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Sample records for cowpox virus combine

  1. Cowpox virus infection associated with a streptococcal septicaemia in a foal.

    PubMed

    Ellenberger, C; Schüppel, K-F; Möhring, M; Reischauer, A; Alex, M; Czerny, C-P; Fercho, A; Schoon, H-A

    2005-01-01

    Cowpox virus infection associated with a streptococcal septicaemia was diagnosed in a weak German Warmblood filly, born 29 days prematurely, and humanely destroyed on the sixth day of life. At necropsy, ulcerative lesions in the alimentary tract, colitis, polyarthritis and nephritis were observed. Transmission electron microscopical examination of specimens from ulcerative lesions revealed typical orthopox virions. Cowpox virus was unequivocally identified by virological and molecular-biological methods.

  2. Cowpox virus infection in natural field vole Microtus agrestis populations: significant negative impacts on survival

    PubMed Central

    Burthe, Sarah; Telfer, Sandra; Begon, Michael; Bennett, Malcolm; Smith, Andrew; Lambin, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Summary Cowpox virus is an endemic virus circulating in populations of wild rodents. It has been implicated as a potential cause of population cycles in field voles Microtus agrestis L., in Britain, owing to a delayed density-dependent pattern in prevalence, but its impact on field vole demographic parameters is unknown. This study tests the hypothesis that wild field voles infected with cowpox virus have a lower probability of survival than uninfected individuals. The effect of cowpox virus infection on the probability of an individual surviving to the next month was investigated using longitudinal data collected over 2 years from four grassland sites in Kielder Forest, UK. This effect was also investigated at the population level, by examining whether infection prevalence explained temporal variation in survival rates, once other factors influencing survival had been controlled for. Individuals with a probability of infection, P(I), of 1 at a time when base survival rate was at median levels had a 22·4% lower estimated probability of survival than uninfected individuals, whereas those with a P(I) of 0·5 had a 10·4% lower survival. At the population level, survival rates also decreased with increasing cowpox prevalence, with lower survival rates in months of higher cowpox prevalence. Simple matrix projection models with 28 day time steps and two stages, with 71% of voles experiencing cowpox infection in their second month of life (the average observed seroprevalence at the end of the breeding season) predict a reduction in 28-day population growth rate during the breeding season from λ = 1·62 to 1·53 for populations with no cowpox infection compared with infected populations. This negative correlation between cowpox virus infection and field vole survival, with its potentially significant effect on population growth rate, is the first for an endemic pathogen in a cyclic population of wild rodents. PMID:18177331

  3. In vivo imaging of cidofovir treatment of cowpox virus infection.

    PubMed

    Goff, Arthur; Twenhafel, Nancy; Garrison, Aura; Mucker, Eric; Lawler, James; Paragas, Jason

    2007-09-01

    Variola virus and other members of the genus Orthopoxviruses constitute a prominent bioterrorism and public health threat. Treatment with the anti-viral drug cidofovir inhibits replication of orthopoxviruses in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we visualized the effect of cidofovir on viral kinetics in orthopoxvirus infected mice by using whole-body fluorescence imaging (FI). We engineered a cowpox virus (CPV) expressing the enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP). Single-step growth curves and calculated 50% lethal doses (LD(50)) of wild-type CPX (Wt-CPV) and GFP-expressing CPX (GFP-CPV) were comparable. Whole-body FI first detected GFP fluorescence in the mesenteric tissue of untreated animals on post-infection day (PID) 1. On PID 3 GFP signal was detected throughout the mesentery, in all abdominal organs by PID 5 and in most major organs, except for the heart and brain by PID 6. Infected animals treated with 25mg/kg of cidofovir also began showing signs of viral replication on PID 1, however, the fluorescent signal was limited only to discrete foci throughout the course of the infection. This work describes the first use of an established Orthopox model of infection to evaluate drug efficacy and track virus progression on a macroscopic level.

  4. A cowpox virus gene required for multiplication in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed Central

    Spehner, D; Gillard, S; Drillien, R; Kirn, A

    1988-01-01

    Cowpox virus, in contrast to vaccinia virus, can multiply in Chinese hamster ovary cells. To study the genetic basis for this difference in host range, recombinants between vaccinia and cowpox viruses were isolated and their DNA restriction patterns were examined. The ability to multiply in Chinese hamster ovary cells could be correlated with the conservation of cowpox virus sequences mapping at the left end of the genome. This was further demonstrated by marker rescue of the host range phenotype with restricted cowpox virus DNA. Marker rescue with cloned restriction fragments of decreasing size enabled the fine localization of the host range function to a 2.3-kilobase-pair fragment. Nucleotide sequencing revealed that the fragment encoded a single major polypeptide of approximately 77,000 daltons. It is suggested that the role of the host range gene from cowpox virus is to prevent the early and extensive shutoff of protein synthesis that normally occurs in Chinese hamster ovary cells infected by vaccinia virus. Images PMID:2831390

  5. Cowpox virus induces interleukin-10 both in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Spesock, April H.; Barefoot, Brice E.; Ray, Caroline A.; Kenan, Daniel J.; Gunn, Michael D.; Ramsburg, Elizabeth A.; Pickup, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Cowpox virus infection induces interleukin-10 (IL-10) production from mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) or cells of the mouse macrophage line (RAW264.7) at about 1800 pg/ml, whereas infections with vaccinia virus (strains WR or MVA) induced much less IL-10. Similarly, in vivo, IL-10 levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids of mice infected with cowpox virus were significantly higher than those after vaccinia virus infection. However, after intranasal cowpox virus infection, although dendritic and T-cell accumulations in the lungs of IL-10 deficient mice were greater than those in wild-type mice, weight-loss and viral burdens were not significantly different. IL-10 deficient mice were more susceptible than wild-type mice to reinfection with cowpox virus even though titers of neutralizing antibodies and virus-specific CD8 T cells were similar between IL-10 deficient and wild-type mice. Greater bronchopneumonia in IL-10 deficient mice than wild-type mice suggests that IL-10 contributes to the suppression of immunopathology in the lungs. PMID:21658738

  6. Genome-wide comparison of cowpox viruses reveals a new clade related to Variola virus.

    PubMed

    Dabrowski, Piotr Wojtek; Radonić, Aleksandar; Kurth, Andreas; Nitsche, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Zoonotic infections caused by several orthopoxviruses (OPV) like monkeypox virus or vaccinia virus have a significant impact on human health. In Europe, the number of diagnosed infections with cowpox viruses (CPXV) is increasing in animals as well as in humans. CPXV used to be enzootic in cattle; however, such infections were not being diagnosed over the last decades. Instead, individual cases of cowpox are being found in cats or exotic zoo animals that transmit the infection to humans. Both animals and humans reveal local exanthema on arms and legs or on the face. Although cowpox is generally regarded as a self-limiting disease, immunosuppressed patients can develop a lethal systemic disease resembling smallpox. To date, only limited information on the complex and, compared to other OPV, sparsely conserved CPXV genomes is available. Since CPXV displays the widest host range of all OPV known, it seems important to comprehend the genetic repertoire of CPXV which in turn may help elucidate specific mechanisms of CPXV pathogenesis and origin. Therefore, 22 genomes of independent CPXV strains from clinical cases, involving ten humans, four rats, two cats, two jaguarundis, one beaver, one elephant, one marah and one mongoose, were sequenced by using massive parallel pyrosequencing. The extensive phylogenetic analysis showed that the CPXV strains sequenced clearly cluster into several distinct clades, some of which are closely related to Vaccinia viruses while others represent different clades in a CPXV cluster. Particularly one CPXV clade is more closely related to Camelpox virus, Taterapox virus and Variola virus than to any other known OPV. These results support and extend recent data from other groups who postulate that CPXV does not form a monophyletic clade and should be divided into multiple lineages.

  7. Inference of cowpox virus transmission rates between wild rodent host classes using space-time interaction.

    PubMed

    Carslake, David; Bennett, Malcolm; Hazel, Sarah; Telfer, Sandra; Begon, Michael

    2006-04-07

    There have been virtually no studies of 'who acquires infection from whom' in wildlife populations, but patterns of transmission within and between different classes of host are likely to be reflected in the spatiotemporal distribution of infection among those host classes. Here, we use a modified form of K-function analysis to test for space-time interaction among bank voles and wood mice infectious with cowpox virus. There was no evidence for transmission between the two host species, supporting previous evidence that they act as separate reservoirs for cowpox. Among wood mice, results suggested that transmission took place primarily between individuals of the opposite sex, raising the possibility that cowpox is sexually transmitted in this species. Results for bank voles indicated that infected females might be a more important source of infection to either sex than are males. The suggestion of different modes of transmission in the two species is itself consistent with the apparent absence of transmission between species.

  8. Fatal cowpox virus infection in cotton-top tamarins (Saguinus oedipus) in Germany.

    PubMed

    Kalthoff, Donata; Bock, Wulf-Iwo; Hühn, Franziska; Beer, Martin; Hoffmann, Bernd

    2014-04-01

    Cowpox virus (CPXV) was isolated from a fatal outbreak among cotton-top tamarins. Samples from healthy common marmosets in contact were also CPXV genome positive. The CPXV isolated from the cotton-top tamarins exhibited a unique hemagglutinin sequence. Pathogenicity investigations using a Wistar rat model characterized the isolate as low pathogenic.

  9. Cowpox virus employs a two-pronged strategy to outflank MHCI antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    McCoy, William H; Wang, Xiaoli; Yokoyama, Wayne M; Hansen, Ted H; Fremont, Daved H

    2013-09-01

    Smallpox decimated humanity for thousands of years before being eradicated by vaccination, a success facilitated by the fact that humans are the only host of variola virus. In contrast, other orthopoxviruses such as cowpox virus can infect a variety of mammalian species, although its dominant reservoir appears to be rodents. This difference in host specificity suggests that cowpox may have developed promiscuous immune evasion strategies to facilitate zoonosis. Recent experiments have established that cowpox can disrupt MHCI antigen presentation during viral infection of both human and murine cells, a process enabled by two unique proteins, CPXV012 and CPXV203. While CPXV012 inhibits antigenic peptide transport from the cytosol to the ER, CPXV203 blocks MHCI trafficking to the cell surface by exploiting the KDEL-receptor recycling pathway. Our recent investigations of CPXV203 reveal that it binds a diverse array of classical and non-classical MHCI proteins with dramatically increased affinities at the lower pH of the Golgi relative to the ER, thereby providing mechanistic insight into how it works synergistically with KDEL receptors to block MHCI surface expression. The strategy used by cowpox to both limit peptide supply and disrupt trafficking of fully assembled MHCI acts as a dual-edged sword that effectively disables adaptive immune surveillance of infected cells.

  10. Concurrent infection of a cat with cowpox virus and feline parvovirus.

    PubMed

    Schaudien, D; Meyer, H; Grunwald, D; Janssen, H; Wohlsein, P

    2007-01-01

    Concurrent infection with cowpox and feline parvovirus was diagnosed in a 5-month-old male European Short Hair cat. Microscopical examination of the facial skin, ears and foot pads revealed multifocal to coalescing, ulcerative to necrotizing dermatitis and panniculitis with ballooning epidermal degeneration and eosinophilic cytoplasmic inclusion bodies. Immunohistochemistry, polymerase chain reaction testing and virus isolation confirmed infection with a strain of cowpox virus similar to that isolated from a cat in Germany 5 years previously. Lymphoid tissues were depleted and there was catarrhal enteritis caused by feline parvovirus as confirmed by immunohistochemistry and in-situ hybridization. This co-infection did not result in a more severe and rapid course of the poxvirus-associated disease.

  11. A Negative Feedback Modulator of Antigen Processing Evolved from a Frameshift in the Cowpox Virus Genome

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jiacheng; Eggensperger, Sabine; Hank, Susanne; Wycisk, Agnes I.; Wieneke, Ralph; Mayerhofer, Peter U.; Tampé, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Coevolution of viruses and their hosts represents a dynamic molecular battle between the immune system and viral factors that mediate immune evasion. After the abandonment of smallpox vaccination, cowpox virus infections are an emerging zoonotic health threat, especially for immunocompromised patients. Here we delineate the mechanistic basis of how cowpox viral CPXV012 interferes with MHC class I antigen processing. This type II membrane protein inhibits the coreTAP complex at the step after peptide binding and peptide-induced conformational change, in blocking ATP binding and hydrolysis. Distinct from other immune evasion mechanisms, TAP inhibition is mediated by a short ER-lumenal fragment of CPXV012, which results from a frameshift in the cowpox virus genome. Tethered to the ER membrane, this fragment mimics a high ER-lumenal peptide concentration, thus provoking a trans-inhibition of antigen translocation as supply for MHC I loading. These findings illuminate the evolution of viral immune modulators and the basis of a fine-balanced regulation of antigen processing. PMID:25503639

  12. Cowpox virus infection in natural field vole Microtus agrestis populations: delayed density dependence and individual risk.

    PubMed

    Burthe, Sarah; Telfer, Sandra; Lambin, Xavier; Bennett, Malcolm; Carslake, David; Smith, Andrew; Begon, Michael

    2006-11-01

    1. Little is known about the dynamics of pathogen (microparasite) infection in wildlife populations, and less still about sources of variation in the risk of infection. Here we present the first detailed analysis of such variation. 2. Cowpox virus is an endemic sublethal pathogen circulating in populations of wild rodents. Cowpox prevalence was monitored longitudinally for 2 years, in populations of field voles exhibiting multiannual cycles of density in Kielder Forest, UK. 3. The probability that available susceptible animals seroconverted in a given trap session was significantly positively related to host density with a 3-month time lag. 4. Males were significantly more likely to seroconvert than females. 5. Despite most infection being found in young animals (because transmission rates were generally high) mature individuals were more likely to seroconvert than immature ones, suggesting that behavioural or physiological changes associated with maturity contribute to variation in infection risk. 6. Hence, these analyses confirm that there is a delayed numerical response of cowpox infection to vole density, supporting the hypothesis that endemic pathogens may play some part in shaping vole cycles.

  13. Inference of cowpox virus transmission rates between wild rodent host classes using space–time interaction

    PubMed Central

    Carslake, David; Bennett, Malcolm; Hazel, Sarah; Telfer, Sandra; Begon, Michael

    2005-01-01

    There have been virtually no studies of ‘who acquires infection from whom’ in wildlife populations, but patterns of transmission within and between different classes of host are likely to be reflected in the spatiotemporal distribution of infection among those host classes. Here, we use a modified form of K-function analysis to test for space–time interaction among bank voles and wood mice infectious with cowpox virus. There was no evidence for transmission between the two host species, supporting previous evidence that they act as separate reservoirs for cowpox. Among wood mice, results suggested that transmission took place primarily between individuals of the opposite sex, raising the possibility that cowpox is sexually transmitted in this species. Results for bank voles indicated that infected females might be a more important source of infection to either sex than are males. The suggestion of different modes of transmission in the two species is itself consistent with the apparent absence of transmission between species. PMID:16618669

  14. [Cowpox virus infection in an alpaca (Vicugna pacos) - clinical symptoms, laboratory diagnostic findings and pathological changes].

    PubMed

    Goerigk, D; Theuß, T; Pfeffer, M; Konrath, A; Kalthoff, D; Woll, D; Vahlenkamp, T W; Beer, M; Starke, A

    2014-01-01

    Orthopoxvirus infections appear to be rare in South American Camelids, because only a few cases have been reported in the literature. Based on a generalized infection with cowpox virus in an alpaca, the clinical symptoms, laboratory diagnostic findings and the pathological changes are described. The case history showed a long treatment because of chronic skin lesions. The main clinical symptom was miliary papules over the entire skin. Furthermore, a bilateral mucopurulent conjunctivitis occurred as well as excessive salivation due to a severe erosive-ulcerative stomatitis. Although the animal received intensive treatment, it died 8 days after admission to the clinic. During necropsy, an erosive-ulcerative laryngitis as well as a necrotising pneumonia and lymphadenitis were observed. Histopathological examination of representative organ samples led to the diagnosis of a suspected orthopoxvirus infection. Electron microscopy and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) of tissue samples confirmed this diagnosis. The virus could be isolated in tissue culture and a PCR with subsequent nucleotide sequencing identified cowpox virus as the causative agent for this generalised infection.

  15. Cowpox: reservoir hosts and geographic range.

    PubMed Central

    Chantrey, J.; Meyer, H.; Baxby, D.; Begon, M.; Bown, K. J.; Hazel, S. M.; Jones, T.; Montgomery, W. I.; Bennett, M.

    1999-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the reservoir hosts of cowpox virus are wild rodents, although direct evidence for this is lacking for much of the virus's geographic range. Here, through a combination of serology and PCR, we demonstrate conclusively that the main hosts in Great Britain are bank voles, wood mice and short-tailed field voles. However, we also suggest that wood mice may not be able to maintain infection alone, explaining the absence of cowpox from Ireland where voles are generally not found. Infection in wild rodents varies seasonally, and this variation probably underlies the marked seasonal incidence of infection in accidental hosts such as humans and domestic cats. PMID:10459650

  16. Generalized fatal Cowpox virus infection in a cat with transmission to a human contact case.

    PubMed

    Schulze, C; Alex, M; Schirrmeier, H; Hlinak, A; Engelhardt, A; Koschinski, B; Beyreiss, B; Hoffmann, M; Czerny, C-P

    2007-01-01

    A 4-month-old female domestic shorthair cat was infected by a virus of the Poxvirus family. The animal developed a severe pneumonia and generalized ulcerating lesions of the skin. Histologically, typical eosinophilic intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies indicative of an Orthopoxvirus (OPV) infection were present. The lung showed grey-white to haemorrhagic nodular lesions with a central zone of complete necrosis of alveolar and bronchial tissue. Electron microscopy from skin and lung nodules revealed typical square-shaped OPV particles. Cultivation of the virus on chorio-allantoic membranes of embryonated chicken eggs resulted in haemorrhagic plaques. Restriction enzyme analysis, PCR and sequencing of the D8L gene identified the OPV isolate as a typical Cowpox virus. It was transmitted by the cat to a human contact person who developed a local nodular dermatitis at the inoculation site in association with signs of general infection and had an increase of OPV-specific neutralizing antibodies in paired serum samples.

  17. Disease dynamics in cyclic populations of field voles (Microtus agrestis): cowpox virus and vole tuberculosis (Mycobacterium microti).

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, Rachel D; Lambin, Xavier; Ergon, Torbjørn; Bennett, Malcolm; Graham, Isla M; van Soolingen, Dick; Begon, Michael

    2004-04-22

    The possible role of pathogens in rodent population cycles has been largely neglected since Elton's 'epidemic hypothesis' of 1931. To revisit this question, 12 adjacent, cyclic but out-of-phase populations of field voles (Microtus agrestis) in North East England were studied and the initial results are presented here. The prevalences of antibodies to cowpox virus and of clinical signs of Mycobacterium microti infection (vole tuberculosis) showed delayed (not direct) density dependence (with a lag of three to six months). This did not result from changes in population structure, even though there were such changes associated with the different phases of the cycle. The prevalences rose as vole numbers rose, and peaked as numbers declined. The apparent lag in the numerical response of infection prevalence to changes in host abundance is consistent with the hypothesis that diseases, singly or in combination, play a hitherto underestimated role in the dynamics of cyclic populations.

  18. Disease dynamics in cyclic populations of field voles (Microtus agrestis): cowpox virus and vole tuberculosis (Mycobacterium microti).

    PubMed Central

    Cavanagh, Rachel D.; Lambin, Xavier; Ergon, Torbjørn; Bennett, Malcolm; Graham, Isla M.; van Soolingen, Dick; Begon, Michael

    2004-01-01

    The possible role of pathogens in rodent population cycles has been largely neglected since Elton's 'epidemic hypothesis' of 1931. To revisit this question, 12 adjacent, cyclic but out-of-phase populations of field voles (Microtus agrestis) in North East England were studied and the initial results are presented here. The prevalences of antibodies to cowpox virus and of clinical signs of Mycobacterium microti infection (vole tuberculosis) showed delayed (not direct) density dependence (with a lag of three to six months). This did not result from changes in population structure, even though there were such changes associated with the different phases of the cycle. The prevalences rose as vole numbers rose, and peaked as numbers declined. The apparent lag in the numerical response of infection prevalence to changes in host abundance is consistent with the hypothesis that diseases, singly or in combination, play a hitherto underestimated role in the dynamics of cyclic populations. PMID:15255106

  19. The effect of cowpox virus infection on fecundity in bank voles and wood mice.

    PubMed Central

    Feore, S M; Bennett, M; Chantrey, J; Jones, T; Baxby, D; Begon, M

    1997-01-01

    Although epidemic infectious diseases are a recognized cause of changes in host population dynamics, there is little direct evidence for the effect of endemic infections on populations. Cowpox virus is an orthopoxvirus which is endemic in bank voles (Clethrionomys glareolus), wood mice (Apodemus sylvaticus) and field voles (Microtus agrestis) in Great Britain. It does not cause obvious signs of disease nor does it affect survival, but in this study we demonstrate experimentally that it can reduce the fecundity of bank voles and wood mice by increasing the time to first litter by 20-30 days. The pathogenic mechanisms causing this effect are at present not known, but this finding suggests that natural subclinical infection could have a considerable effect on the dynamics of wild populations. PMID:9364786

  20. Cowpox virus inhibits human dendritic cell immune function by nonlethal, nonproductive infection

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Spencer J.; Rushton, John; Dekonenko, Alexander; Chand, Hitendra S.; Olson, Gwyneth K.; Hutt, Julie A.; Pickup, David; Lyons, C. Rick; Lipscomb, Mary F.

    2011-04-10

    Orthopoxviruses encode multiple proteins that modulate host immune responses. We determined whether cowpox virus (CPXV), a representative orthopoxvirus, modulated innate and acquired immune functions of human primary myeloid DCs and plasmacytoid DCs and monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs). A CPXV infection of DCs at a multiplicity of infection of 10 was nonproductive, altered cellular morphology, and failed to reduce cell viability. A CPXV infection of DCs did not stimulate cytokine or chemokine secretion directly, but suppressed toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist-induced cytokine secretion and a DC-stimulated mixed leukocyte reaction (MLR). LPS-stimulated NF-{kappa}B nuclear translocation and host cytokine gene transcription were suppressed in CPXV-infected MDDCs. Early viral immunomodulatory genes were upregulated in MDDCs, consistent with early DC immunosuppression via synthesis of intracellular viral proteins. We conclude that a nonproductive CPXV infection suppressed DC immune function by synthesizing early intracellular viral proteins that suppressed DC signaling pathways.

  1. Comparison of host cell gene expression in cowpox, monkeypox or vaccinia virus-infected cells reveals virus-specific regulation of immune response genes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Animal-borne orthopoxviruses, like monkeypox, vaccinia and the closely related cowpox virus, are all capable of causing zoonotic infections in humans, representing a potential threat to human health. The disease caused by each virus differs in terms of symptoms and severity, but little is yet know about the reasons for these varying phenotypes. They may be explained by the unique repertoire of immune and host cell modulating factors encoded by each virus. In this study, we analysed the specific modulation of the host cell’s gene expression profile by cowpox, monkeypox and vaccinia virus infection. We aimed to identify mechanisms that are either common to orthopoxvirus infection or specific to certain orthopoxvirus species, allowing a more detailed description of differences in virus-host cell interactions between individual orthopoxviruses. To this end, we analysed changes in host cell gene expression of HeLa cells in response to infection with cowpox, monkeypox and vaccinia virus, using whole-genome gene expression microarrays, and compared these to each other and to non-infected cells. Results Despite a dominating non-responsiveness of cellular transcription towards orthopoxvirus infection, we could identify several clusters of infection-modulated genes. These clusters are either commonly regulated by orthopoxvirus infection or are uniquely regulated by infection with a specific orthopoxvirus, with major differences being observed in immune response genes. Most noticeable was an induction of genes involved in leukocyte migration and activation in cowpox and monkeypox virus-infected cells, which was not observed following vaccinia virus infection. Conclusion Despite their close genetic relationship, the expression profiles induced by infection with different orthopoxviruses vary significantly. It may be speculated that these differences at the cellular level contribute to the individual characteristics of cowpox, monkeypox and vaccinia virus

  2. Clinical cowpox cases in Norway.

    PubMed

    Tryland, M; Myrmel, H; Holtet, L; Haukenes, G; Traavik, T

    1998-01-01

    In 1994, a human and a feline case of cowpox virus infection appeared in the western part of Norway. Cowpox has not been diagnosed with certainty in Norway since the beginning of this century, when it was associated with the use of cowpox virus as a vaccine against smallpox. The human infection manifested as a spontaneously emerged, severe ulceration at the medial angle of the right eye in a 37-y-old woman, and developed into a relatively severe dermatitis. The ulcer healed slowly, leaving a scar. The feline infection was represented by a febrile, dehydrated and anorectic 6-months-old non-pedigree short-hair, with crater-like ulcers all over the body. After antibiotic and fluid therapy, revision of the skin lesions and amputation of a gangrenous toe, the cat recovered. Electron microscopy of the isolates and cultivation of virus on chorioallantoic membrane of chicken embryos confirmed the suspicion of cowpox virus infection.

  3. Comparison of the Cowpox Virus and Vaccinia Virus Mature Virion Proteome: Analysis of the Species- and Strain-Specific Proteome

    PubMed Central

    Doellinger, Joerg; Schaade, Lars; Nitsche, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Cowpox virus (CPXV) causes most zoonotic orthopoxvirus (OPV) infections in Europe and Northern as well as Central Asia. The virus has the broadest host range of OPV and is transmitted to humans from rodents and other wild or domestic animals. Increasing numbers of human CPXV infections in a population with declining immunity have raised concerns about the virus’ zoonotic potential. While there have been reports on the proteome of other human-pathogenic OPV, namely vaccinia virus (VACV) and monkeypox virus (MPXV), the protein composition of the CPXV mature virion (MV) is unknown. This study focused on the comparative analysis of the VACV and CPXV MV proteome by label-free single-run proteomics using nano liquid chromatography and high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry (nLC-MS/MS). The presented data reveal that the common VACV and CPXV MV proteome contains most of the known conserved and essential OPV proteins and is associated with cellular proteins known to be essential for viral replication. While the species-specific proteome could be linked mainly to less genetically-conserved gene products, the strain-specific protein abundance was found to be of high variance in proteins associated with entry, host-virus interaction and protein processing. PMID:26556597

  4. Effects of abundance on infection in natural populations: field voles and cowpox virus.

    PubMed

    Begon, Michael; Telfer, Sandra; Burthe, Sarah; Lambin, Xavier; Smith, Matthew J; Paterson, Steve

    2009-03-01

    Detailed results on the dynamics of cowpox virus infection in four natural populations of the field vole, Microtus agrestis, are presented. Populations were sampled every 4 weeks (8 weeks in mid-winter) for 6 years. The purpose was to examine the relationships between overall or susceptible host abundance (N, S) and both the number of infected hosts (I) and the prevalence of infection (I/N). Overall, both I and I/N increased with N. However, evidence for a threshold abundance, below which infection was not found, was at best equivocal in spite of the wide range of abundances sampled. Cross-correlation analyses reflected annual and multi-annual cycles in N, I, S and I/N, but whereas N was most strongly correlated with contemporary values of I and I/N, in the case of S, the strongest correlations were with values 1 to 2 months preceding the values of I and I/N. There was no evidence for a 'juvenile dilution effect' (prevalence decreasing with abundance as new susceptibles flush into the population) and only weak evidence of a time-delayed effect of abundance on the number infected. We argue that these effects may occur only in systems with characteristics that are not found here. Transfer function analyses, which have been neglected in epidemiology, were applied. These models, with ln(S) as the input parameter, in spite of their simplicity, could be linked closely to conventional formulations of the transmission process and were highly effective in predicting the number infected. By contrast, transfer function models with ln(N) as the input parameter were less successful in predicting the number infected and/or were more complex and more difficult to interpret. Nonetheless, overall, we contend that while monitoring numbers susceptible has most to offer, monitoring overall abundance may provide valuable insights into the dynamics of infection.

  5. Cowpox Virus Outbreak in Banded Mongooses (Mungos mungo) and Jaguarundis (Herpailurus yagouaroundi) with a Time-Delayed Infection to Humans

    PubMed Central

    Kurth, Andreas; Straube, Martin; Kuczka, Annette; Dunsche, Anton Josef; Meyer, Hermann; Nitsche, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Background Often described as an extremely rare zoonosis, cowpox virus (CPXV) infections are on the increase in Germany. CPXV is rodent-borne with a broad host range and contains the largest and most complete genome of all poxviruses, including parts with high homology to variola virus (smallpox). So far, most CPXV cases have occurred individually in unvaccinated animals and humans and were caused by genetically distinguishable virus strains. Methodology/Principal Findings Generalized CPXV infections in banded mongooses (Mungos mungo) and jaguarundis (Herpailurus yagouaroundi) at a Zoological Garden were observed with a prevalence of the affected animal group of 100% and a mortality of 30%. A subsequent serological investigation of other exotic animal species provided evidence of subclinical cases before the onset of the outbreak. Moreover, a time-delayed human cowpox virus infection caused by the identical virus strain occurred in a different geographical area indicating that handling/feeding food rats might be the common source of infection. Conclusions/Significance Reports on the increased zoonotic transmission of orthopoxviruses have renewed interest in understanding interactions between these viruses and their hosts. The list of animals known to be susceptible to CPXV is still growing. Thus, the likely existence of unknown CPXV hosts and their distribution may present a risk for other exotic animals but also for the general public, as was shown in this outbreak. Animal breeders and suppliers of food rats represent potential multipliers and distributors of CPXV, in the context of increasingly pan-European trading. Taking the cessation of vaccination against smallpox into account, this situation contributes to the increased incidence of CPXV infections in man, particularly in younger age groups, with more complicated courses of clinical infections. PMID:19727399

  6. Cowpox in a human, Russia, 2015.

    PubMed

    Popova, A Y; Maksyutov, R A; Taranov, O S; Tregubchak, T V; Zaikovskaya, A V; Sergeev, A A; Vlashchenko, I V; Bodnev, S A; Ternovoi, V A; Alexandrova, N S; Tarasov, A L; Konovalova, N V; Koroleva, A A; Bulychev, L E; Pyankov, O V; Demina, Y V; Agafonov, A P; Shchelkunov, S N; Miheev, V N

    2017-03-01

    We investigated the first laboratory-confirmed human case of cowpox virus infection in Russia since 1991. Phylogenetic studies of haemagglutinin, TNF-α receptor-like protein and thymidine kinase regions showed significant differences with known orthopoxviruses, including unique amino-acid substitutions and deletions. The described cowpox virus strain, taking into account differences, is genetically closely related to strains isolated years ago in the same geographical region (European part of Russia and Finland), which suggests circulation of viral strains with common origin in wild rodents without spread over long distances and appearance in other parts of the world.

  7. Exposure of rhesus monkeys to cowpox virus Brighton Red by large-particle aerosol droplets results in an upper respiratory tract disease.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Reed F; Hammoud, Dima A; Perry, Donna L; Solomon, Jeffrey; Moore, Ian N; Lackemeyer, Matthew G; Bohannon, Jordan K; Sayre, Philip J; Minai, Mahnaz; Papaneri, Amy B; Hagen, Katie R; Janosko, Krisztina B; Jett, Catherine; Cooper, Kurt; Blaney, Joseph E; Jahrling, Peter B

    2016-08-01

    We previously demonstrated that small-particle (0.5-3.0 µm) aerosol infection of rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) with cowpox virus (CPXV)-Brighton Red (BR) results in fulminant respiratory tract disease characterized by severe lung parenchymal pathology but only limited systemic virus dissemination and limited classic epidermal pox-like lesion development (Johnson et al., 2015). Based on these results, and to further develop CPXV as an improved model of human smallpox, we evaluated a novel large-particle aerosol (7.0-9.0 µm) exposure of rhesus monkeys to CPXV-BR and monitored for respiratory tract disease by serial computed tomography (CT). As expected, the upper respiratory tract and large airways were the major sites of virus-induced pathology following large-particle aerosol exposure. Large-particle aerosol CPXV exposure of rhesus macaques resulted in severe upper airway and large airway pathology with limited systemic dissemination.

  8. A naturally occurring cowpox virus with an ectromelia virus A-type inclusion protein gene displays atypical A-type inclusions.

    PubMed

    Okeke, Malachy Ifeanyi; Hansen, Hilde; Traavik, Terje

    2012-01-01

    Human orthopoxvirus (OPV) infections in Europe are usually caused by cowpox virus (CPXV). The genetic heterogeneity of CPXVs may in part be due to recombination with other OPV species. We describe the characterization of an atypical CPXV (CPXV-No-H2) isolated from a human patient in Norway. CPXV-No-H2 was characterized on the basis of A-type inclusion (ATI) phenotype as well as the DNA region containing the p4c and atip open reading frames. CPXV-No-H2 produced atypical V(+/) ATI, in which virions are on the surface of ATI but not within the ATI matrix. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the atip gene of CPXV-No-H2 clustered closely with that of ectromelia virus (ECTV) with a bootstrap support of 100% whereas its p4c gene is diverged compared to homologues in other OPV species. By recombination analysis we identified a putative crossover event at nucleotide 147, downstream the start of the atip gene. Our results suggest that CPXV-No-H2 originated from a recombination between CPXV and ECTV. Our findings are relevant to the evolution of OPVs.

  9. Effects of Nasal or Pulmonary Delivered Treatments with an Adenovirus Vectored Interferon (mDEF201) on Respiratory and Systemic Infections in Mice Caused by Cowpox and Vaccinia Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Smee, Donald F.; Wong, Min-Hui; Hurst, Brett L.; Ennis, Jane; Turner, Jeffrey D.

    2013-01-01

    An adenovirus 5 vector encoding for mouse interferon alpha, subtype 5 (mDEF201) was evaluated for efficacy against lethal cowpox (Brighton strain) and vaccinia (WR strain) virus respiratory and systemic infections in mice. Two routes of mDEF201 administration were used, nasal sinus (5-µl) and pulmonary (50-µl), to compare differences in efficacy, since the preferred treatment of humans would be in a relatively small volume delivered intranasally. Lower respiratory infections (LRI), upper respiratory infections (URI), and systemic infections were induced by 50-µl intranasal, 10-µl intranasal, and 100-µl intraperitoneal virus challenges, respectively. mDEF201 treatments were given prophylactically either 24 h (short term) or 56d (long-term) prior to virus challenge. Single nasal sinus treatments of 106 and 107 PFU/mouse of mDEF201 protected all mice from vaccinia-induced LRI mortality (comparable to published studies with pulmonary delivered mDEF201). Systemic vaccinia infections responded significantly better to nasal sinus delivered mDEF201 than to pulmonary treatments. Cowpox LRI infections responded to 107 mDEF201 treatments, but a 106 dose was only weakly protective. Cowpox URI infections were equally treatable by nasal sinus and pulmonary delivered mDEF201 at 107 PFU/mouse. Dose-responsive prophylaxis with mDEF201, given one time only 56 d prior to initiating a vaccinia virus LRI infection, was 100% protective from 105 to 107 PFU/mouse. Improvements in lung hemorrhage score and lung weight were evident, as were decreases in liver, lung, and spleen virus titers. Thus, mDEF201 was able to treat different vaccinia and cowpox virus infections using both nasal sinus and pulmonary treatment regimens, supporting its development for humans. PMID:23874722

  10. A longitudinal study of an endemic disease in its wildlife reservoir: cowpox and wild rodents.

    PubMed Central

    Hazel, S. M.; Bennett, M.; Chantrey, J.; Bown, K.; Cavanagh, R.; Jones, T. R.; Baxby, D.; Begon, M.

    2000-01-01

    Cowpox is an orthopoxvirus infection endemic in European wild rodents, but with a wide host range including human beings. In this longitudinal study we examined cowpox in two wild rodent species, bank voles Clethrionomys glareolus and wood mice Apodemus sylvaticus, to investigate the dynamics of a virus in its wild reservoir host. Trapping was carried out at 4-weekly intervals over 3 years and each animal caught was uniquely identified, blood sampled and tested for antibodies to cowpox. Antibody prevalence was higher in bank voles than in wood mice and seroconversion varied seasonally, with peaks in autumn. Infection was most common in males of both species but no clear association with age was demonstrated. This study provides a model for studying other zoonotic infections that derive from wild mammals since other approaches, such as one-off samples, will fail to detect the variation in infection and thus, risk to human health, demonstrated here. PMID:10982080

  11. Human cowpox 1969-93: a review based on 54 cases.

    PubMed

    Baxby, D; Bennett, M; Getty, B

    1994-11-01

    This survey of the clinical and epidemiological features of human cowpox, a rare but relatively severe zoonotic infection, is based on 54 cases, many unpublished, which we have studied since 1969. Patients present with painful, haemorrhagic pustules or black eschars, usually on the hand or face, accompanied by oedema, erythema, lymphadenopathy, and systemic involvement. Severe, occasionally fatal, cases occur in eczematous and immunosuppressed individuals, although cowpox has not yet been reported in anyone infected with the human immunodeficiency virus. Variations in the clinical features are described, and the differential clinical diagnosis of cowpox, parapox, herpes virus, and anthrax infections is discussed. The role of the laboratory in diagnosis is described, and the value of electron microscopy in providing rapid confirmation is emphasized. Care in taking a detailed history will assist in the initial clinical diagnosis, and a history of contact with domestic cats, particularly during July-October, is important. The possible influence of smallpox vaccination on the incidence and severity is discussed and discounted.

  12. Structural Mechanism of ER Retrieval of MHC Class I by Cowpox

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, William H.; Wang, Xiaoli; Yokoyama, Wayne M.; Hansen, Ted H.; Fremont, Daved H.

    2012-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of viral immune evasion is the capacity to disrupt major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) antigen presentation to evade T-cell detection. Cowpox virus encoded protein CPXV203 blocks MHCI surface expression by exploiting the KDEL-receptor recycling pathway, and here we show that CPXV203 directly binds a wide array of fully assembled MHCI proteins, both classical and non-classical. Further, the stability of CPXV203/MHCI complexes is highly pH dependent, with dramatically increased affinities at the lower pH of the Golgi relative to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Crystallographic studies reveal that CPXV203 adopts a beta-sandwich fold similar to poxvirus chemokine binding proteins, and binds the same highly conserved MHCI determinants located under the peptide-binding platform that tapasin, CD8, and natural killer (NK)-receptors engage. Mutagenesis of the CPXV203/MHCI interface identified the importance of two CPXV203 His residues that confer low pH stabilization of the complex and are critical to ER retrieval of MHCI. These studies clarify mechanistically how CPXV203 coordinates with other cowpox proteins to thwart antigen presentation. PMID:23209377

  13. Cowpox infection causing a generalized eruption in a patient with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Blackford, S; Roberts, D L; Thomas, P D

    1993-11-01

    We report a patient with a history of atopic dermatitis who developed a generalized eruption due to cowpox infection. The infection was probably acquired from the patient's cat. This is the first report from Britain of cowpox causing Kaposi's varicelliform eruption in a patient with atopic dermatitis.

  14. Pre-symptomatic Prediction of Illness in Mice Inoculated with Cowpox

    SciTech Connect

    Kercher, J R; Colston, Jr., B W; Langlois, R G; Lyons, C R; Milanovich, F P

    2007-04-19

    We describe here research directed towards early (presyndromic) diagnosis of infection. By using a mouse model and a multi-component blood protein diagnostic tool we detected cowpox infection several days in advance of overt symptoms with high accuracy. We provide details of the experimental design and measurement technique and elaborate on the long-range implication of these results.

  15. Small particle aerosol inoculation of cowpox Brighton Red in rhesus monkeys results in a severe respiratory disease

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Reed F.; Hammoud, Dima A.; Lackemeyer, Matthew G.; Yellayi, Srikanth; Solomon, Jeffrey; Bohannon, Jordan K.; Janosko, Krisztina B.; Jett, Catherine; Cooper, Kurt; Blaney, Joseph E.; Jahrling, Peter B.

    2015-07-15

    Cowpox virus (CPXV) inoculation of nonhuman primates (NHPs) has been suggested as an alternate model for smallpox (Kramski et al., 2010, PLoS One, 5, e10412). Previously, we have demonstrated that intrabronchial inoculation of CPXV-Brighton Red (CPXV-BR) into cynomolgus monkeys resulted in a disease that shared many similarities to smallpox; however, severe respiratory tract disease was observed (Smith et al., 2011, J. Gen. Virol.). Here we describe the course of disease after small particle aerosol exposure of rhesus monkeys using computed tomography (CT) to monitor respiratory disease progression. Subjects developed a severe respiratory disease that was uniformly lethal at 5.7 log{sub 10} PFU of CPXV-BR. CT indicated changes in lung architecture that correlated with changes in peripheral blood monocytes and peripheral oxygen saturation. While the small particle aerosol inoculation route does not accurately mimic human smallpox, the data suggest that CT can be used as a tool to monitor real-time disease progression for evaluation of animal models for human diseases. - Highlights: • Small particle aerosol exposure of rhesus results in a severe respiratory disease. • CT findings correlated with peripheral oxygen saturation and monocyte increases. • Virus dissemination was limited and mainly confined to the respiratory tract. • CT provides insight into pathogenesis to aid development of animal models of disease.

  16. Variola virus-specific diagnostic assays: characterization, sensitivity, and specificity.

    PubMed

    Kondas, Ashley V; Olson, Victoria A; Li, Yu; Abel, Jason; Laker, Miriam; Rose, Laura; Wilkins, Kimberly; Turner, Jonathan; Kline, Richard; Damon, Inger K

    2015-04-01

    A public health response relies upon rapid and reliable confirmation of disease by diagnostic assays. Here, we detail the design and validation of two variola virus-specific real-time PCR assays, since previous assays cross-reacted with newly identified cowpox viruses. The assay specificity must continually be reassessed as other closely related viruses are identified.

  17. Small particle aerosol inoculation of cowpox Brighton Red in rhesus monkeys results in a severe respiratory disease

    PubMed Central

    Hammoud, Dima A.; Lackemeyer, Matthew G.; Yellayi, Srikanth; Solomon, Jeffrey; Bohannon, Jordan K.; Janosko, Krisztina B.; Jett, Catherine; Cooper, Kurt; Blaney, Joseph E.; Jahrling, Peter B.

    2015-01-01

    Cowpox virus (CPXV) inoculation of nonhuman primates (NHPs) has been suggested as an alternate model for smallpox (Kramski et al., 2010, PLoS One, 5, e10412). Previously, we have demonstrated that intrabronchial inoculation of CPXV-Brighton Red (CPXV-BR) into cynomolgus monkeys resulted in a disease that shared many similarities to smallpox; however, severe respiratory tract disease was observed (Smith et al., 2011, J. Gen. Virol). Here we describe the course of disease after small particle aerosol exposure of rhesus monkeys using computed tomography (CT) to monitor respiratory disease progression. Subjects developed a severe respiratory disease that was uniformly lethal at 5.7 log10 PFU of CPXV-BR. CT indicated changes in lung architecture that correlated with changes in peripheral blood monocytes and peripheral oxygen saturation. While the small particle aerosol inoculation route does not accurately mimic human smallpox, the data suggest that CT can be used as a tool to monitor real-time disease progression for evaluation of animal models for human diseases. PMID:25776759

  18. Rodents and risk in the Mekong Delta of Vietnam: seroprevalence of selected zoonotic viruses in rodents and humans.

    PubMed

    Van Cuong, Nguyen; Carrique-Mas, Juan; Vo Be, Hien; An, Nguyen Ngoc; Tue, Ngo Tri; Anh, Nguyet Lam; Anh, Pham Hong; Phuc, Nguyen The; Baker, Stephen; Voutilainen, Liina; Jääskeläinen, Anne; Huhtamo, Eili; Utriainen, Mira; Sironen, Tarja; Vaheri, Antti; Henttonen, Heikki; Vapalahti, Olli; Chaval, Yannick; Morand, Serge; Bryant, Juliet E

    2015-01-01

    In the Mekong Delta in southern Vietnam, rats are commonly traded in wet markets and sold live for food consumption. We investigated seroprevalence to selected groups of rodent-borne viruses among human populations with high levels of animal exposure and among co-located rodent populations. The indirect fluorescence antibody test (IFAT) was used to determine seropositivity to representative reference strains of hantaviruses (Dobrava virus [DOBV], Seoul virus [SEOV]), cowpox virus, arenaviruses (lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus [LCMV]), flaviviruses (tick-borne encephalitis virus [TBEV]), and rodent parechoviruses (Ljungan virus), using sera from 245 humans living in Dong Thap Province and 275 rodents representing the five common rodent species sold in wet markets and present in peridomestic and farm settings. Combined seropositivity to DOBV and SEOV among the rodents and humans was 6.9% (19/275) and 3.7% (9/245), respectively; 1.1% (3/275) and 4.5% (11/245) to cowpox virus; 5.4% (15/275) and 47.3% (116/245) for TBEV; and exposure to Ljungan virus was 18.8% (46/245) in humans, but 0% in rodents. Very little seroreactivity was observed to LCMV in either rodents (1/275, 0.4%) or humans (2/245, 0.8%). Molecular screening of rodent liver tissues using consensus primers for flaviviruses did not yield any amplicons, whereas molecular screening of rodent lung tissues for hantavirus yielded one hantavirus sequence (SEOV). In summary, these results indicate low to moderate levels of endemic hantavirus circulation, possible circulation of a flavivirus in rodent reservoirs, and the first available data on human exposures to parechoviruses in Vietnam. Although the current evidence suggests only limited exposure of humans to known rodent-borne diseases, further research is warranted to assess public health implications of the rodent trade.

  19. Synergistic drug combination effectively blocks Ebola virus infection.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; He, Shihua; Martínez-Romero, Carles; Kouznetsova, Jennifer; Tawa, Gregory; Xu, Miao; Shinn, Paul; Fisher, Ethan G; Long, Yan; Motabar, Omid; Yang, Shu; Sanderson, Philip E; Williamson, Peter R; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Qiu, Xiangguo; Zheng, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Although a group of FDA-approved drugs were previously identified with activity against Ebola virus (EBOV), most of them are not clinically useful because their human blood concentrations are not high enough to inhibit EBOV infection. We screened 795 unique three-drug combinations in an EBOV entry assay. Two sets of three-drug combinations, toremifene-mefloquine-posaconazole and toremifene-clarithromycin-posaconazole, were identified that effectively blocked EBOV entry and were further validated for inhibition of live EBOV infection. The individual drug concentrations in the combinations were reduced to clinically relevant levels. We identified mechanisms of action of these drugs: functional inhibitions of Niemann-Pick C1, acid sphingomyelinase, and lysosomal calcium release. Our findings identify the drug combinations with potential to treat EBOV infection.

  20. Smallpox virus resequencing GeneChips can also rapidly ascertain species status for some zoonotic non-variola orthopoxviruses.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, Irshad M; Sammons, Scott A; Wohlhueter, Robert M

    2008-04-01

    We recently developed a set of seven resequencing GeneChips for the rapid sequencing of Variola virus strains in the WHO Repository of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In this study, we attempted to hybridize these GeneChips with some known non-Variola orthopoxvirus isolates, including monkeypox, cowpox, and vaccinia viruses, for rapid detection.

  1. Positive Selection Drives Preferred Segment Combinations during Influenza Virus Reassortment

    PubMed Central

    Zeldovich, Konstantin B.; Liu, Ping; Renzette, Nicholas; Foll, Matthieu; Pham, Serena T.; Venev, Sergey V.; Gallagher, Glen R.; Bolon, Daniel N.; Kurt-Jones, Evelyn A.; Jensen, Jeffrey D.; Caffrey, Daniel R.; Schiffer, Celia A.; Kowalik, Timothy F.; Wang, Jennifer P.; Finberg, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) has a segmented genome that allows for the exchange of genome segments between different strains. This reassortment accelerates evolution by breaking linkage, helping IAV cross species barriers to potentially create highly virulent strains. Challenges associated with monitoring the process of reassortment in molecular detail have limited our understanding of its evolutionary implications. We applied a novel deep sequencing approach with quantitative analysis to assess the in vitro temporal evolution of genomic reassortment in IAV. The combination of H1N1 and H3N2 strains reproducibly generated a new H1N2 strain with the hemagglutinin and nucleoprotein segments originating from H1N1 and the remaining six segments from H3N2. By deep sequencing the entire viral genome, we monitored the evolution of reassortment, quantifying the relative abundance of all IAV genome segments from the two parent strains over time and measuring the selection coefficients of the reassorting segments. Additionally, we observed several mutations coemerging with reassortment that were not found during passaging of pure parental IAV strains. Our results demonstrate how reassortment of the segmented genome can accelerate viral evolution in IAV, potentially enabled by the emergence of a small number of individual mutations. PMID:25713211

  2. Evaluation of the Efficacy of Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA)/IMVAMUNE (registered trademark) Against Aerosolized Rabbitpox Virus in a Rabbit Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    rabbitpox virus in a rabbit model icole L. Garzaa, Josh M. Hatkina, Virginia Livingstona, Donald K. Nicholsb, aul J. Chaplind, Ariane Volkmannd, Diana...eywords: abbitpox virus a b s t r a c t Infection of rabbitswith aerosolized rabbitpox virus (RPXV) produces a disease similar tomonkeypox and smallpox...irus, amember of the genusOrthopoxvirus in the family Poxviridae. ther orthopoxviruses that can infect humans include monkeypox irus, cowpox virus , and

  3. STUDIES ON A LUNG TISSUE COMPONENT WHICH COMBINES WITH PNEUMONIA VIRUS OF MICE (PVM)

    PubMed Central

    Volkert, Mogens; Horsfall, Frank L.

    1947-01-01

    Evidence has been obtained which indicates that the lung tissues of mammalian species susceptible to infection with PVM contain a specific component which combines with the virus. The concentration of this tissue component appears to be directly proportional to the suceptibility of the species; in its absence infection with PVM cannot be established. The available evidence suggests that the presence of the virus-combining component in lung tissue may play a decisive ro1e in the initiation of infection with this pneumotropic virus. PMID:19871686

  4. Wheat Genotypes With Combined Resistance to Wheat Curl Mite, Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus, Wheat Mosaic Virus, and Triticum Mosaic Virus.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Wen-Po; Rojas, Lina Maria Aguirre; Khalaf, Luaay Kahtan; Zhang, Guorong; Fritz, Allan K; Whitfield, Anna E; Smith, C Michael

    2017-01-13

    The wheat curl mite, Aceria tosichella Keifer, (WCM) is a global pest of bread wheat that reduces yields significantly. In addition, WCM carries Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV, family Potyviridae, genus Tritimovirus), the most significant wheat virus in North America; High Plains wheat mosaic virus (HPWMoV, genus Emaravirus, formerly High plains virus); and Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV, family Potyviridae, genus Poacevirus). Viruses carried by WCM have reduced wheat yields throughout the U.S. Great Plains for >50 yr, with average yield losses of 2-3% and occasional yield losses of 7-10%. Acaricides are ineffective against WCM, and delayed planting of winter wheat is not feasible. Five wheat breeding lines containing Cmc4, a WCM resistance gene from Aegilops tauschii, and Wsm2, a WSMV resistance gene from wheat germplasm CO960293-2 were selected from the breeding process and assessed for phenotypic reaction to WCM feeding, population increase, and the degree of WSMV, HPWMoV, and TriMV infection. Experiments determined that all five lines are resistant to WCM biotype 1 feeding and population increase, and that two breeding lines contain resistance to WSMV, HPWMoV, and TriMV infection as well. These WCM-, WSMV-, HPWMoV-, and TriMV-resistant genotypes can be used improve management of wheat yield losses from WCM-virus complexes.

  5. Presentation of severe combined immunodeficiency with respiratory syncytial virus and pneumocystis co-infection.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Pinilla, Nerea; Allende-Martínez, Luis; Corral Sánchez, María Dolores; Arocena, Jaime de Inocencio; González-Granado, Luis Ignacio

    2015-04-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency can cause severe, life-threatening viral, bacterial and fungal infections at an early age. We report a case of a 4-month-old boy with co-infection by respiratory syncytial virus and Pneumocystis jiroveci infection that led to recognition of severe combined immunodeficiency.

  6. Specific detection of chikungunya virus using a RT-PCR/nested PCR combination.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, M; Linssen, B; Parke, M D; Kinney, R M

    2002-02-01

    Chikungunya (CHIK) virus is enzootic in many countries in Asia and throughout tropical Africa. In Asia the virus is transmitted from primates to humans almost exclusively by Aedes aegypti, while various aedine mosquito species are responsible for human infections in Africa. The clinical picture is characterized by a sudden onset of fever, rash and severe pain in the joints which may persist in a small proportion of cases. Although not listed as a haemorrhagic fever virus, illness caused by CHIK virus can be confused with diseases such as dengue or yellow fever, based on the similarity of the symptoms. Thus, laboratory confirmation of suspected cases is required to launch control measures during an epidemic. CHIK virus diagnosis based on virus isolation is very sensitive, yet requires at least a week in conjunction with virus identification using monovalent sera. We developed a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay which amplifies a 427-bp fragment of the E2 gene. Specificity was confirmed by testing representative strains of all known alphavirus species. To verify further the viral origin of the amplicon and to enhance sensitivity, a nested PCR was performed subsequently. This RT-PCR/nested PCR combination was able to amplify a CHIK virus-specific 172-bp amplicon from a sample containing as few as 10 genome equivalents. This assay was successfully applied to four CHIK virus isolates from Asia and Africa as well as to a vaccine strain developed by USAMRIID. Our method can be completed in less than two working days and may serve as a sensitive alternative in CHIK virus diagnosis.

  7. Characterization of an artificial swine-origin influenza virus with the same gene combination as H1N1/2009 virus: a genesis clue of pandemic strain.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xueli; Sun, Yipeng; Pu, Juan; Fan, Lihong; Shi, Weimin; Hu, Yanxin; Yang, Jun; Xu, Qi; Wang, Jingjing; Hou, Dongjun; Ma, Guangpeng; Liu, Jinhua

    2011-01-01

    Pandemic H1N1/2009 influenza virus, derived from a reassortment of avian, human, and swine influenza viruses, possesses a unique gene segment combination that had not been detected previously in animal and human populations. Whether such a gene combination could result in the pathogenicity and transmission as H1N1/2009 virus remains unclear. In the present study, we used reverse genetics to construct a reassortant virus (rH1N1) with the same gene combination as H1N1/2009 virus (NA and M genes from a Eurasian avian-like H1N1 swine virus and another six genes from a North American triple-reassortant H1N2 swine virus). Characterization of rH1N1 in mice showed that this virus had higher replicability and pathogenicity than those of the seasonal human H1N1 and Eurasian avian-like swine H1N1 viruses, but was similar to the H1N1/2009 and triple-reassortant H1N2 viruses. Experiments performed on guinea pigs showed that rH1N1 was not transmissible, whereas pandemic H1N1/2009 displayed efficient transmissibility. To further determine which gene segment played a key role in transmissibility, we constructed a series of reassortants derived from rH1N1 and H1N1/2009 viruses. Direct contact transmission studies demonstrated that the HA and NS genes contributed to the transmission of H1N1/2009 virus. Second, the HA gene of H1N1/2009 virus, when combined with the H1N1/2009 NA gene, conferred efficient contact transmission among guinea pigs. The present results reveal that not only gene segment reassortment but also amino acid mutation were needed for the generation of the pandemic influenza virus.

  8. EPIPOX: Immunoinformatic Characterization of the Shared T-Cell Epitome between Variola Virus and Related Pathogenic Orthopoxviruses.

    PubMed

    Molero-Abraham, Magdalena; Glutting, John-Paul; Flower, Darren R; Lafuente, Esther M; Reche, Pedro A

    2015-01-01

    Concerns that variola viruses might be used as bioweapons have renewed the interest in developing new and safer smallpox vaccines. Variola virus genomes are now widely available, allowing computational characterization of the entire T-cell epitome and the use of such information to develop safe and yet effective vaccines. To this end, we identified 124 proteins shared between various species of pathogenic orthopoxviruses including variola minor and major, monkeypox, cowpox, and vaccinia viruses, and we targeted them for T-cell epitope prediction. We recognized 8,106, and 8,483 unique class I and class II MHC-restricted T-cell epitopes that are shared by all mentioned orthopoxviruses. Subsequently, we developed an immunological resource, EPIPOX, upon the predicted T-cell epitome. EPIPOX is freely available online and it has been designed to facilitate reverse vaccinology. Thus, EPIPOX includes key epitope-focused protein annotations: time point expression, presence of leader and transmembrane signals, and known location on outer membrane structures of the infective viruses. These features can be used to select specific T-cell epitopes suitable for experimental validation restricted by single MHC alleles, as combinations thereof, or by MHC supertypes.

  9. EPIPOX: Immunoinformatic Characterization of the Shared T-Cell Epitome between Variola Virus and Related Pathogenic Orthopoxviruses

    PubMed Central

    Molero-Abraham, Magdalena; Glutting, John-Paul; Flower, Darren R.; Lafuente, Esther M.; Reche, Pedro A.

    2015-01-01

    Concerns that variola viruses might be used as bioweapons have renewed the interest in developing new and safer smallpox vaccines. Variola virus genomes are now widely available, allowing computational characterization of the entire T-cell epitome and the use of such information to develop safe and yet effective vaccines. To this end, we identified 124 proteins shared between various species of pathogenic orthopoxviruses including variola minor and major, monkeypox, cowpox, and vaccinia viruses, and we targeted them for T-cell epitope prediction. We recognized 8,106, and 8,483 unique class I and class II MHC-restricted T-cell epitopes that are shared by all mentioned orthopoxviruses. Subsequently, we developed an immunological resource, EPIPOX, upon the predicted T-cell epitome. EPIPOX is freely available online and it has been designed to facilitate reverse vaccinology. Thus, EPIPOX includes key epitope-focused protein annotations: time point expression, presence of leader and transmembrane signals, and known location on outer membrane structures of the infective viruses. These features can be used to select specific T-cell epitopes suitable for experimental validation restricted by single MHC alleles, as combinations thereof, or by MHC supertypes. PMID:26605344

  10. Quantifying antiviral activity optimizes drug combinations against hepatitis C virus infection

    SciTech Connect

    Koizumi, Yoshiki; Nakajim, Syo; Ohash, Hirofumi; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Wakita, Takaji; Perelson, Alan S.; Iwami, Shingo; Watashi, Koichi

    2016-03-21

    Cell culture study combing a mathematical model and computer simulation quantifies the anti-hepatitis C virus drug efficacy at any concentrations and any combinations in preclinical settings, and can obtain rich basic evidences for selecting optimal treatments prior to costly clinical trials.

  11. Combining mutualistic yeast and pathogenic virus - a novel method for control for codling moth control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies evaluated the lethal effectiveness of combining yeasts isolated from larvae of codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.) with the codling moth granulosis virus (CpGV). Apples were treated with CpGV and three yeast species, including Metschnikowia pulcherrima Pitt and Miller, Cryptococcus tephrensis...

  12. Combining abilities for agronomic traits and marker-assisted selection for Potato virus X and Potato virus Y resistance.

    PubMed

    Guedes, M L; Pinto, C A B P; Ribeiro, G H M R; Lyra, D H; Carneiro, O L G

    2016-09-16

    Disease-resistant potato cultivars with good tuber appearance and desirable agronomic traits are essential for meeting the demands of producers and the market. Attaining these cultivars is the focus of potato breeding programs whose aim is to benefit the productive chain. The purpose of this study was to estimate combining abilities and evaluate potato clones based on tuber appearance, yield, and resistance to the PVY and PVX viruses. Crosses between four commercial cultivars of potato with good tuber appearance were performed, using eight clones with proven resistance to PVY and PVX from the breeding program of UFLA. The clones obtained were evaluated for agronomic traits, tuber appearance, and the presence of both Ryadg and Rx1 alleles, which confer extreme resistance to the PVY and PVX viruses, respectively. The independent culling level method was used to select genotypes of commercial interest, as well as to estimate the combining abilities of the parents. We identified clones carrying the Ryadg and Rx1 alleles with agronomic traits suitable for the fresh market and for processing. The BRS Ana cultivar and CMA-399 and CMA-385 clones showed positive effects on general combining ability (GCA) for tuber yield, while the Monalisa cultivar showed positive effects on GCA for general tuber appearance.

  13. Combined DECS Analysis and Next-Generation Sequencing Enable Efficient Detection of Novel Plant RNA Viruses.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Hironobu; Tomita, Reiko; Katsu, Koji; Uehara, Takuya; Atsumi, Go; Tateda, Chika; Kobayashi, Kappei; Sekine, Ken-Taro

    2016-03-07

    The presence of high molecular weight double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) within plant cells is an indicator of infection with RNA viruses as these possess genomic or replicative dsRNA. DECS (dsRNA isolation, exhaustive amplification, cloning, and sequencing) analysis has been shown to be capable of detecting unknown viruses. We postulated that a combination of DECS analysis and next-generation sequencing (NGS) would improve detection efficiency and usability of the technique. Here, we describe a model case in which we efficiently detected the presumed genome sequence of Blueberry shoestring virus (BSSV), a member of the genus Sobemovirus, which has not so far been reported. dsRNAs were isolated from BSSV-infected blueberry plants using the dsRNA-binding protein, reverse-transcribed, amplified, and sequenced using NGS. A contig of 4,020 nucleotides (nt) that shared similarities with sequences from other Sobemovirus species was obtained as a candidate of the BSSV genomic sequence. Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR primer sets based on sequences from this contig enabled the detection of BSSV in all BSSV-infected plants tested but not in healthy controls. A recombinant protein encoded by the putative coat protein gene was bound by the BSSV-antibody, indicating that the candidate sequence was that of BSSV itself. Our results suggest that a combination of DECS analysis and NGS, designated here as "DECS-C," is a powerful method for detecting novel plant viruses.

  14. Response of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Cerebral Angiitis to the Combined Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cheron, Julian; Wyndham-Thomas, Chloé; Sadeghi, Niloufar; Naeije, Gilles

    2017-01-01

    When secondary causes are excluded, mechanisms underlying central nervous system angiitis (ACNS) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients are still not understood and optimal treatment remains undefined. We report here a patient with an untreated HIV infection who presented multiple ischemic strokes probably due to HIV-ACNS. ACNS signs on vessel-wall imaging magnetic resonance monitoring retracted with combined antiretroviral therapy without adjunct immunosuppressive drugs. PMID:28348548

  15. Novel Chemical Ligands to Ebola Virus and Marburg Virus Nucleoproteins Identified by Combining Affinity Mass Spectrometry and Metabolomics Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xu; Wang, Zhihua; Li, Lixin; Dong, Shishang; Li, Zhucui; Jiang, Zhenzuo; Wang, Yuefei; Shui, Wenqing

    2016-01-01

    The nucleoprotein (NP) of Ebola virus (EBOV) and Marburg virus (MARV) is an essential component of the viral ribonucleoprotein complex and significantly impacts replication and transcription of the viral RNA genome. Although NP is regarded as a promising antiviral druggable target, no chemical ligands have been reported to interact with EBOV NP or MARV NP. We identified two compounds from a traditional Chinese medicine Gancao (licorice root) that can bind both NPs by combining affinity mass spectrometry and metabolomics approaches. These two ligands, 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid and licochalcone A, were verified by defined compound mixture screens and further characterized with individual ligand binding assays. Accompanying biophysical analyses demonstrate that binding of 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid to EBOV NP significantly reduces protein thermal stability, induces formation of large NP oligomers, and disrupts the critical association of viral ssRNA with NP complexes whereas the compound showed no such activity on MARV NP. Our study has revealed the substantial potential of new analytical techniques in ligand discovery from natural herb resources. In addition, identification of a chemical ligand that influences the oligomeric state and RNA-binding function of EBOV NP sheds new light on antiviral drug development. PMID:27403722

  16. Rapid detection of airborne viruses by personal bioaerosol sampler combined with the PCR device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agranovski, I. E.; Safatov, A. S.; Sergeev, A. A.; Pyankov, O. V.; Petrishchenko, V. A.; Mikheev, M. V.; Sergeev, A. N.

    A new personal sampler had been previously developed and verified for monitoring of viable airborne viruses. The aims of this project were to investigate a possibility of the utilization of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method to speed up the time consuming analytical procedures and to evaluate a lower detection limit of the combined (sampler-PCR) device. Tenfold serial dilutions of the initial suspension of the Vaccinia virus were aerosolized in the chamber and airborne viruses were monitored by two simultaneously operating samplers. The results of monitoring were successfully obtained by a standard plaque assay (live microbes) and by the PCR method (total DNA). The corresponding calculations to identify the minimal detectable concentration in the ambient air were then performed. It was found that the minimal detectable concentration of airborne viruses in the ambient air depends on the sampling time. As demonstrated, such concentration should be at least 125×10 3 PFU m -3 for a sampling time of as short as 1 min. The detectable concentration decreases with the increase of the sampling time and reaches 25×10 3 and 10×10 3 PFU m -3 for 5 and 12.5 min of sampling respectively.

  17. Severe cutaneous human papilloma virus infection associated with Natural Killer cell deficiency following stem cell transplantation for severe combined immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kamili, Qurat-ul-Ain; Seeborg, Filiz O; Saxena, Kapil; Nicholas, Sarah K; Banerjee, Pinaki P; Angelo, Laura S; Mace, Emily M; Forbes, Lisa R; Martinez, Caridad; Wright, Teresa S; Orange, Jordan S.; Hanson, Imelda Celine

    2016-01-01

    Capsule Summary The authors identify Natural Killer cell deficiency in post-transplant severe combined immunodeficiency patients who developed severe human papilloma virus infections as a long term complication. PMID:25159470

  18. Combined effects of atrazine and chlorpyrifos on susceptibility of the tiger salamander to Ambystoma tigrinum virus.

    PubMed

    Kerby, Jacob L; Storfer, Andrew

    2009-03-01

    Several hypotheses have been examined as potential causes of global amphibian declines, including emerging infectious diseases and environmental contaminants. Although these factors are typically studied separately, animals are generally exposed to both stressors simultaneously. We examined the effects of the herbicide atrazine and the insecticide chlorpyrifos on the susceptibility of tiger salamander larvae, Ambystoma tigrinum, to a viral pathogen, Ambystoma tigrinum virus (ATV). Environmentally relevant concentrations of atrazine (0, 20, 200 microg/L) and chlorpyrifos (0, 2, 20, 200 microg/L) were used along with ATV in a fully factorial experimental design whereby individually housed, 4-week-old larvae were exposed for 2 weeks. Atrazine alone was not lethal to larvae, and chlorpyrifos alone was lethal only at the highest concentration. When combined with ATV, chlorpyrifos increased susceptibility to viral infection and resulted in increased larval mortality. A significant interactive effect between atrazine and ATV was detected. Atrazine treatments slightly decreased survival in virus-exposed treatments, yet slightly increased survival in the virus-free treatments. These findings corroborate earlier research on the impacts of atrazine, in particular, on disease susceptibility, but exhibit greater effects (i.e., reduced survival) when younger larvae were examined. This study is the first of its kind to demonstrate decreases in amphibian survival with the combination of pesticide and a viral disease. Further examination of these multiple stressors can provide key insights into potential significance of environmental cofactors, such as pesticides, in disease dynamics.

  19. Combined thermotherapy and cryotherapy for efficient virus eradication: relation of virus distribution, subcellular changes, cell survival and viral RNA degradation in shoot tips.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiaochun; Cuellar, Wilmer J; Rajamäki, Minna-Liisa; Hirata, Yukimasa; Valkonen, Jari P T

    2008-03-01

    Accumulation of viruses in vegetatively propagated plants causes heavy yield losses. Therefore, supply of virus-free planting materials is pivotal to sustainable crop production. In previous studies, Raspberry bushy dwarf virus (RBDV) was difficult to eradicate from raspberry (Rubus idaeus) using the conventional means of meristem tip culture. As shown in the present study, it was probably because this pollen-transmitted virus efficiently invades leaf primordia and all meristematic tissues except the least differentiated cells of the apical dome. Subjecting plants to thermotherapy prior to meristem tip culture heavily reduced viral RNA2, RNA3 and the coat protein in the shoot tips, but no virus-free plants were obtained. Therefore, a novel method including thermotherapy followed by cryotherapy was developed for efficient virus eradication. Heat treatment caused subcellular alterations such as enlargement of vacuoles in the more developed, virus-infected cells, which were largely eliminated following subsequent cryotherapy. Using this protocol, 20-36% of the treated shoot tips survived, 30-40% regenerated and up to 35% of the regenerated plants were virus-free, as tested by ELISA and reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification. Novel cellular and molecular insights into RBDV-host interactions and the factors influencing virus eradication were obtained, including invasion of shoot tips and meristematic tissues by RBDV, enhanced viral RNA degradation and increased sensitivity to freezing caused by thermotherapy, and subcellular changes and subsequent death of cells caused by cryotherapy. This novel procedure should be helpful with many virus-host combinations in which virus eradication by conventional means has proven difficult.

  20. Active vaccination with vaccinia virus A33 protects mice against lethal vaccinia and ectromelia viruses but not against cowpoxvirus; elucidation of the specific adaptive immune response.

    PubMed

    Paran, Nir; Lustig, Shlomo; Zvi, Anat; Erez, Noam; Israely, Tomer; Melamed, Sharon; Politi, Boaz; Ben-Nathan, David; Schneider, Paula; Lachmi, Batel; Israeli, Ofir; Stein, Dana; Levin, Reuven; Olshevsky, Udy

    2013-07-10

    Vaccinia virus protein A33 (A33VACV) plays an important role in protection against orthopoxviruses, and hence is included in experimental multi-subunit smallpox vaccines. In this study we show that single-dose vaccination with recombinant Sindbis virus expressing A33VACV, is sufficient to protect mice against lethal challenge with vaccinia virus WR (VACV-WR) and ectromelia virus (ECTV) but not against cowpox virus (CPXV), a closely related orthopoxvirus. Moreover, a subunit vaccine based on the cowpox virus A33 ortholog (A33CPXV) failed to protect against cowpox and only partially protected mice against VACV-WR challenge. We mapped regions of sequence variation between A33VACV and A33CPXVand analyzed the role of such variations in protection. We identified a single protective region located between residues 104-120 that harbors a putative H-2Kd T cell epitope as well as a B cell epitope - a target for the neutralizing antibody MAb-1G10 that blocks spreading of extracellular virions. Both epitopes in A33CPXV are mutated and predicted to be non-functional. Whereas vaccination with A33VACV did not induce in-vivo CTL activity to the predicted epitope, inhibition of virus spread in-vitro, and protection from lethal VACV challenge pointed to the B cell epitope highlighting the critical role of residue L118 and of adjacent compensatory residues in protection. This epitope's critical role in protection, as well as its modifications within the orthopoxvirus genus should be taken in context with the failure of A33 to protect against CPXV as demonstrated here. These findings should be considered when developing new subunit vaccines and monoclonal antibody based therapeutics against orthopoxviruses, especially variola virus, the etiologic agent of smallpox.

  1. Efficacy of combined porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae vaccination in piglets.

    PubMed

    Drexler, C S; Witvliet, M H; Raes, M; van de Laar, M; Eggen, A A S; Thacker, E L

    2010-01-16

    Three vaccination challenge studies were performed to evaluate the impact on vaccine efficacy of combining porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae vaccines. Piglets were vaccinated with either a M hyopneumoniae bacterin, a modified live PRRSV vaccine based on a European-type PRRSV strain, or a combination of both vaccines, followed by experimental infection with either M hyopneumoniae or PRRSV. Vaccine efficacy was evaluated by assessing lung lesion scores for M hyopneumoniae and measuring viraemia for PRRSV. There were no significant differences between the protective efficacy of the combined vaccine protocol and the protective efficacy of the two single vaccines, indicating that PRRSV vaccination did not interfere with M hyopneumoniae vaccine efficacy and vice versa.

  2. Combining mutualistic yeast and pathogenic virus--a novel method for codling moth control.

    PubMed

    Knight, Alan L; Witzgall, Peter

    2013-07-01

    The combination of a pathogenic virus and mutualistic yeasts isolated from larvae of codling moth Cydia pomonella is proposed as a novel insect control technique. Apples were treated with codling moth granulovirus (CpGV) and either one of three yeasts, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Cryptococcus tephrensis, or Aureobasidium pullulans. The combination of yeasts with CpGV significantly increased mortality of neonate codling moth larvae, compared with CpGV alone. The three yeasts were equally efficient in enhancing the activity of CpGV. The addition of brown cane sugar to yeast further increased larval mortality and the protection of fruit against larvae. In comparison, without yeast, the addition of sugar to CpGV did not produce a significant effect. A field trial confirmed that fruit injury and larval survival were significantly reduced when apple trees were sprayed with CpGV, M. pulcherrima, and sugar. We have shown earlier that mutualistic yeasts are an essential part of codling moth larval diet. The finding that yeast also enhances larval ingestion of an insect-pathogenic virus is an opportunity for the development of a novel plant protection technique. We expect the combination of yeasts and insect pathogens to essentially contribute to future insect management.

