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Sample records for covariant transport theory

  1. Covariant Noncommutative Field Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Estrada-Jimenez, S.; Garcia-Compean, H.; Obregon, O.; Ramirez, C.

    2008-07-02

    The covariant approach to noncommutative field and gauge theories is revisited. In the process the formalism is applied to field theories invariant under diffeomorphisms. Local differentiable forms are defined in this context. The lagrangian and hamiltonian formalism is consistently introduced.

  2. Covariant transport theory

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, Yang |

    1997-09-22

    Many phenomenological models for relativistic heavy ion collisions share a common framework - the relativistic Boltzmann equations. Within this framework, a nucleus-nucleus collision is described by the evolution of phase-space distributions of several species of particles. The equations can be effectively solved with the cascade algorithm by sampling each phase-space distribution with points, i.e. {delta}-functions, and by treating the interaction terms as collisions of these points. In between collisions, each point travels on a straight line trajectory. In most implementations of the cascade algorithm, each physical particle, e.g. a hadron or a quark, is often represented by one point. Thus, the cross-section for a collision of two points is just the cross-section of the physical particles, which can be quite large compared to the local density of the system. For an ultra-relativistic nucleus-nucleus collision, this could lead to a large violation of the Lorentz invariance. By using the invariance property of the Boltzmann equation under a scale transformation, a Lorentz invariant cascade algorithm can be obtained. The General Cascade Program - GCP - is a tool for solving the relativistic Boltzmann equation with any number of particle species and very general interactions with the cascade algorithm.

  3. Group Theory of Covariant Harmonic Oscillators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Y. S.; Noz, Marilyn E.

    1978-01-01

    A simple and concrete example for illustrating the properties of noncompact groups is presented. The example is based on the covariant harmonic-oscillator formalism in which the relativistic wave functions carry a covariant-probability interpretation. This can be used in a group theory course for graduate students who have some background in…

  4. Noncommutative Gauge Theory with Covariant Star Product

    SciTech Connect

    Zet, G.

    2010-08-04

    We present a noncommutative gauge theory with covariant star product on a space-time with torsion. In order to obtain the covariant star product one imposes some restrictions on the connection of the space-time. Then, a noncommutative gauge theory is developed applying this product to the case of differential forms. Some comments on the advantages of using a space-time with torsion to describe the gravitational field are also given.

  5. Covariant Spectator Theory: Foundations and Applications A Mini-Review of the Covariant Spectator Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Alfred Stadler, Franz Gross

    2010-10-01

    We provide a short overview of the Covariant Spectator Theory and its applications. The basic ideas are introduced through the example of a {phi}{sup 4}-type theory. High-precision models of the two-nucleon interaction are presented and the results of their use in calculations of properties of the two- and three-nucleon systems are discussed. A short summary of applications of this framework to other few-body systems is also presented.

  6. Covariant generalization of cosmological perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Enqvist, Kari; Hoegdahl, Janne; Nurmi, Sami; Vernizzi, Filippo

    2007-01-15

    We present an approach to cosmological perturbations based on a covariant perturbative expansion between two worldlines in the real inhomogeneous universe. As an application, at an arbitrary order we define an exact scalar quantity which describes the inhomogeneities in the number of e-folds on uniform density hypersurfaces and which is conserved on all scales for a barotropic ideal fluid. We derive a compact form for its conservation equation at all orders and assign it a simple physical interpretation. To make a comparison with the standard perturbation theory, we develop a method to construct gauge-invariant quantities in a coordinate system at arbitrary order, which we apply to derive the form of the nth order perturbation in the number of e-folds on uniform density hypersurfaces and its exact evolution equation. On large scales, this provides the gauge-invariant expression for the curvature perturbation on uniform density hypersurfaces and its evolution equation at any order.

  7. Spatially covariant theories of a transverse, traceless graviton: Formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoury, Justin; Miller, Godfrey E. J.; Tolley, Andrew J.

    2012-04-01

    General relativity is a generally covariant, locally Lorentz covariant theory of two transverse, traceless graviton degrees of freedom. According to a theorem of Hojman, Kuchař, and Teitelboim, modifications of general relativity must either introduce new degrees of freedom or violate the principle of local Lorentz covariance. In this paper, we explore modifications of general relativity that retain the same graviton degrees of freedom, and therefore explicitly break Lorentz covariance. Motivated by cosmology, the modifications of interest maintain explicit spatial covariance. In spatially covariant theories of the graviton, the physical Hamiltonian density obeys an analogue of the renormalization group equation which encodes invariance under flow through the space of conformally equivalent spatial metrics. This paper is dedicated to setting up the formalism of our approach and applying it to a realistic class of theories. Forthcoming work will apply the formalism more generally.

  8. Variational formulation of covariant eikonal theory for vector waves

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufman, A.N.; Ye, H.; Hui, Y.

    1986-10-01

    The eikonal theory of wave propagation is developed by means of a Lorentz-covariant variational principle, involving functions defined on the natural eight-dimensional phase space of rays. The wave field is a four-vector representing the electromagnetic potential, while the medium is represented by an anisotropic, dispersive nonuniform dielectric tensor D/sup ..mu nu../(k,x). The eikonal expansion yields, to lowest order, the Hamiltonian ray equations, which define the Lagrangian manifold k(x), and the wave-action conservation law, which determines the wave-amplitude transport along the rays. The first-order contribution to the variational principle yields a concise expression for the transport of the polarization phase. The symmetry between k-space and x-space allows for a simple implementation of the Maslov transform, which avoids the difficulties of caustic singularities.

  9. Inflation in general covariant theory of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yongqing; Wang, Anzhong; Wu, Qiang

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, we study inflation in the framework of the nonrelativistic general covariant theory of the Hořava-Lifshitz gravity with the projectability condition and an arbitrary coupling constant λ. We find that the Friedmann-Robterson-Walker (FRW) universe is necessarily flat in such a setup. We work out explicitly the linear perturbations of the flat FRW universe without specifying to a particular gauge, and find that the perturbations are different from those obtained in general relativity, because of the presence of the high-order spatial derivative terms. Applying the general formulas to a single scalar field, we show that in the sub-horizon regions, the metric and scalar field are tightly coupled and have the same oscillating frequencies. In the super-horizon regions, the perturbations become adiabatic, and the comoving curvature perturbation is constant. We also calculate the power spectra and indices of both the scalar and tensor perturbations, and express them explicitly in terms of the slow roll parameters and the coupling constants of the high-order spatial derivative terms. In particular, we find that the perturbations, of both scalar and tensor, are almost scale-invariant, and, with some reasonable assumptions on the coupling coefficients, the spectrum index of the tensor perturbation is the same as that given in the minimum scenario in general relativity (GR), whereas the index for scalar perturbation in general depends on λ and is different from the standard GR value. The ratio of the scalar and tensor power spectra depends on the high-order spatial derivative terms, and can be different from that of GR significantly.

  10. Conditional Covariance Theory and Detect for Polytomous Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Jinming

    2007-01-01

    This paper extends the theory of conditional covariances to polytomous items. It has been proven that under some mild conditions, commonly assumed in the analysis of response data, the conditional covariance of two items, dichotomously or polytomously scored, given an appropriately chosen composite is positive if, and only if, the two items…

  11. A Causal, Covariant Theory of Dissipative Fluid Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scofield, Dillon; Huq, Pablo

    2015-04-01

    The use of newtonian viscous dissipation theory in covariant fluid flow theories is known to lead to predictions that are inconsistent with the second law of thermodynamics and to predictions that are acausal. For instance, these problems effectively limit the covariant form of the Navier-Stokes theory (NST) to time-independent flow regimes. Thus the NST, the work horse of fluid dynamical theory, is limited in its ability to model time-dependent turbulent, stellar or thermonuclear flows. We show how such problems are avoided by a new geometrodynamical theory of fluids. This theory is based on a recent result of geometrodynamics showing current conservation implies gauge field creation, called the vortex field lemma and classification of flows by their Pfaff dimension. Experimental confirmation of the theory is reviewed.

  12. Students' Notions regarding "Covariance" of a Physical Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bandyopadhyay, Atanu; Kumar, Arvind

    2010-01-01

    A physical theory is said to be covariant with respect to a certain class of transformations when its basic equations retain their "form" under those transformations. It is one of the basic notions encountered in physics, particularly in the domain of relativity. In this paper we study in some detail how students deal with this notion in different…

  13. Scale-covariant theory of gravitation and astrophysical applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V.; Adams, P. J.; Hsieh, S.-H.; Tsiang, E.

    1977-01-01

    A scale-covariant theory of gravitation is presented which is characterized by a set of equations that are complete only after a choice of the scale function is made. Special attention is given to gauge conditions and units which allow gravitational phenomena to be described in atomic units. The generalized gravitational-field equations are derived by performing a direct scale transformation, by extending Riemannian geometry to Weyl geometry through the introduction of the notion of cotensors, and from a variation principle. Modified conservation laws are provided, a set of dynamical equations is obtained, and astrophysical consequences are considered. The theory is applied to examine certain homogeneous cosmological solutions, perihelion shifts, light deflections, secular variations of planetary orbital elements, stellar structure equations for a star in quasi-static equilibrium, and the past thermal history of earth. The possible relation of the scale-covariant theory to gauge field theories and their predictions of cosmological constants is discussed.

  14. Relativistic (covariant) kinetic theory of linear plasma waves and instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Lazar, M.; Schlickeiser, R.

    2006-06-19

    The fundamental kinetic description is of vital importance in high-energy astrophysics and fusion plasmas where wave phenomena evolve on scales small comparing with binary collision scales. A rigorous relativistic analysis is required even for nonrelativistic plasma temperatures for which the classical theory yielded unphysical results: e.g. collisonless damping of superluminal waves (phase velocity exceeds the speed of light). The existing nonrelativistic approaches are now improved by covariantly correct dispersion theory. As an important application, the Weibel instability has been recently investigated and confirmed as the source of primordial magnetic field in the intergalactic medium.

  15. Direct Neutron Capture Calculations with Covariant Density Functional Theory Inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shi-Sheng; Peng, Jin-Peng; Smith, Michael S.; Arbanas, Goran; Kozub, Ray L.

    2014-09-01

    Predictions of direct neutron capture are of vital importance for simulations of nucleosynthesis in supernovae, merging neutron stars, and other astrophysical environments. We calculate the direct capture cross sections for E1 transitions using nuclear structure information from a covariant density functional theory as input for the FRESCO coupled-channels reaction code. We find good agreement of our predictions with experimental cross section data on the double closed-shell targets 16O, 48Ca, and 90Zr, and the exotic nucleus 36S. Extensions of the technique for unstable nuclei and for large-scale calculations will be discussed. Predictions of direct neutron capture are of vital importance for simulations of nucleosynthesis in supernovae, merging neutron stars, and other astrophysical environments. We calculate the direct capture cross sections for E1 transitions using nuclear structure information from a covariant density functional theory as input for the FRESCO coupled-channels reaction code. We find good agreement of our predictions with experimental cross section data on the double closed-shell targets 16O, 48Ca, and 90Zr, and the exotic nucleus 36S. Extensions of the technique for unstable nuclei and for large-scale calculations will be discussed. Supported by the U.S. Dept. of Energy, Office of Nuclear Physics.

  16. Covariant density functional theory: The role of the pion

    SciTech Connect

    Lalazissis, G. A.; Karatzikos, S.; Serra, M.; Otsuka, T.; Ring, P.

    2009-10-15

    We investigate the role of the pion in covariant density functional theory. Starting from conventional relativistic mean field (RMF) theory with a nonlinear coupling of the {sigma} meson and without exchange terms we add pions with a pseudovector coupling to the nucleons in relativistic Hartree-Fock approximation. In order to take into account the change of the pion field in the nuclear medium the effective coupling constant of the pion is treated as a free parameter. It is found that the inclusion of the pion to this sort of density functionals does not destroy the overall description of the bulk properties by RMF. On the other hand, the noncentral contribution of the pion (tensor coupling) does have effects on single particle energies and on binding energies of certain nuclei.

  17. Differential cohomology and locally covariant quantum field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Christian; Schenkel, Alexander; Szabo, Richard J.

    We study differential cohomology on categories of globally hyperbolic Lorentzian manifolds. The Lorentzian metric allows us to define a natural transformation whose kernel generalizes Maxwell's equations and fits into a restriction of the fundamental exact sequences of differential cohomology. We consider smooth Pontryagin duals of differential cohomology groups, which are subgroups of the character groups. We prove that these groups fit into smooth duals of the fundamental exact sequences of differential cohomology and equip them with a natural presymplectic structure derived from a generalized Maxwell Lagrangian. The resulting presymplectic Abelian groups are quantized using the CCR-functor, which yields a covariant functor from our categories of globally hyperbolic Lorentzian manifolds to the category of C∗-algebras. We prove that this functor satisfies the causality and time-slice axioms of locally covariant quantum field theory, but that it violates the locality axiom. We show that this violation is precisely due to the fact that our functor has topological subfunctors describing the Pontryagin duals of certain singular cohomology groups. As a byproduct, we develop a Fréchet-Lie group structure on differential cohomology groups.

  18. Nuclear chiral and magnetic rotation in covariant density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Jie; Zhao, Pengwei

    2016-05-01

    Excitations of chiral rotation observed in triaxial nuclei and magnetic and/or antimagnetic rotations (AMR) seen in near-spherical nuclei have attracted a lot of attention. Unlike conventional rotation in well-deformed or superdeformed nuclei, here the rotational axis is not necessary coinciding with any principal axis of the nuclear density distribution. Thus, tilted axis cranking (TAC) is mandatory to describe these excitations self-consistently in the framework of covariant density functional theory (CDFT). We will briefly introduce the formalism of TAC-CDFT and its application for magnetic and AMR phenomena. Configuration-fixed CDFT and its predictions for nuclear chiral configurations and for favorable triaxial deformation parameters are also presented, and the discoveries of the multiple chiral doublets in 133Ce and 103Rh are discussed.

  19. Particle-vibration coupling within covariant density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinova, E.; Ring, P.; Tselyaev, V.

    2007-06-15

    Covariant density functional theory, which has so far been applied only within the framework of static and time-dependent mean-field theory, is extended to include particle-vibration coupling (PVC) in a consistent way. Starting from a conventional energy functional, we calculate the low-lying collective vibrations in the relativistic random phase approximation (RRPA) and construct an energy-dependent self-energy for the Dyson equation. The resulting Bethe-Salpeter equation in the particle-hole (p-h) channel is solved in the time blocking approximation (TBA). No additional parameters are used, and double counting is avoided by a proper subtraction method. The same energy functional, i.e., the same set of coupling constants, generates the Dirac-Hartree single-particle spectrum, the static part of the residual p-h interaction, and the particle-phonon coupling vertices. Therefore, a fully consistent description of nuclear excited states is developed. This method is applied for an investigation of damping phenomena in the spherical nuclei with closed shells {sup 208}Pb and {sup 132}Sn. Since the phonon coupling terms enrich the RRPA spectrum with a multitude of p-hxphonon components, a noticeable fragmentation of the giant resonances is found, which is in full agreement with experimental data and with results of the semiphenomenological nonrelativistic approach.

  20. Covariant Spectator Theory of heavy-light and heavy mesons and the predictive power of covariant interaction kernels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitão, Sofia; Stadler, Alfred; Peña, M. T.; Biernat, Elmar P.

    2017-01-01

    The Covariant Spectator Theory (CST) is used to calculate the mass spectrum and vertex functions of heavy-light and heavy mesons in Minkowski space. The covariant kernel contains Lorentz scalar, pseudoscalar, and vector contributions. The numerical calculations are performed in momentum space, where special care is taken to treat the strong singularities present in the confining kernel. The observed meson spectrum is very well reproduced after fitting a small number of model parameters. Remarkably, a fit to a few pseudoscalar meson states only, which are insensitive to spin-orbit and tensor forces and do not allow to separate the spin-spin from the central interaction, leads to essentially the same model parameters as a more general fit. This demonstrates that the covariance of the chosen interaction kernel is responsible for the very accurate prediction of the spin-dependent quark-antiquark interactions.

  1. On covariant Poisson brackets in classical field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forger, Michael; Salles, Mário O.

    2015-10-01

    How to give a natural geometric definition of a covariant Poisson bracket in classical field theory has for a long time been an open problem—as testified by the extensive literature on "multisymplectic Poisson brackets," together with the fact that all these proposals suffer from serious defects. On the other hand, the functional approach does provide a good candidate which has come to be known as the Peierls-De Witt bracket and whose construction in a geometrical setting is now well understood. Here, we show how the basic "multisymplectic Poisson bracket" already proposed in the 1970s can be derived from the Peierls-De Witt bracket, applied to a special class of functionals. This relation allows to trace back most (if not all) of the problems encountered in the past to ambiguities (the relation between differential forms on multiphase space and the functionals they define is not one-to-one) and also to the fact that this class of functionals does not form a Poisson subalgebra.

  2. Covariant Spectator Theory of np scattering: Isoscalar interaction currents

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, Franz L.

    2014-06-01

    Using the Covariant Spectator Theory (CST), one boson exchange (OBE) models have been found that give precision fits to low energy $np$ scattering and the deuteron binding energy. The boson-nucleon vertices used in these models contain a momentum dependence that requires a new class of interaction currents for use with electromagnetic interactions. Current conservation requires that these new interaction currents satisfy a two-body Ward-Takahashi (WT), and using principals of {\\it simplicity\\/} and {\\it picture independence\\/}, these currents can be uniquely determined. The results lead to general formulae for a two-body current that can be expressed in terms of relativistic $np$ wave functions, ${\\it \\Psi}$, and two convenient truncated wave functions, ${\\it \\Psi}^{(2)}$ and $\\widehat {\\it \\Psi}$, which contain all of the information needed for the explicit evaluation of the contributions from the interaction current. These three wave functions can be calculated from the CST bound or scattering state equations (and their off-shell extrapolations). A companion paper uses this formalism to evaluate the deuteron magnetic moment.

  3. Accuracy of Pseudo-Inverse Covariance Learning--A Random Matrix Theory Analysis.

    PubMed

    Hoyle, David C

    2011-07-01

    For many learning problems, estimates of the inverse population covariance are required and often obtained by inverting the sample covariance matrix. Increasingly for modern scientific data sets, the number of sample points is less than the number of features and so the sample covariance is not invertible. In such circumstances, the Moore-Penrose pseudo-inverse sample covariance matrix, constructed from the eigenvectors corresponding to nonzero sample covariance eigenvalues, is often used as an approximation to the inverse population covariance matrix. The reconstruction error of the pseudo-inverse sample covariance matrix in estimating the true inverse covariance can be quantified via the Frobenius norm of the difference between the two. The reconstruction error is dominated by the smallest nonzero sample covariance eigenvalues and diverges as the sample size becomes comparable to the number of features. For high-dimensional data, we use random matrix theory techniques and results to study the reconstruction error for a wide class of population covariance matrices. We also show how bagging and random subspace methods can result in a reduction in the reconstruction error and can be combined to improve the accuracy of classifiers that utilize the pseudo-inverse sample covariance matrix. We test our analysis on both simulated and benchmark data sets.

  4. Experimental Confirmation of a Causal, Covariant, Relativistic Theory of Dissipative Fluid Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scofield, Dillon; Huq, Pablo

    2015-11-01

    Using newtonian viscous dissipation stress in covariant, relativistic fluid flow theories leads to a violation of the second law of thermodynamics and to acausality of their predictions. E.g., the Landau & Lifshitz theory, a Lorentz covariant formulation, suffers from these defects. These problems effectively limit such theories to time-independent flow régimes. Thus, these theories are of little fundamental interest to astrophysical, geophysical, or thermonuclear flow modeling. We discuss experimental confirmation of the new geometrodynamical theory of fluids solving these problems. This theory is derived from recent results of geometrodynamics showing current conservation implies gauge field creation; the vortex field lemma.

  5. Incorporating Prior Theory in Covariance Structure Analysis: A Bayesian Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fornell, Claes; Rust, Roland T.

    1989-01-01

    A Bayesian approach to the testing of competing covariance structures is developed. Approximate posterior probabilities are easily obtained from the chi square values and other known constants. The approach is illustrated using an example that demonstrates how the prior probabilities can alter results concerning the preferred model specification.…

  6. Noncommutative gauge theory using a covariant star product defined between Lie-valued differential forms

    SciTech Connect

    Chaichian, M.; Tureanu, A.; Oksanen, M.; Zet, G.

    2010-04-15

    We develop an internal gauge theory using a covariant star product. The space-time is a symplectic manifold endowed only with torsion but no curvature. It is shown that, in order to assure the restrictions imposed by the associativity property of the star product, the torsion of the space-time has to be covariant constant. An illustrative example is given and it is concluded that in this case the conditions necessary to define a covariant star product on a symplectic manifold completely determine its connection.

  7. Covariant Action for the Super-Five-Brane of {ital M} Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bandos, I.; Nurmagambetov, A.; Sorokin, D.; Lechner, K.; Pasti, P.; Tonin, M.

    1997-06-01

    We propose a complete, d=6 covariant and kappa-symmetric, action for the M theory five-brane propagating in D=11 supergravity background. This opens a direct way of relating a wide class of super-p -brane solutions of string theory with the five-brane of M theory, which should be useful for studying corresponding dualities and nonperturbative aspects of these theories. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  8. Covariant gauges without Gribov ambiguities in Yang-Mills theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serreau, J.; Tissier, M.; Tresmontant, A.

    2014-06-01

    We propose a one-parameter family of nonlinear covariant gauges which can be formulated as an extremization procedure that may be amenable to lattice implementation. At high energies, where the Gribov ambiguities can be ignored, this reduces to the Curci-Ferrari-Delbourgo-Jarvis gauges. We further propose a continuum formulation in terms of a local action which is free of Gribov ambiguities and avoids the Neuberger zero problem of the standard Faddeev-Popov construction. This involves an averaging over Gribov copies with a nonuniform weight, which introduces a new gauge-fixing parameter. We show that the proposed gauge-fixed action is perturbatively renormalizable in four dimensions and we provide explicit expressions of the renormalization factors at one loop. We discuss the possible implications of the present proposal for the calculation of Yang-Mills correlators.

  9. Covariant response theory beyond RPA and its application

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinova, E. Ring, P. Tselyaev, V.

    2007-08-15

    The covariant particle-vibration coupling model within the time-blocking approximation is employed to supplement the relativistic random phase approximation (RRPA) with coupling to collective vibrations. The Bethe-Salpeter equation in the particle-hole channel with an energy-dependent residual particle-hole (ph) interaction is formulated and solved in the shell-model Dirac basis as well as in the momentum space. The same set of coupling constants generates the Dirac-Hartree single-particle spectrum, the static part of the residual ph interaction, and the particle-phonon coupling amplitudes. This approach is applied to a quantitative description of damping phenomenon in even-even spherical nuclei with closed shells {sup 208}Pb and {sup 132}Sn. Since phonon coupling enriches the RRPA spectrum with a multitude of ph - phonon states, a noticeable fragmentation of giant monopole and dipole resonances is obtained in the examined nuclei. The results are compared with experimental data and results of the nonrelativistic approach.

  10. Strong coupling in nonrelativistic general covariant theory of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Kai; Wang, Anzhong; Wu, Qiang; Zhu, Tao

    2011-08-01

    We study the strong coupling problem in the Horava-Melby-Thompson setup of the Horava-Lifshitz theory of gravity with an arbitrary coupling constant λ, generalized recently by da Silva, where λ describes the deviation of the theory in the infrared from general relativity that has λGR=1. We find that a scalar field in the Minkowski background becomes strongly coupled for processes with energy higher than Λω[≡(Mpl/c1)3/2Mpl|λ-1|5/4], where generically c1≪Mpl. However, this problem can be cured by introducing a new energy scale M*, so that M*<Λω, where M* denotes the suppression energy of high-order derivative terms of the theory.

  11. Magnetic and antimagnetic rotation in covariant density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, P. W.; Liang, H. Z.; Peng, J.; Ring, P.; Zhang, S. Q.; Meng, J.

    2012-10-20

    Progress on microscopic and self-consistent description of the magnetic rotation and antimagnetic rotation phenomena in tilted axis cranking relativistic mean-field theory based on a point-coupling interaction are briefly reviewed. In particular, the microscopic pictures of the shears mechanism in {sup 60}Ni and the two shears-like mechanism in {sup 105}Cd are discussed.

  12. Generally covariant vs. gauge structure for conformal field theories

    SciTech Connect

    Campigotto, M.; Fatibene, L.

    2015-11-15

    We introduce the natural lift of spacetime diffeomorphisms for conformal gravity and discuss the physical equivalence between the natural and gauge natural structure of the theory. Accordingly, we argue that conformal transformations must be introduced as gauge transformations (affecting fields but not spacetime point) and then discuss special structures implied by the splitting of the conformal group. -- Highlights: •Both a natural and a gauge natural structure for conformal gravity are defined. •Global properties and natural lift of spacetime transformations are described. •The possible definitions of physical state are considered and discussed. •The gauge natural theory has less physical states than the corresponding natural one. •The dynamics forces to prefer the gauge natural structure over the natural one.

  13. Cosmology in nonrelativistic general covariant theory of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Anzhong; Wu, Yumei

    2011-02-01

    Horava and Melby-Thompson recently proposed a new version of the Horava-Lifshitz theory of gravity, in which the spin-0 graviton is eliminated by introducing a Newtonian prepotential φ and a local U(1) gauge field A. In this paper, we first derive the corresponding Hamiltonian, supermomentum constraints, the dynamical equations, and the equations for φ and A, in the presence of matter fields. Then, we apply the theory to cosmology and obtain the modified Friedmann equation and the conservation law of energy, in addition to the equations for φ and A. When the spatial curvature is different from zero, terms behaving like dark radiation and stiff-fluid exist, from which, among other possibilities, a bouncing universe can be constructed. We also study linear perturbations of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe with any given spatial curvature k, and we derive the most general formulas for scalar perturbations. The vector and tensor perturbations are the same as those recently given by one of the present authors [A. Wang, Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ1550-7998 82, 124063 (2010).] in the setup of Sotiriou, Visser, and Weinfurtner. Applying these formulas to the Minkowski background, we have shown explicitly that the scalar and vector perturbations of the metric indeed vanish, and the only remaining modes are the massless spin-2 gravitons.

  14. Dissociation between Judgments and Outcome-Expectancy Measures in Covariation Learning: A Signal Detection Theory Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perales, Jose C.; Catena, Andres; Shanks, David R.; Gonzalez, Jose A.

    2005-01-01

    A number of studies using trial-by-trial learning tasks have shown that judgments of covariation between a cue c and an outcome o deviate from normative metrics. Parameters based on trial-by-trial predictions were estimated from signal detection theory (SDT) in a standard causal learning task. Results showed that manipulations of P(c) when…

  15. Understanding Intra-Response Class Covariation from the Matching Theory Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shukla-Mehta, Smita; Albin, Richard W.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to utilize the matching theory to understand intra-response class covariation as a result of extinction for selected members of the response class versus functional communication training. The participant was a 9-year old girl with a severe disability and problem behaviors. Experimental procedures included functional…

  16. Assessing the Item Response Theory with Covariate (IRT-C) Procedure for Ascertaining Differential Item Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tay, Louis; Vermunt, Jeroen K.; Wang, Chun

    2013-01-01

    We evaluate the item response theory with covariates (IRT-C) procedure for assessing differential item functioning (DIF) without preknowledge of anchor items (Tay, Newman, & Vermunt, 2011). This procedure begins with a fully constrained baseline model, and candidate items are tested for uniform and/or nonuniform DIF using the Wald statistic.…

  17. Covariant Density Functional Theory--highlights on recent progress and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, J.; Li, J.; Zhao, P. W.; Liang, H. Z.; Yao, J. M.

    2011-05-06

    The density functional theory with a few number of parameters allows a very successful phenomenological description of ground state properties of nuclei all over the nuclear chart. The recent progress on the application of the covariant density functional theory (CDFT) for nuclear structure and astrophysics as well as its extensions by the group in Beijing is summarized. In particular, its application to magnetic moments is discussed in details.

  18. Strangeness S =-1 hyperon-nucleon scattering in covariant chiral effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kai-Wen; Ren, Xiu-Lei; Geng, Li-Sheng; Long, Bingwei

    2016-07-01

    Motivated by the successes of covariant baryon chiral perturbation theory in one-baryon systems and in heavy-light systems, we study relevance of relativistic effects in hyperon-nucleon interactions with strangeness S =-1 . In this exploratory work, we follow the covariant framework developed by Epelbaum and Gegelia to calculate the Y N scattering amplitude at leading order. By fitting the five low-energy constants to the experimental data, we find that the cutoff dependence is mitigated, compared with the heavy-baryon approach. Nevertheless, the description of the experimental data remains quantitatively similar at leading order.

  19. Applications of Multidimensional Item Response Theory Models with Covariates to Longitudinal Test Data. Research Report. ETS RR-16-21

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fu, Jianbin

    2016-01-01

    The multidimensional item response theory (MIRT) models with covariates proposed by Haberman and implemented in the "mirt" program provide a flexible way to analyze data based on item response theory. In this report, we discuss applications of the MIRT models with covariates to longitudinal test data to measure skill differences at the…

  20. Covariantly constant curvature tensors and D=3, N=4, 5, 8 Chern-Simons matter theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fa-Min

    2012-03-01

    We construct some examples of D=3, N=4 GW theory and N=5 superconformal Chern-Simons matter theory by using the covariantly constant curvature of a quaternionic-Kahler manifold to construct the symplectic 3-algebra in the theories. Comparing with the previous theories, the N=4, 5 theories constructed in this way possess a local Sp(2n) symmetry and a diffeomorphism symmetry associated with the quaternionic-Kahler manifold. We also construct a generalized N=8 BLG theory by utilizing the dual curvature operator of a maximally symmetric space of dimension 4 to construct the Nambu 3-algebra. Comparing with the previous N=8 BLG theory, the theory has a diffeomorphism invariance and a local SO(4) invariance associated with the symmetric space.

  1. Application of the Covariant Spectator Theory to the Study of Heavy and Heavy-Light Mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitão, Sofia; Stadler, Alfred; Peña, M. T.; Biernat, Elmar P.

    2017-03-01

    As an application of the Covariant Spectator Theory (CST) we calculate the spectrum of heavy-light and heavy-heavy mesons using covariant versions of a linear confining potential, a one-gluon exchange, and a constant interaction. The CST equations possess the correct one-body limit and are therefore well-suited to describe mesons in which one quark is much heavier than the other. We find a good fit to the mass spectrum of heavy-light and heavy-heavy mesons with just three parameters (apart from the quark masses). Remarkably, the fit parameters are nearly unchanged when we fit to experimental pseudoscalar states only or to the whole spectrum. Because pseudoscalar states are insensitive to spin-orbit interactions and do not determine spin-spin interactions separately from central interactions, this result suggests that it is the covariance of the kernel that correctly predicts the spin-dependent quark-antiquark interactions.

  2. Scale covariant gravitation. V - Kinetic theory. VI - Stellar structure and evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, S.-H.; Canuto, V. M.

    1981-01-01

    A scale covariant kinetic theory for particles and photons is developed. The mathematical framework of the theory is given by the tangent bundle of a Weyl manifold. The Liouville equation is derived, and solutions to corresponding equilibrium distributions are presented and shown to yield thermodynamic results identical to the ones obtained previously. The scale covariant theory is then used to derive results of interest to stellar structure and evolution. A radiative transfer equation is derived that can be used to study stellar evolution with a variable gravitational constant. In addition, it is shown that the sun's absolute luminosity scales as L approximately equal to GM/kappa, where kappa is the stellar opacity. Finally, a formula is derived for the age of globular clusters as a function of the gravitational constant using a previously derived expression for the absolute luminosity.

  3. Photon-neutrino interaction in θ-exact covariant noncommutative field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvat, R.; Kekez, D.; Schupp, P.; Trampetić, J.; You, J.

    2011-08-01

    Photon-neutrino interactions arise quite naturally in noncommutative field theories. Such couplings are absent in ordinary field theory and imply experimental lower bounds on the energy scale ΛNC˜|θ|-2 of noncommutativity. Using nonperturbative methods and a Seiberg-Witten map based covariant approach to noncommutative gauge theory, we obtain θ-exact expressions for the interactions, thereby eliminating previous restrictions to low-energy phenomena. We discuss implications for plasmon decay, neutrino charge radii, big bang nucleosynthesis, and ultrahigh energy cosmic rays. Our results behave reasonably throughout all interaction energy scales, thus facilitating further phenomenological applications.

  4. Quark model with chiral-symmetry breaking and confinement in the Covariant Spectator Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Biernat, Elmer P.; Pena, Maria Teresa; Ribiero, Jose' Emilio F.; Stadler, Alfred; Gross, Franz L.

    2016-03-01

    We propose a model for the quark-antiquark interaction in Minkowski space using the Covariant Spectator Theory. We show that with an equal-weighted scalar-pseudoscalar structure for the confining part of our interaction kernel the axial-vector Ward-Takahashi identity is preserved and our model complies with the Adler-zero constraint for pi-pi-scattering imposed by chiral symmetry.

  5. Nonlinear closure relations theory for transport processes in nonequilibrium systems.

    PubMed

    Sonnino, Giorgio

    2009-05-01

    A decade ago, a macroscopic theory for closure relations has been proposed for systems out of Onsager's region. This theory is referred to as the thermodynamic field theory (TFT). The aim of this work was to determine the nonlinear flux-force relations that respect the thermodynamic theorems for systems far from equilibrium. We propose a formulation of the TFT where one of the basic restrictions, namely, the closed-form solution for the skew-symmetric piece of the transport coefficients, has been removed. In addition, the general covariance principle is replaced by the De Donder-Prigogine thermodynamic covariance principle (TCP). The introduction of TCP requires the application of an appropriate mathematical formalism, which is referred to as the entropy-covariant formalism. By geometrical arguments, we prove the validity of the Glansdorff-Prigogine universal criterion of evolution. A new set of closure equations determining the nonlinear corrections to the linear ("Onsager") transport coefficients is also derived. The geometry of the thermodynamic space is non-Riemannian. However, it tends to be Riemannian for high values of the entropy production. In this limit, we recover the transport equations found by the old theory. Applications of our approach to transport in magnetically confined plasmas, materials submitted to temperature, and electric potential gradients or to unimolecular triangular chemical reactions can be found at references cited herein. Transport processes in tokamak plasmas are of particular interest. In this case, even in the absence of turbulence, the state of the plasma remains close to (but, it is not in) a state of local equilibrium. This prevents the transport relations from being linear.

  6. Numerical Differentiation Methods for Computing Error Covariance Matrices in Item Response Theory Modeling: An Evaluation and a New Proposal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tian, Wei; Cai, Li; Thissen, David; Xin, Tao

    2013-01-01

    In item response theory (IRT) modeling, the item parameter error covariance matrix plays a critical role in statistical inference procedures. When item parameters are estimated using the EM algorithm, the parameter error covariance matrix is not an automatic by-product of item calibration. Cai proposed the use of Supplemented EM algorithm for…

  7. Spherically symmetric vacuum in covariant F (T )=T +α/2 T2+O (Tγ) gravity theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBenedictis, Andrew; Ilijić, Saša

    2016-12-01

    Recently, a fully covariant version of the theory of F (T ) torsion gravity has been introduced by M. Kršśák and E. Saridakis [Classical Quantum Gravity 33, 115009 (2016)]. In covariant F (T ) gravity, the Schwarzschild solution is not a vacuum solution for F (T )≠T , and therefore determining the spherically symmetric vacuum is an important open problem. Within the covariant framework, we perturbatively solve the spherically symmetric vacuum gravitational equations around the Schwarzschild solution for the scenario with F (T )=T +(α /2 )T2 , representing the dominant terms in theories governed by Lagrangians analytic in the torsion scalar. From this, we compute the perihelion shift correction to solar system planetary orbits as well as perturbative gravitational effects near neutron stars. This allows us to set an upper bound on the magnitude of the coupling constant, α , which governs deviations from general relativity. We find the bound on this nonlinear torsion coupling constant by specifically considering the uncertainty in the perihelion shift of Mercury. We also analyze a bound from a similar comparison with the periastron orbit of the binary pulsar PSR J0045-7319 as an independent check for consistency. Setting bounds on the dominant nonlinear coupling is important in determining if other effects in the Solar System or greater universe could be attributable to nonlinear torsion.

  8. On the covariant formalism of the effective field theory of gravity and leading order corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codello, Alessandro; Jain, Rajeev Kumar

    2016-11-01

    We construct the covariant effective field theory of gravity as an expansion in inverse powers of the Planck mass, identifying the leading and next-to-leading quantum corrections. We determine the form of the effective action for the cases of pure gravity with cosmological constant as well as gravity coupled to matter. By means of heat kernel methods we renormalize and compute the leading quantum corrections to quadratic order in a curvature expansion. The final effective action in our covariant formalism is generally non-local and can be readily used to understand the phenomenology on different spacetimes. In particular, we point out that on curved backgrounds the observable leading quantum gravitational effects are less suppressed than on Minkowski spacetime.

  9. Computer algebra and transport theory.

    SciTech Connect

    Warsa, J. S.

    2004-01-01

    Modern symbolic algebra computer software augments and complements more traditional approaches to transport theory applications in several ways. The first area is in the development and enhancement of numerical solution methods for solving the Boltzmann transport equation. Typically, special purpose computer codes are designed and written to solve specific transport problems in particular ways. Different aspects of the code are often written from scratch and the pitfalls of developing complex computer codes are numerous and well known. Software such as MAPLE and MATLAB can be used to prototype, analyze, verify and determine the suitability of numerical solution methods before a full-scale transport application is written. Once it is written, the relevant pieces of the full-scale code can be verified using the same tools I that were developed for prototyping. Another area is in the analysis of numerical solution methods or the calculation of theoretical results that might otherwise be difficult or intractable. Algebraic manipulations are done easily and without error and the software also provides a framework for any additional numerical calculations that might be needed to complete the analysis. We will discuss several applications in which we have extensively used MAPLE and MATLAB in our work. All of them involve numerical solutions of the S{sub N} transport equation. These applications encompass both of the two main areas in which we have found computer algebra software essential.

  10. Sensitivity analyses of turbulence theory-based variance-covariance matrices of tropospheric slant delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vennebusch, M.; Schön, S.

    2009-04-01

    Atmospheric turbulence induces physical correlations on any space geodetic technique based on electromagnetic waves. Thus, also GNSS phase observations are both temporally and spatially correlated due to refractivity fluctuations along the signal's path from the transmitter to the receiver. Currently, these physical correlations are rarely considered in GNSS data analysis; yielding too optimistic parameter variances and covariances. Based on turbulence theory, Schön and Brunner (2008) developed a formulation of the variances and covariances induced by refractivity fluctuations in the troposphere. This model adequately describes the variance-covariance matrix (VCM) of tropospheric slant delays. The parametrisation is mainly based on the turbulence structure constant, the outer scale length, the integration height, the wind direction and the observation geometry. The VCM can adequately be used to determine synthetic slant delay time series. In this paper, this strategy will be described by using an exemplary GPS configuration. Furthermore, the latest results of simulation studies and sensitivity analyses of this VCM model w.r.t. the model parameters are presented. As a result, the most dominant parameters (that should be either determined with special care or precisely known) will be identified.

  11. A pseudo-sound constitutive relationship for the dilatational covariances in compressible turbulence: An analytical theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ristorcelli, J. R.

    1995-01-01

    The mathematical consequences of a few simple scaling assumptions about the effects of compressibility are explored using a simple singular perturbation idea and the methods of statistical fluid mechanics. Representations for the pressure-dilation and dilatational dissipation covariances appearing in single-point moment closures for compressible turbulence are obtained. While the results are expressed in the context of a second-order statistical closure they provide some interesting and very clear physical metaphors for the effects of compressibility that have not been seen using more traditional linear stability methods. In the limit of homogeneous turbulence with quasi-normal large-scales the expressions derived are - in the low turbulent Mach number limit - asymptotically exact. The expressions obtained are functions of the rate of change of the turbulence energy, its correlation length scale, and the relative time scale of the cascade rate. The expressions for the dilatational covariances contain constants which have a precise and definite physical significance; they are related to various integrals of the longitudinal velocity correlation. The pressure-dilation covariance is found to be a nonequilibrium phenomena related to the time rate of change of the internal energy and the kinetic energy of the turbulence. Also of interest is the fact that the representation for the dilatational dissipation in turbulence, with or without shear, features a dependence on the Reynolds number. This article is a documentation of an analytical investigation of the implications of a pseudo-sound theory for the effects of compressibility.

  12. Static and dynamic aspect of covariant density functional theory in proton rich nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ring, P.; Lalazissis, G. A.; Paar, N.; Vretenar, D.

    2007-11-30

    Proton rich nuclei are investigated in the framework of Covariant Density Functional Theory (CDFT). The Relativistic Hartree Bogoliubov (RHB) model is used to study the proton drip line in the region of heavy and superheavy nuclei. The dynamical behavior of nuclei with a large proton excess is studied within the Relativistic Quasiparticle Random Phase Approximation (RQRPA). Low lying El-strength is observed and it is shown that it corresponds to an oscillation of the proton skin against the isospin saturated neutron-proton core. This mode is in full analogy to the neutron pygmy resonances found in many nuclei with neutron excess.

  13. Frame-covariant formulation of inflation in scalar-curvature theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Daniel; Karamitsos, Sotirios; Pilaftsis, Apostolos

    2016-06-01

    We develop a frame-covariant formulation of inflation in the slow-roll approximation by generalizing the inflationary attractor solution for scalar-curvature theories. Our formulation gives rise to new generalized forms for the potential slow-roll parameters, which enable us to examine the effect of conformal transformations and inflaton reparameterizations in scalar-curvature theories. We find that cosmological observables, such as the power spectrum, the spectral indices and their runnings, can be expressed in a concise manner in terms of the generalized potential slow-roll parameters which depend on the scalar-curvature coupling function, the inflaton wavefunction, and the inflaton potential. We show how the cosmological observables of inflation are frame-invariant in this generalized potential slow-roll formalism, as long as the end-of-inflation condition is appropriately extended to become frame-invariant as well. We then apply our formalism to specific scenarios, such as the induced gravity inflation, Higgs inflation and F (R) models of inflation, and obtain more accurate results, without making additional approximations to the potential. Our results are shown to be consistent to lowest order with those presented in the literature. Finally, we outline how our frame-covariant formalism can be naturally extended beyond the tree-level approximation, within the framework of the Vilkovisky-DeWitt effective action.

  14. Spatially covariant theories of gravity: disformal transformation, cosmological perturbations and the Einstein frame

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Tomohiro; Gao, Xian; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi E-mail: gao@th.phys.titech.ac.jp

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the cosmological background evolution and perturbations in a general class of spatially covariant theories of gravity, which propagates two tensor modes and one scalar mode. We show that the structure of the theory is preserved under the disformal transformation. We also evaluate the primordial spectra for both the gravitational waves and the curvature perturbation, which are invariant under the disformal transformation. Due to the existence of higher spatial derivatives, the quadratic Lagrangian for the tensor modes itself cannot be transformed to the form in the Einstein frame. Nevertheless, there exists a one-parameter family of frames in which the spectrum of the gravitational waves takes the standard form in the Einstein frame.

  15. Within-person Covariation of Agentic and Communal Perceptions: Implications for Interpersonal Theory and Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Roche, Michael J.; Pincus, Aaron L.; Hyde, Amanda L.; Conroy, David E.; Ram, Nilam

    2013-01-01

    Interpersonal theory identifies agency and communion as uncorrelated (orthogonal) dimensions, largely evidenced by research examining between-person analyses of single-occasion measures. However, longitudinal studies of interpersonal behavior demonstrated the within-person association of agency and communion is not orthogonal for many individuals, and between-person differences in these associations relate to adjustment. We applied a similar approach to investigate the association of interpersonal perceptions. 184 university students completed a 7-day event-contingent study of their interpersonal experiences. Using multilevel regression models, we demonstrated that agentic and communal perceptions were positively associated, and the strength of this within-person association was moderated by between-person scores of dependency and narcissism. We discuss the benefits of incorporating within-person interpersonal associations (termed interpersonal covariation) into interpersonal theory and assessment. PMID:24072945

  16. A preliminary evaluation of an O2/CO2 based eddy covariance theory at Missouri AmeriFlux site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, B.; Gu, L.

    2013-12-01

    The eddy covariance (EC) technique has been widely used at flux sites on every continent, across most ecosystem types and climates to monitor exchanges of momentum, mass and energy between land surface and atmosphere. In an attempt to develop a self-consistent theory for the EC technique, Gu et al. (2012) reformulated the fundamental equations for EC by introducing the concept of constraining gas that has no net ecosystem sink/source. Gu (2013) expanded the theory of Gu et al. (2012) to include paired gases whose ecosystem exchange ratios are stable over an averaging period (e.g. 30 min) and therefore can be used to constrain EC flux measurements of any gases. He proposed that O2 and CO2 are an ideal pair of gases as their biological processes are coupled and their ecosystem exchange ratio (also known as oxidative ratio) is close to 1. Advantages of this new O2/CO2 based EC theory include: 1) avoidance of covariance loss in calculating dry air density induced by spatial separation of measuring instruments and use of multiple indirectly derived variables, 2) the minimum number of assumptions adopted for the derivation of the equation, and 3) avoidance of errors related to linearization of ideal gas law. In this study, we conducted a preliminary evaluation for the basic principle of Gu (2013) EC theory. We crosschecked net ecosystem exchange (NEE) estimations from different, independent methods by using CO2 and H2O as paired constraining gases. Using CO2 and H2O instead of CO2 and O2 as paired constraining gases is not ideal in the framework of Gu (2013); however, no fast response O2 analyzer is currently available. CO2 and H2O are both transported between the inside of plants and canopy air through stomata on leaves in the processes of photosynthesis and transpiration which are known to be closely coupled. However, this close coupling is contaminated by other ecosystem sinks/sources, e.g. respiration of plants and soil for CO2 and evaporation of intercepted and soil

  17. Finite temperature and the Polyakov loop in the covariant variational approach to Yang-Mills Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quandt, Markus; Reinhardt, Hugo

    2017-03-01

    We extend the covariant variational approach for Yang-Mills theory in Landau gauge to non-zero temperatures. Numerical solutions for the thermal propagators are presented and compared to high-precision lattice data. To study the deconfinement phase transition, we adapt the formalism to background gauge and compute the effective action of the Polyakov loop for the colour groups SU(2) and SU(3). Using the zero-temperature propagators as input, all parameters are fixed at T = 0 and we find a clear signal for a deconfinement phase transition at finite temperatures, which is second order for SU(2) and first order for SU(3). The critical temperatures obtained are in reasonable agreement with lattice data.

  18. Covariant variational approach to Yang-Mills theory: Effective potential of the Polyakov loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quandt, M.; Reinhardt, H.

    2016-09-01

    We compute the effective action of the Polyakov loop in S U (2 ) and S U (3 ) Yang-Mills theory using a previously developed covariant variational approach. The formalism is extended to background gauge and it is shown how to relate the low-order Green's functions to the ones in Landau gauge studied earlier. The renormalization procedure is discussed. The self-consistent effective action is derived and evaluated using the numerical solution of the gap equation. We find a clear signal for a deconfinement phase transition at finite temperatures, which is second order for S U (2 ) and first order for S U (3 ). The critical temperatures obtained are in reasonable agreement with high-precision lattice data.

  19. Chiral symmetry and π-π scattering in the Covariant Spectator Theory

    DOE PAGES

    Biernat, Elmar P.; Peña, M. T.; Ribeiro, J. E.; ...

    2014-11-14

    The π-π scattering amplitude calculated with a model for the quark-antiquark interaction in the framework of the Covariant Spectator Theory (CST) is shown to satisfy the Adler zero constraint imposed by chiral symmetry. The CST formalism is established in Minkowski space and our calculations are performed in momentum space. We prove that the axial-vector Ward-Takahashi identity is satisfied by our model. Then we show that, similarly to what happens within the Bethe-Salpeter formalism, application of the axial-vector Ward Takahashi identity to the CST π-π scattering amplitude allows us to sum the intermediate quark-quark interactions to all orders. Thus, the Adlermore » self-consistency zero for π-π scattering in the chiral limit emerges as the result for this sum.« less

  20. Exploration of direct neutron capture with covariant density functional theory inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shi-Sheng; Peng, Jin-Peng; Smith, M. S.; Arbanas, G.; Kozub, R. L.

    2015-04-01

    Predictions of direct neutron capture are of vital importance for simulations of nucleosynthesis in supernovae, merging neutron stars, and other astrophysical environments. We calculated direct capture cross sections using nuclear structure information obtained from a covariant density functional theory as input for the fresco coupled reaction channels code. We investigated the impact of pairing, spectroscopic factors, and optical potentials on our results to determine a robust method to calculate cross sections of direct neutron capture on exotic nuclei. Our predictions agree reasonably well with experimental cross section data for the closed shell nuclei 16O and 48Ca, and for the exotic nucleus 36S . We then used this approach to calculate the direct neutron capture cross section on the doubly magic unstable nucleus 132Sn which is of interest for the astrophysical r-process.

  1. Covariant spectator theory for the electromagnetic three-nucleon form factors: Complete impulse approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, Sergio Alexandre; Stadler, Alfred; Gross, Franz

    2009-05-15

    We present the first calculations of the electromagnetic form factors of {sup 3}He and {sup 3}H within the framework of the Covariant Spectator Theory (CST). This first exploratory study concentrates on the sensitivity of the form factors to the strength of the scalar meson-nucleon off-shell coupling, known from previous studies to have a strong influence on the three-body binding energy. Results presented here were obtained using the complete impulse approximation (CIA), which includes contributions of relativistic origin that appear as two-body corrections in a nonrelativistic framework, such as 'Z-graphs', but omits other two and three-body currents. We compare our results to nonrelativistic calculations augmented by relativistic corrections of O(v/c){sup 2}.

  2. Covariant spectator theory for the electromagnetic three-nucleon form factors: Complete impulse approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, Sérgio Alexandre; Stadler, Alfred; Gross, Franz

    2009-05-01

    We present the first calculations of the electromagnetic form factors of 3He and 3H within the framework of the Covariant Spectator Theory (CST). This first exploratory study concentrates on the sensitivity of the form factors to the strength of the scalar meson-nucleon off-shell coupling, known from previous studies to have a strong influence on the three-body binding energy. Results presented here were obtained using the complete impulse approximation (CIA), which includes contributions of relativistic origin that appear as two-body corrections in a non-relativistic framework, such as "Z-graphs," but omits other two and three-body currents. Finally, we compare our results to non-relativistic calculations augmented by relativistic corrections of O(v/c)2.

  3. Covariant spectator theory for the electromagnetic three-nucleon form factors: Complete impulse approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandre Pinto, SÂ ergio; Stadler, Alfred; Gross, Franz

    2009-01-01

    We present the first calculations of the electromagnetic form factors of 3He and 3H within the framework of the Covariant Spectator Theory (CST). This first exploratory study concentrates on the sensitivity of the form factors to the strength of the scalar meson-nucleon off-shell coupling, known from previous studies to have a strong influence on the three-body binding energy. Results presented here were obtained using the complete impulse approximation (CIA), which includes contributions of relativistic origin that appear as two-body corrections in a non-relativistic framework, such as ?Z-graphs?, but omits other two and three-body currents. We compare our results to non-relativistic calculations augmented by relativistic corrections of O(v/c)2.

  4. Locally covariant quantum field theory and the problem of formulating the same physics in all space-times.

    PubMed

    Fewster, Christopher J

    2015-08-06

    The framework of locally covariant quantum field theory is discussed, motivated in part using 'ignorance principles'. It is shown how theories can be represented by suitable functors, so that physical equivalence of theories may be expressed via natural isomorphisms between the corresponding functors. The inhomogeneous scalar field is used to illustrate the ideas. It is argued that there are two reasonable definitions of the local physical content associated with a locally covariant theory; when these coincide, the theory is said to be dynamically local. The status of the dynamical locality condition is reviewed, as are its applications in relation to (i) the foundational question of what it means for a theory to represent the same physics in different space-times and (ii) a no-go result on the existence of natural states.

  5. Consistency between SU(3) and SU(2) covariant baryon chiral perturbation theory for the nucleon mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xiu-Lei; Alvarez-Ruso, L.; Geng, Li-Sheng; Ledwig, Tim; Meng, Jie; Vicente Vacas, M. J.

    2017-03-01

    Treating the strange quark mass as a heavy scale compared to the light quark mass, we perform a matching of the nucleon mass in the SU(3) sector to the two-flavor case in covariant baryon chiral perturbation theory. The validity of the 19 low-energy constants appearing in the octet baryon masses up to next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order [1] is supported by comparing the effective parameters (the combinations of the 19 couplings) with the corresponding low-energy constants in the SU(2) sector [2]. In addition, it is shown that the dependence of the effective parameters and the pion-nucleon sigma term on the strange quark mass is relatively weak around its physical value, thus providing support to the assumption made in Ref. [2] that the SU(2) baryon chiral perturbation theory can be applied to study nf = 2 + 1 lattice QCD simulations as long as the strange quark mass is close to its physical value.

  6. Covariance structure of neuroticism and agreeableness: a twin and molecular genetic analysis of the role of the serotonin transporter gene.

    PubMed

    Jang, K L; Hu, S; Livesley, W J; Angleitner, A; Riemann, R; Ando, J; Ono, Y; Vernon, P A; Hamer, D H

    2001-08-01

    The Revised NEO Personality Inventory domains of Neuroticism and Agreeableness are considered factorially distinct despite several intercorrelations between these domains. The genetic correlation, an index of the degree to which these intercorrelations are caused by genetic influences, was estimated using data from 913 monozygotic and 562 dizygotic volunteer twin pairs from Canada, Germany, and Japan. The serotonin transporter gene, 5-HTTLPR, was assayed in a sample of 388 nontwin sibling pairs from the United States to determine the contribution of the serotonin transporter locus to the covariation between the Neuroticism and Agreeableness scales. In all four samples, genetic influences contributed to the covariance of Neuroticism and Agreeableness, with the serotonin transporter gene accounting for 10% of the relationship between these domains.

  7. A covariant Fokker-Planck equation for a simple gas from relativistic kinetic theory

    SciTech Connect

    Chacon-Acosta, Guillermo; Dagdug, Leonardo; Morales-Tecotl, Hugo A.

    2010-12-14

    A manifestly covariant Fokker-Planck differential equation is derived for the case of a relativistic simple gas by taking a small momentum transfer approximation within the collision integral of the relativistic Boltzmann equation. We follow closely previous work, with the main difference that we keep manifest covariance at every stage of the analysis. In addition, we use the covariant Juettner distribution function to find a relativistic generalization of the Einstein's fluctuation-dissipation relation.

  8. Understanding spike-triggered covariance using Wiener theory for receptive field identification

    PubMed Central

    Sandler, Roman A.; Marmarelis, Vasilis Z.

    2015-01-01

    Receptive field identification is a vital problem in sensory neurophysiology and vision. Much research has been done in identifying the receptive fields of nonlinear neurons whose firing rate is determined by the nonlinear interactions of a small number of linear filters. Despite more advanced methods that have been proposed, spike-triggered covariance (STC) continues to be the most widely used method in such situations due to its simplicity and intuitiveness. Although the connection between STC and Wiener/Volterra kernels has often been mentioned in the literature, this relationship has never been explicitly derived. Here we derive this relationship and show that the STC matrix is actually a modified version of the second-order Wiener kernel, which incorporates the input autocorrelation and mixes first- and second-order dynamics. It is then shown how, with little modification of the STC method, the Wiener kernels may be obtained and, from them, the principal dynamic modes, a set of compact and efficient linear filters that essentially combine the spike-triggered average and STC matrix and generalize to systems with both continuous and point-process outputs. Finally, using Wiener theory, we show how these obtained filters may be corrected when they were estimated using correlated inputs. Our correction technique is shown to be superior to those commonly used in the literature for both correlated Gaussian images and natural images. PMID:26230978

  9. On the covariant formalism of the effective field theory of gravity and its cosmological implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codello, Alessandro; Jain, Rajeev Kumar

    2017-02-01

    Following our previous work wherein the leading order effective action was computed in the covariant effective field theory of gravity, here we specialize the effective action to the FRW spacetime and obtain the effective Friedmann equations. In particular, we focus our attention on studying the cosmological implications of the non-local terms when each of them is combined with the Einstein–Hilbert action. We obtain both analytical and iterative solutions to the effective background equations in all the cases and also briefly comment on the consistency between the iterative and numerical solutions whenever possible. We find that among all the non–local terms, the imprints induced by R\\frac{1}{{{\\square}2}}R are very significant. Interpreting these corrections as an effective dark energy component characterized by an equation of state parameter, we find that the R\\frac{1}{{{\\square}2}}R correction can indeed lead to an accelerated expansion of the universe at the present epoch even in the absence of a cosmological constant. We briefly discuss some phenomenological consequences of our results.

  10. Non-Gaussian covariance of the matter power spectrum in the effective field theory of large scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolini, Daniele; Schutz, Katelin; Solon, Mikhail P.; Walsh, Jonathan R.; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2016-06-01

    We compute the non-Gaussian contribution to the covariance of the matter power spectrum at one-loop order in standard perturbation theory (SPT), using the framework of the effective field theory (EFT) of large scale structure (LSS). The complete one-loop contributions are evaluated for the first time, including the leading EFT corrections that involve seven independent operators, of which four appear in the power spectrum and bispectrum. We compare the non-Gaussian part of the one-loop covariance computed with both SPT and EFT of LSS to two separate simulations. In one simulation, we find that the one-loop prediction from SPT reproduces the simulation well to ki+kj˜0.25 h /Mpc , while in the other simulation we find a substantial improvement of EFT of LSS (with one free parameter) over SPT, more than doubling the range of k where the theory accurately reproduces the simulation. The disagreement between these two simulations points to unaccounted for systematics, highlighting the need for improved numerical and analytic understanding of the covariance.

  11. Item Response Theory with Covariates (IRT-C): Assessing Item Recovery and Differential Item Functioning for the Three-Parameter Logistic Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tay, Louis; Huang, Qiming; Vermunt, Jeroen K.

    2016-01-01

    In large-scale testing, the use of multigroup approaches is limited for assessing differential item functioning (DIF) across multiple variables as DIF is examined for each variable separately. In contrast, the item response theory with covariate (IRT-C) procedure can be used to examine DIF across multiple variables (covariates) simultaneously. To…

  12. Contextualized Network Analysis: Theory and Methods for Networks with Node Covariates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binkiewicz, Norbert M.

    Biological and social systems consist of myriad interacting units. The interactions can be intuitively represented in the form of a graph or network. Measurements of these graphs can reveal the underlying structure of these interactions, which provides insight into the systems that generated the graphs. Moreover, in applications such as neuroconnectomics, social networks, and genomics, graph data is accompanied by contextualizing measures on each node. We leverage these node covariates to help uncover latent communities, using a modification of spectral clustering. Statistical guarantees are provided under a joint mixture model called the node contextualized stochastic blockmodel, including a bound on the mis-clustering rate. For most simulated conditions, covariate assisted spectral clustering yields superior results relative to both regularized spectral clustering without node covariates and an adaptation of canonical correlation analysis. We apply covariate assisted spectral clustering to large brain graphs derived from diffusion MRI, using the node locations or neurological regions as covariates. In both cases, covariate assisted spectral clustering yields clusters that are easier to interpret neurologically. A low rank update algorithm is developed to reduce the computational cost of determining the tuning parameter for covariate assisted spectral clustering. As simulations demonstrate, the low rank update algorithm increases the speed of covariate assisted spectral clustering up to ten-fold, while practically matching the clustering performance of the standard algorithm. Graphs with node attributes are sometimes accompanied by ground truth labels that align closely with the latent communities in the graph. We consider the example of a mouse retina neuron network accompanied by the neuron spatial location and neuronal cell types. In this example, the neuronal cell type is considered a ground truth label. Current approaches for defining neuronal cell type vary

  13. Comparing Consider-Covariance Analysis with Sigma-Point Consider Filter and Linear-Theory Consider Filter Formulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisano, Michael E.

