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Sample records for cpt violating electrodynamics

  1. No contact terms for the magnetic field in Lorentz- and CPT-violating electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schober, Karl; Altschul, Brett

    2016-09-01

    In a Lorentz- and CPT-violating modification of electrodynamics, the fields of a moving charge are known to have unusual singularities. This raises the question of whether the singular behavior may include δ-function contact terms, similar to those that appear in the fields of idealized dipoles. However, by calculating the magnetic field of an infinite straight wire in this theory, we demonstrate that there are no such contact terms in the magnetic field of a moving point charge.

  2. Remarks on the Renormalization Properties of Lorentz- and CPT-Violating Quantum Electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Tiago R. S.; Sobreiro, Rodrigo F.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we employ algebraic renormalization technique to show the renormalizability to all orders in perturbation theory of the Lorentz- and CPT-violating QED. Essentially, we control the breaking terms by using a suitable set of external sources. Thus, with the symmetries restored, a perturbative treatment can be consistently employed. After showing the renormalizability, the external sources attain certain physical values, which allow the recovering of the starting physical action. The main result is that the original QED action presents the three usual independent renormalization parameters. The Lorentz-violating sector can be renormalized by 19 independent parameters. Moreover, vacuum divergences appear with extra independent renormalization. Remarkably, the bosonic odd sector (Chern-Simons-like term) does not renormalize and is not radiatively generated. One-loop computations are also presented and compared with the existing literature.

  3. CPT violation implies violation of Lorentz invariance.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, O W

    2002-12-01

    A interacting theory that violates CPT invariance necessarily violates Lorentz invariance. On the other hand, CPT invariance is not sufficient for out-of-cone Lorentz invariance. Theories that violate CPT by having different particle and antiparticle masses must be nonlocal. PMID:12484997

  4. CPT violation implies violation of Lorentz invariance.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, O W

    2002-12-01

    A interacting theory that violates CPT invariance necessarily violates Lorentz invariance. On the other hand, CPT invariance is not sufficient for out-of-cone Lorentz invariance. Theories that violate CPT by having different particle and antiparticle masses must be nonlocal.

  5. CPT violation and B-meson oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Kostelecky, V. Alan; Van Kooten, Richard J.

    2010-11-15

    Recent evidence for anomalous CP violation in B-meson oscillations can be interpreted as resulting from CPT violation. This yields the first sensitivity to CPT violation in the B{sub s}{sup 0} system, with the relevant coefficient for CPT violation constrained at the level of parts in 10{sup 12}.

  6. Probing CPT violation in B systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kundu, Anirban; Patra, Sunando Kumar; Nandi, Soumitra

    2010-04-01

    We discuss how a possible violation of the combined symmetry CPT in the B meson system can be investigated at the LHC. We show how a tagged and an untagged analysis of the decay modes of both B{sub d} and B{sub s} mesons can lead not only to a possible detection of a CPT-violating new physics but also to an understanding of its precise nature. The implication of CPT violation to a large mixing phase in the B{sub s} system is also discussed.

  7. CPT violation and particle-antiparticle asymmetry in cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgov, A. D.

    2010-04-15

    General features of generation of the cosmological charge asymmetry in CPT noninvariant world are discussed. If the effects of CPT violationmanifest themselves only inmass differences of particles and antiparticles, the baryon asymmetry of the Universe hardly can be explained solely by breaking of CPT invariance. However, CPT noninvariant theories may lead to a new effect of distorting the usual equilibrium distributions. If this takes place, CPT violation may explain the baryon asymmetry of the Universe.

  8. LSND, SN1987A, and CPT violation

    SciTech Connect

    Murayama, Hitoshi; Yanagida, T.

    2000-10-17

    We point out that neutrino events observed at Kamiokande andIMB from SN1987A disfavor the neutrino oscillation parameters preferredby the LSND experiment. For Delta m2>0 (the light side), theelectron neutrinos from the neutronization burst would be lost, while thefirst event at Kamiokande is quite likely to be due to an electronneutrino. For Delta m2<0 (the dark side), the average energy of thedominantly bar nu e events is already lower than the theoreticalexpectations, which would get aggravated by a complete conversion frombar nu mu to bar nu e. If taken seriously, the LSND data are disfavoredindependent of the existence of a sterile neutrino. A possible remedy isCPT violation, which allows different mass spectra for neutrinos andanti-neutrinos and hence can accommodate atmospheric, solar and LSND datawithout a sterile neutrino. If this is the case, Mini-BooNE must run inbar nu rather than the planned nu mode to test the LSND signal. Wespeculate on a possible origin of CPT violation.

  9. CPT Violation: What and where to look for

    SciTech Connect

    Mavromatos, Nick E.

    2005-10-26

    In this review I classify the possible ways of CPT violation, and I describe briefly their phenomenology, in both terrestrial and astrophysical experiments, including antimatter factories, neutral mesons and neutrinos, and discuss the various sensitivities. I also pay attention to disentangling genuine quantum-gravity induced CPT violation from 'fake' violation due to ordinary matter effects. A particularly interesting situation arises when the breaking of CPT invariance is through unitarity violations, in the sense of the matter theory being viewed as an effective field theory, entangled with decoherening quantum gravity 'environments'. In such a case the quantum mechanical CPT operator is ill defined due to another mathematical theorem, and one has novel effects associated with CPT Violating modifications of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen type correlations of entangled meson states in B and {phi} meson factories.

  10. Cosmological CPT violation and CMB polarization measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Jun-Qing

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we study the possibility of testing Charge-Parity-Time Reversal (CPT) symmetry with cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments. We consider two kinds of Chern-Simons (CS) term, electromagnetic CS term and gravitational CS term, and study their effects on the CMB polarization power spectra in detail. By combining current CMB polarization measurements, the seven-year WMAP, BOOMERanG 2003 and BICEP observations, we obtain a tight constraint on the rotation angle Δα = -2.28±1.02 deg (1 σ), indicating a 2.2 σ detection of the CPT violation. Here, we particularly take the systematic errors of CMB measurements into account. After adding the QUaD polarization data, the constraint becomes -1.34 < Δα < 0.82 deg at 95% confidence level. When comparing with the effect of electromagnetic CS term, the gravitational CS term could only generate TB and EB power spectra with much smaller amplitude. Therefore, the induced parameter epsilon can not be constrained from the current polarization data. Furthermore, we study the capabilities of future CMB measurements, Planck and CMBPol, on the constraints of Δα and epsilon. We find that the constraint of Δα can be significantly improved by a factor of 15. Therefore, if this rotation angle effect can not be taken into account properly, the constraints of cosmological parameters will be biased obviously. For the gravitational CS term, the future Planck data still can not constrain epsilon very well, if the primordial tensor perturbations are small, r < 0.1. We need the more accurate CMBPol experiment to give better constraint on epsilon.

  11. Lorentz- and CPT-violating signals in Penning traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yunhua; Kostelecký, Alan

    2016-05-01

    CPT and Lorentz symmetries are fundamental properties of the Standard Model. However, violation of these symmetries is possible in an underlying unified theory such as strings. This talk will focus on possible experimental effects for Lorentz and CPT violations. In particular, observable signals in measurements of anomaly and cyclotron frequencies of particles and antiparticles in a Penning trap will be discussed. New constraints from existing data will be presented and prospective sensitivities in future experiments will be outlined.

  12. Checking T and CPT violation with sterile neutrino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pant, Yogita; Diwakar, Sujata; Singh, Jyotsna; Singh, R. B.

    2016-08-01

    Post LSND results, sterile neutrinos have drawn attention and motivated the high energy physics, astronomy and cosmology to probe physics beyond the standard model considering minimal 3 + 1 (3 active and 1 sterile) to 3 + N neutrino schemes. The analytical equations for neutrino conversion probabilities are developed in this work for 3 + 1 neutrino scheme. Here, we have tried to explore the possible signals of T and CPT violations with four flavor neutrino scheme at neutrino factory. Values of sterile parameters considered in this analysis are taken from two different types of neutrino experiments viz. long baseline experiments and reactor+atmospheric experiments. In this work golden and discovery channels are selected for the investigation of T violation. While observing T violation we stipulate that neutrino factory working at 50 GeV energy has the potential to observe the signatures of T violation through discovery channel if sterile parameter values are equal to that taken from reactor+atmospheric experiments. The ability of neutrino factory for constraining CPT violation is enhanced with increase in energy for normal neutrino mass hierarchy (NH). Neutrino factory with the exposure time of 500 kt-yr will be able to capture CPT violation with δc31 ≥ 3.6 ×10-23 GeV at 3σ level for NH and for IH with δc31 ≥ 4 ×10-23 GeV at 3σ level.

  13. Neutron-antineutron transition as a test-bed for dynamical CPT violations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addazi, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    We show a simple mechanism for a dynamical CPT violation in the neutron sector. In particular, we show a CPT-violating see-saw mechanism, generating a Majorana mass and a CPT-violating mass for the neutron. CPT-violating see-saw involves a sterile partner of the neutron, living in a hidden sector, in which CPT is spontaneously broken. In particular, neutrons (antineutrons) can communicate with the hidden sector through nonperturbative quantum gravity effects called exotic instantons. Exotic instantons dynamically break R-parity, generating one effective vertex between the neutron and its sterile partner. In this way, we show how a small CPT-violating mass term for the neutron is naturally generated. This model can be tested in the next generation of experiments in neutron-antineutron physics. This strongly motivates researches of CPT-violating effects in neutron-antineutron physics as a test-bed for dynamical CPT-violations in SM.

  14. D0 Evidence for CP Violation and Implication for CPT Violation in B-Meson Mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Kooten, R.Van; /Indiana U.

    2010-08-01

    A D0 analysis measuring the charge asymmetry A{sub sl}{sup b} of like-sign dimuon events due to semileptonic b-hadron decays at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider is described. It differs by 3.2 standard deviations from the Standard Model prediction to provide first evidence of CPT-invariant anomalous CP violation in the mixing of neutral B mesons, and is compared to the CP-violating phase obtained from a D0 analysis of the time-dependent decay angles in B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{phi}. If CPT violation is allowed, the dimuon asymmetry also yields the first sensitivity to CPT violation in the B{sub s}{sup 0} system.

  15. Omnibus experiment: CPT and CP violation with sterile neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loo, K. K.; Novikov, N. Yu; Smirnov, M. V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Wurm, M.

    2016-05-01

    We propose to probe both the CPT and CP violation together with the search for sterile neutrinos in one do-it-all experiment. This omnibus experiment would utilize neutrino oscillometry with large scintillator detectors like LENA, JUNO or RENO-50 and manmade radioactive sources similar to the ones used by the GALLEX experiment. Our calculations indicate that such an experiment is realistic and could be performed in parallel to the main research plan for JUNO, LENA, or RENO-50. Assuming as the starting point the values of the oscillation parameters indicated by the current global fit (in 3 active + 1 sterile scenario) and requiring at least 5 sigma confidence level, we estimate that with the proposed experiment we would be able to detect CPT mass anomalies of the order of 1% or larger.

  16. Searches for Lorentz and CPT Violation with Fermions in Penning Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yunhua; Kostelecký, V. Alan

    2015-04-01

    A theoretical analysis is performed of the prospects for detecting Lorentz and CPT violation in Penning-trap experiments with trapped particles and antiparticles. Using the general effective field theory called the Standard-Model Extension, we study signals in anomaly and cyclotron frequencies arising from Lorentz- and CPT-violating operators of arbitrary mass dimensions. Constraints on coefficients for Lorentz and CPT violation are extracted from existing data, and sensitivities attainable in forthcoming Penning-trap experiments are discussed.

  17. Hydrogen and antihydrogen spectroscopy for studies of CPT and Lorentz symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Bluhm, Robert; Kostelecky, V. Alan; Russell, Neil

    1999-01-15

    A theoretical study of possible signals for CPT and Lorentz violation arising in hydrogen and antihydrogen spectroscopy is described. The analysis uses a CPT- and Lorentz-violating extension of quantum electrodynamics, obtained from a general Lorentz-violating extension of the minimal standard model with both CPT-even and CPT-odd terms. Certain 1S-2S transitions and hyperfine Zeeman lines exhibit effects at leading order in small CPT-violating couplings.

  18. Hydrogen and antihydrogen spectroscopy for studies of CPT and Lorentz symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Bluhm, R.; Kostelecky, V.A.; Russell, N.

    1999-01-01

    A theoretical study of possible signals for CPT and Lorentz violation arising in hydrogen and antihydrogen spectroscopy is described. The analysis uses a CPT- and Lorentz-violating extension of quantum electrodynamics, obtained from a general Lorentz-violating extension of the minimal standard model with both CPT-even and CPT-odd terms. Certain 1S-2S transitions and hyperfine Zeeman lines exhibit effects at leading order in small CPT-violating couplings. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Decoherence induced CPT violation and entangled neutral mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Bernabeu, J.; Mavromatos, Nick E.; Sarkar, Sarben

    2006-08-15

    We discuss two classes of semimicroscopic theoretical models of stochastic spacetime foam in quantum gravity and the associated effects on entangled states of neutral mesons, signalling an intrinsic breakdown of CPT invariance. One class of models deals with a specific model of foam, initially constructed in the context of noncritical (Liouville) string theory, but viewed here in the more general context of effective quantum-gravity models. The relevant Hamiltonian perturbation, describing the interaction of the meson with the foam medium, consists of off-diagonal stochastic metric fluctuations, connecting distinct mass eigenstates (or the appropriate generalization thereof in the case of K-mesons), and it is proportional to the relevant momentum transfer (along the direction of motion of the meson pair). There are two kinds of CPT-violating effects in this case, which can be experimentally disentangled: one (termed '{omega}-effect') is associated with the failure of the indistinguishability between the neutral meson and its antiparticle, and affects certain symmetry properties of the initial state of the two-meson system; the second effect is generated by the time evolution of the system in the medium of the spacetime foam, and can result in time-dependent contributions of the {omega}-effect type in the time profile of the two-meson state. Estimates of both effects are given, which show that, at least in certain models, such effects are not far from the sensitivity of experimental facilities available currently or in the near future. The other class of quantum-gravity models involves a medium of gravitational fluctuations which behaves like a 'thermal bath'. In this model both of the above-mentioned intrinsic CPT violation effects are not valid.

