S.

    2010-01-15

    We investigate analytical gravitational lensing by charged, stationary, axially symmetric Kerr-Sen dilaton-axion black holes in the weak-deflection limit. Approximate solutions to the lightlike equations of motion are present up to and including third-order terms in M/b, a/b, and r{sub {alpha}/}b, where M is the black hole mass, a is the angular momentum, r{sub {alpha}=}Q{sup 2}/M, Q being the charge and b is the impact parameter of the light ray. We compute the positions of the two weak field images, the corresponding signed and absolute magnifications up to post-Newtonian order. It is shown that there are static post-Newtonian corrections to the signed magnification and their sum as well as to the critical curves, which are functions of the charge. The shift of the critical curves as a function of the lens angular momentum is found, and it is shown that they decrease slightly with the increase of the charge. The pointlike caustics drift away from the optical axis and do not depend on the charge. All of the lensing quantities are compared to particular cases as Schwarzschild and Kerr black holes as well as the Gibbons-Maeda-Garfinkle-Horowitz-Strominger black hole.

  12. Evaluation of the analytical capability of NIR femtosecond laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Takafumi; Kon, Yoshiaki

    2008-03-01

    A laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometric (LA-ICPMS) technique utilizing a titanium-sapphire (TiS) femtosecond laser (fs-laser) has been developed for elemental and isotopic analysis. The signal intensity profile, depth of the ablation pit and level of elemental fractionation were investigated in order to evaluate the analytical capability of the present fs-laser ablation-ICPMS technique. The signal intensity profile of (57)Fe, obtained from iron sulfide (FeS(2)), demonstrated that the resulting signal intensity of (57)Fe achieved by the fs-laser ablation was almost 4-times higher than that obtained by ArF excimer laser ablation under a similar energy fluence (5 J/cm(2)). In fs-laser ablation, there is no significant difference in a depth of the ablation pit between glass and zircon material, while in ArF laser ablation, the resulting crater depth on the zircon crystal was almost half the level than that obtained for glass material. Both the thermal-induced and particle size-related elemental fractionations, which have been thought to be main sources of analytical error in the LA-ICPMS analysis, were measured on a Harvard 91500 zircon crystal. The resulting fractionation indexes on the (206)Pb/(238)U (f(Pb/U)) and (238)U/(232)Th (f(U/Th)) ratios obtained by the present fs-laser ablation system were significantly smaller than those obtained by a conventional ArF excimer laser ablation system, demonstrative of smaller elemental fractionation. Using the present fs-laser ablation technique, the time profile of the signal intensity of (56)Fe and the isotopic ratios ((57)Fe/(54)Fe and (56)Fe/(54)Fe) have been measured on a natural pyrite (FeS(2)) sample. Repeatability in signal intensity of (56)Fe achieved by the fs-laser ablation system was significantly better than that obtained by ArF excimer laser ablation. Moreover, the resulting precision in (57)Fe/(54)Fe and (56)Fe/(54)Fe ratio measurements could be improved by the fs-laser ablation system

  13. Studies of WW and WZ production and limits on anomalous WWγ and WWZ couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramov, V.; Acharya, B. S.; Adam, I.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Ahn, S.; Akimov, V.; Alves, G. A.; Amos, N.; Anderson, E. W.; Baarmand, M. M.; Babintsev, V. V.; Babukhadia, L.; Baden, A.; Baldin, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bantly, J.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Belyaev, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bertram, I.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Biswas, N.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, P.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N. I.; Borcherding, F.; Boswell, C.; Brandt, A.; Breedon, R.; Briskin, G.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Burtovoi, V. S.; Butler, J. M.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, D.; Casilum, Z.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chen, W.; Choi, S.; Chopra, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Christenson, J. H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Cobau, W. G.; Cochran, J.; Coney, L.; Cooper, W. E.; Coppage, D.; Cretsinger, C.; Cullen-Vidal, D.; Cummings, M. A.; Cutts, D.; Dahl, O. I.; Davis, K.; de, K.; del Signore, K.; Demarteau, M.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; di Loreto, G.; Draper, P.; Ducros, Y.; Dudko, L. V.; Dugad, S. R.; Dyshkant, A.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fahland, T.; Fatyga, M. K.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Fisk, H. E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flattum, E.; Forden, G. E.; Fortner, M.; Frame, K. C.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, A. N.; Gartung, P.; Gavrilov, V.; Geld, T. L.; Genik, R. J.; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Gibbard, B.; Gobbi, B.; Gómez, B.; Gómez, G.; Goncharov, P. I.; González Solís, J. L.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L. T.; Gounder, K.; Goussiou, A.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P. D.; Green, D. R.; Green, J. A.; Greenlee, H.; Grinstein, S.; Grudberg, P.; Grünendahl, S.; Guglielmo, G.; Guida, J. A.; Guida, J. M.; Gupta, A.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hahn, K. S.; Hall, R. E.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, S.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, C.; Hebert, C.; Hedin, D.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hernández-Montoya, R.; Heuring, T.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hoftun, J. S.; Hsieh, F.; Hu, Tong; Ito, A. S.; Jerger, S. A.; Jesik, R.; Joffe-Minor, T.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jöstlein, H.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, C. K.; Kahn, S.; Karmanov, D.; Karmgard, D.; Kehoe, R.; Kim, S. K.; Klima, B.; Klopfenstein, C.; Ko, W.; Kohli, J. M.; Koltick, D.; Kostritskiy, A. V.; Kotcher, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovsky, E. A.; Krane, J.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kubantsev, M.; Kuleshov, S.; Kulik, Y.; Kunori, S.; Landry, F.; Landsberg, G.; Leflat, A.; Li, J.; Li, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Lucotte, A.; Lueking, L.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K.; Madaras, R. J.; Madden, R.; Magaña-Mendoza, L.; Manankov, V.; Mani, S.; Mao, H. S.; Markeloff, R.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M. I.; Martin, R. D.; Mauritz, K. M.; May, B.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McDonald, J.; McKibben, T.; McKinley, J.; McMahon, T.; Melanson, H. L.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Miao, C.; Miettinen, H.; Mincer, A.; Mishra, C. S.; Mokhov, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Mooney, P.; Mostafa, M.; da Motta, H.; Murphy, C.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Narayanan, A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nemethy, P.; Norman, D.; Oesch, L.; Oguri, V.; Oshima, N.; Owen, D.; Padley, P.; Para, A.; Parashar, N.; Park, Y. M.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Paterno, M.; Pawlik, B.; Perkins, J.; Peters, M.; Piegaia, R.; Piekarz, H.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Pope, B. G.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quintas, P. Z.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Ramirez, O.; Reay, N. W.; Reucroft, S.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rockwell, T.; Roco, M.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rutherfoord, J.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Sculli, J.; Shabalina, E.; Shaffer, C.; Shankar, H. C.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shpakov, D.; Shupe, M.; Sidwell, R. A.; Singh, H.; Singh, J. B.; Sirotenko, V.; Smith, E.; Smith, R. P.; Snihur, R.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Sosebee, M.; Sotnikova, N.; Souza, M.; Stanton, N. R.; Steinbrück, G.; Stephens, R. W.; Stevenson, M. L.; Stichelbaut, F.; Stoker, D.; Stolin, V.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Streets, K.; Strovink, M.; Sznajder, A.; Tamburello, P.; Tarazi, J.; Tartaglia, M.; Thomas, T. L.; Thompson, J.; Toback, D.; Trippe, T. G.; Tuts, P. M.; Vaniev, V.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Volkov, A. A.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, G.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; White, A.; White, J. T.; Wightman, J. A.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wirjawan, J. V.; Womersley, J.; Wood, D. R.; Yamada, R.; Yamin, P.; Yasuda, T.

    1999-10-01

    Evidence of anomalous WW and WZ production was sought in pp¯ collisions at a center-of-mass energy of s=1.8 TeV. The final states WW(WZ)-->μν jet jet+X, WZ-->μνee+X and WZ-->eνee+X were studied using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of approximately 90 pb-1. No evidence of anomalous diboson production was found. Limits were set on anomalous WWγ and WWZ couplings and were combined with our previous results. The combined 95% confidence level anomalous coupling limits for Λ=2 TeV are -0.25<=Δκ<=0.39 (λ=0) and -0.18<=λ<=0.19 (Δκ=0), assuming the WWγ couplings are equal to the WWZ couplings.

  14. On the continuous limits and integrability of a new coupled semidiscrete mKdV system

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Zuonong; Zhao Haiqiong; Wu Xiaonan

    2011-04-15

    In this paper, we aim to get more insight on the relation between semidiscrete coupled mKdV system (where ''semidiscrete'' means that the system is discrete in the space variable and continuous in time) and the coupled mKdV equations; to this purpose, we propose a new coupled semidiscrete mKdV system. The Lax pairs, the Darboux transformation, soliton solutions and conservation laws for the coupled semidiscrete mKdV system are given. The coupled mKdV theory including the Lax pairs, the Darboux transformation, soliton solutions, and conservation laws is recovered through the continuous limits of corresponding theory for the new semidiscrete mKdV system.

  15. An evaluation of time-limited psychodynamic psychotherapy for couples: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Balfour, Andrew; Lanman, Monica

    2012-09-01

    Psychodynamic Couple Psychotherapy has developed as a modality in only a few organizations in the public and voluntary sectors in this country. Varieties of couple therapy have evolved due to economic or other constraints, some more open-ended, others involving differing time limits or behavioural techniques. In this study, a time limit of 40 sessions was imposed on the Psychodynamic therapy to improve comparability with other therapeutic approaches. We examined work with 18 couples, employing various measures which, while not in the context of a full controlled trial, produced some interesting and indicative results. We aimed to investigate (1) the effects of time-limited psychodynamic couple psychotherapy, and (2) whether the measures used produce interesting results after 40 weeks. Within a normal clinical setting, measurements of individual and couple functioning would be taken at fixed points in the course of 40-week couple therapies, and analysed for evidence of significant change. Due to funding and clinical limitations within the setting, a baseline period before therapy started was used instead of a control group. Couples were invited to opt in to the study when applying to the agency for therapy. They were provided with 40 weekly sessions of couple therapy. Videotapes of sessions at beginning, middle, and end of the therapies were rated by independent observer, using the Personal Relatedness Profile (PRP) (Hobson, Patrick, & Valentine, 1998) adapted for couples (Lanman, Grier, & Evans, 2003), alongside two individual self-report measures, Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation (CORE) (Evans et al., 2000), and the Golombok Rust Inventory of Marital Satisfaction (GRIMS) (Rust, Bennun, Crow, & Golumbok, 1990). The couples showed improvement as rated both by therapists and observers (rating the videotaped sessions) on the PRP after 40 sessions. On the CORE measure, participants showed improvement at both 20 and 40 sessions. On the GRIMS measure of marital

  16. Influence of analytical bias and imprecision on the number of false positive results using Guideline-Driven Medical Decision Limits.

    PubMed

    Hyltoft Petersen, Per; Klee, George G

    2014-03-20

    Diagnostic decisions based on decision limits according to medical guidelines are different from the majority of clinical decisions due to the strict dichotomization of patients into diseased and non-diseased. Consequently, the influence of analytical performance is more critical than for other diagnostic decisions where much other information is included. The aim of this opinion paper is to investigate consequences of analytical quality and other circumstances for the outcome of "Guideline-Driven Medical Decision Limits". Effects of analytical bias and imprecision should be investigated separately and analytical quality specifications should be estimated accordingly. Use of sharp decision limits doesn't consider biological variation and effects of this variation are closely connected with the effects of analytical performance. Such relationships are investigated for the guidelines for HbA1c in diagnosis of diabetes and in risk of coronary heart disease based on serum cholesterol. The effects of a second sampling in diagnosis give dramatic reduction in the effects of analytical quality showing minimal influence of imprecision up to 3 to 5% for two independent samplings, whereas the reduction in bias is more moderate and a 2% increase in concentration doubles the percentage of false positive diagnoses, both for HbA1c and cholesterol. An alternative approach comes from the current application of guidelines for follow-up laboratory tests according to clinical procedure orders, e.g. frequency of parathyroid hormone requests as a function of serum calcium concentrations. Here, the specifications for bias can be evaluated from the functional increase in requests for increasing serum calcium concentrations. In consequence of the difficulties with biological variation and the practical utilization of concentration dependence of frequency of follow-up laboratory tests already in use, a kind of probability function for diagnosis as function of the key-analyte is proposed

  17. Analytic Expansion for Ground-State Wavefunction of Time-Dependent Strong-Coupling Schrödinger Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mei; Xie, Qiong-Tao

    2011-10-01

    The new method proposed recently by Friedberg, Lee, and Zhao is extended to obtain an analytic expansion for the ground-state wavefunction of a time-dependent strong-coupling Schrödinger equation. Two different types of the time-dependent harmonic oscillators are considered as examples for application of the time-dependent expansion. It is shown that the time-dependent strong-coupling expansion is applicable to the time-dependent harmonic oscillators with a slowly varying time-dependent parameter.

  18. Investigation and comparison of analytical, numerical, and experimentally measured coupling losses for multi-step index optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Aldabaldetreku, Gotzon; Durana, Gaizka; Zubia, Joseba; Arrue, Jon; Poisel, Hans; Losada, María

    2005-05-30

    The aim of the present paper is to provide a comprehensive analysis of the coupling losses in multi-step index (MSI) fibres. Their light power acceptance properties are investigated to obtain the corresponding analytical expressions taking into account longitudinal, transverse, and angular misalignments. For this purpose, a uniform power distribution is assumed. In addition, we perform several experimental measurements and computer simulations in order to calculate the coupling losses for two different MSI polymer optical fibres (MSI-POFs). These results serve us to validate the theoretical expressions we have obtained.

  19. Compiled data set of exact NOE distance limits, residual dipolar couplings and scalar couplings for the protein GB3.

    PubMed

    Vögeli, Beat; Olsson, Simon; Riek, Roland; Güntert, Peter

    2015-12-01

    We compiled an NMR data set consisting of exact nuclear Overhauser enhancement (eNOE) distance limits, residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) and scalar (J) couplings for GB3, which forms one of the largest and most diverse data set for structural characterization of a protein to date. All data have small experimental errors, which are carefully estimated. We use the data in the research article Vogeli et al., 2015, Complementarity and congruence between exact NOEs and traditional NMR probes for spatial decoding of protein dynamics, J. Struct. Biol., 191, 3, 306-317, doi:10.1016/j.jsb.2015.07.008 [1] for cross-validation in multiple-state structural ensemble calculation. We advocate this set to be an ideal test case for molecular dynamics simulations and structure calculations.

  20. Analytical model for tilting proprotor aircraft dynamics, including blade torsion and coupled bending modes, and conversion mode operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.

    1974-01-01

    An analytical model is developed for proprotor aircraft dynamics. The rotor model includes coupled flap-lag bending modes, and blade torsion degrees of freedom. The rotor aerodynamic model is generally valid for high and low inflow, and for axial and nonaxial flight. For the rotor support, a cantilever wing is considered; incorporation of a more general support with this rotor model will be a straight-forward matter.

  1. Information-Theoretic Limits on Broadband Multi-Antenna Systems in the Presence of Mutual Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taluja, Pawandeep Singh

    2011-12-01

    Multiple-input, multiple-output (MIMO) systems have received considerable attention over the last decade due to their ability to provide high throughputs and mitigate multipath fading effects. While most of these benefits are obtained for ideal arrays with large separation between the antennas, practical devices are often constrained in physical dimensions. With smaller inter-element spacings, signal correlation and mutual coupling between the antennas start to degrade the system performance, thereby limiting the deployment of a large number of antennas. Various studies have proposed transceiver designs based on optimal matching networks to compensate for this loss. However, such networks are considered impractical due to their multiport structure and sensitivity to the RF bandwidth of the system. In this dissertation, we investigate two aspects of compact transceiver design. First, we consider simpler architectures that exploit coupling between the antennas, and second, we establish information-theoretic limits of broadband communication systems with closely-spaced antennas. We begin with a receiver model of a diversity antenna selection system and propose novel strategies that make use of inactive elements by virtue of mutual coupling. We then examine the limits on the matching efficiency of a single antenna system using broadband matching theory. Next, we present an extension to this theory for coupled MIMO systems to elucidate the impact of coupling on the RF bandwidth of the system, and derive optimal transceiver designs. Lastly, we summarize the main findings of this dissertation and suggest open problems for future work.

  2. Natural Conception May Be an Acceptable Option in HIV-Serodiscordant Couples in Resource Limited Settings.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lijun; Wang, Fang; Liu, An; Xin, Ruolei; Zhu, Yunxia; Li, Jianwei; Shao, Ying; Ye, Jiangzhu; Chen, Danqing; Li, Zaicun

    2015-01-01

    Many HIV serodiscordant couples have a strong desire to have their own biological children. Natural conception may be the only choice in some resource limited settings but data about natural conception is limited. Here, we reported our findings of natural conception in HIV serodiscordant couples. Between January 2008 and June 2014, we retrospectively collected data on 91 HIV serodiscordant couples presenting to Beijing Youan Hospital with childbearing desires. HIV counseling, effective ART on HIV infected partners, pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) in negative female partners and timed intercourse were used to maximally reduce the risk of HIV transmission. Of the 91 HIV serodiscordant couples, 43 were positive in male partners and 48 were positive in female partners. There were 196 unprotected vaginal intercourses, 100 natural conception and 97 newborns. There were no cases of HIV seroconversion in uninfected sexual partners. Natural conception may be an acceptable option in HIV-serodiscordant couples in resource limited settings if HIV-positive individuals have undetectable viremia on HAART, combined with HIV counseling, PrEP, PEP and timed intercourse.

  3. Limits on anomalous WWγ and WWZ couplings from WW/WZ-->eνjj production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramov, V.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Ahn, S.; Akimov, V.; Alves, G. A.; Amos, N.; Anderson, E. W.; Baarmand, M. M.; Babintsev, V. V.; Babukhadia, L.; Baden, A.; Baldin, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bantly, J.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Belyaev, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bertram, I.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N. I.; Borcherding, F.; Brandt, A.; Breedon, R.; Briskin, G.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Buescher, V.; Burtovoi, V. S.; Butler, J. M.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, D.; Casilum, Z.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chen, L.-P.; Chen, W.; Cho, D. K.; Choi, S.; Chopra, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Christenson, J. H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Cobau, W. G.; Cochran, J.; Coney, L.; Connolly, B.; Cooper, W. E.; Coppage, D.; Cullen-Vidal, D.; Cummings, M. A.; Cutts, D.; Dahl, O. I.; Davis, K.; de, K.; del Signore, K.; Demarteau, M.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; di Loreto, G.; Draper, P.; Ducros, Y.; Dudko, L. V.; Dugad, S. R.; Dyshkant, A.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Estrada, J.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fahland, T.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Fisk, H. E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flattum, E.; Fleuret, F.; Fortner, M.; Frame, K. C.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, A. N.; Gartung, P.; Gavrilov, V.; Genik, R. J.; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Gibbard, B.; Gilmartin, R.; Ginther, G.; Gobbi, B.; Gómez, B.; Gómez, G.; Goncharov, P. I.; González Solís, J. L.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L. T.; Gounder, K.; Goussiou, A.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P. D.; Green, D. R.; Green, J. A.; Greenlee, H.; Grinstein, S.; Grudberg, P.; Grünendahl, S.; Guglielmo, G.; Gupta, A.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hahn, K. S.; Hall, R. E.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, S.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, C.; Hebert, C.; Hedin, D.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Heuring, T.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hoftun, J. S.; Hsieh, F.; Ito, A. S.; Jerger, S. A.; Jesik, R.; Joffe-Minor, T.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jöstlein, H.; Jun, S. Y.; Kahn, S.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Karmgard, D.; Kehoe, R.; Kim, S. K.; Klima, B.; Klopfenstein, C.; Knuteson, B.; Ko, W.; Kohli, J. M.; Koltick, D.; Kostritskiy, A. V.; Kotcher, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovsky, E. A.; Krane, J.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kubantsev, M.; Kuleshov, S.; Kulik, Y.; Kunori, S.; Landsberg, G.; Leflat, A.; Lehner, F.; Li, J.; Li, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Lu, J. G.; Lucotte, A.; Lueking, L.; Lundstedt, C.; Maciel, A. K.; Madaras, R. J.; Manankov, V.; Mani, S.; Mao, H. S.; Markeloff, R.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M. I.; Martin, R. D.; Mauritz, K. M.; May, B.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McDonald, J.; McKibben, T.; McMahon, T.; Melanson, H. L.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Miao, C.; Miettinen, H.; Mincer, A.; Mishra, C. S.; Mokhov, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Mostafa, M.; da Motta, H.; Nagy, E.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Negroni, S.; Norman, D.; Oesch, L.; Oguri, V.; Olivier, B.; Oshima, N.; Owen, D.; Padley, P.; Para, A.; Parashar, N.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Paterno, M.; Patwa, A.; Pawlik, B.; Perkins, J.; Peters, M.; Piegaia, R.; Piekarz, H.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Pope, B. G.; Popkov, E.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quintas, P. Z.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Reay, N. W.; Reucroft, S.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rockwell, T.; Roco, M.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rutherfoord, J.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Schwartzman, A.; Sculli, J.; Sen, N.; Shabalina, E.; Shankar, H. C.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shpakov, D.; Shupe, M.; Sidwell, R. A.; Singh, H.; Singh, J. B.; Sirotenko, V.; Slattery, P.; Smith, E.; Smith, R. P.; Snihur, R.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Song, X. F.; Sorín, V.; Sosebee, M.; Sotnikova, N.; Souza, M.; Stanton, N. R.; Steinbrück, G.; Stephens, R. W.; Stevenson, M. L.; Stichelbaut, F.; Stoker, D.; Stolin, V.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Streets, K.; Strovink, M.; Stutte, L.; Sznajder, A.; Tarazi, J.; Tartaglia, M.; Thomas, T. L.; Thompson, J.; Toback, D.; Trippe, T. G.; Turcot, A. S.; Tuts, P. M.; van Gemmeren, P.; Vaniev, V.; Varelas, N.; Volkov, A. A.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Wahl, H. D.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; White, A.; White, J. T.; Wightman, J. A.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wirjawan, J. V.; Womersley, J.; Wood, D. R.; Yamada, R.; Yamin, P.; Yasuda, T.; Yip, K.; Youssef, S.; Yu, J.; Yu, Y.; Zanabria, M.; Zheng, H.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, Z. H.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zutshi, V.; Zverev, E. G.; Zylberstejn, A.

    2000-09-01

    Limits on anomalous WWγ and WWZ couplings are presented from a study of WW/WZ-->eνjj events produced in pp¯ collisions at s=1.8 TeV. Results from the analysis of data collected using the DØ detector during the 1993-1995 Tevatron collider run at Fermilab are combined with those of an earlier study from the 1992-1993 run. A fit to the transverse momentum spectrum of the W boson yields direct limits on anomalous WWγ and WWZ couplings. With the assumption that the WWγ and WWZ couplings are equal, we obtain -0.34<λ<0.36 (with Δκ=0) and -0.43<Δκ<0.59 (with λ=0) at the 95% confidence level for a form-factor scale Λ=2.0 TeV.

  4. Sulfur Limits of Detection and Spectral Interference Corrections for DWPF Sludge Matrices by Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    JURGENSEN, AR

    2004-04-20

    The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) has been requested to perform sulfur (S) analysis on digested radioactive sludge and supernatant samples by Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectrometry (ICP-ES). The amount of sulfur is a concern because there are sulfur limits for the incoming feed, due to glass melter, process vessel, and off-gas line corrosion concerns and limited sulfur solubility in the glass wasteform. Recent changes in the washing strategy and stream additions change the amount of sulfur in the sludge. Increasing the sulfur concentration in the sludge challenges the current limits, so accurately determining the amount of sulfur present in a sludge batch is paramount. There are two important figures of merit that need to be evaluated for this analysis. The first is the detection limit (LOD), the smallest concentration of an element that can be detected with a defined certainty. This issue is important since the sulfur concentration in these process streams is l ow. Another critical analytical parameter is the effect on the S quantitation from potential spectral interferences. Spectral interferences are caused by background emission from plasma recombination events, scattered and stray light from the line emission of high concentration elements, or molecular band emission and from direct or tailing spectral line overlap from a matrix element. Any existing spectral overlaps could give false positives or increase the measured S concentrations in these matrices.

  5. Analytic derivative couplings between configuration-interaction-singles states with built-in electron-translation factors for translational invariance.

    PubMed

    Fatehi, Shervin; Alguire, Ethan; Shao, Yihan; Subotnik, Joseph E

    2011-12-21

    We present a method for analytically calculating the derivative couplings between a pair of configuration-interaction-singles (CIS) excited states obtained in an atom-centered basis. Our theory is exact and has been derived using two completely independent approaches: one inspired by the Hellmann-Feynman theorem and the other following from direct differentiation. (The former is new, while the latter is in the spirit of existing approaches in the literature.) Our expression for the derivative couplings incorporates all Pulay effects associated with the use of an atom-centered basis, and the computational cost is minimal, roughly comparable to that of a single CIS energy gradient. We have validated our method against CIS finite-difference results and have applied it to the lowest lying excited states of naphthalene; we find that naphthalene derivative couplings include Pulay contributions sufficient to have a qualitative effect. Going beyond standard problems in analytic gradient theory, we have also constructed a correction, based on perturbative electron-translation factors, for including electronic momentum and eliminating spurious components of the derivative couplings that break translational symmetry. This correction is general and can be applied to any level of electronic structure theory.

  6. Analytic gradients for Mukherjee's multireference coupled-cluster method using two-configurational self-consistent-field orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagau, Thomas-C.; Prochnow, Eric; Evangelista, Francesco A.; Gauss, Jürgen

    2010-04-01

    Analytic gradients for the state-specific multireference coupled-cluster method suggested by Mahapatra et al. [Mol. Phys. 94, 157 (1998)] (Mk-MRCC) are reported within the singles and doubles approximation using two-configurational self-consistent field (TCSCF) orbitals. The present implementation extends our previous work on Mk-MRCC gradients [E. Prochnow et al., J. Chem. Phys. 131, 064109 (2009)] which is based on restricted Hartree-Fock orbitals and consequently the main focus of the present paper is on the treatment of orbital relaxation at the TCSCF level using coupled-perturbed TCSCF theory. Geometry optimizations on m-arynes and nitrenes are presented to illustrate the influence of the orbitals on the computed equilibrium structures. The results are compared to those obtained at the single-reference coupled-cluster singles and doubles and at the Mk-MRCC singles and doubles level of theory when using restricted Hartree-Fock orbitals.

  7. Coupled harmonic oscillators for the measurement of a weak classical force at the standard quantum limit

    SciTech Connect

    Leaci, Paola; Ortolan, Antonello

    2007-12-15

    We discuss limitations in precision measurements of a weak classical force coupled to quantum mechanical systems, the so-called standard quantum limit (SQL). Among the several contexts exploiting the measurement of classical signals, gravitational wave (GW) detection is of paramount importance. In this framework, we analyze the quantum limited sensitivity of a free test mass, a quantum mechanical harmonic oscillator, two harmonic oscillators with equal masses and different resonance frequencies, and finally two mechanical oscillators with different masses and resonating at the same frequency. The sensitivity analysis of the latter two cases illustrates the potentialities of back-action reduction and classical impedance matching schemes, respectively. By examining coupled quantum oscillators as detectors of classical signals, we found a viable path to approach the SQL for planned or operating GW detectors, such as DUAL and AURIGA.

  8. Accurate analytical expressions for stripping voltammetry in the Henry adsorption limit.

    PubMed

    Calvente, Juan José; Andreu, Rafael

    2011-08-15

    A strategy is developed to derive accurate analytical expressions for low-coverage cathodic stripping voltammetry. The procedure relies on the observation that diffusion affects the location of simulated voltammetric waves but not their shape, provided that physisorption of the analyte is negligible. As a proof of the generality of the proposed approach and having in mind the stripping of thiols, analytical solutions are derived for the cathodic stripping of monomers, dimers, and a mixture of monomers and dimers, whose reliability is proved by their comparison with numerically simulated voltammograms. Application to the deposition and reductive desorption of mercaptoacetic acid at a mercury electrode demonstrates that these approximate solutions can be used to get insights into the interfacial organization of incipient films. For this particular system, a transition from monomeric to dimeric behavior is identified upon increasing the thiol surface concentration. Further generalization of the proposed methodology is achieved by deriving an approximate analytical solution for thin-layer anodic stripping voltammetry, which is satisfactorily compared to the existing summation series solution.

  9. Quantized Brans-Dicke theory: Phase transition, strong coupling limit, and general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Sridip

    2016-10-01

    We show that Friedmann-Robertson-Walker geometry with a flat spatial section in quantized (Wheeler deWitt quantization) Brans-Dicke (BD) theory reveals a rich phase structure owing to anomalous breaking of a classical symmetry, which maps the scale factor a ↦λ a for some constant λ . In the weak coupling (ω ) limit, the theory goes from a symmetry preserving phase to a broken phase. The existence of a phase boundary is an obstruction to another classical symmetry [see V. Faraoni, Phys. Rev. D 59, 084021 (1999).] (which relates two BD theories with different couplings) admitted by BD theory with scale invariant matter content, i.e., Tμμ=0 . Classically, this prohibits the BD theory from reducing to general relativity (GR) for scale invariant matter content. We show that a strong coupling limit of both BD and GR preserves the symmetry involving the scale factor. We also show that with scale invariant matter content (radiation, i.e., P =1/3 ρ ), the quantized BD theory does reduce to GR as ω →∞ , which is in sharp contrast to classical behavior. This is a first known illustration of a scenario where quantized BD theory provides an example of anomalous symmetry breaking and resulting binary phase structure. We make a conjecture regarding the strong coupling limit of the BD theory in a generic scenario.

  10. Limits on variations in protein backbone dynamics from precise measurements of scalar couplings.

    PubMed

    Vögeli, Beat; Ying, Jinfa; Grishaev, Alexander; Bax, Ad

    2007-08-01

    3JHN,Halpha, 3JHN,Cbeta, and 3JHN,C' couplings, all related to the backbone torsion angle phi, were measured for the third immunoglobulin binding domain of protein G, or GB3. Measurements were carried out using both previously published methods and novel sequences based on the multiple-quantum principle, which limit attenuation of experimental couplings caused by finite lifetimes of the spin states of passive spins. High reproducibility between the multiple-quantum and conventional approaches confirms the accuracy of the measurements. With few exceptions, close agreement between 3JHN,Halpha, 3JHN,Cbeta, and 3JHN,C' and values predicted by their respective Karplus equations is observed. For the three types of couplings, up to 20% better agreement is obtained when fitting the experimental couplings to a dynamic ensemble NMR structure, which has a phi angle root-mean-square spread of 9 +/- 4 degrees and was previously calculated on the basis of a very extensive set of residual dipolar couplings, than for any single static NMR structure. Fits of 3J couplings to a 1.1-A X-ray structure, with hydrogens added in idealized positions, are 40-90% worse. Approximately half of the improvement when fitting to the NMR structures relates to the amide proton deviating from its idealized, in-peptide-plane position, indicating that the positioning of hydrogens relative to the backbone atoms is one of the factors limiting the accuracy at which the backbone torsion angle phi can be extracted from 3J couplings. Introducing an additional, residue-specific variable for the amplitude of phi angle fluctuations does not yield a statistically significant improvement when fitting to a set of dynamic Karplus curves, pointing to a homogeneous behavior of these amplitudes.

  11. Coupling sample paths to the thermodynamic limit in Monte Carlo estimators with applications to gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levien, Ethan; Bressloff, Paul C.

    2017-10-01

    Many biochemical systems appearing in applications have a multiscale structure so that they converge to piecewise deterministic Markov processes in a thermodynamic limit. The statistics of the piecewise deterministic process can be obtained much more efficiently than those of the exact process. We explore the possibility of coupling sample paths of the exact model to the piecewise deterministic process in order to reduce the variance of their difference. We then apply this coupling to reduce the computational complexity of a Monte Carlo estimator. Motivated by the rigorous results in [1], we show how this method can be applied to realistic biological models with nontrivial scalings.

  12. [Rapid determination of 40 pesticide residues in fruits using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry coupled with analyte protectants to compensate for matrix effects].

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiuli; Zhao, Haixiang; Li, Li; Liu, Hanxia; Ren, Heling; Zhong, Weike

    2012-03-01

    A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method was developed for the determination of 40 pesticides in fruits. The effects of adding analyte protectants were evaluated for compensating matrix effects and the impacts on the quantitative results. A new combination of analyte protectants - Polyethylene Glycol 400 (PEG 400) and olive oil combination, which can be dissolved in acetone, was used for the quantitative analysis. The pesticides were extracted from fruit samples with acetonitrile and the extracts were cleaned up using micro-solid phase extraction. A GC-MS method in selective ion monitoring (SIM) mode coupled with large volume injection was finally developed. Using the newly developed analyte protectant combination of PEG 400 and olive oil, a good linearity was obtained in the range of 1 - 200 microg/L with coefficients better than 0.99, and the detection limits were between 0.1 - 3.0 microg/L. The mean recoveries of the pesticides were 75% - 119% with the relative standard deviation values less than 16.6% except for dimethoate. The performance of the analyte protectants was compared with matrix-matched standards calibration curves in terms of quantitative accuracy. The results showed that the method of adding analyte protectants can replace the matrix-matched standard calibration, and can also reduce the sample pretreatment. When the devel- oped method was used for the analysis of apple, peache, orange, banana, grape and other fruit samples, a good matrix compensation effect was achieved, and thus effectively reduced the bad effects of the water-soluble agents to the gas chromatographic column.

  13. An analytical and numerical study of the bifurcations in a system of linearly-coupled oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aronson, D. G.; Doedel, E. J.; Othmer, H. G.

    1987-03-01

    We study a two-parameter family of ordinary differential equations in R 4 that governs the dynamics of two coupled planar oscillators. Each oscillator has a unique periodic solution that is attracting and the uncoupled product system has a unique invariant torus that is attracting. The torus persists for weak coupling and contains two periodic solutions when the coupling is linear and conservative. One of these, in which the oscillators are synchronized, persists and is stable for all coupling strengths. The other, in which the oscillators are π radiant out of phase, disappears either in a Hopf bifurcation or when fixed points appear on the orbit at a critical ratio of the coupling strength to the frequency. The out-of-phase oscillation is unstable except on an open set in the frequency-coupling-strength plane which contains moderate values of both parameters. Furthermore, there are tori bifurcating from the out-of-phase solution, which means, according to the Arnol'd theory for Hopf bifurcations in maps, that there may be periodic solutions of arbitrarily large period and chaotic solutions as well. Numerous other bifurcations occur, and there are a number of higher codimension singularities. In a large region of the frequency-coupling parameter plane stable steady states coexist with stable periodic solutions.

  14. Coupling Semi-Analytic Models and N-Body Simulations: A New Way of Making Galaxies and Stellar Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCord, Krista M.; Bailin, Jeremy; Croton, Darren; Valluri, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Stellar halos give insight to the initial conditions that existed when a host galaxy first formed and provide details on disrupted satellites by looking at the different stellar populations. An algorithm that is computationally inexpensive compared to hydrodynamic simulations is necessary in order to theoretically study the structure and formation of galactic stellar halos in sufficient detail to probe substructure. Currently being developed is CoSANG (Coupled Semi-Analytic/N-body Galaxies), a new computational method that will couple pure dark matter N-body simulations with a semi-analytic model. At each timestep, results from the N-body simulation will feed into the semi-analytic code, whose results will feed back into the N-body code making the evolution of the dark matter and baryonic matter dependent on one another. CoSANG will require much less computing power than hydrodynamical simulations, and will enable a variety of galaxy formation science, including analysis of stellar populations, halo merging, satellite accretion, supermassive black holes, and indirect and direct dark matter detection.

  15. Three-dimensional analytic probabilities of coupled vibrational-rotational-translational energy transfer for DSMC modeling of nonequilibrium flows

    SciTech Connect

    Adamovich, Igor V.

    2014-04-15

    A three-dimensional, nonperturbative, semiclassical analytic model of vibrational energy transfer in collisions between a rotating diatomic molecule and an atom, and between two rotating diatomic molecules (Forced Harmonic Oscillator–Free Rotation model) has been extended to incorporate rotational relaxation and coupling between vibrational, translational, and rotational energy transfer. The model is based on analysis of semiclassical trajectories of rotating molecules interacting by a repulsive exponential atom-to-atom potential. The model predictions are compared with the results of three-dimensional close-coupled semiclassical trajectory calculations using the same potential energy surface. The comparison demonstrates good agreement between analytic and numerical probabilities of rotational and vibrational energy transfer processes, over a wide range of total collision energies, rotational energies, and impact parameter. The model predicts probabilities of single-quantum and multi-quantum vibrational-rotational transitions and is applicable up to very high collision energies and quantum numbers. Closed-form analytic expressions for these transition probabilities lend themselves to straightforward incorporation into DSMC nonequilibrium flow codes.

  16. Communication: spin densities within a unitary group based spin-adapted open-shell coupled-cluster theory: analytic evaluation of isotropic hyperfine-coupling constants for the combinatoric open-shell coupled-cluster scheme.

    PubMed

    Datta, Dipayan; Gauss, Jürgen

    2015-07-07

    We report analytical calculations of isotropic hyperfine-coupling constants in radicals using a spin-adapted open-shell coupled-cluster theory, namely, the unitary group based combinatoric open-shell coupled-cluster (COSCC) approach within the singles and doubles approximation. A scheme for the evaluation of the one-particle spin-density matrix required in these calculations is outlined within the spin-free formulation of the COSCC approach. In this scheme, the one-particle spin-density matrix for an open-shell state with spin S and MS = + S is expressed in terms of the one- and two-particle spin-free (charge) density matrices obtained from the Lagrangian formulation that is used for calculating the analytic first derivatives of the energy. Benchmark calculations are presented for NO, NCO, CH2CN, and two conjugated π-radicals, viz., allyl and 1-pyrrolyl in order to demonstrate the performance of the proposed scheme.

  17. Functional Limitations and Depressive Symptoms: A Longitudinal Analysis of Older Mexican American Couples

    PubMed Central

    Peek, M. Kristen

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. This study extends previous work on longitudinal patterns of spousal associations between functional impairments and psychological well-being in older couples in 3 important ways: By examining Mexican Americans, by considering a broader range of functional limitations, and by assessing the role of health status, social integration, and socioeconomic resources in these associations. Method. Drawing on data from 6 waves of the Hispanic Established Population for the Epidemiologic Study of the Elderly (1993–2007), we employed growth curve models to investigate the implications of the spouse’s functional limitations for the respondent’s age trajectories of depressive symptoms in older Mexican American couples. Models were run separately for husbands and wives. Results. The spouse’s functional limitations were associated with higher levels of depressive symptoms in the respondent. Personal resources can both ameliorate and intensify the adverse implications of the spouse’s functional limitations for the respondent’s depressive symptomatology. The interplay among these factors can vary by gender and the type of the spouse’s functional impairment. Discussion. Future studies would benefit by examining caregiving patterns in older couples, by distinguishing between different dimensions of social support available to them, and by considering changes in couples’ marital quality and social ties over time. PMID:24823692

  18. New coupling limits, dynamical symmetries and microscopic operators of IBM/TQM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paar, V.

    1985-01-01

    A new particle-core basis having approximate supersymmetric (SUSY) features associated with SU(3) dynamical symmetry is introduced. The SUSY and CO-SUSY limits of IBFM/PTQM appear for the characteristic intermediate coupling strengths Γ/δ=±(Γ/δ)SUSY. The CO-SUSY limit is a truncated analog of the Stephens rotation-aligned scheme. A paradox was found in the relation of the SUSY and truncated strong coupling (TSC) limits to the strong coupling limit of the Bohr-Mottelson model. Microscopic dyson and Holstein-Primakoff realizations of RPA collective quadrupole phonon operators are explicitly constructed. Employing this mapping procedure in conjunction with the leading RPA diagrams, various operators of IBM/TQM, IBFM/PTQM have been derived in the particle-hole channel: E2 operator, one-particle transfer operator, two-particle transfer operator etc. In addition to the standard terms, this derivation gives in the same diagrammatic order the additional terms also. A new model was introduced for the odd-odd nuclei in the framework of IBM/TQM. For the SU(3) core the truncated analog of Gallagher-Moszkowski bands appears as the approximate SUSY pattern, of the same intrinsic structure as in the odd-even system. The idea of boson-fermion dynamical symmetry and supersymmetry is extended to odd-odd nuclei and hypernuclei.

  19. An analytic model for limiting high density LH transition by the onset of the tertiary instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Raghvendra; Jhang, Hogun; Kaang, Helen H.

    2016-07-01

    We perform an analytic study of the tertiary instability driven by a strong excitation of zonal flows during high density low to high (LH) mode transition. The drift resistive ballooning mode is assumed to be a dominant edge turbulence driver. The analysis reproduces main qualitative features of early computational results [Rogers and Drake, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 4396 (1998); Guzdar et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 020701 (2007)], as well as new characteristics of the maximum edge density due to the onset of the tertiary instability. An analytical scaling indicates that the density scaling of LH transition power may be determined by the onset condition of the tertiary instability when the operating density approaches to the Greenwald density.

  20. An analytic model for limiting high density LH transition by the onset of the tertiary instability

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Raghvendra Jhang, Hogun; Kaang, Helen H.

    2016-07-15

    We perform an analytic study of the tertiary instability driven by a strong excitation of zonal flows during high density low to high (LH) mode transition. The drift resistive ballooning mode is assumed to be a dominant edge turbulence driver. The analysis reproduces main qualitative features of early computational results [Rogers and Drake, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 4396 (1998); Guzdar et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 020701 (2007)], as well as new characteristics of the maximum edge density due to the onset of the tertiary instability. An analytical scaling indicates that the density scaling of LH transition power may be determined by the onset condition of the tertiary instability when the operating density approaches to the Greenwald density.

  1. Approaching the strong coupling limit in single plasmonic nanorods interacting with J-aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zengin, Gülis; Johansson, Göran; Johansson, Peter; Antosiewicz, Tomasz J.; Käll, Mikael; Shegai, Timur

    2013-10-01

    We studied scattering and extinction of individual silver nanorods coupled to the J-aggregate form of the cyanine dye TDBC as a function of plasmon - exciton detuning. The measured single particle spectra exhibited a strongly suppressed scattering and extinction rate at wavelengths corresponding to the J-aggregate absorption band, signaling strong interaction between the localized surface plasmon of the metal core and the exciton of the surrounding molecular shell. In the context of strong coupling theory, the observed ``transparency dips'' correspond to an average vacuum Rabi splitting of the order of 100 meV, which approaches the plasmon dephasing rate and, thereby, the strong coupling limit for the smallest investigated particles. These findings could pave the way towards ultra-strong light-matter interaction on the nanoscale and active plasmonic devices operating at room temperature.

  2. Approaching the strong coupling limit in single plasmonic nanorods interacting with J-aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Zengin, Gülis; Johansson, Göran; Johansson, Peter; Antosiewicz, Tomasz J.; Käll, Mikael; Shegai, Timur

    2013-01-01

    We studied scattering and extinction of individual silver nanorods coupled to the J-aggregate form of the cyanine dye TDBC as a function of plasmon – exciton detuning. The measured single particle spectra exhibited a strongly suppressed scattering and extinction rate at wavelengths corresponding to the J-aggregate absorption band, signaling strong interaction between the localized surface plasmon of the metal core and the exciton of the surrounding molecular shell. In the context of strong coupling theory, the observed “transparency dips” correspond to an average vacuum Rabi splitting of the order of 100 meV, which approaches the plasmon dephasing rate and, thereby, the strong coupling limit for the smallest investigated particles. These findings could pave the way towards ultra-strong light-matter interaction on the nanoscale and active plasmonic devices operating at room temperature. PMID:24166360

  3. Analysis of a flux-coupling type superconductor fault current limiter with pancake coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shizhuo; Xia, Dong; Zhang, Zhifeng; Qiu, Qingquan; Zhang, Guomin

    2017-10-01

    The characteristics of a flux-coupling type superconductor fault current limiter (SFCL) with pancake coils are investigated in this paper. The conventional double-wound non-inductive pancake coil used in AC power systems has an inevitable defect in Voltage Sourced Converter Based High Voltage DC (VSC-HVDC) power systems. Due to its special structure, flashover would occur easily during the fault in high voltage environment. Considering the shortcomings of conventional resistive SFCLs with non-inductive coils, a novel flux-coupling type SFCL with pancake coils is carried out. The module connections of pancake coils are performed. The electromagnetic field and force analysis of the module are contrasted under different parameters. To ensure proper operation of the module, the impedance of the module under representative operating conditions is calculated. Finally, the feasibility of the flux-coupling type SFCL in VSC-HVDC power systems is discussed.

  4. Nonthermal fixed points in quantum field theory beyond the weak-coupling limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berges, Jürgen; Wallisch, Benjamin

    2017-02-01

    Quantum systems in extreme conditions can exhibit universal behavior far from equilibrium associated to nonthermal fixed points with a wide range of topical applications from early-Universe inflaton dynamics and heavy-ion collisions to strong quenches in ultracold quantum gases. So far, most studies have relied on a mapping of the quantum dynamics onto a classical-statistical theory that can be simulated on a computer. However, the mapping is based on a weak-coupling limit, while phenomenological applications often require moderate interaction strengths. We report on the observation of nonthermal fixed points directly in quantum field theory beyond the weak-coupling limit. For the example of a relativistic scalar O (N )-symmetric quantum field theory, we numerically solve the nonequilibrium dynamics employing a 1 /N expansion to next-to-leading order, which does not rely on a small coupling parameter. Starting from two different sets of overoccupied and of strong-field initial conditions, we find that nonthermal fixed points are not restricted to parameter ranges suitable for classical-statistical simulations but extend also to couplings of order 1. While the infrared behavior is found to be insensitive to the differences in the initial conditions, we demonstrate that transport phenomena to higher momenta depend on the presence or absence of a symmetry-breaking field expectation value.

  5. Strong Coupling Limits and Quantum Isomorphisms of the Gauged Thirring Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bufalo, R.; Casana, R.; Pimentel, B. M.

    We have studied the quantum equivalence in the respective strong coupling limits of the bidimensional gauged Thirring model with both Schwinger and Thirring models. It is achieved following a nonperturbative quantization of the gauged Thirring model into the path-integral approach. First, we have established the constraint structure via the Dirac's formalism for constrained systems and defined the correct vacuum-vacuum transition amplitude by using the Faddeev-Senjanovic method. Next, we have computed exactly the relevant Green's functions and shown the Ward-Takahashi identities. Afterwards, we have established the quantum isomorphisms between gauged Thirring model and both Schwinger and Thirring models by analyzing the respective Green's functions in the strong coupling limits, respectively. A special attention is necessary to establish the quantum isomorphism between the gauged Thirring model and the Thirring model.

  6. Limits on WWγ and WWZ couplings from W boson pair production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adam, I.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Ahn, S.; Aihara, H.; Alves, G. A.; Amos, N.; Anderson, E. W.; Astur, R.; Baarmand, M. M.; Babukhadia, L.; Baden, A.; Balamurali, V.; Balderston, J.; Baldin, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bantly, J.; Barberis, E.; Bartlett, J. F.; Belyaev, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bertram, I.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Biswas, N.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, P.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N. I.; Borcherding, F.; Boswell, C.; Brandt, A.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Burtovoi, V. S.; Butler, J. M.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, D.; Casilum, Z.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chang, S.-M.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chen, L.-P.; Chen, W.; Choi, S.; Chopra, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Christenson, J. H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Cobau, W. G.; Cochran, J.; Coney, L.; Cooper, W. E.; Cretsinger, C.; Cullen-Vidal, D.; Cummings, M. A.; Cutts, D.; Dahl, O. I.; Davis, K.; de, K.; del Signore, K.; Demarteau, M.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; di Loreto, G.; Draper, P.; Ducros, Y.; Dudko, L. V.; Dugad, S. R.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fahland, T.; Fatyga, M. K.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Finocchiaro, G.; Fisk, H. E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flattum, E.; Forden, G. E.; Fortner, M.; Frame, K. C.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, A. N.; Gartung, P.; Gavrilov, V.; Geld, T. L.; Genik, R. J.; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Gibbard, B.; Glenn, S.; Gobbi, B.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gómez, B.; Gómez, G.; Goncharov, P. I.; González Solís, J. L.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L. T.; Gounder, K.; Goussiou, A.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P. D.; Green, D. R.; Greenlee, H.; Grinstein, S.; Grudberg, P.; Grünendahl, S.; Guglielmo, G.; Guida, J. A.; Guida, J. M.; Gupta, A.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hahn, K. S.; Hall, R. E.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, S.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hedin, D.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hernández-Montoya, R.; Heuring, T.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hoftun, J. S.; Hsieh, F.; Hu, Ting; Hu, Tong; Huehn, T.; Ito, A. S.; James, E.; Jaques, J.; Jerger, S. A.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, J. Z.-Y.; Joffe-Minor, T.; Johari, H.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jöstlein, H.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, C. K.; Kahn, S.; Kalbfleisch, G.; Kang, J. S.; Karmanov, D.; Karmgard, D.; Kehoe, R.; Kelly, M. L.; Kim, C. L.; Kim, S. K.; Klima, B.; Klopfenstein, C.; Kohli, J. M.; Koltick, D.; Kostritskiy, A. V.; Kotcher, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kourlas, J.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovsky, E. A.; Krane, J.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kuleshov, S.; Kunori, S.; Landry, F.; Landsberg, G.; Lauer, B.; Leflat, A.; Li, H.; Li, J.; Li-Demarteau, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y. C.; Lobkowicz, F.; Loken, S. C.; Lökös, S.; Lueking, L.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K.; Madaras, R. J.; Madden, R.; Magaña-Mendoza, L.; Manankov, V.; Mani, S.; Mao, H. S.; Markeloff, R.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M. I.; Mauritz, K. M.; May, B.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McDonald, J.; McKibben, T.; McKinley, J.; McMahon, T.; Melanson, H. L.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Miettinen, H.; Mincer, A.; Mishra, C. S.; Mokhov, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Mooney, P.; da Motta, H.; Murphy, C.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Narayanan, A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nemethy, P.; Norman, D.; Oesch, L.; Oguri, V.; Oliveira, E.; Oltman, E.; Oshima, N.; Owen, D.; Padley, P.; Para, A.; Park, Y. M.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Paterno, M.; Pawlik, B.; Perkins, J.; Peters, M.; Piegaia, R.; Piekarz, H.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Pope, B. G.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quintas, P. Z.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Ramirez, O.; Rasmussen, L.; Reucroft, S.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rockwell, T.; Roco, M.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rutherfoord, J.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Sculli, J.; Shabalina, E.; Shaffer, C.; Shankar, H. C.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shupe, M.; Singh, H.; Singh, J. B.; Sirotenko, V.; Smart, W.; Smith, E.; Smith, R. P.; Snihur, R.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Sosebee, M.; Sotnikova, N.; Souza, M.; Spadafora, A. L.; Steinbrück, G.; Stephens, R. W.; Stevenson, M. L.; Stewart, D.; Stichelbaut, F.; Stoker, D.; Stolin, V.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Streets, K.; Strovink, M.; Sznajder, A.; Tamburello, P.; Tarazi, J.; Tartaglia, M.; Thomas, T. L.; Thompson, J.; Trippe, T. G.; Tuts, P. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vititoe, D.; Volkov, A. A.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, G.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; White, A.; White, J. T.; Wightman, J. A.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wirjawan, J. V.; Womersley, J.; Won, E.; Wood, D. R.; Xu, H.; Yamada, R.; Yamin, P.; Yang, J.; Yasuda, T.; Yepes, P.; Yoshikawa, C.; Youssef, S.; Yu, J.; Yu, Y.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, Z. H.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zverev, E. G.; Zylberstejn, A.