    2007-01-01

    Recent literature in applied estimation theory reflects growing interest in the sigma-point (also called unscented ) formulation for optimal sequential state estimation, often describing performance comparisons with extended Kalman filters as applied to specific dynamical problems [c.f. 1, 2, 3]. Favorable attributes of sigma-point filters are described as including a lower expected error for nonlinear even non-differentiable dynamical systems, and a straightforward formulation not requiring derivation or implementation of any partial derivative Jacobian matrices. These attributes are particularly attractive, e.g. in terms of enabling simplified code architecture and streamlined testing, in the formulation of estimators for nonlinear spaceflight mechanics systems, such as filter software onboard deep-space robotic spacecraft. As presented in [4], the Sigma-Point Consider Filter (SPCF) algorithm extends the sigma-point filter algorithm to the problem of consider covariance analysis. Considering parameters in a dynamical system, while estimating its state, provides an upper bound on the estimated state covariance, which is viewed as a conservative approach to designing estimators for problems of general guidance, navigation and control. This is because, whether a parameter in the system model is observable or not, error in the knowledge of the value of a non-estimated parameter will increase the actual uncertainty of the estimated state of the system beyond the level formally indicated by the covariance of an estimator that neglects errors or uncertainty in that parameter. The equations for SPCF covariance evolution are obtained in a fashion similar to the derivation approach taken with standard (i.e. linearized or extended) consider parameterized Kalman filters (c.f. [5]). While in [4] the SPCF and linear-theory consider filter (LTCF) were applied to an illustrative linear dynamics/linear measurement problem, in the present work examines the SPCF as applied to

  14. A unified theory of transport barriers and of subneoclassical transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogister, André L.

    1999-01-01

    "Subneoclassical" heat fluxes are shown to be rigorous consequences of the revisited neoclassical theory published earlier [Phys. Plasmas 1, 619 (1994)]. Including finite Larmor radius and inertia effects, this theory also provides a nondegenerate ambipolarity constraint, which, together with the parallel momentum equation, defines unambiguously the radial electric field Er and the parallel velocity U∥,i. It is shown that the stationary solution of those equations features, under conditions that are discussed, highly sheared Er profiles as observed in edge transport barriers. The operation regime is determined by a competition between nonlinear spin up of the rotation (which is interpreted) and momentum loss via charge exchange neutrals. The position of the transport barrier—near the last closed magnetic surface (LCMS)—is explained. The local threshold condition is analyzed, including the role of recycling neutrals and of the isotope mass. The width of the shear layer, as well as the predicted jumps and negative values of Er in front of the LCMS, agrees with experimental data. The time-dependent equations have solutions propagating from the edge to the core; the time scale associated with the toroidal rotation scales as and is usually comparable to the neoclassical heat transport time scale. Although the theory is so far limited to the high collisionality regime, a clear physical interpretation of the results allows extrapolation to low collisionality plasmas.

  15. Dissipative time-dependent quantum transport theory.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Yam, Chi Yung; Chen, GuanHua

    2013-04-28

    A dissipative time-dependent quantum transport theory is developed to treat the transient current through molecular or nanoscopic devices in presence of electron-phonon interaction. The dissipation via phonon is taken into account by introducing a self-energy for the electron-phonon coupling in addition to the self-energy caused by the electrodes. Based on this, a numerical method is proposed. For practical implementation, the lowest order expansion is employed for the weak electron-phonon coupling case and the wide-band limit approximation is adopted for device and electrodes coupling. The corresponding hierarchical equation of motion is derived, which leads to an efficient and accurate time-dependent treatment of inelastic effect on transport for the weak electron-phonon interaction. The resulting method is applied to a one-level model system and a gold wire described by tight-binding model to demonstrate its validity and the importance of electron-phonon interaction for the quantum transport. As it is based on the effective single-electron model, the method can be readily extended to time-dependent density functional theory.

  16. Charge-conjugation symmetric complete impulse approximation for the pion electromagnetic form factor in the covariant spectator theory

    DOE PAGES

    Biernat, Elmar P.; Gross, Franz; Peña, M. T.; ...

    2015-10-26

    The pion form factor is calculated in the framework of the charge-conjugation invariant covariant spectator theory. This formalism is established in Minkowski space, and the calculation is set up in momentum space. In a previous calculation we included only the leading pole coming from the spectator quark (referred to as the relativistic impulse approximation). In this study we also include the contributions from the poles of the quark which interacts with the photon and average over all poles in both the upper and lower half-planes in order to preserve charge conjugation invariance (referred to as the C-symmetric complete impulse approximation).more » We find that for small pion mass these contributions are significant at all values of the four-momentum transfer Q2 but, surprisingly, do not alter the shape obtained from the spectator poles alone.« less

  17. Charge-conjugation symmetric complete impulse approximation for the pion electromagnetic form factor in the covariant spectator theory

    SciTech Connect

    Biernat, Elmar P.; Gross, Franz; Peña, M. T.; Stadler, Alfred

    2015-10-26

    The pion form factor is calculated in the framework of the charge-conjugation invariant covariant spectator theory. This formalism is established in Minkowski space, and the calculation is set up in momentum space. In a previous calculation we included only the leading pole coming from the spectator quark (referred to as the relativistic impulse approximation). In this study we also include the contributions from the poles of the quark which interacts with the photon and average over all poles in both the upper and lower half-planes in order to preserve charge conjugation invariance (referred to as the C-symmetric complete impulse approximation). We find that for small pion mass these contributions are significant at all values of the four-momentum transfer Q2 but, surprisingly, do not alter the shape obtained from the spectator poles alone.

  18. Bias Reduction in Quasi-Experiments with Little Selection Theory but Many Covariates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steiner, Peter M.; Cook, Thomas D.; Li, Wei; Clark, M. H.

    2015-01-01

    In observational studies, selection bias will be completely removed only if the selection mechanism is ignorable, namely, all confounders of treatment selection and potential outcomes are reliably measured. Ideally, well-grounded substantive theories about the selection process and outcome-generating model are used to generate the sample of…

  19. Hyper(co)homology for exact left covariant functors and a homology theory for topological spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sklyarenko, E. G.

    1995-06-01

    Contents Introduction §1. Strong cohomology of dual complexes §2. Hyperhomology §3. Examples §4. Typical limit relations for Steenrod-Sitnikov homology §5. The strong homology of topological spaces §6. On the special position held by singular theory Bibliography

  20. Pion-nucleon scattering in covariant baryon chiral perturbation theory with explicit Delta resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, De-Liang; Siemens, D.; Bernard, V.; Epelbaum, E.; Gasparyan, A. M.; Gegelia, J.; Krebs, H.; Meißner, Ulf-G.

    2016-05-01

    We present the results of a third order calculation of the pion-nucleon scattering amplitude in a chiral effective field theory with pions, nucleons and delta resonances as explicit degrees of freedom. We work in a manifestly Lorentz invariant formulation of baryon chiral perturbation theory using dimensional regularization and the extended on-mass-shell renormalization scheme. In the delta resonance sector, the on mass-shell renormalization is realized as a complex-mass scheme. By fitting the low-energy constants of the effective Lagrangian to the S- and P -partial waves a satisfactory description of the phase shifts from the analysis of the Roy-Steiner equations is obtained. We predict the phase shifts for the D and F waves and compare them with the results of the analysis of the George Washington University group. The threshold parameters are calculated both in the delta-less and delta-full cases. Based on the determined low-energy constants, we discuss the pion-nucleon sigma term. Additionally, in order to determine the strangeness content of the nucleon, we calculate the octet baryon masses in the presence of decuplet resonances up to next-to-next-to-leading order in SU(3) baryon chiral perturbation theory. The octet baryon sigma terms are predicted as a byproduct of this calculation.

  1. Black holes, compact objects and solar system tests in non-relativistic general covariant theory of gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwald, Jared; Satheeshkumar, V.H.; Wang, Anzhong E-mail: VHSatheeshkumar@baylor.edu

    2010-12-01

    We study spherically symmetric static spacetimes generally filled with an anisotropic fluid in the nonrelativistic general covariant theory of gravity. In particular, we find that the vacuum solutions are not unique, and can be expressed in terms of the U(1) gauge field A. When solar system tests are considered, severe constraints on A are obtained, which seemingly pick up the Schwarzschild solution uniquely. In contrast to other versions of the Horava-Lifshitz theory, non-singular static stars made of a perfect fluid without heat flow can be constructed, due to the coupling of the fluid with the gauge field. These include the solutions with a constant pressure. We also study the general junction conditions across the surface of a star. In general, the conditions allow the existence of a thin matter shell on the surface. When applying these conditions to the perfect fluid solutions with the vacuum ones as describing their external spacetimes, we find explicitly the matching conditions in terms of the parameters appearing in the solutions. Such matching is possible even without the presence of a thin matter shell.

  2. Scaling theory for anomalous semiclassical quantum transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sena-Junior, M. I.; Macêdo, A. M. S.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum transport through devices coupled to electron reservoirs can be described in terms of the full counting statistics (FCS) of charge transfer. Transport observables, such as conductance and shot-noise power are just cumulants of FCS and can be obtained from the sample's average density of transmission eigenvalues, which in turn can be obtained from a finite element representation of the saddle-point equation of the Keldysh (or supersymmetric) nonlinear sigma model, known as quantum circuit theory. Normal universal metallic behavior in the semiclassical regime is controlled by the presence of a Fabry-Pérot singularity in the average density of transmission eigenvalues. We present general conditions for the suppression of Fabry-Pérot modes in the semiclassical regime in a sample of arbitrary shape, a disordered conductor or a network of ballistic quantum dots, which leads to an anomalous metallic phase. Through a double-scaling limit, we derive a scaling equation for anomalous metallic transport, in the form of a nonlinear differential equation, which generalizes the ballistic-diffusive scaling equation of a normal metal. The two-parameter stationary solution of our scaling equation generalizes Dorokhov's universal single-parameter distribution of transmission eigenvalues. We provide a simple interpretation of the stationary solution using a thermodynamic analogy with a spin-glass system. As an application, we consider a system formed by a diffusive wire coupled via a barrier to normal-superconductor reservoirs. We observe anomalous reflectionless tunneling, when all perfectly transmitting channels are suppressed, which cannot be explained by the usual mechanism of disorder-induced opening of tunneling channels.

  3. Dynamics of nuclear single-particle structure in covariant theory of particle-vibration coupling: From light to superheavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinova, E. V.; Afanasjev, A. V.

    2011-07-15

    The impact of particle-vibration coupling and polarization effects due to deformation and time-odd mean fields on single-particle spectra is studied systematically in doubly magic nuclei from low-mass {sup 56}Ni up to superheavy ones. Particle-vibration coupling is treated fully self-consistently within the framework of the relativistic particle-vibration coupling model. Polarization effects due to deformation and time-odd mean field induced by odd particle are computed within covariant density functional theory. It has been found that among these contributions the coupling to vibrations makes a major impact on the single-particle structure. The impact of particle-vibration coupling and polarization effects on calculated single-particle spectra, the size of the shell gaps, the spin-orbit splittings and the energy splittings in pseudospin doublets is discussed in detail; these physical observables are compared with experiment. Particle-vibration coupling has to be taken into account when model calculations are compared with experiment since this coupling is responsible for observed fragmentation of experimental levels; experimental spectroscopic factors are reasonably well described in model calculations.

  4. Plasma transport theory spanning weak to strong coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Daligault, Jérôme; Baalrud, Scott D.

    2015-06-29

    We describe some of the most striking characteristics of particle transport in strongly coupled plasmas across a wide range of Coulomb coupling strength. We then discuss the effective potential theory, which is an approximation that was recently developed to extend conventional weakly coupled plasma transport theory into the strongly coupled regime in a manner that is practical to evaluate efficiently.

  5. General theory of Taylor dispersion phenomena. Part 3. Surface transport

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, L.H.; Brenner, H.

    1982-01-01

    An asymptotic theory of Brownian tracer particle transport phenomena within a bulk fluid, as augmented by surface transport, is presented in the context of generalized Taylor dispersion theory. The analysis expands upon prior work, which was limited to transport wholly within a continuous phase, so as to now include surface adsorption, diffusion, and convection of the tracer along a continuous surface bounding the continuous fluid phase.

  6. Stueckelberg's Covariant Perturbation Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacki, Jan

    After a period of intensive research in molecular physics, Stueckelberg, back in Switzerland, became interested in 1934 in quantum electrodynamics.1 He was then Privatdozent at the University of Zurich with Professor Gregor Wentzel. QED was at that time a prominent topic and many among the most renowned physicists were contributing.2 In a letter to the president of the Schulrat of E. T. H. in Zürich (8 March 1934), W. Pauli writes: Dr. Stuckelberg has stated his desire to get deeper involved with QED and agrees with the nomination of Mr. Weisskopf.3

  7. Transportation optimization with fuzzy trapezoidal numbers based on possibility theory.

    PubMed

    He, Dayi; Li, Ran; Huang, Qi; Lei, Ping

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a parametric method is introduced to solve fuzzy transportation problem. Considering that parameters of transportation problem have uncertainties, this paper develops a generalized fuzzy transportation problem with fuzzy supply, demand and cost. For simplicity, these parameters are assumed to be fuzzy trapezoidal numbers. Based on possibility theory and consistent with decision-makers' subjectiveness and practical requirements, the fuzzy transportation problem is transformed to a crisp linear transportation problem by defuzzifying fuzzy constraints and objectives with application of fractile and modality approach. Finally, a numerical example is provided to exemplify the application of fuzzy transportation programming and to verify the validity of the proposed methods.

  8. Wind dispersion of carbon dioxide leaking from underground sequestration, and outlier detection in eddy covariance data using extreme value theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Katherine Tracy

    The first part of this thesis describes how a relatively simple model can be used to predict the dispersion by turbulent winds of CO 2 leaking from underground sequestration. It is often a good approximation to model both the wind velocity and the turbulent diffusivity by power-law functions of height, which allows an analytical solution to the advection-diffusion equation. This solution is compared to a coupled simulation of CO2 leakage which included both aboveground and belowground layers in the same code. Since the time scale is much faster in the air than underground, the two domains were not coupled in practice. Thus it is more efficient to use the analytic solution in the aboveground domain, and it also provides more realistic boundary conditions. The second part of the thesis concerns measurements of the flux of trace gases between ecosystems and the atmosphere by eddy covariance. There is a quality control issue with "spikes" from the sonic anemometer; since these spikes occur together in both wind and temperature channels, they can introduce significant errors in the measurement of heat flux. Common methods of spike detection rely on excluding points which exceed some number of standard deviations from the mean. However, the probability of large deviations in valid data is not known in advance, and varies between records. A new algorithm is developed using extreme value theory to identify points which are very unlikely to be generated by the same process as the rest of the data. The algorithm starts from the center of the distribution and moves up toward the maximum, using the "spacing theorem" to predict the expected spacings between successively ranked points, until a gap is found whose probability is below the desired significance level; all points beyond the gap are classified as outliers. The expected gap is predicted based only on points which have already been judged valid, thus avoiding any need for repeated passes after rejecting points. The

  9. Quasiclassical theory of charge transport in disordered interacting electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, P.; Raimondi, R.

    2003-10-01

    We consider the corrections to the Boltzmann theory of electrical transport arising from the Coulomb interaction in disordered conductors. In this article the theory is formulated in terms of quasiclassical Green's functions. We demonstrate that the formalism is equivalent to the conventional diagrammatic technique by deriving the well-known Altshuler-Aronov corrections to the conductivity. Compared to the conventional approach, the quasiclassical theory has the advantage of being closer to the Boltzmann theory, and also allows description of interaction effects in the transport across interfaces, as well as non-equilibrium phenomena in the same theoretical framework. As an example, by applying the Zaitsev boundary conditions which were originally developed for superconductors, we obtain the P(E)-theory of the Coulomb blockade in tunnel junctions. Furthermore we summarize recent results obtained for the non-equilibrium transport in thin films, wires and fully coherent conductors.

  10. Theory of Transport for Interacting Many-Body Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-15

    A novel approach to quantum transport in coupled electron-phonon systems has been developed. Application to the polaron problem, two-level systems...This model has been successfully applied to ternary alloys, as well as amorphous semiconductor quantum wells. Quantum transport theory, dissipation, electronic density of states.

  11. Unified theory of ripple transport in stellarators

    SciTech Connect

    Beidler, C.D.; Hitchon, W.N.G.; van Rij, W.I.; Hirshman, S.P.; Shohet, J.L.

    1987-04-27

    The distribution function for ripple-trapped particles has been found in a series form valid for all low collision frequencies, for standard and transport-optimized stellarators. The diffusion coefficient obtained with this distribution function shows excellent agreement with the results of Monte Carlo and Fokker-Planck computer codes, in the cases studied.

  12. Modeling of active transmembrane transport in a mixture theory framework.

    PubMed

    Ateshian, Gerard A; Morrison, Barclay; Hung, Clark T

    2010-05-01

    This study formulates governing equations for active transport across semi-permeable membranes within the framework of the theory of mixtures. In mixture theory, which models the interactions of any number of fluid and solid constituents, a supply term appears in the conservation of linear momentum to describe momentum exchanges among the constituents. In past applications, this momentum supply was used to model frictional interactions only, thereby describing passive transport processes. In this study, it is shown that active transport processes, which impart momentum to solutes or solvent, may also be incorporated in this term. By projecting the equation of conservation of linear momentum along the normal to the membrane, a jump condition is formulated for the mechano-electrochemical potential of fluid constituents which is generally applicable to nonequilibrium processes involving active transport. The resulting relations are simple and easy to use, and address an important need in the membrane transport literature.

  13. A Covariant Generalization of the Real-Time Green's Functions Method in the Theory of Kinetic Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolyansky, S. A.; Prozorkevich, A. V.; Maino, G.; Mashnik, S. G.

    1999-11-01

    A generalized quantum relativistic kinetic equation (RKE) of the Kadanoff-Baym type is obtained on the basis of the Heisenberg equations of motion where the time evolution and space translation are separated from each other by means of the covariant method. The same approach is used also for a covariant modification of the real-time Green's functions method based on the Wigner representation. The suggested approach does not contain arbitrariness' elements and uncertainties which often arise from derivation of RKE on the basis of the motion equations of the Kadanoff-Baym type for the correlation functions in the case of systems with inner degrees of freedom. Possibilities of the proposed method are demonstrated by examples of derivation of RKE of the Vlasov type and collision integrals of the Boltzmann- Uehling-Uhlenbeck (BUU) type in the frame of the σω-version of quantum hadrodynamics, for the simplest case of spin saturated nuclear matter without antinuclear component. Here, the quasiparticle approximation in a covariant performance is used. A generalization of the method for the description of strong non-equilibrium states based on the non-equilibrium statistical operator is then proposed as well.

  14. MSTS - Multiphase Subsurface Transport Simulator theory manual

    SciTech Connect

    White, M.D.; Nichols, W.E.

    1993-05-01

    The US Department of Energy, through the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Office, has designated the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada for detailed study as the candidate US geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Site characterization will determine the suitability of the Yucca Mountain site for the potential waste repository. If the site is determined suitable, subsequent studies and characterization will be conducted to obtain authorization from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to construct the potential waste repository. A principal component of the characterization and licensing processes involves numerically predicting the thermal and hydrologic response of the subsurface environment of the Yucca Mountain site to the potential repository over a 10,000-year period. The thermal and hydrologic response of the subsurface environment to the repository is anticipated to include complex processes of countercurrent vapor and liquid migration, multiple-phase heat transfer, multiple-phase transport, and geochemical reactions. Numerical simulators based on mathematical descriptions of these subsurface phenomena are required to make numerical predictions of the thermal and hydrologic response of the Yucca Mountain subsurface environment The engineering simulator called the Multiphase Subsurface Transport Simulator (MSTS) was developed at the request of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Office to produce numerical predictions of subsurface flow and transport phenomena at the potential Yucca Mountain site. This document delineates the design architecture and describes the specific computational algorithms that compose MSTS. Details for using MSTS and sample problems are given in the {open_quotes}User`s Guide and Reference{close_quotes} companion document.

  15. Circuit theory of transport in ferromagnet - normal metal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brataas, Arne

    2001-03-01

    Electrons have spin as well as charge. At low-temperatures the spin relaxation time can be much longer than other time scales. Non-equilibrium spins may therefore affect the transport properties of small ferromagnet-normal metal systems. Unlike the scalar charge, the spin has a direction. The electron transport properties can be manipulated by the magnetization direction of the ferromagnets. We will demonstrate how the transport through hybrid ferromagnet-normal metal devices can be understood in terms of a circuit theory in the spirit of the conventional analysis of conventional electronic circuits. This spin-circuit theory is based on elements like spin-resistance and spin-capacitance and simplifies the understanding of transport through complicated ferromagnet-normal metal systems.

  16. Density Functional Theory with Dissipation: Transport through Single Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kieron Burke

    2012-04-30

    A huge amount of fundamental research was performed on this grant. Most of it focussed on fundamental issues of electronic structure calculations of transport through single molecules, using density functional theory. Achievements were: (1) First density functional theory with dissipation; (2) Pseudopotential plane wave calculations with master equation; (3) Weak bias limit; (4) Long-chain conductance; and (5) Self-interaction effects in tunneling.

  17. An integral equation arising in two group neutron transport theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassell, J. S.; Williams, M. M. R.

    2003-07-01

    An integral equation describing the fuel distribution necessary to maintain a flat flux in a nuclear reactor in two group transport theory is reduced to the solution of a singular integral equation. The formalism developed enables the physical aspects of the problem to be better understood and its relationship with the corresponding diffusion theory model is highlighted. The integral equation is solved by reducing it to a non-singular Fredholm equation which is then evaluated numerically.

  18. Revisiting Feynman's ratchet with thermoelectric transport theory.

    PubMed

    Apertet, Y; Ouerdane, H; Goupil, C; Lecoeur, Ph

    2014-07-01

    We show how the formalism used for thermoelectric transport may be adapted to Smoluchowski's seminal thought experiment, also known as Feynman's ratchet and pawl system. Our analysis rests on the notion of useful flux, which for a thermoelectric system is the electrical current and for Feynman's ratchet is the effective jump frequency. Our approach yields original insight into the derivation and analysis of the system's properties. In particular we define an entropy per tooth in analogy with the entropy per carrier or Seebeck coefficient, and we derive the analog to Kelvin's second relation for Feynman's ratchet. Owing to the formal similarity between the heat fluxes balance equations for a thermoelectric generator (TEG) and those for Feynman's ratchet, we introduce a distribution parameter γ that quantifies the amount of heat that flows through the cold and hot sides of both heat engines. While it is well established that γ = 1/2 for a TEG, it is equal to 1 for Feynman's ratchet. This implies that no heat may be rejected in the cold reservoir for the latter case. Further, the analysis of the efficiency at maximum power shows that the so-called Feynman efficiency corresponds to that of an exoreversible engine, with γ = 1. Then, turning to the nonlinear regime, we generalize the approach based on the convection picture and introduce two different types of resistance to distinguish the dynamical behavior of the considered system from its ability to dissipate energy. We finally put forth the strong similarity between the original Feynman ratchet and a mesoscopic thermoelectric generator with a single conducting channel.

  19. Faddeev-Popov-ghost propagators for Yang-Mills theories and perturbative quantum gravity in the covariant gauge in de Sitter spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Faizal, Mir; Higuchi, Atsushi

    2008-09-15

    The propagators of the Faddeev-Popov (FP) ghosts for Yang-Mills theories and perturbative quantum gravity in the covariant gauge are infrared (IR) divergent in de Sitter spacetime. We point out, however, that the modes responsible for these divergences will not contribute to loop diagrams in computations of time-ordered products in either Yang-Mills theories or perturbative quantum gravity. Therefore, we propose that the IR-divergent FP-ghost propagator should be regularized by a small mass term that is sent to zero in the end of any perturbative calculations. This proposal is equivalent to using the effective FP-ghost propagators, which we present in an explicit form, obtained by removing the modes responsible for the IR divergences. We also make some comments on the corresponding propagators in anti-de Sitter spacetime.

  20. Linear kinetic theory and particle transport in stochastic mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Pomraning, G.C.

    1995-12-31

    We consider the formulation of linear transport and kinetic theory describing energy and particle flow in a random mixture of two or more immiscible materials. Following an introduction, we summarize early and fundamental work in this area, and we conclude with a brief discussion of recent results.

  1. Effective Potential Theory for Transport Coefficients across Coupling Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baalrud, Scott D.

    2013-10-01

    Plasmas in several modern experiments, including dense, ultracold and dusty plasmas, can reach strong coupling where the Coulomb potential energy of interacting particles exceeds their average kinetic energy. Understanding how the many-body physics of correlations affects plasma transport properties in this regime is interesting both from a basic physics standpoint and as a practical matter. Transport coefficients are essential input required for accurate hydrodynamic modeling of these systems, which can include weakly coupled and strongly coupled components simultaneously. We discuss a physically motivated extension of plasma transport theory that is computationally efficient and versatile enough that it can be applied to essentially any transport property. Like conventional plasma theories, ours is based on a binary collision picture, but where particles interact via an effective potential that accounts for average affects of the intervening medium. This includes both correlations and screening. Hypernetted chain (HNC) theory, which is a well-established approximation for the pair correlation function, is used to derive the effective potential. The theory is shown to compare well with ion velocity relaxation in an ultracold plasma experiment, as well as classical molecular dynamics simulations of temperature relaxation in electron-ion plasmas, and diffusion in both one-component plasmas and ionic mixtures. This research was conducted in collaboration with Jerome Daligault and was supported by a Richard P. Feynman Postdoctoral Fellowship and the LDRD program at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  2. THE LARGE ASPECT RATIO LIMIT OF NEOCLASSICAL TRANSPORT THEORY

    SciTech Connect

    WONG,SK; CHAN,VS

    2002-11-01

    OAK B202 THE LARGE ASPECT RATIO LIMIT OF NEOCLASSICAL TRANSPORT THEORY. This article presents a comprehensive description of neoclassical transport theory in the banana regime for large aspect ratio flux surfaces of arbitrary shapes. The method of matched asymptotic expansions is used to obtain analytical solutions for plasma distribution functions and to compute transport coefficients. The method provides justification for retaining only the part of the Fokker-Planck operator that involves the second derivative with respect to the cosine of the pitch angle for the trapped and barely circulating particles. It leads to a simple equation for the freely circulating particles with boundary conditions that embody a discontinuity separating particles moving in opposite directions. Corrections to the transport coefficients are obtained by generalizing an existing boundary layer analysis. The system of moment and field equations is consistently taken in the cylinder limit, which facilitates discussion of the treatment of dynamical constraints. it is shown that the nonlocal nature of Ohm's law in neoclassical theory renders the mathematical problem of plasma transport with changing flux surfaces nonstandard.

  3. Kinetic theory of nonlinear transport phenomena in complex plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, S. K.; Sodha, M. S.

    2013-03-15

    In contrast to the prevalent use of the phenomenological theory of transport phenomena, a number of transport properties of complex plasmas have been evaluated by using appropriate expressions, available from the kinetic theory, which are based on Boltzmann's transfer equation; in particular, the energy dependence of the electron collision frequency has been taken into account. Following the recent trend, the number and energy balance of all the constituents of the complex plasma and the charge balance on the particles is accounted for; the Ohmic loss has also been included in the energy balance of the electrons. The charging kinetics for the complex plasma comprising of uniformly dispersed dust particles, characterized by (i) uniform size and (ii) the Mathis, Rumpl, and Nordsieck power law of size distribution has been developed. Using appropriate expressions for the transport parameters based on the kinetic theory, the system of equations has been solved to investigate the parametric dependence of the complex plasma transport properties on the applied electric field and other plasma parameters; the results are graphically illustrated.

  4. Deriving Kubelka-Munk theory from radiative transport.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Christopher; Kim, Arnold D

    2014-03-01

    We derive Kubelka-Munk (KM) theory systematically from the radiative transport equation (RTE) by analyzing the system of equations resulting from applying the double spherical harmonics method of order one and transforming that system into one governing the positive- and negative-going fluxes. Through this derivation, we establish the theoretical basis of KM theory, identify all parameters, and determine its range of validity. Moreover, we are able to generalize KM theory to take into account general boundary sources and nonhomogeneous terms, for example. The generalized Kubelka-Munk (gKM) equations are also much more accurate at approximating the solution of the RTE. We validate this theory through comparison with numerical solutions of the RTE.

  5. Current Issues in Electron and Positron Transport Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robson, Robert

    2007-10-01

    In this paper we review the current status of transport theory for low energy electrons or positrons in gases, in the context of both kinetic theory and fluid modelling. In particular, we focus on the following issues: (i) Muliterm vs two-term representation of the velocity distribution function in solution of Boltzmann's equation; (ii) the effect of non-conservative collisions (attachment, ionization, positron annihilation) on transport properties; (iii) the enduring electron- hydrogen vibrational cross section controversy and possible implications for the Boltzmann equation itself; (iv) closure of the fluid equations and the heat flux ansatz; and (v) correct use of swarm transport coefficients in fluid modelling of low temperature plasmas. Both hydrodynamic and non-hydrodynamic examples will be given, with attention focussed on the Franck-Hertz experiment, particularly the ``window'' of fields in which oscillations of transport properties are produced, and the way in which electric and magnetic fields combine to affect transport properties. In collaboration with co-authors Z. LJ. Petrovi'c, Institute of Physics Belgrade, and R.D. White, James Cook University.

  6. Chiral symmetry and π-π scattering in the Covariant Spectator Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Biernat, Elmar P.; Peña, M. T.; Ribeiro, J. E.; Stadler, Alfred; Gross, Franz

    2014-11-14

    The π-π scattering amplitude calculated with a model for the quark-antiquark interaction in the framework of the Covariant Spectator Theory (CST) is shown to satisfy the Adler zero constraint imposed by chiral symmetry. The CST formalism is established in Minkowski space and our calculations are performed in momentum space. We prove that the axial-vector Ward-Takahashi identity is satisfied by our model. Then we show that, similarly to what happens within the Bethe-Salpeter formalism, application of the axial-vector Ward Takahashi identity to the CST π-π scattering amplitude allows us to sum the intermediate quark-quark interactions to all orders. Thus, the Adler self-consistency zero for π-π scattering in the chiral limit emerges as the result for this sum.

  7. Analysis of the theory of high energy ion transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    Procedures for the approximation of the transport of high-energy ions are discussed on the basis of available data on ion nuclear reactions. A straightahead approximation appears appropriate for space applications. The assumption that the secondary-ion-fragment velocity is equal to that of the fragmenting nucleus is inferior to straightahead theory but is of sufficient accuracy if the primary ions display a broad energy spectrum. An iterative scheme for the solution of the inhomogenous integral transport equations holds promise for practical calculation. A model calculation shows that multiple charged ion fragments penetrate to greater depths in comparison with the free path of a primary heavy ion.

  8. Hydrodynamic transport functions from quantum kinetic field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calzetta, E. A.; Hu, B. L.; Ramsey, S. A.

    2000-06-01

    Starting from the quantum kinetic field theory [E. Calzetta and B. L. Hu, Phys. Rev. D 37, 2878 (1988)] constructed from the closed-time-path (CTP), two-particle-irreducible (2PI) effective action we show how to compute from first principles the shear and bulk viscosity functions in the hydrodynamic-thermodynamic regime. For a real scalar field with λΦ4 self-interaction we need to include four-loop graphs in the equation of motion. This work provides a microscopic field-theoretical basis to the ``effective kinetic theory'' proposed by Jeon and Yaffe [S. Jeon and L. G. Yaffe, Phys. Rev. D 53, 5799 (1996)], while our result for the bulk viscosity reproduces their expression derived from linear-response theory and the imaginary-time formalism of thermal field theory. Though unavoidably involved in calculations of this sort, we feel that the approach using fundamental quantum kinetic field theory is conceptually clearer and methodically simpler than the effective kinetic theory approach, as the success of the latter requires a clever rendition of diagrammatic resummations which is neither straightforward nor fail-safe. Moreover, the method based on the CTP-2PI effective action illustrated here for a scalar field can be formulated entirely in terms of functional integral quantization, which makes it an appealing method for a first-principles calculation of transport functions of a thermal non-Abelian gauge theory, e.g., QCD quark-gluon plasma produced from heavy ion collisions.

  9. Microscopic theory and quantum simulation of atomic heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcolongo, Aris; Umari, Paolo; Baroni, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Quantum simulation methods based on electronic-structure theory are deemed unfit to cope with atomic heat transport within the Green-Kubo formalism, because quantum-mechanical energy densities and currents are inherently ill-defined at the atomic scale. We show that, although this difficulty would also affect classical simulations, thermal conductivity is indeed insensitive to such ill-definedness by virtue of a kind of gauge invariance resulting from energy extensivity and conservation. On the basis of these findings, we derive an expression for the adiabatic energy flux from density-functional theory, which allows heat transport to be simulated using ab initio equilibrium molecular dynamics. Our methodology is demonstrated by comparing its predictions to those of classical equilibrium and ab initio non-equilibrium (Müller-Plathe) simulations for a liquid-argon model, and by applying it to heavy water at ambient conditions.

  10. Thermal Transport in Crystals as a Kinetic Theory of Relaxons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cepellotti, Andrea; Marzari, Nicola

    2016-10-01

    Thermal conductivity in dielectric crystals is the result of the relaxation of lattice vibrations described by the phonon Boltzmann transport equation. Remarkably, an exact microscopic definition of the heat carriers and their relaxation times is still missing: Phonons, typically regarded as the relevant excitations for thermal transport, cannot be identified as the heat carriers when most scattering events conserve momentum and do not dissipate heat flux. This is the case for two-dimensional or layered materials at room temperature, or three-dimensional crystals at cryogenic temperatures. In this work, we show that the eigenvectors of the scattering matrix in the Boltzmann equation define collective phonon excitations, which are termed here "relaxons". These excitations have well-defined relaxation times, directly related to heat-flux dissipation, and they provide an exact description of thermal transport as a kinetic theory of the relaxon gas. We show why Matthiessen's rule is violated, and we construct a procedure for obtaining the mean free paths and relaxation times of the relaxons. These considerations are general and would also apply to other semiclassical transport models, such as the electronic Boltzmann equation. For heat transport, they remain relevant even in conventional crystals like silicon, but they are of the utmost importance in the case of two-dimensional materials, where they can revise, by several orders of magnitude, the relevant time and length scales for thermal transport in the hydrodynamic regime.

  11. Thermodynamic transport theory of spin waves in ferromagnetic insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basso, Vittorio; Ferraro, Elena; Piazzi, Marco

    2016-10-01

    We use the Boltzmann transport theory in the relaxation time approximation to describe the thermal transport of spin waves in a ferromagnet. By treating spin waves as magnon excitations we are able to compute analytically and numerically the coefficients of the constitutive thermomagnetic transport equations. As a main result, we find that the absolute thermomagnetic power coefficient ɛM, relating the gradient of the potential of the magnetization current and the gradient of the temperature, in the limit of low temperature and low field, is a constant ɛM=-0.6419 kB/μB . The theory correctly describes the low-temperature and magnetic-field dependencies of spin Seebeck experiments. Furthermore, the theory predicts that in the limit of very low temperatures the spin Peltier coefficient ΠM, relating the heat and the magnetization currents, tends to a finite value which depends on the amplitude of the magnetic field. This indicates the possibility to exploit the spin Peltier effect as an efficient cooling mechanism in cryogenics.

  12. Generalized perturbation theory using two-dimensional, discrete ordinates transport theory

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, R.L.

    1980-06-01

    Perturbation theory for changes in linear and bilinear functionals of the forward and adjoint fluxes in a critical reactor has been implemented using two-dimensional discrete ordinates transport theory. The computer program DOT IV was modified to calculate the generalized functions GAMMA and GAMMA*. Demonstration calculations were performed for changes in a reaction-rate ratio and a reactivity worth caused by system perturbations. The perturbation theory predictions agreed with direct calculations to within about 2%. A method has been developed for calculating higher lambda eigenvalues and eigenfunctions using techniques similar to those developed for generalized functions. Demonstration calculations have been performed to obtain these eigenfunctions.

  13. Upper and lower covariance bounds for perturbed linear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, J.-H.; Skelton, R. E.; Zhu, G.

    1990-01-01

    Both upper and lower bounds are established for state covariance matrices under parameter perturbations of the plant. The motivation for this study lies in the fact that many robustness properties of linear systems are given explicitly in terms of the state covariance matrix. Moreover, there exists a theory for control by covariance assignment. The results provide robustness properties of these covariance controllers.

  14. Deriving covariant holographic entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xi; Lewkowycz, Aitor; Rangamani, Mukund

    2016-11-01

    We provide a gravitational argument in favour of the covariant holographic entanglement entropy proposal. In general time-dependent states, the proposal asserts that the entanglement entropy of a region in the boundary field theory is given by a quarter of the area of a bulk extremal surface in Planck units. The main element of our discussion is an implementation of an appropriate Schwinger-Keldysh contour to obtain the reduced density matrix (and its powers) of a given region, as is relevant for the replica construction. We map this contour into the bulk gravitational theory, and argue that the saddle point solutions of these replica geometries lead to a consistent prescription for computing the field theory Rényi entropies. In the limiting case where the replica index is taken to unity, a local analysis suffices to show that these saddles lead to the extremal surfaces of interest. We also comment on various properties of holographic entanglement that follow from this construction.

  15. STOMP, Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases, theory guide

    SciTech Connect

    White, M.D.; Oostrom, M.

    1996-10-01

    This guide describes the simulator`s governing equations, constitutive functions and numerical solution algorithms of the STOMP (Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases) simulator, a scientific tool for analyzing multiple phase subsurface flow and transport. The STOMP simulator`s fundamental purpose is to produce numerical predictions of thermal and hydrologic flow and transport phenomena in variably saturated subsurface environments, which are contaminated with volatile or nonvolatile organic compounds. Auxiliary applications include numerical predictions of solute transport processes including radioactive chain decay processes. In writing these guides for the STOMP simulator, the authors have assumed that the reader comprehends concepts and theories associated with multiple-phase hydrology, heat transfer, thermodynamics, radioactive chain decay, and nonhysteretic relative permeability, saturation-capillary pressure constitutive functions. The authors further assume that the reader is familiar with the computing environment on which they plan to compile and execute the STOMP simulator. The STOMP simulator requires an ANSI FORTRAN 77 compiler to generate an executable code. The memory requirements for executing the simulator are dependent on the complexity of physical system to be modeled and the size and dimensionality of the computational domain. Likewise execution speed depends on the problem complexity, size and dimensionality of the computational domain, and computer performance. One-dimensional problems of moderate complexity can be solved on conventional desktop computers, but multidimensional problems involving complex flow and transport phenomena typically require the power and memory capabilities of workstation or mainframe type computer systems.

  16. Semiclassical Transport Theory For Quantum Barrier-Conductor Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinkkonen, Juha A. T.

    1988-08-01

    A simple semiclassical treatment of the vertical transport in barrier-conductor structures is presented. The distribution function is constructed by fitting the solutions of the Boltzmann equation for the conductor parts with the barrier reflection and transmission probabilities. This semiclassical theory describes multiple reflection in a random phase approximation leaving out the fine structure associated with the quantum interference. As an application we analyze single and double barrier structures in detail. We study the high frequency behaviour of various diode structures. For the hot electron transistors (HET) we derive simple formulas for the base transport factor, transconductance and other elements of the ac-small signal equivalent circuit. The transistor model is also valid for the resonant hot electron transistor (RHET).

  17. Free Volume Theory of Hydrocarbon Mixture Transport in Nanoporous Materials.

    PubMed

    Obliger, Amaël; Pellenq, Roland; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Coasne, Benoit

    2016-10-06

    Despite recent focus on shale gas, hydrocarbon recovery from the ultraconfining and disordered porosity of organic matter in shales (kerogen) remains poorly understood. Key aspects such as the breakdown of hydrodynamics at the nanoscale and strong adsorption effects lead to unexplained non-Darcy behaviors. Here, molecular dynamics and statistical mechanics are used to elucidate hydrocarbon mixture transport through a realistic molecular model of kerogen [ Bousige, C.; et al. Nat. Mater. 2016 , 15 , 576 ]. Owing to strong adsorption effects, velocity cross-correlations between the mixture components and between molecules of the same species are shown to be negligible. This allows estimation of each component permeance from its self-diffusivity, which can be obtained from single-component data. These permeances are found to scale with the reciprocal of the alkane length and decrease with the number of adsorbed molecules following a simple free volume theory, therefore allowing mixture transport prediction as a function of the amount of trapped fluid.

  18. Does hindered transport theory apply to desalination membranes?

    PubMed

    Dražević, Emil; Košutić, Krešimir; Kolev, Vesselin; Freger, Viatcheslav

    2014-10-07

    As reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration polyamide membranes become increasingly used for water purification, prediction of pollutant transport is required for membrane development and process engineering. Many popular models use hindered transport theory (HTT), which considers a spherical solute moving through an array of fluid-filled rigid cylindrical pores. Experiments and molecular dynamic simulations, however, reveal that polyamide membranes have a distinctly different structure of a "molecular sponge", a network of randomly connected voids widely distributed in size. In view of this disagreement, this study critically examined the validity of HTT by directly measuring diffusivities of several alcohols within a polyamide film of commercial RO membrane using attenuated total reflection-FTIR. It is found that measured diffusivities deviate from HTT predictions by as much as 2-3 orders of magnitude. This result indicates that HTT does not adequately describe solute transport in desalination membranes. As a more adequate alternative, the concept of random resistor networks is suggested, with resistances described by models of activated transport in "soft" polymers without a sharp size cutoff and with a proper address of solute partitioning.

  19. Gyrokinetic theory and simulation of angular momentum transport

    SciTech Connect

    Waltz, R. E.; Staebler, G. M.; Candy, J.; Hinton, F. L.

    2007-12-15

    A gyrokinetic theory of turbulent toroidal angular momentum transport as well as modifications to neoclassical poloidal rotation from turbulence is formulated starting from the fundamental six-dimensional kinetic equation. The gyro-Bohm scaled transport is evaluated from toroidal delta-f gyrokinetic simulations using the GYRO code [Candy and Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)]. The simulations recover two pinch mechanisms in the radial transport of toroidal angular momentum: The slab geometry ExB shear pinch [Dominguez and Staebler, Phys. Fluids B 5, 387 (1993)] and the toroidal geometry 'Coriolis' pinch [Peeters, Angioni, and Strintzi, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 265003 (2007)]. The pinches allow the steady state null stress (or angular momentum transport flow) condition required to understand intrinsic (or spontaneous) toroidal rotation in heated tokamak without an internal source of torque [Staebler, Kinsey, and Waltz, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 46, 221 (2001)]. A predicted turbulent shift in the neoclassical poloidal rotation [Staebler, Phys. Plasmas 11, 1064 (2004)] appears to be small at the finite relative gyroradius (rho-star) of current experiments.

  20. Nonperturbative aspects of Euclidean Yang-Mills theories in linear covariant gauges: Nielsen identities and a BRST-invariant two-point correlation function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capri, M. A. L.; Dudal, D.; Pereira, A. D.; Fiorentini, D.; Guimaraes, M. S.; Mintz, B. W.; Palhares, L. F.; Sorella, S. P.

    2017-02-01

    In order to construct a gauge-invariant two-point function in a Yang-Mills theory, we propose the use of the all-order gauge-invariant transverse configurations Ah . Such configurations can be obtained through the minimization of the functional Amin2 along the gauge orbit within the BRST-invariant formulation of the Gribov-Zwanziger framework recently put forward in [1,2] for the class of the linear covariant gauges. This correlator turns out to provide a characterization of nonperturbative aspects of the theory in a BRST-invariant and gauge-parameter-independent way. In particular, it turns out that the poles of ⟨Aμh(k )Aνh(-k )⟩ are the same as those of the transverse part of the gluon propagator, which are also formally shown to be independent of the gauge parameter α entering the gauge condition through the Nielsen identities. The latter follow from the new exact BRST-invariant formulation introduced before. Moreover, the correlator ⟨Aμh(k )Aνh(-k )⟩ enables us to attach a BRST-invariant meaning to the possible positivity violation of the corresponding temporal Schwinger correlator, giving thus for the first time a consistent, gauge parameter independent, setup to adopt the positivity violation of ⟨Aμh(k )Aνh(-k )⟩ as a signature for gluon confinement. Finally, in the context of gauge theories supplemented with a fundamental Higgs field, we use ⟨Aμh(k )Aνh(-k )⟩ to probe the pole structure of the massive gauge boson in a gauge-invariant fashion.

  1. Covariance Models for Hydrological Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hristopulos, Dionissios

    2014-05-01

    a new class of generalized Gibbs random fields, IEEE Transactions on Information Theory, 53(12), 4667 - 4679. [2] D. T. Hristopulos and M. Zukovic, 2011. Relationships between correlation lengths and integral scales for covariance models with more than two parameters, Stochastic Environmental Research and Risk Assessment, 25(1), 11-19. [3] D. T. Hristopulos, 2014. Radial Covariance Functions Motivated by Spatial Random Field Models with Local Interactions, arXiv:1401.2823 [math.ST] .

  2. A quark transport theory to describe nucleon-nucleon collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalmbach, U.; Vetter, T.; Biró, T. S.; Mosel, U.

    1993-11-01

    On the basis of the Friedberg-Lee model we formulate a semiclassical transport theory to describe the phase-space evolution of nucleon-nucleon collisions on the quark level. The time evolution is given by a Vlasov equation for the quark phase-space distribution and a Klein-Gordon equation for the mean-field describing the nucleon as a soliton bag. The Vlasov equation is solved numerically using an extended test-particle method. We test the confinement mechanism and mean-field effects in (1 + 1)-dimensional simulations.

  3. Theory for plasma confinement and momentum transport in snakes

    SciTech Connect

    Shaing, K.C.

    2005-07-15

    A theory for plasma confinement in snakes is developed based on the consequences of the momentum transport resulting from the symmetry-breaking-induced plasma viscosity in the vicinity of an m=1 magnetic island. Here, m is the poloidal mode number of the island. The symmetry-breaking mechanism is the distortion of the magnetic surface associated with the magnetic island embedded in the equilibrium magnetic field. It is demonstrated that a combination of the turbulence suppression and the effects of the orbit squeezing could be responsible for the observed improved plasma confinement in snakes.

  4. Time-dependent density functional theory for quantum transport.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiao; Chen, GuanHua; Mo, Yan; Koo, SiuKong; Tian, Heng; Yam, ChiYung; Yan, YiJing

    2010-09-21

    Based on our earlier works [X. Zheng et al., Phys. Rev. B 75, 195127 (2007); J. S. Jin et al., J. Chem. Phys. 128, 234703 (2008)], we propose a rigorous and numerically convenient approach to simulate time-dependent quantum transport from first-principles. The proposed approach combines time-dependent density functional theory with quantum dissipation theory, and results in a useful tool for studying transient dynamics of electronic systems. Within the proposed exact theoretical framework, we construct a number of practical schemes for simulating realistic systems such as nanoscopic electronic devices. Computational cost of each scheme is analyzed, with the expected level of accuracy discussed. As a demonstration, a simulation based on the adiabatic wide-band limit approximation scheme is carried out to characterize the transient current response of a carbon nanotube based electronic device under time-dependent external voltages.

  5. Stability, ghost, and strong coupling in nonrelativistic general covariant theory of gravity with λ≠1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yongqing; Wang, Anzhong

    2011-05-01

    In this paper, we investigate three important issues: stability, ghost, and strong coupling, in the Horava-Melby-Thompson setup of the Horava-Lifshitz theory with λ≠1, generalized recently by da Silva. We first develop the general linear scalar perturbations of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) universe with arbitrary spatial curvature and find that an immediate by-product of the setup is that, in all the inflationary models described by a scalar field, the FRW universe is necessarily flat. Applying them to the case of the Minkowski background, we find that it is stable, and, similar to the case λ=1, the spin-0 graviton is eliminated. The vector perturbations vanish identically in the Minkowski background. Thus, similar to general relativity, a free gravitational field in this setup is completely described by a spin-2 massless graviton, even with λ≠1. We also study the ghost problem in the FRW background and find explicitly the ghost-free conditions. To study the strong coupling problem, we consider two different kinds of spacetimes, all with the presence of matter: one is cosmological, and the other is static. We find that the coupling becomes strong for a process with energy higher than Mpl|cψ|5/2 in the flat FRW background and Mpl|cψ|3 in a static weak gravitational field, where |cψ|≡|(1-λ)/(3λ-1)|1/2.

  6. Applications of the compensating pressure theory of water transport.

    PubMed

    Canny, M

    1998-07-01

    Some predictions of the recently proposed theory of long-distance water transport in plants (the Compensating Pressure Theory) have been verified experimentally in sunflower leaves. The xylem sap cavitates early in the day under quite small water stress, and the compensating pressure P (applied as the tissue pressure of turgid cells) pushes water into embolized vessels, refilling them during active transpiration. The water potential, as measured by the pressure chamber or psychrometer, is not a measure of the pressure in the xylem, but (as predicted by the theory) a measure of the compensating pressure P. As transpiration increases, P is increased to provide more rapid embolism repair. In many leaf petioles this increase in P is achieved by the hydrolysis of starch in the starch sheath to soluble sugars. At night P falls as starch is reformed. A hypothesis is proposed to explain these observations by pressure-driven reverse osmosis of water from the ground parenchyma of the petiole. Similar processes occur in roots and are manifested as root pressure. The theory requires a pump to transfer water from the soil into the root xylem. A mechanism is proposed by which this pump may function, in which the endodermis acts as a one-way valve and a pressure-confining barrier. Rays and xylem parenchyma of wood act like the xylem parenchyma of petioles and roots to repair embolisms in trees. The postulated root pump permits a re-appraisal of the work done by evaporation during transpiration, leading to the proposal that in tall trees there is no hydrostatic gradient to be overcome in lifting water. Some published observations are re-interpreted in terms of the theory: doubt is cast on the validity of measurements of hydraulic conductance of wood; vulnerability curves are found not to measure the cavitation threshold of water in the xylem, but the osmotic pressure of the xylem parenchyma; if measures of xylem pressure and of hydraulic conductance are both suspect, the accepted

  7. Covariate-free and Covariate-dependent Reliability.

    PubMed

    Bentler, Peter M

    2016-12-01

    Classical test theory reliability coefficients are said to be population specific. Reliability generalization, a meta-analysis method, is the main procedure for evaluating the stability of reliability coefficients across populations. A new approach is developed to evaluate the degree of invariance of reliability coefficients to population characteristics. Factor or common variance of a reliability measure is partitioned into parts that are, and are not, influenced by control variables, resulting in a partition of reliability into a covariate-dependent and a covariate-free part. The approach can be implemented in a single sample and can be applied to a variety of reliability coefficients.

  8. Yttrium ENDF/B-VII Data from Theory and LANSCE/GEANIE Measurements and Covariances Estimated using Bayesian and Monte-Carlo Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, M.B. Kawano, T.; Talou, P.; Bauge, E.; Hilaire, S.; Dossantos-Uzarralde, P.; Garrett, P.E.; Becker, J.A.; Nelson, R.O.

    2007-12-15

    Yttrium plays an important role as a radiochemical dosimetry detector for determining high energy 14 MeV neutron fluences, through measurement of (n,2n) activation products. The total (n,2n) cross section is known rather well from extensive activation measurements on the stable {sup 89}Y isotope, and from a previous activation measurement on the unstable {sup 88}Y ground state. However, until now the branching ratios to the ground state and excited isomers in {sup 88}Y via the {sup 89}Y (n,2n) reaction were not well known, and furthermore, uncertainty estimates were not available for these cross sections and branching ratios. This paper describes how gamma-ray transitions between states in (n,2n) and (n,n') reactions measured using the GEANIE detector at Los Alamos' LANSCE facility, together with theory predictions using the GNASH code, enable us to determine these quantities for the ENDF/B-VII evaluation. A previous measurement by Dietrich, at Livermore, provided important complementary information to the GEANIE analysis. We describe an uncertainty quantification analysis that uses the GNASH-KALMAN approach to evaluate cross sections for the {sup 89}Y (n,2n) population of the {sup 88}Y ground state and two meta-stable isomers (m1 and m2), along with their uncertainties. Our new results agree with Arthur's historic Los Alamos evaluated cross sections within a few percent below 15 MeV (with larger differences above 15 MeV). The (n,2n) cross sections to the {sup 88}Y ground state and m1, m2 isomers impact the average {sup 88}Y(n,2n){sup 87}Y cross section at leading-order; we determine this 14.1 MeV average cross section {sup 88}Y(n,2n){sup 87}Y = 1107 mb ({+-} 4%), which agrees with the value obtained from Arthur's evaluation to 0.7%. An alternative method to predict cross sections, uncertainties, and covariance data, is described that uses the European TALYS reaction modeling code and a Backward-Forward Monte-Carlo uncertainty quantification technique. This

  9. Theory of activated transport in bilayer quantum Hall systems.

    PubMed

    Roostaei, B; Mullen, K J; Fertig, H A; Simon, S H

    2008-07-25

    We analyze the transport properties of bilayer quantum Hall systems at total filling factor nu=1 in drag geometries as a function of interlayer bias, in the limit where the disorder is sufficiently strong to unbind meron-antimeron pairs, the charged topological defects of the system. We compute the typical energy barrier for these objects to cross incompressible regions within the disordered system using a Hartree-Fock approach, and show how this leads to multiple activation energies when the system is biased. We then demonstrate using a bosonic Chern-Simons theory that in drag geometries current in a single layer directly leads to forces on only two of the four types of merons, inducing dissipation only in the drive layer. Dissipation in the drag layer results from interactions among the merons, resulting in very different temperature dependences for the drag and drive layers, in qualitative agreement with experiment.

  10. Phenomenological Spin Transport Theory Driven by Anomalous Nernst Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Tomohiro

    2016-07-01

    Several experimental efforts such as material investigation and structure improvement have been made recently to find a large anomalous Nernst effect in ferromagnetic metals. Here, we develop a theory of spin transport driven by the anomalous Nernst effect in a diffusive ferromagnetic/nonmagnetic multilayer. Starting from a phenomenological formula of a spin-dependent electric current, the theoretical formulas of electric voltage and spin torque generated by the anomalous Nernst effect are derived. The magnitude of the electric voltage generated from the spin current via the inverse spin Hall effect is on the order of 0.1 µV for currently available experimental parameter values. The temperature gradient necessary to switch the magnetization is quite larger than the typical experimental value. The separation of the contributions of the Seebeck and transverse spin Seebeck effects is also discussed.

  11. Microscopic theory on charge transports of a correlated multiorbital system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakawa, Naoya

    2016-07-01

    Current vertex correction (CVC), the backflowlike correction to the current, comes from conservation laws, and the CVC due to electron correlation contains information about many-body effects. However, it has been little understood how the CVC due to electron correlation affects the charge transports of a correlated multiorbital system. To improve this situation, I studied the in-plane resistivity ρa b and the Hall coefficient in the weak-field limit RH, in addition to the magnetic properties and the electronic structure, for a t2 g-orbital Hubbard model on a square lattice in a paramagnetic state away from or near an antiferromagnetic (AF) quantum-critical point (QCP) in the fluctuation-exchange (FLEX) approximation with the CVCs arising from the self-energy (Σ ), the Maki-Thompson (MT) irreducible four-point vertex function, and the main terms of the Aslamasov-Larkin (AL) one. Then, I found three main results about the CVCs. First, the main terms of the AL CVC do not qualitatively change the results obtained in the FLEX approximation with the Σ CVC and the MT CVC. Second, ρa b and RH near the AF QCP have a high-temperature region, governed mainly by the Σ CVC, and a low-temperature region, governed mainly by the Σ CVC and the MT CVC. Third, in case away from the AF QCP, the MT CVC leads to a considerable effect on only RH at low temperatures, although RH at high temperatures and ρa b at all temperatures considered are sufficiently described by including only the Σ CVC. Those findings reveal several aspects of many-body effects on the charge transports of a correlated multiorbital system. I also achieved the qualitative agreement with several experiments of Sr2RuO4 or Sr2Ru0.975Ti0.025O4 . Moreover, I showed several better points of this theory than other theories.

  12. Density Functional Theory Calculations of Mass Transport in UO2

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, Anders D.; Dorado, Boris; Uberuaga, Blas P.; Stanek, Christopher R.

    2012-06-26

    In this talk we present results of density functional theory (DFT) calculations of U, O and fission gas diffusion in UO{sub 2}. These processes all impact nuclear fuel performance. For example, the formation and retention of fission gas bubbles induce fuel swelling, which leads to mechanical interaction with the clad thereby increasing the probability for clad breach. Alternatively, fission gas can be released from the fuel to the plenum, which increases the pressure on the clad walls and decreases the gap thermal conductivity. The evolution of fuel microstructure features is strongly coupled to diffusion of U vacancies. Since both U and fission gas transport rates vary strongly with the O stoichiometry, it is also important to understand O diffusion. In order to better understand bulk Xe behavior in UO{sub 2{+-}x} we first calculate the relevant activation energies using DFT techniques. By analyzing a combination of Xe solution thermodynamics, migration barriers and the interaction of dissolved Xe atoms with U, we demonstrate that Xe diffusion predominantly occurs via a vacancy-mediated mechanism. Since Xe transport is closely related to diffusion of U vacancies, we have also studied the activation energy for this process. In order to explain the low value of 2.4 eV found for U migration from independent damage experiments (not thermal equilibrium) the presence of vacancy clusters must be included in the analysis. Next we investigate species transport on the (111) UO{sub 2} surface, which is motivated by the formation of small voids partially filled with fission gas atoms (bubbles) in UO{sub 2} under irradiation. Surface diffusion could be the rate-limiting step for diffusion of such bubbles, which is an alternative mechanism for mass transport in these materials. As expected, the activation energy for surface diffusion is significantly lower than for bulk transport. These results are further discussed in terms of engineering-scale fission gas release models

  13. The Normal-Theory and Asymptotic Distribution-Free (ADF) Covariance Matrix of Standardized Regression Coefficients: Theoretical Extensions and Finite Sample Behavior.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jeff A; Waller, Niels G

    2015-06-01

    Yuan and Chan (Psychometrika, 76, 670-690, 2011) recently showed how to compute the covariance matrix of standardized regression coefficients from covariances. In this paper, we describe a method for computing this covariance matrix from correlations. Next, we describe an asymptotic distribution-free (ADF; Browne in British Journal of Mathematical and Statistical Psychology, 37, 62-83, 1984) method for computing the covariance matrix of standardized regression coefficients. We show that the ADF method works well with nonnormal data in moderate-to-large samples using both simulated and real-data examples. R code (R Development Core Team, 2012) is available from the authors or through the Psychometrika online repository for supplementary materials.

  14. Molecular orbital theory of ballistic electron transport through molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernzerhof, Matthias; Rocheleau, Philippe; Goyer, Francois

    2009-03-01

    Electron transport through molecules occurs, for instance, in STM imaging and in conductance measurements on molecular electronic devices (MEDs). To model these phenomena, we use a non-Hermitian model Hamiltonian [1] for the description of open systems that exchange current density with their environment. We derive qualitative, molecular-orbital-based rules relating molecular structure and conductance. We show how side groups attached to molecular conductors [2] can completely suppress the conductance. We discuss interference effects in aromatic molecules [3] that can also inhibit electron transport. Rules are developed [1] for the prediction of Fano resonances. All these phenomena are explained with a molecular orbital theory [1,4] for molecules attached to macroscopic reservoirs. [1] F. Goyer, M. Ernzerhof, and M. Zhuang, JCP 126, 144104 (2007); M. Ernzerhof, JCP 127, 204709 (2007). [2] M. Ernzerhof, M. Zhuang, and P. Rocheleau, JCP 123, 134704 (2005); G. C. Solomon, D Q. Andrews, R P. Van Duyne, and M A. Ratner, JACS 130, 7788 (2008). [3] M. Ernzerhof, H. Bahmann, F. Goyer, M. Zhuang, and P. Rocheleau, JCTC 2, 1291 (2006); G. C. Solomon, D. Q. Andrews, R. P. Van Duyne, and M. A. Ratner, JCP 129, 054701 (2008). [4] B.T. Pickup, P.W. Fowler, CPL 459, 198 (2008); P. Rocheleau and M. Ernzerhof, JCP, submitted.