  3. Role of ledipasvir/sofosbuvir combination for genotype 1 hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Sundaram, Vinay; Kowdley, Kris V

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is one of the most common etiologies of liver-related mortality throughout the world. Among the six HCV genotypes, genotype 1 was significantly more aggressive when utilizing the combination of pegylated interferon and ribavirin, as genotype 1-infected patients had the lowest likelihood of achieving cure (40%–50%) and required twice as long duration of treatment, as compared to genotypes 2 and 3. Recently, however, significant advances have been made with the advent of all-oral direct-acting antiviral agents, which have significantly improved the safety, efficacy, and tolerability of the treatment of HCV genotype 1. Among the available treatments for HCV genotype 1, the combination therapy of ledipasvir/sofosbuvir provides several advantages compared to other regimens, including use of a single-pill regimen, possibility to shorten the duration of treatment to 8 weeks, efficacy in patients exposed to protease inhibitors, safety in decompensated cirrhosis, and potential to avoid ribavirin. In this review, we discuss the pharmacotherapy of the combination of ledipasvir/sofosbuvir therapy and summarize the results of the Phase III clinical trials for this treatment in HCV genotype 1 patients. We will also discuss the data for special populations, including decompensated cirrhosis, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfected patients, African-Americans, the elderly, and those who failed sofosbuvir-containing regimens. PMID:27418860

  4. Immunogenicity of Combination DNA Vaccines for Rift Valley Fever Virus, Tick-Borne Encephalitis Virus, Hantaan Virus, and Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-22

    genus of the family Bunyaviridae and is one of four hantaviruses known to cause hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS). HFRS caused by HTNV...infection is found exclusively in Asia, with most cases occurring in China (reviewed in [2]). Hantaviruses are transmitted to humans by exposure to...before in our studies of antavirus DNA vaccines. We showed that although DNA accines for two hantaviruses , HTNV and Seoul virus, are ighly immunogenic

  5. Viral fusion efficacy of specific H3N2 influenza virus reassortant combinations at single-particle level

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Hung-Lun; Millet, Jean K.; Costello, Deirdre A.; Whittaker, Gary R.; Daniel, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Virus pseudotyping is a useful and safe technique for studying entry of emerging strains of influenza virus. However, few studies have compared different reassortant combinations in pseudoparticle systems, or compared entry kinetics of native viruses and their pseudotyped analogs. Here, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-based pseudovirions displaying distinct influenza virus envelope proteins were tested for fusion activity. We produced VSV pseudotypes containing the prototypical X-31 (H3) HA, either alone or with strain-matched or mismatched N2 NAs. We performed single-particle fusion assays using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy to compare hemifusion kinetics among these pairings. Results illustrate that matching pseudoparticles behaved very similarly to native virus. Pseudoparticles harboring mismatched HA-NA pairings fuse at significantly slower rates than native virus, and NA-lacking pseudoparticles exhibiting the slowest fusion rates. Relative viral membrane HA density of matching pseudoparticles was higher than in mismatching or NA-lacking pseudoparticles. An equivalent trend of HA expression level on cell membranes of HA/NA co-transfected cells was observed and intracellular trafficking of HA was affected by NA co-expression. Overall, we show that specific influenza HA-NA combinations can profoundly affect the critical role played by HA during entry, which may factor into viral fitness and the emergence of new pandemic influenza viruses. PMID:27752100

  6. Viral fusion efficacy of specific H3N2 influenza virus reassortant combinations at single-particle level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hung-Lun; Millet, Jean K.; Costello, Deirdre A.; Whittaker, Gary R.; Daniel, Susan

    2016-10-01

    Virus pseudotyping is a useful and safe technique for studying entry of emerging strains of influenza virus. However, few studies have compared different reassortant combinations in pseudoparticle systems, or compared entry kinetics of native viruses and their pseudotyped analogs. Here, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-based pseudovirions displaying distinct influenza virus envelope proteins were tested for fusion activity. We produced VSV pseudotypes containing the prototypical X-31 (H3) HA, either alone or with strain-matched or mismatched N2 NAs. We performed single-particle fusion assays using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy to compare hemifusion kinetics among these pairings. Results illustrate that matching pseudoparticles behaved very similarly to native virus. Pseudoparticles harboring mismatched HA-NA pairings fuse at significantly slower rates than native virus, and NA-lacking pseudoparticles exhibiting the slowest fusion rates. Relative viral membrane HA density of matching pseudoparticles was higher than in mismatching or NA-lacking pseudoparticles. An equivalent trend of HA expression level on cell membranes of HA/NA co-transfected cells was observed and intracellular trafficking of HA was affected by NA co-expression. Overall, we show that specific influenza HA-NA combinations can profoundly affect the critical role played by HA during entry, which may factor into viral fitness and the emergence of new pandemic influenza viruses.

  7. Ectromelia virus encodes a novel family of F-box proteins that interact with the SCF complex.

    PubMed

    van Buuren, Nick; Couturier, Brianne; Xiong, Yue; Barry, Michele

    2008-10-01

    Poxviruses are notorious for encoding multiple proteins that regulate cellular signaling pathways, including the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Bioinformatics indicated that ectromelia virus, the causative agent of lethal mousepox, encoded four proteins, EVM002, EVM005, EVM154, and EVM165, containing putative F-box domains. In contrast to cellular F-box proteins, the ectromelia virus proteins contain C-terminal F-box domains in conjunction with N-terminal ankyrin repeats, a combination that has not been previously reported for cellular proteins. These observations suggested that the ectromelia virus F-box proteins interact with SCF (Skp1, cullin-1, and F-box) ubiquitin ligases. We focused our studies on EVM005, since this protein had only one ortholog in cowpox virus. Using mass spectrometry, we identified cullin-1 as a binding partner for EVM005, and this interaction was confirmed by overexpression of hemagglutinin (HA)-cullin-1. During infection, Flag-EVM005 and HA-cullin-1 colocalized to distinct cellular bodies. Significantly, EVM005 coprecipitated with endogenous Skp1, cullin-1, and Roc1 and associated with conjugated ubiquitin, suggesting that EVM005 interacted with the components of a functional ubiquitin ligase. Interaction of EVM005 with cullin-1 and Skp1 was abolished upon deletion of the F-box, indicating that the F-box played a crucial role in interaction with the SCF complex. Additionally, EVM002 and EVM154 interacted with Skp1 and conjugated ubiquitin, suggesting that ectromelia virus encodes multiple F-box-containing proteins that regulate the SCF complex. Our results indicate that ectromelia virus has evolved multiple proteins that interact with the SCF complex.

  8. Effects of rainfall events on the occurrence and detection efficiency of viruses in river water impacted by combined sewer overflows.

    PubMed

    Hata, Akihiko; Katayama, Hiroyuki; Kojima, Keisuke; Sano, Shoichi; Kasuga, Ikuro; Kitajima, Masaaki; Furumai, Hiroaki

    2014-01-15

    Rainfall events can introduce large amount of microbial contaminants including human enteric viruses into surface water by intermittent discharges from combined sewer overflows (CSOs). The present study aimed to investigate the effect of rainfall events on viral loads in surface waters impacted by CSO and the reliability of molecular methods for detection of enteric viruses. The reliability of virus detection in the samples was assessed by using process controls for virus concentration, nucleic acid extraction and reverse transcription (RT)-quantitative PCR (qPCR) steps, which allowed accurate estimation of virus detection efficiencies. Recovery efficiencies of poliovirus in river water samples collected during rainfall events (<10%) were lower than those during dry weather conditions (>10%). The log10-transformed virus concentration efficiency was negatively correlated with suspended solid concentration (r(2)=0.86) that increased significantly during rainfall events. Efficiencies of DNA extraction and qPCR steps determined with adenovirus type 5 and a primer sharing control, respectively, were lower in dry weather. However, no clear relationship was observed between organic water quality parameters and efficiencies of these two steps. Observed concentrations of indigenous enteric adenoviruses, GII-noroviruses, enteroviruses, and Aichi viruses increased during rainfall events even though the virus concentration efficiency was presumed to be lower than in dry weather. The present study highlights the importance of using appropriate process controls to evaluate accurately the concentration of water borne enteric viruses in natural waters impacted by wastewater discharge, stormwater, and CSOs.

  9. Combined effects of virus, pesticide, and predator cue on the larval tiger salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum).

    PubMed

    Kerby, Jacob L; Hart, Alison J; Storfer, Andrew

    2011-03-01

    Emerging diseases and environmental contamination are two of the leading hypotheses for global amphibian declines. Yet few studies have examined the influence of contaminants on disease susceptibility, and even fewer have incorporated the role of natural stressors such as predation. We performed a factorial study investigating the interaction of the insecticide carbaryl, dragonfly predator cue, and the emerging pathogen Ambystoma tigrinum virus (ATV) on fitness correlates and disease susceptibility in tiger salamander larvae. Four week old larvae were exposed for 22 days in a 2 (0, 500 μg/l carbaryl) × 2 (control, predator cue water) × 2 (0, 1 × 10(4) pfu ATV) factorial designed laboratory study. Results show significant impacts to survival of larvae for both virus and predator cue treatments, as well as an interactive effect between the two, in which predator cue strongly exacerbated disease-driven mortality. There was a clear pattern of reduced survival with the addition of stressors, with those where all three stressors were present exhibiting the worst effects (a decrease in survival from 93 to 60%). On those that survived, we also detected several sub-lethal impacts in mass, SVL, and development. Predator cue and pesticide treatments significantly reduced both SVL and mass. Virus and predator treatments significantly slowed development. Stressors also exhibited opposing effects on activity. Predator cue caused a significant reduction in activity, whereas virus caused a significant increase in activity over time. These results highlight the importance of examining combined natural and introduced stressors to understand potential impacts on amphibian species. Such stressors may contribute to the emergence of ATV in particular regions, raising concerns about the influence of pesticides on disease emergence in general.

  10. Co-administration of the broad-spectrum antiviral, brincidofovir (CMX001), with smallpox vaccine does not compromise vaccine protection in mice challenged with ectromelia virus.

    PubMed

    Parker, Scott; Crump, Ryan; Foster, Scott; Hartzler, Hollyce; Hembrador, Ed; Lanier, E Randall; Painter, George; Schriewer, Jill; Trost, Lawrence C; Buller, R Mark

    2014-11-01

    Natural orthopoxvirus outbreaks such as vaccinia, cowpox, cattlepox and buffalopox continue to cause morbidity in the human population. Monkeypox virus remains a significant agent of morbidity and mortality in Africa. Furthermore, monkeypox virus's broad host-range and expanding environs make it of particular concern as an emerging human pathogen. Monkeypox virus and variola virus (the etiological agent of smallpox) are both potential agents of bioterrorism. The first line response to orthopoxvirus disease is through vaccination with first-generation and second-generation vaccines, such as Dryvax and ACAM2000. Although these vaccines provide excellent protection, their widespread use is impeded by the high level of adverse events associated with vaccination using live, attenuated virus. It is possible that vaccines could be used in combination with antiviral drugs to reduce the incidence and severity of vaccine-associated adverse events, or as a preventive in individuals with uncertain exposure status or contraindication to vaccination. We have used the intranasal mousepox (ectromelia) model to evaluate the efficacy of vaccination with Dryvax or ACAM2000 in conjunction with treatment using the broad spectrum antiviral, brincidofovir (BCV, CMX001). We found that co-treatment with BCV reduced the severity of vaccination-associated lesion development. Although the immune response to vaccination was quantifiably attenuated, vaccination combined with BCV treatment did not alter the development of full protective immunity, even when administered two days following ectromelia challenge. Studies with a non-replicating vaccine, ACAM3000 (MVA), confirmed that BCV's mechanism of attenuating the immune response following vaccination with live virus was, as expected, by limiting viral replication and not through inhibition of the immune system. These studies suggest that, in the setting of post-exposure prophylaxis, co-administration of BCV with vaccination should be considered

  11. Treatment strategies for combining immunostimulatory oncolytic virus therapeutics with dendritic cell injections.

    PubMed

    Wares, Joanna R; Crivelli, Joseph J; Yun, Chae-Ok; Choi, Il-Kyu; Gevertz, Jana L; Kim, Peter S

    2015-12-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OVs) are used to treat cancer, as they selectively replicate inside of and lyse tumor cells. The efficacy of this process is limited and new OVs are being designed to mediate tumor cell release of cytokines and co-stimulatory molecules, which attract cytotoxic T cells to target tumor cells, thus increasing the tumor-killing effects of OVs. To further promote treatment efficacy, OVs can be combined with other treatments, such as was done by Huang et al., who showed that combining OV injections with dendritic cell (DC) injections was a more effective treatment than either treatment alone. To further investigate this combination, we built a mathematical model consisting of a system of ordinary differential equations and fit the model to the hierarchical data provided from Huang et al. We used the model to determine the effect of varying doses of OV and DC injections and to test alternative treatment strategies. We found that the DC dose given in Huang et al. was near a bifurcation point and that a slightly larger dose could cause complete eradication of the tumor. Further, the model results suggest that it is more effective to treat a tumor with immunostimulatory oncolytic viruses first and then follow-up with a sequence of DCs than to alternate OV and DC injections. This protocol, which was not considered in the experiments of Huang et al., allows the infection to initially thrive before the immune response is enhanced. Taken together, our work shows how the ordering, temporal spacing, and dosage of OV and DC can be chosen to maximize efficacy and to potentially eliminate tumors altogether.

  12. Evaluation of the efficacy and duration of immunity of a canine combination vaccine against virulent parvovirus, infectious canine hepatitis virus, and distemper virus experimental challenges.

    PubMed

    Abdelmagid, Omar Y; Larson, Laurie; Payne, Laurie; Tubbs, Anna; Wasmoen, Terri; Schultz, Ronald

    2004-01-01

    The results of this study confirmed that dogs vaccinated subcutaneously with a commercially available multivalent vaccine containing modified-live canine distemper virus, canine adenovirus type 2, canine parvovirus type 2b, and canine parainfluenza virus antigens were protected against sequential experimental challenge 55 to 57 months after initial vaccination given at 7 to 8 weeks of age. All 10 vaccinates were protected against clinical diseases and mortality following parvovirus and infectious canine hepatitis experimental infections. All vaccinates were protected against mortality and 90% against clinical disease following distemper challenge. These data support at least a 4-year duration of immunity for these three "core" fractions in the combination vaccine.

  13. Combination ledipasvir-sofosbuvir for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus infection: a review and clinical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Nkuize, Marcel; Sersté, Thomas; Buset, Michel; Mulkay, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C treatment has continued to evolve, and interferon-free, oral treatment with direct-acting antiviral agents is the current standard of care. Recently, a new treatment, which is a combination of two direct-acting antiviral agents, ledipasvir 90 mg (anti-NS5A) and sofosbuvir 400 mg (anti-NS5B), has been approved in the US and the European Union for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C viral infection. In Phase III trials among chronic hepatitis C virus genotype 1 monoinfected (treatment-naïve, treatment-experienced, and with advanced liver disease or posttransplant) patients and HIV–hepatitis C virus coinfected patients, the ledipasvir-sofosbuvir fixed-dose combination is associated with a higher rate of sustained virologic response at 12 weeks after therapy has ceased. According to preliminary data, the ledipasvir-sofosbuvir combination also may be effective against hepatitis C genotype 4 virus infection. The ledipasvir-sofosbuvir combination taken orally is generally well-tolerated. Moreover, the combination treatment may suppress the effect of predictive factors of chronic hepatitis C that have historically been known to be associated with treatment failure. Thus, the fixed-dose single-tablet combination of ledipasvir-sofosbuvir offers a new era for the effective treatment of a variety of patients suffering from chronic hepatitis C virus infection. PMID:27350749

  14. Clearance of BK Virus Nephropathy by Combination Antiviral Therapy With Intravenous Immunoglobulin

    PubMed Central

    Kable, Kathy; Davies, Carmen D.; O'connell, Philip J.; Chapman, Jeremy R.; Nankivell, Brian John

    2017-01-01

    Background Reactivation of BK polyoma virus causes a destructive virus allograft nephropathy (BKVAN) with graft loss in 46%. Treatment options are limited to reduced immunosuppression and largely ineffective antiviral agents. Some studies suggest benefit from intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). Methods We evaluated effectiveness of adjuvant IVIG to eliminate virus from blood and tissue, in a retrospective, single-center cohort study, against standard-of-care controls. Both groups underwent reduced immunosuppression; conversion of tacrolimus to cyclosporine; and mycophenolate to leflunomide, oral ciprofloxacin, and intravenous cidofovir. Results Biopsy-proven BKVAN occurred in 50 kidneys at 7 (median interquartile range, 3-12) months after transplantation, predominantly as histological stage B (92%), diagnosed following by dysfunction in 46%, screening viremia in 20%, and protocol biopsy in 34%. After treatment, mean viral loads fell from 1581 ± 4220 × 103 copies at diagnosis to 1434 ± 70 639 midtreatment, and 0.138 ± 0.331 after 3 months (P < 0.001). IVIG at 1.01 ± 0.18 g/kg was given to 22 (44%) patients. The IVIG group more effectively cleared viremia (hazard ratio, 3.68; 95% confidence interval, 1.56-8.68; P = 0.003) and BK immunohistochemistry from repeated tissue sampling (hazard ratio, 2.24; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-4.58; P = 0.028), and resulted in faster (11.3 ± 10.4 months vs 29.1 ± 31.8 months, P = 0.015) and more complete resolution of viremia (33.3% vs 77.3%, P = 0.044). Numerically, fewer graft losses occurred with IVIG (27.3% vs 53.6% for control, P = 0.06), although graft and patient survivals were not statistically different. Acute renal dysfunction requiring pulse corticosteroid was common (59.1% vs 78.6%, P = 0.09), respectively, after immunosuppression reduction. Conclusions Combination treatment incorporating adjuvant IVIG was more effective eliminating virus from BKVAN, compared with conventional therapy. Validation by multicenter

  15. Rational design and adaptive management of combination therapies for Hepatitis C virus infection

    SciTech Connect

    Ke, Ruian; Loverdo, Claude; Qi, Hangfei; Sun, Ren; Lloyd-Smith, James O.; Kouyos, Roger Dimitri

    2015-06-30

    Recent discoveries of direct acting antivirals against Hepatitis C virus (HCV) have raised hopes of effective treatment via combination therapies. Yet rapid evolution and high diversity of HCV populations, combined with the reality of suboptimal treatment adherence, make drug resistance a clinical and public health concern. We develop a general model incorporating viral dynamics and pharmacokinetics/ pharmacodynamics to assess how suboptimal adherence affects resistance development and clinical outcomes. We derive design principles and adaptive treatment strategies, identifying a high-risk period when missing doses is particularly risky for de novo resistance, and quantifying the number of additional doses needed to compensate when doses are missed. Using data from large-scale resistance assays, we demonstrate that the risk of resistance can be reduced substantially by applying these principles to a combination therapy of daclatasvir and asunaprevir. By providing a mechanistic framework to link patient characteristics to the risk of resistance, these findings show the potential of rational treatment design.

  16. Rational design and adaptive management of combination therapies for Hepatitis C virus infection

    DOE PAGES

    Ke, Ruian; Loverdo, Claude; Qi, Hangfei; ...

    2015-06-30

    Recent discoveries of direct acting antivirals against Hepatitis C virus (HCV) have raised hopes of effective treatment via combination therapies. Yet rapid evolution and high diversity of HCV populations, combined with the reality of suboptimal treatment adherence, make drug resistance a clinical and public health concern. We develop a general model incorporating viral dynamics and pharmacokinetics/ pharmacodynamics to assess how suboptimal adherence affects resistance development and clinical outcomes. We derive design principles and adaptive treatment strategies, identifying a high-risk period when missing doses is particularly risky for de novo resistance, and quantifying the number of additional doses needed to compensatemore » when doses are missed. Using data from large-scale resistance assays, we demonstrate that the risk of resistance can be reduced substantially by applying these principles to a combination therapy of daclatasvir and asunaprevir. By providing a mechanistic framework to link patient characteristics to the risk of resistance, these findings show the potential of rational treatment design.« less

  17. The synergism of nucleoside antibiotics combined with guanine 7-N-oxide against a rhabdovirus, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV).

    PubMed

    Hasobe, M; Saneyoshi, M; Isono, K

    1986-09-01

    Guanine 7-N-oxide was shown to have synergistic activity in combination with neplanocin A against a rhabdovirus, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), as reported previously. We examined further the antiviral activity of guanine 7-N-oxide in combination with other nucleoside antibiotics against IHNV. Synergism was seen between guanine 7-N-oxide and D-eritadenine or cordycepin. It is considered that compounds inhibiting RNA methylation show synergism with guanine 7-N-oxide.

  18. Slow CD4+ T-Cell Recovery in Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Hepatitis B Virus-Coinfected Patients Initiating Truvada-Based Combination Antiretroviral Therapy in Botswana

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Motswedi; Gaseitsiwe, Simani; Moyo, Sikhulile; Thami, Kerapetse P.; Mohammed, Terence; Setlhare, Ditiro; Sebunya, Theresa K.; Powell, Eleanor A.; Makhema, Joseph; Blackard, Jason T.; Marlink, Richard; Essex, Max; Musonda, Rosemary M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection has emerged as an important cause of morbidity and mortality. We determined the response to Truvada-based first-line combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in HIV/HBV-coinfected verus HIV-monoinfected patients in Botswana. Methods. Hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg), HBV e antigen (HBeAg), and HBV deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) load were determined from baseline and follow-up visits in a longitudinal cART cohort of Truvada-based regimen. We assessed predictors of HBV serostatus and viral suppression (undetectable HBV DNA) using logistic regression techniques. Results. Of 300 participants, 28 were HBsAg positive, giving an HIV/HBV prevalence of 9.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 6.3–13.2), and 5 of these, 17.9% (95% CI, 6.1–36.9), were HBeAg positive. There was a reduced CD4+ T-cell gain in HIV/HBV-coinfected compared with HIV-monoinfected patients. Hepatitis B virus surface antigen and HBeAg loss was 38% and 60%, respectively, at 24 months post-cART initiation. The HBV DNA suppression rates increased with time on cART from 54% to 75% in 6 and 24 months, respectively. Conclusions. Human immunodeficiency virus/HBV coinfection negatively affected immunologic recovery compared with HIV-1C monoinfection. Hepatitis B virus screening before cART initiation could help improve HBV/HIV treatment outcomes and help determine treatment options when there is a need to switch regimens. PMID:27800524

  19. Combined PCR-heteroduplex mobility assay for detection and differentiation of influenza A viruses from different animal species.

    PubMed

    Ellis, J S; Zambon, M C

    2001-11-01

    Transfer of influenza A viruses from animal hosts to man may lead to the emergence of new human pandemic strains. The early detection and identification of such events are therefore paramount in the surveillance of influenza viruses. To detect and partially characterize influenza A viruses from different animal species, a combined reverse transcription (RT)-PCR heteroduplex mobility assay (HMA) was designed. This M gene RT-PCR was shown to be sensitive and specific for the detection of human, avian, and swine influenza A viruses. PCR amplicons from human, avian, and swine viruses of 15 different subtypes, with between 1.9 and 21.4% nucleotide divergence, were differentiated by HMA. Sequencing of the amplicons showed that the heteroduplex mobility patterns correlated with the sequence divergence between test and reference DNA. The application of the RT-PCR HMA method for rapid screening of samples was assessed with a reference panel of viruses of human, avian, and swine origin. The avian H9N2 virus A/HongKong/1073/99, which crossed the species barrier to humans, was screened against the reference panel. It was found to be most closely related to the avian A/Quail/HongKong/G1/97 H9N2 reference PCR product. Sequence analysis showed a nucleotide divergence of 1.1% between the A/Quail/HongKong/G1/97 and A/HongKong/1073/99 amplicons. From the results of our work, we consider the RT-PCR HMA method described to offer a rapid and sensitive means for screening for novel or unusual influenza viruses.

  20. Treating brain tumor–initiating cells using a combination of myxoma virus and rapamycin

    PubMed Central

    Zemp, Franz J.; Lun, Xueqing; McKenzie, Brienne A.; Zhou, Hongyuan; Maxwell, Lori; Sun, Beichen; Kelly, John J.P.; Stechishin, Owen; Luchman, Artee; Weiss, Samuel; Cairncross, J. Gregory; Hamilton, Mark G.; Rabinovich, Brian A.; Rahman, Masmudur M.; Mohamed, Mohamed R.; Smallwood, Sherin; Senger, Donna L.; Bell, John; McFadden, Grant; Forsyth, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Intratumoral heterogeneity in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) poses a significant barrier to therapy in certain subpopulation such as the tumor-initiating cell population, being shown to be refractory to conventional therapies. Oncolytic virotherapy has the potential to target multiple compartments within the tumor and thus circumvent some of the barriers facing conventional therapies. In this study, we investigate the oncolytic potential of myxoma virus (MYXV) alone and in combination with rapamycin in vitro and in vivo using human brain tumor–initiating cells (BTICs). Methods We cultured fresh GBM specimens as neurospheres and assayed their growth characteristics in vivo. We then tested the susceptibility of BTICs to MYXV infection with or without rapamycin in vitro and assessed viral biodistribution/survival in vivo in orthotopic xenografts. Results The cultured neurospheres were found to retain stem cell markers in vivo, and they closely resembled human infiltrative GBM. In this study we determined that (i) all patient-derived BTICs tested, including those resistant to temozolomide, were susceptible to MYXV replication and killing in vitro; (ii) MYXV replicated within BTICs in vivo, and intratumoral administration of MYXV significantly prolonged survival of BTIC-bearing mice; (iii) combination therapy with MYXV and rapamycin improved antitumor activity, even in mice bearing “advanced” BTIC tumors; (iv) MYXV treatment decreased expression of stem cell markers in vitro and in vivo. Conclusions Our study suggests that MYXV in combination with rapamycin infects and kills both the BTICs and the differentiated compartments of GBM and may be an effective treatment even in TMZ-resistant patients. PMID:23585629

  1. Combination treatment with hepatitis C virus protease and NS5A inhibitors is effective against recombinant genotype 1a, 2a, and 3a viruses.

    PubMed

    Gottwein, Judith M; Jensen, Sanne B; Li, Yi-Ping; Ghanem, Lubna; Scheel, Troels K H; Serre, Stéphanie B N; Mikkelsen, Lotte; Bukh, Jens

    2013-03-01

    With the development of directly acting antivirals, hepatitis C virus (HCV) therapy entered a new era. However, rapid selection of resistance mutations necessitates combination therapy. To study combination therapy in infectious culture systems, we aimed at developing HCV semi-full-length (semi-FL) recombinants relying only on the JFH1 NS3 helicase, NS5B, and the 3' untranslated region. With identified adaptive mutations, semi-FL recombinants of genotypes(isolates) 1a(TN) and 3a(S52) produced supernatant infectivity titers of ~4 log(10) focus-forming units/ml in Huh7.5 cells. Genotype 1a(TN) adaptive mutations allowed generation of 1a(H77) semi-FL virus. Concentration-response profiles revealed the higher efficacy of the NS3 protease inhibitor asunaprevir (BMS-650032) and the NS5A inhibitor daclatasvir (BMS-790052) against 1a(TN and H77) than 3a(S52) viruses. Asunaprevir had intermediate efficacy against previously developed 2a recombinants J6/JFH1 and J6cc. Daclatasvir had intermediate efficacy against J6/JFH1, while low sensitivity was confirmed against J6cc. Using a cross-titration scheme, infected cultures were treated until viral escape or on-treatment virologic suppression occurred. Compared to single-drug treatment, combination treatment with relatively low concentrations of asunaprevir and daclatasvir suppressed infection with all five recombinants. Escaped viruses primarily had substitutions at amino acids in the NS3 protease and NS5A domain I reported to be genotype 1 resistance mutations. Inhibitors showed synergism at drug concentrations reported in vivo. In summary, semi-FL HCV recombinants, including the most advanced reported genotype 3a infectious culture system, permitted genotype-specific analysis of combination treatment in the context of the complete viral life cycle. Despite differential sensitivity to lead compound NS3 protease and NS5A inhibitors, genotype 1a, 2a, and 3a viruses were suppressed by combination treatment with relatively low

  2. Liver damage and kinetics of hepatitis C virus and human immunodeficiency virus replication during the early phases of combination antiretroviral treatment.

    PubMed

    Puoti, M; Gargiulo, F; Quiros Roldan, E; Chiodera, A; Palvarini, L; Spinetti, A; Zaltron, S; Putzolu, V; Zanini, B; Favilli, F; Turano, A; Carosi, G

    2000-06-01

    In order to assess the relationship between human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) RNA, hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA, CD4, CD8, and liver enzymes during combination antiretroviral therapy, these parameters were measured in 12 HIV-HCV-coinfected patients (who were naive for antiretrovirals) on the day before and 3, 7, 14, 28, 56, and 84 days after initiating the following treatments: stavudine and lamivudine in all patients, indinavir in 6 patients, and nevirapine in 6 patients. HIV RNA declined rapidly, CD4 cells increased slowly, and CD8 cells and liver enzymes were stable. HCV RNA showed a transient significant increase at days 14 and 21 (7.33+/-0.16 [mean +/- SE] and 7.29+/-0.2 log copies/mL vs. 7+/-0.2 log copies/mL at baseline; P<.05). These changes were similar in both treatment groups. A 2-fold alanine aminotransferase increase was observed in 4 of 12 patients; 4 of 4 patients showed increased HCV RNA. The relationship between HCV RNA increase and HIV RNA decrease indicates virus-virus interference. An HCV RNA increase may cause significant liver damage only in a minority of patients.

  3. Companion Animals as a Source of Viruses for Human Beings and Food Production Animals.

    PubMed

    Reperant, L A; Brown, I H; Haenen, O L; de Jong, M D; Osterhaus, A D M E; Papa, A; Rimstad, E; Valarcher, J-F; Kuiken, T

    2016-07-01

    Companion animals comprise a wide variety of species, including dogs, cats, horses, ferrets, guinea pigs, reptiles, birds and ornamental fish, as well as food production animal species, such as domestic pigs, kept as companion animals. Despite their prominent place in human society, little is known about the role of companion animals as sources of viruses for people and food production animals. Therefore, we reviewed the literature for accounts of infections of companion animals by zoonotic viruses and viruses of food production animals, and prioritized these viruses in terms of human health and economic importance. In total, 138 virus species reportedly capable of infecting companion animals were of concern for human and food production animal health: 59 of these viruses were infectious for human beings, 135 were infectious for food production mammals and birds, and 22 were infectious for food production fishes. Viruses of highest concern for human health included hantaviruses, Tahyna virus, rabies virus, West Nile virus, tick-borne encephalitis virus, Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus, Aichi virus, European bat lyssavirus, hepatitis E virus, cowpox virus, G5 rotavirus, influenza A virus and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. Viruses of highest concern for food production mammals and birds included bluetongue virus, African swine fever virus, foot-and-mouth disease virus, lumpy skin disease virus, Rift Valley fever virus, porcine circovirus, classical swine fever virus, equine herpesvirus 9, peste des petits ruminants virus and equine infectious anaemia virus. Viruses of highest concern for food production fishes included cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (koi herpesvirus), viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus and infectious pancreatic necrosis virus. Of particular concern as sources of zoonotic or food production animal viruses were domestic carnivores, rodents and food production animals kept as companion animals. The current list of viruses provides an objective

  4. Gene Therapy Model of X-linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Using a Modified Foamy Virus Vector

    PubMed Central

    Horino, Satoshi; Uchiyama, Toru; So, Takanori; Nagashima, Hiroyuki; Sun, Shu-lan; Sato, Miki; Asao, Atsuko; Haji, Yoichi; Sasahara, Yoji; Candotti, Fabio; Tsuchiya, Shigeru; Kure, Shigeo; Sugamura, Kazuo; Ishii, Naoto

    2013-01-01

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) is an inherited genetic immunodeficiency associated with mutations in the common cytokine receptor γ chain (γc) gene, and characterized by a complete defect of T and natural killer (NK) cells. Gene therapy for SCID-X1 using conventional retroviral (RV) vectors carrying the γc gene results in the successful reconstitution of T cell immunity. However, the high incidence of vector-mediated T cell leukemia, caused by vector insertion near or within cancer-related genes has been a serious problem. In this study, we established a gene therapy model of mouse SCID-X1 using a modified foamy virus (FV) vector expressing human γc. Analysis of vector integration in a human T cell line demonstrated that the FV vector integration sites were significantly less likely to be located within or near transcriptional start sites than RV vector integration sites. To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy, bone marrow cells from γc-knockout (γc-KO) mice were infected with the FV vector and transplanted into γc-KO mice. Transplantation of the FV-treated cells resulted in the successful reconstitution of functionally active T and B cells. These data suggest that FV vectors can be effective and may be safer than conventional RV vectors for gene therapy for SCID-X1. PMID:23990961

  5. Combined Rod and Cone Transduction by Adeno-Associated Virus 2/8

    PubMed Central

    Manfredi, Anna; Marrocco, Elena; Puppo, Agostina; Cesi, Giulia; Sommella, Andrea; Della Corte, Michele; Rossi, Settimio; Giunti, Massimo; Craft, Cheryl M.; Bacci, Maria Laura; Simonelli, Francesca; Surace, Enrico M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Gene transfer to both cone and rod photoreceptors (PRs) is essential for gene therapy of inherited retinal degenerations that are caused by mutations in genes expressed in both PR types. Vectors based on the adeno-associated virus (AAV) efficiently transduce PRs of different species. However, these are predominantly rods and little is known about the ability of the AAV to transduce cones in combination with rods. Here we show that AAV2/8 transduces pig cones to levels that are similar to AAV2/9, and the outer nuclear layer (mainly rods) to levels that are on average higher, although not statistically significant, than both AAV2/5 and AAV2/9. We additionally found that the ubiquitous cytomegalovirus (CMV), but not the PR-specific GRK1 promoter, transduced pig cones efficiently, presumably because GRK1 is not expressed in pig cones as observed in mice and humans. Indeed, the GRK1 and CMV promoters transduce a similar percentage of murine cones with the CMV reaching the highest expression levels. Consistent with this, the AAV2/8 vectors with either the CMV or the GRK1 promoter restore cone function in a mouse model of Leber congenital amaurosis type 1 (LCA1), supporting the use of AAV2/8 for gene therapy of LCA1 as well as of other retinal diseases requiring gene transfer to both PR types. PMID:24067103

  6. Gene therapy model of X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency using a modified foamy virus vector.

    PubMed

    Horino, Satoshi; Uchiyama, Toru; So, Takanori; Nagashima, Hiroyuki; Sun, Shu-Lan; Sato, Miki; Asao, Atsuko; Haji, Yoichi; Sasahara, Yoji; Candotti, Fabio; Tsuchiya, Shigeru; Kure, Shigeo; Sugamura, Kazuo; Ishii, Naoto

    2013-01-01

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) is an inherited genetic immunodeficiency associated with mutations in the common cytokine receptor γ chain (γc) gene, and characterized by a complete defect of T and natural killer (NK) cells. Gene therapy for SCID-X1 using conventional retroviral (RV) vectors carrying the γc gene results in the successful reconstitution of T cell immunity. However, the high incidence of vector-mediated T cell leukemia, caused by vector insertion near or within cancer-related genes has been a serious problem. In this study, we established a gene therapy model of mouse SCID-X1 using a modified foamy virus (FV) vector expressing human γc. Analysis of vector integration in a human T cell line demonstrated that the FV vector integration sites were significantly less likely to be located within or near transcriptional start sites than RV vector integration sites. To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy, bone marrow cells from γc-knockout (γc-KO) mice were infected with the FV vector and transplanted into γc-KO mice. Transplantation of the FV-treated cells resulted in the successful reconstitution of functionally active T and B cells. These data suggest that FV vectors can be effective and may be safer than conventional RV vectors for gene therapy for SCID-X1.

  7. Impact of combined acute rejection on BK virus-associated nephropathy in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon Jung; Jeong, Jong Cheol; Koo, Tai Yeon; Kwon, Hyuk Yong; Han, Miyeun; Jeon, Hee Jung; Ahn, Curie; Yang, Jaeseok

    2013-12-01

    BK virus-associated nephropathy (BKVAN) is one of the major causes of allograft dysfunction in kidney transplant (KT) patients. We compared BKVAN combined with acute rejection (BKVAN/AR) with BKVAN alone in KT patients. We retrospectively analyzed biopsy-proven BKVAN in KT patients from 2000 to 2011 at Seoul National University Hospital. Among 414 biopsies from 951 patients, biopsy-proven BKVAN was found in 14 patients. Nine patients had BKVAN alone, while 5 patients had both BKVAN and acute cellular rejection. BKVAN in the BKVAN alone group was detected later than in BKVAN/AR group (21.77 vs 6.39 months after transplantation, P=0.03). Serum creatinine at diagnosis was similar (2.09 vs 2.00 mg/dL). Histological grade was more advanced in the BKVAN/AR group (P=0.034). Serum load of BKV, dose of immunosuppressants, and tacrolimus level showed a higher tendency in the BKVAN alone group; however it was not statistically significant. After anti-rejection therapy, immunosuppression was reduced in the BKVAN/AR group. Renal functional deterioration over 1 yr after BKVAN diagnosis was similar between the two groups (P=0.665). These findings suggest that the prognosis of BKVAN/AR after anti-rejection therapy followed by anti-BKV therapy might be similar to that of BKVAN alone after anti-BKV therapy.

  8. Baculovirus-expressed virus-like particle vaccine in combination with DNA encoding the fusion protein confers protection against respiratory syncytial virus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Seok; Kwon, Young-Man; Hwang, Hye Suk; Lee, Yu-Na; Ko, Eun-Ju; Yoo, Si-Eun; Kim, Min-Chul; Kim, Ki-Hye; Cho, Min-Kyoung; Lee, Young-Tae; Lee, You Ri; Quan, Fu-Shi; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major viral agent causing significant morbidity and mortality in young infants and the elderly. There is no licensed vaccine against RSV and it is a high priority to develop a safe RSV vaccine. We determined the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of combined virus-like particle and DNA vaccines presenting RSV glycoproteins (Fd.VLP) in comparison with formalin inactivated RSV (FI-RSV). Immunization of mice with Fd.VLP induced higher ratios of IgG2a/IgG1 antibody responses compared to those with FI-RSV. Upon live RSV challenge, Fd.VLP and FI-RSV vaccines were similarly effective in clearing lung viral loads. However, FI-RSV immunized mice showed a substantial weight loss and high levels of T helper type 2 (Th2) cytokines as well as extensive lung histopathology and eosinophil infiltration. In contrast, Fd.VLP immunized mice did not exhibit Th2 type cytokines locally and systemically, which might contribute to preventing vaccine-associated RSV lung disease. These results indicate that virus-like particles in combination with DNA vaccines represent a potential approach for developing a safe and effective RSV vaccine. PMID:25173478

  9. Baculovirus-expressed virus-like particle vaccine in combination with DNA encoding the fusion protein confers protection against respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Seok; Kwon, Young-Man; Hwang, Hye Suk; Lee, Yu-Na; Ko, Eun-Ju; Yoo, Si-Eun; Kim, Min-Chul; Kim, Ki-Hye; Cho, Min Kyoung; Lee, Young-Tae; Lee, You Ri; Quan, Fu-Shi; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2014-10-07

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major viral agent causing significant morbidity and mortality in young infants and the elderly. There is no licensed vaccine against RSV and it is a high priority to develop a safe RSV vaccine. We determined the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of combined virus-like particle and DNA vaccines presenting RSV glycoproteins (Fd.VLP) in comparison with formalin inactivated RSV (FI-RSV). Immunization of mice with Fd.VLP induced higher ratios of IgG2a/IgG1 antibody responses compared to those with FI-RSV. Upon live RSV challenge, Fd.VLP and FI-RSV vaccines were similarly effective in clearing lung viral loads. However, FI-RSV immunized mice showed a substantial weight loss and high levels of T helper type 2 (Th2) cytokines as well as extensive lung histopathology and eosinophil infiltration. In contrast, Fd.VLP immunized mice did not exhibit Th2 type cytokines locally and systemically, which might contribute to preventing vaccine-associated RSV lung disease. These results indicate that virus-like particles in combination with DNA vaccines represent a potential approach for developing a safe and effective RSV vaccine.

  10. Detection of hepatitis C virus RNA by a combined reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay.

    PubMed Central

    Young, K K; Resnick, R M; Myers, T W

    1993-01-01

    Amplification of RNA by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is normally a two-step process requiring separate enzymes and buffer conditions. We describe a combined reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) assay for hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA amplification in which a single enzyme and buffer condition are used. In this assay, both the RT and PCR steps are carried out with the thermoactive DNA polymerase of Thermus thermophilus. A transcription vector containing HCV sequences has also been constructed to generate quantifiable HCV RNA templates that can be used to optimize reaction conditions and to assess the efficiency of amplification. Amplification from < or = 100 copies of RNA was detected reproducibly by gel electrophoresis. The assay sensitivity was increased to 10 RNA copies by hybridization to a probe. The patterns of viremia in three individuals infected with HCV were examined by amplification of HCV RNA from plasma samples collected serially over a period of 1 year. These results were correlated with the times of seroconversion and the onset of rise in levels of alanine aminotransferase in serum. In all three subjects, HCV RNA was detected prior to seroconversion and the initial rise in levels of alanine aminotransferase in serum. Upon seroconversion, HCV RNA fell to a level below the detection limit of the assay. This pattern of transient viremia appears to be characteristic of acute, resolving HCV infections. The combined RT-PCR assay is a sensitive method which circumvents the problems associated with PCR amplification of RNA. Using this assay, we demonstrated that three donors infected by the same index case all have similar patterns of viremia. Images PMID:8385151

  11. Mitochondrial alternative oxidase is involved in both compatible and incompatible host-virus combinations in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Feng; Deng, Xing-Guang; Xu, Fei; Jian, Wei; Peng, Xing-Ji; Zhu, Tong; Xi, De-Hui; Lin, Hong-Hui

    2015-10-01

    The alternative oxidase (AOX) functions in the resistance to biotic stress. However, the mechanisms of AOX in the systemic antiviral defense response and N (a typical resistance gene)-mediated resistance to Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) are elusive. A chemical approach was undertaken to investigate the role of NbAOX in the systemic resistance to RNA viruses. Furthermore, we used a virus-induced gene-silencing (VIGS)-based genetics approach to investigate the function of AOX in the N-mediated resistance to TMV. The inoculation of virus significantly increased the NbAOX transcript and protein levels and the cyanide-resistant respiration in the upper un-inoculated leaves. Pretreatment with potassium cyanide greatly increased the plant's systemic resistance, whereas the application of salicylhydroxamic acid significantly compromised the plant's systemic resistance. Additionally, in NbAOX1a-silenced N-transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants, the inoculated leaf collapsed and the movement of TMV into the systemic tissue eventually led to the spreading of HR-PCD and the death of the whole plant. The hypersensitive response marker gene HIN1 was significantly increased in the NbAOX1a-silenced plants. Significant amounts of TMV-CP mRNA and protein were detected in the NbAOX1a-silenced plants but not in the control plants. Overall, evidence is provided that AOX plays important roles in both compatible and incompatible plant-virus combinations.

  12. Fatal combined infection with canine distemper virus and orthopoxvirus in a group of Asian marmots (Marmota caudata).

    PubMed

    Origgi, F C; Sattler, U; Pilo, P; Waldvogel, A S

    2013-09-01

    A fatal combined infection with canine distemper virus (CDV) and orthopoxvirus (OPXV) in Asian marmots (Marmota caudata) is reported in this article. A total of 7 Asian marmots from a small zoological garden in Switzerland were found dead in hibernation during a routine check in the winter of 2011. The marmots died in February 2011. No clinical signs of disease were observed at any time. The viruses were detected in all individuals for which the tissues were available (n = 3). Detection of the viruses was performed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The most consistent gross lesion was a neck and thorax edema. A necrotizing pharyngitis and a multifocal necrotizing pneumonia were observed histologically. Numerous large intracytoplasmic eosinophilic inclusions were seen in the epithelial cells of the pharynx, of the airways, and in the skin keratinocytes. Brain lesions were limited to mild multifocal gliosis. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the marmot CDV strain was closely related to the clusters of CDVs detected in Switzerland in wild carnivores during a local outbreak in 2002 and the 2009-2010 nationwide epidemic, suggesting a spillover of this virus from wildlife. The OPXV was most closely related to a strain of cowpoxvirus, a poxvirus species considered endemic in Europe. This is the first reported instance of CDV infection in a rodent species and of a combined CDV and OPXV infection.

  13. Evaluation of radiation effects against C6 glioma in combination with vaccinia virus-p53 gene therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gridley, D. S.; Andres, M. L.; Li, J.; Timiryasova, T.; Chen, B.; Fodor, I.; Nelson, G. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the antitumor effects of recombinant vaccinia virus-p53 (rVV-p53) in combination with radiation therapy against the C6 rat glioma, a p53 deficient tumor that is relatively radioresistant. VV-LIVP, the parental virus (Lister strain), was used as a control. Localized treatment of subcutaneous C6 tumors in athymic mice with either rVV-p53 or VV-LIVP together with tumor irradiation resulted in low tumor incidence and significantly slower tumor progression compared to the agents given as single modalities. Assays of blood and spleen indicated that immune system activation may account, at least partly, for the enhance tumor inhibition seen with combined treatment. No overt signs of treatment-related toxicity were noted.

  14. Significant increase in titer of Raspberry bushy dwarf virus when present in combination with Raspberry leaf mottle virus and its effect on raspberry plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Raspberry crumbly fruit is a virus-induced disease widespread in the Pacific Northwest (PNW). Raspberry bushy dwarf virus (RBDV) has been attributed as the causal agent of the disease. Recently, the identification of two new viruses: Raspberry leaf mottle virus (RLMV) and Raspberry latent virus (RpL...

  15. Tobacco mosaic virus disassembly by high hydrostatic pressure in combination with urea and low temperature.

    PubMed

    Bonafe, C F; Vital, C M; Telles, R C; Gonçalves, M C; Matsuura, M S; Pessine, F B; Freitas, D R; Vega, J

    1998-08-04

    We investigated the effect of low temperature and urea combined with high pressure on tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). The evaluation of its aggregation state and denaturation process was studied using gel filtration, transmission electron microscopy, and spectroscopic methods. The incubation at 2.5 kbar induced 18% dissociation, and decreasing of temperature to -19 degreesC promoted additional dissociation to 72%, with stabilization of the dissociation products. Under such conditions, extensive denaturation did not occur. The apparent enthalpy and entropy of dissociation (Delta and TDelta) were -9.04 kcal/mol subunit and -15.1 kcal/mol subunit, respectively, indicating that the TMV association is an entropicly driven process. The apparent free energy of stabilization given by the presence of RNA is at least -1.7 kcal/mol subunit. Urea-induced dissociation of TMV samples and incubation at high-pressure promoted a higher degree of dissociation. The volume change of dissociation decreased in magnitude from -16.3 to -3.1 mL/mol of dissociated subunit, respectively, in the absence and presence of 2.5 M urea, suggesting exposure of the protein-protein interface to the solvent. High-pressure induced remarkable TMV denaturation in the presence of 2.5 M urea, with a volume change of -101 mL/mol of denatured subunit. The apparent enthalpy and entropy of denaturation (Delta and TDelta) by 1.75 M urea at 2.5 kbar was -11.1 and -10.2 kcal/mol subunit, respectively, demonstrating that the TMV protein coat presents an apparent free energy of denaturation by urea close to zero. Although the processes could not be assumed to be pure equilibria, these thermodynamic parameters could be derived by assuming a steady-state condition.

  16. Viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lytic bacteriophages, viruses which infect and lyse bacterial cells, can provide a natural method to reduce bacterial pathogens on produce commodities. The use of multi-phage cocktails is most likely to be effective against bacterial pathogens on produce commodities, and minimize the development of...

  17. Using a bioaerosol personal sampler in combination with real-time PCR analysis for rapid detection of airborne viruses.

    PubMed

    Pyankov, Oleg V; Agranovski, Igor E; Pyankova, Olga; Mokhonova, Ekaterina; Mokhonov, Vlad; Safatov, Alexander S; Khromykh, Alexander A

    2007-04-01

    We have recently developed a new personal sampler and demonstrated its feasibility for detection of viable airborne microorganisms including bacteria, fungi and viruses. To accelerate the time-consuming analytical procedure involving 2-5 days of biological testing, we employed a real-time PCR protocol in conjunction with the personal sampler for collection of airborne viruses. The advantage of this approach is that if the presence of a particular pathogen in the air is detected by the PCR, the remaining collecting liquid can be further analysed by more time-consuming biological methods to estimate the number of airborne infectious/live microorganisms. As sampling of bioaerosols in natural environments is likely to be associated with substantial contamination by a range of microorganisms commonly existing in an ambient air, an investigation of the specificity of detection by targeted PCR analysis is required. Here we present the results of the study on the detection of Influenza virus in the ambient air contaminated with high concentrations of bacteria and fungi using real-time PCR protocol. The combined sampling PCR detection method was found to be fully feasible for the rapid ( approximately 2.5 h) and highly specific (no cross-reactivity) identification of the labile airborne virus in the air containing elevated concentrations of other microorganisms.

  18. A Combination of Serological Assays to Detect Human Antibodies to the Avian Influenza A H7N9 Virus

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Rongbao; Dong, Jie; Zhang, Ye; Guo, Junfeng; Zou, Shumei; Zhou, Jianfang; Zhu, Yun; Xin, Li; Li, Xiaodan; Xu, Cuiling; Wang, Dayan; Shu, Yuelong

    2014-01-01

    Human infection with avian influenza A H7N9 virus was first identified in March 2013 and represents an ongoing threat to public health. There is a need to optimize serological methods for this new influenza virus. Here, we compared the sensitivity and specificity of the hemagglutinin inhibition (HI), microneutralization (MN), and Western blot (WB) assays for the detection of human antibodies against avian influenza A (H7N9) virus. HI with horse erythrocytes (hRBCs) and a modified MN assay possessed greater sensitivity than turkey erythrocytes and the standard MN assay, respectively. Using these assays, 80% of tested sera from confirmed H7N9 cases developed detectable antibody to H7N9 after 21 days. To balance sensitivity and specificity, we found serum titers of ≥20 (MN) or 160 (HI) samples were most effective in determining seropositive to H7N9 virus. Single serum with HI titers of 20–80 or MN titer of 10 could be validated by each other or WB assay. Unlike serum collected from adult or elderly populations, the antibody response in children with mild disease was low or undetectable. These combinations of assays will be useful in case diagnosis and serologic investigation of human cases. PMID:24755627

  19. Elevated Plasma Viral Loads in Romidepsin-Treated Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Rhesus Macaques on Suppressive Combination Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Del Prete, Gregory Q.; Oswald, Kelli; Lara, Abigail; Shoemaker, Rebecca; Smedley, Jeremy; Macallister, Rhonda; Coalter, Vicky; Wiles, Adam; Wiles, Rodney; Li, Yuan; Fast, Randy; Kiser, Rebecca; Lu, Bing; Zheng, Jim; Alvord, W. Gregory; Trubey, Charles M.; Piatak, Michael; Deleage, Claire; Keele, Brandon F.; Estes, Jacob D.; Hesselgesser, Joseph; Geleziunas, Romas

    2015-01-01

    Replication-competent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) persists in infected people despite suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), and it represents a major obstacle to HIV functional cure or eradication. We have developed a model of cART-mediated viral suppression in simian human immunodeficiency virus (SIV) mac239-infected Indian rhesus macaques and evaluated the impact of the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) romidepsin (RMD) on viremia in vivo. Eight macaques virologically suppressed to clinically relevant levels (<30 viral RNA copies/ml of plasma), using a three-class five-drug cART regimen, received multiple intravenous infusions of either RMD (n = 5) or saline (n = 3) starting 31 to 54 weeks after cART initiation. In vivo RMD treatment resulted in significant transient increases in acetylated histone levels in CD4+ T cells. RMD-treated animals demonstrated plasma viral load measurements for each 2-week treatment cycle that were significantly higher than those in saline control-treated animals during periods of treatment, suggestive of RMD-induced viral reactivation. However, plasma virus rebound was indistinguishable between RMD-treated and control-treated animals for a subset of animals released from cART. These findings suggest that HDACi drugs, such as RMD, can reactivate residual virus in the presence of suppressive antiviral therapy and may be a valuable component of a comprehensive HIV functional cure/eradication strategy. PMID:26711758

  20. Combination Chemotherapy Using Immune Modulators and Antiviral Drugs against Togaviruses and Bunyaviruses. Antiviral Therapy Against Banzi Virus, Semliki Forest Virus, and Richinde Virus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-30

    1473, JUN 86 Previous eclitions are obsolete. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE 14r lee. r rS SUMMARY Many viruses in the families Togaviridae ...6119 University of Texas Medical Branch Galveston, TX 77550 DOD DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT: Approved for public release; distribution unlimited The findings...in this report are not to be construed as an official Department of the Army position unless so designated by other author-- ized documents. IDTIC

  1. Combined virus-like particle and fusion protein-encoding DNA vaccination of cotton rats induces protection against respiratory syncytial virus without causing vaccine-enhanced disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Hye Suk; Lee, Young-Tae; Kim, Ki-Hye; Park, Soojin; Kwon, Young-Man; Lee, Youri; Ko, Eun-Ju; Jung, Yu-Jin; Lee, Jong Seok; Kim, Yu-Jin; Lee, Yu-Na; Kim, Min-Chul; Cho, Minkyoung; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2016-07-15

    A safe and effective vaccine against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) should confer protection without causing vaccine-enhanced disease. Here, using a cotton rat model, we investigated the protective efficacy and safety of an RSV combination vaccine composed of F-encoding plasmid DNA and virus-like particles containing RSV fusion (F) and attachment (G) glycoproteins (FFG-VLP). Cotton rats with FFG-VLP vaccination controlled lung viral replication below the detection limit, and effectively induced neutralizing activity and antibody-secreting cell responses. In comparison with formalin inactivated RSV (FI-RSV) causing severe RSV disease after challenge, FFG-VLP vaccination did not cause weight loss, airway hyper-responsiveness, IL-4 cytokines, histopathology, and infiltrates of proinflammatory cells such as eosinophils. FFG-VLP was even more effective in preventing RSV-induced pulmonary inflammation than live RSV infections. This study provides evidence that FFG-VLP can be developed into a safe and effective RSV vaccine candidate. - Highlights: • Combined RSV FFG VLP vaccine is effective in inducing F specific responses. • FFG VLP vaccine confers RSV neutralizing activity and viral control in cotton rats. • Cotton rats with RSV FFG VLP vaccination do not show vaccine-enhanced disease. • Cotton rats with FFG VLP vaccine induce F specific antibody secreting cell responses. • Cotton rats with FFG VLP do not induce lung cellular infiltrates and Th2 cytokine.

  2. Efficacy and Safety of Tenofovir and Lamivudine in Combination with Efavirenz in Patients Co-infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Hepatitis B Virus in China

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ya-Song; Zhang, Wei-Wei; Ling, Xue-Mei; Yang, Lian; Huang, Shao-Biao; Wang, Xi-Cheng; Wu, Hao; Cai, Wei-Ping; Wang, Min; Wang, Hui; Liu, Yan-Fen; He, Hao-Lan; Wei, Fei-Li; Wu, Zun-You; Zhang, Fu-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is high among individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in China. Both HIV and HBV can be treated with tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) and lamivudine (3TC), so we evaluated the safety and efficacy of combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) that included TDF, 3TC, and efavirenz (EFV) among ART-naive individuals who were co-infected with HIV and HBV. Methods: One hundred HIV/HBV co-infected ARV-naive individuals were started on the regimen of TDF, 3TC, and EFV, and the levels of plasma HBV DNA, HIV RNA, and biochemical evaluation related to the function of liver and kidney were analyzed. Results: Concerning efficacy, this study found that by week 48, the vast majority co-infected participants receiving this ART regimen had undetectable HBV DNA levels (71%) and/or HIV RNA levels (90%). Concerning safety, this study found that the median estimated glomerular filtration rate of participants decreased from baseline (109 ml·min−1·1.73 m−2) to week 12 (104 ml·min−1·1.73 m−2) but was almost back to baseline at week 48 (111 ml·min−1·1.73 m−2). Conclusion: This combination ART regimen is safe and effective for patients with HIV/HBV co-infection. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01751555; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01751555. PMID:26831232

  3. Orthopox virus infections in Eurasian wild rodents.

    PubMed

    Kinnunen, Paula M; Henttonen, Heikki; Hoffmann, Bernd; Kallio, Eva R; Korthase, Christian; Laakkonen, Juha; Niemimaa, Jukka; Palva, Airi; Schlegel, Mathias; Ali, Hanan Sheikh; Suominen, Paula; Ulrich, Rainer G; Vaheri, Antti; Vapalahti, Olli

    2011-08-01

    The genus Orthopoxvirus includes variola (smallpox) virus and zoonotic cowpox virus (CPXV). All orthopoxviruses (OPV) are serologically cross-reactive and cross-protective, and after the cessation of smallpox vaccination, CPXV and other OPV infections represent an emerging threat to human health. In this respect CPXV, with its reservoir in asymptomatically infected wild rodents, is of special importance. In Europe, clinical cowpox has been diagnosed in both humans and animals. The main objective of this study was to elucidate the prevalence of OPV infections in wild rodents in different parts of Eurasia and to compare the performance of three real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods in detecting OPV DNA in wildlife samples. We investigated 962 wild rodents from Northern Europe (Finland), Central Europe (Germany), and Northern Asia (Siberia, Russia) for the presence of OPV antibodies. According to a CPXV antigen-based immunofluorescence assay, animals from 13 of the 17 locations (76%) showed antibodies. Mean seroprevalence was 33% in Finland (variation between locations 0%-69%), 32% in Germany (0%-43%), and 3.2% (0%-15%) in Siberia. We further screened tissue samples from 513 of the rodents for OPV DNA using up to three real-time PCRs. Three rodents from two German and one Finnish location were OPV DNA positive. The amplicons were 96% to 100% identical to available CPXV sequences. Further, we demonstrated OPV infections as far east as the Baikal region and occurring in hamster and two other rodent species, ones previously unnoticed as possible reservoir hosts. Based on serological and PCR findings, Eurasian wild rodents are frequently but nonpersistently infected with OPVs. Results from three real-time PCR methods were highly concordant. This study extends the geographic range and wildlife species diversity in which OPV (or CPXV) viruses are naturally circulating.

  4. A novel non-toxic combined CTA1-DD and ISCOMS adjuvant vector for effective mucosal immunization against influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Eliasson, Dubravka Grdic; Helgeby, Anja; Schön, Karin; Nygren, Caroline; El-Bakkouri, Karim; Fiers, Walter; Saelens, Xavier; Lövgren, Karin Bengtsson; Nyström, Ida; Lycke, Nils Y

    2011-05-23

    Here we demonstrate that by using non-toxic fractions of saponin combined with CTA1-DD we can achieve a safe and above all highly efficacious mucosal adjuvant vector. We optimized the construction, tested the requirements for function and evaluated proof-of-concept in an influenza A virus challenge model. We demonstrated that the CTA1-3M2e-DD/ISCOMS vector provided 100% protection against mortality and greatly reduced morbidity in the mouse model. The immunogenicity of the vector was superior to other vaccine formulations using the ISCOM or CTA1-DD adjuvants alone. The versatility of the vector was best exemplified by the many options to insert, incorporate or admix vaccine antigens with the vector. Furthermore, the CTA1-3M2e-DD/ISCOMS could be kept 1 year at 4°C or as a freeze-dried powder without affecting immunogenicity or adjuvanticity of the vector. Strong serum IgG and mucosal IgA responses were elicited and CD4 T cell responses were greatly enhanced after intranasal administration of the combined vector. Together these findings hold promise for the combined vector as a mucosal vaccine against influenza virus infections including pandemic influenza. The CTA1-DD/ISCOMS technology represents a breakthrough in mucosal vaccine vector design which successfully combines immunomodulation and targeting in a safe and stable particulate formation.

  5. Enhanced efficacy of cidofovir combined with vaccinia immune globulin in treating progressive cutaneous vaccinia virus infections in immunosuppressed hairless mice.

    PubMed

    Smee, Donald F; Dagley, Ashley; Downs, Brittney; Hagloch, Joseph; Tarbet, E Bart

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of progressive vaccinia in individuals has involved antiviral drugs, such as cidofovir (CDV), brincidofovir, and/or tecovirimat, combined with vaccinia immune globulin (VIG). VIG is costly, and its supply is limited, so sparing the use of VIG during treatment is an important objective. VIG sparing was modeled in immunosuppressed mice by maximizing the treatment benefits of CDV combined with VIG to determine the effective treatments that delayed the time to death, reduced cutaneous lesion severity, and/or decreased tissue viral titers. SKH-1 hairless mice immunosuppressed with cyclophosphamide and hairless SCID mice (SHO strain) were infected cutaneously with vaccinia virus. Monotherapy, dual combinations (CDV plus VIG), or triple therapy (topical CDV, parenteral CDV, and VIG) were initiated 2 days postinfection and were given every 3 to 4 days through day 11. The efficacy assessment included survival rate, cutaneous lesion severity, and viral titers. Delays in the time to death and the reduction in lesion severity occurred in the following order of efficacy: triple therapy had greater efficacy than double combinations (CDV plus VIG or topical plus parenteral CDV), which had greater efficacy than VIG alone. Parenteral administration of CDV or VIG was necessary to suppress virus titers in internal organs (liver, lung, and spleen). The skin viral titers were significantly reduced by triple therapy only. The greatest efficacy was achieved by triple therapy. In humans, this regimen should translate to a faster cure rate, thus sparing the amount of VIG used for treatment.

  6. Characterization of Clonality of Epstein-Barr Virus-Induced Human B Lymphoproliferative Disease in Mice with Severe Combined Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Nakamine, Hirokazu; Masih, Aneal S.; Okano, Motohiko; Taguchi, Yuichi; Pirruccello, Samuel J.; Davis, Jack R.; Mahloch, Mark L.; Beisel, Kirk W.; Kleveland, Kimberly; Sanger, Warren G.; Purtilo, David T.

    1993-01-01

    To improve the diagnostic accuracy and understanding of the pathogenesis of lymphoproliferative diseases (LPDs) occurring in immunosuppressed transplant recipients (post-transplantation LPD), clonality of Epstein-Barr virus-induced human LPDs in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency was examined by analyzing: 1) human immunoglobulin genes and their products, 2) the clonality of Epstein-Barr virus DNA, and 3) genetic alteration of c-myc or bcl-2 genes. A spectrum of clonality was found in the LPDs comparable with that reported for post-transplantation LPDs, although rearrangements of c-myc or bcl-2 genes were not detected. It is confirmed that this system is useful in terms of clonality for understanding the early phases in the pathogenesis of post-transplantation LPD or LPD in immune deficient patients. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:8380952

  7. Avian influenza virus with Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase combination H8N8, isolated in Russia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study reports the genome sequence of an avian influenza virus (AIV) subtype H8N8 isolated in Russia. The genome analysis shows that all genes belong to AIV Eurasian lineages. The PB2 gene was similar to a Mongolian low pathogenic (LP) AIV H7N1 and a Chinese high pathogenic (HP) AIV H5N2....

  8. Efficacy of combined vaccination against Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in dually infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Bourry, Olivier; Fablet, Christelle; Simon, Gaëlle; Marois-Créhan, Corinne

    2015-11-18

    Porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC) is one of the main causes of economic losses for swine producers. This complex is due to a combination of different pathogens and their interactions. Two major pathogens involved in PRDC are Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (Mhp) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). The objectives of this study were (i) to develop an experimental model of dual Mhp/PRRSV infection in SPF pigs with European strains of Mhp and PRRSV and (ii) to assess and compare the effects of single Mhp, single PRRSV or combined Mhp/PRRSV vaccination against this dual infection. Pigs dually infected with Mhp and PRRSV showed a combination of symptoms characteristic of each pathogen but no significant exacerbation of pathogenicity. Thus, the co-infected pigs displayed coughing and pneumonia typical of Mhp infection in addition to PRRSV-related hyperthermia and decrease in average daily gain (ADG). Hyperthermia was reduced in PRRSV vaccinated animals (single or combined vaccination), whereas ADG was restored in Mhp/PRRSV vaccinated pigs only. Regarding respiratory symptoms and lung lesions, no vaccine decreased coughing. However, all vaccines reduced the pneumonia score but more so in animals receiving the Mhp vaccine, whether single or combined. This vaccine also decreased the Mhp load in the respiratory tract. In conclusion, combined vaccination against both Mhp and PRRSV efficiently pooled the efficacy of each single PRRSV and Mhp vaccination and could be an interesting tool to control PRDC in European swine production.

  9. Transmission of Hepatitis A Virus through Combined Liver–Small Intestine–Pancreas Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Weil, Lauren M.; Jin, Sherry; Johnson, Thomas; Hayden-Mixson, Tonya R.; Khudyakov, Yury; Annambhotla, Pallavi D.; Basavaraju, Sridhar V.; Kamili, Saleem; Ritter, Jana M.; Nelson, Noele; Mazariegos, George; Green, Michael; Himes, Ryan W.; Kuhar, David T.; Kuehnert, Matthew J.; Miller, Jeffrey A.; Wiseman, Rachel; Moorman, Anne C.

    2017-01-01

    Although transmission of hepatitis A virus (HAV) through blood transfusion has been documented, transmission through organ transplantation has not been reported. In August 2015, state health officials in Texas, USA, were notified of 2 home health nurses with HAV infection whose only common exposure was a child who had undergone multi–visceral organ transplantation 9 months earlier. Specimens from the nurses, organ donor, and all organ recipients were tested and medical records reviewed to determine a possible infection source. Identical HAV RNA sequences were detected from the serum of both nurses and the organ donor, as well as from the multi–visceral organ recipient’s serum and feces; this recipient’s posttransplant liver and intestine biopsy specimens also had detectable virus. The other organ recipients tested negative for HAV RNA. Vaccination of the donor might have prevented infection in the recipient and subsequent transmission to the healthcare workers. PMID:28322704

  10. Combination treatment with oncolytic Vaccinia virus and cyclophosphamide results in synergistic antitumor effects in human lung adenocarcinoma bearing mice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The capacity of the recombinant Vaccinia virus GLV-1h68 as a single agent to efficiently treat different human or canine cancers has been shown in several preclinical studies. Currently, its human safety and efficacy are investigated in phase I/II clinical trials. In this study we set out to evaluate the oncolytic activity of GLV-1h68 in the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line PC14PE6-RFP in cell cultures and analyzed the antitumor potency of a combined treatment strategy consisting of GLV-1h68 and cyclophosphamide (CPA) in a mouse model of PC14PE6-RFP lung adenocarcinoma. Methods PC14PE6-RFP cells were treated in cell culture with GLV-1h68. Viral replication and cell survival were determined by plaque assays and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays, respectively. Subcutaneously implanted PC14PE6-RFP xenografts were treated by systemic injection of GLV-1h68, CPA or a combination of both. Tumor growth and viral biodistribution were monitored and immune-related antigen profiling of tumor lysates was performed. Results GLV-1h68 efficiently infected, replicated in and lysed human PC14PE6-RFP cells in cell cultures. PC14PE6-RFP tumors were efficiently colonized by GLV-1h68 leading to much delayed tumor growth in PC14PE6-RFP tumor-bearing nude mice. Combination treatment with GLV-1h68 and CPA significantly improved the antitumor efficacy of GLV-1h68 and led to an increased viral distribution within the tumors. Pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines were distinctly elevated in tumors of GLV-1h68-treated mice. Factors expressed by endothelial cells or present in the blood were decreased after combination treatment. A complete loss in the hemorrhagic phenotype of the PC14PE6-RFP tumors and a decrease in the number of blood vessels after combination treatment could be observed. Conclusions CPA and GLV-1h68 have synergistic antitumor effects on PC14PE6-RFP xenografts. We strongly suppose that in the PC14PE6-RFP model the

  11. Synergistic combinations of favipiravir and oseltamivir against wild-type pandemic and oseltamivir-resistant influenza A virus infections in mice

    PubMed Central

    Smee, Donald F; Tarbet, E Bart; Furuta, Yousuke; Morrey, John D; Barnard, Dale L

    2014-01-01

    Aim Favipiravir and oseltamivir are antiviral compounds used for the treatment of influenza infections. We have aimed to investigate the efficacy of the compounds in combination to treat influenza H1N1 virus infections in mice. Materials & methods Mice infected with pandemic influenza A/California/04/2009 (H1N1pdm) virus or an oseltamivir-resistant (H275Y neuraminidase mutation) influenza A/Mississippi/ 3/2001 (H1N1) virus were treated orally with inhibitors twice a day for 5 days starting 4 h after infection. Results Complete protection from death was afforded by favipiravir treatments of 100 mg/kg/day, but lower doses were less effective. Combinations of oseltamivir (1 and 3 mg/kg/day) with favipiravir (3, 10 and 30 mg/kg/day) resulted in a synergistic improvement in survival rates against H1N1pdm infections. Significant reductions in lung virus titers also occurred. Against the H275Y virus infection, oseltamivir alone was only 30% protective from death at 100 mg/kg/day, but combinations of the two compounds produced a synergistic improvement in survival rate. Conclusion The utility of treating H1N1 influenza virus infections with oseltamivir and favipiravir in combination has been established. PMID:24563658

  12. Superior Efficacy of a Human Immunodeficiency Virus Vaccine Combined with Antiretroviral Prevention in Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Challenged Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Le Grand, Roger; Dereuddre-Bosquet, Nathalie; Dispinseri, Stefania; Gosse, Leslie; Desjardins, Delphine; Shen, Xiaoying; Tolazzi, Monica; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Saidi, Hela; Tomaras, Georgia; Prague, Mélanie; Barnett, Susan W.; Thiebaut, Rodolphe; Scarlatti, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although vaccines and antiretroviral (ARV) prevention have demonstrated partial success against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in clinical trials, their combined introduction could provide more potent protection. Furthermore, combination approaches could ameliorate the potential increased risk of infection following vaccination in the absence of protective immunity. We used a nonhuman primate model to determine potential interactions of combining a partially effective ARV microbicide with an envelope-based vaccine. The vaccine alone provided no protection from infection following 12 consecutive low-dose intravaginal challenges with simian-HIV strain SF162P3, with more animals infected compared to naive controls. The microbicide alone provided a 68% reduction in the risk of infection relative to that of the vaccine group and a 45% reduction relative to that of naive controls. The vaccine-microbicide combination provided an 88% reduction in the per-exposure risk of infection relative to the vaccine alone and a 79% reduction relative to that of the controls. Protected animals in the vaccine-microbicide group were challenged a further 12 times in the absence of microbicide and demonstrated a 98% reduction in the risk of infection. A total risk reduction of 91% was observed in this group over 24 exposures (P = 0.004). These important findings suggest that combined implementation of new biomedical prevention strategies may provide significant gains in HIV prevention. IMPORTANCE There is a pressing need to maximize the impact of new biomedical prevention tools in the face of the 2 million HIV infections that occur each year. Combined implementation of complementary biomedical approaches could create additive or synergistic effects that drive improved reduction of HIV incidence. Therefore, we assessed a combination of an untested vaccine with an ARV-based microbicide in a nonhuman primate vaginal challenge model. The vaccine alone provided no

  13. A Pilot Study of Raltegravir Plus Combination Antiretroviral Therapy in Early Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection: Challenges and Lessons Learned

    PubMed Central

    Collier, Ann C.; Chun, Tae-Wook; Maenza, Janine; Coombs, Robert W.; Tapia, Kenneth; Chang, Ming; Stevens, Claire E.; Justement, J. Shawn; Murray, Danielle; Stekler, Joanne D.; Mullins, James I; Holte, Sarah E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Availability of integrase strand transfer inhibitors created interest in determining whether their use would decrease persistently infected cell numbers. This study hypothesized that adding raltegravir (RAL) to standard antiretroviral therapy (ART) would decrease human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected CD4+ T cells more than standard combination ART. This was a pilot, randomized study comparing open-label standard triple ART to standard triple ART plus RAL over 96 weeks in ART-naive adults with early HIV infection. The primary objective was to compare quantity and trajectory of HIV DNA. Eighty-two persons were referred. A diverse set of reasons precluded the enrollment of all but 10. Those who enrolled and completed the study had an estimated median duration of HIV infection of 74 days at ART start. The groups had similar baseline characteristics. The RAL group had more rapid first phase plasma HIV RNA decay (0.67 log10 copies/mL/day) than with combination ART (0.34 log10copies/mL/day), p = 0.037. Second phase HIV RNA decay, residual viremia, cell-associated RNA, HIV DNA, CD4+ T-cells with replication-competent virus, and 2LTR circle levels did not differ between groups. Among those with entry plasma HIV RNA levels above the median, 2LTR circles were significantly lower over time than in those with lower entry HIV RNA levels (p = 0.02). Our results suggest homogeneity of responses in cell-associated RNA, HIV DNA, CD4+ T-cells with replication-competent virus, and 2LTR circles with early HIV in both ART groups. The kinetics of 2LTR DNA did not reflect the kinetics of plasma HIV RNA decline following ART initiation. PMID:26862469

  14. Heterologous immunity triggered by a single, latent virus in Mus musculus: combined costimulation- and adhesion- blockade decrease rejection.