    1998-09-01

    The results of a search for W boson pair production in pp¯ collisions at s=1.8 TeV with subsequent decay to eμ, ee, and μμ channels are presented. Five candidate events are observed with an expected background of 3.1+/-0.4 events for an integrated luminosity of approximately 97 pb-1. Limits on the anomalous couplings are obtained from a maximum likelihood fit of the ET spectra of the leptons in the candidate events. Assuming identical WWγ and WWZ couplings, the 95% C.L. limits are -0.62<Δκ<0.77 (λ=0) and -0.53<λ <0.56 (Δκ=0) for a form factor scale Λ=1.5 TeV.

  7. Improving the Mass-Limited Performance of Routine NMR Probes using Coupled Coils.

    PubMed

    Marsden, Brian; Lim, Victor; Taber, Bob; Zens, Albert

    2016-07-01

    We report a method to convert, on demand, a general use dual-broadband probe to a high performance mass-limited probe for both high band and low band nuclei. This technology uses magnetic coupling of inductors to achieve this capability. The method offers a cost effective way of increasing the performance of routine NMR probes without having to change probes or increase the overall foot print of the spectrometer.

  8. Improving the Mass-Limited Performance of Routine NMR Probes using Coupled Coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsden, Brian; Lim, Victor; Taber, Bob; Zens, Albert

    2016-07-01

    We report a method to convert, on demand, a general use dual-broadband probe to a high performance mass-limited probe for both high band and low band nuclei. This technology uses magnetic coupling of inductors to achieve this capability. The method offers a cost effective way of increasing the performance of routine NMR probes without having to change probes or increase the overall foot print of the spectrometer.

  9. Chiral Lagrangians from lattice gauge theories in the strong coupling limit

    SciTech Connect

    Nagao, Taro; Nishigaki, Shinsuke M.

    2001-07-01

    We derive nonlinear {sigma} models (chiral Lagrangians) over symmetric spaces U(n), U(2n)/Sp(2n), and U(2n)/O(2n) from U(N), O(N), and Sp(2N) lattice gauge theories coupled to n flavors of staggered fermions, in the large-N and g{sup 2}N limit. To this end, we employ Zirnbauer{close_quote}s color-flavor transformation. We prove the spatial homogeneity of the vacuum configurations of mesons by explicitly solving the large-N saddle point equations, and thus establish these patterns of spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking in the above limit.

  10. Analytical performance of an r.f. capacitively coupled plasma for atomic emission with tip-ring electrode geometry.

    PubMed

    Frenţiu, T; Rusu, A M; Ponta, M; Anghel, S D; Cordos, E A

    1996-06-01

    A low to medium power radiofrequency capacitively coupled plasma is characterized as spectral source for atomic emission. The signal to background ratio and the limits of detection were determined for 19 elements as a function of the plasma torch geometry and the observation point.

  11. Analytical continuation in coupling constant method; application to the calculation of resonance energies and widths for organic molecules: Glycine, alanine and valine and dimer of formic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papp, P.; Matejčík, Š.; Mach, P.; Urban, J.; Paidarová, I.; Horáček, J.

    2013-06-01

    The method of analytic continuation in the coupling constant (ACCC) in combination with use of the statistical Padé approximation is applied to the determination of resonance energy and width of some amino acids and formic acid dimer. Standard quantum chemistry codes provide accurate data which can be used for analytic continuation in the coupling constant to obtain the resonance energy and width of organic molecules with a good accuracy. The obtained results are compared with the existing experimental ones.

  12. Calculation of S-matrix poles by means of analytic continuation in the coupling constant: Application to the 2Πg state of N2-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horáček, J.; Mach, P.; Urban, J.

    2010-09-01

    The method of analytic continuation in the coupling constant in combination with use of the statistical Padé approximation is applied to the determination of resonance energy and width of the 2Πg state of N2-. It is shown that standard quantum chemistry codes provide accurate data which can be used for analytic continuation in the coupling constant, and the resonance energy and width can be inferred with an accuracy comparable to other more elaborate methods.

  13. Heat transfer from earth-coupled heat exchangers-Experimental and analytical results

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, J.A.; Vitta, P.K.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental heat transfer results obtained with tubular heat transfer coils buried in soil are presented along with a finite difference simulation model that predicts the heat transfer to or from the buried pipes and the temperature distribution in the soil surrounding the buried pipes. The results were obtained with two different earth-coupled coils. Each coil was fabricated from 2.2 in. (5.6 cm) ID nominal 2 in. diameter cast iron pipe. The length of the heat exchanger for each earth-coupled system was 90 ft. (27.4 m). The earth-coupled coils were buried at a depth of 2.75 ft. (0.84 m) below the surface of the earth. The experimental data cover a time span of seven months and represent operation of the earth-coupled coils at various heat rates. Some of the prime quantities measured on a continuous basis are the earth's temperature at several locations in the vicinity of the buried coils, the far earth temperature, the solar insolation, moisture content of the soil, and the heat transferred to or from the buried coils to the surrounding soil. The finite difference model tracks the temperature distribution in the earth surrounding the coils on a continuous basis and predicts the earth's temperature at many locations adjacent to the earth-coupled coil with a maximum error of 4/sup 0/F (2.2/sup 0/C) during the seven month test. As parameters, the finite difference model included the moisture content of the soil, convection at the surface of the earth, emissivity of the soil, radiation exchange at the air-soil interface, as well as all of the pertinent parameters related to the flow of the heat transfer fluid through the buried pipes. The results presented, both experimental and simulated, have direct application in the design of earth-coupled water-source heat pump systems.

  14. Authentication of Kalix (N.E. Sweden) vendace caviar using inductively coupled plasma-based analytical techniques: evaluation of different approaches.

    PubMed

    Rodushkin, I; Bergman, T; Douglas, G; Engström, E; Sörlin, D; Baxter, D C

    2007-02-05

    Different analytical approaches for origin differentiation between vendace and whitefish caviars from brackish- and freshwaters were tested using inductively coupled plasma double focusing sector field mass spectrometry (ICP-SFMS) and multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS). These approaches involve identifying differences in elemental concentrations or sample-specific isotopic composition (Sr and Os) variations. Concentrations of 72 elements were determined by ICP-SFMS following microwave-assisted digestion in vendace and whitefish caviar samples from Sweden (from both brackish and freshwater), Finland and USA, as well as in unprocessed vendace roe and salt used in caviar production. This data set allows identification of elements whose contents in caviar can be affected by salt addition as well as by contamination during production and packaging. Long-term method reproducibility was assessed for all analytes based on replicate caviar preparations/analyses and variations in element concentrations in caviar from different harvests were evaluated. The greatest utility for differentiation was demonstrated for elements with varying concentrations between brackish and freshwaters (e.g. As, Br, Sr). Elemental ratios, specifically Sr/Ca, Sr/Mg and Sr/Ba, are especially useful for authentication of vendace caviar processed from brackish water roe, due to the significant differences between caviar from different sources, limited between-harvest variations and relatively high concentrations in samples, allowing precise determination by modern analytical instrumentation. Variations in the 87Sr/86Sr ratio for vendace caviar from different harvests (on the order of 0.05-0.1%) is at least 10-fold less than differences between caviar processed from brackish and freshwater roe. Hence, Sr isotope ratio measurements (either by ICP-SFMS or by MC-ICP-MS) have great potential for origin differentiation. On the contrary, it was impossible to

  15. An analytical model for inductively coupled implantable biomedical devices with ferrite rods.

    PubMed

    Theilmann, P T; Asbeck, P M

    2009-02-01

    Using approximations applicable to near field coupled implants simplified expressions for the complex mutual inductance of coaxial aligned coils with and without a cylindrical ferrite rod are derived. Experimental results for ferrite rods of various sizes and permeabilities are presented to verify the accuracy of this expression. An equivalent circuit model for the inductive link between an implant and power coil is then presented and used to investigate how ferrite size, permeability and loss affect the power available to the implant device. Enhancements in coupling provided by high frequency, low permeability nickel zinc rods are compared with low frequency high permeability manganese zinc rods.

  16. Analytical stability and simulation response study for a coupled two-body system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, K. M.; Roberts, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    An analytical stability study and a digital simulation response study of two connected rigid bodies are documented. Relative rotation of the bodies at the connection is allowed, thereby providing a model suitable for studying system stability and response during a soft-dock regime. Provisions are made of a docking port axes alignment torque and a despin torque capability for encountering spinning payloads. Although the stability analysis is based on linearized equations, the digital simulation is based on nonlinear models.

  17. Analytical solution of a stochastic model of risk spreading with global coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Satoru; Yoshimura, Jin

    2013-11-01

    We study a stochastic matrix model to understand the mechanics of risk spreading (or bet hedging) by dispersion. Up to now, this model has been mostly dealt with numerically, except for the well-mixed case. Here, we present an analytical result that shows that optimal dispersion leads to Zipf's law. Moreover, we found that the arithmetic ensemble average of the total growth rate converges to the geometric one, because the sample size is finite.

  18. Analytical and Numerical Evaluation of Limit States of MSE Wall Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drusa, Marián; Vlček, Jozef; Holičková, Martina; Kais, Ladislav

    2016-12-01

    Simplification of the design of Mechanically Stabilized Earth wall structures (MSE wall or MSEW) is now an important factor that helps us not only to save a time and costs, but also to achieve the desired results more reliably. It is quite common way in practice, that the designer of a section of motorway or railway line gives order for design to a supplier of geosynthetics materials. However, supplier company has experience and skills, but a general designer does not review the safety level of design and its efficiency, and is simply incorporating into the overall design of the construction project. Actually, large number of analytical computational methods for analysis and design of MSE walls or similar structures are known. The problem of these analytical methods is the verification of deformations and global stability of structure. The article aims to clarify two methods of calculating the internal stability of MSE wall and their comparison with FEM numerical model. Comparison of design approaches allows us to draft an effective retaining wall and tells us about the appropriateness of using a reinforcing element.

  19. Analytical steady-state solutions for water-limited cropping systems using saline irrigation water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skaggs, T. H.; Anderson, R. G.; Corwin, D. L.; Suarez, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    Due to the diminishing availability of good quality water for irrigation, it is increasingly important that irrigation and salinity management tools be able to target submaximal crop yields and support the use of marginal quality waters. In this work, we present a steady-state irrigated systems modeling framework that accounts for reduced plant water uptake due to root zone salinity. Two explicit, closed-form analytical solutions for the root zone solute concentration profile are obtained, corresponding to two alternative functional forms of the uptake reduction function. The solutions express a general relationship between irrigation water salinity, irrigation rate, crop salt tolerance, crop transpiration, and (using standard approximations) crop yield. Example applications are illustrated, including the calculation of irrigation requirements for obtaining targeted submaximal yields, and the generation of crop-water production functions for varying irrigation waters, irrigation rates, and crops. Model predictions are shown to be mostly consistent with existing models and available experimental data. Yet the new solutions possess advantages over available alternatives, including: (i) the solutions were derived from a complete physical-mathematical description of the system, rather than based on an ad hoc formulation; (ii) the analytical solutions are explicit and can be evaluated without iterative techniques; (iii) the solutions permit consideration of two common functional forms of salinity induced reductions in crop water uptake, rather than being tied to one particular representation; and (iv) the utilized modeling framework is compatible with leading transient-state numerical models.

  20. Bose—Einstein Condensation in Strong-Coupling Quark Color Superconductor near Flavor SU(3) Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Ren, Chun-Fu; Zhang, Yi

    2011-06-01

    Near the flavor SU(3) limit, we propose an analytical description for color-flavor-locked-type Bardeen—Cooper—Schrieffer (BCS) phase in the Nambu Jona—Lasinio (NJL) model. The diquark behaviors in light-flavor and strange-flavor-involved channels and Bose—Einstein condensation (BEC) of bound diquark states are studied. When the attractive interaction between quarks is strong enough, a BCS-BEC crossover is predicted in the environment with color-flavor-locked pairing pattern. The resulting Bose—Einstein condensed phase is found to be an intergrade phase before the emergence of the previous-predicted BEC phase in two-flavor quark superconductor.

  1. Experimental and analytical study of close-coupled ventral nozzles for ASTOVL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcardle, Jack G.; Smith, C. Frederic

    1990-01-01

    Flow in a generic ventral nozzle system was studied experimentally and analytically with a block version of the PARC3D computational fluid dynamics program (a full Navier-Stokes equation solver) in order to evaluate the program's ability to predict system performance and internal flow patterns. For the experimental work a one-third-size model tailpipe with a single large rectangular ventral nozzle mounted normal to the tailpipe axis was tested with unheated air at steady-state pressure ratios up to 4.0. The end of the tailpipe was closed to simulate a blocked exhaust nozzle. Measurements showed about 5 1/2 percent flow-turning loss, reasonable nozzle performance coefficients, and a significant aftward axial component of thrust due to flow turning loss, reasonable nozzle performance coefficients, and a significant aftward axial component of thrust due to flow turning more than 90 deg. Flow behavior into and through the ventral duct is discussed and illustrated with paint streak flow visualization photographs. For the analytical work the same ventral system configuration was modeled with two computational grids to evaluate the effect of grid density. Both grids gave good results. The finer-grid solution produced more detailed flow patterns and predicted performance parameters, such as thrust and discharge coefficient, within 1 percent of the measured values. PARC3D flow visualization images are shown for comparison with the paint streak photographs. Modeling and computational issues encountered in the analytical work are discussed.

  2. Analytic derivative couplings in time-dependent density functional theory: Quadratic response theory versus pseudo-wavefunction approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xing; Herbert, John M.

    2015-02-01

    We revisit the formalism for analytic derivative couplings between excited states in time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). We derive and implement these couplings using quadratic response theory, then numerically compare this response-theory formulation to couplings implemented previously based on a pseudo-wavefunction formalism and direct differentiation of the Kohn-Sham determinant. Numerical results, including comparison to full configuration interaction calculations, suggest that the two approaches perform equally well for many molecular systems, provided that the underlying DFT method affords accurate potential energy surfaces. The response contributions are found to be important for certain systems with high symmetry, but can be calculated with only a moderate increase in computational cost beyond what is required for the pseudo-wavefunction approach. In the case of spin-flip TDDFT, we provide a formal proof that the derivative couplings obtained using response theory are identical to those obtained from the pseudo-wavefunction formulation, which validates our previous implementation based on the latter formalism.

  3. Analytic derivative couplings in time-dependent density functional theory: Quadratic response theory versus pseudo-wavefunction approach.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xing; Herbert, John M

    2015-02-14

    We revisit the formalism for analytic derivative couplings between excited states in time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). We derive and implement these couplings using quadratic response theory, then numerically compare this response-theory formulation to couplings implemented previously based on a pseudo-wavefunction formalism and direct differentiation of the Kohn-Sham determinant. Numerical results, including comparison to full configuration interaction calculations, suggest that the two approaches perform equally well for many molecular systems, provided that the underlying DFT method affords accurate potential energy surfaces. The response contributions are found to be important for certain systems with high symmetry, but can be calculated with only a moderate increase in computational cost beyond what is required for the pseudo-wavefunction approach. In the case of spin-flip TDDFT, we provide a formal proof that the derivative couplings obtained using response theory are identical to those obtained from the pseudo-wavefunction formulation, which validates our previous implementation based on the latter formalism.

  4. Analytic derivative couplings in time-dependent density functional theory: Quadratic response theory versus pseudo-wavefunction approach

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xing; Herbert, John M.

    2015-02-14

    We revisit the formalism for analytic derivative couplings between excited states in time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). We derive and implement these couplings using quadratic response theory, then numerically compare this response-theory formulation to couplings implemented previously based on a pseudo-wavefunction formalism and direct differentiation of the Kohn-Sham determinant. Numerical results, including comparison to full configuration interaction calculations, suggest that the two approaches perform equally well for many molecular systems, provided that the underlying DFT method affords accurate potential energy surfaces. The response contributions are found to be important for certain systems with high symmetry, but can be calculated with only a moderate increase in computational cost beyond what is required for the pseudo-wavefunction approach. In the case of spin-flip TDDFT, we provide a formal proof that the derivative couplings obtained using response theory are identical to those obtained from the pseudo-wavefunction formulation, which validates our previous implementation based on the latter formalism.

  5. Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Analytic Formulation for the Evaluation of Spline Couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Y.; Keller, J.; Errichello, R.; Halse, C.

    2013-12-01

    Gearboxes in wind turbines have not been achieving their expected design life; however, they commonly meet and exceed the design criteria specified in current standards in the gear, bearing, and wind turbine industry as well as third-party certification criteria. The cost of gearbox replacements and rebuilds, as well as the down time associated with these failures, has elevated the cost of wind energy. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) was established by the U.S. Department of Energy in 2006; its key goal is to understand the root causes of premature gearbox failures and improve their reliability using a combined approach of dynamometer testing, field testing, and modeling. As part of the GRC program, this paper investigates the design of the spline coupling often used in modern wind turbine gearboxes to connect the planetary and helical gear stages. Aside from transmitting the driving torque, another common function of the spline coupling is to allow the sun to float between the planets. The amount the sun can float is determined by the spline design and the sun shaft flexibility subject to the operational loads. Current standards address spline coupling design requirements in varying detail. This report provides additional insight beyond these current standards to quickly evaluate spline coupling designs.

  6. Simulation of population response to ionizing radiation in an ecosystem with a limiting resource--Model and analytical solutions.

    PubMed

    Sazykina, Tatiana G; Kryshev, Alexander I

    2016-01-01

    A dynamic mathematical model is formulated, predicting the development of radiation effects in a generic animal population, inhabiting an elemental ecosystem 'population-limiting resource'. Differential equations of the model describe the dynamic responses to radiation damage of the following population characteristics: gross biomass; intrinsic fractions of healthy and reversibly damaged tissues in biomass; intrinsic concentrations of the self-repairing pool and the growth factor; and amount of the limiting resource available in the environment. Analytical formulae are found for the steady states of model variables as non-linear functions of the dose rate of chronic radiation exposure. Analytical solutions make it possible to predict the expected severity of radiation effects in a model ecosystem, including such endpoints as morbidity, mortality, life shortening, biosynthesis, and population biomass. Model parameters are selected from species data on lifespan, physiological growth and mortality rates, and individual radiosensitivity. Thresholds for population extinction can be analytically calculated for different animal species, examples are provided for generic mice and wolf populations. The ecosystem model demonstrates a compensatory effect of the environment on the development of radiation effects in wildlife. The model can be employed to construct a preliminary scale 'radiation exposure-population effects' for different animal species; species can be identified, which are vulnerable at a population level to chronic radiation exposure.

  7. [Interest and limits of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for urinary diagnosis of radionuclide internal contamination].

    PubMed

    Lecompte, Yannick; Bohand, Sandra; Laroche, Pierre; Cazoulat, Alain

    2013-01-01

    After a review of radiometric reference methods used in radiotoxicology, analytical performance of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for the workplace urinary diagnosis of internal contamination by radionuclides are evaluated. A literature review (covering the period from 2000 to 2012) is performed to identify the different applications of ICP-MS in radiotoxicology for urine analysis. The limits of detection are compared to the recommendations of the International commission on radiological protection (ICRP 78: "Individual monitoring for internal exposure of workers"). Except one publication describing the determination of strontium-90 (β emitter), all methods using ICP-MS reported in the literature concern actinides (α emitters). For radionuclides with a radioactive period higher than 10(4) years, limits of detection are most often in compliance with ICRP publication 78 and frequently lower than radiometric methods. ICP-MS allows the specific determination of plutonium-239 + 240 isotopes which cannot be discriminated by α spectrometry. High resolution ICP-MS can also measure uranium isotopic ratios in urine for total uranium concentrations lower than 20 ng/L. The interest of ICP-MS in radiotoxicology concerns essentially the urinary measurement of long radioactive period actinides, particularly for uranium isotope ratio determination and 239 and 240 plutonium isotopes discrimination. Radiometric methods remain the most efficient for the majority of other radionuclides.

  8. Complete active space configuration interaction from state-averaged configuration interaction singles natural orbitals: Analytic first derivatives and derivative coupling vectors.

    PubMed

    Fales, B Scott; Shu, Yinan; Levine, Benjamin G; Hohenstein, Edward G

    2017-09-07

    A new complete active space configuration interaction (CASCI) method was recently introduced that uses state-averaged natural orbitals from the configuration interaction singles method (configuration interaction singles natural orbital CASCI, CISNO-CASCI). This method has been shown to perform as well or better than state-averaged complete active space self-consistent field for a variety of systems. However, further development and testing of this method have been limited by the lack of available analytic first derivatives of the CISNO-CASCI energy as well as the derivative coupling between electronic states. In the present work, we present a Lagrangian-based formulation of these derivatives as well as a highly efficient implementation of the resulting equations accelerated with graphical processing units. We demonstrate that the CISNO-CASCI method is practical for dynamical simulations of photochemical processes in molecular systems containing hundreds of atoms.

  9. Complete active space configuration interaction from state-averaged configuration interaction singles natural orbitals: Analytic first derivatives and derivative coupling vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fales, B. Scott; Shu, Yinan; Levine, Benjamin G.; Hohenstein, Edward G.

    2017-09-01

    A new complete active space configuration interaction (CASCI) method was recently introduced that uses state-averaged natural orbitals from the configuration interaction singles method (configuration interaction singles natural orbital CASCI, CISNO-CASCI). This method has been shown to perform as well or better than state-averaged complete active space self-consistent field for a variety of systems. However, further development and testing of this method have been limited by the lack of available analytic first derivatives of the CISNO-CASCI energy as well as the derivative coupling between electronic states. In the present work, we present a Lagrangian-based formulation of these derivatives as well as a highly efficient implementation of the resulting equations accelerated with graphical processing units. We demonstrate that the CISNO-CASCI method is practical for dynamical simulations of photochemical processes in molecular systems containing hundreds of atoms.

  10. Analytic limits on the forms of spectra possible from optically thin collisional bremsstrahlung source models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, John C.; Emslie, A. Gordon

    1988-01-01

    The constraints on hard X-ray bremsstrahlung spectral forms required in order for them to correspond to physically acceptable (nonnegative) electron distributions in thin-target, thick-target, and thermal source models are discussed. The extent to which various spectra can be attributed to the different models is examined, showing that many possible spectra cannot be described by all, or in some cases, any of the models. It is shown that for any bremsstrahlung cross section, the thick-target and thermal models require that successively higher derivatives of the thin-target constraint have the appropriate sign. It is found that thermal models are the most restrictive, and that thin-target models are the least restrictive. Explicit analytic constraint expressions are derived for all three cases for the Kramers cross section and examples of acceptable and unacceptable spectra are given. Application of these criteria to the testing and exclusion of models is discussed.

  11. Thermodynamic efficiency limits of classical and bifacial multi-junction tandem solar cells: An analytical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Muhammad Ashraful; Khan, M. Ryyan

    2016-10-01

    Bifacial tandem cells promise to reduce three fundamental losses (i.e., above-bandgap, below bandgap, and the uncollected light between panels) inherent in classical single junction photovoltaic (PV) systems. The successive filtering of light through the bandgap cascade and the requirement of current continuity make optimization of tandem cells difficult and accessible only to numerical solution through computer modeling. The challenge is even more complicated for bifacial design. In this paper, we use an elegantly simple analytical approach to show that the essential physics of optimization is intuitively obvious, and deeply insightful results can be obtained with a few lines of algebra. This powerful approach reproduces, as special cases, all of the known results of conventional and bifacial tandem cells and highlights the asymptotic efficiency gain of these technologies.

  12. Comparison of Analytical Methods for the Determination of Uranium in Seawater Using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Jordana R.; Gill, Gary A.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Strivens, Jonathan E.; Choe, Key-Young

    2016-04-20

    Trace element determinations in seawater by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry are analytically challenging due to the typically very low concentrations of the trace elements and the potential interference of the salt matrix. In this study, we did a comparison for uranium analysis using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) of Sequim Bay seawater samples and three seawater certified reference materials (SLEW-3, CASS-5 and NASS-6) using seven different analytical approaches. The methods evaluated include: direct analysis, Fe/Pd reductive precipitation, standard addition calibration, online automated dilution using an external calibration with and without matrix matching, and online automated pre-concentration. The method which produced the most accurate results was the method of standard addition calibration, recovering uranium from a Sequim Bay seawater sample at 101 ± 1.2%. The on-line preconcentration method and the automated dilution with matrix-matched calibration method also performed well. The two least effective methods were the direct analysis and the Fe/Pd reductive precipitation using sodium borohydride

  13. Analytical Calculation of Mutual Information between Weakly Coupled Poisson-Spiking Neurons in Models of Dynamically Gated Communication.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Mutual information is a commonly used measure of communication between neurons, but little theory exists describing the relationship between mutual information and the parameters of the underlying neuronal interaction. Such a theory could help us understand how specific physiological changes affect the capacity of neurons to synaptically communicate, and, in particular, they could help us characterize the mechanisms by which neuronal dynamics gate the flow of information in the brain. Here we study a pair of linear-nonlinear-Poisson neurons coupled by a weak synapse. We derive an analytical expression describing the mutual information between their spike trains in terms of synapse strength, neuronal activation function, the time course of postsynaptic currents, and the time course of the background input received by the two neurons. This expression allows mutual information calculations that would otherwise be computationally intractable. We use this expression to analytically explore the interaction of excitation, information transmission, and the convexity of the activation function. Then, using this expression to quantify mutual information in simulations, we illustrate the information-gating effects of neural oscillations and oscillatory coherence, which may either increase or decrease the mutual information across the synapse depending on parameters. Finally, we show analytically that our results can quantitatively describe the selection of one information pathway over another when multiple sending neurons project weakly to a single receiving neuron.

  14. Analytical modeling of demagnetizing effect in magnetoelectric ferrite/PZT/ferrite trilayers taking into account a mechanical coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loyau, V.; Aubert, A.; LoBue, M.; Mazaleyrat, F.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the demagnetizing effect in ferrite/PZT/ferrite magnetoelectric (ME) trilayer composites consisting of commercial PZT discs bonded by epoxy layers to Ni-Co-Zn ferrite discs made by a reactive Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) technique. ME voltage coefficients (transversal mode) were measured on ferrite/PZT/ferrite trilayer ME samples with different thicknesses or phase volume ratio in order to highlight the influence of the magnetic field penetration governed by these geometrical parameters. Experimental ME coefficients and voltages were compared to analytical calculations using a quasi-static model. Theoretical demagnetizing factors of two magnetic discs that interact together in parallel magnetic structures were derived from an analytical calculation based on a superposition method. These factors were introduced in ME voltage calculations which take account of the demagnetizing effect. To fit the experimental results, a mechanical coupling factor was also introduced in the theoretical formula. This reflects the differential strain that exists in the ferrite and PZT layers due to shear effects near the edge of the ME samples and within the bonding epoxy layers. From this study, an optimization in magnitude of the ME voltage is obtained. Lastly, an analytical calculation of demagnetizing effect was conducted for layered ME composites containing higher numbers of alternated layers (n ≥ 5). The advantage of such a structure is then discussed.

  15. Computation of DNP coupling factors of a nitroxide radical in toluene: seamless combination of MD simulations and analytical calculations.

    PubMed

    Sezer, Deniz

    2013-01-14

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) employs paramagnetic species to increase the NMR signal of nuclear spins. In liquids, the efficiency of the effect depends on the strength of the interaction between the electron and nuclear spins and the time scales on which this interaction is modulated by the physical motion of the spin-bearing molecules. An approach to quantitatively predict the contribution of molecular motions to the DNP enhancement using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations is developed and illustrated for the nitroxide radical TEMPOL in liquid toluene. A multi-resolution strategy that combines explicit treatment of the solvent at short distances from the free radical with implicit description at large intermolecular distances is adopted. Novel analytical expressions are obtained to correct for the finite spatial extent of the MD simulations. The atomistic and analytical descriptions are sewn seamlessly together by ensuring that for molecular trajectories that start in the near (explicit) region and end in the distant (implicit) region the analytical dipolar spectral densities reproduce the MD estimates. The spectral densities obtained from the developed approach are used to calculate DNP coupling factors separately for the ring and methyl protons of toluene. The agreement with previously reported experimental DNP data at a magnetic field of 3.4 T is noteworthy and encouraging. Maximum obtainable DNP enhancements at other magnetic fields are predicted.

  16. Acceleration of spin-orbit-coupled Bose-Einstein condensates: Analytical description of the emergence of Landau-Zener transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llorente, J. M. Gomez; Plata, J.

    2016-11-01

    We analytically study the effect of gravitational and harmonic forces on ultracold atoms with synthetic spin-orbit coupling (SOC). In particular, we focus on the recently observed transitions between internal states induced by acceleration of the external modes. Our description corresponds to a generalized version of the Landau-Zener (LZ) model: the dimensionality is enlarged to combine the quantum treatment of the external variables with the internal-state characterization; additionally, atomic-interaction effects are considered. The emergence of the basic model is analytically traced. Namely, by using a sequence of unitary transformations and a subsequent reduction to the spin space, the SOC Hamiltonian, with the gravitational potential incorporated, is exactly converted into the primary LZ scenario. Moreover, the transitions induced by harmonic acceleration are approximately cast into the framework of the basic LZ model through a complete analytical procedure. We evaluate how the validity of our picture depends on the system preparation and on the magnitude of atomic-interaction effects. The identification of the regime of applicability and the rigorous characterization of the parameters of the effective model provide elements to control the transitions.

  17. Basic properties of electrical field coupling between neurons: an analytical approach.

    PubMed

    Costalat, Robert; Chauvet, Gilbert

    2008-06-01

    The basic properties of the electrical field coupling between two parallel neurons, with linear electrical properties of the membranes, are investigated using a mathematical model-based on Laplace transform and matrix algebra, assuming that the system is unidimensional. This approach is extended to a ramified dendritic tree, and to a set of parallel neurons a subset of which is synaptically activated. We show that the electrical field effect is governed by certain geometrical and electrophysiological parameters, the most important being a coupling coefficient k, which depends on the extra- and intracellular resistivity, as well as the extracellular volume fraction. These results support the hypothesis that electrical field effects play an important role in the regions of the brain where neurons are densely packed, even in the absence of, or before, cell firing.

  18. Experimental and analytical investigations of fuselage modal characteristics and structural-acoustic coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Myles A.; Mathur, Gopal P.

    1992-01-01

    Measurements conducted on a DC-9 aircraft test section to define the shell and cavity modes of the fuselage, understand its structural-acoustic coupling characteristics, and measure its response to different types of acoustic and vibration excitations are reported. The data were processed to generate spatial plots and wavenumber maps of the shell acceleration and cabin acoustic pressure field. Analysis and interpretation of the spatial plots and wavenumber maps showed that the only structural-acoustic coupling occurred at 105 Hz between the N=2 circumferential structural mode and the (n=2, p=0) circumferential cavity mode. The fuselage response to vibration excitation was found to be dominated by modes whose order increases with frequency.

  19. Experimental and analytical investigations of fuselage modal characteristics and structural-acoustic coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Myles A.; Mathur, Gopal P.

    1992-01-01

    Measurements conducted on a DC-9 aircraft test section to define the shell and cavity modes of the fuselage, understand its structural-acoustic coupling characteristics, and measure its response to different types of acoustic and vibration excitations are reported. The data were processed to generate spatial plots and wavenumber maps of the shell acceleration and cabin acoustic pressure field. Analysis and interpretation of the spatial plots and wavenumber maps showed that the only structural-acoustic coupling occurred at 105 Hz between the N=2 circumferential structural mode and the (n=2, p=0) circumferential cavity mode. The fuselage response to vibration excitation was found to be dominated by modes whose order increases with frequency.

  20. An analytical model for contaminant transport in landfill composite liners considering coupled effect of consolidation, diffusion, and degradation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Haijian; Yan, Huaxiang; Feng, Shijin; Wang, Qiao; Chen, Peixiong

    2016-10-01

    One-dimensional mathematical model is developed to investigate the behavior of contaminant transport in landfill composite liner system considering coupled effect of consolidation, diffusion, and degradation. The first- and second-type bottom boundary conditions are used to derive the steady-state and quasi-steady-state analytical solutions. The concentration profiles obtained by the proposed analytical solution are in good agreement with those obtained by the laboratory tests. The bottom concentration and flux of the soil liners can be greatly reduced when the degradation effect and porosity changing are considered. For the case under steady-state, the bottom flux and concentration for the case with t 1/2 =10 years can be 2.8 and 5.5 times lower than those of the case with t 1/2 =100 years, respectively. The bottom concentration and flux of the soil liners can be greatly reduced when the coefficient of volume compressibility decreases. For quasi-steady-state and with t 1/2 = 10 years, the bottom flux and concentration for the case with m v  = 0.02/MPa can be 17.4 and 21 times lower than the case with m v  = 0.5/MPa. This may be due to the fact that the true fluid velocity induced by consolidation is greater for the case with high coefficient of volume compressibility. The bottom flux for the case with single compacted clay liner (CCL) can be 1.5 times larger than that for the case with GMB/CCL considering diffusion and consolidation for DCM. The proposed analytical model can be used for verification of more complicated numerical models and assessment of the coupled effect of diffusion, consolidation, and degradation on contaminant transport in landfill liner systems.

  1. Analytical Investigation of Icing Limit for Diamond-Shaped Airfoil in Transonic and Supersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callaghan, Edmund E.; Serafini, John S.

    1953-01-01

    Calculations have been made for the icing limit of a diamond airfoil at zero angle of attack in terms of the stream Mach number, stream temperature, and pressure altitude. The icing limit is defined as a wetted-surface temperature of 320 F and is related to the stream conditions by the method of Hardy. The results show that the point most likely to ice on the airfoil lies immediately behind the shoulder and is subject to possible icing at Mach numbers as high as 1.4.

  2. Generalized semi-analytical solutions to multispecies transport equation coupled with sequential first-order reaction network with spatially or temporally variable transport and decay coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suk, Heejun

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a semi-analytical procedure for solving coupled the multispecies reactive solute transport equations, with a sequential first-order reaction network on spatially or temporally varying flow velocities and dispersion coefficients involving distinct retardation factors. This proposed approach was developed to overcome the limitation reported by Suk (2013) regarding the identical retardation values for all reactive species, while maintaining the extensive capability of the previous Suk method involving spatially variable or temporally variable coefficients of transport, general initial conditions, and arbitrary temporal variable inlet concentration. The proposed approach sequentially calculates the concentration distributions of each species by employing only the generalized integral transform technique (GITT). Because the proposed solutions for each species' concentration distributions have separable forms in space and time, the solution for subsequent species (daughter species) can be obtained using only the GITT without the decomposition by change-of-variables method imposing the limitation of identical retardation values for all the reactive species by directly substituting solutions for the preceding species (parent species) into the transport equation of subsequent species (daughter species). The proposed solutions were compared with previously published analytical solutions or numerical solutions of the numerical code of the Two-Dimensional Subsurface Flow, Fate and Transport of Microbes and Chemicals (2DFATMIC) in three verification examples. In these examples, the proposed solutions were well matched with previous analytical solutions and the numerical solutions obtained by 2DFATMIC model. A hypothetical single-well push-pull test example and a scale-dependent dispersion example were designed to demonstrate the practical application of the proposed solution to a real field problem.

  3. Analytical and numerical studies of disordered spin-1 Heisenberg chains with aperiodic couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casa Grande, H. L.; Laflorencie, N.; Alet, F.; Vieira, A. P.

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the low-temperature properties of the one-dimensional spin-1 Heisenberg model with geometric fluctuations induced by aperiodic but deterministic coupling distributions, involving two parameters. We focus on two aperiodic sequences, the Fibonacci sequence and the 6-3 sequence. Our goal is to understand how these geometric fluctuations modify the physics of the (gapped) Haldane phase, which corresponds to the ground state of the uniform spin-1 chain. We make use of different adaptations of the strong-disorder renormalization-group (SDRG) scheme of Ma, Dasgupta, and Hu, widely employed in the study of random spin chains, supplemented by quantum Monte Carlo and density-matrix renormalization-group numerical calculations, to study the nature of the ground state as the coupling modulation is increased. We find no phase transition for the Fibonacci chain, while we show that the 6-3 chain exhibits a phase transition to a gapless, aperiodicity-dominated phase similar to the one found for the aperiodic spin-1/2 XXZ chain. Contrary to what is verified for random spin-1 chains, we show that different adaptations of the SDRG scheme may lead to different qualitative conclusions about the nature of the ground state in the presence of aperiodic coupling modulations.

  4. On the coupling of hyperbolic and parabolic systems: Analytical and numerical approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gastaldi, Fabio; Quarteroni, Alfio

    1988-01-01

    The coupling of hyperbolic and parabolic systems is discussed in a domain Omega divided into two distinct subdomains omega(+) and omega(-). The main concern is to find the proper interface conditions to be fulfilled at the surface separating the two domains. Next, they are used in the numerical approximation of the problem. The justification of the interface conditions is based on a singular perturbation analysis, i.e., the hyperbolic system is rendered parabolic by adding a small artifical viscosity. As this goes to zero, the coupled parabolic-parabolic problem degenerates into the original one, yielding some conditions at the interface. These are taken as interface conditions for the hyperbolic-parabolic problem. Actually, two alternative sets of interface conditions are discussed according to whether the regularization procedure is variational or nonvariational. It is shown how these conditions can be used in the frame of a numerical approximation to the given problem. Furthermore, a method of resolution is discussed which alternates the resolution of the hyperbolic problem within omega(-) and of the parabolic one within omega(+). The spectral collocation method is proposed, as an example of space discretization (different methods could be used as well); both explicit and implicit time-advancing schemes are considered. The present study is a preliminary step toward the analysis of the coupling between Euler and Navier-Stokes equations for compressible flows.

  5. Electrical and thermal transport in the quasiatomic limit of coupled Luttinger liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szasz, Aaron; Ilan, Roni; Moore, Joel E.

    2017-02-01

    We introduce a new model for quasi-one-dimensional materials, motivated by intriguing but not yet well-understood experiments that have shown two-dimensional polymer films to be promising materials for thermoelectric devices. We consider a two-dimensional material consisting of many one-dimensional systems, each treated as a Luttinger liquid, with weak (incoherent) coupling between them. This approximation of strong interactions within each one-dimensional chain and weak coupling between them is the "quasiatomic limit." We find integral expressions for the (interchain) transport coefficients, including the electrical and thermal conductivities and the thermopower, and we extract their power law dependencies on temperature. Luttinger liquid physics is manifested in a violation of the Wiedemann-Franz law; the Lorenz number is larger than the Fermi liquid value by a factor between γ2 and γ4, where γ ≥1 is a measure of the electron-electron interaction strength in the system.

  6. Dual microcoil NMR probe coupled to cyclic ce for continuous separation and analyte isolation.

    PubMed

    Jayawickrama, Dimuthu A; Sweedler, Jonathan V

    2004-08-15

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE)-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy combines the separation efficiency of CE and the information-rich detection capabilities of NMR. However, the temporally narrow CE peaks reduce NMR sensitivity and prevent on-line multidimensional NMR acquisitions. In this work, cyclic CE with multicoil NMR instrumentation is developed to perform CE in multiple closed loops. As a proof of concept, a two-loop five-junction capillary configuration creates two connected yet independently operable fluidic loops. With appropriate voltage switching, analytes can be directed as desired around or between the loops, and a particular analyte band can be parked in one NMR detector coil while CE continues in the second loop and monitored with a second NMR detector coil. The separation of a mixture of amino acids (Ala, Val, Thr) is achieved in two cycles. After one CE cycle, Ala is separated and COSY data are recorded in one loop while Val and Thr are separated in the second loop. At the end of the second cycle, both Val and Thr are separated and multidimensional NMR spectra acquired. With this instrumentation and appropriate protocols, two-dimensional NMR data acquisition and CE separation are achieved simultaneously.

  7. The effect of plasma operating parameters on analyte signals in inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horlick, G.; Tan, S. H.; Vaughan, M. A.; Rose, C. A.

    Utilizing the SCIEX ICP-MS an extensive study of the effects that plasma operating parameters have on analyte ion signals in ICP-MS has been carried out. Parameters studied included aerosol flow rate (nebulizer pressure), auxiliary flow rate, power and sampling depth (sampling position from the load coil). The two key parameters are aerosol flow rate (nebulizer pressure) and power. Elements can be grouped into characteristic behaviour patterns based on the overall dependence of their ion count signal on these two parameters. The nebulizer pressure-power behavior patterns allow a sensible selection of compromise operating conditions and significantly clarify single parameter observations which often indicate confusing trends in behavior. In addition to characterizing analyte ion signals the parameter behavior plots have also been used to study oxide species and plus two ions in ICP-MS. While aerosol flow rate and power appear to be the key ICP parameters in ICP-MS, ion signals are dependent on sampling depth and auxiliary flow rate and some data are also presented illustrating the signal dependence on these two parameters.

  8. Radial heat flux limits in potassium heat pipes: An experimental and analytical investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Woloshun, K.A.; Sena, J.T.; Keddy, E.S.; Merrigan, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    A radial flux limit of 147 W/cm{sup 2} at the wetted inner tube wall has been demonstrated with a Nb-1%Zr/K heat pipe, a flux 5 times greater than the previously accepted safe design level of 25-30 W/cm{sup 2}. The wick structure was an annular gap type fabricated from 100 {times} 100 mesh Nb-1%Zr screen. Rigorous fabrication and cleaning procedures are believed to be critical to good wetting, resulting in significantly reduced active nucleation site size and a higher boiling limit. The procedure used to clean this heat pipe included acid wash, Freon-TF degrease, ethanol wash, high-vacuum firing, and operation as a lithium heat pipe. A heat pipe boiling limit model, based on the active nucleation site radius, is described. An active nucleation site radius of 6 {times} 10{sup -6} m (2.4 {times} 10{sup -4} in) correlates the radial flux boiling limit measured in these tests. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  9. An Analytical Means for Determination of Scoring Limited Load Capacity in Sliding/Rolling Contact

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    Scoring limited load capacity of paired discs in sliding/rolling lubricated contact is addressed. The approach used previously acquired data in a multiple regression analysis. The resulting mathematical expression for load capacity at failure has a correlation coefficient greater than 99%.

  10. Analytical Investigation of the Decrease in the Size of the Habitable Zone due to Limited CO2 Outgassing Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbot, D. S.

    2016-12-01

    The habitable zone concept is important because it focuses the scientific search for extraterrestrial life and aids the planning of future telescopes. Recent work has shown that planets near the outer edge of the habitable zone might not actually be able to stay warm and habitable if CO2 outgassing rates are not large enough to maintain high CO2 partial pressures against removal by silicate weathering. I use simple equations for the climate and CO2 budget of a planet in the habitable zone that can capture the qualitative behavior of the system. With these equations I derive an analytical formula for an effective outer edge of the habitable zone, including limitations imposed by the CO2 outgassing rate. I then show that climate cycles between a Snowball state and a warm climate are only possible beyond this limit if the weathering rate in the Snowball climate is smaller than the CO2 outgassing rate (otherwise stable Snowball states result). I derive an analytical solution for the climate cycles including a formula for their period in this limit. This work allows us to explore the qualitative effects of weathering processes on the effective outer edge of the habitable zone, which is important because weathering parameterizations are uncertain.

  11. Analytical Investigation of the Decrease in the Size of the Habitable Zone Due to a Limited CO2 Outgassing Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbot, Dorian S.

    2016-08-01

    The habitable zone concept is important because it focuses the scientific search for extraterrestrial life and aids the planning of future telescopes. Recent work has shown that planets near the outer edge of the habitable zone might not actually be able to stay warm and habitable if CO2 outgassing rates are not large enough to maintain high CO2 partial pressures against removal by silicate weathering. In this paper, I use simple equations for the climate and CO2 budget of a planet in the habitable zone that can capture the qualitative behavior of the system. With these equations I derive an analytical formula for an effective outer edge of the habitable zone, including limitations imposed by the CO2 outgassing rate. I then show that climate cycles between a snowball state and a warm climate are only possible beyond this limit if the weathering rate in the snowball climate is smaller than the CO2 outgassing rate (otherwise stable snowball states result). I derive an analytical solution for the climate cycles including a formula for their period in this limit. This work allows us to explore the qualitative effects of weathering processes on the effective outer edge of the habitable zone, which is important because weathering parameterizations are uncertain.

  12. Analytical Modeling of Acoustic Phonon-Limited Mobility in Strained Graphene Nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousefvand, Ali; Ahmadi, Mohammad T.; Meshginqalam, Bahar

    2017-07-01

    Recent advances in graphene nanoribbon-based electronic devices encourage researchers to develop modeling and simulation methods to explore device physics. On the other hand, increasing the operating speed of nanoelectronic devices has recently attracted significant attention, and the modification of acoustic phonon interactions because of their important effect on carrier mobility can be considered as a method for carrier mobility optimization which subsequently enhances the device speed. Moreover, strain has an important influence on the electronic properties of the nanoelectronic devices. In this paper, the acoustic phonons mobility of armchair graphene nanoribbons (n-AGNRs) under uniaxial strain is modeled analytically. In addition, strain, width and temperature effects on the acoustic phonon mobility of strained n-AGNRs are investigated. An increment in the strained AGNR acoustic phonon mobility by increasing the ribbon width is reported. Additionally, two different behaviors for the acoustic phonon mobility are verified by increasing the applied strain in 3m, 3m + 2 and 3m + 1 AGNRs. Finally, the temperature effect on the modeled AGNR phonon mobility is explored, and mobility reduction by raising the temperature is reported.

  13. Comparing Theory and Experiment for Analyte Transport in the First Vacuum Stage of the Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zachreson, Matthew R.

    The inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) has been used in laboratories for many years. The majority of the improvements to the instrument have been done empirically through trial and error. A few fluid models have been made, which have given a general description of the flow through the mass spectrometer interface. However, due to long mean free path effects and other factors, it is very difficult to simulate the flow details well enough to predict how changing the interface design will change the formation of the ion beam. Towards this end, Spencer et al. developed FENIX, a direct simulation Monte Carlo algorithm capable of modeling this transitional flow through the mass spectrometer interface, the transitional flow from disorganized plasma to focused ion beam. Their previous work describes how FENIX simulates the neutral ion flow. While understanding the argon flow is essential to understanding the ICP-MS, the true goal is to improve its analyte detection capabilities. In this work, we develop a model for adding analyte to FENIX and compare it to previously collected experimental data. We also calculate how much ambipolar fields, plasma sheaths, and electron-ion recombination affect the ion beam formation. We find that behind the sampling interface there is no evidence of turbulent mixing. The behavior of the analyte seems to be described simply by convection and diffusion. Also, ambipolar field effects are small and do not significantly affect ion beam formation between the sampler and skimmer cones. We also find that the plasma sheath that forms around the sampling cone does not significantly affect the analyte flow downstream from the skimmer. However, it does thermally insulate the electrons from the sampling cone, which reduces ion-electron recombination. We also develop a model for electron-ion recombination. By comparing it to experimental data, we find that significant amounts of electron-ion recombination occurs just downstream from the

  14. Quality control analytical methods: microbial limit tests for nonsterile pharmaceuticals, Part 1.

    PubMed

    Vu, Nicole; Lou, Jessica R; Kupiec, Thomas C

    2014-01-01

    Contamination of pharmaceuticals with microorganisms may lead to deleterious effects on the therapeutic properties of the drug, and may potentially cause injuries to intended recipients. Cases of contaminated nonsterile products have been reported in increasing numbers, and often associated with the presence of objectionable microorganisms. Methods for detection of these organisms are described in three major Pharmacopeias. Their functions and their limitations in the examination of microbiological quality for nonsterile products will be reviewed in this report.