  15. Cooperative learning of neutron diffusion and transport theories

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Michael A.

    1999-04-30

    A cooperative group instructional strategy is being used to teach a unit on neutron transport and diffusion theory in a first-year-graduate level, Reactor Theory course that was formerly presented in the traditional lecture/discussion style. Students are divided into groups of two or three for the duration of the unit. Class meetings are divided into traditional lecture/discussion segments punctuated by cooperative group exercises. The group exercises were designed to require the students to elaborate, summarize, or practice the material presented in the lecture/discussion segments. Both positive interdependence and individual accountability are fostered by adjusting individual grades on the unit exam by a factor dependent upon group achievement. Group collaboration was also encouraged on homework assignments by assigning each group a single grade on each assignment. The results of the unit exam have been above average in the two classes in which the cooperative group method was employed. In particular, the problem solving ability of the students has shown particular improvement. Further,the students felt that the cooperative group format was both more educationally effective and more enjoyable than the lecture/discussion format.

  16. Theory and Transport of Nearly Incompressible Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zank, G. P.; Adhikari, L.; Hunana, P.; Shiota, D.; Bruno, R.; Telloni, D.

    2017-02-01

    The theory of nearly incompressible magnetohydrodynamics (NI MHD) was developed largely in the early 1990s, together with an important extension to inhomogeneous flows in 2010. Much of the focus in the earlier work was to understand the apparent incompressibility of the solar wind and other plasma environments, and the relationship of density fluctuations to apparently incompressible manifestations of turbulence in the solar wind and interstellar medium. Further important predictions about the “dimensionality” of solar wind turbulence and its relationship to the plasma beta were made and subsequently confirmed observationally. However, despite the initial success of NI MHD in describing fluctuations in the solar wind, a detailed application to solar wind turbulence has not been undertaken. Here, we use the equations of NI MHD to describe solar wind turbulence, rewriting the NI MHD system in terms of Elsässer variables. Distinct descriptions of 2D and slab turbulence emerge naturally from the Elsässer formulation, as do the nonlinear couplings between 2D and slab components. For plasma beta order 1 or less regions, predictions for 2D and slab spectra result from the NI MHD description, and predictions for the spectral characteristics of density fluctuations can be made. We conclude by presenting a NI MHD formulation describing the transport of majority 2D and minority slab turbulence throughout the solar wind. A preliminary comparison of theory and observations is presented.

  17. Theory of nonlocal transport in laser produced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silin, V. P.

    1996-01-01

    More than twenty years ago the experimental laser plasma researcher found the phenomena of the electron heat flux inhibition. It was found that the electron heat flux of a collisionless plasma is much smaller than the usual Knudsen heat flux which is estimated in the frame of the ideas of the theory of rarefied gases. Previously the inhibition phenomenon was connected with the ion-acoustic plasma turbulence, but a lot of numerical simulations of the collisional plasma gave indications onto the collisional nature of the inhibition phenomena. It was no real understanding of the physical role of collisions because of the difficulties to understand the numerical calculations. Now we have elaborated the analytic kinetic theory that describes the role of the collisional low velocity electrons in conditions when the thermal electrons are collisionless. Instead of the usually discussed role of the hot electrons we have discovered the important properties of the cold subthermal electrons. It permits us to formulate new analytic laws for the nonlocal transport and to understand the new reason of the old electron heat flux inhibition phenomena that can be connected with the long range Coulomb field of the charged particles.

  18. Theory of Transport Phenomena in Coherent Quantum Hall Bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Allan H.; Chen, Hua; Sodemann, Inti

    2015-03-01

    We will describe a theory that allows to understand the anomalous transport properties of the excitonic condensate state occurring in quantum quantum Hall bilayers in terms of a picture in which the condensate phase is nearly uniform across the sample, and the strength of condensate coupling to interlayer tunneling processes is substantially reduced compared to the predictions of disorder-free microscopic mean-field theory. These ingredients provide a natural explanation for recently established I-V characteristics which feature a critical current above which the tunneling resistance abruptly increases and a non-local interaction between interlayer tunneling at the inner and outer edges of Corbino rings. We propose a microscopic picture in which disorder is the main agent responsible for the reduction of the effective interlayer tunneling strength. IS is supported by the Pappalardo Fellowship in Physics. HC and AHM are supported by DOE Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering Grant DE-FG03- 02ER45958 and Welch Foundation Grant TBF1473.

  19. Levy Matrices and Financial Covariances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burda, Zdzislaw; Jurkiewicz, Jerzy; Nowak, Maciej A.; Papp, Gabor; Zahed, Ismail

    2003-10-01

    In a given market, financial covariances capture the intra-stock correlations and can be used to address statistically the bulk nature of the market as a complex system. We provide a statistical analysis of three SP500 covariances with evidence for raw tail distributions. We study the stability of these tails against reshuffling for the SP500 data and show that the covariance with the strongest tails is robust, with a spectral density in remarkable agreement with random Lévy matrix theory. We study the inverse participation ratio for the three covariances. The strong localization observed at both ends of the spectral density is analogous to the localization exhibited in the random Lévy matrix ensemble. We discuss two competitive mechanisms responsible for the occurrence of an extensive and delocalized eigenvalue at the edge of the spectrum: (a) the Lévy character of the entries of the correlation matrix and (b) a sort of off-diagonal order induced by underlying inter-stock correlations. (b) can be destroyed by reshuffling, while (a) cannot. We show that the stocks with the largest scattering are the least susceptible to correlations, and likely candidates for the localized states. We introduce a simple model for price fluctuations which captures behavior of the SP500 covariances. It may be of importance for assets diversification.

  20. Coarse mesh transport theory model for heterogeneous systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilas, Danut

    To improve fuel utilization, recent reactor cores have become substantially more heterogeneous. In these cores, use of variable fuel enrichments and strong absorbers lead to high neutron flux gradients, which may limit the accuracy (validity) of diffusion theory based methods. In fact, the diffusion equation itself may become a poor approximation of the Boltzmann equation, the exact equation that describes the neutron flux. Therefore, numerical methods to solve the transport equation efficiently over a large heterogeneous region (such as a reactor core) are very desirable in case where the diffusion approximation breaks down. Presently, the only methods capable of computing the power (flux) distributions very accurately throughout a large system such as a nuclear reactor core are the Monte-Carlo or the fine-mesh transport theory methods. Both these methods suffer from the long computational time which makes them useless for routine core calculations. Starting from a variational principle that admits trial functions that can be discontinuous at coarse mesh (assembly) interfaces, we propose a method to solve the transport equation on a spatial grid made up of meshes as large as the size of a fuel assembly. The variational principle is derived for the most general case, but further methods are developed for one-dimensional geometry with the angular variable treated by discrete ordinates. The method uses the finite element approach for the space variable with basis functions precomputed for each element to obtain an algebraic linear system of equations. The eigenvalue of this system is the multiplication constant and the eigenvector represents the incoming angular fluxes for each coarse mesh. The latter allows the reconstruction of the fine mesh solution (angular flux) throughout the domain of interest when used with the basis functions (surface Green's function) for each coarse mesh. The method requires no homogenization procedure that can be a serious source of

  1. General theory of spherically symmetric boundary-value problems of the linear transport theory.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanal, M.

    1972-01-01

    A general theory of spherically symmetric boundary-value problems of the one-speed neutron transport theory is presented. The formulation is also applicable to the 'gray' problems of radiative transfer. The Green's function for the purely absorbing medium is utilized in obtaining the normal mode expansion of the angular densities for both interior and exterior problems. As the integral equations for unknown coefficients are regular, a general class of reduction operators is introduced to reduce such regular integral equations to singular ones with a Cauchy-type kernel. Such operators then permit one to solve the singular integral equations by the standard techniques due to Muskhelishvili. We discuss several spherically symmetric problems. However, the treatment is kept sufficiently general to deal with problems lacking azimuthal symmetry. In particular the procedure seems to work for regions whose boundary coincides with one of the coordinate surfaces for which the Helmholtz equation is separable.

  2. Comparison of Observed Toroidal Rotation with Neoclassical Transport Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, S. K.; Chan, V. S.; Hinton, F. L.

    2000-10-01

    Toroidal rotations have been observed in Ohmic and ICRF discharges(J.E. Rice et al.), Nucl. Fusion 39 (1999) 1175. which have little overall momentum input. They are found to correlate with the thermal energy content and the magnitude of the plasma current and change sign relative to the plasma current in different conditions. Existing comparisons with neoclassical transport theory either focus on the relation of the rotation with the radial electric field or fail to use the full expression of the angular momentum flux. We seek to remedy this by invoking the correct expressions(M.N. Rosenbluth et al.), Plasma Phys. Contr. Nucl. Fusion Research (IAEA, Vienna, 1971), Vol. 1, p. 495.^,(R.D. Hazeltine, Phys. Fluids 17) (1974) 961.^,(F.L. Hinton and S.K. Wong, Phys. Fluids 28) (1985) 3082. which contain both diffusive and non-diffusive terms. Developmental work is performed to consider such issues as the presence of impurity ions, the occurrence of near-sonic flows, and the lack of up-down symmetry of flux surfaces. Comparison with experiments will be presented.

  3. Computational implementation of interfacial kinetic transport theory for water vapour transport in porous media.

    PubMed

    Albaalbaki, Bashar; Hill, Reghan J

    2014-01-08

    A computational framework is developed for applying interfacial kinetic transport theory to predict water vapour permeability of porous media. Modified conservation equations furnish spatially periodic disturbances from which the average flux and, thus, the effective diffusivity is obtained. The equations are solved exactly for a model porous medium comprising parallel layers of gas and solid with arbitrary solid volume fraction. From the microscale effective diffusivity, a two-point boundary-value problem is solved at the macroscale to furnish the water vapour transport rate in membranes subjected to a finite RH differential. Then, the microscale model is implemented using a computational framework (extended finite-element method) to examine the role of particle size, aspect ratio and positioning for periodic arrays of aligned super-ellipses (model particles that pack with high density). We show that the transverse water vapour permeability can be reduced by an order of magnitude only when fibres with a high-aspect ratio cross section are packed in a periodic staggered configuration. Maximum permeability is achieved at intermediate micro-structural length scales, where gas-phase diffusion is enhanced by surface diffusion, but not limited by interfacial-exchange kinetics. The two-dimensional computations demonstrated here are intended to motivate further efforts to develop efficient computational solutions for realistic three-dimensional microstructures.

  4. Breeding curvature from extended gauge covariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldrovandi, R.

    1991-05-01

    Independence between spacetime and “internal” space in gauge theories is related to the adjoint-covariant behaviour of the gauge potential. The usual gauge scheme is modified to allow a coupling between both spaces. Gauging spacetime translations produce field equations similar to Einstein equations. A curvature-like quantity of mixed differential-algebraic character emerges. Enlarged conservation laws are present, pointing to the presence of an covariance.

  5. Covariant action for type IIB supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Ashoke

    2016-07-01

    Taking clues from the recent construction of the covariant action for type II and heterotic string field theories, we construct a manifestly Lorentz covariant action for type IIB supergravity, and discuss its gauge fixing maintaining manifest Lorentz invariance. The action contains a (non-gravitating) free 4-form field besides the usual fields of type IIB supergravity. This free field, being completely decoupled from the interacting sector, has no physical consequence.

  6. Ballistic transport in Saturn's rings - An analytic theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    Ejecta from impacts of micrometeoroids on Saturn's ring particles will, in most cases, remain in orbit about Saturn and eventually be reaccreted by the rings, possibly at a different radial location. The resulting mass transport has been suggested as the cause of some of the features observed in Saturn's rings. Previous attempts to model this transport have used numerical simulations which have not included the effects of the angular momentum transport coincident with mass transport. An analytical model for ballistic mass transport in Saturn's rings is developed. The model includes the effects of angular momentum advection and shows that the net material movement due to angular momentum advection is comparable to that caused by direct ballistic mass transport.

  7. Galilean covariant harmonic oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horzela, Andrzej; Kapuscik, Edward

    1993-01-01

    A Galilean covariant approach to classical mechanics of a single particle is described. Within the proposed formalism, all non-covariant force laws defining acting forces which become to be defined covariantly by some differential equations are rejected. Such an approach leads out of the standard classical mechanics and gives an example of non-Newtonian mechanics. It is shown that the exactly solvable linear system of differential equations defining forces contains the Galilean covariant description of harmonic oscillator as its particular case. Additionally, it is demonstrated that in Galilean covariant classical mechanics the validity of the second Newton law of dynamics implies the Hooke law and vice versa. It is shown that the kinetic and total energies transform differently with respect to the Galilean transformations.

  8. Transport in weak dynamic disorder: a unified theory.

    PubMed

    Min, Bin; Li, Tiejun

    2013-11-01

    For quantum particles, it is well known that static disorder would lead to Anderson localization (AL) while dynamic (evolving) disorder would destroy AL and facilitate the transport. In this article, we study the transport behavior of a quantum particle in weak dynamic disorder. Based on Wigner representation, we obtain the radiative transfer equation (a linear Boltzmann equation) in the weak dynamic disorder limit, which could lead to not only all the existing transport behaviors in the literature but also new transport behaviors (for example, Lévy flight in momentum space). Furthermore, for dimensions greater than one, though we can formally derive the diffusive transport approximation, we argue that this diffusive transport is not physical but the nondiffusive transport should persist forever. This provides a possible resolution for the long-standing puzzle whether diffusive or nondiffusive transport would prevail in the long time limit. Our result would have major implications for the hypertransport of light, matter wave dynamics in disordered media, and directed polymer problems.

  9. Construction of Covariance Functions with Variable Length Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaspari, Gregory; Cohn, Stephen E.; Guo, Jing; Pawson, Steven

    2005-01-01

    This article focuses on construction, directly in physical space, of three-dimensional covariance functions parametrized by a tunable length field, and on an application of this theory to reproduce the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO) in the Goddard Earth Observing System, Version 4 (GEOS-4) data assimilation system. These Covariance models are referred to as multi-level or nonseparable, to associate them with the application where a multi-level covariance with a large troposphere to stratosphere length field gradient is used to reproduce the QBO from sparse radiosonde observations in the tropical lower stratosphere. The multi-level covariance functions extend well-known single level covariance functions depending only on a length scale. Generalizations of the first- and third-order autoregressive covariances in three dimensions are given, providing multi-level covariances with zero and three derivatives at zero separation, respectively. Multi-level piecewise rational covariances with two continuous derivatives at zero separation are also provided. Multi-level powerlaw covariances are constructed with continuous derivatives of all orders. Additional multi-level covariance functions are constructed using the Schur product of single and multi-level covariance functions. A multi-level powerlaw covariance used to reproduce the QBO in GEOS-4 is described along with details of the assimilation experiments. The new covariance model is shown to represent the vertical wind shear associated with the QBO much more effectively than in the baseline GEOS-4 system.

  10. A state-of-the-art review of transportation systems evaluation techniques relevant to air transportation, volume 1. [urban planning and urban transportation using decision theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haefner, L. E.

    1975-01-01

    Mathematical and philosophical approaches are presented for evaluation and implementation of ground and air transportation systems. Basic decision processes are examined that are used for cost analyses and planning (i.e, statistical decision theory, linear and dynamic programming, optimization, game theory). The effects on the environment and the community that a transportation system may have are discussed and modelled. Algorithmic structures are examined and selected bibliographic annotations are included. Transportation dynamic models were developed. Citizen participation in transportation projects (i.e, in Maryland and Massachusetts) is discussed. The relevance of the modelling and evaluation approaches to air transportation (i.e, airport planning) is examined in a case study in St. Louis, Missouri.

  11. SU-E-P-04: Transport Theory Learning Module in the Maple Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Both, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The medical physics graduate program at the University of Miami is developing a computerized instructional module which provides an interactive mechanism for students to learn transport theory. While not essential in the medical physics curriculum, transport theory should be taught because the conceptual level of transport theory is fundamental, a substantial literature exists and ought to be accessible, and students should understand commercial software which solves the Boltzmann equation.But conventional teaching and learning of transport theory is challenging. Students may be under prepared to appreciate its methods, results, and relevance, and it is not substantially addressed in textbooks for the medical physicists. Other resources an instructor might reasonably use, while excellent, may be too briskly paced for beginning students. The purpose of this work is to render teaching of transport theory more tractable by making learning highly interactive. Methods: The module is being developed in the Maple mathematics environment by instructors and graduate students. It will refresh the students' knowledge of vector calculus and differential equations, and will develop users' intuition for phase space concepts. Scattering concepts will be developed with animated simulations using tunable parameters characterizing interactions, so that students may develop a “feel” for cross section. Transport equations for one and multiple types of radiation will be illustrated with phase space animations. Numerical methods of solution will be illustrated. Results: Attempts to teach rudiments of transport theory in radiation physics and dosimetry courses using conventional classroom techniques at the University of Miami have had small success, because classroom time is limited and the material has been hard for our students to appreciate intuitively. Conclusion: A joint effort of instructor and students to teach and learn transport theory by building an interactive

  12. Criticism of generally accepted fundamentals and methodologies of traffic and transportation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Kerner, Boris S.

    2015-03-10

    It is explained why the set of the fundamental empirical features of traffic breakdown (a transition from free flow to congested traffic) should be the empirical basis for any traffic and transportation theory that can be reliable used for control and optimization in traffic networks. It is shown that generally accepted fundamentals and methodologies of traffic and transportation theory are not consistent with the set of the fundamental empirical features of traffic breakdown at a highway bottleneck. To these fundamentals and methodologies of traffic and transportation theory belong (i) Lighthill-Whitham-Richards (LWR) theory, (ii) the General Motors (GM) model class (for example, Herman, Gazis et al. GM model, Gipps’s model, Payne’s model, Newell’s optimal velocity (OV) model, Wiedemann’s model, Bando et al. OV model, Treiber’s IDM, Krauß’s model), (iii) the understanding of highway capacity as a particular stochastic value, and (iv) principles for traffic and transportation network optimization and control (for example, Wardrop’s user equilibrium (UE) and system optimum (SO) principles). Alternatively to these generally accepted fundamentals and methodologies of traffic and transportation theory, we discuss three-phase traffic theory as the basis for traffic flow modeling as well as briefly consider the network breakdown minimization (BM) principle for the optimization of traffic and transportation networks with road bottlenecks.

  13. Criticism of generally accepted fundamentals and methodologies of traffic and transportation theory: A brief review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerner, Boris S.

    2013-11-01

    It is explained why the set of the fundamental empirical features of traffic breakdown (a transition from free flow to congested traffic) should be the empirical basis for any traffic and transportation theory that can be reliably used for control and optimization in traffic networks. It is shown that the generally accepted fundamentals and methodologies of the traffic and transportation theory are not consistent with the set of the fundamental empirical features of traffic breakdown at a highway bottleneck. To these fundamentals and methodologies of the traffic and transportation theory belong (i) Lighthill-Whitham-Richards (LWR) theory, (ii) the General Motors (GM) model class (for example, Herman, Gazis et al. GM model, Gipps’s model, Payne’s model, Newell’s optimal velocity (OV) model, Wiedemann’s model, Bando et al. OV model, Treiber’s IDM, Krauß’s model), (iii) the understanding of highway capacity as a particular (fixed or stochastic) value, and (iv) principles for traffic and transportation network optimization and control (for example, Wardrop’s user equilibrium (UE) and system optimum (SO) principles). Alternatively to these generally accepted fundamentals and methodologies of the traffic and transportation theory, we discuss the three-phase traffic theory as the basis for traffic flow modeling as well as briefly consider the network breakdown minimization (BM) principle for the optimization of traffic and transportation networks with road bottlenecks.

  14. Covariant mutually unbiased bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmeli, Claudio; Schultz, Jussi; Toigo, Alessandro

    2016-06-01

    The connection between maximal sets of mutually unbiased bases (MUBs) in a prime-power dimensional Hilbert space and finite phase-space geometries is well known. In this article, we classify MUBs according to their degree of covariance with respect to the natural symmetries of a finite phase-space, which are the group of its affine symplectic transformations. We prove that there exist maximal sets of MUBs that are covariant with respect to the full group only in odd prime-power dimensional spaces, and in this case, their equivalence class is actually unique. Despite this limitation, we show that in dimension 2r covariance can still be achieved by restricting to proper subgroups of the symplectic group, that constitute the finite analogues of the oscillator group. For these subgroups, we explicitly construct the unitary operators yielding the covariance.

  15. Towards a wave theory of charged beam transport: A collection of thoughts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dattoli, G.; Mari, C.; Torre, A.

    1992-01-01

    We formulate in a rigorous way a wave theory of charged beam linear transport. The Wigner distribution function is introduced and provides the link with classical mechanics. Finally, the von Neumann equation is shown to coincide with the Liouville equation for the nonlinear transport.

  16. Quantum noise theory for phonon transport through nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Li; Huang, Yunmi; Huang, Changcheng

    2017-04-01

    We have developed a quantum noise approach to study the phonon transport through nanostructures. The nanostructures acting as phonon channels are attached to two phonon reservoirs. And the temperature drop between the two reservoirs drives the phonon transport through the channels. We have derived a quantum Langevin equation(QLE) to describe the phonon transport with the quantum noise originated from the thermal fluctuation of the reservoirs. Within the Markov approximation, the QLE is used to get the thermal conductivity κ of the nanostructures and the finite size effect of the κ then is studied. In this study, the advantage of the quantum noise approach lays on the fact that no any local temperature needs to be defined for the nanostructures in its non-equilibrium state.

  17. Near-field radiative thermal transport: From theory to experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Bai Fiorino, Anthony; Meyhofer, Edgar; Reddy, Pramod

    2015-05-15

    Radiative thermal transport via the fluctuating electromagnetic near-field has recently attracted increasing attention due to its fundamental importance and its impact on a range of applications from data storage to thermal management and energy conversion. After a brief historical account of radiative thermal transport, we summarize the basics of fluctuational electrodynamics, a theoretical framework for the study of radiative heat transfer in terms of thermally excited propagating and evanescent electromagnetic waves. Various approaches to modeling near-field thermal transport are briefly discussed, together with key results and proposals for manipulation and utilization of radiative heat flow. Subsequently, we review the experimental advances in the characterization of both near-field heat flow and energy density. We conclude with remarks on the opportunities and challenges for future explorations of radiative heat transfer at the nanoscale.

  18. Enzymatically driven transport: a kinetic theory for nuclear export.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sanghyun; Elbaum, M

    2013-11-05

    Nuclear import and export are often considered inverse processes whereby transport receptors ferry protein cargo through the nuclear pore. In contrast to import, where the reversible binding of receptor to nuclear RanGTP leads to a balanced bidirectional exchange, termination of export by physiologically irreversible hydrolysis of the Ran-bound GTP leads to unidirectional transport. We present a concise mathematical model that predicts protein distributions and kinetic rates for receptor-mediated nuclear export, which further exhibit an unexpected pseudolinear relation one to the other. Predictions of the model are verified with permeabilized and live cell measurements.

  19. The theory of bio-energy transport in the protein molecules and its properties.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xiao-feng

    2011-10-01

    The bio-energy transport is a basic problem in life science and related to many biological processes. Therefore to establish the mechanism of bio-energy transport and its theory have an important significance. Based on different properties of structure of α-helical protein molecules some theories of bio-energy transport along the molecular chains have been proposed and established, where the energy is released by hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). A brief survey of past researches on different models and theories of bio-energy, including Davydov's, Takeno's, Yomosa's, Brown et al.'s, Schweitzer's, Cruzeiro-Hansson's, Forner's and Pang's models were first stated in this paper. Subsequently we studied and reviewed mainly and systematically the properties, thermal stability and lifetimes of the carriers (solitons) transporting the bio-energy at physiological temperature 300 K in Pang's and Davydov's theories. From these investigations we know that the carrier (soliton) of bio-energy transport in the α-helical protein molecules in Pang's model has a higher binding energy, higher thermal stability and larger lifetime at 300 K relative to those of Davydov's model, in which the lifetime of the new soliton at 300 K is enough large and belongs to the order of 10(-10) s or τ/τ(0)≥700. Thus we can conclude that the soliton in Pang's model is exactly the carrier of the bio-energy transport, Pang's theory is appropriate to α-helical protein molecules.

  20. The theory of bio-energy transport in the protein molecules and its properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Xiao-feng

    2011-10-01

    The bio-energy transport is a basic problem in life science and related to many biological processes. Therefore to establish the mechanism of bio-energy transport and its theory have an important significance. Based on different properties of structure of α-helical protein molecules some theories of bio-energy transport along the molecular chains have been proposed and established, where the energy is released by hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). A brief survey of past researches on different models and theories of bio-energy, including Davydov's, Takeno's, Yomosa's, Brown et al.'s, Schweitzer's, Cruzeiro-Hansson's, Forner's and Pang's models were first stated in this paper. Subsequently we studied and reviewed mainly and systematically the properties, thermal stability and lifetimes of the carriers (solitons) transporting the bio-energy at physiological temperature 300 K in Pang's and Davydov's theories. From these investigations we know that the carrier (soliton) of bio-energy transport in the α-helical protein molecules in Pang's model has a higher binding energy, higher thermal stability and larger lifetime at 300 K relative to those of Davydov's model, in which the lifetime of the new soliton at 300 K is enough large and belongs to the order of 10 -10 s or τ/τ⩾700. Thus we can conclude that the soliton in Pang's model is exactly the carrier of the bio-energy transport, Pang's theory is appropriate to α-helical protein molecules.

  1. A Class of Population Covariance Matrices in the Bootstrap Approach to Covariance Structure Analysis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ke-Hai; Hayashi, Kentaro; Yanagihara, Hirokazu

    2007-01-01

    Model evaluation in covariance structure analysis is critical before the results can be trusted. Due to finite sample sizes and unknown distributions of real data, existing conclusions regarding a particular statistic may not be applicable in practice. The bootstrap procedure automatically takes care of the unknown distribution and, for a given sample size, also provides more accurate results than those based on standard asymptotics. But the procedure needs a matrix to play the role of the population covariance matrix. The closer the matrix is to the true population covariance matrix, the more valid the bootstrap inference is. The current paper proposes a class of covariance matrices by combining theory and data. Thus, a proper matrix from this class is closer to the true population covariance matrix than those constructed by any existing methods. Each of the covariance matrices is easy to generate and also satisfies several desired properties. An example with nine cognitive variables and a confirmatory factor model illustrates the details for creating population covariance matrices with different misspecifications. When evaluating the substantive model, bootstrap or simulation procedures based on these matrices will lead to more accurate conclusion than that based on artificial covariance matrices.

  2. Extraction of hot QCD matter transport coefficients utilizing microscopic transport theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, Nasser Soliman

    Ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) are thought to have produced a state of matter called the Quark-Gluon-Plasma (QGP). The QGP forms when nuclear matter governed by Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) reaches a temperature and baryochemical potential necessary to achieve the transition of hadrons (bound states of quarks and gluons) to deconfined quarks and gluons. Such conditions have been achieved at RHIC, and the resulting QGP created exhibits properties of a near perfect fluid. In particular, strong evidence shows that the QGP exhibits a very small shear viscosity to entropy density ratio eta/s, near the lower bound predicted for that quantity by Anti-deSitter space/Conformal Field Theory (AdS/CFT) methods of eta/s = ℎ4pkB , where h is Planck's constant and kB is Boltzmann's constant. As the produced matter expands and cools, it evolves through a phase described by a hadron gas with rapidly increasing eta/s. This thesis presents robust calculations of eta/s for hadronic and partonic media as a function of temperature using the Green-Kubo formalism. An analysis is performed for the behavior of eta/s to mimic situations of the hadronic media at RHIC evolving out of chemical equilibrium, and systematic uncertainties are assessed for our method. In addition, preliminary results are presented for the bulk viscosity to entropy density ratio zeta/s, whose behavior is not well-known in a relativistic heavy ion collisions. The diffusion coefficient for baryon number is investigated, and an algorithm is presented to improve upon the previous work of investigation of heavy quark diffusion in a thermal QGP. By combining the results of my investigations for eta/s from our microscopic transport models with what is currently known from the experimental results on elliptic flow from RHIC, I find that the trajectory of eta/s in a heavy ion collision has a rich structure, especially near the deconfinement transition temperature Tc. I

  3. GQ corrections in the circuit theory of quantum transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campagnano, G.; Nazarov, Yu. V.

    2006-09-01

    We develop a finite-element technique that allows one to evaluate correction of the order of GQ to various transport characteristics of arbitrary nanostructures. Common examples of such corrections are the weak-localization effect on conductance and universal conductance fluctuations. Our approach, however, is not restricted to conductance only. It allows one in the same manner to evaluate corrections to the noise characteristics, superconducting properties, strongly nonequilibrium transport, and transmission distribution. To enable such functionality, we consider Green’s functions of arbitrary matrix structure. We derive a finite-element technique from Cooperon and diffuson ladders for these Green’s functions. The derivation is supplemented with application examples. Those include transitions between ensembles and the Aharonov-Bohm effect.

  4. Fractional-order theory of heat transport in rigid bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zingales, Massimiliano

    2014-11-01

    The non-local model of heat transfer, used to describe the deviations of the temperature field from the well-known prediction of Fourier/Cattaneo models experienced in complex media, is framed in the context of fractional-order calculus. It has been assumed (Borino et al., 2011 [53], Mongioví and Zingales, 2013 [54]) that thermal energy transport is due to two phenomena: (i) A short-range heat flux ruled by a local transport equation; (ii) A long-range thermal energy transfer proportional to a distance-decaying function, to the relative temperature and to the product of the interacting masses. The distance-decaying function is assumed in the functional class of the power-law decay of the distance yielding a novel temperature equation in terms of α-order Marchaud fractional-order derivative (0⩽α⩽1). Thermodynamical consistency of the model is provided in the context of Clausius-Plank inequality. The effects induced by the boundary conditions on the temperature field are investigated for diffusive as well as ballistic local heat flux. Deviations of the temperature field from the linear distributions in the neighborhood of the thermostated zones of small-scale conductors are qualitatively predicted by the used fractional-order heat transport model, as shown by means of molecular dynamics simulations.

  5. Catchment-scale herbicides transport: Theory and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertuzzo, E.; Thomet, M.; Botter, G.; Rinaldo, A.

    2013-02-01

    This paper proposes and tests a model which couples the description of hydrologic flow and transport of herbicides at catchment scales. The model accounts for streamflow components' age to characterize short and long term fluctuations of herbicide flux concentrations in stream waters, whose peaks exceeding a toxic threshold are key to exposure risk of aquatic ecosystems. The model is based on a travel time formulation of transport embedding a source zone that describes near surface herbicide dynamics. To this aim we generalize a recently proposed scheme for the analytical derivation of travel time distributions to the case of solutes that can be partially taken up by transpiration and undergo chemical degradation. The framework developed is evaluated by comparing modeled hydrographs and atrazine chemographs with those measured in the Aabach agricultural catchment (Switzerland). The model proves reliable in defining complex transport features shaped by the interplay of long term processes, related to the persistence of solute components in soils, and short term dynamics related to storm inter-arrivals. The effects of stochasticity in rainfall patterns and application dates on concentrations and loads in runoff are assessed via Monte Carlo simulations, highlighting the crucial role played by the first rainfall event occurring after herbicide application. A probabilistic framework for critical determinants of exposure risk to aquatic communities is defined. Modeling of herbicides circulation at catchment scale thus emerges as essential tools for ecological risk assessment.

  6. Covariant Bardeen perturbation formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitenti, S. D. P.; Falciano, F. T.; Pinto-Neto, N.

    2014-05-01

    In a previous work we obtained a set of necessary conditions for the linear approximation in cosmology. Here we discuss the relations of this approach with the so-called covariant perturbations. It is often argued in the literature that one of the main advantages of the covariant approach to describe cosmological perturbations is that the Bardeen formalism is coordinate dependent. In this paper we will reformulate the Bardeen approach in a completely covariant manner. For that, we introduce the notion of pure and mixed tensors, which yields an adequate language to treat both perturbative approaches in a common framework. We then stress that in the referred covariant approach, one necessarily introduces an additional hypersurface choice to the problem. Using our mixed and pure tensors approach, we are able to construct a one-to-one map relating the usual gauge dependence of the Bardeen formalism with the hypersurface dependence inherent to the covariant approach. Finally, through the use of this map, we define full nonlinear tensors that at first order correspond to the three known gauge invariant variables Φ, Ψ and Ξ, which are simultaneously foliation and gauge invariant. We then stress that the use of the proposed mixed tensors allows one to construct simultaneously gauge and hypersurface invariant variables at any order.

  7. Covariance mapping techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frasinski, Leszek J.

    2016-08-01

    Recent technological advances in the generation of intense femtosecond pulses have made covariance mapping an attractive analytical technique. The laser pulses available are so intense that often thousands of ionisation and Coulomb explosion events will occur within each pulse. To understand the physics of these processes the photoelectrons and photoions need to be correlated, and covariance mapping is well suited for operating at the high counting rates of these laser sources. Partial covariance is particularly useful in experiments with x-ray free electron lasers, because it is capable of suppressing pulse fluctuation effects. A variety of covariance mapping methods is described: simple, partial (single- and multi-parameter), sliced, contingent and multi-dimensional. The relationship to coincidence techniques is discussed. Covariance mapping has been used in many areas of science and technology: inner-shell excitation and Auger decay, multiphoton and multielectron ionisation, time-of-flight and angle-resolved spectrometry, infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, stimulated Raman scattering, directional gamma ray sensing, welding diagnostics and brain connectivity studies (connectomics). This review gives practical advice for implementing the technique and interpreting the results, including its limitations and instrumental constraints. It also summarises recent theoretical studies, highlights unsolved problems and outlines a personal view on the most promising research directions.

  8. Kinetic theory of transport processes in partially ionized reactive plasma, I: General transport equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, V. M.; Stepanenko, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we derive the set of general transport equations for multicomponent partially ionized reactive plasma in the presence of electric and magnetic fields taking into account the internal degrees of freedom and electronic excitation of plasma particles. Our starting point is a generalized Boltzmann equation with the collision integral in the Wang-Chang and Uhlenbeck form and a reactive collision integral. We obtain a set of conservation equations for such plasma and employ a linearized variant of Grad's moment method to derive the system of moment (or transport) equations for the plasma species nonequilibrium parameters. Full and reduced transport equations, resulting from the linearized system of moment equations, are presented, which can be used to obtain transport relations and expressions for transport coefficients of electrons and heavy plasma particles (molecules, atoms and ions) in partially ionized reactive plasma.

  9. Linear response theory for magnon transport in ferromagnetic insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Shuichi; Matsumoto, Ryo

    2012-02-01

    We study transverse response of magnons in ferromagnetic insulators within linear response theory. In analogy with the corresponding theory for electrons [1], magnon transverse response is described, including the Hall effect, Nernst effect, and thermal Hall effect. As is also the case for electrons [1], the response functions for magnons consist of the Kubo-formula term, and the term corresponding to the orbital angular momentum. We can rewrite the response functions in terms of the Berry curvature in momentum space [2]. We apply this theory to the (quantum-mechanical) magnons and to the classical magnetostatic waves. For the magnetostatic waves, the eigenmodes are given by a generalized eigenvalue problem, giving rise to the special form of the Berry curvature [2]. We explain various properties of this Berry curvature for the generalized eigenvalue problem, and discuss its implications for the physical properties of magnetostatic modes. [1] L. Smrcka and P. Streda, J. Phys. C, 10, 2153 (1977); H. Oji, P. Streda, Phys. Rev. B 31, 7291 (1985); [2] R. Matsumoto and S. Murakami, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 197202 (2011); Phys. Rev. B 84, 184406 (2011).

  10. Lorentz covariance of loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovelli, Carlo; Speziale, Simone

    2011-05-01

    The kinematics of loop gravity can be given a manifestly Lorentz-covariant formulation: the conventional SU(2)-spin-network Hilbert space can be mapped to a space K of SL(2,C) functions, where Lorentz covariance is manifest. K can be described in terms of a certain subset of the projected spin networks studied by Livine, Alexandrov and Dupuis. It is formed by SL(2,C) functions completely determined by their restriction on SU(2). These are square-integrable in the SU(2) scalar product, but not in the SL(2,C) one. Thus, SU(2)-spin-network states can be represented by Lorentz-covariant SL(2,C) functions, as two-component photons can be described in the Lorentz-covariant Gupta-Bleuler formalism. As shown by Wolfgang Wieland in a related paper, this manifestly Lorentz-covariant formulation can also be directly obtained from canonical quantization. We show that the spinfoam dynamics of loop quantum gravity is locally SL(2,C)-invariant in the bulk, and yields states that are precisely in K on the boundary. This clarifies how the SL(2,C) spinfoam formalism yields an SU(2) theory on the boundary. These structures define a tidy Lorentz-covariant formalism for loop gravity.

  11. Statistical theory of designed quantum transport across disordered networks.

    PubMed

    Walschaers, Mattia; Mulet, Roberto; Wellens, Thomas; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    We explain how centrosymmetry, together with a dominant doublet of energy eigenstates in the local density of states, can guarantee interference-assisted, strongly enhanced, strictly coherent quantum excitation transport between two predefined sites of a random network of two-level systems. Starting from a generalization of the chaos-assisted tunnelling mechanism, we formulate a random matrix theoretical framework for the analytical prediction of the transfer time distribution, of lower bounds of the transfer efficiency, and of the scaling behavior of characteristic statistical properties with the size of the network. We show that these analytical predictions compare well to numerical simulations, using Hamiltonians sampled from the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble.

  12. Covariance Applications with Kiwi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattoon, C. M.; Brown, D.; Elliott, J. B.

    2012-05-01

    The Computational Nuclear Physics group at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is developing a new tool, named `Kiwi', that is intended as an interface between the covariance data increasingly available in major nuclear reaction libraries (including ENDF and ENDL) and large-scale Uncertainty Quantification (UQ) studies. Kiwi is designed to integrate smoothly into large UQ studies, using the covariance matrix to generate multiple variations of nuclear data. The code has been tested using critical assemblies as a test case, and is being integrated into LLNL's quality assurance and benchmarking for nuclear data.

  13. Transport coefficients in Yang-Mills theory and QCD.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Nicolai; Haas, Michael; Pawlowski, Jan M; Strodthoff, Nils

    2015-09-11

    We calculate the shear-viscosity-over-entropy-density ratio η/s in Yang-Mills theory from the Kubo formula using an exact diagrammatic representation in terms of full propagators and vertices using gluon spectral functions as external input. We provide an analytic fit formula for the temperature dependence of η/s over the whole temperature range from a glueball resonance gas at low temperatures, to a high-temperature regime consistent with perturbative results. Subsequently, we provide a first estimate for η/s in QCD.

  14. Fermion particle production in semiclassical Boltzmann-Vlasov transport theory

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, John F.; Mihaila, Bogdan; Cooper, Fred

    2009-07-01

    We present numerical solutions of the semiclassical Boltzmann-Vlasov equation for fermion particle-antiparticle production by strong electric fields in boost-invariant coordinates in (1+1) and (3+1) dimensional QED. We compare the Boltzmann-Vlasov results with those of recent quantum field theory calculations and find good agreement. We conclude that extending the Boltzmann-Vlasov approach to the case of QCD should allow us to do a thorough investigation of how backreaction affects recent results on the dependence of the transverse momentum distribution of quarks and antiquarks on a second Casimir invariant of color SU(3)

  15. Kinetic theory of transport processes in partially ionized reactive plasma, II: Electron transport properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, V. M.; Stepanenko, A. A.

    2016-11-01

    The previously obtained in (Zhdanov and Stepanenko, 2016) general transport equations for partially ionized reactive plasma are employed for analysis of electron transport properties in molecular and atomic plasmas. We account for both elastic and inelastic interaction channels of electrons with atoms and molecules of plasma and also the processes of electron impact ionization of neutral particles and three-body ion-electron recombination. The system of scalar transport equations for electrons is discussed and the expressions for non-equilibrium corrections to electron ionization and recombination rates and the diagonal part of the electron pressure tensor are derived. Special attention is paid to analysis of electron energy relaxation during collisions with plasma particles having internal degrees of freedom and the expression for the electron coefficient of inelastic energy losses is deduced. We also derive the expressions for electron vector and tensorial transport fluxes and the corresponding transport coefficients for partially ionized reactive plasma, which represent a generalization of the well-known results obtained by Devoto (1967). The results of numerical evaluation of contribution from electron inelastic collisions with neutral particles to electron transport properties are presented for a series of molecular and atomic gases.

  16. On the theory of gaseous transport to plant canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bache, D. H.

    Solutions of the convection-diffusion equations are developed to show the relationship between bulk transport parameters affecting gaseous transfer to plant canopies and local rates of transfer within the canopy. Foliage density is considered to be uniform and the drag coefficient of elements is specified by cd = γu- n with u as the local wind-speed and γ and n constants. Under conditions of high surface resistance, the bulk deposition velocity at the top of the canopy vg( h) approaches a limit defined by v g(h) = v̂gL p(1-ψ v̂gL p/u ∗) , where v̂g is the local deposition rate, Lp the effective foliage area, u ∗ the friction velocity and ψ a structure coefficient. From this, a criterion is proposed for defining the conditions in which the local resistances may be added in parallel. Comparisons with the external model for the bulk transport resistance rp = ra + rb + rc (where r p = 1/v g(h) and ra is a diffusive resistance between the apparent momentum sink and height h) shows that the bulk surface resistance r c = r̂s/L p( r̂s being a local surface resistance due to internal properties of the surface) and r b = overliner̂p-r a, appearing as an excess aerodynamic component; overliner̂p refers to the depth-averaged value of r̂p—the resistance to transfer through the laminar sublayer enveloping individual canopy elements. In conditions of zero surface resistance the bulk transport rate rp, o can be specified by r p,o/r a = E( r̂p/r̂∗) hq with E and q as constants, the term r̂p/r̂∗ referring to the resistances to mass and momentum transfer to canopy elements. A general expression is formulated for the sublayer Stanton number B -1  r bu ∗ at the extremes of high and zero surface resistance. In conditions of low surface resistance, it is shown that the terms rb + rc cannot be conveniently separated into equivalent aerodynamic and surface components as at the limit of high surface resistance. This conclusion is a departure from previous

  17. Anomalous transport theory for the reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, P.W.; Hegna, C.C; Sovinec, C.R.

    1996-09-01

    Physically motivated transport models with predictive capabilities and significance beyond the reversed field pinch (RFP) are presented. It is shown that the ambipolar constrained electron heat loss observed in MST can be quantitatively modeled by taking account of the clumping in parallel streaming electrons and the resultant self-consistent interaction with collective modes; that the discrete dynamo process is a relaxation oscillation whose dependence on the tearing instability and profile relaxation physics leads to amplitude and period scaling predictions consistent with experiment; that the Lundquist number scaling in relaxed plasmas driven by magnetic turbulence has a weak S{sup {minus}1/4} scaling; and that radial E{times}B shear flow can lead to large reductions in the edge particle flux with little change in the heat flux, as observed in the RFP and tokamak. 24 refs.

  18. Noninvasive cross section reconstruction with transport theory constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Fredette, N.; Ragusa, J.; Bangerth, W.

    2012-07-01

    We consider the inverse problem of identifying the spatially variable absorption and scattering properties of a medium by measuring the exiting radiation when the body is actively interrogated. We formulate this inverse problem as a PDE-constrained optimization problem and solve it iteratively with Newton's method. The constraint is given by the radiative transport equation for neutral particles. Two examples are considered. The first is a dual inclusion domain with no scattering. This problem explores the convergence patterns of the method. The second problem is a central inclusion problem with scattering. This problem explores the optical thickness limit of the method. This optical thickness was determined to be 2-3 mean free paths. (authors)

  19. The electrical transport properties of liquid Rb using pseudopotential theory

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, A. B. Bhatt, N. K. Thakore, B. Y. Jani, A. R.; Vyas, P. R.

    2014-04-24

    Certain electric transport properties of liquid Rb are reported. The electrical resistivity is calculated by using the self-consistent approximation as suggested by Ferraz and March. The pseudopotential due to Hasegawa et al for full electron-ion interaction, which is valid for all electrons and contains the repulsive delta function due to achieve the necessary s-pseudisation was used for the calculation. Temperature dependence of structure factor is considered through temperature dependent potential parameter in the pair potential. Finally, thermo-electric power and thermal conductivity are obtained. The outcome of the present study is discussed in light of other such results, and confirms the applicability of pseudopotential at very high temperature via temperature dependent pair potential.

  20. Transport theory for potato orbits in an axisymmetric torus with finite toroidal flow speed

    SciTech Connect

    Shaing, K. C.; Peng, Yueng Kay Martin

    2004-01-01

    Transport theory for potato orbits in the region near the magnetic axis in an axisymmetric torus such as tokamaks and spherical tori is extended to the situation where the toroidal flow speed is of the order of the sonic speed as observed in National Spherical Torus Experiment [E. J. Synakowski, M. G. Bell, R. E. Bell et al., Nucl. Fusion 43, 1653 (2003)]. It is found that transport fluxes such as ion radial heat flux, and bootstrap current density are modified by a factor of the order of the square of the toroidal Mach number. The consequences of the orbit squeezing are also presented. The theory is developed for parabolic (in radius r) plasma profiles. A method to apply the results of the theory for the transport modeling is discussed.

  1. The intraclass covariance matrix.

    PubMed

    Carey, Gregory

    2005-09-01

    Introduced by C.R. Rao in 1945, the intraclass covariance matrix has seen little use in behavioral genetic research, despite the fact that it was developed to deal with family data. Here, I reintroduce this matrix, and outline its estimation and basic properties for data sets on pairs of relatives. The intraclass covariance matrix is appropriate whenever the research design or mathematical model treats the ordering of the members of a pair as random. Because the matrix has only one estimate of a population variance and covariance, both the observed matrix and the residual matrix from a fitted model are easy to inspect visually; there is no need to mentally average homologous statistics. Fitting a model to the intraclass matrix also gives the same log likelihood, likelihood-ratio (LR) chi2, and parameter estimates as fitting that model to the raw data. A major advantage of the intraclass matrix is that only two factors influence the LR chi2--the sampling error in estimating population parameters and the discrepancy between the model and the observed statistics. The more frequently used interclass covariance matrix adds a third factor to the chi2--sampling error of homologous statistics. Because of this, the degrees of freedom for fitting models to an intraclass matrix differ from fitting that model to an interclass matrix. Future research is needed to establish differences in power-if any--between the interclass and the intraclass matrix.

  2. Generalized Linear Covariance Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, James R.; Markley, F. Landis

    2014-01-01

    This talk presents a comprehensive approach to filter modeling for generalized covariance analysis of both batch least-squares and sequential estimators. We review and extend in two directions the results of prior work that allowed for partitioning of the state space into solve-for'' and consider'' parameters, accounted for differences between the formal values and the true values of the measurement noise, process noise, and textita priori solve-for and consider covariances, and explicitly partitioned the errors into subspaces containing only the influence of the measurement noise, process noise, and solve-for and consider covariances. In this work, we explicitly add sensitivity analysis to this prior work, and relax an implicit assumption that the batch estimator's epoch time occurs prior to the definitive span. We also apply the method to an integrated orbit and attitude problem, in which gyro and accelerometer errors, though not estimated, influence the orbit determination performance. We illustrate our results using two graphical presentations, which we call the variance sandpile'' and the sensitivity mosaic,'' and we compare the linear covariance results to confidence intervals associated with ensemble statistics from a Monte Carlo analysis.

  3. Dissipative quantum transport in macromolecules: Effective field theory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, E.; a Beccara, S.; Faccioli, P.

    2013-08-01

    We introduce an atomistic approach to the dissipative quantum dynamics of charged or neutral excitations propagating through macromolecular systems. Using the Feynman-Vernon path integral formalism, we analytically trace out from the density matrix the atomic coordinates and the heat bath degrees of freedom. This way we obtain an effective field theory which describes the real-time evolution of the quantum excitation and is fully consistent with the fluctuation-dissipation relation. The main advantage of the field-theoretic approach is that it allows us to avoid using the Keldysh contour formulation. This simplification makes it straightforward to derive Feynman diagrams to analytically compute the effects of the interaction of the propagating quantum excitation with the heat bath and with the molecular atomic vibrations. For illustration purposes, we apply this formalism to investigate the loss of quantum coherence of holes propagating through a poly(3-alkylthiophene) polymer.

  4. The role of magnetic helicity in cosmic ray transport theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. L.; Matthaeus, W. H.

    1981-01-01

    It has been found that the computed values of the mean free path for pitch angle scattering of low rigidity cosmic rays computed from weak turbulence theory are systematically larger than the values inferred from analyses of solar particle events. Reasons for this discrepancy are considered, taking into account components of the spectral tensor of the magnetic field fluctuations which can contribute to pitch angle scattering. The contributions of the additional terms can be estimated from the interplanetary magnetic field. It is shown that these additional contributions can be significant. A description is given of a formalism which includes the possibility that the field magnitude is constant. The formalism provides a formal basis for the heuristic arguments made by Goldstein (1980).

  5. On the tuning of electrical and thermal transport in thermoelectrics: an integrated theory-experiment perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jiong; Xi, Lili; Qiu, Wujie; Wu, Lihua; Shi, Xun; Chen, Lidong; Yang, Jihui; Zhang, Wenqing; Uher, Ctirad; Singh, David J.

    2016-02-01

    During the last two decades, we have witnessed great progress in research on thermoelectrics. There are two primary focuses. One is the fundamental understanding of electrical and thermal transport, enabled by the interplay of theory and experiment; the other is the substantial enhancement of the performance of various thermoelectric materials, through synergistic optimisation of those intercorrelated transport parameters. Here we review some of the successful strategies for tuning electrical and thermal transport. For electrical transport, we start from the classical but still very active strategy of tuning band degeneracy (or band convergence), then discuss the engineering of carrier scattering, and finally address the concept of conduction channels and conductive networks that emerge in complex thermoelectric materials. For thermal transport, we summarise the approaches for studying thermal transport based on phonon-phonon interactions valid for conventional solids, as well as some quantitative efforts for nanostructures. We also discuss the thermal transport in complex materials with chemical-bond hierarchy, in which a portion of the atoms (or subunits) are weakly bonded to the rest of the structure, leading to an intrinsic manifestation of part-crystalline part-liquid state at elevated temperatures. In this review, we provide a summary of achievements made in recent studies of thermoelectric transport properties, and demonstrate how they have led to improvements in thermoelectric performance by the integration of modern theory and experiment, and point out some challenges and possible directions.

  6. Discrete symmetries in covariant loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovelli, Carlo; Wilson-Ewing, Edward

    2012-09-01

    We study time-reversal and parity—on the physical manifold and in internal space—in covariant loop gravity. We consider a minor modification of the Holst action which makes it transform coherently under such transformations. The classical theory is not affected but the quantum theory is slightly different. In particular, the simplicity constraints are slightly modified and this restricts orientation flips in a spin foam to occur only across degenerate regions, thus reducing the sources of potential divergences.

  7. Twisted covariant noncommutative self-dual gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Estrada-Jimenez, S.; Garcia-Compean, H.; Obregon, O.; Ramirez, C.

    2008-12-15

    A twisted covariant formulation of noncommutative self-dual gravity is presented. The formulation for constructing twisted noncommutative Yang-Mills theories is used. It is shown that the noncommutative torsion is solved at any order of the {theta} expansion in terms of the tetrad and some extra fields of the theory. In the process the first order expansion in {theta} for the Plebanski action is explicitly obtained.

  8. Relativistic covariance of Ohm's law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starke, R.; Schober, G. A. H.

    2016-04-01

    The derivation of Lorentz-covariant generalizations of Ohm's law has been a long-term issue in theoretical physics with deep implications for the study of relativistic effects in optical and atomic physics. In this article, we propose an alternative route to this problem, which is motivated by the tremendous progress in first-principles materials physics in general and ab initio electronic structure theory in particular. We start from the most general, Lorentz-covariant first-order response law, which is written in terms of the fundamental response tensor χμ ν relating induced four-currents to external four-potentials. By showing the equivalence of this description to Ohm's law, we prove the validity of Ohm's law in every inertial frame. We further use the universal relation between χμ ν and the microscopic conductivity tensor σkℓ to derive a fully relativistic transformation law for the latter, which includes all effects of anisotropy and relativistic retardation. In the special case of a constant, scalar conductivity, this transformation law can be used to rederive a standard textbook generalization of Ohm's law.

  9. Adjusting for covariate effects on classification accuracy using the covariate-adjusted receiver operating characteristic curve.

    PubMed

    Janes, Holly; Pepe, Margaret S

    2009-06-01

    Recent scientific and technological innovations have produced an abundance of potential markers that are being investigated for their use in disease screening and diagnosis. In evaluating these markers, it is often necessary to account for covariates associated with the marker of interest. Covariates may include subject characteristics, expertise of the test operator, test procedures or aspects of specimen handling. In this paper, we propose the covariate-adjusted receiver operating characteristic curve, a measure of covariate-adjusted classification accuracy. Nonparametric and semiparametric estimators are proposed, asymptotic distribution theory is provided and finite sample performance is investigated. For illustration we characterize the age-adjusted discriminatory accuracy of prostate-specific antigen as a biomarker for prostate cancer.

  10. Impact of the 235U Covariance Data in Benchmark Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, Luiz C; Mueller, Don; Arbanas, Goran; Wiarda, Dorothea; Derrien, Herve

    2008-01-01

    The error estimation for calculated quantities relies on nuclear data uncertainty information available in the basic nuclear data libraries such as the U.S. Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF/B). The uncertainty files (covariance matrices) in the ENDF/B library are generally obtained from analysis of experimental data. In the resonance region, the computer code SAMMY is used for analyses of experimental data and generation of resonance parameters. In addition to resonance parameters evaluation, SAMMY also generates resonance parameter covariance matrices (RPCM). SAMMY uses the generalized least-squares formalism (Bayes method) together with the resonance formalism (R-matrix theory) for analysis of experimental data. Two approaches are available for creation of resonance-parameter covariance data. (1) During the data-evaluation process, SAMMY generates both a set of resonance parameters that fit the experimental data and the associated resonance-parameter covariance matrix. (2) For existing resonance-parameter evaluations for which no resonance-parameter covariance data are available, SAMMY can retroactively create a resonance-parameter covariance matrix. The retroactive method was used to generate covariance data for 235U. The resulting 235U covariance matrix was then used as input to the PUFF-IV code, which processed the covariance data into multigroup form, and to the TSUNAMI code, which calculated the uncertainty in the multiplication factor due to uncertainty in the experimental cross sections. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the use of the 235U covariance data in calculations of critical benchmark systems.

  11. Using Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA) with Fallible Covariates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culpepper, Steven Andrew; Aguinis, Herman

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) is used widely in psychological research implementing nonexperimental designs. However, when covariates are fallible (i.e., measured with error), which is the norm, researchers must choose from among 3 inadequate courses of action: (a) know that the assumption that covariates are perfectly reliable is violated but…

  12. Hydrodynamic theory of thermoelectric transport and negative magnetoresistance in Weyl semimetals

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Andrew; Davison, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    We present a theory of thermoelectric transport in weakly disordered Weyl semimetals where the electron–electron scattering time is faster than the electron–impurity scattering time. Our hydrodynamic theory consists of relativistic fluids at each Weyl node, coupled together by perturbatively small intervalley scattering, and long-range Coulomb interactions. The conductivity matrix of our theory is Onsager reciprocal and positive semidefinite. In addition to the usual axial anomaly, we account for the effects of a distinct, axial–gravitational anomaly expected to be present in Weyl semimetals. Negative thermal magnetoresistance is a sharp, experimentally accessible signature of this axial–gravitational anomaly, even beyond the hydrodynamic limit. PMID:27512042

  13. A mixture theory model of fluid and solute transport in the microvasculature of normal and malignant tissues. I. Theory.

    PubMed

    Schuff, M M; Gore, J P; Nauman, E A

    2013-05-01

    In order to better understand the mechanisms governing transport of drugs, nanoparticle-based treatments, and therapeutic biomolecules, and the role of the various physiological parameters, a number of mathematical models have previously been proposed. The limitations of the existing transport models indicate the need for a comprehensive model that includes transport in the vessel lumen, the vessel wall, and the interstitial space and considers the effects of the solute concentration on fluid flow. In this study, a general model to describe the transient distribution of fluid and multiple solutes at the microvascular level was developed using mixture theory. The model captures the experimentally observed dependence of the hydraulic permeability coefficient of the capillary wall on the concentration of solutes present in the capillary wall and the surrounding tissue. Additionally, the model demonstrates that transport phenomena across the capillary wall and in the interstitium are related to the solute concentration as well as the hydrostatic pressure. The model is used in a companion paper to examine fluid and solute transport for the simplified case of an axisymmetric geometry with no solid deformation or interconversion of mass.

  14. Accumulation, selection and covariation of amino acids in sieve tube sap of tansy (Tanacetum vulgare) and castor bean (Ricinus communis): evidence for the function of a basic amino acid transporter and the absence of a γ-amino butyric acid transporter.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Susanne N; Nowak, Heike; Keller, Frank; Kallarackal, Jose; Hajirezaei, Mohamad-Reza; Komor, Ewald

    2014-09-01

    Sieve tube sap was obtained from Tanacetum by aphid stylectomy and from Ricinus after apical bud decapitation. The amino acids in sieve tube sap were analyzed and compared with those from leaves. Arginine and lysine accumulated in the sieve tube sap of Tanacetum more than 10-fold compared to the leaf extracts and they were, together with asparagine and serine, preferably selected into the sieve tube sap, whereas glycine, methionine/tryptophan and γ-amino butyric acid were partially or completely excluded. The two basic amino acids also showed a close covariation in sieve tube sap. The acidic amino acids also grouped together, but antagonistic to the other amino acids. The accumulation ratios between sieve tube sap and leaf extracts were smaller in Ricinus than in Tanacetum. Arginine, histidine, lysine and glutamine were enriched and preferentially loaded into the phloem, together with isoleucine and valine. In contrast, glycine and methionine/tryptophan were partially and γ-amino butyric acid almost completely excluded from sieve tube sap. The covariation analysis grouped arginine together with several neutral amino acids. The acidic amino acids were loaded under competition with neutral amino acids. It is concluded from comparison with the substrate specificities of already characterized plant amino acid transporters, that an AtCAT1-like transporter functions in phloem loading of basic amino acids, whereas a transporter like AtGAT1 is absent in phloem. Although Tanacetum and Ricinus have different minor vein architecture, their phloem loading specificities for amino acids are relatively similar.

  15. Covariant deformed oscillator algebras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quesne, Christiane

    1995-01-01

    The general form and associativity conditions of deformed oscillator algebras are reviewed. It is shown how the latter can be fulfilled in terms of a solution of the Yang-Baxter equation when this solution has three distinct eigenvalues and satisfies a Birman-Wenzl-Murakami condition. As an example, an SU(sub q)(n) x SU(sub q)(m)-covariant q-bosonic algebra is discussed in some detail.

  16. Using Nuclear Theory, Data and Uncertainties in Monte Carlo Transport Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rising, Michael Evan

    2015-11-03

    These are slides for a presentation on using nuclear theory, data and uncertainties in Monte Carlo transport applications. The following topics are covered: nuclear data (experimental data versus theoretical models, data evaluation and uncertainty quantification), fission multiplicity models (fixed source applications, criticality calculations), uncertainties and their impact (integral quantities, sensitivity analysis, uncertainty propagation).