    PubMed

    Beus, Jonathan M; Hashmi, Salila S; Selvaraj, Saranya A; Duan, Danxia; Stempora, Linda L; Monday, Stephanie A; Cheeseman, Jennifer A; Hamby, Kelly M; Speck, Samuel H; Larsen, Christian P; Kirk, Allan D; Kean, Leslie S

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying latent-virus-mediated heterologous immunity, and subsequent transplant rejection, especially in the setting of T cell costimulation blockade, remain undetermined. To address this, we have utilized MHV68 to develop a rodent model of latent virus-induced heterologous alloimmunity. MHV68 infection was correlated with multimodal immune deviation, which included increased secretion of CXCL9 and CXCL10, and with the expansion of a CD8(dim) T cell population. CD8(dim) T cells exhibited decreased expression of multiple costimulation molecules and increased expression of two adhesion molecules, LFA-1 and VLA-4. In the setting of MHV68 latency, recipients demonstrated accelerated costimulation blockade-resistant rejection of skin allografts compared to non-infected animals (MST 13.5 d in infected animals vs 22 d in non-infected animals, p<.0001). In contrast, the duration of graft acceptance was equivalent between non-infected and infected animals when treated with combined anti-LFA-1/anti-VLA-4 adhesion blockade (MST 24 d for non-infected and 27 d for infected, p = n.s.). The combination of CTLA-4-Ig/anti-CD154-based costimulation blockade+anti-LFA-1/anti-VLA-4-based adhesion blockade led to prolonged graft acceptance in both non-infected and infected cohorts (MST>100 d for both, p<.0001 versus costimulation blockade for either). While in the non-infected cohort, either CTLA-4-Ig or anti-CD154 alone could effectively pair with adhesion blockade to prolong allograft acceptance, in infected animals, the prolonged acceptance of skin grafts could only be recapitulated when anti-LFA-1 and anti-VLA-4 antibodies were combined with anti-CD154 (without CTLA-4-Ig, MST>100 d). Graft acceptance was significantly impaired when CTLA-4-Ig alone (no anti-CD154) was combined with adhesion blockade (MST 41 d). These results suggest that in the setting of MHV68 infection, synergy occurs predominantly between adhesion pathways and CD154-based costimulation, and

  15. Immune Modulation in Primary Vaccinia virus Zoonotic Human Infections

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Juliana Assis Silva; de Araújo, Fernanda Fortes; Trindade, Giliane de Souza; Quinan, Bárbara Resende; Drumond, Betânia Paiva; Ferreira, Jaqueline Maria Siqueira; Mota, Bruno Eduardo Fernandes; Nogueira, Maurício Lacerda; Kroon, Erna Geessien; Abrahão, Jônatas Santos; Côrrea-Oliveira, Rodrigo; da Fonseca, Flávio Guimarães

    2012-01-01

    In 2010, the WHO celebrated the 30th anniversary of the smallpox eradication. Ironically, infections caused by viruses related to smallpox are being increasingly reported worldwide, including Monkeypox, Cowpox, and Vaccinia virus (VACV). Little is known about the human immunological responses elicited during acute infections caused by orthopoxviruses. We have followed VACV zoonotic outbreaks taking place in Brazil and analyzed cellular immune responses in patients acutely infected by VACV. Results indicated that these patients show a biased immune modulation when compared to noninfected controls. Amounts of B cells are low and less activated in infected patients. Although present, T CD4+ cells are also less activated when compared to noninfected individuals, and so are monocytes/macrophages. Similar results were obtained when Balb/C mice were experimentally infected with a VACV sample isolated during the zoonotic outbreaks. Taking together, the data suggest that zoonotic VACVs modulate specific immune cell compartments during an acute infection in humans. PMID:22229039

  16. ZMPSTE24 defends against influenza and other pathogenic viruses.

    PubMed

    Fu, Bishi; Wang, Lingyan; Li, Shitao; Dorf, Martin E

    2017-02-28

    Zinc metallopeptidase STE24 (ZMPSTE24) is a transmembrane metalloprotease whose catalytic activity is critical for processing lamin A on the inner nuclear membrane and clearing clogged translocons on the endoplasmic reticulum. We now report ZMPSTE24 is a virus-specific effector that restricts enveloped RNA and DNA viruses, including influenza A, Zika, Ebola, Sindbis, vesicular stomatitis, cowpox, and vaccinia, but not murine leukemia or adenovirus. ZMPSTE24-mediated antiviral action is independent of protease activity. Coimmunoprecipitation studies indicate ZMPSTE24 can complex with proteins of the interferon-induced transmembrane protein (IFITM) family. IFITM proteins impede viral entry, and ZMPSTE24 expression is necessary for IFITM antiviral activity. In vivo studies demonstrate ZMPSTE24-deficient mice display higher viral burdens, enhanced cytokine production, and increased mortality after influenza infection. Collectively, these findings identify ZMPSTE24 as an intrinsic broad-spectrum antiviral protein and provide insights into antiviral defense mechanisms.

  17. Efficacy of combined therapy with amantadine, oseltamivir, and ribavirin in vivo against susceptible and amantadine-resistant influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Jack T; Smee, Donald F; Barnard, Dale L; Julander, Justin G; Gross, Matthew; de Jong, Menno D; Went, Gregory T

    2012-01-01

    The limited efficacy of existing antiviral therapies for influenza--coupled with widespread baseline antiviral resistance--highlights the urgent need for more effective therapy. We describe a triple combination antiviral drug (TCAD) regimen composed of amantadine, oseltamivir, and ribavirin that is highly efficacious at reducing mortality and weight loss in mouse models of influenza infection. TCAD therapy was superior to dual and single drug regimens in mice infected with drug-susceptible, low pathogenic A/H5N1 (A/Duck/MN/1525/81) and amantadine-resistant 2009 A/H1N1 influenza (A/California/04/09). Treatment with TCAD afforded >90% survival in mice infected with both viruses, whereas treatment with dual and single drug regimens resulted in 0% to 60% survival. Importantly, amantadine had no activity as monotherapy against the amantadine-resistant virus, but demonstrated dose-dependent protection in combination with oseltamivir and ribavirin, indicative that amantadine's activity had been restored in the context of TCAD therapy. Furthermore, TCAD therapy provided survival benefit when treatment was delayed until 72 hours post-infection, whereas oseltamivir monotherapy was not protective after 24 hours post-infection. These findings demonstrate in vivo efficacy of TCAD therapy and confirm previous reports of the synergy and broad spectrum activity of TCAD therapy against susceptible and resistant influenza strains in vitro.

  18. Patterns of longitudinal change in hepatitis C virus neutralization titers correlate with the outcome of peginterferon and ribavirin combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jianguo; Wang, Weihua; Xu, Yanjuan; Di Bisceglie, Adrian M; Fan, Xiaofeng

    2015-05-01

    In chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, combination therapy of peginterferon and ribavirin does not guarantee viral eradication. Among factors relevant to therapeutic efficacy, the role of humoral immunity has not been examined thoroughly. In the current study, HCV pseudoparticles (HCVpp) were first generated with 80 patient-derived full-length HCV envelope clones, followed by detailed characterization with regard to virus productivity, infectivity and neutralizing activity. Selective HCVpp were used to measure HCV neutralization titers in two independent patient cohorts consisting of 102 patients undergoing antiviral therapy. The HCV neutralization titers at the baseline fitted with a power-law distribution among patients. Pretreatment neutralization titers in both patient cohorts were not correlated with treatment outcomes. In the patient cohort 2 (n = 28) that had samples available at multiple time points, however, HCV neutralization titers displayed clearly distinct patterns over therapeutic course and follow-up. No virological responders (n = 10) had neutralization titers stabilized at low level while it was increased significantly in both sustained virological responders (n = 10) and relapsers (n = 8). High HCV neutralization titers were maintained only in sustained virological responders but not in relapsers after treatment cessation. Therefore, patterns of longitudinal change of HCV neutralization titers, but not pretreatment titers, correlate with the treatment outcome in patients undergoing peginterferon and ribavirin combination therapy.

  19. Combining genomic sequencing methods to explore viral diversity and reveal potential virus-host interactions

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Cheryl-Emiliane T.; Winget, Danielle M.; White, Richard A.; Hallam, Steven J.; Suttle, Curtis A.

    2015-01-01

    Viral diversity and virus-host interactions in oxygen-starved regions of the ocean, also known as oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), remain relatively unexplored. Microbial community metabolism in OMZs alters nutrient and energy flow through marine food webs, resulting in biological nitrogen loss and greenhouse gas production. Thus, viruses infecting OMZ microbes have the potential to modulate community metabolism with resulting feedback on ecosystem function. Here, we describe viral communities inhabiting oxic surface (10 m) and oxygen-starved basin (200 m) waters of Saanich Inlet, a seasonally anoxic fjord on the coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia using viral metagenomics and complete viral fosmid sequencing on samples collected between April 2007 and April 2010. Of 6459 open reading frames (ORFs) predicted across all 34 viral fosmids, 77.6% (n = 5010) had no homology to reference viral genomes. These fosmids recruited a higher proportion of viral metagenomic sequences from Saanich Inlet than from nearby northeastern subarctic Pacific Ocean (Line P) waters, indicating differences in the viral communities between coastal and open ocean locations. While functional annotations of fosmid ORFs were limited, recruitment to NCBI's non-redundant “nr” database and publicly available single-cell genomes identified putative viruses infecting marine thaumarchaeal and SUP05 proteobacteria to provide potential host linkages with relevance to coupled biogeochemical cycling processes in OMZ waters. Taken together, these results highlight the power of coupled analyses of multiple sequence data types, such as viral metagenomic and fosmid sequence data with prokaryotic single cell genomes, to chart viral diversity, elucidate genomic and ecological contexts for previously unclassifiable viral sequences, and identify novel host interactions in natural and engineered ecosystems. PMID:25914678

  20. Replication-Competent Influenza Virus and Respiratory Syncytial Virus Luciferase Reporter Strains Engineered for Co-Infections Identify Antiviral Compounds in Combination Screens

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Dan; Weisshaar, Marco; Lamb, Kristen; Chung, Hokyung K; Lin, Michael Z; Plemper, Richard K

    2016-01-01

    Myxoviruses such as influenza A virus (IAV) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) are major human pathogens, mandating the development of novel therapeutics. To establish a high-throughput screening protocol for the simultaneous identification of pathogen- and host-targeted hit candidates against either or both pathogens, we have attempted coinfection of cells with IAV and RSV. However, viral replication kinetics were incompatible, RSV signal window was low, and an IAV-driven minireplicon reporter assay used in initial screens narrowed the host cell range and restricted to single-cycle infections. To overcome these limitations, we developed an RSV strain carrying firefly luciferase fused to an innovative universal small-molecule assisted shut-off domain, which boosted assay signal window, and a hyperactive fusion protein that synchronized IAV and RSV reporter expression kinetics and suppresses the identification of RSV entry inhibitors sensitive to a recently reported RSV pan-resistance mechanism. Combined with a replication-competent recombinant IAV strain harboring nano-luciferase, the assay performed well on a human respiratory cell line and supports multi-cycle infections. Miniaturized to 384-well format, the protocol was validated through screening of a set of the NIH Clinical Collection (NCC) in quadruplicate. These test screens demonstrated favorable assay parameters and reproducibility. Application to a LOPAC library of bioactive compounds in a proof-of-concept campaign detected licensed anti-myxovirus therapeutics, ribavirin and the neuraminidase inhibitor zanamivir, and identified two unexpected RSV-specific hit candidates, Fenretinide and the opioid receptor antagonist BNTX-7. Hits were evaluated in direct and orthogonal dose-response counterscreens using a standard recRSV reporter strain expressing renilla luciferase. PMID:26307636

  1. Insecticidal activity of the granulosis virus in combination with neem products and talc powder against the potato tuberworm Phthorimaea operculella (Zeller) (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae).

    PubMed

    Mascarin, G M; Delalibera, I

    2012-06-01

    The potato tuberworm Phthorimaea operculella (Zeller) is an important agricultural pest that causes significant economic losses to potato growers worldwide. The addition of an effective method of biological control for the potato tuberworm is greatly needed, and is currently unavailable in Brazil. The granulosis virus (Baculoviridae) is a promising biological control agent to protect post-harvest potatoes and in storage from the potato tuberworm. However, the control measure must be economically feasible. Liquid suspensions of a granulosis virus applied alone or in mixture with two commercial neem oil-based products (DalNeem™ and NeemAzal™), and a dry powder formulation of viral granules were evaluated for control of potato tuberworm larvae by treating potato tubers under laboratory conditions. High larval mortality (86.7%) was achieved when DalNeem and virus were applied together at 4 mg of azadirachtin/L and 10(4) occlusion bodies (OBs)/mL, respectively. This combination resulted in ≥50% efficacy in relation to their counterparts alone. Conversely, NeemAzal did not enhance virus effectiveness against larvae of the potato tuberworm. The talc-based virus formulation was used for dusting seed tubers at different concentrations and resulted in 100% larval mortality at 5 × 10(8) OBs/g. Formulated and unformulated virus provided 50% mortality at 166 OBs/g and at 5.0 × 10(5) OBs/mL, respectively. As a result, talc-based virus formulation had a better control efficiency on potato tuberworm than the aqueous virus suspension. The granulosis virus combined with DalNeem at low rates or formulated with talc powder is a viable option to control the potato tuberworm under storage conditions.

  2. Combined use of the ASK and SHK-1 cell lines to enhance the detection of infectious salmon anemia virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rolland, J.B.; Bouchard, D.; Coll, J.; Winton, J.R.

    2005-01-01

    Infectious salmon anemia (ISA) is a severe disease primarily affecting commercially farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) in seawater. The disease has been reported in portions of Canada, the United Kingdom, the Faroe Islands, and the United States. Infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV), the causative agent of ISA, has also been isolated from several asymptomatic marine and salmonid fish species. Diagnostic assays for the detection of ISAV include virus isolation in cell culture, a reverse transcriptase-PCR, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and an indirect fluorescent antibody test. Virus isolation is considered the gold standard, and 5 salmonid cell lines are known to support growth of ISAV. In this study, the relative performance of the salmon head kidney 1 (SHK-1), Atlantic salmon kidney (ASK), and CHSE-214 cell lines in detecting ISAV was evaluated using samples from both experimentally and naturally infected Atlantic salmon. Interlaboratory comparisons were conducted using a quality control-quality assurance ring test. Both the ASK and SHK-1 cell lines performed well in detecting ISAV, although the SHK-1 line was more variable in its sensitivity to infection and somewhat slower in the appearance of cytopathic effect. Relative to the SHK-1 and ASK lines, the CHSE-214 cell line performed poorly. Although the ASK line appeared to represent a good alternative to the more commonly used SHK-1 line, use of a single cell line for diagnostic assays may increase the potential for false-negative results. Thus, the SHK-1 and ASK cell lines can be used in combination to provide enhanced ability to detect ISAV.

  3. Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Tropism for Human Sensory Ganglion Neurons in the Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Mouse Model of Neuropathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Che, Xibing; Reichelt, Mike; Qiao, Yanli; Gu, Haidong; Arvin, Ann

    2013-01-01

    The tropism of herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) for human sensory neurons infected in vivo was examined using dorsal root ganglion (DRG) xenografts maintained in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). In contrast to the HSV-1 lytic infectious cycle in vitro, replication of the HSV-1 F strain was restricted in human DRG neurons despite the absence of adaptive immune responses in SCID mice, allowing the establishment of neuronal latency. At 12 days after DRG inoculation, 26.2% of human neurons expressed HSV-1 protein and 13.1% expressed latency-associated transcripts (LAT). Some infected neurons showed cytopathic changes, but HSV-1, unlike varicella-zoster virus (VZV), only rarely infected satellite cells and did not induce fusion of neuronal and satellite cell plasma membranes. Cell-free enveloped HSV-1 virions were observed, indicating productive infection. A recombinant HSV-1-expressing luciferase exhibited less virulence than HSV-1 F in the SCID mouse host, enabling analysis of infection in human DRG xenografts for a 61-day interval. At 12 days after inoculation, 4.2% of neurons expressed HSV-1 proteins; frequencies increased to 32.1% at 33 days but declined to 20.8% by 61 days. Frequencies of LAT-positive neurons were 1.2% at 12 days and increased to 40.2% at 33 days. LAT expression remained at 37% at 61 days, in contrast to the decline in neurons expressing viral proteins. These observations show that the progression of HSV-1 infection is highly restricted in human DRG, and HSV-1 genome silencing occurs in human neurons infected in vivo as a consequence of virus-host cell interactions and does not require adaptive immune control. PMID:23269807

  4. Single-tube multiplexed molecular detection of endemic porcine viruses in combination with background screening for transboundary diseases.

    PubMed

    Wernike, Kerstin; Hoffmann, Bernd; Beer, Martin

    2013-03-01

    Detection of several pathogens with multiplexed real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays in a one-step setup allows the simultaneous detection of two endemic porcine and four different selected transboundary viruses. Reverse transcription (RT)-qPCR systems for the detection of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) and porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), two of the most economically important pathogens of swine worldwide, were combined with a screening system for diseases notifiable to the World Organization of Animal Health, namely, classical and African swine fever, foot-and-mouth disease, and Aujeszky's disease. Background screening was implemented using the identical fluorophore for all four different RT-qPCR assays. The novel multiplex RT-qPCR system was validated with a large panel of different body fluids and tissues from pigs and other animal species. Both reference samples and clinical specimens were used for a complete evaluation. It could be demonstrated that a highly sensitive and specific parallel detection of the different viruses was possible. The assays for the notifiable diseases were even not affected by the simultaneous amplification of very high loads of PRRSV- and PCV2-specific sequences. The novel broad-spectrum multiplex assay allows in a unique form the routine investigation for endemic porcine pathogens with exclusion diagnostics of the most important transboundary diseases in samples from pigs with unspecific clinical signs, such as fever or hemorrhages. The new system could significantly improve early detection of the most important notifiable diseases of swine and could lead to a new approach in syndromic surveillance.

  5. Herpes simplex virus 1 tropism for human sensory ganglion neurons in the severe combined immunodeficiency mouse model of neuropathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zerboni, Leigh; Che, Xibing; Reichelt, Mike; Qiao, Yanli; Gu, Haidong; Arvin, Ann

    2013-03-01

    The tropism of herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) for human sensory neurons infected in vivo was examined using dorsal root ganglion (DRG) xenografts maintained in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). In contrast to the HSV-1 lytic infectious cycle in vitro, replication of the HSV-1 F strain was restricted in human DRG neurons despite the absence of adaptive immune responses in SCID mice, allowing the establishment of neuronal latency. At 12 days after DRG inoculation, 26.2% of human neurons expressed HSV-1 protein and 13.1% expressed latency-associated transcripts (LAT). Some infected neurons showed cytopathic changes, but HSV-1, unlike varicella-zoster virus (VZV), only rarely infected satellite cells and did not induce fusion of neuronal and satellite cell plasma membranes. Cell-free enveloped HSV-1 virions were observed, indicating productive infection. A recombinant HSV-1-expressing luciferase exhibited less virulence than HSV-1 F in the SCID mouse host, enabling analysis of infection in human DRG xenografts for a 61-day interval. At 12 days after inoculation, 4.2% of neurons expressed HSV-1 proteins; frequencies increased to 32.1% at 33 days but declined to 20.8% by 61 days. Frequencies of LAT-positive neurons were 1.2% at 12 days and increased to 40.2% at 33 days. LAT expression remained at 37% at 61 days, in contrast to the decline in neurons expressing viral proteins. These observations show that the progression of HSV-1 infection is highly restricted in human DRG, and HSV-1 genome silencing occurs in human neurons infected in vivo as a consequence of virus-host cell interactions and does not require adaptive immune control.

  6. The Combined Influence of Oral Contraceptives and Human Papillomavirus Virus on Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Efird, Jimmy T.; Toland, Amanda E.; Lea, C. Suzanne; Phillips, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    The vast majority of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC) will occur in those with fair complexion, tendency to burn, and high ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure. Organ transplant recipients also are an important population at great risk for CSCC. An association has been reported between oral contraceptive (OC) use, human papillomavirus virus (HPV) and cervical cancer, and there could be a similar association for CSCC. The cutaneous HPV β-E6 protein, a close cousin of the transformative E6 protein underlying anogenital cancers, has been shown to inhibit apoptosis in response to UVR damage and stimulate morphologic transformation in rodent fibroblast cell lines. Furthermore, OC use has been shown to enhance HPV transcription and may contribute to CSCC risk through this pathway. PMID:21499554

  7. Lethal exacerbation of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in severe combined immunodeficiency mice after infection by pneumonia virus of mice.

    PubMed

    Roths, J B; Smith, A L; Sidman, C L

    1993-04-01

    Mice homozygous for the mutant allele scid (severe combined immunodeficiency) have been described as excellent models for Pneumocystis carinii (Pc) pneumonia (PCP), a major health problem in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and other immunodeficiency states. Other microorganisms have been shown to infect AIDS patients simultaneously with Pc, but whether one opportunist is able to directly influence the pathogenicity of another has not been determined previously. We have deliberately coinfected scid mice (with extent Pc infection) with a variety of primarily pneumotropic viruses and bacteria and have identified pneumonia virus of mice as causing a dramatic increase in the density of Pc organisms and the morbidity due to PCP in immunodeficient scid mice. This finding has clinical significance in the management of PCP, in that the identification and treatment of coinfecting pneumotropic pathogens may be as important as treatment targeted at Pc. A search for other synergistic (or antagonistic) microorganisms and determination of their mechanism(s) of action in altering the progression of PCP is indicated.

  8. Enhanced resistance to Sendai virus infection in DBA/2J mice with a botanical drug combination (Sinupret).

    PubMed

    Schmolz, M; Ottendorfer, D; März, R W; Sieder, C

    2001-09-01

    It was investigated whether the botanical drug combination Sinupret is able to modulate the resistance of mice to a respiratory tract infection with Sendai virus (Parainfluenza viridae) if given prophylactically to the animals. Three doses of Sinupret drops (SD) and Sinupret tablets (ST, p.o.), and two active controls, the chemical secretolytic ambroxol (p.o.) and the immunomodulator Muramyldipeptide (MDP, i.v.) were used. Test and reference substances were applied at days - 3 and -1 before infection, except MDP, which was given once on day--before infection. CD4+ and CD8 + lymphocyte subpopulations were measured after infection as indicators of immunological treatment response. Groups of 20 mice each were infected by intranasal application of Sendai virus under anaesthesia. We found that the 1 x and 5 x human doses of Sinupret drops significantly prolonged the survival times (p < 0.05) compared to placebo. Additionally, ambroxol and MDP were comparably less effective. In all groups, changes in CD4 + and CD8 + T-lymphocyte subpopulations of the peripheral blood were observed, but no clear relationship to the treatment results was seen. It was concluded that Sinupret increases the resistance to an experimentally induced respiratory tract infection in mice. Moreover, the effect of Sinupret was superior to that of an immunostimulant (MDP) and of a synthetic secretagogue (ambroxolhydrochloride).

  9. Non-viral adeno-associated virus-based platform for stable expression of antibody combination therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Wilmes, Gwendolyn M; Carey, Kimberly L; Hicks, Stuart W; Russell, Hugh H; Stevenson, Jesse A; Kocjan, Paulina; Lutz, Stephen R; Quesenberry, Rachel S; Shulga-Morskoy, Sergey V; Lewis, Megan E; Clark, Ethan; Medik, Violetta; Cooper, Anthony B; Reczek, Elizabeth E

    2014-01-01

    Antibody combination therapeutics (ACTs) are polyvalent biopharmaceuticals that are uniquely suited for the control of complex diseases, including antibiotic resistant infectious diseases, autoimmune disorders and cancers. However, ACTs also represent a distinct manufacturing challenge because the independent manufacture and subsequent mixing of monoclonal antibodies quickly becomes cost prohibitive as more complex mixtures are envisioned. We have developed a virus-free recombinant protein expression platform based on adeno-associated viral (AAV) elements that is capable of rapid and consistent production of complex antibody mixtures in a single batch format. Using both multiplexed immunoassays and cation exchange (CIEX) chromatography, cell culture supernatants generated using our system were assessed for stability of expression and ratios of the component antibodies over time. Cultures expressing combinations of three to ten antibodies maintained consistent expression levels and stable ratios of component antibodies for at least 60 days. Cultures showed remarkable reproducibility following cell banking, and AAV-based cultures showed higher stability and productivity than non-AAV based cultures. Therefore, this non-viral AAV-based expression platform represents a predictable, reproducible, quick and cost effective method to manufacture or quickly produce for preclinical testing recombinant antibody combination therapies and other recombinant protein mixtures. PMID:24758837

  10. Ivermectin alone or in combination with benzyl benzoate in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus-associated scabies.

    PubMed

    Alberici, F; Pagani, L; Ratti, G; Viale, P

    2000-05-01

    In order to establish a safe and reliable treatment for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated scabies, we have treated 60 episodes of scabies in this setting, occurring in 39 patients, with one of the following regimens: (i) topical treatment with benzyl benzoate solution; (ii) single-dose oral treatment with ivermectin alone; and (iii) combination therapy with benzyl benzoate solution and oral ivermectin, employing the same regimens as single-agent therapy. Patients were stratified according to the severity score of the disease and the outcome (eradication, relapse, failure). We found that both benzyl benzoate and ivermectin alone were quite effective in mild to moderate scabies, but they were both associated with an unacceptable rate of relapse and failure in severe or crusted scabies. In contrast, combined treatment produced an optimal rate of success, without significant treatment-related side-effects. Therefore, we consider that combination treatment with benzyl benzoate solution and oral ivermectin is preferable to single-agent therapy in crusted scabies occurring in HIV/acquired immune deficiency syndrome patients.

  11. Combination of Leflunomide and Everolimus for treatment of BK virus nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Jaw, Juli; Hill, Prue; Goodman, David

    2017-04-01

    BK nephropathy (BKN) is a common cause of graft dysfunction following kidney transplantation. Minimization of immunosuppressive therapy remains the first line of therapy, but this may lead to rejection and graft loss. In some cases, despite lowering immunosuppression, BK infection can persist, leading to chronic damage and kidney failure. Currently, there is no specific anti-BK viral therapy. Recent in vitro experiments have demonstrated a reduction in BK viral replication when infected cells are treated with the combination of Leflunomide and Everolimus. This study aims to explore the effect of this drugs combination on viral clearance and graft function in patients with persistent disease despite reduction in immunosuppression. We treated three patients with combination Leflunomide and Everolimus. Data on medical history, biochemical parameters and viral loads were collected. Significant improvement in viral loads was observed in two cases with resolution of viremia in another (Table 1). Two recipients had preserved allograft function. The remaining graft was lost because of combination of obstruction and BKN. No adverse reactions such as bone marrow toxicity were observed. Combination of Leflunomide and Everolimus is safe and should be considered as a rescue therapy in treatment of BKN, especially in those who fail to clear this infection despite reduction of immunosuppressive therapy.

  12. A combinational therapy of EGFR-CAR NK cells and oncolytic herpes simplex virus 1 for breast cancer brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xilin; Han, Jianfeng; Chu, Jianhong; Zhang, Lingling; Zhang, Jianying; Chen, Charlie; Chen, Luxi; Wang, Youwei; Wang, Hongwei; Yi, Long; Elder, J Bradley; Wang, Qi-En; He, Xiaoming; Kaur, Balveen; Chiocca, E Antonio; Yu, Jianhua

    2016-05-10

    Breast cancer brain metastases (BCBMs) are common in patients with metastatic breast cancer and indicate a poor prognosis. These tumors are especially resistant to currently available treatments due to multiple factors. However, the combination of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified immune cells and oncolytic herpes simplex virus (oHSV) has not yet been explored in this context. In this study, NK-92 cells and primary NK cells were engineered to express the second generation of EGFR-CAR. The efficacies of anti-BCBMs of EGFR-CAR NK cells, oHSV-1, and their combination were tested in vitro and in a breast cancer intracranial mouse model. In vitro, compared with mock-transduced NK-92 cells or primary NK cells, EGFR-CAR-engineered NK-92 cells and primary NK cells displayed enhanced cytotoxicity and IFN-γ production when co-cultured with breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468, and MCF-7. oHSV-1 alone was also capable of lysing and destroying these cells. However, a higher cytolytic effect of EGFR-CAR NK-92 cells was observed when combined with oHSV-1 compared to the monotherapies. In the mice intracranially pre-inoculated with EGFR-expressing MDA-MB-231 cells, intratumoral administration of either EGFR-CAR-transduced NK-92 cells or oHSV-1 mitigated tumor growth. Notably, the combination of EGFR-CAR NK-92 cells with oHSV-1 resulted in more efficient killing of MDA-MB-231 tumor cells and significantly longer survival of tumor-bearing mice when compared to monotherapies. These results demonstrate that regional administration of EGFR-CAR NK-92 cells combined with oHSV-1 therapy is a potentially promising strategy to treat BCBMs.

  13. Clinical Potential of the Acyclic Nucleoside Phosphonates Cidofovir, Adefovir, and Tenofovir in Treatment of DNA Virus and Retrovirus Infections

    PubMed Central

    De Clercq, Erik

    2003-01-01

    The acyclic nucleoside phosphonates HPMPC (cidofovir), PMEA (adefovir), and PMPA (tenofovir) have proved to be effective in vitro (cell culture systems) and in vivo (animal models and clinical studies) against a wide variety of DNA virus and retrovirus infections: cidofovir against herpesvirus (herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 varicella-zoster virus, cytomegalovirus [CMV], Epstein-Barr virus, and human herpesviruses 6, 7, and 8), polyomavirus, papillomavirus, adenovirus, and poxvirus (variola virus, cowpox virus, vaccinia virus, molluscum contagiosum virus, and orf virus) infections; adefovir against herpesvirus, hepadnavirus (human hepatitis B virus), and retrovirus (human immunodeficiency virus types 1 [HIV-1] and 2 [HIV-2], simian immunodeficiency virus, and feline immunodeficiency virus) infections; and tenofovir against both hepadnavirus and retrovirus infections. Cidofovir (Vistide) has been officially approved for the treatment of CMV retinitis in AIDS patients, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (Viread) has been approved for the treatment of HIV infections (i.e., AIDS), and adefovir dipivoxil (Hepsera) has been approved for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B. Nephrotoxicity is the dose-limiting side effect for cidofovir (Vistide) when used intravenously (5 mg/kg); no toxic side effects have been described for adefovir dipivoxil and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, at the approved doses (Hepsera at 10 mg orally daily and Viread at 300 mg orally daily). PMID:14557287

  14. A clinical pilot study of lignin--ascorbic acid combination treatment of herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Blanca Silvia Gonzalez; Yamamoto, Masaji; Utsumi, Katsuaki; Aratsu, Chiaki; Sakagami, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Antiviral drugs as well as natural remedies have been used to reduce symptoms and the rate of recurrences of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection, a common disease. To evaluate anti-HSV-1 activity of a pine cone lignin and ascorbic acid treatment, a clinical pilot study was carried out. Forty-eight healthy patients of both genders between 4 and 61 years old (mean: 31+/-16 years), with active lesions of HSV-1, took part in the study. According to the HSV-1 stage at the presentation, the patients were classified into the prodromic (16 patients), erythema (11 patients), papule edema (1 patient), vesicle/pustule (13 patients) and ulcer stages (7 patients). One mg of lignin-ascorbic acid tablet or solution was orally administered three times daily for a month. Clinical evaluations were made daily the first week and at least three times a week during the second week after the onset and every six months during the subsequent year to identify recurrence episodes. The patients who began the lignin-ascorbic acid treatment within the first 48 hours of symptom onset did not develop HSV-1 characteristic lesions, whereas those patients who began the treatment later experienced a shorter duration of cold sore lesions and a decrease in the symptoms compared with previous episodes. The majority of the patients reported the reduction in the severity of symptoms and the reduction in the recurrence episodes after the lignin-ascorbic acid treatment compared with previous episodes, suggesting its possible applicability for the prevention and treatment of HSV-1 infection.

  15. Deciphering the Effects of Injectable Pre-exposure Prophylaxis for Combination Human Immunodeficiency Virus Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Glaubius, Robert L.; Parikh, Urvi M.; Hood, Greg; Penrose, Kerri J.; Bendavid, Eran; Mellors, John W.; Abbas, Ume L.

    2016-01-01

    Background. A long-acting injectable formulation of rilpivirine (RPV), under investigation as antiretroviral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), may facilitate PrEP adherence. In contrast, cross-resistance between RPV and nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors comprising first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) could promote human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance and reduce PrEP's effectiveness. Methods. We use novel mathematical modeling of different RPV PrEP scale-up strategies in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, to investigate their effects on HIV prevention and drug resistance, compared with a reference scenario without PrEP. Results. Pre-exposure prophylaxis scale-up modestly increases the proportion of prevalent drug-resistant infections, from 33% to ≤37%. The change in the number of prevalent drug-resistant infections depends on the interplay between PrEP factors (coverage, efficacy, delivery reliability, and scale-up strategy) and the level of cross-resistance between PrEP and ART. An optimistic scenario of 70% effective RPV PrEP (90% efficacious and 80% reliable delivery), among women aged 20–29 years, prevents 17% of cumulative infections over 10 years while decreasing prevalent resistance; however, prevention decreases and resistance increases with more conservative assumptions. Uncertainty analysis assuming 40%–70% cross-resistance prevalence predicts an increase in prevalent resistance unless PrEP's effectiveness exceeds 90%. Conclusions. Prioritized scale-up of injectable PrEP among women in KwaZulu-Natal could reduce HIV infections, but suboptimal effectiveness could promote the spread of drug resistance. PMID:27703992

  16. Combinations of oseltamivir and peramivir for the treatment of influenza A (H1N1) virus infections in cell culture and in mice

    PubMed Central

    Smee, Donald F.; Hurst, Brett L.; Wong, Min-Hui; Tarbet, E. Bart; Babu, Y.S.; Klumpp, Klaus; Morrey, John D.

    2010-01-01

    Oseltamivir and peramivir are being considered for combination treatment of serious influenza virus infections in humans. Both compounds are influenza virus neuraminidase inhibitors, and since peramivir binds tighter to the enzyme than oseltamivir carboxylate (the active form of oseltamivir), the possibility exists that antagonistic interactions might result when using the two compounds together. To study this possibility, combination chemotherapy experiments were conducted in vitro and in mice infected with influenza A/NWS/33 (H1N1) virus. Treatment of infected MDCK cells was performed with combinations of oseltamivir carboxylate and peramivir at 0.32-100 μM for 3 days, followed by virus yield determinations. Additive drug interactions with a narrow region of synergy were found using the MacSynergy method. In a viral neuraminidase assay with combinations of inhibitors at 0.01-10 nM, no significant antagonistic or synergistic interactions were observed across the range of concentrations. Infected mice were treated twice-daily for 5 days starting 2 hours prior to virus challenge using drug doses of 0.05-0.4 mg/kg/day. Consistent and statistically significant increases in the numbers of survivors were seen when twice daily oral oseltamivir (0.4 mg/kg/day) was combined with twice daily intramuscular peramivir (0.1 and 0.2 mg/kg/day) compared to single drug treatments The data demonstrate that combinations of oseltamivir and peramivir perform better than suboptimal doses of each compound alone to treat influenza infections in mice. Treatment with these two compounds should be considered as an option. PMID:20633577

  17. Combination Immunosuppressive Therapy Including Rituximab for Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis in Adult-Onset Still's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, Eva Johanna; Jung, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphopcytosis (HLH) is a life-threatening condition. It can occur either as primary form with genetic defects or secondary to other conditions, such as hematological or autoimmune diseases. Certain triggering factors can predispose individuals to the development of HLH. We report the case of a 25-year-old male patient who was diagnosed with HLH in the context of adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) during a primary infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). During therapy with anakinra and dexamethasone, he was still symptomatic with high-spiking fevers, arthralgia, and sore throat. His laboratory values showed high levels of ferritin and C-reactive protein. His condition improved after the addition of rituximab and cyclosporine to his immunosuppressive regimen with prednisolone and anakinra. This combination therapy led to a sustained clinical and serological remission of his condition. While rituximab has been used successfully for HLH in the context of EBV-associated lymphoma, its use in autoimmune diseases is uncommon. We hypothesize that the development of HLH was triggered by a primary EBV infection and that rituximab led to elimination of EBV-infected B-cells, while cyclosporine ameliorated the cytokine excess. We therefore propose that this combination immunosuppressive therapy might be successfully used in HLH occurring in the context of autoimmune diseases. PMID:28018698

  18. Combined hepatitis C virus (HCV) antigen-antibody detection assay does not improve diagnosis for seronegative individuals with occult HCV infection.

    PubMed

    Quiroga, Juan A; Castillo, Inmaculada; Pardo, Margarita; Rodríguez-Iñigo, Elena; Carreño, Vicente

    2006-12-01

    A combined hepatitis C virus (HCV) antigen-antibody assay was evaluated for 115 seronegative individuals with occult HCV infection. The assay was reactive in one patient and negative to weakly reactive in three others (all four gave indeterminate results by supplemental assay) but failed to detect HCV in the remaining patients. Despite increased sensitivity the combined assay does not improve serodiagnosis of occult HCV infection.

  19. Discovery of Influenza A Virus Sequence Pairs and Their Combinations for Simultaneous Heterosubtypic Targeting that Hedge against Antiviral Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jing; Pramono, Zacharias Aloysius Dwi; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    The multiple circulating human influenza A virus subtypes coupled with the perpetual genomic mutations and segment reassortment events challenge the development of effective therapeutics. The capacity to drug most RNAs motivates the investigation on viral RNA targets. 123,060 segment sequences from 35,938 strains of the most prevalent subtypes also infecting humans–H1N1, 2009 pandemic H1N1, H3N2, H5N1 and H7N9, were used to identify 1,183 conserved RNA target sequences (≥15-mer) in the internal segments. 100% theoretical coverage in simultaneous heterosubtypic targeting is achieved by pairing specific sequences from the same segment (“Duals”) or from two segments (“Doubles”); 1,662 Duals and 28,463 Doubles identified. By combining specific Duals and/or Doubles to form a target graph wherein an edge connecting two vertices (target sequences) represents a Dual or Double, it is possible to hedge against antiviral resistance besides maintaining 100% heterosubtypic coverage. To evaluate the hedging potential, we define the hedge-factor as the minimum number of resistant target sequences that will render the graph to become resistant i.e. eliminate all the edges therein; a target sequence or a graph is considered resistant when it cannot achieve 100% heterosubtypic coverage. In an n-vertices graph (n ≥ 3), the hedge-factor is maximal (= n– 1) when it is a complete graph i.e. every distinct pair in a graph is either a Dual or Double. Computational analyses uncover an extensive number of complete graphs of different sizes. Monte Carlo simulations show that the mutation counts and time elapsed for a target graph to become resistant increase with the hedge-factor. Incidentally, target sequences which were reported to reduce virus titre in experiments are included in our target graphs. The identity of target sequence pairs for heterosubtypic targeting and their combinations for hedging antiviral resistance are useful toolkits to construct target graphs for

  20. Influenza A virus in swine breeding herds: Combination of vaccination and biosecurity practices can reduce likelihood of endemic piglet reservoir.

    PubMed

    White, L A; Torremorell, M; Craft, M E

    2017-03-01

    Recent modelling and empirical work on influenza A virus (IAV) suggests that piglets play an important role as an endemic reservoir. The objective of this study is to test intervention strategies aimed at reducing the incidence of IAV in piglets and ideally, preventing piglets from becoming exposed in the first place. These interventions include biosecurity measures, vaccination, and management options that swine producers may employ individually or jointly to control IAV in their herds. We have developed a stochastic Susceptible-Exposed-Infectious-Recovered-Vaccinated (SEIRV) model that reflects the spatial organization of a standard breeding herd and accounts for the different production classes of pigs therein. Notably, this model allows for loss of immunity for vaccinated and recovered animals, and for vaccinated animals to have different latency and infectious periods from unvaccinated animals as suggested by the literature. The interventions tested include: (1) varied timing of gilt introductions to the breeding herd, (2) gilt separation (no indirect transmission to or from the gilt development unit), (3) gilt vaccination upon arrival to the farm, (4) early weaning, and (5) vaccination strategies of sows with different timing (mass and pre-farrow) and efficacy (homologous vs. heterologous). We conducted a Latin Hypercube Sampling and Partial Rank Correlation Coefficient (LHS-PRCC) analysis combined with a random forest analysis to assess the relative importance of each epidemiological parameter in determining epidemic outcomes. In concert, mass vaccination, early weaning of piglets (removal 0-7days after birth), gilt separation, gilt vaccination, and longer periods between introductions of gilts (6 months) were the most effective at reducing prevalence. Endemic prevalence overall was reduced by 51% relative to the null case; endemic prevalence in piglets was reduced by 74%; and IAV was eliminated completely from the herd in 23% of all simulations. Importantly

  1. A Polyvalent Clade B Virus-Like Particle HIV Vaccine Combined with Partially Protective Oral Preexposure Prophylaxis Prevents Simian–Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in Macaques and Primes for Virus-Amplified Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Ted M.; Pereira, Lara E.; Luckay, Amara; McNicholl, Janet M.; García-Lerma, J. Gerardo; Heneine, Walid; Eugene, Hermancia S.; Pierce-Paul, Brooke R.; Zhang, Jining; Hendry, R. Michael

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Vaccination and preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) with antiretrovirals have shown only partial protection from HIV-1 infection in human trials. Oral Truvada (emtricitabine/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate) is FDA approved as PrEP but partial adherence reduces efficacy. If combined as biomedical preventions (CBP), an HIV vaccine could protect when PrEP adherence is low and PrEP could prevent vaccine breakthroughs. The efficacy of combining oral PrEP with an HIV vaccine has not been evaluated in humans. We determined the efficacy of combining a DNA/virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine with partially effective intermittent PrEP in Indian rhesus macaques (RM). Eight RM received intramuscular inoculations of five DNA plasmids encoding four HIV-1 Clade B primary isolate Envs and SIVmac239 Gag (at weeks 0 and 4), followed by intramuscular and intranasal inoculations of homologous Gag VLPs and four Env VLPs (at weeks 12, 16, and 53). At week 61, we initiated weekly rectal exposures with heterologous SHIV162p3 (10 TCID50) along with oral Truvada (TDF, 22 mg/kg; FTC 20 mg/kg) dosing 2 h before and 22 h after each exposure. This PrEP regimen previously demonstrated 50% efficacy. Five controls (no vaccine, no PrEP) received weekly SHIV162p3. All controls were infected after a median of four exposures; the mean peak plasma viral load (VL) was 3.9×107 vRNA copies/ml. CBP protected seven of eight (87.5%) RM. The one infected CBP RM had a reduced peak VL of 8.8×105 copies/ml. SHIV exposures during PrEP amplified Gag and Env antibody titers in protected RM. These results suggest that combining oral PrEP with HIV vaccines could enhance protection against HIV-1 infection. PMID:24914761

  2. Combination vascular delivery of herpes simplex oncolytic viruses and amplicon mediated cytokine gene transfer is effective therapy for experimental liver cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Zager, J. S.; Delman, K. A.; Malhotra, S.; Ebright, M. I.; Bennett, J. J.; Kates, T.; Halterman, M.; Federoff, H.; Fong, Y.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Herpes simplex type I (HSV)-based vectors have been used experimentally for suicide gene therapy, immunomodulatory gene delivery, and direct oncolytic therapy. The current study utilizes the novel concept of regional delivery of an oncolytic virus in combination with or serving as the helper virus for packaging herpes-based amplicon vectors carrying a cytokine transgene, with the goal of identifying if this combination is more efficacious than either modality alone. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A replication competent oncolytic HSV (G207) and a replication incompetent HSV amplicon carrying the gene for the immunomodulatory cytokine IL-2 (HSV-IL2) were tested in murine syngeneic colorectal carcinoma and in rat hepatocellular carcinoma models. Liver tumors were treated with vascular delivery of (1) phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), (2) G207, (3) HSV-IL2, (4) G207 and HSV-IL2 mixed in combination (mG207/HSV- IL2), and (5) G207 as the helper virus for packaging the construct HSV-IL2 (pG207/HSV-IL2). RESULTS: Tumor burden was significantly reduced in all treatment groups in both rats and mice treated with high-dose G207, HSV-IL2, or both (p < 0.02). When a low dose of virus was used in mice, anti-tumor efficacy was improved by use of G207 and HSV-IL2 in combination or with HSV-IL2 packaged by G207 (p < 0.001). This improvement was abolished when CD4(+) and CD8(+) lymphocytes were depleted, implying that the enhanced anti-tumor response to low-dose combined therapy is immune mediated. CONCLUSIONS: Vascular regional delivery of oncolytic and amplicon HSV vectors can be used to induce improved anti-tumor efficacy by combining oncolytic and immunostimulatory strategies. PMID:11591892

  3. Effects of mTOR and calcineurin inhibitors combined therapy in Epstein-Barr virus positive and negative Burkitt lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wowro, Sylvia J; Schmitt, Katharina R L; Tong, Giang; Berger, Felix; Schubert, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder is a severe complication in solid organ transplant recipients, which is highly associated with Epstein-Barr virus infection in pediatric patients and occasionally presents as Burkitt- or Burkitt-like lymphoma. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway has been described as a possible antitumor target whose inhibition may influence lymphoma development and proliferation after pediatric transplantation. We treated Epstein-Barr virus positive (Raji and Daudi) and negative (Ramos) human Burkitt lymphoma derived cells with mTOR inhibitor everolimus alone and in combination with clinically relevant immunosuppressive calcineurin inhibitors (tacrolimus or cyclosporin A). Cell proliferation, toxicity, and mitochondrial metabolic activity were analyzed. The effect on mTOR Complex 1 downstream targets p70 S6 kinase, eukaryotic initiation factor 4G, and S6 ribosomal protein activation was also investigated. We observed that treatment with everolimus alone significantly decreased Burkitt lymphoma cell proliferation and mitochondrial metabolic activity. Everolimus in combination with cyclosporin A had a stronger suppressive effect in Epstein-Barr virus negative but not in Epstein-Barr virus positive cells. In contrast, tacrolimus completely abolished the everolimus-mediated suppressive effects. Moreover, we showed a significant decrease in activation of mTOR Complex 1 downstream targets after treatment with everolimus that was attenuated when combined with tacrolimus, but not with cyclosporin A. For the first time we showed the competitive effect between everolimus and tacrolimus when used as combination therapy on Burkitt lymphoma derived cells. Thus, according to our in vitro data, the combination of calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporin A with everolimus is preferred to the combination of tacrolimus and everolimus.

  4. Combined local and systemic immunization is essential for durable T-cell mediated heterosubtypic immunity against influenza A virus

    PubMed Central

    Uddback, Ida E. M.; Pedersen, Line M. I.; Pedersen, Sara R.; Steffensen, Maria A.; Holst, Peter J.; Thomsen, Allan R.; Christensen, Jan P.

    2016-01-01

    The threat from unpredictable influenza virus pandemics necessitates the development of a new type of influenza vaccine. Since the internal proteins are highly conserved, induction of T cells targeting these antigens may provide the solution. Indeed, adenoviral (Ad) vectors expressing flu nucleoprotein have previously been found to induce short-term protection in mice. In this study we confirm that systemic (subcutaneous (s.c.) immunization rapidly induced heterosubtypic protection predominantly mediated by CD8 T cells, but within three months clinical protection completely disappeared. Local (intranasal (i.n.)) immunization elicited delayed, but more lasting protection despite relatively inefficient immunization. However, by far, the most robust protection was induced by simultaneous, combined (i.n. + s.c.) vaccination, and, notably, in this case clinical protection lasted at least 8 months without showing any evidence of fading. Interestingly, the superior ability of the latter group to resist reinfection correlated with a higher number of antigen-specific CD8 T cells in the spleen. Thus, detailed analysis of the underlying CD8 T cell responses highlights the importance of T cells already positioned in the lungs prior to challenge, but at the same time underscores an important back-up role for circulating antigen-specific cells with the capacity to expand and infiltrate the infected lungs. PMID:26831578

  5. The rational of catalytic activity of herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase. a combined biochemical and quantum chemical study.

    PubMed

    Sulpizi, M; Schelling, P; Folkers, G; Carloni, P; Scapozza, L

    2001-06-15

    Most antiherpes therapies exploit the large substrate acceptance of herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (TK(HSV1)) relative to the human isoenzyme. The enzyme selectively phosphorylates nucleoside analogs that can either inhibit viral DNA polymerase or cause toxic effects when incorporated into viral DNA. To relate structural properties of TK(HSV1) ligands to their chemical reactivity we have carried out ab initio quantum chemistry calculations within the density functional theory framework in combination with biochemical studies. Calculations have focused on a set of ligands carrying a representative set of the large spectrum of sugar-mimicking moieties and for which structural information of the TK(HSV1)-ligand complex is available. The k(cat) values of these ligands have been measured under the same experimental conditions using an UV spectrophotometric assay. The calculations point to the crucial role of electric dipole moment of ligands and its interaction with the negatively charged residue Glu(225). A striking correlation is found between the energetics associated with this interaction and the k(cat) values measured under homogeneous conditions. This finding uncovers a fundamental aspect of the mechanism governing substrate diversity and catalytic turnover and thus represents a significant step toward the rational design of novel and powerful prodrugs for antiviral and TK(HSV1)-linked suicide gene therapies.

  6. Mefenamic acid in combination with ribavirin shows significant effects in reducing chikungunya virus infection in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Rothan, Hussin A; Bahrani, Hirbod; Abdulrahman, Ammar Y; Mohamed, Zulqarnain; Teoh, Teow Chong; Othman, Shatrah; Rashid, Nurshamimi Nor; Rahman, Noorsaadah A; Yusof, Rohana

    2016-03-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infection is a persistent problem worldwide due to efficient adaptation of the viral vectors, Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes. Therefore, the absence of effective anti-CHIKV drugs to combat chikungunya outbreaks often leads to a significant impact on public health care. In this study, we investigated the antiviral activity of drugs that are used to alleviate infection symptoms, namely, the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), on the premise that active compounds with potential antiviral and anti-inflammatory activities could be directly subjected for human use to treat CHIKV infections. Amongst the various NSAID compounds, Mefenamic acid (MEFE) and Meclofenamic acid (MECLO) showed considerable antiviral activity against viral replication individually or in combination with the common antiviral drug, Ribavirin (RIBA). The 50% effective concentration (EC50) was estimated to be 13 μM for MEFE, 18 μM for MECLO and 10 μM for RIBA, while MEFE + RIBA (1:1) exhibited an EC50 of 3 μM, and MECLO + RIBA (1:1) was 5 μM. Because MEFE is commercially available and its synthesis is easier compared with MECLO, MEFE was selected for further in vivo antiviral activity analysis. Treatment with MEFE + RIBA resulted in a significant reduction of hypertrophic effects by CHIKV on the mouse liver and spleen. Viral titre quantification in the blood of CHIKV-infected mice through the plaque formation assay revealed that treatment with MEFE + RIBA exhibited a 6.5-fold reduction compared with untreated controls. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that MEFE in combination with RIBA exhibited significant anti-CHIKV activity by impairing viral replication in vitro and in vivo. Indeed, this finding may lead to an even broader application of these combinatorial treatments against other viral infections.

  7. Clinical outcome of interferon and ribavirin combination treatment in hepatitis C virus infected patients with congenital bleeding disorders in Iran.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, M; Toosi, M N; Ghannadi, K; Lari, G R; Jazebi, M; Rasoulzadegan, M; Ala, F

    2009-09-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with inherited bleeding disorders. The results of interferon and ribavirin combination therapy have been reported in a limited number of clinical trials on these patients. Peginterferon is a costly treatment. Conventional interferon and ribavirin therapy is still the main available and affordable antiviral therapy in some countries. The goal of this study was to assess the effectiveness and safety of interferon alfa-2b plus ribavirin in HIV seronegative, non-alcoholic, non-cirrhotic, naïve subjects with congenital coagulopathy. Between May 2003 and August 2007, 103 haemophiliacs were treated consecutively with standard inclusion and exclusion criteria, with interferon alfa-2b (PDferon B) 3MIU three times a week subcutaneously plus ribavirin, for 24-48 weeks, with appropriate dose adjustments. They were all scheduled to have serial visits and laboratory tests. Among 7(6.8%) female and 96(93.2%) male haemophiliacs, 11(10.68%) cases did not complete the study because of psychological side effects. With intent-to-treat analysis, end-of-treatment response was 63.1%, and sustained virological response (SVR) was 56.3%. There was a significant correlation between SVR and genotype, baseline HCV viral load, rapid virological response, early virological response and BMI. A decrease in the haemoglobin level of two patients required ribavirin dose reduction. One developed thrombocytopenia at the end of treatment, but none had neutropenia. Hypothyroidism was observed in two patients. Interferon plus ribavirin combination therapy in HCV-infected haemophilic patients is well tolerated and treatment outcomes appear to be similar to those seen in the general population.

  8. Clearance of Hepatitis C Virus After Fixed-Dose Combination Ledipasvir/Sofosbuvir in an Adolescent Female With Decompensated Cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sara K; Rosenthal, Philip

    2016-11-01

    Currently the only Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment for children with chronic hepatitis C virus is pegylated interferon with ribavirin, which is associated with significant adverse effects and low sustained virologic response rates. In this report, we discuss the use of ledipasvir/sofosbuvir to treat an adolescent with cirrhosis secondary to chronic hepatitis C virus.

  9. Intranasal immunization with live recombinant Lactococcus lactis combined with heat-labile toxin B subunit protects chickens from highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus.

    PubMed

    Lei, Han; Peng, Xiaojue; Shu, Handing; Zhao, Daxian

    2015-01-01

    Development of safe and effective vaccines to prevent highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus infection is a challenging goal. Lactococcus lactis (L. lactis) is an ideal delivery vector for vaccine development, and it has been shown previously that oral immunization of encapsulated secretory L. lactis-hemagglutinin (HA) could provide complete protection against homologous H5N1 virus challenge in the mice model. While intranasal immunization is an appealing approach, it is now reported that secretory L. lactis-HA combined with mucosal adjuvant heat-labile toxin B subunit (LTB) could provide protective immunity in the chicken model. As compared to intranasal immunization with L. lactis-HA alone, L. lactis-HA combined with LTB (L. lactis-HA + LTB) could elicit robust neutralizing antibody responses and mucosal IgA responses, as well as strong cellular immune responses in the vaccinated chickens. Importantly, intranasal immunization with L. lactis-HA + LTB could provide 100% protection against H5N1 virus challenge. Taken together, these results suggest that intranasal immunization with L. lactis-HA + LTB can be considered as an effective approach for preventing and controlling infection of H5N1 virus in poultry during an avian influenza A/H5N1 pandemic.

  10. Engineering of a parainfluenza virus type 5 fusion protein (PIV-5 F): development of an autonomous and hyperfusogenic protein by a combinational mutagenesis approach.

    PubMed

    Terrier, O; Durupt, F; Cartet, G; Thomas, L; Lina, B; Rosa-Calatrava, M

    2009-12-01

    The entry of enveloped viruses into host cells is accomplished by fusion of the viral envelope with the target cell membrane. For the paramyxovirus parainfluenza virus type 5 (PIV-5), this fusion involves an attachment protein (HN) and a class I viral fusion protein (F). We investigated the effect of 20 different combinations of 12 amino-acid substitutions within functional domains of the PIV-5 F glycoprotein, by performing cell surface expression measurements, quantitative fusion and syncytia assays. We found that combinations of mutations conferring an autonomous phenotype with mutations leading to an increased fusion activity were compatible and generated functional PIV-5 F proteins. The addition of mutations in the heptad-repeat domains led to both autonomous and hyperfusogenic phenotypes, despite the low cell surface expression of the corresponding mutants. Such engineering approach may prove useful not only for deciphering the fundamental mechanism behind viral-mediated membrane fusion but also in the development of potential therapeutic applications.

  11. Randomized trial of combined triple therapy comprising two types of peginterferon with simeprevir in patients with hepatitis C virus genotype 1b.

    PubMed

    Tamori, Akihiro; Yoshida, Kanako; Kurai, Osamu; Kioka, Kiyohide; Hai, Hoang; Kozuka, Ritsuzo; Motoyama, Hiroyuki; Kawamura, Etsushi; Hagihara, Atsushi; Uchida-Kobayashi, Sawako; Morikawa, Hiroyasu; Enomoto, Masaru; Murakami, Yoshiki; Kawada, Norifumi

    2016-12-01

    Simeprevir (SMV) is a potent, macrocyclic hepatitis C virus (HCV) non-structural 3/4 A protease inhibitor. This prospective study compared the efficacy and safety of SMV in combination with peginterferon α2a + ribavirin (P2aR) and with peginterferon α2b + ribavirin (P2bR) in Japanese patients with HCV genotype 1b infection.

  12. The Risk of West Nile Virus Infection Is Associated with Combined Sewer Overflow Streams in Urban Atlanta, Georgia, USA

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez-Prokopec, Gonzalo M.; Vanden Eng, Jodi L.; Kelly, Rosmarie; Mead, Daniel G.; Kolhe, Priti; Howgate, James; Kitron, Uriel; Burkot, Thomas R.

    2010-01-01

    Background At present, the factors favoring transmission and amplification of West Nile Virus (WNV) within urban environments are poorly understood. In urban Atlanta, Georgia, the highly polluted waters of streams affected by combined sewer overflow (CSO) represent significant habitats for the WNV mosquito vector Culex quinquefasciatus. However, their contribution to the risk of WNV infection in humans and birds remains unclear. Objectives Our goals were to describe and quantify the spatial distribution of WNV infection in mosquitoes, humans, and corvids, such as blue jays and American crows that are particularly susceptible to WNV infection, and to assess the relationship between WNV infection and proximity to CSO-affected streams in the city of Atlanta, Georgia. Materials and methods We applied spatial statistics to human, corvid, and mosquito WNV surveillance data from 2001 through 2007. Multimodel analysis was used to estimate associations of WNV infection in Cx. quinquefasciatus, humans, and dead corvids with selected risk factors including distance to CSO streams and catch basins, land cover, median household income, and housing characteristics. Results We found that WNV infection in mosquitoes, corvids, and humans was spatially clustered and statistically associated with CSO-affected streams. WNV infection in Cx. quinquefasciatus was significantly higher in CSO compared with non-CSO streams, and WNV infection rates among humans and corvids were significantly associated with proximity to CSO-affected streams, the extent of tree cover, and median household income. Conclusions Our study strongly suggests that CSO-affected streams are significant sources of Cx. quinquefasciatus mosquitoes that may facilitate WNV transmission to humans within urban environments. Our findings may have direct implications for the surveillance and control of WNV in other urban centers that continue to use CSO systems as a waste management practice. PMID:20529765

  13. The synergistic effect of combined immunization with a DNA vaccine and chimeric yellow fever/dengue virus leads to strong protection against dengue.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Adriana S; Gonçalves, Antônio J S; Archer, Marcia; Freire, Marcos S; Galler, Ricardo; Alves, Ada M B

    2013-01-01

    The dengue envelope glycoprotein (E) is the major component of virion surface and its ectodomain is composed of domains I, II and III. This protein is the main target for the development of a dengue vaccine with induction of neutralizing antibodies. In the present work, we tested two different vaccination strategies, with combined immunizations in a prime/booster regimen or simultaneous inoculation with a DNA vaccine (pE1D2) and a chimeric yellow fever/dengue 2 virus (YF17D-D2). The pE1D2 DNA vaccine encodes the ectodomain of the envelope DENV2 protein fused to t-PA signal peptide, while the YF17D-D2 was constructed by replacing the prM and E genes from the 17D yellow fever vaccine virus by those from DENV2. Balb/c mice were inoculated with these two vaccines by different prime/booster or simultaneous immunization protocols and most of them induced a synergistic effect on the elicited immune response, mainly in neutralizing antibody production. Furthermore, combined immunization remarkably increased protection against a lethal dose of DENV2, when compared to each vaccine administered alone. Results also revealed that immunization with the DNA vaccine, regardless of the combination with the chimeric virus, induced a robust cell immune response, with production of IFN-γ by CD8+ T lymphocytes.

  14. The combined effects of irradiation and herpes simplex virus type 1 infection on an immortal gingival cell line

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Oral mucosa is frequently exposed to Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection and irradiation due to dental radiography. During radiotherapy for oral cancer, the surrounding clinically normal tissues are also irradiated. This prompted us to study the effects of HSV-1 infection and irradiation on viability and apoptosis of oral epithelial cells. Methods Immortal gingival keratinocyte (HMK) cells were infected with HSV-1 at a low multiplicity of infection (MOI) and irradiated with 2 Gy 24 hours post infection. The cells were then harvested at 24, 72 and 144 hours post irradiation for viability assays and qRT-PCR analyses for the apoptosis-related genes caspases 3, 8, and 9, bcl-2, NFκB1, and viral gene VP16. Mann–Whitney U-test was used for statistical calculations. Results Irradiation improved the cell viability at 144 hours post irradiation (P = 0.05), which was further improved by HSV-1 infection at MOI of 0.00001 (P = 0.05). Simultaneously, the combined effects of infection at MOI of 0.0001 and irradiation resulted in upregulation in NFκB1 (P = 0.05). The combined effects of irradiation and HSV infection also significantly downregulated the expression of caspases 3, 8, and 9 at 144 hours (P = 0.05) whereas caspase 3 and 8 significantly upregulated in non-irradiated, HSV-infected cells as compared to uninfected controls (P = 0.05). Infection with 0.0001 MOI downregulated bcl-2 in non-irradiated cells but was upregulated by 27% after irradiation when compared to non-irradiated infected cells (P = 0.05). Irradiation had no effect on HSV-1 shedding or HSV gene expression at 144 hours. Conclusions HSV-1 infection may improve the viability of immortal cells after irradiation. The effect might be related to inhibition of apoptosis. PMID:25005804

  15. The Origin of the Variola Virus

    PubMed Central

    Babkin, Igor V.; Babkina, Irina N.

    2015-01-01

    The question of the origin of smallpox, one of the major menaces to humankind, is a constant concern for the scientific community. Smallpox is caused by the agent referred to as the variola virus (VARV), which belongs to the genus Orthopoxvirus. In the last century, smallpox was declared eradicated from the human community; however, the mechanisms responsible for the emergence of new dangerous pathogens have yet to be unraveled. Evolutionary analyses of the molecular biological genomic data of various orthopoxviruses, involving a wide range of epidemiological and historical information about smallpox, have made it possible to date the emergence of VARV. Comparisons of the VARV genome to the genomes of the most closely related orthopoxviruses and the examination of the distribution their natural hosts’ ranges suggest that VARV emerged 3000 to 4000 years ago in the east of the African continent. The VARV evolution rate has been estimated to be approximately 2 × 10−6 substitutions/site/year for the central conserved genomic region and 4 × 10−6 substitutions/site/year for the synonymous substitutions in the genome. Presumably, the introduction of camels to Africa and the concurrent changes to the climate were the particular factors that triggered the divergent evolution of a cowpox-like ancestral virus and thereby led to the emergence of VARV. PMID:25763864

  16. The origin of the variola virus.

    PubMed

    Babkin, Igor V; Babkina, Irina N

    2015-03-10

    The question of the origin of smallpox, one of the major menaces to humankind, is a constant concern for the scientific community. Smallpox is caused by the agent referred to as the variola virus (VARV), which belongs to the genus Orthopoxvirus. In the last century, smallpox was declared eradicated from the human community; however, the mechanisms responsible for the emergence of new dangerous pathogens have yet to be unraveled. Evolutionary analyses of the molecular biological genomic data of various orthopoxviruses, involving a wide range of epidemiological and historical information about smallpox, have made it possible to date the emergence of VARV. Comparisons of the VARV genome to the genomes of the most closely related orthopoxviruses and the examination of the distribution their natural hosts' ranges suggest that VARV emerged 3000 to 4000 years ago in the east of the African continent. The VARV evolution rate has been estimated to be approximately 2 × 10-6 substitutions/site/year for the central conserved genomic region and 4 × 10-6 substitutions/site/year for the synonymous substitutions in the genome. Presumably, the introduction of camels to Africa and the concurrent changes to the climate were the particular factors that triggered the divergent evolution of a cowpox-like ancestral virus and thereby led to the emergence of VARV.

  17. Enhanced cytotoxicity with a novel system combining the paclitaxel-2'-ethylcarbonate prodrug and an HSV amplicon with an attenuated replication-competent virus, HF10 as a helper virus.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Daisuke; Nawa, Akihiro; Tanino, Tadatoshi; Goshima, Fumi; Luo, Chen Hong; Iwaki, Masahiro; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Shibata, Kiyosumi; Yamamoto, Eiko; Ino, Kazuhiko; Tsurumi, Tatsuya; Nishiyama, Yukihiro; Kikkawa, Fumitaka

    2010-02-01

    We previously demonstrated that HF10, which is a natural, non-engineered HSV-1, has potent oncolytic activity in the treatment of solid malignant tumors in vitro and in vivo [H. Takakuwa, F. Goshima, N. Nozawa, T. Yoshikawa, H. Kimata, A. Nakao, et al., Oncolytic viral therapy using a spontaneously generated herpes simplex virus type 1 variant for disseminated peritoneal tumor in immunocompetent mice, Arch. Virol. 148 (2003) 813-825; S. Kohno, C. Lou, F. Goshima, Y. Nishiyama, T. Sata, Y. Ono, Herpes simplex virus type 1 mutant HF10 oncolytic viral therapy for bladder cancer, Urology 66 (2005) 1116-1121; D. Watanabe, F. Goshima, I. Mori, Y. Tamada, Y. Matsumoto, Y. Nishiyama, Oncolytic virotherapy for malignant melanoma with herpes simplex virus type 1 mutant HF10, J. Dermatol. Sci. 50 (2008) 185-196; A. Nawa, C. Luo, L. Zhang, Y. Ushijima, D. Ishida, M. Kamakura, et al., Non-engineered, naturally oncolytic herpes simplex virus HSV1 HF10: applications for cancer gene therapy, Curr. Gene. Ther. 8 (2008) 208-221]. Previous reports have also shown that a combination of HF10 and paclitaxel (TAX) was more efficacious than either regimen alone for some types of malignant tumors [S. Shimoyama, F. Goshima, O. Teshigahara, H. Kasuya, Y. Kodera, A. Nakao, et al., Enhanced efficacy of herpes simplex virus mutant HF10 combined with paclitaxel in peritoneal cancer dissemination models, Hepatogastroenterology 54 (2007) 1038-1042]. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT) using a novel system that combines the paclitaxel-2'-ethylcarbonate prodrug (TAX-2'-Et) and an HSV amplicon expressing rabbit-carboxylesterase (CES) with HF10 as a helper virus. This GDEPT system aims to produce high level of CES at the tumor site, resulting in efficient local conversion of the TAX-2'-Et prodrug into the active drug TAX [A. Nawa, T. Tanino, C. Lou, M. Iwaki, H. Kajiyama, K. Shibata, et al., Gene directed enzyme prodrug therapy for ovarian cancer

  18. Complete genome sequence and integrated protein localization and interaction map for alfalfa dwarf virus, which combines properties of both cytoplasmic and nuclear plant rhabdoviruses

    SciTech Connect

    Bejerman, Nicolás; Giolitti, Fabián; Breuil, Soledad de; Trucco, Verónica; Nome, Claudia; Lenardon, Sergio; Dietzgen, Ralf G.

    2015-09-15

    Summary: We have determined the full-length 14,491-nucleotide genome sequence of a new plant rhabdovirus, alfalfa dwarf virus (ADV). Seven open reading frames (ORFs) were identified in the antigenomic orientation of the negative-sense, single-stranded viral RNA, in the order 3′-N-P-P3-M-G-P6-L-5′. The ORFs are separated by conserved intergenic regions and the genome coding region is flanked by complementary 3′ leader and 5′ trailer sequences. Phylogenetic analysis of the nucleoprotein amino acid sequence indicated that this alfalfa-infecting rhabdovirus is related to viruses in the genus Cytorhabdovirus. When transiently expressed as GFP fusions in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, most ADV proteins accumulated in the cell periphery, but unexpectedly P protein was localized exclusively in the nucleus. ADV P protein was shown to have a homotypic, and heterotypic nuclear interactions with N, P3 and M proteins by bimolecular fluorescence complementation. ADV appears unique in that it combines properties of both cytoplasmic and nuclear plant rhabdoviruses. - Highlights: • The complete genome of alfalfa dwarf virus is obtained. • An integrated localization and interaction map for ADV is determined. • ADV has a genome sequence similarity and evolutionary links with cytorhabdoviruses. • ADV protein localization and interaction data show an association with the nucleus. • ADV combines properties of both cytoplasmic and nuclear plant rhabdoviruses.

  19. Serological survey of rodent-borne viruses in Finnish field voles.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Kristian M; Voutilainen, Liina; Jääskeläinen, Anne; Sironen, Tarja; Kinnunen, Paula M; Stuart, Peter; Vapalahti, Olli; Henttonen, Heikki; Huitu, Otso

    2014-04-01

    In northern Europe, rodent populations display cyclic density fluctuations that can be correlated with the human incidence of zoonotic diseases they spread. During density peaks, field voles (Microtus agrestis) become one of the most abundant rodent species in northern Europe, yet little is known of the viruses they host. We screened 709 field voles, trapped from 14 sites over 3 years, for antibodies against four rodent-borne, potentially zoonotic viruses or virus groups-hantaviruses, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), Ljungan virus (LV), and orthopoxviruses (OPV). Antibodies against all four viruses were detected. However, seroprevalence of hantaviruses, LV, and LCMV was low. OPV antibodies (most likely cowpox) were more common but restricted geographically to southeastern Finland. Within these sites, antibody prevalence showed delayed density dependence in spring and direct density dependence in fall. Higher seroprevalence was found in spring than fall. These results substantially increase knowledge of the presence and distribution of viruses of field voles in Finland, as well as CPXV infection dynamics.

  20. The combination of PRRS virus and bacterial endotoxin as a model for multifactorial respiratory disease in pigs.

    PubMed

    Van Gucht, Steven; Labarque, Geoffrey; Van Reeth, Kristien

    2004-12-08

    This paper reviews in vivo studies on the interaction between porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) and LPS performed in the authors' laboratory. The main aim was to develop a reproducible model to study the pathogenesis of PRRSV-induced multifactorial respiratory disease. The central hypothesis was that respiratory disease results from an overproduction of proinflammatory cytokines in the lungs. In a first series of studies, PRRSV was shown to be a poor inducer of TNF-alpha and IFN-alpha in the lungs, whereas IL-1 and the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 were produced consistently during infection. We then set up a dual inoculation model in which pigs were inoculated intratracheally with PRRSV and 3-14 days later with LPS. PRRSV-infected pigs developed acute respiratory signs for 12-24h upon intratracheal LPS inoculation, in contrast to pigs inoculated with PRRSV or LPS only. Moreover, peak TNF-alpha, IL-1 and IL-6 titers were 10-100 times higher in PRRSV-LPS inoculated pigs than in the singly inoculated pigs and the cytokine overproduction was associated with disease. To further prove the role of proinflammatory cytokines, we studied the effect of pentoxifylline, a known inhibitor of TNF-alpha and IL-1, on PRRSV-LPS induced cytokine production and disease. The clinical effects of two non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), meloxicam and flunixin meglumine, were also examined. Pentoxifylline, but not the NSAIDs, significantly reduced fever and respiratory signs from 2 to 6h after LPS. The levels of TNF-alpha and IL-1 in the lungs of pentoxifylline-treated pigs were moderately reduced, but were still 26 and 3.5-fold higher than in pigs inoculated with PRRSV or LPS only. This indicates that pathways other than inhibition of cytokine production contributed to the clinical improvement. Finally, we studied a mechanism by which PRRSV may sensitize the lungs for LPS. We hypothesized that PRRSV would increase the amount of LPS receptor

  1. Combinations of Oseltamivir and T-705 Extend the Treatment Window for Highly Pathogenic Influenza A(H5N1) Virus Infection in Mice.

    PubMed

    Marathe, Bindumadhav M; Wong, Sook-San; Vogel, Peter; Garcia-Alcalde, Fernando; Webster, Robert G; Webby, Richard J; Najera, Isabel; Govorkova, Elena A

    2016-05-25

    Current anti-influenza therapy depends on administering drugs soon after infection, which is often impractical. We assessed whether combinations of oseltamivir (a neuraminidase inhibitor) and T-705 (a nonspecific inhibitor of viral polymerases) could extend the window for treating lethal infection with highly pathogenic A(H5N1) influenza virus in mice. Combination therapy protected 100% of mice, even when delayed until 96 h postinoculation. Compared to animals receiving monotherapy, mice receiving combination therapy had reduced viral loads and restricted viral spread in lung tissues, limited lung damage, and decreased inflammatory cytokine production. Next-generation sequencing showed that virus populations in T-705-treated mice had greater genetic variability, with more frequent transversion events, than did populations in control and oseltamivir-treated mice, but no substitutions associated with resistance to oseltamivir or T-705 were detected. Thus, combination therapy extended the treatment window for A(H5N1) influenza infection in mice and should be considered for evaluation in a clinical setting.

  2. Combinations of Oseltamivir and T-705 Extend the Treatment Window for Highly Pathogenic Influenza A(H5N1) Virus Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Marathe, Bindumadhav M.; Wong, Sook-San; Vogel, Peter; Garcia-Alcalde, Fernando; Webster, Robert G.; Webby, Richard J.; Najera, Isabel; Govorkova, Elena A.