  15. Analytical determination of coupled bending-torsion vibrations of cantilever beams by means of station functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendelson, Alexander; Gendler, Selwyn

    1951-01-01

    A method based on the concept of station functions is presented for calculating the modes and the frequencies of nonuniform cantilever beams vibrating in torsion, bending, and coupled bending-torsion motion. The method combines some of the advantages of the Rayleigh-Ritz and Stodola methods, in that a continuous loading function for the beam is used, with the advantages of the influence-coefficient method, in that the continuous loading function is obtained in terms of the displacements of a finite number of stations along the beam.

  16. Analytical formulation of orbiter-payload coupled by trunnion joints with Coulomb friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Frank C.

    1986-01-01

    An orbiter and its payload substructure are linked together by five trunnion joints which have thirty degrees-of-freedom. Geometric compatibility conditions require fourteen of the interface physical coordinates of the orbiter and payload to be equal to each other and the remaining sixteen are free to have relative motions under Coulomb friction. The component modes synthesis method using fourteen inertia relief attachment modes for the formulation of the coupled system is presented. The exact nonlinear friction function is derived based on the characteristics of the joints. Formulation is applicable to an orbiter that carries any number of payload substructures.

  17. Photon noise limited radiation detection with lens-antenna coupled microwave kinetic inductance detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, S. J. C.; Baselmans, J. J. A.; Endo, A.; Janssen, R. M. J.; Ferrari, L.; Diener, P.; Baryshev, A. M.

    2011-08-01

    Microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs) have shown great potential for sub-mm instrumentation because of the high scalability of the technology. Here, we demonstrate for the first time in the sub-mm band (0.1-2 mm) a photon noise limited performance of a small antenna coupled MKID detector array and we describe the relation between photon noise and MKID intrinsic generation-recombination noise. Additionally, we use the observed photon noise to measure the optical efficiency of detectors to be 0.8 ± 0.2.

  18. Photon noise limited radiation detection with lens-antenna coupled microwave kinetic inductance detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, S. J. C.; Baselmans, J. J. A.; Diener, P.; Endo, A.; Janssen, R. M. J.; Ferrari, L.; Baryshev, A. M.

    2011-08-15

    Microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs) have shown great potential for sub-mm instrumentation because of the high scalability of the technology. Here, we demonstrate for the first time in the sub-mm band (0.1-2 mm) a photon noise limited performance of a small antenna coupled MKID detector array and we describe the relation between photon noise and MKID intrinsic generation-recombination noise. Additionally, we use the observed photon noise to measure the optical efficiency of detectors to be 0.8 {+-} 0.2.

  19. Coupled-cluster theory of a gas of strongly-interacting electrons in the dilute limit

    SciTech Connect

    Mihaila, Bodgan; Cardenas, Andres L

    2008-01-01

    We study the ground-state properties of a dilute gas of strongly-interacting fermions in the framework of the coupled-cluster expansion (CCE). We demonstrate that properties such as universality, opening of a gap in the excitation spectrum and applicability of s-wave approximations appear naturally in the CCE approach. In the zero-density limit, we show that the ground-state energy density depends on only one parameter which in turn may depend at most on the spatial dimensionality of the system.

  20. Development of an analytical model for estimating global terrestrial carbon assimilation using a rate-limitation framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donohue, Randall; Yang, Yuting; McVicar, Tim; Roderick, Michael

    2016-04-01

    A fundamental question in climate and ecosystem science is "how does climate regulate the land surface carbon budget?" To better answer that question, here we develop an analytical model for estimating mean annual terrestrial gross primary productivity (GPP), which is the largest carbon flux over land, based on a rate-limitation framework. Actual GPP (climatological mean from 1982 to 2010) is calculated as a function of the balance between two GPP potentials defined by the climate (i.e., precipitation and solar radiation) and a third parameter that encodes other environmental variables and modifies the GPP-climate relationship. The developed model was tested at three spatial scales using different GPP sources, i.e., (1) observed GPP from 94 flux-sites, (2) modelled GPP (using the model-tree-ensemble approach) at 48654 (0.5 degree) grid-cells and (3) at 32 large catchments across the globe. Results show that the proposed model could account for the spatial GPP patterns, with a root-mean-square error of 0.70, 0.65 and 0.3 g C m-2 d-1 and R2 of 0.79, 0.92 and 0.97 for the flux-site, grid-cell and catchment scales, respectively. This analytical GPP model shares a similar form with the Budyko hydroclimatological model, which opens the possibility of a general analytical framework to analyze the linked carbon-water-energy cycles.

  1. Coupling Semi-Analytic Models and N-Body Simulations: A New Way of Making Galaxies and Stellar Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCord, Krista

    Stellar halos give insight into the initial conditions that existed when a host galaxy first formed and provide details on disrupted satellites via their different stellar populations. An algorithm that is computationally inexpensive compared to hydrodynamic simulations is necessary in order to theoretically study the structure and formation of galactic stellar halos in sufficient detail to probe substructure. CoSANG (Coupling Semi-Analytic/N-body Galaxies) is a new computational method that we are developing which couples pure dark matter N-body simulations with a semi-analytic galaxy formation model. At each timestep, results from the N-body simulation feed into the semi-analytic code, whose results feed back into the N-body code making the evolution of the dark matter and baryonic matter dependent on one another. CoSANG will enable a variety of galaxy formation science, including analysis of stellar populations, halo merging, satellite accretion, supermassive black holes, and indirect and direct dark matter detection. In this dissertation, I will describe the new simulation code CoSANG. The results from the extensive testing phase on CoSANG will be presented which indicate CoSANG is properly simulating feedback from galaxies within a dark matter halo. I used this validated code to analyze a CoSANG zoom simulation of a 1012M solar masses dark matter halo. Results showed a flatter inner halo near the disk and a more spherical outer halo which is expected when a galaxy exists at the center of a dark matter halo. A comparison is made with a simulation run with the same initial conditions, but with the baryonic component simulated using a hydrodynamic algorithm. The semi-analytic model predicted galaxy types better than the hydrodynamic simulation leading to the conclusion that the CoSANG halo is more accurate. I also present a dark matter direct detection analysis on the CoSANG zoom halo to measure the dark matter velocity distributions and modulation amplitudes

  2. Fibre coupled micro-light emitting diode array light source with integrated band-pass filter for fluorescence detection in miniaturised analytical systems.

    PubMed

    Vaculovičová, Markéta; Akther, Mahbub; Maaskant, Pleun; Brabazon, Dermot; Macka, Mirek

    2015-04-29

    In this work, a new type of miniaturized fibre-coupled solid-state light source is demonstrated as an excitation source for fluorescence detection in capillary electrophoresis. It is based on a parabolically shaped micro-light emitting diode (μ-LED) array with a custom band-pass optical interference filter (IF) deposited at the back of the LED substrate. The GaN μ-LED array consisted of 270 individual μ-LED elements with a peak emission at 470 nm, each about 14 μm in diameter and operated as a single unit. Light was extracted through the transparent substrate material, and coupled to an optical fibre (OF, 400 μm in diameter, numerical aperture NA=0.37), to form an integrated μ-LED-IF-OF light source component. This packaged μ-LED-IF-OF light source emitted approximately 225 μW of optical power at a bias current of 20 mA. The bandpass IF filter was designed to reduce undesirable LED light emissions in the wavelength range above 490 nm. Devices with and without IF were compared in terms of the optical power output, spectral characteristics as well as LOD values. While the IF consisted of only 7.5 pairs (15 layers) of SiO2/HfO2 layers, it resulted in an improvement of the baseline noise as well as the detection limit measured using fluorescein as test analyte, both by approximately one order of magnitude, with a LOD of 1×10(-8) mol L(-1) obtained under optimised conditions. The μ-LED-IF-OF light source was then demonstrated for use in capillary electrophoresis with fluorimetric detection. The limits of detection obtained by this device were compared to those obtained with a commercial fibre coupled LED device.

  3. The limit spin current in a time-dependent Rashba spin-orbit coupling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shu-feng; Zhu, Wei

    2013-02-01

    The generation of spin current in a one dimensional electron gas (1DEG) system is studied, where the Rashba spin-orbit coupling (RSOC) is modulated by a time-varying gate voltage. With a simple unitary transformation, we show the appearance of an additional spin-dependent potential which results in a spin-dependent effective electric field. We include the scattering interaction by taking a relaxation approximation. The formula for the induced spin current is derived, the limit value accessible by time-varying RSOC is obtained and the order of magnitude is estimated. We find that the maximum of a pulsed spin current can reach that limit value. The results in 1DEG are extended to 2DEG. In addition, we study the spin current in a metal-quantum dot-metal system.

  4. On the Strong Coupling Limit of the Faddeev-Hopf Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speight, J. M.; Svensson, M.

    2007-06-01

    The variational calculus for the Faddeev-Hopf model on a general Riemannian domain, with general Kähler target space, is studied in the strong coupling limit. In this limit, the model has key similarities with pure Yang-Mills theory, namely conformal invariance in dimension 4 and an infinite dimensional symmetry group. The first and second variation formulae are calculated and several examples of stable solutions are obtained. In particular, it is proved that all immersive solutions are stable. Topological lower energy bounds are found in dimensions 2 and 4. An explicit description of the spectral behaviour of the Hopf map {S^3 rightarrow S^2} is given, and a conjecture of Ward concerning the stability of this map in the full Faddeev-Hopf model is proved.

  5. Analytical coupled vibroacoustic modeling of membrane-type acoustic metamaterials: plate model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yangyang; Huang, Guoliang; Zhou, Xiaoming; Hu, Gengkai; Sun, Chin-Teh

    2014-12-01

    By considering the elastic membrane's dissipation, the membrane-type acoustic metamaterial (MAM) has been demonstrated to be a super absorber for low-frequency sound. In the paper, a theoretical vibroacoustic plate model is developed to reveal the sound energy absorption mechanism within the MAM under a plane normal incidence. Based on the plate model in conjunction with the point matching method, the in-plane strain energy of the membrane due to the resonant and antiresonant motion of the attached masses can be accurately captured by solving the coupled vibroacoustic integrodifferential equation. The sound absorption ability of the MAM is quantitatively determined, which is also in good agreement with the prediction from the finite element method. In particular, microstructure effects including eccentricity of the attached masses, the depth, thickness, and loss factor of the membrane on sound absorption peak values are discussed.

  6. Flexure-FET biosensor to break the fundamental sensitivity limits of nanobiosensors using nonlinear electromechanical coupling.

    PubMed

    Jain, Ankit; Nair, Pradeep R; Alam, Muhammad A

    2012-06-12

    In this article, we propose a Flexure-FET (flexure sensitive field effect transistor) ultrasensitive biosensor that utilizes the nonlinear electromechanical coupling to overcome the fundamental sensitivity limits of classical electrical or mechanical nanoscale biosensors. The stiffness of the suspended gate of Flexure-FET changes with the capture of the target biomolecules, and the corresponding change in the gate shape or deflection is reflected in the drain current of FET. The Flexure-FET is configured to operate such that the gate is biased near pull-in instability, and the FET-channel is biased in the subthreshold regime. In this coupled nonlinear operating mode, the sensitivity (S) of Flexure-FET with respect to the captured molecule density (N(s)) is shown to be exponentially higher than that of any other electrical or mechanical biosensor. In other words, while S(Flexure) ~ e(γ1 [square root]Ns-γ2Ns), classical electrical or mechanical biosensors are limited to S(classical) ~ γ(3)N(S) or γ(4) ln(N(S)), where γ(i) are sensor-specific constants. In addition, the proposed sensor can detect both charged and charge-neutral biomolecules, without requiring a reference electrode or any sophisticated instrumentation, making it a potential candidate for various low-cost, point-of-care applications.

  7. [Allowable limits of analytical error which can guarantee the reliability of reference intervals for interpretation of clinical laboratory data].

    PubMed

    Hosogaya, Shigemi; Ozaki, Yukio

    2008-07-01

    The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) developed a guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement (GUM). The purpose of such guidance is to provide a basis for the international comparison of measurement results. In this study, we propose a basic protocol to evaluate and express uncertainty in measurement for routine test results in the clinical laboratory. We also sought to investigate the effects of measurement errors on the evaluation of biological variations in healthy subjects. To this end, we analyzed the allowable limits of analytical error which guarantee the reliability of reference intervals for the interpretation of clinical laboratory data. As a conclusion, we suggest that 1/2 or less of biological intraindividual variations is an appropriate criterion for an allowable limit of uncertainty to be applied in health check-ups, and this value is in agreement with previous reports. If this criterion as a marker for intra laboratory imprecision is met, it suggests that a given institute is able to evaluate time series changes in follow-up of individual data. If the reference interval of laboratory data for disease screening is shared by different institutes, it is suggested that a criterion of 1/4 or less of a biological inter- pulse intra-individual variation is appropriate. This criterion appears to be the goal for analytical inter-laboratory variations.

  8. Intercomparisons of land-surface parameterizations coupled to a limited area forecast model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timbal, B.; Henderson-Sellers, A.

    1998-12-01

    The goal of the Project for Intercomparison of Land-surface Parameterization Schemes (PILPS) is to improve the understanding of the interactions between the atmosphere and the continental surface in climate and weather forecast models. In PILPS Phase 4(b), selected schemes are coupled to the Limited Area Prediction System (LAPS) developed by the Australian Bureau of Meteorology. To facilitate the comparison of PILPS schemes' behavior within LAPS, a single mode of coupling is selected: explicit coupling. This type of coupling is more flexible and avoids most of the problems raised when interchanging the surface schemes. Exploratory tests are conducted. Initially, experiments are run in which the land-surface schemes use the same parameters as in their original host models. Then, in other runs, the most important surface parameters are set constant in an attempt to reduce the scatter amongst the schemes' results. In order to understand the impact of initialisation of soil moisture on the schemes' results some extreme cases (wet and dry) are performed. The partitioning between surface fluxes is studied as well as the soil moisture budget. Both regional and local results are analysed. Sensitivity between LSS is found in the precipitation field with rainfall over the Australian continent altering by about 20%, but no significant change is found in the net radiation. The scatter in the surface energy fluxes amongst the schemes is large (up to 300 W m -2 locally, during the daytime peak) but is seldom affected by the choice of surface parameters. The dynamical range of flux partitioning between extremely dry and wet initialisation varies strongly amongst the schemes. Some major shortcoming with the BUCKET approach are seen in the re-evaporation of convective precipitation over dry land, in the very large evaporation from wet surfaces and the diurnal cycle of surface temperature.

  9. Probabilistic pharmacokinetic models of decompression sickness in humans, part 1: Coupled perfusion-limited compartments.

    PubMed

    Murphy, F Gregory; Hada, Ethan A; Doolette, David J; Howle, Laurens E

    2017-07-01

    Decompression sickness (DCS) is a disease caused by gas bubbles forming in body tissues following a reduction in ambient pressure, such as occurs in scuba diving. Probabilistic models for quantifying the risk of DCS are typically composed of a collection of independent, perfusion-limited theoretical tissue compartments which describe gas content or bubble volume within these compartments. It has been previously shown that 'pharmacokinetic' gas content models, with compartments coupled in series, show promise as predictors of the incidence of DCS. The mechanism of coupling can be through perfusion or diffusion. This work examines the application of five novel pharmacokinetic structures with compartments coupled by perfusion to the prediction of the probability and time of onset of DCS in humans. We optimize these models against a training set of human dive trial data consisting of 4335 exposures with 223 DCS cases. Further, we examine the extrapolation quality of the models on an additional set of human dive trial data consisting of 3140 exposures with 147 DCS cases. We find that pharmacokinetic models describe the incidence of DCS for single air bounce dives better than a single-compartment, perfusion-limited model. We further find the U.S. Navy LEM-NMRI98 is a better predictor of DCS risk for the entire training set than any of our pharmacokinetic models. However, one of the pharmacokinetic models we consider, the CS2T3 model, is a better predictor of DCS risk for single air bounce dives and oxygen decompression dives. Additionally, we find that LEM-NMRI98 outperforms CS2T3 on the extrapolation data. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Ab initio analytical infrared intensities for periodic systems through a coupled perturbed Hartree-Fock/Kohn-Sham method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maschio, Lorenzo; Kirtman, Bernard; Orlando, Roberto; Rèrat, Michel

    2012-11-01

    A fully analytical method for calculating Born charges and, hence, infrared intensities of periodic systems, is formulated and implemented in the CRYSTAL program, which uses a local Gaussian type basis set. Our efficient formalism combines integral gradients with first-order coupled perturbed Hartree-Fock/Kohn Sham electronic response to an electric field. It avoids numerical differentiation with respect to wave vectors, as in some Berry phase approaches, and with respect to atomic coordinates. No perturbation equations for the atomic displacements need to be solved. Several tests are carried out to verify numerical stability, consistency in one, two, and three dimensions, and applicability to large unit cells. Future extensions to piezoelectricity and Raman intensities are noted.

  11. Stochastic heat and Burgers equations and their singularities. II. Analytical properties and limiting distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Ian M.; Truman, Aubrey; Zhao, Huaizhong

    2005-04-01

    We study the inviscid limit, μ →0, of the stochastic viscous Burgers equation, for the velocity field vμ(x,t), t >0, x εRd, (∂vμ/∂t)+(vμ.∇)vμ=-∇c(x,t)-ε∇k(x,t)Ẇt+(μ2/2)Δvμ, for small ε, with vμ(x,0)≡∇S0(x) for some given S0, Ẇt representing white noise. Here we use the Hopf-Cole transformation, vμ=-μ2∇lnuμ, where uμ satisfies the stochastic heat equation of Stratonovich-type and the Feynmac-Kac Truman-Zhao formula for uμ, where dutμ(x )=[(μ2/2)Δutμ(x)+μ-2c(x,t)utμ(x)]dt+εμ-2k(x,t)utμ(x)∘dWt, with u0μ(x)=T0(x)exp(-S0(x)/μ2), S0 as before and T0 a smooth positive function. In an earlier paper, Davies, Truman, and Zhao [J. Math. Phys. 43, 3293 (2002)], an exact solution of the stochastic viscous Burgers equation was used to show how the formal "blow-up" of the Burgers velocity field occurs on random shockwaves for the vμ =0 solution of Burgers equation coinciding with the caustics of a corresponding Hamiltonian system with classical flow map Φ. Moreover, the uμ =0 solution of the stochastic heat equation has its wavefront determined by the behavior of the Hamilton principal function of the corresponding stochastic mechanics. This led in particular to the level surface of the minimizing Hamilton-Jacobi function developing cusps at points corresponding to points of intersection of the corresponding prelevel surface with the precaustic, "pre" denoting the preimage under Φ determined algebraically. These results were primarily of a geometrical nature. In this paper we consider small ε and derive the shape of the random shockwave for the inviscid limit of the stochastic Burgers velocity field and also give the equation determining the random wavefront for the stochastic heat equation both correct to first order in ε. In the case c (x,t)=1/2xTΩ2x, ∇k(x,t)=-a(t), we obtain the exact random shockwave and prove that its shape is unchanged by the addition of noise, it merely being displaced by a random Brownian vector

  12. Generalized semi-analytical solutions to multispecies transport equation coupled with sequential first-order reaction network in arbitrary heterogenious medium using GITT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suk, Heejun

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents a semi-analytical procedure for solving coupled the multispecies reactive solute transport equations, with a sequential first-order reaction network in arbitrary heterogeneous media using General Integral Transformation Tecgnique(GITT).This proposed approach was developed to describe behavior of reactive multicpecise transport on spatially or temporally varying flow velocities and dispersion coefficients with distinct retardation factors, which might be function of space and time. This proposed approach deals with general initial conditions, and arbitrary temporal variable inlet concentration as well as arbitrary heterogenous media. The proposed approach sequentially calculates the concentration distributions of each species by employing only the generalized integral transform technique (GITT). Because the proposed solutions for each species' concentration distributions have separable forms in space and time, the solution for subsequent species (daughter species) can be obtained using only the GITT without the decomposition by change-of-variables method imposing the limitation of identical retarda- tion values for all the reactive species by directly substituting solutions for the preceding species (parent species) into the transport equation of subsequent species (daughter species). The proposed solutions were compared with previously published analytical solutions or numerical solutions of the numerical code of the Two-Dimensional Subsurface Flow, Fate and Transport of Microbes and Chemicals (2DFATMIC) in all verification examples. In these examples, the proposed solutions were well matched with previous analytical solutions and the numerical solutions obtained by 2DFATMIC model. A hypothetical single-well push-pull test example and a scale-dependent dispersion example were designed to demonstrate the practical application of the proposed solution to a real field problem.

  13. Sound propagation in dilute suspensions of spheres: Analytical comparison between coupled phase model and multiple scattering theory.

    PubMed

    Valier-Brasier, Tony; Conoir, Jean-Marc; Coulouvrat, François; Thomas, Jean-Louis

    2015-10-01

    Sound propagation in dilute suspensions of small spheres is studied using two models: a hydrodynamic model based on the coupled phase equations and an acoustic model based on the ECAH (ECAH: Epstein-Carhart-Allegra-Hawley) multiple scattering theory. The aim is to compare both models through the study of three fundamental kinds of particles: rigid particles, elastic spheres, and viscous droplets. The hydrodynamic model is based on a Rayleigh-Plesset-like equation generalized to elastic spheres and viscous droplets. The hydrodynamic forces for elastic spheres are introduced by analogy with those of droplets. The ECAH theory is also modified in order to take into account the velocity of rigid particles. Analytical calculations performed for long wavelength, low dilution, and weak absorption in the ambient fluid show that both models are strictly equivalent for the three kinds of particles studied. The analytical calculations show that dilatational and translational mechanisms are modeled in the same way by both models. The effective parameters of dilute suspensions are also calculated.

  14. Resonance Energies and Lifetimes from the Analytic Continuation of the Coupling Constant Method: Robust Algorithms and a Critical Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sommerfeld, Thomas; Melugin, Joshua B; Hamal, Prakash; Ehara, Masahiro

    2017-06-13

    The energy of a metastable state can be computed by adding an artificial stabilizing potential to the Hamiltonian, increasing the stabilization until the metastable state is turned into a bound one, and then further increasing the stabilization until enough bound-state data have been collected so that these can be extrapolated back to vanishing stabilization. The lifetime of the metastable state can be obtained from the same data, but only if the extrapolation is performed by analytic continuation. This extrapolation method is called analytic continuation of the coupling constant (ACCC). Here we introduce preconditioning schemes for two of the three established extrapolation algorithms and critically compare results from all three extrapolation schemes in a variety of situations: As examples for resonance states serve the π* temporary anions of ethylene and formaldehyde as well as a model potential, which provides a case where input data with full numeric precision are available. In the data collection step, three different stabilizing potentials are employed, a Coulomb potential, a short-range Coulomb potential, and a soft-box Voronoi potential. Effects of different orders of the extrapolating Padé approximant are investigated, and last, the energy range of input data for the extrapolation is studied. Moreover, all ACCC results are compared to resonance parameters that have been independently obtained with the same theoretical method, but with a different continuum approach-complex scaling for the model and complex absorbing potentials for the temporary anions.

  15. Finite lattice model for molecular aggregation equilibria. Boolean statistics, analytical approximations, and the macroscopic limit.

    PubMed

    Rankin, Blake M; Ben-Amotz, Dor; Widom, B

    2015-09-14

    Molecular processes, ranging from hydrophobic aggregation and protein binding to mesoscopic self-assembly, are typically driven by a delicate balance of energetic and entropic non-covalent interactions. Here, we focus on a broad class of such processes in which multiple ligands bind to a central solute molecule as a result of solute-ligand (direct) and/or ligand-ligand (cooperative) interaction energies. Previously, we described a weighted random mixing (WRM) mean-field model for such processes and compared the resulting adsorption isotherms and aggregate size distributions with exact finite lattice (FL) predictions, for lattices with up to n = 20 binding sites. Here, we compare FL predictions obtained using both Bethe-Guggenheim (BG) and WRM approximations, and find that the latter two approximations are complementary, as they are each most accurate in different aggregation regimes. Moreover, we describe a computationally efficient method for exhaustively counting nearest neighbors in FL configurations, thus making it feasible to obtain FL predictions for systems with up n = 48 binding sites, whose properties approach the thermodynamic (infinite lattice) limit. We further illustrate the applicability of our results by comparing lattice model and molecular dynamics simulation predictions pertaining to the aggregation of methane around neopentane.

  16. What can we learn from soil organic carbon fractions? - analytical options and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Don, Axel; Poeplau, Christopher

    2017-04-01

    The number of soil organic carbon (SOC) fractionation schemes applied has increased drastically during recent years. All of them are based on the different stabilisation concepts of physical stabilisation requiring physical fractionation or recalcitrance, requiring chemical separation. A major aim of SOM fractionation is the separation of preferably homogeneous pools that are characterized by distinct properties, such as C turnover rates. However, SOM properties including turnover times cover wide range of continuum. Thus, the partitioning of SOM in distinct fractions is challenging. There have been little attempts to evaluate and to compare fractionation schemes and protocols. In 2015 a large international method comparison was started - the SOMFrac ring trial - aiming at new insights in differences between fractionation schemes. Samples from three long-term C3-C4vegetaion change sites were used providing a 13C labeling of the young C4-derived carbon fraction. No fractionation scheme was able to isolate only young C4-derived carbon but at maximum 76 %. The C4-carbon input reached almost all fractions within a time frame of few decades. Mineral-associated carbon was among the key components to be separated from particulate organic carbon in many fractionation schemes. However, in particular in sandy soils, only chemical oxidation or extraction proved to isolate the most passive fractions. Thus, combining chemical and physical fractionation steps led to the best separation of young and old soil organic carbon pools. We discuss advantages and limitations of different fractionation schemes also in the light of its applicability and workload.

  17. Numerical and Analytical Assessment of a Coupled Rotating Detonation Engine and Turbine Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.; Naples, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    An analysis is presented of an experimental rig comprising a rotating detonation engine (RDE) with bypass ejector flow coupled to a downstream turbine. The analysis used a validated computational fluid dynamics RDE simulation combined with straightforward algebraic mixing equations for the bypass flow. The objectives of the analysis were to supplement and interpret the necessarily sparse measurements from the rig, and to assess the performance of the RDE itself, which was not instrumented in this installation. The analysis is seen to agree reasonably well with available data. It shows that the RDE is operating in an unusual fashion, with subsonic flow throughout the exhaust plane. The detonation event itself is producing a total pressure rise relative to the pre-detonative pressure; however, the length of the device and the substantial flow restriction at the inlet yield an overall pressure loss. This is not surprising since the objective of the rig test was primarily aimed at investigating RDE turbine interactions, and not on performance optimization. Furthermore, the RDE was designed for fundamental detonation studies and not performance. Nevertheless, the analysis indicates that with some small alterations to the design, an RDE with an overall pressure rise is possible.

  18. Numerical and Analytical Assessment of a Coupled Rotating Detonation Engine and Turbine Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.; Naples, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    An analysis is presented of an experimental rig comprising a rotating detonation engine (RDE) with bypass ejector flow coupled to a downstream turbine. The analysis used a validated computational fluid dynamics RDE simulation combined with straightforward algebraic mixing equations for the bypass flow. The objectives of the analysis were to supplement and interpret the necessarily sparse measurements from the rig, and to assess the performance of the RDE itself, which was not instrumented in this installation. The analysis is seen to agree reasonably well with available data. It shows that the RDE is operating in an unusual fashion, with subsonic flow throughout the exhaust plane. The detonation event itself is producing a total pressure rise relative to the pre-detonative pressure; however, the length of the device and the substantial flow restriction at the inlet yield an overall pressure loss. This is not surprising since the objective of the rig test was primarily aimed at investigating RDE/turbine interactions, and not on performance optimization. Furthermore, the RDE was designed for fundamental detonation studies and not performance. Nevertheless, the analysis indicates that with some small alterations to the design, an RDE with an overall pressure rise is possible.

  19. Communication: Spin densities within a unitary group based spin-adapted open-shell coupled-cluster theory: Analytic evaluation of isotropic hyperfine-coupling constants for the combinatoric open-shell coupled-cluster scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, Dipayan Gauss, Jürgen

    2015-07-07

    We report analytical calculations of isotropic hyperfine-coupling constants in radicals using a spin-adapted open-shell coupled-cluster theory, namely, the unitary group based combinatoric open-shell coupled-cluster (COSCC) approach within the singles and doubles approximation. A scheme for the evaluation of the one-particle spin-density matrix required in these calculations is outlined within the spin-free formulation of the COSCC approach. In this scheme, the one-particle spin-density matrix for an open-shell state with spin S and M{sub S} = + S is expressed in terms of the one- and two-particle spin-free (charge) density matrices obtained from the Lagrangian formulation that is used for calculating the analytic first derivatives of the energy. Benchmark calculations are presented for NO, NCO, CH{sub 2}CN, and two conjugated π-radicals, viz., allyl and 1-pyrrolyl in order to demonstrate the performance of the proposed scheme.

  20. On-chip sample preparation and analyte quantification using a microfluidic aqueous two-phase extraction coupled with an immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Soares, R R G; Novo, P; Azevedo, A M; Fernandes, P; Aires-Barros, M R; Chu, V; Conde, J P

    2014-11-07

    Immunoassays are fast and sensitive techniques for analyte quantification, and their use in point-of-care devices for medical, environmental, and food safety applications has potential benefits of cost, portability, and multiplexing. However, immunoassays are often affected by matrix interference effects, requiring the use of complex laboratory extraction and concentration procedures in order to achieve the required sensitivity. In this paper we propose an integrated microfluidic device for the simultaneous matrix clean-up, concentration and detection. This device consists of two modules in series, the first performing an aqueous two-phase extraction (ATPE) for matrix extraction and analyte pre-concentration, and the second an immunoassay for quantification. The model analyte was the mycotoxin ochratoxin A (OTA) in a wine matrix. Using this strategy, a limit of detection (LoD) of 0.26 ng mL(-1) was obtained for red wine spiked with OTA, well below the regulatory limit for OTA in wines of 2 ng mL(-1) set by the European Union. Furthermore, the linear response on the logarithmic concentration scale was observed to span 3 orders of magnitude (0.1-100 ng mL(-1)). These results are comparable to those obtained for the quantification of OTA in plain buffer without an integrated ATPE (LoD = 0.15 ng mL(-1)). The proposed method was also found to provide similar results for markedly different matrices, such as red and white wines. This novel approach based on aqueous two-phase systems can help the development of point-of-care devices that can directly deal with real samples in complex matrices without the need for extra extraction processes and equipment.

  1. Tetrahedral DNA nanostructure-based microRNA biosensor coupled with catalytic recycling of the analyte.

    PubMed

    Miao, Peng; Wang, Bidou; Chen, Xifeng; Li, Xiaoxi; Tang, Yuguo

    2015-03-25

    MicroRNAs are not only important regulators of a wide range of cellular processes but are also identified as promising disease biomarkers. Due to the low contents in serum, microRNAs are always difficult to detect accurately . In this study, an electrochemical biosensor for ultrasensitive detection of microRNA based on tetrahedral DNA nanostructure is developed. Four DNA single strands are engineered to form a tetrahedral nanostructure with a pendant stem-loop and modified on a gold electrode surface, which largely enhances the molecular recognition efficiency. Moreover, taking advantage of strand displacement polymerization, catalytic recycling of microRNA, and silver nanoparticle-based solid-state Ag/AgCl reaction, the proposed biosensor exhibits high sensitivity with the limit of detection down to 0.4 fM. This biosensor shows great clinical value and may have practical utility in early diagnosis and prognosis of certain diseases.

  2. Analytical procedures for the determination of selected trace elements in peat and plant samples by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krachler, Michael; Mohl, Carola; Emons, Hendrik; Shotyk, William

    2002-08-01

    A simple, robust and reliable analytical procedure for the determination of 15 elements, namely Ca, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb, Ag, Cd, Ba, Tl, Th and U in peat and plant materials by inductively coupled plasma-quadrupole mass spectrometry (ICP-QMS) was developed. Powdered sample aliquots of approximately 220 mg were dissolved with various acid mixtures in a microwave heated high-pressure autoclave capable to digest 40 samples simultaneously. The selection of appropriate amounts of digestion acids (nitric acid, hydrofluoric acid or tetrafluoroboric acid) was crucial to obtain accurate results. The optimized acid mixture for digestion of plant and peat samples consisted of 3 ml HNO 3 and 0.1 ml HBF 4. An ultrasonic nebulizer with an additional membrane desolvation unit was found beneficial for the determination of Co, Ni, Ag, Tl, Th and U, allowing to aspirate a dry sample aerosol into the ICP-QMS. A pneumatic cross flow nebulizer served as sample introduction device for the other elements. Internal standardization was achieved with 103Rh for all elements, except for Th whose ICP-QMS signals were corrected by 103Rh and 185Re. Quality control was ascertained by analysis of the certified plant reference material GBW 07602 Bush Branches and Leaves. In almost all cases HNO 3 alone could not fully liberate the analytes of interest from the peat or plant matrix, probably because of the silicates present. After adding small amounts (0.05-0.1 ml) of either HF or HBF 4 to the digestion mixture, concentrations quantified by ICP-QMS generally increased significantly, in the case of Rb up to 80%. Further increasing the volumes of HF or HBF 4 in turn, resulted in a loss of recoveries of almost all elements, some of which amounted to approximately 60%. The successful analytical procedures were applied to the determination of two bulk peat materials. In general, good agreement between the found concentrations and results from an inter-laboratory trial or from instrumental

  3. Deviations from Cooper Limit Theory in Disordered Arrays of Proximity Coupled Nanoscale Superconducting Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouh, Taejoon; Valles, Zhenyi Long, Jr.

    2002-03-01

    Recently, novel superconductor to metal quantum phase transitions (SMQPT) have been predicted to occur in proximity coupled arrays of nanoscale superconducting islands. Quantum fluctuations, not considered in conventional proximity effect theories, drive these transitions^2. We have created 2d disordered arrays of Pb grains with radii and heights less than 10 nm and 4 nm, respectively, coupled by overlayers of Ag using the technique of quench condensation. We have measured the resistive transitions as a function of temperature, R(T), and Pb and Ag coverages, d_Pb and d_Ag, respectively. The R(T) follow the form expected for an array of mesoscopic SNS junctions. The transition temperature, T_co, of the highest d_Pb arrays decreases exponentially with d_Ag as expected from the Cooper Limit Theory of the proximity effect and faster than exponentially in arrays with smaller d_Pb. We discuss how the latter behavior is consistent with the arrays approaching a SMQPT. ^2See for example, B. Spivak, A. Zyuzin, and M. Hruska, Phys. Rev. B 6413, 2502 (2001).

  4. Ionic limiting molar conductivity calculation of Li-ion battery electrolyte based on mode coupling theory.

    PubMed

    He, Xiangming; Pu, Weihua; Han, Jingli; Chen, Jian; Lu, Jiufang; Jiang, Changyin; Wan, Chunrong

    2005-12-15

    A method is proposed based on mode coupling theory in which the ion transference number is introduced into the theory. The ionic limiting molar conductivities of LiPF6, LiClO4, LiBF4, LiCF3SO3, Li(CF3SO3)2N, LiC4F9SO3, and LiAsF6 in PC(propylene carbonate), GBL(gamma-butyrolactone), PC(propylene carbonate)/EMC(ethylmethyl carbonate), and PC(propylene carbonate)/DME(dimethoxyethane) are calculated based on this method, which does not involve any adjustable parameter. The results fit well to the literature data which are calculated by an empirically adjusted formula. This presents a potential way to calculate the conductivities of Li-ion battery electrolytes.

  5. Kinetics-Driven Superconducting Gap in Underdoped Cuprate Superconductors Within the Strong-Coupling Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, Wei; Yildirim, Yucel

    2012-02-01

    A generic theory [1] of the quasiparticle superconducting gap in underdoped cuprates is derived in the strong-coupling limit, and found to describe the experimental ``second gap'' in absolute scale. In drastic contrast to the standard pairing gap associated with Bogoliubov quasiparticle excitations, the quasiparticle gap is shown to originate from anomalous kinetic (scattering) processes, with a size unrelated to the pairing strength. Consequently, the k dependence of the gap deviates significantly from the pure dx^2-y^2 wave of the order parameter. Our study reveals a new paradigm for the nature of the superconducting gap, and is expected to reconcile numerous apparent contradictions among existing experiments and point toward a more coherent understanding of high-temperature superconductivity. [4pt] [1] Y. Yildirim and Wei Ku, PRX 1, 011011 (2011).

  6. New limits on coupling of fundamental constants to gravity using 87Sr optical lattice clocks.

    PubMed

    Blatt, S; Ludlow, A D; Campbell, G K; Thomsen, J W; Zelevinsky, T; Boyd, M M; Ye, J; Baillard, X; Fouché, M; Le Targat, R; Brusch, A; Lemonde, P; Takamoto, M; Hong, F-L; Katori, H; Flambaum, V V

    2008-04-11

    The 1S0-3P0 clock transition frequency nuSr in neutral 87Sr has been measured relative to the Cs standard by three independent laboratories in Boulder, Paris, and Tokyo over the last three years. The agreement on the 1 x 10(-15) level makes nuSr the best agreed-upon optical atomic frequency. We combine periodic variations in the 87Sr clock frequency with 199Hg+ and H-maser data to test local position invariance by obtaining the strongest limits to date on gravitational-coupling coefficients for the fine-structure constant alpha, electron-proton mass ratio mu, and light quark mass. Furthermore, after 199Hg+, 171Yb+, and H, we add 87Sr as the fourth optical atomic clock species to enhance constraints on yearly drifts of alpha and mu.

  7. New Limits on Coupling of Fundamental Constants to Gravity Using {sup 87}Sr Optical Lattice Clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Blatt, S.; Ludlow, A. D.; Campbell, G. K.; Thomsen, J. W.; Zelevinsky, T.; Boyd, M. M.; Ye, J.; Baillard, X.; Fouche, M.; Le Targat, R.; Brusch, A.; Lemonde, P.; Takamoto, M.; Hong, F.-L.; Katori, H.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2008-04-11

    The {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 3}P{sub 0} clock transition frequency {nu}{sub Sr} in neutral {sup 87}Sr has been measured relative to the Cs standard by three independent laboratories in Boulder, Paris, and Tokyo over the last three years. The agreement on the 1x10{sup -15} level makes {nu}{sub Sr} the best agreed-upon optical atomic frequency. We combine periodic variations in the {sup 87}Sr clock frequency with {sup 199}Hg{sup +} and H-maser data to test local position invariance by obtaining the strongest limits to date on gravitational-coupling coefficients for the fine-structure constant {alpha}, electron-proton mass ratio {mu}, and light quark mass. Furthermore, after {sup 199}Hg{sup +}, {sup 171}Yb{sup +}, and H, we add {sup 87}Sr as the fourth optical atomic clock species to enhance constraints on yearly drifts of {alpha} and {mu}.

  8. Refined weak-coupling limit: Coherence, entanglement, and non-Markovianity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivas, Ángel

    2017-04-01

    We study the properties of a refined weak-coupling limit that preserves complete positivity in order to describe non-Markovian dynamics in the spin-boson model. With this tool, we show the system presents a rich non-Markovian phenomenology. This implies a dynamical difference between entanglement and coherence: the latter undergoes revivals, whereas the former not, despite the induced dynamics being fully incoherent. In addition, the evolution presents "quasieternal" non-Markovianity, becoming nondivisible at any time period where the system evolves qualitatively. Furthermore, the method allows for an exact derivation of a master equation that accounts for a reversible energy exchange between system and environment. Specifically, this is obtained in the form of a time-dependent Lamb shift term.

  9. Analytical method development for the determination of emerging contaminants in water using supercritical-fluid chromatography coupled with diode-array detection.

    PubMed

    Del Carmen Salvatierra-Stamp, Vilma; Ceballos-Magaña, Silvia G; Gonzalez, Jorge; Ibarra-Galván, Valentin; Muñiz-Valencia, Roberto

    2015-05-01

    An analytical method using supercritical-fluid chromatography coupled with diode-array detection for the determination of seven emerging contaminants-two pharmaceuticals (carbamazepine and glyburide), three endocrine disruptors (17α-ethinyl estradiol, bisphenol A, and 17β-estradiol), one bactericide (triclosan), and one pesticide (diuron)-was developed and validated. These contaminants were chosen because of their frequency of use and their toxic effects on both humans and the environment. The optimized chromatographic separation on a Viridis BEH 2-EP column achieved baseline resolution for all compounds in less than 10 min. This separation was applied to environmental water samples after sample preparation. The optimized sample treatment involved a preconcentration step by means of solid-phase extraction using C18-OH cartridges. The proposed method was validated, finding recoveries higher than 94 % and limits of detection and limits of quantification in the range of 0.10-1.59 μg L(-1) and 0.31-4.83 μg L(-1), respectively. Method validation established the proposed method to be selective, linear, accurate, and precise. Finally, the method was successfully applied to environmental water samples.

  10. Analytical evaluation of nebulizers for the introduction of acetic acid extracts aiming at the determination of trace elements by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Gois, Jefferson S.; Maranhão, Tatiane de A.; Oliveira, Fernando J. S.; Frescura, Vera L. A.; Curtius, Adilson J.; Borges, Daniel L. G.

    2012-11-01

    Most of the official procedures aiming at classification of solid waste toxicity take into account metal solubility and bioavailability by means of extraction experiments using acetic acid solutions. Hence, the aim of this work was to investigate and optimize conditions to suppress the effect of acetic acid on the determination of trace elements using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The performance of four nebulizers (cross-flow (CFN), ultrasonic (USN), Meinhard (MN) and MicroMist (MMN)) were compared as to their efficiency in minimizing spectral and non-spectral effects on the determination of Ag, As, Ba, Cd, Cr, Hg, Pb and Se, with the ultimate goal to analyze acetic acid extracts obtained from solid waste residues. Operating conditions (desolvation temperatures for USN, RF power and nebulizer gas flow rates) were optimized individually for each nebulizer and for all analytes maintained in 0.14 mol L- 1 HNO3 solutions and in solutions prepared with acetic acid and acetic acid + NaOH, adjusted to pH 2.88 and 4.93, respectively. Pronounced non-spectral interferences for 75As and 82Se were observed in the presence of acetic acid for CF and MN, although to a less extent also for MMN and USN. Signal increase for blank solutions measured at m/z 208 (208Pb) for CFN and MN, 107 (107Ag) for USN and MN coupled to a cyclonic chamber and, m/z 82 (82Se) for USN was observed, indicating an increased risk of spectral interference upon an increase in the concentration of acetic acid. Signal increase at specific m/z ratios, however, was not significant when the MMN was used, with the exception of m/z 52 (52Cr) in acetic acid solutions, arising from the formation of 40Ar12C+. This same effect was noticed for all nebulizers, although at noticeably different intensities. A signal stability study was performed, demonstrating that variations in the analytical signal were within a 20% range for all analytes, with the exception of Hg, after continuous aspiration for 70 min

  11. Same Sign W+/-W+/- Production and Limits on Anomalous Quartic Gauge Couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lulu

    2014-03-01

    The production of a pair of W bosons with the same electric charge is a process which has not been observed at the LHC. One of its dominant production mechanisms is through the vector boson scattering (VBS), whose unitarization relies on the electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism and makes VBS of great interest to study. This talk, together with the talk by Alex Sood, will present a measurement of the inclusive same sign W+/-W+/- cross section, as well as a further study of the production through VBS with the requirement that the two leading pT jets are separated by at least 2.4 in rapidity (Δy). Limits are set on the anomalous quartic gauge couplings (aQGC). The analysis is performed using 20 fb-1 of data collected by the ATLAS detector at √{ s} = 8 GeV. This talk will focus on the extraction of the cross section and the limits on aQGC.

  12. Gs-coupled adenosine receptors differentially limit antigen-induced mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Hua, Xiaoyang; Chason, Kelly D; Jania, Corey; Acosta, Tatiana; Ledent, Catherine; Tilley, Stephen L

    2013-02-01

    Mast cell activation results in the immediate release of proinflammatory mediators prestored in cytoplasmic granules, as well as initiation of lipid mediator production and cytokine synthesis by these resident tissue leukocytes. Allergen-induced mast cell activation is central to the pathogenesis of asthma and other allergic diseases. Presently, most pharmacological agents for the treatment of allergic disease target receptors for inflammatory mediators. Many of these mediators, such as histamine, are released by mast cells. Targeting pathways that limit antigen-induced mast cell activation may have greater therapeutic efficacy by inhibiting the synthesis and release of many proinflammatory mediators produced in the mast cell. In vitro studies using cultured human and mouse mast cells, and studies of mice lacking A(2B) receptors, suggest that adenosine receptors, specifically the G(s)-coupled A(2A) and A(2B) receptors, might provide such a target. Here, using a panel of mice lacking various combinations of adenosine receptors, and mast cells derived from these animals, we show that adenosine receptor agonists provide an effective means of inhibition of mast cell degranulation and induction of cytokine production both in vitro and in vivo. We identify A(2B) as the primary receptor limiting mast cell degranulation, whereas the combined activity of A(2A) and A(2B) is required for the inhibition of cytokine synthesis.

  13. Coherent coupling between a molecular vibration and Fabry-Perot optical cavity to give hybridized states in the strong coupling limit (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, James P.; Owrutsky, Jeff C.; Fears, Kenan P.; Dressick, Walter J.; Dunkelberger, Adam D.; Compton, Ryan; Spann, Bryan; Simpkins, Blake S.

    2015-09-01

    Coherent coupling between an optical-transition and confined optical mode, when sufficiently strong, gives rise to new modes separated by the vacuum Rabi splitting. Such systems have been investigated for electronic-state transitions, however, only very recently have vibrational transitions been considered. Here, we bring strong polaritonic-coupling in cavities from the visible into the infrared where a new range of static and dynamic vibrational processes await investigation. First, we experimentally and numerically describe coupling between a Fabry-Perot cavity and carbonyl stretch (~1730 cm 1) in poly-methylmethacrylate. As is requisite for "strong coupling", the measured vacuum Rabi splitting of 132 cm 1 is much larger than the full width of the cavity (34 cm-1) and the inhomogeneously broadened carbonyl-stretch (24 cm-1). Agreement with classical theories providea evidence that the mixed-states are relatively immune to inhomogeneous broadening. Next, we investigate strong and weak coupling regimes through examination of cavities loaded with varying concentrations of urethane. Rabi splittings increases from 0 to ~104 cm-1 with concentrations from 0-20 vol% and are in excellent agreement to an analytical description using no fitting parameters. Ultra-fast pump-probe measurements reveal transient absorption signals over a frequency range well-separated from the vibrational band as well as modifications of energy relaxation times. Finally, we demonstrate coupling to liquids using the C-O stretching band (~1985 cm-1) of Mo(CO)6 in an aqueous solution. Opening the field of polaritonic coupling to vibrational species promises to be a rich arena amenable to a wide variety of infrared-active bonds that can be studied statically and dynamically.

  14. An efficient semi-analytical method for modeling strongly coupled diffusion and deformation processes in layered poroelastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, R.; Kuempel, H.

    2003-12-01

    From poroelasticity theory we know that fluid diffusion will induce matrix deformation and vice versa. In practice, well known phenomena for such coupled processes are, for example, occurrence of seismo-tectonically induced groundwater fluctuations, land subsidence as a result of fluid extraction from subsurface reservoirs, production-induced surface strain near the vicinity of wells, reservoir- or injection-induced seismicity. Modeling of deformation and pore-pressure data that have been observed near the surface can help to image the dynamics and to assess the hydraulic properties of subsurface aquifers. We here present a semi-analytical Haskell propagator method to fully handle linear poroelastic problems in a multilayered half-space. Our method is a powerful tool for various reasons: (1) It is faster than traditional numerical schemes when respective discretization of the object region is chosen and solutions are sought for single locations only; (2) a problem is easily formulated, as only a set of five poroelastic parameters per layer plus the layers' thicknesses need to be specified; (3) the method is highly flexible, as forcing functions of point injection, single force (e.g., surface loading), double couple dislocation (earthquakes), etc. may be readily incorporated; (4) the so-called loss-of-precision problem of the original propagator algorithm has been fully overcome using the orthonormalization technique. The effectiveness of the new tool has been demonstrated by modeling pump-induced near-surface tilt data obtained at a test site near Sopron in western Hungary. The results show that the hydraulic diffusivity of the shallow subsurface aquifer can be assessed with an accuracy better than half an order of magnitude, if other elastic parameters and the geometry (depth and thickness) of the water-bearing formations are sufficiently known from, for example, bore-log records. Moreover, the present method can be applied to model induced seismicity based on the

  15. Problems, possibilities and limitations of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry in the determination of platinum, palladium and rhodium in samples with different matrix composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, P.; Velichkov, S.; Velitchkova, N.; Havezov, I.; Daskalova, N.