  17. Introduction to quantum chromo transport theory for quark-gluon plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Gyulassy, M.; Elze, H.Th.; Iwazaki, A.; Vasak, D.

    1986-08-01

    Upcoming heavy ion experiments at the AGS and SPS are aimed at producing and diagnosing a primordial form of matter, the quark-gluon plasma. In these lectures some recent developments on formulating a quantum transport theory for quark-gluon plasmas are introduced. 46 refs.

  18. The Bayesian Covariance Lasso.

    PubMed

    Khondker, Zakaria S; Zhu, Hongtu; Chu, Haitao; Lin, Weili; Ibrahim, Joseph G

    2013-04-01

    Estimation of sparse covariance matrices and their inverse subject to positive definiteness constraints has drawn a lot of attention in recent years. The abundance of high-dimensional data, where the sample size (n) is less than the dimension (d), requires shrinkage estimation methods since the maximum likelihood estimator is not positive definite in this case. Furthermore, when n is larger than d but not sufficiently larger, shrinkage estimation is more stable than maximum likelihood as it reduces the condition number of the precision matrix. Frequentist methods have utilized penalized likelihood methods, whereas Bayesian approaches rely on matrix decompositions or Wishart priors for shrinkage. In this paper we propose a new method, called the Bayesian Covariance Lasso (BCLASSO), for the shrinkage estimation of a precision (covariance) matrix. We consider a class of priors for the precision matrix that leads to the popular frequentist penalties as special cases, develop a Bayes estimator for the precision matrix, and propose an efficient sampling scheme that does not precalculate boundaries for positive definiteness. The proposed method is permutation invariant and performs shrinkage and estimation simultaneously for non-full rank data. Simulations show that the proposed BCLASSO performs similarly as frequentist methods for non-full rank data.

  19. The Bayesian Covariance Lasso

    PubMed Central

    Khondker, Zakaria S; Zhu, Hongtu; Chu, Haitao; Lin, Weili; Ibrahim, Joseph G.

    2012-01-01

    Estimation of sparse covariance matrices and their inverse subject to positive definiteness constraints has drawn a lot of attention in recent years. The abundance of high-dimensional data, where the sample size (n) is less than the dimension (d), requires shrinkage estimation methods since the maximum likelihood estimator is not positive definite in this case. Furthermore, when n is larger than d but not sufficiently larger, shrinkage estimation is more stable than maximum likelihood as it reduces the condition number of the precision matrix. Frequentist methods have utilized penalized likelihood methods, whereas Bayesian approaches rely on matrix decompositions or Wishart priors for shrinkage. In this paper we propose a new method, called the Bayesian Covariance Lasso (BCLASSO), for the shrinkage estimation of a precision (covariance) matrix. We consider a class of priors for the precision matrix that leads to the popular frequentist penalties as special cases, develop a Bayes estimator for the precision matrix, and propose an efficient sampling scheme that does not precalculate boundaries for positive definiteness. The proposed method is permutation invariant and performs shrinkage and estimation simultaneously for non-full rank data. Simulations show that the proposed BCLASSO performs similarly as frequentist methods for non-full rank data. PMID:24551316

  20. Kinetic Theory in Hot Plasmas and Neutral Gases Applications to the Computation of the transport coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Bendib, A.

    2008-09-23

    The conference is devoted to the study of systems consisting of a large number of particles by using the kinetic theory. In a first part, we present a general overview of the kinetic theory. In particular, the role of the correlations between particles is shown and discussed through the main models reported in the literature. In a second part, we present three applications to the transport properties in plasmas and neutral gases. The first application is devoted to the transport in hot plasmas perturbed with respect to the global equilibrium. The quasi-static and collisionless distribution function and transport coefficients are established. The influence of relativistic effects is also discussed. The second application deals with strongly inhomogeneous magnetized plasmas. The transport coefficients of Braginskii are calculated numerically in the local and the weakly nonlocal approximations. New nonlocal transport coefficients are emphasized. Finally, we apply the kinetic theory to the neutral gases by calculating the semi-collisional dispersion relation of acoustic waves. In particular, the dispersion and the damping of these waves in rarefied gases are highlighted. The method used to solve the kinetic equations is compared with the conventional method of Chapman-Enskog.

  1. CFEST Coupled Flow, Energy & Solute Transport Version CFEST005 Theory Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, Vicky L.; Chen, Yousu; Gupta, Sumant K.

    2005-11-01

    This document presents the mathematical theory implemented in the CFEST (Coupled Flow, Energy, and Solute Transport) simulator. The simulator is a three-dimensional finite element model that can be used for evaluating flow and solute mass transport. Although the theory for thermal transport is presented in this guide, it has not yet been fully implemented in the simulator. The flow module is capable of simulating both confined and unconfined aquifer systems, as well as constant and variable density fluid flows. For unconfined aquifers, the model uses a moving boundary for the water table, deforming the numerical mesh so that the uppermost nodes are always at the water table. For solute transport, changes in concentration of a single dissolved chemical constituent are computed for advective and hydrodynamic transport, linear sorption represented by a retardation factor, and radioactive decay. Once fully implemented, transport of thermal energy in the groundwater and solid matrix of the aquifer can also be used to model aquifer thermal regimes. Mesh construction employs “collapsible”, hexahedral finite elements in a three-dimensional coordinate system. CFEST uses the Galerkin finite element method to convert the partial differential equations to algebraic form. To solve the coupled equations for momentum, solute and heat transport, either Picard or Newton-Raphson iterative schemes are used to treat nonlinearities. An upstream weighted residual finite-element method is used to solve the advective-dispersive transport and energy transfer equations, which circumvents problems of numerical oscillation problems. Matrix solutions of the flow and transport problems are performed using efficient iterative solvers available in ITPACK and PETSc, solvers that are available in the public domain. These solvers are based on the preconditioned conjugate gradient and ORTHOMIN methods for symmetric and a nonsymmetric matrices, respectively.

  2. Large-Scale Transportation Network Congestion Evolution Prediction Using Deep Learning Theory

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiaolei; Yu, Haiyang; Wang, Yunpeng; Wang, Yinhai

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how congestion at one location can cause ripples throughout large-scale transportation network is vital for transportation researchers and practitioners to pinpoint traffic bottlenecks for congestion mitigation. Traditional studies rely on either mathematical equations or simulation techniques to model traffic congestion dynamics. However, most of the approaches have limitations, largely due to unrealistic assumptions and cumbersome parameter calibration process. With the development of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) and Internet of Things (IoT), transportation data become more and more ubiquitous. This triggers a series of data-driven research to investigate transportation phenomena. Among them, deep learning theory is considered one of the most promising techniques to tackle tremendous high-dimensional data. This study attempts to extend deep learning theory into large-scale transportation network analysis. A deep Restricted Boltzmann Machine and Recurrent Neural Network architecture is utilized to model and predict traffic congestion evolution based on Global Positioning System (GPS) data from taxi. A numerical study in Ningbo, China is conducted to validate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed method. Results show that the prediction accuracy can achieve as high as 88% within less than 6 minutes when the model is implemented in a Graphic Processing Unit (GPU)-based parallel computing environment. The predicted congestion evolution patterns can be visualized temporally and spatially through a map-based platform to identify the vulnerable links for proactive congestion mitigation. PMID:25780910

  3. ANGULAR MOMENTUM TRANSPORT BY ACOUSTIC MODES GENERATED IN THE BOUNDARY LAYER. I. HYDRODYNAMICAL THEORY AND SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, Mikhail A.; Rafikov, Roman R.; Stone, James M.

    2013-06-10

    The nature of angular momentum transport in the boundary layers of accretion disks has been one of the central and long-standing issues of accretion disk theory. In this work we demonstrate that acoustic waves excited by supersonic shear in the boundary layer serve as an efficient mechanism of mass, momentum, and energy transport at the interface between the disk and the accreting object. We develop the theory of angular momentum transport by acoustic modes in the boundary layer, and support our findings with three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations, using an isothermal equation of state. Our first major result is the identification of three types of global modes in the boundary layer. We derive dispersion relations for each of these modes that accurately capture the pattern speeds observed in simulations to within a few percent. Second, we show that angular momentum transport in the boundary layer is intrinsically nonlocal, and is driven by radiation of angular momentum away from the boundary layer into both the star and the disk. The picture of angular momentum transport in the boundary layer by waves that can travel large distances before dissipating and redistributing angular momentum and energy to the disk and star is incompatible with the conventional notion of local transport by turbulent stresses. Our results have important implications for semianalytical models that describe the spectral emission from boundary layers.

  4. Large-scale transportation network congestion evolution prediction using deep learning theory.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaolei; Yu, Haiyang; Wang, Yunpeng; Wang, Yinhai

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how congestion at one location can cause ripples throughout large-scale transportation network is vital for transportation researchers and practitioners to pinpoint traffic bottlenecks for congestion mitigation. Traditional studies rely on either mathematical equations or simulation techniques to model traffic congestion dynamics. However, most of the approaches have limitations, largely due to unrealistic assumptions and cumbersome parameter calibration process. With the development of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) and Internet of Things (IoT), transportation data become more and more ubiquitous. This triggers a series of data-driven research to investigate transportation phenomena. Among them, deep learning theory is considered one of the most promising techniques to tackle tremendous high-dimensional data. This study attempts to extend deep learning theory into large-scale transportation network analysis. A deep Restricted Boltzmann Machine and Recurrent Neural Network architecture is utilized to model and predict traffic congestion evolution based on Global Positioning System (GPS) data from taxi. A numerical study in Ningbo, China is conducted to validate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed method. Results show that the prediction accuracy can achieve as high as 88% within less than 6 minutes when the model is implemented in a Graphic Processing Unit (GPU)-based parallel computing environment. The predicted congestion evolution patterns can be visualized temporally and spatially through a map-based platform to identify the vulnerable links for proactive congestion mitigation.

  5. Quasi-linear theory and transport theory. [particle acceleration in interplanetary medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Charles W.

    1992-01-01

    The theory of energetic particle scattering by magnetostatic fluctuations is reviewed in so far as it fails to produce the rigidity-independent mean-free-paths observed. Basic aspects of interplanetary magnetic field fluctuations are reviewed with emphasis placed on the existence of dissipation range spectra at high wavenumbers. These spectra are then incorporated into existing theories for resonant magnetostatic scattering and are shown to yield infinite mean-free-paths. Nonresonant scattering in the form of magnetic mirroring is examined and offered as a partial solution to the magnetostatic problem. In the process, mean-free-paths are obtained in good agreement with observations in the interplanetary medium at 1 AU and upstream of planetary bow shocks.

  6. Earth Observing System Covariance Realism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaidi, Waqar H.; Hejduk, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of covariance realism is to properly size a primary object's covariance in order to add validity to the calculation of the probability of collision. The covariance realism technique in this paper consists of three parts: collection/calculation of definitive state estimates through orbit determination, calculation of covariance realism test statistics at each covariance propagation point, and proper assessment of those test statistics. An empirical cumulative distribution function (ECDF) Goodness-of-Fit (GOF) method is employed to determine if a covariance is properly sized by comparing the empirical distribution of Mahalanobis distance calculations to the hypothesized parent 3-DoF chi-squared distribution. To realistically size a covariance for collision probability calculations, this study uses a state noise compensation algorithm that adds process noise to the definitive epoch covariance to account for uncertainty in the force model. Process noise is added until the GOF tests pass a group significance level threshold. The results of this study indicate that when outliers attributed to persistently high or extreme levels of solar activity are removed, the aforementioned covariance realism compensation method produces a tuned covariance with up to 80 to 90% of the covariance propagation timespan passing (against a 60% minimum passing threshold) the GOF tests-a quite satisfactory and useful result.

  7. Covariant magnetic connection hypersurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pegoraro, F.

    2016-04-01

    > In the single fluid, non-relativistic, ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) plasma description, magnetic field lines play a fundamental role by defining dynamically preserved `magnetic connections' between plasma elements. Here we show how the concept of magnetic connection needs to be generalized in the case of a relativistic MHD description where we require covariance under arbitrary Lorentz transformations. This is performed by defining 2-D magnetic connection hypersurfaces in the 4-D Minkowski space. This generalization accounts for the loss of simultaneity between spatially separated events in different frames and is expected to provide a powerful insight into the 4-D geometry of electromagnetic fields when .

  8. Relativistic phenomenology of meson spectra with a covariant quark model in Minkowski space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitão, Sofia; Stadler, Alfred; Peña, M. T.; Biernat, Elmar P.

    2017-03-01

    In this work, we perform a covariant treatment of quark-antiquark systems.We calculate the spectra and wave functions using a formalism based on the Covariant Spectator Theory (CST). Our results not only reproduce very well the experimental data with a very small set of global parameters, but they also allow a direct test of the predictive power of covariant kernels.

  9. Studies of transport of asphaltenes through membranes using hindered diffusion theories for spheres and spheroids

    SciTech Connect

    Ravi-Kumar, V.S.; Tsotsis, T.T.; Sahimi, M.

    1997-08-01

    The results of ongoing efforts by this group to model the transport of asphaltene molecules through model membranes are presented. A model is described which aims to capture the effect of the polydisperse nature of asphaltene molecules on their transport properties. The asphaltene structure is generated stochastically using Monte Carlo techniques. Individual asphaltene molecules are approximated as spheroids for the purpose of calculating their hindered diffusivities. Continuum hydrodynamic theories and boundary element methods are used to calculate the diffusion coefficients. A number of analytical expressions, scaling relationships and approximations utilized in the literature are evaluated.

  10. Beyond Orbital-Motion-Limited theory effects for dust transport in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Delzanno, Gian Luca; Tang, Xianzhu

    2015-05-29

    Dust transport in tokamaks is very important for ITER. Can many kilograms of dust really accumulate in the device? Can the dust survive? The conventional dust transport model is based on Orbital-Motion-Limited theory (OML). But OML can break in the limit where the dust grain becomes positively charged due to electron emission processes because it overestimates the dust collected power. An OML+ approximation of the emitted electrons trapped/passing boundary is shown to be in good agreement with PIC simulations.

  11. The FN method for anisotropic scattering in neutron transport theory: the critical slab problem.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gülecyüz, M. C.; Tezcan, C.

    1996-08-01

    The FN method which has been applied to many physical problems for isotropic and anisotropic scattering in neutron transport theory is extended for problems for extremely anisotropic scattering. This method depends on the Placzek lemma and the use of the infinite medium Green's function. Here the Green's function for extremely anisotropic scattering which was expressed as a combination of the Green's functions for isotropic scattering is used to solve the critical slab problem. It is shown that the criticality condition is in agreement with the one obtained previously by reducing the transport equation for anisotropic scattering to isotropic scattering and solving using the FN method.

  12. Molecular Theory for Electrokinetic Transport in pH-Regulated Nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xian; Jiang, Jian; Lu, Diannan; Liu, Zheng; Wu, Jianzhong

    2014-09-04

    Ion transport through nanochannels depends on various external driving forces as well as the structural and hydrodynamic inhomogeneity of the confined fluid inside of the pore. Conventional models of electrokinetic transport neglect the discrete nature of ionic species and electrostatic correlations important at the boundary and often lead to inconsistent predictions of the surface potential and the surface charge density. Here, we demonstrate that the electrokinetic phenomena can be successfully described by the classical density functional theory in conjunction with the Navier-Stokes equation for the fluid flow. The new theoretical procedure predicts ion conductivity in various pH-regulated nanochannels under different driving forces, in excellent agreement with experimental data.

  13. Plasma confinement theory and transport simulation. Technical progress report, May 1, 1991--April 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, D.W.

    1993-10-01

    The objectives of the Fusion Research Center Theory Program continue to be: (1) to advance the transport studies of tokamaks, including development and maintenance of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Database; and (2) to provide theoretical interpretation, modeling and equilibrium and stability studies for the TEXT-Upgrade tokamak. Publications and reports and conference presentations for the grant period are listed. Work is described in five basic categories: A. Magnetic Fusion Energy Database; B. Computational Support and Numerical Modeling; C. Support for TEXT-Upgrade and Diagnostics; D. Transport Studies; E. Alfven Waves.

  14. Plasma confinement theory and transport simulation. Final report, October 1, 1988--October 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, D.W.

    1994-10-01

    The objectives of the Fusion Research Center Theory Program are: (1) to advance the transport studies of tokamaks, including development and maintenance of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Database, and (2) to provide theoretical interpretation, modeling and equilibrium and stability studies for the TEXT-Upgrade tokamak. Publications and reports and conference presentations for the grant period are listed. Work is described in five basic categories: (A) magnetic fusion energy database; (B) computational support and numerical modeling; (C) support for TEXT-upgrade and diagnostics; (D) transport studies; and (E) Alfven waves.

  15. Full quantum theory of the chiral anomaly transport in a Weyl semimetal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Woo-Ram; Park, Kwon; KIAS Team

    In relativistic field theory, the chiral anomaly means a violation of the number conservation of chiral fermions. In condensed matter physics, the chiral anomaly can be manifested in a Weyl semimetal as a negative magnetoresistance in the presence of parallel electric and magnetic fields. In this work, we use the Keldysh-Floquet Green's function formalism to develop a full quantum theory of the chiral anomaly transport, which can be valid in a broad range of both electric and magnetic field strengths. The authors thank KIAS Center for Advanced Computation (CAC) for providing computing resources.

  16. Covariant quantization of the CBS superparticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassi, P. A.; Policastro, G.; Porrati, M.

    2001-07-01

    The quantization of the Casalbuoni-Brink-Schwarz superparticle is performed in an explicitly covariant way using the antibracket formalism. Since an infinite number of ghost fields are required, within a suitable off-shell twistor-like formalism, we are able to fix the gauge of each ghost sector without modifying the physical content of the theory. The computation reveals that the antibracket cohomology contains only the physical degrees of freedom.

  17. cDF Theory Software for mesoscopic modeling of equilibrium and transport phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    2015-12-01

    The approach is based on classical Density Functional Theory ((cDFT) coupled with the Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) transport kinetics model and quantum mechanical description of short-range interaction and elementary transport processes. The model we proposed and implemented is fully atomistic, taking into account pairwise short-range and manybody long-range interactions. But in contrast to standard molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, where long-range manybody interactions are evaluated as a sum of pair-wise atom-atom contributions, we include them analytically based on wellestablished theories of electrostatic and excluded volume interactions in multicomponent systems. This feature of the PNP/cDFT approach allows us to reach well beyond the length-scales accessible to MD simulations, while retaining the essential physics of interatomic interactions from first principles and in a parameter-free fashion.

  18. Electronic transport properties of one dimensional lithium nanowire using density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Thakur, Anil; Kumar, Arun; Chandel, Surjeet; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2015-05-15

    Single nanowire electrode devices are a unique platform for studying as energy storage devices. Lithium nanowire is of much importance in lithium ion batteries and therefore has received a great deal of attention in past few years. In this paper we investigated structural and electronic transport properties of Li nanowire using density functional theory (DFT) with SIESTA code. Electronic transport properties of Li nanowire are investigated theoretically. The calculations are performed in two steps: first an optimized geometry for Li nanowire is obtained using DFT calculations, and then the transport relations are obtained using NEGF approach. SIESTA and TranSIESTA simulation codes are used in the calculations correspondingly. The electrodes are chosen to be the same as the central region where transport is studied, eliminating current quantization effects due to contacts and focusing the electronic transport study to the intrinsic structure of the material. By varying chemical potential in the electrode regions, an I-V curve is traced which is in agreement with the predicted behavior. Agreement of bulk properties of Li with experimental values make the study of electronic and transport properties in lithium nanowires interesting because they are promising candidates as bridging pieces in nanoelectronics. Transmission coefficient and V-I characteristic of Li nano wire indicates that Li nanowire can be used as an electrode device.

  19. Electronic transport properties of one dimensional lithium nanowire using density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Anil; Kumar, Arun; Chandel, Surjeet; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2015-05-01

    Single nanowire electrode devices are a unique platform for studying as energy storage devices. Lithium nanowire is of much importance in lithium ion batteries and therefore has received a great deal of attention in past few years. In this paper we investigated structural and electronic transport properties of Li nanowire using density functional theory (DFT) with SIESTA code. Electronic transport properties of Li nanowire are investigated theoretically. The calculations are performed in two steps: first an optimized geometry for Li nanowire is obtained using DFT calculations, and then the transport relations are obtained using NEGF approach. SIESTA and TranSIESTA simulation codes are used in the calculations correspondingly. The electrodes are chosen to be the same as the central region where transport is studied, eliminating current quantization effects due to contacts and focusing the electronic transport study to the intrinsic structure of the material. By varying chemical potential in the electrode regions, an I-V curve is traced which is in agreement with the predicted behavior. Agreement of bulk properties of Li with experimental values make the study of electronic and transport properties in lithium nanowires interesting because they are promising candidates as bridging pieces in nanoelectronics. Transmission coefficient and V-I characteristic of Li nano wire indicates that Li nanowire can be used as an electrode device.

  20. Many-body theory of electric and thermal transport in single-molecule heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergfield, Justin

    2010-03-01

    Electron transport in single-molecule junctions (SMJ) is a key example of a strongly-correlated system far from equilibrium, with myriad potential applications in nanotechnology. When macroscopic leads are attached to a single molecule, a SMJ is formed, transforming the ``few-body'' molecular problem into a true ``many-body'' problem. Until recently, a theory of transport that properly accounts for both the particle and wave character of the electron has been lacking, so that the Coulomb blockade and coherent transport regimes were considered ``complementary.'' We have developed a nonequilibrium many-body theoryfootnotetextJ. P. Bergfield and C. A. Stafford, Phys. Rev. B 79, 245125 (2009). that reproduces the key features of both the Coulomb blockade and coherent transport regimes simultaneously. Our approach is based on nonequilibrium Green's functions, enabling physically motivated approximations that sum terms to all orders. The junction Green's functions are calculated exactly in the sequential-tunneling limit, and the corrections to the electron self-energy due to finite tunneling width are included via Dyson-Keldysh equations. In this talk, I will present a brief overview of our many-body theory of SMJ and discuss the simulated linear and nonlinear response of a benzenedithiol-gold junction. I will also outline our derivation of an exact expression for the heat current in an interacting nanostructure, highlighting our predictionfootnotetextJ. P. Bergfield and C. A. Stafford, Nano Letters 9, 3072 (2009). of a dramatic quantum-induced enhancement of thermoelectric effects in the vicinity of a transmission node. Finally, I will provide several striking examples where the predictions of our many-body theory differ drastically from those of mean-field (density functional) theory.

  1. HIGH DIMENSIONAL COVARIANCE MATRIX ESTIMATION IN APPROXIMATE FACTOR MODELS

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jianqing; Liao, Yuan; Mincheva, Martina

    2012-01-01

    The variance covariance matrix plays a central role in the inferential theories of high dimensional factor models in finance and economics. Popular regularization methods of directly exploiting sparsity are not directly applicable to many financial problems. Classical methods of estimating the covariance matrices are based on the strict factor models, assuming independent idiosyncratic components. This assumption, however, is restrictive in practical applications. By assuming sparse error covariance matrix, we allow the presence of the cross-sectional correlation even after taking out common factors, and it enables us to combine the merits of both methods. We estimate the sparse covariance using the adaptive thresholding technique as in Cai and Liu (2011), taking into account the fact that direct observations of the idiosyncratic components are unavailable. The impact of high dimensionality on the covariance matrix estimation based on the factor structure is then studied. PMID:22661790

  2. HIGH DIMENSIONAL COVARIANCE MATRIX ESTIMATION IN APPROXIMATE FACTOR MODELS.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jianqing; Liao, Yuan; Mincheva, Martina

    2011-01-01

    The variance covariance matrix plays a central role in the inferential theories of high dimensional factor models in finance and economics. Popular regularization methods of directly exploiting sparsity are not directly applicable to many financial problems. Classical methods of estimating the covariance matrices are based on the strict factor models, assuming independent idiosyncratic components. This assumption, however, is restrictive in practical applications. By assuming sparse error covariance matrix, we allow the presence of the cross-sectional correlation even after taking out common factors, and it enables us to combine the merits of both methods. We estimate the sparse covariance using the adaptive thresholding technique as in Cai and Liu (2011), taking into account the fact that direct observations of the idiosyncratic components are unavailable. The impact of high dimensionality on the covariance matrix estimation based on the factor structure is then studied.

  3. Network Theory: A Primer and Questions for Air Transportation Systems Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Bruce J.

    2004-01-01

    A new understanding (with potential applications to air transportation systems) has emerged in the past five years in the scientific field of networks. This development emerges in large part because we now have a new laboratory for developing theories about complex networks: The Internet. The premise of this new understanding is that most complex networks of interest, both of nature and of human contrivance, exhibit a fundamentally different behavior than thought for over two hundred years under classical graph theory. Classical theory held that networks exhibited random behavior, characterized by normal, (e.g., Gaussian or Poisson) degree distributions of the connectivity between nodes by links. The new understanding turns this idea on its head: networks of interest exhibit scale-free (or small world) degree distributions of connectivity, characterized by power law distributions. The implications of scale-free behavior for air transportation systems include the potential that some behaviors of complex system architectures might be analyzed through relatively simple approximations of local elements of the system. For air transportation applications, this presentation proposes a framework for constructing topologies (architectures) that represent the relationships between mobility, flight operations, aircraft requirements, and airspace capacity, and the related externalities in airspace procedures and architectures. The proposed architectures or topologies may serve as a framework for posing comparative and combinative analyses of performance, cost, security, environmental, and related metrics.

  4. Estimation of Interbasin Transport Using Ocean Bottom Pressure: Theory and Model for Asian Marginal Seas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Y. Tony

    2006-01-01

    The Asian Marginal Seas are interconnected by a number of narrow straits, such as the Makassar Strait connecting the Pacific Ocean with the Indian Ocean, the Luzon Strait connecting the South China Sea with the Pacific Ocean, and the Korea/Tsushima Strait connecting the East China Sea with the Japan/East Sea. Here we propose a method, the combination of the "geostrophic control" formula of Garrett and Toulany (1982) and the "hydraulic control" theory of Whitehead et al. (1974), allowing the use of satellite-observed sea-surface-height (SSH) and ocean-bottom-pressure (OBP) data for estimating interbasin transport. The new method also allows separating the interbasin transport into surface and bottom fluxes that play an important role in maintaining the mass balance of the regional oceans. Comparison with model results demonstrates that the combined method can estimate the seasonal variability of the strait transports and is significantly better than the method of using SSH or OBP alone.

  5. Theory and numerical application of subsurface flow and transport for transient freezing conditions

    SciTech Connect

    White, M.D.

    1995-04-01

    Protective barriers are being investigated for the containment of radioactive waste within subsurface environments. Predicting the effectiveness of cryogenic barriers and near-surface barriers in temperate or arctic climates requires capabilities for numerically modeling subsurface flow and transport for freezing soil conditions. A predictive numerical model is developed herein to simulate the flow and transport of radioactive solutes for three-phase (water-ice-air) systems under freezing conditions. This physically based model simulates the simultaneous flow of water, air, heat, and radioactive solutes through variably saturated and variably frozen geologic media. Expressions for ice (frozen water) and liquid water saturations as functions of temperature, interfacial pressure differences, and osmotic potential are developed from nonhysteretic versions of the Brooks and Corey and van Genuchten functions for soil moisture retention. Aqueous relative permeability functions for variably saturated and variably frozen geologic media are developed from the Mualem and Burdine theories for predicting relative permeability of unsaturated soil. Soil deformations, caused by freezing and melting transitions, are neglected. Algorithms developed for predicting ice and liquid water saturations and aqueous-phase permeabilities were incorporated into the finite-difference based numerical simulator STOMP (Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases). Application of the theory is demonstrated by the solution of heat and mass transport in a horizontal cylinder of partially saturated porous media with differentially cooled ends, with the colder end held below the liquid water freezing point. This problem represents an essential capability for modeling cryogenic barriers in variably saturated geologic media.

  6. Preferential Transport Theory for Beta-Amyloid Clearance from the Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coloma, Mikhail; Schaffer, David; Chiarot, Paul; Huang, Peter

    2015-11-01

    The failure to clear beta-amyloid from the aging brain leads to its accumulation within the walls of arteries and to Alzheimer's disease. However, the transport mechanism for beta-amyloid clearance is not well understood. In this study, we propose a preferential transport theory for flow within the vascular walls in the cerebral arterial basement membrane. The flow conduit within the arterial basement membrane is modeled as an annulus between deformable concentric cylinders filled with an incompressible, single-phase Newtonian fluid. The transport is driven by arterial lumen deformation induced by heart pulsations superimposed with reflected boundary waves. Our theory predicts that while the overall arterial wave propagation is in the same direction as the blood flow toward the capillaries, a reverse flow in the basement membrane can be preferentially induced toward larger arteries. This has been suggested as a potential clearance pathway for beta-amyloid. We estimate the magnitude of the reverse transport through a control volume analysis which is corroborated by numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations. Bench-top experiments to validate our computational models are presented.

  7. Stardust Navigation Covariance Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Premkumar R.

    2000-01-01

    The Stardust spacecraft was launched on February 7, 1999 aboard a Boeing Delta-II rocket. Mission participants include the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Lockheed Martin Astronautics (LMA) and the University of Washington. The primary objective of the mission is to collect in-situ samples of the coma of comet Wild-2 and return those samples to the Earth for analysis. Mission design and operational navigation for Stardust is performed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). This paper will describe the extensive JPL effort in support of the Stardust pre-launch analysis of the orbit determination component of the mission covariance study. A description of the mission and it's trajectory will be provided first, followed by a discussion of the covariance procedure and models. Predicted accuracy's will be examined as they relate to navigation delivery requirements for specific critical events during the mission. Stardust was launched into a heliocentric trajectory in early 1999. It will perform an Earth Gravity Assist (EGA) on January 15, 2001 to acquire an orbit for the eventual rendezvous with comet Wild-2. The spacecraft will fly through the coma (atmosphere) on the dayside of Wild-2 on January 2, 2004. At that time samples will be obtained using an aerogel collector. After the comet encounter Stardust will return to Earth when the Sample Return Capsule (SRC) will separate and land at the Utah Test Site (UTTR) on January 15, 2006. The spacecraft will however be deflected off into a heliocentric orbit. The mission is divided into three phases for the covariance analysis. They are 1) Launch to EGA, 2) EGA to Wild-2 encounter and 3) Wild-2 encounter to Earth reentry. Orbit determination assumptions for each phase are provided. These include estimated and consider parameters and their associated a-priori uncertainties. Major perturbations to the trajectory include 19 deterministic and statistical maneuvers

  8. Covariance Manipulation for Conjunction Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hejduk, M. D.

    2016-01-01

    Use of probability of collision (Pc) has brought sophistication to CA. Made possible by JSpOC precision catalogue because provides covariance. Has essentially replaced miss distance as basic CA parameter. Embrace of Pc has elevated methods to 'manipulate' covariance to enable/improve CA calculations. Two such methods to be examined here; compensation for absent or unreliable covariances through 'Maximum Pc' calculation constructs, projection (not propagation) of epoch covariances forward in time to try to enable better risk assessments. Two questions to be answered about each; situations to which such approaches are properly applicable, amount of utility that such methods offer.

  9. A New Approach for Nuclear Data Covariance and Sensitivity Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, L.C.; Larson, N.M.; Derrien, H.; Kawano, T.; Chadwick, M.B.

    2005-05-24

    Covariance data are required to correctly assess uncertainties in design parameters in nuclear applications. The error estimation of calculated quantities relies on the nuclear data uncertainty information available in the basic nuclear data libraries, such as the U.S. Evaluated Nuclear Data File, ENDF/B. The uncertainty files in the ENDF/B library are obtained from the analysis of experimental data and are stored as variance and covariance data. The computer code SAMMY is used in the analysis of the experimental data in the resolved and unresolved resonance energy regions. The data fitting of cross sections is based on generalized least-squares formalism (Bayes' theory) together with the resonance formalism described by R-matrix theory. Two approaches are used in SAMMY for the generation of resonance-parameter covariance data. In the evaluation process SAMMY generates a set of resonance parameters that fit the data, and, in addition, it also provides the resonance-parameter covariances. For existing resonance-parameter evaluations where no resonance-parameter covariance data are available, the alternative is to use an approach called the 'retroactive' resonance-parameter covariance generation. In the high-energy region the methodology for generating covariance data consists of least-squares fitting and model parameter adjustment. The least-squares fitting method calculates covariances directly from experimental data. The parameter adjustment method employs a nuclear model calculation such as the optical model and the Hauser-Feshbach model, and estimates a covariance for the nuclear model parameters. In this paper we describe the application of the retroactive method and the parameter adjustment method to generate covariance data for the gadolinium isotopes.

  10. Theory of band warping and its effects on thermoelectronic transport properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mecholsky, Nicholas A.; Resca, Lorenzo; Pegg, Ian L.; Fornari, Marco

    2014-04-01

    Optical and transport properties of materials depend heavily upon features of electronic band structures in proximity of energy extrema in the Brillouin zone (BZ). Such features are generally described in terms of multidimensional quadratic expansions and corresponding definitions of effective masses. Multidimensional quadratic expansions, however, are permissible only under strict conditions that are typically violated when energy bands become degenerate at extrema in the BZ. Even for energy bands that are nondegenerate at critical points in the BZ there are instances in which multidimensional quadratic expansions cannot be correctly performed. Suggestive terms such as "band warping," "fluted energy surfaces," or "corrugated energy surfaces" have been used to refer to such situations and ad hoc methods have been developed to treat them. While numerical calculations may reflect such features, a complete theory of band warping has not hitherto been developed. We define band warping as referring to band structures that do not admit second-order differentiability at critical points in k space and we develop a generally applicable theory, based on radial expansions, and a corresponding definition of angular effective mass. Our theory also accounts for effects of band nonparabolicity and anisotropy, which hitherto have not been precisely distinguished from, if not utterly confused with, band warping. Based on our theory, we develop precise procedures to evaluate band warping quantitatively. As a benchmark demonstration, we analyze the warping features of valence bands in silicon using first-principles calculations and we compare those with previous semiempirical models. As an application of major significance to thermoelectricity, we use our theory and angular effective masses to generalize derivations of tensorial transport coefficients for cases of either single or multiple electronic bands, with either quadratically expansible or warped energy surfaces. From that

  11. Perturbative approach to covariance matrix of the matter power spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammed, Irshad; Seljak, Uros; Vlah, Zvonimir

    2016-06-30

    We evaluate the covariance matrix of the matter power spectrum using perturbation theory up to dominant terms at 1-loop order and compare it to numerical simulations. We decompose the covariance matrix into the disconnected (Gaussian) part, trispectrum from the modes outside the survey (beat coupling or super-sample variance), and trispectrum from the modes inside the survey, and show how the different components contribute to the overall covariance matrix. We find the agreement with the simulations is at a 10\\% level up to $k \\sim 1 h {\\rm Mpc^{-1}}$. We show that all the connected components are dominated by the large-scale modes ($k<0.1 h {\\rm Mpc^{-1}}$), regardless of the value of the wavevectors $k,\\, k'$ of the covariance matrix, suggesting that one must be careful in applying the jackknife or bootstrap methods to the covariance matrix. We perform an eigenmode decomposition of the connected part of the covariance matrix, showing that at higher $k$ it is dominated by a single eigenmode. The full covariance matrix can be approximated as the disconnected part only, with the connected part being treated as an external nuisance parameter with a known scale dependence, and a known prior on its variance for a given survey volume. Finally, we provide a prescription for how to evaluate the covariance matrix from small box simulations without the need to simulate large volumes.

  12. Perturbative approach to covariance matrix of the matter power spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, Irshad; Seljak, Uroš; Vlah, Zvonimir

    2017-04-01

    We evaluate the covariance matrix of the matter power spectrum using perturbation theory up to dominant terms at 1-loop order and compare it to numerical simulations. We decompose the covariance matrix into the disconnected (Gaussian) part, trispectrum from the modes outside the survey (supersample variance) and trispectrum from the modes inside the survey, and show how the different components contribute to the overall covariance matrix. We find the agreement with the simulations is at a 10 per cent level up to k ∼ 1 h Mpc-1. We show that all the connected components are dominated by the large-scale modes (k < 0.1 h Mpc-1), regardless of the value of the wave vectors k, k΄ of the covariance matrix, suggesting that one must be careful in applying the jackknife or bootstrap methods to the covariance matrix. We perform an eigenmode decomposition of the connected part of the covariance matrix, showing that at higher k, it is dominated by a single eigenmode. The full covariance matrix can be approximated as the disconnected part only, with the connected part being treated as an external nuisance parameter with a known scale dependence, and a known prior on its variance for a given survey volume. Finally, we provide a prescription for how to evaluate the covariance matrix from small box simulations without the need to simulate large volumes.

  13. Covariant harmonic oscillators: 1973 revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noz, M. E.

    1993-01-01

    Using the relativistic harmonic oscillator, a physical basis is given to the phenomenological wave function of Yukawa which is covariant and normalizable. It is shown that this wave function can be interpreted in terms of the unitary irreducible representations of the Poincare group. The transformation properties of these covariant wave functions are also demonstrated.

  14. Covariance hypotheses for LANDSAT data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decell, H. P.; Peters, C.

    1983-01-01

    Two covariance hypotheses are considered for LANDSAT data acquired by sampling fields, one an autoregressive covariance structure and the other the hypothesis of exchangeability. A minimum entropy approximation of the first structure by the second is derived and shown to have desirable properties for incorporation into a mixture density estimation procedure. Results of a rough test of the exchangeability hypothesis are presented.

  15. Universality in chaotic quantum transport: the concordance between random-matrix and semiclassical theories.

    PubMed

    Berkolaiko, Gregory; Kuipers, Jack

    2012-04-01

    Electronic transport through chaotic quantum dots exhibits universal, system-independent properties, consistent with random-matrix theory. The quantum transport can also be rooted, via the semiclassical approximation, in sums over the classical scattering trajectories. Correlations between such trajectories can be organized diagrammatically and have been shown to yield universal answers for some observables. Here, we develop the general combinatorial treatment of the semiclassical diagrams, through a connection to factorizations of permutations. We show agreement between the semiclassical and random matrix approaches to the moments of the transmission eigenvalues. The result is valid for all moments to all orders of the expansion in inverse channel number for all three main symmetry classes (with and without time-reversal symmetry and spin-orbit interaction) and extends to nonlinear statistics. This finally explains the applicability of random-matrix theory to chaotic quantum transport in terms of the underlying dynamics as well as providing semiclassical access to the probability density of the transmission eigenvalues.

  16. (In)validity of the constant field and constant currents assumptions in theories of ion transport.

    PubMed Central

    Syganow, A; von Kitzing, E

    1999-01-01

    Constant electric fields and constant ion currents are often considered in theories of ion transport. Therefore, it is important to understand the validity of these helpful concepts. The constant field assumption requires that the charge density of permeant ions and flexible polar groups is virtually voltage independent. We present analytic relations that indicate the conditions under which the constant field approximation applies. Barrier models are frequently fitted to experimental current-voltage curves to describe ion transport. These models are based on three fundamental characteristics: a constant electric field, negligible concerted motions of ions inside the channel (an ion can enter only an empty site), and concentration-independent energy profiles. An analysis of those fundamental assumptions of barrier models shows that those approximations require large barriers because the electrostatic interaction is strong and has a long range. In the constant currents assumption, the current of each permeating ion species is considered to be constant throughout the channel; thus ion pairing is explicitly ignored. In inhomogeneous steady-state systems, the association rate constant determines the strength of ion pairing. Among permeable ions, however, the ion association rate constants are not small, according to modern diffusion-limited reaction rate theories. A mathematical formulation of a constant currents condition indicates that ion pairing very likely has an effect but does not dominate ion transport. PMID:9929480

  17. Theory of Band Warping and its Effects on Thermoelectronic Transport Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mecholsky, Nicholas; Resca, Lorenzo; Pegg, Ian; Fornari, Marco

    2015-03-01

    Transport properties of materials depend upon features of band structures near extrema in the BZ. Such features are generally described in terms of quadratic expansions and effective masses. Such expansions, however, are permissible only under strict conditions that are sometimes violated by materials. Suggestive terms such as ``band warping'' have been used to refer to such situations and ad hoc methods have been developed to treat them. We develop a generally applicable theory, based on radial expansions, and a corresponding definition of angular effective mass which also accounts for effects of band non-parabolicity and anisotropy. Further, we develop precise procedures to evaluate band warping quantitatively and as an example we analyze the warping features of valence bands in silicon using first-principles calculations and we compare those with semi-empirical models. We use our theory to generalize derivations of transport coefficients for cases of either single or multiple electronic bands, with either quadratically expansible or warped energy surfaces. We introduce the transport-equivalent ellipsoid and illustrate the drastic effects that band warping can induce on thermoelectric properties using multi-band models. Vitreous State Laboratory and Samsung's GRO program.

  18. Chiral four-dimensional heterotic covariant lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beye, Florian

    2014-11-01

    In the covariant lattice formalism, chiral four-dimensional heterotic string vacua are obtained from certain even self-dual lattices which completely decompose into a left-mover and a right-mover lattice. The main purpose of this work is to classify all right-mover lattices that can appear in such a chiral model, and to study the corresponding left-mover lattices using the theory of lattice genera. In particular, the Smith-Minkowski-Siegel mass formula is employed to calculate a lower bound on the number of left-mover lattices. Also, the known relationship between asymmetric orbifolds and covariant lattices is considered in the context of our classification.

  19. On covariance structure in noisy, big data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paffenroth, Randy C.; Nong, Ryan; Du Toit, Philip C.

    2013-09-01

    Herein we describe theory and algorithms for detecting covariance structures in large, noisy data sets. Our work uses ideas from matrix completion and robust principal component analysis to detect the presence of low-rank covariance matrices, even when the data is noisy, distorted by large corruptions, and only partially observed. In fact, the ability to handle partial observations combined with ideas from randomized algorithms for matrix decomposition enables us to produce asymptotically fast algorithms. Herein we will provide numerical demonstrations of the methods and their convergence properties. While such methods have applicability to many problems, including mathematical finance, crime analysis, and other large-scale sensor fusion problems, our inspiration arises from applying these methods in the context of cyber network intrusion detection.

  20. Different Approaches to Covariate Inclusion in the Mixture Rasch Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Tongyun; Jiao, Hong; Macready, George B.

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigates different approaches to adding covariates and the impact in fitting mixture item response theory models. Mixture item response theory models serve as an important methodology for tackling several psychometric issues in test development, including the detection of latent differential item functioning. A Monte Carlo…

  1. Normal and Anomalous Diffusion: An Analytical Study Based on Quantum Collision Dynamics and Boltzmann Transport Theory.

    PubMed

    Mahakrishnan, Sathiya; Chakraborty, Subrata; Vijay, Amrendra

    2016-09-15

    Diffusion, an emergent nonequilibrium transport phenomenon, is a nontrivial manifestation of the correlation between the microscopic dynamics of individual molecules and their statistical behavior observed in experiments. We present a thorough investigation of this viewpoint using the mathematical tools of quantum scattering, within the framework of Boltzmann transport theory. In particular, we ask: (a) How and when does a normal diffusive transport become anomalous? (b) What physical attribute of the system is conceptually useful to faithfully rationalize large variations in the coefficient of normal diffusion, observed particularly within the dynamical environment of biological cells? To characterize the diffusive transport, we introduce, analogous to continuous phase transitions, the curvature of the mean square displacement as an order parameter and use the notion of quantum scattering length, which measures the effective interactions between the diffusing molecules and the surrounding, to define a tuning variable, η. We show that the curvature signature conveniently differentiates the normal diffusion regime from the superdiffusion and subdiffusion regimes and the critical point, η = ηc, unambiguously determines the coefficient of normal diffusion. To solve the Boltzmann equation analytically, we use a quantum mechanical expression for the scattering amplitude in the Boltzmann collision term and obtain a general expression for the effective linear collision operator, useful for a variety of transport studies. We also demonstrate that the scattering length is a useful dynamical characteristic to rationalize experimental observations on diffusive transport in complex systems. We assess the numerical accuracy of the present work with representative experimental results on diffusion processes in biological systems. Furthermore, we advance the idea of temperature-dependent effective voltage (of the order of 1 μV or less in a biological environment, for example

  2. Time-dependent density functional theory quantum transport simulation in non-orthogonal basis.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Yan Ho; Xie, Hang; Yam, Chi Yung; Zheng, Xiao; Chen, Guan Hua

    2013-12-14

    Basing on the earlier works on the hierarchical equations of motion for quantum transport, we present in this paper a first principles scheme for time-dependent quantum transport by combining time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) and Keldysh's non-equilibrium Green's function formalism. This scheme is beyond the wide band limit approximation and is directly applicable to the case of non-orthogonal basis without the need of basis transformation. The overlap between the basis in the lead and the device region is treated properly by including it in the self-energy and it can be shown that this approach is equivalent to a lead-device orthogonalization. This scheme has been implemented at both TDDFT and density functional tight-binding level. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate our method and comparison with wide band limit approximation is made. Finally, the sparsity of the matrices and computational complexity of this method are analyzed.

  3. Fokker Planck and Krook theory of energetic electron transport in a laser produced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Manheimer, Wallace; Colombant, Denis

    2015-09-15

    Various laser plasma instabilities, such as the two plasma decay instability and the stimulated Raman scatter instability, produce large quantities of energetic electrons. How these electrons are transported and heat the plasma are crucial questions for laser fusion. This paper works out a Fokker Planck and Krook theory for such transport and heating. The result is a set of equations, for which one can find a simple asymptotic approximation for the solution, for the Fokker Planck case, and an exact solution for the Krook case. These solutions are evaluated and compared with one another. They give rise to expressions for the spatially dependent heating of the background plasma, as a function of the instantaneous laser and plasma parameters, in either planar or spherical geometry. These formulas are simple, universal (depending weakly only on the single parameter Z, the charge state), and can be easily be incorporated into a fluid simulation.

  4. Dissipative time-dependent quantum transport theory: Quantum interference and phonon induced decoherence dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Yam, ChiYung; Chen, GuanHua

    2015-04-28

    A time-dependent inelastic electron transport theory for strong electron-phonon interaction is established via the equations of motion method combined with the small polaron transformation. In this work, the dissipation via electron-phonon coupling is taken into account in the strong coupling regime, which validates the small polaron transformation. The corresponding equations of motion are developed, which are used to study the quantum interference effect and phonon-induced decoherence dynamics in molecular junctions. Numerical studies show clearly quantum interference effect of the transport electrons through two quasi-degenerate states with different couplings to the leads. We also found that the quantum interference can be suppressed by the electron-phonon interaction where the phase coherence is destroyed by phonon scattering. This indicates the importance of electron-phonon interaction in systems with prominent quantum interference effect.

  5. Transport-theory based multispectral imaging with PDE-constrained optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun K.; Flexman, Molly; Yamashiro, Darrell J.; Kandel, Jessica J.; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2011-02-01

    We introduce here a transport-theory-based PDE-constrained multispectral imaging algorithm for direct reconstruction of the spatial distribution of chromophores in tissue. The method solves the forward and inverse problems simultaneously in the framework of a reduced Hessian sequential quadratic programming method. The performance of the new algorithm is evaluated using numerical and experimental studies involving tumor bearing mice. The results show that the PDE-constrained multispectral method leads to 15-fold acceleration in the image reconstruction of tissue chromophores when compared to the unconstrained multispectral approach and also gives more accurate results when compared to the traditional two-step method.

  6. Covariance Manipulation for Conjunction Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hejduk, M. D.

    2016-01-01

    The manipulation of space object covariances to try to provide additional or improved information to conjunction risk assessment is not an uncommon practice. Types of manipulation include fabricating a covariance when it is missing or unreliable to force the probability of collision (Pc) to a maximum value ('PcMax'), scaling a covariance to try to improve its realism or see the effect of covariance volatility on the calculated Pc, and constructing the equivalent of an epoch covariance at a convenient future point in the event ('covariance forecasting'). In bringing these methods to bear for Conjunction Assessment (CA) operations, however, some do not remain fully consistent with best practices for conducting risk management, some seem to be of relatively low utility, and some require additional information before they can contribute fully to risk analysis. This study describes some basic principles of modern risk management (following the Kaplan construct) and then examines the PcMax and covariance forecasting paradigms for alignment with these principles; it then further examines the expected utility of these methods in the modern CA framework. Both paradigms are found to be not without utility, but only in situations that are somewhat carefully circumscribed.

  7. Visualization of three-dimensional particle transport calculations with the use of generalized contributon theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gungordu, Erkut

    2000-11-01

    Generalized Contributon Theory has been implemented for three dimensional (x-y-z) cartesian geometry. The TORT 3D neutron/photon transport code is used for the calculation of the forward and adjoint directional fluxes and these are used for the generation of the contribution theory parameters. A new 3D contribution code has been developed for the generation of the contributon theory parameters. The new 3D contributon code is also capable of doing 2D calculations by using the data generated by the TORT code with its 2D calculational option. The integral response calculations of the contributon code are verified by the integral response conservation theorem of spatial channel theory using a 3D, eight-group symmetric dipole problem. The slowing down theory calculations of the contributon code are also verified using the slowing down equation with the same 3D problem. The spatial channel theory calculations are illustrated by a 3D, eight-group unsymmetrical dipole problem. This 3D geometry contains an irregular streaming gap and a shield region which is placed in front of the detector. The visualizations of the integral contributon flux show the important spatial regions of the response flow. The streamlines drawn by a quantitative streamline distribution technique reveals the spatial concentrations of the integral response flow. Quantitative streamline visualizations with three different 3D, eight-group unsymmetrical dipole problems very clearly show that the response flows through the least resistant regions of the medium. The volumetric color-contour visualizations of the response flow from different perspectives are also used to illustrate quantitatively the spatial response flow magnitude. The energy dependent processes of the response flow are investigated by contributon slowing down theory. The same 3D, eight-group unsymmetrical dipole problem prepared for the spatial channel theory applications is used for the numerical interpretation of the slowing down theory

  8. Motivation and challenge to capture both large-scale and local transport in next generation accretion theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackman, Eric G.; Nauman, Farrukh

    2015-10-01

    > Accretion disc theory is less developed than stellar evolution theory although a similarly mature phenomenological picture is ultimately desired. While the interplay of theory and numerical simulations has amplified community awareness of the role of magnetic fields in angular momentum transport, there remains a long term challenge to incorporate the insights gained from simulations into improving practical models for comparison with observations. What has been learned from simulations that can lead to improvements beyond SS73 in practical models? Here, we emphasize the need to incorporate the role of non-local transport more precisely. To show where large-scale transport would fit into the theoretical framework and how it is currently missing, we review why the wonderfully practical approach of Shakura & Sunyaev (Astron. Astrophys., vol. 24, 1973, pp. 337-355, SS73) is necessarily a mean field theory, and one which does not include large-scale transport. Observations of coronae and jets, combined with the interpretation of results from shearing box simulations, of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) suggest that a significant fraction of disc transport is indeed non-local. We show that the Maxwell stresses in saturation are dominated by large-scale contributions and that the physics of MRI transport is not fully captured by a viscosity. We also clarify the standard physical interpretation of the MRI as it applies to shearing boxes. Computational limitations have so far focused most attention toward local simulations, but the next generation of global simulations should help to inform improved mean field theories. Mean field accretion theory and mean field dynamo theory should in fact be unified into a single theory that predicts the time evolution of spectra and luminosity from separate disc, corona and outflow contributions. Finally, we note that any mean field theory, including that of SS73, has a finite predictive precision that needs to be quantified

  9. Performance assessment of several equations of state and second virial coefficients in modified Enskog theory: Results for transport properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiani, M.; Alavianmehr, M. M.; Otoofat, M.; Mohsenipour, A. A.; Ghatee, A.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we identify a simple method for predicting transport properties of fluids over wide ranges of temperatures and pressure. In this respect, the capability of several equations of state (EOS) and second virial coefficient correlations to predict transport properties of fluids including carbon dioxide, methane and argon using modified Enskog theory (MET) is investigated. The transport properties in question are viscosity and thermal conductivity. The results indicate that the SRK EOS employed in the modified Enskog theory outperforms other equations of state. The average absolute deviation was found to be 12.2 and 18.5% for, respectively, the calculated thermal conductivity and viscosity using the MET.

  10. A summary of research on the NASA-Global Atmospheric Sampling Program performed by the Atmospheric Sciences Research Center. [ozone transport theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, P. D.; Pratt, R. W.

    1979-01-01

    The annual variations of ozone near the tropopause are derived from aircraft exhibit year-to-year differences which are not explicitly accounted for by the simple, classical ozone transport theory. Phenomena such as tropopause lifting, interannual variations in the rates of stratospheric-tropospheric exchange and meridional mixing, contribute differently to the distribution of ozone in this altitude region. Ozone encounter climatologies have been represented by global maps which show the probabilities of exceeding ambient ozone levels of 200, 300, and 400 ppbV along flight routes during the year. Continuous ozone records obtained from the GASP system revealed the presence of gravity waves whose wavelength is of the order 20 km. The GASP data cannot, however, be utilized for the evaluation of horizontal fluxes of such quantities as ozone, sensible heat, and zonal momentum; the data are too sparsely and irregularly distributed for the computation of stable correlations. Multiple species data from the unique circumglobal flight of a Pan American airliner on 28-30 October 1977 are discussed with particular regard to the apparent interhemispheric differences in tropospheric species concentrations, variation between the Arctic and Antarctic stratospheres, to possible covariations between species, and to potential source regions for various constituents.

  11. Adjusting power for a baseline covariate in linear models

    PubMed Central

    Glueck, Deborah H.; Muller, Keith E.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY The analysis of covariance provides a common approach to adjusting for a baseline covariate in medical research. With Gaussian errors, adding random covariates does not change either the theory or the computations of general linear model data analysis. However, adding random covariates does change the theory and computation of power analysis. Many data analysts fail to fully account for this complication in planning a study. We present our results in five parts. (i) A review of published results helps document the importance of the problem and the limitations of available methods. (ii) A taxonomy for general linear multivariate models and hypotheses allows identifying a particular problem. (iii) We describe how random covariates introduce the need to consider quantiles and conditional values of power. (iv) We provide new exact and approximate methods for power analysis of a range of multivariate models with a Gaussian baseline covariate, for both small and large samples. The new results apply to the Hotelling-Lawley test and the four tests in the “univariate” approach to repeated measures (unadjusted, Huynh-Feldt, Geisser-Greenhouse, Box). The techniques allow rapid calculation and an interactive, graphical approach to sample size choice. (v) Calculating power for a clinical trial of a treatment for increasing bone density illustrates the new methods. We particularly recommend using quantile power with a new Satterthwaite-style approximation. PMID:12898543

  12. Hawking radiation and covariant anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Rabin; Kulkarni, Shailesh

    2008-01-15

    Generalizing the method of Wilczek and collaborators we provide a derivation of Hawking radiation from charged black holes using only covariant gauge and gravitational anomalies. The reliability and universality of the anomaly cancellation approach to Hawking radiation is also discussed.

  13. Generalization of Spatial Channel Theory to Three-Dimensional x-y-z Transport Computations

    SciTech Connect

    I. K. Abu-Shumays; M. A. Hunter; R. L. Martz; J. M. Risner

    2002-03-12

    Spatial channel theory, initially introduced in 1977 by M. L. Williams and colleagues at ORNL, is a powerful tool for shield design optimization. It focuses on so called ''contributon'' flux and current of particles (a fraction of the total of neutrons, photons, etc.) which contribute directly or through their progeny to a pre-specified response, such as a detector reading, dose rate, reaction rate, etc., at certain locations of interest. Particles that do not contribute directly or indirectly to the pre-specified response, such as particles that are absorbed or leak out, are ignored. Contributon fluxes and currents are computed based on combined forward and adjoint transport solutions. The initial concepts were considerably improved by Abu-Shumays, Selva, and Shure by introducing steam functions and response flow functions. Plots of such functions provide both qualitative and quantitative information on dominant particle flow paths and identify locations within a shield configuration that are important in contributing to the response of interest. Previous work was restricted to two dimensional (2-D) x-y rectangular and r-z cylindrical geometries. This paper generalizes previous work to three-dimensional x-y-z geometry, since it is now practical to solve realistic 3-D problems with multidimensional transport programs. As in previous work, new analytic expressions are provided for folding spherical harmonics representations of forward and adjoint transport flux solutions. As a result, the main integrals involve in spatial channel theory are computed exactly and more efficiently than by numerical quadrature. The analogy with incompressible fluid flow is also applied to obtain visual qualitative and quantitative measures of important streaming paths that could prove vital for shield design optimization. Illustrative examples are provided. The connection between the current paper and the excellent work completed by M. L. Williams in 1991 is also discussed.

  14. Critical comparison of electrode models in density functional theory based quantum transport calculations.

    PubMed

    Jacob, D; Palacios, J J

    2011-01-28

    We study the performance of two different electrode models in quantum transport calculations based on density functional theory: parametrized Bethe lattices and quasi-one-dimensional wires or nanowires. A detailed account of implementation details in both the cases is given. From the systematic study of nanocontacts made of representative metallic elements, we can conclude that the parametrized electrode models represent an excellent compromise between computational cost and electronic structure definition as long as the aim is to compare with experiments where the precise atomic structure of the electrodes is not relevant or defined with precision. The results obtained using parametrized Bethe lattices are essentially similar to the ones obtained with quasi-one-dimensional electrodes for large enough cross-sections of these, adding a natural smearing to the transmission curves that mimics the true nature of polycrystalline electrodes. The latter are more demanding from the computational point of view, but present the advantage of expanding the range of applicability of transport calculations to situations where the electrodes have a well-defined atomic structure, as is the case for carbon nanotubes, graphene nanoribbons, or semiconducting nanowires. All the analysis is done with the help of codes developed by the authors which can be found in the quantum transport toolbox ALACANT and are publicly available.

  15. GENERAL: Mean-field Theory for Some Bus Transport Networks with Random Overlapping Clique Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xu-Hua; Sun, Bao; Wang, Bo; Sun, You-Xian

    2010-04-01

    Transport networks, such as railway networks and airport networks, are a kind of random network with complex topology. Recently, more and more scholars paid attention to various kinds of transport networks and try to explore their inherent characteristics. Here we study the exponential properties of a recently introduced Bus Transport Networks (BTNs) evolution model with random overlapping clique structure, which gives a possible explanation for the observed exponential distribution of the connectivities of some BTNs of three major cities in China. Applying mean-field theory, we analyze the BTNs model and prove that this model has the character of exponential distribution of the connectivities, and develop a method to predict the growth dynamics of the individual vertices, and use this to calculate analytically the connectivity distribution and the exponents. By comparing mean-field based theoretic results with the statistical data of real BTNs, we observe that, as a whole, both of their data show similar character of exponential distribution of the connectivities, and their exponents have same order of magnitude, which show the availability of the analytical result of this paper.