  20. Nonlinear modes of the tensor Dirac equation and CPT violation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reifler, Frank J.; Morris, Randall D.

    1993-01-01

    Recently, it has been shown that Dirac's bispinor equation can be expressed, in an equivalent tensor form, as a constrained Yang-Mills equation in the limit of an infinitely large coupling constant. It was also shown that the free tensor Dirac equation is a completely integrable Hamiltonian system with Lie algebra type Poisson brackets, from which Fermi quantization can be derived directly without using bispinors. The Yang-Mills equation for a finite coupling constant is investigated. It is shown that the nonlinear Yang-Mills equation has exact plane wave solutions in one-to-one correspondence with the plane wave solutions of Dirac's bispinor equation. The theory of nonlinear dispersive waves is applied to establish the existence of wave packets. The CPT violation of these nonlinear wave packets, which could lead to new observable effects consistent with current experimental bounds, is investigated.

  1. Feynman propagator for the nonbirefringent CPT-even electrodynamics of the standard model extension

    SciTech Connect

    Casana, Rodolfo; Ferreira, Manoel M. Jr.; Santos, Frederico E. P. dos; Gomes, Adalto R.

    2010-12-15

    The CPT-even gauge sector of the standard model extension is composed of 19 components comprised in the tensor (K{sub F}){sub {mu}{nu}{rho}{sigma}}, of which nine do not yield birefringence. In this work, we examine the Maxwell electrodynamics supplemented by these nine nonbirefringent CPT-even components in aspects related to the Feynman propagator and full consistency (stability, causality, unitarity). We adopt a prescription that parametrizes the nonbirefringent components in terms of a symmetric and traceless tensor, K{sub {mu}{nu}}, and second parametrization that writes K{sub {mu}{nu}} in terms of two arbitrary four-vectors, U{sub {mu}} and V{sub {nu}}. We then explicitly evaluate the gauge propagator of this electrodynamics in a tensor closed way. In the sequel, we show that this propagator and involved dispersion relations can be specialized for the parity-odd and parity-even sectors of the tensor (K{sub F}){sub {mu}{nu}{rho}{sigma}}. In this way, we reassess some results of the literature and derive some new outcomes showing that the parity-even anisotropic sector engenders a stable, noncausal and unitary electrodynamics.

  2. Search for Violation of CPT and Lorentz Invariance in Bs(0) Meson Oscillations.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agnew, J P; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Askew, A; Atkins, S; Augsten, K; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bazterra, V; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Bellantoni, L; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bhat, P C; Bhatia, S; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Borysova, M; Brandt, A; Brandt, O; Brock, R; Bross, A; Brown, D; Bu, X B; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Buszello, C P; Camacho-Pérez, E; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Caughron, S; Chakrabarti, S; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapon, E; Chen, G; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Cuth, J; Cutts, D; Das, A; Davies, G; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Déliot, F; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Deterre, C; DeVaughan, K; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Ding, P F; Dominguez, A; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Fauré, A; Feng, L; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fuess, S; Garbincius, P H; Garcia-Bellido, A; García-González, J A; Gavrilov, V; Geng, W; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Gogota, O; Golovanov, G; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guillemin, T; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haley, J; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Head, T; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegab, H; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hogan, J; Hohlfeld, M; Holzbauer, J L; Howley, I; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Ilchenko, Y; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jayasinghe, A; Jeong, M S; Jesik, R; Jiang, P; Johns, K; Johnson, E; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Joshi, J; Jung, A W; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Katsanos, I; Kaur, M; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Kiselevich, I; Kohli, J M; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurča, T; Kuzmin, V A; Lammers, S; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Lei, X; Lellouch, J; Li, D; Li, H; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, H; Liu, Y; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lopes de Sa, R; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madar, R; Magaña-Villalba, R; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mansour, J; Martínez-Ortega, J; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Miconi, F; Mondal, N K; Mulhearn, M; Nagy, E; Narain, M; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nguyen, H T; Nunnemann, T; Orduna, J; Osman, N; Osta, J; Pal, A; Parashar, N; Parihar, V; Park, S K; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, Y; Petridis, K; Petrillo, G; Pétroff, P; Pleier, M-A; Podstavkov, V M; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Price, D; Prokopenko, N; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Ratoff, P N; Razumov, I; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Rominsky, M; Ross, A; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santos, A S; Savage, G; Savitskyi, M; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schott, M; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shary, V; Shaw, S; Shchukin, A A; Simak, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Soustruznik, K; Stark, J; Stoyanova, D A; Strauss, M; Suter, L; Svoisky, P; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tsai, Y-T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verkheev, A Y; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vilanova, D; Vokac, P; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weichert, J; Welty-Rieger, L; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yamada, R; Yang, S; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, W; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Youn, S W; Yu, J M; Zennamo, J; Zhao, T G; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L

    2015-10-16

    We present the first search for CPT-violating effects in the mixing of Bs(0) mesons using the full Run II data set with an integrated luminosity of 10.4  fb(-1) of proton-antiproton collisions collected using the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We measure the CPT-violating asymmetry in the decay Bs(0)→μ(±)Ds(±) as a function of celestial direction and sidereal phase. We find no evidence for CPT-violating effects and place limits on the direction and magnitude of flavor-dependent CPT- and Lorentz-invariance violating coupling coefficients. We find 95% confidence intervals of Δa⊥<1.2×10(-12)  GeV and (-0.8<ΔaT-0.396ΔaZ<3.9)×10(-13)  GeV. PMID:26550864

  3. Search for Violation of $CPT$ and Lorentz Invariance in $${B_s^0}$$ Meson Oscillations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2015-06-12

    We present the first search for CPT-violating effects in the mixing of B0s mesons using the full Run II data set with an integrated luminosity of 10.4 fb-1 of proton-antiproton collisions collected using the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We measure the CPT-violating asymmetry in the decay B0s → µ±D±s as a function of celestial direction and sidereal phase. We find no evidence for CPT-violating effects and place limits on the direction and magnitude of flavor-dependent CPTand Lorentz-invariance violating coupling coefficients. We find 95% confidence intervals of Δa⊥ < 1.2 × 10-12 GeV and (-0.8 < ΔaT -more » 0.396ΔaZ < 3.9) × 10-13 GeV.« less

  4. Lorentz-violating spinor electrodynamics and Penning traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yunhua; Kostelecký, V. Alan

    2016-09-01

    The prospects are explored for testing Lorentz- and C P T -violating quantum electrodynamics in experiments with Penning traps. We present the Lagrange density of Lorentz-violating spinor electrodynamics with operators of mass dimensions up to 6, and we discuss some of its properties. The theory is used to derive Lorentz- and C P T -violating perturbative shifts of the energy levels of a particle confined to a Penning trap. Observable signals are discussed for trapped electrons, positrons, protons, and antiprotons. Existing experimental measurements on anomaly frequencies are used to extract new or improved bounds on numerous coefficients for Lorentz and C P T violation, using sidereal variations of observables and comparisons between particles and antiparticles.

  5. A Search for Lorentz Invariance and CPT Violation with the MINOS Far Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, P.; Auty, D.J.; Ayres, D.S.; Backhouse, C.; Barr, G.; Barrett, W.L.; Bishai, M.; Blake, A.; Bock, G.J.; Boehnlein, D.J.; Bogert, D.; /Fermilab /Indiana U.

    2010-07-01

    We searched for a sidereal modulation in the MINOS far detector neutrino rate. Such a signal would be a consequence of Lorentz and CPT violation as described by the Standard-Model Extension framework. It also would be the first detection of a perturbative effect to conventional neutrino mass oscillations. We found no evidence for this sidereal signature and the upper limits placed on the magnitudes of the Lorentz and CPT violating coefficients describing the theory are an improvement by factors of 20-510 over the current best limits found using the MINOS near detector.

  6. Search for Lorentz invariance and CPT violation with the MINOS far detector.

    PubMed

    Adamson, P; Auty, D J; Ayres, D S; Backhouse, C; Barr, G; Barrett, W L; Bishai, M; Blake, A; Bock, G J; Boehnlein, D J; Bogert, D; Bower, C; Budd, S; Cavanaugh, S; Cherdack, D; Childress, S; Choudhary, B C; Coelho, J A B; Cobb, J H; Coleman, S J; Corwin, L; Cravens, J P; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Danko, I Z; de Jong, J K; Devenish, N E; Diwan, M V; Dorman, M; Escobar, C O; Evans, J J; Falk, E; Feldman, G J; Frohne, M V; Gallagher, H R; Gomes, R A; Goodman, M C; Gouffon, P; Gran, R; Grant, N; Grzelak, K; Habig, A; Harris, D; Harris, P G; Hartnell, J; Hatcher, R; Himmel, A; Holin, A; Huang, X; Hylen, J; Ilic, J; Irwin, G M; Isvan, Z; Jaffe, D E; James, C; Jensen, D; Kafka, T; Kasahara, S M S; Koizumi, G; Kopp, S; Kordosky, M; Krahn, Z; Kreymer, A; Lang, K; Lefeuvre, G; Ling, J; Litchfield, P J; Loiacono, L; Lucas, P; Mann, W A; Marshak, M L; Mayer, N; McGowan, A M; Mehdiyev, R; Meier, J R; Messier, M D; Michael, D G; Miller, J L; Miller, W H; Mishra, S R; Mitchell, J; Moore, C D; Mualem, L; Mufson, S; Musser, J; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Newman, H B; Nichol, R J; Oliver, W P; Orchanian, M; Paley, J; Patterson, R B; Patzak, T; Pawloski, G; Pearce, G F; Pittam, R; Plunkett, R K; Ratchford, J; Raufer, T M; Rebel, B; Rodrigues, P A; Rosenfeld, C; Rubin, H A; Ryabov, V A; Sanchez, M C; Saoulidou, N; Schneps, J; Schreiner, P; Semenov, V K; Shanahan, P; Smart, W; Sousa, A; Strait, M; Tagg, N; Talaga, R L; Thomas, J; Thomson, M A; Tinti, G; Toner, R; Tzanakos, G; Urheim, J; Vahle, P; Viren, B; Weber, A; Webb, R C; White, C; Whitehead, L; Wojcicki, S G; Wright, D M; Yang, T; Zois, M; Zwaska, R

    2010-10-01

    We searched for a sidereal modulation in the MINOS far detector neutrino rate. Such a signal would be a consequence of Lorentz and CPT violation as described by the standard-model extension framework. It also would be the first detection of a perturbative effect to conventional neutrino mass oscillations. We found no evidence for this sidereal signature, and the upper limits placed on the magnitudes of the Lorentz and CPT violating coefficients describing the theory are an improvement by factors of 20-510 over the current best limits found by using the MINOS near detector.

  7. Bound on Lorentz and CPT Violating Boost Effects for the Neutron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsworth, Ronald

    2003-01-01

    A search for a sidereal annual variation in the frequency difference between co-located Xe-129 and He-3 Zeeman masers sets a limit of approximately 10(exp -27) GeV on the coupling of the neutron to the time component of a possible background Lorentz and CPT violating tensor field.

  8. Novel type of CPT violation for correlated Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen states of neutral mesons.

    PubMed

    Bernabéu, J; Mavromatos, N; Papavassiliou, J

    2004-04-01

    We discuss modifications to the concept of an "antiparticle," induced by a breakdown of the CPT symmetry at a fundamental level, realized within an extended class of quantum gravity models. The resulting loss of particle-antiparticle identity in the neutral-meson system induces a breaking of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen correlation imposed by Bose statistics. This is parametrized by a complex parameter associated with the contamination by the "wrong symmetry" state. The physical consequences are studied, and novel observables of CPT violation in phi factories are proposed. PMID:15089595

  9. Novel type of CPT violation for correlated Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen states of neutral mesons.

    PubMed

    Bernabéu, J; Mavromatos, N; Papavassiliou, J

    2004-04-01

    We discuss modifications to the concept of an "antiparticle," induced by a breakdown of the CPT symmetry at a fundamental level, realized within an extended class of quantum gravity models. The resulting loss of particle-antiparticle identity in the neutral-meson system induces a breaking of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen correlation imposed by Bose statistics. This is parametrized by a complex parameter associated with the contamination by the "wrong symmetry" state. The physical consequences are studied, and novel observables of CPT violation in phi factories are proposed.

  10. Search for Violation of CPT and Lorentz Invariance in B-s(0) Meson Oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V. M.

    2015-10-14

    We present the first search for CPT-violating effects in the mixing of B0s mesons using the full Run II data set with an integrated luminosity of 10.4 fb-1 of proton-antiproton collisions collected using the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We measure the CPT-violating asymmetry in the decay B0s → µ±D±s as a function of celestial direction and sidereal phase. We find no evidence for CPT-violating effects and place limits on the direction and magnitude of flavor-dependent CPTand Lorentz-invariance violating coupling coefficients. We find 95% confidence intervals of Δa⊥ < 1.2 × 10-12 GeV and (-0.8 < ΔaT - 0.396ΔaZ < 3.9) × 10-13 GeV.

  11. Search for Violation of $CPT$ and Lorentz Invariance in ${B_s^0}$ Meson Oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2015-06-12

    We present the first search for CPT-violating effects in the mixing of B0s mesons using the full Run II data set with an integrated luminosity of 10.4 fb-1 of proton-antiproton collisions collected using the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We measure the CPT-violating asymmetry in the decay B0s → µ±D±s as a function of celestial direction and sidereal phase. We find no evidence for CPT-violating effects and place limits on the direction and magnitude of flavor-dependent CPTand Lorentz-invariance violating coupling coefficients. We find 95% confidence intervals of Δa⊥ < 1.2 × 10-12 GeV and (-0.8 < ΔaT - 0.396ΔaZ < 3.9) × 10-13 GeV.