    2016-01-01

    Current anti-influenza therapy depends on administering drugs soon after infection, which is often impractical. We assessed whether combinations of oseltamivir (a neuraminidase inhibitor) and T-705 (a nonspecific inhibitor of viral polymerases) could extend the window for treating lethal infection with highly pathogenic A(H5N1) influenza virus in mice. Combination therapy protected 100% of mice, even when delayed until 96 h postinoculation. Compared to animals receiving monotherapy, mice receiving combination therapy had reduced viral loads and restricted viral spread in lung tissues, limited lung damage, and decreased inflammatory cytokine production. Next-generation sequencing showed that virus populations in T-705–treated mice had greater genetic variability, with more frequent transversion events, than did populations in control and oseltamivir-treated mice, but no substitutions associated with resistance to oseltamivir or T-705 were detected. Thus, combination therapy extended the treatment window for A(H5N1) influenza infection in mice and should be considered for evaluation in a clinical setting. PMID:27221530

  3. A combination HIV reporter virus system for measuring post-entry event efficiency and viral outcome in primary CD4+ T cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Tilton, Carisa A; Tabler, Caroline O; Lucera, Mark B; Marek, Samantha L; Haqqani, Aiman A; Tilton, John C

    2014-01-01

    Fusion between the viral membrane of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and the host cell marks the end of the HIV entry process and the beginning of a series of post-entry events including uncoating, reverse transcription, integration, and viral gene expression. The efficiency of post-entry events can be modulated by cellular factors including viral restriction factors and can lead to several distinct outcomes: productive, latent, or abortive infection. Understanding host and viral proteins impacting post-entry event efficiency and viral outcome is critical for strategies to reduce HIV infectivity and to optimize transduction of HIV-based gene therapy vectors. Here, we report a combination reporter virus system measuring both membrane fusion and viral promoter-driven gene expression. This system enables precise determination of unstimulated primary CD4+ T cell subsets targeted by HIV, the efficiency of post-entry viral events, and viral outcome and is compatible with high-throughput screening and cell-sorting methods.

  4. Lipopolysaccharide, immune activation, and liver abnormalities in HIV/hepatitis B virus (HBV)-coinfected individuals receiving HBV-active combination antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Crane, Megan; Avihingsanon, Anchalee; Rajasuriar, Reena; Velayudham, Pushparaj; Iser, David; Solomon, Ajantha; Sebolao, Baotuti; Tran, Andrew; Spelman, Tim; Matthews, Gail; Cameron, Paul; Tangkijvanich, Pisit; Dore, Gregory J; Ruxrungtham, Kiat; Lewin, Sharon R

    2014-09-01

    We investigated the relationship between microbial translocation, immune activation, and liver disease in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/hepatitis B virus (HBV) coinfection. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), soluble CD14, CXCL10, and CCL-2 levels were elevated in patients with HIV/HBV coinfection. Levels of LPS, soluble CD14, and CCL-2 declined following receipt of HBV-active combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), but the CXCL10 level remained elevated. No markers were associated with liver disease severity on liver biopsy (n = 96), but CXCL10, interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 10 (IL-10), tumor necrosis factor α, and interferon γ (IFN-γ) were all associated with elevated liver enzyme levels during receipt of HBV-active cART. Stimulation of hepatocyte cell lines in vitro with IFN-γ and LPS induced a profound synergistic increase in the production of CXCL10. LPS may contribute to liver disease via stimulating persistent production of CXCL10.

  5. T-Cell Receptor/CD28 Engagement When Combined with Prostaglandin E2 Treatment Leads to Potent Activation of Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Dumais, Nancy; Paré, Marie-Ève; Mercier, Simon; Bounou, Salim; Marriot, Susan J.; Barbeau, Benoit; Tremblay, Michel J.

    2003-01-01

    Infection with human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is characterized by long latency periods, indicating that viral gene expression is under tight control. There is presently little information available regarding the nature of extracellular stimuli that can transactivate the regulatory elements of HTLV-1 (i.e., long terminal repeat [LTR]). To gain insight into the biological importance of externally induced activation pathways in virus gene expression, primary and established T cells were transfected with HTLV-1-based reporter gene vectors and then were treated with agents that cross-linked the T-cell receptor (TCR) or the costimulatory CD28 molecule with prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). We demonstrated that a potent induction of HTLV-1 LTR-driven reporter gene activity was seen only when the three agents were used in combination. Interestingly, similar observations were made when using C91/PL, a cell line that carries integrated HTLV-1 proviral DNA. This TCR-CD28-PGE2-mediated increase in virus transcription was dependent on protein kinase A activation and induction of the cAMP response element binding protein. Experiments with a mutated reporter construct further revealed the importance of the Tax-responsive elements in the HTLV-1 LTR in the observed up regulation of virus gene expression when TCR/CD28 engagement was combined with PGE2 treatment. The protein tyrosine kinases p56lck and the transmembrane tyrosine phosphatase CD45 were all found to be involved in TCR-CD28-PGE2-directed increase in HTLV-1 LTR activity. This study presents new information on the possible mechanisms underlying reactivation of this retrovirus. PMID:14512564

  6. T-cell receptor/CD28 engagement when combined with prostaglandin E2 treatment leads to potent activation of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Dumais, Nancy; Paré, Marie-Eve; Mercier, Simon; Bounou, Salim; Marriot, Susan J; Barbeau, Benoit; Tremblay, Michel J

    2003-10-01

    Infection with human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is characterized by long latency periods, indicating that viral gene expression is under tight control. There is presently little information available regarding the nature of extracellular stimuli that can transactivate the regulatory elements of HTLV-1 (i.e., long terminal repeat [LTR]). To gain insight into the biological importance of externally induced activation pathways in virus gene expression, primary and established T cells were transfected with HTLV-1-based reporter gene vectors and then were treated with agents that cross-linked the T-cell receptor (TCR) or the costimulatory CD28 molecule with prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)). We demonstrated that a potent induction of HTLV-1 LTR-driven reporter gene activity was seen only when the three agents were used in combination. Interestingly, similar observations were made when using C91/PL, a cell line that carries integrated HTLV-1 proviral DNA. This TCR-CD28-PGE(2)-mediated increase in virus transcription was dependent on protein kinase A activation and induction of the cAMP response element binding protein. Experiments with a mutated reporter construct further revealed the importance of the Tax-responsive elements in the HTLV-1 LTR in the observed up regulation of virus gene expression when TCR/CD28 engagement was combined with PGE(2) treatment. The protein tyrosine kinases p56(lck) and the transmembrane tyrosine phosphatase CD45 were all found to be involved in TCR-CD28-PGE(2)-directed increase in HTLV-1 LTR activity. This study presents new information on the possible mechanisms underlying reactivation of this retrovirus.

  7. A Multiplex PCR/LDR Assay for the Simultaneous Identification of Category A Infectious Pathogens: Agents of Viral Hemorrhagic Fever and Variola Virus

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sanchita; Rundell, Mark S.; Mirza, Aashiq H.; Pingle, Maneesh R.; Shigyo, Kristi; Garrison, Aura R.; Paragas, Jason; Smith, Scott K.; Olson, Victoria A.; Larone, Davise H.; Spitzer, Eric D.; Barany, Francis; Golightly, Linnie M.

    2015-01-01

    CDC designated category A infectious agents pose a major risk to national security and require special action for public health preparedness. They include viruses that cause viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) syndrome as well as variola virus, the agent of smallpox. VHF is characterized by hemorrhage and fever with multi-organ failure leading to high morbidity and mortality. Smallpox, a prior scourge, has been eradicated for decades, making it a particularly serious threat if released nefariously in the essentially non-immune world population. Early detection of the causative agents, and the ability to distinguish them from other pathogens, is essential to contain outbreaks, implement proper control measures, and prevent morbidity and mortality. We have developed a multiplex detection assay that uses several species-specific PCR primers to generate amplicons from multiple pathogens; these are then targeted in a ligase detection reaction (LDR). The resultant fluorescently-labeled ligation products are detected on a universal array enabling simultaneous identification of the pathogens. The assay was evaluated on 32 different isolates associated with VHF (ebolavirus, marburgvirus, Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, Lassa fever virus, Rift Valley fever virus, Dengue virus, and Yellow fever virus) as well as variola virus and vaccinia virus (the agent of smallpox and its vaccine strain, respectively). The assay was able to detect all viruses tested, including 8 sequences representative of different variola virus strains from the CDC repository. It does not cross react with other emerging zoonoses such as monkeypox virus or cowpox virus, or six flaviviruses tested (St. Louis encephalitis virus, Murray Valley encephalitis virus, Powassan virus, Tick-borne encephalitis virus, West Nile virus and Japanese encephalitis virus). PMID:26381398

  8. A Multiplex PCR/LDR Assay for the Simultaneous Identification of Category A Infectious Pathogens: Agents of Viral Hemorrhagic Fever and Variola Virus.

    PubMed

    Das, Sanchita; Rundell, Mark S; Mirza, Aashiq H; Pingle, Maneesh R; Shigyo, Kristi; Garrison, Aura R; Paragas, Jason; Smith, Scott K; Olson, Victoria A; Larone, Davise H; Spitzer, Eric D; Barany, Francis; Golightly, Linnie M

    2015-01-01

    CDC designated category A infectious agents pose a major risk to national security and require special action for public health preparedness. They include viruses that cause viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) syndrome as well as variola virus, the agent of smallpox. VHF is characterized by hemorrhage and fever with multi-organ failure leading to high morbidity and mortality. Smallpox, a prior scourge, has been eradicated for decades, making it a particularly serious threat if released nefariously in the essentially non-immune world population. Early detection of the causative agents, and the ability to distinguish them from other pathogens, is essential to contain outbreaks, implement proper control measures, and prevent morbidity and mortality. We have developed a multiplex detection assay that uses several species-specific PCR primers to generate amplicons from multiple pathogens; these are then targeted in a ligase detection reaction (LDR). The resultant fluorescently-labeled ligation products are detected on a universal array enabling simultaneous identification of the pathogens. The assay was evaluated on 32 different isolates associated with VHF (ebolavirus, marburgvirus, Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, Lassa fever virus, Rift Valley fever virus, Dengue virus, and Yellow fever virus) as well as variola virus and vaccinia virus (the agent of smallpox and its vaccine strain, respectively). The assay was able to detect all viruses tested, including 8 sequences representative of different variola virus strains from the CDC repository. It does not cross react with other emerging zoonoses such as monkeypox virus or cowpox virus, or six flaviviruses tested (St. Louis encephalitis virus, Murray Valley encephalitis virus, Powassan virus, Tick-borne encephalitis virus, West Nile virus and Japanese encephalitis virus).

  9. Combined immunoaffinity cDNA-RNA hybridization assay for detection of hepatitis A virus in clinical specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, R W; Newbold, J E; Lemon, S M

    1985-01-01

    To apply cDNA-RNA hybridization methods to the detection of hepatitis A virus (HAV) in clinical materials, we developed a two-step method in which a microtiter-based, solid-phase immunoadsorption procedure incorporating a monoclonal anti-HAV capture antibody was followed by direct blotting of virus eluates to nitrocellulose and hybridization with 32P-labeled recombinant HAV cDNA. This immunoaffinity hybridization method is simple and involves few sample manipulations, yet it retains high sensitivity (10- to 30-fold more than radioimmunoassay) and is capable of detecting approximately 1 X 10(5) to 2 X 10(5) genome copies of virus. The inclusion of the immunoaffinity step removes most contaminating proteins and thus facilitates subsequent immobilization of the virus for hybridization. It also permits positive hybridization signals to be related to specific antigens and adds a level of specificity to the hybridization procedure. When the method was applied to 23 fecal specimens collected from individuals during week 1 of symptoms due to hepatitis A, 13 specimens were found to be reproducibly positive for HAV RNA by immunoaffinity hybridization, whereas only 11 contained viral antigen detectable by radioimmunoassay. Images PMID:2999190

  10. Combination of an unbiased amplification method and a resequencing microarray for detecting and genotyping equine arteritis virus.

    PubMed

    Hans, Aymeric; Gaudaire, Delphine; Manuguerra, Jean-Claude; Leon, Albertine; Gessain, Antoine; Laugier, Claire; Berthet, Nicolas; Zientara, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    This study shows that an unbiased amplification method applied to equine arteritis virus RNA significantly improves the sensitivity of the real-time reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) recommended by the World Organization for Animal Health. Twelve viral RNAs amplified using this method were hybridized on a high-density resequencing microarray for effective viral characterization.

  11. Oseltamivir-zanamivir combination therapy is not superior to zanamivir monotherapy in mice infected with influenza A(H3N2) and A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses.

    PubMed

    Pizzorno, Andrés; Abed, Yacine; Rhéaume, Chantal; Boivin, Guy

    2014-05-01

    The efficacy of oseltamivir-zanamivir combination therapy compared to that of monotherapy was evaluated in mice infected with influenza A(H3N2) or A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses. For A(H3N2) virus, zanamivir monotherapy and oseltamivir-zanamivir combination showed significant reduction of mean weight loss compared to oseltamivir. Zanamivir monotherapy also conferred decreased mortality, weight loss and lung viral titers (LVT) compared to oseltamivir for A(H1N1)pdm09 wild-type virus. Intermediate benefits were observed for the oseltamivir-zanamivir combination. For the oseltamivir-resistant A(H1N1)pdm09 H275Y virus, the efficacy of oseltamivir-zanamivir was comparable to that of zanamivir and significantly higher than that of oseltamivir in terms of survival, weight loss and LVT.

  12. The combined effects of oncolytic reovirus plus Newcastle disease virus and reovirus plus parvovirus on U87 and U373 cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Alkassar, Muhannad; Gärtner, Barbara; Roemer, Klaus; Graesser, Friedrich; Rommelaere, Jean; Kaestner, Lars; Haeckel, Isabelle; Graf, Norbert

    2011-09-01

    Previous results had documented oncolytic capacity of reovirus, parvovirus and Newcastle disease virus (NDV) on several tumor cell types. To test whether combinations of these viruses may increase this capacity, human U87- and U373-glioblastoma cells, in vitro or xenografted into immuno-compromised mice, were subjected to simultaneous double infections and analyzed. Our results show that reovirus (serotype-3) plus NDV (Hitcher-B1) and reovirus plus parvovirus-H1 lead to a significant increase in tumor cell killing in vitro in both cell lines (Kruskal-Wallis test, P < 0.01) and in vivo. Immunofluorescence and flow cytometry analyses demonstrated the simultaneous replication of the viruses in nearly all cells (>95%) after combined infection. These data thus indicate that a synergistic anti-tumor effect can be achieved by the combined infection with oncolytic viruses.

  13. Combined administration of oseltamivir and hochu-ekki-to (TJ-41) dramatically decreases the viral load in lungs of senescence-accelerated mice during influenza virus infection.

    PubMed

    Ohgitani, Eriko; Kita, Masakazu; Mazda, Osam; Imanishi, Jiro

    2014-02-01

    To enhance the effect of anti-influenza-virus agent treatment, the effect of combined administration of oseltamivir phosphate and hochu-ekki-to (Japanese traditional herbal medicine, HET) on early viral clearance was examined. Senescence-accelerated mice were given HET in drinking water for 2 weeks, followed by intranasal infection with influenza A virus strain PR8. After 4 hours of infection, oseltamivir was administered orally for 5 days. The viral loads in the lungs of the group receiving combined treatment were dramatically lower when compared with the viral loads in the lungs of the group receiving oseltamivir alone. HET significantly increased the induction of IL-1β and TNF-α in the lungs of PR8-infected mice and stimulated alveolar macrophage phagocytosis. From these results, we conclude that these functions may be responsible the increased effect on viral load reduction. Here, we show that the combined administration of oseltamivir and HET is very useful for influenza treatment in senescence-accelerated mice.

  14. The development of persistent duck hepatitis B virus infection can be prevented using antiviral therapy combined with DNA or recombinant fowlpoxvirus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Feng, Feng; Teoh, Chee Quin; Qiao, Qiao; Boyle, David; Jilbert, Allison R

    2010-10-28

    We recently reported the development of a successful post-exposure combination antiviral and "prime-boost" vaccination strategy using the duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) model of human hepatitis B virus infection. The current study aimed to simplify the vaccination strategy and to test the post-exposure efficacy of combination therapy with the Bristol-Myers Squibb antiviral drug, entecavir (ETV) and either a single dose of DHBV DNA vaccines on day 0 post-infection (p.i.) or a single dose of recombinant fowlpoxvirus (rFPV-DHBV) vaccines on day 7 p.i. Whilst untreated control ducks infected with an equal dose of DHBV all developed persistent and wide spread DHBV infection of the liver, ducks treated with ETV combined with either the DHBV DNA vaccines on day 0 p.i. or the rFPV-DHBV vaccines on day 7 p.i. had no detectable DHBV-infected hepatocytes by day 14 p.i. and were protected from the development of persistent DHBV infection.

  15. Protective Effects of Broadly Neutralizing Immunoglobulin against Homologous and Heterologous Equine Infectious Anemia Virus Infection in Horses with Severe Combined Immunodeficiency▿

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Sandra D.; Leib, Steven R.; Wu, Wuwei; Nelson, Robert; Carpenter, Susan; Mealey, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    Using the equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) lentivirus model system, we previously demonstrated protective effects of broadly neutralizing immune plasma in young horses (foals) with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). However, in vivo selection of a neutralization-resistant envelope variant occurred. Here, we determined the protective effects of purified immunoglobulin with more potent broadly neutralizing activity. Overall, protection correlated with the breadth and potency of neutralizing activity in vitro. Four of five SCID foals were completely protected against homologous challenge, while partial protection occurred following heterologous challenge. These results support the inclusion of broadly neutralizing antibodies in lentivirus control strategies. PMID:21543497

  16. Protective effects of broadly neutralizing immunoglobulin against homologous and heterologous equine infectious anemia virus infection in horses with severe combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Sandra D; Leib, Steven R; Wu, Wuwei; Nelson, Robert; Carpenter, Susan; Mealey, Robert H

    2011-07-01

    Using the equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) lentivirus model system, we previously demonstrated protective effects of broadly neutralizing immune plasma in young horses (foals) with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). However, in vivo selection of a neutralization-resistant envelope variant occurred. Here, we determined the protective effects of purified immunoglobulin with more potent broadly neutralizing activity. Overall, protection correlated with the breadth and potency of neutralizing activity in vitro. Four of five SCID foals were completely protected against homologous challenge, while partial protection occurred following heterologous challenge. These results support the inclusion of broadly neutralizing antibodies in lentivirus control strategies.

  17. Visual Detection of West Nile Virus Using Reverse Transcription Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Combined with a Vertical Flow Visualization Strip.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zengguo; Wang, Hualei; Wang, Lina; Li, Ling; Jin, Hongli; Xu, Changping; Feng, Na; Wang, Jianzhong; Li, Qian; Zhao, Yongkun; Wang, Tiecheng; Gao, Yuwei; Lu, Yiyu; Yang, Songtao; Xia, Xianzhu

    2016-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) causes a severe zoonosis, which can lead to a large number of casualties and considerable economic losses. A rapid and accurate identification method for WNV for use in field laboratories is urgently needed. Here, a method utilizing reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification combined with a vertical flow visualization strip (RT-LAMP-VF) was developed to detect the envelope (E) gene of WNV. The RT-LAMP-VF assay could detect 10(2) copies/μl of an WNV RNA standard using a 40 min amplification reaction followed by a 2 min incubation of the amplification product on the visualization strip, and no cross-reaction with other closely related members of the Flavivirus genus was observed. The assay was further evaluated using cells and mouse brain tissues infected with a recombinant rabies virus expressing the E protein of WNV. The assay produced sensitivities of 10(1.5) TCID50/ml and 10(1.33) TCID50/ml for detection of the recombinant virus in the cells and brain tissues, respectively. Overall, the RT-LAMP-VF assay developed in this study is rapid, simple and effective, and it is therefore suitable for clinical application in the field.

  18. Combined action of influenza virus and Staphylococcus aureus panton-valentine leukocidin provokes severe lung epithelium damage.

    PubMed

    Niemann, Silke; Ehrhardt, Christina; Medina, Eva; Warnking, Kathrin; Tuchscherr, Lorena; Heitmann, Vanessa; Ludwig, Stephan; Peters, Georg; Löffler, Bettina

    2012-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus necrotizing pneumonia is a life-threatening disease that is frequently preceded by influenza infection. The S. aureus toxin Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) is most likely causative for necrotizing diseases, but the precise pathogenic mechanisms of PVL and a possible contribution of influenza virus remain to be elucidated. In this study, we present a model that explains how influenza virus and PVL act together to cause necrotizing pneumonia: an influenza infection activates the lung epithelium to produce chemoattractants for neutrophils. Upon superinfection with PVL-expressing S. aureus, the recruited neutrophils are rapidly killed by PVL, resulting in uncontrolled release of neutrophil proteases that damage the airway epithelium. The host counteracts this pathogen strategy by generating PVL-neutralizing antibodies and by neutralizing the released proteases via protease inhibitors present in the serum. These findings explain why necrotizing infections mainly develop in serum-free spaces (eg, pulmonary alveoli) and open options for new therapeutic approaches.

  19. Proteomics approach combined with biochemical attributes to elucidate compatible and incompatible plant-virus interactions between Vigna mungo and Mungbean Yellow Mosaic India Virus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Vigna mungo, a tropical leguminous plant, highly susceptible to yellow mosaic disease caused by Mungbean Yellow Mosaic India Virus (MYMIV) resulting in high yield penalty. The molecular events occurring during compatible and incompatible interactions between V. mungo and MYMIV pathosystem are yet to be explored. In this study biochemical analyses in conjunction with proteomics of MYMIV-susceptible and -resistant V. mungo genotypes were executed to get an insight in the molecular events during compatible and incompatible plant-virus interactions. Results Biochemical analysis revealed an increase in phenolics, hydrogen peroxide and carbohydrate contents in both compatible and incompatible interactions; but the magnitudes were higher during incompatible interaction. In the resistant genotype the activities of superoxide dismutase and ascorbate peroxidase increased significantly, while catalase activity decreased. Comparative proteome analyses using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry identified 109 differentially abundant proteins at 3, 7 and 14 days post MYMIV-inoculation. Proteins of several functional categories were differentially changed in abundance during both compatible and incompatible interactions. Among these, photosynthesis related proteins were mostly affected in the susceptible genotype resulting in reduced photosynthesis rate under MYMIV-stress. Differential intensities of chlorophyll fluorescence and chlorophyll contents are in congruence with proteomics data. It was revealed that Photosystem II electron transports are the primary targets of MYMIV during pathogenesis. Quantitative real time PCR analyses of selected genes corroborates with respective protein abundance during incompatible interaction. The network of various cellular pathways that are involved in inducing defense response contains several conglomerated cores of nodal proteins, of which ascorbate peroxidase, rubisco activase and serine

  20. Genotypic characterization of Indian isolates of infectious bursal disease virus strains by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction combined with restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis.

    PubMed

    Priyadharsini, C V; Senthilkumar, T M A; Raja, P; Kumanan, K

    2016-03-01

    The reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) combined with restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) is used for the differentiation of classical virulent (cv), virulent (v) and very virulent (vv) strains of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) isolates from chicken bursal tissues in southern states of India. In the present study, six different isolates (MB11, HY12, PY12, BGE14, VCN14 and NKL14) of IBDV strains were subjected for genotyping along with vaccine virus (Georgia, intermediate strain) using RT-PCR for amplification of a 743 bp sequence in the hypervariable region of VP2 gene followed by restriction enzyme digestion with 5 different restriction enzymes (BspMI, SacI, HhaI, StuI and SspI). The RT-PCR products obtained from vvIBDV strains were digested by SspI enzyme except PY12, BGE14 and MB11 isolates. The SacI digested the isolate MB11, PY12 and the vaccine strain, but it did not cleave the very virulent isolates of IBDV. HhaI cleaved all the isolates with different restriction profile patterns. StuI digested all the vvIBDV isolates and BspMI was not able to differentiate field isolates from vaccine strain. Though RT-PCR combined with RFLP is a genotypic method, further confirmation of serotypes to distinguish the vvIBDV from cvIBDV has to be carried out using pathogenicity studies.

  1. Evaluation of three experimental bovine viral diarrhea virus killed vaccines adjuvanted with combinations of Quil A cholesterol and dimethyldioctadecylammonium (DDA) bromide.

    PubMed

    Ridpath, Julia F; Dominowski, Paul; Mannan, Ramasany; Yancey, Robert; Jackson, James A; Taylor, Lucas; Mediratta, Sangita; Eversole, Robert; Mackenzie, Charles D; Neill, John D

    2010-12-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infections cause respiratory, reproductive, and enteric disease in cattle. Vaccination raises herd resistance and limits the spread of BVDV among cattle. Both killed and modified live vaccines against BVDV are available. While modified live vaccines elicit an immune response with a broader range and a longer duration of immunity, killed vaccines are considered to be safer. One way to improve the performance of killed vaccines is to develop new adjuvants. The goal of this research was evaluate new adjuvants, consisting of combinations of Quil A cholesterol and dimethyldioctadecylammonium (DDA) bromide, for use in killed vaccines. Responses to three novel killed vaccines, using combinations of Quil A and DDA as adjuvants, were compared to responses to a commercial modified live and a commercial killed vaccine. Vaccination response was monitored by measuring viral neutralizing antibodies (VN) levels and by response to challenge. All three novel vaccines were efficacious based on reduction in virus isolation, pyrexia, and depression. Compared to a commercial killed vaccine, the three novel vaccines elicited higher VN levels and reduced injection site inflammation.

  2. Combination electro-gene therapy using herpes virus thymidine kinase and interleukin-12 expression plasmids is highly efficient against murine carcinomas in vivo.

    PubMed

    Goto, Tomoaki; Nishi, Toru; Kobayashi, Osamu; Tamura, Takahiko; Dev, Sukhendu B; Takeshima, Hideo; Kochi, Masato; Kuratsu, Jun-ichi; Sakata, Tsuneaki; Ushio, Yukitaka

    2004-11-01

    We report the use of plasmid DNA-mediated combination gene therapy for tumor-bearing mice using in vivo electroporation, also called electro-gene therapy (EGT), that resulted in uncomplicated and complete cures in more than 90% of the mice. Subcutaneously inoculated CT26 tumors in syngeneic BALB/c mice were subjected to repeated EGT treatments consisting of intratumoral co-injection of naked plasmids encoding the cytokine interleukin-12 (IL-12) (p35 and p40 subunits) and the suicide gene herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk), followed by in vivo electroporation. The early anti-tumor effect was always stronger, and the rate of cure, as seen in the long-term follow-up, was always greater in the groups treated with combination EGT than in those treated with IL-12 or HSV-tk EGT alone. Systemic levels of IL-12 and IFN-gamma increased in both combination and IL-12-alone EGT-treated groups. Moreover, combination EGT for established subcutaneous tumors strongly reduced hematogenous lung metastases and increased survival time when live CT26 tumor cells were injected through the tail vein. Limited experiments on C57/B16 mice with murine melanoma also showed very similar trends. These results suggest that this simple and safe method of plasmid-mediated combination EGT may provide a potentially effective gene therapy for cancer.

  3. Combination of PB2 271A and SR polymorphism at positions 590/591 is critical for viral replication and virulence of swine influenza virus in cultured cells and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qinfang; Qiao, Chuanling; Marjuki, Henju; Bawa, Bhupinder; Ma, Jingqun; Guillossou, Stephane; Webby, Richard J; Richt, Jürgen A; Ma, Wenjun

    2012-01-01

    Triple reassortant swine influenza viruses (SIVs) and 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) virus contain an avian-origin PB2 with 271A, 590S, 591R, and 627E. To evaluate the role of PB2 271A, 590S, and 591R in the replication and virulence of SIV, single (1930-TX98-PB2-271T)-, double (1930-TX98-PB2-590A591A)-, and triple (1930-TX98-PB2-271T590A591A)-mutated viruses were generated in the background of the H1N1 A/swine/Iowa/15/30 (1930) virus with an avian-origin PB2 from the triple-reassortant A/swine/Texas/4199-2/98 (TX98) virus, called the parental 1930-TX98-PB2. Compared to parental virus and single- and double-mutated viruses, the triple-mutated virus replicated less efficiently in cell cultures and was attenuated in mice. These results suggest that a combination of 271A with the 590/591 SR polymorphism is critical for pH1N1 and triple-reassortant SIVs for efficient replication and adaptation in mammals.

  4. Rational combination of oncolytic vaccinia virus and PD-L1 blockade works synergistically to enhance therapeutic efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zuqiang; Ravindranathan, Roshni; Kalinski, Pawel; Guo, Z. Sheng; Bartlett, David L.

    2017-01-01

    Both anti-PD1/PD-L1 therapy and oncolytic virotherapy have demonstrated promise, yet have exhibited efficacy in only a small fraction of cancer patients. Here we hypothesized that an oncolytic poxvirus would attract T cells into the tumour, and induce PD-L1 expression in cancer and immune cells, leading to more susceptible targets for anti-PD-L1 immunotherapy. Our results demonstrate in colon and ovarian cancer models that an oncolytic vaccinia virus attracts effector T cells and induces PD-L1 expression on both cancer and immune cells in the tumour. The dual therapy reduces PD-L1+ cells and facilitates non-redundant tumour infiltration of effector CD8+, CD4+ T cells, with increased IFN-γ, ICOS, granzyme B and perforin expression. Furthermore, the treatment reduces the virus-induced PD-L1+ DC, MDSC, TAM and Treg, as well as co-inhibitory molecules-double-positive, severely exhausted PD-1+CD8+ T cells, leading to reduced tumour burden and improved survival. This combinatorial therapy may be applicable to a much wider population of cancer patients. PMID:28345650

  5. In vitro combination of PNU-140690, a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease inhibitor, with ritonavir against ritonavir-sensitive and -resistant clinical isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Chong, K T; Pagano, P J

    1997-01-01

    PNU-140690 (sulfonamide-containing 5,6-dihydro-4-hydroxy-2-pyrone) is a potent, nonpeptidic inhibitor of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease currently under clinical evaluation. PNU-140690 and ritonavir were studied in two-drug combinations against the replication of HIV-1 clinical isolates in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. A ritonavir-sensitive (301-1x) and -resistant (301-6x) isolate pair derived from an individual before and after monotherapy with ritonavir were used. These isolates showed no significant difference in sensitivity to PNU-140690, but isolate 301-6x was more than 50-fold less sensitive to ritonavir than isolate 301-1x. Mathematical analysis showed that the combination of various concentrations of PNU-140690 with ritonavir yielded additive to moderately synergistic antiviral effects against the ritonavir-sensitive isolate and stronger synergy against the ritonavir-resistant isolate. The mechanism of synergy was not investigated, but the results suggested that both the virological and the observed in vitro pharmacological effects may have contributed to the observed synergy. Importantly, no significant antagonism was observed with the drug combinations studied. These data suggest that PNU-140690 may be useful in combination regimens with a structurally unrelated protease inhibitor such as ritonavir. PMID:9371335

  6. Liver Fibrosis Regression Measured by Transient Elastography in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-Hepatitis B Virus (HBV)-Coinfected Individuals on Long-Term HBV-Active Combination Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Audsley, Jennifer; Robson, Christopher; Aitchison, Stacey; Matthews, Gail V.; Iser, David; Sasadeusz, Joe; Lewin, Sharon R.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Advanced fibrosis occurs more commonly in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-hepatitis B virus (HBV) coinfected individuals; therefore, fibrosis monitoring is important in this population. However, transient elastography (TE) data in HIV-HBV coinfection are lacking. We aimed to assess liver fibrosis using TE in a cross-sectional study of HIV-HBV coinfected individuals receiving combination HBV-active (lamivudine and/or tenofovir/tenofovir-emtricitabine) antiretroviral therapy, identify factors associated with advanced fibrosis, and examine change in fibrosis in those with >1 TE assessment. Methods. We assessed liver fibrosis in 70 HIV-HBV coinfected individuals on HBV-active combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Change in fibrosis over time was examined in a subset with more than 1 TE result (n = 49). Clinical and laboratory variables at the time of the first TE were collected, and associations with advanced fibrosis (≥F3, Metavir scoring system) and fibrosis regression (of least 1 stage) were examined. Results. The majority of the cohort (64%) had mild to moderate fibrosis at the time of the first TE, and we identified alanine transaminase, platelets, and detectable HIV ribonucleic acid as associated with advanced liver fibrosis. Alanine transaminase and platelets remained independently advanced in multivariate modeling. More than 28% of those with >1 TE subsequently showed liver fibrosis regression, and higher baseline HBV deoxyribonucleic acid was associated with regression. Prevalence of advanced fibrosis (≥F3) decreased 12.3% (32.7%–20.4%) over a median of 31 months. Conclusions. The observed fibrosis regression in this group supports the beneficial effects of cART on liver stiffness. It would be important to study a larger group of individuals with more advanced fibrosis to more definitively assess factors associated with liver fibrosis regression. PMID:27006960

  7. Liver Fibrosis Regression Measured by Transient Elastography in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-Hepatitis B Virus (HBV)-Coinfected Individuals on Long-Term HBV-Active Combination Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Audsley, Jennifer; Robson, Christopher; Aitchison, Stacey; Matthews, Gail V; Iser, David; Sasadeusz, Joe; Lewin, Sharon R

    2016-01-01

    Background.  Advanced fibrosis occurs more commonly in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-hepatitis B virus (HBV) coinfected individuals; therefore, fibrosis monitoring is important in this population. However, transient elastography (TE) data in HIV-HBV coinfection are lacking. We aimed to assess liver fibrosis using TE in a cross-sectional study of HIV-HBV coinfected individuals receiving combination HBV-active (lamivudine and/or tenofovir/tenofovir-emtricitabine) antiretroviral therapy, identify factors associated with advanced fibrosis, and examine change in fibrosis in those with >1 TE assessment. Methods.  We assessed liver fibrosis in 70 HIV-HBV coinfected individuals on HBV-active combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Change in fibrosis over time was examined in a subset with more than 1 TE result (n = 49). Clinical and laboratory variables at the time of the first TE were collected, and associations with advanced fibrosis (≥F3, Metavir scoring system) and fibrosis regression (of least 1 stage) were examined. Results.  The majority of the cohort (64%) had mild to moderate fibrosis at the time of the first TE, and we identified alanine transaminase, platelets, and detectable HIV ribonucleic acid as associated with advanced liver fibrosis. Alanine transaminase and platelets remained independently advanced in multivariate modeling. More than 28% of those with >1 TE subsequently showed liver fibrosis regression, and higher baseline HBV deoxyribonucleic acid was associated with regression. Prevalence of advanced fibrosis (≥F3) decreased 12.3% (32.7%-20.4%) over a median of 31 months. Conclusions.  The observed fibrosis regression in this group supports the beneficial effects of cART on liver stiffness. It would be important to study a larger group of individuals with more advanced fibrosis to more definitively assess factors associated with liver fibrosis regression.

  8. Oral Combination Vaccine, Comprising Bifidobacterium Displaying Hepatitis C Virus Nonstructural Protein 3 and Interferon-α, Induces Strong Cellular Immunity Specific to Nonstructural Protein 3 in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Koichi; Omoto, Chika; Oda, Tsugumi; Araki, Ayame; Saito, Hiroki; Shigemura, Katsumi; Katayama, Takane; Hotta, Hak; Shirakawa, Toshiro

    2017-01-23

    We previously generated an oral hepatitis C virus (HCV) vaccine using Bifidobacterium displaying the HCV nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) polypeptide. NS3-specific cellular immunity is important for viral clearance and recovery from HCV infection. In this study, we enhanced the cellular immune responses induced by our oral HCV vaccine, Bifidobacterium longum 2165 (B. longum 2165), by combining interferon-α (IFN-α) as an adjuvant with the vaccine in a mouse experimental model. IFN-α is a widely used cytokine meeting the standard of care (SOC) for HCV infection and plays various immunoregulatory roles. We treated C57BL/6N mice with B. longum 2165 every other day and/or IFN-α twice a week for a month and then analyzed the immune responses using spleen cells. We determined the induction of NS3-specific cellular immunity by cytokine quantification, intracellular cytokine staining, and a cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) assay targeting EL4 tumor cells expressing NS3/4A protein (EL4-NS3/4A). We also treated mice bearing EL4-NS3/4A tumor with the combination therapy in vivo. The results confirmed that the combination therapy of B. longum 2165 and IFN-α induced significantly higher IFN-γ secretion, higher population of CD4(+)T and CD8(+)T cells secreting IFN-γ, and higher CTL activity against EL4-NS3/4A cells compared with the control groups of phosphate-buffered saline, B. longum 2165 alone, and IFN-α alone (p < 0.05). We also confirmed that the combination therapy strongly enhanced tumor growth inhibitory effects in vivo with no serious adverse effects (p < 0.05). These results suggest that the combination of B. longum 2165 and IFN-α could induce a strong cellular immunity specific to NS3 protein as a combination therapy augmenting the current SOC immunotherapy against chronic HCV infection.

  9. Response to hepatitis A and B vaccine alone or in combination in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus and advanced fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Erik Seth; Hofmann, Charlotte; Smith, Paula G; Shiffman, Mitchell L; Sterling, Richard K

    2009-09-01

    Patients with advanced fibrosis are at increased risk of severe outcomes if they develop acute infection with hepatitis A (HAV) or hepatitis B (HBV) viruses. There are no data on the efficacy of combined HAV/HBV vaccination in patients with advanced fibrosis. Our aim was to evaluate the response to the HAV and HBV vaccine alone or in combination for patients with chronic hepatitis C (HCV) and advanced fibrosis and to evaluate the impact of administering the vaccine while patients were receiving peginterferon for treatment of chronic HCV. In this prospective study of patients with advanced fibrosis (Ishak 3-6), those without serologic evidence of prior exposure were vaccinated with either Havrix HAV, Engerix( HBV, or the TWINRIX HAV/HBV combination vaccine as appropriate, and response was defined as the development of anti-HAV or anti-HBV surface antibodies. Of the 162 eligible patients, the prevalence of prior exposure to HAV and HBV was 30 and 18%, respectively. Of the 84 patients vaccinated, 38% received Havrix, 14% Engerix, and 48% TWINRIX. The response to the HAV vaccine was 75% in those receiving Havrix compared to 78% receiving TWINRIX. In contrast, the response to HBV vaccination was 42% in patients receiving Engerix compared to 60% in those vaccinated with TWINRIX (difference 18.3%; OR 0.29; 95% CI: 0.57-7.79). The presence of diabetes was the only risk factor identified for reduced HBV response (P = 0.01). Responses to both HAV and HBV vaccines when administered alone or in combination were lower than expected in patients with HCV and advanced fibrosis, especially in those with diabetes. The observation that the decline in HBV vaccine response was somewhat lower when this was administered alone as opposed to the combination A/B vaccine suggests that the administration of a combination vaccine may enhance the vaccination response to HBV.

  10. Dynamics of PBMC gene expression in hepatitis C virus genotype 1-infected patients during combined peginterferon/ribavirin therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ming-Ying; Huang, Ching-I; Hsieh, Ming-Yen; Hsieh, Tusty-Juan; Hsi, Edward; Tsai, Pei-Chien; Tsai, Yi-Shan; Lin, Ching-Chih; Hsieh, Meng-Hsuan; Liang, Po-Cheng; Lin, Yi-Hung; Hou, Nai-Jen; Yeh, Ming-Lun; Huang, Chung-Feng; Lin, Zu-Yau; Chen, Shinn-Cherng; Huang, Jee-Fu; Chuang, Wan-Long; Dai, Chia-Yen; Yu, Ming-Lung

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) can replicate in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), which can produce interferon to defend against virus infection. We hypothesized that dynamic gene expression in PBMCs might impact the treatment efficacy of peginterferon/ribavirin in HCV patients. PBMCs were collected at baseline, 1st week and 4th week of treatment from 27 chronic HCV-1 patients with 48-week peginterferon/ribavirin therapy (screening dataset n = 7; validation dataset n = 20). A sustained virologic response (SVR) was defined as undetectable HCV RNA throughout the 24 weeks after end-of-treatment. A complete early virologic response (cEVR) was defined as negative HCV RNA at treatment week 12. Forty-three differentially expressed genes identified by Affymetrix microarray were validated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Thirteen genes at week 1 and 24 genes at week 4 were upregulated in the SVR group compared with the non-SVR group. We selected 8 target genes (RSAD2, LOC26010, HERC5, HERC6, IFI44, SERPING1, IFITM3, and DDX60) at week 1 as the major components of the predictive model. This predictive model reliably stratified the responders and non-responders at week 1 (AUC = 0.89, p = 0.007 for SVR; AUC = 0.95, p = 0.003 for cEVR), especially among patients carrying the IL28B rs8099917 TT genotype (AUC = 0.89, p = 0.02 for SVR; AUC = 1.0, p = 0.008 for cEVR). The performance of this predictive model was superior to traditional predictors, including the rapid virologic response, viral load and IL28B genotype. PMID:27542257

  11. Potent and synergistic neutralization of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 primary isolates by hyperimmune anti-HIV immunoglobulin combined with monoclonal antibodies 2F5 and 2G12.

    PubMed

    Mascola, J R; Louder, M K; VanCott, T C; Sapan, C V; Lambert, J S; Muenz, L R; Bunow, B; Birx, D L; Robb, M L

    1997-10-01

    Three antibody reagents that neutralize primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates were tested for magnitude and breadth of neutralization when used alone or in double or triple combinations. Hyperimmune anti-HIV immunoglobulin (HIVIG) is derived from the plasma of HIV-1-infected donors, and monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) 2F5 and 2G12 bind to distinct regions of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein. The antibodies were initially tested against a panel of 15 clade B HIV-1 isolates, using a single concentration that is achievable in vivo (HIVIG, 2,500 microg/ml; MAbs, 25 microg/ml). Individual antibody reagents neutralized many of the viruses tested, but antibody potency varied substantially among the viruses. The virus neutralization produced by double combinations of HIVIG plus 2F5 or 2G12, the two MAbs together, or the triple combination of HIVIG, 2F5, and 2G12 was generally equal to or greater than that predicted by the effect of individual antibodies. Overall, the triple combination displayed the greatest magnitude and breadth of neutralization. Synergistic neutralization was evaluated by analyzing data from dose-response curves of each individual antibody reagent compared to the triple combination and was demonstrated against each of four viruses tested. Therefore, combinations of polyclonal and monoclonal anti-HIV antibodies can produce additive or synergistic neutralization of primary HIV-1 isolates. Passive immunotherapy for treatment or prophylaxis of HIV-1 should consider mixtures of potent neutralizing antibody reagents to expand the magnitude and breadth of virus neutralization.

  12. Potent and synergistic neutralization of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 primary isolates by hyperimmune anti-HIV immunoglobulin combined with monoclonal antibodies 2F5 and 2G12.

    PubMed Central

    Mascola, J R; Louder, M K; VanCott, T C; Sapan, C V; Lambert, J S; Muenz, L R; Bunow, B; Birx, D L; Robb, M L

    1997-01-01

    Three antibody reagents that neutralize primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates were tested for magnitude and breadth of neutralization when used alone or in double or triple combinations. Hyperimmune anti-HIV immunoglobulin (HIVIG) is derived from the plasma of HIV-1-infected donors, and monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) 2F5 and 2G12 bind to distinct regions of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein. The antibodies were initially tested against a panel of 15 clade B HIV-1 isolates, using a single concentration that is achievable in vivo (HIVIG, 2,500 microg/ml; MAbs, 25 microg/ml). Individual antibody reagents neutralized many of the viruses tested, but antibody potency varied substantially among the viruses. The virus neutralization produced by double combinations of HIVIG plus 2F5 or 2G12, the two MAbs together, or the triple combination of HIVIG, 2F5, and 2G12 was generally equal to or greater than that predicted by the effect of individual antibodies. Overall, the triple combination displayed the greatest magnitude and breadth of neutralization. Synergistic neutralization was evaluated by analyzing data from dose-response curves of each individual antibody reagent compared to the triple combination and was demonstrated against each of four viruses tested. Therefore, combinations of polyclonal and monoclonal anti-HIV antibodies can produce additive or synergistic neutralization of primary HIV-1 isolates. Passive immunotherapy for treatment or prophylaxis of HIV-1 should consider mixtures of potent neutralizing antibody reagents to expand the magnitude and breadth of virus neutralization. PMID:9311792

  13. Evidence for Persistence of Ectromelia Virus in Inbred Mice, Recrudescence Following Immunosuppression and Transmission to Naïve Mice.

    PubMed

    Sakala, Isaac G; Chaudhri, Geeta; Scalzo, Anthony A; Eldi, Preethi; Newsome, Timothy P; Buller, Robert M; Karupiah, Gunasegaran

    2015-12-01

    Orthopoxviruses (OPV), including variola, vaccinia, monkeypox, cowpox and ectromelia viruses cause acute infections in their hosts. With the exception of variola virus (VARV), the etiological agent of smallpox, other OPV have been reported to persist in a variety of animal species following natural or experimental infection. Despite the implications and significance for the ecology and epidemiology of diseases these viruses cause, those reports have never been thoroughly investigated. We used the mouse pathogen ectromelia virus (ECTV), the agent of mousepox and a close relative of VARV to investigate virus persistence in inbred mice. We provide evidence that ECTV causes a persistent infection in some susceptible strains of mice in which low levels of virus genomes were detected in various tissues late in infection. The bone marrow (BM) and blood appeared to be key sites of persistence. Contemporaneous with virus persistence, antiviral CD8 T cell responses were demonstrable over the entire 25-week study period, with a change in the immunodominance hierarchy evident during the first 3 weeks. Some virus-encoded host response modifiers were found to modulate virus persistence whereas host genes encoded by the NKC and MHC class I reduced the potential for persistence. When susceptible strains of mice that had apparently recovered from infection were subjected to sustained immunosuppression with cyclophosphamide (CTX), animals succumbed to mousepox with high titers of infectious virus in various organs. CTX treated index mice transmitted virus to, and caused disease in, co-housed naïve mice. The most surprising but significant finding was that immunosuppression of disease-resistant C57BL/6 mice several weeks after recovery from primary infection generated high titers of virus in multiple tissues. Resistant mice showed no evidence of a persistent infection. This is the strongest evidence that ECTV can persist in inbred mice, regardless of their resistance status.

  14. Pharmacophore modeling, resistant mutant isolation, docking, and MM-PBSA analysis: Combined experimental/computer-assisted approaches to identify new inhibitors of the bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV).

    PubMed

    Tonelli, Michele; Boido, Vito; La Colla, Paolo; Loddo, Roberta; Posocco, Paola; Paneni, Maria Silvia; Fermeglia, Maurizio; Pricl, Sabrina

    2010-03-15

    Starting from a series of our new 2-phenylbenzimidazole derivatives, shown to be selectively and potently active against the bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), we developed a hierarchical combined experimental/molecular modeling strategy to explore the drug leads for the BVDV RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase. Accordingly, a successful 3D pharmacophore model was developed, characterized by distinct chemical features that may be responsible for the activity of the inhibitors. BVDV mutants resistant to lead compounds in our series were then isolated, and the mutant residues on the viral molecular target, the RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase, were identified. Docking procedures upon pharmacophoric constraints and mutational data were carried out, and the binding affinity of all active compounds for the RdRp were estimated. Given the excellent agreement between in silico and in vitro data, this procedure is currently being employed in the design a new series of more selective and potent BVDV inhibitors.

  15. Identification of Optimal Donor-Recipient Combinations Among Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-Positive Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Locke, J E; Shelton, B A; Reed, R D; MacLennan, P A; Mehta, S; Sawinski, D; Segev, D L

    2016-08-01

    For some patient subgroups, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has been associated with worse outcomes after kidney transplantation (KT); potentially modifiable factors may be responsible. The study goal was to identify factors that predict a higher risk of graft loss among HIV-positive KT recipients compared with a similar transplant among HIV-negative recipients. In this study, 82 762 deceased donor KT recipients (HIV positive: 526; HIV negative: 82 236) reported to the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (SRTR) (2001-2013) were studied by interaction term analysis. Compared to HIV-negative recipients, the hepatitis C virus (HCV) amplified risk 2.72-fold among HIV-positive KT recipients (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR]: 2.72, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.75-4.22, p < 0.001). Forty-three percent of the excess risk was attributable to the interaction between HIV and HCV (attributable proportion of risk due to the interaction [AP]: 0.43, 95% CI: 0.23-0.63, p = 0.02). Among HIV-positive recipients with more than three HLA mismatches (MMs), risk was amplified 1.80-fold compared to HIV-negative (aHR: 1.80, 95% CI: 1.31-2.47, p < 0.001); 42% of the excess risk was attributable to the interaction between HIV and more than three HLA MMs (AP: 0.42, 95% CI: 0.24-0.60, p = 0.01). High-HIV-risk (HIV-positive/HCV-positive HLAwith more than three MMs) recipients had a 3.86-fold increased risk compared to low-HIV-risk (HIV-positive/HCV-negative HLA with three or fewer MMs)) recipients (aHR: 3.86, 95% CI: 2.37-6.30, p < 0.001). Avoidance of more than three HLA MMs in HIV-positive KT recipients, particularly among coinfected patients, may mitigate the increased risk of graft loss associated with HIV infection.

  16. The Efficacy and Safety of Entecavir and Interferon Combination Therapy for Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Qiao-Ling; Zhu, Ying; Wu, Ling-Hong; Fu, Lin-Lin; Xiang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of entecavir (ETV) and interferon (IFN) combination therapy in the treatment of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) mono-infection via a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). All eligible RCTs evaluating combination therapy for treating CHB were identified from nine electronic databases. A meta-analysis was performed in accordance with the Cochrane Systemic Review handbook. Eleven trials encompassing 1010 participants were included in this meta-analysis. It showed that at 12 and ≥ 96 weeks of therapy, the combination of ETV and IFN was not better than ETV in improving the undetectable HBV DNA (12 weeks: RR=1.12, 95% CI=0.88-1.42; ≥ 96 weeks: RR = 0.64, 95% CI=0.21-1.98, respectively) and HBeAg seroconversion rates (12 weeks: RR=1.35, 95% CI=0.60-3.04; ≥ 96 weeks: RR=1.36, 95% CI=0.75-2.64, respectively). But at 48 weeks of therapy and approximately 2 years of follow up, combination therapy was superior to ETV in improving the undetectable HBV DNA (48 weeks: RR=1.46, 95% CI=1.13-1.90; follow up: RR=2.20, 95% CI=1.26-3.81, respectively) and HBeAg seroconversion rates (48 weeks: RR=1.82, 95% CI=1.44-2.30; follow up: RR=1.92, 95% CI=1.19-3.11, respectively). When compared to IFN group, at 24 and 48 weeks of therapy, combination group showed a greater undetectable HBV DNA (24 weeks: RR=2.14, 95% CI=1.59-2.89; 48 weeks: RR=2.28, 95% CI=1.54-3.37, respectively) and ALT normalization rate (24 weeks: RR=1.56, 95% CI= 1.24-1.96; 48 weeks: RR=1.55, 95% CI = 1.16-2.07, respectively). At 48 weeks of therapy, combination group achieved a greater HBeAg seroconversion rate than IFN (48 weeks: RR=1.58, 95% CI=1.24-2.00). No significant differences were observed in the side effects of the three therapies. So we can conclude that ETV and IFN combination therapy is more effective than ETV or IFN mono-therapy in CHB treatment. ETV, IFN, and the combination of the two are safe in CHB treatment. PMID

  17. Antibodies to parvovirus, distemper virus and adenovirus conferred to household dogs using commercial combination vaccines containing Leptospira bacterin.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, M; Namikawa, K; Maruo, T; Lynch, J; Sahara, H

    2010-12-11

    To examine how the inclusion (+) or exclusion (-) of inactivated Leptospira antigens in a vaccine for canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2), canine distemper virus (CDV) and canine adenovirus type 2 (CAdV-2) affects antibody titres to CPV-2, CDV and CAdV-1 antigens, household dogs were vaccinated with commercially available vaccines from one of three manufacturers. CPV-2, CDV and CAdV-1 antibody titres were measured 11 to 13 months later and compared within three different age groups and three different bodyweight groups. There were significant differences between CPV-2 antibody titres in dogs vaccinated with (+) vaccine and those vaccinated with (-) vaccine for two products in the two-year-old group and for one product in the greater than seven-year-old group; no significant differences were seen that could be attributed to bodyweight. No differences in CDV antibody titres were observed within age groups, but a significant difference was seen in the 11 to 20 kg weight group for one product. Significant differences in CAdV-1 antibody titres were seen for one product in both the two-year-old group and the ≤10 kg weight group.

  18. Murine hypothalamic destruction with vascular cell apoptosis subsequent to combined administration of human papilloma virus vaccine and pertussis toxin

    PubMed Central

    Aratani, Satoko; Fujita, Hidetoshi; Kuroiwa, Yoshiyuki; Usui, Chie; Yokota, Shumpei; Nakamura, Ikuro; Nishioka, Kusuki; Nakajima, Toshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination is the most powerful way to prevent human beings from contracting infectious diseases including viruses. In the case of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, an unexpectedly novel disease entity, HPV vaccination associated neuro-immunopathetic syndrome (HANS), has been reported and remains to be carefully verified. To elucidate the mechanism of HANS, we applied a strategy similar to the active experimental autoimmune encephalitis (EAE) model - one of the most popular animal models used to induce maximum immunological change in the central nervous system. Surprisingly, mice vaccinated with pertussis toxin showed neurological phenotypes that include low responsiveness of the tail reflex and locomotive mobility. Pathological analyses revealed the damage to the hypothalamus and circumventricular regions around the third ventricle, and these regions contained apoptotic vascular endothelial cells. These data suggested that HPV-vaccinated donners that are susceptible to the HPV vaccine might develop HANS under certain environmental factors. These results will give us the new insight into the murine pathological model of HANS and help us to find a way to treat of patients suffering from HANS. PMID:27833142

  19. Towards peptide vaccines against Zika virus: Immunoinformatics combined with molecular dynamics simulations to predict antigenic epitopes of Zika viral proteins

    PubMed Central

    Usman Mirza, Muhammad; Rafique, Shazia; Ali, Amjad; Munir, Mobeen; Ikram, Nazia; Manan, Abdul; Salo-Ahen, Outi M. H.; Idrees, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    The recent outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in Brazil has developed to a global health concern due to its likely association with birth defects (primary microcephaly) and neurological complications. Consequently, there is an urgent need to develop a vaccine to prevent or a medicine to treat the infection. In this study, immunoinformatics approach was employed to predict antigenic epitopes of Zika viral proteins to aid in development of a peptide vaccine against ZIKV. Both linear and conformational B-cell epitopes as well as cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes were predicted for ZIKV Envelope (E), NS3 and NS5 proteins. We further investigated the binding interactions of altogether 15 antigenic CTL epitopes with three class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC I) proteins after docking the peptides to the binding groove of the MHC I proteins. The stability of the resulting peptide-MHC I complexes was further studied by molecular dynamics simulations. The simulation results highlight the limits of rigid-body docking methods. Some of the antigenic epitopes predicted and analyzed in this work might present a preliminary set of peptides for future vaccine development against ZIKV. PMID:27934901

  20. The combination of type I IFN, TNF-α, and cell surface receptor engagement with dendritic cells enables NK cells to overcome immune evasion by dengue virus.

    PubMed

    Lim, Daniel Say Liang; Yawata, Nobuyo; Selva, Kevin John; Li, Na; Tsai, Chen Yu; Yeong, Lai Han; Liong, Ka Hang; Ooi, Eng Eong; Chong, Mun Keat; Ng, Mah Lee; Leo, Yee Sin; Yawata, Makoto; Wong, Soon Boon Justin

    2014-11-15

    Clinical studies have suggested the importance of the NK cell response against dengue virus (DenV), an arboviral infection that afflicts >50 million individuals each year. However, a comprehensive understanding of the NK cell response against dengue-infected cells is lacking. To characterize cell-contact mechanisms and soluble factors that contribute to the antidengue response, primary human NK cells were cocultured with autologous DenV-infected monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC). NK cells responded by cytokine production and the lysis of target cells. Notably, in the absence of significant monokine production by DenV-infected DC, it was the combination of type I IFNs and TNF-α produced by DenV-infected DC that was important for stimulating the IFN-γ and cytotoxic responses of NK cells. Cell-bound factors enhanced NK cell IFN-γ production. In particular, reduced HLA class I expression was observed on DenV-infected DC, and IFN-γ production was enhanced in licensed/educated NK cell subsets. NK-DC cell contact was also identified as a requirement for a cytotoxic response, and there was evidence for both perforin/granzyme as well as Fas/Fas ligand-dependent pathways of killing by NK cells. In summary, our results have uncovered a previously unappreciated role for the combined effect of type I IFNs, TNF-α, and cell surface receptor-ligand interactions in triggering the antidengue response of primary human NK cells.

  1. Combined detection of liver stiffness and C-reactive protein in patients with hepatitis B virus-related liver cirrhosis, with and without hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Yan; Ma, Li-Na; Yan, Ting-Ting; Lu, Zhen-Hui; Tang, Yuan-Yuan; Luo, Xia; Ding, Xiang-Chun

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the usefulness of combined detection of liver stiffness (LS) and serum C-reactive protein (CRP) level in patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related liver cirrhosis (LC). A total of 156 cases of previously untreated patients with HBV-related LC were classified into the LC group [LC without hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)] and the HCC group (LC with HCC). Comparative analyses of LS and serum CRP level were conducted between these two groups. LS values and serum CRP levels were found to be significantly higher in the HCC group compared with those in the LC group (P<0.01). The LS values and serum CRP levels were not significantly different between α-fetoprotein (AFP)-positive and -negative patients. A high LS value was a high-risk factor for HCC in patients with chronic hepatitis B. The CRP-positive rate was significantly higher in the HCC group compared with that in LC group in a subset of patients with high LS values (P<0.01). In conclusion, the combined detection of LS and serum CRP may complement the measurement of AFP in the diagnosis of HBV-related HCC, improve the identification of patients with AFP-negative HCC and help distinguish HCC from LC.

  2. Combining Linear-Scaling DFT with Subsystem DFT in Born-Oppenheimer and Ehrenfest Molecular Dynamics Simulations: From Molecules to a Virus in Solution.

    PubMed

    Andermatt, Samuel; Cha, Jinwoong; Schiffmann, Florian; VandeVondele, Joost

    2016-07-12

    In this work, methods for the efficient simulation of large systems embedded in a molecular environment are presented. These methods combine linear-scaling (LS) Kohn-Sham (KS) density functional theory (DFT) with subsystem (SS) DFT. LS DFT is efficient for large subsystems, while SS DFT is linear scaling with a smaller prefactor for large sets of small molecules. The combination of SS and LS, which is an embedding approach, can result in a 10-fold speedup over a pure LS simulation for large systems in aqueous solution. In addition to a ground-state Born-Oppenheimer SS+LS implementation, a time-dependent density functional theory-based Ehrenfest molecular dynamics (EMD) using density matrix propagation is presented that allows for performing nonadiabatic dynamics. Density matrix-based EMD in the SS framework is naturally linear scaling and appears suitable to study the electronic dynamics of molecules in solution. In the LS framework, linear scaling results as long as the density matrix remains sparse during time propagation. However, we generally find a less than exponential decay of the density matrix after a sufficiently long EMD run, preventing LS EMD simulations with arbitrary accuracy. The methods are tested on various systems, including spectroscopy on dyes, the electronic structure of TiO2 nanoparticles, electronic transport in carbon nanotubes, and the satellite tobacco mosaic virus in explicit solution.

  3. Detection of hepatitis A virus in seeded oyster digestive tissue by ricin A-linked magnetic separation combined with reverse transcription PCR.

    PubMed

    Ko, Sang-Mu; Vaidya, Bipin; Kwon, Joseph; Lee, Hee-Min; Oh, Myung-Joo; Shin, Tai-Sun; Cho, Se-Young; Kim, Duwoon

    2015-05-01

    Outbreaks of hepatitis A virus (HAV) infections are most frequently associated with the consumption of contaminated oysters. A rapid and selective concentration method is necessary for the recovery of HAV from contaminated oysters prior to detection using PCR. In this study, ricin extracted from castor beans (Ricinus communis) was tested as an alternative to antibody used in immunomagnetic separation while concentrating HAV prior to its detection using reverse transcription PCR. Initially, the extracted proteins from castor beans were fractionated into 13 fractions by gel filtration chromatography. Pretreatment of different protein fractions showed a variation in binding of HAV viral protein (VP) 1 to oyster digestive tissue in the range of 25.9 to 63.9%. The protein fraction, which caused the highest reduction in binding of VP1 to the tissue, was identified as ricin A by quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Ricin A could significantly inhibit binding of VP1 to the tissue with a 50% inhibitory concentration of 4.5 μg/ml and a maximal inhibitory concentration of 105.2%. The result showed that the rate of inhibition of HAV binding to tissue was higher compared to the rate of ricin itself binding to HAV (slope: 0.0029 versus 0.00059). However, ricin A concentration showed a higher correlation to the relative binding of ricin itself to HAV than the inhibition of binding of HAV to the tissue (coefficient of determination, R(2): 0.9739 versus 0.6804). In conclusion, ricin A-linked magnetic bead separation combined with reverse transcription PCR can successfully detect HAV in artificially seeded oyster digestive tissue up to a 10(-4) dilution of the virus stock (titer: 10(4) 50% tissue culture infective dose per ml).

  4. Combination hepatitis C virus antigen and antibody immunoassay as a new tool for early diagnosis of infection.

    PubMed

    Ansaldi, F; Bruzzone, B; Testino, G; Bassetti, M; Gasparini, R; Crovari, P; Icardi, G

    2006-01-01

    Reduction of the window period of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection represents an important goal in the transfusional and diagnostic setting. A prototype assay designed to simultaneously detect circulating HCV antigen and anti-HCV, has been developed. Aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of this new assay in terms of specificity and sensitivity and to compare its efficacy with commercial assays. To evaluate the specificity of the assay, 400 samples from the general population and 100 'difficult' sera, negative for anti-HCV, were tested. To assess sensitivity, the new test was used on 76 PCR-positive and anti-HCV negative sera, seven natural or commercial seroconversion panels that included 17 RNA-positive and anti-HCV negative sera and 31 anti-HCV positive sera, 20 weak anti-HCV positive sera, 80 viraemic and anti-HCV-positive sera from patients infected with different subtypes and 10 sera from patients with HBV-HCV or HIV-HCV co-infections. Of 500 anti-HCV negative samples, 499 (99.8%) were negative with a cut-off index <0.5, while one sample was within the grey zone. Of the 93 HCV-RNA positive and anti-HCV negative sera from patients and panels, 85 (91.4%) resulted positive, and one had the cut-off index in the grey zone. The reduction in the diagnostic window period observed with the new test and HCV-RNA assays were equal, on average, to 24 and 34.4 days respectively. All anti-HCV positive sera were positive. The new assay shows high sensitivity and specificity and could be a useful tool not only in the diagnostic setting, where procedures to reduce the window period, such as antigen or HCV-RNA detection, are not currently recommended, but also in the screening of blood donations, when nucleic acid technologies is not feasible because of costs, organization, emergency and/or logistic difficulties.

  5. Heartland Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vector-Borne Diseases (DVBD) NCEZID Share Compartir Heartland virus On this Page What is Heartland virus? How ... Do I Need to Know? What is Heartland virus? Heartland virus belongs to a family of viruses ...

  6. Infectious Lassa virus, but not filoviruses, is restricted by BST-2/tetherin.

    PubMed

    Radoshitzky, Sheli R; Dong, Lian; Chi, Xiaoli; Clester, Jeremiah C; Retterer, Cary; Spurgers, Kevin; Kuhn, Jens H; Sandwick, Sarah; Ruthel, Gordon; Kota, Krishna; Boltz, Dutch; Warren, Travis; Kranzusch, Philip J; Whelan, Sean P J; Bavari, Sina

    2010-10-01

    Bone marrow stromal antigen 2 (BST-2/tetherin) is a cellular membrane protein that inhibits the release of HIV-1. We show for the first time, using infectious viruses, that BST-2 also inhibits egress of arenaviruses but has no effect on filovirus replication and spread. Specifically, infectious Lassa virus (LASV) release significantly decreased or increased in human cells in which BST-2 was either stably expressed or knocked down, respectively. In contrast, replication and spread of infectious Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV) and Lake Victoria marburgvirus (MARV) were not affected by these conditions. Replication of infectious Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) and cowpox virus (CPXV) was also not affected by BST-2 expression. Elevated cellular levels of human or murine BST-2 inhibited the release of virus-like particles (VLPs) consisting of the matrix proteins of multiple highly virulent NIAID Priority Pathogens, including arenaviruses (LASV and Machupo virus [MACV]), filoviruses (ZEBOV and MARV), and paramyxoviruses (Nipah virus). Although the glycoproteins of filoviruses counteracted the antiviral activity of BST-2 in the context of VLPs, they could not rescue arenaviral (LASV and MACV) VLP release upon BST-2 overexpression. Furthermore, we did not observe colocalization of filoviral glycoproteins with BST-2 during infection with authentic viruses. None of the arenavirus-encoded proteins rescued budding of VLPs in the presence of BST-2. Our results demonstrate that BST-2 might be a broad antiviral factor with the ability to restrict release of a wide variety of human pathogens. However, at least filoviruses, RVFV, and CPXV are immune to its inhibitory effect.

  7. Foodborne viruses.

    PubMed

    Koopmans, Marion; von Bonsdorff, Carl Henrik; Vinjé, Jan; de Medici, Dario; Monroe, Steve

    2002-06-01

    culture systems. As currently available routine monitoring systems exclusively focus on bacterial pathogens, efforts should be made to combine epidemiological and virological information for a combined laboratory-based rapid detection system for foodborne viruses. With better surveillance, including typing information, outbreaks of foodborne infections could be reported faster to prevent further spread.

  8. Effect of Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1b Core and NS5A Mutations on Response to Peginterferon Plus Ribavirin Combination Therapy.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Shingo; Imazeki, Fumio; Arai, Makoto; Yasui, Shin; Nakamura, Masato; Haga, Yuki; Sasaki, Reina; Kanda, Tatsuo; Shirasawa, Hiroshi; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2015-09-07

    We examined whether hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1b core- and NS5A-region mutations are associated with response to peginterferon α-2b plus ribavirin combination therapy. A total of 103 patients with high HCV genotype 1b viral loads (≥ 100 KIU/mL) were treated with the combination therapy. Pretreatment mutations in the core region and interferon sensitivity determining region (ISDR) in the NS5A region were analyzed. In univariate analysis, arginine and leucine at positions 70 and 91 in the core region, defined as double wild (DW)-type, were associated with early virologic response (p = 0.002), sustained virologic response (SVR) (p = 0.004), and non-response (p = 0.005). Non-threonine at position 110 was associated with SVR (p = 0.004). Multivariate analysis showed the following pretreatment predictors of SVR: hemoglobin level ≥ 14 g/dL (odds ratio (OR) 6.2, p = 0.04); platelet count ≥ 14 × 10⁴/mm³ (OR 5.2, p = 0.04); aspartate aminotransferase (AST)/alanine aminotransferase (ALT) ratio < 0.9 (OR 6.17, p = 0.009); DW-type (OR 6.8, p = 0.02); non-threonine at position 110 (OR 14.5, p = 0.03); and ≥ 2 mutations in the ISDR (OR 12.3, p = 0.02). Patients with non-DW-type, non-threonine at position 110, and < 2 ISDR mutations showed significantly lower SVR rates than others (11/45 (24.4%) vs. 27/37 (73.0%), respectively; p < 0.001). SVR can be predicted through core and NS5A region mutations and host factors like hemoglobin, platelet count, and AST/ALT ratio in HCV genotype 1b-infected patients treated with peginterferon and ribavirin combination therapy.

  9. Immunological evaluation of Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio harveyi, Vibrio vulnificus and infectious spleen and kidney necrosis virus (ISKNV) combined-vaccine efficacy in Epinephelus coioides.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhijian; Tang, Jingjing; Li, Mei; Fu, Yacheng; Dong, Chuanfu; Zhong, Jiang F; He, Jianguo

    2012-11-15

    Combined vaccines are immunological products intended for immunization against multifactorial infectious diseases caused by different types or variants of pathogens. In this study, the effectiveness of Vibrio alginolyticus (Va), Vibrio harveyi (Vh), Vibrio vulnificus (Vv) and infectious spleen and kidney necrosis virus (ISKNV), an iridovirus, combined-vaccine (Vibrio and ISKNV combined vaccines, VICV), Va+Vh+Vv inactive vaccine (VIV) and ISKNV whole cell inactive vaccine (IWCIV) in Epinephelus coioides were evaluated using various immunological parameters including antibody titer, serum lysozyme activity (LA), respiratory burst (RB) activity, bactericidal activity (BA) and relative percentage survival (RPS). E. coioides immunized with VICV and challenged with Va+Vh+Vv+ISKNV had an RPS of 80%. The RPS was 73.3% in E. coioides immunized with VIV and challenged with Va+Vh+Vv. E. coioides immunized with IWCIV and challenged with ISKNV had an RPS of 69.6%. Serum LA in the vaccinated group was significantly higher than the control group on days 21 and 28 post-vaccination (P<0.01). The RB activity of head kidney cells in the vaccinated group was significantly higher (P<0.01) compared to that in the control group. However, RB activity of spleen cells in the vaccinated group and the control group were not significantly different (P>0.05). After immunization with VICV, BA values of blood leucocytes and head kidney cells increased significantly more than spleen cells. BA value of blood leucocytes was higher than that in head kidney cells. There were distinct difference between BA values in head kidney cells and in spleen cells (P<0.05) as well as between BA value of blood leucocytes and head kidney cells (P<0.01). E. coioides vaccinated with VICV have significantly higher antibody levels than control groupers (P<0.01). Our study suggests that the VICV candidate can effectively protect groupers against multiple bacterial and viral pathogens.

  10. Recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated gene transfer for the potential therapy of adenosine deaminase-deficient severe combined immune deficiency.

    PubMed

    Silver, Jared N; Elder, Melissa; Conlon, Thomas; Cruz, Pedro; Wright, Amy J; Srivastava, Arun; Flotte, Terence R

    2011-08-01

    Severe combined immune deficiency due to adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency is a rare, potentially fatal pediatric disease, which results from mutations within the ADA gene, leading to metabolic abnormalities and ultimately profound immunologic and nonimmunologic defects. In this study, recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors based on serotypes 1 and 9 were used to deliver a secretory version of the human ADA (hADA) gene to various tissues to promote immune reconstitution following enzyme expression in a mouse model of ADA deficiency. Here, we report that a single-stranded rAAV vector, pTR2-CB-Igκ-hADA, (1) facilitated successful gene delivery to multiple tissues, including heart, skeletal muscle, and kidney, (2) promoted ectopic expression of hADA, and (3) allowed enhanced serum-based enzyme activity over time. Moreover, the rAAV-hADA vector packaged in serotype 9 capsid drove partial, prolonged, and progressive immune reconstitution in ADA-deficient mice. Overview Summary Gene therapies for severe combined immune deficiency due to adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency (ADA-SCID) over two decades have exclusively involved retroviral vectors targeted to lymphocytes and hematopoietic progenitor cells. These groundbreaking gene therapies represented an unprecedented revolution in clinical medicine but in most cases did not fully correct the immune deficiency and came with the potential risk of insertional mutagenesis. Alternatively, recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors have gained attention as valuable tools for gene transfer, having demonstrated no pathogenicity in humans, minimal immunogenicity, long-term efficacy, ease of administration, and broad tissue tropism (Muzyczka, 1992 ; Flotte et al., 1993 ; Kessler et al., 1996 ; McCown et al., 1996 ; Lipkowitz et al., 1999 ; Marshall, 2001 ; Chen et al., 2003 ; Conlon and Flotte, 2004 ; Griffey et al., 2005 ; Pacak et al., 2006 ; Stone et al., 2008 ; Liu et al., 2009 ; Choi et al., 2010

  11. New classes of orthopoxvirus vaccine candidates by functionally screening a synthetic library for protective antigens.

    PubMed

    Borovkov, Alexandre; Magee, D Mitch; Loskutov, Andrey; Cano, Jose A; Selinsky, Cheryl; Zsemlye, Jason; Lyons, C Rick; Sykes, Kathryn

    2009-12-05

    The licensed smallpox vaccine, comprised of infectious vaccinia, is no longer popular as it is associated with a variety of adverse events. Safer vaccines have been explored such as further attenuated viruses and component designs. However, these alternatives typically provide compromised breadth and strength of protection. We conducted a genome-level screening of cowpox, the ancestral poxvirus, in the broadly immune-presenting C57BL/6 mouse as an approach to discovering novel components with protective capacities. Cowpox coding sequences were synthetically built and directly assayed by genetic immunization for open-reading frames that protect against lethal pulmonary infection. Membrane and non-membrane antigens were identified that partially protect C57BL/6 mice against cowpox and vaccinia challenges without adjuvant or regimen optimization, whereas the 4-pox vaccine did not. New vaccines might be developed from productive combinations of these new and existing antigens to confer potent, broadly efficacious protection and be contraindicated for none.

  12. Human CD4 T cell epitopes selective for Vaccinia versus Variola virus.

    PubMed

    Probst, Alicia; Besse, Aurore; Favry, Emmanuel; Imbert, Gilles; Tanchou, Valérie; Castelli, Florence Anne; Maillere, Bernard

    2013-04-01

    Due to the high degree of sequence identity between Orthopoxvirus species, the specific B and T cell responses raised against these viruses are largely cross-reactive and poorly selective. We therefore searched for CD4 T cell epitopes present in the conserved parts of the Vaccinia genome (VACV) but absent from Variola viruses (VARV), with a view to identifying immunogenic sequences selective for VACV. We identified three long peptide fragments from the B7R, B10R and E7R proteins by in silico comparisons of the poxvirus genomes, and evaluated the recognition of these fragments by VACV-specific T cell lines derived from healthy donors. For the 12 CD4 T cell epitopes identified, we assessed their binding to common HLA-DR allotypes and their capacity to induce peptide-specific CD4 T-cell lines. Four peptides from B7R and B10R displayed a broad binding specificity for HLA-DR molecules and induced multiple T cell lines from healthy donors. Besides their absence from VARV, the two B10R peptide sequences were mutated in the Cowpox virus and completely absent from the Monkeypox genome. This work contributes to the development of differential diagnosis of poxvirus infections.