  16. Quantum dissipation theory and applications to quantum transport and quantum measurement in mesoscopic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Ping

    The thesis comprises two major themes of quantum statistical dynamics. One is the development of quantum dissipation theory (QDT). It covers the establishment of some basic relations of quantum statistical dynamics, the construction of several nonequivalent complete second-order formulations, and the development of exact QDT. Another is related to the applications of quantum statistical dynamics to a variety of research fields. In particular, unconventional but novel theories of the electron transfer in Debye solvents, quantum transport, and quantum measurement are developed on the basis of QDT formulations. The thesis is organized as follows. In Chapter 1, we present some background knowledge in relation to the aforementioned two themes of this thesis. The key quantity in QDT is the reduced density operator rho(t) ≡ trBrho T(t); i.e., the partial trace of the total system and bath composite rhoT(t) over the bath degrees of freedom. QDT governs the evolution of reduced density operator, where the effects of bath are treated in a quantum statistical manner. In principle, the reduced density operator contains all dynamics information of interest. However, the conventional quantum transport theory is formulated in terms of nonequilibrium Green's function. The newly emerging field of quantum measurement in relation to quantum information and quantum computing does exploit a sort of QDT formalism. Besides the background of the relevant theoretical development, some representative experiments on molecular nanojunctions are also briefly discussed. In chapter 2, we outline some basic (including new) relations that highlight several important issues on QDT. The content includes the background of nonequilibrium quantum statistical mechanics, the general description of the total composite Hamiltonian with stochastic system-bath interaction, a novel parameterization scheme for bath correlation functions, a newly developed exact theory of driven Brownian oscillator (DBO

  17. Comparison of Resonance Parameter Covariance Generation using CONRAD and SAMMY Computer Codes

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, Luiz C; De Saint Jean, C; Noguere, G

    2010-01-01

    Cross section evaluations in the resolved resonance region are based on formalisms derived from the R-matrix theory. As a result, the evaluations provide a set of resonance parameters that can be used to reproduce the experimental data reasonably well. The evaluated nuclear data are used in neutron transport calculations for the analysis and design of nuclear reactor systems, nuclear criticality safety analyses, etc. To achieve the desired accuracy on the nuclear system calculations, the questions frequently asked are how well the nuclear data are known and how the uncertainty in the nuclear data can be propagated into the final nuclear system results. There have been ongoing efforts at several research centers for generating data uncertainties in the resonance and high-energy regions. The biggest issue in relation to the covariance data is how good the calculated uncertainties are or whether the calculated uncertainties are in agreement with realistic uncertainties derived from an experimental nuclear system or nuclear benchmark. In this work an attempt is made to use two distinct and independently developed computer codes, CONRAD and SAMMY, to evaluate and generate covariance data in the resonance region. The verification study has been performed in support of the U.S. Nuclear Criticality Safety program (NCSP) as the NCSP is working to provide improved nuclear data files to support criticality safety analyses. The objective is to check the procedures and the methodologies used in the resonance region for covariance generation. The studies have been carried out using the 48Ti resolved resonance parameters.

  18. Light ion components of the galactic cosmic rays: Nuclear interactions and transport theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Shinn, J. L.; Badhwar, G. D.; Dubey, R. R.

    1996-01-01

    Light nuclei are present in the primary galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and are produced in thick targets due to projectile or target fragmentation from both nucleon and heavy induced reactions. In the primary GCR, He-4 is the most abundant nucleus after H-1. However, there are also a substantial fluxes of H-2 and He-3. In this paper we describe theoretical models based on quantum multiple scattering theory for the description of light ion nuclear interactions. The energy dependence of the light ion fragmentation cross section is considered with comparisons of inclusive yields and secondary momentum distributions to experiments described. We also analyze the importance of a fast component of lights ions from proton and neutron induced target fragementation. These theoretical models have been incorporated into the cosmic ray transport code HZETRN and will be used to analyze the role of shielding materials in modulating the production and the energy spectrum of light ions.

  19. Incorporating biplane wing theory into a large, subsonic, all-cargo transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zyskowski, Michael K.

    1994-01-01

    If the air-cargo market increases at the pace predicted, a new conceptual aircraft will be demanded to meet the needs of the air-cargo industry. Furthermore, it has been found that not only should this aircraft be optimized to carry the intermodal containers used by the current shipping industry, but it should also be be able to operate at existing airports. The best solution to these problems is a configuration incorporating a bi-wing planform, which has resulted in significant improvements over the monoplane in lift/drag, weight reduction, and span reduction. The future of the air-cargo market, biplane theory, wind tunnel tests, and a comparison of the aerodynamic characteristics of the biplane and monoplane are discussed. The factors pertaining to a biplane cargo transport are then examined, resulting in biplane geometric parameters.

  20. Space-time transport schemes and homogenization: II. Extension of the theory and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giona, Massimiliano

    2017-03-01

    The theory of space-time and non-Markovian spin-driven Diffusion processes introduced in Giona (2016 J. Stat. Mech. submitted) is extended to random space-time displacements and to a continuum of spins. The comparison of space-time diffusion models with the continuous time random walk of Montroll and Weiss is developed in order to highlight the analogies and the differences between these two processes. A similar comparison is performed for other classes of processes such as the multistate random walk and the correlated continuous time random walk. Moreover, the article develops the correspondence between space-time and non-Markovian spin-driven diffusion models, analyzes their relativistic properties, and introduces the concept of hyperbolic homogenization. Some preliminary observations on the use of these models in order to frame relativistic quantum mechanics within a stochastic transport paradigm without enforcing the analytic continuation of the time variable to the imaginary axis are outlined.

  1. A transport theory of relativistic nucleon-nucleon collisions with confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetter, T.; Biró, T. S.; Mosel, U.

    1995-02-01

    A transport theory is developed on the quark level to describe nucleon-nucleon collisions. We treat the strong interaction effectively by the Friedberg-Lee model both in its original and in its modified confining version. First we study the stability of the static three-dimensional semiclassical configuration, then we present results of the time evolution given by a Vlasov equation for the quarks coupled to a Klein-Gordon equation for the mean field. We find at higher energies that the nucleons are almost transparent, whereas at lower energies we observe a substantial interaction. At very low energies we see a fusion of our bags, which is due to the purely attractive nature of the mean field and hence is an artifact of our model. We test the confinement mechanism and find that at higher energies the nucleons are restored shortly after the collision.

  2. COSMIC-RAY TRANSPORT THEORY IN PARTIALLY TURBULENT SPACE PLASMAS WITH COMPRESSIBLE MAGNETIC TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Casanova, S.; Schlickeiser, R.

    2012-02-01

    Recently, a new transport theory of cosmic rays in magnetized space plasmas extending the quasilinear approximation to the particle orbit has been developed for the case of an axisymmetric incompressible magnetic turbulence. Here, we generalize the approach to the important physical case of a compressible plasma. As previously obtained in the case of an incompressible plasma, we allow arbitrary gyrophase deviations from the unperturbed spiral orbits in the uniform magnetic field. For the case of quasi-stationary and spatially homogeneous magnetic turbulence we derive, in the small Larmor radius approximation, gyrophase-averaged cosmic-ray Fokker-Planck coefficients. Upper limits for the perpendicular and pitch-angle Fokker-Planck coefficients and for the perpendicular and parallel spatial diffusion coefficients are presented.

  3. General covariance from the quantum renormalization group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shyam, Vasudev

    2017-03-01

    The quantum renormalization group (QRG) is a realization of holography through a coarse-graining prescription that maps the beta functions of a quantum field theory thought to live on the "boundary" of some space to holographic actions in the "bulk" of this space. A consistency condition will be proposed that translates into general covariance of the gravitational theory in the D +1 dimensional bulk. This emerges from the application of the QRG on a planar matrix field theory living on the D dimensional boundary. This will be a particular form of the Wess-Zumino consistency condition that the generating functional of the boundary theory needs to satisfy. In the bulk, this condition forces the Poisson bracket algebra of the scalar and vector constraints of the dual gravitational theory to close in a very specific manner, namely, the manner in which the corresponding constraints of general relativity do. A number of features of the gravitational theory will be fixed as a consequence of this form of the Poisson bracket algebra. In particular, it will require the metric beta function to be of the gradient form.

  4. Navier-Stokes symmetry in the phenomenological transport theory for bacterial chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, Gerald

    1984-05-01

    It is observed that the Navier-Stokes space-time dilatation invariance (x-->-->λx-->,t-->λ2t) implies that the random motility and chemotactic flux function take the forms observed experimentally for motile Escherichia coli attracted by low concentrations of oxygen; moreover, the rate function for E. coli consumption of dissolved oxygen is required to have the form (const) × (local oxygen concentration)2/3. It is also noteworthy that the Schrödinger-Bloch function for redistribution of chemotactic bacteria cells is invariant under the space-time dilatation transformations if and only if the chemotactic flux coefficient-random motility ratio equals 2, a value in the range 1.1 to 2.5 observed experimentally by Holz and Chen in the oxygen chemotaxis of motile E. coli. Suitably specialized governing equations for the phenomenological transport theory also admit a Galilean transformation invariance symmetry if and only if the chemotactic flux coefficient-critical substrate diffusivity ratio equals -2 and the consumption rate function is simply linear in the local oxygen concentration. Applicable to the regime of viscous incompressible flows with Reynolds numbers much less than unity, the Navier-Stokes superposition invariance may also give rise to a corresponding invariance symmetry in equivalent but linear phenomenological transport equations.

  5. [The immuno-endocrine system. A new endocrine theory: the problem of the packed transport].

    PubMed

    Csaba, György

    2011-05-15

    Since the eighties of the last century hormone content was justified in immune cells (lymphocytes, granulocytes, monocytes, macrophages and mast cells), which produce, store and secrete these hormones. Although the amount of these materials in immune cells is relatively small, the mass of the producers (immune cells) is so large, that the phenomenon must be considered from endocrinological point of view, underlying the important differences between the "classical" and immuno-endocrine systems. Cells of the classic (built-in) endocrine system are mono-producers, while immune cells can synthesize many types of hormones (polyproducers). In addition, these cells can transport the whole hormone-producing machinery to the site of need, producing a local effect. This can be observed, for example, in the case of endorphin producing immune cells during inflammation and during early pregnancy around the chorionic villi. Hormone producing immune cells also have receptors for many hormones, so that they are poly-receivers. Via hormone producing and receiving capacity there is a bidirectional connection between the neuro-endocrine and immuno-endocrine systems. In addition, there is a network inside the immuno-endocrine system. The packed transport theory attempts to explain the mechanism and importance of the immuno-endocrine system.

  6. Transport in lymphatic capillaries. I. Macroscopic measurements using residence time distribution theory.

    PubMed

    Swartz, M A; Berk, D A; Jain, R K

    1996-01-01

    We present a novel integrative method for characterizing transport in the lymphatic capillaries in the tail of the anesthetized mouse, which is both sensitive and reproducible for quantifying uptake and flow. Interstitially injected, fluorescently labeled macromolecules were used to visualize and quantify these processes. Residence time distribution (RTD) theory was employed to measure net flow velocity in the lymphatic network as well as to provide a relative measure of lymphatic uptake of macromolecules from the interstitium. The effects of particle size and injection pressure were determined. The uptake rate was found to be independent of particle size in the range of a 6- to 18-nm radius; beyond this size, the interstitial matrix seemed to pose a greater barrier. A comparison of 10 vs. 40 cmH2O injection pressure showed a significant influence on the relative uptake rate but not on the net velocity within the network (3.3 +/- 0.8 vs. 3.8 +/- 1.0 micron/s). This suggested the presence of a systemic driving force for baseline lymph propulsion that is independent of the local pressure gradients driving the uptake. This model can be used to examine various aspects of transport physiology of the initial lymphatics.

  7. Theory of ballistic quantum transport in the presence of localized defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolasiński, K.; Mreńca-Kolasińska, A.; Szafran, B.

    2016-09-01

    We present an efficient numerical approach for treating ballistic quantum transport across devices described by tight-binding (TB) Hamiltonians designated to systems with localized potential defects. The method is based on the wave function matching approach, Lippmann-Schwinger equation (LEQ), and the scattering matrix formalism. We show that the number of matrix elements of the Green's function to be evaluated for the unperturbed system can be essentially reduced by projection of the time reversed scattering wave functions on LEQ which radically improves the speed and lowers the memory consumption of the calculations. Our approach can be applied to quantum devices of an arbitrary geometry and any number of degrees of freedom or leads attached. We provide a couple of examples of possible applications of the theory, including current equilibration at the p -n junction in graphene and scanning gate microscopy mapping of electron trajectories in the magnetic focusing experiment on a graphene ribbon. Additionally, we provide a simple toy example of electron transport through 1D wire with added onsite perturbation and obtain a simple formula for conductance showing that Green's function of the device can be obtained from the conductance versus impurity strength characteristics.

  8. Conformal killing tensors and covariant Hamiltonian dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Cariglia, M.; Gibbons, G. W.; Holten, J.-W. van; Horvathy, P. A.; Zhang, P.-M.

    2014-12-15

    A covariant algorithm for deriving the conserved quantities for natural Hamiltonian systems is combined with the non-relativistic framework of Eisenhart, and of Duval, in which the classical trajectories arise as geodesics in a higher dimensional space-time, realized by Brinkmann manifolds. Conserved quantities which are polynomial in the momenta can be built using time-dependent conformal Killing tensors with flux. The latter are associated with terms proportional to the Hamiltonian in the lower dimensional theory and with spectrum generating algebras for higher dimensional quantities of order 1 and 2 in the momenta. Illustrations of the general theory include the Runge-Lenz vector for planetary motion with a time-dependent gravitational constant G(t), motion in a time-dependent electromagnetic field of a certain form, quantum dots, the Hénon-Heiles and Holt systems, respectively, providing us with Killing tensors of rank that ranges from one to six.

  9. Alterations in Anatomical Covariance in the Prematurely Born.

    PubMed

    Scheinost, Dustin; Kwon, Soo Hyun; Lacadie, Cheryl; Vohr, Betty R; Schneider, Karen C; Papademetris, Xenophon; Constable, R Todd; Ment, Laura R

    2015-10-22

    Preterm (PT) birth results in long-term alterations in functional and structural connectivity, but the related changes in anatomical covariance are just beginning to be explored. To test the hypothesis that PT birth alters patterns of anatomical covariance, we investigated brain volumes of 25 PTs and 22 terms at young adulthood using magnetic resonance imaging. Using regional volumetrics, seed-based analyses, and whole brain graphs, we show that PT birth is associated with reduced volume in bilateral temporal and inferior frontal lobes, left caudate, left fusiform, and posterior cingulate for prematurely born subjects at young adulthood. Seed-based analyses demonstrate altered patterns of anatomical covariance for PTs compared with terms. PTs exhibit reduced covariance with R Brodmann area (BA) 47, Broca's area, and L BA 21, Wernicke's area, and white matter volume in the left prefrontal lobe, but increased covariance with R BA 47 and left cerebellum. Graph theory analyses demonstrate that measures of network complexity are significantly less robust in PTs compared with term controls. Volumes in regions showing group differences are significantly correlated with phonological awareness, the fundamental basis for reading acquisition, for the PTs. These data suggest both long-lasting and clinically significant alterations in the covariance in the PTs at young adulthood.

  10. Modeling the Electron Transport in Nanostructures by Using the Concept of BIons in M-theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepehri, Alireza; Pincak, Richard

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, using the similarity between quantum tunnels in nanostructures and BIon in M-theory, we propose a new model which considers the process of formation of superconductors in nanostructures. We show that by decreasing the size of nanostructures, emitted photons by electrons connect to each other and form a wormhole-like tunnel. This tunnel is a channel for transporting electron inside the nanostructure. If different wormhole-like tunnels join to each other, one big tunnel is constructed that can be an origin for superconductivity in matter. The superconductor order parameter depends on the size of nanostructure and temperature. Increasing temperature, it is shown that the model matches with quantum theory prescriptions. Also, by applying external electromagnetism, external photons interact with exchanging photons between electrons, exchanging photons deviate from original route and the formation of wormhole-like tunnels inside a nanostructure is prevented. Finally, it is shown that the origin of electrodynamics and gravity are the same and thus, the phrase of wormhole can be applied for appeared tunnels in nanostructures.

  11. A class of covariate-dependent spatiotemporal covariance functions.

    PubMed

    Reich, Brian J; Eidsvik, Jo; Guindani, Michele; Nail, Amy J; Schmidt, Alexandra M

    2011-12-01

    In geostatistics, it is common to model spatially distributed phenomena through an underlying stationary and isotropic spatial process. However, these assumptions are often untenable in practice because of the influence of local effects in the correlation structure. Therefore, it has been of prolonged interest in the literature to provide flexible and effective ways to model non-stationarity in the spatial effects. Arguably, due to the local nature of the problem, we might envision that the correlation structure would be highly dependent on local characteristics of the domain of study, namely the latitude, longitude and altitude of the observation sites, as well as other locally defined covariate information. In this work, we provide a flexible and computationally feasible way for allowing the correlation structure of the underlying processes to depend on local covariate information. We discuss the properties of the induced covariance functions and discuss methods to assess its dependence on local covariate information by means of a simulation study and the analysis of data observed at ozone-monitoring stations in the Southeast United States.

  12. WAIS-IV subtest covariance structure: conceptual and statistical considerations.

    PubMed

    Ward, L Charles; Bergman, Maria A; Hebert, Katina R

    2012-06-01

    D. Wechsler (2008b) reported confirmatory factor analyses (CFAs) with standardization data (ages 16-69 years) for 10 core and 5 supplemental subtests from the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV). Analyses of the 15 subtests supported 4 hypothesized oblique factors (Verbal Comprehension, Working Memory, Perceptual Reasoning, and Processing Speed) but also revealed unexplained covariance between Block Design and Visual Puzzles (Perceptual Reasoning subtests). That covariance was not included in the final models. Instead, a path was added from Working Memory to Figure Weights (Perceptual Reasoning subtest) to improve fit and achieve a desired factor pattern. The present research with the same data (N = 1,800) showed that the path from Working Memory to Figure Weights increases the association between Working Memory and Matrix Reasoning. Specifying both paths improves model fit and largely eliminates unexplained covariance between Block Design and Visual Puzzles but with the undesirable consequence that Figure Weights and Matrix Reasoning are equally determined by Perceptual Reasoning and Working Memory. An alternative 4-factor model was proposed that explained theory-implied covariance between Block Design and Visual Puzzles and between Arithmetic and Figure Weights while maintaining compatibility with WAIS-IV Index structure. The proposed model compared favorably with a 5-factor model based on Cattell-Horn-Carroll theory. The present findings emphasize that covariance model comparisons should involve considerations of conceptual coherence and theoretical adherence in addition to statistical fit.

  13. A new look at Lorentz-covariant loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiller, Marc; Lachièze-Rey, Marc; Noui, Karim

    2011-08-01

    In this work, we study the classical and quantum properties of the unique commutative Lorentz-covariant connection for loop quantum gravity. This connection has been found after solving the second-class constraints inherited from the canonical analysis of the Holst action without the time gauge. We show that it has the property of lying in the conjugacy class of a pure su(2) connection, a result which enables one to construct the kinematical Hilbert space of the Lorentz-covariant theory in terms of the usual SU(2) spin-network states. Furthermore, we show that there is a unique Lorentz-covariant electric field, up to trivial and natural equivalence relations. The Lorentz-covariant electric field transforms under the adjoint action of the Lorentz group, and the associated Casimir operators are shown to be proportional to the area density. This gives a very interesting algebraic interpretation of the area. Finally, we show that the action of the surface operator on the Lorentz-covariant holonomies reproduces exactly the usual discrete SU(2) spectrum of time-gauge loop quantum gravity. In other words, the use of the time gauge does not introduce anomalies in the quantum theory.

  14. Transportation and dynamic networks: Models, theory, and applications to supply chains, electric power, and financial networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zugang

    Network systems, including transportation and logistic systems, electric power generation and distribution networks as well as financial networks, provide the critical infrastructure for the functioning of our societies and economies. The understanding of the dynamic behavior of such systems is also crucial to national security and prosperity. The identification of new connections between distinct network systems is the inspiration for the research in this dissertation. In particular, I answer two questions raised by Beckmann, McGuire, and Winsten (1956) and Copeland (1952) over half a century ago, which are, respectively, how are electric power flows related to transportation flows and does money flow like water or electricity? In addition, in this dissertation, I achieve the following: (1) I establish the relationships between transportation networks and three other classes of complex network systems: supply chain networks, electric power generation and transmission networks, and financial networks with intermediation. The establishment of such connections provides novel theoretical insights as well as new pricing mechanisms, and efficient computational methods. (2) I develop new modeling frameworks based on evolutionary variational inequality theory that capture the dynamics of such network systems in terms of the time-varying flows and incurred costs, prices, and, where applicable, profits. This dissertation studies the dynamics of such network systems by addressing both internal competition and/or cooperation, and external changes, such as varying costs and demands. (3) I focus, in depth, on electric power supply chains. By exploiting the relationships between transportation networks and electric power supply chains, I develop a large-scale network model that integrates electric power supply chains and fuel supply markets. The model captures both the economic transactions as well as the physical transmission constraints. The model is then applied to the New

  15. Covariation Neglect among Novice Investors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedesstrom, Ted Martin; Svedsater, Henrik; Garling, Tommy

    2006-01-01

    In 4 experiments, undergraduates made hypothetical investment choices. In Experiment 1, participants paid more attention to the volatility of individual assets than to the volatility of aggregated portfolios. The results of Experiment 2 show that most participants diversified even when this increased risk because of covariation between the returns…

  16. Condition Number Regularized Covariance Estimation.

    PubMed

    Won, Joong-Ho; Lim, Johan; Kim, Seung-Jean; Rajaratnam, Bala

    2013-06-01

    Estimation of high-dimensional covariance matrices is known to be a difficult problem, has many applications, and is of current interest to the larger statistics community. In many applications including so-called the "large p small n" setting, the estimate of the covariance matrix is required to be not only invertible, but also well-conditioned. Although many regularization schemes attempt to do this, none of them address the ill-conditioning problem directly. In this paper, we propose a maximum likelihood approach, with the direct goal of obtaining a well-conditioned estimator. No sparsity assumption on either the covariance matrix or its inverse are are imposed, thus making our procedure more widely applicable. We demonstrate that the proposed regularization scheme is computationally efficient, yields a type of Steinian shrinkage estimator, and has a natural Bayesian interpretation. We investigate the theoretical properties of the regularized covariance estimator comprehensively, including its regularization path, and proceed to develop an approach that adaptively determines the level of regularization that is required. Finally, we demonstrate the performance of the regularized estimator in decision-theoretic comparisons and in the financial portfolio optimization setting. The proposed approach has desirable properties, and can serve as a competitive procedure, especially when the sample size is small and when a well-conditioned estimator is required.

  17. Hyperbolic theory for pH-dependent adsorption in reactive transport in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prigiobbe, V.; Hesse, M. A.; Bryant, S. L.

    2012-12-01

    We use the hyperbolic theory of conservation laws to analyze the transport of strontium (Sr2+) through a porous medium with surface complexation. An hydrophilic iron-oxide surface was considered where Sr2+ and hydrogen (H+) compete for the same site leading to competitive adsorption described by an pH-dependent Langmuir isotherm. Despite the importance of pH-dependent adsorption in environmental applications, the basic structure of the displacement has received little attention. In reactive transport problems with pH-dependent adsorption, one of the conservation laws is for the total hydrogen (cHtot = cH+-cOH-) in the system, also called the acidity. The presence of this equation gives rise to additional nonlinearity in the problems that distinguishes them from other competitive sorption problems where hydrogen is not involved. We analyze a 1D reactive transport model with an incompressible fluid containing H+, Sr2+, sodium (Na+), and chlorine (Cl-) flowing through a reactive porous media made of goethite. Under the assumption of overall charge balance and of only advection for Na+ and Cl-, the mathematical problem reduces to a strictly hyperbolic 3x3 system of partial dierential equations (PDEs) for cHtot, Sr2+ (cSr2+), and effective anions (ca = cCl--cNa+) which are coupled by the adsorption isotherms for H+ and Sr2+ and have the non-linearity in the accumulation terms. One characteristic field is linearly degenerate while the other two are non-genuinely nonlinear due to inflection loci in both isotherms. We derived the complete set of analytical solutions to the Riemann problem (constant initial and injected states) and described the characteristic waves that may arise, concluding that only nine combinations of a contact discontinuity with rarefactions, shocks, shock-rarefactions are possible. The composite shock-rarefaction waves arise from the inflection loci in the isotherms and are absent in classic competitive Langmuir sorption. The inflection loci divide

  18. Sixty years of interest in flow and transport theories: Sources of inspiration and a few results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raats, Peter A. C.

    2016-04-01

    By choosing to major in soil physics at Wageningen now exactly 60 years ago, I could combine my interest in exact sciences with my experience of growing up on a farm. I never regretted that choice. In the first twenty years, I profited much from close contacts with members of the immediate post-WW II generation of soil physicists (especially Jerry Bolt, Arnold Klute, Ed Miller, Champ Tanner, Wilford Gardner, John Philip, and Jan van Schilfgaarde), chemical engineers (especially at UW Madison the trio Bob Bird, Warren Stewart and Ed Lightfoot) and experts in continuum mechanics (especially at Johns Hopkins Clifford Truesdell and Jerald Ericksen). As graduate student at Illinois with Klute, to describe flow and transport theories in soil science I initially explored as possible framework thermodynamics of irreversible processes (TIP), but soon switched to the continuum theory of mixtures (CTM), initiated by Truesdell in 1957. In CTM, the balance of forces gave a rational basis for flux equations. CTM allowed me to deal with swelling/shrinkage, role of inertia, boundary conditions, and structured soils. Later, I did use TIP to deal with certain aspects of transfer of water and heat in soils and selective uptake of water and nutrients by plant roots. Recently, a variety of theories for upscaling from the pore scale to the Darcy scale have clarified the potential, limits and common ground of CTM and TIP. A great advantage of CTM is that it provides geometric tools suited for kinematic aspects of flow, transport, and growth/decay processes. In particular, the concept of material coordinates of the solid phase that I used in my PhD thesis to cope with large deformation due to swelling/shrinkage of soils, later also turned to be useful to deal with simultaneous shrinkage and decay in peat soils and compost heaps, and the growth of plant tissues. Also, by focusing on the material coordinates for the water, it became possible to describe transport of solutes in unsaturated

  19. Discontinuous Finite Elements for a Hyperbolic Problem with Singular Coefficient: a Convergence Theory for 1-D Spherical Neutron Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Machorro, E. A.

    2010-09-07

    A theory of convergence is presented for the discontinuous Galerkin finite element method of solving the non-scattering spherically symmetric Boltzmann transport equation using piecewise constant test and trial functions. Results are then extended to higher order polynomial spaces. Comparisons of numerical properties were presented in earlier work.

  20. Student Assessment System. Domain Referenced Tests. Transportation/Automotive Mechanics. Volume II: Theory. Georgia Vocational Education Program Articulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, James F., Comp.

    These written domain referenced tests (DRTs) for the area of transportation/automotive mechanics test cognitive abilities or knowledge of theory. Introductory materials describe domain referenced testing and test development. Each multiple choice test includes a domain statement, describing the behavior and content of the domain, and a test item…

  1. What are the best covariates for developing non-stationary rainfall Intensity-Duration-Frequency relationship?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agilan, V.; Umamahesh, N. V.

    2017-03-01

    Present infrastructure design is primarily based on rainfall Intensity-Duration-Frequency (IDF) curves with so-called stationary assumption. However, in recent years, the extreme precipitation events are increasing due to global climate change and creating non-stationarity in the series. Based on recent theoretical developments in the Extreme Value Theory (EVT), recent studies proposed a methodology for developing non-stationary rainfall IDF curve by incorporating trend in the parameters of the Generalized Extreme Value (GEV) distribution using Time covariate. But, the covariate Time may not be the best covariate and it is important to analyze all possible covariates and find the best covariate to model non-stationarity. In this study, five physical processes, namely, urbanization, local temperature changes, global warming, El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) cycle and Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) are used as covariates. Based on these five covariates and their possible combinations, sixty-two non-stationary GEV models are constructed. In addition, two non-stationary GEV models based on Time covariate and one stationary GEV model are also constructed. The best model for each duration rainfall series is chosen based on the corrected Akaike Information Criterion (AICc). From the findings of this study, it is observed that the local processes (i.e., Urbanization, local temperature changes) are the best covariate for short duration rainfall and global processes (i.e., Global warming, ENSO cycle and IOD) are the best covariate for the long duration rainfall of the Hyderabad city, India. Furthermore, the covariate Time is never qualified as the best covariate. In addition, the identified best covariates are further used to develop non-stationary rainfall IDF curves of the Hyderabad city. The proposed methodology can be applied to other situations to develop the non-stationary IDF curves based on the best covariate.

  2. TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation outline: transport principles, effective solubility; gasoline composition; and field examples (plume diving).
    Presentation conclusions: MTBE transport follows from - phyiscal and chemical properties and hydrology. Field examples show: MTBE plumes > benzene plu...

  3. Vector order parameter in general relativity: Covariant equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meierovich, Boris E.

    2010-07-01

    Phase transitions with spontaneous symmetry breaking and vector order parameter are considered in multidimensional theory of general relativity. Covariant equations, describing the gravitational properties of topological defects, are derived. The topological defects are classified in accordance with the symmetry of the covariant derivative of the vector order parameter. The abilities of the derived equations are demonstrated in application to the braneworld concept. New solutions of the Einstein equations with a transverse vector order parameter are presented. In the vicinity of phase transition, the solutions are found analytically.

  4. Vector order parameter in general relativity: Covariant equations

    SciTech Connect

    Meierovich, Boris E.

    2010-07-15

    Phase transitions with spontaneous symmetry breaking and vector order parameter are considered in multidimensional theory of general relativity. Covariant equations, describing the gravitational properties of topological defects, are derived. The topological defects are classified in accordance with the symmetry of the covariant derivative of the vector order parameter. The abilities of the derived equations are demonstrated in application to the braneworld concept. New solutions of the Einstein equations with a transverse vector order parameter are presented. In the vicinity of phase transition, the solutions are found analytically.

  5. Convective Transport Theory for Surface Fluxes Tested over the Western Pacific Warm Pool.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greischar, Lawrence; Stull, Roland

    1999-07-01

    Turbulent flux measurements from five flights of the National Center for Atmospheric Research Electra aircraft during the Tropical Oceans and Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA COARE) are used to test convective transport theory (CTT) for a marine boundary layer. Flights during light to moderate winds and under the clearest sky conditions available were chosen. Fluxes of heat, moisture, and momentum were observed by the eddy-correlation method. Mean kinematic values for the observed sensible and latent heat fluxes and momentum flux were 0.0061 K m s1, 0.0313 g kg1 m s1, and 0.0195 m2 s2, respectively.For the range of mixed-layer wind speeds (0.8-8.4 m s1) studied here, the version of CTT that includes the mixed effects of buoyant and shear-driven transport give a better fit to the observations than either the COARE bulk algorithm or the pure free-convection version of CTT. This is to be expected because both of those latter parameterizations were designed for light winds (<5 m s1 approximately).The CTT empirical coefficients listed in Table 3 exhibited slight sensitivity to the COARE light flux conditions, compared to their previous estimates during larger fluxes over land. For example, COARE heat fluxes were roughly 10 times smaller than previous land-based flux measurements used to calculate CTT coefficients, but the corresponding empirical mixed-layer transport coefficients were only 3% smaller. COARE momentum fluxes were also roughly 10 times smaller, but the CTT coefficients were about four times smaller. The greater variation in momentum coefficient may be due, in part, to insufficient flight-leg length used to compute momentum fluxes, to uncertainties in the effects of the ocean surface current and waves, or perhaps to roughness differences.

  6. Noisy covariance matrices and portfolio optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pafka, S.; Kondor, I.

    2002-05-01

    According to recent findings [#!bouchaud!#,#!stanley!#], empirical covariance matrices deduced from financial return series contain such a high amount of noise that, apart from a few large eigenvalues and the corresponding eigenvectors, their structure can essentially be regarded as random. In [#!bouchaud!#], e.g., it is reported that about 94% of the spectrum of these matrices can be fitted by that of a random matrix drawn from an appropriately chosen ensemble. In view of the fundamental role of covariance matrices in the theory of portfolio optimization as well as in industry-wide risk management practices, we analyze the possible implications of this effect. Simulation experiments with matrices having a structure such as described in [#!bouchaud!#,#!stanley!#] lead us to the conclusion that in the context of the classical portfolio problem (minimizing the portfolio variance under linear constraints) noise has relatively little effect. To leading order the solutions are determined by the stable, large eigenvalues, and the displacement of the solution (measured in variance) due to noise is rather small: depending on the size of the portfolio and on the length of the time series, it is of the order of 5 to 15%. The picture is completely different, however, if we attempt to minimize the variance under non-linear constraints, like those that arise e.g. in the problem of margin accounts or in international capital adequacy regulation. In these problems the presence of noise leads to a serious instability and a high degree of degeneracy of the solutions.

  7. Generalized Covariant Gyrokinetic Dynamics of Magnetoplasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Cremaschini, C.; Tessarotto, M.; Nicolini, P.; Beklemishev, A.

    2008-12-31

    A basic prerequisite for the investigation of relativistic astrophysical magnetoplasmas, occurring typically in the vicinity of massive stellar objects (black holes, neutron stars, active galactic nuclei, etc.), is the accurate description of single-particle covariant dynamics, based on gyrokinetic theory (Beklemishev et al., 1999-2005). Provided radiation-reaction effects are negligible, this is usually based on the assumption that both the space-time metric and the EM fields (in particular the magnetic field) are suitably prescribed and are considered independent of single-particle dynamics, while allowing for the possible presence of gravitational/EM perturbations driven by plasma collective interactions which may naturally arise in such systems. The purpose of this work is the formulation of a generalized gyrokinetic theory based on the synchronous variational principle recently pointed out (Tessarotto et al., 2007) which permits to satisfy exactly the physical realizability condition for the four-velocity. The theory here developed includes the treatment of nonlinear perturbations (gravitational and/or EM) characterized locally, i.e., in the rest frame of a test particle, by short wavelength and high frequency. Basic feature of the approach is to ensure the validity of the theory both for large and vanishing parallel electric field. It is shown that the correct treatment of EM perturbations occurring in the presence of an intense background magnetic field generally implies the appearance of appropriate four-velocity corrections, which are essential for the description of single-particle gyrokinetic dynamics.

  8. Random walk theory of a trap-controlled hopping transport process

    PubMed Central

    Scher, H.; Wu, C. H.

    1981-01-01

    A random walk theory of hopping motion in the presence of a periodic distribution of traps is presented. The solution of the continuous-time random walk equations is exact and valid for arbitrary intersite interactions and trap concentration. The treatment is shown to be equivalent to an exact solution of the master equation for this trapping problem. These interactions can be a general function of electric field and are not restricted to nearest neighbors. In particular, with the inclusion of trap-to-trap interactions, as well as trap-to-host interactions, an exact treatment of the change from one hopping channel to another has been obtained. The trap-modulated propagator has been derived in terms of a type of Green's function that is introduced. The results are specialized to spatial moments of the propagator, from which expressions for the drift velocity and diffusion coefficient are obtained. Numerical results for the drift velocity are presented and shown to account for the change in hopping channels in recent transport measurements in mixed molecularly doped polymers. PMID:16592944

  9. Accretion Theory of the Spontaneous Rotation Phenomenon, Consistency with Recent Experiments and Edge Blobs Transport Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lontano, M.; Coppi, B.

    2005-10-01

    The accretion theoryootnotetextB. Coppi, Nucl. Fusion 42, 1 (2002) of the ``spontaneous'' rotation of toroidal plasmas, the first to be based on attributing the source of angular momentum near the edge of the plasma column, has found further support in recent experiments carried out by the Alcator C-ModootnotetextB. LaBombard, 2005 Sherwood Meeting Paper 03-OTR and the D-IIIDootnotetextJ.S. de Grassie et al., Paper IAEA-CN-116/EX/6-4Rb machines. The second basis of the theory involves the intrinsic coupling between spontaneous rotation and thermal energy transport and is consistent with the observation that the variation in the rotation velocity from the L-regime to the H-regime is related to the scaling^2 for the threshold to attain the H-regime. Theoretically, the analysis of non-symmetric spectra, relative to the sign change of the ratio of the poloidal to the toroidal wave number has been pursued considering travelling modes driven by the ion temperature gradient in the presence of an inhomogeonous toroidal velocity. The idea that blobs formed at the edge of the plasma are responsible for the ejection of the angular momentum toward the surrounding material wall is being pursued in collaboration with Myra et al. (paper at this meeting)^*Supported in part by CNR (Italy) and the US DOE.

  10. U and Xe transport in UO2±x: Density functional theory calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, D. A.; Uberuaga, B. P.; Nerikar, P. V.; Unal, C.; Stanek, C. R.

    2011-08-01

    The detrimental effects of the fission gas Xe on the performance of oxide nuclear fuels are well known. However, less well known are the mechanisms that govern fission gas evolution. Here, to better understand bulk Xe behavior (diffusion mechanisms) in UO2±x we calculate the relevant activation energies using density functional theory techniques. By analyzing a combination of Xe solution thermodynamics, migration barriers, and the interaction of dissolved Xe atoms with U, we demonstrate that Xe diffusion predominantly occurs via a vacancy-mediated mechanism. Since Xe transport is closely related to the diffusion of U vacancies, we have also studied the activation energy for this process. To best reproduce experimental data for the Xe and U activation energies, it is critical to consider the active charge-compensation mechanism for intrinsic defects in UO2±x. Due to the high thermodynamic cost of reducing U4+ ions, any defect formation occurring at a fixed composition, i.e., no change in UO2±x stoichiometry, always avoids such reactions, which, for example, implies that the ground-state configuration of an O Frenkel pair in UO2 does not involve any explicit local reduction (oxidation) of U ions at the O vacancy (interstitial).

  11. Data Covariances from R-Matrix Analyses of Light Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, G.M. Paris, M.W.

    2015-01-15

    After first reviewing the parametric description of light-element reactions in multichannel systems using R-matrix theory and features of the general LANL R-matrix analysis code EDA, we describe how its chi-square minimization procedure gives parameter covariances. This information is used, together with analytically calculated sensitivity derivatives, to obtain cross section covariances for all reactions included in the analysis by first-order error propagation. Examples are given of the covariances obtained for systems with few resonances ({sup 5}He) and with many resonances ({sup 13}C ). We discuss the prevalent problem of this method leading to cross section uncertainty estimates that are unreasonably small for large data sets. The answer to this problem appears to be using parameter confidence intervals in place of standard errors.

  12. Understanding covariate shift in model performance

    PubMed Central

    McGaughey, Georgia; Walters, W. Patrick; Goldman, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Three (3) different methods (logistic regression, covariate shift and k-NN) were applied to five (5) internal datasets and one (1) external, publically available dataset where covariate shift existed. In all cases, k-NN’s performance was inferior to either logistic regression or covariate shift. Surprisingly, there was no obvious advantage for using covariate shift to reweight the training data in the examined datasets. PMID:27803797

  13. Evidence for maximal acceleration and singularity resolution in covariant loop quantum gravity.

    PubMed

    Rovelli, Carlo; Vidotto, Francesca

    2013-08-30

    A simple argument indicates that covariant loop gravity (spin foam theory) predicts a maximal acceleration and hence forbids the development of curvature singularities. This supports the results obtained for cosmology and black holes using canonical methods.

  14. Are Maxwell's equations Lorentz-covariant?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redžić, D. V.

    2017-01-01

    It is stated in many textbooks that Maxwell's equations are manifestly covariant when written down in tensorial form. We recall that tensorial form of Maxwell's equations does not secure their tensorial contents; they become covariant by postulating certain transformation properties of field functions. That fact should be stressed when teaching about the covariance of Maxwell's equations.

  15. Lorentz-covariant dissipative Lagrangian systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A. N.

    1985-01-01

    The concept of dissipative Hamiltonian system is converted to Lorentz-covariant form, with evolution generated jointly by two scalar functionals, the Lagrangian action and the global entropy. A bracket formulation yields the local covariant laws of energy-momentum conservation and of entropy production. The formalism is illustrated by a derivation of the covariant Landau kinetic equation.

  16. Noisy covariance matrices and portfolio optimization II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pafka, Szilárd; Kondor, Imre

    2003-03-01

    Recent studies inspired by results from random matrix theory (Galluccio et al.: Physica A 259 (1998) 449; Laloux et al.: Phys. Rev. Lett. 83 (1999) 1467; Risk 12 (3) (1999) 69; Plerou et al.: Phys. Rev. Lett. 83 (1999) 1471) found that covariance matrices determined from empirical financial time series appear to contain such a high amount of noise that their structure can essentially be regarded as random. This seems, however, to be in contradiction with the fundamental role played by covariance matrices in finance, which constitute the pillars of modern investment theory and have also gained industry-wide applications in risk management. Our paper is an attempt to resolve this embarrassing paradox. The key observation is that the effect of noise strongly depends on the ratio r= n/ T, where n is the size of the portfolio and T the length of the available time series. On the basis of numerical experiments and analytic results for some toy portfolio models we show that for relatively large values of r (e.g. 0.6) noise does, indeed, have the pronounced effect suggested by Galluccio et al. (1998), Laloux et al. (1999) and Plerou et al. (1999) and illustrated later by Laloux et al. (Int. J. Theor. Appl. Finance 3 (2000) 391), Plerou et al. (Phys. Rev. E, e-print cond-mat/0108023) and Rosenow et al. (Europhys. Lett., e-print cond-mat/0111537) in a portfolio optimization context, while for smaller r (around 0.2 or below), the error due to noise drops to acceptable levels. Since the length of available time series is for obvious reasons limited in any practical application, any bound imposed on the noise-induced error translates into a bound on the size of the portfolio. In a related set of experiments we find that the effect of noise depends also on whether the problem arises in asset allocation or in a risk measurement context: if covariance matrices are used simply for measuring the risk of portfolios with a fixed composition rather than as inputs to optimization, the

  17. Exploration of regularized covariance estimates with analytical shrinkage intensity for producing invertible covariance matrices in high dimensional hyperspectral data

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, Stephen J.; Tardiff, Mark F.

    2007-10-01

    Removing background from hyperspectral scenes is a common step in the process of searching for materials of interest. Some approaches to background subtraction use spectral library data and require invertible covariance matrices for each member of the library. This is challenging because the covariance matrix can be calculated but standard methods for estimating the inverse requires that the data set for each library member have many more spectral measurements than spectral channels, which is rarely the case. An alternative approach is called shrinkage estimation. This method is investigated as an approach to providing an invertible covariance matrix estimate in the case where the number of spectral measurements is less than the number of spectral channels. The approach is an analytic method for arriving at a target matrix and the shrinkage parameter that modify the existing covariance matrix for the data to make it invertible. The theory is discussed to develop different estimates. The resulting estimates are computed and inspected on a set of hyperspectral data. This technique shows some promise for arriving at an invertible covariance estimate for small hyperspectral data sets.

  18. Correctness and completeness of the theory of bio-energy transport. Reply to the comments on “The theory of bio-energy transport in the protein molecules and its properties”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Xiao Feng

    2011-10-01

    Commentaries by Philip W.T. Pong, Nongyue He, S.D. Liang, Tao Song, Yuri Gaididei and Sergey Volkov and Alexander Y. Grosberg on my review article (Pang, 2011 [1]) are answered. The validity of Davydov's mechanism of bio-energy transport, the completeness of theory, outstanding problems, the normalization and validity of wave function of the system in Pang' model as well as other related problems are elucidated in detail.

  19. Gauge covariant fermion propagator in quenched, chirally symmetric quantum electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, C.D.; Dong, Z.; Munczek, H.J.

    1995-08-01

    The chirally symmetric solution of the massless, quenched, Dyson-Schwinger equation (DSE) for the fermion propagator in three- and four-dimensional quantum electrodynamics was obtained. The DSEs are a valuable nonperturbative tool for studying field theories. In recent years a good deal of progress was made in addressing the limitations of the DSE approach in the study of Abelian gauge theories. Key to this progress is an understanding of the role of the dressed fermion/gauge-boson vertex in ensuring gauge covariance and multiplicative renormalizability of the solution of the fermion DSE. The solutions we obtain are manifestly gauge covariant and a general gauge covariance constraint on the fermion/gauge-boson vertex is presented, which motivates a vertex Ansatz that, for the first time, both satisfies the Ward identity when the fermion self-mass is zero and ensures gauge covariance of the fermion propagator. This research facilitates gauge-invariant, nonperturbative studies of continuum quantum electrodynamics and has already been used by others in studies of the chiral phase transition.

  20. Theory of classical and quantum transport in monolayers of MoS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Shaffique

    From the family of new van der Waals materials, the class of layered transition metal dichalcogenides has emerged as a particularly interesting system due to the inherent spin and valley degrees of freedom. In this talk we focus on the interplay between these degrees of freedom and the different types of disorder in monolayers of molybdenum disulphide. Within the semiclassical Drude-Boltzmann formalism, treating the screening of impurities with the random phase approximation, we demonstrate that different scattering mechanisms such as charged impurity scattering, intervalley scattering, and phonons provide different signatures in electronic transport. This allows us to conclude, for example, that in CVD-grown monolayers of MoS2, intervalley scattering dominates over other mechanisms at low temperatures. Interestingly, charged impurities generate spatial inhomogeneity in the carrier density that results in a classical disorder-induced magnetoresistance that can be observed at room temperature. However, at lower temperatures, in this regime of strong intervalley scattering, we predict that the quantum phase-coherent corrections to the conductivity results in a one-parameter crossover from weak localization to weak anti-localization as a function of magnetic field, where this crossover is determined only by the spin lifetime. By comparing with available experimental data, we show that this combined framework allows for a novel way to measure the spin-relaxation in monolayers of MoS2. We find that the spin scattering arises from the Dyakonov-Perel spin-orbit scattering mechanism with a conduction band spin-splitting of about 4 meV, consistent with calculations using density functional theory. Work done in collaboration with Indra Yudhistira and the experimental groups of Goki Eda (NUS), Michael Fuhrer (Monash) and Roland Kawakami (Ohio State), and funded by Singapore National Research Foundation and Ministry of Education.

  1. Covariance Evaluation Methodology for Neutron Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Herman,M.; Arcilla, R.; Mattoon, C.M.; Mughabghab, S.F.; Oblozinsky, P.; Pigni, M.; Pritychenko, b.; Songzoni, A.A.

    2008-09-01

    We present the NNDC-BNL methodology for estimating neutron cross section covariances in thermal, resolved resonance, unresolved resonance and fast neutron regions. The three key elements of the methodology are Atlas of Neutron Resonances, nuclear reaction code EMPIRE, and the Bayesian code implementing Kalman filter concept. The covariance data processing, visualization and distribution capabilities are integral components of the NNDC methodology. We illustrate its application on examples including relatively detailed evaluation of covariances for two individual nuclei and massive production of simple covariance estimates for 307 materials. Certain peculiarities regarding evaluation of covariances for resolved resonances and the consistency between resonance parameter uncertainties and thermal cross section uncertainties are also discussed.

  2. Parametric methods for estimating covariate-dependent reference limits.

    PubMed

    Virtanen, Arja; Kairisto, Veli; Uusipaikka, Esa

    2004-01-01

    Age-specific reference limits are required for many clinical laboratory measurements. Statistical assessment of calculated intervals must be performed to obtain reliable reference limits. When parametric, covariate-dependent limits are derived, normal distribution theory usually is applied due to its mathematical simplicity and relative ease of fitting. However, it is not always possible to transform data and achieve a normal distribution. Therefore, models other than those based on normal distribution theory are needed. Generalized linear model theory offers one such alternative. Regardless of the statistical model used, the assumptions behind the model should always be examined.

  3. A Kinetic Transport Theory for Particle Acceleration and Transport in Regions of Multiple Contracting and Reconnecting Inertial-scale Flux Ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    le Roux, J. A.; Zank, G. P.; Webb, G. M.; Khabarova, O.

    2015-03-01

    Simulations of particle acceleration in turbulent plasma regions with multiple contracting and merging (reconnecting) magnetic islands emphasize the key role of temporary particle trapping in island structures for the efficient acceleration of particles to form hard power-law spectra. Statistical kinetic transport theories have been developed that capture the essential physics of particle acceleration in multi-island regions. The transport theory of Zank et al. is further developed by considering the acceleration effects of both the mean and the variance of the electric fields induced by the dynamics of multiple inertial-scale flux ropes. A focused transport equation is derived that includes new Fokker-Planck terms for particle scattering and stochastic acceleration due to the variance in multiple flux-rope magnetic fields, plasma flows, and reconnection electric fields. A Parker transport equation is also derived in which a new expression for momentum diffusion appears, combining stochastic acceleration by particle scattering in the mean multi-flux-rope electric fields with acceleration by the variance in these electric fields. Test particle acceleration is modeled analytically considering drift acceleration by the variance in the induced electric fields of flux ropes in the slow supersonic, radially expanding solar wind. Hard power-law spectra occur for sufficiently strong inertial-scale flux ropes with an index modified by adiabatic cooling, solar wind advection, and diffusive escape from flux ropes. Flux ropes might be sufficiently strong behind interplanetary shocks where the index of suprathermal ion power-law spectra observed in the supersonic solar wind can be reproduced.

  4. A KINETIC TRANSPORT THEORY FOR PARTICLE ACCELERATION AND TRANSPORT IN REGIONS OF MULTIPLE CONTRACTING AND RECONNECTING INERTIAL-SCALE FLUX ROPES

    SciTech Connect

    Le Roux, J. A.; Zank, G. P.; Webb, G. M.; Khabarova, O.

    2015-03-10

    Simulations of particle acceleration in turbulent plasma regions with multiple contracting and merging (reconnecting) magnetic islands emphasize the key role of temporary particle trapping in island structures for the efficient acceleration of particles to form hard power-law spectra. Statistical kinetic transport theories have been developed that capture the essential physics of particle acceleration in multi-island regions. The transport theory of Zank et al. is further developed by considering the acceleration effects of both the mean and the variance of the electric fields induced by the dynamics of multiple inertial-scale flux ropes. A focused transport equation is derived that includes new Fokker-Planck terms for particle scattering and stochastic acceleration due to the variance in multiple flux-rope magnetic fields, plasma flows, and reconnection electric fields. A Parker transport equation is also derived in which a new expression for momentum diffusion appears, combining stochastic acceleration by particle scattering in the mean multi-flux-rope electric fields with acceleration by the variance in these electric fields. Test particle acceleration is modeled analytically considering drift acceleration by the variance in the induced electric fields of flux ropes in the slow supersonic, radially expanding solar wind. Hard power-law spectra occur for sufficiently strong inertial-scale flux ropes with an index modified by adiabatic cooling, solar wind advection, and diffusive escape from flux ropes. Flux ropes might be sufficiently strong behind interplanetary shocks where the index of suprathermal ion power-law spectra observed in the supersonic solar wind can be reproduced.

  5. Interpretation of leaching data for cementitious waste forms using analytical solutions based on mass transport theory and empiricism

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, R.D.; Godbee, H.W.; Tallent, O.K.; Nestor, C.W. Jr. )

    1989-01-01

    The analysis of leaching data using analytical solutions based on mass transport theory and empiricism is presented. The waste forms leached to generate the data used in this analysis were prepared with a simulated radioactive waste slurry with traces of potassium ion, manganese ions, carbonate ions, phosphate ions, and sulfate ions solidified with several blends of cementitious materials. Diffusion coefficients were estimated from the results of ANS - 16.1 tests. Data of fraction leached versus time is presented and discussed.

  6. The transport of vorticity through fluids in turbulent motion : in the light of the Prandtl and Taylor theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrari, C

    1936-01-01

    The report studies the problem of the transport of vorticity or of momentum in light of the Taylor and Prandtl theories which are briefly reviewed. It also show how the formulas of Prandtl could be brought into agreement with experimental results in those cases where they agree with the principle of statistic similitude of Karman, and particularly in the problem of the distribution of velocity and temperature in the wake of a heated cylindrical obstacle.

  7. Phase-covariant quantum benchmarks

    SciTech Connect

    Calsamiglia, J.; Aspachs, M.; Munoz-Tapia, R.; Bagan, E.

    2009-05-15

    We give a quantum benchmark for teleportation and quantum storage experiments suited for pure and mixed test states. The benchmark is based on the average fidelity over a family of phase-covariant states and certifies that an experiment cannot be emulated by a classical setup, i.e., by a measure-and-prepare scheme. We give an analytical solution for qubits, which shows important differences with standard state estimation approach, and compute the value of the benchmark for coherent and squeezed states, both pure and mixed.

  8. Theory of bio-energy transport in protein molecules and its experimental evidences as well as applications (I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Xiao-Feng

    2007-10-01

    A new theory of bio-energy transport along protein molecules, where energy is released by the hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), has recently been proposed for some physical and biological reasons. In this theory, Davydov’s Hamiltonian and wave function of the systems are simultaneously improved and extended. A new interaction has been added into the original Hamiltonian. The original wave function of the excitation state of single particles has been replaced by a new wave function of the two-quanta quasi-coherent state. In such case, bio-energy is carried and transported by the new soliton along protein molecular chains. The soliton is formed through the self-trapping of two excitons interacting with amino acid residues. The exciton is generated by the vibration of amide-I (C=O stretching) arising from the energy of the hydrolysis of ATP. The properties of the soliton are extensively studied by analytical methods and its lifetime for a wide range of parameter values relevant to protein molecules is calculated using the nonlinear quantum perturbation theory. The life-time of the new soliton at the biological temperature of 300 K is large enough and belongs to the order of 10-10 s or τ/ τ 0 ⩾ 700. The different properties of the new soliton are further studied. The results show that the new soliton in the new model is a better carrier of bio-energy transport and it can play an important role in biological processes. This model is a candidate of the bio-energy transport mechanism in protein molecules.

  9. COVARIANCE ASSISTED SCREENING AND ESTIMATION.

    PubMed

    Ke, By Tracy; Jin, Jiashun; Fan, Jianqing

    2014-11-01

    Consider a linear model Y = X β + z, where X = Xn,p and z ~ N(0, In ). The vector β is unknown and it is of interest to separate its nonzero coordinates from the zero ones (i.e., variable selection). Motivated by examples in long-memory time series (Fan and Yao, 2003) and the change-point problem (Bhattacharya, 1994), we are primarily interested in the case where the Gram matrix G = X'X is non-sparse but sparsifiable by a finite order linear filter. We focus on the regime where signals are both rare and weak so that successful variable selection is very challenging but is still possible. We approach this problem by a new procedure called the Covariance Assisted Screening and Estimation (CASE). CASE first uses a linear filtering to reduce the original setting to a new regression model where the corresponding Gram (covariance) matrix is sparse. The new covariance matrix induces a sparse graph, which guides us to conduct multivariate screening without visiting all the submodels. By interacting with the signal sparsity, the graph enables us to decompose the original problem into many separated small-size subproblems (if only we know where they are!). Linear filtering also induces a so-called problem of information leakage, which can be overcome by the newly introduced patching technique. Together, these give rise to CASE, which is a two-stage Screen and Clean (Fan and Song, 2010; Wasserman and Roeder, 2009) procedure, where we first identify candidates of these submodels by patching and screening, and then re-examine each candidate to remove false positives. For any procedure β̂ for variable selection, we measure the performance by the minimax Hamming distance between the sign vectors of β̂ and β. We show that in a broad class of situations where the Gram matrix is non-sparse but sparsifiable, CASE achieves the optimal rate of convergence. The results are successfully applied to long-memory time series and the change-point model.

  10. COVARIANCE ASSISTED SCREENING AND ESTIMATION

    PubMed Central

    Ke, By Tracy; Jin, Jiashun; Fan, Jianqing

    2014-01-01

    Consider a linear model Y = X β + z, where X = Xn,p and z ~ N(0, In). The vector β is unknown and it is of interest to separate its nonzero coordinates from the zero ones (i.e., variable selection). Motivated by examples in long-memory time series (Fan and Yao, 2003) and the change-point problem (Bhattacharya, 1994), we are primarily interested in the case where the Gram matrix G = X′X is non-sparse but sparsifiable by a finite order linear filter. We focus on the regime where signals are both rare and weak so that successful variable selection is very challenging but is still possible. We approach this problem by a new procedure called the Covariance Assisted Screening and Estimation (CASE). CASE first uses a linear filtering to reduce the original setting to a new regression model where the corresponding Gram (covariance) matrix is sparse. The new covariance matrix induces a sparse graph, which guides us to conduct multivariate screening without visiting all the submodels. By interacting with the signal sparsity, the graph enables us to decompose the original problem into many separated small-size subproblems (if only we know where they are!). Linear filtering also induces a so-called problem of information leakage, which can be overcome by the newly introduced patching technique. Together, these give rise to CASE, which is a two-stage Screen and Clean (Fan and Song, 2010; Wasserman and Roeder, 2009) procedure, where we first identify candidates of these submodels by patching and screening, and then re-examine each candidate to remove false positives. For any procedure β̂ for variable selection, we measure the performance by the minimax Hamming distance between the sign vectors of β̂ and β. We show that in a broad class of situations where the Gram matrix is non-sparse but sparsifiable, CASE achieves the optimal rate of convergence. The results are successfully applied to long-memory time series and the change-point model. PMID:25541567

  11. A compartmentalized solute transport model for redox zones in contaminated aquifers--1, Theory and development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abrams , Robert H.; Loague, Keith

    2000-01-01

    This paper, the first of two parts [see Abrams and Loague, this issue], takes the compartmentalized approach for the geochemical evolution of redox zones presented by Abrams et al. [1998] and embeds it within a solute transport framework. In this paper the compartmentalized approach is generalized to facilitate the description of its incorporation into a solute transport simulator. An equivalent formulation is developed which removes any discontinuities that may occur when switching compartments. Rate-limited redox reactions are modeled with a modified Monod relationship that allows either the organic substrate or the electron acceptor to be the rate-limiting reactant. Thermodynamic constraints are used to inhibit lower-energy redox reactions from occurring under infeasible geochemical conditions without imposing equilibrium on the lower-energy reactions. The procedure used allows any redox reaction to be simulated as being kinetically limited or thermodynamically limited, depending on local geochemical conditions. Empirical reaction inhibition methods are not needed. The sequential iteration approach (SIA), a technique which allows the number of solute transport equations to be reduced, is adopted to solve the coupled geochemical/solute transport problem. When the compartmentalized approach is embedded within the SIA, with the total analytical concentration of each component as the dependent variable in the transport equation, it is possible to reduce the number of transport equations even further than with the unmodified SIA. A one-dimensional, coupled geochemical/solute transport simulation is presented in which redox zones evolve dynamically in time and space. The compartmentalized solute transport (COMPTRAN) model described in this paper enables the development of redox zones to be simulated under both kinetic and thermodynamic constraints. The modular design of COMPTRAN facilitates the use of many different, preexisting solute transport and geochemical codes

  12. A compartmentalized solute transport model for redox zones in contaminated aquifers: 1: Theory and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrams, Robert H.; Loague, Keith

    2000-08-01

    This paper, the first of two parts [see Abrams and Loague, this issue], takes the compartmentalized approach for the geochemical evolution of redox zones presented by Abrams et al. [1998] and embeds it within a solute transport framework. In this paper the compartmentalized approach is generalized to facilitate the description of its incorporation into a solute transport simulator. An equivalent formulation is developed which removes any discontinuities that may occur when switching compartments. Rate-limited redox reactions are modeled with a modified Monod relationship that allows either the organic substrate or the electron acceptor to be the rate-limiting reactant. Thermodynamic constraints are used to inhibit lower-energy redox reactions from occurring under infeasible geochemical conditions without imposing equilibrium on the lower-energy reactions. The procedure used allows any redox reaction to be simulated as being kinetically limited or thermodynamically limited, depending on local geochemical conditions. Empirical reaction inhibition methods are not needed. The sequential iteration approach (SIA), a technique which allows the number of solute transport equations to be reduced, is adopted to solve the coupled geochemical/solute transport problem. When the compartmentalized approach is embedded within the SIA, with the total analytical concentration of each component as the dependent variable in the transport equation, it is possible to reduce the number of transport equations even further than with the unmodified SIA. A one-dimensional, coupled geochemical/solute transport simulation is presented in which redox zones evolve dynamically in time and space. The compartmentalized solute transport (COMPTRAN) model described in this paper enables the development of redox zones to be simulated under both kinetic and thermodynamic constraints. The modular design of COMPTRAN facilitates the use of many different, preexisting solute transport and geochemical codes

  13. Computation of transform domain covariance matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fino, B. J.; Algazi, V. R.

    1975-01-01

    It is often of interest in applications to compute the covariance matrix of a random process transformed by a fast unitary transform. Here, the recursive definition of fast unitary transforms is used to derive recursive relations for the covariance matrices of the transformed process. These relations lead to fast methods of computation of covariance matrices and to substantial reductions of the number of arithmetic operations required.