  12. Search for Violations of Lorentz Invariance and CPT Symmetry in B_{(s)}^{0} Mixing.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Abellán Beteta, C; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Andreassi, G; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; d'Argent, P; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baker, S; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Bel, L J; Bellee, V; Belloli, N; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bertolin, A; Betti, F; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bifani, S; Billoir, P; Bird, T; Birnkraut, A; Bizzeti, A; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borgheresi, A; Borghi, S; Borisyak, M; Borsato, M; Boubdir, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Braun, S; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Buchanan, E; Burr, C; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Capriotti, L; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carniti, P; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cavallero, G; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chatzikonstantinidis, G; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chrzaszcz, M; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cogoni, V; Cojocariu, L; Collazuol, G; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Crocombe, A; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dall'Occo, E; Dalseno, J; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Aguiar Francisco, O; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Dean, C-T; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Demmer, M; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dey, B; Di Canto, A; Di Ruscio, F; Dijkstra, H; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dufour, L; Dujany, G; Dungs, K; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R; Fazzini, D; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferrari, F; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fleuret, F; Fohl, K; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forshaw, D C; Forty, R; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; García Pardiñas, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Garsed, P J; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gavardi, L; Gazzoni, G; Gerick, D; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Girard, O G; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graverini, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadavizadeh, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; He, J; Head, T; Heister, A; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hongming, L; Hulsbergen, W; Humair, T; Hushchyn, M; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jawahery, A; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Karodia, S; Kecke, M; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Kenzie, M; Ketel, T; Khairullin, E; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Kirn, T; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Kozeiha, M; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Krzemien, W; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kuonen, A K; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Lemos Cid, E; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Liu, X; Loh, D; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lucchesi, D; Lucio Martinez, M; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Lusardi, N; Lusiani, A; Lyu, X; Machefert, F; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Maguire, K; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Manning, P; Mapelli, A; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martin, M; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massacrier, L M; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathad, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mauri, A; Maurin, B; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Melnychuk, D; Merk, M; Merli, A; Michielin, E; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Mitzel, D S; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monroy, I A; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Moron, J; Morris, A B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Müller, D; Müller, J; Müller, K; Müller, V; Mussini, M; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nandi, A; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Niess, V; Nieswand, S; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Novoselov, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, C J G; Osorio Rodrigues, B; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Otto, A; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Pappenheimer, C; Parker, W; Parkes, C; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perret, P; Pescatore, L; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Petruzzo, M; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pikies, M; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Piucci, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Poikela, T; Polci, F; Poluektov, A; Polyakov, I; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Price, E; Price, J D; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Quagliani, R; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rama, M; Ramos Pernas, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Raven, G; Redi, F; Reichert, S; Dos Reis, A C; Renaudin, V; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Lopez, J A; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogozhnikov, A; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Ronayne, J W; Rotondo, M; Ruf, T; Ruiz Valls, P; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santimaria, M; Santovetti, E; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrina, D; Schael, S; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmelzer, T; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schubiger, M; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Semennikov, A; Sergi, A; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Siddi, B G; Silva Coutinho, R; Silva de Oliveira, L; Simi, G; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, E; Smith, I T; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Spradlin, P; Sridharan, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Stefkova, S; Steinkamp, O; Stenyakin, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Tayduganov, A; Tekampe, T; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Trabelsi, K; Traill, M; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Trisovic, A; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vacca, C; Vagnoni, V; Valat, S; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; van Veghel, M; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Volkov, V; Vollhardt, A; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; de Vries, J A; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Weiden, A; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wilkinson, G; Wilkinson, M; Williams, M; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Williams, T; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wraight, K; Wright, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yin, H; Yu, J; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zheng, Y; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zhukov, V; Zucchelli, S

    2016-06-17

    Violations of CPT symmetry and Lorentz invariance are searched for by studying interference effects in B^{0} mixing and in B_{s}^{0} mixing. Samples of B^{0}→J/ψK_{S}^{0} and B_{s}^{0}→J/ψK^{+}K^{-} decays are recorded by the LHCb detector in proton-proton collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3  fb^{-1}. No periodic variations of the particle-antiparticle mass differences are found, consistent with Lorentz invariance and CPT symmetry. Results are expressed in terms of the standard model extension parameter Δa_{μ} with precisions of O(10^{-15}) and O(10^{-14})  GeV for the B^{0} and B_{s}^{0} systems, respectively. With no assumption on Lorentz (non)invariance, the CPT-violating parameter z in the B_{s}^{0} system is measured for the first time and found to be Re(z)=-0.022±0.033±0.005 and Im(z)=0.004±0.011±0.002, where the first uncertainties are statistical and the second systematic. PMID:27367382

  13. Search for Violations of Lorentz Invariance and CPT Symmetry in B_{(s)}^{0} Mixing.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Abellán Beteta, C; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Andreassi, G; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; d'Argent, P; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baker, S; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Bel, L J; Bellee, V; Belloli, N; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bertolin, A; Betti, F; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bifani, S; Billoir, P; Bird, T; Birnkraut, A; Bizzeti, A; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borgheresi, A; Borghi, S; Borisyak, M; Borsato, M; Boubdir, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Braun, S; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Buchanan, E; Burr, C; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Capriotti, L; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carniti, P; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cavallero, G; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chatzikonstantinidis, G; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chrzaszcz, M; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cogoni, V; Cojocariu, L; Collazuol, G; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Crocombe, A; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dall'Occo, E; Dalseno, J; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Aguiar Francisco, O; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Dean, C-T; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Demmer, M; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dey, B; Di Canto, A; Di Ruscio, F; Dijkstra, H; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dufour, L; Dujany, G; Dungs, K; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R; Fazzini, D; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferrari, F; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fleuret, F; Fohl, K; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forshaw, D C; Forty, R; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; García Pardiñas, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Garsed, P J; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gavardi, L; Gazzoni, G; Gerick, D; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Girard, O G; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graverini, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadavizadeh, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; He, J; Head, T; Heister, A; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hongming, L; Hulsbergen, W; Humair, T; Hushchyn, M; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jawahery, A; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Karodia, S; Kecke, M; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Kenzie, M; Ketel, T; Khairullin, E; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Kirn, T; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Kozeiha, M; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Krzemien, W; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kuonen, A K; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Lemos Cid, E; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Liu, X; Loh, D; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lucchesi, D; Lucio Martinez, M; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Lusardi, N; Lusiani, A; Lyu, X; Machefert, F; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Maguire, K; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Manning, P; Mapelli, A; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martin, M; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massacrier, L M; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathad, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mauri, A; Maurin, B; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Melnychuk, D; Merk, M; Merli, A; Michielin, E; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Mitzel, D S; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monroy, I A; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Moron, J; Morris, A B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Müller, D; Müller, J; Müller, K; Müller, V; Mussini, M; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nandi, A; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Niess, V; Nieswand, S; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Novoselov, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, C J G; Osorio Rodrigues, B; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Otto, A; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Pappenheimer, C; Parker, W; Parkes, C; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perret, P; Pescatore, L; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Petruzzo, M; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pikies, M; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Piucci, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Poikela, T; Polci, F; Poluektov, A; Polyakov, I; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Price, E; Price, J D; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Quagliani, R; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rama, M; Ramos Pernas, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Raven, G; Redi, F; Reichert, S; Dos Reis, A C; Renaudin, V; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Lopez, J A; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogozhnikov, A; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Ronayne, J W; Rotondo, M; Ruf, T; Ruiz Valls, P; Saborido Silva, J J; 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Swientek, K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Tayduganov, A; Tekampe, T; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Trabelsi, K; Traill, M; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Trisovic, A; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vacca, C; Vagnoni, V; Valat, S; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; van Veghel, M; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Volkov, V; Vollhardt, A; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; de Vries, J A; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Weiden, A; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wilkinson, G; Wilkinson, M; Williams, M; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Williams, T; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wraight, K; Wright, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yin, H; Yu, J; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zheng, Y; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zhukov, V; Zucchelli, S

    2016-06-17

    Violations of CPT symmetry and Lorentz invariance are searched for by studying interference effects in B^{0} mixing and in B_{s}^{0} mixing. Samples of B^{0}→J/ψK_{S}^{0} and B_{s}^{0}→J/ψK^{+}K^{-} decays are recorded by the LHCb detector in proton-proton collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3  fb^{-1}. No periodic variations of the particle-antiparticle mass differences are found, consistent with Lorentz invariance and CPT symmetry. Results are expressed in terms of the standard model extension parameter Δa_{μ} with precisions of O(10^{-15}) and O(10^{-14})  GeV for the B^{0} and B_{s}^{0} systems, respectively. With no assumption on Lorentz (non)invariance, the CPT-violating parameter z in the B_{s}^{0} system is measured for the first time and found to be Re(z)=-0.022±0.033±0.005 and Im(z)=0.004±0.011±0.002, where the first uncertainties are statistical and the second systematic.

  14. Constraints on CPT violation from Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe three year polarization data: A wavelet analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cabella, Paolo; Silk, Joseph; Natoli, Paolo

    2007-12-15

    We perform a wavelet analysis of the temperature and polarization maps of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) delivered by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe experiment in search for a parity-violating signal. Such a signal could be seeded by new physics beyond the standard model, for which the Lorentz and CPT symmetries may not hold. Under these circumstances, the linear polarization direction of a CMB photon may get rotated during its cosmological journey, a phenomenon also called cosmological birefringence. Recently, Feng et al. have analyzed a subset of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe and BOOMERanG 2003 angular power spectra of the CMB, deriving a constraint that mildly favors a nonzero rotation. By using wavelet transforms we set a tighter limit on the CMB photon rotation angle {delta}{alpha}=-2.5{+-}3.0 ({delta}{alpha}=-2.5{+-}6.0) at the one (two) {sigma} level, consistent with a null detection.

  15. Search for CPT and lorentz violation in B0-B[over ]0 oscillations with dilepton events.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lopes Pegna, D; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Osipenkov, I L; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Vitug, G M; Zhang, L; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Gabareen, A M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Klose, V; Kobel, M J; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Lombardo, V; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Watson, J E; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Santoro, V; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Panduro Vazquez, W; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, L; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Zheng, Y; McLachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; Losecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gagliardi, N; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Biesiada, J; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Baracchini, E; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Castelli, G; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Roethel, W; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Miyashita, T S; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Neal, H

    2008-04-01

    We report results of a search for CPT and Lorentz violation in B(0)-B[over ](0) oscillations using inclusive dilepton events from 232 x 10(6) Upsilon(4S)-->BB[over ] decays recorded by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B Factory at SLAC. We find 2.8sigma significance, compatible with no signal, for variations in the complex CPT violation parameter z at the Earth's sidereal frequency and extract values for the quantities Deltaa(micro) in the general Lorentz-violating standard-model extension. The spectral powers for variations in z over the frequency range 0.26 yr(-1) to 2.1 solar day(-1) are also compatible with no signal. PMID:18517935

  16. Decoherence and CPT Violation in a Stringy Model of Space-Time Foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavromatos, Nick E.

    2010-07-01

    I discuss a model inspired from the string/brane framework, in which our Universe is represented (after perhaps appropriate compactification) as a three brane, propagating in a bulk space time punctured by D0-brane (D-particle) defects. As the D3-brane world moves in the bulk, the D-particles cross it, and from an effective observer on D3 the situation looks like a “space-time foam” with the defects “flashing” on and off (“D-particle foam”). The open strings, with their ends attached on the brane, which represent matter in this scenario, can interact with the D-particles on the D3-brane universe in a topologically non-trivial manner, involving splitting and capture of the strings by the D0-brane defects. Such processes are consistently described by logarithmic conformal field theories on the world-sheet of the strings. Physically, they result in effective decoherence of the string matter on the D3 brane, and as a result, of CPT Violation, but of a type that implies an ill-defined nature of the effective CPT operator. Due to electric charge conservation, only electrically neutral (string) matter can exhibit such interactions with the D-particle foam. This may have unique, experimentally detectable (in principle), consequences for electrically-neutral entangled quantum matter states on the brane world, in particular the modification of the pertinent Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) Correlation in neutral mesons in an appropriate meson factory. For the simplest scenarios, the order of magnitude of such effects might lie within the sensitivity of upgraded φ-meson factories.

  17. Search for T, CP, and CPT violation in B0-B0 mixing with inclusive dilepton events.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro Vazquez, W; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Kelly, M P; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S Y; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Potter, C T; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; del Re, D; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Galeazzi, F; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Martinez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Tan, P; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2006-06-30

    We report the results of a search for T, CP, CPT, and violation in B0-B0 mixing using an inclusive dilepton sample collected by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II factory. Using a sample of 232 x 10(6) BB pairs, we measure the T and CP violation parameter |q/p| - 1 = (-0.8 +/- 2.7(stat) +/- 1.9(syst) x 10(-3), and the CPT and CP parameters Imz = (13.9 +/- 7.3(stat) +/- 3.2(syst)) x 10(-3) and Delta Gamma x Rez = (7.1 +/- 3.9(stat) +/- 2.0(stat)) x 10(-3) ps(-1). The statistical correlation between the measurements of Imz and Delta Gamma x Rez is 76%.

  18. Search for T, CP and CPT Violation in B0-B0bar Mixingwith Inclusive Dilepton Events

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2006-03-31

    The authors report the results of a search for T, CP and CPT violation in B{sup 0}-{bar B}{sup 0} mixing using an inclusive dilepton sample collected by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II B Factory. Using a sample of 232 million B{bar B} pairs, with a simultaneous likelihood fit of the same-sign and opposite-sign dileptons, they measure the T and Cp violation parameter |q/p|-1 = (-0.8 {+-} 2.7(stat.) {+-} 1.9(syst.)) x 10{sup -3}, and the CPT and CP parameters Im z = (-13.9 {+-} 7.3(stat.) {+-} 3.2(syst.)) x 10{sup -3} and {Delta}{Lambda} x Re z = (-7.1 {+-} 3.9(stat.) {+-} 2.0(syst.)) x 10{sup -3} ps{sup -1}. The statistical correlation between the measurements of Im z and {Delta}{Lambda} x Re z is 76%.