    2010-02-01

    The economic and geological importance of platinum group of elements has led to the development of analytical methods to quantify them in different types of samples. In the present paper the quantitative information for spectral interference in radial viewing 40.68 MHz inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry in the determination of Pt, Pd and Rh in the presence of complex matrix, containing Al, Ca, Fe, Mg, Mn, P and Ti as matrix constituents was obtained. The database was used for optimum line selections. By using the selected analysis lines the following detection limits in ng g - 1 were obtained: Pt 1700, Pd-1440, Rh-900. The reached detection limits determine the possibilities and limitation of the direct ICP-AES method in the determination of Pt, Pd and Rh in geological and environmental materials. The database for spectral interferences in the presence of aluminum can be used for the determination of platinum group of elements in car catalysts. The accuracy of the analytical results was experimentally demonstrated by two certified reference materials that were analyzed: SARM 7, Pt ore and recycled auto-catalyst certified reference material SRM 2556.

  16. Determination of Total Arsenic and Speciation in Apple Juice by Liquid Chromatography-Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry: An Experiment for the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    He, Ping; Colon, Luis A.; Aga, Diana S.

    2016-01-01

    A two-part laboratory experiment was designed for upper-level analytical chemistry students to provide hands-on experience in the use of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for separation and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for detection. In the first part of the experiment, the students analyze total arsenic in…

  17. Determination of Total Arsenic and Speciation in Apple Juice by Liquid Chromatography-Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry: An Experiment for the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    He, Ping; Colon, Luis A.; Aga, Diana S.

    2016-01-01

    A two-part laboratory experiment was designed for upper-level analytical chemistry students to provide hands-on experience in the use of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for separation and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for detection. In the first part of the experiment, the students analyze total arsenic in…

  18. Beryllium Limits of Detection and Spectral Interferences in 2 Per Cent Nitric Acid, Digested Air Filter Paper, and GHOSTWIPETM Matrices by Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Jurgensen, A.R.

    2004-02-13

    The Analytical Development Section (ADS) of the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) has been requested to perform beryllium (Be) analysis on digested Air Filter Paper and GHOSTWIPE (Trade Mark) samples by Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectrometry (ICP-ES). One of the important figures of merit for this analysis is the detection limit (LOD), the smallest concentration of an element that can be detected with a defined certainty. To meet the site Industrial Hygiene (IH) requirements, an instrument LOD of 0.03 mg per Air Filter Paper (1 hr sample) and 0.2 mg per GHOSTWIPE (Trade Mark) must be demonstrated. Another important analytical parameter is the effect on the Be quantization from potential spectral interfering matrix elements. Any existing spectral overlaps could give false positives or increase the measured Be concentrations in these matrices. The purpose of this study was to document the Analytical Development Sections' s contained ICP-ES performance in these two areas. In addition, other Quality Control recommendations will be discussed.

  19. Power harvesting by electromagnetic coupling from wind-induced limit cycle oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccalero, G.; Olivieri, S.; Mazzino, A.; Boragno, C.

    2017-09-01

    Recent developments of low-power microprocessors open to new applications such as wireless sensor networks (WSN) with the consequent problem of autonomous powering. For this purpose, a possible strategy is represented by energy harvesting from wind or other flows exploiting fluid-structure interactions. In this work, we present an updated picture of a flutter-based device characterized by fully passive dynamics and a simple constructive layout, where limit cycle oscillations are undergone by an elastically bounded wing. In this case, the conversion from mechanical to electrical energy is performed by means of an electromagnetic coupling between a pair of coils and magnets. A centimetric-size prototype is shown to harvest energy from low wind velocities (between 2 and 4 m s-1), reaching a power peak of 14 mW, representing a valuable amount for applications related to WSN. A mathematical description of the nonlinear dynamics is then provided by a quasi-steady phenomenological model, revealing satisfactory agreement with the experimental framework within a certain parametric range and representing a useful tool for future optimizations.

  20. Octave-wide photonic band gap in three-dimensional plasmonic Bragg structures and limitations of radiative coupling.

    PubMed

    Taubert, Richard; Dregely, Daniel; Stroucken, Tineke; Christ, Andre; Giessen, Harald

    2012-02-21

    Radiative coupling between oscillators is one of the most fundamental subjects of research in optics, where particularly a Bragg-type arrangement is of interest and has already been applied to atoms and excitons in quantum wells. Here we explore this arrangement in a plasmonic structure. We observe the emergence of an octave-wide photonic band gap in the optical regime. Compared with atomic or excitonic systems, the coupling efficiency of the particle plasmons utilized here is several orders of magnitude larger and widely tunable by changing the size and geometry of the plasmonic nanowires. We are thus able to explore the regime where the coupling distance is even limited by the large radiative decay rate of the oscillators. This Bragg-stacked coupling scheme will open a new route for future plasmonic applications such as far-field coupling to quantum emitters without quenching, plasmonic cavity structures and plasmonic distributed gain schemes for spasers.

  1. Investigating the Occurrence and Environmental Significance of Methylated Arsenic Species in Atmospheric Particles by Overcoming Analytical Method Limitations.

    PubMed

    Tziaras, Thrasyvoulos; Pergantis, Spiros A; Stephanou, Euripides G

    2015-10-06

    A novel analytical method has been developed for the determination of all five arsenic species known to exist in atmospheric particulate matter (PM), i.e., the inorganic arsenite iAs(III) and arsenate iAs(V), and the methylated methylarsonate (MA), dimethylarsinate (DMA) and trimethylarsine oxide (TMAO). Although the methylated species were first detected in PM in the late 1970s, most of the recent studies focus mainly on the two inorganic As species, ignoring TMAO in particular. In the present study, an HPLC (with an anion and cation exchange column connected in series)-arsine generation-ICP-MS system provided complete separation of all five As species and limits of detection from 10 to 25 pg As mL(-1). This method was applied to analyze water extracts of the inhalable fraction of atmospheric PM (PM10, PM2.5 and PM2.1). 81 samples were collected, most during Saharan dust events, from a semirural area, and analyzed. The total water extractable arsenic ranged from 0.03 to 0.7 ng of As m(-3), values that are representative for remote areas. iAs(V) was the most abundant species followed by TMAO, DMA, iAs(III) and MA. None of the As species showed any particular trend with the presence or intensity of dust events, or seasonality, except for TMAO, which showed higher concentrations during the colder months.

  2. Coupled modeling of transport and biogeochemical processes in aquifers - Model requirements, strength and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, K.

    2003-12-01

    Microbially mediated geochemical changes in aquifers may trigger a series of secondary reactions that include aqueous and surface complexation, ion exchange, and mineral dissolution-precipitation. Due to the coupled nature and the multitude of processes involved it is often difficult to identify the reactions controlling the system's overall evolution. Numerical models can be a useful component for identifying gaps and inconsistencies in conceptual models and for performing a more quantitative investigation of these systems. Suitable computer codes must allow for a general description of transport and reaction processes to facilitate the investigation of site-specific conditions. In recent years significant advances have been made in terms of model generality and applicability. Major advances include the consideration of mass balance equations for reactants and reaction products, the integration of biodegradation and thermodynamic models, and the development of novel approaches for simulating biogeochemical processes and reactive transport under variably saturated conditions. MIN3P is one of the codes capable of simulating coupled biogeochemical and hydrological processes on an increasingly mechanistic level. The simulation of column experiments and a hypothetical case study at the field scale illustrate how reactive transport modeling can be used. Modeling column experiments can be particularly fruitful, because detailed data can be collected to support the mechanistic approach. However, analysis of conceptual models is also beneficial on the field scale. The case study considered here describes natural attenuation of a petroleum hydrocarbon spill in an unconfined aquifer by multiple electron acceptors. The simulations also consider geochemical reactions triggered by contaminant degradation including the re-oxidation of reaction products during transport away from the source area. Comparing the results to contaminant plumes described in the literature suggests

  3. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, S.A.; Hosea, J.C.; Timberlake, J.R.

    1984-10-19

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face is provided. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution. This limiter shape accommodates the various power scrape-off distances lambda p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V/sub parallel/, of the impacting particles.

  4. Kirchhoff plate theory-based electromechanically-coupled analytical model considering inertia and stiffness effects of a surface-bonded piezoelectric patch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Heonjun; Youn, Byeng D.; Kim, Heung Soo

    2016-02-01

    As a compact and durable design concept, piezoelectric energy harvesting skin (PEH skin) has been recently proposed for self-powered electronic device applications. This study aims to develop an electromechanically-coupled analytical model of PEH skin considering the inertia and stiffness effects of a piezoelectric patch. Based on Kirchhoff plate theory, Hamilton’s principle is used to derive the electromechanically-coupled differential equation of motion. Due to the geometric discontinuity of the piezoelectric patch, the Rayleigh-Ritz method is applied to calculate the natural frequency and corresponding mode shapes. The electrical circuit equation is derived from Gauss’s law. Output voltage is estimated by solving the equation of motion and electrical circuit equation, simultaneously. For the purpose of evaluating the predictive capability, the results of the electromechanically-coupled analytical model are compared with those of the finite element method in a hierarchical manner. The outstanding merits of the electromechanically-coupled analytical model of PEH skin are three-fold: (1) consideration of the inertia and stiffness effects of the piezoelectric patches; (2) physical parameterization between the two-dimensional mechanical configuration and piezoelectric transduction; (3) manipulability of the twisting modes of a cantilever plate with a small aspect ratio.

  5. The Study of Wγ production at D0: Anomalous Coupling Limits and the Radiation Amplitude Zero

    SciTech Connect

    Pawloski, Gregory J.

    2007-06-01

    Wγ production is analyzed in the electron and muon decay channels with approximately 1 fb-1 of data from p$\\bar{p}$ collisions that were produced at a center-of-mass energy of √s = 1.96 TeV and that were collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The inclusive p$\\bar{p}$ → ℓvγ cross section is measured in both channels and is found to be consistent with the Standard Model expectation of 2.08 ± 0.05PDF pb for events with a photon ET > 11 GeV, ΔRγ > 0.7, and ℓvγ transverse mass greater than 90 GeV . The observed cross section is measured to be 2.05 ± 0.18stat ± 0.10sys ± 0.13lumi pb and a.72 ± 0.19stat ± 0.15sys ± 0.10lumi pb for the electron and muon channels respectively. The photon ET spectrum is examined for indications of anomalous WWγ couplings. No evidence is found, and the following one-dimensional limits are set at a 95% confidence level: -0.18 < λ < 0.18 and 0.16 < κ < 1.84. The observed charge-signed photon-lepton rapidity difference is consistent with the Standard Model prediction and is indicative of the theoretically expected radiation amplitude zero. The distribution exhibits a bimodal structure which is expected from the destructive interference, with the unimodal hypothesis being ruled out at the 94% confidence level.

  6. Effect of analytical factors on immunochemical reference limits for complement component C3 in serum of a reference pediatric population.

    PubMed

    Buffone, G J; Lewis, S A

    1977-06-01

    We evaluated analytical factors such as antibody specificity, standard materials, and methodology for the measurement of C3. Mancini-type radial immunodiffusion and immunonephelometry were shown to give comparable data if variables other than procedural variables are eliminated. The most significant analytical factors affecting the measurement were antiserum specificity and source of standard material.

  7. Excitonic splitting and vibronic coupling in 1,2-diphenoxyethane: Conformation-specific effects in the weak coupling limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, Evan G.; Walsh, Patrick S.; Plusquellic, David F.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2013-05-01

    Vibrationally and rotationally resolved electronic spectra of 1,2-diphenoxyethane (C6H5-O-CH2-CH2-O-C6H5, DPOE) are reported for the isolated molecule under jet-cooled conditions. The spectra demonstrate that the two excited surfaces are within a few cm-1 of one another over significant regions of the torsional potential energy surfaces that modulate the position and orientation of the two aromatic rings with respect to one another. Two-color resonant two-photon ionization (2C-R2PI) and laser-induced fluorescence excitation spectra were recorded in the near-ultraviolet in the region of the close-lying S0-S1 and S0-S2 states (36 400-36 750 cm-1). In previous work, double resonance spectroscopy in the ultraviolet and alkyl CH stretch regions of the infrared was used to identify and assign transitions to two conformational isomers differing primarily in the central C-C dihedral angle, a tgt conformation with C2 symmetry and a ttt conformation with C2h symmetry [E. G. Buchanan, E. L. Sibert, and T. S. Zwier, J. Phys. Chem. A 117, 2800 (2013)], 10.1021/jp400691a. Comparison of 2C-R2PI spectra recorded in the m/z 214 (all 12C) and m/z 215 (one 13C) mass channels demonstrate the close proximity of the S1 and S2 excited states for both conformations, with an upper bound of 4 cm-1 between them. High resolution spectra of the origin band of the tgt conformer reveal it to consist of two transitions at 36 422.91 and 36 423.93 cm-1, with transition dipole moments perpendicular to one another. These are assigned to the S0-S1 and S0-S2 origin transitions with excited states of A and B symmetry, respectively, and an excitonic splitting of only 1.02 cm-1. The excited state rotational constants and transition dipole coupling model directions prove that the electronic excitation is delocalized over the two rings. The ttt conformer has only one dipole-allowed electronic transition (Ag→Bu) giving rise to a pure b-type band at 36 508.77 cm-1. Here, the asymmetry induced by a single 13

  8. Efficient analytic model to optimum design laser resonator and optical coupling system of diode-end-pumped solid-state lasers: influence of gain medium length and pump beam M2 factor.

    PubMed

    Shayeganrad, Gholamreza; Mashhadi, Leila

    2008-02-10

    A comprehensive analytical model for optimization longitudinal pumping of ideal four-level lasers is presented for accurate analysis by removing limiting assumptions on active length and pump-beam radius in the gain medium. By taking into account the circular-symmetric Gaussian pump beam including the M2 factor, an analytical formula for the root mean square of the pump beam in the active medium is developed to relate properties of the gain medium and pump beam to the requirement on efficient optimum design. Under the condition of minimum root mean square of pump-beam radius inside the active medium, the key parameters of the optimum optical coupling system have been analytically derived. Using these parameters, optimum mode size and maximum output efficiency are derived as a function of the gain medium length, absorption coefficient, pump-beam M2 factor, and input power. Dependence of the obtained parameters on the gain medium length, absorption coefficient, pump-beam M2 factor, and input power has been investigated. The results of this theory are found to be more comprehensive than the previous theoretical investigations. The present model provides a straightforward procedure to design the optimum laser resonator and the coupling optics for maximizing the output.

  9. Dynamic diffraction-limited light-coupling of 3D-maneuvered wave-guided optical waveguides.

    PubMed

    Villangca, Mark; Bañas, Andrew; Palima, Darwin; Glückstad, Jesper

    2014-07-28

    We have previously proposed and demonstrated the targeted-light delivery capability of wave-guided optical waveguides (WOWs). As the WOWs are maneuvered in 3D space, it is important to maintain efficient light coupling through the waveguides within their operating volume. We propose the use of dynamic diffractive techniques to create diffraction-limited spots that will track and couple to the WOWs during operation. This is done by using a spatial light modulator to encode the necessary diffractive phase patterns to generate the multiple and dynamic coupling spots. The method is initially tested for a single WOW and we have experimentally demonstrated dynamic tracking and coupling for both lateral and axial displacements.

  10. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, Samuel A.; Hosea, Joel C.; Timberlake, John R.

    1986-01-01

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face accommodates the various power scrape-off distances .lambda..sub.p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V.sub..parallel., of the impacting particles. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution.

  11. Dynamics of reaction-diffusion patterns controlled by asymmetric nonlocal coupling as a limiting case of differential advection.

    PubMed

    Siebert, Julien; Alonso, Sergio; Bär, Markus; Schöll, Eckehard

    2014-05-01

    A one-component bistable reaction-diffusion system with asymmetric nonlocal coupling is derived as a limiting case of a two-component activator-inhibitor reaction-diffusion model with differential advection. The effects of asymmetric nonlocal couplings in such a bistable reaction-diffusion system are then compared to the previously studied case of a system with symmetric nonlocal coupling. We carry out a linear stability analysis of the spatially homogeneous steady states of the model and numerical simulations of the model to show how the asymmetric nonlocal coupling controls and alters the steady states and the front dynamics in the system. In a second step, a third fast reaction-diffusion equation is included which induces the formation of more complex patterns. A linear stability analysis predicts traveling waves for asymmetric nonlocal coupling, in contrast to a stationary Turing patterns for a system with symmetric nonlocal coupling. These findings are verified by direct numerical integration of the full equations with nonlocal coupling.

  12. Reprint of "Influence of analytical bias and imprecision on the number of false positive results using Guideline-Driven Medical Decision Limits".

    PubMed

    Hyltoft Petersen, Per; Klee, George G

    2014-05-15

    Diagnostic decisions based on decision limits according to medical guidelines are different from the majority of clinical decisions due to the strict dichotomization of patients into diseased and non-diseased. Consequently, the influence of analytical performance is more critical than for other diagnostic decisions where much other information is included. The aim of this opinion paper is to investigate consequences of analytical quality and other circumstances for the outcome of "Guideline-Driven Medical Decision Limits". Effects of analytical bias and imprecision should be investigated separately and analytical quality specifications should be estimated accordingly. Use of sharp decision limits doesn't consider biological variation and effects of this variation are closely connected with the effects of analytical performance. Such relationships are investigated for the guidelines for HbA1c in diagnosis of diabetes and in risk of coronary heart disease based on serum cholesterol. The effects of a second sampling in diagnosis give dramatic reduction in the effects of analytical quality showing minimal influence of imprecision up to 3 to 5% for two independent samplings, whereas the reduction in bias is more moderate and a 2% increase in concentration doubles the percentage of false positive diagnoses, both for HbA1c and cholesterol. An alternative approach comes from the current application of guidelines for follow-up laboratory tests according to clinical procedure orders, e.g. frequency of parathyroid hormone requests as a function of serum calcium concentrations. Here, the specifications for bias can be evaluated from the functional increase in requests for increasing serum calcium concentrations. In consequence of the difficulties with biological variation and the practical utilization of concentration dependence of frequency of follow-up laboratory tests already in use, a kind of probability function for diagnosis as function of the key-analyte is proposed

  13. New characteristics of a resonant coupling between an analyte-filled core mode and a supermode of a liquid-core photonic crystal fiber based plasmonic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, Vasile A.; Puscas, Niculae Tiberiu; Perrone, Guido

    2013-10-01

    A new fiber optic sensor recently proposed for sensing an analyte with a large refractive index, such as benzene, is investigated using a finite element method in order to optimize its sensitivity. The device exploits the resonant coupling between some modes in a microstructured optical fiber made by a SiO2 rod with several holes, some filled with air, some filled with a liquid analyte, and a central hollow core surrounded by a gold layer and filled with the analyte as well. The structure presents three resonant frequencies, at λ = 0.7105 μm, λ = 2.611 μm and λ = 1.094 μm, depending on the hollow core radius and the different couplings between guided and polariton modes. The first resonant coupling, at λ = 0.7105 μm, is due to a perfect phase matching condition between a mode in the analyte and a supermode; its advantages are a small value of the full width at half maximum (8.6 nm), and a high value of the signal-to-noise ratio (0.29). The second resonant coupling, at λ = 2.611 μm, is due to a loss matching condition between a supermode and a plasmon mode, and its main advantages are large spectral sensitivity and sensor resolution (1.3 × 10-6 RIU). This resonance has also some disadvantages due to a very large value of the full width at half maximum (102 nm for a symmetric line shape), and a small value of the signal-to-noise ratio (0.13). The third resonant coupling is at λ = 1.094 μm and is related again to a phase matching condition between a supermode and a plasmon mode, but for a smaller value of the radius of the central core filled with the analyte. Its advantages are a high value of the amplitude sensitivity (5741.2 RIU-1) and a better value of the sensor resolution (1.74 × 10-6 RIU). The major disadvantages of this structure are a small value of the shift (1.0 nm) towards longer wavelengths of the phase matching point for an increase of the analyte refractive index by 0.001 RIU, a small value of the signal-to-noise ratio (0.03) and a small

  14. Ligands raise the constraint that limits constitutive activation in G protein-coupled opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Vezzi, Vanessa; Onaran, H Ongun; Molinari, Paola; Guerrini, Remo; Balboni, Gianfranco; Calò, Girolamo; Costa, Tommaso

    2013-08-16

    Using a cell-free bioluminescence resonance energy transfer strategy we compared the levels of spontaneous and ligand-induced receptor-G protein coupling in δ (DOP) and μ (MOP) opioid receptors. In this assay GDP can suppress spontaneous coupling, thus allowing its quantification. The level of constitutive activity was 4-5 times greater at the DOP than at the MOP receptor. A series of opioid analogues with a common peptidomimetic scaffold displayed remarkable inversions of efficacy in the two receptors. Agonists that enhanced coupling above the low intrinsic level of the MOP receptor were inverse agonists in reducing the greater level of constitutive coupling of the DOP receptor. Yet the intrinsic activities of such ligands are identical when scaled over the GDP base line of both receptors. This pattern is in conflict with the predictions of the ternary complex model and the "two state" extensions. According to this theory, the order of spontaneous and ligand-induced coupling cannot be reversed if a shift of the equilibrium between active and inactive forms raises constitutive activation in one receptor type. We propose that constitutive activation results from a lessened intrinsic barrier that restrains spontaneous coupling. Any ligand, regardless of its efficacy, must enhance this constraint to stabilize the ligand-bound complexed form.

  15. Ligands Raise the Constraint That Limits Constitutive Activation in G Protein-coupled Opioid Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Vezzi, Vanessa; Onaran, H. Ongun; Molinari, Paola; Guerrini, Remo; Balboni, Gianfranco; Calò, Girolamo; Costa, Tommaso

    2013-01-01

    Using a cell-free bioluminescence resonance energy transfer strategy we compared the levels of spontaneous and ligand-induced receptor-G protein coupling in δ (DOP) and μ (MOP) opioid receptors. In this assay GDP can suppress spontaneous coupling, thus allowing its quantification. The level of constitutive activity was 4–5 times greater at the DOP than at the MOP receptor. A series of opioid analogues with a common peptidomimetic scaffold displayed remarkable inversions of efficacy in the two receptors. Agonists that enhanced coupling above the low intrinsic level of the MOP receptor were inverse agonists in reducing the greater level of constitutive coupling of the DOP receptor. Yet the intrinsic activities of such ligands are identical when scaled over the GDP base line of both receptors. This pattern is in conflict with the predictions of the ternary complex model and the “two state” extensions. According to this theory, the order of spontaneous and ligand-induced coupling cannot be reversed if a shift of the equilibrium between active and inactive forms raises constitutive activation in one receptor type. We propose that constitutive activation results from a lessened intrinsic barrier that restrains spontaneous coupling. Any ligand, regardless of its efficacy, must enhance this constraint to stabilize the ligand-bound complexed form. PMID:23836900

  16. A miniaturized capacitively coupled plasma microtorch optical emission spectrometer and a Rh coiled-filament as small-sized electrothermal vaporization device for simultaneous determination of volatile elements from liquid microsamples: spectral and analytical characterization.

    PubMed

    Frentiu, Tiberiu; Darvasi, Eugen; Butaciu, Sinziana; Ponta, Michaela; Petreus, Dorin; Mihaltan, Alin I; Frentiu, Maria

    2014-11-01

    A low power and low argon consumption (13.56 MHz, 15 W, 150 ml min(-1)) capacitively coupled plasma microtorch interfaced with a low-resolution microspectrometer and a small-sized electrothermal vaporization Rh coiled-filament as liquid microsample introduction device into the plasma was investigated for the simultaneous determination of several volatile elements of interest for environment. Constructive details, spectral and analytical characteristics, and optimum operating conditions of the laboratory equipment for the simultaneous determination of Ag, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn requiring low vaporization power are provided. The method involves drying of 10 μl sample at 100°C, vaporization at 1500°C and emission measurement by capture of 20 successive spectral episodes each at an integration time of 500 ms. Experiments showed that emission of elements and plasma background were disturbed by the presence of complex matrix and hot Ar flow transporting the microsample into plasma. The emission spectrum of elements is simple, dominated by the resonance lines. The analytical system provided detection limits in the ng ml(-1) range: 0.5(Ag); 1.5(Cd); 5.6(Cu); 20(Pb) and 3(Zn) and absolute detection limits of the order of pg: 5(Ag); 15(Cd); 56(Cu); 200(Pb) and 30(Zn). It was demonstrated the utility and capability of the miniaturized analytical system in the simultaneous determination of elements in soil and water sediment using the standard addition method to compensate for the non-spectral effects of alkali and earth alkaline elements. The analysis of eight certified reference materials exhibited reliable results with recovery in the range of 95-108% and precision of 0.5-9.0% for the five examined elements. The proposed miniaturized analytical system is attractive due to the simple construction of the electrothermal vaporization device and microtorch, low costs associated to plasma generation, high analytical sensitivity and easy-to-run for simultaneous multielemental

  17. Benchmarking of numerical codes against analytical solutions for multidimensional multicomponent diffusive transport coupled with precipitation-dissolution reactions and porosity changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayek, M.; Kosakowski, G.; Jakob, A.; Churakov, S.

    2012-04-01

    Numerical computer codes dealing with precipitation-dissolution reactions and porosity changes in multidimensional reactive transport problems are important tools in geoscience. Recent typical applications are related to CO2 sequestration, shallow and deep geothermal energy, remediation of contaminated sites or the safe underground storage of chemotoxic and radioactive waste. Although the agreement between codes using the same models and similar numerical algorithms is satisfactory, it is known that the numerical methods used in solving the transport equation, as well as different coupling schemes between transport and chemistry, may lead to systematic discrepancies. Moreover, due to their inability to describe subgrid pore space changes correctly, the numerical approaches predict discretization-dependent values of porosity changes and clogging times. In this context, analytical solutions become an essential tool to verify numerical simulations. We present a benchmark study where we compare a two-dimensional analytical solution for diffusive transport of two solutes coupled with a precipitation-dissolution reaction causing porosity changes with numerical solutions obtained with the COMSOL Multiphysics code and with the reactive transport code OpenGeoSys-GEMS. The analytical solution describes the spatio-temporal evolution of solutes and solid concentrations and porosity. We show that both numerical codes reproduce the analytical solution very well, although distinct differences in accuracy can be traced back to specific numerical implementations.

  18. A broadened classical master equation approach for nonadiabatic dynamics at metal surfaces: Beyond the weak molecule-metal coupling limit.

    PubMed

    Dou, Wenjie; Subotnik, Joseph E

    2016-01-14

    A broadened classical master equation (BCME) is proposed for modeling nonadiabatic dynamics for molecules near metal surfaces over a wide range of parameter values and with arbitrary initial conditions. Compared with a standard classical master equation-which is valid in the limit of weak molecule-metal couplings-this BCME should be valid for both weak and strong molecule-metal couplings. (The BCME can be mapped to a Fokker-Planck equation that captures level broadening correctly.) Finally, our BCME can be solved with a simple surface hopping algorithm; numerical tests of equilibrium and dynamical observables look very promising.

  19. An analytical method for hydrogeochemical surveys: Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry after using enrichment coprecipitation with cobalt and ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hopkins, D.M.

    1991-01-01

    Trace metals that are commonly associated with mineralization were concentrated and separated from natural water by coprecipitation with ammonium pyrollidine dithiocarbamate (APDC) and cobalt and determined by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The method is useful in hydrogeochemical surveys because it permits preconcentration near the sample sites, and selected metals are preserved shortly after the samples are collected. The procedure is relatively simple: (1) a liter of water is filtered; (2) the pH is adjusted; (3) Co chloride and APDC are added to coprecipitate the trace metals; and (4) later, the precipitate is filtered, dissolved, and diluted to 10 ml for a 100-fold concentration enrichment of the separated metals. Sb(III), As(III), Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb, Mo, Ni, Ag, V, and Zn can then be determined simultaneously by ICP-AES. In an experiment designed to measure the coprecipitation efficiency, Sb(III), Cd and Ag were recovered at 70 to 75% of their original concentration. The remaining metals were recovered at 85 to 100% of their original concentrations, however. The range for the lower limits of determination for the metals after preconcentration is 0.1 to 3.0 ??g/l. The precision of the method was evaluated by replicate analyses of a Colorado creek water and two simulated water samples. The accuracy of the method was estimated using a water reference standard (SRM 1643a) certified by the U.S. National Bureau of Standards. In addition, the method was evaluated by analyzing groundwater samples collected near a porphyry copper deposit in Arizona and by analyzing meltwater from glacier-covered areas favorable for mineralization in south-central Alaska. The results for the ICP-AES analyses compared favorably with those obtained using the sequential technique of GFAAS on the acidified but unconcentrated water samples. ICP-AES analysis of trace-metal preconcentrates for hydrogeochemical surveys is more efficient than GFAAS because a

  20. Limits on dynamically generated spin-orbit coupling: Absence of l =1 Pomeranchuk instabilities in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselev, Egor I.; Scheurer, Mathias S.; Wölfle, Peter; Schmalian, Jörg

    2017-03-01

    An ordered state in the spin sector that breaks parity without breaking time-reversal symmetry, i.e., that can be considered dynamically generated spin-orbit coupling, was proposed to explain puzzling observations in a range of different systems. Here, we derive severe restrictions for such a state that follow from a Ward identity related to spin conservation. It is shown that l =1 spin-Pomeranchuk instabilities are not possible in nonrelativistic systems since the response of spin-current fluctuations is entirely incoherent and nonsingular. This rules out relativistic spin-orbit coupling as an emergent low-energy phenomenon. We illustrate the exotic physical properties of the remaining higher-angular-momentum analogs of spin-orbit coupling and derive a geometric constraint for spin-orbit vectors in lattice systems.

  1. Real-time dynamic coupling of GPC-enhanced diffraction-limited focal spots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villangca, Mark; Bañas, Andrew; Kopylov, Oleksii; Palima, Darwin; Glückstad, Jesper

    2015-03-01

    We have previously demonstrated on-demand dynamic coupling of an optically manipulated wave-guided optical waveguide (WOW) using diffractive techniques on a "point and shoot" approach. In this work, the generation of the coupling focal spots is done in real-time following the position of the WOW. Object-tracking routine has been added in the trapping program to get the position of the WOW. This approach allows continuous coupling of light through the WOWs which may be useful in some application. In addition, we include a GPC light shaper module in the holography setup to efficiently illuminate the spatial light modulator (SLM). The ability to switch from on-demand to continuous addressing with efficient illumination leverages our WOWs for potential applications in stimulation and nonlinear optics.

  2. Bis(aminoaryl) Carbon-Bridged Oligo(phenylenevinylene)s Expand the Limits of Electronic Couplings.

    PubMed

    Burrezo, Paula Mayorga; Lin, Nai-Ti; Nakabayashi, Koji; Ohkoshi, Shin-Ichi; Calzado, Eva M; Boj, Pedro G; Díaz García, María A; Franco, Carlos; Rovira, Concepciò; Veciana, Jaume; Moos, Michael; Lambert, Christoph; López Navarrete, Juan T; Tsuji, Hayato; Nakamura, Eiichi; Casado, Juan

    2017-03-06

    Carbon-bridged bis(aminoaryl) oligo(para-phenylenevinylene)s have been prepared and their optical, electrochemical, and structural properties analyzed. Their radical cations are class III and class II mixed-valence systems, depending on the molecular size, and they show electronic couplings which are among the largest for the self-exchange reaction of purely organic molecules. In their dication states, the antiferromagnetic coupling is progressively tuned with size from quinoidal closed-shell to open-shell biradicals. The data prove that the electronic coupling in the radical cations and the singlet-triplet gap in the dications show similar small attenuation factors, thus allowing charge/spin transfer over rather large distances. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Insulated conductor temperature limited heater for subsurface heating coupled in a three-phase WYE configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Sandberg, Chester Ledlie

    2010-11-09

    A heating system for a subsurface formation is described. The heating system includes a first heater, a second heater, and a third heater placed in an opening in the subsurface formation. Each heater includes: an electrical conductor; an insulation layer at least partially surrounding the electrical conductor; and an electrically conductive sheath at least partially surrounding the insulation layer. The electrical conductor is electrically coupled to the sheath at a lower end portion of the heater. The lower end portion is the portion of the heater distal from a surface of the opening. The first heater, the second heater, and the third heater are electrically coupled at the lower end portions of the heaters. The first heater, the second heater, and the third heater are configured to be electrically coupled in a three-phase wye configuration.

  4. Analytical developments for the determination of monomethylmercury complexes with low molecular mass thiols by reverse phase liquid chromatography hyphenated to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bouchet, Sylvain; Björn, Erik

    2014-04-25

    The behavior of monomethylmercury (MMHg) is markedly influenced by its distribution among complexes with low molecular mass (LMM) thiols but analytical methodologies dedicated to measure such complexes are very scarce up to date. In this work, we selected 15 LMM thiols often encountered in living organisms and/or in the environment and evaluated the separation of the 15 corresponding MMHg-thiol complexes by various high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) columns. Two C18 (Phenomenex Synergi Hydro-RP and LunaC18(2)), two phenyl (Inertsil Ph 3 and 5μm) and one mixed-mode (Restek Ultra IBD) stationary phases were tested for their retention and resolution capacities of the various complexes. The objective was to find simple separation conditions with low organic contents in the mobile phase to provide optimal conditions for detection by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). The 15 complexes were synthesized in solution and characterized by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The C18 columns tested were either not resolutive enough or too retentive. The 3μm phenyl stationary phase was able to resolve 10 out of the 15 complexes in less than 25min, under isocratic conditions. The mixed-mode column was especially effective at separating the most hydrophilic complexes (6 complexes out of the 15), corresponding to the main LMM thiols found in living organisms. The detection limits (DLs) for these two columns were in the low nanomolar range and overall slightly better for the phenyl column. The possibilities offered by such methodology were exemplified by monitoring the time-course concentrations of four MMHg-thiol complexes within a phytoplankton incubation containing MMHg in the presence of an excess of four added thiols. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Welwistatin Support Studies: Expansion and Limitation of Aryllead(IV) Coupling Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Jibo; Brown, Lauren E.

    2008-01-01

    Recent support studies on the total synthesis of the welwitstatin system are described. The target step involves lead-mediated arylation of sterically demanding aryl groups and carbon acid coupling partners in order to establish the highly congested tetracyclic core structure. Type 7 β-ketoesters and β-ketonitriles were successfully arylated with a variety of ortho- and meta-subsituted aryllead compounds generated by a halogen-boron-lead exchange sequence. The enolates of compounds 15, 19 and 25, each bearing all-carbon quaternary centers adjacent to the arylation site, failed to couple. PMID:17685656

  6. Ultrathin limit of exchange bias coupling at oxide multiferroic/ferromagnetic interfaces.

    PubMed

    Huijben, M; Yu, P; Martin, L W; Molegraaf, H J A; Chu, Y-H; Holcomb, M B; Balke, N; Rijnders, G; Ramesh, R

    2013-09-14

    Exchange bias coupling at the multiferroic- ferromagnetic interface in BiFeO₃ /La₀.₇ Sr₀.₃ MnO₃ heterostructures exhibits a critical thickness for ultrathin BiFeO₃ layers of 5 unit cells (2 nm). Linear dichroism measurements demonstrate the dependence on the BiFeO₃ layer thickness with a strong reduction for ultrathin layers, indicating diminished antiferromagnetic ordering that prevents interfacial exchange bias coupling. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. COUPLING

    DOEpatents

    Frisch, E.; Johnson, C.G.

    1962-05-15

    A detachable coupling arrangement is described which provides for varying the length of the handle of a tool used in relatively narrow channels. The arrangement consists of mating the key and keyhole formations in the cooperating handle sections. (AEC)

  8. Strong-coupling limit in cold-molecule formation via photoassociation or Feshbach resonance through Nikitin exponential resonance crossing

    SciTech Connect

    Ishkhanyan, Artur; Nakamura, H.

    2006-12-15

    The strong-coupling limit of molecule formation in an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate via two-mode one-color photoassociation or sweep across a Feshbach resonance is examined using a basic nonlinear time-dependent two-state model. For the general class of term-crossing models with constant coupling, a common strategy for attacking the problem is developed based on the reduction of the initial system of semiclassical equations for atom-molecule amplitudes to a third-order nonlinear differential equation for the molecular state probability. This equation provides deriving exact solution for a class of periodic level-crossing models. These models reveal much in common with the Rabi problem. Discussing the strong-coupling limit for the general case of variable detuning, the equation is further truncated to a limit first-order nonlinear equation. Using this equation, the strong nonlinearity regime for the first Nikitin exponential-crossing model is analyzed and accurate asymptotic expressions for the nonlinear transition probability to the molecular state are derived. It is shown that, because of a finite final detuning involved, this model displays essential deviations from the Landau-Zener behavior. In particular, it is shown that in the limit of strong coupling the final conversion probability tends to 1/6. Thus, in this case the strong interaction limit is not optimal for molecule formation. We have found that if optimal field intensity is applied the molecular probability is increased up to 1/4 (i.e., the half of the initial atomic population)

  9. FEM–BEM coupling for the large-body limit in micromagnetics

    PubMed Central

    Aurada, M.; Melenk, J.M.; Praetorius, D.

    2015-01-01

    We present and analyze a coupled finite element–boundary element method for a model in stationary micromagnetics. The finite element part is based on mixed conforming elements. For two- and three-dimensional settings, we show well-posedness of the discrete problem and present an a priori error analysis for the case of lowest order elements. PMID:26041946

  10. FEM-BEM coupling for the large-body limit in micromagnetics.

    PubMed

    Aurada, M; Melenk, J M; Praetorius, D

    2015-06-01

    We present and analyze a coupled finite element-boundary element method for a model in stationary micromagnetics. The finite element part is based on mixed conforming elements. For two- and three-dimensional settings, we show well-posedness of the discrete problem and present an a priori error analysis for the case of lowest order elements.

  11. Measurement of W±W± vector-boson scattering and limits on anomalous quartic gauge couplings with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; ...

    2017-07-28

    Tmore » his paper presents the extended results of measurements of W±W± j j production and limits on anomalous quartic gauge couplings using 20.3 fb-1 of proton–proton collision data at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 8 eV recorded by the ALAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Events with two leptons (e or μ) with the same electric charge and at least two jets are analyzed. Production cross sections are determined in two fiducial regions, with different sensitivities to the electroweak and strong production mechanisms. Lastly, an additional fiducial region, particularly sensitive to anomalous quartic gauge coupling parameters α4 and α5 , is introduced, which allows more stringent limits on these parameters compared to the previous ALAS measurement.« less

  12. Measurement of W±W± vector-boson scattering and limits on anomalous quartic gauge couplings with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; Abouzeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Ali, B.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alstaty, M.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antel, C.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. 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L.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez, J.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Beringer, J.; Berlendis, S.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertram, I. A.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethani, A.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bielski, R.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao de Mendizabal, J.; Billoud, T. R. V.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bisanz, T.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. 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S.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, F.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farina, C.; Farina, E. M.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fawcett, W. J.; Fayard, L.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Feremenga, L.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Flaschel, N.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, R. R. M.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Forcolin, G. T.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Foster, A. G.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Frate, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; Fressard-Batraneanu, S. M.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fusayasu, T.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gach, G. P.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, L. G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. 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F.; Glazov, A.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Godlewski, J.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino da Costa, J.; Gonella, G.; Gonella, L.; Gongadze, A.; González de La Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Parra, G.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Goudet, C. R.; Goujdami, D.; Goussiou, A. G.; Govender, N.; Gozani, E.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Gradin, P. O. J.; Grafström, P.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, S.; Gratchev, V.; Gravila, P. M.; Gray, H. M.; Graziani, E.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Grefe, C.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Grevtsov, K.; Griffiths, J.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Groh, S.; Grohs, J. P.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grossi, G. C.; Grout, Z. 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K.; Jansen, E.; Jansky, R.; Janssen, J.; Janus, M.; Jarlskog, G.; Javadov, N.; Javå¯Rek, T.; Javurkova, M.; Jeanneau, F.; Jeanty, L.; Jeng, G.-Y.; Jennens, D.; Jenni, P.; Jeske, C.; Jézéquel, S.; Ji, H.; Jia, J.; Jiang, H.; Jiang, Y.; Jiggins, S.; Jimenez Pena, J.; Jin, S.; Jinaru, A.; Jinnouchi, O.; Jivan, H.; Johansson, P.; Johns, K. A.; Johnson, W. J.; Jon-And, K.; Jones, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Jones, S.; Jones, T. J.; Jongmanns, J.; Jorge, P. M.; Jovicevic, J.; Ju, X.; Juste Rozas, A.; Köhler, M. K.; Kaczmarska, A.; Kado, M.; Kagan, H.; Kagan, M.; Kahn, S. J.; Kaji, T.; Kajomovitz, E.; Kalderon, C. W.; Kaluza, A.; Kama, S.; Kamenshchikov, A.; Kanaya, N.; Kaneti, S.; Kanjir, L.; Kantserov, V. A.; Kanzaki, J.; Kaplan, B.; Kaplan, L. S.; Kapliy, A.; Kar, D.; Karakostas, K.; Karamaoun, A.; Karastathis, N.; Kareem, M. J.; Karentzos, E.; Karnevskiy, M.; Karpov, S. N.; Karpova, Z. M.; Karthik, K.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Karyukhin, A. N.; Kasahara, K.; Kashif, L.; Kass, R. 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M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shaikh, N. W.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sickles, A. M.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Simon, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Slovak, R.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smiesko, J.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; Solans Sanchez, C. A.; Solar, M.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Son, H.; Song, H. Y.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stabile, A.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, G. H.; Stark, J.; Stark, S. H.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Stärz, S.; Staszewski, R.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Suchek, S.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, M.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tapia Araya, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, A. C.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, B.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Trofymov, A.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsui, K. M.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tu, Y.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turgeman, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tyndel, M.; Ucchielli, G.; Ueda, I.; Ughetto, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valdes Santurio, E.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; van den Wollenberg, W.; van der Deijl, P. C.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vasquez, J. G.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigani, L.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vittori, C.; Vivarelli, I.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wallangen, V.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, W.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, M. D.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Whallon, N. L.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilk, F.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winston, O. J.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wolf, T. M. H.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Worm, S. D.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zur Nedden, M.; Zwalinski, L.; Atlas Collaboration

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents the extended results of measurements of W±W±j j production and limits on anomalous quartic gauge couplings using 20.3 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data at √{s }=8 TeV recorded by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Events with two leptons (e or μ ) with the same electric charge and at least two jets are analyzed. Production cross sections are determined in two fiducial regions, with different sensitivities to the electroweak and strong production mechanisms. An additional fiducial region, particularly sensitive to anomalous quartic gauge coupling parameters α4 and α5, is introduced, which allows more stringent limits on these parameters compared to the previous ATLAS measurement.

  13. Full characterisation of a background limited antenna coupled KID over an octave of bandwidth for THz radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno, J.; Yurduseven, O.; Yates, S. J. C.; Llombart, N.; Murugesan, V.; Thoen, D. J.; Baryshev, A. M.; Neto, A.; Baselmans, J. J. A.

    2017-06-01

    We present the design, fabrication, and full characterisation (sensitivity, beam pattern, and frequency response) of a background limited broadband antenna coupled kinetic inductance detector covering the frequency range from 1.4 to 2.8 THz. This device shows photon noise limited performance with a noise equivalent power of 2.5 × 10-19 W/Hz1/2 at 1.55 THz and can be easily scaled to a kilo-pixel array. The measured optical efficiency, beam pattern, and antenna frequency response match very well the simulations.

  14. Spin injection beyond the diffusive limit in the presence of spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liefeith, Lennart-Knud; Tholapi, Rajkiran; Ishikura, Tomotsugu; Hänze, Max; Hartmann, Robert; Slobodskyy, Taras; Hansen, Wolfgang

    2017-02-01

    Spin injection from epitaxial iron into InGaAs/InAs quantum wells is observed using an all-electric nonlocal setup. From the choice of material, a significant spin-orbit interaction (SOI) is expected. The contact separation of the spin-valve devices is in the order of the mean free path so that the transport is at the transition between diffusive and ballistic. With an established purely diffusive model a spin-injection efficiency of 77 % is determined from the data. This value is very large compared to previous observations on diffusive spin-valve devices on similar material systems. Motivated by similar results on ballistic spin-valve devices in a material system with small spin-orbit coupling, a recent model was suggested in which a ballistic spin-dephasing length was pointed out to be the crucial length scale. With this model and an experimentally determined spin-orbit coupling parameter of α =4 ×10-12 eV m, very high spin-injection efficiencies are still determined in our quantum wells. We suggest that the spin-dephasing length to be used in the model must be larger due to the crystallographic anisotropy of the spin-orbit coupling, i.e., in our setup the SOI stabilizes the spin in the crystal direction of the spin-polarized current.

  15. Improved gauge actions on anisotropic lattices I. Study of fundamental parameters in the weak coupling limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, S.; Saito, T.; Nakamura, A.

    2000-09-01

    On anisotropic lattices with the anisotropy ξ=a σ/a τ the following basic parameters are calculated by perturbative method: (1) the renormalization of the gauge coupling in spatial and temporal directions, g σ and g τ, (2) the Λ parameter, (3) the ratio of the renormalized and bare anisotropy η=ξ/ξ B and (4) the derivatives of the coupling constants with respect to ξ, ∂g σ-2/∂ξ and ∂g τ-2/∂ξ . We employ the improved gauge actions which consist of plaquette and six-link rectangular loops, c 0P(1×1) μν+c 1P(1×2) μν. This class of actions covers Symanzik, Iwasaki and DBW2 actions. The ratio η shows an impressive behavior as a function of c 1, i.e., η>1 for the standard Wilson and Symanzik actions, while η<1 for Iwasaki and DBW2 actions. This is confirmed non-perturbatively by numerical simulations in weak coupling regions. The derivatives ∂g -2τ/∂ξ and ∂g -2σ/∂ξ also change sign as -c 1 increases. For Iwasaki and DBW2 actions they become opposite sign to those for standard and Symanzik actions. However, their sum is independent of the type of actions due to Karsch's sum rule.

  16. Spin-orbit coupling in InSb semiconductor nanowires: physical limits for majorana states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipahi, Guilherme; de Campos, Tiago; Faria Junior, Paulo E.; Gmitra, Martin; Zutic, Igor; Fabian, Jaroslav

    The search for Majorana fermions is a hot subject nowadays. One of the possibilities for their realization is the use of semiconductor nanowires and p-type superconductors coupled together. Following this path, the first step is the determination of realistic band structures of these wires including spin-orbit effects. To consider the spin-orbit effects, its common to use models that take into account only the first conduction band. Although these reduced models have been successfully used to determine some physical properties, a more realistic description of the spin-orbit coupling between the bands is required to further investigate possible ways to realize the Majorana fermions. In this study we use a state of the art 14 band k.p formalism together with the envelope function approach to determine the band structure of InAs semiconductor nanowires and analyze how the quantum confinement change the coupling between the bands. As a result we have extracted the effective masses and the spin-orbit splitting for a large range of nanowire radial sizes and for several conduction bands that can be used in effective models. FAPESP (No. 2011/19333-4, No. 2012/05618-0 and No. 2013/23393-8), CNPq (No. 246549/2012-2 and No. 149904/2013-4), CAPES(PVE 88881.068174/2014-01) and DFG SFB 689.

  17. Analytic first derivatives for a spin-adapted open-shell coupled cluster theory: Evaluation of first-order electrical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, Dipayan Gauss, Jürgen

    2014-09-14

    An analytic scheme is presented for the evaluation of first derivatives of the energy for a unitary group based spin-adapted coupled cluster (CC) theory, namely, the combinatoric open-shell CC (COSCC) approach within the singles and doubles approximation. The widely used Lagrange multiplier approach is employed for the derivation of an analytical expression for the first derivative of the energy, which in combination with the well-established density-matrix formulation, is used for the computation of first-order electrical properties. Derivations of the spin-adapted lambda equations for determining the Lagrange multipliers and the expressions for the spin-free effective density matrices for the COSCC approach are presented. Orbital-relaxation effects due to the electric-field perturbation are treated via the Z-vector technique. We present calculations of the dipole moments for a number of doublet radicals in their ground states using restricted open-shell Hartree-Fock (ROHF) and quasi-restricted HF (QRHF) orbitals in order to demonstrate the applicability of our analytic scheme for computing energy derivatives. We also report calculations of the chlorine electric-field gradients and nuclear quadrupole-coupling constants for the CCl, CH{sub 2}Cl, ClO{sub 2}, and SiCl radicals.

  18. Analytic first derivatives for a spin-adapted open-shell coupled cluster theory: evaluation of first-order electrical properties.

    PubMed

    Datta, Dipayan; Gauss, Jürgen

    2014-09-14

    An analytic scheme is presented for the evaluation of first derivatives of the energy for a unitary group based spin-adapted coupled cluster (CC) theory, namely, the combinatoric open-shell CC (COSCC) approach within the singles and doubles approximation. The widely used Lagrange multiplier approach is employed for the derivation of an analytical expression for the first derivative of the energy, which in combination with the well-established density-matrix formulation, is used for the computation of first-order electrical properties. Derivations of the spin-adapted lambda equations for determining the Lagrange multipliers and the expressions for the spin-free effective density matrices for the COSCC approach are presented. Orbital-relaxation effects due to the electric-field perturbation are treated via the Z-vector technique. We present calculations of the dipole moments for a number of doublet radicals in their ground states using restricted open-shell Hartree-Fock (ROHF) and quasi-restricted HF (QRHF) orbitals in order to demonstrate the applicability of our analytic scheme for computing energy derivatives. We also report calculations of the chlorine electric-field gradients and nuclear quadrupole-coupling constants for the CCl, CH2Cl, ClO2, and SiCl radicals.