  14. Shrinkage approach for EEG covariance matrix estimation.

    PubMed

    Beltrachini, Leandro; von Ellenrieder, Nicolas; Muravchik, Carlos H

    2010-01-01

    We present a shrinkage estimator for the EEG spatial covariance matrix of the background activity. We show that such an estimator has some advantages over the maximum likelihood and sample covariance estimators when the number of available data to carry out the estimation is low. We find sufficient conditions for the consistency of the shrinkage estimators and results concerning their numerical stability. We compare several shrinkage schemes and show how to improve the estimator by incorporating known structure of the covariance matrix.

  15. Frailty models with missing covariates.

    PubMed

    Herring, Amy H; Ibrahim, Joseph G; Lipsitz, Stuart R

    2002-03-01

    We present a method for estimating the parameters in random effects models for survival data when covariates are subject to missingness. Our method is more general than the usual frailty model as it accommodates a wide range of distributions for the random effects, which are included as an offset in the linear predictor in a manner analogous to that used in generalized linear mixed models. We propose using a Monte Carlo EM algorithm along with the Gibbs sampler to obtain parameter estimates. This method is useful in reducing the bias that may be incurred using complete-case methods in this setting. The methodology is applied to data from Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group melanoma clinical trials in which observations were believed to be clustered and several tumor characteristics were not always observed.

  16. The role of cross-shock potential on pickup ion shock acceleration in the framework of focused transport theory

    DOE PAGES

    Zuo, Pingbing; Zhang, Ming; Rassoul, Hamid K.

    2013-10-03

    The focused transport theory is appropriate to describe the injection and acceleration of low-energy particles at shocks as an extension of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). In this investigation, we aim to characterize the role of cross-shock potential (CSP) originated in the charge separation across the shock ramp on pickup ion (PUI) acceleration at various types of shocks with a focused transport model. The simulation results of energy spectrum and spatial density distribution for the cases with and without CSP added in the model are compared. With sufficient acceleration time, the focused transport acceleration finally falls into the DSA regime withmore » the power-law spectral index equal to the solution of the DSA theory. The CSP can affect the shape of the spectrum segment at lower energies, but it does not change the spectral index of the final power-law spectrum at high energies. It is found that the CSP controls the injection efficiency which is the fraction of PUIs reaching the DSA regime. A stronger CSP jump results in a dramatically improved injection efficiency. Our simulation results also show that the injection efficiency of PUIs is mass-dependent, which is lower for species with a higher mass. Additionally, the CSP is able to enhance the particle reflection upstream to produce a stronger intensity spike at the shock front. Lastly, we conclude that the CSP is a non-negligible factor that affects the dynamics of PUIs at shocks.« less

  17. Lorentz covariant {kappa}-Minkowski spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    DaPbrowski, Ludwik; Godlinski, Michal; Piacitelli, Gherardo

    2010-06-15

    In recent years, different views on the interpretation of Lorentz covariance of noncommuting coordinates have been discussed. By a general procedure, we construct the minimal canonical central covariantization of the {kappa}-Minkowski spacetime. Here, undeformed Lorentz covariance is implemented by unitary operators, in the presence of two dimensionful parameters. We then show that, though the usual {kappa}-Minkowski spacetime is covariant under deformed (or twisted) Lorentz action, the resulting framework is equivalent to taking a noncovariant restriction of the covariantized model. We conclude with some general comments on the approach of deformed covariance.

  18. Balancing continuous covariates based on Kernel densities.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhenjun; Hu, Feifang

    2013-03-01

    The balance of important baseline covariates is essential for convincing treatment comparisons. Stratified permuted block design and minimization are the two most commonly used balancing strategies, both of which require the covariates to be discrete. Continuous covariates are typically discretized in order to be included in the randomization scheme. But breakdown of continuous covariates into subcategories often changes the nature of the covariates and makes distributional balance unattainable. In this article, we propose to balance continuous covariates based on Kernel density estimations, which keeps the continuity of the covariates. Simulation studies show that the proposed Kernel-Minimization can achieve distributional balance of both continuous and categorical covariates, while also keeping the group size well balanced. It is also shown that the Kernel-Minimization is less predictable than stratified permuted block design and minimization. Finally, we apply the proposed method to redesign the NINDS trial, which has been a source of controversy due to imbalance of continuous baseline covariates. Simulation shows that imbalances such as those observed in the NINDS trial can be generally avoided through the implementation of the new method.

  19. A unified theory of tokamak transport via the generalized Balescu--Lenard collision operator

    SciTech Connect

    Mynick, H.E.; Duvall, R.E.

    1988-06-01

    A unified basis from which to study the transport of tokamaks at low collisionality is provided by specializing the ''generalized Balescu--Lenard'' collision operator to toridal geometry. Explicitly evaluating this operator, ripple, turbulent, and neoclassical transport coefficients are obtained, simply by further specializing the single operator to different particular classes of fluctuation wavelength and mode structure. For each class of fluctuations, the operator possesses a diffusive, test-particle contribution D, and in addition a dynamic drag term F, which makes the operator self-consistent, and whose presence is accordingly essential for the resultant fluxes to possess the appropriate conservation laws and symmetrics. These properties, well-known for axisymmetric transport, are demonstrated for one type of turbulent transport, chosen for definiteness, by explicit evaluation of both ''anomalous diffusion'' term arising from D, as well as the closely related test particle calculations, but is shown to have an important impact on the predicted fluxes. 16 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Review of the facile (F/sub N/) method in particle transport theory

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, R.D.M.

    1985-10-01

    The facile (F/sub N/) method for solving particle transport problems is reviewed. The fundamentals of the method are summarized, recent developments are discussed and several applications of the method are described in detail.

  1. Electrokinetic ion transport through unsaturated soil: 1. Theory, model development, and testing.

    PubMed

    Mattson, Earl D; Bowman, Robert S; Lindgren, Eric R

    2002-01-01

    An electromigration transport model for non-reactive ion transport in unsaturated soil was developed and tested against laboratory experiments. This model assumed the electric potential field was constant with respect to time, an assumption valid for highly buffered soil, or when the electrode electrolysis reactions are neutralized. The model also assumed constant moisture contents and temperature with respect to time, and that electroosmotic and hydraulic transport of water through the soil was negligible. A functional relationship between ionic mobility and the electrolyte concentration was estimated using the chemical activity coefficient. Tortuosity was calculated from a mathematical relationship fitted to the electrical conductivity of the bulk pore water and soil moisture data. The functional relationship between ionic mobility, pore-water concentration, and tortuosity as a function of moisture content allowed the model to predict ion transport in heterogeneous unsaturated soils. The model was tested against laboratory measurements assessing anionic electromigration as a function of moisture content. In the test cell, a strip of soil was spiked with red dye No 40 and monitored for a 24-h period while a 10-mA current was maintained between the electrodes. Electromigration velocities predicted by the electromigration transport model were in agreement with laboratory experimental results. Both laboratory-measured and model-predicted dye migration results indicated a maximum transport velocity at moisture contents less than saturation due to competing effects between current density and tortuosity as moisture content decreases.

  2. Electrokinetic ion transport through unsaturated soil: 1. Theory, model development, and testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattson, Earl D.; Bowman, Robert S.; Lindgren, Eric R.

    2002-01-01

    An electromigration transport model for non-reactive ion transport in unsaturated soil was developed and tested against laboratory experiments. This model assumed the electric potential field was constant with respect to time, an assumption valid for highly buffered soil, or when the electrode electrolysis reactions are neutralized. The model also assumed constant moisture contents and temperature with respect to time, and that electroosmotic and hydraulic transport of water through the soil was negligible. A functional relationship between ionic mobility and the electrolyte concentration was estimated using the chemical activity coefficient. Tortuosity was calculated from a mathematical relationship fitted to the electrical conductivity of the bulk pore water and soil moisture data. The functional relationship between ionic mobility, pore-water concentration, and tortuosity as a function of moisture content allowed the model to predict ion transport in heterogeneous unsaturated soils. The model was tested against laboratory measurements assessing anionic electromigration as a function of moisture content. In the test cell, a strip of soil was spiked with red dye No 40 and monitored for a 24-h period while a 10-mA current was maintained between the electrodes. Electromigration velocities predicted by the electromigration transport model were in agreement with laboratory experimental results. Both laboratory-measured and model-predicted dye migration results indicated a maximum transport velocity at moisture contents less than saturation due to competing effects between current density and tortuosity as moisture content decreases.

  3. Conformal invariant cosmological perturbations via the covariant approach

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Mingzhe; Mou, Yicen E-mail: moinch@mail.ustc.edu.cn

    2015-10-01

    It is known that some cosmological perturbations are conformal invariant. This facilitates the studies of perturbations within some gravitational theories alternative to general relativity, for example the scalar-tensor theory, because it is possible to do equivalent analysis in a certain frame in which the perturbation equations are simpler. In this paper we revisit the problem of conformal invariances of cosmological perturbations in terms of the covariant approach in which the perturbation variables have clear geometric and physical meanings. We show that with this approach the conformal invariant perturbations are easily identified.

  4. Covariant effective action for loop quantum cosmology a la Palatini

    SciTech Connect

    Olmo, Gonzalo J.; Singh, Parampreet E-mail: psingh@perimeterinstitute.ca

    2009-01-15

    In loop quantum cosmology, non-perturbative quantum gravity effects lead to the resolution of the big bang singularity by a quantum bounce without introducing any new degrees of freedom. Though fundamentally discrete, the theory admits a continuum description in terms of an effective Hamiltonian. Here we provide an algorithm to obtain the corresponding effective action, establishing in this way the covariance of the theory for the first time. This result provides new insights on the continuum properties of the discrete structure of quantum geometry and opens new avenues to extract physical predictions such as those related to gauge invariant cosmological perturbations.

  5. Transport, charge exchange and loss of energetic heavy ions in the earth's radiation belts - Applicability and limitations of theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spjeldvik, W. N.

    1981-01-01

    Computer simulations of processes which control the relative abundances of ions in the trapping regions of geospace are compared with observations from discriminating ion detectors. Energy losses due to Coulomb collisions between ions and exospheric neutrals are considered, along with charge exchange losses and internal charge exchanges. The time evolution of energetic ion fluxes of equatorially mirroring ions under radial diffusion is modelled to include geomagnetic and geoelectric fluctutations. Limits to the validity of diffusion transport theory are discussed, and the simulation is noted to contain provisions for six ionic charge states and the source effect on the radiation belt oxygen ion distributions. Comparisons are made with ion flux data gathered on Explorer 45 and ISEE-1 spacecraft and results indicate that internal charge exchanges cause the radiation belt ion charge state to be independent of source charge rate characteristics, and relative charge state distribution is independent of the radially diffusive transport rate below the charge state redistribution zone.

  6. Solution of Linearized Drift Kinetic Equations in Neoclassical Transport Theory by the Method of Matched Asymptotic Expansions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, S. K.; Chan, V. S.; Hinton, F. L.

    2001-10-01

    The classic solution of the linearized drift kinetic equations in neoclassical transport theory for large-aspect-ratio tokamak flux-surfaces relies on the variational principle and the choice of ``localized" distribution functions as trialfunctions.(M.N. Rosenbluth, et al., Phys. Fluids 15) (1972) 116. Somewhat unclear in this approach are the nature and the origin of the ``localization" and whether the results obtained represent the exact leading terms in an asymptotic expansion int he inverse aspect ratio. Using the method of matched asymptotic expansions, we were able to derive the leading approximations to the distribution functions and demonstrated the asymptotic exactness of the existing results. The method is also applied to the calculation of angular momentum transport(M.N. Rosenbluth, et al., Plasma Phys. and Contr. Nucl. Fusion Research, 1970, Vol. 1 (IAEA, Vienna, 1971) p. 495.) and the current driven by electron cyclotron waves.

  7. Numerical Test of Different Approximations Used in the Transport Theory of Energetic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, G.; Shalchi, A.

    2016-05-01

    Recently developed theories for perpendicular diffusion work remarkably well. The diffusion coefficients they provide agree with test-particle simulations performed for different turbulence setups ranging from slab and slab-like models to two-dimensional and noisy reduced MHD turbulence. However, such theories are still based on different analytical approximations. In the current paper we use a test-particle code to explore the different approximations used in diffusion theory. We benchmark different guiding center approximations, simplifications of higher-order correlations, and the Taylor-Green-Kubo formula. We demonstrate that guiding center approximations work very well as long as the particle's unperturbed Larmor radius is smaller than the perpendicular correlation length of the turbulence. Furthermore, the Taylor-Green-Kubo formula and the definition of perpendicular diffusion coefficients via mean square displacements provide the same results. The only approximation that was used in the past in nonlinear diffusion theory that fails is to replace fourth-order correlations by a product of two second-order correlation functions. In more advanced nonlinear theories, however, this type of approximation is no longer used. Therefore, we confirm the validity of modern diffusion theories as a result of the work presented in the current paper.

  8. Covariance of Neutron Cross Sections for {sup 16}O through R-matrix Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kunieda, S.; Kawano, T.; Paris, M.; Hale, G.M.; Shibata, K.; Fukahori, T.

    2015-01-15

    Through the R-matrix analysis, neutron cross sections as well as the covariance are estimated for {sup 16}O in the resolved resonance range. Although we consider the current results are still preliminary, we present the summary of the cross section analysis and the results of data uncertainty/covariance, including those for the differential cross sections. It is found that the values obtained highlight consequences of nature in the theory as well as knowledge from measurements, which gives a realistic quantification of evaluated nuclear data covariances.

  9. U{sub N} Method For The Critical Slab Problem In One-Speed Neutron Transport Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Oeztuerk, Hakan; Guengoer, Sueleyman

    2008-11-11

    The Chebyshev polynomial approximation (U{sub N} method) is used to solve the critical slab problem in one-speed neutron transport theory using Marshak boundary condition. The isotropic scattering kernel with the combination of forward and backward scattering is chosen for the neutrons in a uniform finite slab. Numerical results obtained by the U{sub N} method are presented in the tables together with the results obtained by the well-known P{sub N} method for comparison. It is shown that the method converges rapidly with its easily executable equations.

  10. Development of a coupled dynamics code with transport theory capability and application to accelerator driven systems transients

    SciTech Connect

    Cahalan, J. E.; Ama, T.; Palmiotti, G.; Taiwo, T. A.; Yang, W. S.

    2000-03-09

    The VARIANT-K and DIF3D-K nodal spatial kinetics computer codes have been coupled to the SAS4A and SASSYS-1 liquid metal reactor accident and systems analysis codes. SAS4A and SASSYS-1 have been extended with the addition of heavy liquid metal (Pb and Pb-Bi) thermophysical properties, heat transfer correlations, and fluid dynamics correlations. The coupling methodology and heavy liquid metal modeling additions are described. The new computer code suite has been applied to analysis of neutron source and thermal-hydraulics transients in a model of an accelerator-driven minor actinide burner design proposed in an OECD/NEA/NSC benchmark specification. Modeling assumptions and input data generation procedures are described. Results of transient analyses are reported, with emphasis on comparison of P1 and P3 variational nodal transport theory results with nodal diffusion theory results, and on significance of spatial kinetics effects.

  11. Revision of the theory of tracer transport and the convolution model of dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bammer, Roland; Stollberger, Rudolf

    2012-01-01

    Counterexamples are used to motivate the revision of the established theory of tracer transport. Then dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in particular is conceptualized in terms of a fully distributed convection–diffusion model from which a widely used convolution model is derived using, alternatively, compartmental discretizations or semigroup theory. On this basis, applications and limitations of the convolution model are identified. For instance, it is proved that perfusion and tissue exchange states cannot be identified on the basis of a single convolution equation alone. Yet under certain assumptions, particularly that flux is purely convective at the boundary of a tissue region, physiological parameters such as mean transit time, effective volume fraction, and volumetric flow rate per unit tissue volume can be deduced from the kernel. PMID:17429633

  12. Charge ulse studies of transport phenomena in bilayer membranes. II. Detailed theory of steady-state behavior and application to valinomycin-mediated potassium transport.

    PubMed

    Feldberg, S W; Nakadomari, H

    1977-02-24

    The charge-pulse technique is applied to a study of valinomycin-mediated potassium transport across glycerol monooleate (GMO) bilayers. The theory, based on the Läuger-Stark model, is developed for the steady-state domain. The voltage dependences of the surface complexation reactions are also considered. The analysis of the data yields the folowing values for the rate constants: (see article). With the exception of this last ratio, all the values agree well with previously published data. The implication of the exponential term, 0.045, is that the plane of reaction for the surface complexation actually occurs a small distance within the membrane dielectric. If one presumes that the reaction plane is about half way between the plane of adsorbed complex and the membrane-water interface, one deduces that the complex "feels" only about 80% of the applied voltage across the membrane.

  13. Theory-based transport simulations of TFTR L-mode temperature profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, G.

    1991-10-24

    The temperature profiles from a selection of TFTR L-mode discharges are simulated with the 1-1/2-D BALDUR transport code using a combination of theoretically derived transport models, called the Multi-Mode Model. The present version of the Multi-Mode Model consists of effective thermal diffusivities resulting from trapped electron modes and ion temperature gradient ({eta}{sub i}) modes, which dominate in the core of the plasma, together with resistive ballooning modes, which dominate in the periphery. Within the context of this transport model and the TFTR simulations reported here, the scaling of confinement with heating power comes from the temperature dependence of the {eta}{sub i} and trapped electron modes, while the scaling with current comes mostly from resistive ballooning modes. 24 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Covariance Structure Analysis of Ordinal Ipsative Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Wai; Bentler, Peter M.

    1998-01-01

    Proposes a two-stage estimation method for the analysis of covariance structure models with ordinal ipsative data (OID). A goodness-of-fit statistic is given for testing the hypothesized covariance structure matrix, and simulation results show that the method works well with a large sample. (SLD)

  15. Quality Quantification of Evaluated Cross Section Covariances

    SciTech Connect

    Varet, S.; Dossantos-Uzarralde, P.

    2015-01-15

    Presently, several methods are used to estimate the covariance matrix of evaluated nuclear cross sections. Because the resulting covariance matrices can be different according to the method used and according to the assumptions of the method, we propose a general and objective approach to quantify the quality of the covariance estimation for evaluated cross sections. The first step consists in defining an objective criterion. The second step is computation of the criterion. In this paper the Kullback-Leibler distance is proposed for the quality quantification of a covariance matrix estimation and its inverse. It is based on the distance to the true covariance matrix. A method based on the bootstrap is presented for the estimation of this criterion, which can be applied with most methods for covariance matrix estimation and without the knowledge of the true covariance matrix. The full approach is illustrated on the {sup 85}Rb nucleus evaluations and the results are then used for a discussion on scoring and Monte Carlo approaches for covariance matrix estimation of the cross section evaluations.

  16. Position Error Covariance Matrix Validation and Correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisbee, Joe, Jr.

    2016-01-01

    In order to calculate operationally accurate collision probabilities, the position error covariance matrices predicted at times of closest approach must be sufficiently accurate representations of the position uncertainties. This presentation will discuss why the Gaussian distribution is a reasonable expectation for the position uncertainty and how this assumed distribution type is used in the validation and correction of position error covariance matrices.

  17. Solving the transport equation with quadratic finite elements: Theory and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, J.M.

    1997-12-31

    At the 4th Joint Conference on Computational Mathematics, the author presented a paper introducing a new quadratic finite element scheme (QFEM) for solving the transport equation. In the ensuing year the author has obtained considerable experience in the application of this method, including solution of eigenvalue problems, transmission problems, and solution of the adjoint form of the equation as well as the usual forward solution. He will present detailed results, and will also discuss other refinements of his transport codes, particularly for 3-dimensional problems on rectilinear and non-rectilinear grids.

  18. Revisiting the equivalence of light-front and covariant QED in the light-cone gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantovani, Luca; Pasquini, Barbara; Xiong, Xiaonu; Bacchetta, Alessandro

    2016-12-01

    We discuss the equivalence between light-front time-ordered-perturbation theory and covariant quantum field theory in light-front quantization, in the case of quantum electrodynamics at one-loop level. In particular, we review the one-loop calculation of the vertex correction, fermion self-energy and vacuum polarization. We apply the procedure of integration by residue over the light-front energy in the loop to show how the perturbative expansion in covariant terms can be reduced to a sum of propagating and instantaneous diagrams of light-front time-ordered perturbation theory. The detailed proof of equivalence between the two formulations of the theory resolves the controversial question on which form should be used for the gauge-field propagator in the light-cone gauge in the covariant approach.

  19. Adjoints and Low-rank Covariance Representation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tippett, Michael K.; Cohn, Stephen E.

    2000-01-01

    Quantitative measures of the uncertainty of Earth System estimates can be as important as the estimates themselves. Second moments of estimation errors are described by the covariance matrix, whose direct calculation is impractical when the number of degrees of freedom of the system state is large. Ensemble and reduced-state approaches to prediction and data assimilation replace full estimation error covariance matrices by low-rank approximations. The appropriateness of such approximations depends on the spectrum of the full error covariance matrix, whose calculation is also often impractical. Here we examine the situation where the error covariance is a linear transformation of a forcing error covariance. We use operator norms and adjoints to relate the appropriateness of low-rank representations to the conditioning of this transformation. The analysis is used to investigate low-rank representations of the steady-state response to random forcing of an idealized discrete-time dynamical system.

  20. U-duality covariant gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohm, Olaf; Samtleben, Henning

    2013-09-01

    We extend the techniques of double field theory to more general gravity theories and U-duality symmetries, having in mind applications to the complete D = 11 supergravity. In this paper we work out a (3 + 3)-dimensional `U-duality covariantization' of D = 4 Einstein gravity, in which the Ehlers group SL(2, ) is realized geometrically, acting in the 3 representation on half of the coordinates. We include the full (2 + 1)-dimensional metric, while the `internal vielbein' is a coset representative of SL(2, )/SO(2) and transforms under gauge transformations via generalized Lie derivatives. In addition, we introduce a gauge connection of the `C-bracket', and a gauge connection of SL(2, ), albeit subject to constraints. The action takes the form of (2 + 1)-dimensional gravity coupled to a Chern-Simons-matter theory but encodes the complete D = 4 Einstein gravity. We comment on generalizations, such as an ` E 8(8) covariantization' of M-theory.

  1. Theory of electron-vibration coupling in the electron transport of molecular bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukada, Masaru; Mitsutake, Kunihiro

    2006-03-01

    Electron transport through molecules connecting nano-electrodes is the key issue for molecular devices. The competition and coexistence of the coherent and dissipative transport are unresolved issue, in spite of its importance. In this work, this problem is investigated by a novel theoretical approach of an ab initio molecular orbital model with combining polaron effect. When carriers are injected into molecules from electrodes, the structure of the molecule changes, which leads the coupling term of the electron/hole and the molecular vibration. The model Hamiltonian for the thiophene oligomer is solved by a variational approach, and a mixed states of dressed polaron with molecular orbital states mediated by the phonon cloud is found. The former and latter are predominant for small or large transfer integral, respectively. The excited states can be calculated in the same framework as the ground state. The overall carrier transport properties can be analyzed by solving the master equation with the transition rate estimated by the golden rule including the phonon degrees of freedom. In this theoretical approach, the coherent and dissipative electron transport through molecular bridges can be described in a uniform systematic way.

  2. Analytical Theory of the Destruction Terms in Dissipation Rate Transport Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, Robert; Zhou, Ye

    1996-01-01

    Modeled dissipation rate transport equations are often derived by invoking various hypotheses to close correlations in the corresponding exact equations. D. C. Leslie suggested that these models might be derived instead from Kraichnan's wavenumber space integrals for inertial range transport power. This suggestion is applied to the destruction terms in the dissipation rate equations for incompressible turbulence, buoyant turbulence, rotating incompressible turbulence, and rotating buoyant turbulence. Model constants like C(epsilon 2) are expressed as integrals; convergence of these integrals implies the absence of Reynolds number dependence in the corresponding destruction term. The dependence of C(epsilon 2) on rotation rate emerges naturally; sensitization of the modeled dissipation rate equation to rotation is not required. A buoyancy related effect which is absent in the exact transport equation for temperature variance dissipation, but which sometimes improves computational predictions, also arises naturally. Both the presence of this effect and the appropriate time scale in the modeled transport equation depend on whether Bolgiano or Kolmogorov inertial range scaling applies. A simple application of these methods leads to a preliminary, dissipation rate equation for rotating buoyant turbulence.

  3. From Mechanical Motion to Brownian Motion, Thermodynamics and Particle Transport Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bringuier, E.

    2008-01-01

    The motion of a particle in a medium is dealt with either as a problem of mechanics or as a transport process in non-equilibrium statistical physics. The two kinds of approach are often unrelated as they are taught in different textbooks. The aim of this paper is to highlight the link between the mechanical and statistical treatments of particle…

  4. Transport Properties of Complex Oxides: New Ideas and Insights from Theory and Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedek, Nicole

    Complex oxides are one of the largest and most technologically important materials families. The ABO3 perovskite oxides in particular display an unparalleled variety of physical properties. The microscopic origin of these properties (how they arise from the structure of the material) is often complicated, but in many systems previous research has identified simple guidelines or `rules of thumb' that link structure and chemistry to the physics of interest. For example, the tolerance factor is a simple empirical measure that relates the composition of a perovskite to its tendency to adopt a distorted structure. First-principles calculations have shown that the tendency towards ferroelectricity increases systematically as the tolerance factor of the perovskite decreases. Can we uncover a similar set of simple guidelines to yield new insights into the ionic and thermal transport properties of perovskites? I will discuss recent research from my group on the link between crystal structure and chemistry, soft phonons and ionic transport in a family of layered perovskite oxides, the Ln2NiO4+δ Ruddlesden-Popper phases. In particular, we show how the lattice dynamical properties of these materials (their tendency to undergo certain structural distortions) can be correlated with oxide ion transport properties. Ultimately, we seek new ways to understand the microscopic origins of complex transport processes and to develop first-principles-based design rules for new materials based on our understanding.

  5. Eddy Covariance Method: Overview of General Guidelines and Conventional Workflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burba, G. G.; Anderson, D. J.; Amen, J. L.

    2007-12-01

    Atmospheric flux measurements are widely used to estimate water, heat, carbon dioxide and trace gas exchange between the ecosystem and the atmosphere. The Eddy Covariance method is one of the most direct, defensible ways to measure and calculate turbulent fluxes within the atmospheric boundary layer. However, the method is mathematically complex, and requires significant care to set up and process data. These reasons may be why the method is currently used predominantly by micrometeorologists. Modern instruments and software can potentially expand the use of this method beyond micrometeorology and prove valuable for plant physiology, hydrology, biology, ecology, entomology, and other non-micrometeorological areas of research. The main challenge of the method for a non-expert is the complexity of system design, implementation, and processing of the large volume of data. In the past several years, efforts of the flux networks (e.g., FluxNet, Ameriflux, CarboEurope, Fluxnet-Canada, Asiaflux, etc.) have led to noticeable progress in unification of the terminology and general standardization of processing steps. The methodology itself, however, is difficult to unify, because various experimental sites and different purposes of studies dictate different treatments, and site-, measurement- and purpose-specific approaches. Here we present an overview of theory and typical workflow of the Eddy Covariance method in a format specifically designed to (i) familiarize a non-expert with general principles, requirements, applications, and processing steps of the conventional Eddy Covariance technique, (ii) to assist in further understanding the method through more advanced references such as textbooks, network guidelines and journal papers, (iii) to help technicians, students and new researchers in the field deployment of the Eddy Covariance method, and (iv) to assist in its use beyond micrometeorology. The overview is based, to a large degree, on the frequently asked questions

  6. Particle size distributions and the sequential fragmentation/transport theory applied to volcanic ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohletz, K. H.; Sheridan, M. F.; Brown, W. K.

    1989-11-01

    The assumption that distributions of mass versus size interval for fragmented materials fit the log normal distribution is empirically based and has historical roots in the late 19th century. Other often used distributions (e.g., Rosin-Rammler, Weibull) are also empirical and have the general form for mass per size interval: n(l) = klα exp (-lβ), where n(l) represents the number of particles of diameter l, l is the normalized particle diameter, and k, α, and β are constants. We describe and extend the sequential fragmentation distribution to include transport effects upon observed volcanic ash size distributions. The sequential fragmentation/transport (SFT) distribution is also of the above mathematical form, but it has a physical basis rather than empirical. The SFT model applies to a particle-mass distribution formed by a sequence of fragmentation (comminution) and transport (size sorting) events acting upon an initial mass m': n(x, m) = C ∫∫ n(x', m')p(ξ)dx' dm', where x' denotes spatial location along a linear axis, C is a constant, and integration is performed over distance from an origin to the sample location and mass limits from 0 to m. We show that the probability function that models the production of particles of different size from an initial mass and sorts that distribution, p(ξ), is related to mg, where g (noted as γ for fragmentation processes) is a free parameter that determines the location, breadth, and skewness of the distribution; g(γ) must be greater than -1, and it increases from that value as the distribution matures with greater number of sequential steps in the fragmentation or transport process; γ is expected to be near -1 for "sudden" fragmentation mechanisms such as single-event explosions and transport mechanisms that are functionally dependent upon particle mass. This free parameter will be more positive for evolved fragmentation mechanisms such as ball milling and complex transport processes such as saltation. The SFT

  7. Enhancing the characterization of bedload transport in rivers using the analogy between the Hertz contact theory and plate hydrophone measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrière, Julien; Oth, Adrien; Schenkluhn, Reimar; Krein, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Vibration measurements performed with plate or pipe geophone/hydrophone systems are of growing interest for bedload transport monitoring since they allow performing high temporal resolution and continuous records. Our set-up is constituted by a piezoelectric hydrophone acting as a "sediment vibration sensor" in contact with a steel plate located on the streambed. With such an apparatus, the signal processing is generally reduced to power spectral analysis or impact counting. However, a large amount of useful information is contained in the waveform of the impact signal, which conveys the force and the contact time that the bedload imposes on the plate. The wave amplitude is not well constrained because it varies a lot with changing impact location and velocity. The wave frequency is a more relevant parameter, less sensitive to these variables. According to the Hertz contact theory the frequency of the first signal arrival (flexural wave) is directly proportional to the bed-material grain size. Then, an appropriate analysis of the frequency attributes (central frequency, modulation) is needed to estimate the size of bedload particles. In this way, we have developed a complete processing algorithm based on a high dimensional decomposition method (chirplet transform) to get an accurate estimation of the first arrival frequency content. Results on summer flood events in a lowland river show that impacts are well separated by their central frequency and that most of transport occurs during larger peak flows. The portion of coarser sediment which is characterized by low frequencies is preferentially transported during the rising limb whereas the finer sand fraction identified by higher frequencies is transported during both rising and falling limb. Such a processing offers the opportunity to better understand the bedload signature of vibration measurements and is promising in view of quantifying processes of bedload transport and deposition. This final objective of

  8. Schwinger mechanism in linear covariant gauges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar, A. C.; Binosi, D.; Papavassiliou, J.

    2017-02-01

    In this work we explore the applicability of a special gluon mass generating mechanism in the context of the linear covariant gauges. In particular, the implementation of the Schwinger mechanism in pure Yang-Mills theories hinges crucially on the inclusion of massless bound-state excitations in the fundamental nonperturbative vertices of the theory. The dynamical formation of such excitations is controlled by a homogeneous linear Bethe-Salpeter equation, whose nontrivial solutions have been studied only in the Landau gauge. Here, the form of this integral equation is derived for general values of the gauge-fixing parameter, under a number of simplifying assumptions that reduce the degree of technical complexity. The kernel of this equation consists of fully dressed gluon propagators, for which recent lattice data are used as input, and of three-gluon vertices dressed by a single form factor, which is modeled by means of certain physically motivated Ansätze. The gauge-dependent terms contributing to this kernel impose considerable restrictions on the infrared behavior of the vertex form factor; specifically, only infrared finite Ansätze are compatible with the existence of nontrivial solutions. When such Ansätze are employed, the numerical study of the integral equation reveals a continuity in the type of solutions as one varies the gauge-fixing parameter, indicating a smooth departure from the Landau gauge. Instead, the logarithmically divergent form factor displaying the characteristic "zero crossing," while perfectly consistent in the Landau gauge, has to undergo a dramatic qualitative transformation away from it, in order to yield acceptable solutions. The possible implications of these results are briefly discussed.

  9. Equations of state, transport properties, and compositions of argon plasma: combination of self-consistent fluid variation theory and linear response theory.

    PubMed

    Quan, W L; Chen, Q F; Fu, Z J; Sun, X W; Zheng, J; Gu, Y J

    2015-02-01

    A consistent theoretical model that can be applied in a wide range of densities and temperatures is necessary for understanding the variation of a material's properties during compression and heating. Taking argon as an example, we show that the combination of self-consistent fluid variational theory and linear response theory is a promising route for studying warm dense matter. Following this route, the compositions, equations of state, and transport properties of argon plasma are calculated in a wide range of densities (0.001-20 g/cm(3)) and temperatures (5-100 kK). The obtained equations of state and electrical conductivities are found in good agreement with available experimental data. The plasma phase transition of argon is observed at temperatures below 30 kK and density about 2-6g/cm(3). The minimum density for the metallization of argon is found to be about 5.8 g/cm(3), occurring at 30-40 kK. The effects of many-particle correlations and dynamic screening on the electrical conductivity are also discussed through the effective potentials.

  10. Theory of ion transport with fast acid-base equilibrations in bioelectrochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Dykstra, J E; Biesheuvel, P M; Bruning, H; Ter Heijne, A

    2014-07-01

    Bioelectrochemical systems recover valuable components and energy in the form of hydrogen or electricity from aqueous organic streams. We derive a one-dimensional steady-state model for ion transport in a bioelectrochemical system, with the ions subject to diffusional and electrical forces. Since most of the ionic species can undergo acid-base reactions, ion transport is combined in our model with infinitely fast ion acid-base equilibrations. The model describes the current-induced ammonia evaporation and recovery at the cathode side of a bioelectrochemical system that runs on an organic stream containing ammonium ions. We identify that the rate of ammonia evaporation depends not only on the current but also on the flow rate of gas in the cathode chamber, the diffusion of ammonia from the cathode back into the anode chamber, through the ion exchange membrane placed in between, and the membrane charge density.

  11. Excitons in topological Kondo insulators: Theory of thermodynamic and transport anomalies in SmB6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knolle, Johannes; Cooper, Nigel R.

    2017-03-01

    Kondo insulating materials lie outside the usual dichotomy of weakly versus correlated—band versus Mott—insulators. They are metallic at high temperatures but resemble band insulators at low temperatures because of the opening of an interaction-induced band gap. The first discovered Kondo insulator (KI) SmB6 has been predicted to form a topological KI (TKI). However, since its discovery thermodynamic and transport anomalies have been observed that have defied a theoretical explanation. Enigmatic signatures of collective modes inside the charge gap are seen in specific heat, thermal transport, and quantum oscillation experiments in strong magnetic fields. Here, we show that TKIs are susceptible to the formation of excitons and magnetoexcitons. These charge neutral composite particles can account for long-standing anomalies in SmB6 .

  12. Theory of ion transport with fast acid-base equilibrations in bioelectrochemical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykstra, J. E.; Biesheuvel, P. M.; Bruning, H.; Ter Heijne, A.

    2014-07-01

    Bioelectrochemical systems recover valuable components and energy in the form of hydrogen or electricity from aqueous organic streams. We derive a one-dimensional steady-state model for ion transport in a bioelectrochemical system, with the ions subject to diffusional and electrical forces. Since most of the ionic species can undergo acid-base reactions, ion transport is combined in our model with infinitely fast ion acid-base equilibrations. The model describes the current-induced ammonia evaporation and recovery at the cathode side of a bioelectrochemical system that runs on an organic stream containing ammonium ions. We identify that the rate of ammonia evaporation depends not only on the current but also on the flow rate of gas in the cathode chamber, the diffusion of ammonia from the cathode back into the anode chamber, through the ion exchange membrane placed in between, and the membrane charge density.

  13. Excitons in topological Kondo insulators: Theory of thermodynamic and transport anomalies in SmB_{6}.

    PubMed

    Knolle, Johannes; Cooper, Nigel R

    2017-03-03

    Kondo insulating materials lie outside the usual dichotomy of weakly versus correlated-band versus Mott-insulators. They are metallic at high temperatures but resemble band insulators at low temperatures because of the opening of an interaction-induced band gap. The first discovered Kondo insulator (KI) SmB_{6} has been predicted to form a topological KI (TKI). However, since its discovery thermodynamic and transport anomalies have been observed that have defied a theoretical explanation. Enigmatic signatures of collective modes inside the charge gap are seen in specific heat, thermal transport, and quantum oscillation experiments in strong magnetic fields. Here, we show that TKIs are susceptible to the formation of excitons and magnetoexcitons. These charge neutral composite particles can account for long-standing anomalies in SmB_{6}.

  14. Percolation theory for solute transport in porous media: Geochemistry, geomorphology, and carbon cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Allen G.; Ghanbarian, Behzad

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the time-dependent scaling of chemical weathering has been a significant research goal for over a decade. A percolation theoretical treatment of nonreactive solute transport that was previously shown compatible with the scaling of chemical weathering rates is here shown to be compatible with soil formation rates, and with C and N sequestration rates in the soil as well. In this theoretical framework, the percolation backbone fractal dimensionality, which generates the long-time tail of the solute arrival time distribution, also predicts the scaling of the reaction rates, while laboratory proportionality to the fluid flow velocity translates to an analogous relevance of the vertical infiltration rate in the field. The predicted proportionality of solute transport to net infiltration generates simultaneously the variability in soil formation rates across 4 orders of magnitude of precipitation and 12 orders of magnitude of time scales.

  15. Tests of local transport theory and reduced wall impurity influx with highly radiative plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, K. W.; Scott, S. D.; Bell, M.; Budny, R.; Bush, C. E.; Clark, R. E. H.; Denne-Hinnov, B.; Ernst, D. R.; Hammett, G. W.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Mueller, D.; Ongena, J.; Park, H. K.; Ramsey, A. T.; Synakowski, E. J.; Taylor, G.; Zarnstorff, M. C.

    1999-03-01

    The electron temperature (Te) profile in neutral beam-heated supershot plasmas (Te0˜6-7 keV ion temperature Ti0˜15-20 keV, beam power Pb˜16 MW) was remarkably invariant when radiative losses were increased significantly through gas puffing of krypton and xenon in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor [McGuire et al., Phys. Plasmas 2, 2176 (1995)]. Trace impurity concentrations (nz/ne˜10-3) generated almost flat and centrally peaked radiation profiles, respectively, and increased the radiative losses to 45%-90% of the input power (from the normal ˜25%). Energy confinement was not degraded at radiated power fractions up to 80%. A 20%-30% increase in Ti, in spite of an increase in ion-electron power loss, implies a factor of ˜3 drop in the local ion thermal diffusivity. These experiments form the basis for a nearly ideal test of transport theory, since the change in the beam heating power profile is modest, while the distribution of power flow between (1) radiation and (2) conduction plus convection changes radically and is locally measurable. The decrease in Te was significantly less than predicted by two transport models and may provide important tests of more complete transport models. At input power levels of 30 MW, the increased radiation eliminated the catastrophic carbon influx (carbon "bloom") and performance (energy confinement and neutron production) was improved significantly relative to that of matched shots without impurity gas puffing.

  16. Fusion plasma theory. Task 3: ECRH and transport modeling in tandem mirrors and divertor physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmert, G. A.

    1984-06-01

    The research performed under Tank II of this contact has focused on: (1) the coupling of an ECRH ray tracing and absorption code to a tandem mirror transport code in order to self-consistently model the temporal and spatial evolution of the plasma, and (2) the further development of semi-analytical models for plasma flow in divertors and pumped limiters. Work on these topics is briefly summarized.

  17. On Theory of Dispersive Transport in a Two-Layer Polymer Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibatov, R. T.; Morozova, E. V.

    2016-09-01

    Dispersive transport of charge carriers in a two-layer polymer structure is modeled on the basis of the integrodifferential equation of hereditary diffusion. The model of multiple trapping in a bilayer is generalized to the case of an arbitrary density of localized states. With the help of an efficient Monte Carlo algorithm, curves of the transient current are calculated and their features are explained within the framework of a stochastic interpretation of the process.

  18. Interpolation method for the transport theory and its application in fusion-neutronics analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, J.

    1981-09-01

    This report presents an interpolation method for the solution of the Boltzmann transport equation. The method is based on a flux synthesis technique using two reference-point solutions. The equation for the interpolated solution results in a Volterra integral equation which is proved to have a unique solution. As an application of the present method, tritium breeding ratio is calculated for a typical D-T fusion reactor system. The result is compared to that of a variational technique.

  19. Theory of transport phenomena in polycrystalline lead chalcogenide films. Mobility. Nondegenerate statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Atakulov, Sh. B. Zaynolobidinova, S. M.; Nabiev, G. A.; Nabiyev, M. B.; Yuldashev, A. A.

    2013-07-15

    The mobility of nondegenerate electrons in quasi-single-crystal and polycrystalline PbTe films is experimentally investigated. The results obtained are compared with the data for bulk crystals at the same charge-carrier concentration. Under the assumption of limitation of the charge-carrier mobility by intercrystallite potential barriers, electron transport in an electric field is theoretically considered. The theoretical results are in good agreement with the experiment.

  20. Conceptual density functional theory for electron transfer and transport in mesoscopic systems.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Paulo R; Miranda, David A

    2017-02-22

    Molecular and supramolecular systems are essentially mesoscopic in character. The electron self-exchange, in the case of energy fluctuations, or electron transfer/transport, in the case of the presence of an externally driven electrochemical potential, between mesoscopic sites is energetically driven in such a manner where the electrochemical capacitance (C[small mu, Greek, macron]) is fundamental. Thus, the electron transfer/transport through channels connecting two distinct energetic (ΔE[small mu, Greek, macron]) and spatially separated mesoscopic sites is capacitively modulated. Remarkably, the relationship between the quantum conductance (G) and the standard electrochemical rate constant (kr), which is indispensable to understanding the physical and chemical characteristics governing electron exchange in molecular scale systems, was revealed to be related to C[small mu, Greek, macron], that is, C[small mu, Greek, macron] = G/kr. Accordingly, C[small mu, Greek, macron] is the proportional missing term that controls the electron transfer/transport in mesoscopic systems in a wide-range, and equally it can be understood from first principles density functional quantum mechanical approaches. Indeed the differences in energy between states is calculated (or experimentally accessed) throughout the electrochemical capacitance as ΔE[small mu, Greek, macron] = β/C[small mu, Greek, macron], and thus constitutes the driving force for G and/or kr, where β is only a proportional constant that includes the square of the unit electron charge times the square of the number of electron particles interchanged.

  1. Sparse estimation of a covariance matrix.

    PubMed

    Bien, Jacob; Tibshirani, Robert J

    2011-12-01

    We suggest a method for estimating a covariance matrix on the basis of a sample of vectors drawn from a multivariate normal distribution. In particular, we penalize the likelihood with a lasso penalty on the entries of the covariance matrix. This penalty plays two important roles: it reduces the effective number of parameters, which is important even when the dimension of the vectors is smaller than the sample size since the number of parameters grows quadratically in the number of variables, and it produces an estimate which is sparse. In contrast to sparse inverse covariance estimation, our method's close relative, the sparsity attained here is in the covariance matrix itself rather than in the inverse matrix. Zeros in the covariance matrix correspond to marginal independencies; thus, our method performs model selection while providing a positive definite estimate of the covariance. The proposed penalized maximum likelihood problem is not convex, so we use a majorize-minimize approach in which we iteratively solve convex approximations to the original nonconvex problem. We discuss tuning parameter selection and demonstrate on a flow-cytometry dataset how our method produces an interpretable graphical display of the relationship between variables. We perform simulations that suggest that simple elementwise thresholding of the empirical covariance matrix is competitive with our method for identifying the sparsity structure. Additionally, we show how our method can be used to solve a previously studied special case in which a desired sparsity pattern is prespecified.

  2. Concordance between criteria for covariate model building.

    PubMed

    Hennig, Stefanie; Karlsson, Mats O

    2014-04-01

    When performing a population pharmacokinetic modelling analysis covariates are often added to the model. Such additions are often justified by improved goodness of fit and/or decreased in unexplained (random) parameter variability. Increased goodness of fit is most commonly measured by the decrease in the objective function value. Parameter variability can be defined as the sum of unexplained (random) and explained (predictable) variability. Increase in magnitude of explained parameter variability could be another possible criterion for judging improvement in the model. The agreement between these three criteria in diagnosing covariate-parameter relationships of different strengths and nature using stochastic simulations and estimations as well as assessing covariate-parameter relationships in four previously published real data examples were explored. Total estimated parameter variability was found to vary with the number of covariates introduced on the parameter. In the simulated examples and two real examples, the parameter variability increased with increasing number of included covariates. For the other real examples parameter variability decreased or did not change systematically with the addition of covariates. The three criteria were highly correlated, with the decrease in unexplained variability being more closely associated with changes in objective function values than increases in explained parameter variability were. The often used assumption that inclusion of covariates in models only shifts unexplained parameter variability to explained parameter variability appears not to be true, which may have implications for modelling decisions.

  3. Objectively mapping HF radar-derived surface current data using measured and idealized data covariance matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung Yong; Terrill, Eric; Cornuelle, Bruce

    2007-06-01

    Surface currents measured by high-frequency radars are objectively mapped using covariance matrices computed from hourly surface current vectors spanning two years. Since retrievals of surface radial velocities are inherently gappy in space and time, the irregular density of surface current data leads to negative eigenvalues in the sample covariance matrix. The number and the magnitude of the negative eigenvalues depend on the degree of data continuity used in the matrix computation. In a region of 90% data coverage, the negative eigenvalues of the sample covariance matrix are small enough to be removed by adding a noise term to the diagonal of the matrix. The mapping is extended to regions of poorer data coverage by applying a smoothed covariance matrix obtained by spatially averaging the sample covariance matrix. This approach estimates a stable covariance matrix of surface currents for regions with the intermittent radar coverage. An additional benefit is the removal of baseline errors that often exist between two radar sites. The covariance matrices and the correlation functions of the surface currents are exponential in space rather than Gaussian, as is often assumed in the objective mapping of oceanographic data sets. Patterns in the decorrelation length scale provide the variabilities of surface currents and the insights on the influence of topographic features (bathymetry and headlands). The objective mapping approach presented herein lends itself to various applications, including the Lagrangian transport estimates, dynamic analysis through divergence and vorticity of current vectors, and statistical models of surface currents.

  4. Modeling reactive transport in deformable porous media using the theory of interacting continua.

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, Daniel Zack

    2012-01-01

    This report gives an overview of the work done as part of an Early Career LDRD aimed at modeling flow induced damage of materials involving chemical reactions, deformation of the porous matrix, and complex flow phenomena. The numerical formulation is motivated by a mixture theory or theory of interacting continua type approach to coupling the behavior of the fluid and the porous matrix. Results for the proposed method are presented for several engineering problems of interest including carbon dioxide sequestration, hydraulic fracturing, and energetic materials applications. This work is intended to create a general framework for flow induced damage that can be further developed in each of the particular areas addressed below. The results show both convincing proof of the methodologies potential and the need for further validation of the models developed.

  5. Modeling of Beam Wave Pulse Propagation in Vegetation Using Transport Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-31

    T5 •T•IT A July 31, 2005DjSTRIBUT,,t• t;.•~ k Approve , lM - jease Disirlo lited FINAL REPORT New Jersey Institute of Technology STATEMENT OF...intensity at small penetration depths without resorting to computer intensive calculations while maintaining good accuracy. The second new theory...wave in a random medium. Their approach, however, is computational intensive, and does not provide numerical data for off-axis beam scattering’. In the

  6. Radiation Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Urbatsch, Todd James

    2015-06-15

    We present an overview of radiation transport, covering terminology, blackbody raditation, opacities, Boltzmann transport theory, approximations to the transport equation. Next we introduce several transport methods. We present a section on Caseology, observing transport boundary layers. We briefly broach topics of software development, including verification and validation, and we close with a section on high energy-density experiments that highlight and support radiation transport.

  7. Gradual conditioning of non-Gaussian transmissivity fields to flow and mass transport data: 1. Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capilla, José E.; Llopis-Albert, Carlos

    2009-06-01

    SummaryThe paper presents a new stochastic inverse method for the simulation of transmissivity ( T) fields conditional to T measurements, secondary information obtained from expert judgement and geophysical surveys, transient piezometric and solute concentration measurements, and travel time data. The formulation of the method is simple and derived from the gradual deformation method. It basically consists of an iterative optimization procedure in which successive combinations of T fields, that honour T measurements and soft data (secondary data obtained from expert judgement and/or geophysical surveys), gradually lead to a simulated T field conditional to flow and mass transport data. Every combination of fields requires minimizing a penalty function that penalizes the difference between computed and measured conditioning data. This penalty function depends on only one parameter. Travel time conditioning data are considered by means of a backward-in-time probabilistic model, which extends the potential applications of the method to the characterization of groundwater contamination sources. In order to solve the mass transport equation, the method implements a Lagrangian approach that allows avoiding numerical problems usually found in Eulerian methods. Besides, to deal with highly heterogeneous and non-Gaussian media, being able to reproduce anomalous breakthrough curves, a dual-domain approach is implemented with a first-order mass transfer approach. To determine the particle distribution between the mobile domain and the immobile domain the method uses a Bernoulli trial on the appropriate phase transition probabilities, derived using the normalized zeroth spatial moments of the multirate transport equations. The presented method does not require assuming the classical multiGaussian hypothesis thus easing the reproduction of T spatial patterns where extreme values of T show high connectivity. This feature allows the reproduction of a property found in real

  8. The diffusion approximation and transport theory for cosmic rays in relativistic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, G. M.

    1989-01-01

    Equations describing the transport of cosmic rays in relativistic flows in the diffusion approximation are obtained. The analysis is based on the zeroth, first, and second differential moment equations of the relativistic Boltzmann equation with a BGK collision term. A perturbation solution of the moment equations in the diffusion approximation yields both the co-moving frame particle current and viscous stresses. The resultant cosmic-ray continuity equation contains three readily recognized energy change terms: the adiabatic energy change term; the viscous shear energy change term; and a term proportional to the scalar product of the acceleration vector of the scattering frame and the heat flux.

  9. Cross-Section Covariance Data Processing with the AMPX Module PUFF-IV

    SciTech Connect

    Wiarda, Dorothea; Leal, Luiz C; Dunn, Michael E

    2011-01-01

    The ENDF community is endeavoring to release an updated version of the ENDF/B-VII library (ENDF/B-VII.1). In the new release several new evaluations containing covariance information have been added, as the community strives to add covariance information for use in programs like the TSUNAMI (Tools for Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis Methodology Implementation) sequence of SCALE (Ref 1). The ENDF/B formatted files are processed into libraries to be used in transport calculations using the AMPX code system (Ref 2) or the NJOY code system (Ref 3). Both codes contain modules to process covariance matrices: PUFF-IV for AMPX and ERRORR in the case of NJOY. While the cross section processing capability between the two code systems has been widely compared, the same is not true for the covariance processing. This paper compares the results for the two codes using the pre-release version of ENDF/B-VII.1.

  10. Recurrence Analysis of Eddy Covariance Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Holger; Flach, Milan; Foken, Thomas; Hauhs, Michael

    2015-04-01

    The eddy covariance (EC) method is one key method to quantify fluxes in biogeochemical cycles in general, and carbon and energy transport across the vegetation-atmosphere boundary layer in particular. EC data from the worldwide net of flux towers (Fluxnet) have also been used to validate biogeochemical models. The high resolution data are usually obtained at 20 Hz sampling rate but are affected by missing values and other restrictions. In this contribution, we investigate the nonlinear dynamics of EC fluxes using Recurrence Analysis (RA). High resolution data from the site DE-Bay (Waldstein-Weidenbrunnen) and fluxes calculated at half-hourly resolution from eight locations (part of the La Thuile dataset) provide a set of very long time series to analyze. After careful quality assessment and Fluxnet standard gapfilling pretreatment, we calculate properties and indicators of the recurrent structure based both on Recurrence Plots as well as Recurrence Networks. Time series of RA measures obtained from windows moving along the time axis are presented. Their interpretation is guided by three different questions: (1) Is RA able to discern periods where the (atmospheric) conditions are particularly suitable to obtain reliable EC fluxes? (2) Is RA capable to detect dynamical transitions (different behavior) beyond those obvious from visual inspection? (3) Does RA contribute to an understanding of the nonlinear synchronization between EC fluxes and atmospheric parameters, which is crucial for both improving carbon flux models as well for reliable interpolation of gaps? (4) Is RA able to recommend an optimal time resolution for measuring EC data and for analyzing EC fluxes? (5) Is it possible to detect non-trivial periodicities with a global RA? We will demonstrate that the answers to all five questions is affirmative, and that RA provides insights into EC dynamics not easily obtained otherwise.

  11. Two-Phase Thermal Transport in Microgap Channels—Theory, Experimental Results, and Predictive Relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Cohen, Avram; Sheehan, Jessica R.; Rahim, Emil

    2012-01-01

    A comprehensive literature review and analysis of recent microchannel/microgap heat transfer data for two-phase flow of refrigerants and dielectric liquids is presented. The flow regime progression in such a microgap channel is shown to be predicted by the traditional flow regime maps. Moreover, Annular flow is shown to be the dominant regime for this thermal transport configuration and to grow in importance as the channel diameter decreases. The results of heat transfer studies of single miniature channels, as well as the analysis and inverse calculation of IR images of a heated microgap channel wall, are used to identify the existence of a characteristic M-shaped heat transfer coefficient variation with quality (or superficial velocity), with inflection points corresponding to transitions in the two-phase cooling modalities. For the high-quality, Annular flow conditions, the venerable Chen correlation is shown to yield predictive agreement for microgap channels that is comparable to that attained for macrochannels and to provide a mechanistic context for the thermal transport rates attained in microgap channels. Results obtained from infrared imaging, revealing previously undetected, large surface temperature variations in Annular flow, are also reviewed and related to the termination of the favorable thin-film evaporation mode in such channels.

  12. Transport theory with self-consistent confinement related to the lattice data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bożek, P.; He, Y. B.; Hüfner, J.

    1998-06-01

    The space-time development of a quark-gluon plasma is calculated from a Vlasov equation for the distribution function of quasiparticles with medium dependent masses. At each space-time point the masses are calculated self-consistently from a gap equation, whose form is determined by the requirement that in thermal equilibrium and for a range of temperatures the energy density of the quasiparticle system is identical to the one from lattice calculations. The numerical solutions of the Vlasov equation display confinement. Relations to effective theories like that by Friedberg and Lee and Nambu and Jona-Lasinio are established.

  13. Covariance Spectroscopy for Fissile Material Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Rusty Trainham, Jim Tinsley, Paul Hurley, Ray Keegan

    2009-06-02

    Nuclear fission produces multiple prompt neutrons and gammas at each fission event. The resulting daughter nuclei continue to emit delayed radiation as neutrons boil off, beta decay occurs, etc. All of the radiations are causally connected, and therefore correlated. The correlations are generally positive, but when different decay channels compete, so that some radiations tend to exclude others, negative correlations could also be observed. A similar problem of reduced complexity is that of cascades radiation, whereby a simple radioactive decay produces two or more correlated gamma rays at each decay. Covariance is the usual means for measuring correlation, and techniques of covariance mapping may be useful to produce distinct signatures of special nuclear materials (SNM). A covariance measurement can also be used to filter data streams because uncorrelated signals are largely rejected. The technique is generally more effective than a coincidence measurement. In this poster, we concentrate on cascades and the covariance filtering problem.

  14. Using Incidence Sampling to Estimate Covariances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Thomas R.

    1979-01-01

    This paper presents the generalized symmetric means approach to the estimation of population covariances, complete with derivations and examples. Particular attention is paid to the problem of missing data, which is handled very naturally in the incidence sampling framework. (CTM)

  15. Covariation bias in panic-prone individuals.

    PubMed

    Pauli, P; Montoya, P; Martz, G E

    1996-11-01

    Covariation estimates between fear-relevant (FR; emergency situations) or fear-irrelevant (FI; mushrooms and nudes) stimuli and an aversive outcome (electrical shock) were examined in 10 high-fear (panic-prone) and 10 low-fear respondents. When the relation between slide category and outcome was random (illusory correlation), only high-fear participants markedly overestimated the contingency between FR slides and shocks. However, when there was a high contingency of shocks following FR stimuli (83%) and a low contingency of shocks following FI stimuli (17%), the group difference vanished. Reversal of contingencies back to random induced a covariation bias for FR slides in high- and low-fear respondents. Results indicate that panic-prone respondents show a covariation bias for FR stimuli and that the experience of a high contingency between FR slides and aversive outcomes may foster such a covariation bias even in low-fear respondents.

  16. Conformally covariant parametrizations for relativistic initial data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delay, Erwann

    2017-01-01

    We revisit the Lichnerowicz-York method, and an alternative method of York, in order to obtain some conformally covariant systems. This type of parametrization is certainly more natural for non constant mean curvature initial data.

  17. Combining biomarkers for classification with covariate adjustment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soyoung; Huang, Ying

    2017-03-09

    Combining multiple markers can improve classification accuracy compared with using a single marker. In practice, covariates associated with markers or disease outcome can affect the performance of a biomarker or biomarker combination in the population. The covariate-adjusted receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve has been proposed as a tool to tease out the covariate effect in the evaluation of a single marker; this curve characterizes the classification accuracy solely because of the marker of interest. However, research on the effect of covariates on the performance of marker combinations and on how to adjust for the covariate effect when combining markers is still lacking. In this article, we examine the effect of covariates on classification performance of linear marker combinations and propose to adjust for covariates in combining markers by maximizing the nonparametric estimate of the area under the covariate-adjusted ROC curve. The proposed method provides a way to estimate the best linear biomarker combination that is robust to risk model assumptions underlying alternative regression-model-based methods. The proposed estimator is shown to be consistent and asymptotically normally distributed. We conduct simulations to evaluate the performance of our estimator in cohort and case/control designs and compare several different weighting strategies during estimation with respect to efficiency. Our estimator is also compared with alternative regression-model-based estimators or estimators that maximize the empirical area under the ROC curve, with respect to bias and efficiency. We apply the proposed method to a biomarker study from an human immunodeficiency virus vaccine trial. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Covariate analysis of bivariate survival data

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, L.E.

    1992-01-01

    The methods developed are used to analyze the effects of covariates on bivariate survival data when censoring and ties are present. The proposed method provides models for bivariate survival data that include differential covariate effects and censored observations. The proposed models are based on an extension of the univariate Buckley-James estimators which replace censored data points by their expected values, conditional on the censoring time and the covariates. For the bivariate situation, it is necessary to determine the expectation of the failure times for one component conditional on the failure or censoring time of the other component. Two different methods have been developed to estimate these expectations. In the semiparametric approach these expectations are determined from a modification of Burke's estimate of the bivariate empirical survival function. In the parametric approach censored data points are also replaced by their conditional expected values where the expected values are determined from a specified parametric distribution. The model estimation will be based on the revised data set, comprised of uncensored components and expected values for the censored components. The variance-covariance matrix for the estimated covariate parameters has also been derived for both the semiparametric and parametric methods. Data from the Demographic and Health Survey was analyzed by these methods. The two outcome variables are post-partum amenorrhea and breastfeeding; education and parity were used as the covariates. Both the covariate parameter estimates and the variance-covariance estimates for the semiparametric and parametric models will be compared. In addition, a multivariate test statistic was used in the semiparametric model to examine contrasts. The significance of the statistic was determined from a bootstrap distribution of the test statistic.