  13. Characterization of Epstein-Barr virus-induced lymphoproliferation derived from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells transferred to severe combined immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Okano, M.; Taguchi, Y.; Nakamine, H.; Pirruccello, S. J.; Davis, J. R.; Beisel, K. W.; Kleveland, K. L.; Sanger, W. G.; Fordyce, R. R.; Purtilo, D. T.

    1990-01-01

    Mice with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) received 6 X 10(7) fresh human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) intraperitoneally from Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-seropositive and -seronegative donors. B95-8 EBV was inoculated intraperitoneally and intravenously to the mice 6 weeks after transfer of seronegative PBMC. Three of four mice transferred with PBMC from two EBV-seropositive donors and two of four mice from two EBV-seronegative donors inoculated with EBV developed fatal EBV-induced lymphoproliferative disease within 6 to 10 weeks. These tumors were oligoclonal or polyclonal by cytoplasmic immunoglobulin expression. Furthermore no consistent clonal chromosomal abnormalities were shown. Cell lines established from these tumors showed low cloning efficiency in soft agarose. In addition, latent membrane protein, B-lymphocyte activation antigen (CD23), and cell-adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, CD18) all were expressed in the EBV-positive infiltrating lymphoproliferative lesions in each mouse. These results suggest that lymphoid tumors are comparable to lymphoblastoid cell lines immortalized by EBV and are not malignant lymphomas such as Burkitt's lymphoma. This model may be useful for investigating mechanisms responsible for the growing numbers of lymphoproliferative diseases that are occurring in patients with inherited or acquired immunodeficiencies. Images Figure 1 PMID:1975985

  14. Development of a loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay combined with a lateral flow dipstick for rapid and simple detection of classical swine fever virus in the field.

    PubMed

    Chowdry, Vinay Kumar; Luo, Yuzi; Widén, Frederik; Qiu, Hua-Ji; Shan, Hu; Belák, Sándor; Liu, Lihong

    2014-03-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is a highly contagious viral disease and may cause heavy economic loss to farmers. The rapid, simple and accurate diagnosis of the disease at the frontline, for example on the farms of concern is crucial for disease control. This study describes the development and evaluation of a new loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay coupled with lateral flow dipstick (LFD) for the detection of classical swine fever virus (CSFV). This RT-LAMP-LFD assay combines the efficient one-step isothermal amplification of CSF viral RNA and the simplicity of the LFD to read the results within two to five minutes. Seven genotypes (1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3 and 3.1), but not genotype 3.4, were successfully detected by the RT-LAMP-LFD assay, indicating that the method has a broad range of detection and can be applied in different geographical areas where CSFV strains belonging to these genotypes are present. The performance of this RT-LAMP-LFD assay was similar to that of the real-time RT-PCR. The analytical sensitivity was about 100copies per reaction when testing two genotypes (1.1 and 2.3). No cross-reactivity to non-CSFV pestiviruses was observed. This RT-LAMP-LFD assay can be a useful novel tool for the rapid, simple and economic diagnosis of classical swine fever in the field.

  15. Poly(I:C) combined with multi-epitope protein vaccine completely protects against virulent foot-and-mouth disease virus challenge in pigs.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yimei; Lu, Zengjun; Li, Yanli; Sun, Pu; Li, Dong; Li, Pinghua; Bai, Xingwen; Fu, Yuanfang; Bao, Huifang; Zhou, Chunxue; Xie, Baoxia; Chen, Yingli; Liu, Zaixin

    2013-02-01

    We designed a series of epitope proteins containing the G-H loops of three topotypes of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) serotype O and promiscuous artificial Th sites and selected one epitope protein (designated as B4) with optimal immunogenicity and cross-reactivity. Three out of five pigs immunized intramuscularly with this B4 were protected against virulent FMDV challenge after a single inoculation, while all pigs co-immunized with B4 and polyinosinic-cytidylic acid [poly(I:C)] conferred complete protection following FMDV challenge. Additionally, we demonstrated that all pigs co-immunized with B4 and poly(I:C) elicited FMDV-specific neutralizing antibodies, total IgG antibodies, type I interferon (IFN-α/β) and cytokines IFN-γ. In contrast, some pigs immunized with B4 alone produced parameters mentioned above, while some not, suggesting that poly(I:C) reduced animal-to-animal variations in both cellular and humoral responses often observed in association with epitope-based vaccines and up-regulated T-cell immunity often poorly observed in protein-based vaccines. We propose that poly(I:C) is an effective adjuvant for this epitope-based vaccine of FMDV. This combination could yield an effective and safe candidate vaccine for the control and eradication of FMD in pigs.

  16. Systemic Cytokine Levels Do Not Predict CD4+ T-Cell Recovery After Suppressive Combination Antiretroviral Therapy in Chronic Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Philip J.; Zhang, Jinbing; Worlock, Andrew; Nair, Sangeetha V.; Anastos, Kathryn; Minkoff, Howard L.; Villacres, Maria C.; Young, Mary; Greenblatt, Ruth M.; Desai, Seema; Landay, Alan L.; Gange, Stephen J.; Nugent, C. Thomas; Golub, Elizabeth T.; Keating, Sheila M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Subjects on suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) who do not achieve robust reconstitution of CD4+ T cells face higher risk of complications and death. We studied participants in the Women's Interagency HIV Study with good (immunological responder [IR]) or poor (immunological nonresponder [INR]) CD4+ T-cell recovery after suppressive cART (n = 50 per group) to determine whether cytokine levels or low-level viral load correlated with INR status. Methods. A baseline sample prior to viral control and 2 subsequent samples 1 and 2 years after viral control were tested. Serum levels of 30 cytokines were measured at each time point, and low-level human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) viral load and anti-HIV antibody levels were measured 2 years after viral suppression. Results. There were minimal differences in cytokine levels between IR and INR subjects. At baseline, macrophage inflammatory protein-3β levels were higher in IR subjects; after 1 year of suppressive cART, soluble vascular endothelial growth factor-R3 levels were higher in IR subjects; and after 2 years of suppressive cART, interferon gamma-induced protein 10 levels were higher in INR subjects. Very low-level HIV viral load and anti-HIV antibody levels did not differ between IR and INR subjects. Conclusions. These results imply that targeting residual viral replication might not be the optimum therapeutic approach for INR subjects. PMID:26966697

  17. Rapid and sensitive detection of shrimp yellow head virus by loop-mediated isothermal amplification combined with a lateral flow dipstick.

    PubMed

    Khunthong, Sasiwarat; Jaroenram, Wansadaj; Arunrut, Narong; Suebsing, Rungkarn; Mungsantisuk, Idsada; Kiatpathomchai, Wansika

    2013-03-01

    Yellow head virus (YHV) is a highly virulent pathogen that has caused severe mortality in cultivated shrimp (Penaeus monodon and Penaeus vannamei) in Thailand. There are several technologies that are applied to detect YHV for further control of the disease. RT-PCR is currently widely used in the laboratory, but it has some disadvantages related to cost, time-consuming and complexity. An alternative assay combines RT with loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) that not only provides high specificity, sensitivity and rapidity, but is also cheaper and more suitable for field applications in shrimp aquaculture than the RT-PCR. RT-LAMP is performed under isothermal conditions with a set of four to six primers designed to recognize six to eight distinct target sequences, and it has been combined with a chromatographic lateral-flow dipstick (LFD) to detect LAMP amplified product, which avoids the use of gel electrophoresis. In this study, RT-LAMP for the detection of YHV was developed by isothermal amplification at 65 °C for 45 min, followed by hybridization with an FITC-labeled DNA probe for 5 min and detected by LFD within 5 min (time required approximately 55 min, excluding RNA extraction and preparation time). The detection limit of RT-LAMP-LFD was 0.1 pg RNA extracted from shrimp infected with YHV equivalent to the nested RT-PCR, and no cross reaction was observed with other common shrimp viral pathogens. The LAMP method described in this study showed a rapid, high sensitivity and specificity and it is recommended as user-friendly for diagnosis of YHV in the field.

  18. Peptidomimetic furin inhibitor MI-701 in combination with oseltamivir and ribavirin efficiently blocks propagation of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses and delays high level oseltamivir resistance in MDCK cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yinghui; Hardes, Kornelia; Dahms, Sven O; Böttcher-Friebertshäuser, Eva; Steinmetzer, Torsten; Than, Manuel E; Klenk, Hans-Dieter; Garten, Wolfgang

    2015-08-01

    Antiviral medication is used for the treatment of severe influenza infections, of which the neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) are the most effective drugs, approved so far. Here, we investigated the antiviral efficacy of the peptidomimetic furin inhibitor MI-701 in combination with oseltamivir carboxylate and ribavirin against the infection of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIV) that are activated by the host protease furin. Cell cultures infected with the strains A/Thailand/1(KAN-1)/2004 (H5N1) and A/FPV/Rostock/1934 (H7N1) were treated with each agent alone, or in double and triple combinations. MI-701 alone achieved a concentration-dependent reduction of virus propagation. Double treatment of MI-701 with oseltamivir carboxylate and triple combination with ribavirin showed synergistic inhibition and a pronounced delay of virus propagation. MI-701 resistant mutants were not observed. Emergence of NA mutation H275Y conferring high oseltamivir resistance was significantly delayed in the presence of MI-701. Our data indicate that combination with a potent furin inhibitor significantly enhances the therapeutic efficacy of conventional antivirals drugs against HPAIV infection.

  19. Virus-PEDOT Biocomposite Films

    PubMed Central

    Donavan, Keith C.; Arter, Jessica A.

    2012-01-01

    Virus-poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (virus-PEDOT) biocomposite films are prepared by electropolymerizing 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT) in aqueous electrolytes containing 12 mM LiClO4 and the bacteriophage M13. The concentration of virus in these solutions, [virus]soln, is varied from 3 nM to 15 nM. A quartz crystal microbalance is used to directly measure the total mass of the biocomposite film during its electrodeposition. In combination with a measurement of the electrodeposition charge, the mass of the virus incorporated into the film is calculated. These data show that concentration of the M13 within the electropolymerized film, [virus]film, increases linearly with [virus]soln. The incorporation of virus particles into the PEDOT film from solution is efficient, resulting in a concentration ratio: [virus]film:[virus]soln ≈450. Virus incorporation into the PEDOT causes roughening of the film topography that is observed using scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The electrical conductivity of the virus-PEDOT film, measured perpendicular to the plane of the film using conductive tip AFM, decreases linearly with virus loading, from 270 μS/cm for pure PE-DOT films to 50 μS/cm for films containing 100 μM virus. The presence on the virus surface of displayed affinity peptides did not significantly influence the efficiency of incorporation into virus-PEDOT biocomposite films. PMID:22856875

  20. A new generation of modified live-attenuated avian influenza viruses using a two-strategy combination as potential vaccine candidates.

    PubMed

    Song, Haichen; Nieto, Gloria Ramirez; Perez, Daniel R

    2007-09-01

    In light of the recurrent outbreaks of low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) and highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI), there is a pressing need for the development of vaccines that allow rapid mass vaccination. In this study, we introduced by reverse genetics temperature-sensitive mutations in the PB1 and PB2 genes of an avian influenza virus, A/Guinea Fowl/Hong Kong/WF10/99 (H9N2) (WF10). Further genetic modifications were introduced into the PB1 gene to enhance the attenuated (att) phenotype of the virus in vivo. Using the att WF10 as a backbone, we substituted neuraminidase (NA) for hemagglutinin (HA) for vaccine purposes. In chickens, a vaccination scheme consisting of a single dose of an att H7N2 vaccine virus at 2 weeks of age and subsequent challenge with the wild-type H7N2 LPAI virus resulted in complete protection. We further extended our vaccination strategy against the HPAI H5N1. In this case, we reconstituted an att H5N1 vaccine virus, whose HA and NA genes were derived from an Asian H5N1 virus. A single-dose immunization in ovo with the att H5N1 vaccine virus in 18-day-old chicken embryos resulted in more than 60% protection for 4-week-old chickens and 100% protection for 9- to 12-week-old chickens. Boosting at 2 weeks posthatching provided 100% protection against challenge with the HPAI H5N1 virus for chickens as young as 4 weeks old, with undetectable virus shedding postchallenge. Our results highlight the potential of live att avian influenza vaccines for mass vaccination in poultry.

  1. Combined administration of synthetic RNA and a conventional vaccine improves immune responses and protection against foot-and-mouth disease virus in swine.

    PubMed

    Borrego, Belén; Blanco, Esther; Rodríguez Pulido, Miguel; Mateos, Francisco; Lorenzo, Gema; Cardillo, Sabrina; Smitsaart, Eliana; Sobrino, Francisco; Sáiz, Margarita

    2017-03-16

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is the causative agent of a highly contagious disease and a major concern in animal health worldwide. We have previously reported the use of RNA transcripts mimicking structural domains in the non-coding regions of the FMDV RNA as potent type-I interferon (IFN) inducers showing antiviral effect in vivo, as well as their immunomodulatory properties in combination with an FMD vaccine in mice. Here, we describe the enhancing effect of RNA delivery on the immunogenicity and protection induced by a suboptimal dose of a conventional FMD vaccine in pigs. Animals receiving the RNA developed earlier and higher levels of neutralizing antibodies against homologous and heterologous isolates, compared to those immunized with the vaccine alone, and had higher anti-FMDV titers at late times post-vaccination. RNA delivery also induced higher specific T-cell response and protection levels against FMDV challenge. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from pigs inoculated with RNA and the vaccine had a higher IFN-γ specific response than those from pigs receiving the vaccine alone. When challenged with FMDV, all three animals immunized with the conventional vaccine developed antibodies to the non-structural viral proteins 3ABC and two of them developed severe signs of disease. In the group receiving the vaccine together with the RNA, two pigs were fully protected while one showed delayed and mild signs of disease. Our results support the immunomodulatory effect of these RNA molecules in natural hosts and suggest their potential use for improvement of FMD vaccines strategies.

  2. Moderate Sustained Virologic Response Rates With 6-Week Combination Directly Acting Anti–Hepatitis C Virus Therapy in Patients With Advanced Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kattakuzhy, Sarah; Wilson, Eleanor; Sidharthan, Sreetha; Sims, Zayani; McLaughlin, Mary; Price, Angie; Silk, Rachel; Gross, Chloe; Akoth, Elizabeth; McManus, Maryellen; Emmanuel, Benjamin; Shrivastava, Shikha; Tang, Lydia; Nelson, Amy; Teferi, Gebeyehu; Chavez, Jose; Lam, Brian; Mo, Hongmei; Osinusi, Anuoluwapo; Polis, Michael A.; Masur, Henry; Kohli, Anita; Kottilil, Shyamasundaran

    2016-01-01

    Background. Treatment of genotype 1 hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection with combination directly acting antivirals (DAA) for 8–24 weeks is associated with high rates of sustained virologic response (SVR). We previously demonstrated that adding a third DAA to ledipasvir and sofosbuvir (LDV/SOF) can result in high SVR rates in patients without cirrhosis. In this study, we investigated whether a similar regimen would yield equivalent rates of cure in patients with advanced liver fibrosis. Methods. Fifty patients were enrolled at the Clinical Research Center of the National Institutes of Health and associated healthcare centers. Enrollment and follow-up data from April 2014 to June 2015 are reported here. Eligible participants were aged ≥18 years, had chronic HCV genotype 1 infection (serum HCV RNA ≥2000 IU/mL), and stage 3–4 liver fibrosis. HCV RNA was measured using a reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction assay. Results. Of patients treated with LDV, SOF, and the NS3/4A protease inhibitor GS-9451 for 6 weeks, 76% (38 of 50; 95% confidence interval, 60%–85%) had SVR achieved 12 weeks after the end of treatment. There was no statistically significant difference in treatment efficacy between treatment-naive patients (72%, 18 of 25) and those with treatment experience (80%; 20 of 25) (P = .51). Overall, 11 patients (22%) experienced virologic relapse, and 1 (2%) was lost to follow-up at 4 weeks after treatment. No serious adverse events, discontinuations, or deaths were associated with this regimen. Conclusions. Adding a third DAA to LDV/SOF may result in a moderate SVR rate, lower than that observed in patients without cirrhosis. Significant liver fibrosis remains an impediment to achieving SVR with short-duration DAA therapy. Chinese Clinical Trials Registration. CT01805882. PMID:26503379

  3. Ability to Work and Employment Rates in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-1-Infected Individuals Receiving Combination Antiretroviral Therapy: The Swiss HIV Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Elzi, Luigia; Conen, Anna; Patzen, Annalea; Fehr, Jan; Cavassini, Matthias; Calmy, Alexandra; Schmid, Patrick; Bernasconi, Enos; Furrer, Hansjakob; Battegay, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Background.  Limited data exist on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals' ability to work after receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). We aimed to investigate predictors of regaining full ability to work at 1 year after starting cART. Methods.  Antiretroviral-naive HIV-infected individuals <60 years who started cART from January 1998 through December 2012 within the framework of the Swiss HIV Cohort Study were analyzed. Inability to work was defined as a medical judgment of the patient's ability to work as 0%. Results.  Of 5800 subjects, 4382 (75.6%) were fully able to work, 471 (8.1%) able to work part time, and 947 (16.3%) were unable to work at baseline. Of the 947 patients unable to work, 439 (46.3%) were able to work either full time or part time at 1 year of treatment. Predictors of recovering full ability to work were non-white ethnicity (odds ratio [OR], 2.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.20-3.54), higher education (OR, 4.03; 95% CI, 2.47-7.48), and achieving HIV-ribonucleic acid <50 copies/mL (OR, 1.83; 95% CI, 1.20-2.80). Older age (OR, 0.55; 95% CI, .42-.72, per 10 years older) and psychiatric disorders (OR, 0.24; 95% CI, .13-.47) were associated with lower odds of ability to work. Recovering full ability to work at 1 year increased from 24.0% in 1998-2001 to 41.2% in 2009-2012, but the employment rates did not increase. Conclusions.  Regaining full ability to work depends primarily on achieving viral suppression, absence of psychiatric comorbidity, and favorable psychosocial factors. The discrepancy between patients' ability to work and employment rates indicates barriers to reintegration of persons infected with HIV.

  4. Ability to Work and Employment Rates in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-1-Infected Individuals Receiving Combination Antiretroviral Therapy: The Swiss HIV Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Elzi, Luigia; Conen, Anna; Patzen, Annalea; Fehr, Jan; Cavassini, Matthias; Calmy, Alexandra; Schmid, Patrick; Bernasconi, Enos; Furrer, Hansjakob; Battegay, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Background. Limited data exist on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals' ability to work after receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). We aimed to investigate predictors of regaining full ability to work at 1 year after starting cART. Methods. Antiretroviral-naive HIV-infected individuals <60 years who started cART from January 1998 through December 2012 within the framework of the Swiss HIV Cohort Study were analyzed. Inability to work was defined as a medical judgment of the patient's ability to work as 0%. Results. Of 5800 subjects, 4382 (75.6%) were fully able to work, 471 (8.1%) able to work part time, and 947 (16.3%) were unable to work at baseline. Of the 947 patients unable to work, 439 (46.3%) were able to work either full time or part time at 1 year of treatment. Predictors of recovering full ability to work were non-white ethnicity (odds ratio [OR], 2.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.20–3.54), higher education (OR, 4.03; 95% CI, 2.47–7.48), and achieving HIV-ribonucleic acid <50 copies/mL (OR, 1.83; 95% CI, 1.20–2.80). Older age (OR, 0.55; 95% CI, .42–.72, per 10 years older) and psychiatric disorders (OR, 0.24; 95% CI, .13–.47) were associated with lower odds of ability to work. Recovering full ability to work at 1 year increased from 24.0% in 1998–2001 to 41.2% in 2009–2012, but the employment rates did not increase. Conclusions. Regaining full ability to work depends primarily on achieving viral suppression, absence of psychiatric comorbidity, and favorable psychosocial factors. The discrepancy between patients' ability to work and employment rates indicates barriers to reintegration of persons infected with HIV. PMID:26955645

  5. [A novel immunization strategy to induce strong humoral responses against HIV-1 using combined DNA, recombinant vaccinia virus and protein vaccines].

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Wang, Shu-hui; Ren, Li; Hao, Yan-ling; Zhang, Qi-cheng; Liu, Ying

    2014-11-01

    To optimize the immunization strategy against HIV-1, a DNA vaccine was combined with a recombinant vaccinia virus (rTV) vaccine and a protein vaccine. Immune responses against HIV-1 were detected in 30 female guinea pigs divided into six groups. Three groups of guinea pigs were primed with HIV-1 DNA vaccine three times, boosted with rTV at week 14, and then boosted with gp140 protein at intervals of 4, 8 or 12 weeks. Simultaneously, the other three groups of animals were primed with rTV vaccine once, and then boosted with gp140 after 4, 8 or 12 weeks. The HIV-1 specific binding antibody and neutralizing antibody, in addition to the relative affinity of these antibodies, were detected at different time points after the final administration of vaccine in each group. The DNA-rTV-gp140 immune regimen induced higher titers and affinity levels of HIV-1 gp120/gp140 antibodies and stronger V1V2-gp70 antibodies than the rTV-gp140 regimen. In the guinea pigs that underwent the DNA-rTV-gp140 regimen, the highest V1V2-gp70 antibody was induced in the 12-week-interval group. However, the avidity of antibodies was improved in the 4-week-interval group. Using the rTV-gp140 immunization strategy, guinea pigs boosted at 8 or 12 weeks after rTV priming elicited stronger humoral responses than those boosted at 4 weeks after priming. In conclusion, this study shows that the immunization strategy of HIV-1 DNA vaccine priming, followed by rTV and protein vaccine boosting, could strengthen the humoral response against HIV-1. Longer intervals were better to induce V1V2-gp70-specific antibodies, while shorter intervals were more beneficial to enhance the avidity of antibodies.

  6. Inactivation of the Hutchinson strain of non-A, non-B hepatitis virus by combined use of beta-propiolactone and ultraviolet irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Prince, A.M.; Stephan, W.; Dichtelmueller, H.B.; Brotman, B.; Huima, T.

    1985-06-01

    A beta-propiolactone/ultraviolet irradiation procedure (beta PL/UV) has been evaluated for its ability to inactivate 30,000 chimpanzee infectious doses of the Hutchinson strain of non-A, non-B (NANB) virus. The chimpanzees were inoculated with plasma to which this dose of the titrated virus had been added prior to application of the beta PL/UV process in accordance with a procedure used for licensed blood derivatives in Germany. Neither animal developed hepatitis. When subsequently challenged with the same contaminated plasma, which had not been sterilized, both animals promptly developed typical NANB hepatitis. This study extends the high (approximately 10(7)-fold) process efficiency of the beta PL/UV procedure previously reported for hepatitis B virus to a blood-borne NANB virus.

  7. Combining Single RNA Sensitive Probes with Subdiffraction-Limited and Live-Cell Imaging Enables the Characterization of Virus Dynamics in Cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The creation of fluorescently labeled viruses is currently limited by the length of imaging observation time (e.g., labeling an envelope protein) and the rescue of viral infectivity (e.g., encoding a GFP protein). Using single molecule sensitive RNA hybridization probes delivered to the cytoplasm of infected cells, we were able to isolate individual, infectious, fluorescently labeled human respiratory syncytial virus virions. This was achieved without affecting viral mRNA expression, viral protein expression, or infectivity. Measurements included the characterization of viral proteins and genomic RNA in a single virion using dSTORM, the development of a GFP fusion assay, and the development of a pulse-chase assay for viral RNA production that allowed for the detection of both initial viral RNA and nascent RNA production at designated times postinfection. Live-cell measurements included imaging and characterization of filamentous virion fusion and the quantification of virus replication within the same cell over an eight-hour period. Using probe-labeled viruses, individual viral particles can be characterized at subdiffraction-limited resolution, and viral infections can be quantified in single cells over an entire cycle of replication. The implication of this development is that MTRIP labeling of viral RNA during virus assembly has the potential to become a general methodology for the labeling and study of many important RNA viruses. PMID:24351207

  8. Combined Treatment with Antiviral Therapy and Rituximab in Patients with Mixed Cryoglobulinemia: Review of the Literature and Report of a Case Using Direct Antiviral Agents-Based Antihepatitis C Virus Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Urraro, Teresa; Gragnani, Laura; Piluso, Alessia; Fabbrizzi, Alessio; Monti, Monica; Boldrini, Barbara; Ranieri, Jessica; Zignego, Anna Linda

    2015-01-01

    Mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC) is an autoimmune/B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder associated with Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection, manifesting as a systemic vasculitis. In the last decade, antiviral treatment (AT) with pegylated interferon (Peg-IFN) plus ribavirin (RBV) was considered the first therapeutic option for HCV-MC. In MC patients ineligible or not responsive to antivirals, the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab (RTX) is effective. A combined AT plus RTX was also suggested. Since the introduction of direct acting antivirals (DAAs), few data were published about MC and no data about a combined schedule. Here, we report a complete remission of MC after a sustained virological response following a combined RTX/Peg-IFN+RBV+DAA (boceprevir) treatment and review the literature about the combined RTX/AT. PMID:25815218

  9. Development of high-yield influenza B virus vaccine viruses.

    PubMed

    Ping, Jihui; Lopes, Tiago J S; Neumann, Gabriele; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2016-12-20

    The burden of human infections with influenza A and B viruses is substantial, and the impact of influenza B virus infections can exceed that of influenza A virus infections in some seasons. Over the past few decades, viruses of two influenza B virus lineages (Victoria and Yamagata) have circulated in humans, and both lineages are now represented in influenza vaccines, as recommended by the World Health Organization. Influenza B virus vaccines for humans have been available for more than half a century, yet no systematic efforts have been undertaken to develop high-yield candidates. Therefore, we screened virus libraries possessing random mutations in the six "internal" influenza B viral RNA segments [i.e., those not encoding the major viral antigens, hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase NA)] for mutants that confer efficient replication. Candidate viruses that supported high yield in cell culture were tested with the HA and NA genes of eight different viruses of the Victoria and Yamagata lineages. We identified combinations of mutations that increased the titers of candidate vaccine viruses in mammalian cells used for human influenza vaccine virus propagation and in embryonated chicken eggs, the most common propagation system for influenza viruses. These influenza B virus vaccine backbones can be used for improved vaccine virus production.

  10. Rift Valley Fever Virus MP-12 Vaccine Is Fully Attenuated by a Combination of Partial Attenuations in the S, M, and L Segments

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Terence E.; Smith, Jennifer K.; Zhang, Lihong; Juelich, Terry L.; Gong, Bin; Slack, Olga A. L.; Ly, Hoai J.; Lokugamage, Nandadeva; Freiberg, Alexander N.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a mosquito-borne zoonotic disease endemic to Africa and characterized by a high rate of abortion in ruminants and hemorrhagic fever, encephalitis, or blindness in humans. RVF is caused by Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV; family Bunyaviridae, genus Phlebovirus), which has a tripartite negative-stranded RNA genome (consisting of the S, M, and L segments). Further spread of RVF into countries where the disease is not endemic may affect the economy and public health, and vaccination is an effective approach to prevent the spread of RVFV. A live-attenuated MP-12 vaccine is one of the best-characterized RVF vaccines for safety and efficacy and is currently conditionally licensed for use for veterinary purposes in the United States. Meanwhile, as of 2015, no other RVF vaccine has been conditionally or fully licensed for use in the United States. The MP-12 strain is derived from wild-type pathogenic strain ZH548, and its genome encodes 23 mutations in the three genome segments. However, the mechanism of MP-12 attenuation remains unknown. We characterized the attenuation of wild-type pathogenic strain ZH501 carrying a mutation(s) of the MP-12 S, M, or L segment in a mouse model. Our results indicated that MP-12 is attenuated by the mutations in the S, M, and L segments, while the mutations in the M and L segments confer stronger attenuation than those in the S segment. We identified a combination of 3 amino acid changes, Y259H (Gn), R1182G (Gc), and R1029K (L), that was sufficient to attenuate ZH501. However, strain MP-12 with reversion mutations at those 3 sites was still highly attenuated. Our results indicate that MP-12 attenuation is supported by a combination of multiple partial attenuation mutations and a single reversion mutation is less likely to cause a reversion to virulence of the MP-12 vaccine. IMPORTANCE Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a mosquito-transmitted viral disease that is endemic to Africa and that has the potential to

  11. Identification from diverse mammalian poxviruses of host-range regulatory genes functioning equivalently to vaccinia virus C7L.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiangzhi; Chao, Jie; Xiang, Yan

    2008-03-15

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) C7L is a host-range gene that regulates cellular tropism of VACV. Distantly related C7L homologues are encoded by nearly all mammalian poxviruses, but whether they are host-range genes functioning similar to VACV C7L has not been determined. Here, we used VACV as a model system to analyze five different C7L homologues from diverse mammalian poxviruses for their abilities to regulate poxvirus cellular tropism. Three C7L homologues (myxoma virus M63R, M64R and cowpox virus 020), when expressed with an epitope tag and from a VACV mutant lacking the host-range genes K1L and C7L (vK1L-C7L-), failed to support productive viral replication in human and murine cells. In nonpermissive cells, these viruses did not synthesize viral late proteins, expressed a reduced level of the early protein E3L, and were defective at suppressing cellular PKR activation. In contrast, two other C7L homologues, myxoma virus (MYXV) M62R and yaba-like disease virus (YLDV) 67R, when expressed with an epitope tag and from vK1L(-)C7L(-), supported normal viral replication in human and murine cells and restored the ability of the virus to suppress PKR activation. Furthermore, M62R rescued the defect of vK1L(-)C7L(-) at replicating and disseminating in mice following intranasal inoculation. These results show that MYXV M62R and YLDV 67R function equivalently to C7L at supporting VACV replication in mammalian hosts and suggest that a C7L-like host-range gene is essential for the replication of many mammalian poxviruses in mammalian hosts.

  12. Antibodies to CD40 prevent Epstein-Barr virus-mediated human B-cell lymphomagenesis in severe combined immune deficient mice given human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Murphy, W J; Funakoshi, S; Beckwith, M; Rushing, S E; Conley, D K; Armitage, R J; Fanslow, W C; Rager, H C; Taub, D D; Ruscetti, F W

    1995-09-01

    CD40 is expressed on both normal and neoplastic B lymphocytes. Signal transduction through CD40 in vitro has been shown to exert stimulatory effects on normal B cells and inhibitory effects on Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-induced B-cell lymphoma lines and some other cell lines derived from patients with aggressive histology lymphoma. The transfer of normal human peripheral blood lymphocytes (huPBL) from EBV-seropositive donors into severe combined immune deficient (SCID) mice has been previously shown to result in the generation of human B-cell lymphomas. These tumors are similar to the highly aggressive EBV-induced lymphomas that can arise clinically after transplantation or in the setting of immunodeficiency. Treatment of huPBL-SCID chimeric mice with anti-CD40 or anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) significantly delayed the development of EBV-induced B-cell lymphoma. However, the effects of the two MoAb were mechanistically distinct. Anti-CD40 treatment prevented lymphoma generation, while still allowing for functional human B-cell engraftment in the huPBL-SCID mice compared with mice receiving no treatment, all of which succumbed to lymphoma. By contrast, treatment with anti-CD20 significantly inhibited total human B-cell engraftment in the SCID recipients, which accounted for the absence of lymphomas. In vitro assays examining the transformation of human B cells by EBV also indicated that anti-CD40 could directly inhibit EBV-transformation, whereas anti-CD20 antibodies had no effect. Thus, anti-CD40 exerts selective effects to allow for the engraftment of normal human B cells and prevent the emergence of EBV lymphomas. Stimulation of CD40 by antibodies or its physiologic ligand may, therefore, be of significant clinical use in the prevention of EBV-induced B lymphomas that may arise when EBV-seropositive individuals receive immunosuppressive regimens after transplantation or in immune deficiency states, such as acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

  13. Effect of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) administration on the residual virus pool in a model of combination antiretroviral therapy-mediated suppression in SIVmac239-infected indian rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Del Prete, Gregory Q; Shoemaker, Rebecca; Oswald, Kelli; Lara, Abigail; Trubey, Charles M; Fast, Randy; Schneider, Douglas K; Kiser, Rebecca; Coalter, Vicky; Wiles, Adam; Wiles, Rodney; Freemire, Brandi; Keele, Brandon F; Estes, Jacob D; Quiñones, Octavio A; Smedley, Jeremy; Macallister, Rhonda; Sanchez, Rosa I; Wai, John S; Tan, Christopher M; Alvord, W Gregory; Hazuda, Daria J; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D

    2014-11-01

    Nonhuman primate models are needed for evaluations of proposed strategies targeting residual virus that persists in HIV-1-infected individuals receiving suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). However, relevant nonhuman primate (NHP) models of cART-mediated suppression have proven challenging to develop. We used a novel three-class, six-drug cART regimen to achieve durable 4.0- to 5.5-log reductions in plasma viremia levels and declines in cell-associated viral RNA and DNA in blood and tissues of simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac239-infected Indian-origin rhesus macaques, then evaluated the impact of treatment with the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA; Vorinostat) on the residual virus pool. Ex vivo SAHA treatment of CD4(+) T cells obtained from cART-suppressed animals increased histone acetylation and viral RNA levels in culture supernatants. cART-suppressed animals each received 84 total doses of oral SAHA. We observed SAHA dose-dependent increases in acetylated histones with evidence for sustained modulation as well as refractoriness following prolonged administration. In vivo virologic activity was demonstrated based on the ratio of viral RNA to viral DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, a presumptive measure of viral transcription, which significantly increased in SAHA-treated animals. However, residual virus was readily detected at the end of treatment, suggesting that SAHA alone may be insufficient for viral eradication in the setting of suppressive cART. The effects observed were similar to emerging data for repeat-dose SAHA treatment of HIV-infected individuals on cART, demonstrating the feasibility, utility, and relevance of NHP models of cART-mediated suppression for in vivo assessments of AIDS virus functional cure/eradication approaches.

  14. [Fusion proteins encoded by orf 129L of ectromelia and orf A30L of smallpox viruses cross-react with neutralizing monoclonal antibodies].

    PubMed

    razumov, I A; Gileva, I P; Vasil'eva, M A; Nepomniashchikh, T S; Mishina, M N; Belanov, E F; Kochneva, G V; Konovalov, E E; Shchelkunov, S N; Loktev, V B

    2005-01-01

    Open reading frame (orf) 129L of ectromelia (EV) and orf A30L of smallpox viruses (SPV) encoding fusion proteins were cloned and expressed in E. coli cells. The recombinant polypeptides (prA30L H pr129L) were purified from cell lysates by Ni-NTA chromatography. Recombinant polypeptides were able to form trimers in buffered saline and they destroyed under treatment with SDS and 2-mercaptoethanol. Reactivity of prA30L, pr129L and orthopoxvirus proteins was analyzed by ELISA and Western blotting with panel of 22 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against orthopoxviruses (19 against EV, 2 MAbs against vaccinia virus and 1 Mabs against cowpox virus). This data allowed us to conclude that there are 12 EV-specific epitopes of pr129L and EV fusion proteins, ten orthopox-specific epitopes of EV, VV, CPV fusion proteins, from them 9 orthopox-specific epitopes of prA30L and SPV fusion proteins. Five Mabs, which cross-reacted with orthopox-specific epitopes, were able to neutralize the VV on Vero cells and from them two MAbs has neutralizing activity against smallpox virus. Our findings demonstrate that 129L fusion protein have EV-specific epitopes, that EV 129L and SPV A30L fusion proteins have a several orthopox-specific epitopes to induce a neutralizing antibodies against human pathogenic orthopoxviruses.

  15. Improved cell mediated immune responses after successful re-vaccination of non-responders to the hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) vaccine using the combined hepatitis A and B vaccine.

    PubMed

    Nyström, Jessica; Cardell, Kristina; Björnsdottir, Thora Björg; Fryden, Aril; Hultgren, Catharina; Sällberg, Matti

    2008-11-05

    We successfully re-vaccinated hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccine non-responders using a double dose of the combined hepatitis A virus (HAV) and HBV vaccine. The hope was to improve priming of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-specific cell mediated immune response (CMI) by an increased antigen dose and a theoretical adjuvant-effect from the local presence of a HAV-specific CMI. A few non-responders had a detectable HBsAg-specific CMI before re-vaccination. An in vitro detectable HBsAg-specific CMI was primed equally effective in non-responders (58%) as in first time vaccine recipients (68%). After the third dose a weak, albeit significant, association was observed between the magnitude of HBsAg-specific proliferation and anti-HBs levels. This regimen improves the priming of HBsAg-specific CMIs and antibodies.

  16. Combined use of an immunotoxin and cyclosporine to prevent both activated and quiescent peripheral blood T cells from producing type 1 human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, K D; Ramilo, O; Vitetta, E S

    1993-01-01

    Two different populations of infected T cells are present in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals: activated cells that produce virions and quiescent cells that harbor the viral genome but are unable to produce virus unless they are activated. Using an in vitro model of acute HIV infection, we have evaluated the effect of depleting activated T cells with an immunotoxin and subsequently inhibiting activation of quiescent T cells with an immunosuppressive agent. CD25 (Tac, p55), the alpha chain of the interleukin 2 receptor, is expressed on activated, but not quiescent, T cells. An anti-CD25-ricin A chain immunotoxin eliminated activated, CD25+ HIV-infected cells and, thereby, inhibited viral production by these cells. Subsequent addition of cyclosporine to the residual CD25- cells prevented their activation and thereby suppressed their ability to produce virus and to propagate the infection to uninfected T cells. Images PMID:8434001

  17. Evaluation of Rice Resistance to Southern Rice Black-Streaked Dwarf Virus and Rice Ragged Stunt Virus through Combined Field Tests, Quantitative Real-Time PCR, and Proteome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhenchao; Yu, Lu; Jin, Linhong; Wang, Wenli; Zhao, Qi; Ran, Longlu; Li, Xiangyang; Chen, Zhuo; Guo, Rong; Wei, Yongtian; Yang, Zhongcheng; Liu, Enlong; Hu, Deyu; Song, Baoan

    2017-01-01

    Diseases caused by southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV) and rice ragged stunt virus (RRSV) considerably decrease grain yield. Therefore, determining rice cultivars with high resistance to SRBSDV and RRSV is necessary. In this study, rice cultivars with high resistance to SRBSDV and RRSV were evaluated through field trials in Shidian and Mangshi county, Yunnan province, China. SYBR Green I-based quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis was used to quantitatively detect virus gene expression levels in different rice varieties. The following parameters were applied to evaluate rice resistance: acre yield (A.Y.), incidence of infected plants (I.I.P.), virus load (V.L.), disease index (D.I.), and insect quantity (I.Q.) per 100 clusters. Zhongzheyou1 (Z1) and Liangyou2186 (L2186) were considered the most suitable varieties with integrated higher A.Y., lower I.I.P., V.L., D.I. and I.Q. features. In order to investigate the mechanism of rice resistance, comparative label-free shotgun liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) proteomic approaches were applied to comprehensively describe the proteomics of rice varieties’ SRBSDV tolerance. Systemic acquired resistance (SAR)-related proteins in Z1 and L2186 may result in the superior resistance of these varieties compared with Fengyouxiangzhan (FYXZ). PMID:28241456

  18. Three-year rabies duration of immunity in dogs following vaccination with a core combination vaccine against canine distemper virus, canine adenovirus type-1, canine parvovirus, and rabies virus.

    PubMed

    Lakshmanan, Nallakannu; Gore, Thomas C; Duncan, Karen L; Coyne, Michael J; Lum, Melissa A; Sterner, Frank J

    2006-01-01

    Thirty-two seronegative pups were vaccinated at 8 weeks of age with modified-live canine distemper virus (CDV), canine adenovirus type-2 (CAV-2), and canine parvovirus (CPV) vaccine and at 12 weeks with a modified-live CDV, CAV-2, CPV, and killed rabies virus vaccine. An additional 31 seronegative pups served as age-matched, nonvaccinated controls. All test dogs were strictly isolated for 3 years after receiving the second vaccination and then were challenged with virulent rabies virus. Clinical signs of rabies were prevented in 28 (88%) of the 32 vaccinated dogs. In contrast, 97% (30 of 31) of the control dogs died of rabies infection. These study results indicated that no immunogenic interference occurred between the modified-live vaccine components and the killed rabies virus component. Furthermore, these results indicated that the rabies component in the test vaccine provided protection against virulent rabies challenge in dogs 12 weeks of age or older for a minimum of 3 years following vaccination.

  19. Combined prime-boost vaccination against tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) using a recombinant vaccinia virus and a bacterial plasmid both expressing TBE virus non-structural NS1 protein

    PubMed Central

    Aleshin, SE; Timofeev, AV; Khoretonenko, MV; Zakharova, LG; Pashvykina, GV; Stephenson, JR; Shneider, AM; Altstein, AD

    2005-01-01

    Background Heterologous prime-boost immunization protocols using different gene expression systems have proven to be successful tools in protecting against various diseases in experimental animal models. The main reason for using this approach is to exploit the ability of expression cassettes to prime or boost the immune system in different ways during vaccination procedures. The purpose of the project was to study the ability of recombinant vaccinia virus (VV) and bacterial plasmid, both carrying the NS1 gene from tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) virus under the control of different promoters, to protect mice against lethal challenge using a heterologous prime-boost vaccination protocol. Results The heterologous prime-boost vaccination protocol, using a VV recombinant and bacterial plasmid, both containing the NS1 TBE virus protein gene under the control of different promoters, achieved a high level of protection in mice against lethal challenge with a highly pathogenic TBE virus strain. No signs of pronounced TBE infection were detected in the surviving animals. Conclusion Heterologous prime-boost vaccination protocols using recombinant VV and bacterial plasmids could be used for the development of flavivirus vaccines. PMID:16076390

  20. Virus trafficking – learning from single-virus tracking

    PubMed Central

    Brandenburg, Boerries; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2009-01-01

    What could be a better way to study virus trafficking than ‘miniaturizing oneself’ and ‘taking a ride with the virus particle’ on its journey into the cell? Single-virus tracking in living cells potentially provides us with the means to visualize the virus journey. This approach allows us to follow the fate of individual virus particles and monitor dynamic interactions between viruses and cellular structures, revealing previously unobservable infection steps. The entry, trafficking and egress mechanisms of various animal viruses have been elucidated using this method. The combination of single-virus trafficking with systems approaches and state-of-the-art imaging technologies should prove exciting in the future. PMID:17304249

  1. ECHO virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001340.htm ECHO virus To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Enteric cytopathic human orphan (ECHO) viruses are a group of viruses that lead to ...

  2. Development of a real-time RT-PCR assay combined with ethidium monoazide treatment for RNA viruses and its application to detect viral RNA after heat exposure.

    PubMed

    Kim, K; Katayama, H; Kitajima, M; Tohya, Y; Ohgaki, S

    2011-01-01

    A method was developed for discriminating damaged viruses or naked viral RNA from intact viruses by ethidium monoazide (EMA) treatment before RT-PCR. The applied EMA treatment consisted of three steps: (1) EMA dose, (2) exposure to light, and (3) additional purification by spin-column gel filtration. Approximately 4-log reduction in viral RNA concentration was observed by adding a dose of 10 μg/mL-EMA with 300 s of light irradiation. Although residual EMA can be an inhibitor of RT-PCR, its effect was reduced by spin-column gel filtration or a QIAamp® Viral RNA Mini Kit. EMA-RT-PCR was applied to the thermally treated PV1. Results of EMA-RT-PCR were similar to the plaque assay when PV1 was thermally inactivated. Although this is a preliminary study investigating applicability of the EMA-RT-PCR method for RNA viruses, the results suggest that the method is potentially applicable for the selective detection of epidemiologically important enteric viruses in water such as enteroviruses and noroviruses.

  3. CD4 T cell control primary measles virus infection of the CNS: regulation is dependent on combined activity with either CD8 T cells or with B cells: CD4, CD8 or B cells alone are ineffective.

    PubMed

    Tishon, Antoinette; Lewicki, Hanna; Andaya, Abegail; McGavern, Dorian; Martin, Lee; Oldstone, Michael B A

    2006-03-30

    Measles virus (MV), one of the most infectious of human pathogens, still infects over 30 million humans and causes over 500,000 deaths each year [Griffin, D., 2001. Measles virus. In: Fields, B., Knipe, D., Howley, P. (Eds.), Fields Virology. Lippincott-Raven, Philadelphia, pp. 1401-1442; ]. Death is primarily due to secondary microbial infections associated with the immunosuppression caused by MV. Studies of humans with genetic or acquired deficiencies of either the humoral or cellular arm of the immune system, and rodent models have implicated T cells in the control of the ongoing MV infection but the precise role and activities of the specific T cell subset or the molecules they produce is not clear. Using a transgenic mouse model in conjunction with depletion and reconstitution of individual B and T cell subsets alone or in combination, we show that neither CD4, CD8 nor B cells per se control acute MV infection. However, combinations of either CD4 T cells and B cells, or of CD4 and CD8 T cells are essential but CD8 T with B cells are ineffective. Interferon-gamma and neutralizing antibodies, but neither perforin nor TNF-alpha alone are associated with clearance of MV infection. TNF-alpha combined with interferon-gamma is more effective in protection than interferon alone. Further, the lack of an interferon-gamma response leads to persistence of MV.

  4. A combination microbicide gel protects macaques against vaginal simian human immunodeficiency virus-reverse transcriptase infection, but only partially reduces herpes simplex virus-2 infection after a single high-dose cochallenge.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Mayla; Aravantinou, Meropi; Menon, Radhika; Seidor, Samantha; Goldman, Daniel; Kenney, Jessica; Derby, Nina; Gettie, Agegnehu; Blanchard, James; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Fernández-Romero, Jose A; Zydowsky, Thomas M; Robbiani, Melissa

    2014-02-01

    Herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) infection increases HIV susceptibility. We previously established a rhesus macaque model of vaginal HSV-2 preexposure followed by cochallenge with HSV-2 and simian/human immunodeficiency virus-reverse transcriptase (SHIV-RT). Using this model, we showed that a gel containing the nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) MIV-150 in carrageenan (CG) reduced SHIV-RT infection. To evaluate the efficacy of new generation microbicides against both viruses, we first established dual infection after single vaginal cochallenge with SHIV-RT and HSV-2 in HSV-2-naive macaques. All animals (6/6) became HSV-2 infected, with 4/6 coinfected with SHIV-RT. In a control group cochallenged with SHIV-RT and UV-inactivated HSV-2, 2/4 became SHIV-RT infected, and none had detectable HSV-2. Low-level HSV-2-specific antibody and T cell responses were detected in some HSV-2-infected animals. To test a CG gel containing MIV-150 and zinc acetate (MZC), which provided naive animals full protection from SHIV-RT for at least 8 h, MZC (vs. CG) was applied daily for 14 days followed by cochallenge 8 h later. MZC prevented SHIV-RT infection (0/9 infected, p=0.04 vs. 3/6 in CG controls), but only reduced HSV-2 infection by 20% (6/9 infected vs. 5/6 in CG, p=0.6). In HSV-2-infected animals, none of the gel-treated animals seroconverted, and only the CG controls had measurable HSV-2-specific T cell responses. This study shows the promise of MZC to prevent immunodeficiency virus infection (even in the presence of HSV-2) and reduce HSV-2 infection after exposure to a high-dose inoculum. Additionally, it demonstrates the potential of a macaque coinfection model to evaluate broad-spectrum microbicides.

  5. Induction of murine tumors in adult mice by a combination of either avian sarcoma virus or human adenovirus and syngeneic mouse embryo cells.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, M; Nitta, K

    1983-01-01

    Primary murine Rous sarcoma was produced in adult mice of seven strains, C57BL/6, DBA/2, BALB/c, C3H/He, CBAJ, AKR, and DDD, by s.c. inoculation of a mixture of 5 X 10(6) chicken tumor cells containing Schmidt-Ruppin Rous sarcoma virus and 9- to 12-day-old mouse embryo cells (MEC) (2 X 10(6) ) of the syngeneic strain. The sarcoma developed at the site of injection in almost all mice tested, but there were some differences in the latent period and the survival time among mouse strains. When the number of cells inoculated was reduced to 5 X 10(4) for chicken tumor cells induced by the Schmidt-Ruppin strain of Rous sarcoma virus (SR-CTC) and 2 X 10(4) for MEC, no tumor was produced in C3H/He mice. These tumors had strain specificity and the Schmidt-Ruppin strain of Rous sarcoma virus genome in masked form. The tumor at the site of injection originated in the embryo cells injected along with SR-CTC. This was confirmed by CBAT6/T6 marker chromosome analysis of the tumor cells of CBA mice induced with SR-CTC plus CBAT6/T6 MEC and also confirmed by transplantation of a C57BL/6 X C3H/He F1 tumor which had been induced with SR-CTC plus C3H/He or C57BL/6 MEC. Tumor induction in adult mouse by a mixture of virus and syngeneic 9- to 14-day-old embryo cells was tested for human adenovirus serotype 12 (Ad12) and simian virus 40. Primary Ad12 tumor was also induced in adult CBA, C3H/He, and DDD mice by 4 X 10(5 to 6) 50% tissue culture infective dose of Ad12 with 5 X 10(6) syngeneic embryo cells. This tumor contained Ad12 T-antigen-positive particles in cells. But in the case of simian virus 40, the tumor did not appear for about 300 days of observation.

  6. Combination Emtricitabine and Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate Prevents Vaginal Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in Macaques Harboring Chlamydia trachomatis and Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Radzio, Jessica; Henning, Tara; Jenkins, Leecresia; Ellis, Shanon; Farshy, Carol; Phillips, Christi; Holder, Angela; Kuklenyik, Susan; Dinh, Chuong; Hanson, Debra; McNicholl, Janet; Heneine, Walid; Papp, John; Kersh, Ellen N; García-Lerma, J Gerardo

    2016-05-15

    Genital inflammation associated with sexually transmitted infections increases susceptibility to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), but it is unclear whether the increased risk can reduce the efficacy of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). We investigated whether coinfection of macaques with Chlamydia trachomatis and Trichomonas vaginalis decreases the prophylactic efficacy of oral emtricitabine (FTC)/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF). Macaques were exposed to simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) vaginally each week for up to 16 weeks and received placebo or FTC/TDF pericoitally. All animals in the placebo group were infected with SHIV, while 4 of 6 PrEP recipients remained uninfected (P= .03). Oral FTC/TDF maintains efficacy in a macaque model of sexually transmitted coinfection, although the infection of 2 macaques signals a modest loss of PrEP activity.

  7. SR-2P Vaginal Microbicide Gel Provides Protection against Herpes Simplex Virus 2 When Administered as a Combined Prophylactic and Postexposure Therapeutic

    PubMed Central

    Fields, Scott A.; Bhatia, Gaurav; Fong, Julie M.; Liu, Mingtao

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that a single prophylactic dose of SR-2P, a novel dual-component microbicide gel comprising acyclovir and tenofovir, led to a modest increase in mouse survival following a lethal challenge of herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2). Here, we show that a dose of SR-2P administered 24 h prior to infection provides some protection against the virus, but to a lesser degree than SR-2P administered either once a day for 2 days or 1 h prior to infection. None of the prophylactic doses blocked infection by the virus, and all resulted in 80 to 100% lethality. However, given that a prophylactic dose still provided a significant reduction in overall clinical score, reduced rate of body weight loss, and increased median survival of the mice, we examined whether a repetitive dose regimen (postinfection) in addition to the prophylactic dose could prevent death and reduce the levels of virus in mice. Nearly all (9 of 10 in each group) of the mice that received SR-2P for 2 days prior to infection or that received SR-2P 1 h prior to infection and were administered SR-2P once a day for 10 days after infection showed no clinical symptoms of infection and no viral loads in vaginal swabs and survived for 28 days postinfection. Conversely, mice receiving no treatment or an identical vehicle treatment demonstrated advanced clinical signs and did not survive past day 9 postinfection. We conclude that SR-2P is an effective anti-HSV-2 agent in mice. PMID:26149989

  8. A novel tetravalent formulation combining the four aggregated domain III-capsid proteins from dengue viruses induces a functional immune response in mice and monkeys.

    PubMed

    Suzarte, Edith; Gil, Lázaro; Valdés, Iris; Marcos, Ernesto; Lazo, Laura; Izquierdo, Alienys; García, Angélica; López, Lázaro; Álvarez, Maylin; Pérez, Yusleydis; Castro, Jorge; Romero, Yaremis; Guzmán, María G; Guillén, Gerardo; Hermida, Lisset

    2015-08-01

    Our group developed a subunit vaccine candidate against dengue virus based on two different viral regions: the domain III of the envelope protein and the capsid protein. The novel chimeric protein from dengue-2 virus [domain III-capsid (DIIIC-2)], when presented as aggregated incorporating oligodeoxynucleotides, induced anti-viral and neutralizing antibodies, a cellular immune response and conferred significant protection to mice and monkeys. The remaining constructs were already obtained and properly characterized. Based on this evidence, this work was aimed at assessing the immune response in mice of the chimeric proteins DIIIC of each serotype, as monovalent and tetravalent formulations. Here, we demonstrated the immunogenicity of each protein in terms of humoral and cell-mediated immunity, without antigen competition on the mixture forming the formulation tetra DIIIC. Accordingly, significant protection was afforded as measured by the limited viral load in the mouse encephalitis model. The assessment of the tetravalent formulation in non-human primates was also conducted. In this animal model, it was demonstrated that the formulation induced neutralizing antibodies and memory cell-mediated immune response with IFN-γ-secreting and cytotoxic capacity, regardless the route of immunization used. Taken together, we can assert that the tetravalent formulation of DIIIC proteins constitutes a promising vaccine candidate against dengue virus, and propose it for further efficacy experiments in monkeys or in the dengue human infection model, as it has been recently proposed.

  9. Foodborne viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Testing for human pathogenic viruses in foods represents a formidable task requiring the extraction, concentration, and assay of a host of viruses from a wide range of food matrices. The enteric viruses, particularly genogroup I and II (GI and GII) noroviruses and hepatitis A virus, are the princip...

  10. Inventing Viruses.

    PubMed

    Summers, William C

    2014-11-01

    In the nineteenth century, "virus" commonly meant an agent (usually unknown) that caused disease in inoculation experiments. By the 1890s, however, some disease-causing agents were found to pass through filters that retained the common bacteria. Such an agent was called "filterable virus," the best known being the virus that caused tobacco mosaic disease. By the 1920s there were many examples of filterable viruses, but no clear understanding of their nature. However, by the 1930s, the term "filterable virus" was being abandoned in favor of simply "virus," meaning an agent other than bacteria. Visualization of viruses by the electron microscope in the late 1930s finally settled their particulate nature. This article describes the ever-changing concept of "virus" and how virologists talked about viruses. These changes reflected their invention and reinvention of the concept of a virus as it was revised in light of new knowledge, new scientific values and interests, and new hegemonic technologies.

  11. Vaccinia virus K1L protein mediates host-range function in RK-13 cells via ankyrin repeat and may interact with a cellular GTPase-activating protein.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Ritu R; Terajima, Masanori

    2005-12-01

    The K1L protein of vaccinia virus is required for its growth in certain cell lines (RK-13 and human). The cowpox host-range protein CP77 has been shown to complement K1L function in RK-13 cells, despite a lack of homology between the two proteins except for ankyrin repeats. We investigated the role of ankyrin repeats of K1L protein in RK-13 cells. The growth of a recombinant vaccinia virus, with K1L gene mutated in the most conserved ankyrin repeat, was severely impaired. Infection with the mutant virus caused shutdown of cellular and viral protein synthesis early in infection. We also investigated the interaction of K1L protein with cellular proteins and found that K1L interacts with the rabbit homologue of human ACAP2, a GTPase-activating protein with ankyrin repeats. Our result suggests the importance of ankyrin repeat for host-range function of K1L in RK-13 cells and identifies ACAP2 as a cellular protein, which may be interacting with K1L.

  12. Executive summary of the Consensus Document of GeSIDA and Spanish Secretariat for the National Plan on AIDS on combined antiretroviral treatment in adults infected by the human immunodeficiency virus (January 2013).

    PubMed

    2013-11-01

    In the present update of the guidelines, a starting combination antiretroviral treatment (cART) is recommended in symptomatic patients, in pregnant women, in serodiscordant couples with a high risk of transmission, in patients co-infected with hepatitis B virus requiring treatment, and in patients with HIV-related nephropathy. Guidelines on cART are included in the event of a concurrent diagnosis of HIV infection with an AIDS-defining event. In asymptomatic naïve patients, cART is recommended if the CD4(+) lymphocyte count is <500cells/μL; if the CD4(+) lymphocyte count is >500cells/μL, cART can be delayed, although it may be considered in patients with liver cirrhosis, chronic infection due to hepatitis C virus, high cardiovascular risk, plasma viral load (PVL) >10(5)copies/mL, CD4(+) lymphocyte percentage <14%, cognitive impairment, and age >55 years. cART in naïve patients requires a combination of 3 drugs, and its aim is to achieve undetectable PVL. Treatment adherence plays a key role in sustaining a favorable response. cART can, and should be, changed if virological failure occurs, in order to return to undetectable PVL. Approaches to cART in acute HIV infection, in women, in pregnancy, in tuberculosis, and post-exposure prophylaxis are also examined.

  13. Maternal immunization with respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein formulated with a novel combination adjuvant provides protection from RSV in newborn lambs.

    PubMed

    Garg, R; Latimer, L; Wang, Y; Simko, E; Gerdts, V; Potter, A; van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, S

    2016-01-04

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the causative agent of serious upper and lower respiratory tract infections in newborns and infants. Protection from RSV is crucial for neonates, and maternal immunization is one approach that holds promise for providing immediate protection to young infants against severe RSV infection. We previously reported efficacy of a subunit vaccine consisting of the fusion (F) protein formulated with a novel adjuvant (ΔF/TriAdj) in neonates. The goal of the current study was to evaluate the ΔF/TriAdj as a maternal vaccine. Pregnant ewes were vaccinated intramuscularly with ΔF/TriAdj or PBS six weeks prior to lambing, and re-vaccinated four weeks later, which resulted in transfer of maternal antibodies (MatAbs) to the newborn lambs through the colostrum. Significantly higher levels of RSV ΔF-specific serum IgG were detected in vaccinated pregnant ewes and their lambs when compared to control animals, which revealed that MatAbs were passively transferred to the offspring. All newborn lambs were challenged with RSV at three days of age. After RSV challenge, virus production and lung pathology were significantly lower in lambs that had received passively transferred antibodies than in control animals. These results indicate that maternal immunization with ΔF/TriAdj might be an alternative, safe and effective approach to provide protection against RSV in newborn and young infants.

  14. Tissue distribution of mucosal antibody-producing cells specific for respiratory syncytial virus in severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) mice engrafted with human tonsils.

    PubMed Central

    Nadal, D; Albini, B; Schläpfer, E; Chen, C; Brodsky, L; Ogra, P L

    1991-01-01

    Groups of C.B-17 SCID mice were reconstituted intraperitoneally with human tonsillar mononuclear cells (hu-TMC) from children seropositive for antibody to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and subsequently challenged intraperitoneally with inactivated RSV or sham-immunized. The synthesis and the distribution characteristics of human antibody to RSV in various murine tissues were studied using an enzyme-linked immunospot assay (ELISPOT). No specific antibody was observed in sham-immunized animals. In contrast, mice engrafted with hu-TMC exhibited the appearance of specific human antibody secreting cells (hu-ASC) after i.p. immunization with inactivated RSV. RSV-specific hu-ASC were detected only in animals engrafted with cells from donors seropositive for antibodies to Epstein-Barr virus. Hu-TMC engrafted mice showed RSV-specific IgM and, in lower numbers, IgG hu-ASC in several tissues including the lungs. Numbers of RSV-specific IgA hu-ASC were low, however, and detected only in the lung. No RSV-specific hu-ASC were detected in the intestine. These data demonstrate for the first time that hu-TMC-SCID chimeras respond to immunization with viral antigen. Furthermore, the results suggest that hu-TMC engraft in lungs but not in the intestinal tissue. PMID:1893614

  15. The Combination of Grazoprevir, a Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) NS3/4A Protease Inhibitor, and Elbasvir, an HCV NS5A Inhibitor, Demonstrates a High Genetic Barrier to Resistance in HCV Genotype 1a Replicons

    PubMed Central

    Bystol, Karin; Curry, Stephanie; McMonagle, Patricia; Xia, Ellen; Ingravallo, Paul; Chase, Robert; Liu, Rong; Black, Todd; Hazuda, Daria; Howe, Anita Y. M.; Asante-Appiah, Ernest

    2016-01-01

    The selection of resistance-associated variants (RAVs) against single agents administered to patients chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) necessitates that direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) targeting multiple viral proteins be developed to overcome failure resulting from emergence of resistance. The combination of grazoprevir (formerly MK-5172), an NS3/4A protease inhibitor, and elbasvir (formerly MK-8742), an NS5A inhibitor, was therefore studied in genotype 1a (GT1a) replicon cells. Both compounds were independently highly potent in GT1a wild-type replicon cells, with 90% effective concentration (EC90) values of 0.9 nM and 0.006 nM for grazoprevir and elbasvir, respectively. No cross-resistance was observed when clinically relevant NS5A and NS3 RAVs were profiled against grazoprevir and elbasvir, respectively. Kinetic analyses of HCV RNA reduction over 14 days showed that grazoprevir and elbasvir inhibited prototypic NS5A Y93H and NS3 R155K RAVs, respectively, with kinetics comparable to those for the wild-type GT1a replicon. In combination, grazoprevir and elbasvir interacted additively in GT1a replicon cells. Colony formation assays with a 10-fold multiple of the EC90 values of the grazoprevir-elbasvir inhibitor combination suppressed emergence of resistant colonies, compared to a 100-fold multiple for the independent agents. The selected resistant colonies with the combination harbored RAVs that required two or more nucleotide changes in the codons. Mutations in the cognate gene caused greater potency losses for elbasvir than for grazoprevir. Replicons bearing RAVs identified from resistant colonies showed reduced fitness for several cell lines and may contribute to the activity of the combination. These studies demonstrate that the combination of grazoprevir and elbasvir exerts a potent effect on HCV RNA replication and presents a high genetic barrier to resistance. The combination of grazoprevir and elbasvir is currently approved for

  16. Swine Influenza Virus: Emerging Understandings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: In March-April 2009, a novel pandemic H1N1 emerged in the human population in North America [1]. The gene constellation of the emerging virus was demonstrated to be a combination of genes from swine influenza A viruses (SIV) of North American and Eurasian lineages that had never before...

  17. Serological behaviour of influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    Fiset, P.; Depoux, R.

    1954-01-01

    By antibody absorption it was found that strains of influenza virus exhibiting P-Q differences were related according to certain patterns. In the course of this investigation it was also revealed that some viruses possessed masked antigens capable of stimulating antibody production but incapable of combining efficiently with antibody. PMID:14364182

  18. Incidence of Wheat streak mosaic virus, Triticum mosaic virus, and Wheat mosaic virus in wheat curl mites recovered from maturing winter wheat spikes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat curl mites (WCM; Aceria tosichella) transmit Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV), Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV), and Wheat mosaic virus (WMoV) to wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in the Great Plains region of the United States. These viruses can be detected in single, double, or triple combinations i...

  19. A Conformational Restriction in the Influenza A Virus Neuraminidase Binding Site by R152 Results in a Combinational Effect of I222T and H274Y on Oseltamivir Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lan; Cao, Yang; Zhou, Jianfang; Qin, Kun; Zhu, Wenfei; Zhu, Yun; Yang, Lei; Wang, Dayan

    2014-01-01

    The I222K, I222R, and I222T substitutions in neuraminidase (NA) have been found in clinically derived 2009 pandemic influenza A/H1N1 viruses with altered susceptibilities to NA inhibitors (NAIs). The effects of these substitutions, together with the most frequently observed resistance-related substitution, H274Y, on viral fitness and resistance mechanisms were further investigated in this study. Reduced sensitivities to oseltamivir were observed in all three mutants (I222K, I222R, and I222T). Furthermore, the I222K and I222T substitutions had a combinational effect of further increasing resistance in the presence of H274Y, which might result from a conformational restriction in the NA binding site. Of note, by using molecular dynamics simulations, R152, the neighbor of T222, was observed to translate to a position closer to T222, resulting in the narrowing of the binding pocket, which otherwise only subtends the residue substitution of H274Y. Moreover, significantly attenuated NA function and viral growth abilities were found in the I222K+H274Y double mutant, while the I222T+H274Y double mutant exhibited slightly delayed growth but had a peak viral titer similar to that of the wild-type virus in MDCK cells. The relative growth advantage of the I222T mutant versus the I222K mutant and the higher frequency of I222T emerging in N1 subtype influenza viruses raise concerns necessitating close monitoring of the dual substitutions I222T and H274Y. PMID:24366752

  20. Studies of inactivation, retardation and accumulation of viruses in porous media by a combination of dye labeled and native bacteriophage probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitis, Vitaly; Dlugy, Christina; Gun, Jenny; Lev, Ovadia

    2011-06-01

    Penetration of viruses through soils is governed by the processes of transport, reversible adsorption, accumulation and inactivation. Until now, it was difficult to decouple the latter two processes and accurately predict viral fate. The present work describes a novel method—tracer studies with a mixture of native and fluorescent-dyed bacteriophages—that facilitates parallel quantification of the two processes. When the native phages are experiencing both accumulation and inactivation, the labeled ones are inactivated already and therefore can only be accumulated. Thus the effect of inactivation is applicable to native bacteriophages only and depletion of phage concentration due to inactivation can be elucidated from a total phage balance. The novel approach is exemplified by batch and column studies of the effects of temperature, pH, and saturation, on inactivation of MS2 bacteriophage. A three-parameter model accounting for inactivation, reversible adsorption (i.e., retardation), and accumulation is implemented.

  1. Zika Virus

    MedlinePlus

    Zika is a virus that is spread mostly by mosquitoes. A pregnant mother can pass it to ... through blood transfusions. There have been outbreaks of Zika virus in the United States, Africa, Southeast Asia, ...

  2. Chikungunya virus

    MedlinePlus

    Chikungunya virus infection; Chikungunya ... Where Chikungunya is found Before 2013, the virus was found in Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Indian and Pacific oceans. In late 2013, outbreaks occurred for the first time in the ...

  3. Chikungunya Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... is key! Prevent Infection. Use mosquito repellent. Chikungunya Virus Distribution Chikungunya in the U.S. What's New Surveillance ... Clinical Challenge For Travelers CDC Travelers' Health Chikungunya Virus Home Prevention Transmission Symptoms & Treatment Geographic Distribution Chikungunya ...

  4. Combined cytotoxic activity of an infectious, but non-replicative herpes simplex virus type 1 and plasmacytoid dendritic cells against tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Thomann, Sabrina; Boscheinen, Jan B; Vogel, Karin; Knipe, David M; DeLuca, Neal; Gross, Stefanie; Schuler-Thurner, Beatrice; Schuster, Philipp; Schmidt, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Malignant melanoma is an aggressive tumour of the skin with increasing incidence, frequent metastasis and poor prognosis. At the same time, it is an immunogenic type of cancer with spontaneous regressions. Most recently, the tumoricidal effect of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) and their capacity to overcome the immunosuppressive tumour microenvironment are being investigated. In this respect, we studied the effect of the infectious, but replication-deficient, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) d106S vaccine strain, which lacks essential immediate early genes, in pDC co-cultures with 11 melanoma cell lines. We observed a strong cytotoxic activity, inducing apoptotic and necrotic cell death in most melanoma cell lines. The cytotoxic activity of HSV-1 d106S plus pDC was comparable to the levels of cytotoxicity induced by natural killer cells, but required only a fraction of cells with effector : target ratios of 1 : 20 (P < 0·05). The suppressive activity of cell-free supernatants derived from virus-stimulated pDC was significantly neutralized using antibodies against the interferon-α receptor (P < 0·05). In addition to type I interferons, TRAIL and granzyme B contributed to the inhibitory effect of HSV-1 d106S plus pDC to a minor extent. UV-irradiated viral stocks were significantly less active than infectious particles, both in the absence and presence of pDC (P < 0·05), indicating that residual activity of HSV-1 d106S is a major component and sensitizes the tumour cells to interferon-producing pDC. Three leukaemic cell lines were also susceptible to this treatment, suggesting a general anti-tumour effect. In conclusion, the potential of HSV-1 d106S for therapeutic vaccination should be further evaluated in patients suffering from different malignancies. PMID:26194553

  5. Rapid detection method for hepatitis A virus from lettuce by a combination of filtration and integrated cell culture-real-time reverse transcription PCR.

    PubMed

    Hyeon, Ji-Yeon; Chon, Jung-Whan; Park, Chankyu; Lee, Joong-Bok; Choi, In-Soo; Kim, Moo-Sang; Seo, Kun-Ho

    2011-10-01

    We have developed a rapid and simple method for filtration using a positively charged membrane to concentrate hepatitis A virus (HAV) from lettuce and an integrated cell culture-real-time reverse transcription PCR (ICC-real-time RT-PCR) to detect infectious HAV. The most suitable buffer for HAV concentration by filtration was 100 mM Tris-HCl, 50 mM glycine (pH 9.5). Filtration using the NanoCeram matrix was compared with polyethylene glycol precipitation for viral concentration from lettuce inoculated with 6 log RNA copies of HAV. The recovery rate of filtration was statistically higher than that of polyethylene glycol precipitation (47.3 versus 24.9%, respectively). The sensitivity of ICC-real-time RT-PCR for detection of infectious HAV was determined by inoculation of FRhK-4 cells with HAV (4 log to 0 log RNA copies). ICC-real-time RT-PCR detected infectious HAV on average 5 days earlier than cytopathic effects at all inoculation levels. HAV recovered from lettuce (approximately 3 log RNA copies) was also analyzed with ICC-real-time RT-PCR. Infectious HAV was detected within 2 days postinfection by ICC-real-time RT-PCR, whereas cytopathic effects were not observed until 7 days postinfection. Coupled with a virus concentration and purification system using a positively charged membrane, ICC-real-time RT-PCR has the potential to become a novel and rapid method for the detection of infectious HAV in vegetables.

  6. Virologic failure in first-line human immunodeficiency virus therapy with a CCR5 entry inhibitor, aplaviroc, plus a fixed-dose combination of lamivudine-zidovudine: nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistance regardless of envelope tropism.

    PubMed

    Demarest, James F; Amrine-Madsen, Heather; Irlbeck, David M; Kitrinos, Kathryn M

    2009-03-01

    The CCR102881 (ASCENT) study evaluated the antiviral activity of the novel CCR5 entry inhibitor aplaviroc plus a fixed-dose combination of lamivudine-zidovudine (Combivir) in drug-naïve human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected subjects with only CCR5-tropic virus detected in plasma. Although the trial was stopped prematurely due to idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity, eight subjects met protocol-defined virologic failure criteria. Clonal analyses of the viral envelope tropism, aplaviroc susceptibility, and env sequencing were performed on plasma at baseline and at the time of virologic failure. Molecular evolutionary analyses were also performed. The majority of the subjects with virologic failure (six of eight) acquired the lamivudine resistance-associated mutation M184V, and none had evidence of reduced susceptibility to aplaviroc at the time of virologic failure, even at the clonal level. Six subjects with virologic failure maintained CCR5 tropism, while two exhibited a change in population tropism readout to dual/mixed-tropic with R5X4-tropic clones detected prior to therapy. Two evolutionary patterns were observed: five subjects had no evidence of population turnover, while three subjects had multiple lines of evidence for env population turnover. The acquisition of the M184V mutation is the primary characteristic of virologic failure in first-line therapy with aplaviroc plus lamivudine-zidovudine, regardless of the envelope tropism.

  7. Hepadna viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, W.; Koike, K.; Will, H.

    1987-01-01

    This book examines the molecular biology, disease pathogenesis, epidemiology, and clinical features of hepadna and other viruses with hepatic tropism and outlines future directions and approaches for their management. The volume's six sections provide a review of the various features, mechanisms, and functions of these viruses, ranging from hepadna virus replication and regulation of gene expression to the structure and function of hepadna-virus gene products.

  8. Use of dual priming oligonucleotide system-based multiplex RT-PCR combined with high performance liquid chromatography assay for simultaneous detection of five enteric viruses associated with acute enteritis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wen-Lu; Wang, Zi-Wei; Qin, Yue; Sun, Chao; Liu, Zhong-Mei; Jiang, Yan-Ping; Qiao, Xin-Yuan; Tang, Li-Jie; Li, Yi-Jing; Xu, Yi-Gang

    2017-05-01

    In this study, a specific and sensitive method for simultaneous detection of human astrovirus, human rotavirus, norovirus, sapovirus and enteric adenovirus associated with acute enteritis was developed, based on the specific dual priming oligonucleotide (DPO) system and the sensitive high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. The DPO system-based multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) combined with HPLC assay was more sensitive than agarose gel electrophoresis analysis and real-time SYBR Green PCR assay, and showed a specificity of 100% and sensitivity of 96%-100%. The high sensitivity and specificity of the assay indicates its great potential to be a useful tool for the accurate diagnosis of enteric virus infections.