  19. Investigating the effects of marriage and relationship education on couples' communication skills: a meta-analytic study.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Victoria L; Hawkins, Alan J; Baldwin, Scott A; Fawcett, Elizabeth B

    2009-04-01

    This meta-analysis probes into previous research substantiating the positive effects of marriage and relationship education (MRE) on couples' communication skills. We reviewed 97 MRE research reports that yielded 143 distinct evaluation studies. We found modest evidence that MRE functions both as a universal prevention and as a selective or indicated prevention. That is, MRE demonstrates program effects at longer term follow-ups for well-functioning couples and at postassessment and shorter term follow-ups for more distressed couples. In addition, we found that observational assessments produced larger effects than self-report assessments, although interpreting the meaning of this difference is difficult.

  20. An analytical study on excitation of nuclear-coupled thermal-hydraulic instability due to seismically induced resonance in BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Masashi

    1997-07-01

    This paper describes the results of a scoping study on seismically induced resonance of nuclear-coupled thermal-hydraulic instability in BWRs, which was conducted by using TRAC-BF1 within a framework of a point kinetics model. As a result of the analysis, it is shown that a reactivity insertion could occur accompanied by in-surge of coolant into the core resulted from the excitation of the nuclear-coupled instability by the external acceleration. In order to analyze this phenomenon more in detail, it is necessary to couple a thermal-hydraulic code with a three-dimensional nuclear kinetics code.

  1. A review of special gate coupling effects in long-channel SOI MOSFETs with lightly doped ultra-thin bodies and their compact analytical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudenko, T.; Nazarov, A.; Kilchytska, V.; Flandre, D.

    2016-03-01

    The charge coupling between the front and back gates is a fundamental property of any fully-depleted silicon-on-insulator (SOI) MOSFET. It is traditionally described by the classical Lim and Fossum model (Lim and Fossum, 1983). However, in the case of lightly-doped ultra-thin-body (UTB) SOI MOSFETs with ultra-thin gate dielectrics, significant deviations from this model have been observed and analyzed over the years. In this paper, we present a thorough review of special features of gate coupling in such devices, combining a large set of results from one-dimensional numerical simulations in classical and quantum-mechanical modes, experimental data and analytical modeling. We show that UTB SOI MOSFETs with ultra-thin gate dielectrics feature stronger modulation of the threshold voltage at the conduction side with opposite gate bias and much wider range of gate voltages for interface coupling than predicted by the Lim and Fossum model. These differences originate from both electrostatic and quantization effects. A simple analytical model taking into account these effects is presented. The model enables an easy assessment of the quantization-induced threshold voltage increase in a long-channel SOI MOSFET versus opposite gate bias and the electric field in the silicon film associated with gate decoupling.

  2. Microbial mechanisms coupling carbon and phosphorus cycles in phosphorus-limited northern Adriatic Sea.

    PubMed

    Malfatti, F; Turk, V; Tinta, T; Mozetič, P; Manganelli, M; Samo, T J; Ugalde, J A; Kovač, N; Stefanelli, M; Antonioli, M; Fonda-Umani, S; Del Negro, P; Cataletto, B; Hozić, A; Ivošević Denardis, N; Zutić, V; Svetličić, V; Mišić Radić, T; Radić, T; Fuks, D; Azam, F

    2014-02-01

    The coastal northern Adriatic Sea receives pulsed inputs of riverine nutrients, causing phytoplankton blooms and seasonally sustained dissolved organic carbon (DOC) accumulation-hypothesized to cause episodes of massive mucilage. The underlying mechanisms regulating P and C cycles and their coupling are unclear. Extensive biogeochemical parameters, processes and community composition were measured in a 64-day mesocosms deployed off Piran, Slovenia. We followed the temporal trends of C and P fluxes in P-enriched (P+) and unenriched (P-) mesocosms. An intense diatom bloom developed then crashed; however, substantial primary production was maintained throughout, supported by tightly coupled P regeneration by bacteria and phytoplankton. Results provide novel insights on post-bloom C and P dynamics and mechanisms. 1) Post-bloom DOC accumulation to 186 μM remained elevated despite high bacterial carbon demand. Presumably, a large part of DOC accumulated due to the bacterial ectohydrolytic processing of primary productivity that adventitiously generated slow-to-degrade DOC; 2) bacteria heavily colonized post-bloom diatom aggregates, rendering them microscale hotspots of P regeneration due to locally intense bacterial ectohydrolase activities; 3) Pi turnover was rapid thus suggesting high P flux through the DOP pool (dissolved organic phosphorus) turnover; 4) Alpha- and Gamma-proteobacteria dominated the bacterial communities despite great differences of C and P pools and fluxes in both mesocosms. However, minor taxa showed dramatic changes in community compositions. Major OTUs were presumably generalists adapted to diverse productivity regimes.We suggest that variation in bacterial ectohydrolase activities on aggregates, regulating the rates of POM→DOM transition as well as dissolved polymer hydrolysis, could become a bottleneck in P regeneration. This could be another regulatory step, in addition to APase, in the microbial regulation of P cycle and the coupling

  3. Synthetic dimensions in the strong-coupling limit: Supersolids and pair superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilitewski, Thomas; Cooper, Nigel R.

    2016-08-01

    We study the many-body phases of bosonic atoms with N internal states confined to a one-dimensional (1D) optical lattice under the influence of a synthetic magnetic field and strong repulsive interactions. The N internal states of the atoms are coupled via Raman transitions creating the synthetic magnetic field in the space of internal spin states corresponding to recent experimental realizations. We focus on the case of strong SU(N ) invariant local density-density interactions in which each site of the 1D lattice is at most singly occupied, and strong Raman coupling, in distinction to previous work which has focused on the weak Raman coupling case. This allows us to keep only a single state per site and derive a low-energy effective spin-1 /2 model. The effective model contains first-order nearest-neighbor tunneling terms, second-order nearest-neighbor interactions, and correlated next-nearest-neighbor tunneling terms. By adjusting the flux ϕ , one can tune the relative importance of first-order and second-order terms in the effective Hamiltonian. In particular, first-order terms can be set to zero, realizing a model with dominant second-order terms. We show that the resulting competition between density-dependent tunneling and repulsive density-density interaction leads to an interesting phase diagram including a phase with long-range pair-superfluid correlations. The method can be straightforwardly extended to higher dimensions and lattices of arbitrary geometry, including geometrically frustrated lattices where the interplay of frustration, interactions, and kinetic terms is expected to lead to even richer physics.

  4. Analytical solution and simplified analysis of coupled parent-daughter steady-state transport with multirate mass transfer

    Treesearch

    R. Haggerty

    2013-01-01

    In this technical note, a steady-state analytical solution of concentrations of a parent solute reacting to a daughter solute, both of which are undergoing transport and multirate mass transfer, is presented. Although the governing equations are complicated, the resulting solution can be expressed in simple terms. A function of the ratio of concentrations, In (daughter...

  5. Determination of the resonance energy and width of the (2)B(2g) shape resonance of ethylene with the method of analytical continuation in the coupling constant.

    PubMed

    Horáček, Jiří; Paidarová, Ivana; Curík, Roman

    2014-08-21

    The method of analytical continuation in the coupling constant, which allows us to determine the energy and width of a shape resonance, has been applied to the study of the (2)B2g shape resonance of ethylene. The procedure was done in two steps. In the first step, we used commercially available quantum-chemistry programs to calculate the electronic energy of a neutral molecule and of a negative ion. In both calculations, the Hamiltonian was altered by the inclusion of an additional attractive potential that helps to keep the negative ion bound. In the second step, the energy difference between the neutral molecule and its negative ion was analytically continued by the use of the statistical Padé approximation.

  6. Quantifying Spasticity With Limited Swinging Cycles Using Pendulum Test Based on Phase Amplitude Coupling.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Chien Hung; Young, Hsu Wen Vincent; Wang, Cheng Yen; Wang, Yung Hung; Lee, Po Lei; Kang, Jiunn Horng; Lo, Men Tzung

    2016-10-01

    Parameters derived from the goniometer measures in the Pendulum test are insufficient in describing the function of abnormal muscle activity in the spasticity. To explore a quantitative evaluation of muscle activation-movement interaction, we propose a novel index based on phase amplitude coupling (PAC) analysis with the consideration of the relations between movement and surface electromyography (SEMG) activity among 22 hemiplegic stroke patients. To take off trend and noise, we use the empirical mode decomposition (EMD) to obtain intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) of the angular velocity due to its superior decomposing ability in nonlinear oscillations. Shannon entropy based on angular velocity (phase)-envelope of EMG (amplitude) distribution was calculated to demonstrate characteristics of the coupling between SEMG activity and joint movement. We also compare our results with those from traditional methods such as the normalized relaxation index derived from the Pendulum test and the mean root mean square (RMS) of the SEMG signals in the study. Our results show effective discrimination ability between spastic and nonaffected limbs using our method . This study indicates the feasibility of using the novel indices based on the PAC in evaluation the spasticity among the hemiplegic stroke patients with less than three swinging cycles.

  7. Semi-analytical modeling of the coupled strain and low-temperature dependence of the normal-state resistivity in Nb3Sn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lin; Ding, He; Zhang, Xin; Qiao, Li

    2017-03-01

    A semi-analytical modeling framework on the microscopic basis is proposed in this paper to predict the low-temperature transport properties of strained Nb3Sn superconductors. The theoretical predictions agree well with experimental observations, which indicate that the competitions between the strain state-dependent variations in the phonon spectrum and the electron density of states (DOS) are an important consideration in interpreting the coupled low temperature-strain sensitivity of resistivity in superconducting Nb3Sn. The model is helpful for identifying the scaling law describing the anomalies in the strain dependence of superconducting critical properties of Nb3Sn conductors.

  8. Ab initio analytical Raman intensities for periodic systems through a coupled perturbed Hartree-Fock/Kohn-Sham method in an atomic orbital basis. I. Theory.

    PubMed

    Maschio, Lorenzo; Kirtman, Bernard; Rérat, Michel; Orlando, Roberto; Dovesi, Roberto

    2013-10-28

    We present a fully analytical formulation for calculating Raman intensities of crystalline periodic systems using a local basis set. Numerical differentiation with respect to atomic coordinates and with respect to wavevectors is entirely avoided as is the determination of crystal orbital coefficient derivatives with respect to nuclear displacements. Instead, our method utilizes the orbital energy-weighted density matrix and is based on the self-consistent solution of first- and second-order Coupled Perturbed Hartree-Fock/Kohn-Sham equations for the electronic response to external electric fields at the equilibrium geometry. This method has also been implemented in the Crystal program, which uses a Gaussian type basis set.

  9. Benefits and limitations of using decision analytic tools to assess uncertainty and prioritize Landscape Conservation Cooperative information needs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Post van der Burg, Max; Cullinane Thomas, Catherine; Holcombe, Tracy R.; Nelson, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    The Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCCs) are a network of partnerships throughout North America that are tasked with integrating science and management to support more effective delivery of conservation at a landscape scale. In order to achieve this integration, some LCCs have adopted the approach of providing their partners with better scientific information in an effort to facilitate more effective and coordinated conservation decisions. Taking this approach has led many LCCs to begin funding research to provide the information for improved decision making. To ensure that funding goes to research projects with the highest likelihood of leading to more integrated broad scale conservation, some LCCs have also developed approaches for prioritizing which information needs will be of most benefit to their partnerships. We describe two case studies in which decision analytic tools were used to quantitatively assess the relative importance of information for decisions made by partners in the Plains and Prairie Potholes LCC. The results of the case studies point toward a few valuable lessons in terms of using these tools with LCCs. Decision analytic tools tend to help shift focus away from research oriented discussions and toward discussions about how information is used in making better decisions. However, many technical experts do not have enough knowledge about decision making contexts to fully inform the latter type of discussion. When assessed in the right decision context, however, decision analyses can point out where uncertainties actually affect optimal decisions and where they do not. This helps technical experts understand that not all research is valuable in improving decision making. But perhaps most importantly, our results suggest that decision analytic tools may be more useful for LCCs as way of developing integrated objectives for coordinating partner decisions across the landscape, rather than simply ranking research priorities.

  10. Benthic Foraminifera, Food in the Deep Sea, and Limits to Bentho-Pelagic Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, E.; Boscolo-Galazzo, F.; Arreguin-Rodrigu, G. J.; Ortiz, S.; Alegret, L.

    2015-12-01

    The deep-sea is the largest habitat on Earth, contains highly diverse biota, but is very little known. Many of its abundant benthic biota (e.g., nematodes) are not preserved in the fossil record. Calcareous and agglutinated benthic foraminifera (unicellular eukaryotes, Rhizaria; efficient dispersers) and ostracodes (Animalia, Crustacea; non-efficient dispersers) are the most common organisms providing a fossil record of deep-sea environments. Very little food is supplied to the deep-sea, because organic matter produced by photosynthesis is largely degraded before it arrives at the seafloor. Only a few % of organic matter is carried to the ocean bottom by 'marine snow', with its particle size and behavior in the water column controlled by surface ecosystem structure, including type of dominant primary producers (diatoms, cyanobacteria). Food supply and its seasonality are generally seen as the dominant control on benthic assemblages (combined with oxygenation), providing bentho-pelagic coupling between primary and benthic productivity. Benthic foraminiferal assemblages (composition and density) thus are used widely to estimate past productivity, especially during episodes of global climate change, ocean acidification, and mass extinction of primary producers. We show that some environmental circumstances may result in interrupting bentho-pelagic coupling, e.g. through lateral supply of organic matter along continental margins (adding more refractory organic matter), through trophic focusing and/or fine particle winnowing on seamounts (giving an advantage to suspension feeders), and through carbonate undersaturation (giving advantage to infaunal over epifaunal calcifyers). In addition, increased remineralization of organic matter combined with increased metabolic rates may cause assemblages to reflect more oligotrophic conditions at stable primary productivity during periods of global warming. As a result, benthic foraminiferal accumulation rates must be carefully

  11. Unidirectional solidification of binary melts from a cooled boundary: analytical solutions of a nonlinear diffusion-limited problem.

    PubMed

    Alexandrov, D V; Nizovtseva, I G; Malygin, A P; Huang, H-N; Lee, D

    2008-03-19

    A model is presented that describes nonstationary solidification of binary melts or solutions from a cooled boundary maintained at a time-dependent temperature. Heat and mass transfer processes are described on the basis of the principles of a mushy layer, which divides pure solid material and a liquid phase. Nonlinear equations characterizing the dynamics of the phase transition boundaries are deduced. Approximate analytical solutions of the model under consideration are constructed. A method for controlling the external temperature at a cooled wall in order to obtain a required solidification velocity is discussed.

  12. Limiting efficiencies of GaInP/GaAs/Ge up-conversion systems: Addressing the issue of radiative coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Dongchen; Green, Martin A.

    2016-09-01

    Recent work proposed up-conversion of sunlight through low-band-gap solar cells in combination with a large-band-gap light-emitting diode (LED), with one possibility being the use of a GaAs/Ge tandem photovoltaic device to drive a GaInP LED. One-sun limiting efficiencies for a GaInP bifacial solar cell with such an up-converter attached to its rear are reported for varying band-gap of GaInP junctions, both when there are radiative couplings between cells in the rear up-converter and when there are not. With a maximum theoretical efficiency of 44%, it is shown that the top cell's band-gap is a trade-off and radiative coupling in the rear up-converter reduces the efficiency, where physical reasons are given as is insight into the practice.

  13. Applications of the zeeman effect to analytical atomic spectroscopy--IV: capacitively-coupled radiofrequency spectral sources.

    PubMed

    Stephens, R

    1977-04-01

    A magnetically-stable spectral source is described in which a radiofrequency plasma is generated within a single hollow-cathode electrode. Power is coupled to the plasma by placing metal electrodes at the radiofrequency supply potential, around the outside of the lamp-casing. The sources are simple to build, and the capacitive power-coupling technique is convenient for generating a plasma at any desired point within the envelope. The performance of the sources is compared with that of the corresponding commercial hollow-cathode lamps driven from a direct current supply.

  14. Obtaining Arbitrary Prescribed Mean Field Dynamics for Recurrently Coupled Networks of Type-I Spiking Neurons with Analytically Determined Weights.

    PubMed

    Nicola, Wilten; Tripp, Bryan; Scott, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental question in computational neuroscience is how to connect a network of spiking neurons to produce desired macroscopic or mean field dynamics. One possible approach is through the Neural Engineering Framework (NEF). The NEF approach requires quantities called decoders which are solved through an optimization problem requiring large matrix inversion. Here, we show how a decoder can be obtained analytically for type I and certain type II firing rates as a function of the heterogeneity of its associated neuron. These decoders generate approximants for functions that converge to the desired function in mean-squared error like 1/N, where N is the number of neurons in the network. We refer to these decoders as scale-invariant decoders due to their structure. These decoders generate weights for a network of neurons through the NEF formula for weights. These weights force the spiking network to have arbitrary and prescribed mean field dynamics. The weights generated with scale-invariant decoders all lie on low dimensional hypersurfaces asymptotically. We demonstrate the applicability of these scale-invariant decoders and weight surfaces by constructing networks of spiking theta neurons that replicate the dynamics of various well known dynamical systems such as the neural integrator, Van der Pol system and the Lorenz system. As these decoders are analytically determined and non-unique, the weights are also analytically determined and non-unique. We discuss the implications for measured weights of neuronal networks.

  15. Obtaining Arbitrary Prescribed Mean Field Dynamics for Recurrently Coupled Networks of Type-I Spiking Neurons with Analytically Determined Weights

    PubMed Central

    Nicola, Wilten; Tripp, Bryan; Scott, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental question in computational neuroscience is how to connect a network of spiking neurons to produce desired macroscopic or mean field dynamics. One possible approach is through the Neural Engineering Framework (NEF). The NEF approach requires quantities called decoders which are solved through an optimization problem requiring large matrix inversion. Here, we show how a decoder can be obtained analytically for type I and certain type II firing rates as a function of the heterogeneity of its associated neuron. These decoders generate approximants for functions that converge to the desired function in mean-squared error like 1/N, where N is the number of neurons in the network. We refer to these decoders as scale-invariant decoders due to their structure. These decoders generate weights for a network of neurons through the NEF formula for weights. These weights force the spiking network to have arbitrary and prescribed mean field dynamics. The weights generated with scale-invariant decoders all lie on low dimensional hypersurfaces asymptotically. We demonstrate the applicability of these scale-invariant decoders and weight surfaces by constructing networks of spiking theta neurons that replicate the dynamics of various well known dynamical systems such as the neural integrator, Van der Pol system and the Lorenz system. As these decoders are analytically determined and non-unique, the weights are also analytically determined and non-unique. We discuss the implications for measured weights of neuronal networks. PMID:26973503

  16. New steady-state models for water-limited cropping systems using saline irrigation waters: Analytical solutions and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skaggs, T. H.; Anderson, R. G.; Corwin, D. L.; Suarez, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    Due to the diminishing availability of good quality water for irrigation, it is increasingly important that irrigation and salinity management tools be able to target submaximal crop yields and support the use of marginal quality waters. In this work, we present a steady-state irrigated systems modeling framework that accounts for reduced plant water uptake due to root zone salinity. Two new explicit, closed-form analytical solutions for the root zone solute concentration profile are obtained, corresponding to two alternative functional forms of the uptake reduction function. The solutions express a general relationship between irrigation water salinity, irrigation rate, crop salt tolerance, crop transpiration, and (using standard approximations) crop yield. Example applications are illustrated, including the calculation of irrigation requirements for obtaining targeted submaximal yields, and the generation of crop-water production functions for varying irrigation waters, irrigation rates, and crops. Model predictions are shown to be mostly consistent with existing models and available experimental data. Yet the new solutions possess clear advantages over available alternatives, including: (i) the new solutions were derived from a complete physical-mathematical description of the system, rather than based on an ad hoc formulation; (ii) the new analytical solutions are explicit and can be evaluated without iterative techniques; (iii) the solutions permit consideration of two common functional forms of salinity induced reductions in crop water uptake, rather than being tied to one particular representation; and (iv) the utilized modeling framework is compatible with leading transient-state numerical models.

  17. Analytical Performance of a Venturi-assisted Array of Micromachined UltraSonic Electrosprays (AMUSE) Coupled to Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry for the Analysis of Peptides and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hampton, Christina Y.; Forbes, Thomas P.; Varady, Mark J.; Meacham, J. Mark; Fedorov, Andrei G.; Degertekin, F. Levent; Fernández, Facundo M.

    2008-01-01

    The analytical characterization of a novel ion source for mass spectrometry named Array of Micromachined UltraSonic Electrosprays (AMUSE) is presented here. This is a fundamentally different type of ion generation device, consisting of three major components: 1) a piezoelectric transducer that creates ultrasonic waves at one of the resonant frequencies of the sample-filled device, 2) an array of pyramidally-shaped nozzles micromachined on a silicon wafer, and 3) a spacer which prevents contact between the array and transducer ensuring the transfer of acoustic energy to the sample. A high pressure gradient generated at the apices of the nozzle pyramids forces the periodic ejection of multiple droplet streams from the device. With this device, the processes of droplet formation and droplet charging are separated, hence, the limitations of conventional electrospray-type ion sources, including the need for high charging potentials and the addition of organic solvent to decrease surface tension can be avoided. In this work, a Venturi device is coupled with AMUSE in order to increase desolvation, droplet focusing, and signal stability. Results show that ionization of model peptides and small tuning molecules is possible with DC charging potentials of 100 VDC or less. Ionization in RF-only mode (without DC biasing) was also possible. It was observed that, when combined with AMUSE, the Venturi device provides a 10-fold gain in signal-to-noise ratio for 90% aqueous sample solutions. Further reduction in the diameter of the orifices of the micromachined arrays, led to an additional signal gain of at least 3 orders of magnitude, a 2- to 10-fold gain in the signal-to-noise ratio, and an improvement in signal stability from 47% to 8.5% RSD. The effectiveness of this device for the soft ionization of model proteins in aqueous media, such as cytochrome C was also examined, yielding spectra with an average charge state of 8.8 when analyzed with a 100 VDC charging potential

  18. Correlation forces between helical macro-ions in the weak coupling limit.

    PubMed

    Lee, D J

    2011-03-16

    When correlation effects are relatively weak, electrostatic interaction forces between cylindrical macro-ions may be divided into two contributions (Lee 2010 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22 414101). Firstly, there is a mean field contribution, described by the theory of Kornyshev and Leikin (1997 J. Chem. Phys. 107 3656) at large separations. Secondly, we have correlation forces, which we analyze by performing an expansion in the number density of condensed ions. We see three distinct contributions, for which analytical expressions are given for both general and helical contributions. Firstly, there is a term (of leading order in the expansion) that is a change in the solvation energies of uncondensed counter-ions due to two macro-molecular interfaces. Secondly, we have a contribution that comes from fluctuations in the condensed ion charge density being repelled by their 'images' in the other molecule. Both of these contributions are repulsive. Lastly, there exists an attractive Oosawa contribution that arises from fluctuations in the condensed ions about one molecule correlating with those about the other molecule. The first two forces do not depend on the orientation of the molecules about their long axes. However, the Oosawa force may do so, depending on the pattern of bound and fixed charges. For a DNA like charge distribution, we see that the strength of this dependence is governed by the relative proportion of bound ions, between two positions that represent the DNA groove centers. We see that, at a Debye screening length equivalent to physiological salt concentrations, the correlation forces can be neglected for univalent ions. For divalent ions, they contribute a small, albeit significant, correction. Our calculations suggest that increasing the salt concentration reduces the size of these forces.

  19. Electron attachment in F2 - Conclusive demonstration of nonresonant, s-wave coupling in the limit of zero electron energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, A.; Alajajian, S. H.

    1987-01-01

    Dissociative electron attachment to F2 has been observed in the energy range 0-140 meV, at a resolution of 6 meV (full width at half maximum). Results show conclusively a sharp, resolution-limited threshold behavior consistent with an s-wave cross section varying as sq rt of epsilon. Two accurate theoretical calculations predict only p-wave behavior varying as the sq rt of epsilon. Several nonadiabatic coupling effects leading to s-wave behavior are outlined.

  20. Electron attachment in F2 - Conclusive demonstration of nonresonant, s-wave coupling in the limit of zero electron energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, A.; Alajajian, S. H.

    1987-01-01

    Dissociative electron attachment to F2 has been observed in the energy range 0-140 meV, at a resolution of 6 meV (full width at half maximum). Results show conclusively a sharp, resolution-limited threshold behavior consistent with an s-wave cross section varying as sq rt of epsilon. Two accurate theoretical calculations predict only p-wave behavior varying as the sq rt of epsilon. Several nonadiabatic coupling effects leading to s-wave behavior are outlined.

  1. Short communication: Reference limits for blood analytes in Holstein late-pregnant heifers and dry cows: Effects of parity, days relative to calving, and season.

    PubMed

    Brscic, M; Cozzi, G; Lora, I; Stefani, A L; Contiero, B; Ravarotto, L; Gottardo, F

    2015-11-01

    Reference limits for metabolic profiles in Holstein late-pregnant heifers and dry cows were determined considering the effects of parity, days relative to calving, and season. Blood samples were collected from 104 pregnant heifers and 186 dry cows (68 primiparous and 118 pluriparous) from 60 to 10 d before the expected calving date in 31 dairy farms in northeastern Italy. Sampling was performed during summer (182 samples) and the following winter (108 samples). All the animals were judged as clinically healthy at a veterinary visit before sampling. Outliers were removed from data of each blood analyte, and variables that were not normally distributed were log transformed. A mixed model was used to test the fixed effects of parity (late-pregnant heifers, primiparous or pluriparous dry cows), class of days relative to calving (60-41 d, 40-21 d, 20-10 d), season (summer or winter), and the interactions between parity and class of days relative to calving and between parity and season, with farm as random effect. Single general reference limits and 95% confidence intervals were generated for analytes that did not vary according to fixed effects. Whenever a fixed effect included in the model significantly affected a given analyte, specific reference limits and 95% confidence intervals were generated for each of its levels. Albumin, urea, triglycerides, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, creatinine kinase, conjugated bilirubin, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, potassium, chloride, zinc, copper, and iron concentrations were not influenced by any of the fixed effects. Total protein, globulins, creatinine, glucose, alkaline phosphatase, gamma glutamyltransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, and sodium plasma concentrations were affected by parity. The class of days relative to calving had a significant effect on the concentrations of total protein, globulins, fatty acids, cholesterol, total bilirubin, and sodium. Season affected plasma concentrations of

  2. Analytical methods for the determination of aflatoxins in various food matrices at concentrations regarding the limits set in european regulations: development, characteristics, limits.

    PubMed

    Stroka, J; Petz, M; Anklam, E

    2000-03-01

    Methods for the determination of aflatoxins in paprika, peanut butter, pistachio paste, fig paste and baby food were developed. The methods employ an immunoaffinity cleanup step and reversed-phase liquid chromatography. All steps of the analysis were tested for their suitability for all matrices with focus on method robustness, simplicity, toxicology, environment, and user friendliness. Extraction procedures, chromatographic separation and post column derivatisation techniques were elaborated for this purpose. The methods were statistically validated in collaborative trials at currently established legal limits for aflatoxins and are in the process for adoption as official methods by CEN and AOAC.

  3. Microscale enzymatic optical biosensors using mass transport limiting nanofilms. 1. Fabrication and characterization using glucose as a model analyte.

    PubMed

    Stein, Erich W; Grant, Patrick S; Zhu, Huiguang; McShane, Michael J

    2007-02-15

    "Smart tattoo" sensors-fluorescent microspheres that can be implanted intradermally and interrogated noninvasively using light-are being developed as potential tools for in vivo biochemical monitoring. In this work, a platform for enzymatic tattoo-type sensors is described and prototype devices evaluated using glucose as a model analyte. Sensor particles were prepared by immobilizing Pt(II) octaethylporphine (PtOEP), a phosphorescent dye readily quenched by molecular oxygen, into hybrid silicate microspheres, followed by loading and subsequent covalent immobilization of glucose oxidase. Rhodamine B-doped multilayer nanofilms were subsequently assembled on the surfaces of the particles to provide a reference signal and provide critical control of glucose transport into the particle. The enzymatic oxidation of glucose within the sensor results in the glucose concentration-dependent depletion of local oxygen levels, enabling indirect monitoring of glucose by measuring relative changes in PtOEP emission. A custom testing apparatus was used to monitor the dynamic sensor response to varying bulk oxygen and glucose levels, respectively. For the prototypes tested, dynamic test results indicate that the sensors respond rapidly (t(95) = 84 s) and reversibly to changes in bulk glucose levels, while demonstrating high baseline stability. The sensitivity (change in intensity ratio) of these devices was determined to be 4.16 +/- 0.57%/mg dL(-1). The analytical range for the prototypes was determined to be 2-120 mg/dl, though this can be extended to cover the physiologically relevant range by tailoring the nanofilm coatings. These findings confirm the potential for enzymatic microscale optical and pave the way for extension of this initial demonstration with glucose to target other biochemical species relevant to metabolic monitoring.

  4. Microscale Enzymatic Optical Biosensors using Mass-Transport Limiting Nanofilms. 1. Fabrication and Characterization Using Glucose as a Model Analyte

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Erich W.; Grant, Patrick S.; Zhu, Huiguang; McShane, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    “Smart tattoo” sensors – fluorescent microspheres which can be implanted intradermally and interrogated noninvasively using light – are being developed as potential tools for in vivo biochemical monitoring. In this work, a platform for enzymatic tattoo-type sensors is described, and prototype devices evaluated using glucose as a model analyte. Sensor particles were prepared by immobilizing Pt(II) octaethylporphine (PtOEP), a phosphorescent dye readily quenched by molecular oxygen, into hybrid silicate microspheres, followed by loading and subsequent covalent immobilization of glucose oxidase (GOx). Rhodamine B (RITC)-doped multilayer nanofilms were subsequently assembled on the surfaces of the particles to provide a reference signal and provide critical control of glucose transport into the particle. The enzymatic oxidation of glucose within the sensor results in the glucose concentration-dependent depletion of local oxygen levels, enabling indirect monitoring of glucose by measuring relative changes in PtOEP emission. A custom testing apparatus was used to monitor the dynamic sensor response to varying bulk oxygen and glucose levels, respectively. For the prototypes tested, dynamic test results indicate that the sensors respond rapidly (t95 = 84 sec) and reversibly to changes in bulk glucose levels, while demonstrating high baseline stability. The sensitivity (change in intensity ratio) of these devices was determined to be 4.16 ± 0.57 %/mg dL−1. The analytical range for the prototypes was determined to be 2 to 120 mg/dl, though this can be extended to cover the physiologically relevant range by tailoring the nanofilm coatings. These findings confirm the potential for enzymatic microscale optical, and pave the way for extension of this initial demonstration with glucose to target other biochemical species relevant to metabolic monitoring. PMID:17297932

  5. Analytic energy gradients for the coupled-cluster singles and doubles with perturbative triples method with the density-fitting approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozkaya, Uǧur; Sherrill, C. David

    2017-07-01

    An efficient implementation of analytic gradients for the coupled-cluster singles and doubles with perturbative triples [CCSD(T)] method with the density-fitting (DF) approximation, denoted as DF-CCSD(T), is reported. For the molecules considered, the DF approach substantially accelerates conventional CCSD(T) analytic gradients due to the reduced input/output time and the acceleration of the so-called "gradient terms": formation of particle density matrices (PDMs), computation of the generalized Fock-matrix (GFM), solution of the Z-vector equation, formation of the effective PDMs and GFM, back-transformation of the PDMs and GFM, from the molecular orbital to the atomic orbital (AO) basis, and computation of gradients in the AO basis. For the largest member of the molecular test set considered (C6H14), the computational times for analytic gradients (with the correlation-consistent polarized valence triple-ζ basis set in serial) are 106.2 [CCSD(T)] and 49.8 [DF-CCSD(T)] h, a speedup of more than 2-fold. In the evaluation of gradient terms, the DF approach completely avoids the use of four-index two-electron integrals. Similar to our previous studies on DF-second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory and DF-CCSD gradients, our formalism employs 2- and 3-index two-particle density matrices (TPDMs) instead of 4-index TPDMs. Errors introduced by the DF approximation are negligible for equilibrium geometries and harmonic vibrational frequencies.

  6. Analytic energy gradients for the coupled-cluster singles and doubles with perturbative triples method with the density-fitting approximation.

    PubMed

    Bozkaya, Uğur; Sherrill, C David

    2017-07-28

    An efficient implementation of analytic gradients for the coupled-cluster singles and doubles with perturbative triples [CCSD(T)] method with the density-fitting (DF) approximation, denoted as DF-CCSD(T), is reported. For the molecules considered, the DF approach substantially accelerates conventional CCSD(T) analytic gradients due to the reduced input/output time and the acceleration of the so-called "gradient terms": formation of particle density matrices (PDMs), computation of the generalized Fock-matrix (GFM), solution of the Z-vector equation, formation of the effective PDMs and GFM, back-transformation of the PDMs and GFM, from the molecular orbital to the atomic orbital (AO) basis, and computation of gradients in the AO basis. For the largest member of the molecular test set considered (C6H14), the computational times for analytic gradients (with the correlation-consistent polarized valence triple-ζ basis set in serial) are 106.2 [CCSD(T)] and 49.8 [DF-CCSD(T)] h, a speedup of more than 2-fold. In the evaluation of gradient terms, the DF approach completely avoids the use of four-index two-electron integrals. Similar to our previous studies on DF-second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory and DF-CCSD gradients, our formalism employs 2- and 3-index two-particle density matrices (TPDMs) instead of 4-index TPDMs. Errors introduced by the DF approximation are negligible for equilibrium geometries and harmonic vibrational frequencies.

  7. Analytical asymptotic solutions for heat transfer during transient compression filling of spherical and cylindrical pressure vessels in the limit of small Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Melissa; Woodfield, Peter Lloyd; Hall, Wayne

    2017-01-01

    Taking the limit of small Reynolds number for a vessel being filled with compressed gas, the energy equation was found to asymptote to the unsteady heat conduction equation with heat generation and variable density. This equation was solved analytically for cylindrical and spherical geometry. Assuming the density changes linearly with time, a solution is obtained which is identical in form to the constant density solution if the Fourier number is defined using the log-mean density rather than the instantaneous density. At steady state conditions, the Nusselt number based on the diameter for cylinders with aspect ratios larger than 1 rapidly approaches an integer solution of NuD = 8. For cylinders with aspect ratios less than 1, the Nusselt number based on the cylinder length (height) characteristic dimension rapidly approaches NuL = 6. It is shown experimentally and numerically that during compression filling, the heat transfer asymptotically approaches this analytical solution at low Reynolds numbers.

  8. Analytical asymptotic solutions for heat transfer during transient compression filling of spherical and cylindrical pressure vessels in the limit of small Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Melissa; Woodfield, Peter Lloyd; Hall, Wayne

    2017-06-01

    Taking the limit of small Reynolds number for a vessel being filled with compressed gas, the energy equation was found to asymptote to the unsteady heat conduction equation with heat generation and variable density. This equation was solved analytically for cylindrical and spherical geometry. Assuming the density changes linearly with time, a solution is obtained which is identical in form to the constant density solution if the Fourier number is defined using the log-mean density rather than the instantaneous density. At steady state conditions, the Nusselt number based on the diameter for cylinders with aspect ratios larger than 1 rapidly approaches an integer solution of NuD = 8. For cylinders with aspect ratios less than 1, the Nusselt number based on the cylinder length (height) characteristic dimension rapidly approaches NuL = 6. It is shown experimentally and numerically that during compression filling, the heat transfer asymptotically approaches this analytical solution at low Reynolds numbers.

  9. Subsurface fluids screening by an analytical system employing a diffusion-limited and implantable sampling module deployable with a cone penetrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Lucero, D.P.; Ilgner, R.H.; Smith, R.R.; Jenkins, R.A.

    1997-03-01

    An analytical system employing a diffusion-limited sampling module and a direct sampling ion trap for quantitative assessment of subsurface fluids was developed and field tested. The sampling module is deployable with a cone penetrometer. It can be retrieved and/or remain as an implant for an indefinite time period. The device geometry, comprised of two planar membranes enclosing a diffusion cell, provides good implant ruggedness and reliable service in the field. Also, the sampling module is protected within a push pipe housing to extend implant service life. Subsurface volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors, in nanoliter amounts, diffuse through the sampler membrane wall by a diffusion-limited process that is independent of the soil permeability. Sample vapors are transported to the surface for analysis by direct sampling ion trap, or other analytical devices. Metered pressurized or reduced pressure transport (carrier) gas is utilized for sample transport to the surface. The vapors obtained are a function only of the fluid partial pressure and the vapor conductance of the sampler. Thus, quantitative analytical data is obtained regardless of soil conditions. The sampling module was deployed in the field at Dover Air Force Base at depths of 5 to 8.5 feet by the US Army Site Characterization and Analysis Penetrometer System (SCAPS). Relatively small 1.75 inch diameter push pipe and the relatively small vapor samples extracted cause minimal soil disturbance which preserves the integrity of the sampler subsurface surroundings. Analytical results were obtained for the system sampler operating in real time and as an implant where equilibrium was obtained between sampler interior and the external surroundings.

  10. Muon flux limits for Majorana dark matter from strong coupling theories

    SciTech Connect

    Belotsky, Konstantin; Khlopov, Maxim; Kouvaris, Chris

    2009-04-15

    We analyze the effects of the capture of dark matter (DM) particles, with successive annihilations, predicted in the minimal walking technicolor model (MWT) by the Sun and the Earth. We show that the Super-Kamiokande upper limit on excessive muon flux disfavors the mass interval between 100 and 200 GeV for MWT DM with a suppressed standard model interaction (due to a mixing angle), and the mass interval between 0 and 1500 GeV for MWT DM without such suppression, upon making the standard assumption about the value of the local DM distribution. In the first case, the exclusion interval is found to be very sensitive to the DM distribution parameters and can vanish at the extreme of the acceptable values.

  11. Analytical formulas for low-fluence non-line-narrowed hole-burned spectra in an excitonically coupled dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reppert, Mike; Naibo, Virginia; Jankowiak, Ryszard

    2009-12-01

    We present exact equations for the low-fluence non-line-narrowed (NLN) nonphotochemical hole-burning (NPHB) spectrum of an excitonically coupled dimer (for arbitrary coupling strength) under the assumption that postburn and preburn site energies are independent. The equations provide a transparent view into the contributions of various effects to the NPHB spectrum. It is demonstrated that the NPHB spectrum in dimers is largely dominated by the statistical reshuffling of site energies and by altered excitonic transition energies of both excitonic states (in contrast with only the lowest state). For comparison of these results with those from larger excitonically coupled systems, the low-fluence NLN NPHB spectrum obtained for the CP47 complex (a 16-pigment core antenna complex of Photosystem II) is also calculated using Monte Carlo simulations. In this larger system it is shown that the NPHB spectra for individual excitonic states are not entirely conservative (although the changes in average oscillator strength for the higher excitonic states are in most cases less than 1%), a feature which we argue is due primarily to reordering of the contributions of various pigments to the excitonic states. We anticipate that a better understanding of NPHB spectra obtained for various photosynthetic complexes and their simultaneous fits with other optical spectra (e.g., absorption, emission, and circular dichroism spectra) will provide more insight into the underlying electronic structures of various photosynthetic systems.

  12. Analytic derivative couplings and first-principles exciton/phonon coupling constants for an ab initio Frenkel-Davydov exciton model: Theory, implementation, and application to compute triplet exciton mobility parameters for crystalline tetracene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Adrian F.; Herbert, John M.

    2017-06-01

    Recently, we introduced an ab initio version of the Frenkel-Davydov exciton model for computing excited-state properties of molecular crystals and aggregates. Within this model, supersystem excited states are approximated as linear combinations of excitations localized on molecular sites, and the electronic Hamiltonian is constructed and diagonalized in a direct-product basis of non-orthogonal configuration state functions computed for isolated fragments. Here, we derive and implement analytic derivative couplings for this model, including nuclear derivatives of the natural transition orbital and symmetric orthogonalization transformations that are part of the approximation. Nuclear derivatives of the exciton Hamiltonian's matrix elements, required in order to compute the nonadiabatic couplings, are equivalent to the "Holstein" and "Peierls" exciton/phonon couplings that are widely discussed in the context of model Hamiltonians for energy and charge transport in organic photovoltaics. As an example, we compute the couplings that modulate triplet exciton transport in crystalline tetracene, which is relevant in the context of carrier diffusion following singlet exciton fission.

  13. Constructing Programming Tests from an Item Pool: Pushing the Limits of Student Knowledge Using Assessment and Learning Analytics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivancevic, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Tests targeting the upper limits of student ability could aid students in their learning. This article gives an overview of an approach to the construction of such tests in programming, together with ideas on how to implement and refine them within a learning management system.

  14. Kinetic coupling of phosphate release, force generation and rate-limiting steps in the cross-bridge cycle.

    PubMed

    Stehle, Robert; Tesi, Chiara

    2017-09-16

    A basic goal in muscle research is to understand how the cyclic ATPase activity of cross-bridges is converted into mechanical force. A direct approach to study the chemo-mechanical coupling between Pi release and the force-generating step is provided by the kinetics of force response induced by a rapid change in [Pi]. Classical studies on fibres using caged-Pi discovered that rapid increases in [Pi] induce fast force decays dependent on final [Pi] whose kinetics were interpreted to probe a fast force-generating step prior to Pi release. However, this hypothesis was called into question by studies on skeletal and cardiac myofibrils subjected to Pi jumps in both directions (increases and decreases in [Pi]) which revealed that rapid decreases in [Pi] trigger force rises with slow kinetics, similar to those of calcium-induced force development and mechanically-induced force redevelopment at the same [Pi]. A possible explanation for this discrepancy came from imaging of individual sarcomeres in cardiac myofibrils, showing that the fast force decay upon increase in [Pi] results from so-called sarcomere 'give'. The slow force rise upon decrease in [Pi] was found to better reflect overall sarcomeres cross-bridge kinetics and its [Pi] dependence, suggesting that the force generation coupled to Pi release cannot be separated from the rate-limiting transition. The reasons for the different conclusions achieved in fibre and myofibril studies are re-examined as the recent findings on cardiac myofibrils have fundamental consequences for the coupling between Pi release, rate-limiting steps and force generation. The implications from Pi-induced force kinetics of myofibrils are discussed in combination with historical and recent models of the cross-bridge cycle.

  15. Analysis of high affinity self-association by fluorescence optical sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation of labeled proteins: opportunities and limitations.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huaying; Lomash, Suvendu; Glasser, Carla; Mayer, Mark L; Schuck, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation (SV) is a powerful first-principle technique for the study of protein interactions, and allows a rigorous characterization of binding stoichiometry and affinities. A recently introduced commercial fluorescence optical detection system (FDS) permits analysis of high-affinity interactions by SV. However, for most proteins the attachment of an extrinsic fluorophore is an essential prerequisite for analysis by FDS-SV. Using the glutamate receptor GluA2 amino terminal domain as a model system for high-affinity homo-dimerization, we demonstrate how the experimental design and choice of fluorescent label can impact both the observed binding constants as well as the derived hydrodynamic parameter estimates for the monomer and dimer species. Specifically, FAM (5,6-carboxyfluorescein) was found to create different populations of artificially high-affinity and low-affinity dimers, as indicated by both FDS-SV and the kinetics of dimer dissociation studied using a bench-top fluorescence spectrometer and Förster Resonance Energy Transfer. By contrast, Dylight488 labeled GluA2, as well as GluA2 expressed as an EGFP fusion protein, yielded results consistent with estimates for unlabeled GluA2. Our study suggests considerations for the choice of labeling strategies, and highlights experimental designs that exploit specific opportunities of FDS-SV for improving the reliability of the binding isotherm analysis of interacting systems.

  16. Overcoming the detection bandwidth limit in precision spectroscopy: The analytical apparatus function for a stepped frequency scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohart, François

    2017-01-01

    In a previous paper [Rohart et al., Phys Rev A 2014;90(042506)], the influence of detection-bandwidth properties on observed line-shapes in precision spectroscopy was theoretically modeled for the first time using the basic model of a continuous sweeping of the laser frequency. Specific experiments confirmed general theoretical trends but also revealed several insufficiencies of the model in case of stepped frequency scans. As a consequence in as much as up-to-date experiments use step-by-step frequency-swept lasers, a new model of the influence of the detection-bandwidth is developed, including a realistic timing of signal sampling and frequency changes. Using Fourier transform techniques, the resulting time domain apparatus function gets a simple analytical form that can be easily implemented in line-shape fitting codes without any significant increase of computation durations. This new model is then considered in details for detection systems characterized by 1st and 2nd order bandwidths, underlining the importance of the ratio of detection time constant to frequency step duration, namely for the measurement of line frequencies. It also allows a straightforward analysis of corresponding systematic deviations on retrieved line frequencies and broadenings. Finally, a special attention is paid to consequences of a finite detection-bandwidth in Doppler Broadening Thermometry, namely to experimental adjustments required for a spectroscopic determination of the Boltzmann constant at the 1-ppm level of accuracy. In this respect, the interest of implementing a Butterworth 2nd order filter is emphasized.

  17. Geomechanical Facies Concept In Fractured Resevoirs and the Application of Hybrid Numerical and Analytical Techniques for the Description of Coupled Transport In Fractured Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermott, C. I.; Wenqing, W.; Kolditz, O.

    2009-04-01

    Exploiting and geo-engineering of fractured rocks in the context of reservoir storage and utilisation is important to applications such as hydrogeology, petroleum geology, geothermal energy, nuclear waste storage and CO2-sequestration. Understanding fluid, mass and energy transport in the three dimensional fracture network is critical to the evaluation planned operating efficiency. Hydraulic, thermal, mechanical and chemical coupled processes under the typical reservoir conditions operate at different scales. Depending on whether the process is continuum dominated (e.g. transfer of stress in the rock body) or discontinuity dominated (e.g. hydraulic transport processes) different methods of numerically investigating and quantifying the system can be applied. A geomechanical facies approach provides the basis for large scale numerical analysis of the coupled processes and prediction of system response. It also provides the basis for a three dimensional holistic understanding of the reservoir systems and the appropriate investigation techniques which could be used to evaluate the capacities of the reservoirs to be investigated as well as appropriate development techniques. Concentrating on the numerical modelling there is often a difficult balance between the numerical stability criteria of the different equation systems which need to be solved to describe the interaction of the dominant processes. The introduction of analytical solutions where possible, functional dependencies and multiple meshes provides on the framework of the geo-mechanical facies concept provides an efficient and stable method for the prediction of the effect of the in situ coupling.

  18. Analytical method for coupled transmission error of helical gear system with machining errors, assembly errors and tooth modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tengjiao; He, Zeyin

    2017-07-01

    We present a method for analyzing the transmission error of helical gear system with errors. First a finite element method is used for modeling gear transmission system with machining errors, assembly errors, modifications and the static transmission error is obtained. Then the bending-torsional-axial coupling dynamic model of the transmission system based on the lumped mass method is established and the dynamic transmission error of gear transmission system is calculated, which provides error excitation data for the analysis and control of vibration and noise of gear system.

  19. Differentiation of colloidal and dissolved silica: Analytical separation using spectrophotometry and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewis-Russ, A.; Ranville, J.; Kashuba, A.T.

    1991-01-01

    A method is described that differentiates between solutions containing silica-dominated colloids and solutions that are essentially free of colloids. Suspensions of tuff particles were treated to remove colloids by centrifugation, filtration or both. Agreement of silica concentrations determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and by a spectrophotometric method was taken as an indication of colloid-free solutions. For two tuffs, centrifugation was effective for removing colloids. For the third, highly altered tuff, filtration was more effective for removing colloids.

  20. A critical review of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry for geoanalysis, geochemistry and hydrology, Part 1. Analytical performance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brenner, I.B.; Taylor, H.E.

    1992-01-01

    Present-day inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) instrumentation is described briefly. Emphasis is placed on performance characteristics for geoanalysis, geochemistry, and hydrology. Applications where ICP-MS would be indispensable are indicated. Determination of geochemically diagnostic trace elements (such as the rare earth elements [REE], U and Th), of isotope ratios for fingerprinting, tracer and other geo-isotope applications, and benchmark isotope dilution determinations are considered to be typical priority applications for ICP-MS. It is concluded that ICP-MS furnishes unique geoanalytical and environmental data that are not readily provided by conventional spectroscopic (emission and absorption) techniques.