  19. Phase-covariant quantum cloning of qudits

    SciTech Connect

    Fan Heng; Imai, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Keiji; Wang, Xiang-Bin

    2003-02-01

    We study the phase-covariant quantum cloning machine for qudits, i.e., the input states in a d-level quantum system have complex coefficients with arbitrary phase but constant module. A cloning unitary transformation is proposed. After optimizing the fidelity between input state and single qudit reduced density operator of output state, we obtain the optimal fidelity for 1 to 2 phase-covariant quantum cloning of qudits and the corresponding cloning transformation.

  20. Blob birth and transport in NSTX: GPI data analysis and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myra, J. R.; Stotler, D. P.; Maqueda, R.; Boedo, J.; Munsat, T.

    2005-10-01

    Movies of blobs (i.e. convecting filamentary structures in the scrape-off-layer) taken with the gas-puff-imaging (GPI) diagnostic are used to extract blob parameters: birth zone, scale size, radial velocity vx and (with DEGAS-2 modeling to infer plasma density and temperature from the He 5876 emission), density and temperature. These measured properties are compared with theory. It is shown that the birth zone and blob parameters are related to the local maximum of the edge ∇ln

    suggesting blob generation by an underlying edge instability. The observed blobs are plotted on a theoretical regime diagram,ootnotetextJ.R. Myra, D.A. D'Ippolito, Lodestar Report #LRC-05-105, May, 2005. and mostly lie in the sheath-connected regime. The observed vx are equal to, or exceed, a minimum velocity scaling predicted by theory. The excess depends on position and is qualitatively consistent with separatrix effects. However, some additional physics not in the present model also influences vx.

  1. Covariance in models of loop quantum gravity: Spherical symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojowald, Martin; Brahma, Suddhasattwa; Reyes, Juan D.

    2015-08-01

    Spherically symmetric models of loop quantum gravity have been studied recently by different methods that aim to deal with structure functions in the usual constraint algebra of gravitational systems. As noticed by Gambini and Pullin, a linear redefinition of the constraints (with phase-space dependent coefficients) can be used to eliminate structure functions, even Abelianizing the more difficult part of the constraint algebra. The Abelianized constraints can then easily be quantized or modified by putative quantum effects. As pointed out here, however, the method does not automatically provide a covariant quantization, defined as an anomaly-free quantum theory with a classical limit in which the usual (off-shell) gauge structure of hypersurface deformations in space-time appears. The holonomy-modified vacuum theory based on Abelianization is covariant in this sense, but matter theories with local degrees of freedom are not. Detailed demonstrations of these statements show complete agreement with results of canonical effective methods applied earlier to the same systems (including signature change).

  2. Tests of Transport Theory and Reduced Impurity Influx with Highly Radiative Plasmas in TFTR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, K. W.

    1997-11-01

    The electron and ion temperature profiles in beam-heated plasmas were observed to be remarkably invariant when radiative losses were increased significantly through gas puffing of high-Z impurities (argon, krypton, xenon) in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor. Without impurity puffing, radiative losses accounted for typically only ~ 25\\char'45 of the input power and the radiation profile was strongly peaked at the plasma edge, where the dominant carbon impurity was not fully stripped. At central electron temperatures, T_eo, of ~ 6 keV, trace concentrations of krypton and xenon (n_z/ne ~ 10-3) generated flat and centrally peaked radiation profiles respectively, and a significant fraction of the input power (45-100\\char'45 ) was lost through radiation. This loss provided a nearly ideal technique for studying local heat transport in tokamaks because it perturbed the net heating profile strongly and in a measureable way, with little effect on the density and the beam deposition profiles. In supershot plasmas, Ti >> T_e, the ion temperature profile remained constant, or even increased modestly, as the radiated power fraction was increased to 75-90\\char'45 with krypton and xenon. This observation is surprising because ion-electron coupling is the dominant power loss term for the ions in the core of supershot plasmas, and the central Ti would have decreased a factor of two if the local ion thermal diffusivity had remained constant at its value without impurity puffing. In L-mode plasmas where ion-electron power coupling is a smaller term in the power balance, the electron temperature during impurity puffing also changed only ~ 10-15\\char'45 even as the net power flow through the electrons was decreased by a factor of ~ 3. The ``stiffness" of the temperature profiles to net input power is supportive of transport mechanisms which have a marginal-stability character. Preliminary comparisons of the temperature changes with predictions of the IFS/PPPL transport model

  3. General covariance in quantum gravity at a Lifshitz point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hořava, Petr; Melby-Thompson, Charles M.

    2010-09-01

    In the minimal formulation of gravity with Lifshitz-type anisotropic scaling, the gauge symmetries of the system are foliation-preserving diffeomorphisms of spacetime. Consequently, compared to general relativity, the spectrum contains an extra scalar graviton polarization. Here we investigate the possibility of extending the gauge group by a local U(1) symmetry to “nonrelativistic general covariance.” This extended gauge symmetry eliminates the scalar graviton, and forces the coupling constant λ in the kinetic term of the minimal formulation to take its relativistic value, λ=1. The resulting theory exhibits anisotropic scaling at short distances, and reproduces many features of general relativity at long distances.

  4. Low-dimensional Representation of Error Covariance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tippett, Michael K.; Cohn, Stephen E.; Todling, Ricardo; Marchesin, Dan

    2000-01-01

    Ensemble and reduced-rank approaches to prediction and assimilation rely on low-dimensional approximations of the estimation error covariances. Here stability properties of the forecast/analysis cycle for linear, time-independent systems are used to identify factors that cause the steady-state analysis error covariance to admit a low-dimensional representation. A useful measure of forecast/analysis cycle stability is the bound matrix, a function of the dynamics, observation operator and assimilation method. Upper and lower estimates for the steady-state analysis error covariance matrix eigenvalues are derived from the bound matrix. The estimates generalize to time-dependent systems. If much of the steady-state analysis error variance is due to a few dominant modes, the leading eigenvectors of the bound matrix approximate those of the steady-state analysis error covariance matrix. The analytical results are illustrated in two numerical examples where the Kalman filter is carried to steady state. The first example uses the dynamics of a generalized advection equation exhibiting nonmodal transient growth. Failure to observe growing modes leads to increased steady-state analysis error variances. Leading eigenvectors of the steady-state analysis error covariance matrix are well approximated by leading eigenvectors of the bound matrix. The second example uses the dynamics of a damped baroclinic wave model. The leading eigenvectors of a lowest-order approximation of the bound matrix are shown to approximate well the leading eigenvectors of the steady-state analysis error covariance matrix.

  5. Electronic and thermoelectric properties of InN studied using ab initio density functional theory and Boltzmann transport calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Borges, P. D. E-mail: lscolfaro@txstate.edu; Scolfaro, L. E-mail: lscolfaro@txstate.edu

    2014-12-14

    The thermoelectric properties of indium nitride in the most stable wurtzite phase (w-InN) as a function of electron and hole concentrations and temperature were studied by solving the semiclassical Boltzmann transport equations in conjunction with ab initio electronic structure calculations, within Density Functional Theory. Based on maximally localized Wannier function basis set and the ab initio band energies, results for the Seebeck coefficient are presented and compared with available experimental data for n-type as well as p-type systems. Also, theoretical results for electric conductivity and power factor are presented. Most cases showed good agreement between the calculated properties and experimental data for w-InN unintentionally and p-type doped with magnesium. Our predictions for temperature and concentration dependences of electrical conductivity and power factor revealed a promising use of InN for intermediate and high temperature thermoelectric applications. The rigid band approach and constant scattering time approximation were utilized in the calculations.

  6. Transition state theory demonstrated at the micron scale with out-of-equilibrium transport in a confined environment

    PubMed Central

    Vestergaard, Christian L.; Mikkelsen, Morten Bo; Reisner, Walter; Kristensen, Anders; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Transition state theory (TST) provides a simple interpretation of many thermally activated processes. It applies successfully on timescales and length scales that differ several orders of magnitude: to chemical reactions, breaking of chemical bonds, unfolding of proteins and RNA structures and polymers crossing entropic barriers. Here we apply TST to out-of-equilibrium transport through confined environments: the thermally activated translocation of single DNA molecules over an entropic barrier helped by an external force field. Reaction pathways are effectively one dimensional and so long that they are observable in a microscope. Reaction rates are so slow that transitions are recorded on video. We find sharp transition states that are independent of the applied force, similar to chemical bond rupture, as well as transition states that change location on the reaction pathway with the strength of the applied force. The states of equilibrium and transition are separated by micrometres as compared with angstroms/nanometres for chemical bonds. PMID:26732388

  7. Transport Properties of Polysulfide Species in Lithium–Sulfur Battery Electrolytes: Coupling of Experiment and Theory

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive experimental and theoretical analysis of the isothermal transport of species for the two model ternary-electrolytes with LiTFSI-Li2S4/dioxolane (DOL)-dimethoxyethane (DME) and LiTFSI-Li2S6/DOL-DME formulations is presented. An unambiguous picture of the polysulfide’s mobility is set forth after a detailed investigation of the macroscopic transference number and diffusion coefficients. The new findings of incongruent diffusion for Li2S4 species and high significance of cross-term diffusion coefficients reformulate a fledgling view of the prevalent redox-shuttle phenomena. The practical implications of this complex mechanism are discussed in detail. PMID:27610417

  8. Relation between finite element methods and nodal methods in transport theory

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between nodal methods and finite-element methods for solving the discrete-ordinates form of the transport equation in x-y geometry. Specifically, we will examine the relation of three finite-element schemes to the linear-linear (LL) and linear-nodal (LN) nodal schemes. The three finite-element schemes are the linear-continuous-diamond-difference (DD) scheme, the linear-discontinuous (LD) scheme, and the quadratic-discontinuous (QD) scheme. A brief derivation of the (LL) and (LN) nodal schemes is given in the third section of this paper. The approximations that cause the LL scheme to reduce to the DD, LD, and QD schemes are then indicated. An extremely simple method of deriving the finite-element schemes is then introduced.

  9. Low-energy effective theory in the bulk for transport in a topological phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradlyn, Barry; Read, N.

    2015-03-01

    We construct a low-energy effective action for a two-dimensional nonrelativistic topological (i.e., gapped) phase of matter in a continuum, which completely describes all of its bulk electrical, thermal, and stress-related properties in the limit of low frequencies, long distances, and zero temperature, without assuming either Lorentz or Galilean invariance. This is done by generalizing Luttinger's approach to thermoelectric phenomena, via the introduction of a background vielbein (i.e., gravitational) field and spin connection a la Cartan, in addition to the electromagnetic vector potential, in the action for the microscopic degrees of freedom (the matter fields). Crucially, the geometry of spacetime is allowed to have timelike and spacelike torsion. These background fields make all natural invariances—under U(1) gauge transformations, translations in both space and time, and spatial rotations—appear locally, and corresponding conserved currents and the stress tensor can be obtained, which obey natural continuity equations. On integrating out the matter fields, we derive the most general form of a local bulk induced action to first order in derivatives of the background fields, from which thermodynamic and transport properties can be obtained. We show that the gapped bulk cannot contribute to low-temperature thermoelectric transport other than the ordinary Hall conductivity; the other thermoelectric effects (if they occur) are thus purely edge effects. The coupling to "reduced" spacelike torsion is found to be absent in minimally coupled models, and, using a generalized Belinfante stress tensor, the stress response to time-dependent vielbeins (i.e., strains) is the Hall viscosity, which is robust against perturbations and related to the spin current, as in earlier work.

  10. Transport Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Timothy M.; Wuebbles, Donald J.; Boering, Kristie A.; Eckman, Richard S.; Lerner, Jean; Plumb, R. Alan; Rind, David H.; Rinsland, Curtis P.; Waugh, Darryn W.; Wei, Chu-Feng

    1999-01-01

    MM II defined a series of experiments to better understand and characterize model transport and to assess the realism of this transport by comparison to observations. Measurements from aircraft, balloon, and satellite, not yet available at the time of MM I [Prather and Remsberg, 1993], provide new and stringent constraints on model transport, and address the limits of our transport modeling abilities. Simulations of the idealized tracers the age spectrum, and propagating boundary conditions, and conserved HSCT-like emissions probe the relative roles of different model transport mechanisms, while simulations of SF6 and C02 make the connection to observations. Some of the tracers are related, and transport diagnostics such as the mean age can be derived from more than one of the experiments for comparison to observations. The goals of the transport experiments are: (1) To isolate the effects of transport in models from other processes; (2) To assess model transport for realistic tracers (such as SF6 and C02) for comparison to observations; (3) To use certain idealized tracers to isolate model mechanisms and relationships to atmospheric chemical perturbations; (4) To identify strengths and weaknesses of the treatment of transport processes in the models; (5) To relate evaluated shortcomings to aspects of model formulation. The following section are included:Executive Summary, Introduction, Age Spectrum, Observation, Tropical Transport in Models, Global Mean Age in Models, Source-Transport Covariance, HSCT "ANOY" Tracer Distributions, and Summary and Conclusions.

  11. Transport theory at the nanoscale. II. Interface dynamics for film growth.

    PubMed

    ten Bosch, A

    2006-03-01

    Conditions for surface nucleation and growth of a film are determined in a diffuse interface model. A method is given, derived from a Fokker-Planck equation for the nonequilibrium particle distribution, which links atomic and mesoscopic events in a rheological description similar to the classical continuum theory of fluid flow. Film nucleation and growth are modeled by the spatially inhomogeneous continuous evolution of the instantaneous density profile which measures the average number of particles or molecules at given time and position. It is shown how an alteration in the distribution of particles in the vicinity of the boundary between parent and product phases induces transient film growth and damped vibrations at the surface. The method is general but as an illustration, the condensation of a simple classical fluid on cooling is considered in detail.

  12. Stochastic Transport Theory for Investigating the Three-Dimensional Canopy Structure from Space Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Dong; Knyazikhin, Yuri; Wang, Weile; Deering, Donald W,; Stenberg, Pauline; Shabanov, Nikolay; Tan, Bin; Myneni, Ranga B.

    2008-01-01

    Radiation reflected from vegetation canopies exhibits high spatial variation. Satellite-borne sensors measure the mean intensities emanating from heterogeneous vegetated pixels. The theory of radiative transfer in stochastic media provides the most logical linkage between satellite observations and the three-dimensional canopy structure through a closed system of simple equations which contains the mean intensity and higher statistical moments directly as its unknowns. Although this theory has been a highly active research field in recent years, its potential for satellite remote sensing of vegetated surfaces has not been fully realized because of the lack of models of a canopy pair-correlation function that the stochastic radiative transfer equations require. The pair correlation function is defined as the probability of finding simultaneously phytoelements at two points. This paper presents analytical and Monte Carlo generated pair correlation functions. Theoretical and numerical analyses show that the spatial correlation between phytoelements is primarily responsible for the effects of the three-dimensional canopy structure on canopy reflective and absorptive properties. The pair correlation function, therefore, is the most natural and physically meaningful measure of the canopy structure over a wide range of scales. The stochastic radiative transfer equations naturally admit this measure and thus provide a powerful means to investigate the three-dimensional canopy structure from space. Canopy reflectances predicted by the stochastic equations are assessed by comparisons with the PARABOLA measurements from coniferous and broadleaf forest stands in the BOREAS Southern Study Areas. The pair correlation functions are derived from data on tree structural parameters collected during field campaigns conducted at these sites. The simulated canopy reflectances compare well with the PARABOLA data.

  13. Covariance Modifications to Subspace Bases

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, D B

    2008-11-19

    Adaptive signal processing algorithms that rely upon representations of signal and noise subspaces often require updates to those representations when new data become available. Subspace representations frequently are estimated from available data with singular value (SVD) decompositions. Subspace updates require modifications to these decompositions. Updates can be performed inexpensively provided they are low-rank. A substantial literature on SVD updates exists, frequently focusing on rank-1 updates (see e.g. [Karasalo, 1986; Comon and Golub, 1990, Badeau, 2004]). In these methods, data matrices are modified by addition or deletion of a row or column, or data covariance matrices are modified by addition of the outer product of a new vector. A recent paper by Brand [2006] provides a general and efficient method for arbitrary rank updates to an SVD. The purpose of this note is to describe a closely-related method for applications where right singular vectors are not required. This note also describes the SVD updates to a particular scenario of interest in seismic array signal processing. The particular application involve updating the wideband subspace representation used in seismic subspace detectors [Harris, 2006]. These subspace detectors generalize waveform correlation algorithms to detect signals that lie in a subspace of waveforms of dimension d {ge} 1. They potentially are of interest because they extend the range of waveform variation over which these sensitive detectors apply. Subspace detectors operate by projecting waveform data from a detection window into a subspace specified by a collection of orthonormal waveform basis vectors (referred to as the template). Subspace templates are constructed from a suite of normalized, aligned master event waveforms that may be acquired by a single sensor, a three-component sensor, an array of such sensors or a sensor network. The template design process entails constructing a data matrix whose columns contain the

  14. Global coherence of quantum evolutions based on decoherent histories: Theory and application to photosynthetic quantum energy transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allegra, Michele; Giorda, Paolo; Lloyd, Seth

    2016-04-01

    Assessing the role of interference in natural and artificial quantum dynamical processes is a crucial task in quantum information theory. To this aim, an appropriate formalism is provided by the decoherent histories framework. While this approach has been deeply explored from different theoretical perspectives, it still lacks of a comprehensive set of tools able to concisely quantify the amount of coherence developed by a given dynamics. In this paper, we introduce and test different measures of the (average) coherence present in dissipative (Markovian) quantum evolutions, at various time scales and for different levels of environmentally induced decoherence. In order to show the effectiveness of the introduced tools, we apply them to a paradigmatic quantum process where the role of coherence is being hotly debated: exciton transport in photosynthetic complexes. To spot out the essential features that may determine the performance of the transport, we focus on a relevant trimeric subunit of the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex and we use a simplified (Haken-Strobl) model for the system-bath interaction. Our analysis illustrates how the high efficiency of environmentally assisted transport can be traced back to a quantum recoil avoiding effect on the exciton dynamics, that preserves and sustains the benefits of the initial fast quantum delocalization of the exciton over the network. Indeed, for intermediate levels of decoherence, the bath is seen to selectively kill the negative interference between different exciton pathways, while retaining the initial positive one. The concepts and tools here developed show how the decoherent histories approach can be used to quantify the relation between coherence and efficiency in quantum dynamical processes.

  15. Charge transport calculations by a wave-packet dynamical approach using maximally localized Wannier functions based on density functional theory: Application to high-mobility organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Nobuhiko; Hirose, Kenji

    2017-01-01

    We present a wave-packet dynamical approach to charge transport using maximally localized Wannier functions based on density functional theory including van der Waals interactions. We apply it to the transport properties of pentacene and rubrene single crystals and show the temperature-dependent natures from bandlike to thermally activated behaviors as a function of the magnitude of external static disorder. We compare the results with those obtained by the conventional band and hopping models and experiments.

  16. Lyapunov exponents, covariant vectors and shadowing sensitivity analysis of 3D wakes: from laminar to chaotic regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiqi; Rigas, Georgios; Esclapez, Lucas; Magri, Luca; Blonigan, Patrick

    2016-11-01

    Bluff body flows are of fundamental importance to many engineering applications involving massive flow separation and in particular the transport industry. Coherent flow structures emanating in the wake of three-dimensional bluff bodies, such as cars, trucks and lorries, are directly linked to increased aerodynamic drag, noise and structural fatigue. For low Reynolds laminar and transitional regimes, hydrodynamic stability theory has aided the understanding and prediction of the unstable dynamics. In the same framework, sensitivity analysis provides the means for efficient and optimal control, provided the unstable modes can be accurately predicted. However, these methodologies are limited to laminar regimes where only a few unstable modes manifest. Here we extend the stability analysis to low-dimensional chaotic regimes by computing the Lyapunov covariant vectors and their associated Lyapunov exponents. We compare them to eigenvectors and eigenvalues computed in traditional hydrodynamic stability analysis. Computing Lyapunov covariant vectors and Lyapunov exponents also enables the extension of sensitivity analysis to chaotic flows via the shadowing method. We compare the computed shadowing sensitivities to traditional sensitivity analysis. These Lyapunov based methodologies do not rely on mean flow assumptions, and are mathematically rigorous for calculating sensitivities of fully unsteady flow simulations.

  17. Core turbulent transport in tokamak plasmas: bridging theory and experiment with QuaLiKiz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdelle, C.; Citrin, J.; Baiocchi, B.; Casati, A.; Cottier, P.; Garbet, X.; Imbeaux, F.; Contributors, JET

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinear gyrokinetic codes allow for detailed understanding of tokamak core turbulent transport. However, their computational demand precludes their use for predictive profile modeling. An alternative approach is required to bridge the gap between theoretical understanding and prediction of experiments. A quasilinear gyrokinetic model, QuaLiKiz (Bourdelle et al 2007 Phys. Plasmas 14 112501), is demonstrated to be rapid enough to ease systematic interface with experiments. The derivation and approximation of this approach are reviewed. The quasilinear approximation is proven valid over a wide range of core plasma parameters. Examples of profile prediction using QuaLiKiz coupled to the CRONOS integrated modeling code (Artaud et al 2010 Nucl. Fusion 50 043001) are presented. QuaLiKiz is being coupled to other integrated modeling platforms such as ETS and JETTO. QuaLiKiz quasilinear gyrokinetic turbulent heat, particle and angular momentum fluxes are available to all users. It allows for extensive stand-alone interpretative analysis and for first principle based integrated predictive modeling.

  18. Measurements and theory for transport layer structure in intense bed-load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraccarollo, L.; Capart, H.

    2012-04-01

    We focus on sediment laden flows driven by turbulent open-channel flows where the bed surface is fully mobilized and nonetheless the thickness of the bedload layer is conveniently smaller than the flow depth. This regime presents dynamic and kinematic features which persist in the range of applied Shields stress between about 0.3 and 3. Below the lower limit the moving grains do not develop significant stresses compared to the applied ones; above the upper limit, debris-flow type frictional contacts develop in a non negligible portion of the bedload layer. We report laboratory experiments in which, using high-speed cameras and a laser light sheet, detailed profiles of granular velocity and concentration have been measured. We checked that the transversal bed profile is flat and that the sidewall measurements are representative of the interior domain. The profiles provide new information on transport layer structure and its relation to the applied Shields stress. Contrary to expectations, we find that intense bed-load layers respond to changes in flow conditions by adjusting their granular concentration at the base. Two mechanisms account for the resulting behavior: stresses generated by immersed granular collisions, and equilibration by density stratification. Without parameter adjustment, the deduced constitutive relations capture the responses of velocity, concentration, and layer thickness in the above reported ten-fold increase Shields-stress range. Away from this intermediate range, in both directions, we show how the flow features rapidly change and the theoretical inferences decay.

  19. Theory of coherent charge transport in junctions involving unconventional superconducting materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burmistrova, A. V.; Devyatov, I. A.

    2016-10-01

    Recent theoretical studies of coherent charge transport in junctions involving unconventional superconducting materials such as high-temperature superconducting iron-based pnictides (FeBS) and in structures with induced superconductivity which are formed of a thin metal layer with spin-orbit coupling in contact with an s-wave superconductor (SSO) are reported. The theoretical analysis is performed with our unified approach based on the tight-binding method and boundary conditions obtained for it. This approach makes it possible to take into account a complex nonparabolic and anisotropic spectrum of normal excitations in unconventional superconducting materials and their multiband character, as well as unusual types of symmetries of the superconducting order parameter in them. The possibility of a semiclassical description in the case of intraorbital superconducting pairing is demonstrated. The method of calculations and their results are presented for the conductivities of junctions between a normal metal and unconventional superconducting materials, as well as for the Josephson current. Comparison with the experiment for the junction with FeBS is performed and indicates the presence of the unusual s± symmetry of the order parameter. An experiment is proposed to test our theoretical results for SSO.

  20. A mixture theory analysis for passive transport in osmotic loading of cells.

    PubMed

    Ateshian, Gerard A; Likhitpanichkul, Morakot; Hung, Clark T

    2006-01-01

    The theory of mixtures is applied to the analysis of the passive response of cells to osmotic loading with neutrally charged solutes. The formulation, which is derived for multiple solute species, incorporates partition coefficients for the solutes in the cytoplasm relative to the external solution, and accounts for cell membrane tension. The mixture formulation provides an explicit dependence of the hydraulic conductivity of the cell membrane on the concentration of permeating solutes. The resulting equations are shown to reduce to the classical equations of Kedem and Katchalsky in the limit when the membrane tension is equal to zero and the solute partition coefficient in the cytoplasm is equal to unity. Numerical simulations demonstrate that the concentration-dependence of the hydraulic conductivity is not negligible; the volume response to osmotic loading is very sensitive to the partition coefficient of the solute in the cytoplasm, which controls the magnitude of cell volume recovery; and the volume response is sensitive to the magnitude of cell membrane tension. Deviations of the Boyle-van't Hoff response from a straight line under hypo-osmotic loading may be indicative of cell membrane tension.

  1. Closure and transport theory for high-collisionality electron-ion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Jeong-Young; Held, Eric D.

    2013-04-01

    Systems of algebraic equations for a high-collisionality electron-ion plasma are constructed from the general moment equations with linearized collision operators [J.-Y. Ji and E. D. Held, Phys. Plasmas 13, 102103 (2006) and J.-Y. Ji and E. D. Held, Phys. Plasmas 15, 102101 (2008)]. A systematic geometric method is invented and applied to solve the system of equations to find closure and transport relations. It is known that some closure coefficients of Braginskii [S. I. Braginskii, Reviews of Plasma Physics (Consultants Bureau, New York, 1965), Vol. 1] are in error up to 65% for some finite values of x (cyclotron frequency × electron-ion collision time) and have significant error in the large-x limit [E. M. Epperlein and M. G. Haines, Phys. Fluids 29, 1029 (1986)]. In this work, fitting formulas for electron coefficients are obtained from the 160 moment (Laguerre polynomial) solution, which converges with increasing moments for x ≤100 and from the asymptotic solution for large x-values. The new fitting formulas are practically exact (less than 1% error) for arbitrary x and Z (the ion charge number, checked up to Z = 100). The ion coefficients for equal electron and ion temperatures are moderately modified by including the ion-electron collision operator. When the ion temperature is higher than the electron temperature, the ion-electron collision and the temperature change terms in the moment equations must be kept. The ion coefficient formulas from 3 moment (Laguerre polynomial) calculations, precise to less than 0.4% error from the convergent values, are explicitly written.

  2. Aerosol penetration through a model transport system: Comparison of theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    McFarland, A.R.; Wong, F.S.; Anand, N.K.; Ortiz, C.A. )

    1991-09-01

    Numerical predictions were made of aerosol penetration through a model transport system. A physical model of the system was constructed and tested in an aerosol wind tunnel to obtain comparative data. The system was 26.6 mm in diameter and consisted of an inlet and three straight sections (oriented horizontally, vertically, and at 45{degree}). Particle sizes covered a range in which losses were primarily caused by inertial and gravitational effects (3-25 {mu}m aerodynamic equivalent diameter (AED)). Tests were conducted at two flow rates (70 and 130 l/min) and two inlet orientations (parallel and perpendicular to the free stream). Wind speed was 3 m/s for all test cases. The cut points for aerosol penetration through the experimental model vis-a-vis the numerical results are as follows: At a flow rate of 70 l/min with the inlet at 0{degree}, the experimentally observed cut point was 16.2 {mu}m AED while the numerically predicted value was 18.2 {mu}m AED while the numerically predicted value was 18.2 {mu}m AED. At 130 l/min and 0{degree}, the experimental cut point was 12.8 {mu}m AED as compared with a numerically value of 13.7 {mu}m AED. At 70l/min and a 90{degree}, the experimental cut point was 12.0 {mu}m AED while the numerically calculated value was 11.1 {mu}m AED. Slopes of the experimental penetration curves are somewhat steeper than the numerically predicted counterparts.

  3. 3-D Deep Penetration Neutron Imaging of Thick Absorgin and Diffusive Objects Using Transport Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Ragusa, Jean; Bangerth, Wolfgang

    2011-08-01

    here explores the inverse problem of optical tomography applied to heterogeneous domains. The neutral particle transport equation was used as the forward model for how neutral particles stream through and interact within these heterogeneous domains. A constrained optimization technique that uses Newtons method served as the basis of the inverse problem. Optical tomography aims at reconstructing the material properties using (a) illuminating sources and (b) detector readings. However, accurate simulations for radiation transport require that the particle (gamma and/or neutron) energy be appropriate discretize in the multigroup approximation. This, in turns, yields optical tomography problems where the number of unknowns grows (1) about quadratically with respect to the number of energy groups, G, (notably to reconstruct the scattering matrix) and (2) linearly with respect to the number of unknown material regions. As pointed out, a promising approach could rely on algorithms to appropriately select a material type per material zone rather than G2 values. This approach, though promising, still requires further investigation: (a) when switching from cross-section values unknowns to material type indices (discrete integer unknowns), integer programming techniques are needed since derivative information is no longer available; and (b) the issue of selecting the initial material zoning remains. The work reported here proposes an approach to solve the latter item, whereby a material zoning is proposed using one-group or few-groups transport approximations. The capabilities and limitations of the presented method were explored; they are briefly summarized next and later described in fuller details in the Appendices. The major factors that influenced the ability of the optimization method to reconstruct the cross sections of these domains included the locations of the sources used to illuminate the domains, the number of separate experiments used in the reconstruction, the

  4. Convex Banding of the Covariance Matrix.

    PubMed

    Bien, Jacob; Bunea, Florentina; Xiao, Luo

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a new sparse estimator of the covariance matrix for high-dimensional models in which the variables have a known ordering. Our estimator, which is the solution to a convex optimization problem, is equivalently expressed as an estimator which tapers the sample covariance matrix by a Toeplitz, sparsely-banded, data-adaptive matrix. As a result of this adaptivity, the convex banding estimator enjoys theoretical optimality properties not attained by previous banding or tapered estimators. In particular, our convex banding estimator is minimax rate adaptive in Frobenius and operator norms, up to log factors, over commonly-studied classes of covariance matrices, and over more general classes. Furthermore, it correctly recovers the bandwidth when the true covariance is exactly banded. Our convex formulation admits a simple and efficient algorithm. Empirical studies demonstrate its practical effectiveness and illustrate that our exactly-banded estimator works well even when the true covariance matrix is only close to a banded matrix, confirming our theoretical results. Our method compares favorably with all existing methods, in terms of accuracy and speed. We illustrate the practical merits of the convex banding estimator by showing that it can be used to improve the performance of discriminant analysis for classifying sound recordings.

  5. A sparse Ising model with covariates.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jie; Levina, Elizaveta; Wang, Pei; Zhu, Ji

    2014-12-01

    There has been a lot of work fitting Ising models to multivariate binary data in order to understand the conditional dependency relationships between the variables. However, additional covariates are frequently recorded together with the binary data, and may influence the dependence relationships. Motivated by such a dataset on genomic instability collected from tumor samples of several types, we propose a sparse covariate dependent Ising model to study both the conditional dependency within the binary data and its relationship with the additional covariates. This results in subject-specific Ising models, where the subject's covariates influence the strength of association between the genes. As in all exploratory data analysis, interpretability of results is important, and we use ℓ1 penalties to induce sparsity in the fitted graphs and in the number of selected covariates. Two algorithms to fit the model are proposed and compared on a set of simulated data, and asymptotic results are established. The results on the tumor dataset and their biological significance are discussed in detail.

  6. A Nonparametric Prior for Simultaneous Covariance Estimation.

    PubMed

    Gaskins, Jeremy T; Daniels, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    In the modeling of longitudinal data from several groups, appropriate handling of the dependence structure is of central importance. Standard methods include specifying a single covariance matrix for all groups or independently estimating the covariance matrix for each group without regard to the others, but when these model assumptions are incorrect, these techniques can lead to biased mean effects or loss of efficiency, respectively. Thus, it is desirable to develop methods to simultaneously estimate the covariance matrix for each group that will borrow strength across groups in a way that is ultimately informed by the data. In addition, for several groups with covariance matrices of even medium dimension, it is difficult to manually select a single best parametric model among the huge number of possibilities given by incorporating structural zeros and/or commonality of individual parameters across groups. In this paper we develop a family of nonparametric priors using the matrix stick-breaking process of Dunson et al. (2008) that seeks to accomplish this task by parameterizing the covariance matrices in terms of the parameters of their modified Cholesky decomposition (Pourahmadi, 1999). We establish some theoretic properties of these priors, examine their effectiveness via a simulation study, and illustrate the priors using data from a longitudinal clinical trial.

  7. Progress on Nuclear Data Covariances: AFCI-1.2 Covariance Library

    SciTech Connect

    Oblozinsky,P.; Oblozinsky,P.; Mattoon,C.M.; Herman,M.; Mughabghab,S.F.; Pigni,M.T.; Talou,P.; Hale,G.M.; Kahler,A.C.; Kawano,T.; Little,R.C.; Young,P.G

    2009-09-28

    Improved neutron cross section covariances were produced for 110 materials including 12 light nuclei (coolants and moderators), 78 structural materials and fission products, and 20 actinides. Improved covariances were organized into AFCI-1.2 covariance library in 33-energy groups, from 10{sup -5} eV to 19.6 MeV. BNL contributed improved covariance data for the following materials: {sup 23}Na and {sup 55}Mn where more detailed evaluation was done; improvements in major structural materials {sup 52}Cr, {sup 56}Fe and {sup 58}Ni; improved estimates for remaining structural materials and fission products; improved covariances for 14 minor actinides, and estimates of mubar covariances for {sup 23}Na and {sup 56}Fe. LANL contributed improved covariance data for {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu including prompt neutron fission spectra and completely new evaluation for {sup 240}Pu. New R-matrix evaluation for {sup 16}O including mubar covariances is under completion. BNL assembled the library and performed basic testing using improved procedures including inspection of uncertainty and correlation plots for each material. The AFCI-1.2 library was released to ANL and INL in August 2009.

  8. Mathematics Teachers' Covariational Reasoning Levels and Predictions about Students' Covariational Reasoning Abilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeytun, Aysel Sen; Cetinkaya, Bulent; Erbas, Ayhan Kursat

    2010-01-01

    Various studies suggest that covariational reasoning plays an important role on understanding the fundamental ideas of calculus and modeling dynamic functional events. The purpose of this study was to investigate a group of mathematics teachers' covariational reasoning abilities and predictions about their students. Data were collected through…

  9. Covariant quantization of C P T -violating photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colladay, D.; McDonald, P.; Noordmans, J. P.; Potting, R.

    2017-01-01

    We perform the covariant canonical quantization of the C P T - and Lorentz-symmetry-violating photon sector of the minimal Standard-Model Extension, which contains a general (timelike, lightlike, or spacelike) fixed background tensor kAF μ. Well-known stability issues, arising from complex-valued energy states, are solved by introducing a small photon mass, orders of magnitude below current experimental bounds. We explicitly construct a covariant basis of polarization vectors, in which the photon field can be expanded. We proceed to derive the Feynman propagator and show that the theory is microcausal. Despite the occurrence of negative energies and vacuum-Cherenkov radiation, we do not find any runaway stability issues, because the energy remains bounded from below. An important observation is that the ordering of the roots of the dispersion relations is the same in any observer frame, which allows for a frame-independent condition that selects the correct branch of the dispersion relation. This turns out to be critical for the consistency of the quantization. To our knowledge, this is the first system for which quantization has consistently been performed, in spite of the fact that the theory contains negative energies in some observer frames.

  10. Reactive Transport of Carbonated Magma Beneath a Mid-Oceanic Ridge: Theory and Numerical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, T.; Katz, R. F.; Hirschmann, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    Laboratory experiments indicate that even small concentrations of CO2 in the upper mantle significantly affect the silicate melting behavior [DH06]. CO2 stabilizes carbon-rich melt at high pressure, thus vastly increasing the volume of the upper mantle expected to be partially molten [H10,DH10]. These small-degree melts have important consequences for chemical differentiation and could affect the dynamics of mantle flow. We have developed theory and numerical implementation to simulate thermo-chemically coupled magma/mantle dynamics in terms of a two-phase (rock+melt), three component (dunite+basalt+volatiles) physical model. The fluid dynamics is based on McKenzie's equations [McK84], while the thermo-chemical formulation of the system is represented by a novel, disequilibrium approach to volatile-bearing mantle melting. An experimentally constrained ternary phase diagram, based on an effective solid solution, is used to characterize the equilibrium state in the system. This physical model is implemented as a parallel, two-dimensional finite-volume code that leverages tools from the PETSc library. Early application of this simulation code to a mid-ocean ridge system suggests that the methodology captures some of the first order features of carbonated mantle melting, including deep, low-degree, volatile-rich melt formation. Melt segregation leads to continuous dynamic thermo-chemical dis-equilibration, while phenomenologically derived reaction rates continually move the system towards re-equilibration. The simulations will be used to first characterize carbon extraction from the MOR system assuming chemically homogeneous mantle, and will subsequently be extended to investigate the consequences of heterogeneity in lithology [KW12] and volatile content. Such studies will advance our understanding of the role that the mid-ocean ridge system plays in the deep carbon cycle. REFERENCESDH06 Dasgupta & Hirschmann (2006), doi:10.1038/nature04612.H10 Hirschmann (2010), doi

  11. Structural damage detection based on covariance of covariance matrix with general white noise excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Yi; Law, Siu Seong; Ku, Chiu Jen

    2017-02-01

    Covariance of the auto/cross-covariance matrix based method is studied for the damage identification of a structure with illustrations on its advantages and limitations. The original method is extended for structures under direct white noise excitations. The auto/cross-covariance function of the measured acceleration and its corresponding derivatives are formulated analytically, and the method is modified in two new strategies to enable successful identification with much fewer sensors. Numerical examples are adopted to illustrate the improved method, and the effects of sampling frequency and sampling duration are discussed. Results show that the covariance of covariance calculated from responses of higher order modes of a structure play an important role to the accurate identification of local damage in a structure.

  12. Variations of cosmic large-scale structure covariance matrices across parameter space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reischke, Robert; Kiessling, Alina; Schäfer, Björn Malte

    2017-03-01

    The likelihood function for cosmological parameters, given by e.g. weak lensing shear measurements, depends on contributions to the covariance induced by the non-linear evolution of the cosmic web. As highly non-linear clustering to date has only been described by numerical N-body simulations in a reliable and sufficiently precise way, the necessary computational costs for estimating those covariances at different points in parameter space are tremendous. In this work, we describe the change of the matter covariance and the weak lensing covariance matrix as a function of cosmological parameters by constructing a suitable basis, where we model the contribution to the covariance from non-linear structure formation using Eulerian perturbation theory at third order. We show that our formalism is capable of dealing with large matrices and reproduces expected degeneracies and scaling with cosmological parameters in a reliable way. Comparing our analytical results to numerical simulations, we find that the method describes the variation of the covariance matrix found in the SUNGLASS weak lensing simulation pipeline within the errors at one-loop and tree-level for the spectrum and the trispectrum, respectively, for multipoles up to ℓ ≤ 1300. We show that it is possible to optimize the sampling of parameter space where numerical simulations should be carried out by minimizing interpolation errors and propose a corresponding method to distribute points in parameter space in an economical way.

  13. Incorporating covariates in skewed functional data models.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Staicu, Ana-Maria; Bondell, Howard D

    2015-07-01

    We introduce a class of covariate-adjusted skewed functional models (cSFM) designed for functional data exhibiting location-dependent marginal distributions. We propose a semi-parametric copula model for the pointwise marginal distributions, which are allowed to depend on covariates, and the functional dependence, which is assumed covariate invariant. The proposed cSFM framework provides a unifying platform for pointwise quantile estimation and trajectory prediction. We consider a computationally feasible procedure that handles densely as well as sparsely observed functional data. The methods are examined numerically using simulations and is applied to a new tractography study of multiple sclerosis. Furthermore, the methodology is implemented in the R package cSFM, which is publicly available on CRAN.

  14. FAST NEUTRON COVARIANCES FOR EVALUATED DATA FILES.

    SciTech Connect

    HERMAN, M.; OBLOZINSKY, P.; ROCHMAN, D.; KAWANO, T.; LEAL, L.

    2006-06-05

    We describe implementation of the KALMAN code in the EMPIRE system and present first covariance data generated for Gd and Ir isotopes. A complete set of covariances, in the full energy range, was produced for the chain of 8 Gadolinium isotopes for total, elastic, capture, total inelastic (MT=4), (n,2n), (n,p) and (n,alpha) reactions. Our correlation matrices, based on combination of model calculations and experimental data, are characterized by positive mid-range and negative long-range correlations. They differ from the model-generated covariances that tend to show strong positive long-range correlations and those determined solely from experimental data that result in nearly diagonal matrices. We have studied shapes of correlation matrices obtained in the calculations and interpreted them in terms of the underlying reaction models. An important result of this study is the prediction of narrow energy ranges with extremely small uncertainties for certain reactions (e.g., total and elastic).

  15. Covariance based outlier detection with feature selection.

    PubMed

    Zwilling, Chris E; Wang, Michelle Y

    2016-08-01

    The present covariance based outlier detection algorithm selects from a candidate set of feature vectors that are best at identifying outliers. Features extracted from biomedical and health informatics data can be more informative in disease assessment and there are no restrictions on the nature and number of features that can be tested. But an important challenge for an algorithm operating on a set of features is for it to winnow the effective features from the ineffective ones. The powerful algorithm described in this paper leverages covariance information from the time series data to identify features with the highest sensitivity for outlier identification. Empirical results demonstrate the efficacy of the method.

  16. Sparse Covariance Matrix Estimation With Eigenvalue Constraints.

    PubMed

    Liu, Han; Wang, Lie; Zhao, Tuo

    2014-04-01

    We propose a new approach for estimating high-dimensional, positive-definite covariance matrices. Our method extends the generalized thresholding operator by adding an explicit eigenvalue constraint. The estimated covariance matrix simultaneously achieves sparsity and positive definiteness. The estimator is rate optimal in the minimax sense and we develop an efficient iterative soft-thresholding and projection algorithm based on the alternating direction method of multipliers. Empirically, we conduct thorough numerical experiments on simulated datasets as well as real data examples to illustrate the usefulness of our method. Supplementary materials for the article are available online.

  17. Parametric number covariance in quantum chaotic spectra.

    PubMed

    Vinayak; Kumar, Sandeep; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2016-03-01

    We study spectral parametric correlations in quantum chaotic systems and introduce the number covariance as a measure of such correlations. We derive analytic results for the classical random matrix ensembles using the binary correlation method and obtain compact expressions for the covariance. We illustrate the universality of this measure by presenting the spectral analysis of the quantum kicked rotors for the time-reversal invariant and time-reversal noninvariant cases. A local version of the parametric number variance introduced earlier is also investigated.

  18. Covariance Analysis of Gamma Ray Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Trainham, R.; Tinsley, J.

    2013-01-01

    The covariance method exploits fluctuations in signals to recover information encoded in correlations which are usually lost when signal averaging occurs. In nuclear spectroscopy it can be regarded as a generalization of the coincidence technique. The method can be used to extract signal from uncorrelated noise, to separate overlapping spectral peaks, to identify escape peaks, to reconstruct spectra from Compton continua, and to generate secondary spectral fingerprints. We discuss a few statistical considerations of the covariance method and present experimental examples of its use in gamma spectroscopy.

  19. Covariance analysis of gamma ray spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Trainham, R.; Tinsley, J.

    2013-01-15

    The covariance method exploits fluctuations in signals to recover information encoded in correlations which are usually lost when signal averaging occurs. In nuclear spectroscopy it can be regarded as a generalization of the coincidence technique. The method can be used to extract signal from uncorrelated noise, to separate overlapping spectral peaks, to identify escape peaks, to reconstruct spectra from Compton continua, and to generate secondary spectral fingerprints. We discuss a few statistical considerations of the covariance method and present experimental examples of its use in gamma spectroscopy.

  20. On the Estimation of Polychoric Correlations and Their Asymptotic Covariance Matrix.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joreskog, Karl G.

    1994-01-01

    Estimation of polychoric correlations is seen as a special case of the theory of parametric inference in contingency tables. the asymptotic covariance matrix of the estimated polychoric correlations is derived for the case when thresholds are estimated from univariate marginals and polychoric correlations are estimated from bivariate marginals for…

  1. Covariant spectator theory of np scattering: Deuteron quadrupole moment

    DOE PAGES

    Gross, Franz

    2015-01-26

    The deuteron quadrupole moment is calculated using two CST model wave functions obtained from the 2007 high precision fits to np scattering data. Included in the calculation are a new class of isoscalar np interaction currents automatically generated by the nuclear force model used in these fits. The prediction for model WJC-1, with larger relativistic P-state components, is 2.5% smaller that the experiential result, in common with the inability of models prior to 2014 to predict this important quantity. However, model WJC-2, with very small P-state components, gives agreement to better than 1%, similar to the results obtained recently frommore » XEFT predictions to order N3LO.« less

  2. Covariant spectator theory of np scattering: Deuteron quadrupole moment

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, Franz

    2015-01-26

    The deuteron quadrupole moment is calculated using two CST model wave functions obtained from the 2007 high precision fits to np scattering data. Included in the calculation are a new class of isoscalar np interaction currents automatically generated by the nuclear force model used in these fits. The prediction for model WJC-1, with larger relativistic P-state components, is 2.5% smaller that the experiential result, in common with the inability of models prior to 2014 to predict this important quantity. However, model WJC-2, with very small P-state components, gives agreement to better than 1%, similar to the results obtained recently from XEFT predictions to order N3LO.

  3. Scale-covariant theory of gravitation and astrophysical applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V.; Hsieh, S. H.; Adams, P. J.

    1977-01-01

    Generalized Einstein equations invariant under scale transformations are presented, and several astrophysical tests studied. It is assumed that the dynamics of atoms or clocks used as measuring apparatus is given a priori. Connection with gauge fields and broken symmetries is made through the cosmological constant.

  4. Partial covariance based functional connectivity computation using Ledoit-Wolf covariance regularization.

    PubMed

    Brier, Matthew R; Mitra, Anish; McCarthy, John E; Ances, Beau M; Snyder, Abraham Z

    2015-11-01

    Functional connectivity refers to shared signals among brain regions and is typically assessed in a task free state. Functional connectivity commonly is quantified between signal pairs using Pearson correlation. However, resting-state fMRI is a multivariate process exhibiting a complicated covariance structure. Partial covariance assesses the unique variance shared between two brain regions excluding any widely shared variance, hence is appropriate for the analysis of multivariate fMRI datasets. However, calculation of partial covariance requires inversion of the covariance matrix, which, in most functional connectivity studies, is not invertible owing to rank deficiency. Here we apply Ledoit-Wolf shrinkage (L2 regularization) to invert the high dimensional BOLD covariance matrix. We investigate the network organization and brain-state dependence of partial covariance-based functional connectivity. Although RSNs are conventionally defined in terms of shared variance, removal of widely shared variance, surprisingly, improved the separation of RSNs in a spring embedded graphical model. This result suggests that pair-wise unique shared variance plays a heretofore unrecognized role in RSN covariance organization. In addition, application of partial correlation to fMRI data acquired in the eyes open vs. eyes closed states revealed focal changes in uniquely shared variance between the thalamus and visual cortices. This result suggests that partial correlation of resting state BOLD time series reflect functional processes in addition to structural connectivity.

  5. Partial covariance based functional connectivity computation using Ledoit-Wolf covariance regularization

    PubMed Central

    Brier, Matthew R.; Mitra, Anish; McCarthy, John E.; Ances, Beau M.; Snyder, Abraham Z.

    2015-01-01

    Functional connectivity refers to shared signals among brain regions and is typically assessed in a task free state. Functional connectivity commonly is quantified between signal pairs using Pearson correlation. However, resting-state fMRI is a multivariate process exhibiting a complicated covariance structure. Partial covariance assesses the unique variance shared between two brain regions excluding any widely shared variance, hence is appropriate for the analysis of multivariate fMRI datasets. However, calculation of partial covariance requires inversion of the covariance matrix, which, in most functional connectivity studies, is not invertible owing to rank deficiency. Here we apply Ledoit-Wolf shrinkage (L2 regularization) to invert the high dimensional BOLD covariance matrix. We investigate the network organization and brain-state dependence of partial covariance-based functional connectivity. Although RSNs are conventionally defined in terms of shared variance, removal of widely shared variance, surprisingly, improved the separation of RSNs in a spring embedded graphical model. This result suggests that pair-wise unique shared variance plays a heretofore unrecognized role in RSN covariance organization. In addition, application of partial correlation to fMRI data acquired in the eyes open vs. eyes closed states revealed focal changes in uniquely shared variance between the thalamus and visual cortices. This result suggests that partial correlation of resting state BOLD time series reflect functional processes in addition to structural connectivity. PMID:26208872

  6. Transport Mechanisms and Quality Changes During Frying of Chicken Nuggets--Hybrid Mixture Theory Based Modeling and Experimental Verification.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Harkirat S; Takhar, Pawan S; Alvarado, Christine Z; Thompson, Leslie D

    2015-12-01

    Hybrid mixture theory (HMT) based 2-scale fluid transport relations of Takhar coupled with a multiphase heat transfer equation were solved to model water, oil and gas movement during frying of chicken nuggets. A chicken nugget was treated as a heterogeneous material consisting of meat core with wheat-based coating. The coupled heat and fluid transfer equations were solved using the finite element method. Numerical simulations resulted in data on spatial and temporal profiles for moisture, rate of evaporation, temperature, oil, pore pressure, pressure in various phases, and coefficient of elasticity. Results showed that most of the oil stayed in the outer 1.5 mm of the coating region. Temperature values greater than 100 °C were observed in the coating after 30 s of frying. Negative gage-pore pressure (p(w) < p(g)) magnitudes were observed in simulations, which is in agreement with experimental observations of Sandhu and others. It is hypothesized that high water-phase capillary pressure (p(c) > p(g)) in the hydrophilic matrix causes p(w) < p(g), which further results in negative pore pressure. The coefficient of elasticity was the highest at the surface (2.5 × 10(5) Pa) for coating and the interface of coating and core (6 × 10(5) Pa). Kinetics equation for color change obtained from experiments was coupled with the HMT based model to predict the color (L, a, and b) as a function of frying time.

  7. Theory of coupled spin-charge transport due to spin-orbit interaction in inhomogeneous two-dimensional electron liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Ka; Raimondi, R.; Vignale, G.

    2014-12-01

    Spin-orbit interactions in two-dimensional electron liquids are responsible for many interesting transport phenomena in which particle currents are converted to spin polarizations and spin currents and vice versa. Prime examples are the spin Hall effect, the Edelstein effect, and their inverses. By similar mechanisms, it is also possible to partially convert an optically induced electron-hole density wave to a spin density wave and vice versa. In this paper, we present a unified theoretical treatment of these effects based on quantum kinetic equations that include not only the intrinsic spin-orbit coupling from the band structure of the host material, but also the spin-orbit coupling due to an external electric field and a random impurity potential. The drift-diffusion equations we derive in the diffusive regime are applicable to a broad variety of experimental situations, both homogeneous and nonhomogeneous, and include on equal footing "skew scattering" and "side jump" from electron-impurity collisions. As a demonstration of the strength and usefulness of the theory we apply it to the study of several effects of current experimental interest: the inverse Edelstein effect, the spin-current swapping effect, and the partial conversion of an electron-hole density wave to a spin density wave in a two-dimensional electron gas with Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit couplings, subject to an electric field.

  8. Ab-initio Density Functional Theory (DFT) Studies of Electronic, Transport, and Bulk Properties of Sodium Oxide (Na2O)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polin, Daniel; Ziegler, Joshua; Malozovsky, Yuriy; Bagayoko, Diola

    We present the findings of ab-initio calculations of electronic, transport, and structural properties of cubic sodium oxide (Na2O). These results were obtained using density functional theory (DFT), specifically a local density approximation (LDA) potential, and the linear combination of Gaussian orbitals (LCGO). Our implementation of LCGO followed the Bagayoko, Zhao, and Williams method as enhanced by the work of Ekuma and Franklin (BZW-EF). We describe the electronic band structure of Na2O with a direct band gap of 2.22 eV. Our results include predicted values for the electronic band structure and associated energy eigenvalues, the total and partial density of states (DOS and pDOS), the equilibrium lattice constant of Na2O, and the bulk modulus. We have also calculated the electron and holes effective masses in the Γ to L, Γ to X, and Γ to K directions. Acknowledgments: This work was funded in part by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Louisiana Board of Regents, through LASiGMA [Award Nos. EPS- 1003897, NSF (2010-15)-RII-SUBR] and NSF HRD-1002541, the US Department of Energy - National, Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) (Award No. DE- NA0002630), LaSPACE, and LONI-SUBR.

  9. Observed Score Linear Equating with Covariates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branberg, Kenny; Wiberg, Marie

    2011-01-01

    This paper examined observed score linear equating in two different data collection designs, the equivalent groups design and the nonequivalent groups design, when information from covariates (i.e., background variables correlated with the test scores) was included. The main purpose of the study was to examine the effect (i.e., bias, variance, and…

  10. Economical phase-covariant cloning of qudits

    SciTech Connect

    Buscemi, Francesco; D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro; Macchiavello, Chiara

    2005-04-01

    We derive the optimal N{yields}M phase-covariant quantum cloning for equatorial states in dimension d with M=kd+N, k integer. The cloning maps are optimal for both global and single-qudit fidelity. The map is achieved by an 'economical' cloning machine, which works without ancilla.

  11. A covariance NMR toolbox for MATLAB and OCTAVE.

    PubMed

    Short, Timothy; Alzapiedi, Leigh; Brüschweiler, Rafael; Snyder, David

    2011-03-01

    The Covariance NMR Toolbox is a new software suite that provides a streamlined implementation of covariance-based analysis of multi-dimensional NMR data. The Covariance NMR Toolbox uses the MATLAB or, alternatively, the freely available GNU OCTAVE computer language, providing a user-friendly environment in which to apply and explore covariance techniques. Covariance methods implemented in the toolbox described here include direct and indirect covariance processing, 4D covariance, generalized indirect covariance (GIC), and Z-matrix transform. In order to provide compatibility with a wide variety of spectrometer and spectral analysis platforms, the Covariance NMR Toolbox uses the NMRPipe format for both input and output files. Additionally, datasets small enough to fit in memory are stored as arrays that can be displayed and further manipulated in a versatile manner within MATLAB or OCTAVE.

  12. Development and Testing of Neutron Cross Section Covariance Data for SCALE 6.2

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, William BJ J; Williams, Mark L; Wiarda, Dorothea; Rearden, Bradley T; Dunn, Michael E; Mueller, Don; Clarity, Justin B; Jones, Elizabeth L

    2015-01-01

    assessment of similarities between benchmark experiments and safety applications. This is described by a ck value for each experiment with each application. Several studies have analyzed typical ck values for a range of critical experiments compared with hypothetical irradiated fuel applications. The ck value is sensitive to the cross-section covariance data because the contribution of each nuclide is influenced by its uncertainty; large uncertainties indicate more likely bias sources and are thus given more weight. Changes in ck values resulting from different covariance data can be used to examine and assess underlying data changes. These comparisons are performed for PWR and BWR fuel in storage and transportation systems.

  13. Non-parametric estimation for baseline hazards function and covariate effects with time-dependent covariates.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Manatunga, Amita K; Chen, Shande

    2007-02-20

    Often in many biomedical and epidemiologic studies, estimating hazards function is of interest. The Breslow's estimator is commonly used for estimating the integrated baseline hazard, but this estimator requires the functional form of covariate effects to be correctly specified. It is generally difficult to identify the true functional form of covariate effects in the presence of time-dependent covariates. To provide a complementary method to the traditional proportional hazard model, we propose a tree-type method which enables simultaneously estimating both baseline hazards function and the effects of time-dependent covariates. Our interest will be focused on exploring the potential data structures rather than formal hypothesis testing. The proposed method approximates the baseline hazards and covariate effects with step-functions. The jump points in time and in covariate space are searched via an algorithm based on the improvement of the full log-likelihood function. In contrast to most other estimating methods, the proposed method estimates the hazards function rather than integrated hazards. The method is applied to model the risk of withdrawal in a clinical trial that evaluates the anti-depression treatment in preventing the development of clinical depression. Finally, the performance of the method is evaluated by several simulation studies.

  14. Energy-averaged electron-ion momentum transport cross section in the Born approximation and Debye-Hückel potential: Comparison with the cut-off theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaghloul, Mofreh R.; Bourham, Mohamed A.; Doster, J. Michael

    2000-04-01

    An exact analytical expression for the energy-averaged electron-ion momentum transport cross section in the Born approximation and Debye-Hückel exponentially screened potential has been derived and compared with the formulae given by other authors. A quantitative comparison between cut-off theory and quantum mechanical perturbation theory has been presented. Based on results from the Born approximation and Spitzer's formula, a new approximate formula for the quantum Coulomb logarithm has been derived and shown to be more accurate than previous expressions.

  15. Energy-averaged electron-ion momentum transport cross section in the Born Approximation and Debye-Hückel potential: Comparison with the cut-off theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaghloul, Mofreh R.; Bourham, Mohamed A.; Doster, J. Michael

    2000-02-01

    An exact analytical expression for the energy-averaged electron-ion momentum transport cross section in the Born approximation and Debye-Hückel exponentially screened potential has been derived and compared with the formulae given by other authors. A quantitative comparison between cut-off theory and quantum mechanical perturbation theory has been presented. Based on results from the Born approximation and Spitzer's formula, a new approximate formula for the quantum Coulomb logarithm has been derived and shown to be more accurate than previous expressions.

  16. Analyzing the evolutionary mechanisms of the Air Transportation System-of-Systems using network theory and machine learning algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotegawa, Tatsuya

    Complexity in the Air Transportation System (ATS) arises from the intermingling of many independent physical resources, operational paradigms, and stakeholder interests, as well as the dynamic variation of these interactions over time. Currently, trade-offs and cost benefit analyses of new ATS concepts are carried out on system-wide evaluation simulations driven by air traffic forecasts that assume fixed airline routes. However, this does not well reflect reality as airlines regularly add and remove routes. A airline service route network evolution model that projects route addition and removal was created and combined with state-of-the-art air traffic forecast methods to better reflect the dynamic properties of the ATS in system-wide simulations. Guided by a system-of-systems framework, network theory metrics and machine learning algorithms were applied to develop the route network evolution models based on patterns extracted from historical data. Constructing the route addition section of the model posed the greatest challenge due to the large pool of new link candidates compared to the actual number of routes historically added to the network. Of the models explored, algorithms based on logistic regression, random forests, and support vector machines showed best route addition and removal forecast accuracies at approximately 20% and 40%, respectively, when validated with historical data. The combination of network evolution models and a system-wide evaluation tool quantified the impact of airline route network evolution on air traffic delay. The expected delay minutes when considering network evolution increased approximately 5% for a forecasted schedule on 3/19/2020. Performance trade-off studies between several airline route network topologies from the perspectives of passenger travel efficiency, fuel burn, and robustness were also conducted to provide bounds that could serve as targets for ATS transformation efforts. The series of analysis revealed that high

  17. Impacts of data covariances on the calculated breeding ratio for CRBRP

    SciTech Connect

    Liaw, J.R.; Collins, P.J.; Henryson, H. II; Shenter, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    In order to establish confidence on the data adjustment methodology as applied to LMFBR design, and to estimate the importance of data correlations in that respect, an investigation was initiated on the impacts of data covariances on the calculated reactor performance parameters. This paper summarizes the results and findings of such an effort specifically related to the calculation of breeding ratio for CRBRP as an illustration. Thirty-nine integral parameters and their covariances, including k/sub eff/ and various capture and fission reaction rate ratios, from the ZEBRA-8 series and four ZPR physics benchmark assemblies were used in the least-squares fitting processes. Multigroup differential data and the sensitivity coefficients of those 39 integral parameters were generated by standard 2-D diffusion theory neutronic calculational modules at ANL. Three differential data covariance libraries, all based on ENDF/B-V evaluations, were tested in this study.