  19. Vacuum Cherenkov radiation in quantum electrodynamics with high-energy Lorentz violation

    SciTech Connect

    Anselmi, Damiano; Taiuti, Martina

    2011-03-01

    We study phenomena predicted by a renormalizable, CPT invariant extension of the standard model that contains higher-dimensional operators and violates Lorentz symmetry explicitly at energies greater than some scale {Lambda}{sub L}. In particular, we consider the Cherenkov radiation in vacuo. In a rather general class of dispersion relations, there exists an energy threshold above which radiation is emitted. The threshold is enhanced in composite particles by a sort of kinematic screening mechanism. We study the energy loss and compare the predictions of our model with known experimental bounds on Lorentz violating parameters and observations of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays. We argue that the scale of Lorentz violation {Lambda}{sub L} (with preserved CPT invariance) can be smaller than the Planck scale, actually as small as 10{sup 14}-10{sup 15} GeV. Our model also predicts the Cherenkov radiation of neutral particles.

  20. Search for CPT and Lorentz Violation in B0-B0bar Oscillations with Inclusive Dilepton Events

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2006-09-26

    We report preliminary results of a search for CPT and Lorentz violation in B{sup 0}-{bar B}{sup 0} oscillations using an inclusive dilepton sample collected by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II B Factory. Using a sample of 232 million B{bar B} pairs, we search for time-dependent variations in the complex CPT parameter z = z{sub 0} +z{sub 1} cos ({Omega}{cflx t} + {phi}) where {Omega} is the Earth's sidereal frequency and {cflx t} is sidereal time. We measure Imz{sub 0} = (-14.1 {+-} 7.3(stat.) {+-} 2.4(syst.)) x 10{sup -3}, {Delta}{Lambda} x Rez{sub 0} = (-7.2 {+-} 4.1(stat.) {+-} 2.1(syst.)) x 10{sup -3} ps{sup -1}, Im z{sub 1} = (-24.0 {+-} 10.7(stat.) {+-} 5.9(syst.)) x 10{sup -3}, and {Delta}{Lambda} x Re z{sub 1} = (-18.8 {+-} 5.5(stat.) {+-} 4.0(syst.)) x 10{sup -3} ps{sup -1}, where {Delta}{Lambda} is the difference between the decay rates of the neutral B mass eigenstates. The statistical correlation between the measurements of Imz{sub 0} and {Delta}{Lambda} x Rez{sub 0} is 76%; between Imz{sub 1} and {Delta}{Lambda} x Rez{sub 1} it is 79%. These results are used to evaluate expressions involving coefficients for Lorentz and CPT violation in the general Lorentz-violating standard-model extension. In a complementary approach, we examine the spectral power of periodic variations in z over a wide range of frequencies and find no significant signal.

  1. Exact Foldy-Wouthuysen transformation for a Dirac spinor in torsion and other CPT and Lorentz violating backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Goncalves, Bruno; Shapiro, Ilya L.; Obukhov, Yuri N.

    2009-12-15

    We discuss the possibility to perform and use the exact Foldy-Wouthuysen transformation (EFWT) for the Dirac spinor coupled to different CPT and Lorentz violating terms. The classification of such terms is performed, selecting those of them which admit EFWT. For the particular example of an axial vector field, which can be associated with the completely antisymmetric torsion, we construct an explicit EFWT in the case when only a timelike component of this axial vector is present. In the cases when EFWT is not possible, one can still use the corresponding technique for deriving the perturbative Foldy-Wouthuysen transformation, as is illustrated in a particular example in the Appendix.

  2. New methods of testing Lorentz violation in electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Tobar, Michael Edmund; Fowler, Alison; Hartnett, John Gideon; Wolf, Peter

    2005-01-15

    We investigate experiments that are sensitive to the scalar and parity-odd coefficients for Lorentz violation in the photon sector of the standard model extension (SME). We show that of the classic tests of special relativity, Ives-Stilwell (IS) experiments are sensitive to the scalar coefficient, but at only parts in 10{sup 5} for the state-of-the-art experiment. We then propose asymmetric Mach-Zehnder interferometers with different electromagnetic properties in the two arms, including recycling techniques based on travelling wave resonators to improve the sensitivity. With present technology we estimate that the scalar and parity-odd coefficients may be measured with a sensitivity better than parts in 10{sup 11} and 10{sup 15} respectively.

  3. A New Limit on Lorentz- and CPT-Violating Neutron Spin Interactions Using a Potassium-Helium Comagnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Justin Matthew

    Gravity and quantum mechanics are expected to unify at the Planck scale described by an exceedingly large energy of 1019 GeV. This regime is far from the reach of the highest energy colliders, but tests of fundamental symmetries provide an avenue to explore physics at this scale from the low energy world. Proposed theories of quantum gravity suggest possible spontaneous breaking of Lorentz and CPT symmetry that have so far been unobserved. This thesis presents a test of a Lorentz- and CPT-violating background field constant across the solar system coupling to the neutron spin. A comagnetometer with polarized atomic vapors K and 3He suppresses magnetic fields but remains sensitive to non-magnetic spin couplings. In a tabletop setup, the comagnetometer measures the equatorial components to be b~nX = (0.1 +/- 1.6) x 10-33 GeV and b~nY = (2.5 +/- 1.6) x 10-33 GeV, improving the previous neutron coupling limit by a factor of 30. This work utilizes the CPT-II apparatus, a second generation comagnetometer installation which features a compact design and evacuated bell jar enclosing all optics for improved long term stability. A rotating platform provides frequent reversals of the apparatus orientation and represents a significant improvement in a Lorentz violation search. The comagnetometer is also a sensitive gyroscope, so reorientation with respect to Earth's rotation contributes significantly to the signal. Reversals along both the north-south and east-west directions provide a separation of systematic effects from maximal and minimal gyroscope backgrounds. Systematic background effects associated with reversals of the apparatus are also identified and removed. Several novel features of comagnetometer behavior are also explored including the response to an ac magnetic field and magnetic field gradients. Furthermore, a compact, nuclear spin source containing 9 x 10 21 hyper-polarized 3He spins is designed and constructed. The spin source is used in conjunction with

  4. Relativistic geometric quantum phases from the Lorentz symmetry violation effects in the CPT-even gauge sector of Standard Model Extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakke, K.; Belich, H.

    2015-11-01

    We discuss the appearance of geometric quantum phases for a Dirac neutral particle in the context of relativistic quantum mechanics based on possible scenarios of the Lorentz symmetry violation tensor background in the CPT-even gauge sector of Standard Model Extension. We assume that the Lorentz symmetry breaking is determined by a tensor background given by (KF)μναβ, then, relativistic analogues of the Anandan quantum phase [J. Anandan, Phys. Lett. A 138, 347 (1989)] are obtained based on the parity-even and parity-odd sectors of the tensor (KF)μναβ.

  5. Search for CPT Violation with the FOCUS Experiment and Measurement of Lambda(b) lifetime in the decay Lambda(b) --> J / psi Lambda with the D0 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kryemadhi, Abaz

    2004-12-01

    This dissertation describes two different projects from two different experiments. We have performed a search for CPT violation in neutral charm meson oscillations using data from the FOCUS Experiment. While flavor mixing in the charm sector is predicted to be small in the Standard Model, it is still possible to investigate CPT violation through a study of the proper time dependence of a CPT asymmetry in right-sign decay rates for D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -} {pi}{sup +} and {bar D}{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. This asymmetry is related to the CPT violating complex parameter {xi} and the mixing parameters x and y: A{sub CPT} {infinity} Re{xi}y - Im{xi}x. We determine a 95% confidence level limit of -0.0068 < Re{xi}y - Im{xi}x < 0.0234. Within the framework of the Standard Model Extension incorporating general CPT violation, we also find 95% confidence level limits for the expressions involving coefficients of Lorentz violation of (-2.8 < N(x,y,{delta}))({Delta}a{sub 0} + 0.6 {Delta}a{sub Z} < 4.8) x 10{sup -16} GeV, (-7.0 < N(x,y,{delta}){Delta}a{sub x} < 3.8) x 10{sup -16} GeV, and (-7.0 < N(x,y,{delta}){Delta}a{sub y} < 3.8) x 10{sup -16} GeV, where N(x,y,{delta}) is a normalization factor that incorporates mixing parameters x, y and the doubly Cabibbo suppressed to Cabibbo favored relative strong phase {delta}.

  6. A Search for Lorentz and CPT Violation in the Neutrino Sector of the Standard Model Extension Using the Near Detectors of the Tokai to Kamioka Neutrino Oscillation Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clifton, Gary Alexander

    The Tokai to Kamioka (T2K) neutrino experiment is designed to search for electron neutrino appearance oscillations and muon neutrino disappearance oscillations. While the main physics goals of T2K fall into conventional physics, T2K may be used to search for more exotic physics. One exotic physics analysis that can be performed is a search for Lorentz and CPT symmetry violation (LV and CPTV) through short baseline neutrino oscillations. The theoretical framework which describes these phenomena is the Standard Model Extension (SME). Due to its off-axis nature, T2K has two near detectors. A search for LV and CPTV is performed in each detector. The search utilizes charged-current inclusive (CC inclusive) neutrino events to search for sidereal variations in the neutrino event rate at each detector. Two methods are developed; the first being a Fast Fourier Transform method to perform a hypothesis test of the data with a set of 10,000 toy Monte-Carlo simulations that do not have any LV signal in them. The second is a binned likelihood fit. Using three data sets, both analysis methods are consistent with no sidereal variations. One set of data is used to calculate upper limits on combinations of the SME coefficients while the other two are used to constrain the SME coefficients directly. Despite not seeing any indication of LV in the T2K near detectors, the upper limits provided are useful for the theoretical field to continue improving theories which include LV and CPTV.

  7. CPT-Odd resonances in neutrino oscillations

    PubMed

    Barger; Pakvasa; Weiler; Whisnant

    2000-12-11

    We consider the consequences for future neutrino factory experiments of small CPT-odd interactions in neutrino oscillations. The nu(&mgr;)-->nu(&mgr;) and nu;(&mgr;)-->nu;(&mgr;) survival probabilities at a baseline L = 732 km can test for CPT-odd contributions at orders of magnitude better sensitivity than present neutrino sector limits. Interference between the CPT-violating interaction and CPT-even mass terms in the Lagrangian can lead to a resonant enhancement of the oscillation amplitude. For oscillations in matter, a simultaneous enhancement of both neutrino and antineutrino oscillation amplitudes is possible.

  8. Neutrino experiments: Hierarchy, CP, CPT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Manmohan; Randhawa, Monika; Singh, Mandip

    2016-07-01

    We present an overview of our recent investigations regarding the prospects of ongoing neutrino experiments as well as future experiments in determining few of the most important unknowns in the field of neutrino physics, specifically the neutrino mass ordering and leptonic CP-violation phase. The effect of matter oscillations on the neutrino oscillation probabilities has been exploited in resolving the degeneracy between the neutrino mass ordering and the CP violation phase in the leptonic sector. Further, we estimate the extent of extrinsic CP and CPT violation in the experiments with superbeams as well as neutrino factories.

  9. Gravity, CPT, and the standard-model extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasson, Jay D.

    2015-08-01

    Exotic atoms provide unique opportunities to search for new physics. The search for CPT and Lorentz violation in the context of the general field-theory based framework of the gravitational Standard-Model Extension (SME) is one such opportunity. This work summarizes the implications of Lorentz and CPT violation for gravitational experiments with antiatoms and atoms containing higher-generation matter as well as recent nongravitational proposals to test CPT and Lorentz symmetry with muons and muonic systems.

  10. Testing CPT Invariance with Antiprotonic Helium Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, Dezso

    2008-08-08

    The structure of matter is related to symmetries at every level of study. CPT symmetry is one of the most important laws of field theory: it states the invariance of physical properties when one simultaneously changes the signs of the charge and of the spatial and time coordinates of free elementary particles. Although in general opinion CPT symmetry is not violated in Nature, there are theoretical attempts to develop CPT-violating models. The Antiproton Decelerator at CERN has been built to test CPT invariance. The ASACUSA experiment compares the properties of particles and antiparticles by studying the antiprotonic helium atom via laser spectroscopy and measuring the mass, charge and magnetic moment of the antiproton as compared to those of the proton.

  11. Worldline CPT and massless supermultiplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvanitakis, Alex S.; Mezincescu, Luca; Townsend, Paul K.

    2016-09-01

    The action for a massless particle in 4D Minkowski space-time has a worldline-time reversing symmetry corresponding to CPT invariance of the quantum theory. The analogous symmetry of the 𝒩-extended superparticle is shown to be anomalous when 𝒩 is odd; in the supertwistor formalism this is because a CPT-violating worldline-Chern-Simons term is needed to preserve the chiral U(1) gauge invariance. This accords with the fact that no massless 𝒩 = 1 super-Poincaré irrep is CPT-self-conjugate. There is a CPT self-conjugate supermultiplet when 𝒩 is even, but it has 2𝒩+1 states when 1 2𝒩 is odd (e.g. the 𝒩 = 2 hypermultiplet) in contrast to just 2𝒩 when 1 2𝒩 is even (e.g. the 𝒩 = 4 Maxwell supermultiplet). This is shown to follow from a Kramers degeneracy of the superparticle state space when 1 2𝒩 is odd.

  12. CPT Results from KTeV

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan Nguyen

    2002-01-14

    I present several preliminary measurements from KTeV of the fundamental neutral K parameters, and their implications for CPT violation. A new limit is given on the sidereal time dependence of {phi}{sub +-}. The results are based on data collected in 1996-97.

  13. Theoretical Studies of Lorentz and CPT Symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostelecky, V. Alan

    2005-01-01

    The fundamental symmetries studied here are Lorentz and CPT invariance, which form a cornerstone of the relativistic quantum theories used in modern descriptions of nature. The results obtained during the reporting period focus on the idea, originally suggested by the P.I. and his group in the late 1980s, that observable CPT and Lorentz violation in nature might emerge from the qualitatively new physics expected to hold at the Planck scale. What follows is a summary of results obtained during the period of this grant.

  14. Lorentz and CPT Tests with Spin-Polarized Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Bluhm, Robert; Kostelecky, V. Alan

    2000-02-14

    Experiments using macroscopic samples of spin-polarized matter offer exceptional sensitivity to Lorentz and CPT violation in the electron sector. Data from existing experiments with a spin-polarized torsion pendulum provide sensitivity in this sector rivaling that of all other existing experiments and could reveal spontaneous violation of Lorentz symmetry at the Planck scale. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  15. Time-reversal violation in beta decay

    SciTech Connect

    Herczeg, P.