  1. Analytical and Clinical Validation of a Point-of-Care Cardiac Troponin T Test with an Improved Detection Limit.

    PubMed

    Jungbauer, Carsten; Hupf, Julian; Giannitsis, Evangelos; Frick, Johann; Slagman, Anna; Ehret, Christoph; Herbert, Nicolas; Jung, Christine; Zerback, Rainer; Bertsch, Thomas; Christ, Michael

    2017-04-01

    The point-of-care test Roche CARDIAC POC Troponin T (PoC TnT) is an improved assay which has been developed for the Roche cobas h 232 system. We performed a multicentre evaluation (four sites) to assess the analytical performance of the PoC TnT assay and to compare it with the central laboratory Elecsys® troponin T high sensitive (lab cTnT-hs) assay. The relative mean differences found in method comparisons of PoC TnT vs. lab cTnT-hs ranged from -4.1% to +6.8%. Additionally, there was good concordance between PoC TnT and lab cTnT-hs for the number of samples with troponin T values below the measuring range of 40 ng/L. Lot-to-lot differences of PoC TnT ranged from -8.6% to +4.6%. Within-series coefficients of variation (CV) resulting from 81 ten-fold measurements with patient samples were 9.3%, 11.8%, and 12.9% in the low (40 to < 200 ng/L), medium (200 to < 600 ng/L), and high (600 to 2000 ng/L) measuring range, respectively. Using the system quality control, the mean CV for between-day imprecision was 11.3%. No interference was observed by triglycerides (up to 11.4 mmol/L), bilirubin (up to 376 µmol/L), hemoglobin (up to 0.12 mmol/L), biotin (up to 30 µg/L), rheumatoid factor (up to 200 IU/mL), or with 52 standard or cardiovascular drugs at therapeutic concentrations. There was no influence on the results by varying hematocrit values in a range from 25% to 53%. However, interferences with human anti-mouse antibodies were found. No significant influence on the results was found with PoC TnT by using sample volumes between 135 to 165 µL. High troponin T concentrations up to 500 µg/L did not lead to false low results, indicating no high-concentration hook effect. No cross-reactivity was found between the PoC TnT assay and human skeletal troponin T up to 1000 µg/L (< 0.05%). Diagnostic sensitivity and specificity data of a subpopulation (23 patients) of this study are in agreement with results of another large pre-hospital study. The PoC TnT assay showed good

  2. An analytical and explicit multi-field coupled nonlinear constitutive model for Terfenol-D giant magnetostrictive material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hao-Miao; Li, Meng-Han; Li, Xiao-Hong; Zhang, Da-Guang

    2016-08-01

    For a giant magnetostrictive rod under the action of multiple physical loads, such as an external magnetic field, temperature and axial pre-stress, this paper proposes a general one-dimensional nonlinear magneto-thermo-mechanical coupled constitutive model. This model is based on the Taylor expansion of the elastic Gibbs free energy of giant magnetostrictive material and thermodynamic relations from the perspective of macro continuum mechanics. Predictions made using this model are in good agreement with experimental data for magnetization and the magnetostrictive strain curve under the collective effect of pre-stress and temperature. Additionally, the model overcomes the drawback of the existing magneto-thermo-mechanical constitutive model that cannot accurately predict the magnetization and magnetostrictive strain curve for different temperatures and pre-stresses. Furthermore, the constitutive model does not contain an implicit function and is compact, and can thus be applied in both situations of tensile and compressive stress and to both positive and negative magnetostrictive materials, and it is thus appropriate for engineering applications. Comprehensive analysis shows that the model fully describes the nonlinear coupling properties of a magnetic field, magnetostrictive strain and elasticity of a magnetostrictive material subjected to stress, a magnetic field and heat.

  3. The analytical model for crosstalk noise of current-mode signaling in coupled RLC interconnects of VLSI circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Peng; Pan, Zhongliang

    2017-09-01

    With the continuous advancement of semiconductor technology, the interconnects crosstalk has had a great influence on the performances of VLSI circuits. To date, most of the research about the interconnects of VLSI circuits focus on the voltage-mode signaling (VMS) scheme while the current-mode signaling (CMS) scheme is rarely analyzed. First of all, an equivalent circuit model of two-line coupled interconnects is presented in this paper, which is applicable to both the CMS and VMS schemes. The coupling capacitive and mutual inductive are taken into account in the equivalent circuit model. Secondly, the output noise of CMS and VMS schemes are investigated in the paper according to the decoupling technique and ABCD parameter matrix approach at local level, intermediate level and global level, respectively. Moreover, the experimental results show that the CMS interconnects have lesser noise peak, noise width and noise amplitude than the VMS interconnects in the same cases, and the CMS scheme is especially suitable for the global interconnects communication of VLSI circuits. It is found that the results obtained by ABCD parameter matrix approach are in good accordance with the simulation results of the advanced design system. Project supported by the Guangdong Provincial Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 2014A030313441), the Guangzhou Science and Technology Project (No. 201510010169), the Guangdong Province Science and Technology Project (No. 2016B090918071), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61072028).

  4. Preliminary Study of High Resolution HPLC Analytical Method for Sedimentary Pigments Based on Coupled C8 Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, P.; Yu, Z.; Deng, C.; Liu, S.; Zhao, J.

    2008-05-01

    The pigments in marine water columns can provide accurate estimates of community composition and abundance of phytoplankton. In addition, the sedimentary pigments, especially the derivatives of chlorophyll such as pyrophaeophytins, pyrophaeophorbides and steryl chlorin esters (SCEs) formed during early diagenesis can also provide information on the primary producer community and the changes in paleoproductivity. Accordingly, analysis of pigments and their derivatives is of great importance for oceanography, limnology and geochemistry. Many methods have been developed for the separation of chlorophylls, carotenoids and their derivatives derived from phytoplankton and water column samples using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Methods widely cited in the literatures include those developed by Wright et al. (1991) and Zapata et al. (2000). Both methods use reversed-phase columns, but C18 column was employed in Wright et al. (1991) and C8 column in Zapata et al. (2000). However, evident coelutions are observed in published works. This will particularly cause problematic identification and quantification in dealing with sedimentary pigments which are highly complex and often display a broad range in polarity. Clearly, it is necessary to improve the separation of the complex pigments if the information carried by the pigments is to be used fully. Coupled C18 columns were used in the HPLC method developed by Airs et al. (2001) for the analysis of complex pigment distributions. Improved chromatographic resolution, more pigment components and novel bacteriochlorophyll derivatives were obtained by this method. It indicates a new road for HPLC method development. C8 column has shorter carbon chains than that of C18 column and can provide less retention of apolar compounds which is of particular advantaged to hydrophobic chlorophyll a, b and their derivatives. That is one of the reasons why the C8 method developed by Zapata et al. (2000) is admittedly better than

  5. An analytical model for nanowire junctionless SOI FinFETs with considering three-dimensional coupling effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan-Yu, Liu; Heng-Zhu, Liu; Bi-Wei, Liu; Yu-Feng, Guo

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the three-dimensional (3D) coupling effect is discussed for nanowire junctionless silicon-on-insulator (SOI) FinFETs. With fin width decreasing from 100 nm to 7 nm, the electric field induced by the lateral gates increases and therefore the influence of back gate on the threshold voltage weakens. For a narrow and tall fin, the lateral gates mainly control the channel and therefore the effect of back gate decreases. A simple two-dimensional (2D) potential model is proposed for the subthreshold region of junctionless SOI FinFET. TCAD simulations validate our model. It can be used to extract the threshold voltage and doping concentration. In addition, the tuning of back gate on the threshold voltage can be predicted. Project supported by the Research Program of the National University of Defense Technology (Grant No. JC 13-06-04).

  6. The effects of analyte mass and collision gases on ion beam formation in an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Jessica J.; Edmund, Alisa J.; Farnsworth, Paul B.

    2016-11-01

    Planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) was used to evaluate the effect of matrix components on the formation and focusing of a Ba ion beam in a commercial inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. Cross sections of the ion beams were taken in the second vacuum stage, in front of the entrance to the mass analyzer. Under normal operating conditions, the addition of Pb shifted the position of the Ba ion beam to the right. PLIF was also used to evaluate the effect of a collision reaction interface (CRI) on Ca and Ba ion beams. A wider velocity distribution of ions and a decrease in overall intensity were observed for the CRI images. The fluorescence and mass spectrometer signals decreased with increased CRI flow rates. These effects were most obvious for Ca ions with He gas.

  7. A comprehensive HPLC analytical system for the identification and quantification of hexoses that employs 2-aminobenzamide coupling.

    PubMed

    Hasehira, Kayo; Nakakita, Shin-Ichi; Miyanishi, Nobumitsu; Sumiyoshi, Wataru; Hayashi, Shie; Takegawa, Kaoru; Hirabayashi, Jun

    2010-04-01

    Rare sugars are defined as monosaccharides with extremely low natural abundances. Their natural distributions and biological functions remain to be clarified. To establish a robust analytical system that can separate, identify and quantify rare sugars, 12 d-hexoses-including five rare aldohexoses and three rare ketohexoses-were labelled with 2-aminobenzamide (2-AB), and the fluorescently tagged monosaccharides were separated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Because the ketohexoses were much less reactive than were the aldohexoses, the reaction conditions were optimized to achieve the maximum yields (>75%) for both aldohexoses and ketohexoses. The calibration curve determined for the rare ketohexose, d-psicose (Psi), was linear between 1 pmol and 1 micromol and had a correlation coefficient of 0.9999. Using the developed method, the psicose content in a leaf of Itea virginica, in which the presence of psicose has previously been reported, was found to be 2.7 mg psicose/g leaf. The result proved feasibility of the method even for natural products. Because the system is a comprehensive tool, it should help answer questions concerning the biosyntheses and functions of rare hexose sugars.

  8. The analytic gradient for the coupled pair functional method - Formula and application for HCl, H2CO, and the dimer H2CO-HCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Julia E.; Lee, Timothy J.; Handy, Nicholas C.

    1988-06-01

    A general analytic gradient is formulated for the coupled pair functional (CPF) electron correlation procedure. An application of the new procedure to the structure of the H2CO-HCl complex is presented, and the predictions are compared with those of second-order perturbation theory (MP2), singles and doubles configuration interaction, and available experimental results. The CPF method in conjunction with a large basis set is found to obtain highly accurate structures and molecular properties for the H2CO and HCl molecules. The CPF triple zeta plus double polarization method is found to give the most reliable prediction of the equilibrium structure of the dimer. The hydrogen bond is predicted to have a length of 1.952 A and to be nonlinear, with the angle O-HCl = 163.2 deg. The angular orientation of the two monomers in the complex, described by C = O-H, is determined to be 109.0 deg at equilibrium.

  9. A new analytical approach based on asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation coupled to ultraviolet spectrometry and light scattering detection for SWCNT aqueous dispersion studies.

    PubMed

    Gigault, Julien; Grassl, Bruno; Lespes, Gaëtane

    2012-02-21

    This work demonstrates the potential of asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (A4F) coupled to Ultraviolet spectrometry (UV) and multi-angle light scattering (MALS) for the study of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) dispersion in aqueous solutions containing a surfactant. The results indicate that this technique is a powerful analytical tool that is able to evaluate SWCNT dispersion states in aqueous media and, more importantly, determine the presence or absence of aggregates, the numbers and sizes of different SWCNT populations and the SWCNT size distribution. Dynamic light scattering was employed to complete and demonstrate the relevance of the data that were obtained via A4F-UV-MALS. Two different anionic surfactants that are used to disperse SWCNTs were then studied. The dispersing powers of the surfactants were experimentally evaluated based on their structural organizations. This study demonstrates that surfactant concentration and sonication energy are key parameters that control the SWCNT dispersion state and SWCNT structural integrity therein.

  10. An efficient formulation and implementation of the analytic energy gradient method to the single and double excitation coupled-cluster wave function - Application to Cl2O2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rendell, Alistair P.; Lee, Timothy J.

    1991-01-01

    The analytic energy gradient for the single and double excitation coupled-cluster (CCSD) wave function has been reformulated and implemented in a new set of programs. The reformulated set of gradient equations have a smaller computational cost than any previously published. The iterative solution of the linear equations and the construction of the effective density matrices are fully vectorized, being based on matrix multiplications. The new method has been used to investigate the Cl2O2 molecule, which has recently been postulated as an important intermediate in the destruction of ozone in the stratosphere. In addition to reporting computational timings, the CCSD equilibrium geometries, harmonic vibrational frequencies, infrared intensities, and relative energetics of three isomers of Cl2O2 are presented.

  11. An efficient formulation and implementation of the analytic energy gradient method to the single and double excitation coupled-cluster wave function - Application to Cl2O2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rendell, Alistair P.; Lee, Timothy J.

    1991-01-01

    The analytic energy gradient for the single and double excitation coupled-cluster (CCSD) wave function has been reformulated and implemented in a new set of programs. The reformulated set of gradient equations have a smaller computational cost than any previously published. The iterative solution of the linear equations and the construction of the effective density matrices are fully vectorized, being based on matrix multiplications. The new method has been used to investigate the Cl2O2 molecule, which has recently been postulated as an important intermediate in the destruction of ozone in the stratosphere. In addition to reporting computational timings, the CCSD equilibrium geometries, harmonic vibrational frequencies, infrared intensities, and relative energetics of three isomers of Cl2O2 are presented.

  12. Improved Dyson series expansion for steady-state quantum transport beyond the weak coupling limit: divergences and resolution.

    PubMed

    Thingna, Juzar; Zhou, Hangbo; Wang, Jian-Sheng

    2014-11-21

    We present a general theory to calculate the steady-state heat and electronic currents for nonlinear systems using a perturbative expansion in the system-bath coupling. We explicitly demonstrate that using the truncated Dyson-series leads to divergences in the steady-state limit, thus making it impossible to be used for actual applications. In order to resolve the divergences, we propose a unique choice of initial condition for the reduced density matrix, which removes the divergences at each order. Our approach not only allows us to use the truncated Dyson-series, with a reasonable choice of initial condition, but also gives the expected result that the steady-state solutions should be independent of initial preparations. Using our improved Dyson series we evaluate the heat and electronic currents up to fourth-order in system-bath coupling, a considerable improvement over the standard quantum master equation techniques. We then numerically corroborate our theory for archetypal settings of linear systems using the exact nonequilibrium Green's function approach. Finally, to demonstrate the advantage of our approach, we deal with the nonlinear spin-boson model to evaluate heat current up to fourth-order and find signatures of cotunnelling process.

  13. Calculation of diffusion-limited kinetics for the reactions in collision coupling and receptor cross-linking.

    PubMed Central

    Shea, L D; Omann, G M; Linderman, J J

    1997-01-01

    Both enzyme (e.g., G-protein) activation via a collision coupling model and the formation of cross-linked receptors by a multivalent ligand involve reactions between two molecules diffusing in the plasma membrane. The diffusion of these molecules is thought to play a critical role in these two early signal transduction events. In reduced dimensions, however, diffusion is not an effective mixing mechanism; consequently, zones in which the concentration of particular molecules (e.g., enzymes, receptors) becomes depleted or enriched may form. To examine the formation of these depletion/ accumulation zones and their effect on reaction rates and ultimately the cellular response, Monte Carlo techniques are used to simulate the reaction and diffusion of molecules in the plasma membrane. The effective reaction rate at steady state is determined in terms of the physical properties of the tissue and ligand for both enzyme activation via collision coupling and the generation of cross-linked receptors. The diffusion-limited reaction rate constant is shown to scale with the mean square displacement of a receptor-ligand complex. The rate constants determined in the simulation are compared with other theoretical predictions as well as experimental data. PMID:9414209

  14. Improved Dyson series expansion for steady-state quantum transport beyond the weak coupling limit: Divergences and resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Thingna, Juzar; Zhou, Hangbo; Wang, Jian-Sheng

    2014-11-21

    We present a general theory to calculate the steady-state heat and electronic currents for nonlinear systems using a perturbative expansion in the system-bath coupling. We explicitly demonstrate that using the truncated Dyson-series leads to divergences in the steady-state limit, thus making it impossible to be used for actual applications. In order to resolve the divergences, we propose a unique choice of initial condition for the reduced density matrix, which removes the divergences at each order. Our approach not only allows us to use the truncated Dyson-series, with a reasonable choice of initial condition, but also gives the expected result that the steady-state solutions should be independent of initial preparations. Using our improved Dyson series we evaluate the heat and electronic currents up to fourth-order in system-bath coupling, a considerable improvement over the standard quantum master equation techniques. We then numerically corroborate our theory for archetypal settings of linear systems using the exact nonequilibrium Green's function approach. Finally, to demonstrate the advantage of our approach, we deal with the nonlinear spin-boson model to evaluate heat current up to fourth-order and find signatures of cotunnelling process.

  15. Bayesian inference of interaction properties of noisy dynamical systems with time-varying coupling: capabilities and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilting, Jens; Lehnertz, Klaus

    2015-08-01

    We investigate a recently published analysis framework based on Bayesian inference for the time-resolved characterization of interaction properties of noisy, coupled dynamical systems. It promises wide applicability and a better time resolution than well-established methods. At the example of representative model systems, we show that the analysis framework has the same weaknesses as previous methods, particularly when investigating interacting, structurally different non-linear oscillators. We also inspect the tracking of time-varying interaction properties and propose a further modification of the algorithm, which improves the reliability of obtained results. We exemplarily investigate the suitability of this algorithm to infer strength and direction of interactions between various regions of the human brain during an epileptic seizure. Within the limitations of the applicability of this analysis tool, we show that the modified algorithm indeed allows a better time resolution through Bayesian inference when compared to previous methods based on least square fits.

  16. Multi-residue analytical method for the determination of endocrine disruptors and related compounds in river and waste water using dual column liquid chromatography switching system coupled to mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gorga, Marina; Petrovic, Mira; Barceló, Damià

    2013-06-21

    The present study describes a novel, fully automated method, based on column switching using EQuan™ columns for an integrated sample preconcentration and liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-LC-MS/MS). The method allows the unequivocal identification and quantification of the most relevant environmental endocrine disruptors compounds (EDCs) and compounds suspected to be EDCs, such as natural and synthetic estrogens and their conjugates, antimicrobials, parabens, bisphenol A, alkylphenolic compounds, benzotriazoles, and organophosphorus flame retardants, in surface river water and wastewater samples. Applying this technique, water samples were directly injected into the chromatographic system and the target compounds were concentrated into the loading column. Thereafter, the analytes were transferred into the analytical column for subsequent detection by MS-MS (QqQ). A comparative study employing three types of columns, with different chemical modifications, was performed in order to determine the optimal column that allowed maximum retention and subsequent elution of the analytes. Using this new optimized methodology a fast and easy online methodology for the analysis of EDCs in surface river water and wastewater with low limits of quantification (LOQ) was obtained. LOQs ranged from 0.008 to 1.54 ng/L for surface river water and from 0.178/0.364 to 12.5/25.0 ng/L (except for alkylphenol monoethoxylates) for effluent/influent waste water. Moreover, employing approximately 1h, a complete analysis was performed which was significant improvement in comparison to other methods reported previously. This method was used to track the presence and fate of target compounds in the Ebro River which is the most important river in Spain whose intensive agricultural and industrial activities concentrate mainly close to the main cities in the basin, deteriorating soil and water quality. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Cisapride a green analytical reagent for rapid and sensitive determination of bromate in drinking water, bread and flour additives by oxidative coupling spectrophotometric methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Okab, Riyad Ahmed

    2013-02-01

    Green analytical methods using Cisapride (CPE) as green analytical reagent was investigated in this work. Rapid, simple, and sensitive spectrophotometric methods for the determination of bromate in water sample, bread and flour additives were developed. The proposed methods based on the oxidative coupling between phenoxazine and Cisapride in the presence of bromate to form red colored product with max at 520 nm. Phenoxazine and Cisapride and its reaction products were found to be environmentally friendly under the optimum experimental condition. The method obeys beers law in concentration range 0.11-4.00 g ml-1 and molar absorptivity 1.41 × 104 L mol-1 cm-1. All variables have been optimized and the presented reaction sequences were applied to the analysis of bromate in water, bread and flour additive samples. The performance of these method was evaluated in terms of Student's t-test and variance ratio F-test to find out the significance of proposed methods over the reference method. The combination of pharmaceutical drugs reagents with low concentration create some unique green chemical analyses.

  18. Enhanced fluorescence sensitivity by coupling yttrium-analyte complexes and three-way fast high-performance liquid chromatography data modeling.

    PubMed

    Alcaraz, Mirta R; Culzoni, María J; Goicoechea, Héctor C

    2016-01-01

    The present study reports a sensitive chromatographic method for the analysis of seven fluoroquinolones (FQs) in environmental water samples, by coupling yttrium-analyte complex and three-way chromatographic data modeling. This method based on the use of HPLC-FSFD does not require complex or tedious sample treatments or enrichment processes before the analysis, due to the significant fluorescence increments of the analytes reached by the presence of Y(3+). Enhancement achieved for the FQs signals obtained after Y(3+) addition reaches 103- to 1743-fold. Prediction results corresponding to the application of MCR-ALS to the validation set showed relative error of prediction (REP%) values below 10% in all cases. A recovery study that includes the simultaneous determination of the seven FQs in three different environmental aqueous matrices was conducted. The recovery studies assert the efficiency and the accuracy of the proposed method. The LOD values calculated are in the order of part per trillion (below 0.5 ng mL(-1) for all the FQs, except for enoxacin). It is noteworthy to mention that the method herein proposed, which does not include pre-concentration steps, allows reaching LOD values in the same order of magnitude than those achieved by more sophisticated methods based on SPE and UHPLC-MS/MS.

  19. Cisapride a green analytical reagent for rapid and sensitive determination of bromate in drinking water, bread and flour additives by oxidative coupling spectrophotometric methods.

    PubMed

    Al Okab, Riyad Ahmed

    2013-02-15

    Green analytical methods using Cisapride (CPE) as green analytical reagent was investigated in this work. Rapid, simple, and sensitive spectrophotometric methods for the determination of bromate in water sample, bread and flour additives were developed. The proposed methods based on the oxidative coupling between phenoxazine and Cisapride in the presence of bromate to form red colored product with max at 520 nm. Phenoxazine and Cisapride and its reaction products were found to be environmentally friendly under the optimum experimental condition. The method obeys beers law in concentration range 0.11-4.00 g ml(-1) and molar absorptivity 1.41 × 10(4) L mol(-1)cm(-1). All variables have been optimized and the presented reaction sequences were applied to the analysis of bromate in water, bread and flour additive samples. The performance of these method was evaluated in terms of Student's t-test and variance ratio F-test to find out the significance of proposed methods over the reference method. The combination of pharmaceutical drugs reagents with low concentration create some unique green chemical analyses.

  20. Analytical procedure for characterization of medieval wall-paintings by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syta, Olga; Rozum, Karol; Choińska, Marta; Zielińska, Dobrochna; Żukowska, Grażyna Zofia; Kijowska, Agnieszka; Wagner, Barbara

    2014-11-01

    Analytical procedure for the comprehensive chemical characterization of samples from medieval Nubian wall-paintings by means of portable X-ray fluorescence (pXRF), laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) and Raman spectroscopy (RS) was proposed in this work. The procedure was used for elemental and molecular investigations of samples from archeological excavations in Nubia (modern southern Egypt and northern Sudan). Numerous remains of churches with painted decorations dated back to the 7th-14th century were excavated in the region of medieval kingdoms of Nubia but many aspects of this art and its technology are still unknown. Samples from the selected archeological sites (Faras, Old Dongola and Banganarti) were analyzed in the form of transfers (n = 26), small fragments collected during the excavations (n = 35) and cross sections (n = 15). XRF was used to collect data about elemental composition, LA-ICPMS allowed mapping of selected elements, while RS was used to get the molecular information about the samples. The preliminary results indicated the usefulness of the proposed analytical procedure for distinguishing the substances, from both the surface and sub-surface domains of the wall-paintings. The possibility to identify raw materials from the wall-paintings will be used in the further systematic, archeometric studies devoted to the detailed comparison of various historic Nubian centers.

  1. Large deformation of uniaxially loaded slender microbeams on the basis of modified couple stress theory: Analytical solution and Galerkin-based method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiani, Keivan

    2017-09-01

    Large deformation regime of micro-scale slender beam-like structures subjected to axially pointed loads is of high interest to nanotechnologists and applied mechanics community. Herein, size-dependent nonlinear governing equations are derived by employing modified couple stress theory. Under various boundary conditions, analytical relations between axially applied loads and deformations are presented. Additionally, a novel Galerkin-based assumed mode method (AMM) is established to solve the highly nonlinear equations. In some particular cases, the predicted results by the analytical approach are also checked with those of AMM and a reasonably good agreement is reported. Subsequently, the key role of the material length scale on the load-deformation of microbeams is discussed and the deficiencies of the classical elasticity theory in predicting such a crucial mechanical behavior are explained in some detail. The influences of slenderness ratio and thickness of the microbeam on the obtained results are also examined. The present work could be considered as a pivotal step in better realizing the postbuckling behavior of nano-/micro- electro-mechanical systems consist of microbeams.

  2. PASSIVE SAMPLING COUPLED TO ULTRAVIOLET IRRADIATION: A USEFUL ANALYTICAL APPROACH FOR STUDYING OXYGENATED POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON FORMATION IN BIOAVAILABLE MIXTURES

    PubMed Central

    Forsberg, Norman D; O'Connell, Steven G; Allan, Sarah E; Anderson, Kim A

    2014-01-01

    The authors investigated coupling passive sampling technologies with ultraviolet irradiation experiments to study polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and oxygenated PAH transformation processes in real-world bioavailable mixtures. Passive sampling device (PSD) extracts were obtained from coastal waters impacted by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill and Superfund sites in Portland, Oregon, USA. Oxygenated PAHs were found in the contaminated waters with our PSDs. All mixtures were subsequently exposed to a mild dose of ultraviolet B (UVB). A reduction in PAH levels and simultaneous formation of several oxygenated PAHs were measured. Site-specific differences were observed with UVB-exposed PSD mixtures. Environ Toxicol Chem 2014;33:XX–XX. © 2013 The Authors. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of SETAC. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial, and no modifications or adaptations are made. PMID:24123227

  3. Analytical control of wollastonite for biomedical applications by use of atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    De Aza, P N; Guitián, F; De Aza, S; Valle, F J

    1998-04-01

    Preliminary in vitro experiments revealed that wollastonite (CaSiO3) is a potentially highly bioactive material that forms a hyroxyapatite (HA) surface layer on exposure to simulated body fluid with an ion concentration, pH and temperature virtually identical with those of human blood plasma. The formation of the HA layer is an essential requirement for an artificial material to be used as bioactive bone substitute. This finding opens up a wide field for biomedical applications of wollastonite. Biomaterials used as implants in the human body require strict control of trace elements and of the toxic species specified in American Society for Testing and Materials F-1185-88 (As, Cd, Hg and Pb) in ceramic hydroxyapatite for surgical implantation. In this work, two types of pseudowollastonite, the high temperature form of wollastonite, were analysed by using cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry and hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry, in order to determine the elements stated in the above-mentioned norm, and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry to establish the SiO2/CaO ratio of the two materials and analyse for all other impurities introduced by the raw materials and by the processes of synthesis, sintering and grinding. Barium and Mg were especially prominent in raw materials, and Zr, Y, Mg, W, Co and Ni come mainly from the processing.

  4. Secular diffusion in discrete self-gravitating tepid discs. I. Analytic solution in the tightly wound limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouvry, J. B.; Pichon, C.; Chavanis, P. H.

    2015-09-01

    The secular evolution of an infinitely thin tepid isolated galactic disc made of a finite number of particles is described using the inhomogeneous Balescu-Lenard equation. Assuming that only tightly wound transient spirals are present in the disc, a WKB approximation provides a simple and tractable quadrature for the corresponding drift and diffusion coefficients. It provides insight into the physical processes at work during the secular diffusion of a self-gravitating discrete disc and makes quantitative predictions on the initial variations of the distribution function in action space. When applied to the secular evolution of an isolated stationary self-gravitating Mestel disc, this formalism predicts the initial importance of the corotation resonance in the inner regions of the disc leading to a regime involving radial migration and heating. It predicts in particular the formation of a ridge-like feature in action space, in agreement with simulations, but over-estimates the timescale involved in its appearance. Swing amplification is likely needed to resolve this discrepancy. In astrophysics, the inhomogeneous Balescu-Lenard equation and its WKB limit may also describe the secular diffusion of giant molecular clouds in galactic discs, the secular migration and segregation of planetesimals in proto-planetary discs, or even the long-term evolution of population of stars within the Galactic centre. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  5. The Importance and Current Limitations of Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) Retrieval from Space for Land-Atmosphere Coupling Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santanello, J. A., Jr.; Schaefer, A.

    2016-12-01

    There is an established need for improved PBL remote sounding over land for hydrology, land-atmosphere (L-A), PBL, cloud/convection, pollution/chemistry studies and associated model evaluation and development. Most notably, the connection of surface hydrology (through soil moisture) to clouds and precipitation relies on proper quantification of water's transport through the coupled system, which is modulated strongly by PBL structure, growth, and feedback processes such as entrainment. In-situ (ground-based or radiosonde) measurements will be spatially limited to small field campaigns for the foreseeable future, so satellite data is a must in order to understand these processes globally. The scales of these applications require diurnal resolution (e.g. 3-hourly or finer) at <100m vertical and 1-10km spatial resolutions in order to assess processes driving land-PBL coupling and water and energy cycles at their native scales. Today's satellite sensors (e.g. advanced IR, GEO, lidar, GPS-RO) do not reach close to these targets in terms of accuracy or resolution, and each of these sensors has some advantages but even more limitations that make them impractical for PBL and L-A studies. Unfortunately, there is very little attention or planning (short or long-term) in place for improving lower tropospheric sounding over land, and as a result PBL and L-A interactions have been identified as `gaps' in current programmatic focal areas. It is therefore timely to assess how these technologies can be leveraged, combined, or evolved in order to form a dedicated mission or sub-mission to routinely monitor the PBL on diurnal timescales. In addition, improved PBL monitoring from space needs to be addressed in the next Decadal Survey. In this talk, the importance of PBL information (structure, evolution) for L-A coupling diagnostics and model development will be summarized. The current array of PBL retrieval methods and products from space will then be assessed in terms of meeting

  6. A Complete First-Order Analytical Solution for Optimal Low-Thrust Limited-Power Transfers Between Coplanar Orbits with Small Eccentricities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Silva Fernandes, Sandro; Das Chagas Carvalho, Francisco; Vilhena de Moraes, Rodolpho

    The purpose of this work is to present a complete first order analytical solution, which includes short periodic terms, for the problem of optimal low-thrust limited power trajectories with large amplitude transfers (no rendezvous) between coplanar orbits with small eccentricities in Newtonian central gravity field. The study of these transfers is particularly interesting because the orbits found in practice often have a small eccentricity and the problem of transferring a vehicle from a low earth orbit to a high earth orbit is frequently found. Besides, the analysis has been motivated by the renewed interest in the use of low-thrust propulsion systems in space missions verified in the last two decades. Several researchers have obtained numerical and sometimes analytical solutions for a number of specific initial orbits and specific thrust profiles. Averaging methods are also used in such researches. Firstly, the optimization problem associated to the space transfer problem is formulated as a Mayer problem of optimal control with Cartesian elements - position and velocity vectors - as state variables. After applying the Pontryagin Maximum Principle, successive Mathieu transformations are performed and suitable sets of orbital elements are introduced. The short periodic terms are eliminated from the maximum Hamiltonian function through an infinitesimal canonical transformation built through Hori method - a perturbation canonical method based on Lie series. The new Hamiltonian function, which results from the infinitesimal canonical transformation, describes the extremal trajectories for long duration maneuvers. Closed-form analytical solutions are obtained for the new canonical system by solving the Hamilton-Jacobi equation through the separation of variables technique. By applying the transformation equations of the algorithm of Hori method, a first order analytical solution for the problem is obtained in non-singular orbital elements. For long duration maneuvers

  7. A simple analytical solution for the transient dike volume change and dike velocity for the chamber - dike coupled problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivalta, Eleonora

    2010-05-01

    In the past decades volcano seismologists and geodesists have collected many observations on the transient regime of dike emplacement that current models of dike propagation do not explain. The cause of this failure has been already identified by several authors in the common assumption that magma chambers can maintain their pressure constant while feeding dikes. This assumption collides e.g. with the convex upward shape of the volume evolution during the 1997 dike intrusion at KIlauea, as noted by Owen et al. [2000] and Segall et al. [2001]. Segall et al. [2001] described the flow of the magma from a chamber to a dike with an ordinary differential equation for the unknown pressures of chamber and dike. The feeding of dikes is then associated to a pressure drop in the magma chamber, controlled by magma bulk modulus and elastic compressibility of surrounding rock. Here I present a model developing on that intuition, which makes use of mass conservation (instead of volume conservation) as a constraint for pressure, as magma flows from the chamber to the dike. This ansatz allows to solve the problem analytically. The model predicts that chamber and intrusion volume change exponentially with time as V (t) = V ∞[1 - exp(-t-?)]. Intrusion velocity is found to change as v = v0 exp(-t-?), where v0 is the initial dike velocity. The asymptotic volume V ∞ and the time scale ? can be expressed in terms of rock, magma, chamber and dike parameters and of the initial pressure conditions. Fitting volume or velocity curves can provide independent constraints on parameters difficult to retrieve otherwise. I validate my model with data from the 2000 Miyakejima intrusion (Japan), the 1978 Krafla event (Iceland) and from some intrusions following the 2005 event in Afar (Ethiopia). The fit between model and observations is excellent. This paper confirms and extends the results of a previous study [Rivalta and Segall , 2008] that explained the volume imbalance found during some dike

  8. Pushing back the limits of Raman imaging by coupling super-resolution and chemometrics for aerosols characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offroy, Marc; Moreau, Myriam; Sobanska, Sophie; Milanfar, Peyman; Duponchel, Ludovic

    2015-07-01

    The increasing interest in nanoscience in many research fields like physics, chemistry, and biology, including the environmental fate of the produced nano-objects, requires instrumental improvements to address the sub-micrometric analysis challenges. The originality of our approach is to use both the super-resolution concept and multivariate curve resolution (MCR-ALS) algorithm in confocal Raman imaging to surmount its instrumental limits and to characterize chemical components of atmospheric aerosols at the level of the individual particles. We demonstrate the possibility to go beyond the diffraction limit with this algorithmic approach. Indeed, the spatial resolution is improved by 65% to achieve 200 nm for the considered far-field spectrophotometer. A multivariate curve resolution method is then coupled with super-resolution in order to explore the heterogeneous structure of submicron particles for describing physical and chemical processes that may occur in the atmosphere. The proposed methodology provides new tools for sub-micron characterization of heterogeneous samples using far-field (i.e. conventional) Raman imaging spectrometer.

  9. Pushing back the limits of Raman imaging by coupling super-resolution and chemometrics for aerosols characterization

    PubMed Central

    Offroy, Marc; Moreau, Myriam; Sobanska, Sophie; Milanfar, Peyman; Duponchel, Ludovic

    2015-01-01

    The increasing interest in nanoscience in many research fields like physics, chemistry, and biology, including the environmental fate of the produced nano-objects, requires instrumental improvements to address the sub-micrometric analysis challenges. The originality of our approach is to use both the super-resolution concept and multivariate curve resolution (MCR-ALS) algorithm in confocal Raman imaging to surmount its instrumental limits and to characterize chemical components of atmospheric aerosols at the level of the individual particles. We demonstrate the possibility to go beyond the diffraction limit with this algorithmic approach. Indeed, the spatial resolution is improved by 65% to achieve 200 nm for the considered far-field spectrophotometer. A multivariate curve resolution method is then coupled with super-resolution in order to explore the heterogeneous structure of submicron particles for describing physical and chemical processes that may occur in the atmosphere. The proposed methodology provides new tools for sub-micron characterization of heterogeneous samples using far-field (i.e. conventional) Raman imaging spectrometer. PMID:26201867

  10. Structural and functional studies on the sodium- and chloride-coupled. gamma. -aminobutyric acid transporter: Deglycosylation and limited proteolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kanner, B.I.; Keynan, S.; Radian, R. )

    1989-05-02

    The sodium- and chloride-coupled {gamma}-aminobutyric transporter, an 80-kDa glycoprotein, has been subjected to deglycosylation and limited proteolysis. The treatment of the 80-kDa band with endoglycosidase F results in its disappearance and reveals the presence of a polypeptide with an apparent molecular mass of about 60 kDa, which is devoid of {sup 125}I-labeled wheat germ agglutinin binding activity but is nevertheless recognized by the antibodies against the 80-kDa band. Upon limited proteolysis with papain or Pronase, the 80-kDa band was degraded to one with an apparent molecular mass of about 60 kDa. This polypeptide still contains the {sup 125}I-labeled wheat germ agglutinin binding activity but is not recognized by the antibody. The effect of proteolysis on function is examined. The transporter was purified by use of all steps except that for the lectin chromatography. After papain treatment and lectin chromatography, {gamma}-aminobutyric transport activity was eluted with N-acetylglucosamine. The characteristics of transport were the same as those of the pure transporter, but the preparation contained instead of the 80-kDa polypeptide two fragments of about 66 and 60 kDa. The ability of the anti-80-kDa antibody to recognize these fragments was relatively low. The observations indicate that the transporter contains exposed domains which are not important for function.

  11. Rational approach for self-limiting current injection transformers confirmed by coupled electromagnetic-thermal FEM simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhadi, Mustafa; Heydari, Hossein

    2011-07-01

    Current injection transformer (CIT) systems are within the major group of the standard-type test of high current components in the electrical industry. The present precious approach contemplates an arrangement for a rational design of a self-current limiting transformer (SLT) being integrated by a single unit 25 kA CIT system for fast overcurrent detection in stipulated current tests. This paper describes mathematical formulations based on an electric models and the dominant effects of an auxiliary winding on the rate of the self-limiting process of the system. This requires the evaluation of multiphysical (i.e. coupling of the electromagnetic and thermal parts) finite element modelling and simulations for three different approaches to suit the designer's choice. An overcurrent causes a considerable distortion of axial leakage flux, which in turn produces high radial forces. The transient analysis of the leakage flux densities and the corresponding electromagnetic forces on windings of the CIT and proposed SLT are the other objects of this paper. Moreover, the distribution of the flux density and the corresponding localized losses within the SLT core are further objects of this paper. However, this paper will mark another important event in superconductor technology and augment efficiency and compactness from which a lower overall cost of the CIT system could be attainable.

  12. COUPLED SPIN AND SHAPE EVOLUTION OF SMALL RUBBLE-PILE ASTEROIDS: SELF-LIMITATION OF THE YORP EFFECT

    SciTech Connect

    Cotto-Figueroa, Desireé; Statler, Thomas S.; Richardson, Derek C.; Tanga, Paolo E-mail: statler@ohio.edu

    2015-04-10

    We present the first self-consistent simulations of the coupled spin-shape evolution of small gravitational aggregates under the influence of the YORP effect. Because of YORP’s sensitivity to surface topography, even small centrifugally driven reconfigurations of aggregates can alter the YORP torque dramatically, resulting in spin evolution that can differ qualitatively from the rigid-body prediction. One-third of our simulations follow a simple evolution described as a modified YORP cycle. Two-thirds exhibit one or more of three distinct behaviors—stochastic YORP, self-governed YORP, and stagnating YORP—which together result in YORP self-limitation. Self-limitation confines rotation rates of evolving aggregates to far narrower ranges than those expected in the classical YORP cycle, greatly prolonging the times over which objects can preserve their sense of rotation. Simulated objects are initially randomly packed, disordered aggregates of identical spheres in rotating equilibrium, with low internal angles of friction. Their shape evolution is characterized by rearrangement of the entire body, including the deep interior. They do not evolve to axisymmetric top shapes with equatorial ridges. Mass loss occurs in one-third of the simulations, typically in small amounts from the ends of a prolate-triaxial body. We conjecture that YORP self-limitation may inhibit formation of top-shapes, binaries, or both, by restricting the amount of angular momentum that can be imparted to a deformable body. Stochastic YORP, in particular, will affect the evolution of collisional families whose orbits drift apart under the influence of Yarkovsky forces, in observable ways.

  13. Coupled Spin and Shape Evolution of Small Rubble-pile Asteroids: Self-limitation of the YORP Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotto-Figueroa, Desireé; Statler, Thomas S.; Richardson, Derek C.; Tanga, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    We present the first self-consistent simulations of the coupled spin-shape evolution of small gravitational aggregates under the influence of the YORP effect. Because of YORP’s sensitivity to surface topography, even small centrifugally driven reconfigurations of aggregates can alter the YORP torque dramatically, resulting in spin evolution that can differ qualitatively from the rigid-body prediction. One-third of our simulations follow a simple evolution described as a modified YORP cycle. Two-thirds exhibit one or more of three distinct behaviors—stochastic YORP, self-governed YORP, and stagnating YORP—which together result in YORP self-limitation. Self-limitation confines rotation rates of evolving aggregates to far narrower ranges than those expected in the classical YORP cycle, greatly prolonging the times over which objects can preserve their sense of rotation. Simulated objects are initially randomly packed, disordered aggregates of identical spheres in rotating equilibrium, with low internal angles of friction. Their shape evolution is characterized by rearrangement of the entire body, including the deep interior. They do not evolve to axisymmetric top shapes with equatorial ridges. Mass loss occurs in one-third of the simulations, typically in small amounts from the ends of a prolate-triaxial body. We conjecture that YORP self-limitation may inhibit formation of top-shapes, binaries, or both, by restricting the amount of angular momentum that can be imparted to a deformable body. Stochastic YORP, in particular, will affect the evolution of collisional families whose orbits drift apart under the influence of Yarkovsky forces, in observable ways.

  14. Reaffirmed limitations of meta-analytic methods in the study of mild traumatic brain injury: a response to Rohling et al.

    PubMed

    Bigler, Erin D; Farrer, Thomas J; Pertab, Jon L; James, Kelly; Petrie, Jo Ann; Hedges, Dawson W

    2013-01-01

    In 2009 Pertab, James, and Bigler published a critique of two prior meta-analyses by Binder, Rohling, and Larrabee (1997) and Frencham, Fox, and Maybery (2005) that showed small effect size difference at least 3 months post-injury in individuals who had sustained a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). The Binder et al. and Frencham et al. meta-analyses have been widely cited as showing no lasting effect of mTBI. In their critique Pertab et al. (2009) point out many limitations of these two prior meta-analyses, demonstrating that depending on how inclusion/exclusion criteria were defined different meta-analytic findings occur, some supporting the persistence of neuropsychological impairments beyond 3 months. Rohling et al. (2011) have now critiqued Pertab et al. (2009). Herein we respond to the Rolling et al. (2011) critique reaffirming the original findings of Pertab et al. (2009), providing additional details concerning the flaws in prior meta-analytic mTBI studies and the effects on neuropsychological performance.

  15. Scales of benthic–pelagic coupling and the intensity of species interactions: From recruitment limitation to top-down control

    PubMed Central

    Navarrete, Sergio A.; Wieters, Evie A.; Broitman, Bernardo R.; Castilla, Juan Carlos

    2005-01-01

    Large and usually unpredictable variation in species interaction strength has been a major roadblock to applying local experimental results to large-scale management and conservation issues. Recent studies explicitly considering benthic-pelagic coupling are starting to shed light on, and find regularities in, the causes of such large-scale variation in coastal ecosystems. Here, we evaluate the effects of variation in wind-driven upwelling on community regulation along 900 km of coastline of the southeastern Pacific, between 29°S and 35°S during 72 months. Variability in the intensity of upwelling occurring over tens of km produced predictable variation in recruitment of intertidal mussels, but not barnacles, and did not affect patterns of community structure. In contrast, sharp discontinuities in upwelling regimes produced abrupt and persistent breaks in the dynamics of benthic and pelagic communities over hundreds of km (regional) scales. Rates of mussel and barnacle recruitment changed sharply at ≈32°-33°S, determining a geographic break in adult abundance of these competitively dominant species. Analysis of satellite images demonstrates that regional-scale discontinuities in oceanographic regimes can couple benthic and pelagic systems, as evidenced by coincident breaks in dynamics and concentration of offshore surface chlorophyll-a. Field experiments showed that the paradigm of top-down control of intertidal benthic communities holds only south of the discontinuity. To the north, populations seem recruitment-limited, and predators have negligible effects, despite attaining similarly high abundances and potential predation effects across the region. Thus, geographically discontinuous oceanographic regimes set bounds to the strength of species interactions and define distinct regions for the design and implementation of sustainable management and conservation policies. PMID:16332959

  16. Scales of benthic-pelagic coupling and the intensity of species interactions: from recruitment limitation to top-down control.

    PubMed

    Navarrete, Sergio A; Wieters, Evie A; Broitman, Bernardo R; Castilla, Juan Carlos

    2005-12-13

    Large and usually unpredictable variation in species interaction strength has been a major roadblock to applying local experimental results to large-scale management and conservation issues. Recent studies explicitly considering benthic-pelagic coupling are starting to shed light on, and find regularities in, the causes of such large-scale variation in coastal ecosystems. Here, we evaluate the effects of variation in wind-driven upwelling on community regulation along 900 km of coastline of the southeastern Pacific, between 29 degrees S and 35 degrees S during 72 months. Variability in the intensity of upwelling occurring over tens of km produced predictable variation in recruitment of intertidal mussels, but not barnacles, and did not affect patterns of community structure. In contrast, sharp discontinuities in upwelling regimes produced abrupt and persistent breaks in the dynamics of benthic and pelagic communities over hundreds of km (regional) scales. Rates of mussel and barnacle recruitment changed sharply at approximately 32 degrees -33 degrees S, determining a geographic break in adult abundance of these competitively dominant species. Analysis of satellite images demonstrates that regional-scale discontinuities in oceanographic regimes can couple benthic and pelagic systems, as evidenced by coincident breaks in dynamics and concentration of offshore surface chlorophyll-a. Field experiments showed that the paradigm of top-down control of intertidal benthic communities holds only south of the discontinuity. To the north, populations seem recruitment-limited, and predators have negligible effects, despite attaining similarly high abundances and potential predation effects across the region. Thus, geographically discontinuous oceanographic regimes set bounds to the strength of species interactions and define distinct regions for the design and implementation of sustainable management and conservation policies.

  17. A series of meta-analytic tests of the depletion effect: Self-control does not seem to rely on a limited resource.

    PubMed

    Carter, Evan C; Kofler, Lilly M; Forster, Daniel E; McCullough, Michael E

    2015-08-01

    Failures of self-control are thought to underlie various important behaviors (e.g., addiction, violence, obesity, poor academic achievement). The modern conceptualization of self-control failure has been heavily influenced by the idea that self-control functions as if it relied upon a limited physiological or cognitive resource. This view of self-control has inspired hundreds of experiments designed to test the prediction that acts of self-control are more likely to fail when they follow previous acts of self-control (the depletion effect). Here, we evaluated the empirical evidence for this effect with a series of focused, meta-analytic tests that address the limitations in prior appraisals of the evidence. We find very little evidence that the depletion effect is a real phenomenon, at least when assessed with the methods most frequently used in the laboratory. Our results strongly challenge the idea that self-control functions as if it relies on a limited psychological or physical resource. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Limits on the Anomalous ZZγ and Zγγ Couplings in pp¯ Collisions at s = 1.8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abachi, S.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adam, I.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Ahn, S.; Aihara, H.; Alitti, J.; Álvarez, G.; Alves, G. A.; Amidi, E.; Amos, N.; Anderson, E. W.; Aronson, S. H.; Astur, R.; Avery, R. E.; Baden, A.; Balamurali, V.; Balderston, J.; Baldin, B.; Bantly, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bazizi, K.; Bendich, J.; Beri, S. B.; Bertram, I.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Bischoff, A.; Biswas, N.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N. I.; Borcherding, F.; Borders, J.; Boswell, C.; Brandt, A.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Burtovoi, V. S.; Butler, J. M.; Casey, D.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chang, S.-M.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chen, L.-P.; Chen, W.; Chevalier, L.; Chopra, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Christenson, J. H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Cobau, W. G.; Cochran, J.; Cooper, W. E.; Cretsinger, C.; Cullen-Vidal, D.; Cummings, M.; Cutts, D.; Dahl, O. I.; de, K.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisenko, K.; Denisenko, N.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Dharmaratna, W.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; di Loreto, G.; Dixon, R.; Draper, P.; Drinkard, J.; Ducros, Y.; Dugad, S. R.; Durston-Johnson, S.; Edmunds, D.; Efimov, A. O.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fahey, S.; Fahland, T.; Fatyga, M.; Fatyga, M. K.; Featherly, J.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Finocchiaro, G.; Fisk, H. E.; Fisyak, Yu.; Flattum, E.; Forden, G. E.; Fortner, M.; Frame, K. C.; Franzini, P.; Fredriksen, S.; Fuess, S.; Galjaev, A. N.; Gallas, E.; Gao, C. S.; Gao, S.; Geld, T. L.; Genik, R. J., II; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gibbard, B.; Glebov, V.; Glenn, S.; Gobbi, B.; Goforth, M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gomez, B.; Goncharov, P. I.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L. T.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P. D.; Green, D. R.; Green, J.; Greenlee, H.; Griffin, G.; Grossman, N.; Grudberg, P.; Grünendahl, S.; Guida, J. A.; Guida, J. M.; Guryn, W.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutnikov, Y. E.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hahn, K. S.; Hall, R. E.; Hansen, S.; Hatcher, R.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hedin, D.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hernández-Montoya, R.; Heuring, T.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hoftun, J. S.; Hsieh, F.; Hu, Ting; Hu, Tong; Huehn, T.; Igarashi, S.; Ito, A. S.; James, E.; Jaques, J.; Jerger, S. A.; Jiang, J. Z.-Y.; Joffe-Minor, T.; Johari, H.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnstad, H.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jöstlein, H.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, C. K.; Kahn, S.; Kang, J. S.; Kehoe, R.; Kelly, M.; Kernan, A.; Kerth, L.; Kim, C. L.; Kim, S. K.; Klatchko, A.; Klima, B.; Klochkov, B. I.; Klopfenstein, C.; Klyukhin, V. I.; Kochetkov, V. I.; Kohli, J. M.; Koltick, D.; Kostritskiy, A. V.; Kotcher, J.; Kourlas, J.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovski, E. A.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lami, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lanou, R. E.; Lebrat, J.-F.; Leflat, A.; Li, H.; Li, J.; Li, Y. K.; Li-Demarteau, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y. C.; Lobkowicz, F.; Loken, S. C.; Lökös, S.; Lueking, L.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K.; Madaras, R. J.; Madden, R.; Mandrichenko, I. V.; Mangeot, Ph.; Mani, S.; Mansoulié, B.; Mao, H. S.; Margulies, S.; Markeloff, R.; Markosky, L.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M. I.; Marx, M.; May, B.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McKibben, T.; McKinley, J.; Melanson, H. L.; de Mello Neto, J. R.; Merritt, K. W.; Miettinen, H.; Milder, A.; Milner, C.; Mincer, A.; de Miranda, J. M.; Mishra, C. S.; Mohammadi-Baarmand, M.; Mokhov, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Mooney, P.; Mudan, M.; Murphy, C.; Murphy, C. T.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Narayanan, A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neis, E.; Nemethy, P.; NešiĆ, D.; Norman, D.; Oesch, L.; Oguri, V.; Oltman, E.; Oshima, N.; Owen, D.; Padley, P.; Pang, M.; Para, A.; Park, C. H.; Park, Y. M.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Paterno, M.; Perkins, J.; Peryshkin, A.; Peters, M.; Piekarz, H.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Pluquet, A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pope, B. G.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Pušeljić, D.; Qian, J.; Quintas, P. Z.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Ramirez, O.; Rao, M. V.; Rapidis, P. A.; Rasmussen, L.; Read, A. L.; Reucroft, S.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rockwell, T.; Roe, N. A.; Roldan, J. M.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rusin, S.; Rutherfoord, J.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Schmid, D.; Sculli, J.; Shabalina, E.; Shaffer, C.; Shankar, H. C.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shupe, M.; Singh, J. B.; Sirotenko, V.; Smart, W.; Smith, A.; Smith, R. P.; Snihur, R.; Snow, G. R.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Sood, P. M.; Sosebee, M.; Souza, M.; Spadafora, A. L.; Stephens, R. W.; Stevenson, M. L.; Stewart, D.; Stocker, F.; Stoianova, D. A.; Stoker, D.; Streets, K.; Strovink, M.; Taketani, A.; Tamburello, P.; Tarazi, J.; Tartaglia, M.; Taylor, T. L.; Teiger, J.; Thompson, J.; Trippe, T. G.; Tuts, P. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Virador, P. R.; Vititoe, D.; Volkov, A. A.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, J.; Wang, L. Z.; Warchol, J.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; Wenzel, W. A.; White, A.; White, J. T.; Wightman, J. A.; Wilcox, J.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wirjawan, J. V.; Wolf, Z.; Womersley, J.; Won, E.; Wood, D. R.; Xu, H.; Yamada, R.; Yamin, P.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yang, J.; Yasuda, T.; Yepes, P.; Yoshikawa, C.; Youssef, S.; Yu, J.; Yu, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhou, Y. H.; Zhu, Q.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. H.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zinchenko, A.; Zylberstejn, A.