  9. Combinations of mutations in the connection domain of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase: assessing the impact on nucleoside and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistance.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Soumi; Fransen, Signe; Paxinos, Ellen E; Stawiski, Eric; Huang, Wei; Petropoulos, Christos J

    2010-05-01

    Recent reports have described the effect of mutations in the connection and RNase H domains of reverse transcriptase (RT) on nucleoside and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI and NNRTI, respectively) resistance in the presence of thymidine analog resistance mutations (TAMs) and NNRTI mutations (J. H. Brehm, D. Koontz, J. D. Meteer, V. Pathak, N. Sluis-Cremer, and J. W. Mellors, J. Virol. 81:7852-7859, 2007; K. A. Delviks-Frankenberry, G. N. Nikolenko, R. Barr, and V. K. Pathak, J. Virol. 81:6837-6845, 2007; G. N. Nikolenko, K. A. Delviks-Frankenberry, S. Palmer, F. Maldarelli, M. J. Fivash, Jr., J. M. Coffin, and V. K. Pathak, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 104:317-322, 2007; G. N. Nikolenko, S. Palmer, F. Maldarelli, J. W. Mellors, J. M. Coffin, and V. K. Pathak, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 102:2093-2098, 2005; and S. H. Yap, C. W. Sheen, J. Fahey, M. Zanin, D. Tyssen, V. D. Lima, B. Wynhoven, M. Kuiper, N. Sluis-Cremer, P. R. Harrigan, and G. Tachedjian, PLoS Med. 4:e335, 2007). In the present study, novel mutations in the connection domain of RT (T369I/V), first identified in patient-derived viruses, were characterized, and their effects on NNRTI and NNRTI susceptibility were determined. Furthermore, the effect of N348I on NRTI and NNRTI resistance was confirmed. HIV-1 with either N348I or T369I/V demonstrated reduced susceptibility to nevirapine (NVP), efavirenz (EFV), delaviridine (DLV), and zidovudine (ZDV) compared to wild-type HIV-1. However, HIV-1 with T369I and N348I demonstrated 10- to 60-fold resistance to these same drugs. In clinical samples, these two connection domain RT mutations were predominantly observed in viruses containing TAMs and NNRTI mutations and did not alter the susceptible-resistant classifications of these samples. Introduction of T369I, N348I, or T369I/N348I also reduced replication capacity (RC). These observations suggest that it may be of scientific interest to test these mutations against new NNRTI

  10. Efficacy and Tolerability of Pegylated Interferon and Ribavirin in Combination with Simeprevir to Treat Hepatitis C Virus Infections After Living Donor Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Miuma, Satoshi; Ichikawa, Tatsuki; Miyaaki, Hisamitsu; Haraguchi, Masafumi; Tamada, Yoko; Shibata, Hidetaka; Taura, Naota; Soyama, Akihiko; Hidaka, Masaaki; Takatsuki, Mitsuhisa; Eguchi, Susumu; Nakao, Kazuhiko

    2016-06-01

    Pegylated interferon and ribavirin plus simeprevir therapy (simeprevir-based triple therapy) has been recently introduced, providing excellent results for nontransplant patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. However, there are limited data available on its effect on liver transplant recipients. In the present study, we evaluated the efficacy and tolerability of simeprevir-based triple therapy in liver transplant recipients. We treated 9 liver transplant recipients for genotype 1b HCV reinfection with simeprevir-based triple therapy. The efficacy and adverse effects were evaluated until 24 weeks after therapy. All recipients continued immunosuppressive therapy at the same dose as that before therapy induction. Seven of the 9 recipients (77.8%) achieved sustained virological response at 24 weeks. Two recipients (22.2%) experienced viral breakthrough (BT) at 12 and 16 weeks; NS3 HCV mutations conferring resistance to simeprevir were detected in both these patients after BT. Anemia was the most common adverse effect, requiring ribavirin dose reduction and blood transfusion. However, all recipients, except those with BT, completed the 24-week therapy. No recipient experienced cellular rejection during therapy. In conclusion, simeprevir-based triple therapy exhibited high efficacy and tolerability in liver transplant recipients with genotype 1b HCV reinfection.

  11. Combined Linkage and Association Studies Show that HLA Class II Variants Control Levels of Antibodies against Epstein-Barr Virus Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Cobat, Aurélie; Guergnon, Julien; Brice, Pauline; Fermé, Christophe; Carde, Patrice; Hermine, Olivier; Pendeven, Catherine Le-; Amiel, Corinne; Taoufik, Yassine; Alcaïs, Alexandre; Theodorou, Ioannis; Besson, Caroline; Abel, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Over 95% of the adult population worldwide is infected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). EBV infection is associated with the development of several cancers, including Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Elevated levels of anti-EBV antibodies have been associated with increased risk of HL. There is growing evidence that genetic factors control the levels of antibodies against EBV antigens. Here, we conducted linkage and association studies to search for genetic factors influencing either anti-viral capsid antigen (VCA) or anti-Epstein Barr nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1) IgG levels in a unique cohort of 424 individuals of European origin from 119 French families recruited through a Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patient. No major locus controlling anti-VCA antibody levels was identified. However, we found that the HLA region influenced anti-EBNA-1 IgG titers. Refined association studies in this region identified a cluster of HLA class II variants associated with anti-EBNA-1 IgG titers (e.g. p = 5×10–5 for rs9268403). The major allele of rs9268403 conferring a predisposition to high anti-EBNA-1 antibody levels was also associated with an increased risk of HL (p = 0.02). In summary, this study shows that HLA class II variants influenced anti-EBNA-1 IgG titers in a European population. It further shows the role of the same variants in the risk of HL. PMID:25025336

  12. Recombinase polymerase amplification combined with a lateral flow dipstick for discriminating between infectious Penaeus stylirostris densovirus and virus-related sequences in shrimp genome.

    PubMed

    Jaroenram, Wansadaj; Owens, Leigh

    2014-11-01

    Penaeus stylirostris densovirus (PstDV) is an important shrimp pathogen that causes mortality in P. stylirostris and runt deformity syndrome (RDS) in Penaeus vannamei and Penaeus monodon. Recently, PstDV-related sequences were found in the genome of P. monodon and P. vannamei. This led to false positive results by PCR-based detection system. Here, a more efficient detection platform based on recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) and a lateral flow dipstick (LFD) was developed for detecting PstDV. Under the optimal conditions, 30 min at 37°C for RPA followed by 5 min at room temperature for LFD, the protocol was 10 times more sensitive than the Saksmerphrome et al's interim 3-tube nested PCR and showed no cross-reaction with other shrimp viruses. It also reduced false positive results arising from viral inserts to ∼5% compared to 76-78% by the IQ2000™ nested PCR kit and the 309F/R PCR protocol currently recommended by World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) for PstDV detection. Together with simplicity and portability, the protocol serves as an alternative tool to PCR for primarily screening PstDV, which is suitable for both laboratory and field application.

  13. Transmission dynamics of a zoonotic pathogen within and between wildlife host species.

    PubMed Central

    Begon, M; Hazel, S M; Baxby, D; Bown, K; Cavanagh, R; Chantrey, J; Jones, T; Bennett, M

    1999-01-01

    The transmission dynamics of the cowpox virus infection have been quantified in two mixed populations of bank voles (Clethrionomys glareolus) and wood mice (Apodemus sylvaticus), through analyses of detailed time-series of the numbers of susceptible, infectious and newly infected individuals. The cowpox virus is a zoonosis which circulates in these rodent hosts and has been shown to have an adverse effect on reproductive output. The transmission dynamics within species is best described as frequency dependent rather than density dependent, contrary to the 'mass action' assumption of most previous studies, both theoretical and empirical. Estimation of a transmission coefficient for each species in each population also allows annual and seasonal variations in transmission dynamics to be investigated through an analysis of regression residuals. Transmission between host species is found to be negligible despite their close cohabitation. The consequences of this for the combining ability of hosts as zoonotic reservoirs, and for apparent competition between hosts, are discussed. PMID:10584336

  14. Control of cucurbit viruses.

    PubMed

    Lecoq, Hervé; Katis, Nikolaos

    2014-01-01

    More than 70 well-characterized virus species transmitted by a diversity of vectors may infect cucurbit crops worldwide. Twenty of those cause severe epidemics in major production areas, occasionally leading to complete crop failures. Cucurbit viruses' control is based on three major axes: (i) planting healthy seeds or seedlings in a clean environment, (ii) interfering with vectors activity, and (iii) using resistant cultivars. Seed disinfection and seed or seedling quality controls guarantee growers on the sanitary status of their planting material. Removal of virus or vector sources in the crop environment can significantly delay the onset of viral epidemics. Insecticide or oil application may reduce virus spread in some situations. Diverse cultural practices interfere with or prevent vector reaching the crop. Resistance can be obtained by grafting for soil-borne viruses, by cross-protection, or generally by conventional breeding or genetic engineering. The diversity of the actions that may be taken to limit virus spread in cucurbit crops and their limits will be discussed. The ultimate goal is to provide farmers with technical packages that combine these methods within an integrated disease management program and are adapted to different countries and cropping systems.

  15. [Norwalk virus and Noro virus].

    PubMed

    Furuta, Itaru; Yamazumi, Toshiaki; Kitahashi, Toshiaki; Yagi, Kazurou; Takemura, Tukasa

    2003-01-01

    Norwalk virus and Noro virus are members of the Caliciviridae. These viruses are morphological similarity in each other and shows small round structure. These viruses also are well known as main pathogens of acute infectious gastroenteritis. Clinical features include an incubation period of 24 of 48 hours and illness period of 18 to 72 hours with vomiting and diarrhea in most patients and high secondary attack rates. Oral transmitted infection occurs contaminated water and foods. In our country, outbreak of Noro virus-related gastroenteritis are reported sometimes in hospital and nursing home from winter to early spring seasons. This article are described to the morphlogy, physical characteristics, epidemiology, and clinical manifestation relating to Norwalk virus and Noro virus.

  16. Discovery of Novel Hepatitis C Virus NS5B Polymerase Inhibitors by Combining Random Forest, Multiple e-Pharmacophore Modeling and Docking

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yu; Li, Jinlong; Qing, Jie; Huang, Mingjie; Wu, Ming; Gao, Fenghua; Li, Dongmei; Hong, Zhangyong; Kong, Lingbao; Huang, Weiqiang; Lin, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    The NS5B polymerase is one of the most attractive targets for developing new drugs to block Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We describe the discovery of novel potent HCV NS5B polymerase inhibitors by employing a virtual screening (VS) approach, which is based on random forest (RB-VS), e-pharmacophore (PB-VS), and docking (DB-VS) methods. In the RB-VS stage, after feature selection, a model with 16 descriptors was used. In the PB-VS stage, six energy-based pharmacophore (e-pharmacophore) models from different crystal structures of the NS5B polymerase with ligands binding at the palm I, thumb I and thumb II regions were used. In the DB-VS stage, the Glide SP and XP docking protocols with default parameters were employed. In the virtual screening approach, the RB-VS, PB-VS and DB-VS methods were applied in increasing order of complexity to screen the InterBioScreen database. From the final hits, we selected 5 compounds for further anti-HCV activity and cellular cytotoxicity assay. All 5 compounds were found to inhibit NS5B polymerase with IC50 values of 2.01–23.84 μM and displayed anti-HCV activities with EC50 values ranging from 1.61 to 21.88 μM, and all compounds displayed no cellular cytotoxicity (CC50 > 100 μM) except compound N2, which displayed weak cytotoxicity with a CC50 value of 51.3 μM. The hit compound N2 had the best antiviral activity against HCV, with a selective index of 32.1. The 5 hit compounds with new scaffolds could potentially serve as NS5B polymerase inhibitors through further optimization and development. PMID:26845440

  17. Liver toxicity of antiretroviral combinations including fosamprenavir plus ritonavir 1400/100 mg once daily in HIV/hepatitis C virus-coinfected patients.

    PubMed

    Merchante, Nicolás; López-Cortés, Luis F; Delgado-Fernández, Marcial; Ríos-Villegas, Maria J; Márquez-Solero, Manuel; Merino, Dolores; Pasquau, Juan; García-Figueras, Carolina; Martínez-Pérez, Maria Angeles; Omar, Mohamed; Rivero, Antonio; Macías, Juan; Mata, Rosario; Pineda, Juan Antonio

    2011-07-01

    Abstract Our objective was to evaluate the liver toxicity of antiretroviral regimens including fosamprenavir plus ritonavir (FPV/r) 1400/100 mg once daily (QD) in HIV/hepatitis C virus (HCV)-coinfected patients. This was a prospective cohort study that included 117 HIV/HCV-coinfected patients who started FPV/r 1400/100 mg QD-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) and who neither had received a previous antiretroviral regimen containing FPV nor had a past history of virologic failure while receiving protease inhibitors (PI). The primary end point of the study was the occurrence of grade 3-4 liver enzymes elevations (LEE) within 1 year after starting FPV/r QD. Factors potentially associated with grade 3-4 LEE, including baseline liver fibrosis, were analyzed. Eleven (9%) patients had a grade 3-4 LEE during the follow-up, resulting in an incidence of severe liver toxicity of 9% (95% confidence interval 4.1-14.6%). None of these cases led to FPV/r discontinuation. Baseline liver fibrosis could be assessed in 97 (83%) patients. Six of 71 patients (8%) with significant fibrosis had a grade 3-4 LEE versus 2 of 26 (8%) without significant fibrosis (p=1.0). Twenty (21%) patients had cirrhosis at baseline. There were no cases of LEE among cirrhotics. In conclusion, the incidence of severe liver toxicity after 1 year of therapy with FPV/r QD-based ART in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients is similar to what has been reported with other boosted PIs. In addition, the presence of significant fibrosis or cirrhosis was not associated with the emergence of liver toxicity. Thus, ART regimens containing FPV/r QD may be considered safe in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients, including those with cirrhosis.

  18. Neutralization of both IL-1α/IL-1β plays a major role in suppressing combined cigarette smoke/virus-induced pulmonary inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Bucher, Hannes; Mang, Samuel; Keck, Martina; Przibilla, Michèl; Lamb, David; Schiele, Felix; Wittenbrink, Mareike; Fuchs, Klaus; Jung, Birgit; Erb, Klaus J; Peter, Daniel

    2017-03-15

    Smoking is an important risk factor for the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and viral infections are believed to be major triggers of exacerbations, which periodically lead to a worsening of symptoms. The pro-inflammatory IL-1 family members IL-1α and IL-1β are increased in COPD patients and might contribute to disease pathology. We investigated whether individual or combined inhibition of these cytokines reduced lung inflammation in cigarette smoke (CS)-exposed and H1N1-infected BALB/c mice. Animals were treated with individual or combined antibodies (Abs) directed against IL-1α, IL-1β or IL-1R1. Cells in BAL fluid and cytokines/chemokines in lung homogenate were determined. The viral load was investigated. Blocking IL-1α had significant suppressive effects on total cells, neutrophils, and macrophages. Furthermore, it reduced KC levels significantly. Blocking of IL-1β did not provide significant activity. In line with the in vivo findings, IL-1α Abs but not IL-1β Abs reduced levels of TNF-α and IL-6 in H1N1 infected primary human bronchial epithelial air-liquid-interface cell culture. Concomitant usage of Abs against IL-1α/IL-1β revealed strong effects in vivo and reduced total cells, neutrophils and macrophages. Additionally, levels of KC, IL-6, TNF-α, MCP-1, MIP-1α and MIP-1β were significantly reduced and ICAM-1 and MUC5 A/C mRNA expression was attenuated. The viral load decreased significantly upon combined IL-1α/IL-1β Ab treatment. Blocking the IL-1R1 provided significant effects on total cells, neutrophils and macrophages but was inferior compared to inhibiting both its soluble ligands IL-1α/IL-1β. Our results suggest that combined inhibition of IL-1α/IL-1β might be beneficial to reduce CS/H1N1-induced airway inflammation. Moreover, combined targeting of both IL-1α/IL-1β might be more efficient compared to individual neutralization IL-1α or IL-1β or inhibition of the IL-1R1.

  19. Development of a combined canine distemper virus specific RT-PCR protocol for the differentiation of infected and vaccinated animals (DIVA) and genetic characterization of the hemagglutinin gene of seven Chinese strains demonstrated in dogs.

    PubMed

    Yi, Li; Cheng, Shipeng; Xu, Hongli; Wang, Jianke; Cheng, Yuening; Yang, Shen; Luo, Bin

    2012-01-01

    A combined reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method was developed for the detection and differentiation of wild-type and vaccine strains of the canine distemper virus (CDV). A pair of primers (P1/P2) was used to detect both CDV wild-type strains and vaccines. Another pair (P3/P4) was used to detect only CDV wild-type strains. A 335bp fragment was amplified from the genomic RNA of the vaccine and wild-type strains. A 555bp fragment was amplified specifically from the genomic RNA of the wild-type strains. No amplification was achieved for the uninfected cells, cells infected with canine parvovirus, canine coronavirus, or canine adenovirus. The combined RT-PCR method detected effectively and differentiated the CDV wild-type and vaccine strains by two separate RT-PCRs. The method can be used for clinical detection and epidemiological surveillance. The phylogenetic analysis of the hemagglutinin gene of the local wild-type CDV strains revealed that the seven local isolates all belonged to the Asia-1 lineage, and were clustered closely with one another at the same location. These results suggested that the CDV genotype Asia-1 is circulating currently in domestic dogs in China.

  20. A combined assay of hTERT and E6 oncoprotein to identify virus-infected keratinocytes with higher telomerase activity in human papillomaviruses 16 and 18-related bowenoid papulosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongsheng; Dong, Bilin; Hu, Zhimin; Chen, Liuqing; Zeng, Xianyu; Chen, Jinbo; Duan, Yiqun

    2012-12-01

    In the present study, we aim to evaluate the application potential of a combined assay of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) and E6 oncoprotein in screening the virus-infected keratinocytes with higher telomerase activity in human papillomaviruses (HPV) 16- and 18-related bowenoid papulosis (BP). HPV16/18 DNA in BP (n = 123) was identified by in situ hybridization, the expression of hTERT and E6 in HPV16/18-related BP (n = 68) was determined by immunohistochemistry. We demonstrated that the expression of hTERT correlated well with that of E6 oncoprotein in HPV16/18-related BP lesions (Spearman rho = 0.868, P < 0.01). Furthermore, the majority of keratinocytes with positive nuclear staining for hTERT or E6 in the consecutive sections of each HPV16/18-related BP lesion showed nuclear paleomorphism or nuclear mitosis. In conclusion, we suggested that a combined assay of hTERT and E6 oncoprotein can be used to screen the HPV-infected keratinocytes with higher telomerase activity in HPV16-related and HPV18-related BP lesions.

  1. Structure and functional dynamics characterization of the ion channel of the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) small hydrophobic protein (SH) transmembrane domain by combining molecular dynamics with excited normal modes.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Gabriela C; Silva, Ricardo H T; Scott, Luis P B; Araujo, Alexandre S; Souza, Fatima P; de Oliveira, Ronaldo Junio

    2016-12-01

    The human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is the major cause of lower respiratory tract infection in children and elderly people worldwide. Its genome encodes 11 proteins including SH protein, whose functions are not well known. Studies show that SH protein increases RSV virulence degree and permeability to small compounds, suggesting it is involved in the formation of ion channels. The knowledge of SH structure and function is fundamental for a better understanding of its infection mechanism. The aim of this study was to model, characterize, and analyze the structural behavior of SH protein in the phospholipids bilayer environment. Molecular modeling of SH pentameric structure was performed, followed by traditional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the protein immersed in the lipid bilayer. Molecular dynamics with excited normal modes (MDeNM) was applied in the resulting system in order to investigate long time scale pore dynamics. MD simulations support that SH protein is stable in its pentameric form. Simulations also showed the presence of water molecules within the bilayer by density distribution, thus confirming that SH protein is a viroporin. This water transport was also observed in MDeNM studies with histidine residues of five chains (His22 and His51), playing a key role in pore permeability. The combination of traditional MD and MDeNM was a very efficient protocol to investigate functional conformational changes of transmembrane proteins that act as molecular channels. This protocol can support future investigations of drug candidates by acting on SH protein to inhibit viral infection. Graphical Abstract The ion channel of the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) small hydrophobic protein (SH) transmembrane domainᅟ.

  2. Baseline Prediction of Combination Therapy Outcome in Hepatitis C Virus 1b Infected Patients by Discriminant Analysis Using Viral and Host Factors

    PubMed Central

    Saludes, Verónica; Bracho, Maria Alma; Valero, Oliver; Ardèvol, Mercè; Planas, Ramón; González-Candelas, Fernando; Ausina, Vicente; Martró, Elisa

    2010-01-01

    Background Current treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has limited efficacy −especially among genotype 1 infected patients−, is costly, and involves severe side effects. Thus, predicting non-response is of major interest for both patient wellbeing and health care expense. At present, treatment cannot be individualized on the basis of any baseline predictor of response. We aimed to identify pre-treatment clinical and virological parameters associated with treatment failure, as well as to assess whether therapy outcome could be predicted at baseline. Methodology Forty-three HCV subtype 1b (HCV-1b) chronically infected patients treated with pegylated-interferon alpha plus ribavirin were retrospectively studied (21 responders and 22 non-responders). Host (gender, age, weight, transaminase levels, fibrosis stage, and source of infection) and viral-related factors (viral load, and genetic variability in the E1–E2 and Core regions) were assessed. Logistic regression and discriminant analyses were used to develop predictive models. A “leave-one-out” cross-validation method was used to assess the reliability of the discriminant models. Principal Findings Lower alanine transaminase levels (ALT, p = 0.009), a higher number of quasispecies variants in the E1–E2 region (number of haplotypes, nHap_E1–E2) (p = 0.003), and the absence of both amino acid arginine at position 70 and leucine at position 91 in the Core region (p = 0.039) were significantly associated with treatment failure. Therapy outcome was most accurately predicted by discriminant analysis (90.5% sensitivity and 95.5% specificity, 85.7% sensitivity and 81.8% specificity after cross-validation); the most significant variables included in the predictive model were the Core amino acid pattern, the nHap_E1–E2, and gamma-glutamyl transferase and ALT levels. Conclusions and Significance Discriminant analysis has been shown as a useful tool to predict treatment outcome using

  3. Development of a recombinant epsilon toxoid vaccine against enterotoxemia and its use as a combination vaccine with live attenuated sheep pox virus against enterotoxemia and sheep pox.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Dev; Naidu, Sureddi Satyam; Sugumar, Parthasarathy; Rani, Gudavalli Sudha; Vijayan, Shahana Pallichera; Mathur, Deepika; Garg, Lalit C; Srinivasan, Villuppanoor Alwar

    2010-06-01

    Sheep pox and enterotoxemia are important diseases of sheep, and these diseases cause severe economic losses to sheep farmers. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the potential of formaldehyde-inactivated recombinant epsilon toxin as a vaccine candidate. The potency of the recombinant epsilon toxoid with aluminum hydroxide as an adjuvant in sheep was determined. Vaccinated sheep were protected against enterotoxemia, with potency values of >5 IU being protective. Further, the use of this construct in a combination vaccine against sheep pox resulted in the sheep being protected against both sheep pox and enterotoxemia.

  4. Expression of Epstein-Barr virus antibodies EA-IgG, Rta-IgG, and VCA-IgA in nasopharyngeal carcinoma and their use in a combined diagnostic assay.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Wang, K; Yin, S K; Zheng, H L; Min, D L

    2016-03-18

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is closely associated with nasopharyngeal carcinoma, which can be monitored by the levels of Rta protein antibody IgG (Rta-IgG), early antigen antibody (EA-IgG), and viral capsid antibody (VCA-IgA). In the present study, we investigated the serum levels of Rta-IgG, EA-IgG, and VCA-IgA in nasopharyngeal cancer patients, and the diagnostic value of a combined assay that includes these antibodies in addition to the EBV-DNA. A total of 56 nasopharyngeal cancer patients were recruited as the study population, along with 48 benign rhinitis patients and 42 healthy individuals. Serum EA-IgG, Rta-IgG, and VCA-IgA levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and EBV-DNA was quantified with PCR. The diagnostic value of these indices was further evaluated by ROC curve analysis. The expression levels of EA-IgG, Rta-IgG, VCA-IgA, and EBV-DNA were elevated in the nasopharyngeal cancer patients, who had higher levels of these antibodies than those in the rhinitis patients, followed by the healthy individuals. These indices were also increased with advanced TNM stage. The overall diagnostic efficacy was ranked as follows: VCA-IgA, Rta-IgA, EA-IgA, and EBV-DNA. The combined diagnosis using these four indices increased the sensitivity to 98.21% and the negative predictive value to 98.61%, without any significant compromise on the test specificity. In conclusion, EA-IgG, Rta-IgG, VCA-IgA, and EBV-DNA expression levels were elevated in nasopharyngeal patients. The combined diagnostic value of these serum indices has important implications in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

  5. [Consensus document of Gesida and Spanish Secretariat for the National Plan on AIDS (SPNS) regarding combined antiretroviral treatment in adults infected by the human immunodeficiency virus (January 2012)].

    PubMed

    2012-06-01

    This consensus document has been prepared by a panel consisting of members of the AIDS Study Group (Gesida) and the Spanish Secretariat for the National Plan on AIDS (SPNS) after reviewing the efficacy and safety results of clinical trials, cohort and pharmacokinetic studies published in medical journals, or presented in medical scientific meetings. Gesida has prepared an objective and structured method to prioritise combined antiretroviral treatment (cART) in naïve patients. Recommendations strength (A, B, C) and the evidence which supports them (I, II, III) are based on a modification of the Infectious Diseases Society of America criteria. The current antiretroviral treatment (ART) of choice for chronic HIV infection is the combination of three drugs. ART is recommended in patients with symptomatic HIV infection, in pregnancy, in serodiscordant couples with high transmission risk, hepatitis B fulfilling treatment criteria, and HIV nephropathy. Guidelines on ART treatment in patients with concurrent diagnosis of HIV infection and an opportunistic type C infection are included. In asymptomatic patients ART is recommended on the basis of CD4 lymphocyte counts, plasma viral load and patient co-morbidities, as follows: 1) therapy should be started in patients with CD4 counts <350 cells/μL; 2) when CD4 counts are between 350 and 500 cells/μL, therapy will be recommended and only delayed if patient is reluctant to take it, the CD4 are stabilised, and the plasma viral load is low; 3) therapy could be deferred when CD4 counts are above 500 cells/μL, but should be considered in cases of cirrhosis, chronic hepatitis C, high cardiovascular risk, plasma viral load >10(5) copies/mL, proportion of CD4 cells <14%, and in people aged >55 years. ART should include 2 reverse transcriptase inhibitors nucleoside analogues and a third drug (non-analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitor, ritonavir boosted protease inhibitor or integrase inhibitor). The panel has consensually

  6. Combining Molecular Docking and Molecular Dynamics to Predict the Binding Modes of Flavonoid Derivatives with the Neuraminidase of the 2009 H1N1 Influenza A Virus

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shih-Jen; Chong, Fok-Ching

    2012-01-01

    Control of flavonoid derivatives inhibitors release through the inhibition of neuraminidase has been identified as a potential target for the treatment of H1N1 influenza disease. We have employed molecular dynamics simulation techniques to optimize the 2009 H1N1 influenza neuraminidase X-ray crystal structure. Molecular docking of the compounds revealed the possible binding mode. Our molecular dynamics simulations combined with the solvated interaction energies technique was applied to predict the docking models of the inhibitors in the binding pocket of the H1N1 influenza neuraminidase. In the simulations, the correlation of the predicted and experimental binding free energies of all 20 flavonoid derivatives inhibitors is satisfactory, as indicated by R2 = 0.75. PMID:22605992

  7. An Automatic Unpacking Method for Computer Virus Effective in the Virus Filter Based on Paul Graham's Bayesian Theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dengfeng; Nakaya, Naoshi; Koui, Yuuji; Yoshida, Hitoaki

    Recently, the appearance frequency of computer virus variants has increased. Updates to virus information using the normal pattern matching method are increasingly unable to keep up with the speed at which viruses occur, since it takes time to extract the characteristic patterns for each virus. Therefore, a rapid, automatic virus detection algorithm using static code analysis is necessary. However, recent computer viruses are almost always compressed and obfuscated. It is difficult to determine the characteristics of the binary code from the obfuscated computer viruses. Therefore, this paper proposes a method that unpacks compressed computer viruses automatically independent of the compression format. The proposed method unpacks the common compression formats accurately 80% of the time, while unknown compression formats can also be unpacked. The proposed method is effective against unknown viruses by combining it with the existing known virus detection system like Paul Graham's Bayesian Virus Filter etc.

  8. Persistent virus and addiction modules: an engine of symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, Luis P

    2016-06-01

    The giant DNA viruses are highly prevalent and have a particular affinity for the lytic infection of unicellular eukaryotic host. The giant viruses can also be infected by inhibitory virophage which can provide lysis protection to their host. The combined protective and destructive action of such viruses can define a general model (PD) of virus-mediated host survival. Here, I present a general model for role such viruses play in the evolution of host symbiosis. By considering how virus mixtures can participate in addiction modules, I provide a functional explanation for persistence of virus derived genetic 'junk' in their host genomic habitats.

  9. Synergistic effect of a novel oxymatrine-baicalin combination against hepatitis B virus replication, α smooth muscle actin expression and type I collagen synthesis in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yang; Ping, Jian; Xu, Huai-Dong; Fu, Hai-Jun; Zhou, Zhao-Hui

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of oxymatrine-baicalin combination (OB) against HBV replication in 2.2.15 cells and α smooth muscle actin (α SMA) expression, type I, collagen synthesis in HSC-T6 cells. METHODS: The 2.2.15 cells and HSC-T6 cells were cultured and treated respectively. HBsAg and HBeAg in the culture supernatants were detected by ELISA and HBV DNA levels were determined by fluorescence quantitative PCR. Total RNA was extracted from HSC-T6 cells and reverse transcribed into cDNA. The cDNAs were amplified by PCR and the quantities were expressed in proportion to β actin. The total cellular proteins extracted from HSC-T6 cells were separated by electrophoresis. Resolved proteins were electrophoretically transferred to nitrocellulose membrane. Protein bands were revealed and the quantities were corrected by β actin. RESULTS: In the 2.2.15 cell culture system, the inhibitory rate against secretion of HBsAg and HBeAg in the OB group was significantly stronger than that in the oxymatrine group (HBsAg, P = 0.043; HBeAg, P = 0.026; respectively); HBV DNA level in the OB group was significantly lower than that in the oxymatrine group (P = 0.041). In HSC-T6 cells the mRNA and protein expression levels of α SMA in the OB group were significantly lower as compared with those in the oxymatrine group (mRNA, P = 0.013; protein, P = 0.042; respectively); The mRNA and protein expression levels of type I collagen in the OB group were significantly lower as compared with those in the oxymatrine group (mRNA, P < 0.01; protein, P < 0.01; respectively). CONCLUSION: OB combination has a better effect against HBV replication in 2.2.15 cells and is more effective against α SMA expression and typeI collagen synthesis in HSC-T6 cells than oxymatrine in vitro. PMID:16937525

  10. Mycoplasma viruses.

    PubMed

    Maniloff, J

    1988-01-01

    Unlike bacterial viruses that infect cells bounded by a cell wall, mycoplasma viruses have evolved to enter and propagate in mycoplasma cells bounded only by a single lipid-protein cell membrane. In addition, mycoplasmas have the smallest amount of genetic information of any known cells, so their complexity is constrained by a limited genetic coding capacity. As a consequence of these host cell differences, mycoplasma viruses have been found to have a variety of structures and replication strategies which are different from those of the bacterial viruses. This article is a critical review of mycoplasma viruses infecting the genera Acholeplasma, Spiroplasma, and Mycoplasma; included are data on classification, morphology and structure, biological and physical properties, chemical composition, and productive and lysogenic replication cycles.

  11. Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) genital shedding in HSV-2-/HIV-1-co-infected women receiving effective combination antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Péré, Héléne; Rascanu, Aida; LeGoff, Jérome; Matta, Mathieu; Bois, Frédéric; Lortholary, Olivier; Leroy, Valériane; Launay, Odile; Bélec, Laurent

    2016-03-01

    The dynamics of genital shedding of HSV-2 DNA was assessed in HIV-1-infected women taking combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). HIV-1 RNA, HIV-1 DNA and HSV DNA loads were measured during 12-18 months using frozen plasma, PBMC and cervicovaginal lavage samples from 22 HIV-1-infected women, including 17 women naive for antiretroviral therapy initiating cART and 5 women with virological failure switching to a new regimen. Nineteen (86%) women were HSV-2-seropositive. Among HSV-2-/HIV-1-co-infected women, HIV-1 RNA loads showed a rapid fall from baseline after one month of cART, in parallel in paired plasma and cervicovaginal secretions. In contrast, HIV-1 DNA loads did not show significant variations from baseline up to 18 months of treatment in both systemic and genital compartments. HSV DNA was detected at least once in 12 (63%) of 19 women during follow up: HSV-2 shedding in the genital compartment was observed in 11% of cervicovaginal samples at baseline and in 16% after initiating or switching cART. Cervicovaginal HIV-1 RNA loads were strongly associated with plasma HIV-1 RNA loads over time, but not with cervicovaginal HSV DNA loads. Reactivation of genital HSV-2 replication frequently occurred despite effective cART in HSV-2-/HIV-1-co-infected women. Genital HSV-2 replication under cART does not influence cervicovaginal HIV-1 RNA or DNA shedding.

  12. Computer viruses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denning, Peter J.

    1988-01-01

    The worm, Trojan horse, bacterium, and virus are destructive programs that attack information stored in a computer's memory. Virus programs, which propagate by incorporating copies of themselves into other programs, are a growing menace in the late-1980s world of unprotected, networked workstations and personal computers. Limited immunity is offered by memory protection hardware, digitally authenticated object programs,and antibody programs that kill specific viruses. Additional immunity can be gained from the practice of digital hygiene, primarily the refusal to use software from untrusted sources. Full immunity requires attention in a social dimension, the accountability of programmers.

  13. Pseudotyping of vesicular stomatitis virus with the envelope glycoproteins of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Gert; Locher, Samira; Berger Rentsch, Marianne; Halbherr, Stefan J

    2014-08-01

    Pseudotype viruses are useful for studying the envelope proteins of harmful viruses. This work describes the pseudotyping of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) with the envelope glycoproteins of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses. VSV lacking the homotypic glycoprotein (G) gene (VSVΔG) was used to express haemagglutinin (HA), neuraminidase (NA) or the combination of both. Propagation-competent pseudotype viruses were only obtained when HA and NA were expressed from the same vector genome. Pseudotype viruses containing HA from different H5 clades were neutralized specifically by immune sera directed against the corresponding clade. Fast and sensitive reading of test results was achieved by vector-mediated expression of GFP. Pseudotype viruses expressing a mutant VSV matrix protein showed restricted spread in IFN-competent cells. This pseudotype system will facilitate the detection of neutralizing antibodies against virulent influenza viruses, circumventing the need for high-level biosafety containment.

  14. Zika Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Zika Virus Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... ol Português Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Zika Cases in Texas Zika Cases in Florida Birth ...

  15. Lassa virus.

    PubMed

    Günther, Stephan; Lenz, Oliver

    2004-01-01

    Lassa virus is a RNA virus belonging to the family of Arenaviridae. It was discovered as the causative agent of a hemorrhagic fever--Lassa fever--about 30 years ago. Lassa fever is endemic in West Africa and is estimated to affect some 100,000 people annually. Great progress in the understanding of the life cycle of arenaviruses, including Lassa virus, has been made in recent years. New insights have been gained in the pathogenesis and molecular epidemiology of Lassa fever, and state-of the-art technologies for diagnosing this life-threatening disease have been developed. The intention of this review is to summarize in particular the recent literature on Lassa virus and Lassa fever. Several aspects ranging from basic research up to clinical practice and laboratory diagnosis are discussed and linked together.

  16. The Association of Substitutions in the Hepatitis C Virus Subtype 1b Core Gene and IL28B Polymorphisms With the Response to Peg-IFNα-2a/RBV Combination Therapy in Azerbaijani Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bokharaei-Salim, Farah; Salehi-Vaziri, Mostafa; Sadeghi, Farzin; Esghaei, Maryam; Monavari, Seyed Hamidreza; Alavian, Seyed Moayed; Fakhim, Shahin; Keyvani, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Background The hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has been identified as a leading cause of progressive liver diseases worldwide. Despite new treatment strategies, pegylated interferon alfa-2a (Peg-IFNα-2a), in combination with ribavirin (RBV), still represents the gold standard of therapy for hepatitis C in developing countries. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the association of substitutions in the HCV subtype 1b (HCV-1b) core protein and the rs12979860 polymorphism in the interleukin 28B gene (IL28B) with the response to Peg-IFNα-2a/RBV combination therapy in Azerbaijani patients. Patients and Methods A total of fifty-one chronically HCV-1b-infected Azerbaijani patients were enrolled in this cross-sectional study from March 2010 to June 2015. After RNA extraction from pre-treatment plasma, the core region of the HCV genome was amplified using the nested reverse transcription (RT) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method, followed by standard sequencing. In addition, genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) specimens, and the rs12979860 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was identified using a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay. Results In this study, a significant association was observed between the non-responders and relapsers to antiviral therapy and substitutions in the HCV-1b core region at positions 43 (R43K, P = 0.047), 70 (R70Q, P < 0.001), 91 (M91L, P = 0.037), and 106 (S106N, P = 0.018). Concerning the IL28B polymorphism, the results showed that sustained virological response was significantly associated with homozygous CC patients (P = 0.009) as compared with other genotypes, while homozygous TT subjects were associated with HCV relapse after therapy (P = 0.006). Conclusions The data of the present study suggest that amino acid substitutions at position 43, 70, 91, and 106 in the HCV-1b core protein are correlated with the response to the Peg-IFNα-2a/RBV treatment in

  17. Powassan (POW) Virus Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Related Topics For International Travelers Powassan (POW) Virus Basics Download this fact sheet formatted for print: ... POW) Virus Fact Sheet (PDF) What is Powassan virus? Powassan (POW) virus is a flavivirus that is ...

  18. Virophages or satellite viruses?

    PubMed

    Krupovic, Mart; Cvirkaite-Krupovic, Virginija

    2011-11-01

    It has been argued that the smaller viruses associated with giant DNA viruses are a new biological entity. However, Mart Krupovic and Virginija Cvirkaite-Krupovic argue here that these smaller viruses should be classified with the satellite viruses.

  19. Ebola Virus and Marburg Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... chimps and fruit bats in Africa. Transmission from animals to humans Experts suspect that both viruses are transmitted to humans through an infected animal's bodily fluids. Examples include: Blood. Butchering or eating ...

  20. Control of virus diseases of berry crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Virus control in berry crops starts with the development of plants free of targeted pathogens, usually viruses, viroids, phytoplasmas and systemic bacteria, through a combination of testing and therapy. These then become the top tier plants in certification programs and are the source from which all...

  1. Evaluation of reproductive protection against bovine viral diarrhea virus and bovine herpesvirus-1 afforded by annual revaccination with modified-live viral or combination modified-live/killed viral vaccines after primary vaccination with modified-live viral vaccine.

    PubMed

    Walz, Paul H; Givens, M Daniel; Rodning, Soren P; Riddell, Kay P; Brodersen, Bruce W; Scruggs, Daniel; Short, Thomas; Grotelueschen, Dale

    2017-02-15

    The objective of this study was to compare reproductive protection in cattle against bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) and bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1) provided by annual revaccination with multivalent modified-live viral (MLV) vaccine or multivalent combination viral (CV) vaccine containing temperature-sensitive modified-live BoHV-1 and killed BVDV when MLV vaccines were given pre-breeding to nulliparous heifers. Seventy-five beef heifers were allocated into treatment groups A (n=30; two MLV doses pre-breeding, annual revaccination with MLV vaccine), B (n=30; two MLV doses pre-breeding, annual revaccination with CV vaccine) and C (n=15; saline in lieu of vaccine). Heifers were administered treatments on days 0 (weaning), 183 (pre-breeding), 366 (first gestation), and 738 (second gestation). After first calving, primiparous cows were bred, with pregnancy assessment on day 715. At that time, 24 group A heifers (23 pregnancies), 23 group B heifers (22 pregnancies), and 15 group C heifers (15 pregnancies) were commingled with six persistently infected (PI) cattle for 16days. Ninety-nine days after PI removal, cows were intravenously inoculated with BoHV-1. All fetuses and live offspring were assessed for BVDV and BoHV-1. Abortions occurred in 3/23 group A cows, 1/22 group B cows, and 11/15 group C cows. Fetal infection with BVDV or BoHV-1 occurred in 4/23 group A offspring, 0/22 group B offspring, and 15/15 group C offspring. This research demonstrates efficacy of administering two pre-breeding doses of MLV vaccine with annual revaccination using CV vaccine to prevent fetal loss due to exposure to BVDV and BoHV-1.

  2. Humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy: severe combined immunodeficient/beige mouse model of adult T-cell lymphoma independent of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type-1 tax expression.

    PubMed

    Richard, V; Lairmore, M D; Green, P L; Feuer, G; Erbe, R S; Albrecht, B; D'Souza, C; Keller, E T; Dai, J; Rosol, T J

    2001-06-01

    The majority of patients with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) resulting from human T-cell lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) infection develop humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy (HHM). We used an animal model using severe combined immunodeficient (SCID)/beige mice to study the pathogenesis of HHM. SCID/beige mice were inoculated intraperitoneally with a human ATL line (RV-ATL) and were euthanized 20 to 32 days after inoculation. SCID/beige mice with engrafted RV-ATL cells developed lymphoma in the mesentery, liver, thymus, lungs, and spleen. The lymphomas stained positively for human CD45RO surface receptor and normal mouse lymphocytes stained negatively confirming the human origin of the tumors. The ATL cells were immunohistochemically positive for parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP). In addition, PTHrP mRNA was highly expressed in lymphomas when compared to MT-2 cells (HTLV-1-positive cell line). Mice with lymphoma developed severe hypercalcemia. Plasma PTHrP concentrations were markedly increased in mice with hypercalcemia, and correlated with the increase in plasma calcium concentrations. Bone densitometry and histomorphometry in lymphoma-bearing mice revealed significant bone loss because of a marked increase in osteoclastic bone resorption. RV-ATL cells contained 1.5 HTLV-1 proviral copies of the tax gene as determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). However, tax expression was not detected by Western blot or reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR in RV-ATL cells, which suggests that factors other than Tax are modulators of PTHrP gene expression. The SCID/beige mouse model mimics HHM as it occurs in ATL patients, and will be useful to investigate the regulation of PTHrP expression by ATL cells in vivo.

  3. Improvement in the suspension-culture production of recombinant adeno-associated virus-LacZ in HEK-293 cells using polyethyleneimine-DNA complexes in combination with hypothermic treatment.

    PubMed

    Feng, Lei; Guo, Meijin; Zhang, Shuxiang; Chu, Ju; Zhuang, Yingping; Zhang, Siliang

    2008-06-01

    rAAV (recombinant adeno-associated virus) has become a very useful gene-delivery vector for gene therapy. However, it is very difficult to generate rAAV using triple transfection on a commercial scale, owing to its low transfection efficiency. An optimal procedure for transfection in suspension-culture mode was developed for rAAV-LacZ production in suspension-cultured HEK-293 (human embryonic kidney-293) cells mediated by PEI (polyethyleneimine)-DNA complexes in combination with transient severe hypothermia at 4 degrees C for 1 h in the present study (LacZ is the product of the reporter gene lacZ, which codes for beta-D-galactosidase). It showed that the PEI/DNA ratio, cell density at the beginning of transfection and cell-cycle arrest in G2/M-phase were key factors affecting suspension-culture triple-transfection efficiency and rAAV-LacZ productivity. After incubation at 4 degrees C for 1 h and re-warming at 37 degrees C for 18 h, HEK-293 cells at 1x10(6) cells/ml were transfected with PEI-DNA complexes at a PEI/DNA ratio of 5:1 (w/w) with final concentrations of 30 mug/ml 25 kDa linear PEI and 6 mug/ml plasmid DNA in culture. After 6 h incubation for transfection, an equal volume of medium was added to the culture for additional 48 h growth until harvest. Finally, the high transfection efficiency of some 75% and rAAV-LacZ titre of (7.48+/-0.59)x10(11) physical particles or 1.86+/-0.96x10(10) infectious particles were achieved in 250 ml shake flasks with 60 ml working volume, indicating a promising application for scale-up.

  4. Antiviral drugs for viruses other than human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Razonable, Raymund R

    2011-10-01

    Most viral diseases, with the exception of those caused by human immunodeficiency virus, are self-limited illnesses that do not require specific antiviral therapy. The currently available antiviral drugs target 3 main groups of viruses: herpes, hepatitis, and influenza viruses. With the exception of the antisense molecule fomivirsen, all antiherpes drugs inhibit viral replication by serving as competitive substrates for viral DNA polymerase. Drugs for the treatment of influenza inhibit the ion channel M(2) protein or the enzyme neuraminidase. Combination therapy with Interferon-α and ribavirin remains the backbone treatment for chronic hepatitis C; the addition of serine protease inhibitors improves the treatment outcome of patients infected with hepatitis C virus genotype 1. Chronic hepatitis B can be treated with interferon or a combination of nucleos(t)ide analogues. Notably, almost all the nucleos(t) ide analogues for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B possess anti-human immunodeficiency virus properties, and they inhibit replication of hepatitis B virus by serving as competitive substrates for its DNA polymerase. Some antiviral drugs possess multiple potential clinical applications, such as ribavirin for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C and respiratory syncytial virus and cidofovir for the treatment of cytomegalovirus and other DNA viruses. Drug resistance is an emerging threat to the clinical utility of antiviral drugs. The major mechanisms for drug resistance are mutations in the viral DNA polymerase gene or in genes that encode for the viral kinases required for the activation of certain drugs such as acyclovir and ganciclovir. Widespread antiviral resistance has limited the clinical utility of M(2) inhibitors for the prevention and treatment of influenza infections. This article provides an overview of clinically available antiviral drugs for the primary care physician, with a special focus on pharmacology, clinical uses, and adverse effects.

  5. Antiviral Drugs for Viruses Other Than Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Razonable, Raymund R.

    2011-01-01

    Most viral diseases, with the exception of those caused by human immunodeficiency virus, are self-limited illnesses that do not require specific antiviral therapy. The currently available antiviral drugs target 3 main groups of viruses: herpes, hepatitis, and influenza viruses. With the exception of the antisense molecule fomivirsen, all antiherpes drugs inhibit viral replication by serving as competitive substrates for viral DNA polymerase. Drugs for the treatment of influenza inhibit the ion channel M2 protein or the enzyme neuraminidase. Combination therapy with Interferon-α and ribavirin remains the backbone treatment for chronic hepatitis C; the addition of serine protease inhibitors improves the treatment outcome of patients infected with hepatitis C virus genotype 1. Chronic hepatitis B can be treated with interferon or a combination of nucleos(t)ide analogues. Notably, almost all the nucleos(t) ide analogues for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B possess anti–human immunodeficiency virus properties, and they inhibit replication of hepatitis B virus by serving as competitive substrates for its DNA polymerase. Some antiviral drugs possess multiple potential clinical applications, such as ribavirin for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C and respiratory syncytial virus and cidofovir for the treatment of cytomegalovirus and other DNA viruses. Drug resistance is an emerging threat to the clinical utility of antiviral drugs. The major mechanisms for drug resistance are mutations in the viral DNA polymerase gene or in genes that encode for the viral kinases required for the activation of certain drugs such as acyclovir and ganciclovir. Widespread antiviral resistance has limited the clinical utility of M2 inhibitors for the prevention and treatment of influenza infections. This article provides an overview of clinically available antiviral drugs for the primary care physician, with a special focus on pharmacology, clinical uses, and adverse effects. PMID

  6. Computer Viruses. Technology Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponder, Tim, Comp.; Ropog, Marty, Comp.; Keating, Joseph, Comp.

    This document provides general information on computer viruses, how to help protect a computer network from them, measures to take if a computer becomes infected. Highlights include the origins of computer viruses; virus contraction; a description of some common virus types (File Virus, Boot Sector/Partition Table Viruses, Trojan Horses, and…

  7. Combination of lamivudine and adefovir without hepatitis B immune globulin is safe and effective prophylaxis against hepatitis B virus recurrence in hepatitis B surface antigen-positive liver transplant candidates.

    PubMed

    Gane, Edward J; Patterson, Scott; Strasser, Simone I; McCaughan, Geoffrey W; Angus, Peter W

    2013-03-01

    Without effective prophylaxis, liver transplantation for hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related liver disease is frequently complicated by severe and rapidly progressive HBV recurrence. Combination prophylaxis with hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIG) and lamivudine (LAM) reduces long-term recurrence rates below 10%; however, HBIG is costly and inconvenient to administer. We, therefore, conducted a multicenter, prospective study of outcomes with an HBIG-sparing regimen of LAM plus adefovir dipivoxil (ADV) initiated at the time of listing for liver transplantation and continued after transplantation. Twenty-six patients were recruited into this study at the time of listing for transplantation, and 20 subsequently underwent transplantation. Twelve of the 26 patients had LAM exposure before the study baseline, but none had LAM resistance. The median HBV viral load before the institution of antiviral therapy was approximately 4.0 log(10) IU/mL (range=2.3-7.5 log(10) IU/mL). To the 20 patients who underwent transplantation, 800 IU of intramuscular HBIG was given immediately after transplantation and daily for 7 days only (total HBIG dose=6400 IU). All transplant patients remained alive without HBV recurrence (they were negative for hepatitis B surface antigen, and HBV DNA was undetectable) after a median follow-up of 57 months after transplantation (range=27-83 months). The median serum creatinine level in these patients rose from 81 to 119 μmol/L over the course of the study. No patient required dose reduction or cessation. After the completion of this prospective study, the regimen was modified so that no perioperative HBIG was administered if the pretransplant serum HBV DNA level was suppressed below 3 log(10) IU/mL. Another 28 patients with HBV-related liver disease underwent transplantation (18 without HBIG). All remained alive and well without HBV recurrence after a median follow-up of 22 months after transplantation (range=10-58 months). In conclusion, a combination of

  8. [Serologic studies of domestic cats for potential human pathogenic virus infections from wild rodents].

    PubMed

    Nowotny, N

    1996-05-01

    For several viral infections a reservoir in wild rodents has been demonstrated. Some of the agents are known or suspected to be pathogenic for humans. Because improvements in hygiene have reduced direct human contact with rodents, domestic cats could be acting as active transmitters of these viruses from rodents to man. We selected 4 such pathogens--ortho- and parapox-, hanta- and encephalomyocarditis viruses--which, in different ways, may lead to serious human illness: Ortho- and parapoxvirus infections may cause localized pox lesions following direct skin contact. In general, the lesions heal without complications; in immunosuppressed or -deficient individuals, however, infection may generalize and take a dramatic course. Hantaviruses exist in various serotypes with different pathogenicity for human beings, varying from asymptomatic infection to highly fatal disease. In central and northern Europe the Puumala serotype is predominant causing influenza-like symptoms and renal dysfunction. Human infections arise from inhalation of aerosolized excreta of persistently infected rodents. Infections of man associated with encephalomyocarditis virus were demonstrated sporadically in cases of encephalitis and meningitis. In the present study, we investigated in 200 feline serum samples the prevalence of antibodies to ortho- and parapox-, hanta- and encephalomyocarditis virus. All serum samples were from cats that had been allowed to roam outside and to hunt. They were submitted from all parts of Austria for routine diagnosis in 1993. Four per cent of cats showed antibodies to orthopoxviruses with haemagglutination inhibition (HI) titres of 16-512; because of extensive cross-reactivity, positive samples reacted with all investigated orthopoxviruses (a feline orthopoxvirus recently isolated in Vienna, the reference strain of cowpox virus, Brighton, and vaccinia virus, strain IHD), only varying in titre. The specificity of the results was confirmed by virus neutralisation (VN

  9. Zika Virus.

    PubMed

    FitzSimmons, Jack; Shah, Shailen

    2016-06-29

    To the Editor: Petersen et al. (April 21 issue)(1) provide a detailed review of Zika virus. We have some concern regarding diagnostic criteria for microcephaly in fetuses and newborns exposed to the virus. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommendation that microcephaly should be defined as an occipitofrontal circumference below the third percentile, nearly 3% of newborns would be categorized as having microcephaly. In Brazil, where there are 3 million live births per year, the application of this definition would result in nearly 90,000 infants being labeled as having microcephaly - a far greater number than . . .

  10. Avian influenza viruses and human health.

    PubMed

    Alexander, D J

    2006-01-01

    Influenza A viruses cause natural infections of humans, some other mammals and birds. Few of the 16 haemagglutinin and nine neuraminidase subtype combinations have been isolated from mammals, but all subtypes have been isolated from birds. In the 20th century, there were four pandemics of influenza as a result of the emergence of antigenically different strains in humans: 1918 (H1N1), 1957 (H2N2), 1968 (H3N2) and 1977 (H1N1). Influenza A viruses contain eight distinct RNA genes and reassortment of these can occur in mixed infections with different viruses. The 1957 and 1968 pandemic viruses differed from the preceding viruses in humans by the substitution of genes that came from avian viruses, suggesting they arose by genetic reassortment of viruses of human and avian origin. Up to 1995, there had been only three reports of avian influenza viruses infecting humans, in 1959, 1977 and 1981 (all H7N7), but, since 1996, there have been regular reports of natural infections of humans with avian influenza viruses: in England in 1996 (H7N7), Hong Kong 1997 (H5N1), 1999 (H9N2), and 2003 (H5N1), in The Netherlands 2003 (H7N7), Canada 2004 (H7N3), Vietnam 2004 (H5N1) and Thailand 2004 (H5N1). The H5N1 virus is alarming because 51 (64 %) of the 80 people confirmed as infected since 1997 have died.

  11. Human PIV-2 recombinant Sendai virus (rSeV) elicits durable immunity and combines with two additional rSeVs to protect against hPIV-1, hPIV-2, hPIV-3, and RSV.

    PubMed

    Jones, Bart; Zhan, Xiaoyan; Mishin, Vasiliy; Slobod, Karen S; Surman, Sherri; Russell, Charles J; Portner, Allen; Hurwitz, Julia L

    2009-03-13

    The human parainfluenza viruses (hPIVs) and respiratory syncytial viruses (RSVs) are the leading causes of hospitalizations due to respiratory viral disease in infants and young children, but no vaccines are yet available. Here we describe the use of recombinant Sendai viruses (rSeVs) as candidate vaccine vectors for these respiratory viruses in a cotton rat model. Two new Sendai virus (SeV)-based hPIV-2 vaccine constructs were generated by inserting the fusion (F) gene or the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) gene from hPIV-2 into the rSeV genome. The inoculation of either vaccine into cotton rats elicited neutralizing antibodies toward both homologous and heterologous hPIV-2 virus isolates. The vaccines elicited robust and durable antibodies toward hPIV-2, and cotton rats immunized with individual or mixed vaccines were fully protected against hPIV-2 infections of the lower respiratory tract. The immune responses toward a single inoculation with rSeV vaccines were long-lasting and cotton rats were protected against viral challenge for as long as 11 months after vaccination. One inoculation with a mixture of the hPIV-2-HN-expressing construct and two additional rSeVs (expressing the F protein of RSV and the HN protein of hPIV-3) resulted in protection against challenge viruses hPIV-1, hPIV-2, hPIV-3, and RSV. Results identify SeV vectors as promising vaccine candidates for four different paramyxoviruses, each responsible for serious respiratory infections in children.

  12. Orthopoxvirus DNA in Eurasian lynx, Sweden.

    PubMed

    Tryland, Morten; Okeke, Malachy Ifeanyi; Af Segerstad, Carl Hård; Mörner, Torsten; Traavik, Terje; Ryser-Degiorgis, Marie Pierre

    2011-04-01

    Cowpox virus, which has been used to protect humans against smallpox but may cause severe disease in immunocompromised persons, has reemerged in humans, domestic cats, and other animal species in Europe. Orthopoxvirus (OPV) DNA was detected in tissues (lung, kidney, spleen) in 24 (9%) of 263 free-ranging Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx) from Sweden. Thymidine kinase gene amplicon sequences (339 bp) from 21 lynx were all identical to those from cowpox virus isolated from a person in Norway and phylogenetically closer to monkeypox virus than to vaccinia virus and isolates from 2 persons with cowpox virus in Sweden. Prevalence was higher among animals from regions with dense, rather than rural, human populations. Lynx are probably exposed to OPV through predation on small mammal reservoir species. We conclude that OPV is widely distributed in Sweden and may represent a threat to humans. Further studies are needed to verify whether this lynx OPV is cowpox virus.

  13. Lassa-Vesicular Stomatitis Chimeric Virus Safely Destroys Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wollmann, Guido; Drokhlyansky, Eugene; Davis, John N.; Cepko, Connie

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT High-grade tumors in the brain are among the deadliest of cancers. Here, we took a promising oncolytic virus, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), and tested the hypothesis that the neurotoxicity associated with the virus could be eliminated without blocking its oncolytic potential in the brain by replacing the neurotropic VSV glycoprotein with the glycoprotein from one of five different viruses, including Ebola virus, Marburg virus, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), rabies virus, and Lassa virus. Based on in vitro infections of normal and tumor cells, we selected two viruses to test in vivo. Wild-type VSV was lethal when injected directly into the brain. In contrast, a novel chimeric virus (VSV-LASV-GPC) containing genes from both the Lassa virus glycoprotein precursor (GPC) and VSV showed no adverse actions within or outside the brain and targeted and completely destroyed brain cancer, including high-grade glioblastoma and melanoma, even in metastatic cancer models. When mice had two brain tumors, intratumoral VSV-LASV-GPC injection in one tumor (glioma or melanoma) led to complete tumor destruction; importantly, the virus moved contralaterally within the brain to selectively infect the second noninjected tumor. A chimeric virus combining VSV genes with the gene coding for the Ebola virus glycoprotein was safe in the brain and also selectively targeted brain tumors but was substantially less effective in destroying brain tumors and prolonging survival of tumor-bearing mice. A tropism for multiple cancer types combined with an exquisite tumor specificity opens a new door to widespread application of VSV-LASV-GPC as a safe and efficacious oncolytic chimeric virus within the brain. IMPORTANCE Many viruses have been tested for their ability to target and kill cancer cells. Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) has shown substantial promise, but a key problem is that if it enters the brain, it can generate adverse neurologic consequences, including death. We

  14. [Influenza virus].

    PubMed

    Juozapaitis, Mindaugas; Antoniukas, Linas

    2007-01-01

    Every year, especially during the cold season, many people catch an acute respiratory disease, namely flu. It is easy to catch this disease; therefore, it spreads very rapidly and often becomes an epidemic or a global pandemic. Airway inflammation and other body ailments, which form in a very short period, torment the patient several weeks. After that, the symptoms of the disease usually disappear as quickly as they emerged. The great epidemics of flu have rather unique characteristics; therefore, it is possible to identify descriptions of such epidemics in historic sources. Already in the 4th century bc, Hippocrates himself wrote about one of them. It is known now that flu epidemics emerge rather frequently, but there are no regular intervals between those events. The epidemics can differ in their consequences, but usually they cause an increased mortality of elderly people. The great flu epidemics of the last century took millions of human lives. In 1918-19, during "The Spanish" pandemic of flu, there were around 40-50 millions of deaths all over the world; "Pandemic of Asia" in 1957 took up to one million lives, etc. Influenza virus can cause various disorders of the respiratory system: from mild inflammations of upper airways to acute pneumonia that finally results in the patient's death. Scientist Richard E. Shope, who investigated swine flu in 1920, had a suspicion that the cause of this disease might be a virus. Already in 1933, scientists from the National Institute for Medical Research in London - Wilson Smith, Sir Christopher Andrewes, and Sir Patrick Laidlaw - for the first time isolated the virus, which caused human flu. Then scientific community started the exhaustive research of influenza virus, and the great interest in this virus and its unique features is still active even today.

  15. Isolation of influenza viruses in MDCK 33016PF cells and clearance of contaminating respiratory viruses.

    PubMed

    Roth, Bernhard; Mohr, Hannah; Enders, Martin; Garten, Wolfgang; Gregersen, Jens-Peter

    2012-01-11

    This paper summarizes results obtained by multiplex PCR screening of human clinical samples for respiratory viruses and corresponding data obtained after passaging of virus-positive samples in MDCK 33016PF cells. Using the ResPlexII v2.0 (Qiagen) multiplex PCR, 393 positive results were obtained in 468 clinical samples collected during an influenza season in Germany. The overall distribution of positive results was influenza A 42.0%, influenza B 38.7%, adenovirus 1.5%, bocavirus 0.5%, coronavirus 3.3%, enterovirus 5.6%, metapneumovirus 1.0%, parainfluenza virus 0.8%, rhinovirus 4.1%, and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) 2.5%. Double infections of influenza virus together with another virus were found for adenovirus B and E, bocavirus, coronavirus, enterovirus and for rhinovirus. These other viruses were rapidly lost upon passages in MDCK 33016PF cells and under conditions as applied to influenza virus passaging. Clinical samples, in which no influenza virus but other viruses were found, were also subject to passages in MDCK 33016PF cells. Using lower inoculum dilutions than those normally applied for preparations containing influenza virus (total dilution of the original sample of ∼10(4)), the positive results for the different viruses turned negative already after 2 or 3 passages in MDCK 33016PF cells. These results demonstrate that, under practical conditions as applied to grow influenza viruses, contaminating viruses can be effectively removed by passages in MDCK cells. In combination with their superior isolation efficiency, MDCK cells appear highly suitable to be used as an alternative to embryonated eggs to isolate and propagate influenza vaccine candidate viruses.

  16. The Geometry of Viruses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Christine L.

    1991-01-01

    Presented is an activity in which students make models of viruses, which allows them to visualize the shape of these microorganisms. Included are some background on viruses, the biology and geometry of viruses, directions for building viruses, a comparison of cells and viruses, and questions for students. (KR)

  17. ORAL 1-O-OCTADECYL-2-O-BENZYL-SN-GLYCERO-3-CIDOFOVIR TARGETS THE LUNG AND IS EFFECTIVE AGAINST A LETHAL RESPIRATORY CHALLENGE WITH ECTROMELIA VIRUS IN MICE

    PubMed Central

    Hostetler, Karl Y.; Beadle, James R.; Trahan, Julissa; Aldern, Kathy A.; Owens, Gelita; Schriewer, Jill; Melman, Lora; Buller, R. Mark

    2007-01-01

    Hexadecyloxypropyl-cidofovir (HDP-CDV) has been shown to be orally active against lethal infection with orthopoxviruses including, mousepox, cowpox, vaccinia and rabbitpox. The alkoxyalkyl group provides oral absorption and reduces greatly the amount of drug reaching the kidney, the site of CDV’s dose limiting toxicity. However, the amount of HDP-CDV detected in lung, an important site of early poxvirus replication, is low and the reduction of viral titers in surviving animals is reduced moderately compared with the liver where poxvirus titers are virtually undetectable. We synthesized a novel glycerol ester of CDV, 1-O-octadecyl-2-O-benzyl-sn-glycero-3-CDV (ODBG-CDV), and compared its oral pharmacokinetics with that of HDP-CDV. Surprisingly, ODBG-CDV levels in lung are much higher and liver levels are reduced, suggesting that the compound is transported in small intestinal lymph instead the portal vein. ODBG-CDV has excellent in vitro activity in cells infected with ectromelia virus (ECTV). In mice infected with a lethal aerosol or intranasal challenge of ECTV, HDP-CDV and ODBG-CDV are equally effective in preventing death from disease. Other drugs esterified to 1-O-octadecyl-2-O-benzyl-sn-glycerol or 1-O-octadecyl-2-O-benzyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate may provide lung targeting for treatment of microbial or neoplastic diseases while reducing first pass removal by the liver during oral absorption. PMID:17123638

  18. Oral 1-O-octadecyl-2-O-benzyl-sn-glycero-3-cidofovir targets the lung and is effective against a lethal respiratory challenge with ectromelia virus in mice.

    PubMed

    Hostetler, Karl Y; Beadle, James R; Trahan, Julissa; Aldern, Kathy A; Owens, Gelita; Schriewer, Jill; Melman, Lora; Buller, R Mark

    2007-03-01

    Hexadecyloxypropyl-cidofovir (HDP-CDV) has been shown to be orally active against lethal infection with orthopoxviruses including, mousepox, cowpox, vaccinia and rabbitpox. The alkoxyalkyl group provides oral absorption and reduces greatly the amount of drug reaching the kidney, the site of CDV's dose limiting toxicity. However, the amount of HDP-CDV detected in lung, an important site of early poxvirus replication, is low and the reduction of viral titers in surviving animals is reduced moderately compared with the liver where poxvirus titers are virtually undetectable. We synthesized a novel glycerol ester of CDV, 1-O-octadecyl-2-O-benzyl-sn-glycero-3-CDV (ODBG-CDV), and compared its oral pharmacokinetics with that of HDP-CDV. Surprisingly, ODBG-CDV levels in lung are much higher and liver levels are reduced, suggesting that the compound is transported in small intestinal lymph instead the portal vein. ODBG-CDV has excellent in vitro activity in cells infected with ectromelia virus (ECTV). In mice infected with a lethal aerosol or intranasal challenge of ECTV, HDP-CDV and ODBG-CDV are equally effective in preventing death from disease. Other drugs esterified to 1-O-octadecyl-2-O-benzyl-sn-glycerol or 1-O-octadecyl-2-O-benzyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate may provide lung targeting for treatment of microbial or neoplastic diseases while reducing first pass removal by the liver during oral absorption.

  19. Plant Virus Metagenomics: Advances in Virus Discovery.

    PubMed

    Roossinck, Marilyn J; Martin, Darren P; Roumagnac, Philippe

    2015-06-01

    In recent years plant viruses have been detected from many environments, including domestic and wild plants and interfaces between these systems-aquatic sources, feces of various animals, and insects. A variety of methods have been employed to study plant virus biodiversity, including enrichment for virus-like particles or virus-specific RNA or DNA, or the extraction of total nucleic acids, followed by next-generation deep sequencing and bioinformatic analyses. All of the methods have some shortcomings, but taken together these studies reveal our surprising lack of knowledge about plant viruses and point to the need for more comprehensive studies. In addition, many new viruses have been discovered, with most virus infections in wild plants appearing asymptomatic, suggesting that virus disease may be a byproduct of domestication. For plant pathologists these studies are providing useful tools to detect viruses, and perhaps to predict future problems that could threaten cultivated plants.

  20. Measles virus.

    PubMed

    Naim, Hussein Y

    2015-01-01

    Measles was an inevitable infection during the human development with substantial degree of morbidity and mortality. The severity of measles virus (MV) infection was largely contained by the development of a live attenuated vaccine that was introduced into the vaccination programs. However, all efforts to eradicate the disease failed and continued to annually result in significant deaths. The development of molecular biology techniques allowed the rescue of MV from cDNA that enabled important insights into a variety of aspects of the biology of the virus and its pathogenesis. Subsequently these technologies facilitated the development of novel vaccine candidates that induce immunity against measles and other pathogens. Based on the promising prospective, the use of MV as a recombinant vaccine and a therapeutic vector is addressed.

  1. Forty years of marburg virus.

    PubMed

    Slenczka, Werner; Klenk, Hans Dieter

    2007-11-15

    Forty years ago, in early August 1967, the first filovirus ever detected, Marburg virus, made its appearance in Europe, causing severe and often fatal hemorrhagic fever in laboratory workers in Marburg and Frankfurt and, about 4 weeks later, in Belgrade. The etiological agent was isolated and identified by the combined efforts of virologists in Marburg and Hamburg within the very short time of 3 months. Marburg was not the only town where the virus was isolated and identified for the first time, but most cases of infection occurred in Marburg.

  2. Protection Against Dengue Virus by Non-Replicating and Live Attenuated Vaccines Used Together in a Prime Boost Vaccination Strategy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Protection against dengue virus by non-replicating and live attenuated vaccines used together in a prime boost vaccination strategy Monika Simmons a...Dengue DNA Punfied inacdvared virus Uvc artenuatcd virus Jlnmc boost A new vaccination strategy for dengue virus (DENV) was eval uated in rhesus...region (TDNA) then boosting 2 months l,ltcr with a tetravalent live aucnuated virus (TLAV) vaccine . Both vaccine combinations elicited virus

  3. Zika Virus.

    PubMed

    Musso, Didier; Gubler, Duane J

    2016-07-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an arthropod-borne virus (arbovirus) in the genus Flavivirus and the family Flaviviridae. ZIKV was first isolated from a nonhuman primate in 1947 and from mosquitoes in 1948 in Africa, and ZIKV infections in humans were sporadic for half a century before emerging in the Pacific and the Americas. ZIKV is usually transmitted by the bite of infected mosquitoes. The clinical presentation of Zika fever is nonspecific and can be misdiagnosed as other infectious diseases, especially those due to arboviruses such as dengue and chikungunya. ZIKV infection was associated with only mild illness prior to the large French Polynesian outbreak in 2013 and 2014, when severe neurological complications were reported, and the emergence in Brazil of a dramatic increase in severe congenital malformations (microcephaly) suspected to be associated with ZIKV. Laboratory diagnosis of Zika fever relies on virus isolation or detection of ZIKV-specific RNA. Serological diagnosis is complicated by cross-reactivity among members of the Flavivirus genus. The adaptation of ZIKV to an urban cycle involving humans and domestic mosquito vectors in tropical areas where dengue is endemic suggests that the incidence of ZIKV infections may be underestimated. There is a high potential for ZIKV emergence in urban centers in the tropics that are infested with competent mosquito vectors such as Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus.

  4. Multiscale Modeling of Virus Entry via Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jin

    2012-11-01

    Virus infections are ubiquitous and remain major threats to human health worldwide. Viruses are intracellular parasites and must enter host cells to initiate infection. Receptor-mediated endocytosis is the most common entry pathway taken by viruses, the whole process is highly complex and dictated by various events, such as virus motions, membrane deformations, receptor diffusion and ligand-receptor reactions, occurring at multiple length and time scales. We develop a multiscale model for virus entry through receptor-mediated endocytosis. The binding of virus to cell surface is based on a mesoscale three dimensional stochastic adhesion model, the internalization (endocytosis) of virus and cellular membrane deformation is based on the discretization of Helfrich Hamiltonian in a curvilinear space using Monte Carlo method. The multiscale model is based on the combination of these two models. We will implement this model to study the herpes simplex virus entry into B78 cells and compare the model predictions with experimental measurements.

  5. Computer Viruses: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marmion, Dan

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the early history and current proliferation of computer viruses that occur on Macintosh and DOS personal computers, mentions virus detection programs, and offers suggestions for how libraries can protect themselves and their users from damage by computer viruses. (LRW)

  6. SAMPLING VIRUSES FROM SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter describes in detail methods for detecting viruses of bacteria and humans in soil. Methods also are presented for the assay of these viruses. Reference sources are provided for information on viruses of plants.

  7. Hanta virus (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Hanta virus is a distant cousin of Ebola virus, but is found worldwide. The virus is spread by human contact with rodent waste. Dangerous respiratory illness develops. Effective treatment is not yet ...

  8. Ebola Virus Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fact files Questions & answers Features Multimedia Contacts Ebola virus disease Fact sheet Updated January 2016 Key facts ... survivors of Ebola virus disease Symptoms of Ebola virus disease The incubation period, that is, the time ...

  9. Virus Movement Maintains Local Virus Population Diversity

    SciTech Connect

    J. Snyder; B. Wiedenheft; M. Lavin; F. Roberto; J. Spuhler; A. Ortmann; T. Douglas; M. Young

    2007-11-01

    Viruses are the largest reservoir of genetic material on the planet, yet little is known about the population dynamics of any virus within its natural environment. Over a 2-year period, we monitored the diversity of two archaeal viruses found in hot springs within Yellowstone National Park (YNP). Both temporal phylogeny and neutral biodiversity models reveal that virus diversity in these local environments is not being maintained by mutation but rather by high rates of immigration from a globally distributed metacommunity. These results indicate that geographically isolated hot springs are readily able to exchange viruses. The importance of virus movement is supported by the detection of virus particles in air samples collected over YNP hot springs and by their detection in metacommunity sequencing projects conducted in the Sargasso Sea. Rapid rates of virus movement are not expected to be unique to these archaeal viruses but rather a common feature among virus metacommunities. The finding that virus immigration rather than mutation can dominate community structure has significant implications for understanding virus circulation and the role that viruses play in ecology and evolution by providing a reservoir of mobile genetic material.

  10. Viruses as nanomedicine for cancer

    PubMed Central

    Badrinath, Narayanasamy; Heo, Jeong; Yoo, So Young

    2016-01-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy, a type of nanomedicine in which oncolytic viruses (OVs) are used to selectively infect and lyse cancer cells, is an emerging field in cancer therapy. Some OVs exhibit a specific tropism for cancer cells, whereas others require genetic modification to enhance their binding with and entry into cancer cells. OVs both kill tumor cells and induce the host’s immune response against tumor cells. Armed with antitumor cellular molecules, antibodies, and/or in combination with anticancer drugs, OVs can accelerate the lysis of cancer cells. Among the OVs, vaccinia virus has been the focus of preclinical and clinical research because of its many favorable properties. In this review, the basic mechanisms of action of OVs are presented, including their entry, survival, tumor lysis, and immune activation, and the latest research in vaccinia virus-based virotherapy and its status as an anticancer nanomedicine in prospective clinical trials are discussed. PMID:27703350

  11. Viruses as nanomedicine for cancer.

    PubMed

    Badrinath, Narayanasamy; Heo, Jeong; Yoo, So Young

    Oncolytic virotherapy, a type of nanomedicine in which oncolytic viruses (OVs) are used to selectively infect and lyse cancer cells, is an emerging field in cancer therapy. Some OVs exhibit a specific tropism for cancer cells, whereas others require genetic modification to enhance their binding with and entry into cancer cells. OVs both kill tumor cells and induce the host's immune response against tumor cells. Armed with antitumor cellular molecules, antibodies, and/or in combination with anticancer drugs, OVs can accelerate the lysis of cancer cells. Among the OVs, vaccinia virus has been the focus of preclinical and clinical research because of its many favorable properties. In this review, the basic mechanisms of action of OVs are presented, including their entry, survival, tumor lysis, and immune activation, and the latest research in vaccinia virus-based virotherapy and its status as an anticancer nanomedicine in prospective clinical trials are discussed.