    2003-01-01

    At present there is no unambigous direct evidence for time-reversal (T) violation in the fundamental interactions. But T-violation is intimately connected with CP-violation by the CPT theorem. A stringent bound on possible violation of CPT invariance comes from the properties of K{sup 0} - {bar K}{sup 0} mixing [I]. In the following we shall assume that CPT violating interactions, if present, can be neglected, and use the terms 'T-violation' and 'CP-violation' interchangably.

  16. On the CPT theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greaves, Hilary; Thomas, Teruji

    2014-02-01

    We provide a careful development and rigorous proof of the CPT theorem within the framework of mainstream (Lagrangian) quantum field theory. This is in contrast to the usual rigorous proofs in purely axiomatic frameworks, and non-rigorous proof-sketches in the mainstream approach. We construct the CPT transformation for a general field directly, without appealing to the enumerative classification of representations, and in a manner that is clearly related to the requirements of our proof. Our approach applies equally in Minkowski spacetimes of any dimension at least three, and is in principle neutral between classical and quantum field theories: the quantum CPT theorem has a natural classical analogue. The key mathematical tool is that of complexification; this tool is central to the existing axiomatic proofs, but plays no overt role in the usual mainstream approaches to CPT.

  17. CPT-hole closure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noce, T.E.; Holzer, T.L.

    2003-01-01

    The long-term stability of deep holes 1.75 inches. (4.4 cm) in diameter by 98.4 feet (30 m) created by cone penetration testing (CPT) was monitored at a site in California underlain by Holocene and Pleistocene age alluvial fan deposits. Portions of the holes remained open both below and above the 28.6-foot (8.7 m)-deep water table for approximately three years, when the experiment was terminated. Hole closure appears to be a very slow process that may take decades in the stiff soils studied here. Other experience suggests holes in softer soils may also remain open. Thus, despite their small diameter, CPT holes may remain open for years and provide paths for rapid migration of contaminants. The observations confirm the need to grout holes created by CPT soundings as well as other direct-push techniques in areas where protection of shallow ground water is important.

  18. Search for CPT-odd decays of positronium

    SciTech Connect

    Vetter, Paul A.; Freedman, Stuart J.

    2003-07-11

    We have limited a CPT-violating correlation in annihilationsof polarized ortho-positronium. We searched for an asymmetry in thetriple correlations dot k1 cross k2, where k1 and k2 are the two largestphoton momenta, and s is the spin of the positronium. Using theGammasphere array of Compton-suppressed high-purity germanium detectors,we detected 2.65e7 events of ortho-Ps annihila tion. The amplitude of aCPT-violating asymmetry in the data set is found to be 0.0026 plus orminus 0.0031, a factor of 6 smaller than previousexperiments.

  19. ''CPT Theorem'' for Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Vladimir Shiltsev

    2004-08-05

    In this paper we attempt to reveal common features in evolution of various colliders' luminosity over commissioning periods. A simplified formula, ''CPT theorem'' or CP = T, is proposed which relates the time needed for commissioning T, the ''complexity'' of the machine C and performance increase goal P.

  20. Lorentz and CPT tests involving antiprotons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, Ralf

    2005-10-01

    Perhaps the largest gap in our understanding of nature at the smallest scales is a consistent quantum theory underlying the Standard Model and General Relativity. Substantial theoretical research has been performed in this context, but observational efforts are hampered by the expected Planck suppression of deviations from conventional physics. However, a variety of candidate models predict minute violations of both Lorentz and CPT invariance. Such effects open a promising avenue for experimental research in this field because these symmetries are amenable to Planck-precision tests. The low-energy signatures of Lorentz and CPT breaking are described by an effective field theory called the Standard-Model Extension (SME). In addition to the body of established physics (i.e., the Standard Model and General Relativity), this framework incorporates all Lorentz- and CPT-violating corrections compatible with key principles of physics. To date, the SME has provided the basis for the analysis of numerous tests of Lorentz and CPT symmetry involving protons, neutrons, electrons, muons, and photons. Discovery potential exists in neutrino physics. A particularly promising class of Planck-scale tests involve matter-antimatter comparisons at low temperatures. SME predictions for transition frequencies in such systems include both matter-antimatter differences and sidereal variations. For example, in hydrogen-antihydrogen spectroscopy, leading-order effects in a 1S-2S transition as well as in a 1S Zeeman transition could exist that can be employed to obtain clean constraints. Similarly, tight bounds can be obtained from Penning-trap experiments involving antiprotons.

  1. Lorentz and CPT tests involving antiprotons

    SciTech Connect

    Lehnert, Ralf

    2005-10-19

    Perhaps the largest gap in our understanding of nature at the smallest scales is a consistent quantum theory underlying the Standard Model and General Relativity. Substantial theoretical research has been performed in this context, but observational efforts are hampered by the expected Planck suppression of deviations from conventional physics. However, a variety of candidate models predict minute violations of both Lorentz and CPT invariance. Such effects open a promising avenue for experimental research in this field because these symmetries are amenable to Planck-precision tests.The low-energy signatures of Lorentz and CPT breaking are described by an effective field theory called the Standard-Model Extension (SME). In addition to the body of established physics (i.e., the Standard Model and General Relativity), this framework incorporates all Lorentz- and CPT-violating corrections compatible with key principles of physics. To date, the SME has provided the basis for the analysis of numerous tests of Lorentz and CPT symmetry involving protons, neutrons, electrons, muons, and photons. Discovery potential exists in neutrino physics.A particularly promising class of Planck-scale tests involve matter-antimatter comparisons at low temperatures. SME predictions for transition frequencies in such systems include both matter-antimatter differences and sidereal variations. For example, in hydrogen-antihydrogen spectroscopy, leading-order effects in a 1S-2S transition as well as in a 1S Zeeman transition could exist that can be employed to obtain clean constraints. Similarly, tight bounds can be obtained from Penning-trap experiments involving antiprotons.

  2. Carroll-Field-Jackiw electrodynamics in the premetric framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itin, Yakov

    2004-07-01

    We analyze the Carroll-Field-Jackiw (CFJ) modification of electrodynamics reformulated as the ordinary Maxwell theory with an additional special axion field. In this form, the CFJ model appears as a special case of the premetric approach recently developed by Hehl and Obukhov. This embedding turns out to be nontrivial. Particularly, the premetric energy-momentum tensor does not depend on the axion. This is in contrast to the CFJ energy-momentum tensor which involves the axion addition explicitly. We show that the relation between these two quantities is similar to the correspondence between the Noether conserved tensor and the Hilbert symmetric tensor. As a result the CFJ energy-momentum tensor appears as the unique conserved closure of the premetric one. Another problem is in the description of the birefringence effect, which in the premetric framework does not depend on the axion. The comparison with the CFJ model shows that the corresponding wave propagation (Fresnel) equation has to be extended by a derivative term, which is nonzero for the axion field. In this way, the CFJ birefringence effect is derived in the metric-free approach. Consequently the Lorentz and CPT violating models can be embedded without contradictions in the premetric approach to electrodynamics. This correspondence can be useful for both constructions.

  3. CPT and Lorentz Tests in Hydrogen and Antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Bluhm, R.; Kostelecky, V.A.; Russell, N.

    1999-03-01

    Signals for CPT and Lorentz violation at the Planck scale may arise in hydrogen and antihydrogen spectroscopy. We show that certain 1S-2S and hyperfine transitions can exhibit theoretically detectable effects unsuppressed by any power of the fine-structure constant. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. Antihydrogen for tests of CPT and Lorentz invariance

    SciTech Connect

    Holzscheiter, Michael H.

    1999-01-15

    Antihydrogen atoms, produced near rest, trapped in a magnetic well, and cooled to the lowest possible temperature (kinetic energy) could provide an extremely powerful tool for the search of violations of CPT and Lorentz invarianz. We describe our plans to form a significant number of cold antihydrogen atoms for comparative precision spectroscopy of hydrogen and antihydrogen.

  5. Antihydrogen for tests of CPT and Lorentz invariance

    SciTech Connect

    ATHENA collaboration

    1999-01-01

    Antihydrogen atoms, produced near rest, trapped in a magnetic well, and cooled to the lowest possible temperature (kinetic energy) could provide an extremely powerful tool for the search of violations of CPT and Lorentz invarianz. We describe our plans to form a significant number of cold antihydrogen atoms for comparative precision spectroscopy of hydrogen and antihydrogen. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Can the master time asymmetry in nature be electrodynamic in origin?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiter, D.

    1985-01-01

    If the electrodynamic measurement process is operationally described by imposing measurement color onto classical electrodynamics, self-energy infinities are eliminated and a retarded electrodynamic time arrow emerges dynamically from internal dynamic-stability conditions. This occurs because the new formalism contains nonlocal radiation fields which carry a negative parity under mathematical time reversal. This result is shown to be compatible with an extended form of T and CPT symmetry which preserves the dynamically chosen retarded electrodynamic arrow of time in the measurement color electrodynamic formalism.

  7. CPT symmetry and antimatter gravity in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villata, M.

    2011-04-01

    The gravitational behavior of antimatter is still unknown. While we may be confident that antimatter is self-attractive, the interaction between matter and antimatter might be either attractive or repulsive. We investigate this issue on theoretical grounds. Starting from the CPT invariance of physical laws, we transform matter into antimatter in the equations of both electrodynamics and gravitation. In the former case, the result is the well-known change of sign of the electric charge. In the latter, we find that the gravitational interaction between matter and antimatter is a mutual repulsion, i.e. antigravity appears as a prediction of general relativity when CPT is applied. This result supports cosmological models attempting to explain the Universe accelerated expansion in terms of a matter-antimatter repulsive interaction.

  8. Tests of Lorentz and CPT symmetry with hadrons and nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noordmans, J. P.; de Vries, J.; Timmermans, R. G. E.

    2016-08-01

    We explore the breaking of Lorentz and CPT invariance in strong interactions at low energy in the framework of chiral perturbation theory. Starting from the set of Lorentz-violating operators of mass-dimension five with quark and gluon fields, we construct the effective chiral Lagrangian with hadronic and electromagnetic interactions induced by these operators. We develop the power-counting scheme and discuss loop diagrams and the one-pion-exchange nucleon-nucleon potential. The effective chiral Lagrangian is the basis for calculations of low-energy observables with hadronic degrees of freedom. As examples, we consider clock-comparison experiments with nuclei and spin-precession experiments with nucleons in storage rings. We derive strict limits on the dimension-five tensors that quantify Lorentz and CPT violation.

  9. Constraints on relativity violations from gamma-ray bursts.

    PubMed

    Kostelecký, V Alan; Mewes, Matthew

    2013-05-17

    Tiny violations of the Lorentz symmetry of relativity and the associated discrete CPT symmetry could emerge in a consistent theory of quantum gravity such as string theory. Recent evidence for linear polarization in gamma-ray bursts improves existing sensitivities to Lorentz and CPT violation involving photons by factors ranging from ten to a million.

  10. Constraints on relativity violations from gamma-ray bursts.

    PubMed

    Kostelecký, V Alan; Mewes, Matthew

    2013-05-17

    Tiny violations of the Lorentz symmetry of relativity and the associated discrete CPT symmetry could emerge in a consistent theory of quantum gravity such as string theory. Recent evidence for linear polarization in gamma-ray bursts improves existing sensitivities to Lorentz and CPT violation involving photons by factors ranging from ten to a million. PMID:25167393

  11. Tests of CPT, Lorentz invariance and the WEP with antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Holzscheiter, M.H.; ATHENA Collaboration

    1999-03-01

    Antihydrogen atoms, produced near rest, trapped in a magnetic well, and cooled to the lowest possible temperature (kinetic energy) could provide an extremely powerful tool for the search of violations of CPT and Lorentz invariance. Equally well, such a system could be used for searches of violations of the Weak Equivalence Principle (WEP) at high precision. The author describes his plans to form a significant number of cold, trapped antihydrogen atoms for comparative precision spectroscopy of hydrogen and antihydrogen and comment on possible first experiments.

  12. Electrodynamic pulsator

    SciTech Connect

    Myslinski, A.; Semeniuk, B.; Kasprzycka-Guttman, T. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1993-11-01

    An electrodynamic pulsator, designed for the reciprocation of liquids in an pulsed extractor, is described. Application of the pulsator is illustrated by its performance in connection with a laboratory packed column used for extraction of citric acid from aqueous solutions by cyclohexanone. A schematic of the pulsator is shown. This pulsator was designed to avoid the indirect, stepwise, mechanical regulation systems used in pulsed extractors which employ an external device such as a piston pump.

  13. CPT Word Processing Instructional Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slaymaker, Josephine; Eakman, Donna

    A project to develop a student word processing manual was developed by using input from: (1) information specialists, employees, and educators; and (2) students using the manual. These instructional materials provide workbook assignments and reading for an individualized unit on CPT word processing to be used by 30 to 40 high school students per…

  14. Tests of CP and CPT with polarized positronium

    SciTech Connect

    Skalsey, M. )

    1992-08-20

    This paper reports on two experiments, using polarization techniques with triplet positronium (ps), that have searched for violations of initially the CPT and, most recently, the CP symmetries. Angular correlations between the Ps spin (S) and the momenta of the decay [lambda]-rays ([vert bar]k[sub 1][vert bar] [gt] [vert bar]k[sub 2][vert bar] [gt] [vert bar]k[sub 3][vert bar]) were measured: C[sub n](S [center dot] K[sub 1] [times] k[sub 2]) CPT-test, C[sub CP](S [center dot] k[sub 1])(S [center dot] k[sub 1] [times] k[sub 2]) CP-test.

  15. N+CPT clock resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Crescimanno, M.; Hohensee, M.

    2008-12-15

    In a typical compact atomic time standard a current modulated semiconductor laser is used to create the optical fields that interrogate the atomic hyperfine transition. A pair of optical sidebands created by modulating the diode laser become the coherent population trapping (CPT) fields. At the same time, other pairs of optical sidebands may contribute to other multiphoton resonances, such as three-photon N-resonance [Phys. Rev. A 65, 043817 (2002)]. We analyze the resulting joint CPT and N-resonance (hereafter N+CPT) analytically and numerically. Analytically we solve a four-level quantum optics model for this joint resonance and perturbatively include the leading ac Stark effects from the five largest optical fields in the laser's modulation comb. Numerically we use a truncated Floquet solving routine that first symbolically develops the optical Bloch equations to a prescribed order of perturbation theory before evaluating. This numerical approach has, as input, the complete physical details of the first two excited-state manifolds of {sup 87}Rb. We test these theoretical approaches with experiments by characterizing the optimal clock operating regimes.