    1995-08-01

    We performed a direct search for the anomalous ZZγ and Zγγ couplings by studying pp¯-->llγ+X \\(l = e,μ\\) events at s = 1.8 TeV with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. A fit to the transverse energy spectrum of the photon in the signal events, based on the data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 14.3 pb-1 ( 13.7 pb-1) for the electron (muon) channel, yields the following 95% confidence level limits on the anomalous CP-conserving ZZγ couplings: \\|hZ30\\|<1.8 ( hZ40 = 0) and \\|hZ40\\|<0.5 ( hZ30 = 0), for a form-factor scale Λ = 500 GeV. Limits for the Zγγ couplings and CP-violating couplings are also discussed.

  19. Interpolated energy densities, correlation indicators and lower bounds from approximations to the strong coupling limit of DFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuckovic, Stefan; Irons, Tom J. P.; Wagner, Lucas O.; Teale, Andrew M.; Gori-Giorgi, Paola

    We investigate the construction of approximated exchange-correlation functionals by interpolating locally along the adiabatic connection between the weak- and the strong-coupling regimes, focussing on the effect of using approximate functionals for the strong-coupling energy densities. The gauge problem is avoided by dealing with quantities that are all locally defined in the same way. Using exact ingredients at weak coupling we are able to isolate the error coming from the approximations at strong coupling only. We find that the nonlocal radius model, which retains some of the non-locality of the exact strong-coupling regime, yields very satisfactory results. We also use interpolation models and quantities from the weak- and strong-coupling regimes to define a correlation-type indicator and a lower bound to the exact exchange-correlation energy. Open problems, related to the nature of the local and global slope of the adiabatic connection at weak coupling, are also discussed.

  20. Protein and nucleotide biosynthesis are coupled through a single rate limiting enzyme, PRPS2, to drive cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, John T.; Moreno, Melissa V.; Lodi, Alessia; Ronen, Sabrina M.; Ruggero, Davide

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cells must integrate multiple biosynthetic demands to drive indefinite proliferation. An outstanding question is how these key cellular processes such as metabolism and protein synthesis cross-talk to fuel cancer cell growth. Here we uncover the mechanism by which the MYC oncogene coordinates the production of the two most abundant classes of cellular macromolecules, proteins and nucleic acids in cancer cells. We find that a single rate-limiting enzyme, phosphoribosyl-pyrophosphate synthetase 2 (PRPS2), promotes increased nucleotide biosynthesis in MYC-transformed cells. Remarkably, Prps2 couples protein and nucleotide biosynthesis through a specialized cis-regulatory element within the Prps2 5′UTR, which is controlled by the oncogene and translation initiation factor eIF4E downstream Myc activation. We demonstrate with a Prps2 knockout mouse that the nexus between protein and nucleotide biosynthesis controlled by PRPS2 is crucial for Myc-driven tumorigenesis. Together, these studies identify a translationally-anchored anabolic circuit critical for cancer cell survival and an unexpected vulnerability for “undruggable” oncogenes, such as Myc. PMID:24855946

  1. Energy density functionals from the strong-coupling limit applied to the anions of the He isoelectronic series

    SciTech Connect

    Mirtschink, André; Gori-Giorgi, Paola; Umrigar, C. J.; Morgan, John D.

    2014-05-14

    Anions and radicals are important for many applications including environmental chemistry, semiconductors, and charge transfer, but are poorly described by the available approximate energy density functionals. Here we test an approximate exchange-correlation functional based on the exact strong-coupling limit of the Hohenberg-Kohn functional on the prototypical case of the He isoelectronic series with varying nuclear charge Z < 2, which includes weakly bound negative ions and a quantum phase transition at a critical value of Z, representing a big challenge for density functional theory. We use accurate wavefunction calculations to validate our results, comparing energies and Kohn-Sham potentials, thus also providing useful reference data close to and at the quantum phase transition. We show that our functional is able to bind H{sup −} and to capture in general the physics of loosely bound anions, with a tendency to strongly overbind that can be proven mathematically. We also include corrections based on the uniform electron gas which improve the results.

  2. Small coupling limit and multiple solutions to the Dirichlet problem for Yang-Mills connections in four dimensions. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isobe, Takeshi; Marini, Antonella

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we complete the proof of the existence of multiple solutions (and, in particular, non minimal ones), to the ɛ-Dirichlet problem obtained as a variational problem for the SU(2)ɛ-Yang-Mills functional. This is equivalent to proving the existence of multiple solutions to the Dirichlet problem for the SU(2)-Yang-Mills functional with small boundary data. In the first paper of this series this non-compact variational problem is transformed into the finite-dimensional problem of finding the critical points of the function J_{ɛ }({q}), which is essentially the Yang-Mills functional evaluated on the approximate solutions, constructed via a gluing technique. In the present paper, we establish a Morse theory for J_{ɛ }({q}), by means of Ljusternik-Schnirelmann theory, thus complete the proofs of Theorems 1-3 given by Isobe and Marini ["Small coupling limit and multiple solutions to the Dirichlet Problem for Yang-Mills connections in 4 dimensions - Part I," J. Math. Phys. 53, 063706 (2012)], 10.1063/1.4728211.

  3. Characterization of acoustic black hole effect using a one-dimensional fully-coupled and wavelet-decomposed semi-analytical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Liling; Cheng, Li; Ji, Hongli; Qiu, Jinhao

    2016-07-01

    Acoustics Black Hole (ABH) effect shows promising features for potential vibration control and energy harvesting applications. The phenomenon occurs in a structure with diminishing thickness which gradually reduces the phase velocity of flexural waves. The coupling between the tailored ABH structure and the damping layer used to compensate for the adverse effect of the unavoidable truncation is critical and has not been well apprehended by the existing models. This paper presents a semi-analytical model to analyze an Euler-Bernoulli beam with embedded ABH feature and its full coupling with the damping layers coated over its surface. By decomposing the transverse displacement field of the beam over the basis of a set of Mexican hat wavelets, the extremalization of the Hamiltonian via Lagrange's equation yields a set of linear equations, which can be solved for structural responses. Highly consistent with the FEM and experimental results, numerical simulations demonstrate that the proposed wavelet-based model is particularly suitable to characterize the ABH-induced drastic wavelength fluctuation phenomenon. The ABH feature as well as the effect of the wedge truncation and that of the damping layers on the vibration response of the beam is analyzed. It is shown that the mass of the damping layers needs particular attention when their thickness is comparable to that of the ABH wedge around the tip area. Due to its modular and energy-based feature, the proposed framework offers a general platform allowing embodiment of other control or energy harvesting elements into the model to guide ABH structural design for various applications.

  4. A coupled 1-D biological/physical model of the northeast subarctic Pacific Ocean with iron limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denman, K. L.; Peña, M. A.

    1999-11-01

    The recent NE subarctic Pacific study of the Canadian JGOFS project was designed primarily to address why phytoplankton biomass and production at Ocean Station Papa (OSP: 50°N, 145°W) are not as high as the nitrate concentrations could potentially support. To examine the possible role of iron (Fe) limitation in concert with microzooplankton grazing and physical supply of nitrate, we have coupled a four-compartment Nitrogen-Phytoplankton-Zooplankton-Detritus planktonic ecosystem model with a 60-layer (each 2 m thick) one-dimensional mixed-layer model (Mellor-Yamada level 2.5), driven by annual forcing characteristic of OSP. Both the physical and ecological models are forced with the same annual heat budget, mean phytoplankton concentration was tuned with the equilibrium solution of the model, and the zooplankton parameter values were chosen to be representative of microzooplankton. Modelled sea surface temperature ranged between 6 (fixed - late winter) and 13-14°C, depending on the distribution and amount of phytoplankton and detritus calculated by the model. Simulations with Fe limitation reducing the maximum specific growth rate of phytoplankton (for Fe-replete conditions) by a factor of ˜3 best reproduced the annual cycle of surface layer nitrate, although the resulting annual f-ratio calculated from the fluxes into and out of the nitrogen compartment was marginally higher than recent estimates of f-ratio based on observations at OSP. The best simulations with Fe limitation agreed with observations of the annual cycle of surface nitrate concentration, the f-ratio, particulate nitrogen concentration in the euphotic layer, the export production, and the remineralization depth scale for sinking detritus, to within ˜50%, probably within the range of observational uncertainty and/or seasonal and interannual variability. Possible modifications include separating the detrital pool into suspended and sinking organic matter, decreasing the rate of remineralization

  5. Limits on WWZ and WWγ Couplings from pp¯ --> eνjjX Events at s } = 1.8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adam, I.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Ahn, S.; Aihara, H.; Alves, G. A.; Amidi, E.; Amos, N.; Anderson, E. W.; Astur, R.; Baarmand, M. M.; Baden, A.; Balamurali, V.; Balderston, J.; Baldin, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bantly, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bazizi, K.; Belyaev, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bertram, I.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Biswas, N.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, P.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N. I.; Borcherding, F.; Borders, J.; Boswell, C.; Brandt, A.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Burtovoi, V. S.; Butler, J. M.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, D.; Casilum, Z.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chang, S.-M.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chen, L.-P.; Chen, W.; Choi, S.; Chopra, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Christenson, J. H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Cobau, W. G.; Cochran, J.; Cooper, W. E.; Cretsinger, C.; Cullen-Vidal, D.; Cummings, M. A.; Cutts, D.; Dahl, O. I.; Davis, K.; de, K.; del Signore, K.; Demarteau, M.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; di Loreto, G.; Draper, P.; Ducros, Y.; Dudko, L. V.; Dugad, S. R.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fahland, T.; Fatyga, M.; Fatyga, M. K.; Featherly, J.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Finocchiaro, G.; Fisk, H. E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flattum, E.; Forden, G. E.; Fortner, M.; Frame, K. C.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, A. N.; Gartung, P.; Geld, T. L.; Genik, R. J.; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gibbard, B.; Glenn, S.; Gobbi, B.; Goforth, M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gómez, B.; Gómez, G.; Goncharov, P. I.; González Solís, J. L.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L. T.; Gounder, K.; Goussiou, A.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P. D.; Green, D. R.; Green, J.; Greenlee, H.; Grim, G.; Grinstein, S.; Grossman, N.; Grudberg, P.; Grünendahl, S.; Guglielmo, G.; Guida, J. A.; Guida, J. M.; Gupta, A.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutnikov, Y. E.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hahn, K. S.; Hall, R. E.; Hansen, S.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hedin, D.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hernández-Montoya, R.; Heuring, T.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hoftun, J. S.; Hsieh, F.; Hu, Ting; Hu, Tong; Huehn, T.; Ito, A. S.; James, E.; Jaques, J.; Jerger, S. A.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, J. Z.-Y.; Joffe-Minor, T.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jöstlein, H.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, C. K.; Kahn, S.; Kalbfleisch, G.; Kang, J. S.; Kehoe, R.; Kelly, M. L.; Kim, C. L.; Kim, S. K.; Klatchko, A.; Klima, B.; Klopfenstein, C.; Klyukhin, V. I.; Kochetkov, V. I.; Kohli, J. M.; Koltick, D.; Kostritskiy, A. V.; Kotcher, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kourlas, J.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovski, E. A.; Krane, J.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lami, S.; Lan, H.; Lander, R.; Landry, F.; Landsberg, G.; Lauer, B.; Leflat, A.; Li, H.; Li, J.; Li-Demarteau, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Q.; Liu, Y. C.; Lobkowicz, F.; Loken, S. C.; Lökös, S.; Lueking, L.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K.; Madaras, R. J.; Madden, R.; Magaña-Mendoza, L.; Mani, S.; Mao, H. S.; Markeloff, R.; Markosky, L.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M. I.; Mauritz, K. M.; May, B.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McDonald, J.; McKibben, T.; McKinley, J.; McMahon, T.; Melanson, H. L.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Miettinen, H.; Mincer, A.; de Miranda, J. M.; Mishra, C. S.; Mokhov, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Mooney, P.; da Motta, H.; Murphy, C.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Narayanan, A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nemethy, P.; Nicola, M.; Norman, D.; Oesch, L.; Oguri, V.; Oltman, E.; Oshima, N.; Owen, D.; Padley, P.; Pang, M.; Para, A.; Park, Y. M.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Paterno, M.; Perkins, J.; Peters, M.; Piegaia, R.; Piekarz, H.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pope, B. G.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quintas, P. Z.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Ramirez, O.; Rasmussen, L.; Reucroft, S.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rockwell, T.; Roe, N. A.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rutherfoord, J.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Sculli, J.; Shabalina, E.; Shaffer, C.; Shankar, H. C.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shupe, M.; Singh, H.; Singh, J. B.; Sirotenko, V.; Smart, W.; Smith, A.; Smith, R. P.; Snihur, R.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Sood, P. M.; Sosebee, M.; Sotnikova, N.; Souza, M.; Spadafora, A. L.; Stephens, R. W.; Stevenson, M. L.; Stewart, D.; Stoianova, D. A.; Stoker, D.; Strauss, M.; Streets, K.; Strovink, M.; Sznajder, A.; Tamburello, P.; Tarazi, J.; Tartaglia, M.; Thomas, T. L.; Thompson, J.; Trippe, T. G.; Tuts, P. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vititoe, D.; Volkov, A. A.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, G.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; White, A.; White, J. T.; Wightman, J. A.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wirjawan, J. V.; Womersley, J.; Won, E.; Wood, D. R.; Xu, H.; Yamada, R.; Yamin, P.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yang, J.; Yasuda, T.; Yepes, P.; Yoshikawa, C.; Youssef, S.; Yu, J.; Yu, Y.; Zhu, Z. H.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zverev, E. G.; Zylberstejn, A.

    1997-08-01

    We present limits on anomalous WWZ and WWγ couplings from a search for WW and WZ production in pp¯ collisions at s = 1.8 TeV. We use pp¯-->eνjjX events recorded with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider during the 1992-1995 run. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 96.0+/-5.1 pb-1. Assuming identical WWZ and WWγ coupling parameters, the 95% C.L. limits on the CP-conserving couplings are -0.33<λ<0.36 \\(Δκ = 0\\) and -0.43<Δκ<0.59 \\(λ = 0\\), for a form factor scale Λ = 2.0 TeV. Limits based on other assumptions are also presented.

  6. Analytic evaluation of nonadiabatic coupling terms at the MR-CI level. II. Minima on the crossing seam: formaldehyde and the photodimerization of ethylene.

    PubMed

    Dallos, Michal; Lischka, Hans; Shepard, Ron; Yarkony, David R; Szalay, Peter G

    2004-04-22

    The method for the analytic calculation of the nonadiabatic coupling vector at the multireference configuration-interaction (MR-CI) level and its program implementation into the COLUMBUS program system described in the preceding paper [Lischka et al., J. Chem. Phys. 120, 7322 (2004)] has been combined with automatic searches for minima on the crossing seam (MXS). Based on a perturbative description of the vicinity of a conical intersection, a Lagrange formalism for the determination of MXS has been derived. Geometry optimization by direct inversion in the iterative subspace extrapolation is used to improve the convergence properties of the corresponding Newton-Raphson procedure. Three examples have been investigated: the crossing between the 1(1)B1/2(1)A1 valence states in formaldehyde, the crossing between the 2(1)A1/3(1)A1 pi-pi* valence and ny-3py Rydberg states in formaldehyde, and three crossings in the case of the photodimerization of ethylene. The methods developed allow MXS searches of significantly larger systems at the MR-CI level than have been possible before and significantly more accurate calculations as compared to previous complete-active space self-consistent field approaches.

  7. One-baryon spectrum and analytical properties of one-baryon dispersion curves in 3 + 1 dimensional strongly coupled lattice QCD with three flavors

    SciTech Connect

    Faria da Veiga, Paulo A. O’Carroll, Michael Valencia Alvites, José C.

    2016-03-15

    Considering a 3 + 1 dimensional lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD) model defined with the improved Wilson action, three flavors, and 4 × 4 Dirac spin matrices, in the strong coupling regime, we reanalyze the question of the existence of the eightfold way baryons and complete our previous work where the existence of isospin octet baryons was rigorously solved. Here, we show the existence of isospin decuplet baryons which are associated with isolated dispersion curves in the subspace of the underlying quantum mechanical Hilbert space with vectors constructed with an odd number of fermion and antifermion basic quark and antiquark fields. Moreover, smoothness properties for these curves are obtained. The present work deals with a case for which the traditional method to solve the implicit equation for the dispersion curves, based on the use of the analytic implicit function theorem, cannot be applied. We do not have only one but two solutions for each one-baryon decuplet sector with fixed spin third component. Instead, we apply the Weierstrass preparation theorem, which also provides a general method for the general degenerate case. This work is completed by analyzing a spectral representation for the two-baryon correlations and providing the leading behaviors of the field strength normalization and the mass of the spectral contributions with more than one-particle. These are needed results for a rigorous analysis of the two-baryon and meson-baryon particle spectra.

  8. Development and validation of an analytical method for quantification of arsenic and antimony in liposomes using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Reis, Priscila G; Abreu, Adriana T; Guimarães, Andrea G; Teixeira, Mônica C; de Souza, Jacqueline; Silva-Barcellos, Neila M

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic and antimony compounds are used to treat endemic diseases, such as cancer, leishmaniasis, and schistosomiasis, in spite of their toxicity. Several studies seeking the development and characterization of nanocarrier systems such as liposomes are being carried out with the aim of developing new drug delivery systems and minimizing the toxicity of these drugs. However, the lack of reference methods to quantify these semimetals within a liposomal matrix hinders the QC of these formulations. Therefore, the validation of an analytical method for arsenic and antimony quantification in liposomal matrix by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry is presented here. The linearity, specificity, LOD, LOQ, accuracy, and precision were determined according to the International Conference on Harmonization norms and the Brazilian Health Surveillance Agency (Resolution 899). The LOD values were 0.02 and 0.06 mg/L for antimony and arsenic, respectively. The LOQ for both was 3.0 mg/L, with an adequate accuracy within 98.26 and 101.32% for different levels of antimony and 99.98 and 100.36% for arsenic. Precision (CV) was lower than 5.0%. The developed and validated method was shown to be reproducible for quantification of arsenic and antimony in liposome pharmaceutical dosage forms.

  9. Perturbative treatment of scalar-relativistic effects in coupled-cluster calculations of equilibrium geometries and harmonic vibrational frequencies using analytic second-derivative techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michauk, Christine; Gauss, Jürgen

    2007-07-01

    An analytic scheme for the computation of scalar-relativistic corrections to nuclear forces is presented. Relativistic corrections are included via a perturbative treatment involving the mass-velocity and the one-electron and two-electron Darwin terms. Such a scheme requires mixed second derivatives of the nonrelativistic energy with respect to the relativistic perturbation and the nuclear coordinates and can be implemented using available second-derivative techniques. Our implementation for Hartree-Fock self-consistent field, second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, as well as the coupled-cluster level is used to investigate the relativistic effects on the geometrical parameters and harmonic vibrational frequencies for a set of molecules containing light elements (HX, X =F, Cl, Br; H2X, X =O, S; HXY, X =O, S and Y =F, Cl, Br). The focus of our calculations is the basis-set dependence of the corresponding relativistic effects, additivity of electron correlation and relativistic effects, and the importance of core correlation on relativistic effects.

  10. Perturbative treatment of scalar-relativistic effects in coupled-cluster calculations of equilibrium geometries and harmonic vibrational frequencies using analytic second-derivative techniques.

    PubMed

    Michauk, Christine; Gauss, Jürgen

    2007-07-28

    An analytic scheme for the computation of scalar-relativistic corrections to nuclear forces is presented. Relativistic corrections are included via a perturbative treatment involving the mass-velocity and the one-electron and two-electron Darwin terms. Such a scheme requires mixed second derivatives of the nonrelativistic energy with respect to the relativistic perturbation and the nuclear coordinates and can be implemented using available second-derivative techniques. Our implementation for Hartree-Fock self-consistent field, second-order Moller-Plesset perturbation theory, as well as the coupled-cluster level is used to investigate the relativistic effects on the geometrical parameters and harmonic vibrational frequencies for a set of molecules containing light elements (HX, X=F, Cl, Br; H2X, X=O, S; HXY, X=O, S and Y=F, Cl, Br). The focus of our calculations is the basis-set dependence of the corresponding relativistic effects, additivity of electron correlation and relativistic effects, and the importance of core correlation on relativistic effects.

  11. Study of a dual frequency capacitively coupled rf discharge in the background of multi-component plasma and its validation by a simple analytical sheath model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuyan, Heman; Saikia, Partha; Favre, Mario; Wyndham, Edmundo; Veloso, Felipe

    2016-10-01

    The behavior of a phase-locked dual frequency capacitively coupled rf discharges (2f-CCRF) in the background of multi-component plasma is experimentally studied by rf current-voltage measurements and optical emission spectroscopy (OES). The multi-component plasma is produced by adding hydrogen to the argon CCRF discharge. Variation of experimental parameters, like working pressure, low frequency (LF) and high frequency (HF) rf power indicate significant changes in the electron density and temperature as well as the DC self-bias developed on the power electrode. It is observed that the electron density decreases as the percentage of hydrogen increases in the argon plasma while the electron temperature follows opposite trend. An analytical sheath model for the 2f-CCRF discharge in the background of multi-component plasma is developed and its prediction on the observed variation of DC self-bias is well agreed with the experimental observations. Authors acknowledge Proyecto Puente No P1611 and FONDECYT 3160179.

  12. Growth temperatures and the limits of coupled growth in unidirectional solidification of Fe-C eutectic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, H.; Kurz, W.

    1980-08-01

    Growth temperature has been measured as a function of applied growth velocity V for grey (austenite-flake graphite) eutectic, austenite dendrites and white (austenite-cementite) eutectic in Fe-4.28 wt pct C at a temperature gradient G of ˜7 K/mm. Grey eutectic (0.4 to 65 µm/s) required an undercooling ΔTfor growth equal to K 1 V 1/2 with K 1 as 3.4 ± 0.1 Ks1/2/µm1/2, giving values of ΔT nearly an order of magnitude larger than predicted for growth at the extremum, as shown previously by Toloui and Hellawell for the related Al-Si eutectic. Austenite dendrites growing together with the grey eutectic at V between 11 and 65 µ m/s exhibited a range of tip temperatures giving rise to average undercoolings of magnitude [ GD/V + K 2 V n ] with D as diffusion coefficient of carbon in the melt and K 2 as 0.73 Ksn µm-n with n as 0.46 predicted by Ivantsov’s theory for growth of an austenite needle. White eutectic displaced both grey eutectic and austenite dendrites at V of 100 µm/s. Except for the persistence of grey eutectic rather than white eutectic in the presence of austenite dendrites (11 < V < 65 µm/s), these observed growth transitions are consistent with the derived relationships governing growth temperatures on the basis of competitive growth, i.e. that the growth form with the highest growth temperature at a particular V should prevail. The results are then applied to derive the limiting conditions for growth of grey and white eutectics as a function of composition in Fe-C ( i.e. their coupled zones). The significance of observed dependences on V of volume fraction and spacing of austenite dendrites is discussed.

  13. Analytical capability of a medium power capacitively coupled plasma for the multielemental determination in multimineral/multivitamin preparations by atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Frentiu, Tiberiu; Ponta, Michaela; Darvasi, Eugen; Frentiu, Maria; Cordos, Emil

    2012-10-15

    A method for multielemental (Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, P and Zn) determination in multimineral/multivitamins by atomic emission spectrometry in a medium power radiofrequency capacitively coupled plasma (275 W) and low Ar consumption (0.4 L min(-1)) is proposed. Determinations were performed on commercially available tablets and a standard reference material after acidic high-pressure microwave assisted digestion and using the standard additions procedure. The detection limits (mg g(-1)) were in the range 0.003 (Na)-1.5 (P) and were not depreciated by the non-spectral interference of mineral matrices of K, Ca, Mg and Na excepting Zn and P. Found concentrations corresponded generally to the labelled contents with recovery in the range of 90-107% and 1.0-13.0% repeatability. The proposed technique could be an advantageous alternative to the more expensive inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry in the quality control of multimineral/multivitamin preparations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Simultaneous determination of acrylamide, asparagine and glucose in food using short chain methyl imidazolium ionic liquid based ultrasonic assisted extraction coupled with analyte focusing by ionic liquid micelle collapse capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Abd El-Hady, Deia; Albishri, Hassan M

    2015-12-01

    Acrylamide (AA) is a known lethal neurotoxin and carcinogen. AA is formed in foods during the browning process by the Maillard reaction of glucose (GL) with asparagine (AS). For the first time, the simultaneous online preconcentration and separation of AA, AS and GL using analyte focusing by ionic liquid micelle collapse capillary electrophoresis (AFILMC) was presented. Samples were prepared in a 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide (BMIMBr) micellar matrix with a conductivity 4 times greater than that of the running buffer (12.5 mmol L(-1) phosphate buffer at pH 8.5). Samples were hydrodynamically injected into a fused silica capillary at 25.0 mbar for 25.0 s. Separations were performed by applying a voltage of 25.0 kV and a detection at 200.0 nm. To sufficiently reduce BMIMBr adsorption on the interior surface of capillary, an appropriate rinsing procedure by hydrochloric acid and water was optimized. AFILMC measurements of analytes within the concentration range of 0.05-10.0 μmol L(-1) achieved adequate reproducibility and accuracy with RSD 1.14-3.42% (n=15) and recovery 98.0-110.0%, respectively. Limits of detections were 0.71 ng g(-1) AA, 1.06 ng g(-1) AS and 27.02 ng g(-1) GL with linearity ranged between 2.2 and 1800 ng g(-1). The coupling of AFILMC with IL based ultrasonic assisted extraction (ILUAE) was successfully applied to the efficient extraction and determination of AA, AS and GL in bread samples. The structure of ILs has significant effects on the extraction efficiency of analytes. The optimal extraction efficiency (97.8%) was achieved by an aqueous extraction with 4:14 ratio of sample: 3.0 mol L(-1) BMIMBr followed by sonication at 35 °C. The proposed combination of ILUAE and AFILMC was simple, ecofriendly, reliable and inexpensive to analyze a toxic compound and its precursors in bread which is applicable to food safety.

  15. Analytic energy derivatives for the calculation of the first-order molecular properties using the domain-based local pair-natural orbital coupled-cluster theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Dipayan; Kossmann, Simone; Neese, Frank

    2016-09-01

    The domain-based local pair-natural orbital coupled-cluster (DLPNO-CC) theory has recently emerged as an efficient and powerful quantum-chemical method for the calculation of energies of molecules comprised of several hundred atoms. It has been demonstrated that the DLPNO-CC approach attains the accuracy of a standard canonical coupled-cluster calculation to about 99.9% of the basis set correlation energy while realizing linear scaling of the computational cost with respect to system size. This is achieved by combining (a) localized occupied orbitals, (b) large virtual orbital correlation domains spanned by the projected atomic orbitals (PAOs), and (c) compaction of the virtual space through a truncated pair natural orbital (PNO) basis. In this paper, we report on the implementation of an analytic scheme for the calculation of the first derivatives of the DLPNO-CC energy for basis set independent perturbations within the singles and doubles approximation (DLPNO-CCSD) for closed-shell molecules. Perturbation-independent one-particle density matrices have been implemented in order to account for the response of the CC wave function to the external perturbation. Orbital-relaxation effects due to external perturbation are not taken into account in the current implementation. We investigate in detail the dependence of the computed first-order electrical properties (e.g., dipole moment) on the three major truncation parameters used in a DLPNO-CC calculation, namely, the natural orbital occupation number cutoff used for the construction of the PNOs, the weak electron-pair cutoff, and the domain size cutoff. No additional truncation parameter has been introduced for property calculation. We present benchmark calculations on dipole moments for a set of 10 molecules consisting of 20-40 atoms. We demonstrate that 98%-99% accuracy relative to the canonical CCSD results can be consistently achieved in these calculations. However, this comes with the price of tightening the

  16. Analytical modeling, finite-difference simulation and experimental validation of air-coupled ultrasound beam refraction and damping through timber laminates, with application to non-destructive testing.

    PubMed

    Sanabria, Sergio J; Furrer, Roman; Neuenschwander, Jürg; Niemz, Peter; Schütz, Philipp

    2015-12-01

    Reliable non-destructive testing (NDT) ultrasound systems for timber composite structures require quantitative understanding of the propagation of ultrasound beams in wood. A finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) model is described, which incorporates local anisotropy variations of stiffness, damping and density in timber elements. The propagation of pulsed air-coupled ultrasound (ACU) beams in normal and slanted incidence configurations is reproduced by direct definition of material properties (gas, solid) at each model pixel. First, the model was quantitatively validated against analytical derivations. Time-varying wavefronts in unbounded timber with curved growth rings were accurately reproduced, as well as the acoustic properties (velocity, attenuation, beam skewing) of ACU beams transmitted through timber lamellas. An experimental sound field imaging (SFI) setup was implemented at NDT frequencies (120 kHz), which for specific beam incidence positions allows spatially resolved ACU field characterization at the receiver side. The good agreement of experimental and modeled beam shifts across timber laminates allowed extrapolation of the inner propagation paths. The modeling base is an orthotropic stiffness dataset for the desired wood species. In cross-grain planes, beam skewing leads to position-dependent wave paths. They are well-described in terms of the growth ring curvature, which is obtained by visual observation of the laminate. Extraordinary refraction phenomena were observed, which lead to well-collimated quasi-shear wave coupling at grazing beam incidence angles. The anisotropic damping in cross-grain planes is satisfactorily explained in terms of the known anisotropic stiffness dataset and a constant loss tangent. The incorporation of high-resolution density maps (X-ray computed tomography) provided insight into ultrasound scattering effects in the layered growth ring structure. Finally, the combined potential of the FDTD model and the SFI setup for

  17. Analytical sedimentology

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, D.W. . Dept. of Geology); McConchie, D.M. . Centre for Coastal Management)

    1994-01-01

    Both a self instruction manual and a cookbook'' guide to field and laboratory analytical procedures, this book provides an essential reference for non-specialists. With a minimum of mathematics and virtually no theory, it introduces practitioners to easy, inexpensive options for sample collection and preparation, data acquisition, analytic protocols, result interpretation and verification techniques. This step-by-step guide considers the advantages and limitations of different procedures, discusses safety and troubleshooting, and explains support skills like mapping, photography and report writing. It also offers managers, off-site engineers and others using sediments data a quick course in commissioning studies and making the most of the reports. This manual will answer the growing needs of practitioners in the field, either alone or accompanied by Practical Sedimentology, which surveys the science of sedimentology and provides a basic overview of the principles behind the applications.

  18. On the evaluation of nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements for MCSCF/CI wave functions. IV. Second derivative terms using analytic gradient methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxe, Paul; Yarkony, David R.

    1987-01-01

    A recently proposed methodology for determining second derivative nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements h(J,I,Rα,R) ≡<ΨJ(r;R)‖(∂2/∂R2α )ΨI(r;R)>r based on analytic gradient methods is implemented and discussed. Here r denotes the electronic coordinates, R the nuclear coordinates, and the ΨJ (r;R) are eigenfunctions of the nonrelativistic Born-Oppenheimer Hamiltonian at the state averaged MCSCF/CI level. The region of a conical intersection of the 1,2 2A' potential energy surfaces of the Li-H2 system is considered in order to illustrate the potential of this approach. The relation between h(J,I,Rα,R) and the first derivative matrix elements g(J,I,Rα,R) ≡<ΨJ(r;R)‖(∂/∂Rα)ΨI (r;R)>r is considered and the role of symmetry discussed. The h(J,I,Rα,R) are analyzed in terms of contributions from molecular orbital and CI coefficient derivatives and the importance of the various nuclear degree of freedom, Rα, is considered. It is concluded that for the case considered a flexible multiconfiguration wave function is desirable for characterizing h(J,I,Rα,R). This methodology complements recent advances in treating nonadiabatic processes for diatomic and triatomic systems starting with adiabatic states, including the work of Mead, Truhlar, and co-workers on conical (Jahn-Teller) intersections in X3 systems, by providing an essential computational step for the ab initio characterization the relevant electronic structure parameters.

  19. Engineering the coupling between Majorana bound states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Z. C.; Shao, X. Q.; Xia, Y.; Yi, X. X.

    2017-09-01

    We study the coupling between Majorana bound states (CMBS), which is mediated by a topologically trivial chain in the presence of pairing coupling and long-range coupling. The results show that CMBS can be enhanced by the pairing coupling and long-range coupling of the trivial chain. When driving the trivial chain by periodic driving field, we deduce the analytical expressions of CMBS in the high-frequency limit, and demonstrate that CMBS can be modulated by the frequency and amplitude of driving field. Finally we exhibit the application of tunable CMBS in realizing quantum logic gates.

  20. Analytical method for total chromium and nickel in urine using an inductively coupled plasma-universal cell technology-mass spectrometer (ICP-UCT-MS) in kinetic energy discrimination (KED) mode.

    PubMed

    Quarles, C Derrick; Jones, Deanna R; Jarrett, Jeffery M; Shakirova, Gulchekhra; Pan, Yi; Caldwell, Kathleen L; Jones, Robert L

    Biomonitoring and emergency response measurements are an important aspect of the Division of Laboratory Sciences of the National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The continuing advancement in instrumentation allows for enhancements to existing analytical methods. Prior to this work, chromium and nickel were analyzed on a sector field inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (SF-ICP-MS). This type of instrumentation provides the necessary sensitivity, selectivity, accuracy, and precision but due to the higher complexity of instrumentation and operation, it is not preferred for routine high throughput biomonitoring needs. Instead a quadrupole based method has been developed on a PerkinElmer NexION(™) 300D ICP-MS. The instrument is operated using 6.0 mL min(-1) helium as the collision cell gas and in kinetic energy discrimination mode, interferences are successfully removed for the analysis of (52)Cr ((40)Ar(12)C and (35)Cl(16)O(1)H) and (60)Ni ((44)Ca(16)O). The limits of detection are 0.162 μg L(-1) Cr and 0.248 μg L(-1) Ni. Method accuracy using NIST SRM 2668 level 1 (1.08 μg L(-1) Cr and 2.31μg L(-1) Ni) and level 2 (27.7 μg L(-1) Cr and 115 μg L(-1) Ni) was within the 95% confidence intervals reported in the NIST certificate. Among-run precision is less than 10% RSDs (N = 20) for in house quality control and NIST SRM urine samples. While the limits of detection (LOD) for the new quadrupole ICP-UCT-MS with KED method are similar to the SF-ICP-MS method, better measurement precision is observed for the quadrupole method. The new method presented provides fast, accurate, and more precise results on a less complex and more robust ICP-MS platform.

  1. Analytical method for total chromium and nickel in urine using an inductively coupled plasma-universal cell technology-mass spectrometer (ICP-UCT-MS) in kinetic energy discrimination (KED) mode

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Deanna R.; Jarrett, Jeffery M.; Shakirova, Gulchekhra; Pan, Yi; Caldwell, Kathleen L.; Jones, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Biomonitoring and emergency response measurements are an important aspect of the Division of Laboratory Sciences of the National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The continuing advancement in instrumentation allows for enhancements to existing analytical methods. Prior to this work, chromium and nickel were analyzed on a sector field inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (SF-ICP-MS). This type of instrumentation provides the necessary sensitivity, selectivity, accuracy, and precision but due to the higher complexity of instrumentation and operation, it is not preferred for routine high throughput biomonitoring needs. Instead a quadrupole based method has been developed on a PerkinElmer NexION™ 300D ICP-MS. The instrument is operated using 6.0 mL min−1 helium as the collision cell gas and in kinetic energy discrimination mode, interferences are successfully removed for the analysis of 52Cr (40Ar12C and 35Cl16O1H) and 60Ni (44Ca16O). The limits of detection are 0.162 μg L−1 Cr and 0.248 μg L−1 Ni. Method accuracy using NIST SRM 2668 level 1 (1.08 μg L−1 Cr and 2.31μg L−1 Ni) and level 2 (27.7 μg L−1 Cr and 115 μg L−1 Ni) was within the 95% confidence intervals reported in the NIST certificate. Among-run precision is less than 10% RSDs (N = 20) for in house quality control and NIST SRM urine samples. While the limits of detection (LOD) for the new quadrupole ICP-UCT-MS with KED method are similar to the SF-ICP-MS method, better measurement precision is observed for the quadrupole method. The new method presented provides fast, accurate, and more precise results on a less complex and more robust ICP-MS platform. PMID:26229219

  2. Limits on Anomalous Trilinear Gauge Couplings in $Z\\gamma$ Events from $p\\bar{p}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2011-03-01

    Using Z{gamma} candidate events collected by the CDF detector at the Tevatron Collider, we search for potential anomalous (non-standard-model) couplings between the Z boson and the photon. At the hard scatter energies typical of the Tevatron, standard model Z{gamma} couplings are too weak to be detected by current experiments; hence any evidence of couplings indicates new physics. Measurements are performed using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.9 fb{sup -1} in the Z {yields} {nu}{bar {nu}} decay channel and 5.1 fb{sup -1} in the Z {yields} l{sup +}l{sup -} (l = {mu}, e) decay channels. The combination of these measurements provides the most stringent limits to date on Z{gamma} trilinear gauge couplings. Using an energy scale of {Lambda} = 1.5 TeV to allow for a direct comparison with previous measurements, we find limits on the CP-conserving parameters that describe Z{gamma} couplings to be |h{sub 3}{sup {gamma},Z}| < 0.017 and |h{sub 4}{sup {gamma},Z}| < 0.0006. These results are consistent with standard model predictions.

  3. Limits on anomalous trilinear gauge couplings in Zγ events from pp¯ collisions at √s=1.96  TeV.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Brigliadori, L; Brisuda, A; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Bucciantonio, M; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Calancha, C; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; d'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Dorigo, M; Dorigo, T; Ebina, K; Elagin, A; Eppig, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Ershaidat, N; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Funakoshi, Y; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamaguchi, A; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hocker, A; Hopkins, W; Horn, D; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Hurwitz, M; Husemann, U; Hussain, N; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Klimenko, S; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; LeCompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Lee, S W; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lin, C-J; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maksimovic, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Mastrandrea, P; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mondragon, M N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Potamianos, K; Poukhov, O; Prokoshin, F; Pronko, A; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rubbo, F; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shreyber, I; Simonenko, A; Sinervo, P; Sissakian, A; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Squillacioti, P; Stancari, M; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thome, J; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Tu, Y; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Varganov, A; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R L; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Wick, F; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanetti, A; Zeng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2011-07-29

    Using Zγ candidate events collected by the CDF detector at the Tevatron Collider, we search for potential anomalous (non-standard-model) couplings between the Z boson and the photon. Zγ couplings vanish at tree level and are heavily suppressed at higher orders; hence any evidence of couplings indicates new physics. Measurements are performed using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.9  fb(-1) in the Z→νν¯ decay channel and 5.1  fb(-1) in the Z→l(+)l(-) (l=μ, e) decay channels. The combination of these measurements provides the most stringent limits to date on Zγ trilinear gauge couplings. Using an energy scale of Λ=1.5  TeV to allow for a direct comparison with previous measurements, we find limits on the CP-conserving parameters that describe Zγ couplings to be |h(3)(γ,Z)|<0.022 and |h(4)(γ,Z)|<0.0009. These results are consistent with standard model predictions.

  4. Magnetic field tuning of an excitonic insulator between the weak and strong coupling regimes in quantum limit graphite [Tunable excitonic insulator in quantum limit graphite

    DOE PAGES

    Zhu, Zengwei; McDonald, R. D.; Shekhter, A.; ...

    2017-05-04

    Here, the excitonic insulator phase has long been predicted to form in proximity to a band gap opening in the underlying band structure. The character of the pairing is conjectured to crossover from weak (BCS-like) to strong coupling (BEC-like) as the underlying band structure is tuned from the metallic to the insulating side of the gap opening. Here we report the high-magnetic field phase diagram of graphite to exhibit just such a crossover. By way of comprehensive angle-resolved magnetoresistance measurements, we demonstrate that the underlying band gap opening occurs inside the magnetic field-induced phase, paving the way for a systematicmore » study of the BCS-BEC-like crossover by means of conventional condensed matter probes.« less

  5. Vibron phonon in a lattice of H-bonded peptide units: A criterion to discriminate between the weak and the strong coupling limit.

    PubMed

    Pouthier, Vincent

    2010-01-21

    Based on dynamical considerations, a simple and intuitive criterion is established to measure the strength of the vibron-phonon coupling in a lattice of H-bonded peptide units. The main idea is to compare separately the influence of both the vibron-phonon coupling and the dipole-dipole interaction on a specific element of the vibron reduced density matrix. This element, which refers to the coherence between the ground state and a local excited amide-I mode, generalizes the concept of survival amplitude at finite temperature. On the one hand, when the dipole-dipole interaction is neglected, it is shown that dephasing-limited coherent dynamics is induced by the vibron-phonon coupling. On the other hand, when the vibron-phonon coupling is disregarded, decoherence occurs due to dipole-dipole interactions since the local excited state couples with neighboring local excited states. Therefore, our criterion simply states that the strongest interaction is responsible for the fastest decoherence. It yields a critical coupling chi( *) approximately 25 pN at biological temperature.

  6. Data pattern sensitivity in tracking performance of an AC coupled Costas loop with hard-limited in-phase channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Y. H.

    1979-01-01

    This paper is concerned with data pattern sensitivity in carrier tracking performance of an AC coupled Costas loop with a suppressed BPSK signal. The signal amplitude suppression factor is derived as a function of data 'asymmetry ratio' - the ratio of '1's to the total number of bits in a period of a periodic signal. For an asymmetric pattern, the effect of AC coupling is noticeable whereas there is almost no effect for symmetric square wave. The tracking performance with an asymmetric pattern is worse than that with a symmetric pattern. However, it is also shown that as expected, the tracking performance of a DC coupled loop with an asymmetric pattern is better than that with a symmetric pattern.

  7. Gas and liquid chromatography with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry detection for environmental speciation analysis — advances and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szpunar, Joanna; McSheehy, Shona; Połeć, Kasia; Vacchina, Véronique; Mounicou, Sandra; Rodriguez, Isaac; Łobiński, Ryszard

    2000-07-01

    Recent advances in the coupling of gas chromatography (GC) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP MS) and their role in trace element speciation analysis of environmental materials are presented. The discussion is illustrated with three research examples concerning the following topics: (i) development and coupling of multicapillary microcolumn GC with ICP MS for speciation of organotin in sediment and biological tissue samples; (ii) speciation of arsenic in marine algae by size-exclusion-anion-exchange HPLC-ICP MS; and (iii) speciation of cadmium in plant cell cultures by size-exclusion HPLC-ICP MS. Particular attention is paid to the problem of signal identification in ICP MS chromatograms; the potential of electrospray MS/MS for this purpose is highlighted.

  8. Analytical speciation of mercury in fish tissues by reversed phase liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry with Bi(3+) as internal standard.

    PubMed

    Santoyo, María Maldonado; Figueroa, Julio Alberto Landero; Wrobel, Kazimierz; Wrobel, Katarzyna

    2009-08-15

    In this work, the quantification of two mercury species (Hg(2+) and CH(3)Hg(+)) in fish tissues has been revisited. The originality of our approach relies on the use of Bi(3+) as internal standard (IS) and on the modification of typical extraction conditions. The IS (125 microl, 1000 microg l(-1) Bi(3+)) was added to the aliquot of fresh fish tissue (400-500 mg). A high-speed blender and ultrasound-assisted homogenization/extraction was carried out in the presence of perchloric acid (1.5 ml, 0.6 mol l(-1)), l-cysteine (500 microl, 0.75 mol l(-1)) and 500 microl toluene:methanol (1:1). Perchloric acid was used for protein denaturation and precipitation, toluene helped to destroy lipid structures potentially sequestering CH(3)Hg(+), L-cysteine was used to form water-soluble complexes with Bi(3+), Hg(2+) and CH(3)Hg(+). The excess of perchloric acid was eliminated by addition of potassium hydroxide (pH 5 with acetic acid). The obtained extract, was diluted with the mobile phase (1:1) and introduced (20 microl) to the reversed phase HPLC-ICP-MS system. The separation was achieved by isocratic elution (2.5 mmol l(-1) cysteine, 12.5 mmol l(-1) (NH(4))(2)HPO(4), 0.05% triethylamine, pH 7.0:methanol (96:4)) at a flow rate 0.6 ml min(-1). Column effluent was on-line introduced to ICP-MS for specific detection of (202)Hg, (200)Hg and (209)Bi. Analytical signal was defined as the ratio between (202)Hg/(209)Bi peak areas. The detection limits evaluated for Hg(2+) and CH(3)Hg(+) were 0.8 and 0.7 microg l(-1). Recovery of the procedure, calculated as the sum of species concentrations found in the sample with respect to total ICP-MS-determined Hg was 91.9% for king mackerel muscle and 89.5% for red snapper liver. In the standard addition experiments, the recovery results were 98.9% for Hg(2+) and 100.6% for CH(3)Hg(+). It should be stressed that the use of Bi(3+) as IS enabled to improve analytical performance by compensating for incomplete extraction and for imprecision of

  9. Extended Analytic Device Optimization Employing Asymptotic Expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, Jonathan; Sehirlioglu, Alp; Dynsys, Fred

    2013-01-01

    Analytic optimization of a thermoelectric junction often introduces several simplifying assumptionsincluding constant material properties, fixed known hot and cold shoe temperatures, and thermallyinsulated leg sides. In fact all of these simplifications will have an effect on device performance,ranging from negligible to significant depending on conditions. Numerical methods, such as FiniteElement Analysis or iterative techniques, are often used to perform more detailed analysis andaccount for these simplifications. While numerical methods may stand as a suitable solution scheme,they are weak in gaining physical understanding and only serve to optimize through iterativesearching techniques. Analytic and asymptotic expansion techniques can be used to solve thegoverning system of thermoelectric differential equations with fewer or less severe assumptionsthan the classic case. Analytic methods can provide meaningful closed form solutions and generatebetter physical understanding of the conditions for when simplifying assumptions may be valid.In obtaining the analytic solutions a set of dimensionless parameters, which characterize allthermoelectric couples, is formulated and provide the limiting cases for validating assumptions.Presentation includes optimization of both classic rectangular couples as well as practically andtheoretically interesting cylindrical couples using optimization parameters physically meaningful toa cylindrical couple. Solutions incorporate the physical behavior for i) thermal resistance of hot andcold shoes, ii) variable material properties with temperature, and iii) lateral heat transfer through legsides.