  18. Covariance of nonstationary sodium current fluctuations at the node of Ranvier.

    PubMed Central

    Sigworth, F J

    1981-01-01

    A theory is presented which relates the nonstationary autocovariance (covariance) function to the kinetics of independently-gated ionic channels. The experimental covariance was calculated from ensembles of 256--504 current records elicited from single, voltage-clamped, frog myelinated nerve fibers. Analysis of the covariance shows that the decay of channels from conducting to nonconducting states proceeds more slowly late in a depolarization to near 0 mV, as compared with early in the same depolarization. This behavior is inconsistent with there being only one kinetic state corresponding to the open channel. The behavior can be explained by the existence of multiple kinetic states corresponding to the open channel, or, alternatively, by the existence of multiple, kinetically distinct populations of channels. PMID:6260261

  19. Lorentz Covariant Distributions with Spectral Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zinoviev, Yury M.

    2007-11-14

    The properties of the vacuum expectation values of products of the quantum fields are formulated in the book [1]. The vacuum expectation values of quantum fields products would be the Fourier transforms of the Lorentz covariant tempered distributions with supports in the product of the closed upper light cones. Lorentz invariant distributions are studied in the papers [2]--[4]. The authors of these papers wanted to describe Lorentz invariant distributions in terms of distributions given on the Lorentz group orbit space. This orbit space has a complicated structure. It is noted [5] that a tempered distribution with support in the closed upper light cone may be represented as the action of the wave operator in some power on a differentiable function with support in the closed upper light cone. For the description of the Lorentz covariant differentiable functions the boundary of the closed upper light cone is not important. The measure of this boundary is zero.

  20. RNA sequence analysis using covariance models.

    PubMed Central

    Eddy, S R; Durbin, R

    1994-01-01

    We describe a general approach to several RNA sequence analysis problems using probabilistic models that flexibly describe the secondary structure and primary sequence consensus of an RNA sequence family. We call these models 'covariance models'. A covariance model of tRNA sequences is an extremely sensitive and discriminative tool for searching for additional tRNAs and tRNA-related sequences in sequence databases. A model can be built automatically from an existing sequence alignment. We also describe an algorithm for learning a model and hence a consensus secondary structure from initially unaligned example sequences and no prior structural information. Models trained on unaligned tRNA examples correctly predict tRNA secondary structure and produce high-quality multiple alignments. The approach may be applied to any family of small RNA sequences. Images PMID:8029015

  1. Low-Fidelity Covariances: Neutron Cross Section Covariance Estimates for 387 Materials

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Low-fidelity Covariance Project (Low-Fi) was funded in FY07-08 by DOEÆs Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP). The project was a collaboration among ANL, BNL, LANL, and ORNL. The motivation for the Low-Fi project stemmed from an imbalance in supply and demand of covariance data. The interest in, and demand for, covariance data has been in a continual uptrend over the past few years. Requirements to understand application-dependent uncertainties in simulated quantities of interest have led to the development of sensitivity / uncertainty and data adjustment software such as TSUNAMI [1] at Oak Ridge. To take full advantage of the capabilities of TSUNAMI requires general availability of covariance data. However, the supply of covariance data has not been able to keep up with the demand. This fact is highlighted by the observation that the recent release of the much-heralded ENDF/B-VII.0 included covariance data for only 26 of the 393 neutron evaluations (which is, in fact, considerably less covariance data than was included in the final ENDF/B-VI release).[Copied from R.C. Little et al., "Low-Fidelity Covariance Project", Nuclear Data Sheets 109 (2008) 2828-2833] The Low-Fi covariance data are now available at the National Nuclear Data Center. They are separate from ENDF/B-VII.0 and the NNDC warns that this information is not approved by CSEWG. NNDC describes the contents of this collection as: "Covariance data are provided for radiative capture (or (n,ch.p.) for light nuclei), elastic scattering (or total for some actinides), inelastic scattering, (n,2n) reactions, fission and nubars over the energy range from 10(-5{super}) eV to 20 MeV. The library contains 387 files including almost all (383 out of 393) materials of the ENDF/B-VII.0. Absent are data for (7{super})Li, (232{super})Th, (233,235,238{super})U and (239{super})Pu as well as (223,224,225,226{super})Ra, while (nat{super})Zn is replaced by (64,66,67,68,70{super})Zn

  2. Conductivity tensor of graphene dominated by spin-orbit coupling scatterers: A comparison between the results from Kubo and Boltzmann transport theories.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhe; Jiang, Liwei; Zheng, Yisong

    2016-03-31

    The diagonal and Hall conductivities of graphene arising from the spin-orbit coupling impurity scattering are theoretically studied. Based on the continuous model, i.e. the massless Dirac equation, we derive analytical expressions of the conductivity tensor from both the Kubo and Boltzmann transport theories. By performing numerical calculations, we find that the Kubo quantum transport result of the diagonal conductivity within the self-consistent Born approximation exhibits an insulating gap around the Dirac point. And in this gap a well-defined quantized spin Hall plateau occurs. This indicates the realization of the quantum spin Hall state of graphene driven by the spin-orbit coupling impurities. In contrast, the semi-classical Boltzmann theory fails to predict such a topological insulating phase. The Boltzmann diagonal conductivity is nonzero even in the insulating gap, in which the Boltzmann spin Hall conductivity does not exhibit any quantized plateau.

  3. Conductivity tensor of graphene dominated by spin-orbit coupling scatterers: A comparison between the results from Kubo and Boltzmann transport theories

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhe; Jiang, Liwei; Zheng, Yisong

    2016-01-01

    The diagonal and Hall conductivities of graphene arising from the spin-orbit coupling impurity scattering are theoretically studied. Based on the continuous model, i.e. the massless Dirac equation, we derive analytical expressions of the conductivity tensor from both the Kubo and Boltzmann transport theories. By performing numerical calculations, we find that the Kubo quantum transport result of the diagonal conductivity within the self-consistent Born approximation exhibits an insulating gap around the Dirac point. And in this gap a well-defined quantized spin Hall plateau occurs. This indicates the realization of the quantum spin Hall state of graphene driven by the spin-orbit coupling impurities. In contrast, the semi-classical Boltzmann theory fails to predict such a topological insulating phase. The Boltzmann diagonal conductivity is nonzero even in the insulating gap, in which the Boltzmann spin Hall conductivity does not exhibit any quantized plateau. PMID:27029398

  4. Torsion and geometrostasis in covariant superstrings

    SciTech Connect

    Zachos, C.

    1985-01-01

    The covariant action for freely propagating heterotic superstrings consists of a metric and a torsion term with a special relative strength. It is shown that the strength for which torsion flattens the underlying 10-dimensional superspace geometry is precisely that which yields free oscillators on the light cone. This is in complete analogy with the geometrostasis of two-dimensional sigma-models with Wess-Zumino interactions. 13 refs.

  5. Covariance expressions for eigenvalue and eigenvector problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liounis, Andrew J.

    There are a number of important scientific and engineering problems whose solutions take the form of an eigenvalue--eigenvector problem. Some notable examples include solutions to linear systems of ordinary differential equations, controllability of linear systems, finite element analysis, chemical kinetics, fitting ellipses to noisy data, and optimal estimation of attitude from unit vectors. In many of these problems, having knowledge of the eigenvalue and eigenvector Jacobians is either necessary or is nearly as important as having the solution itself. For instance, Jacobians are necessary to find the uncertainty in a computed eigenvalue or eigenvector estimate. This uncertainty, which is usually represented as a covariance matrix, has been well studied for problems similar to the eigenvalue and eigenvector problem, such as singular value decomposition. There has been substantially less research on the covariance of an optimal estimate originating from an eigenvalue-eigenvector problem. In this thesis we develop two general expressions for the Jacobians of eigenvalues and eigenvectors with respect to the elements of their parent matrix. The expressions developed make use of only the parent matrix and the eigenvalue and eigenvector pair under consideration. In addition, they are applicable to any general matrix (including complex valued matrices, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors) as long as the eigenvalues are simple. Alongside this, we develop expressions that determine the uncertainty in a vector estimate obtained from an eigenvalue-eigenvector problem given the uncertainty of the terms of the matrix. The Jacobian expressions developed are numerically validated with forward finite, differencing and the covariance expressions are validated using Monte Carlo analysis. Finally, the results from this work are used to determine covariance expressions for a variety of estimation problem examples and are also applied to the design of a dynamical system.

  6. Linear Covariance Analysis for a Lunar Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jang, Jiann-Woei; Bhatt, Sagar; Fritz, Matthew; Woffinden, David; May, Darryl; Braden, Ellen; Hannan, Michael

    2017-01-01

    A next-generation lunar lander Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GNC) system, which includes a state-of-the-art optical sensor suite, is proposed in a concept design cycle. The design goal is to allow the lander to softly land within the prescribed landing precision. The achievement of this precision landing requirement depends on proper selection of the sensor suite. In this paper, a robust sensor selection procedure is demonstrated using a Linear Covariance (LinCov) analysis tool developed by Draper.

  7. Inverse covariance simplification for efficient uncertainty management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalobeanu, A.; Gutiérrez, J. A.

    2007-11-01

    When it comes to manipulating uncertain knowledge such as noisy observations of physical quantities, one may ask how to do it in a simple way. Processing corrupted signals or images always propagates the uncertainties from the data to the final results, whether these errors are explicitly computed or not. When such error estimates are provided, it is crucial to handle them in such a way that their interpretation, or their use in subsequent processing steps, remain user-friendly and computationally tractable. A few authors follow a Bayesian approach and provide uncertainties as an inverse covariance matrix. Despite its apparent sparsity, this matrix contains many small terms that carry little information. Methods have been developed to select the most significant entries, through the use of information-theoretic tools for instance. One has to find a Gaussian pdf that is close enough to the posterior pdf, and with a small number of non-zero coefficients in the inverse covariance matrix. We propose to restrict the search space to Markovian models (where only neighbors can interact), well-suited to signals or images. The originality of our approach is in conserving the covariances between neighbors while setting to zero the entries of the inverse covariance matrix for all other variables. This fully constrains the solution, and the computation is performed via a fast, alternate minimization scheme involving quadratic forms. The Markovian structure advantageously reduces the complexity of Bayesian updating (where the simplified pdf is used as a prior). Moreover, uncertainties exhibit the same temporal or spatial structure as the data.

  8. Evaluation of the Chromium Resonance Parameters Including Resonance Parameter Covariance

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, Luiz C; Derrien, Herve; Guber, Klaus H; Arbanas, Goran; Wiarda, Dorothea

    2011-01-01

    The intent of this work is to report the results and describe the procedures utilized to evaluate the chromium isotopes' cross sections, i.e., (50)Cr, (52)Cr, (53)Cr, and (54)Cr, for criticality safety applications. The evaluations were done in the resolved resonance region using the reduced Reich-Moore R-matrix formalism. The novel aspect of this evaluation is the inclusion of new transmission and capture cross-section measurements performed at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) for energies below 100 keV and the extension of the (53)Cr energy region. The resonance analysis was performed with the multilevel R-matrix code, SAMMY, which utilizes the generalized least-squares technique based on the Bayes' theory. Complete sets of resonance parameters and resonance parameter covariance matrices (RPCMs) were obtained for each of the chromium isotopes from the SAMMY analysis of the experimental database.

  9. A systematic description of the generation of covariance matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, N. M.; Leal, L. C.; Derrien, H.; Arbanas, G.; Sayer, R. O.; Wiarda, D.

    2006-07-01

    In this paper, we describe techniques used to determine realistic and appropriate uncertainties and correlations (or, equivalently, covariances) for multigroup cross sections in the resolved-resonance region, starting from fundamental principles. The entire process is described, with emphasis on the propagation of uncertainties through each step of the process. The key steps are data reduction (conversion from measured counts-per-time-channel to experimental cross section as a function of energy), data evaluation (determining appropriate parameter values to fit theory to experiment), generation of point-wise cross sections (reconstruction of theoretical cross sections as a function of energy), collapsing into multigroup cross sections (averaging the point-wise cross sections to give multigroup cross sections), and calculating integral quantities from those multigroup cross sections. (authors)

  10. Covariant approach of perturbations in Lovelock type brane gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagatella-Flores, Norma; Campuzano, Cuauhtemoc; Cruz, Miguel; Rojas, Efraín

    2016-12-01

    We develop a covariant scheme to describe the dynamics of small perturbations on Lovelock type extended objects propagating in a flat Minkowski spacetime. The higher-dimensional analogue of the Jacobi equation in this theory becomes a wave type equation for a scalar field Φ . Whithin this framework, we analyse the stability of membranes with a de Sitter geometry where we find that the Jacobi equation specializes to a Klein-Gordon (KG) equation for Φ possessing a tachyonic mass. This shows that, to some extent, these types of extended objects share the symmetries of the Dirac-Nambu-Goto (DNG) action which is by no means coincidental because the DNG model is the simplest included in this type of gravity.

  11. Spatial regression with covariate measurement error: A semiparametric approach.

    PubMed

    Huque, Md Hamidul; Bondell, Howard D; Carroll, Raymond J; Ryan, Louise M

    2016-09-01

    Spatial data have become increasingly common in epidemiology and public health research thanks to advances in GIS (Geographic Information Systems) technology. In health research, for example, it is common for epidemiologists to incorporate geographically indexed data into their studies. In practice, however, the spatially defined covariates are often measured with error. Naive estimators of regression coefficients are attenuated if measurement error is ignored. Moreover, the classical measurement error theory is inapplicable in the context of spatial modeling because of the presence of spatial correlation among the observations. We propose a semiparametric regression approach to obtain bias-corrected estimates of regression parameters and derive their large sample properties. We evaluate the performance of the proposed method through simulation studies and illustrate using data on Ischemic Heart Disease (IHD). Both simulation and practical application demonstrate that the proposed method can be effective in practice.

  12. Development of covariance capabilities in EMPIRE code

    SciTech Connect

    Herman,M.; Pigni, M.T.; Oblozinsky, P.; Mughabghab, S.F.; Mattoon, C.M.; Capote, R.; Cho, Young-Sik; Trkov, A.

    2008-06-24

    The nuclear reaction code EMPIRE has been extended to provide evaluation capabilities for neutron cross section covariances in the thermal, resolved resonance, unresolved resonance and fast neutron regions. The Atlas of Neutron Resonances by Mughabghab is used as a primary source of information on uncertainties at low energies. Care is taken to ensure consistency among the resonance parameter uncertainties and those for thermal cross sections. The resulting resonance parameter covariances are formatted in the ENDF-6 File 32. In the fast neutron range our methodology is based on model calculations with the code EMPIRE combined with experimental data through several available approaches. The model-based covariances can be obtained using deterministic (Kalman) or stochastic (Monte Carlo) propagation of model parameter uncertainties. We show that these two procedures yield comparable results. The Kalman filter and/or the generalized least square fitting procedures are employed to incorporate experimental information. We compare the two approaches analyzing results for the major reaction channels on {sup 89}Y. We also discuss a long-standing issue of unreasonably low uncertainties and link it to the rigidity of the model.

  13. Using Covariance Analysis to Assess Pointing Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, David; Kang, Bryan

    2009-01-01

    A Pointing Covariance Analysis Tool (PCAT) has been developed for evaluating the expected performance of the pointing control system for NASA s Space Interferometry Mission (SIM). The SIM pointing control system is very complex, consisting of multiple feedback and feedforward loops, and operating with multiple latencies and data rates. The SIM pointing problem is particularly challenging due to the effects of thermomechanical drifts in concert with the long camera exposures needed to image dim stars. Other pointing error sources include sensor noises, mechanical vibrations, and errors in the feedforward signals. PCAT models the effects of finite camera exposures and all other error sources using linear system elements. This allows the pointing analysis to be performed using linear covariance analysis. PCAT propagates the error covariance using a Lyapunov equation associated with time-varying discrete and continuous-time system matrices. Unlike Monte Carlo analysis, which could involve thousands of computational runs for a single assessment, the PCAT analysis performs the same assessment in a single run. This capability facilitates the analysis of parametric studies, design trades, and "what-if" scenarios for quickly evaluating and optimizing the control system architecture and design.

  14. Shrinkage covariance matrix approach for microarray data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karjanto, Suryaefiza; Aripin, Rasimah

    2013-04-01

    Microarray technology was developed for the purpose of monitoring the expression levels of thousands of genes. A microarray data set typically consists of tens of thousands of genes (variables) from just dozens of samples due to various constraints including the high cost of producing microarray chips. As a result, the widely used standard covariance estimator is not appropriate for this purpose. One such technique is the Hotelling's T2 statistic which is a multivariate test statistic for comparing means between two groups. It requires that the number of observations (n) exceeds the number of genes (p) in the set but in microarray studies it is common that n < p. This leads to a biased estimate of the covariance matrix. In this study, the Hotelling's T2 statistic with the shrinkage approach is proposed to estimate the covariance matrix for testing differential gene expression. The performance of this approach is then compared with other commonly used multivariate tests using a widely analysed diabetes data set as illustrations. The results across the methods are consistent, implying that this approach provides an alternative to existing techniques.

  15. All covariance controllers for linear discrete-time systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, Chen; Skelton, Robert E.

    1990-01-01

    The set of covariances that a linear discrete-time plant with a specified-order controller can have is characterized. The controllers that assign such covariances to any linear discrete-time system are given explicitly in closed form. The freedom in these covariance controllers is explicit and is parameterized by two orthogonal matrices. By appropriately choosing these free parameters, additional system objectives can be achieved without altering the state covariance, and the stability of the closed-loop system is guaranteed.

  16. Factorization of the Discrete Noise Covariance Matrix for Plans,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-02-01

    rapport prdsente la formulation exacte de la matrice de covariance Qk necessaire pour la propagation de la matrice de covariance du filtre Kalman ...approximation la d6composition necessaire pour utiliser la formulation Biermann-Agee-Turner du filtre Kalman . Cette decomposition approximative est...form of the discrete driving noise covariance matrix Qk which is needed to propagate the covariance matrix in the Kalman filter used by PLANS. It is

  17. Hidden Covariation Detection Produces Faster, Not Slower, Social Judgments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Lynne A.; Andrade, Jackie

    2006-01-01

    In P. Lewicki's (1986b) demonstration of hidden covariation detection (HCD), responses of participants were slower to faces that corresponded with a covariation encountered previously than to faces with novel covariations. This slowing contrasts with the typical finding that priming leads to faster responding and suggests that HCD is a unique type…

  18. Earth Observation System Flight Dynamics System Covariance Realism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaidi, Waqar H.; Tracewell, David

    2016-01-01

    This presentation applies a covariance realism technique to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Observation System (EOS) Aqua and Aura spacecraft based on inferential statistics. The technique consists of three parts: collection calculation of definitive state estimates through orbit determination, calculation of covariance realism test statistics at each covariance propagation point, and proper assessment of those test statistics.

  19. Covariate Selection in Propensity Scores Using Outcome Proxies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelcey, Ben

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the practical problem of covariate selection in propensity scores (PSs) given a predetermined set of covariates. Because the bias reduction capacity of a confounding covariate is proportional to the concurrent relationships it has with the outcome and treatment, particular focus is set on how we might approximate…

  20. Covariate Imbalance and Precision in Measuring Treatment Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Xiaofeng Steven

    2011-01-01

    Covariate adjustment can increase the precision of estimates by removing unexplained variance from the error in randomized experiments, although chance covariate imbalance tends to counteract the improvement in precision. The author develops an easy measure to examine chance covariate imbalance in randomization by standardizing the average…

  1. Ballistic transport in planetary ring systems due to particle erosion mechanisms. I - Theory, numerical methods, and illustrative examples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durisen, Richard H.; Murphy, Brian W.; Cramer, Nichael Lynn; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Mullikin, Thomas L.

    1989-01-01

    Ballistic transport, defined as the net radial transport of mass and angular momentum due to exchanges of meteoroid hypersonic-impact ejecta by neighboring planetary ring regions on time-scales orders-of-magnitude shorter than the age of the solar system, is presently considered as a problem in mathematical physics. The preliminary results of a numerical scheme for following the combined effects of ballistic transport and viscous diffusion demonstrate that ballistic transport generates structure near sharp edges already present in the ring-mass distribution; the entire ring system ultimately develops an undulatory structure whose length scale is typically of the order of the radial excursion of the impact ejecta.

  2. Time-variable transit time distributions and transport: Theory and application to storage-dependent transport of chloride in a watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harman, Ciaran J.

    2015-01-01

    Transport processes and pathways through many hydrodynamic systems vary over time, often driven by variations in total water storage. This paper develops a very general approach to modeling unsteady transport through an arbitrary control volume (such as a watershed) that accounts for temporal variability in the underlying transport dynamics. Controls on the selection of discharge from stored water are encapsulated in probability distributions ΩQ>(ST,t>) of age-ranked storage ST (the volume of water in storage ranked from youngest to oldest). This framework is applied to a long-term record of rainfall and streamflow chloride in a small, humid watershed at Plynlimon, UK. While a time-invariant gamma distribution for ΩQ produced a good fit to data, the fit was significantly improved when the distribution was allowed to vary with catchment storage. However, the variation was inverse to that of a "well-mixed" system where storage has a pure dilution effect. Discharge at high storage was predicted to contain a larger fraction of recent event water than at low storage. The effective volume of storage involved in transport was 3411 mm at mean catchment wetness, but declined by 71 mm per 1 mm of additional catchment storage, while the fraction of event water in discharge increased by 1.4%. This "inverse storage effect" is sufficient to reproduce the observed long-memory 1/f fractal spectral structure of stream chloride. Metrics quantifying the strength and direction of storage effects are proposed as useful signatures, and point toward a unified framework for observing and modeling coupled watershed flow and transport.

  3. Density functional theory based study of molecular interactions, recognition, engineering, and quantum transport in π molecular systems.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yeonchoo; Cho, Woo Jong; Youn, Il Seung; Lee, Geunsik; Singh, N Jiten; Kim, Kwang S

    2014-11-18

    CONSPECTUS: In chemical and biological systems, various interactions that govern the chemical and physical properties of molecules, assembling phenomena, and electronic transport properties compete and control the microscopic structure of materials. The well-controlled manipulation of each component can allow researchers to design receptors or sensors, new molecular architectures, structures with novel morphology, and functional molecules or devices. In this Account, we describe the structures and electronic and spintronic properties of π-molecular systems that are important for controlling the architecture of a variety of carbon-based systems. Although DFT is an important tool for describing molecular interactions, the inability of DFT to accurately represent dispersion interactions has made it difficult to properly describe π-interactions. However, the recently developed dispersion corrections for DFT have allowed us to include these dispersion interactions cost-effectively. We have investigated noncovalent interactions of various π-systems including aromatic-π, aliphatic-π, and non-π systems based on dispersion-corrected DFT (DFT-D). In addition, we have addressed the validity of DFT-D compared with the complete basis set (CBS) limit values of coupled cluster theory with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations [CCSD(T)] and Møller-Plesset second order perturbation theory (MP2). The DFT-D methods are still unable to predict the correct ordering in binding energies within the benzene dimer and the cyclohexane dimer. Nevertheless, the overall DFT-D predicted binding energies are in reasonable agreement with the CCSD(T) results. In most cases, results using the B97-D3 method closely reproduce the CCSD(T) results with the optimized energy-fitting parameters. On the other hand, vdW-DF2 and PBE0-TS methods estimate the dispersion energies from the calculated electron density. In these approximations, the interaction energies around the equilibrium

  4. Entropy of a vacuum: What does the covariant entropy count?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Yasunori; Weinberg, Sean J.

    2014-11-01

    We argue that a unitary description of the formation and evaporation of a black hole implies that the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy is the "entropy of a vacuum": the logarithm of the number of possible independent ways in which quantum field theory on a fixed classical spacetime background can emerge in a full quantum theory of gravity. In many cases, the covariant entropy counts this entropy—the degeneracy of emergent quantum field theories in full quantum gravity—with the entropy of particle excitations in each quantum field theory giving only a tiny perturbation. In the Rindler description of a (black hole) horizon, the relevant vacuum degrees of freedom manifest themselves as an extra hidden quantum number carried by the states representing the second exterior region; this quantum number is invisible in the emergent quantum field theory. In a distant picture, these states arise as exponentially degenerate ground and excited states of the intrinsically quantum gravitational degrees of freedom on the stretched horizon. The formation and evaporation of a black hole involve processes in which the entropy of collapsing matter is transformed into that of a vacuum and then to that of final-state Hawking radiation. In the intermediate stage of this evolution, entanglement between the vacuum and (early) Hawking radiation develops, which is transferred to the entanglement among final-state Hawking quanta through the evaporation process. The horizon is kept smooth throughout the evolution; in particular, no firewall develops. Similar considerations also apply for cosmological horizons, for example for the horizon of a metastable de Sitter space.

  5. WASP7 Stream Transport - Model Theory and User's Guide: Supplement to Water Quality Analysis Simulation Program (WASP) User Documentation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The standard WASP7 stream transport model calculates water flow through a branching stream network that may include both free-flowing and ponded segments. This supplemental user manual documents the hydraulic algorithms, including the transport and hydrogeometry equations, the m...

  6. BRST formulation of Chern-Simons gauge theory coupled to matter fields

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, H.; Kim, W.; Kim, J. ); Park, Y. )

    1992-09-15

    We study the Abelian Chern-Simons gauge theory coupled to a complex scalar field in the covariant gauge. By introducing the Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin formulation, it is shown that fractional spin also appears in the covariant gauge.

  7. Linear Covariance Analysis and Epoch State Estimators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. Landis; Carpenter, J. Russell

    2012-01-01

    This paper extends in two directions the results of prior work on generalized linear covariance analysis of both batch least-squares and sequential estimators. The first is an improved treatment of process noise in the batch, or epoch state, estimator with an epoch time that may be later than some or all of the measurements in the batch. The second is to account for process noise in specifying the gains in the epoch state estimator. We establish the conditions under which the latter estimator is equivalent to the Kalman filter.

  8. Cosmology of a covariant Galilean field.

    PubMed

    De Felice, Antonio; Tsujikawa, Shinji

    2010-09-10

    We study the cosmology of a covariant scalar field respecting a Galilean symmetry in flat space-time. We show the existence of a tracker solution that finally approaches a de Sitter fixed point responsible for cosmic acceleration today. The viable region of model parameters is clarified by deriving conditions under which ghosts and Laplacian instabilities of scalar and tensor perturbations are absent. The field equation of state exhibits a peculiar phantomlike behavior along the tracker, which allows a possibility to observationally distinguish the Galileon gravity from the cold dark matter model with a cosmological constant.

  9. Minimal covariant observables identifying all pure states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmeli, Claudio; Heinosaari, Teiko; Toigo, Alessandro

    2013-09-01

    It has been recently shown by Heinosaari, Mazzarella and Wolf (2013) [1] that an observable that identifies all pure states of a d-dimensional quantum system has minimally 4d-4 outcomes or slightly less (the exact number depending on d). However, no simple construction of this type of minimal observable is known. We investigate covariant observables that identify all pure states and have minimal number of outcomes. It is shown that the existence of this kind of observables depends on the dimension of the Hilbert space.

  10. Linear Covariance Analysis and Epoch State Estimators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. Landis; Carpenter, J. Russell

    2014-01-01

    This paper extends in two directions the results of prior work on generalized linear covariance analysis of both batch least-squares and sequential estimators. The first is an improved treatment of process noise in the batch, or epoch state, estimator with an epoch time that may be later than some or all of the measurements in the batch. The second is to account for process noise in specifying the gains in the epoch state estimator. We establish the conditions under which the latter estimator is equivalent to the Kalman filter.

  11. Covariant harmonic oscillators and coupled harmonic oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Daesoo; Kim, Young S.; Noz, Marilyn E.

    1995-01-01

    It is shown that the system of two coupled harmonic oscillators shares the basic symmetry properties with the covariant harmonic oscillator formalism which provides a concise description of the basic features of relativistic hadronic features observed in high-energy laboratories. It is shown also that the coupled oscillator system has the SL(4,r) symmetry in classical mechanics, while the present formulation of quantum mechanics can accommodate only the Sp(4,r) portion of the SL(4,r) symmetry. The possible role of the SL(4,r) symmetry in quantum mechanics is discussed.

  12. Covariant change of signature in classical relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, G. F. R.

    1992-10-01

    This paper gives a covariant formalism enabling investigation of the possibility of change of signature in classical General Relativity, when the geometry is that of a Robertson-Walker universe. It is shown that such changes are compatible with the Einstein field equations, both in the case of a barotropic fluid and of a scalar field. A criterion is given for when such a change of signature should take place in the scalar field case. Some examples show the kind of resulting exact solutions of the field equations.

  13. Spatiotemporal noise covariance estimation from limited empirical magnetoencephalographic data.

    PubMed

    Jun, Sung C; Plis, Sergey M; Ranken, Doug M; Schmidt, David M

    2006-11-07

    The performance of parametric magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG) source localization approaches can be degraded by the use of poor background noise covariance estimates. In general, estimation of the noise covariance for spatiotemporal analysis is difficult mainly due to the limited noise information available. Furthermore, its estimation requires a large amount of storage and a one-time but very large (and sometimes intractable) calculation or its inverse. To overcome these difficulties, noise covariance models consisting of one pair or a sum of multi-pairs of Kronecker products of spatial covariance and temporal covariance have been proposed. However, these approaches cannot be applied when the noise information is very limited, i.e., the amount of noise information is less than the degrees of freedom of the noise covariance models. A common example of this is when only averaged noise data are available for a limited prestimulus region (typically at most a few hundred milliseconds duration). For such cases, a diagonal spatiotemporal noise covariance model consisting of sensor variances with no spatial or temporal correlation has been the common choice for spatiotemporal analysis. In this work, we propose a different noise covariance model which consists of diagonal spatial noise covariance and Toeplitz temporal noise covariance. It can easily be estimated from limited noise information, and no time-consuming optimization and data-processing are required. Thus, it can be used as an alternative choice when one-pair or multi-pair noise covariance models cannot be estimated due to lack of noise information. To verify its capability we used Bayesian inference dipole analysis and a number of simulated and empirical datasets. We compared this covariance model with other existing covariance models such as conventional diagonal covariance, one-pair and multi-pair noise covariance models, when noise information is sufficient to estimate them. We

  14. Thermodynamically Constrained Averaging Theory Approach for Modeling Flow and Transport Phenomena in Porous Medium Systems: 8. Interface and Common Curve Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Gray, William G.; Miller, Cass T.

    2010-01-01

    This work is the eighth in a series that develops the fundamental aspects of the thermodynamically constrained averaging theory (TCAT) that allows for a systematic increase in the scale at which multiphase transport phenomena is modeled in porous medium systems. In these systems, the explicit locations of interfaces between phases and common curves, where three or more interfaces meet, are not considered at scales above the microscale. Rather, the densities of these quantities arise as areas per volume or length per volume. Modeling of the dynamics of these measures is an important challenge for robust models of flow and transport phenomena in porous medium systems, as the extent of these regions can have important implications for mass, momentum, and energy transport between and among phases, and formulation of a capillary pressure relation with minimal hysteresis. These densities do not exist at the microscale, where the interfaces and common curves correspond to particular locations. Therefore, it is necessary for a well-developed macroscale theory to provide evolution equations that describe the dynamics of interface and common curve densities. Here we point out the challenges and pitfalls in producing such evolution equations, develop a set of such equations based on averaging theorems, and identify the terms that require particular attention in experimental and computational efforts to parameterize the equations. We use the evolution equations developed to specify a closed two-fluid-phase flow model. PMID:21197134

  15. Thermodynamically Constrained Averaging Theory Approach for Modeling Flow and Transport Phenomena in Porous Medium Systems: 8. Interface and Common Curve Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Gray, William G; Miller, Cass T

    2010-12-01

    This work is the eighth in a series that develops the fundamental aspects of the thermodynamically constrained averaging theory (TCAT) that allows for a systematic increase in the scale at which multiphase transport phenomena is modeled in porous medium systems. In these systems, the explicit locations of interfaces between phases and common curves, where three or more interfaces meet, are not considered at scales above the microscale. Rather, the densities of these quantities arise as areas per volume or length per volume. Modeling of the dynamics of these measures is an important challenge for robust models of flow and transport phenomena in porous medium systems, as the extent of these regions can have important implications for mass, momentum, and energy transport between and among phases, and formulation of a capillary pressure relation with minimal hysteresis. These densities do not exist at the microscale, where the interfaces and common curves correspond to particular locations. Therefore, it is necessary for a well-developed macroscale theory to provide evolution equations that describe the dynamics of interface and common curve densities. Here we point out the challenges and pitfalls in producing such evolution equations, develop a set of such equations based on averaging theorems, and identify the terms that require particular attention in experimental and computational efforts to parameterize the equations. We use the evolution equations developed to specify a closed two-fluid-phase flow model.

  16. Covariant perturbations in a multifluid cosmological medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunsby, Peter K. S.; Bruni, Marco; Ellis, George F. R.

    1992-08-01

    In a series of recent papers, a new covariant formalism was introduced to treat inhomogeneities in any spacetime. The variables introduced in these papers are gauge-invariant with respect to a Robertson-Walker background spacetime because they vanish identically in such models, and they have a transparent physical meaning. Exact evolution equations were found for these variables, and the linearized form of these equations were obtained, showing that they give the standard results for a barotropic perfect fluid. In this paper we extend this formalism to the general case of multicomponent fluid sources with interactions between them. We show, using the tilted formalism of King and Ellis, (1973) that choosing either the energy frame or the particle frame gives rise to a set of physically well-defined covariant and gauge-invariant variables which describe density and velocity perturbations, both for the total fluid and its constituent components. We then derive a complete set of equations for these variables and show, through harmonic analysis, that they are equivalent to those of Bardeen (1980) and of Kodama and Sasaki (1984). We discuss a number of interesting applications, including the case where the universe is filled with a mixture of baryons and radiation, coupled through Thomson scattering, and we derive solutions for the density and velocity perturbations in the large-scale limit. We also correct a number of errors in the previous literature.

  17. Modeling Covariance Matrices via Partial Autocorrelations

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, M.J.; Pourahmadi, M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary We study the role of partial autocorrelations in the reparameterization and parsimonious modeling of a covariance matrix. The work is motivated by and tries to mimic the phenomenal success of the partial autocorrelations function (PACF) in model formulation, removing the positive-definiteness constraint on the autocorrelation function of a stationary time series and in reparameterizing the stationarity-invertibility domain of ARMA models. It turns out that once an order is fixed among the variables of a general random vector, then the above properties continue to hold and follows from establishing a one-to-one correspondence between a correlation matrix and its associated matrix of partial autocorrelations. Connections between the latter and the parameters of the modified Cholesky decomposition of a covariance matrix are discussed. Graphical tools similar to partial correlograms for model formulation and various priors based on the partial autocorrelations are proposed. We develop frequentist/Bayesian procedures for modelling correlation matrices, illustrate them using a real dataset, and explore their properties via simulations. PMID:20161018

  18. A Class of Population Covariance Matrices in the Bootstrap Approach to Covariance Structure Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuan, Ke-Hai; Hayashi, Kentaro; Yanagihara, Hirokazu

    2007-01-01

    Model evaluation in covariance structure analysis is critical before the results can be trusted. Due to finite sample sizes and unknown distributions of real data, existing conclusions regarding a particular statistic may not be applicable in practice. The bootstrap procedure automatically takes care of the unknown distribution and, for a given…

  19. Covariance Partition Priors: A Bayesian Approach to Simultaneous Covariance Estimation for Longitudinal Data.

    PubMed

    Gaskins, J T; Daniels, M J

    2016-01-02

    The estimation of the covariance matrix is a key concern in the analysis of longitudinal data. When data consists of multiple groups, it is often assumed the covariance matrices are either equal across groups or are completely distinct. We seek methodology to allow borrowing of strength across potentially similar groups to improve estimation. To that end, we introduce a covariance partition prior which proposes a partition of the groups at each measurement time. Groups in the same set of the partition share dependence parameters for the distribution of the current measurement given the preceding ones, and the sequence of partitions is modeled as a Markov chain to encourage similar structure at nearby measurement times. This approach additionally encourages a lower-dimensional structure of the covariance matrices by shrinking the parameters of the Cholesky decomposition toward zero. We demonstrate the performance of our model through two simulation studies and the analysis of data from a depression study. This article includes Supplementary Material available online.

  20. Evaluating covariance in prognostic and system health management applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Sandeep; Jin, Xiaohang; Chow, Tommy W. S.; Pecht, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Developing a diagnostic and prognostic health management system involves analyzing system parameters monitored during the lifetime of the system. This data analysis may involve multiple steps, including data reduction, feature extraction, clustering and classification, building control charts, identification of anomalies, and modeling and predicting parameter degradation in order to evaluate the state of health for the system under investigation. Evaluating the covariance between the monitored system parameters allows for better understanding of the trends in monitored system data, and therefore it is an integral part of the data analysis. Typically, a sample covariance matrix is used to evaluate the covariance between monitored system parameters. The monitored system data are often sensor data, which are inherently noisy. The noise in sensor data can lead to inaccurate evaluation of the covariance in data using a sample covariance matrix. This paper examines approaches to evaluate covariance, including the minimum volume ellipsoid, the minimum covariance determinant, and the nearest neighbor variance estimation. When the performance of these approaches was evaluated on datasets with increasing percentage of Gaussian noise, it was observed that the nearest neighbor variance estimation exhibited the most stable estimates of covariance. To improve the accuracy of covariance estimates using nearest neighbor-based methodology, a modified approach for the nearest neighbor variance estimation technique is developed in this paper. Case studies based on data analysis steps involved in prognostic solutions are developed in order to compare the performance of the covariance estimation methodologies discussed in the paper.

  1. Electromagnetism, Local Covariance, the Aharonov-Bohm Effect and Gauss' Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Ko; Dappiaggi, Claudio; Hack, Thomas-Paul

    2014-06-01

    We quantise the massless vector potential A of electromagnetism in the presence of a classical electromagnetic (background) current, j, in a generally covariant way on arbitrary globally hyperbolic spacetimes M. By carefully following general principles and procedures we clarify a number of topological issues. First we combine the interpretation of A as a connection on a principal U(1)-bundle with the perspective of general covariance to deduce a physical gauge equivalence relation, which is intimately related to the Aharonov-Bohm effect. By Peierls' method we subsequently find a Poisson bracket on the space of local, affine observables of the theory. This Poisson bracket is in general degenerate, leading to a quantum theory with non-local behaviour. We show that this non-local behaviour can be fully explained in terms of Gauss' law. Thus our analysis establishes a relationship, via the Poisson bracket, between the Aharonov-Bohm effect and Gauss' law - a relationship which seems to have gone unnoticed so far. Furthermore, we find a formula for the space of electric monopole charges in terms of the topology of the underlying spacetime. Because it costs little extra effort, we emphasise the cohomological perspective and derive our results for general p-form fields A ( p < dim( M)), modulo exact fields, for the Lagrangian density . In conclusion we note that the theory is not locally covariant, in the sense of Brunetti-Fredenhagen-Verch. It is not possible to obtain such a theory by dividing out the centre of the algebras, nor is it physically desirable to do so. Instead we argue that electromagnetism forces us to weaken the axioms of the framework of local covariance, because the failure of locality is physically well-understood and should be accommodated.

  2. The Impact of Covariate Measurement Error on Risk Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Khudyakov, Polyna; Gorfine, Malka; Zucker, David; Spiegelman, Donna

    2015-01-01

    In the development of risk prediction models, predictors are often measured with error. In this paper, we investigate the impact of covariate measurement error on risk prediction. We compare the prediction performance using a costly variable measured without error, along with error-free covariates, to that of a model based on an inexpensive surrogate along with the error-free covariates. We consider continuous error-prone covariates with homoscedastic and heteroscedastic errors, and also a discrete misclassified covariate. Prediction performance is evaluated by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), the Brier score (BS), and the ratio of the observed to the expected number of events (calibration). In an extensive numerical study, we show that (i) the prediction model with the error-prone covariate is very well calibrated, even when it is mis-specified; (ii) using the error-prone covariate instead of the true covariate can reduce the AUC and increase the BS dramatically; (iii) adding an auxiliary variable, which is correlated with the error-prone covariate but conditionally independent of the outcome given all covariates in the true model, can improve the AUC and BS substantially. We conclude that reducing measurement error in covariates will improve the ensuing risk prediction, unless the association between the error-free and error-prone covariates is very high. Finally, we demonstrate how a validation study can be used to assess the effect of mismeasured covariates on risk prediction. These concepts are illustrated in a breast cancer risk prediction model developed in the Nurses’ Health Study. PMID:25865315

  3. Eigenvalues of the sample covariance matrix for a towed array.

    PubMed

    Gerstoft, Peter; Menon, Ravishankar; Hodgkiss, William S; Mecklenbräuker, Christoph F

    2012-10-01

    It is well known that observations of the spatial sample covariance matrix (SCM, also called the cross-spectral matrix) reveal that the ordered noise eigenvalues of the SCM decay steadily, but common models predict equal noise eigenvalues. Random matrix theory (RMT) is used to derive and discuss properties of the eigenvalue spectrum of the data SCM for linear arrays, with an application to ocean acoustic data. Noise on the array is considered either incoherent or propagating acoustic noise that is coherent across the array. Using conventional three-dimensional or two-dimensional isotropic noise models with full or snapshot-deficient observations, realizations of the SCM eigenvalues are explained using RMT. Deep-water towed-array data are analyzed and it is shown that the eigenvalues of the SCM compare well with theory. It is demonstrated how RMT can be applied to study eigenvalue spectrum estimation as dependent on array properties (element spacing to wavelength ratio) and data sampling (snapshots). Apart from explaining the observed noise eigenvalue spectrum, the improved model of the eigenvalue spectrum has important applications in array signal processing.

  4. High-Pressure Transport Properties Of Fluids: Theory And Data From Levitated Drops At Combustion-Relevant Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Harstad, Kenneth; Ohsaka, Kenichi

    2003-01-01

    Although the high pressure multicomponent fluid conservation equations have already been derived and approximately validated for binary mixtures by this PI, the validation of the multicomponent theory is hampered by the lack of existing mixing rules for property calculations. Classical gas dynamics theory can provide property mixing-rules at low pressures exclusively. While thermal conductivity and viscosity high-pressure mixing rules have been documented in the literature, there is no such equivalent for the diffusion coefficients and the thermal diffusion factors. The primary goal of this investigation is to extend the low pressure mixing rule theory to high pressures and validate the new theory with experimental data from levitated single drops. The two properties that will be addressed are the diffusion coefficients and the thermal diffusion factors. To validate/determine the property calculations, ground-based experiments from levitated drops are being conducted.

  5. Size effects and charge transport in metals: Quantum theory of the resistivity of nanometric metallic structures arising from electron scattering by grain boundaries and by rough surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz, Raul C.; Arenas, Claudio

    2017-03-01

    We discuss recent progress regarding size effects and their incidence upon the coefficients describing charge transport (resistivity, magnetoresistance, and Hall effect) induced by electron scattering from disordered grain boundaries and from rough surfaces on metallic nanostructures; we review recent measurements of the magneto transport coefficients that elucidate the electron scattering mechanisms at work. We review as well theoretical developments regarding quantum transport theories that allow calculating the increase in resistivity induced by electron-rough surface scattering (in the absence of grain boundaries) from first principles—from the parameters that describe the surface roughness that can be measured with a Scanning Tunnelling Microscope (STM). We evaluate the predicting power of the quantum version of the Fuchs-Sondheimer theory and of the model proposed by Calecki, abandoning the method of parameter fitting used for decades, but comparing instead theoretical predictions with resistivity measured in thin films where surface roughness has also been measured with a STM, and where electron-grain boundary scattering can be neglected. We also review the theory of Mayadas and Shatzkes (MS) [Phys. Rev. B 1, 1382 (1970)] used for decades, and discuss its severe conceptual difficulties that arise out of the fact that: (i) MS employed plane waves to describe the electronic states within the metal sample having periodic grain boundaries, rather than the Bloch states known since the thirties to be the solutions of the Schrödinger equation describing electrons propagating through a Krönig-Penney [Proc. R. Soc. London Ser. A 130, 499 (1931)] periodic potential; (ii) MS ignored the fact that the wave functions describing electrons propagating through a 1-D disordered potential are expected to decay exponentially with increasing distance, a fact known since the work of Anderson [Phys. Rev. 109, 1492 (1958)] in 1958 for which he was awarded the Nobel Prize in

  6. Electrokinetic Ion Transport through Unsaturated Soil: 1) Theory, Model Development, and Testing 2) Application to a Heterogeneous Field Site

    SciTech Connect

    Mattson, Earl Douglas; Bowman, R. S.; Lindgren, E. R.

    2002-01-01

    An electromigration transport model for non-reactive ion transport in unsaturated soil was developed and tested against laboratory experiments. This model assumed the electric potential field was constant with respect to time, an assumption valid for highly buffered soil, or when the electrode electrolysis reactions are neutralized. The model also assumed constant moisture contents and temperature with respect to time, and that electroosmotic and hydraulic transport of water through the soil was negligible. A functional relationship between ionic mobility and the electrolyte concentration was estimated using the chemical activity coefficient. Tortuosity was calculated from a mathematical relationship fitted to the electrical conductivity of the bulk pore water and soil moisture data. The functional relationship between ionic mobility, pore-water concentration, and tortuosity as a function of moisture content allowed the model to predict ion transport in heterogeneous unsaturated soils. The model was tested against laboratory measurements assessing anionic electromigration as a function of moisture content. In the test cell, a strip of soil was spiked with red dye No 40 and monitored for a 24-h period while a 10-mA current was maintained between the electrodes. Electromigration velocities predicted by the electromigration transport model were in agreement with laboratory experimental results. Both laboratory-measured and model-predicted dye migration results indicated a maximum transport velocity at moisture contents less than saturation due to competing effects between current density and tortuosity as moisture content decreases. Results of a field demonstration of electrokinetic transport of acetate through an unsaturated heterogeneous soil are compared to numerical modeling predictions. The numerical model was based on the groundwater flow and transport codes MODFLOW and MT3D modified to account for electrically induced ion transport. The 6-month field

  7. Identifying sources of uncertainty using covariance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyslop, N. P.; White, W. H.

    2010-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol monitoring often includes performing multiple analyses on a collected sample. Some common analyses resolve suites of elements or compounds (e.g., spectrometry, chromatography). Concentrations are determined through multi-step processes involving sample collection, physical or chemical analysis, and data reduction. Uncertainties in the individual steps propagate into uncertainty in the calculated concentration. The assumption in most treatments of measurement uncertainty is that errors in the various species concentrations measured in a sample are random and therefore independent of each other. This assumption is often not valid in speciated aerosol data because some errors can be common to multiple species. For example, an error in the sample volume will introduce a common error into all species concentrations determined in the sample, and these errors will correlate with each other. Measurement programs often use paired (collocated) measurements to characterize the random uncertainty in their measurements. Suites of paired measurements provide an opportunity to go beyond the characterization of measurement uncertainties in individual species to examine correlations amongst the measurement uncertainties in multiple species. This additional information can be exploited to distinguish sources of uncertainty that affect all species from those that only affect certain subsets or individual species. Data from the Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) program are used to illustrate these ideas. Nine analytes commonly detected in the IMPROVE network were selected for this analysis. The errors in these analytes can be reasonably modeled as multiplicative, and the natural log of the ratio of concentrations measured on the two samplers provides an approximation of the error. Figure 1 shows the covariation of these log ratios among the different analytes for one site. Covariance is strongest amongst the dust element (Fe, Ca, and

  8. AFCI-2.0 Library of Neutron Cross Section Covariances

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, M.; Herman,M.; Oblozinsky,P.; Mattoon,C.; Pigni,M.; Hoblit,S.; Mughabghab,S.F.; Sonzogni,A.; Talou,P.; Chadwick,M.B.; Hale.G.M.; Kahler,A.C.; Kawano,T.; Little,R.C.; Young,P.G.

    2011-06-26

    Neutron cross section covariance library has been under development by BNL-LANL collaborative effort over the last three years. The primary purpose of the library is to provide covariances for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) data adjustment project, which is focusing on the needs of fast advanced burner reactors. The covariances refer to central values given in the 2006 release of the U.S. neutron evaluated library ENDF/B-VII. The preliminary version (AFCI-2.0beta) has been completed in October 2010 and made available to the users for comments. In the final 2.0 release, covariances for a few materials were updated, in particular new LANL evaluations for {sup 238,240}Pu and {sup 241}Am were adopted. BNL was responsible for covariances for structural materials and fission products, management of the library and coordination of the work, while LANL was in charge of covariances for light nuclei and for actinides.

  9. Evaluation of the Covariance Matrix of Estimated Resonance Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, B.; Capote, R.; Kopecky, S.; Massimi, C.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Sirakov, I.; Volev, K.

    2014-04-01

    In the resonance region nuclear resonance parameters are mostly obtained by a least square adjustment of a model to experimental data. Derived parameters can be mutually correlated through the adjustment procedure as well as through common experimental or model uncertainties. In this contribution we investigate four different methods to propagate the additional covariance caused by experimental or model uncertainties into the evaluation of the covariance matrix of the estimated parameters: (1) including the additional covariance into the experimental covariance matrix based on calculated or theoretical estimates of the data; (2) including the uncertainty affected parameter in the adjustment procedure; (3) evaluation of the full covariance matrix by Monte Carlo sampling of the common parameter; and (4) retroactively including the additional covariance by using the marginalization procedure of Habert et al.

  10. The ontogenetic trajectory of the phenotypic covariance matrix, with examples from craniofacial shape in rats and humans.

    PubMed

    Mitteroecker, Philipp; Bookstein, Fred

    2009-03-01

    Many classic quantitative genetic theories assume the covariance structure among adult phenotypic traits to be relatively static during evolution. But the cross-sectional covariance matrix arises from the joint variation of a large range of developmental processes and hence is not constant over the period during which a population of developing organisms is actually exposed to selection. To examine how development shapes the phenotypic covariance structure, we ordinate the age-specific covariance matrices of shape coordinates for craniofacial growth in rats and humans. The metric that we use for this purpose is given by the square root of the summed squared log relative eigenvalues. This is the natural metric on the space of positive-definite symmetric matrices, which we introduce and justify in a biometric context. In both species, the covariance matrices appear to change continually throughout the full period of postnatal development. The resulting ontogenetic trajectories alter their direction at major changes of the developmental programs whereas they are fairly straight in between. Consequently, phenotypic covariance matrices--and thus also response to selection--should be expected to vary both over ontogenetic and phylogenetic time scales as different phenotypes are necessarily produced by different developmental pathways.

  11. Poloidal Rotation Dynamics, Radial Electric Field, and Neoclassical Theory in the Jet Internal-Transport-Barrier Region

    SciTech Connect

    Crombe, K.; Oost, G. van; Andrew, Y.; Giroud, C.; Hawkes, N. C.; Parail, V.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; Zastrow, K.-D.; Hacquin, S.; Nave, M.F.F.; Ongena, J.

    2005-10-07

    Results from the first measurements of a core plasma poloidal rotation velocity (v{sub {theta}}) across internal transport barriers (ITB) on JET are presented. The spatial and temporal evolution of the ITB can be followed along with the v{sub {theta}} radial profiles, providing a very clear link between the location of the steepest region of the ion temperature gradient and localized spin-up of v{sub {theta}}. The v{sub {theta}} measurements are an order of magnitude higher than the neoclassical predictions for thermal particles in the ITB region, contrary to the close agreement found between the determined and predicted particle and heat transport coefficients [K.-D. Zastrow et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 46, B255 (2004)]. These results have significant implications for the understanding of transport barrier dynamics due to their large impact on the measured radial electric field profile.

  12. Non-Abelian gauge theory on q-Quantum spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Schraml, Stefan L.

    2002-08-23

    Gauge theories on q-deformed spaces are constructed using covariant derivatives. For this purpose a ''vielbein'' is introduced, which transforms under gauge transformations. The non-Abelian case is treated by establishing a connection to gauge theories on commutative spaces, i.e. by a Seiberg-Witten map. As an example we consider the Manin plane. Remarks are made concerning the relation between covariant coordinates and covariant derivatives.

  13. A statistical mechanical theory of proton transport kinetics in hydrogen-bonded networks based on population correlation functions with applications to acids and bases.

    PubMed

    Tuckerman, Mark E; Chandra, Amalendu; Marx, Dominik

    2010-09-28

    Extraction of relaxation times, lifetimes, and rates associated with the transport of topological charge defects in hydrogen-bonded networks from molecular dynamics simulations is a challenge because proton transfer reactions continually change the identity of the defect core. In this paper, we present a statistical mechanical theory that allows these quantities to be computed in an unbiased manner. The theory employs a set of suitably defined indicator or population functions for locating a defect structure and their associated correlation functions. These functions are then used to develop a chemical master equation framework from which the rates and lifetimes can be determined. Furthermore, we develop an integral equation formalism for connecting various types of population correlation functions and derive an iterative solution to the equation, which is given a graphical interpretation. The chemical master equation framework is applied to the problems of both hydronium and hydroxide transport in bulk water. For each case it is shown that the theory establishes direct links between the defect's dominant solvation structures, the kinetics of charge transfer, and the mechanism of structural diffusion. A detailed analysis is presented for aqueous hydroxide, examining both reorientational time scales and relaxation of the rotational anisotropy, which is correlated with recent experimental results for these quantities. Finally, for OH(-)(aq) it is demonstrated that the "dynamical hypercoordination mechanism" is consistent with available experimental data while other mechanistic proposals are shown to fail. As a means of going beyond the linear rate theory valid from short up to intermediate time scales, a fractional kinetic model is introduced in the Appendix in order to describe the nonexponential long-time behavior of time-correlation functions. Within the mathematical framework of fractional calculus the power law decay ∼t(-σ), where σ is a parameter of the

  14. Review and Assessment of Neutron Cross Section and Nubar Covariances for Advanced Reactor Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Maslov,V.M.; Oblozinsky, P.; Herman, M.

    2008-12-01

    In January 2007, the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) produced a set of preliminary neutron covariance data for the international project 'Nuclear Data Needs for Advanced Reactor Systems'. The project was sponsored by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), Paris, under the Subgroup 26 of the International Working Party on Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC). These preliminary covariances are described in two recent BNL reports. The NNDC used a simplified version of the method developed by BNL and LANL that combines the recent Atlas of Neutron Resonances, the nuclear reaction model code EMPIRE and the Bayesian code KALMAN with the experimental data used as guidance. There are numerous issues involved in these estimates of covariances and it was decided to perform an independent review and assessment of these results so that better covariances can be produced for the revised version in future. Reviewed and assessed are uncertainties for fission, capture, elastic scattering, inelastic scattering and (n,2n) cross sections as well as prompt nubars for 15 minor actinides ({sup 233,234,236}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 238,240,241,242}Pu, {sup 241,242m,243}Am and {sup 242,243,244,245}Cm) and 4 major actinides ({sup 232}Th, {sup 235,238}U and {sup 239}Pu). We examined available evaluations, performed comparison with experimental data, taken into account uncertainties in model parameterization and made use state-of-the-art nuclear reaction theory to produce the uncertainty assessment.

  15. Power series evaluation of transition and covariance matrices.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bierman, G. J.

    1972-01-01

    Reexamination power series solutions to the matrix covariance differential equation and the transition differential equation. Truncation error bounds are derived which are computationally attractive and which extend previous results. Polynomial approximations are obtained by exploiting the functional equations satisfied by the transition and covariance matrices. The series-functional equation propagation technique represents a fast and accurate alternative to the numerical integration of the time-invariant transition and covariance equations.

  16. Bayesian hierarchical model for large-scale covariance matrix estimation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dongxiao; Hero, Alfred O

    2007-12-01

    Many bioinformatics problems implicitly depend on estimating large-scale covariance matrix. The traditional approaches tend to give rise to high variance and low accuracy due to "overfitting." We cast the large-scale covariance matrix estimation problem into the Bayesian hierarchical model framework, and introduce dependency between covariance parameters. We demonstrate the advantages of our approaches over the traditional approaches using simulations and OMICS data analysis.

  17. EMPIRE ULTIMATE EXPANSION: RESONANCES AND COVARIANCES.

    SciTech Connect

    HERMAN,M.; MUGHABGHAB, S.F.; OBLOZINSKY, P.; ROCHMAN, D.; PIGNI, M.T.; KAWANO, T.; CAPOTE, R.; ZERKIN, V.; TRKOV, A.; SIN, M.; CARSON, B.V.; WIENKE, H. CHO, Y.-S.

    2007-04-22

    The EMPIRE code system is being extended to cover the resolved and unresolved resonance region employing proven methodology used for the production of new evaluations in the recent Atlas of Neutron Resonances. Another directions of Empire expansion are uncertainties and correlations among them. These include covariances for cross sections as well as for model parameters. In this presentation we concentrate on the KALMAN method that has been applied in EMPIRE to the fast neutron range as well as to the resonance region. We also summarize role of the EMPIRE code in the ENDF/B-VII.0 development. Finally, large scale calculations and their impact on nuclear model parameters are discussed along with the exciting perspectives offered by the parallel supercomputing.

  18. Covariance of lucky images: performance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagigal, Manuel P.; Valle, Pedro J.; Cagigas, Miguel A.; Villó-Pérez, Isidro; Colodro-Conde, Carlos; Ginski, C.; Mugrauer, M.; Seeliger, M.

    2017-01-01

    The covariance of ground-based lucky images is a robust and easy-to-use algorithm that allows us to detect faint companions surrounding a host star. In this paper, we analyse the relevance of the number of processed frames, the frames' quality, the atmosphere conditions and the detection noise on the companion detectability. This analysis has been carried out using both experimental and computer-simulated imaging data. Although the technique allows us the detection of faint companions, the camera detection noise and the use of a limited number of frames reduce the minimum detectable companion intensity to around 1000 times fainter than that of the host star when placed at an angular distance corresponding to the few first Airy rings. The reachable contrast could be even larger when detecting companions with the assistance of an adaptive optics system.

  19. Covariates of Craving in Actively Drinking Alcoholics

    PubMed Central

    Chakravorty, Subhajit; Kuna, Samuel T.; Zaharakis, Nikola; O’Brien, Charles P.; Kampman, Kyle M.; Oslin, David

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this cross-sectional study was to assess the relationship of alcohol craving with biopsychosocial and addiction factors that are clinically pertinent to alcoholism treatment. Alcohol craving was assessed in 315 treatment-seeking, alcohol dependent subjects using the PACS questionnaire. Standard validated questionnaires were used to evaluate a variety of biological, addiction, psychological, psychiatric, and social factors. Individual covariates of craving included age, race, problematic consequences of drinking, heavy drinking, motivation for change, mood disturbance, sleep problems, and social supports. In a multivariate analysis (R2 = .34), alcohol craving was positively associated with mood disturbance, heavy drinking, readiness for change, and negatively associated with age. The results from this study suggest that alcohol craving is a complex phenomenon influenced by multiple factors. PMID:20716308

  20. Performance of internal covariance estimators for cosmic shear correlation functions

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, O.; Seitz, S.; Eifler, T. F.; Gruen, D.

    2015-12-31

    Data re-sampling methods such as the delete-one jackknife are a common tool for estimating the covariance of large scale structure probes. In this paper we investigate the concepts of internal covariance estimation in the context of cosmic shear two-point statistics. We demonstrate how to use log-normal simulations of the convergence field and the corresponding shear field to carry out realistic tests of internal covariance estimators and find that most estimators such as jackknife or sub-sample covariance can reach a satisfactory compromise between bias and variance of the estimated covariance. In a forecast for the complete, 5-year DES survey we show that internally estimated covariance matrices can provide a large fraction of the true uncertainties on cosmological parameters in a 2D cosmic shear analysis. The volume inside contours of constant likelihood in the $\\Omega_m$-$\\sigma_8$ plane as measured with internally estimated covariance matrices is on average $\\gtrsim 85\\%$ of the volume derived from the true covariance matrix. The uncertainty on the parameter combination $\\Sigma_8 \\sim \\sigma_8 \\Omega_m^{0.5}$ derived from internally estimated covariances is $\\sim 90\\%$ of the true uncertainty.