  12. Virus-Based Chemical and Biological Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Chuanbin; Liu, Aihua; Cao, Binrui

    2009-01-01

    Viruses have recently proven useful for the detection of target analytes such as explosives, proteins, bacteria, viruses, spores, and toxins with high selectivity and sensitivity. Bacteriophages (often shortened to phages), viruses that specifically infect bacteria, are currently the most studied viruses, mainly because target-specific nonlytic phages (and the peptides and proteins carried by them) can be identified by using the well-established phage display technique, and lytic phages can specifically break bacteria to release cell-specific marker molecules such as enzymes that can be assayed. In addition, phages have good chemical and thermal stability, and can be conjugated with nanomaterials and immobilized on a transducer surface in an analytical device. This Review focuses on progress made in the use of phages in chemical and biological sensors in combination with traditional analytical techniques. Recent progress in the use of virus—nanomaterial composites and other viruses in sensing applications is also high-lighted. PMID:19662666

  13. Immunogenicity of a modified-live virus vaccine against bovine viral diarrhea virus types 1 and 2, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus, bovine parainfluenza-3 virus, and bovine respiratory syncytial virus when administered intranasally in young calves.

    PubMed

    Xue, Wenzhi; Ellis, John; Mattick, Debra; Smith, Linda; Brady, Ryan; Trigo, Emilio

    2010-05-14

    The immunogenicity of an intranasally-administered modified-live virus (MLV) vaccine in 3-8 day old calves was evaluated against bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) types 1 and 2, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR) virus, parainfluenza-3 (PI-3) virus and bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV). Calves were intranasally vaccinated with a single dose of a multivalent MLV vaccine and were challenged with one of the respective viruses three to four weeks post-vaccination in five separate studies. There was significant sparing of diseases in calves intranasally vaccinated with the MLV vaccine, as indicated by significantly fewer clinical signs, lower rectal temperatures, reduced viral shedding, greater white blood cell and platelet counts, and less severe pulmonary lesions than control animals. This was the first MLV combination vaccine to demonstrate efficacy against BVDV types 1 and 2, IBR, PI-3 and BRSV in calves 3-8 days of age.

  14. Efficacy of vaccination with different combinations of MF59-adjuvanted and nonadjuvanted seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccines against pandemic H1N1 (2009) influenza virus infection in ferrets.

    PubMed

    van den Brand, Judith M A; Kreijtz, Joost H C M; Bodewes, Rogier; Stittelaar, Koert J; van Amerongen, Geert; Kuiken, Thijs; Simon, James; Fouchier, Ron A M; Del Giudice, Giuseppe; Rappuoli, Rino; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F; Osterhaus, Albert D M E

    2011-03-01

    Serum antibodies induced by seasonal influenza or seasonal influenza vaccination exhibit limited or no cross-reactivity against the 2009 pandemic swine-origin influenza virus of the H1N1 subtype (pH1N1). Ferrets immunized once or twice with MF59-adjuvanted seasonal influenza vaccine exhibited significantly reduced lung virus titers but no substantial clinical protection against pH1N1-associated disease. However, priming with MF59-adjuvanted seasonal influenza vaccine significantly increased the efficacy of a pandemic MF59-adjuvanted influenza vaccine against pH1N1 challenge. Elucidating the mechanism involved in this priming principle will contribute to our understanding of vaccine- and infection-induced correlates of protection. Furthermore, a practical consequence of these findings is that during an emerging pandemic, the implementation of a priming strategy with an available adjuvanted seasonal vaccine to precede the eventual pandemic vaccination campaign may be useful and life-saving.

  15. Viruses and Virus Diseases of Rubus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rubus species are propagated vegetatively and are subject to infection by viruses during development, propagation and fruit production stages. Reports of initial detection and symptoms of more than 30 viruses, virus-like diseases and phytoplasmas affecting Rubus spp. have been reviewed more than 20 ...

  16. Crystallization of viruses and virus proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sehnke, Paul C.; Harrington, Melissa; Hosur, M. V.; Li, Yunge; Usha, R.; Craig Tucker, R.; Bomu, Wu; Stauffacher, Cynthia V.; Johnson, John E.

    1988-07-01

    Methods for crystallizing six isometric plant and insect viruses are presented. Procedures developed for modifying, purifying and crystallizing coat protein subunits isolated from a virus forming asymmetric, spheroidal particles, stabilized almost exclusively by protein-RNA interactions, are also discussed. The tertiary and quaternary structures of small RNA viruses are compared.

  17. Improving the effectiveness of artificial microRNA (amiR)-mediated resistance against Turnip mosaic virus by combining two amiRs or by targeting highly conserved viral genomic regions.

    PubMed

    Lafforgue, Guillaume; Martínez, Fernando; Niu, Qi-Wen; Chua, Nam-Hai; Daròs, José-Antonio; Elena, Santiago F

    2013-07-01

    A drawback of recent antiviral therapies based on the transgenic expression of artificial microRNAs (amiRs) is the ease with which viruses generate escape mutations. Here, we show two alternative strategies for improving the effectiveness of resistance in plants. First, we expressed two amiRs complementary to independent targets in the viral genome, and second, we designed amiRs complementary to highly conserved RNA motifs in the viral genome.

  18. Inactivated Recombinant Rabies Viruses Displaying Canine Distemper Virus Glycoproteins Induce Protective Immunity against Both Pathogens.

    PubMed

    da Fontoura Budaszewski, Renata; Hudacek, Andrew; Sawatsky, Bevan; Krämer, Beate; Yin, Xiangping; Schnell, Matthias J; von Messling, Veronika

    2017-04-15

    The development of multivalent vaccines is an attractive methodology for the simultaneous prevention of several infectious diseases in vulnerable populations. Both canine distemper virus (CDV) and rabies virus (RABV) cause lethal disease in wild and domestic carnivores. While RABV vaccines are inactivated, the live-attenuated CDV vaccines retain residual virulence for highly susceptible wildlife species. In this study, we developed recombinant bivalent vaccine candidates based on recombinant vaccine strain rabies virus particles, which concurrently display the protective CDV and RABV glycoprotein antigens. The recombinant viruses replicated to near-wild-type titers, and the heterologous glycoproteins were efficiently expressed and incorporated in the viral particles. Immunization of ferrets with beta-propiolactone-inactivated recombinant virus particles elicited protective RABV antibody titers, and animals immunized with a combination of CDV attachment protein- and fusion protein-expressing recombinant viruses were protected from lethal CDV challenge. However, animals that were immunized with only a RABV expressing the attachment protein of CDV vaccine strain Onderstepoort succumbed to infection with a more recent wild-type strain, indicating that immune responses to the more conserved fusion protein contribute to protection against heterologous CDV strains.IMPORTANCE Rabies virus and canine distemper virus (CDV) cause high mortality rates and death in many carnivores. While rabies vaccines are inactivated and thus have an excellent safety profile and high stability, live-attenuated CDV vaccines can retain residual virulence in highly susceptible species. Here we generated recombinant inactivated rabies viruses that carry one of the CDV glycoproteins on their surface. Ferrets immunized twice with a mix of recombinant rabies viruses carrying the CDV fusion and attachment glycoproteins were protected from lethal CDV challenge, whereas all animals that received

  19. Studies on the induction of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA polymerase (POL) and deoxyribonuclease (DNase) by the combined action of 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and N-butyrate (SB in EBV-carrying cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nutter, L.M.; Tan, R.S.; Grill, S.; Li, J.S.; Cheng, Y.C.

    1986-03-05

    TPA and SB were found to induce EBV early antigen in EBV-carrying Raji cells, a Burkitt's Lymphoma-derived human cell line. The mode of interaction of these agents was unclear. They have examined the induction of EBV-POL and DNase activities by TPA and SB. It was found that neither agent alone could induce EBV-POL and DNase activities, even though the virus DNA could be induced by either compound alone. Induction of virus enzymes could only occur when cells were exposed to both compounds. A 2h exposure to TPA followed by 46h to SB resulted in levels of induction of EBV-POL and DNase activities comparable to those induced with simultaneous exposure to both agents for 48h. No induction of the enzymes will occur if the sequence of exposure to these agents is reversed. Phospholipase C, which increases intracellular diacylglycerol (and subsequently the activation of Protein Kinase C), and 5-Aza-deoxycytidine, a DNA hypomethylating agent, were able to partially substitute for TPA and SB, respectively. These results suggest that the mechanism of induction of EBV enzyme activities by TPA and SB could involve both Protein Kinase C activation and DNA hypomethylation. Furthermore, the synthesis of EBV DNA is not sufficient for induction of these virus enzyme activities.

  20. Effects of electrolytes on virus inactivation by acidic solutions.

    PubMed

    Nishide, Mitsunori; Tsujimoto, Kazuko; Uozaki, Misao; Ikeda, Keiko; Yamasaki, Hisashi; Koyama, A Hajime; Arakawa, Tsutomu

    2011-06-01

    Acidic pH is frequently used to inactivate viruses. We have previously shown that arginine synergizes with low pH in enhancing virus inactivation. Considering a potential application of the acid inactivation of viruses for the prevention and treatment of superficial virus infection at body surfaces and fixtures, herein we have examined the effects of various electrolytes on the acid-induced inactivation of the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and type 2 (HSV-2), the influenza A virus (IAV) and the poliovirus upon their incubation at 30˚C for 5 min. Eight electrolytes, i.e., phosphate, NaCl, glutamate, aspartate, pyrrolidone carboxylate, citrate, malate and acetate were tested. No detectable inactivation of the poliovirus was observed under the conditions examined, reflecting its acid-resistance. HSV-1 and HSV-2 responded similarly to the acid-treatment and electrolytes. Some electrolytes showed a stronger virus inactivation than others at a given pH and concentration. The effects of the electrolytes were virus-dependent, as IAV responded differently from HSV-1 and HSV-2 to these electrolytes, indicating that certain combinations of the electrolytes and a low pH can exert a more effective virus inactivation than other combinations and that their effects are virus-specific. These results should be useful in designing acidic solvents for the inactivation of viruses at various surfaces.

  1. The Tobacco Mosaic Virus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sulzinski, Michael A.

    1992-01-01

    Explains how the tobacco mosaic virus can be used to study virology. Presents facts about the virus, procedures to handle the virus in the laboratory, and four laboratory exercises involving the viruses' survival under inactivating conditions, dilution end point, filterability, and microscopy. (MDH)

  2. Virus inactivation in aluminum and polyaluminum coagulation.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yoshihiko; Matsushita, Taku; Sakuma, Satoru; Gojo, Takahito; Mamiya, Teppei; Suzuoki, Hiroshi; Inoue, Takanobu

    2003-11-15

    Inorganic aluminum salts, such as aluminum sulfate, are coagulants that cause small particles, such as bacteria and viruses as well as inorganic particles, to destabilize and combine into larger aggregates. In this investigation, batch coagulation treatments of water samples spiked with Qbeta, MS2, T4, and P1 viruses were conducted with four different aluminum coagulants. The total infectious virus concentration in the suspension of floc particles that eventually formed by dosing with coagulant was measured after the floc particles were dissolved by raising the pH with an alkaline beef extract solution. The virus concentrations were extremely reduced after the water samples were dosed with aluminum coagulants. Viruses mixed with and adsorbed onto preformed aluminum hydroxide floc were, however, completely recovered after the floc dissolution. These results indicated that the aluminum coagulation process inactivates viruses. Virucidal activity was most prominent with the prehydrolyzed aluminum salt coagulant, polyaluminum chloride (PACl). Virucidal activity was lower in river water than in ultrapure water--natural organic matter in the river water depressed the virucidal activity. Mechanisms and kinetics of the virus inactivation were discussed. Our results suggest that intermediate polymers formed during hydrolysis of the aluminum coagulants sorbed strongly to viruses, either rendering them inactive or preventing infectivity.

  3. Reassortment ability of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus with circulating human and avian influenza viruses: public health risk implications.

    PubMed

    Stincarelli, Maria; Arvia, Rosaria; De Marco, Maria Alessandra; Clausi, Valeria; Corcioli, Fabiana; Cotti, Claudia; Delogu, Mauro; Donatelli, Isabella; Azzi, Alberta; Giannecchini, Simone

    2013-08-01

    Exploring the reassortment ability of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 (A/H1N1pdm09) influenza virus with other circulating human or avian influenza viruses is the main concern related to the generation of more virulent or new variants having implications for public health. After different coinfection experiments in human A549 cells, by using the A/H1N1pdm09 virus plus one of human seasonal influenza viruses of H1N1 and H3N2 subtype or one of H11, H10, H9, H7 and H1 avian influenza viruses, several reassortant viruses were obtained. Among these, the HA of H1N1 was the main segment of human seasonal influenza virus reassorted in the A/H1N1pdm09 virus backbone. Conversely, HA and each of the three polymerase segments, alone or in combination, of the avian influenza viruses mainly reassorted in the A/H1N1pdm09 virus backbone. Of note, A/H1N1pdm09 viruses that reassorted with HA of H1N1 seasonal human or H11N6 avian viruses or carried different combination of avian origin polymerase segments, exerted a higher replication effectiveness than that of the parental viruses. These results confirm that reassortment of the A/H1N1pdm09 with circulating low pathogenic avian influenza viruses should not be misjudged in the prediction of the next pandemic.

  4. Understanding Ebola Virus Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Judson, Seth; Prescott, Joseph; Munster, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    An unprecedented number of Ebola virus infections among healthcare workers and patients have raised questions about our understanding of Ebola virus transmission. Here, we explore different routes of Ebola virus transmission between people, summarizing the known epidemiological and experimental data. From this data, we expose important gaps in Ebola virus research pertinent to outbreak situations. We further propose experiments and methods of data collection that will enable scientists to fill these voids in our knowledge about the transmission of Ebola virus. PMID:25654239

  5. Understanding ebola virus transmission.

    PubMed

    Judson, Seth; Prescott, Joseph; Munster, Vincent

    2015-02-03

    An unprecedented number of Ebola virus infections among healthcare workers and patients have raised questions about our understanding of Ebola virus transmission. Here, we explore different routes of Ebola virus transmission between people, summarizing the known epidemiological and experimental data. From this data, we expose important gaps in Ebola virus research pertinent to outbreak situations. We further propose experiments and methods of data collection that will enable scientists to fill these voids in our knowledge about the transmission of Ebola virus.

  6. Tailoring a Combination Preerythrocytic Malaria Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Bauza, Karolis; Malinauskas, Tomas; Blagborough, Andrew M.; Reyes-Sandoval, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    The leading malaria vaccine candidate, RTS,S, based on the Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (CSP), will likely be the first publicly adopted malaria vaccine. However, this and other subunit vaccines, such as virus-vectored thrombospondin-related adhesive protein (TRAP), provide only intermediate to low levels of protection. In this study, the Plasmodium berghei homologues of antigens CSP and TRAP are combined. TRAP is delivered using adenovirus- and vaccinia virus-based vectors in a prime-boost regime. Initially, CSP is also delivered using these viral vectors; however, a reduction of anti-CSP antibodies is seen when combined with virus-vectored TRAP, and the combination is no more protective than either subunit vaccine alone. Using an adenovirus-CSP prime, protein-CSP boost regime, however, increases anti-CSP antibody titers by an order of magnitude, which is maintained when combined with virus-vectored TRAP. This combination regime using protein CSP provided 100% protection in C57BL/6 mice compared to no protection using virus-vectored TRAP alone and 40% protection using adenovirus-CSP prime and protein-CSP boost alone. This suggests that a combination of CSP and TRAP subunit vaccines could enhance protection against malaria. PMID:26667840

  7. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Antibody Testing and the Right of Privacy.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-30

    test, the Western blot is done. Western blot is more specific than ELISA for antibodies but it is more expensive and complicated to run. Unfortunately...the error rates or the reliability of the ELISA test varies from laboratory to laboratory. The S interpretation of the Western blot also can vary...Immunodeficiency Virus, HIV (formerly known as Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Type III, HTLV III and Lymphadenopathy Associated Virus, LAV or a combination of those

  8. Virus-Vectored Influenza Virus Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Tripp, Ralph A.; Tompkins, S. Mark

    2014-01-01

    Despite the availability of an inactivated vaccine that has been licensed for >50 years, the influenza virus continues to cause morbidity and mortality worldwide. Constant evolution of circulating influenza virus strains and the emergence of new strains diminishes the effectiveness of annual vaccines that rely on a match with circulating influenza strains. Thus, there is a continued need for new, efficacious vaccines conferring cross-clade protection to avoid the need for biannual reformulation of seasonal influenza vaccines. Recombinant virus-vectored vaccines are an appealing alternative to classical inactivated vaccines because virus vectors enable native expression of influenza antigens, even from virulent influenza viruses, while expressed in the context of the vector that can improve immunogenicity. In addition, a vectored vaccine often enables delivery of the vaccine to sites of inductive immunity such as the respiratory tract enabling protection from influenza virus infection. Moreover, the ability to readily manipulate virus vectors to produce novel influenza vaccines may provide the quickest path toward a universal vaccine protecting against all influenza viruses. This review will discuss experimental virus-vectored vaccines for use in humans, comparing them to licensed vaccines and the hurdles faced for licensure of these next-generation influenza virus vaccines. PMID:25105278

  9. Unlocking the promise of oncolytic virotherapy in glioma: combination with chemotherapy to enhance efficacy.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Drew A; Young, Jacob S; Kanojia, Deepak; Kim, Julius W; Polster, Sean P; Murphy, Jason P; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2015-01-01

    Malignant glioma is a relentless burden to both patients and clinicians, and calls for innovation to overcome the limitations in current management. Glioma therapy using viruses has been investigated to accentuate the nature of a virus, killing a host tumor cell during its replication. As virus mediated approaches progress with promising therapeutic advantages, combination therapy with chemotherapy and oncolytic viruses has emerged as a more synergistic and possibly efficacious therapy. Here, we will review malignant glioma as well as prior experience with oncolytic viruses, chemotherapy and combination of the two, examining how the combination can be optimized in the future.

  10. Viruses Infecting Reptiles

    PubMed Central

    Marschang, Rachel E.

    2011-01-01

    A large number of viruses have been described in many different reptiles. These viruses include arboviruses that primarily infect mammals or birds as well as viruses that are specific for reptiles. Interest in arboviruses infecting reptiles has mainly focused on the role reptiles may play in the epidemiology of these viruses, especially over winter. Interest in reptile specific viruses has concentrated on both their importance for reptile medicine as well as virus taxonomy and evolution. The impact of many viral infections on reptile health is not known. Koch’s postulates have only been fulfilled for a limited number of reptilian viruses. As diagnostic testing becomes more sensitive, multiple infections with various viruses and other infectious agents are also being detected. In most cases the interactions between these different agents are not known. This review provides an update on viruses described in reptiles, the animal species in which they have been detected, and what is known about their taxonomic positions. PMID:22163336

  11. Viruses infecting reptiles.

    PubMed

    Marschang, Rachel E

    2011-11-01

    A large number of viruses have been described in many different reptiles. These viruses include arboviruses that primarily infect mammals or birds as well as viruses that are specific for reptiles. Interest in arboviruses infecting reptiles has mainly focused on the role reptiles may play in the epidemiology of these viruses, especially over winter. Interest in reptile specific viruses has concentrated on both their importance for reptile medicine as well as virus taxonomy and evolution. The impact of many viral infections on reptile health is not known. Koch's postulates have only been fulfilled for a limited number of reptilian viruses. As diagnostic testing becomes more sensitive, multiple infections with various viruses and other infectious agents are also being detected. In most cases the interactions between these different agents are not known. This review provides an update on viruses described in reptiles, the animal species in which they have been detected, and what is known about their taxonomic positions.

  12. Development of high-yield influenza A virus vaccine viruses

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Jihui; Lopes, Tiago J.S.; Nidom, Chairul A.; Ghedin, Elodie; Macken, Catherine A.; Fitch, Adam; Imai, Masaki; Maher, Eileen A.; Neumann, Gabriele; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination is one of the most cost-effective ways to prevent infection. Influenza vaccines propagated in cultured cells are approved for use in humans, but their yields are often suboptimal. Here, we screened A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8) virus mutant libraries to develop vaccine backbones (defined here as the six viral RNA segments not encoding haemagglutinin and neuraminidase) that support high yield in cell culture. We also tested mutations in the coding and regulatory regions of the virus, and chimeric haemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes. A combination of high-yield mutations from these screens led to a PR8 backbone that improved the titres of H1N1, H3N2, H5N1 and H7N9 vaccine viruses in African green monkey kidney and Madin–Darby canine kidney cells. This PR8 backbone also improves titres in embryonated chicken eggs, a common propagation system for influenza viruses. This PR8 vaccine backbone thus represents an advance in seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccine development. PMID:26334134

  13. Viruses in the sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suttle, Curtis A.

    2005-09-01

    Viruses exist wherever life is found. They are a major cause of mortality, a driver of global geochemical cycles and a reservoir of the greatest genetic diversity on Earth. In the oceans, viruses probably infect all living things, from bacteria to whales. They affect the form of available nutrients and the termination of algal blooms. Viruses can move between marine and terrestrial reservoirs, raising the spectre of emerging pathogens. Our understanding of the effect of viruses on global systems and processes continues to unfold, overthrowing the idea that viruses and virus-mediated processes are sidebars to global processes.

  14. Viruses in maize and Johnsongrass in southern Ohio.

    PubMed

    Stewart, L R; Teplier, R; Todd, J C; Jones, M W; Cassone, B J; Wijeratne, S; Wijeratne, A; Redinbaugh, M G

    2014-12-01

    The two major U.S. maize viruses, Maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV) and Maize chlorotic dwarf virus (MCDV), emerged in southern Ohio and surrounding regions in the 1960s and caused significant losses. Planting resistant varieties and changing cultural practices has dramatically reduced virus impact in subsequent decades. Current information on the distribution, diversity, and impact of known and potential U.S. maize disease-causing viruses is lacking. To assess the current reservoir of viruses present at the sites of past disease emergence, we used a combination of serological testing and next-generation RNA sequencing approaches. Here, we report enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and RNA-Seq data from samples collected over 2 years to assess the presence of viruses in cultivated maize and an important weedy reservoir, Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense). Results revealed a persistent reservoir of MDMV and two strains of MCDV in Ohio Johnsongrass. We identified sequences of several other grass-infecting viruses and confirmed the presence of Wheat mosaic virus in Ohio maize. Together, these results provide important data for managing virus disease in field corn and sweet corn maize crops, and identifying potential future virus threats.

  15. Pandemic threat posed by avian influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Horimoto, T; Kawaoka, Y

    2001-01-01

    Influenza pandemics, defined as global outbreaks of the disease due to viruses with new antigenic subtypes, have exacted high death tolls from human populations. The last two pandemics were caused by hybrid viruses, or reassortants, that harbored a combination of avian and human viral genes. Avian influenza viruses are therefore key contributors to the emergence of human influenza pandemics. In 1997, an H5N1 influenza virus was directly transmitted from birds in live poultry markets in Hong Kong to humans. Eighteen people were infected in this outbreak, six of whom died. This avian virus exhibited high virulence in both avian and mammalian species, causing systemic infection in both chickens and mice. Subsequently, another avian virus with the H9N2 subtype was directly transmitted from birds to humans in Hong Kong. Interestingly, the genes encoding the internal proteins of the H9N2 virus are genetically highly related to those of the H5N1 virus, suggesting a unique property of these gene products. The identification of avian viruses in humans underscores the potential of these and similar strains to produce devastating influenza outbreaks in major population centers. Although highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses had been identified before the 1997 outbreak in Hong Kong, their devastating effects had been confined to poultry. With the Hong Kong outbreak, it became clear that the virulence potential of these viruses extended to humans.

  16. Pandemic Threat Posed by Avian Influenza A Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Horimoto, Taisuke; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2001-01-01

    Influenza pandemics, defined as global outbreaks of the disease due to viruses with new antigenic subtypes, have exacted high death tolls from human populations. The last two pandemics were caused by hybrid viruses, or reassortants, that harbored a combination of avian and human viral genes. Avian influenza viruses are therefore key contributors to the emergence of human influenza pandemics. In 1997, an H5N1 influenza virus was directly transmitted from birds in live poultry markets in Hong Kong to humans. Eighteen people were infected in this outbreak, six of whom died. This avian virus exhibited high virulence in both avian and mammalian species, causing systemic infection in both chickens and mice. Subsequently, another avian virus with the H9N2 subtype was directly transmitted from birds to humans in Hong Kong. Interestingly, the genes encoding the internal proteins of the H9N2 virus are genetically highly related to those of the H5N1 virus, suggesting a unique property of these gene products. The identification of avian viruses in humans underscores the potential of these and similar strains to produce devastating influenza outbreaks in major population centers. Although highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses had been identified before the 1997 outbreak in Hong Kong, their devastating effects had been confined to poultry. With the Hong Kong outbreak, it became clear that the virulence potential of these viruses extended to humans. PMID:11148006

  17. Associations between co-detected respiratory viruses in children with acute respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Kaida, Atsushi; Kubo, Hideyuki; Takakura, Koh-ichi; Sekiguchi, Jun-ichiro; Yamamoto, Seiji P; Kohdera, Urara; Togawa, Masao; Amo, Kiyoko; Shiomi, Masashi; Ohyama, Minori; Goto, Kaoru; Hase, Atsushi; Kageyama, Tsutomu; Iritani, Nobuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Viruses are the major etiological agents of acute respiratory infections (ARIs) in young children. Although respiratory virus co-detections are common, analysis of combinations of co-detected viruses has never been conducted in Japan. Nineteen respiratory viruses or subtypes were surveyed using multiplex real-time PCR on 1,044 pediatric (patient age < 6 years) ARI specimens collected in Osaka City, Japan between January 2010 and December 2011. In total, 891 specimens (85.3%) were virus positive (1,414 viruses were detected), and 388 of the virus-positive specimens (43.5%, 388/891) were positive for multiple viruses. The ratio of multiple/total respiratory virus-positive specimens was high in children aged 0-35 months. Statistical analyses revealed that human bocavirus 1 and human adenovirus were synchronously co-detected. On the other hand, co-detections of human parainfluenza virus type 1 (HPIV-1) with HPIV-3, HPIV-3 with human metapneumovirus (hMPV), hMPV with respiratory syncytial virus A (RSV A), hMPV with influenza virus A (H1N1) 2009 (FLUA (H1N1) 2009), RSV A with RSV B, and human rhinovirus and FLUA (H1N1) 2009 were exclusive. These results suggest that young children (<3 years) are highly susceptible to respiratory viruses, and some combinations of viruses are synchronously or exclusively co-detected.

  18. Raspberry (Rubus spp.)-Viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are several important virus diseases of raspberry and black raspberry in the Pacific Northwest. Pollen-borne viruses include Raspberry bushy dwarf virus and Strawberry necrotic shock virus (aka Tobacco streak virus –Rubus isolate or Black raspberry latent virus). Strawberry necrotic shock viru...

  19. Efficacy of Inactivated Swine Influenza Virus Vaccines Against the 2009 A/H1N1 Influenza Virus in Pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gene constellation of the 2009 pandemic A/H1N1 virus is a unique combination from swine influenza A viruses (SIV) of North American and Eurasian lineages, but prior to April 2009 had never before been identified in swine or other species. Although its hemagglutinin gene is related to North Ameri...

  20. Efficacy of Inactivated Swine Influenza Virus Vaccines Against 2009 H1N1 Influenza Virus in Pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction. The gene constellation of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus is a unique combination from swine influenza A viruses (SIV) of North American and Eurasian lineages, but prior to April 2009 had never before been identified in swine or other species (1). Although its hemagglutinin gene is relat...

  1. Multiscale perspectives of virus entry via endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Barrow, Eric; Nicola, Anthony V; Liu, Jin

    2013-06-05

    Most viruses take advantage of endocytic pathways to gain entry into host cells and initiate infections. Understanding of virus entry via endocytosis is critically important for the design of antiviral strategies. Virus entry via endocytosis is a complex process involving hundreds of cellular proteins. The entire process is dictated by events occurring at multiple time and length scales. In this review, we discuss and evaluate the available means to investigate virus endocytic entry, from both experimental and theoretical/numerical modeling fronts, and highlight the importance of multiscale features. The complexity of the process requires investigations at a systems biology level, which involves the combination of different experimental approaches, the collaboration of experimentalists and theorists across different disciplines, and the development of novel multiscale models.

  2. Live Virus Smallpox Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Submit What's this? Submit Button The Live Virus Smallpox Vaccine Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... the vaccinia virus. Who should NOT get the smallpox vaccine? People most likely to have side effects ...

  3. Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Introduce a Vaccine against Ebola Ebola Virus Ecology and Transmission About Ebola Signs and Symptoms Symptoms ... Resources Videos Audio Infographics & Illustrations Factsheets Posters Virus Ecology Graphic Language: English Español Français File ...

  4. Zika Virus Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... sheets Fact files Questions & answers Features Multimedia Contacts Zika virus Fact sheet Updated 6 September 2016 Key ... and last for 2-7 days. Complications of Zika virus disease Based on a systematic review of ...

  5. Viruses and human cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Gallo, R.C.; Haseltine, W.; Klein, G.; Zur Hausen, H.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains papers on the following topics: Immunology and Epidemiology, Biology and Pathogenesis, Models of Pathogenesis and Treatment, Simian and Bovine Retroviruses, Human Papilloma Viruses, EBV and Herpesvirus, and Hepatitis B Virus.

  6. Human Parainfluenza Viruses

    MedlinePlus

    ... HPIVs Are Not the Same as Influenza (Flu) Viruses People usually get HPIV infections more often in ... hands, and touching objects or surfaces with the viruses on them then touching your mouth, nose, or ...

  7. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections

    MedlinePlus

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes mild, cold-like symptoms in adults and older healthy children. It can cause serious problems in ... tests can tell if your child has the virus. There is no specific treatment. You should give ...

  8. Hepatitis virus panel

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003558.htm Hepatitis virus panel To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The hepatitis virus panel is a series of blood tests used ...

  9. West Nile Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... West Nile virus has been found in animals, birds, and humans in all continental states in the ... picked up the virus after feeding on infected birds. Pets and other animals can also become infected ...

  10. Tumorigenic DNA viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, G.

    1989-01-01

    The eighth volume of Advances in Viral Oncology focuses on the three major DNA virus groups with a postulated or proven tumorigenic potential: papillomaviruses, animal hepatitis viruses, and the Epstein-Bar virus. In the opening chapters, the contributors analyze the evidence that papillomaviruses and animal hepatitis viruses are involved in tumorigenesis and describe the mechanisms that trigger virus-host cell interactions. A detailed section on the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) - comprising more than half the book - examines the transcription and mRNA processing patterns of the virus genome; the mechanisms by which EBV infects lymphoid and epithelial cells; the immunological aspects of the virus; the actions of EBV in hosts with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome; and the involvement of EBV in the etiology of Burkitt's lymphoma.

  11. Viruses and cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Rigby, P.W.J.; Wilkie, N.M.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 14 selections. Some of the titles are: Immortalising gene(s) encoded by Epstein-Barr Virus; Adenovirus genes involved in transformation. What determines the oncogenic phenotype.; Oncogenesis by mouse mammary tumour virus; and Transforming ras genes.

  12. Quasispecies of dengue virus.

    PubMed

    Kurosu, Takeshi

    2011-12-01

    Pathogenic viruses have RNA genomes that cause acute and chronic infections. These viruses replicate with high mutation rates and exhibit significant genetic diversity, so-called viral quasispecies. Viral quasispecies play an important role in chronic infectious diseases, but little is known about their involvement in acute infectious diseases such as dengue virus (DENV) infection. DENV, the most important human arbovirus, is a causative agent of dengue fever (DF) and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). Accumulating observations suggest that DENV exists as an extremely diverse virus population, but its biological significance is unclear. In other virus diseases, quasispecies affect the therapeutic strategies using drugs and vaccines. Here, I describe the quasispecies of DENV and discuss the possible role of quasispecies in the pathogenesis of and therapeutic strategy against DENV infection in comparison with other viruses such as Hepatitis C virus, human immunodeficiency virus type 1, and poliovirus.

  13. Viruses and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, James S.; Heng, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Viruses are the accepted cause of many important cancers including cancers of the cervix and anogenital area, the liver, some lymphomas, head and neck cancers and indirectly human immunodeficiency virus associated cancers. For over 50 years, there have been serious attempts to identify viruses which may have a role in breast cancer. Despite these efforts, the establishment of conclusive evidence for such a role has been elusive. However, the development of extremely sophisticated new experimental techniques has allowed the recent development of evidence that human papilloma virus, Epstein-Barr virus, mouse mammary tumor virus and bovine leukemia virus may each have a role in the causation of human breast cancers. This is potentially good news as effective vaccines are already available to prevent infections from carcinogenic strains of human papilloma virus, which causes cancer of the uterine cervix. PMID:24281093

  14. Virus Assembly and Maturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, John E.

    2004-03-01

    We use two techniques to look at three-dimensional virus structure: electron cryomicroscopy (cryoEM) and X-ray crystallography. Figure 1 is a gallery of virus particles whose structures Timothy Baker, one of my former colleagues at Purdue University, used cryoEM to determine. It illustrates the variety of sizes of icosahedral virus particles. The largest virus particle on this slide is the Herpes simplex virus, around 1200Å in diameter; the smallest we examined was around 250Å in diameter. Viruses bear their genomic information either as positive-sense DNA and RNA, double-strand DNA, double-strand RNA, or negative-strand RNA. Viruses utilize the various structure and function "tactics" seen throughout cell biology to replicate at high levels. Many of the biological principles that we consider general were in fact discovered in the context of viruses ...

  15. Peptide inhibitors of dengue virus and West Nile virus infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Hrobowski, Yancey M; Garry, Robert F; Michael, Scott F

    2005-01-01

    Viral fusion proteins mediate cell entry by undergoing a series of conformational changes that result in virion-target cell membrane fusion. Class I viral fusion proteins, such as those encoded by influenza virus and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), contain two prominent alpha helices. Peptides that mimic portions of these alpha helices inhibit structural rearrangements of the fusion proteins and prevent viral infection. The envelope glycoprotein (E) of flaviviruses, such as West Nile virus (WNV) and dengue virus (DENV), are class II viral fusion proteins comprised predominantly of beta sheets. We used a physio-chemical algorithm, the Wimley-White interfacial hydrophobicity scale (WWIHS) [1] in combination with known structural data to identify potential peptide inhibitors of WNV and DENV infectivity that target the viral E protein. Viral inhibition assays confirm that several of these peptides specifically interfere with target virus entry with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) in the 10 μM range. Inhibitory peptides similar in sequence to domains with a significant WWIHS scores, including domain II (IIb), and the stem domain, were detected. DN59, a peptide corresponding to the stem domain of DENV, inhibited infection by DENV (>99% inhibition of plaque formation at a concentrations of <25 μM) and cross-inhibition of WNV fusion/infectivity (>99% inhibition at <25 μM) was also demonstrated with DN59. However, a potent WNV inhibitory peptide, WN83, which corresponds to WNV E domain IIb, did not inhibit infectivity by DENV. Additional results suggest that these inhibitory peptides are noncytotoxic and act in a sequence specific manner. The inhibitory peptides identified here can serve as lead compounds for the development of peptide drugs for flavivirus infection. PMID:15927084

  16. Power combiner

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Mobius; Ives, Robert Lawrence

    2006-09-05

    A power combiner for the combining of symmetric and asymmetric traveling wave energy comprises a feed waveguide having an input port and a launching port, a reflector for reflecting launched wave energy, and a final waveguide for the collection and transport of launched wave energy. The power combiner has a launching port for symmetrical waves which comprises a cylindrical section coaxial to the feed waveguide, and a launching port for asymmetric waves which comprises a sawtooth rotated about a central axis.

  17. Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Respiratory Syncytial Virus KidsHealth > For Parents > Respiratory Syncytial Virus A A A What's in this article? About ... RSV When to Call the Doctor en español Virus respiratorio sincitial About RSV Respiratory syncytial (sin-SISH- ...

  18. Computer Virus Protection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rajala, Judith B.

    2004-01-01

    A computer virus is a program--a piece of executable code--that has the unique ability to replicate. Like biological viruses, computer viruses can spread quickly and are often difficult to eradicate. They can attach themselves to just about any type of file, and are spread by replicating and being sent from one individual to another. Simply having…

  19. Avian influenza virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian influenza (AI) is caused by type A influenza virus, a member of the Orthomyxoviridae family. AI viruses are serologically categorized into 16 hemagglutinin (H1-H16) and 9 neuraminidase (N1-N9) subtypes. All subtypes have been identified in birds. Infections by AI viruses have been reported in ...

  20. Avian influenza virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) is type A influenza, which is adapted to an avian host. Although avian influenza has been isolated from numerous avian species, the primary natural hosts for the virus are dabbling ducks, shorebirds, and gulls. The virus can be found world-wide in these species and in o...

  1. Nairobi sheep disease virus/Ganjam virus.

    PubMed

    M D, Baron; B, Holzer

    2015-08-01

    Nairobi sheep disease virus (NSDV) is a tick-borne virus which causes a severe disease in sheep and goats, and has been responsible for several outbreaks of disease in East Africa. The virus is also found in the Indian subcontinent, where it is known as Ganjam virus. The virus only spreads through the feeding of competent infected ticks, and is therefore limited in its geographic distribution by the distribution of those ticks, Rhipicephalus appendiculata in Africa and Haemaphysalis intermedia in India. Animals bred in endemic areas do not normally develop disease, and the impact is therefore primarily on animals being moved for trade or breeding purposes. The disease caused by NSDV has similarities to several other ruminant diseases, and laboratory diagnosis is necessary for confirmation. There are published methods for diagnosis based on polymerase chain reaction, for virus growth in cell culture and for other simple diagnostic tests, though none has been commercialised. There is no established vaccine against NSDV, although cell-culture attenuated strains have been developed which show promise and could be put into field trials if it were deemed necessary. The virus is closely related to Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus, and studies on NSDV may therefore be useful in understanding this important human pathogen.

  2. Avian influenza virus and Newcastle disease virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) and Newcastle disease virus (NDV) severely impact poultry egg production. Decreased egg yield and hatchability, as well as misshapen eggs, are often observed during infection with AIV and NDV, even with low-virulence strains or in vaccinated flocks. Data suggest that in...

  3. B Virus (Macacine Herpesvirus 1) Divergence: Variations in Glycoprotein D from Clinical and Laboratory Isolates Diversify Virus Entry Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Patrusheva, Irina; Perelygina, Ludmila; Torshin, Ivan; LeCher, Julia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT B virus (Macacine herpesvirus 1) can cause deadly zoonotic disease in humans. Molecular mechanisms of B virus cell entry are poorly understood for both macaques and humans. Here we investigated the abilities of clinical B virus isolates to use entry receptors of herpes simplex viruses (HSV). We showed that resistant B78H1 cells became susceptible to B virus clinical strains upon expression of either human nectin-2 or nectin-1. Antibody against glycoprotein D (gD) protected these nectin-bearing cells from B virus infection, and a gD-negative recombinant B virus failed to enter these cells, indicating that the nectin-mediated B virus entry depends on gD. We observed that the infectivity of B virus isolates with a single amino acid substitution (D122N) in the IgV-core of the gD ectodomain was impaired on nectin-1-bearing cells. Computational homology-based modeling of the B virus gD–nectin-1 complex revealed conformational differences between the structures of the gD-122N and gD-122D variants that affected the gD–nectin-1 protein-protein interface and binding affinity. Unlike HSV, B virus clinical strains were unable to use herpesvirus entry mediator (HVEM) as a receptor, regardless of conservation of the gD amino acid residues essential for HSV-1 entry via HVEM. Based on the model of the B virus gD-HVEM interface, we predict that residues R7, R11, and G15 are largely responsible for the inability of B virus to utilize HVEM for entry. The ability of B virus to enter cells of a human host by using a combination of receptors distinct from those for HSV-1 or HSV-2 suggests a possible mechanism of enhanced neuropathogenicity associated with zoonotic infections. IMPORTANCE B virus causes brainstem destruction in infected humans in the absence of timely diagnosis and intervention. Nectins are cell adhesion molecules that are widely expressed in human tissues, including neurons and neuronal synapses. Here we report that human nectin-2 is a target receptor for B

  4. The taxonomy of viruses should include viruses.

    PubMed

    Calisher, Charles H

    2016-05-01

    Having lost sight of its goal, the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses has redoubled its efforts. That goal is to arrive at a consensus regarding virus classification, i.e., proper placement of viruses in a hierarchical taxonomic scheme; not an easy task given the wide variety of recognized viruses. Rather than suggesting a continuation of the bureaucratic machinations of the past, this opinion piece is a call for insertion of common sense in sorting out the avalanche of information already, and soon-to-be, accrued data. In this way information about viruses ideally would be taxonomically correct as well as useful to working virologists and journal editors, rather than being lost, minimized, or ignored.

  5. A poxvirus host range protein, CP77, binds to a cellular protein, HMG20A, and regulates its dissociation from the vaccinia virus genome in CHO-K1 cells.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Jye-Chian; Chao, Chien-Chiang; Young, Ming-Jer; Chang, Yu-Tai; Cho, Er-Chieh; Chang, Wen

    2006-08-01

    Vaccinia virus does not grow in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells in the absence of a viral host range factor, cowpox protein CP77. In this study, CP77 was fused to the C terminus of green fluorescence protein (GFP-CP77) and a series of nested deletion mutants of GFP-CP77 was constructed for insertion into a vaccinia virus host range mutant, VV-hr, and expressed from a viral early promoter. Deletion mapping analyses demonstrated that the N-terminal 352 amino acids of CP77 were sufficient to support vaccinia virus growth in CHO-K1 cells, whereas the C-terminal residues 353 to 668 were dispensable. In yeast two-hybrid analyses, CP77 bound to a cellular protein, HMG20A, and GST pulldown analyses showed that residues 1 to 234 of CP77 were sufficient for this interaction. After VV-hr virus infection of CHO-K1 cells, HMG20A was translocated from the nucleus to viral factories and bound to the viral genome via the HMG box region. In control VV-hr-infected CHO-K1 cells, binding of HMG20A to the viral genome persisted from 2 to 8 h postinfection (h p.i.); in contrast, when CP77 was expressed, the association of HMG20A with viral genome was transient, with little HMG20A remaining bound at 8 h p.i. This indicates that dissociation of HMG20A from viral factories correlates well with CP77 host range activity in CHO-K1 cells. Finally, in cells expressing a CP77 deletion protein (amino acids 277 to 668) or a DeltaANK5 mutant that did not support vaccinia virus growth and did not contain the HMG20A binding site, HMG20A remained bound to viral DNA, demonstrating that the binding of CP77 to HMG20A is essential for its host range function. In summary, our data revealed that a novel cellular protein, HMG20A, the dissociation of which from viral DNA is regulated by CP77, providing the first cellular target regulated by viral host range CP77 protein.

  6. Blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum)-Virus Diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    At least six viruses have been found in highbush blueberry plantings in the Pacific Northwest: Blueberry mosaic virus, Blueberry red ringspot virus, Blueberry scorch virus, Blueberry shock virus, Tobacco ringspot virus, and Tomato ringspot virus. Six other virus and virus-like diseases of highbush b...

  7. Viruses of asparagus.

    PubMed

    Tomassoli, Laura; Tiberini, Antonio; Vetten, Heinrich-Josef

    2012-01-01

    The current knowledge on viruses infecting asparagus (Asparagus officinalis) is reviewed. Over half a century, nine virus species belonging to the genera Ilarvirus, Cucumovirus, Nepovirus, Tobamovirus, Potexvirus, and Potyvirus have been found in this crop. The potyvirus Asparagus virus 1 (AV1) and the ilarvirus Asparagus virus 2 (AV2) are widespread and negatively affect the economic life of asparagus crops reducing yield and increasing the susceptibility to biotic and abiotic stress. The main properties and epidemiology of AV1 and AV2 as well as diagnostic techniques for their detection and identification are described. Minor viruses and control are briefly outlined.

  8. Viruses and marine pollution.

    PubMed

    Danovaro, R; Armeni, M; Corinaldesi, C; Mei, M L

    2003-03-01

    This short review summarises the present knowledge on pollutant impacts on marine viruses, virus-host systems and their potential ecological implications. Excess nutrients from sewage and river effluents are a primary cause of marine eutrophication and mucilage formation, often related to the development of large viral assemblages. At the same time, hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyl and pesticides alter ecosystem functioning and can determinate changes in the virus-host interactions, thus increasing the potential of viral infection. All these pollutants might have synergistic effects on the virus-host system and are able to induce prophage, thus increasing the impact of viruses on marine ecosystems.

  9. Equine influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Landolt, Gabriele A

    2014-12-01

    For decades the horse has been viewed as an isolated or "dead-end" host for influenza A viruses, with equine influenza virus being considered as relatively stable genetically. Although equine influenza viruses are genetically more stable than those of human lineage, they are by no means in evolutionary stasis. Moreover, recent transmission of equine-lineage influenza viruses to dogs also challenges the horse's status as a dead-end host. This article reviews recent developments in the epidemiology and evolution of equine influenza virus. In addition, the clinical presentation of equine influenza infection, diagnostic techniques, and vaccine recommendations are briefly summarized.

  10. Serodiagnosis for Tumor Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Brian J.; Labo, Nazzarena; Miley, Wendell J.; Whitby, Denise

    2015-01-01

    The known human tumor viruses include the DNA viruses Epstein-Barr virus, Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus, Merkel cell polyomavirus, human papillomavirus, and hepatitis B virus. RNA tumor viruses include Human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type-1 and hepatitis C virus. The serological identification of antigens/antibodies in plasma serum is a rapidly progressing field with utility for both scientists and clinicians. Serology is useful for conducting seroepidemiology studies and to inform on the pathogenesis and host immune response to a particular viral agent. Clinically, serology is useful for diagnosing current or past infection and for aiding in clinical management decisions. Serology is useful for screening blood donations for infectious agents and for monitoring the outcome of vaccination against these viruses. Serodiagnosis of human tumor viruses has improved in recent years with increased specificity and sensitivity of the assays, as well as reductions in cost and the ability to assess multiple antibody/antigens in single assays. Serodiagnosis of tumor viruses plays an important role in our understanding of the prevalence and transmission of these viruses and ultimately in the ability to develop treatments/preventions for these globally important diseases. PMID:25843726

  11. Virus transmission via food.

    PubMed

    Cliver, D O

    1997-01-01

    Viruses are transmitted to humans via foods as a result of direct or indirect contamination of the foods with human faeces. Viruses transmitted by a faecal-oral route are not strongly dependent on foods as vehicles of transmission, but viruses are important among agents of foodborne disease. Vehicles are most often molluscs from contaminated waters, but many other foods are contaminated directly by infected persons. The viruses most often foodborne are the hepatitis A virus and the Norwalk-like gastroenteritis viruses. Detection methods for these viruses in foods are very difficult and costly; the methods are not routine. Indicators that would rapidly and reliably suggest the presence of viral contamination of foods are still being sought. Contamination can be prevented by keeping faeces out of food or by treating vehicles such as water in order to inactivate virus that might be carried to food in this way. Virus cannot multiply in food, but can usually be inactivated by adequate heating. Other methods of inactivating viruses within a food are relatively unreliable, but viruses in water and on exposed surfaces can be inactivated with ultraviolet light or with strong oxidizing agents.

  12. Avian influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Won; Saif, Yehia M

    2009-07-01

    Avian influenza viruses do not typically replicate efficiently in humans, indicating direct transmission of avian influenza virus to humans is unlikely. However, since 1997, several cases of human infections with different subtypes (H5N1, H7N7, and H9N2) of avian influenza viruses have been identified and raised the pandemic potential of avian influenza virus in humans. Although circumstantial evidence of human to human transmission exists, the novel avian-origin influenza viruses isolated from humans lack the ability to transmit efficiently from person-to-person. However, the on-going human infection with avian-origin H5N1 viruses increases the likelihood of the generation of human-adapted avian influenza virus with pandemic potential. Thus, a better understanding of the biological and genetic basis of host restriction of influenza viruses is a critical factor in determining whether the introduction of a novel influenza virus into the human population will result in a pandemic. In this article, we review current knowledge of type A influenza virus in which all avian influenza viruses are categorized.

  13. Diagnostic significance of combined detection of Epstein-Barr virus antibodies, VCA/IgA, EA/IgA, Rta/IgG and EBNA1/IgA for nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yong-Lin; Li, Jun; Lu, Ai-Ying; Zheng, Yu-Ming; Zhong, Wei-Ming; Wang, Wei; Gao, Jian-Quan; Zeng, Hong; Cheng, Ji-Ru; Tang, Min-Zhong

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the diagnostic significance of EBV antibody combined detection for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) in a high incidence region of southern China. Two hundred and eleven untreated NPC patients, 203 non-NPC ENT patients, and 210 healthy controls were recruited for the study. The titers of VCA/IgA and EA/IgA were assessed by immunoenzyme assay, and the levels of Rta/IgG and EBNA1/IgA were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The levels of VCA/IgA, EA/IgA, Rta/IgG and EBNA1/ IgA demonstrated no association with gender or age (p>0.05). The receiver operating characteristic curve and the area under the curve were used to evaluate the diagnostic value. The sensitivity of VCA/IgA (98.1%) and the specificity of EA/IgA (98.5%) were the highest. When a logistic regression model was used to combine the results from multiple antibodies to increase the accuracy, the combination of VCA/IgA+Rta/IgG, whose area under the curve was 0.99, had the highest diagnostic efficiency, and its sensitivity, specificity and Youden index were 94.8%, 98.0% and 0.93 respectively. The data suggest that the combination of VCA/IgA+Rta/IgG may be most suitable for NPC serodiagnosis.

  14. Co-infection with Influenza Viruses and Influenza-Like Virus During the 2015/2016 Epidemic Season.

    PubMed

    Szymański, Karol; Cieślak, K; Kowalczyk, D; Brydak, L B

    2017-02-09

    Concerning viral infection of the respiratory system, a single virus can cause a variety of clinical symptoms and the same set of symptoms can be caused by different viruses. Moreover, infection is often caused by a combination of viruses acting at the same time. The present study demonstrates, using multiplex RT-PCR and real-time qRT-PCR, that in the 2015/2016 influenza season, co-infections were confirmed in patients aged 1 month to 90 years. We found 73 co-infections involving influenza viruses, 17 involving influenza viruses and influenza-like viruses, and six involving influenza-like viruses. The first type of co-infections above mentioned was the most common, amounting to 51 cases, with type A and B viruses occurring simultaneously. There also were four cases of co-infections with influenza virus A/H1N1/pdm09 and A/H1N1/ subtypes and two cases with A/H1N1/pdm09 and A/H3N2/ subtypes. The 2015/2016 epidemic season was characterized by a higher number of confirmed co-infections compared with the previous seasons. Infections by more than one respiratory virus were most often found in children and in individuals aged over 65.

  15. Virus, Oncolytic virus and Human Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guang Bin; Zhao, Liang; Zhang, Lifang; Zhao, Kong-Nan

    2016-12-15

    Prostate cancer (PCa), a disease, is characterized by abnormal cell growth in the prostate - a gland in the male reproductive system. PCa is one of the leading causes of cancer death among men of all races. Although older age and a family history of the disease have been recognized as the risk factors of PCa, the cause of this cancer remains unclear. Mounting evidence suggests that infections with various viruses are causally linked to PCa pathogenesis. Published studies have provided strong evidence that at least two viruses (RXMV and HPV) contribute to prostate tumourigenicity and impact on the survival of patients with malignant PCa. Traditional therapies including chemotherapy and radiotherapy are unable to distinguish cancer cells from normal cells, which are a significant drawback and leads to toxicities for PCa patients undergoing treatment. So far, few other options are available for treating patients with advanced PCa. Virotherapy is being developed to be a novel therapy for cancers, which uses oncotropic and oncolytic viruses with their abilities to find and destroy malignant cells in the body. For PCa treatment, oncolytic virotherapy appears to be much more attractive, which uses live viruses to selectively kill cancer cells. Oncolytic viruses can be genetically engineered to induce cancer cell lysis through virus replication and expression of cytotoxic proteins. As oncolytic viruses are a relatively new class of anti-cancer immunotherapy agents, several important barriers still exist on the road to the use of oncolytic viruses for PCa therapy. In this review, we first discuss the controversy of the contribution of virus infection to PCa, and subsequently summarize the development of oncolytic virotherapy for PCa in the past several years.

  16. Infection of phytoplankton by aerosolized marine viruses

    PubMed Central

    Sharoni, Shlomit; Trainic, Miri; Schatz, Daniella; Lehahn, Yoav; Flores, Michel J.; Bidle, Kay D.; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Rudich, Yinon; Vardi, Assaf

    2015-01-01

    Marine viruses constitute a major ecological and evolutionary driving force in the marine ecosystems. However, their dispersal mechanisms remain underexplored. Here we follow the dynamics of Emiliania huxleyi viruses (EhV) that infect the ubiquitous, bloom-forming phytoplankton E. huxleyi and show that EhV are emitted to the atmosphere as primary marine aerosols. Using a laboratory-based setup, we showed that the dynamic of EhV aerial emission is strongly coupled to the host–virus dynamic in the culture media. In addition, we recovered EhV DNA from atmospheric samples collected over an E. huxleyi bloom in the North Atlantic, providing evidence for aerosolization of marine viruses in their natural environment. Decay rate analysis in the laboratory revealed that aerosolized viruses can remain infective under meteorological conditions prevailing during E. huxleyi blooms in the ocean, allowing potential dispersal and infectivity over hundreds of kilometers. Based on the combined laboratory and in situ findings, we propose that atmospheric transport of EhV is an effective transmission mechanism for spreading viral infection over large areas in the ocean. This transmission mechanism may also have an important ecological impact on the large-scale host–virus “arms race” during bloom succession and consequently the turnover of carbon in the ocean. PMID:25964340

  17. Infection of phytoplankton by aerosolized marine viruses.

    PubMed

    Sharoni, Shlomit; Trainic, Miri; Schatz, Daniella; Lehahn, Yoav; Flores, Michel J; Bidle, Kay D; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Rudich, Yinon; Koren, Ilan; Vardi, Assaf

    2015-05-26

    Marine viruses constitute a major ecological and evolutionary driving force in the marine ecosystems. However, their dispersal mechanisms remain underexplored. Here we follow the dynamics of Emiliania huxleyi viruses (EhV) that infect the ubiquitous, bloom-forming phytoplankton E. huxleyi and show that EhV are emitted to the atmosphere as primary marine aerosols. Using a laboratory-based setup, we showed that the dynamic of EhV aerial emission is strongly coupled to the host-virus dynamic in the culture media. In addition, we recovered EhV DNA from atmospheric samples collected over an E. huxleyi bloom in the North Atlantic, providing evidence for aerosolization of marine viruses in their natural environment. Decay rate analysis in the laboratory revealed that aerosolized viruses can remain infective under meteorological conditions prevailing during E. huxleyi blooms in the ocean, allowing potential dispersal and infectivity over hundreds of kilometers. Based on the combined laboratory and in situ findings, we propose that atmospheric transport of EhV is an effective transmission mechanism for spreading viral infection over large areas in the ocean. This transmission mechanism may also have an important ecological impact on the large-scale host-virus "arms race" during bloom succession and consequently the turnover of carbon in the ocean.

  18. Prevalence and pattern of neuropsychological impairment in human immunodeficiency virus-infected/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) patients across pre- and post-highly active antiretroviral therapy eras: a combined study of two cohorts.

    PubMed

    Cysique, Lucette A; Maruff, Paul; Brew, Bruce J

    2004-12-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence and pattern of neuropsychological impairment in cohorts of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals across pre- and post-HAART (highly active antiretroviral therapy) eras. Two cohorts of HIV-infected individuals attending tertiary referral hospital outpatient clinics were studied. The cohorts represented two eras of antiretroviral medication: monotherapy (n = 51) and HAART (n = 90). Each was compared in nine neuropsychological domains in regard to the prevalence as well as pattern of neuropsychological impairment. Because the authors intended to characterize the prevalence and pattern of neuropsychological deficits in nondemented advanced HIV-infected individuals, patients with a current diagnosis of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) dementia complex were not included. The prevalence of impairment was not significantly different across pre-HAART and HAART eras using a standard criterion to define impairment: -2 SD in two neuropsychological measures (41.1%/38.8%). Prevalence of deficits was not significantly reduced in patients with undetectable plasma viral load. The pattern of neuropsychological impairment was different across pre-HAART and HAART eras, with an improvement in attention, verbal fluency, visuoconstruction deficits, but a deterioration in learning efficiency and complex attention. This change remained even in patients with an undetectable plasma viral load, although the severity was partially diminished. Neuropsychological deficits remain common in the HAART era, essentially uninfluenced by HAART. The finding that some neuropsychological functions are improving while other are deteriorating indicates that these deficits do not reflect "burnt out" damage but rather that there is an active intracerebral process occurring, the nature of which is still to be determined.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: ZAP70-related severe combined immunodeficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... combined immunodeficiency, a group of disorders with several genetic causes. Children with SCID lack virtually all immune protection from bacteria, viruses, and fungi. They are prone to repeated and persistent infections ...

  20. [The great virus comeback].

    PubMed

    Forterre, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Viruses have been considered for a long time as by-products of biological evolution. This view is changing now as a result of several recent discoveries. Viral ecologists have shown that viral particles are the most abundant biological entities on our planet, whereas metagenomic analyses have revealed an unexpected abundance and diversity of viral genes in the biosphere. Comparative genomics have highlighted the uniqueness of viral sequences, in contradiction with the traditional view of viruses as pickpockets of cellular genes. On the contrary, cellular genomes, especially eukaryotic ones, turned out to be full of genes derived from viruses or related elements (plasmids, transposons, retroelements and so on). The discovery of unusual viruses infecting archaea has shown that the viral world is much more diverse than previously thought, ruining the traditional dichotomy between bacteriophages and viruses. Finally, the discovery of giant viruses has blurred the traditional image of viruses as small entities. Furthermore, essential clues on virus history have been obtained in the last ten years. In particular, structural analyses of capsid proteins have uncovered deeply rooted homologies between viruses infecting different cellular domains, suggesting that viruses originated before the last universal common ancestor (LUCA). These studies have shown that several lineages of viruses originated independently, i.e., viruses are polyphyletic. From the time of LUCA, viruses have coevolved with their hosts, and viral lineages can be viewed as lianas wrapping around the trunk, branches and leaves of the tree of life. Although viruses are very diverse, with genomes encoding from one to more than one thousand proteins, they can all be simply defined as organisms producing virions. Virions themselves can be defined as infectious particles made of at least one protein associated with the viral nucleic acid, endowed with the capability to protect the viral genome and ensure its

  1. Other Viruses and Viruslike Agents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The diseases reported under 'Virus and Virus-like Agents' in the first volume of this compendium, with the exception of Cherry rasp leaf virus and Rubus chinese seed-borne virus, should be considered oddities since there are no known type isolates available for these reported viruses. Without a po...

  2. Postmortem stability of Ebola virus.

    PubMed

    Prescott, Joseph; Bushmaker, Trenton; Fischer, Robert; Miazgowicz, Kerri; Judson, Seth; Munster, Vincent J

    2015-05-01

    The ongoing Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa has highlighted questions regarding stability of the virus and detection of RNA from corpses. We used Ebola virus-infected macaques to model humans who died of Ebola virus disease. Viable virus was isolated <7 days posteuthanasia; viral RNA was detectable for 10 weeks.

  3. RNA Viruses Infecting Pest Insects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RNA viruses are viruses whose genetic material is ribonucleic acid (RNA). RNA viruses may be double or single-stranded based on the type of RNA they contain. Single-stranded RNA viruses can be further grouped into negative sense or positive-sense viruses according to the polarity of their RNA. Fur...

  4. Infectious laryngotracheitis virus in chickens

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Shan-Chia; Giambrone, Joseph J

    2012-01-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is an important respiratory disease of chickens and annually causes significant economic losses in the poultry industry world-wide. ILT virus (ILTV) belongs to alphaherpesvirinae and the Gallid herpesvirus 1 species. The transmission of ILTV is via respiratory and ocular routes. Clinical and post-mortem signs of ILT can be separated into two forms according to its virulence. The characteristic of the severe form is bloody mucus in the trachea with high mortality. The mild form causes nasal discharge, conjunctivitis, and reduced weight gain and egg production. Conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR), nested PCR, real-time PCR, and loop-mediated isothermal amplification were developed to detect ILTV samples from natural or experimentally infected birds. The PCR combined with restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) can separate ILTVs into several genetic groups. These groups can separate vaccine from wild type field viruses. Vaccination is a common method to prevent ILT. However, field isolates and vaccine viruses can establish latent infected carriers. According to PCR-RFLP results, virulent field ILTVs can be derived from modified-live vaccines. Therefore, modified-live vaccine reversion provides a source for ILT outbreaks on chicken farms. Two recently licensed commercial recombinant ILT vaccines are also in use. Other recombinant and gene-deficient vaccine candidates are in the developmental stages. They offer additional hope for the control of this disease. However, in ILT endemic regions, improved biosecurity and management practices are critical for improved ILT control. PMID:24175219

  5. Virus Removal by Biogenic Cerium

    SciTech Connect

    De Gusseme, B.; Du Laing, G; Hennebel, T; Renard, P; Chidambaram, D; Fitts, J; Bruneel, E; Van Driessche, I; Verbeken, K; et. al.

    2010-01-01

    The rare earth element cerium has been known to exert antifungal and antibacterial properties in the oxidation states +III and +IV. This study reports on an innovative strategy for virus removal in drinking water by the combination of Ce(III) on a bacterial carrier matrix. The biogenic cerium (bio-Ce) was produced by addition of aqueous Ce(III) to actively growing cultures of either freshwater manganese-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) Leptothrix discophora or Pseudomonas putida MnB29. X-ray absorption spectroscopy results indicated that Ce remained in its trivalent state on the bacterial surface. The spectra were consistent with Ce(III) ions associated with the phosphoryl groups of the bacterial cell wall. In disinfection assays using a bacteriophage as model, it was demonstrated that bio-Ce exhibited antiviral properties. A 4.4 log decrease of the phage was observed after 2 h of contact with 50 mg L{sup -1} bio-Ce. Given the fact that virus removal with 50 mg L{sup -1} Ce(III) as CeNO{sub 3} was lower, the presence of the bacterial carrier matrix in bio-Ce significantly enhanced virus removal.

  6. Proteomic Analysis of Virus-Host Interactions in an Infectious Context Using Recombinant Viruses*

    PubMed Central

    Komarova, Anastassia V.; Combredet, Chantal; Meyniel-Schicklin, Laurène; Chapelle, Manuel; Caignard, Grégory; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Lotteau, Vincent; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Tangy, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    RNA viruses exhibit small-sized genomes encoding few proteins, but still establish complex networks of interactions with host cell components to achieve replication and spreading. Ideally, these virus-host protein interactions should be mapped directly in infected cell culture, but such a high standard is often difficult to reach when using conventional approaches. We thus developed a new strategy based on recombinant viruses expressing tagged viral proteins to capture both direct and indirect physical binding partners during infection. As a proof of concept, we engineered a recombinant measles virus (MV) expressing one of its virulence factors, the MV-V protein, with a One-STrEP amino-terminal tag. This allowed virus-host protein complex analysis directly from infected cells by combining modified tandem affinity chromatography and mass spectrometry analysis. Using this approach, we established a prosperous list of 245 cellular proteins interacting either directly or indirectly with MV-V, and including four of the nine already known partners of this viral factor. These interactions were highly specific of MV-V because they were not recovered when the nucleoprotein MV-N, instead of MV-V, was tagged. Besides key components of the antiviral response, cellular proteins from mitochondria, ribosomes, endoplasmic reticulum, protein phosphatase 2A, and histone deacetylase complex were identified for the first time as prominent targets of MV-V and the critical role of the later protein family in MV replication was addressed. Most interestingly, MV-V showed some preferential attachment to essential proteins in the human interactome network, as assessed by centrality and interconnectivity measures. Furthermore, the list of MV-V interactors also showed a massive enrichment for well-known targets of other viruses. Altogether, this clearly supports our approach based on reverse genetics of viruses combined with high-throughput proteomics to probe the interaction network that

  7. Constructing computer virus phylogenies

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, L.A.; Goldberg, P.W.; Phillips, C.A.; Sorkin, G.B.

    1996-03-01

    There has been much recent algorithmic work on the problem of reconstructing the evolutionary history of biological species. Computer virus specialists are interested in finding the evolutionary history of computer viruses--a virus is often written using code fragments from one or more other viruses, which are its immediate ancestors. A phylogeny for a collection of computer viruses is a directed acyclic graph whose nodes are the viruses and whose edges map ancestors to descendants and satisfy the property that each code fragment is ``invented`` only once. To provide a simple explanation for the data, we consider the problem of constructing such a phylogeny with a minimal number of edges. In general, this optimization problem cannot be solved in quasi-polynomial time unless NQP=QP; we present positive and negative results for associated approximated problems. When tree solutions exist, they can be constructed and randomly sampled in polynomial time.

  8. Filamentous Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Badham, Matthew D.; Rossman, Jeremy S.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus is a pathogen of global medical importance causing significant health and socio-economic costs every year. Influenza virus is an unusual pathogen in that it is pleomorphic, capable of forming virions ranging in shape from spherical to filamentous. Despite decades of research on the influenza virus, much remains unknown about the formation of filamentous influenza viruses and their role in the viral replication cycle. Here, we discuss what is known about influenza virus assembly and budding, focusing on the viral and host factors that are involved in the determination of viral morphology. Whilst the biological function of the filamentous morphology remains unknown, recent results suggest a role in facilitating viral spread in vivo. We discuss these results and speculate on the consequences of viral morphology during influenza virus infection of the human respiratory tract. PMID:28042529

  9. Viruses in Antarctic lakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kepner, R. L. Jr; Wharton, R. A. Jr; Suttle, C. A.; Wharton RA, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Water samples collected from four perennially ice-covered Antarctic lakes during the austral summer of 1996-1997 contained high densities of extracellular viruses. Many of these viruses were found to be morphologically similar to double-stranded DNA viruses that are known to infect algae and protozoa. These constitute the first observations of viruses in perennially ice-covered polar lakes. The abundance of planktonic viruses and data suggesting substantial production potential (relative to bacteria] secondary and photosynthetic primary production) indicate that viral lysis may be a major factor in the regulation of microbial populations in these extreme environments. Furthermore, we suggest that Antarctic lakes may be a reservoir of previously undescribed viruses that possess novel biological and biochemical characteristics.

  10. Viruses of lower vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Essbauer, S; Ahne, W

    2001-08-01

    Viruses of lower vertebrates recently became a field of interest to the public due to increasing epizootics and economic losses of poikilothermic animals. These were reported worldwide from both wildlife and collections of aquatic poikilothermic animals. Several RNA and DNA viruses infecting fish, amphibians and reptiles have been studied intensively during the last 20 years. Many of these viruses induce diseases resulting in important economic losses of lower vertebrates, especially in fish aquaculture. In addition, some of the DNA viruses seem to be emerging pathogens involved in the worldwide decline in wildlife. Irido-, herpes- and polyomavirus infections may be involved in the reduction in the numbers of endangered amphibian and reptile species. In this context the knowledge of several important RNA viruses such as orthomyxo-, paramyxo-, rhabdo-, retro-, corona-, calici-, toga-, picorna-, noda-, reo- and birnaviruses, and DNA viruses such as parvo-, irido-, herpes-, adeno-, polyoma- and poxviruses, is described in this review.

  11. Water system virus detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, A. S.; Wells, A. F.; Tenoso, H. J. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    The performance of a waste water reclamation system is monitored by introducing a non-pathogenic marker virus, bacteriophage F2, into the waste-water prior to treatment and, thereafter, testing the reclaimed water for the presence of the marker virus. A test sample is first concentrated by absorbing any marker virus onto a cellulose acetate filter in the presence of a trivalent cation at low pH and then flushing the filter with a limited quantity of a glycine buffer solution to desorb any marker virus present on the filter. Photo-optical detection of indirect passive immune agglutination by polystyrene beads indicates the performance of the water reclamation system in removing the marker virus. A closed system provides for concentrating any marker virus, initiating and monitoring the passive immune agglutination reaction, and then flushing the system to prepare for another sample.

  12. Viruses within animal genomes.

    PubMed

    De Brognier, A; Willems, L

    2016-04-01

    Viruses and their hosts can co-evolve to reach a fragile equilibrium that allows the survival of both. An excess of pathogenicity in the absence of a reservoir would be detrimental to virus survival. A significant proportion of all animal genomes has been shaped by the insertion of viruses that subsequently became 'fossilised'. Most endogenous viruses have lost the capacity to replicate via an infectious cycle and now replicate passively. The insertion of endogenous viruses has contributed to the evolution of animal genomes, for example in the reproductive biology of mammals. However, spontaneous viral integration still occasionally occurs in a number of virus-host systems. This constitutes a potential risk to host survival but also provides an opportunity for diversification and evolution.

  13. DNA Virus Replication Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Melanie; Speiseder, Thomas; Dobner, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Viruses employ a variety of strategies to usurp and control cellular activities through the orchestrated recruitment of macromolecules to specific cytoplasmic or nuclear compartments. Formation of such specialized virus-induced cellular microenvironments, which have been termed viroplasms, virus factories, or virus replication centers, complexes, or compartments, depends on molecular interactions between viral and cellular factors that participate in viral genome expression and replication and are in some cases associated with sites of virion assembly. These virus-induced compartments function not only to recruit and concentrate factors required for essential steps of the viral replication cycle but also to control the cellular mechanisms of antiviral defense. In this review, we summarize characteristic features of viral replication compartments from different virus families and discuss similarities in the viral and cellular activities that are associated with their assembly and the functions they facilitate for viral replication. PMID:24257611

  14. Mechanical properties of viruses.

    PubMed

    de Pablo, Pedro J; Mateu, Mauricio G

    2013-01-01

    Structural biology techniques have greatly contributed to unveil the relationships between structure, properties and functions of viruses. In recent years, classic structural approaches are being complemented by single-molecule techniques such as atomic force microscopy and optical tweezers to study physical properties and functions of viral particles that are not accessible to classic structural techniques. Among these features are mechanical properties such as stiffness, intrinsic elasticity, tensile strength and material fatigue. The field of virus mechanics is contributing to materials science by investigating some physical parameters of "soft" biological matter and biological nano-objects. Virus mechanics studies are also starting to unveil the biological implications of physical properties of viruses. Growing evidence indicate that viruses are subjected to internal and external forces, and that they may have adapted to withstand and even use those forces. This chapter describes what is known on the mechanical properties of virus particles, their structural determinants, and possible biological implications, of which several examples are provided.

  15. Experimental tests of host-virus coevolution in natural killer yeast strains.

    PubMed

    Pieczynska, M D; Korona, R; De Visser, J A G M

    2017-04-01

    Fungi may carry cytoplasmic viruses that encode anticompetitor toxins. These so-called killer viruses may provide competitive benefits to their host, but also incur metabolic costs associated with viral replication, toxin production and immunity. Mechanisms responsible for the stable maintenance of these endosymbionts are insufficiently understood. Here, we test whether co-adaptation of host and killer virus underlies their stable maintenance in seven natural and one laboratory strain of the genus Saccharomyces. We employ cross-transfection of killer viruses, all encoding the K1-type toxin, to test predictions from host-virus co-adaptation. These tests support local adaptation of hosts and/or their killer viruses. First, new host-virus combinations have strongly reduced killing ability against a standard sensitive strain when compared with re-constructed native combinations. Second, viruses are more likely to be lost from new than from original hosts upon repeated bottlenecking or the application of stressful conditions. Third, host fitness is increased after the re-introduction of native viruses, but decreased after the introduction of new viruses. Finally, rather than a trade-off, original combinations show a positive correlation between killing ability and fitness. Together, these results suggest that natural yeast killer strains and their viruses have co-adapted, allowing the transition from a parasitic to a mutualistic symbiosis.

  16. Hemagglutinin-esterase-fusion (HEF) protein of influenza C virus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingyang; Veit, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Influenza C virus, a member of the Orthomyxoviridae family, causes flu-like disease but typically only with mild symptoms. Humans are the main reservoir of the virus, but it also infects pigs and dogs. Very recently, influenza C-like viruses were isolated from pigs and cattle that differ from classical influenza C virus and might constitute a new influenza virus genus. Influenza C virus is unique since it contains only one spike protein, the hemagglutinin-esterase-fusion glycoprotein HEF that possesses receptor binding, receptor destroying and membrane fusion activities, thus combining the functions of Hemagglutinin (HA) and Neuraminidase (NA) of influenza A and B viruses. Here we briefly review the epidemiology and pathology of the virus and the morphology of virus particles and their genome. The main focus is on the structure of the HEF protein as well as on its co- and post-translational modification, such as N-glycosylation, disulfide bond formation, S-acylation and proteolytic cleavage into HEF1 and HEF2 subunits. Finally, we describe the functions of HEF: receptor binding, esterase activity and membrane fusion.