  10. Continuum Limit of Susceptibility from Strong Coupling Expansion. Two-Dimensional Nonlinear O(N) Sigma Model N ≥ 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Hirofumi

    2012-12-01

    On the basis of a strong-coupling expansion, we reinvestigate the scaling behavior of the susceptibility χ of the two-dimensional O( N) sigma model on the square lattice with Padé-Borel approximants. To exploit the Borel transform, we express the bare coupling g in a series expansion in χ. For large N, the Padé-Borel approximants exhibit scaling behavior at the four-loop level. We estimate the nonperturbative constant associated with the susceptibility for N ≥ 3 and compare the results with previous analytica l results and Monte Carlo data.

  11. Rapid reconnaissance hydrogeologic modeling on public lands using analytic element solutions coupled with MODFLOW - application to the Eagle Creek watershed, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Congdon, R. D.

    2012-12-01

    There is frequently a need in land management agencies for a quick and easy method for estimating hydrogeologic conditions in a watershed for which there is very little subsurface information. Setting up a finite difference or finite element model takes valuable time that often is not available when decisions need to be made quickly. An analytic element model (AEM), GFLOW in this case, may enable the investigator to produce a preliminary steady-state model for a watershed, and to easily evaluate variants of the conceptual model. Use of preexisting data, such as stream gage data or USGS reports makes the job much easier. Solutions to analytic element models are obtained within seconds. The Eagle Creek watershed in central New Mexico is a site of local water supply issues in an area of volcanic and plutonic rocks. Parameters estimated by groundwater consultants and the USGS, and discharge data from three USGS stream gages were used to set up the steady-state analytical model (GFLOW). Matching gage records with line-sink fluxes facilitated conceptualization of local groundwater flow and quick analysis of the effects of steady water supply pumping on Eagle Creek. Because of steep topgraphy and limited access, a water supply well is located within the stream channel within 20 meters of the creek, and it would be useful to evaluate the effects of the well on stream flow. A USGS report (SIR 2010-5205) revealed a section of Eagle Creek with a high vertical conductivity which results in flow loss of up to 34 l/s (including flow to the water table and flow into alluvium) when the well was pumped and the water table was lowered below the channel bottom. The water supply well was simulated with a steady-state well pumping at the average and maximum rates of 12 l/s and 31 l/s. The initial simulation shows that pumping at these rates results in stream flow loss of 19% and 51%, respectively. The simulation was conducted with average flow conditions, and this information will be

  12. Analysis of the limiting noise and identification of some factors that dictate the detection limits in a low-power inductively coupled argon plasma system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boumans, P. W. J. M.; McKenna, R. J.; Bosveld, M.

    The background signal defined as the output signal ( xB) of the photomultiplier and the relative standard deviation (RSD) of xB at the wavelengths of 36 prominent analysis lines in the 190-320 nm region were measured under ICP compromise conditions for simultaneous multi-element analysis using a monochromator with an experimental spectral bandwidth of 0.015 nm. The RSD was found to vary systematically with xB according to the theoretically expected relationship RSD = (α B2 + gβ/ xB) 1/2 where α B(≈0.5%) is the constant source flicker noise contribution, gβ/ xB the shot-noise contribution and gβ a coefficient containing the photomultiplier (PMT) gain g. Dark current detector noise was negligible, at least in part, owing to the use of lock-in amplification. The validity of relationship (0) was tested for various types of PMT and for both pure aqueous solutions and solutions with 1 to 3% w/v amounts of either calcium chloride, sodium chloride, or a mixture of nickel and cobalt nitrates. Only in the case of the nickel-cobalt matrix were some departures found and these were attributable to line coincidences. Relationship (0) was found to apply also to net line signals, the flicker noise term, α s, then being about 1% instead of 0.5% for the present ICP system. Detection limits for 36 prominent lines of the elements As, Au, B, Be, Bi, Ge, In, Mg, Mn, Ni, P, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn and Zn were computed on the basis of relationship (0) and measured signal-to-background ratios (SBR). The results permitted an assessment of the separate effects that SBR, source flicker noise and shot noise have on the detection limits and this facilitated a detailed comparison of the detection limits obtained in this work with those reported by Winge, Peterson and Fassel [ Appl. Spectrosc.33, 106 (1979)]. The measurements of detection limits were extended to solutions with matrices (calcium chloride, sodium chloride, and a mixture of nickel and cobalt nitrates) to test the validity of the

  13. Validated analytical strategy for the determination of polycyclic aromatic compounds in marine sediments by liquid chromatography coupled with diode-array detection and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    González-Piñuela, Cristina; Alonso-Salces, Rosa M; Andrés, Ana; Ortiz, Inmaculada; Viguri, Javier R

    2006-10-06

    The aim of this work was to optimise and validate the experimental conditions for the analysis of 20 polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) [19 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and dibenzothiophene as polycyclic aromatic sulphur heterocycle (PASH)] in marine sediments by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to photodiode array detection (DAD) and to mass spectrometry (MS). The LC-MS interface used was atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) in the positive ion mode. The operational parameters of the APCI interface and MS detection, such as organic modifier, fragmentation voltage, gain, vaporizer temperature, corona current, capillary voltage, drying gas (N2) and nebulizer pressure, were studied. The sediments were subjected to microwave-assisted solvent extraction (MAE) and clean-up by solid-phase extraction (SPE). The relevance of the selected PACs lies in the fact that 16 PACs are classified by the US Environmental Protection Agency as priority pollutants; 17 PACs are detected in the Prestige oil spill; and 8 PACs are included in the priority substance list of the EU water policy. Recoveries from 47% to 102% were obtained for SRM 1944 certified reference sediment. The limits of quantitation were lower than 100 ngg(-1) dry weight for most PACs, and good precision was achieved.

  14. Web Analytics

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA’s Web Analytics Program collects, analyzes, and provides reports on traffic, quality assurance, and customer satisfaction metrics for EPA’s website. The program uses a variety of analytics tools, including Google Analytics and CrazyEgg.

  15. Numerical aperture limits on efficient ball lens coupling of laser diodes to single-mode fibers with defocus to balance spherical aberration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. Gale

    1994-01-01

    The potential capabilities and limitations of single ball lenses for coupling laser diode radiation to single-mode optical fibers have been analyzed; parameters important to optical communications were specifically considered. These parameters included coupling efficiency, effective numerical apertures, lens radius, lens refractive index, wavelength, magnification in imaging the laser diode on the fiber, and defocus to counterbalance spherical aberration of the lens. Limiting numerical apertures in object and image space were determined under the constraint that the lens perform to the Rayleigh criterion of 0.25-wavelength (Strehl ratio = 0.80). The spherical aberration-defocus balance to provide an optical path difference of 0.25 wavelength units was shown to define a constant coupling efficiency (i.e., 0.56). The relative numerical aperture capabilities of the ball lens were determined for a set of wavelengths and associated fiber-core diameters of particular interest for single-mode fiber-optic communication. The results support general continuing efforts in the optical fiber communications industry to improve coupling links within such systems with emphasis on manufacturing simplicity, system packaging flexibility, relaxation of assembly alignment tolerances, cost reduction of opto-electronic components and long term reliability and stability.

  16. Study of Zgamma events and limits on anomalous ZZgamma and Zgammagamma couplings in pp collisions at square root s = 1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agelou, M; Agram, J-L; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Arnoud, Y; Askew, A; Asman, B; Jesus, A C S Assis; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Baldin, B; Balm, P W; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barnes, C; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Beauceron, S; Begel, M; Bellavance, A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Binder, M; Biscarat, C; Black, K M; Blackler, I; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Blumenschein, U; Boehnlein, A; Boeriu, O; Bolton, T A; Borcherding, F; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Butler, J M; Bystricky, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapin, D; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christiansen, T; Christofek, L; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Corcoran, M; Cothenet, A; Cousinou, M-C; Cox, B; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cristetiu, M; Cutts, D; da Motta, H; Davies, B; Davies, G; Davis, G A; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Dean, S; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doidge, M; Dong, H; Doulas, S; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Edwards, T; Ellison, J; Elmsheuser, J; Elvira, V D; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Eroshin, O V; Estrada, J; Evans, D; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Fast, J; Fatakia, S N; Feligioni, L; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fleck, I; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gardner, J; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Gelé, D; Gelhaus, R; Genser, K; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Golling, T; Gómez, B; Gounder, K; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Groer, L; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Gurzhiev, S N; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Hagopian, S; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, C; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Harder, K; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Huang, J; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jain, V; Jakobs, K; Jenkins, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahl, W; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Kesisoglou, S; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Kim, H; Klima, B; Klute, M; Kohli, J M; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Koubarovsky, A; Kozelov, A V; Kozminski, J; Kryemadhi, A; Krzywdzinski, S; Kuleshov, S; Kulik, Y; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lager, S; Lahrichi, N; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Le Bihan, A-C; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Leonidopoulos, C; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linn, S L; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lueking, L; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Magnan, A-M; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martens, M; Mattingly, S E K; Mayorov, A A; McCarthy, R; McCroskey, R; Meder, D; Melanson, H L; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Michaut, M; Miettinen, H; Mitrevski, J; Mokhov, N; Molina, J; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mutaf, Y D; Nagy, E; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Nelson, S; Neustroev, P; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Nurse, E; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Oshima, N; Otero Y Garzón, G J; Padley, P; Parashar, N; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Perea, P M; Perez, E; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Phaf, L; Piegaia, R; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pope, B G; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Rapidis, P A; Ratoff, P N; Reay, N W; Reucroft, S; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Rud, V I; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schmitt, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shephard, W D; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Sidwell, R A; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smith, R P; Smolek, K; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Song, X; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stanton, N R; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stevenson, K; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Thomas, E; Thooris, B; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torborg, J; Towers, S; Trefzger, T; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Turcot, A S; Tuts, P M; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vlimant, J-R; Von Toerne, E; Vreeswijk, M; Vu Anh, T; Wahl, H D; Walker, R; Wang, L; Wang, Z-M; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wegner, M; Wermes, N; White, A; White, V; Wicke, D; Wijngaarden, D A; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wittlin, J; Wobisch, M; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xu, Q; Xuan, N; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yen, Y; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zabi, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zdrazil, M; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhang, X; Zhao, T; Zhao, Z; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zitoun, R; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2005-07-29

    We present a measurement of the Zgamma production cross section and limits on anomalous ZZgamma and Zgammagamma couplings for form-factor scales of lambda = 750 and 1000 GeV. The measurement is based on 138 (152) candidates in the eegamma (mumugamma) final state using 320(290) pb(-1) of pp(-1) collisions at square root of s = 1.96 TeV. The 95% C.L. limits on real and imaginary parts of individual anomalous couplings are /h(10,30)Z/ < 0.23, /h(20,40)Z/ < 0.020, /h(10,30)gamma/ < 0.23, and /h(20,40)gamma/ < 0.019 for lambda = 1000 GeV.

  17. Limits on Anomalous WWγ Couplings from pp¯-->Wγ + X Events at √s = 1.8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abachi, S.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adam, I.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Ahn, S.; Aihara, H.; Álvarez, G.; Alves, G. A.; Amidi, E.; Amos, N.; Anderson, E. W.; Aronson, S. H.; Astur, R.; Baarmand, M. M.; Baden, A.; Balamurali, V.; Balderston, J.; Baldin, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bantly, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bazizi, K.; Belyaev, A.; Bendich, J.; Beri, S. B.; Bertram, I.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Bischoff, A.; Biswas, N.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, P.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N. I.; Borcherding, F.; Borders, J.; Boswell, C.; Brandt, A.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Burtovoi, V. S.; Butler, J. M.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, D.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chang, S.-M.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chen, L.-P.; Chen, W.; Choi, S.; Chopra, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Christenson, J. H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Cobau, W. G.; Cochran, J.; Cooper, W. E.; Cretsinger, C.; Cullen-Vidal, D.; Cummings, M. A.; Cutts, D.; Dahl, O. I.; de, K.; del Signore, K.; Demarteau, M.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; di Loreto, G.; Draper, P.; Drinkard, J.; Ducros, Y.; Dudko, L. V.; Dugad, S. R.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fahey, S.; Fahland, T.; Fatyga, M.; Fatyga, M. K.; Featherly, J.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Finocchiaro, G.; Fisk, H. E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flattum, E.; Forden, G. E.; Fortner, M.; Frame, K. C.; Franzini, P.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, A. N.; Gartung, P.; Geld, T. L.; Genik, R. J., II; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gibbard, B.; Glebov, V.; Glenn, S.; Gobbi, B.; Goforth, M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gómez, B.; Gomez, G.; Goncharov, P. I.; González Solís, J. L.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L. T.; Goussiou, A.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P. D.; Green, D. R.; Green, J.; Greenlee, H.; Griffin, G.; Grim, G.; Grossman, N.; Grudberg, P.; Grünendahl, S.; Guglielmo, G.; Guida, J. A.; Guida, J. M.; Guryn, W.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutnikov, Y. E.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hahn, K. S.; Hall, R. E.; Hansen, S.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hedin, D.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hernández-Montoya, R.; Heuring, T.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hoftun, J. S.; Hsieh, F.; Hu, Ting; Hu, Tong; Huehn, T.; Ito, A. S.; James, E.; Jaques, J.; Jerger, S. A.; Jiang, J. Z.-Y.; Joffe-Minor, T.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jöstlein, H.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, C. K.; Kahn, S.; Kalbfleisch, G.; Kang, J. S.; Kehoe, R.; Kelly, M. L.; Kerth, L.; Kim, C. L.; Kim, S. K.; Klatchko, A.; Klima, B.; Klochkov, B. I.; Klopfenstein, C.; Klyukhin, V. I.; Kochetkov, V. I.; Kohli, J. M.; Koltick, D.; Kostritskiy, A. V.; Kotcher, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kourlas, J.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovski, E. A.; Krane, J.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lami, S.; Lan, H.; Landsberg, G.; Lauer, B.; Lebrat, J.-F.; Leflat, A.; Li, H.; Li, J.; Li, Y. K.; Li-Demarteau, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Q.; Liu, Y. C.; Lobkowicz, F.; Loken, S. C.; Lökös, S.; Lueking, L.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K.; Madaras, R. J.; Madden, R.; Magaña-Mendoza, L.; Mani, S.; Mao, H. S.; Markeloff, R.; Markosky, L.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M. I.; May, B.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McDonald, J.; McKibben, T.; McKinley, J.; McMahon, T.; Melanson, H. L.; Merritt, K. W.; Miettinen, H.; Mincer, A.; de Miranda, J. M.; Mishra, C. S.; Mokhov, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Mooney, P.; da Motta, H.; Mudan, M.; Murphy, C.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Narayanan, A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nemethy, P.; Nes̆iĆ, D.; Nicola, M.; Norman, D.; Oesch, L.; Oguri, V.; Oltman, E.; Oshima, N.; Owen, D.; Padley, P.; Pang, M.; Para, A.; Park, Y. M.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Paterno, M.; Perkins, J.; Peters, M.; Piekarz, H.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pope, B. G.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Pus̆eljić, D.; Qian, J.; Quintas, P. Z.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Ramirez, O.; Rapidis, P. A.; Rasmussen, L.; Reucroft, S.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rockwell, T.; Roe, N. A.; Robinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rutherfoord, J.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Sculli, J.; Shabalina, E.; Shaffer, C.; Shankar, H. C.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shupe, M.; Singh, H.; Singh, J. B.; Sirotenko, V.; Smart, W.; Smith, A.; Smith, R. P.; Snihur, R.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Sood, P. M.; Sosebee, M.; Sotnikova, N.; Souza, M.; Spadafora, A. L.; Stephens, R. W.; Stevenson, M. L.; Stewart, D.; Stoianova, D. A.; Stoker, D.; Streets, K.; Strovink, M.; Sznajder, A.; Tamburello, P.; Tarazi, J.; Tartaglia, M.; Thomas, T. L.; Thompson, J.; Trippe, T. G.; Tuts, P. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vititoe, D.; Volkov, A. A.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, G.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; White, A.; White, J. T.; Wightman, J. A.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wirjawan, J. V.; Womersley, J.; Won, E.; Wood, D. R.; Xu, H.; Yamada, R.; Yamin, P.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yang, J.; Yasuda, T.; Yepes, P.; Yoshikawa, C.; Youssef, S.; Yu, J.; Yu, Y.; Zhu, Q.; Zhu, Z. H.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zverev, E. G.; Zylberstejn, A.

    1997-05-01

    We have measured the WWγ gauge boson coupling parameters using pp¯-->lνγ+X ( l = e,μ) events at s = 1.8 TeV. The data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 92.8 pb-1, were collected using the DØ detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The measured cross section times branching ratio for pp¯-->Wγ+X with pγT>10 GeV/c and Rlγ>0.7 is 11.3+1.7-1.5+/-1.5 pb, in agreement with the standard model prediction. The 1 degree of freedom 95% confidence level limits on individual CP-conserving parameters are -0.93<Δκ<0.94 and -0.31<λ<0.29. Similar limits are set on the CP-violating coupling parameters.

  18. Projecting Range Limits with Coupled Thermal Tolerance - Climate Change Models: An Example Based on Gray Snapper (Lutjanus griseus) along the U.S. East Coast

    PubMed Central

    Hare, Jonathan A.; Wuenschel, Mark J.; Kimball, Matthew E.

    2012-01-01

    We couple a species range limit hypothesis with the output of an ensemble of general circulation models to project the poleward range limit of gray snapper. Using laboratory-derived thermal limits and statistical downscaling from IPCC AR4 general circulation models, we project that gray snapper will shift northwards; the magnitude of this shift is dependent on the magnitude of climate change. We also evaluate the uncertainty in our projection and find that statistical uncertainty associated with the experimentally-derived thermal limits is the largest contributor (∼ 65%) to overall quantified uncertainty. This finding argues for more experimental work aimed at understanding and parameterizing the effects of climate change and variability on marine species. PMID:23284974

  19. Development of an analytical method for the targeted screening and multi-residue quantification of environmental contaminants in urine by liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry for evaluation of human exposures.

    PubMed

    Cortéjade, A; Kiss, A; Cren, C; Vulliet, E; Buleté, A

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an analytical method and contribute to the assessment of the Exposome. Thus, a targeted analysis of a wide range of contaminants in contact with humans on daily routines in urine was developed. The method focused on a list of 38 contaminants, including 12 pesticides, one metabolite of pesticide, seven veterinary drugs, five parabens, one UV filter, one plastic additive, two surfactants and nine substances found in different products present in the everyday human environment. These contaminants were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry (HPLC-HRMS) with a quadrupole-time-of-flight (QqToF) instrument from a raw urinary matrix. A validation according to the FDA guidelines was employed to evaluate the specificity, linear or quadratic curve fitting, inter- and intra-day precision, accuracy and limits of detection and quantification (LOQ). The developed analysis allows for the quantification of 23 contaminants in the urine samples, with the LOQs ranging between 4.3 ng.mL(-1) and 113.2 ng.mL(-1). This method was applied to 17 urine samples. Among the targeted contaminants, four compounds were detected in samples. One of the contaminants (tributyl phosphate) was detected below the LOQ. The three others (4-hydroxybenzoic acid, sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate and O,O-diethyl thiophosphate potassium) were detected but did not fulfill the validation criteria for quantification. Among these four compounds, two of them were found in all samples: tributyl phosphate and the surfactant sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Chemometric analytical approach for the cloud point extraction and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric determination of zinc oxide nanoparticles in water samples.

    PubMed

    Majedi, Seyed Mohammad; Lee, Hian Kee; Kelly, Barry C

    2012-08-07

    Cloud point extraction (CPE) with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) was applied to the analysis of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs, mean diameter ~40 nm) in water and wastewater samples. Five CPE factors, surfactant (Triton X-114 (TX-114)) concentration, pH, ionic strength, incubation temperature, and incubation time, were investigated and optimized by orthogonal array design (OAD). A three-level OAD, OA(27) (3(13)) matrix was employed in which the effects of the factors and their contributions to the extraction efficiency were quantitatively assessed by the analysis of variance (ANOVA). Based on the analysis, the best extraction efficiency (87.3%) was obtained at 0.25% (w/v) of TX-114, pH = 10, salt content of 15 mM NaCl, incubation temperature of 45 °C, and incubation time of 30 min. The results showed that surfactant concentration, pH, incubation time, and ionic strength exert significant effects on the extraction efficiency. Preconcentration factors of 62 and 220 were obtained with 0.25 and 0.05% (w/v) TX-114, respectively. The relative recoveries of ZnO NPs from different environmental waters were in the range 64-123% at 0.5-100 μg/L spiked levels. The ZnO NPs extracted into the TX-114-rich phase were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) combined with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and UV-visible spectrometry. Based on the results, no significant changes in size and shape of NPs were observed compared to those in the water before extraction. The extracted ZnO NPs were determined after microwave digestion by ICPMS. A detection limit of 0.05 μg/L was achieved for ZnO NPs. The optimized conditions were successfully applied to the analysis of ZnO NPs in water samples.

  1. Analytical formula for residual current density excited in the process of gas ionization by a few-cycle laser pulse in the low-intensity limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silaev, A. A.; Vvedenskii, N. V.

    2015-03-01

    This work is devoted to analytical study of excitation of the residual current density (RCD) in the process of gas ionization by a few-cycle laser pulse. The RCD remains in the laser-produced plasma after the passage of the laser pulse and is as an initial push leading to excitation of the plasma oscillations which can radiate terahertz waves. We derive simple closed-form analytical formula for RCD for relatively small peak intensity of few-cycle laser pulse, which corresponds to small final degree of ionization. The dependences of the RCD on laser pulse parameters are discussed.

  2. A coupled phase-field and volume-of-fluid method for accurate representation of limiting water wave deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu; Yu, Xiping

    2016-09-01

    A coupled phase-field and volume-of-fluid method is developed to study the sensitive behavior of water waves during breaking. The THINC model is employed to solve the volume-of-fluid function over the entire domain covered by a relatively coarse grid while the phase-field model based on Allen-Cahn equation is applied over the fine grid. A special algorithm that takes into account the sharpness of the diffuse-interface is introduced to correlate the order parameter obtained on the fine grid and the volume-of-fluid function obtained on the coarse grid. The coupled model is then applied to the study of water waves generated by moving pressures on the free surface. The deformation process of the wave crest during the initial stage of breaking is discussed in details. It is shown that there is a significant variation of the free nappe developed at the front side of the wave crest as the wave steepness differs. It is of a plunging type at large wave steepness while of a spilling type at small wave steepness. The numerical results also indicate that breaking occurs later and the duration of breaking is shorter for waves of smaller steepness and vice versa. Neglecting the capillary effect leads to wave breaking with a sharper nappe and a more dynamic plunging process. The surface tension also has an effect to prevent the formation of a free nappe at the front side of the wave crest in some cases.

  3. Understanding Business Analytics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-05

    Business Analytics, Decision Analytics, Business Intelligence, Advanced Analytics, Data Science . . . to a certain degree, to label is to limit - if only...broad category of inquiry that can be used to help drive changes and improvements in business practices. Data Science : the study of where infor...Management Sciences (INFORMS) This scientific process of transforming data into insight with ana- lytics for better decision-making has taken the form

  4. Manifesting the evolution of eigenstates from quantum billiards to singular billiards in the strongly coupled limit with a truncated basis by using RLC networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuan, P. H.; Liang, H. C.; Tung, J. C.; Chiang, P. Y.; Huang, K. F.; Chen, Y. F.

    2015-12-01

    The coupling interaction between the driving source and the RLC network is explored and characterized as the effective impedance. The mathematical form of the derived effective impedance is verified to be identical to the meromorphic function of the singular billiards with a truncated basis. By using the derived impedance function, the resonant modes of the RLC network can be divided into the open-circuit and short-circuit states to manifest the evolution of eigenvalues and eigenstates from closed quantum billiards to the singular billiards with a truncated basis in the strongly coupled limit. The substantial differences of the wave patterns between the uncoupled and strongly coupled eigenmodes in the two-dimensional wave systems can be clearly revealed with the RLC network. Finally, the short-circuit resonant states are exploited to confirm that the experimental Chladni nodal-line patterns in the vibrating plate are the resonant modes subject to the strong coupling between the oscillation system and the driving source.

  5. Deriving accurate interproton distances from ROESY spectra with limited knowledge of scalar coupling constants via the CARNIVAL algorithm. An iterative complete-relaxation-matrix approach.

    PubMed

    Liu, H; Banville, D L; Basus, V J; James, T L

    1995-04-01

    A method (termed CARNIVAL) for accurately determining distances from proton homonuclear rotating-frame Overhauser effect spectroscopy (ROESY) is described. The method entails an iterative calculation of the relaxation matrix using methodology introduced with the MARDIGRAS algorithm for analysis of two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser effect spectra (B. A. Borgias and T. L. James, J. Magn. Reson. 87, 475, 1990). The situation is complicated in the case of ROESY as spectral peak intensities are influenced by resonance offset and contributions from homonuclear Hartmann-Hahn (HOHAHA) transfer if the nuclear spins are related by scalar coupling. The effects of spin-locking field strength on distance determinations and the ensuing distance errors incurred when HOHAHA corrections are made with limited knowledge of scalar (J) coupling information have been evaluated using simulated ROESY intensities with a model peptide structure. It has been demonstrated that accurate distances can be obtained with little or no explicit knowledge of the homonuclear coupling constants over a moderate range of spin-locking field strengths. The CARNIVAL algorithm has been utilized to determine distances in a decapeptide using experimental ROESY data without measured coupling constants.

  6. Deriving Accurate Interproton Distances from ROESY Spectra with Limited Knowledge of Scalar Coupling Constants via the CARNIVAL Algorithm. An Iterative Complete-Relaxation-Matrix Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.; Banville, D. L.; Basus, V. J.; James, T. L.

    A method (termed CARNIVAL) for accurately determining distances from proton homonuclear rotating-frame Overhauser effect spectroscopy (ROESY) is described. The method entails an iterative calculation of the relaxation matrix using methodology introduced with the MARDIGRAS algorithm for analysis of two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser effect spectra (B. A. Borgias and T. L. James, J. Magn. Reson.87, 475, 1990). The situation is complicated in the case of ROESY as spectral peak intensities are influenced by resonance offset and contributions from homonuclear Hartmann-Hahn (HOHAHA) transfer if the nuclear spins are related by scalar coupling. The effects of spin-locking field strength on distance determinations and the ensuing distance errors incurred when HOHAHA corrections are made with limited knowledge of scalar ( J) coupling information have been evaluated using simulated ROESY intensities with a model peptide structure. It has been demonstrated that accurate distances can be obtained with little or no explicit knowledge of the homonuclear coupling constants over a moderate range of spin-locking field strengths. The CARNIVAL algorithm has been utilized to determine distances in a decapeptide using experimental ROESY data without measured coupling constants.

  7. Multiresidue analytical method for the determination of antimicrobials, preservatives, benzotriazole UV stabilizers, flame retardants and plasticizers in fish using ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joon-Woo; Ramaswamy, Babu Rajendran; Chang, Kwang-Hyeon; Isobe, Tomohiko; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2011-06-03

    A multiresidue analytical method for the determination of emerging pollutants belonging to personal care products (PCPs) (antimicrobials, preservatives), benzotriazole UV stabilizers (BUVSs) and organophosphorus compounds (OPCs) in fish has been developed using high speed solvent extraction (HSSE) followed by silica gel clean up and ultra fast liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (UFLC-MS/MS) analysis. Developed extraction and clean up method yielded good recovery (> 70%) for all the four groups of emerging pollutants, i.e. antimicrobials (78.5-85.6%), preservatives (85.0-89.4%), BUVSs (70.9-112%) and OPCs (81.6-114%; except for TEP - 68.9% and TPeP - 58.1%) with RSDs ranging from 0.7 to 15.4%. Intra- and inter-day repeatabilities were less than 19.8% and 19.0%, respectively at three spiked levels. The concentrations were given in lipid weight (lw) basis, and the method detection limits were achieved in the lowest range of 0.001-0.006 ng g⁻¹ for two antimicrobials, 0.001-0.015 ng g⁻¹ for four preservatives, 0.0002-0.009 ng g⁻¹ for eight BUVSs and 0.001-0.014 ng g⁻¹ for nine OPCs. Finally, the method was successfully validated as a simple and fast extraction method for the determination of 23 compounds belonging to PCPs, BUVSs and OPCs and applied to the analysis of three species of fish from Manila Bay, the Philippines. Concentrations ranged from 27 to 278 ng g⁻¹ for antimicrobials, 6.61 to 1580 ng g⁻¹ for paraben preservatives, limit) to 179 ng g⁻¹ for BUVSs and ND (not detected) to 266 ng g⁻¹ for OPCs suggesting the ubiquitous contamination by these emerging pollutants in Manila Bay. This is the first method developed for the determination of triclocarban, four paraben preservatives and four BUVSs, in fish. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Small coupling limit and multiple solutions to the Dirichlet problem for Yang-Mills connections in four dimensions. I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isobe, Takeshi; Marini, Antonella

    2012-06-01

    In this paper and its sequel (Part II), we analyze the space of solutions to the ɛ-Dirichlet problem for the Yang-Mills equations on the four-dimensional disk, for small values of the coupling constant ɛ. These are in 1-1 correspondence with solutions to the Dirichlet problem for Yang-Mills, for small boundary data ɛA0. We establish a Morse theory for this non-compact variational problem and prove the existence of multiple solutions, and, also, non minimal ones. Here, we describe the problem, state the main theorems and do the first part of the proof. This consists in making the problem finite dimensional, by seeking solutions approximated by the connected sum of a minimal solution with an instanton, plus a correction term due to the boundary. By introducing an auxiliary equation, we solve the problem orthogonally to the space of the approximate solutions.

  9. Surrogate analyte approach for quantitation of endogenous NAD(+) in human acidified blood samples using liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liling; Cui, Zhiyi; Deng, Yuzhong; Dean, Brian; Hop, Cornelis E C A; Liang, Xiaorong

    2016-02-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) assay for the quantitative determination of NAD(+) in human whole blood using a surrogate analyte approach was developed and validated. Human whole blood was acidified using 0.5N perchloric acid at a ratio of 1:3 (v:v, blood:perchloric acid) during sample collection. 25μL of acidified blood was extracted using a protein precipitation method and the resulting extracts were analyzed using reverse-phase chromatography and positive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. (13)C5-NAD(+) was used as the surrogate analyte for authentic analyte, NAD(+). The standard curve ranging from 0.250 to 25.0μg/mL in acidified human blood for (13)C5-NAD(+) was fitted to a 1/x(2) weighted linear regression model. The LC-MS/MS response between surrogate analyte and authentic analyte at the same concentration was obtained before and after the batch run. This response factor was not applied when determining the NAD(+) concentration from the (13)C5-NAD(+) standard curve since the percent difference was less than 5%. The precision and accuracy of the LC-MS/MS assay based on the five analytical QC levels were well within the acceptance criteria from both FDA and EMA guidance for bioanalytical method validation. Average extraction recovery of (13)C5-NAD(+) was 94.6% across the curve range. Matrix factor was 0.99 for both high and low QC indicating minimal ion suppression or enhancement. The validated assay was used to measure the baseline level of NAD(+) in 29 male and 21 female human subjects. This assay was also used to study the circadian effect of endogenous level of NAD(+) in 10 human subjects.

  10. Measurement of the pp¯→Wγ+X cross section at √(s)=1.96 TeV and WWγ anomalous coupling limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahn, S. H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Anastasoaie, M.; Andeen, T.; Anderson, S.; Andrieu, B.; Arnoud, Y.; Askew, A.; Åsman, B.; Jesus, A. C.; Atramentov, O.; Autermann, C.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Baden, A.; Baldin, B.; Balm, P. W.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Bargassa, P.; Baringer, P.; Barnes, C.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bauer, D.; Bean, A.; Beauceron, S.; Begel, M.; Bellavance, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Binder, M.; Biscarat, C.; Black, K. M.; Blackler, I.; Blazey, G.; Blekman, F.; Blessing, S.; Bloch, D.; Blumenschein, U.; Boehnlein, A.; Boeriu, O.; Bolton, T. A.; Borcherding, F.; Borissov, G.; Bos, K.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Buchanan, N. J.; Buchholz, D.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Busato, E.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, J. M.; Bystricky, J.; Caron, S.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, B. C.; Cason, N. M.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapin, D.; Charles, F.; Cheu, E.; Cho, D. K.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Christiansen, T.; Christofek, L.; Claes, D.; Clément, B.; Clément, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Coppage, D.; Corcoran, M.; Cothenet, A.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cox, B.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Cutts, D.; da Motta, H.; Davies, B.; Davies, G.; Davis, G. A.; de, K.; de Jong, P.; de Jong, S. J.; Cruz-Burelo, E. De; Martins, C. De; Dean, S.; Degenhardt, J. D.; Déliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Demine, P.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Doidge, M.; Dong, H.; Doulas, S.; Dudko, L. V.; Duflot, L.; Dugad, S. R.; Duperrin, A.; Dyer, J.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Edwards, T.; Ellison, J.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Eno, S.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Estrada, J.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fast, J.; Fatakia, S. N.; Feligioni, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fleck, I.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fu, S.; Fuess, S.; Gadfort, T.; Galea, C. F.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, E.; Garcia, C.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gardner, J.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Gelé, D.; Gelhaus, R.; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Gillberg, D.; Ginther, G.; Golling, T.; Gollub, N.; Gómez, B.; Gounder, K.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Groer, L.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hadley, N. J.; Hagopian, S.; Hall, I.; Hall, R. E.; Han, C.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Harrington, R.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hauser, R.; Hays, J.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Heinmiller, J. M.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hong, S. J.; Hooper, R.; Houben, P.; Hu, Y.; Huang, J.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jain, S.; Jain, V.; Jakobs, K.; Jenkins, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Juste, A.; Käfer, D.; Kahn, S.; Kajfasz, E.; Kalinin, A. M.; Kalk, J.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, J.; Kau, D.; Kaur, R.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Kesisoglou, S.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. M.; Kim, H.; Kim, T. J.; Klima, B.; Kohli, J. M.; Kopal, M.; Korablev, V. M.; Kotcher, J.; Kothari, B.; Koubarovsky, A.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozminski, J.; Kryemadhi, A.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kulik, Y.; Kumar, A.; Kunori, S.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kvita, J.; Lager, S.; Lahrichi, N.; Landsberg, G.; Lazoflores, J.; Bihan, A.-C. Le; Lebrun, P.; Lee, W. M.; Leflat, A.; Lehner, F.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Leveque, J.; Lewis, P.; Li, J.; Li, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Lobo, L.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lounis, A.; Love, P.; Lubatti, H. J.; Lueking, L.; Lynker, M.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K.; Madaras, R. J.; Mättig, P.; Magass, C.; Magerkurth, A.; Magnan, A.-M.; Makovec, N.; Mal, P. K.; Malbouisson, H. B.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mao, H. S.; Maravin, Y.; Martens, M.; Mattingly, S. E.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McCroskey, R.; Meder, D.; Melanson, H. L.; Melnitchouk, A.; Mendes, A.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Michaut, M.; Miettinen, H.; Mitrevski, J.; Molina, J.; Mondal, N. K.; Moore, R. W.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulders, M.; Mutaf, Y. D.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Naumann, N. A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nelson, S.; Neustroev, P.; Noeding, C.; Nomerotski, A.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Nurse, E.; O'dell, V.; O'Neil, D. C.; Oguri, V.; Oliveira, N.; Oshima, N.; Y Garzón, G. J.; Padley, P.; Parashar, N.; Park, S. K.; Parsons, J.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Pawloski, G.; Perea, P. M.; Perez, E.; Pétroff, P.; Petteni, M.; Piegaia, R.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pogorelov, Y.; Pope, B. G.; da Silva, W. L.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rani, K. J.; Ranjan, K.; Rapidis, P. A.; Ratoff, P. N.; Reucroft, S.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Robinson, S.; Rodrigues, R. F.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rud, V. I.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santoro, A.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Schieferdecker, P.; Schmitt, C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sengupta, S.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shephard, W. D.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shpakov, D.; Sidwell, R. A.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smith, R. P.; Smolek, K.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Song, X.; Sonnenschein, L.; Sopczak, A.; Sosebee, M.; Soustruznik, K.; Souza, M.; Spurlock, B.; Stanton, N. R.; Stark, J.; Steele, J.; Stevenson, K.; Stolin, V.; Stone, A.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strandberg, J.; Strang, M. A.; Strauss, M.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D.; Strovink, M.; Stutte, L.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Sznajder, A.; Talby, M.; Tamburello, P.; Taylor, W.; Telford, P.; Temple, J.; Tomoto, M.; Toole, T.; Torborg, J.; Towers, S.; Trefzger, T.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Turcot, A. S.; Tuts, P. M.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Vachon, B.; Kooten, R. Van; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vartapetian, A.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Vaupel, M.; Verdier, P.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Villeneuve-Seguier, F.; Vlimant, J.-R.; Toerne, E. Von; Vreeswijk, M.; Anh, T. Vu; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, L.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weber, M.; Weerts, H.; Wegner, M.; Wermes, N.; White, A.; White, V.; Wicke, D.; Wijngaarden, D. A.; Wilson, G. W.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wittlin, J.; Wobisch, M.; Womersley, J.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xu, Q.; Xuan, N.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, R.; Yan, M.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Yen, Y.; Yip, K.; Yoo, H. D.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zabi, A.; Zatserklyaniy, A.; Zdrazil, M.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zitoun, R.; Zutshi, V.; Zverev, E. G.

    2005-05-01

    The WWγ triple gauge boson coupling parameters are studied using pp¯→ℓνγ+X(ℓ=e,μ) events at √(s)=1.96 TeV. The data were collected with the D0 detector from an integrated luminosity of 162 pb-1 delivered by the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The cross section times branching fraction for pp¯→W(γ)+X→ℓνγ+X with EγT>8 GeV and ΔRℓγ> 0.7 is 14.8±1.6(stat)±1.0(syst)±1.0(lum) pb. The one-dimensional 95% confidence level limits on anomalous couplings are -0.88<Δκγ<0.96 and -0.20<λγ<0.20.

  11. 1010 Amplification and phase conjugation with high efficiency achieved by overcoming noise limitations in Brillouin two-beam coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glick, Yaakov; Sternklar, Shmuel

    1995-06-01

    A model incorporating noise and pump depletion in a Brillouin amplifier (BA) predicts a fundamental limitation on attainable pump-to-signal-ratio extraction efficiency. Experimental data supporting this model are also presented. In spite of the limitation, an experimental technique is shown that results in a factor-of-7 increase in extraction efficiency. We accomplish this by noise suppressing and subsequently double passing a BA. We report an overall power efficiency of 37% and phase-conjugate amplification of 3.75 \\times 1010 for a signal input power near the noise level. This performance, which is the best to our knowledge recorded to date, is accomplished without requiring additional input energy.

  12. Transcription factor Nr4a1 couples sympathetic and inflammatory cues in CNS-recruited macrophages to limit neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Shaked, Iftach; Hanna, Richard N; Shaked, Helena; Chodaczek, Grzegorz; Nowyhed, Heba N; Tweet, George; Tacke, Robert; Basat, Alp Bugra; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Togher, Susan; Miller, Jacqueline; Blatchley, Amy; Salek-Ardakani, Shahram; Darvas, Martin; Kaikkonen, Minna U; Thomas, Graham D; Lai-Wing-Sun, Sonia; Rezk, Ayman; Bar-Or, Amit; Glass, Christopher K; Bandukwala, Hozefa; Hedrick, Catherine C

    2015-12-01

    The molecular mechanisms that link the sympathetic stress response and inflammation remain obscure. Here we found that the transcription factor Nr4a1 regulated the production of norepinephrine (NE) in macrophages and thereby limited experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a mouse model of multiple sclerosis. Lack of Nr4a1 in myeloid cells led to enhanced NE production, accelerated infiltration of leukocytes into the central nervous system (CNS) and disease exacerbation in vivo. In contrast, myeloid-specific deletion of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in catecholamine biosynthesis, protected mice against EAE. Furthermore, we found that Nr4a1 repressed autocrine NE production in macrophages by recruiting the corepressor CoREST to the Th promoter. Our data reveal a new role for macrophages in neuroinflammation and identify Nr4a1 as a key regulator of catecholamine production by macrophages.

  13. Silicon-containing particles in synovial fluid: scanning electron microscopy coupled with analytical techniques allows an easy identification and differentiation from pathologically relevant crystals.

    PubMed Central

    Faure, G; Netter, P; Bene, M C

    1985-01-01

    Silicon-containing particles were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in synovial fluid samples from patients with crystal-induced or inflammatory synovitis, or both. This material was an artefact produced by the technical procedures, but these particles could be easily differentiated from naturally occurring compounds by their morphology and their composition determined by analytical spectrometry. Images PMID:3977417

  14. Evidence of W γ γ Production in p p Collisions at s = 8 TeV and Limits on Anomalous Quartic Gauge Couplings with the ATLAS Detector

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; ...

    2015-07-16

    This Letter reports evidence of triple gauge boson production pp → W (lν)γγ + X, which is accessible for the first time with the 8 TeV LHC data set. The fiducial cross section for this process is measured in a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1, collected by the ATLAS detector in 2012. Events are selected using the W boson decay to eν or μν as well as requiring two isolated photons. The measured cross section is used to set limits on anomalous quartic gauge couplings in the high diphoton mass region.

  15. Evidence of Wγγ Production in pp Collisions at s=8TeV and Limits on Anomalous Quartic Gauge Couplings with the ATLAS Detector

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; ...

    2015-07-16

    Here we report evidence of triple gauge boson production pp→W(ℓν)γγ+X, which is accessible for the first time with the 8 TeV LHC data set. The fiducial cross section for this process is measured in a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb₋1, collected by the ATLAS detector in 2012. Events are selected using the W boson decay to eν or μν as well as requiring two isolated photons. The measured cross section is used to set limits on anomalous quartic gauge couplings in the high diphoton mass region.

  16. An atomic orbital-based formulation of analytical gradients and nonadiabatic coupling vector elements for the state-averaged complete active space self-consistent field method on graphical processing units

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, James W.; Hohenstein, Edward G.; Luehr, Nathan; Martínez, Todd J.

    2015-10-21

    We recently presented an algorithm for state-averaged complete active space self-consistent field (SA-CASSCF) orbital optimization that capitalizes on sparsity in the atomic orbital basis set to reduce the scaling of computational effort with respect to molecular size. Here, we extend those algorithms to calculate the analytic gradient and nonadiabatic coupling vectors for SA-CASSCF. Combining the low computational scaling with acceleration from graphical processing units allows us to perform SA-CASSCF geometry optimizations for molecules with more than 1000 atoms. The new approach will make minimal energy conical intersection searches and nonadiabatic dynamics routine for molecular systems with O(10{sup 2}) atoms.

  17. First study of the radiation-amplitude zero in Wgamma production and limits on anomalous WWgamma couplings at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Assis Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J M; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Korablev, V M; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Krop, D; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lellouch, J; Leveque, J; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero Y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rich, P; Rieger, J; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Tamburello, P; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Trefzger, T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Welty-Rieger, L; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2008-06-20

    We present results from a study of pp-->Wgamma+X events utilizing data corresponding to 0.7 fb{-1} of integrated luminosity at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We set limits on anomalous WWgamma couplings at the 95% C.L. The one-dimensional 95% C.L. limits are 0.49

  18. Zγ production in pp¯ collisions at s=1.8 TeV and limits on anomalous ZZγ and Zγγ couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adam, I.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Ahn, S.; Aihara, H.; Alves, G. A.; Amidi, E.; Amos, N.; Anderson, E. W.; Astur, R.; Baarmand, M. M.; Baden, A.; Balamurali, V.; Balderston, J.; Baldin, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bantly, J.; Barberis, E.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bazizi, K.; Belyaev, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bertram, I.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Biswas, N.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, P.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N. I.; Borcherding, F.; Boswell, C.; Brandt, A.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Burtovoi, V. S.; Butler, J. M.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, D.; Casilum, Z.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chang, S.-M.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chen, L.-P.; Chen, W.; Choi, S.; Chopra, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Christenson, J. H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Cobau, W. G.; Cochran, J.; Cooper, W. E.; Cretsinger, C.; Cullen-Vidal, D.; Cummings, M. A.; Cutts, D.; Dahl, O. I.; Davis, K.; de, K.; del Signore, K.; Demarteau, M.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; di Loreto, G.; Draper, P.; Ducros, Y.; Dudko, L. V.; Dugad, S. R.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fahland, T.; Fatyga, M.; Fatyga, M. K.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Finocchiaro, G.; Fisk, H. E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flattum, E.; Forden, G. E.; Fortner, M.; Frame, K. C.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, A. N.; Gartung, P.; Geld, T. L.; Genik, R. J.; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gibbard, B.; Glenn, S.; Gobbi, B.; Goforth, M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gómez, B.; Gómez, G.; Goncharov, P. I.; González Solís, J. L.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L. T.; Gounder, K.; Goussiou, A.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P. D.; Green, D. R.; Green, J.; Greenlee, H.; Grim, G.; Grinstein, S.; Grossman, N.; Grudberg, P.; Grünendahl, S.; Guglielmo, G.; Guida, J. A.; Guida, J. M.; Gupta, A.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutnikov, Y. E.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hahn, K. S.; Hall, R. E.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, S.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hedin, D.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hernández-Montoya, R.; Heuring, T.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hoftun, J. S.; Hsieh, F.; Hu, Ting; Hu, Tong; Huehn, T.; Ito, A. S.; James, E.; Jaques, J.; Jerger, S. A.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, J. Z.-Y.; Joffe-Minor, T.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jöstlein, H.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, C. K.; Kahn, S.; Kalbfleisch, G.; Kang, J. S.; Karmgard, D.; Kehoe, R.; Kelly, M. L.; Kim, C. L.; Kim, S. K.; Klatchko, A.; Klima, B.; Klopfenstein, C.; Klyukhin, V. I.; Kochetkov, V. I.; Kohli, J. M.; Koltick, D.; Kostritskiy, A. V.; Kotcher, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kourlas, J.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovski, E. A.; Krane, J.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lami, S.; Lan, H.; Lander, R.; Landry, F.; Landsberg, G.; Lauer, B.; Leflat, A.; Li, H.; Li, J.; Li-Demarteau, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y. C.; Lobkowicz, F.; Loken, S. C.; Lökös, S.; Lueking, L.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K.; Madaras, R. J.; Madden, R.; Magaña-Mendoza, L.; Mani, S.; Mao, H. S.; Markeloff, R.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M. I.; Mauritz, K. M.; May, B.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McDonald, J.; McKibben, T.; McKinley, J.; McMahon, T.; Melanson, H. L.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Miettinen, H.; Mincer, A.; Mishra, C. S.; Mokhov, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Mooney, P.; da Motta, H.; Murphy, C.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Narayanan, A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nemethy, P.; Norman, D.; Oesch, L.; Oguri, V.; Oltman, E.; Oshima, N.; Owen, D.; Padley, P.; Pang, M.; Para, A.; Park, Y. M.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Paterno, M.; Pawlik, B.; Perkins, J.; Peters, M.; Piegaia, R.; Piekarz, H.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pope, B. G.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quintas, P. Z.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Ramirez, O.; Rasmussen, L.; Reucroft, S.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rockwell, T.; Roe, N. A.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rutherfoord, J.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Sculli, J.; Shabalina, E.; Shaffer, C.; Shankar, H. C.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shupe, M.; Singh, H.; Singh, J. B.; Sirotenko, V.; Smart, W.; Smith, R. P.; Snihur, R.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Sood, P. M.; Sosebee, M.; Sotnikova, N.; Souza, M.; Spadafora, A. L.; Stephens, R. W.; Stevenson, M. L.; Stewart, D.; Stichelbaut, F.; Stoianova, D. A.; Stoker, D.; Strauss, M.; Streets, K.; Strovink, M.; Sznajder, A.; Tamburello, P.; Tarazi, J.; Tartaglia, M.; Thomas, T. L.; Thompson, J.; Trippe, T. G.; Tuts, P. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vititoe, D.; Volkov, A. A.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, G.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; White, A.; White, J. T.; Wightman, J. A.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wirjawan, J. V.; Womersley, J.; Won, E.; Wood, D. R.; Xu, H.; Yamada, R.; Yamin, P.; Yang, J.; Yasuda, T.; Yepes, P.; Yoshikawa, C.; Youssef, S.; Yu, J.; Yu, Y.; Zhu, Z. H.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zverev, E. G.; Zylberstejn, A.

    1998-04-01

    We present a study of Zγ+X production in pp¯ collisions at s=1.8 TeV from 97 (87) pb-1 of data collected in the eeγ (μμγ) decay channel with the D0 detector at Fermilab. The event yield and kinematic characteristics are consistent with the standard model predictions. We obtain limits on anomalous ZZγ and Zγγ couplings for form factor scales Λ=500 GeV and Λ=750 GeV. Combining this analysis with our previous results yields 95% C.L. limits \\|hZ30\\|<0.36, \\|hZ40\\|<0.05, \\|hγ30\\|<0.37, and \\|hγ40\\|<0.05 for a form factor scale Λ=750 GeV.

  19. Predictive coupled-cluster isomer orderings for some SinCm (m, n ≤ 12) clusters: A pragmatic comparison between DFT and complete basis limit coupled-cluster benchmarks.

    PubMed

    Byrd, Jason N; Lutz, Jesse J; Jin, Yifan; Ranasinghe, Duminda S; Montgomery, John A; Perera, Ajith; Duan, Xiaofeng F; Burggraf, Larry W; Sa