  16. Lorentz-violating gravitoelectromagnetism

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Quentin G.

    2010-09-15

    The well-known analogy between a special limit of general relativity and electromagnetism is explored in the context of the Lorentz-violating standard-model extension. An analogy is developed for the minimal standard-model extension that connects a limit of the CPT-even component of the electromagnetic sector to the gravitational sector. We show that components of the post-Newtonian metric can be directly obtained from solutions to the electromagnetic sector. The method is illustrated with specific examples including static and rotating sources. Some unconventional effects that arise for Lorentz-violating electrostatics and magnetostatics have an analog in Lorentz-violating post-Newtonian gravity. In particular, we show that even for static sources, gravitomagnetic fields arise in the presence of Lorentz violation.

  17. TESTING CPT SYMMETRY WITH CURRENT AND FUTURE CMB MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Si-Yu; Zhang, Xinmin; Xia, Jun-Qing; Li, Hong; Li, Mingzhe

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we use the current and future cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments to test the Charge-Parity-Time Reversal (CPT) symmetry. We consider a CPT-violating interaction in the photon sector L{sub cs}∼p{sub μ}A{sub ν} F-tilde {sup μν}, which gives rise to a rotation of the polarization vectors of the propagating CMB photons. By combining the 9 yr WMAP, BOOMERanG 2003, and BICEP1 observations, we obtain the current constraint on the isotropic rotation angle α-bar =−2.12±1.14 (1σ), indicating that the significance of the CPT violation is about 2σ. Here, we particularly take the systematic errors of CMB measurements into account. Then, we study the effects of the anisotropies of the rotation angle [Δα( n-hat )] on the CMB polarization power spectra in detail. Due to the small effects, the current CMB polarization data cannot constrain the related parameters very well. We obtain the 95% C.L. upper limit of the variance of the anisotropies of the rotation angle C {sup α}(0) < 0.035 from all of the CMB data sets. More interestingly, including the anisotropies of rotation angle could lower the best-fit value of r and relax the tension on the constraints of r between BICEP2 and Planck. Finally, we investigate the capabilities of future Planck polarization measurements on α-bar and Δα( n-hat ). Benefited from the high precision of Planck data, the constraints of the rotation angle can be significantly improved.

  18. Time Reversal Violation

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, H; /SLAC

    2009-01-27

    This talk briefly reviews three types of time-asymmetry in physics, which I classify as universal, macroscopic and microscopic. Most of the talk is focused on the latter, namely the violation of T-reversal invariance in particle physics theories. In sum tests of microscopic T-invariance, or observations of its violation, are limited by the fact that, while we can measure many processes, only in very few cases can we construct a matched pair of process and inverse process and observe it with sufficient sensitivity to make a test. In both the cases discussed here we can achieve an observable T violation making use of flavor tagging, and in the second case also using the quantum properties of an antisymmetric coherent state of two B mesons to construct a CP-tag. Both these tagging properties depend only on very general properties of the flavor and/or CP quantum numbers and so provide model independent tests for T-invariance violations. The microscopic laws of physics are very close to T-symmetric. There are small effects that give CP- and T-violating processes in three-generation-probing weak decays. Where a T-violating observable can be constructed we see the relationships between T-violation and CP-violation expected in a CPT conserving theory. These microscopic effects are unrelated to the 'arrow of time' that is defined by increasing entropy, or in the time direction defined by the expansion of our Universe.

  19. Probing new CP violating observables in D meson decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yong-Feng; Kang, Xian-Wei

    2016-08-01

    CP violation in the charm quark sector has not been examined very well as the case for strange and beauty ones. Some novel insights into the issue on the CP violation in D meson decay are discussed. Specifically, i) the T-violating observables in D → VV decays are constructed. Assuming CPT invariance T violation implies CP violation. This is a new idea and an alternative way for probing CP violation in D decays; ii) the decay of quantum correlated DD̅ pair to vector mesons (denoted by V) is explored, which offers the new CP violating observables that have not been noticed before;

  20. Testing Lorentz invariance and CPT conservation with NuMI neutrinos in the MINOS near detector.

    PubMed

    Adamson, P; Andreopoulos, C; Arms, K E; Armstrong, R; Auty, D J; Ayres, D S; Baller, B; Barr, G; Barrett, W L; Becker, B R; Belias, A; Bernstein, R H; Bhattacharya, D; Bishai, M; Blake, A; Bock, G J; Boehm, J; Boehnlein, D J; Bogert, D; Bower, C; Buckley-Geer, E; Cavanaugh, S; Chapman, J D; Cherdack, D; Childress, S; Choudhary, B C; Coleman, S J; Culling, A J; de Jong, J K; Diwan, M V; Dorman, M; Dytman, S A; Escobar, C O; Evans, J J; Falk Harris, E; Feldman, G J; Frohne, M V; Gallagher, H R; Goodman, M C; Gouffon, P; Gran, R; Grashorn, E W; Grossman, N; Grzelak, K; Habig, A; Harris, D; Harris, P G; Hartnell, J; Hatcher, R; Heller, K; Himmel, A; Holin, A; Hylen, J; Irwin, G M; Ishitsuka, M; Jaffe, D E; James, C; Jensen, D; Kafka, T; Kasahara, S M S; Kim, J J; Koizumi, G; Kopp, S; Kordosky, M; Koskinen, D J; Kreymer, A; Kumaratunga, S; Lang, K; Ling, J; Litchfield, P J; Litchfield, R P; Loiacono, L; Lucas, P; Ma, J; Mann, W A; Marshak, M L; Marshall, J S; Mayer, N; McGowan, A M; Meier, J R; Messier, M D; Metelko, C J; Michael, D G; Miller, J L; Miller, W H; Mishra, S R; Moore, C D; Morfín, J; Mualem, L; Mufson, S; Murgia, S; Musser, J; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Newman, H B; Nichol, R J; Nicholls, T C; Ochoa-Ricoux, J P; Oliver, W P; Ospanov, R; Paley, J; Paolone, V; Para, A; Patzak, T; Pavlović, Z; Pawloski, G; Pearce, G F; Peck, C W; Petyt, D A; Pittam, R; Plunkett, R K; Rahaman, A; Rameika, R A; Raufer, T M; Rebel, B; Reichenbacher, J; Rodrigues, P A; Rosenfeld, C; Rubin, H A; Sanchez, M C; Saoulidou, N; Schneps, J; Schreiner, P; Shanahan, P; Smart, W; Sousa, A; Speakman, B; Stamoulis, P; Strait, M; Tagg, N; Talaga, R L; Tavera, M A; Thomas, J; Thompson, J; Thomson, M A; Thron, J L; Tinti, G; Tzanakos, G; Urheim, J; Vahle, P; Viren, B; Watabe, M; Weber, A; Webb, R C; Wehmann, A; West, N; White, C; Wojcicki, S G; Yang, T; Zois, M; Zhang, K; Zwaska, R

    2008-10-10

    A search for a sidereal modulation in the MINOS near detector neutrino data was performed. If present, this signature could be a consequence of Lorentz and CPT violation as predicted by the effective field theory called the standard-model extension. No evidence for a sidereal signal in the data set was found, implying that there is no significant change in neutrino propagation that depends on the direction of the neutrino beam in a sun-centered inertial frame. Upper limits on the magnitudes of the Lorentz and CPT violating terms in the standard-model extension lie between 10(-4) and 10(-2) of the maximum expected, assuming a suppression of these signatures by a factor of 10(-17).

  1. CPT conservation and atmospheric neutrinos in the MINOS far detector

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Bernard Raymond

    2006-02-01

    The MINOS Far Detector is a 5400 ton iron calorimeter located at the Soudan state park in Soudan Minnesota. The MINOS far detector can observe atmospheric neutrinos and separate charge current νμ and $\\bar{v}$μ interactions by using a 1.4 T magnetic field to identify the charge of the produced muon. The CPT theorem requires that neutrinos and anti-neutrinos oscillate in the same way. In a fiducial exposure of 5.0 kilo-ton years a total of 41 candidate neutrino events are observed with an expectation of 53.1 ± 7.6(system.) ± 7.2(stat.) unoscillated events or 31.6 ± 4.7(system.) ± 5.6(stat.) events with Δm2 = 2.4 x 10-3 eV2, sin2(2θ) = 1.0 as oscillation parameters. These include 28 events which can have there charge identified with high confidence. These 28 events consist of 18 events consistent with being produced by νμ and 10 events being consistent with being produced by $\\bar{v}$μ. No evidence of CPT violation is observed.

  2. Double-modulation CPT cesium compact clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Peter; Mejri, Sinda; Tricot, Francois; Abdel Hafiz, Moustafa; Boudot, Rodolphe; de Clercq, Emeric; Guérandel, Stéphane

    2016-06-01

    Double-modulation coherent population trapping (CPT) is based on a synchronous modulation of Raman phase and laser polarization, which allows the atomic population to accumulate in a common dark state. The high contrast signal obtained on the clock transition with a relative compact and robust laser system is interesting as basis of a high performance microwave clock. Here we study the parameters of a double-modulation CPT Cs clock working in cw mode. The optimal polarization modulation frequency and cell temperature for maximum contrast of clock transition are investigated. The parameters of the detection are also studied. With the optimal parameters, we observe a CPT signal with contrast of 10% and linewidth of 492 Hz, which is well suited for implementing a cw atomic clock.

  3. Kinetic-energy-momentum tensor in electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, Cheyenne J.; Kemp, Brandon A.

    2016-01-01

    We show that the Einstein-Laub formulation of electrodynamics is invalid since it yields a stress-energy-momentum (SEM) tensor that is not frame invariant. Two leading hypotheses for the kinetic formulation of electrodynamics (Chu and Einstein-Laub) are studied by use of the relativistic principle of virtual power, mathematical modeling, Lagrangian methods, and SEM transformations. The relativistic principle of virtual power is used to demonstrate the field dynamics associated with energy relations within a relativistic framework. Lorentz transformations of the respective SEM tensors demonstrate the relativistic frameworks for each studied formulation. Mathematical modeling of stationary and moving media is used to illustrate the differences and discrepancies of specific proposed kinetic formulations, where energy relations and conservation theorems are employed. Lagrangian methods are utilized to derive the field kinetic Maxwell's equations, which are studied with respect to SEM tensor transforms. Within each analysis, the Einstein-Laub formulation violates special relativity, which invalidates the Einstein-Laub SEM tensor.

  4. Effects of cannabinoid receptor 1 (brain) on lipid accumulation by transcriptional control of CPT1A and CPT1B.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y-F; Yuan, Z-Q; Song, D-G; Zhou, X-H; Wang, Y-Z

    2014-02-01

    CB1 (also known as CNR1), a main receptor for cannabinoids acting at PPARs, can enhance fat deposition. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT1), an enzyme responsible for the transport of long-chain fatty acids for β-oxidation, is closely related to fat deposition. Whether CB1 can regulate intramuscular adipocytes lipid accumulation through regulation of CPT1 is unclear. Based on the investigation of tissue- and breed-specific CPT1A and CPT1B mRNA expression levels in Jinhua and Landrace pigs, we studied the effects of CB1 on lipid accumulation and CPT1B expression by treating porcine intramuscular adipocytes with CB1 antagonist Δ9-THC and antagonist SR141716. Results showed that muscle CPT1 mRNA was expressed at higher levels in the longissimus dorsi and subcutaneous fat. Liver CPT1A mRNA expression levels were higher in the pancreas, duodenum and liver. Compared with Landrace pigs, CPT1A and CPT1B in the longissimus dorsi of Jinhua pigs were significantly higher and positively correlated with intramuscular fat content. However, for subcutaneous fat, CPT1 levels were significantly lower and negatively correlated with body fat percentage. Δ9-THC significantly increased CB1 mRNA levels and lipid accumulation but decreased CPT1A and CPT1B mRNA levels. Conversely, SR141716 reduced CB1 mRNA levels but increased CPT1A and CPT1B mRNA levels, resulting in decreased lipid accumulation. The CPT1 antagonist etomoxir did not affect CB1 expression, suggesting that CB1 is likely upstream of CPT1A and CPT1B. Meanwhile, PPARA expression was greatly decreased when CPT1A and CPT1B were inhibited and enhanced when CPT1A and CPT1B were activated. Taken together, these data indicate that CB1 can affect intramuscular fat deposition by regulating both CPT1A and CPT1B mRNA expression, with the PPARA signal pathway likely playing a major role in this process. PMID:23914904

  5. Time-Reversal Violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernabéu, José; Martínez-Vidal, Fernando

    2015-10-01

    The violation of CP symmetry between matter and antimatter in the neutral K and B meson systems is well established, with a high degree of consistency between all available experimental measurements and with the Standard Model of particle physics. On the basis of the up-to-now-unbroken CPT symmetry, the violation of CP symmetry strongly suggests that the behavior of these particles under weak interactions must also be asymmetric under time reversal T. Many searches for T violation have been performed and proposed using different observables and experimental approaches. These include T-odd observables, such as triple products in weak decays, and genuine observables, such as permanent electric dipole moments of nondegenerate stationary states and the breaking of the reciprocity relation. We discuss the conceptual basis of the required exchange of initial and final states with unstable particles, using quantum entanglement and the decay as a filtering measurement, for the case of neutral B and K mesons. Using this method, the BaBar experiment at SLAC has clearly observed T violation in B mesons.