  17. The human oncogenic viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Luderer, A.A.; Weetall, H.H

    1986-01-01

    This book contains eight selections. The titles are: Cytogenetics of the Leukemias and Lymphomas; Cytogenetics of Solid Tumors: Renal Cell Carcinoma, Malignant Melanoma, Retinoblastoma, and Wilms' Tumor; Elucidation of a Normal Function for a Human Proto-Oncogene; Detection of HSV-2 Genes and Gene Products in Cervical Neoplasia; Papillomaviruses in Anogennital Neoplasms; Human Epstein-Barr Virus and Cancer; Hepatitis B Virus and Hepatocellular Carcinoma; and Kaposi's Sarcoma: Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and Associated Viruses.

  18. Zika virus infection.

    PubMed

    Pougnet, Laurence; Thill, Chloé; Pougnet, Richard; Auvinet, Henri; Giacardi, Christophe; Drouillard, Isabelle

    2016-12-01

    A 21-year old woman from New-Caledonia had 40 ̊C fever with vomiting, arthralgia, myalgia, and measles-like rash. Etiological analyses showed primary infection with Zika virus. Because of severe clinical presentation, she was hospitalized in the intensive care unit of the Brest military Hospital. Zika virus is mainly transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes. If they settle in Metropolitan France, Zika virus might also spread there.

  19. Thermal Inactivation of Viruses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-10-01

    Hammon. 1966. Studies on Japanese B encephalitis virus vaccines from tissue culture. VI. Development of a hamster kidney tissue culture inactivated... tissue culture passage, storage, temperature and drying on viability of SE polyoma virus. Exper. Biol. and Hed. Proc. of the Soc. for Exper. Biol...studies of heated tissue suspensions containing foot- and-mouth disease virus. Amer. J. Vet. Res. 20:510-521. Dupre’, M. V., and M. Frobisher. 1966

  20. Broadband Respiratory Virus Surveillance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    HSV – Herpes Simplex Virus LOD – Limit of Detection PCR – Polymerase Chain Reaction PIV – Parainfluenza viruses 37 PRMS – Pacific Regional Medical...the RVS assay was determined by testing 109 pre-characterized samples collected at TAMC. This included 20 adenovirus, 20 RSV, 20 PIV, 19 Herpes ... Simplex Virus (HSV) and 19 Enterovirus 7 positive as well as 11 HSV negative specimens as determined by the TAMC Department of Pathology’s current gold

  1. Virus World as an Evolutionary Network of Viruses and Capsidless Selfish Elements

    PubMed Central

    Dolja, Valerian V.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Viruses were defined as one of the two principal types of organisms in the biosphere, namely, as capsid-encoding organisms in contrast to ribosome-encoding organisms, i.e., all cellular life forms. Structurally similar, apparently homologous capsids are present in a huge variety of icosahedral viruses that infect bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes. These findings prompted the concept of the capsid as the virus “self” that defines the identity of deep, ancient viral lineages. However, several other widespread viral “hallmark genes” encode key components of the viral replication apparatus (such as polymerases and helicases) and combine with different capsid proteins, given the inherently modular character of viral evolution. Furthermore, diverse, widespread, capsidless selfish genetic elements, such as plasmids and various types of transposons, share hallmark genes with viruses. Viruses appear to have evolved from capsidless selfish elements, and vice versa, on multiple occasions during evolution. At the earliest, precellular stage of life's evolution, capsidless genetic parasites most likely emerged first and subsequently gave rise to different classes of viruses. In this review, we develop the concept of a greater virus world which forms an evolutionary network that is held together by shared conserved genes and includes both bona fide capsid-encoding viruses and different classes of capsidless replicons. Theoretical studies indicate that selfish replicons (genetic parasites) inevitably emerge in any sufficiently complex evolving ensemble of replicators. Therefore, the key signature of the greater virus world is not the presence of a capsid but rather genetic, informational parasitism itself, i.e., various degrees of reliance on the information processing systems of the host. PMID:24847023

  2. Virus world as an evolutionary network of viruses and capsidless selfish elements.

    PubMed

    Koonin, Eugene V; Dolja, Valerian V

    2014-06-01

    Viruses were defined as one of the two principal types of organisms in the biosphere, namely, as capsid-encoding organisms in contrast to ribosome-encoding organisms, i.e., all cellular life forms. Structurally similar, apparently homologous capsids are present in a huge variety of icosahedral viruses that infect bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes. These findings prompted the concept of the capsid as the virus "self" that defines the identity of deep, ancient viral lineages. However, several other widespread viral "hallmark genes" encode key components of the viral replication apparatus (such as polymerases and helicases) and combine with different capsid proteins, given the inherently modular character of viral evolution. Furthermore, diverse, widespread, capsidless selfish genetic elements, such as plasmids and various types of transposons, share hallmark genes with viruses. Viruses appear to have evolved from capsidless selfish elements, and vice versa, on multiple occasions during evolution. At the earliest, precellular stage of life's evolution, capsidless genetic parasites most likely emerged first and subsequently gave rise to different classes of viruses. In this review, we develop the concept of a greater virus world which forms an evolutionary network that is held together by shared conserved genes and includes both bona fide capsid-encoding viruses and different classes of capsidless replicons. Theoretical studies indicate that selfish replicons (genetic parasites) inevitably emerge in any sufficiently complex evolving ensemble of replicators. Therefore, the key signature of the greater virus world is not the presence of a capsid but rather genetic, informational parasitism itself, i.e., various degrees of reliance on the information processing systems of the host.

  3. Cowpea viruses: Effect of single and mixed infections on symptomatology and virus concentration

    PubMed Central

    Taiwo, Moni A; Kareem, Kehinde T; Nsa, Imade Y; D'A Hughes, Jackies

    2007-01-01

    Natural multiple viral infections of cultivated cowpeas have been reported in Nigeria. In this study, three Nigerian commercial cowpea cultivars ("Olo 11", "Oloyin" and "White") and two lines from the IITA (IT86D- 719 and TVU 76) were mechanically inoculated with Cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus (CABMV), Bean southern mosaic virus (SBMV) and Cowpea mottle virus (CMeV) singly, as well as in all possible combinations at 10, 20 and 30 days after planting (DAP). Samples of leaves or stems were collected at 10, 20 and 30 days after inoculation (DAI) and analyzed for relative virus concentration by Enzyme-Linked Immunosrbent Assay. All the cultivars and lines {CVS/L} were susceptible to the viruses but the commercial CVS showed more severe symptoms and had relatively higher viral concentration. In single virus infections, CABMV which induced the most severe symptoms had absorbance values (at 405 nm) of 0.11 to 0.46 while SBMV and CMeV which induced moderate symptoms had virus titre of 0.74 to 1.99 and 0.11 to 0.90 respectively. Plants inoculated 10 DAP had significantly higher virus concentration than those inoculated 30 DAP. In mixed infections involving CABMV (10 DAP) apical necrosis and death were observed in commercial cultivars "Olo 11" and "White". Enhancement of CMeV titers were observed in plants infected with CMeV + CABMV. Multiple viral infections of cowpeas may result in complete yield loss, hence, the availability of seeds of cultivars with a high level of multiple virus resistance is recommended as a means of control. PMID:17900355

  4. Interim Report on SNP analysis and forensic microarray probe design for South American hemorrhagic fever viruses, tick-borne encephalitis virus, henipaviruses, Old World Arenaviruses, filoviruses, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever viruses, Rift Valley fever

    SciTech Connect

    Jaing, C; Gardner, S

    2012-06-05

    The goal of this project is to develop forensic genotyping assays for select agent viruses, enhancing the current capabilities for the viral bioforensics and law enforcement community. We used a multipronged approach combining bioinformatics analysis, PCR-enriched samples, microarrays and TaqMan assays to develop high resolution and cost effective genotyping methods for strain level forensic discrimination of viruses. We have leveraged substantial experience and efficiency gained through year 1 on software development, SNP discovery, TaqMan signature design and phylogenetic signature mapping to scale up the development of forensics signatures in year 2. In this report, we have summarized the whole genome wide SNP analysis and microarray probe design for forensics characterization of South American hemorrhagic fever viruses, tick-borne encephalitis viruses and henipaviruses, Old World Arenaviruses, filoviruses, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, Rift Valley fever virus and Japanese encephalitis virus.

  5. Rabies virus receptors.

    PubMed

    Lafon, Monique

    2005-02-01

    There is convincing in vitro evidence that the muscular form of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR), the neuronal cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), and the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) bind rabies virus and/or facilitate rabies virus entry into cells. Other components of the cell membrane, such as gangliosides, may also participate in the entry of rabies virus. However, little is known of the role of these molecules in vivo. This review proposes a speculative model that accounts for the role of these different molecules in entry and trafficking of rabies virus into the nervous system.

  6. Water system virus detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, A. S.; Wells, A. F.; Tenoso, H. J.

    1975-01-01

    A monitoring system developed to test the capability of a water recovery system to reject the passage of viruses into the recovered water is described. A nonpathogenic marker virus, bacteriophage F2, is fed into the process stream before the recovery unit and the reclaimed water is assayed for its presence. Detection of the marker virus consists of two major components, concentration and isolation of the marker virus, and detection of the marker virus. The concentration system involves adsorption of virus to cellulose acetate filters in the presence of trivalent cations and low pH with subsequent desorption of the virus using volumes of high pH buffer. The detection of the virus is performed by a passive immune agglutination test utilizing specially prepared polystyrene particles. An engineering preliminary design was performed as a parallel effort to the laboratory development of the marker virus test system. Engineering schematics and drawings of a fully functional laboratory prototype capable of zero-G operation are presented. The instrument consists of reagent pump/metering system, reagent storage containers, a filter concentrator, an incubation/detector system, and an electronic readout and control system.

  7. Viruses infecting marine molluscs.

    PubMed

    Arzul, Isabelle; Corbeil, Serge; Morga, Benjamin; Renault, Tristan

    2017-02-09

    Although a wide range of viruses have been reported in marine molluscs, most of these reports rely on ultrastructural examination and few of these viruses have been fully characterized. The lack of marine mollusc cell lines restricts virus isolation capacities and subsequent characterization works. Our current knowledge is mostly restricted to viruses affecting farmed species such as oysters Crassostrea gigas, abalone Haliotis diversicolor supertexta or the scallop Chlamys farreri. Molecular approaches which are needed to identify virus affiliation have been carried out for a small number of viruses, most of them belonging to the Herpesviridae and birnaviridae families. These last years, the use of New Generation Sequencing approach has allowed increasing the number of sequenced viral genomes and has improved our capacity to investigate the diversity of viruses infecting marine molluscs. This new information has in turn allowed designing more efficient diagnostic tools. Moreover, the development of experimental infection protocols has answered some questions regarding the pathogenesis of these viruses and their interactions with their hosts. Control and management of viral diseases in molluscs mostly involve active surveillance, implementation of effective bio security measures and development of breeding programs. However factors triggering pathogen development and the life cycle and status of the viruses outside their mollusc hosts still need further investigations.

  8. FAQ: General Questions about West Nile Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Public Service Videos General Questions About West Nile Virus Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On This ... West Nile virus cases? What is West Nile virus? West Nile virus is an arthropod-borne virus ( ...

  9. Reverse genetics in high throughput: rapid generation of complete negative strand RNA virus cDNA clones and recombinant viruses thereof

    PubMed Central

    Nolden, T.; Pfaff, F.; Nemitz, S.; Freuling, C. M.; Höper, D.; Müller, T.; Finke, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Reverse genetics approaches are indispensable tools for proof of concepts in virus replication and pathogenesis. For negative strand RNA viruses (NSVs) the limited number of infectious cDNA clones represents a bottleneck as clones are often generated from cell culture adapted or attenuated viruses, with limited potential for pathogenesis research. We developed a system in which cDNA copies of complete NSV genomes were directly cloned into reverse genetics vectors by linear-to-linear RedE/T recombination. Rapid cloning of multiple rabies virus (RABV) full length genomes and identification of clones identical to field virus consensus sequence confirmed the approache’s reliability. Recombinant viruses were recovered from field virus cDNA clones. Similar growth kinetics of parental and recombinant viruses, preservation of field virus characters in cell type specific replication and virulence in the mouse model were confirmed. Reduced titers after reporter gene insertion indicated that the low level of field virus replication is affected by gene insertions. The flexibility of the strategy was demonstrated by cloning multiple copies of an orthobunyavirus L genome segment. This important step in reverse genetics technology development opens novel avenues for the analysis of virus variability combined with phenotypical characterization of recombinant viruses at a clonal level. PMID:27046474

  10. Reverse genetics in high throughput: rapid generation of complete negative strand RNA virus cDNA clones and recombinant viruses thereof.

    PubMed

    Nolden, T; Pfaff, F; Nemitz, S; Freuling, C M; Höper, D; Müller, T; Finke, Stefan

    2016-04-05

    Reverse genetics approaches are indispensable tools for proof of concepts in virus replication and pathogenesis. For negative strand RNA viruses (NSVs) the limited number of infectious cDNA clones represents a bottleneck as clones are often generated from cell culture adapted or attenuated viruses, with limited potential for pathogenesis research. We developed a system in which cDNA copies of complete NSV genomes were directly cloned into reverse genetics vectors by linear-to-linear RedE/T recombination. Rapid cloning of multiple rabies virus (RABV) full length genomes and identification of clones identical to field virus consensus sequence confirmed the approache's reliability. Recombinant viruses were recovered from field virus cDNA clones. Similar growth kinetics of parental and recombinant viruses, preservation of field virus characters in cell type specific replication and virulence in the mouse model were confirmed. Reduced titers after reporter gene insertion indicated that the low level of field virus replication is affected by gene insertions. The flexibility of the strategy was demonstrated by cloning multiple copies of an orthobunyavirus L genome segment. This important step in reverse genetics technology development opens novel avenues for the analysis of virus variability combined with phenotypical characterization of recombinant viruses at a clonal level.

  11. A human papilloma virus testing algorithm comprising a combination of the L1 broad-spectrum SPF10 PCR assay and a novel E6 high-risk multiplex type-specific genotyping PCR assay.

    PubMed

    van Alewijk, Dirk; Kleter, Bernhard; Vent, Maarten; Delroisse, Jean-Marc; de Koning, Maurits; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Quint, Wim; Colau, Brigitte

    2013-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) epidemiological and vaccine studies require highly sensitive HPV detection and genotyping systems. To improve HPV detection by PCR, the broad-spectrum L1-based SPF10 PCR DNA enzyme immunoassay (DEIA) LiPA system and a novel E6-based multiplex type-specific system (MPTS123) that uses Luminex xMAP technology were combined into a new testing algorithm. To evaluate this algorithm, cervical swabs (n = 860) and cervical biopsy specimens (n = 355) were tested, with a focus on HPV types detected by the MPTS123 assay (types 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59, 66, 68, 6, and 11). Among the HPV-positive samples, identifications of individual HPV genotypes were compared. When all MPTS123 targeted genotypes were considered together, good overall agreement was found (κ = 0.801, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.784 to 0.818) with identification by SPF10 LiPA, but significantly more genotypes (P < 0.0001) were identified by the MPTS123 PCR Luminex assay, especially for HPV types 16, 35, 39, 45, 58, and 59. An alternative type-specific assay was evaluated that is based on detection of a limited number of HPV genotypes by type-specific PCR and a reverse hybridization assay (MPTS12 RHA). This assay showed results similar to those of the expanded MPTS123 Luminex assay. These results confirm the fact that broad-spectrum PCRs are hampered by type competition when multiple HPV genotypes are present in the same sample. Therefore, a testing algorithm combining the broad-spectrum PCR and a range of type-specific PCRs can offer a highly accurate method for the analysis of HPV infections and diminish the rate of false-negative results and may be particularly useful for epidemiological and vaccine studies.

  12. A systems biology approach to the evolution of plant-virus interactions.

    PubMed

    Elena, Santiago F; Carrera, Javier; Rodrigo, Guillermo

    2011-08-01

    Omic approaches to the analysis of plant-virus interactions are becoming increasingly popular. These types of data, in combination with models of interaction networks, will aid in revealing not only host components that are important for the virus life cycle, but also general patterns about the way in which different viruses manipulate host regulation of gene expression for their own benefit and possible mechanisms by which viruses evade host defenses. Here, we review studies identifying host genes regulated by viruses and discuss how these genes integrate in host regulatory and interaction networks, with a particular focus on the physical properties of these networks.

  13. Nano-optofluidic detection of single viruses and nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Anirban; Deutsch, Bradley; Ignatovich, Filipp; Dykes, Carrie; Novotny, Lukas

    2010-03-23

    The reliable detection, sizing, and sorting of viruses and nanoparticles is important for biosensing, environmental monitoring, and quality control. Here we introduce an optical detection scheme for the real-time and label-free detection and recognition of single viruses and larger proteins. The method makes use of nanofluidic channels in combination with optical interferometry. Elastically scattered light from single viruses traversing a stationary laser focus is detected with a differential heterodyne interferometer and the resulting signal allows single viruses to be characterized individually. Heterodyne detection eliminates phase variations due to different particle trajectories, thus improving the recognition accuracy as compared to standard optical interferometry. We demonstrate the practicality of our approach by resolving nanoparticles of various sizes, and detecting and recognizing different species of human viruses from a mixture. The detection system can be readily integrated into larger nanofluidic architectures for practical applications.

  14. Hepatitis C virus: Promising discoveries and new treatments

    PubMed Central

    Bastos, Juliana Cristina Santiago; Padilla, Marina Aiello; Caserta, Leonardo Cardia; Miotto, Noelle; Vigani, Aline Gonzalez; Arns, Clarice Weis

    2016-01-01

    Despite advances in therapy, hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection remains an important global health issue. It is estimated that a significant part of the world population is chronically infected with the virus, and many of those affected may develop cirrhosis or liver cancer. The virus shows considerable variability, a characteristic that directly interferes with disease treatment. The response to treatment varies according to HCV genotype and subtype. The continuous generation of variants (quasispecies) allows the virus to escape control by antivirals. Historically, the combination of ribavirin and interferon therapy has represented the only treatment option for the disease. Currently, several new treatment options are emerging and are available to a large part of the affected population. In addition, the search for new substances with antiviral activity against HCV continues, promising future improvements in treatment. Researchers should consider the mutation capacity of the virus and the other variables that affect treatment success. PMID:27605875

  15. West Nile virus ecology in a tropical ecosystem in Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Morales-Betoulle, Maria E; Komar, Nicholas; Panella, Nicholas A; Alvarez, Danilo; López, María R; Betoulle, Jean-Luc; Sosa, Silvia M; Müller, María L; Kilpatrick, A Marm; Lanciotti, Robert S; Johnson, Barbara W; Powers, Ann M; Cordón-Rosales, Celia

    2013-01-01

    West Nile virus ecology has yet to be rigorously investigated in the Caribbean Basin. We identified a transmission focus in Puerto Barrios, Guatemala, and established systematic monitoring of avian abundance and infection, seroconversions in domestic poultry, and viral infections in mosquitoes. West Nile virus transmission was detected annually between May and October from 2005 to 2008. High temperature and low rainfall enhanced the probability of chicken seroconversions, which occurred in both urban and rural sites. West Nile virus was isolated from Culex quinquefasciatus and to a lesser extent, from Culex mollis/Culex inflictus, but not from the most abundant Culex mosquito, Culex nigripalpus. A calculation that combined avian abundance, seroprevalence, and vertebrate reservoir competence suggested that great-tailed grackle (Quiscalus mexicanus) is the major amplifying host in this ecosystem. West Nile virus transmission reached moderate levels in sentinel chickens during 2007, but less than that observed during outbreaks of human disease attributed to West Nile virus in the United States.

  16. Hepatitis C virus: Promising discoveries and new treatments.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Juliana Cristina Santiago; Padilla, Marina Aiello; Caserta, Leonardo Cardia; Miotto, Noelle; Vigani, Aline Gonzalez; Arns, Clarice Weis

    2016-07-28

    Despite advances in therapy, hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection remains an important global health issue. It is estimated that a significant part of the world population is chronically infected with the virus, and many of those affected may develop cirrhosis or liver cancer. The virus shows considerable variability, a characteristic that directly interferes with disease treatment. The response to treatment varies according to HCV genotype and subtype. The continuous generation of variants (quasispecies) allows the virus to escape control by antivirals. Historically, the combination of ribavirin and interferon therapy has represented the only treatment option for the disease. Currently, several new treatment options are emerging and are available to a large part of the affected population. In addition, the search for new substances with antiviral activity against HCV continues, promising future improvements in treatment. Researchers should consider the mutation capacity of the virus and the other variables that affect treatment success.

  17. Papaya ringspot virus (Potyviridae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Papaya ringspot virus, a member of the family Potyviridae, is single stranded RNA plant virus with a monocistronic genome of about 10,326 nucleotides that is expressed via a large polyprotein subsequently cleaved into functional proteins. It causes severe damage on cucurbit crops such as squash and...

  18. Virus separation using membranes.

    PubMed

    Grein, Tanja A; Michalsky, Ronald; Czermak, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Industrial manufacturing of cell culture-derived viruses or virus-like particles for gene therapy or vaccine production are complex multistep processes. In addition to the bioreactor, such processes require a multitude of downstream unit operations for product separation, concentration, or purification. Similarly, before a biopharmaceutical product can enter the market, removal or inactivation of potential viral contamination has to be demonstrated. Given the complexity of biological solutions and the high standards on composition and purity of biopharmaceuticals, downstream processing is the bottleneck in many biotechnological production trains. Membrane-based filtration can be an economically attractive and efficient technology for virus separation. Viral clearance, for instance, of up to seven orders of magnitude has been reported for state of the art polymeric membranes under best conditions.This chapter summarizes the fundamentals of virus ultrafiltration, diafiltration, or purification with adsorptive membranes. In lieu of an impractical universally applicable protocol for virus filtration, application of these principles is demonstrated with two examples. The chapter provides detailed methods for production, concentration, purification, and removal of a rod-shaped baculovirus (Autographa californica M nucleopolyhedrovirus, about 40 × 300 nm in size, a potential vector for gene therapy, and an industrially important protein expression system) or a spherical parvovirus (minute virus of mice, 22-26 nm in size, a model virus for virus clearance validation studies).

  19. Avian influenza virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) is type A influenza that is adapted to avian host species. Although the virus can be isolated from numerous avian species, the natural host reservoir species are dabbling ducks, shorebirds and gulls. Domestic poultry species (poultry being defined as birds that are rais...

  20. Equine Arteritis Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    03. Nidovirales : 03.004. Arteriviridae : 03.004.0. {03.004.0. unknown} : 03.004.0.01. Arterivirus : 03.004.0.01.001. Equine arteritis virus will be published online. The article details the phenotypic and genotypic makeup of equine arteritis virus (EAV), and summarizes its biological properties....

  1. Rift Valley Fever Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a mosquito-transmitted virus or arbovirus that is endemic in sub-Saharan Africa. In the last decade, Rift Valley fever (RVF) outbreaks have resulted in loss of human and animal life, as well as had significant economic impact. The disease in livestock is primarily a...

  2. Papaya Ringspot Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The term papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) was coined by Jensen in 1949, to describe a papaya disease in Hawaii. Later work showed that diseases such as papaya mosaic and watermelon mosaic virus-1 were caused by PRSV. The primary host range of PRSV is papaya and cucurbits, with Chenopium amaranticolor ...

  3. Usutu Virus, Italy, 1996

    PubMed Central

    Bakonyi, Tamás; Rossi, Giacomo; Mani, Paolo; Nowotny, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    Retrospective analysis of archived tissue samples from bird deaths in the Tuscany region of Italy in 1996 identified Usutu virus. Partial sequencing confirmed identity with the 2001 Vienna strain and provided evidence for a much earlier introduction of this virus into Europe than previously assumed. PMID:23347844

  4. West Nile Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... spread by mosquitoes. Mosquitoes become infected by biting birds that carry the virus. People can get West Nile virus when an infected mosquito bites them. This happens most often in the warm-weather months of spring, summer and early fall. You ...

  5. Viruses in reptiles.

    PubMed

    Ariel, Ellen

    2011-09-21

    The etiology of reptilian viral diseases can be attributed to a wide range of viruses occurring across different genera and families. Thirty to forty years ago, studies of viruses in reptiles focused mainly on the zoonotic potential of arboviruses in reptiles and much effort went into surveys and challenge trials of a range of reptiles with eastern and western equine encephalitis as well as Japanese encephalitis viruses. In the past decade, outbreaks of infection with West Nile virus in human populations and in farmed alligators in the USA has seen the research emphasis placed on the issue of reptiles, particularly crocodiles and alligators, being susceptible to, and reservoirs for, this serious zoonotic disease. Although there are many recognised reptilian viruses, the evidence for those being primary pathogens is relatively limited. Transmission studies establishing pathogenicity and cofactors are likewise scarce, possibly due to the relatively low commercial importance of reptiles, difficulties with the availability of animals and permits for statistically sound experiments, difficulties with housing of reptiles in an experimental setting or the inability to propagate some viruses in cell culture to sufficient titres for transmission studies. Viruses as causes of direct loss of threatened species, such as the chelonid fibropapilloma associated herpesvirus and ranaviruses in farmed and wild tortoises and turtles, have re-focused attention back to the characterisation of the viruses as well as diagnosis and pathogenesis in the host itself.

  6. Positive reinforcement for viruses.

    PubMed

    Vigant, Frederic; Jung, Michael; Lee, Benhur

    2010-10-29

    Virus-cell membrane fusion requires a critical transition from positive to negative membrane curvature. St. Vincent et al. (2010), in PNAS, designed a class of antivirals that targets this transition. These rigid amphipathic fusion inhibitors are active against an array of enveloped viruses.

  7. Analgesic combinations

    PubMed Central

    Raffa, Robert B.; Pergolizzi, Joseph V.; Tallarida, Ronald J.

    2010-01-01

    When the pathophysiology of a medical condition is multi-modal, i.e., related to multiple physiological causes or mediated by multiple pathways, the optimal strategy can be to use a drug or a combination of drugs that contribute multiple mechanisms to the therapeutic endpoint. In such situations, a rational multi-modal approach can also result in the fewest adverse effects. We discuss the quantitative analysis of multi-modal action using the treatment of pain as a practical example and give examples of its application to some widely used analgesic drugs. PMID:20338825

  8. Electron tomography of viruses.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Sriram; Bartesaghi, Alberto; Liu, Jun; Bennett, Adam E; Sougrat, Rachid

    2007-10-01

    Understanding the molecular architectures of enveloped and complex viruses is a challenging frontier in structural biology. In these viruses, the structural and compositional variation from one viral particle to another generally precludes the use of either crystallization or image averaging procedures that have been successfully implemented in the past for highly symmetric viruses. While advances in cryo electron tomography of unstained specimens provide new opportunities for identification and molecular averaging of individual subcomponents such as the surface glycoprotein spikes on purified viruses, electron tomography of stained and plunge-frozen cells is being used to visualize the cellular context of viral entry and replication. Here, we review recent developments in both areas as they relate to our understanding of the biology of heterogeneous and pleiomorphic viruses.

  9. Mayaro virus proteins.

    PubMed

    Mezencio, J M; Rebello, M A

    1993-01-01

    Mayaro virus was grown in BHK-21 cells and purified by centrifugation in a potassium-tartrate gradient (5-50%). The electron microscopy analyses of the purified virus showed an homogeneous population of enveloped particles with 69 +/- 2.3 nm in diameter. Three structural virus proteins were identified and designated p1, p2 and p3. Their average molecular weight were p1, 54 KDa; p2, 50 KDa and p3, 34 KDa. In Mayaro virus infected Aedes albopictus cells and in BHK-21 infected cells we detected six viral proteins, in which three of them are the structural virus proteins and the other three were products from processing of precursors of viral proteins, whose molecular weights are 62 KDa, 64 KDa and 110 KDa. The 34 KDa protein was the first viral protein synthesized at 5 hours post-infection in both cell lines studied.

  10. Virus excretion in smallpox

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, J. K.; Mitra, A. C.; Mukherjee, M. K.; De, S. K.

    1973-01-01

    Throat swabs of 34 of 328 family contacts of 52 smallpox cases, examined 4-8 days after the onset of the disease in the family, were positive for variola virus. The log titre of virus per swab ranged from 2 to 3.95. A higher proportion of unvaccinated than of vaccinated contacts excreted the virus. Only 4 of the virus-positive contacts developed clinical smallpox; this occurred 5-7 days after their swabs were examined. Excretion of virus in the throats of these contacts, a few of whom were in the incubation period of the disease, suggests the possibility that they could have spread the infection. This possibility, if kept in mind, may help in tracing the source of infection or in determining the incubation period in a few instances when difficulty is experienced. PMID:4359679

  11. Hepatitis B Virus Biology

    PubMed Central

    Seeger, Christoph; Mason, William S.

    2000-01-01

    Hepadnaviruses (hepatitis B viruses) cause transient and chronic infections of the liver. Transient infections run a course of several months, and chronic infections are often lifelong. Chronic infections can lead to liver failure with cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The replication strategy of these viruses has been described in great detail, but virus-host interactions leading to acute and chronic disease are still poorly understood. Studies on how the virus evades the immune response to cause prolonged transient infections with high-titer viremia and lifelong infections with an ongoing inflammation of the liver are still at an early stage, and the role of the virus in liver cancer is still elusive. The state of knowledge in this very active field is therefore reviewed with an emphasis on past accomplishments as well as goals for the future. PMID:10704474

  12. Virus inactivation mechanisms: impact of disinfectants on virus function and structural integrity.

    PubMed

    Wigginton, Krista Rule; Pecson, Brian M; Sigstam, Thérese; Bosshard, Franziska; Kohn, Tamar

    2012-11-06

    Oxidative processes are often harnessed as tools for pathogen disinfection. Although the pathways responsible for bacterial inactivation with various biocides are fairly well understood, virus inactivation mechanisms are often contradictory or equivocal. In this study, we provide a quantitative analysis of the total damage incurred by a model virus (bacteriophage MS2) upon inactivation induced by five common virucidal agents (heat, UV, hypochlorous acid, singlet oxygen, and chlorine dioxide). Each treatment targets one or more virus functions to achieve inactivation: UV, singlet oxygen, and hypochlorous acid treatments generally render the genome nonreplicable, whereas chlorine dioxide and heat inhibit host-cell recognition/binding. Using a combination of quantitative analytical tools, we identified unique patterns of molecular level modifications in the virus proteins or genome that lead to the inhibition of these functions and eventually inactivation. UV and chlorine treatments, for example, cause site-specific capsid protein backbone cleavage that inhibits viral genome injection into the host cell. Combined, these results will aid in developing better methods for combating waterborne and foodborne viral pathogens and further our understanding of the adaptive changes viruses undergo in response to natural and anthropogenic stressors.

  13. Virus discovery and recent insights into virus diversity in arthropods.

    PubMed

    Junglen, Sandra; Drosten, Christian

    2013-08-01

    Recent studies on virus discovery have focused mainly on mammalian and avian viruses. Arbovirology with its long tradition of ecologically oriented investigation is now catching up, with important novel insights into the diversity of arthropod-associated viruses. Recent discoveries include taxonomically outlying viruses within the families Flaviviridae, Togaviridae, and Bunyaviridae, and even novel virus families within the order Nidovirales. However, the current focusing of studies on blood-feeding arthropods has restricted the range of arthropod hosts analyzed for viruses so far. Future investigations should include species from other arthropod taxa than Ixodita, Culicidae and Phlebotominae in order to shed light on the true diversity of arthropod viruses.

  14. Immunization with a vaccine combining herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) glycoprotein C (gC) and gD subunits improves the protection of dorsal root ganglia in mice and reduces the frequency of recurrent vaginal shedding of HSV-2 DNA in guinea pigs compared to immunization with gD alone.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Sita; Lubinski, John M; Shaw, Carolyn E; Barrett, Shana M; Cai, Michael; Wang, Fushan; Betts, Michael; Kingsley, Susan; Distefano, Daniel J; Balliet, John W; Flynn, Jessica A; Casimiro, Danilo R; Bryan, Janine T; Friedman, Harvey M

    2011-10-01

    Attempts to develop a vaccine to prevent genital herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) disease have been only marginally successful, suggesting that novel strategies are needed. Immunization with HSV-2 glycoprotein C (gC-2) and gD-2 was evaluated in mice and guinea pigs to determine whether adding gC-2 to a gD-2 subunit vaccine would improve protection by producing antibodies that block gC-2 immune evasion from complement. Antibodies produced by gC-2 immunization blocked the interaction between gC-2 and complement C3b, and passive transfer of gC-2 antibody protected complement-intact mice but not C3 knockout mice against HSV-2 challenge, indicating that gC-2 antibody is effective, at least in part, because it prevents HSV-2 evasion from complement. Immunization with gC-2 also produced neutralizing antibodies that were active in the absence of complement; however, the neutralizing titers were higher when complement was present, with the highest titers in animals immunized with both antigens. Animals immunized with the gC-2-plus-gD-2 combination had robust CD4+ T-cell responses to each immunogen. Multiple disease parameters were evaluated in mice and guinea pigs immunized with gC-2 alone, gD-2 alone, or both antigens. In general, gD-2 outperformed gC-2; however, the gC-2-plus-gD-2 combination outperformed gD-2 alone, particularly in protecting dorsal root ganglia in mice and reducing recurrent vaginal shedding of HSV-2 DNA in guinea pigs. Therefore, the gC-2 subunit antigen enhances a gD-2 subunit vaccine by stimulating a CD4+ T-cell response, by producing neutralizing antibodies that are effective in the absence and presence of complement, and by blocking immune evasion domains that inhibit complement activation.

  15. Immunization with a Vaccine Combining Herpes Simplex Virus 2 (HSV-2) Glycoprotein C (gC) and gD Subunits Improves the Protection of Dorsal Root Ganglia in Mice and Reduces the Frequency of Recurrent Vaginal Shedding of HSV-2 DNA in Guinea Pigs Compared to Immunization with gD Alone ▿

    PubMed Central

    Awasthi, Sita; Lubinski, John M.; Shaw, Carolyn E.; Barrett, Shana M.; Cai, Michael; Wang, Fushan; Betts, Michael; Kingsley, Susan; DiStefano, Daniel J.; Balliet, John W.; Flynn, Jessica A.; Casimiro, Danilo R.; Bryan, Janine T.; Friedman, Harvey M.

    2011-01-01

    Attempts to develop a vaccine to prevent genital herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) disease have been only marginally successful, suggesting that novel strategies are needed. Immunization with HSV-2 glycoprotein C (gC-2) and gD-2 was evaluated in mice and guinea pigs to determine whether adding gC-2 to a gD-2 subunit vaccine would improve protection by producing antibodies that block gC-2 immune evasion from complement. Antibodies produced by gC-2 immunization blocked the interaction between gC-2 and complement C3b, and passive transfer of gC-2 antibody protected complement-intact mice but not C3 knockout mice against HSV-2 challenge, indicating that gC-2 antibody is effective, at least in part, because it prevents HSV-2 evasion from complement. Immunization with gC-2 also produced neutralizing antibodies that were active in the absence of complement; however, the neutralizing titers were higher when complement was present, with the highest titers in animals immunized with both antigens. Animals immunized with the gC-2-plus-gD-2 combination had robust CD4+ T-cell responses to each immunogen. Multiple disease parameters were evaluated in mice and guinea pigs immunized with gC-2 alone, gD-2 alone, or both antigens. In general, gD-2 outperformed gC-2; however, the gC-2-plus-gD-2 combination outperformed gD-2 alone, particularly in protecting dorsal root ganglia in mice and reducing recurrent vaginal shedding of HSV-2 DNA in guinea pigs. Therefore, the gC-2 subunit antigen enhances a gD-2 subunit vaccine by stimulating a CD4+ T-cell response, by producing neutralizing antibodies that are effective in the absence and presence of complement, and by blocking immune evasion domains that inhibit complement activation. PMID:21813597

  16. Diversity and Ecology of Viruses in Hyperarid Desert Soils.

    PubMed

    Zablocki, Olivier; Adriaenssens, Evelien M; Cowan, Don

    2015-11-20

    In recent years, remarkable progress has been made in the field of virus environmental ecology. In marine ecosystems, for example, viruses are now thought to play pivotal roles in the biogeochemical cycling of nutrients and to be mediators of microbial evolution through horizontal gene transfer. The diversity and ecology of viruses in soils are poorly understood, but evidence supports the view that the diversity and ecology of viruses in soils differ substantially from those in aquatic systems. Desert biomes cover ∼ 33% of global land masses, and yet the diversity and roles of viruses in these dominant ecosystems remain poorly understood. There is evidence that hot hyperarid desert soils are characterized by high levels of bacterial lysogens and low extracellular virus counts. In contrast, cold desert soils contain high extracellular virus titers. We suggest that the prevalence of microbial biofilms in hyperarid soils, combined with extreme thermal regimens, exerts strong selection pressures on both temperate and virulent viruses. Many desert soil virus sequences show low values of identity to virus genomes in public databases, suggesting the existence of distinct and as-yet-uncharacterized soil phylogenetic lineages (e.g., cyanophages). We strongly advocate for amplification-free metavirome analyses while encouraging the classical isolation of phages from dominant and culturable microbial isolates in order to populate sequence databases. This review provides an overview of recent advances in the study of viruses in hyperarid soils and of the factors that contribute to viral abundance and diversity in hot and cold deserts and offers technical recommendations for future studies.

  17. Diversity and Ecology of Viruses in Hyperarid Desert Soils

    PubMed Central

    Zablocki, Olivier; Adriaenssens, Evelien M.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, remarkable progress has been made in the field of virus environmental ecology. In marine ecosystems, for example, viruses are now thought to play pivotal roles in the biogeochemical cycling of nutrients and to be mediators of microbial evolution through horizontal gene transfer. The diversity and ecology of viruses in soils are poorly understood, but evidence supports the view that the diversity and ecology of viruses in soils differ substantially from those in aquatic systems. Desert biomes cover ∼33% of global land masses, and yet the diversity and roles of viruses in these dominant ecosystems remain poorly understood. There is evidence that hot hyperarid desert soils are characterized by high levels of bacterial lysogens and low extracellular virus counts. In contrast, cold desert soils contain high extracellular virus titers. We suggest that the prevalence of microbial biofilms in hyperarid soils, combined with extreme thermal regimens, exerts strong selection pressures on both temperate and virulent viruses. Many desert soil virus sequences show low values of identity to virus genomes in public databases, suggesting the existence of distinct and as-yet-uncharacterized soil phylogenetic lineages (e.g., cyanophages). We strongly advocate for amplification-free metavirome analyses while encouraging the classical isolation of phages from dominant and culturable microbial isolates in order to populate sequence databases. This review provides an overview of recent advances in the study of viruses in hyperarid soils and of the factors that contribute to viral abundance and diversity in hot and cold deserts and offers technical recommendations for future studies. PMID:26590289

  18. A manual and an automatic TERS based virus discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olschewski, Konstanze; Kämmer, Evelyn; Stöckel, Stephan; Bocklitz, Thomas; Deckert-Gaudig, Tanja; Zell, Roland; Cialla-May, Dana; Weber, Karina; Deckert, Volker; Popp, Jürgen

    2015-02-01

    Rapid techniques for virus identification are more relevant today than ever. Conventional virus detection and identification strategies generally rest upon various microbiological methods and genomic approaches, which are not suited for the analysis of single virus particles. In contrast, the highly sensitive spectroscopic technique tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) allows the characterisation of biological nano-structures like virions on a single-particle level. In this study, the feasibility of TERS in combination with chemometrics to discriminate two pathogenic viruses, Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) and Porcine teschovirus (PTV), was investigated. In a first step, chemometric methods transformed the spectral data in such a way that a rapid visual discrimination of the two examined viruses was enabled. In a further step, these methods were utilised to perform an automatic quality rating of the measured spectra. Spectra that passed this test were eventually used to calculate a classification model, through which a successful discrimination of the two viral species based on TERS spectra of single virus particles was also realised with a classification accuracy of 91%.Rapid techniques for virus identification are more relevant today than ever. Conventional virus detection and identification strategies generally rest upon various microbiological methods and genomic approaches, which are not suited for the analysis of single virus particles. In contrast, the highly sensitive spectroscopic technique tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) allows the characterisation of biological nano-structures like virions on a single-particle level. In this study, the feasibility of TERS in combination with chemometrics to discriminate two pathogenic viruses, Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) and Porcine teschovirus (PTV), was investigated. In a first step, chemometric methods transformed the spectral data in such a way that a rapid visual discrimination of the two examined viruses

  19. Virus diseases of peppers (Capsicum spp.) and their control.

    PubMed

    Kenyon, Lawrence; Kumar, Sanjeet; Tsai, Wen-Shi; Hughes, Jacqueline d'A

    2014-01-01

    The number of virus species infecting pepper (Capsicum spp.) crops and their incidences has increased considerably over the past 30 years, particularly in tropical and subtropical pepper production systems. This is probably due to a combination of factors, including the expansion and intensification of pepper cultivation in these regions, the increased volume and speed of global trade of fresh produce (including peppers) carrying viruses and vectors to new locations, and perhaps climate change expanding the geographic range suitable for the viruses and vectors. With the increased incidences of diverse virus species comes increased incidences of coinfection with two or more virus species in the same plant. There is then greater chance of synergistic interactions between virus species, increasing symptom severity and weakening host resistance, as well as the opportunity for genetic recombination and component exchange and a possible increase in aggressiveness, virulence, and transmissibility. The main virus groups infecting peppers are transmitted by aphids, whiteflies, or thrips, and a feature of many populations of these vector groups is that they can develop resistance to some of the commonly used insecticides relatively quickly. This, coupled with the increasing concern over the impact of over- or misuse of insecticides on the environment, growers, and consumers, means that there should be less reliance on insecticides to control the vectors of viruses infecting pepper crops. To improve the durability of pepper crop protection measures, there should be a shift away from the broadscale use of insecticides and the use of single, major gene resistance to viruses. Instead, integrated and pragmatic virus control measures should be sought that combine (1) cultural practices that reduce sources of virus inoculum and decrease the rate of spread of viruliferous vectors into the pepper crop, (2) synthetic insecticides, which should be used judiciously and only when the

  20. Computer Viruses: Pathology and Detection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, John R.; Lamon, William E.

    1992-01-01

    Explains how computer viruses were originally created, how a computer can become infected by a virus, how viruses operate, symptoms that indicate a computer is infected, how to detect and remove viruses, and how to prevent a reinfection. A sidebar lists eight antivirus resources. (four references) (LRW)

  1. A Virus in Turbo Pascal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teleky, Heidi Ann; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Addresses why the authors feel it is not inappropriate to teach about viruses in the how-to, hands-on fashion. Identifies the special features of Turbo Pascal that have to be used for the creation of an effective virus. Defines virus, derives its structure, and from this structure is derived the implemented virus. (PR)

  2. ICTV Virus Taxonomy Profile: Dicistroviridae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dicistroviridae is a family of small non-enveloped viruses with RNA genomes of approximately 8-10 kilobases in length. All members infect arthropod hosts with some having devastating economic consequences, such as Acute bee paralysis virus, Kashmir bee virus, and Israeli acute paralysis virus towar...

  3. Realms of the Viruses Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Dennis

    2007-01-01

    Viruses have evolved strategies for infecting all taxa, but most viruses are highly specific about their cellular host. In humans, viruses cause diverse diseases, from chronic but benign warts, to acute and deadly hemorrhagic fever. Viruses have entertaining names like Zucchini Yellow Mosaic, Semliki Forest, Coxsackie, and the original terminator,…

  4. Imaging and tracking HIV viruses in human cervical mucus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boukari, Fatima; Makrogiannis, Sokratis; Nossal, Ralph; Boukari, Hacène

    2016-09-01

    We describe a systematic approach to image, track, and quantify the movements of HIV viruses embedded in human cervical mucus. The underlying motivation for this study is that, in HIV-infected adults, women account for more than half of all new cases and most of these women acquire the infection through heterosexual contact. The endocervix is believed to be a susceptible site for HIV entry. Cervical mucus, which coats the endocervix, should play a protective role against the viruses. Thus, we developed a methodology to apply time-resolved confocal microscopy to examine the motion of HIV viruses that were added to samples of untreated cervical mucus. From the images, we identified the viruses, tracked them over time, and calculated changes of the statistical mean-squared displacement (MSD) of each virus. Approximately half of tracked viruses appear constrained while the others show mobility with MSDs that are proportional to τα+ν2τ2, over time range τ, depicting a combination of anomalous diffusion (0<α<0.4) and flow-like behavior. The MSD data also reveal plateaus attributable to possible stalling of the viruses. Although a more extensive study is warranted, these results support the assumption of mucus being a barrier against the motion of these viruses.

  5. Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Virus Infection Spreading in Tissues.

    PubMed

    Bocharov, Gennady; Meyerhans, Andreas; Bessonov, Nickolai; Trofimchuk, Sergei; Volpert, Vitaly

    2016-01-01

    Virus spreading in tissues is determined by virus transport, virus multiplication in host cells and the virus-induced immune response. Cytotoxic T cells remove infected cells with a rate determined by the infection level. The intensity of the immune response has a bell-shaped dependence on the concentration of virus, i.e., it increases at low and decays at high infection levels. A combination of these effects and a time delay in the immune response determine the development of virus infection in tissues like spleen or lymph nodes. The mathematical model described in this work consists of reaction-diffusion equations with a delay. It shows that the different regimes of infection spreading like the establishment of a low level infection, a high level infection or a transition between both are determined by the initial virus load and by the intensity of the immune response. The dynamics of the model solutions include simple and composed waves, and periodic and aperiodic oscillations. The results of analytical and numerical studies of the model provide a systematic basis for a quantitative understanding and interpretation of the determinants of the infection process in target organs and tissues from the image-derived data as well as of the spatiotemporal mechanisms of viral disease pathogenesis, and have direct implications for a biopsy-based medical testing of the chronic infection processes caused by viruses, e.g. HIV, HCV and HBV.

  6. Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Virus Infection Spreading in Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Meyerhans, Andreas; Bessonov, Nickolai; Trofimchuk, Sergei; Volpert, Vitaly

    2016-01-01

    Virus spreading in tissues is determined by virus transport, virus multiplication in host cells and the virus-induced immune response. Cytotoxic T cells remove infected cells with a rate determined by the infection level. The intensity of the immune response has a bell-shaped dependence on the concentration of virus, i.e., it increases at low and decays at high infection levels. A combination of these effects and a time delay in the immune response determine the development of virus infection in tissues like spleen or lymph nodes. The mathematical model described in this work consists of reaction-diffusion equations with a delay. It shows that the different regimes of infection spreading like the establishment of a low level infection, a high level infection or a transition between both are determined by the initial virus load and by the intensity of the immune response. The dynamics of the model solutions include simple and composed waves, and periodic and aperiodic oscillations. The results of analytical and numerical studies of the model provide a systematic basis for a quantitative understanding and interpretation of the determinants of the infection process in target organs and tissues from the image-derived data as well as of the spatiotemporal mechanisms of viral disease pathogenesis, and have direct implications for a biopsy-based medical testing of the chronic infection processes caused by viruses, e.g. HIV, HCV and HBV. PMID:27997613

  7. Allopolyploidy and the evolution of plant virus resistance

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The relationship between allopolyploidy and plant virus resistance is poorly understood. To determine the relationship of plant evolutionary history and basal virus resistance, a panel of Nicotiana species from diverse geographic regions and ploidy levels was assessed for resistance to non-coevolved viruses from the genus Nepovirus, family Secoviridae. The heritability of resistance was tested in a panel of synthetic allopolyploids. Leaves of different positions on each inoculated plant were tested for virus presence and a subset of plants was re-inoculated and assessed for systemic recovery. Results Depending on the host-virus combination, plants displayed immunity, susceptibility or intermediate levels of resistance. Synthetic allopolyploids showed an incompletely dominant resistance phenotype and manifested systemic recovery. Plant ploidy was weakly negatively correlated with virus resistance in Nicotiana species, but this trend did not hold when synthetic allopolyploids were taken into account. Furthermore, a relationship between resistance and geographical origin was observed. Conclusion The gradients of resistance and virulence corresponded to a modified matching allele model of resistance. Intermediate resistance responses of allopolyploids corresponded with a model of multi-allelic additive resistance. The variable virus resistance of extant allopolyploids suggested that selection-based mechanisms surpass ploidy with respect to evolution of basal resistance to viruses. PMID:24992820

  8. Experimental Inoculation of Pigs with Pandemic H1N1 2009 Virus and HI Cross-Reactivity with Contemporary Swine Influenza Virus Antisera

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In March-April 2009, a novel A/H1N1 emerged in the human population in North America. The gene constellation of the virus was demonstrated to be a combination from swine influenza A viruses (SIV) of North American and Eurasian lineages that had never before been identified in swine or other species...

  9. Molecular simultaneous detection of Cherry necrotic rusty mottle virus and Cherry green ring mottle virus by real-time RT-PCR and high resolution melting analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, real-time RT-PCR assays were combined with high resolution melting (HRM) analysis for the simultaneous detection of Cherry necrotic rusty mottle virus (CNRMV) and Cherry green ring mottle virus (CGRMV) infection in sweet cherry trees. Detection of CNRMV and CGRMV was performed using a...

  10. ssRNA viruses from biotrophic Oomycetes form a new phylogenetic group between Nodaviridae and Tombusviridae.

    PubMed

    Grasse, Wolfgang; Spring, Otmar

    2017-02-02

    Plasmopara halstedii virus (PhV) is one of the few characterized oomycete viruses. Although it is fully sequenced and well-studied in its genetic diversity, the exact classification and phylogenetic relationships of PhV remain uncertain. The only known virus with characteristics similar to PhV is the Sclerophthora macrospora Virus A (SmV-A). Both viruses infect obligate biotrophic oomycetes. While RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRp) of oomycetes viruses have high similarity to the corresponding enzymes from viruses classified in the family Nodaviridae, the coat proteins (CP) seem to be completely different from those of other viruses of this family. In contrast, the coat proteins of PhV and SmV-A have high similarity to viruses classified in the Tombusviridae, Circoviridae and a new group of hybrid DNA-RNA viruses (so-called chimeric viruses or cruciviruses). Because phylogenetic analyses based on the sequences of either RdRp or CP result in different affinities, an alternative, genome-based approach combining the sequences of both proteins was used. This analysis placed the two oomycete viruses together with Tombunodavirus UC1 in a new, independent group between families Nodaviridae and Tombusviridae.

  11. Multiplex Assay for Simultaneously Typing and Subtyping Influenza Viruses by Use of an Electronic Microarray ▿

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying; Tang, Huong; Duffy, Stuart; Hong, Yuwen; Norman, Sylvia; Ghosh, Madhu; He, Jie; Bose, Michael; Henrickson, Kelly J.; Fan, Jiang; Kraft, Andrea J.; Weisburg, William G.; Mather, Elizabeth L.

    2009-01-01

    We report on the use of an electronic microarray to simultaneously type influenza A and B viruses and to distinguish influenza A virus subtypes H1N1 and H3N2 from the potentially pandemic avian virus subtype H5N1. The assay targets seven genes: the H1, H3, H5, N1, and N2 genes of influenza A virus; the matrix protein M1 gene of influenza A virus; and the nonstructural protein (NS) gene of influenza B virus. By combining a two-step reverse transcription-multiplex PCR with typing and subtyping on the electronic microarray, the assay achieved an analytical sensitivity of 102 to 103 copies of transcripts per reaction for each of the genes. The assay correctly typed and subtyped 15 different influenza virus isolates, including two influenza B virus, five A/H1N1, six A/H3N2, and two A/H5N1 isolates. In addition, the assay correctly identified 8 out of 10 diluted, archived avian influenza virus specimens with complete typing and subtyping information and 2 specimens with partial subtyping information. In a study of 146 human clinical specimens that had previously been shown to be positive for influenza virus or another respiratory virus, the assay showed a clinical sensitivity of 96% and a clinical specificity of 100%. The assay is a rapid, accurate, user-friendly method for simultaneously typing and subtyping influenza viruses. PMID:19073867

  12. Viruses isolated from Panamanian sloths.

    PubMed

    Seymour, C; Peralta, P H; Montgomery, G G

    1983-11-01

    Seven virus strains were isolated in Vero cells from whole blood samples from 80 wild-caught sloths, Bradypus variegatus and Choloepus hoffmanni, from Central Panamá. Four strains of at least two different serotypes are related to Changuinola virus; two of these were associated with prolonged or recrudescent viremias. One strain is an antigenic subtype of Punta Toro virus, and another, described here as Bradypus-4 virus, is a new, antigenically ungrouped virus. A second new virus from sloths, Utive virus, forms an antigenic complex within the Simbu serogroup with Utinga and Pintupo viruses. Tests on sequential plasma samples from radio-marked free-ranging sloths and from recently captured animals maintained in captivity showed that both species develop neutralizing antibodies following naturally acquired virus infections. Antibodies against the Changuinola and Simbu serogroup viruses are widespread in both sloth species and are especially prevalent in Choloepus, but are virtually absent in all other wild vertebrate species tested.

  13. Ocular tropism of respiratory viruses.

    PubMed

    Belser, Jessica A; Rota, Paul A; Tumpey, Terrence M

    2013-03-01

    Respiratory viruses (including adenovirus, influenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus, coronavirus, and rhinovirus) cause a broad spectrum of disease in humans, ranging from mild influenza-like symptoms to acute respiratory failure. While species D adenoviruses and subtype H7 influenza viruses are known to possess an ocular tropism, documented human ocular disease has been reported following infection with all principal respiratory viruses. In this review, we describe the anatomical proximity and cellular receptor distribution between ocular and respiratory tissues. All major respiratory viruses and their association with human ocular disease are discussed. Research utilizing in vitro and in vivo models to study the ability of respiratory viruses to use the eye as a portal of entry as well as a primary site of virus replication is highlighted. Identification of shared receptor-binding preferences, host responses, and laboratory modeling protocols among these viruses provides a needed bridge between clinical and laboratory studies of virus tropism.

  14. Giant viruses infecting algae.

    PubMed

    Van Etten, J L; Meints, R H

    1999-01-01

    Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus (PBCV-1) is the prototype of a family of large, icosahedral, plaque-forming, double-stranded-DNA-containing viruses that replicate in certain unicellular, eukaryotic chlorella-like green algae. DNA sequence analysis of its 330, 742-bp genome leads to the prediction that this phycodnavirus has 376 protein-encoding genes and 10 transfer RNA genes. The predicted gene products of approximately 40% of these genes resemble proteins of known function. The chlorella viruses have other features that distinguish them from most viruses, in addition to their large genome size. These features include the following: (a) The viruses encode multiple DNA methyltransferases and DNA site-specific endonucleases; (b) PBCV-1 encodes at least part, if not the entire machinery to glycosylate its proteins; (c) PBCV-1 has at least two types of introns--a self-splicing intron in a transcription factor-like gene and a splicesomal processed type of intron in its DNA polymerase gene. Unlike the chlorella viruses, large double-stranded-DNA-containing viruses that infect marine, filamentous brown algae have a circular genome and a lysogenic phase in their life cycle.

  15. Influenza virus isolation.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Scott; Walker, David; Webster, Robert G

    2012-01-01

    The isolation of influenza viruses is important for the diagnosis of respiratory diseases in lower animals and humans, for the detection of the infecting agent in surveillance programs, and is an essential element in the development and production of vaccine. Since influenza is caused by a zoonotic virus it is necessary to do surveillance in the reservoir species (aquatic waterfowls), intermediate hosts (quails, pigs), and in affected mammals including humans. Two of the hemagglutinin (HA) subtypes of influenza A viruses (H5 and H7) can evolve into highly pathogenic (HP) strains for gallinaceous poultry; some HP H5 and H7 strains cause lethal infection of humans. In waterfowls, low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) isolates are obtained primarily from the cloaca (or feces); in domestic poultry, the virus is more often recovered from the respiratory tract than from cloacal samples; in mammals, the virus is most often isolated from the respiratory tract, and in cases of high pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) from the blood and internal organs of infected birds. Virus isolation procedures are performed by inoculation of clinical specimens into embryonated eggs (primarily chicken eggs) or onto a variety of primary or continuous tissue culture systems. Successful isolation of influenza virus depends on the quality of the sample and matching the appropriate culture method to the sample type.

  16. Serological detection of St. Louis encephalitis virus and West Nile virus in equines from Santa Fe, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Tauro, Laura; Marino, Betina; Diaz, Luis Adrian; Lucca, Eduardo; Gallozo, Debora; Spinsanti, Lorena; Contigiani, Marta

    2012-06-01

    St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) and West Nile virus (WNV) present ecological and antigenic similarities and are responsible for serious human diseases. In addition, WNV is a significant pathogen in terms of equine health. The purpose of our study was to analyse the seroprevalence of SLEV and WNV in equine sera collected in Santa Fe Province, Argentina. The seroprevalence determined using the plaque reduction neutralisation test was 12.2% for SLEV, 16.2% for WNV and 48.6% for a combination of both viruses. These results provide evidence of the co-circulation of SLEV and WNV in equines in Santa Fe.

  17. Susceptibility of Vaccinia Virus to Chemical Disinfectants

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Tércia Moreira Ludolfo; Rehfeld, Izabelle Silva; Coelho Guedes, Maria Isabel Maldonado; Ferreira, Jaqueline Maria Siqueira; Kroon, Erna Geessien; Lobato, Zélia Inês Portela

    2011-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) is the cause of bovine vaccinia (BV), an emerging zoonotic disease that affects dairy cows and milkers. Some chemical disinfectants have been used on farms affected by BV to disinfect cow teats and milkers' hands. To date, there is no information about the efficacy of disinfectants against VACV. Therefore, this study aimed to assess the virucidal activity of some active disinfectants commonly used in the field. Sodium hypochlorite, quaternary ammonium combined with chlorhexidine, and quaternary ammonium combined with glutaraldehyde were effective in inactivating the virus at all concentrations tested. Iodine and quaternary ammonium as the only active component were partially effective. The presence of bovine feces as organic matter and light decreased the effectiveness of sodium hypochlorite. These results show that an appropriated disinfection and asepsis of teats and hands may be helpful in the control and prevention of BV and other infections with VACV. PMID:21734141

  18. Fighting cancer with viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, S. C.; Martins, M. L.; Vilela, M. J.

    2005-01-01

    One of the most promising strategies to treat cancer is attacking it with viruses. Viruses can kill tumor cells specifically or act as carriers that deliver normal genes into cancer cells. A model for virotherapy of cancer is investigated and its predictions are in agreement with results obtained from experimental tumors. Furthermore, the model reveals an oscillatory (periodic or aperiodic) response of tumor cells and virus populations which may make clinical prognosis difficult. These results suggest the need for new in vivo and in vitro experiments aiming to detect this oscillatory response.

  19. [Ebola virus disease].

    PubMed

    Nazimek, Katarzyna; Bociaga-Jasik, Monika; Bryniarski, Krzysztof; Gałas, Aleksander; Garlicki, Aleksander; Gawda, Anna; Gawlik, Grzegorz; Gil, Krzysztof; Kosz-Vnenchak, Magdalena; Mrozek-Budzyn, Dorota; Olszanecki, Rafał; Piatek, Anna; Zawilińska, Barbara; Marcinkiewicz, Janusz

    2014-01-01

    Ebola is one of the most virulent zoonotic RNA viruses causing in humans haemorrhagic fever with fatality ratio reaching 90%. During the outbreak of 2014 the number of deaths exceeded 8.000. The "imported" cases reported in Western Europe and USA highlighted the extreme risk of Ebola virus spreading outside the African countries. Thus, haemorrhagic fever outbreak is an international epidemiological problem, also due to the lack of approved prevention and therapeutic strategies. The editorial review article briefly summarizes current knowledge on Ebola virus disease epidemiology, etiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis as well as possible prevention and treatment.

  20. Viruses in reptiles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The etiology of reptilian viral diseases can be attributed to a wide range of viruses occurring across different genera and families. Thirty to forty years ago, studies of viruses in reptiles focused mainly on the zoonotic potential of arboviruses in reptiles and much effort went into surveys and challenge trials of a range of reptiles with eastern and western equine encephalitis as well as Japanese encephalitis viruses. In the past decade, outbreaks of infection with West Nile virus in human populations and in farmed alligators in the USA has seen the research emphasis placed on the issue of reptiles, particularly crocodiles and alligators, being susceptible to, and reservoirs for, this serious zoonotic disease. Although there are many recognised reptilian viruses, the evidence for those being primary pathogens is relatively limited. Transmission studies establishing pathogenicity and cofactors are likewise scarce, possibly due to the relatively low commercial importance of reptiles, difficulties with the availability of animals and permits for statistically sound experiments, difficulties with housing of reptiles in an experimental setting or the inability to propagate some viruses in cell culture to sufficient titres for transmission studies. Viruses as causes of direct loss of threatened species, such as the chelonid fibropapilloma associated herpesvirus and ranaviruses in farmed and wild tortoises and turtles, have re-focused attention back to the characterisation of the viruses as well as diagnosis and pathogenesis in the host itself. 1. Introduction 2. Methods for working with reptilian viruses 3. Reptilian viruses described by virus families 3.1. Herpesviridae 3.2. Iridoviridae 3.2.1 Ranavirus 3.2.2 Erythrocytic virus 3.2.3 Iridovirus 3.3. Poxviridae 3.4. Adenoviridae 3.5. Papillomaviridae 3.6. Parvoviridae 3.7. Reoviridae 3.8. Retroviridae and inclusion body disease of Boid snakes 3.9. Arboviruses 3.9.1. Flaviviridae 3.9.2. Togaviridae 3.10. Caliciviridae

  1. Zika virus in Asia.

    PubMed

    Duong, Veasna; Dussart, Philippe; Buchy, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging mosquito-borne virus that was first isolated from a sentinel rhesus monkey in the Zika Forest in Uganda in 1947. In Asia, the virus was isolated in Malaysia from Aedes aegypti mosquitoes in 1966, and the first human infections were reported in 1977 in Central Java, Indonesia. In this review, all reported cases of ZIKV infection in Asia as of September 1, 2016 are summarized and some of the hypotheses that could currently explain the apparently low incidence of Zika cases in Asia are explored.

  2. Zika virus: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Rawal, Gautam; Yadav, Sankalp; Kumar, Raj

    2016-01-01

    The Zika virus has been in the news for quite some time due to the ongoing recent outbreak in the Southern America, which started in December 2015. It has been declared a public health emergency by the World Health Organization in February 2016 owing to its association with the congenital deformities, particularly microcephaly in infants borne to the infected mothers. The rapid spread of the virus throughout the United States of America and subsequently to Asia has raised serious international concerns. Its spread to countries neighboring India is a serious threat to the Indian population. This review article gives an overview about the virus, its diagnosis, clinical features, and the management. PMID:28217576

  3. Diversity of influenza A virus subtypes isolated from domestic poultry in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Shortridge, K F; Butterfield, W K; Webster, R G; Campbell, C H

    1979-01-01

    The second phase of a 2-year influenza virus surveillance programme of domestic avian species in Hong Kong (up to October 1977) yielded influenza A virus, Newcastle disease virus, and Hong Kong paramyxovirus, as well as unidentified haemagglutinating agents. These viruses were isolated from the trachea or cloaca of apparently healthy domestic ducks, geese, and chickens originating from China and Hong Kong. Twenty-five combinations of haemagglutinin and neuraminidase surface antigens were identified from the 136 influenza A viruses isolated. Eight of the combinations do not appear to have been previously reported - Hav3Nav2, Hav4Nav2, Hav4Nav4, Hav4Nav5, Hav4Neq1, Hav6Nav4, Hav6Nav6, and Hav9Nav1. The existence of such a diverse pool of influenza virus genetic information may play a role in the emergence of new human pandemic strains.

  4. Horizon scanning for emergence of new viruses: from constructing complex scenarios to online games.

    PubMed

    Gale, P; Breed, A C

    2013-10-01

    Horizon scanning techniques can be developed to identify novel routes and sources for the emergence of viruses in the medium to long term. Central to horizon scanning is prediction of the complex scenarios through which viruses could emerge before they occur. One approach involves 'spidergrams' in which complex scenarios are generated by combining factors randomly selected from different categories of events. Spidergrams provide a framework for how different factors could interact, irrespective of the virus, and also enable testing of combinations not previously considered but which would be 'tested' in nature by a virus. The emergence of viruses through new routes is often related to changes, for example, in environmental and social factors, and the Internet will undoubtedly be used to identify long-term trends for consideration. In addition, online games may provide horizon scanners with suggestions for new routes and strategies that could be used by emerging viruses.

  5. Chimeric human parainfluenza virus bearing the Ebola virus glycoprotein as the sole surface protein is immunogenic and highly protective against Ebola virus challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Bukreyev, Alexander Marzi, Andrea; Feldmann, Friederike; Zhang Liqun; Dorward, David W.; Pickles, Raymond J.; Feldmann, Heinz; Collins, Peter L.

    2009-01-20

    We generated a new live-attenuated vaccine against Ebola virus (EBOV) based on a chimeric virus HPIV3/{delta}F-HN/EboGP that contains the EBOV glycoprotein (GP) as the sole transmembrane envelope protein combined with the internal proteins of human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3). Electron microscopy analysis of the virus particles showed that they have an envelope and surface spikes resembling those of EBOV and a particle size and shape resembling those of HPIV3. When HPIV3/{delta}F-HN/EboGP was inoculated via apical surface of an in vitro model of human ciliated airway epithelium, the virus was released from the apical surface; when applied to basolateral surface, the virus infected basolateral cells but did not spread through the tissue. Following intranasal (IN) inoculation of guinea pigs, scattered infected cells were detected in the lungs by immunohistochemistry, but infectious HPIV3/{delta}F-HN/EboGP could not be recovered from the lungs, blood, or other tissues. Despite the attenuation, the virus was highly immunogenic, and a single IN dose completely protected the animals against a highly lethal intraperitoneal challenge of guinea pig-adapted EBOV.

  6. Migration of plant viruses: Time correlations with the agriculture history and human immigration.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Kazusato

    2015-01-01

    In this review, I made the phylodynamic comparisons of three plant viruses, Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV), Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) and Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), using the genomic sequences of a large numbers of isolates collected worldwide. We analyzed these genomic nucleotide sequences, in combination with published sequences, to estimate the timescale and rate of evolution of the individual genes of TuMV, CaMV and CMV. The main hosts of the viruses are Brassicaceae crops. We also compared these estimates from complete sequences with those from which non-synonymous and invariate codons had been removed. Our analyses provided a preliminary definition of the present geographical structure of three plant virus populations in the world, and showed that the time of migration of three plant viruses correlate well with agriculture history and human immigration.

  7. Animal models of disease shed light on Nipah virus pathogenesis and transmission

    PubMed Central

    de Wit, Emmie; Munster, Vincent J.

    2014-01-01

    Nipah virus is an emerging virus infection that causes yearly disease outbreaks with high case fatality rates in Bangladesh. Nipah virus causes encephalitis and systemic vasculitis, sometimes in combination with respiratory disease. Pteropus species fruit bats are the natural reservoir of Nipah virus and zoonotic transmission can occur directly or via an intermediate host; human-to-human transmission occurs regularly. In this review we discuss the current state of knowledge on the pathogenesis and transmission of Nipah virus, focusing on dissemination of the virus through its host, known determinants of pathogenicity and routes of zoonotic and human-to-human transmission. Since data from human cases are sparse, this knowledge is largely based on the results of studies performed in animal models that recapitulate Nipah virus disease in humans. PMID:25229234

  8. Simultaneous Visualization of Parental and Progeny Viruses by a Capsid-Specific HaloTag Labeling Strategy.

    PubMed

    Liu, An-An; Zhang, Zhenfeng; Sun, En-Ze; Zheng, Zhenhua; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Hu, Qinxue; Wang, Hanzhong; Pang, Dai-Wen

    2016-01-26

    Real-time, long-term, single-particle tracking (SPT) provides us an opportunity to explore the fate of individual viruses toward understanding the mechanisms underlying virus infection, which in turn could lead to the development of therapeutics against viral diseases. However, the research focusing on the virus assembly and egress by SPT remains a challenge because established labeling strategies could neither specifically label progeny viruses nor make them distinguishable from the parental viruses. Herein, we have established a temporally controllable capsid-specific HaloTag labeling strategy based on reverse genetic technology. VP26, the smallest pseudorabies virus (PrV) capsid protein, was fused with HaloTag protein and labeled with the HaloTag ligand during virus replication. The labeled replication-competent recombinant PrV harvested from medium can be applied directly in SPT experiments without further modification. Thus, virus infectivity, which is critical for the visualization and analysis of viral motion, is retained to the largest extent. Moreover, progeny viruses can be distinguished from parental viruses using diverse HaloTag ligands. Consequently, the entire course of virus infection and replication can be visualized continuously, including virus attachment and capsid entry, transportation of capsids to the nucleus along microtubules, docking of capsids on the nucleus, endonuclear assembly of progeny capsids, and the egress of progeny viruses. In combination with SPT, the established strategy represents a versatile means to reveal the mechanisms and dynamic global picture of the life cycle of a virus.

  9. Combining HDAC inhibitors with oncolytic virotherapy for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Hiroshi; Nguyen, Tran; Chiocca, Ennio Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) enzymes play a critical role in the epigenetic regulation of cellular functions and signaling pathways in many cancers. HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) have been validated for single use or in combination with other drugs in oncologic therapeutics. An even more novel combination therapy with HDACi is to use them with an oncolytic virus. HDACi may lead to an amplification of tumor-specific lytic effects by facilitating increased cycles of viral replication, but there may also be direct anticancer effects of the drug by itself. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms of anti-cancer effects of the combination of oncolytic viruses with HDACi.

  10. Bilateral Linear Lichen Planus Pigmentosus Associated with Hepatitis C Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Vachiramon, Vasanop; Suchonwanit, Poonkiat; Thadanipon, Kunlawat

    2010-09-11

    Lichen planus pigmentosus is a rare subtype of lichen planus. We report a first case of lichen planus pigmentosus with bilateral linear distribution associated with hepatitis C virus infection. The lesion was improved after sun avoidance and treatment of hepatitis C virus infection with a combination of interferon and ribavirin. This case stresses the importance of screening for hepatitis C virus infection as lichen planus pigmentosus can be an associated condition.

  11. Bilateral Linear Lichen Planus Pigmentosus Associated with Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Vachiramon, Vasanop; Suchonwanit, Poonkiat; Thadanipon, Kunlawat

    2010-01-01

    Lichen planus pigmentosus is a rare subtype of lichen planus. We report a first case of lichen planus pigmentosus with bilateral linear distribution associated with hepatitis C virus infection. The lesion was improved after sun avoidance and treatment of hepatitis C virus infection with a combination of interferon and ribavirin. This case stresses the importance of screening for hepatitis C virus infection as lichen planus pigmentosus can be an associated condition. PMID:21060775

  12. A Quantitative Quasispecies Theory-Based Model of Virus Escape Mutation Under Immune Selection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    A quantitative quasispecies theory-based model of virus escape mutation under immune selection Hyung-June Woo and Jaques Reifman1 Biotechnology High...Viral infections involve a complex interplay of the immune response and escape mutation of the virus quasispecies inside a single host. Although...response. The virus quasispecies dynamics are explicitly repre- sented by mutations in the combined sequence space of a set of epitopes within the viral

  13. What's West Nile Virus?

    MedlinePlus

    ... is caused by a bite from an infected mosquito that's already carrying the virus, but it's important ... the risk of being bitten by an infected mosquito is greatest from July to early September. But ...

  14. Virus Chapter: Iflaviridae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The iflaviruses comprise viruses isolated from arthropod species of agricultural importance. All members of iflaviruses have a genome arrangement similar to the picornaviruses, ootyviruses, and secoviruses. However, phylogenetic analysis using the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase region showed that th...

  15. Hepatitis B virus (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis B is also known as serum hepatitis and is spread through blood and sexual contact. It is ... population. This photograph is an electronmicroscopic image of hepatitis B virus particles. (Image courtesy of the Centers for ...

  16. VIRUS instrument enclosures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochaska, T.; Allen, R.; Mondrik, N.; Rheault, J. P.; Sauseda, M.; Boster, E.; James, M.; Rodriguez-Patino, M.; Torres, G.; Ham, J.; Cook, E.; Baker, D.; DePoy, Darren L.; Marshall, Jennifer L.; Hill, G. J.; Perry, D.; Savage, R. D.; Good, J. M.; Vattiat, Brian L.

    2014-08-01

    The Visible Integral-Field Replicable Unit Spectrograph (VIRUS) instrument will be installed at the Hobby-Eberly Telescope† in the near future. The instrument will be housed in two enclosures that are mounted adjacent to the telescope, via the VIRUS Support Structure (VSS). We have designed the enclosures to support and protect the instrument, to enable servicing of the instrument, and to cool the instrument appropriately while not adversely affecting the dome environment. The system uses simple HVAC air handling techniques in conjunction with thermoelectric and standard glycol heat exchangers to provide efficient heat removal. The enclosures also provide power and data transfer to and from each VIRUS unit, liquid nitrogen cooling to the detectors, and environmental monitoring of the instrument and dome environments. In this paper, we describe the design and fabrication of the VIRUS enclosures and their subsystems.

  17. Avoiding Computer Viruses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Joyce; And Others

    1989-01-01

    The threat of computer sabotage is a real concern to business teachers and