  6. First quantized electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, A.F.

    2014-06-15

    The parametrized Dirac wave equation represents position and time as operators, and can be formulated for many particles. It thus provides, unlike field-theoretic Quantum Electrodynamics (QED), an elementary and unrestricted representation of electrons entangled in space or time. The parametrized formalism leads directly and without further conjecture to the Bethe–Salpeter equation for bound states. The formalism also yields the Uehling shift of the hydrogenic spectrum, the anomalous magnetic moment of the electron to leading order in the fine structure constant, the Lamb shift and the axial anomaly of QED. -- Highlights: •First-quantized electrodynamics of the parametrized Dirac equation is developed. •Unrestricted entanglement in time is made explicit. •Bethe and Salpeter’s equation for relativistic bound states is derived without further conjecture. •One-loop scattering corrections and the axial anomaly are derived using a partial summation. •Wide utility of semi-classical Quantum Electrodynamics is argued.

  7. Structure of Aristotelian electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Ted

    2015-07-01

    Aristotelian electrodynamics (AE) describes the regime of a plasma with a very strong electric field that is not shorted out, with the charge current determined completely by pair production and the balance of the Lorentz 4-force against the curvature radiation reaction. Here it is shown how the principal null directions and associated eigenvalues of the field tensor govern AE, and how force-free electrodynamics arises smoothly from AE when the eigenvalues (and therefore the electric field in some frame) vanish. A criterion for validity of AE and force-free electrodynamics is proposed in terms of a pair of "field curvature scalars" formed from the first derivative of the principal null directions.

  8. Test of CPT and Lorentz symmetry in entangled neutral kaons with the KLOE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babusci, D.; Balwierz-Pytko, I.; Bencivenni, G.; Bloise, C.; Bossi, F.; Branchini, P.; Budano, A.; Caldeira Balkeståhl, L.; Capon, G.; Ceradini, F.; Ciambrone, P.; Curciarello, F.; Czerwiński, E.; Danè, E.; De Leo, V.; De Lucia, E.; De Robertis, G.; De Santis, A.; De Simone, P.; Di Cicco, A.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Salvo, R.; Domenici, D.; Erriquez, O.; Fanizzi, G.; Fantini, A.; Felici, G.; Fiore, S.; Franzini, P.; Gajos, A.; Gauzzi, P.; Giardina, G.; Giovannella, S.; Graziani, E.; Happacher, F.; Heijkenskjöld, L.; Höistad, B.; Jacewicz, M.; Johansson, T.; Kacprzak, K.; Kamińska, D.; Kupsc, A.; Lee-Franzini, J.; Loddo, F.; Loffredo, S.; Mandaglio, G.; Martemianov, M.; Martini, M.; Mascolo, M.; Messi, R.; Miscetti, S.; Morello, G.; Moricciani, D.; Moskal, P.; Nguyen, F.; Palladino, A.; Passeri, A.; Patera, V.; Prado Longhi, I.; Ranieri, A.; Santangelo, P.; Sarra, I.; Schioppa, M.; Sciascia, B.; Silarski, M.; Taccini, C.; Tortora, L.; Venanzoni, G.; Wiślicki, W.; Wolke, M.; Zdebik, J.

    2014-03-01

    Neutral kaon pairs produced in ϕ decays in anti-symmetric entangled state can be exploited to search for violation of CPT symmetry and Lorentz invariance. We present an analysis of the CP-violating process ϕ→KSKL→π+π-π+π- based on 1.7 fb of data collected by the KLOE experiment at the Frascati ϕ-factory DAΦNE. The data are used to perform a measurement of the CPT-violating parameters Δaμ for neutral kaons in the context of the Standard Model Extension framework. The parameters measured in the reference frame of the fixed stars are: Δa0=(-6.0±7.7stat±3.1syst)×10-18 GeV, ΔaX=(0.9±1.5stat±0.6syst)×10-18 GeV, ΔaY=(-2.0±1.5stat±0.5syst)×10-18 GeV, ΔaZ=(3.1±1.7stat±0.5syst)×10-18 GeV. These are presently the most precise measurements in the quark sector of the Standard Model Extension.

  9. Electrodynamics panel presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccoy, J.

    1986-01-01

    The Plasma Motor Generator (PMG) concept is explained in detail. The PMG tether systems being used to calculate the estimated performance data is described. The voltage drops and current contact geometries involved in the operation of an electrodynamic tether are displayed illustrating the comparative behavior of hollow cathodes, electron guns, and passive collectors for current coupling into the ionosphere. The basic PMG design involving the massive tether cable with little or no satellite mass at the far end(s) are also described. The Jupiter mission and its use of electrodynamic tethers are given. The need for demonstration experiments is stressed.

  10. Causality in Classical Electrodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savage, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Causality in electrodynamics is a subject of some confusion, especially regarding the application of Faraday's law and the Ampere-Maxwell law. This has led to the suggestion that we should not teach students that electric and magnetic fields can cause each other, but rather focus on charges and currents as the causal agents. In this paper I argue…

  11. Quantum Electrodynamics: Theory

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    The Standard Model of particle physics is composed of several theories that are added together. The most precise component theory is the theory of quantum electrodynamics or QED. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains how theoretical QED calculations can be done. This video links to other videos, giving the viewer a deep understanding of the process.

  12. CP violation experiment at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, Yee B.

    1990-07-01

    The E731 experiment at Fermilab has searched for direct'' CP violation in K{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{pi}, which is parametrized by {var epsilon}{prime}/{var epsilon}. For the first time, in 20% of the data set, all four modes of the K{sub L,S} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}} ({pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) were collected simultaneously, providing a great check on the systematic uncertainty. The result is Re({var epsilon}{prime}/{var epsilon}) = {minus}0.0004 {plus minus} 0.0014 (stat) {plus minus} 0.0006(syst), which provides no evidence for direct'' CP violation. The CPT symmetry has also been tested by measuring the phase difference {Delta}{phi} = {phi}{sub 00} {minus} {phi}{sub {plus minus}} between the two CP violating parameters {eta}{sub 00} and {eta}{sub {plus minus}}. We fine {Delta}{phi} = {minus}0.3{degrees} {plus minus} 2.4{degree}(stat) {plus minus} 1.2{degree}(syst). Using this together with the world average {phi}{sub {plus minus}}, we fine that the phase of the K{sup 0}-{bar K}{sup 0} mixing parameter {var epsilon} is 44.5{degree} {plus minus} 1.5{degree}. Both of these results agree well with the predictions of CPT symmetry. 17 refs., 10 figs.

  13. On a modified electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Reiss, H R

    2012-09-01

    A modification of electrodynamics is proposed, motivated by previously unremarked paradoxes that can occur in the standard formulation. It is shown by specific examples that gauge transformations exist that radically alter the nature of a problem, even while maintaining the values of many measurable quantities. In one example, a system with energy conservation is transformed to a system where energy is not conserved. The second example possesses a ponderomotive potential in one gauge, but this important measurable quantity does not appear in the gauge-transformed system. A resolution of the paradoxes comes from noting that the change in total action arising from the interaction term in the Lagrangian density cannot always be neglected, contrary to the usual assumption. The problem arises from the information lost by employing an adiabatic cutoff of the field. This is not necessary. Its replacement by a requirement that the total action should not change with a gauge transformation amounts to a supplementary condition for gauge invariance that can be employed to preserve the physical character of the problem. It is shown that the adiabatic cutoff procedure can also be eliminated in the construction of quantum transition amplitudes, thus retaining consistency between the way in which asymptotic conditions are applied in electrodynamics and in quantum mechanics. The 'gauge-invariant electrodynamics' of Schwinger is shown to depend on an ansatz equivalent to the condition found here for maintenance of the ponderomotive potential in a gauge transformation. Among the altered viewpoints required by the modified electrodynamics, in addition to the rejection of the adiabatic cutoff, is the recognition that the electric and magnetic fields do not completely determine a physical problem, and that the electromagnetic potentials supply additional information that is required for completeness of electrodynamics.

  14. The Changing Face of Healthcare: 2016 CPT Changes and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Thelian, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews the changes to CPT 2016, with emphasis on the way CPT services will be provided in the future. Some of the newer codes are designed for reimbursable services provided by the medical clinical staff. In addition to the CPT changes, there are changes to the Medicare fee-for service Physician Fee Schedule. Review of these changes provides the reader with a snapshot of how healthcare will be provided and reimbursed in the future. PMID:27249875

  15. Recent Results on T and CP Violation at BABAR

    SciTech Connect

    Perez Perez, Alejandro

    2015-02-06

    CP-violation (CPV) and Time-reversal violation (TRV) are intimately related through the CPT theorem: if one of these discrete symmetries is violated the other one has to be violated in such a way to conserve CPT. Although CPV in the B0B0-bar system has been established by the B-factories, implying indirectly TRV, there is still no direct evidence of TRV. We report on the observation of TRV in the B-meson system performed with a dataset of 468 × 106 BB-bar pairs produced in Υ(4S) decays collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e- collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We also report on other CPV measurements recently performed on the B-meson system

  16. Gravity-induced neutrino antineutrino oscillation: CPT and lepton number non-conservation under gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata

    2007-03-01

    We introduce a new effect in the neutrino oscillation phase which shows that the neutrino antineutrino oscillation is possible under gravity even if the rest masses of the corresponding eigenstates are the same. This is due to CPT violation, and is possible to demonstrate if the neutrino mass eigenstates are expressed as a combination of neutrino and antineutrino eigenstates, as of the neutral kaon system, with the plausible breaking of lepton number conservation. For Majorana neutrinos, this oscillation is expected to significantly affect the inner edge of neutrino-dominated accretion discs around compact objects by influencing the neutrino sphere which controls the accretion dynamics, and then the related type-II supernova evolution and the r-process nucleosynthesis. On the other hand, in the early universe, in the presence of various lepton number violating processes, this oscillation, we argue, might have led to neutrino asymmetry which resulted in baryogenesis from the B L symmetry by electro-weak sphaleron processes.

  17. Genuine T, CP, CPT asymmetry parameters for the entangled B d system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernabéu, José; Botella, Francisco J.; Nebot, Miguel

    2016-06-01

    The precise connection between the theoretical T, CP, CPT asymmetries, in terms of transition probabilities between the filtered neutral meson B d states, and the experimental asymmetries, in terms of the double decay rate intensities for Flavour-CP eigenstate decay products in a B-factory of entangled states, is established. This allows the identification of genuine Asymmetry Parameters in the time distribution of the asymmetries and their measurability by disentangling genuine and possible fake terms. We express the nine asymmetry parameters — three different observables for each one of the three symmetries — in terms of the ingredients of the Weisskopf-Wigner dynamical description of the entangled B d -meson states and we obtain a global fit to their values from the BaBar collaboration experimental results. The possible fake terms are all compatible with zero and the information content of the nine asymmetry parameters is indeed different. The non-vanishing [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] and [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] are impressive separate direct evidence of Time-Reversal-violation and CP-violation in these transitions and compatible with Standard Model expectations. An intriguing 2 σ effect for the Re( θ) parameter responsible of CPT-violation appears which, interpreted as an upper limit, leads to |{M}_{{overline{B}}^0{overline{B}}^0}-{M}_B{{{}{^0}}_B}{^0}|<4.0× 1{0}^{-5} eV at 95% C.L. for the diagonal flavour terms of the mass matrix. It contributes to the CP-violating [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] asymmetry parameter in an unorthodox manner — in its cos(Δ M t) time dependence —, and it is accessible in facilities with non-entangled B d 's, like the LHCb experiment.

  18. On generalized logarithmic electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruglov, S. I.

    2015-02-01

    The generalized logarithmic electrodynamics with two parameters and is considered. The indexes of refraction of light in the external magnetic field are calculated. In the case we come to results obtained by Gaete and Helayël-Neto (Eur Phys J C 74:2816, 2014). The bound on the values of , was obtained from the Biréfringence Magnétique du Vide (BMV) experiment. The symmetrical Belinfante energy-momentum tensor and dilatation current are found.

  19. Extended symmetrical classical electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Fedorov, A V; Kalashnikov, E G

    2008-03-01

    In this paper, we discuss a modification of classical electrodynamics in which "ordinary" point charges are absent. The modified equations contain additional terms describing the induced charges and currents. The densities of the induced charges and currents depend on the vector k and the vectors of the electromagnetic field, E and B . It is shown that the vectors E and B can be defined in terms of two four-potentials and the components of k are the components of a four-tensor of the third rank. The Lagrangian of the modified electrodynamics is defined. The conditions are derived at which only one four-potential determines the behavior of the electromagnetic field. It is also shown that static modified electrodynamics can describe the electromagnetic field in the inner region of an electric monopole. In the outer region of the electric monopole the electric field is governed by the Maxwell equations. It follows from boundary conditions at the interface between the inner and outer regions of the monopole that the vector k has a discrete spectrum. The electric and magnetic fields, energy, and angular momentum of the monopole are found for different eigenvalues of k .

  20. McGee Ranch CPT investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Cassem, B.R.

    1993-06-15

    Applied Research Associated, Inc. (ARA), under contract to Argonne National Laboratory to perform work for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), conducted Peizo Cone Penetration (P-CPT) Tests as part of an investigation of the fine-textured soils at the McGee Ranch Site. The purpose of the investigation was to characterize a potential borrow area for fine-textured soil materials that would be used to construct multi-layer closure covers on the Hanford Site. As part of the investigation, WHC conducted non auger-drill borings on the site during September 1992. ARA`s objective was to characterize the soils at the McGee Ranch site using the cone penetrometer and compare the findings with the lithologic characterization obtained from geologic boring logs. This report documents ARA`s site investigation efforts, test techniques, and analysis of the data for field work conducted April 14 and 15, 1993.

  1. Electrodynamic force law controversy.

    PubMed

    Graneau, P; Graneau, N

    2001-05-01

    Cavalleri et al. [Phys. Rev. E 52, 2505 (1998); Eur. J. Phys. 17, 205 (1996)] have attempted to resolve the electrodynamic force law controversy. This attempt to prove the validity of either the Ampère or Lorentz force law by theory and experiment has revealed only that the two are equivalent when predicting the force on part of a circuit due to the current in the complete circuit. However, in our analysis of internal stresses, only Ampère's force law agrees with experiment. PMID:11415053

  2. Semi-classical Electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lestone, John

    2016-03-01

    Quantum electrodynamics is complex and its associated mathematics can appear overwhelming for those not trained in this field. We describe semi-classical approaches that can be used to obtain a more intuitive physical feel for several QED processes including electro-statics, Compton scattering, pair annihilation, the anomalous magnetic moment, and the Lamb shift, that could be taught easily to undergraduate students. Any physicist who brings their laptop to the talk will be able to build spread sheets in less than 10 minutes to calculate g/2 =1.001160 and a Lamb shift of 1057 MHz.

  3. Electrodynamics of Perfect Conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiolhais, Miguel C. N.; Essén, Hanno

    2013-05-01

    The most general electrodynamic equations of a perfect conducting state are obtained using a variational principle in a classical framework, following an approach by Pierre-Gilles de Gennes. London equations are derived as the time-independent case of these equations, corresponding to the magnetostatic minimal energy state of the perfect conducting system. For further confirmation, the same equations are also derived in the classical limit of the Coleman-Weinberg model, the most successful quantum macroscopic theory of superconductivity. The magnetic field expulsion is, therefore, a direct consequence of zero resistivity and not an exclusive property of superconductors.

  4. General CPT-even dimension-five nonminimal couplings between fermions and photons yielding EDM and MDM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araujo, Jonas B.; Casana, Rodolfo; Ferreira, Manoel M.

    2016-09-01

    In this letter, we examine a new class of CPT-even nonminimal interactions, between fermions and photons, deprived of higher order derivatives, that yields electric dipole moment (EDM) and magnetic dipole moment (MDM) in the context of the Dirac equation. The couplings are dimension-five CPT-even and Lorentz-violating nonminimal structures, composed of a rank-2 tensor, Tμν, the electromagnetic tensor, and gamma matrices, being addressed in its axial and non-axial Hermitian versions, and also comprising general possibilities. We then use the electron's anomalous magnetic dipole moment and electron electric dipole moment measurements to reach upper bounds of 1 part in 1020 and 1025 (eV) - 1.

  5. CP violation in the K and B systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kayser, B.

    1996-11-01

    Although CP violation was discovered more than thirty years ago, its origin is still unknown. In these lectures, we describe the CP- violating effects which have been seen in K decays, and explain how CP violation can be caused by the Standard Model weak interaction. The hypothesis that this interaction is indeed the origin of CP violation will be incisively tested by future experiments on B and K decays. We explain what quantities these experiments will try to determine, and how they will be able to determine them in a theoretically clean way. To clarify the physics of the K system, we give a phase-convention-free description of CP violation in this system. We conclude by briefly exploring whether electric dipole moments actually violate CP even if CPT invariance is not assumed.

  6. Møller scattering and Lorentz-violating Z bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Hao; Lehnert, Ralf

    2016-11-01

    Lorentz-symmetry breakdown in weak-interaction physics is studied. In particular, the CPT-even Lorentz-violating contributions to the Z boson in the minimal Standard-Model Extension are considered, and in this context polarized electron-electron scattering is investigated. Corrections to the usual parity-violating asymmetry are determined at tree level. Together with available data, this result can be used to improve existing estimates for the Lorentz-violating kW coefficient by two orders of magnitude. Some implications for past and future experiments are mentioned.

  7. Modeling Ionospheric Electrodynamics (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huba, J. D.

    2009-12-01

    We present modeling results of ionospheric electrodynamics using the 3D NRL ionosphere model SAMI3. Recently, SAMI3 has been upgraded to solve the potential equation that determines the electrostatic potential from the ionospheric conductances (Pedersen and Hall) and drivers: neutral wind, gravity, and parallel current systems. We present results showing the impact of different neutral wind models (e.g., HWM93, HWM07, TIMEGCM) on the dynamics of the low- to mid-latitude ionosphere, as well as the Region 1 and 2 current systems. We point out issues and concerns with obtaining an accurate specification of the global electric field within the context of existing models.(with J. Krall, G. Joyce, S. Slinker, and G. Crowley). Research supported by NASA and ONR

  8. Electrodynamic tether system study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this program is to define an Electrodynamic Tether System (ETS) that could be erected from the space station and/or platforms to function as an energy storage device. A schematic representation of the ETS concept mounted on the space station is presented. In addition to the hardware design and configuration efforts, studies are also documented involving simulations of the Earth's magnetic fields and the effects this has on overall system efficiency calculations. Also discussed are some preliminary computer simulations of orbit perturbations caused by the cyclic/night operations of the ETS. System cost estimates, an outline for future development testing for the ETS system, and conclusions and recommendations are also provided.

  9. Middle atmospheric electrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, M. C.

    1983-01-01

    A review is presented of the advances made during the last few years with respect to the study of the electrodynamics in the earth's middle atmosphere. In a report of the experimental work conducted, attention is given to large middle atmospheric electric fields, the downward coupling of high altitude processes into the middle atmosphere, and upward coupling of tropospheric processes into the middle atmosphere. It is pointed out that new developments in tethered balloons and superpressure balloons should greatly increase the measurement duration of earth-ionospheric potential measurements and of stratospheric electric field measurements in the next few years. Theoretical work considered provides an excellent starting point for study of upward coupling of transient and dc electric fields. Hays and Roble (1979) were the first to construct a model which included orographic features as well as the classical thunderstorm generator.

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF A WIRELINE CPT SYSTEM FOR MULTIPLE TOOL USAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen P. Farrington; Martin L. Gildea; J. Christopher Bianchi

    1999-08-01

    The first phase of development of a wireline cone penetrometer system for multiple tool usage was completed under DOE award number DE-AR26-98FT40366. Cone penetrometer technology (CPT) has received widespread interest and is becoming more commonplace as a tool for environmental site characterization activities at several Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Although CPT already offers many benefits for site characterization, the wireline system can improve CPT technology by offering greater utility and increased cost savings. Currently the use of multiple CPT tools during a site characterization (i.e. piezometric cone, chemical sensors, core sampler, grouting tool) must be accomplished by withdrawing the entire penetrometer rod string to change tools. This results in multiple penetrations being required to collect the data and samples that may be required during characterization of a site, and to subsequently seal the resulting holes with grout. The wireline CPT system allows multiple CPT tools to be interchanged during a single penetration, without withdrawing the CPT rod string from the ground. The goal of the project is to develop and demonstrate a system by which various tools can be placed at the tip of the rod string depending on the type of information or sample desired. Under the base contract, an interchangeable piezocone and grouting tool was designed, fabricated, and evaluated. The results of the evaluation indicate that success criteria for the base contract were achieved. In addition, the wireline piezocone tool was validated against ASTM standard cones, the depth capability of the system was found to compare favorably with that of conventional CPT, and the reliability and survivability of the system were demonstrated.

  11. Crystal Structure of Rat Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase II (CPT-II)

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao,Y.; Jogl, G.; Esser, V.; Tong, L.

    2006-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT-II) has a crucial role in the {beta}-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids in mitochondria. We report here the crystal structure of rat CPT-II at 1.9 Angstroms resolution. The overall structure shares strong similarity to those of short- and medium-chain carnitine acyltransferases, although detailed structural differences in the active site region have a significant impact on the substrate selectivity of CPT-II. Three aliphatic chains, possibly from a detergent that is used for the crystallization, were found in the structure. Two of them are located in the carnitine and CoA binding sites, respectively. The third aliphatic chain may mimic the long-chain acyl group in the substrate of CPT-II. The binding site for this aliphatic chain does not exist in the short- and medium-chain carnitine acyltransferases, due to conformational differences among the enzymes. A unique insert in CPT-II is positioned on the surface of the enzyme, with a highly hydrophobic surface. It is likely that this surface patch mediates the association of CPT-II with the inner membrane of the mitochondria.

  12. Pulsar electrodynamics: an unsolved problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melrose, D. B.; Yuen, R.

    2016-04-01

    > Pulsar electrodynamics is reviewed emphasizing the role of the inductive electric field in an oblique rotator and the incomplete screening of its parallel component by charges, leaving `gaps' with \\Vert \

  13. Timelike Momenta In Quantum Electrodynamics

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Brodsky, S. J.; Ting, S. C. C.

    1965-12-01

    In this note we discuss the possibility of studying the quantum electrodynamics of timelike photon propagators in muon or electron pair production by incident high energy muon or electron beams from presently available proton or electron accelerators.

  14. Neutrinos with Lorentz-violating operators of arbitrary dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostelecký, V. Alan; Mewes, Matthew

    2012-05-01

    The behavior of fermions in the presence of Lorentz and CPT violation is studied. Allowing for operators of any mass dimension, we classify all Lorentz-violating terms in the quadratic Lagrange density for free fermions. The result is adapted to obtain the effective Hamiltonian describing the propagation and mixing of three flavors of left-handed neutrinos in the presence of Lorentz violation involving operators of arbitrary mass dimension. A characterization of the neutrino coefficients for Lorentz violation is provided via a decomposition using spin-weighted spherical harmonics. The restriction of the general theory to various special cases is discussed, including among others the renormalizable limit, the massless scenario, flavor-blind and oscillation-free models, the diagonalizable case, and several isotropic limits. The formalism is combined with existing data on neutrino oscillations and kinematics to extract a variety of measures of coefficients for Lorentz and CPT violation. For oscillations, we use results from the short-baseline experiments LSND and MiniBooNE to obtain explicit sensitivities to effects from flavor-mixing Lorentz-violating operators up to mass dimension 10, and we present methods to analyze data from long-baseline experiments. For propagation, we use time-of-flight measurements from the supernova SN1987A and from a variety of experiments including MINOS and OPERA to constrain oscillation-free Lorentz-violating operators up to mass dimension 10, and we discuss constraints from threshold effects in meson decays and Čerenkov emission.

  15. CPT Test with (anti)proton Magnetic Moments Based on Quantum Logic Cooling and Readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemann, M.; Paschke, A.-G.; Dubielzig, T.; Ulmer, S.; Ospelkaus, C.

    2014-01-01

    Dehmelt and VanDyck's famous 1987 measurement of the electron and positron g-factor is still the most precise g-factor comparison in the lepton sector, and a sensitive test of possible CPT violation. A complementary g-factor comparison between the proton and the antiproton is highly desirable to test CPT symmetry in the baryon sector. Current experiments, based on Dehmelt's continuous Stern-Gerlach effect and the double Penning-trap technique, are making rapid progress. They are, however, extremely difficult to carry out because ground state cooling using cryogenic techniques is virtually impossible for heavy baryons, and because the continous Stern-Gerlach effect scales as μ/m, where m is the mass of the particle and μ its magnetic moment. Both difficulties will ultimately limit the accuracy. We discuss experimental prospects of realizing an alternative approach to a g-factor comparison with single (anti)protons, based on quantum logic techniques proposed by Heinzen and Wineland and by Wineland et al. The basic idea is to cool, control and measure single (anti)protons through interaction with a well-controlled atomic ion.

  16. Electrodynamic Arrays Having Nanomaterial Electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trigwell, Steven (Inventor); Biris, Alexandru S. (Inventor); Calle, Carlos I. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An electrodynamic array of conductive nanomaterial electrodes and a method of making such an electrodynamic array. In one embodiment, a liquid solution containing nanomaterials is deposited as an array of conductive electrodes on a substrate, including rigid or flexible substrates such as fabrics, and opaque or transparent substrates. The nanomaterial electrodes may also be grown in situ. The nanomaterials may include carbon nanomaterials, other organic or inorganic nanomaterials or mixtures.

  17. Experiments with Electrodynamic Wheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaul, Nathan; Corey, Daniel; Cordrey, Vincent; Majewski, Walerian

    2015-04-01

    Our experiments were involving inductive magnetic levitation. A Halbach array is a system in which a series of magnets is arranged in a manner such that the magnetic field is cancelled on one side of the array while strengthening the field on the other. We constructed two circular Halbach wheels, making the strong magnetic field on the outer rim of the ring. Such system is usually dubbed as an Electrodynamic Wheel (EDW). Rotating this wheel around a horizontal axis above a flat conducting surface should induce eddy currents in said surface through the variable magnetic flux. The eddy currents produce, in turn, their own magnetic fields which interact with the magnets of the EDW. We demonstrated that these interactions produce both drag and lift forces on the EDW which can theoretically be used for lift and propulsion of the EDW. The focus of our experiments is determining how to maximize the lift-to-drag ratio by the proper choice of the induction element. We will also describe our experiments with a rotating circular Halbach array having the strong magnetic field of about 1 T on the flat side of the ring, and acting as a hovercraft.

  18. Time reversal invariance and the arrow of time in classical electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Rohrlich, Fritz

    2005-11-01

    Time reversal invariance, T, is well known to hold in quantum electrodynamics. However, it has caused difficulties in classical electrodynamics (CED). These are shown to be conceptual misunderstandings. When corrected: (1) the classical equations of motion of a charge are T invariant despite the explicit occurrence of retarded fields in the equations of motion. (2) Advanced fields violate causality and occur neither in nature nor in the CED that describes it. (3) The nonexistence of advanced fields in nature implies an "arrow of time" for electromagnetic radiation: radiation emission is an overall dissipative phenomenon. This electromagnetic "arrow of time" does not contradict time reversal invariance.

  19. Quantization of general linear electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera, Sergio; Schuller, Frederic P.

    2011-03-15

    General linear electrodynamics allow for an arbitrary linear constitutive relation between the field strength 2-form and induction 2-form density if crucial hyperbolicity and energy conditions are satisfied, which render the theory predictive and physically interpretable. Taking into account the higher-order polynomial dispersion relation and associated causal structure of general linear electrodynamics, we carefully develop its Hamiltonian formulation from first principles. Canonical quantization of the resulting constrained system then results in a quantum vacuum which is sensitive to the constitutive tensor of the classical theory. As an application we calculate the Casimir effect in a birefringent linear optical medium.

  20. Electrodynamic Dust Shield Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stankie, Charles G.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the project was to design and manufacture a device to demonstrate a new technology developed by NASA's Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory. The technology itself is a system which uses magnetic principles to remove regolith dust from its surface. This project was to create an enclosure that will be used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the invention to The Office of the Chief Technologist. ONE of the most important challenges of space exploration is actually caused by something very small and seemingly insignificant. Dust in space, most notably on the moon and Mars, has caused many unforeseen issues. Dirt and dust on Earth, while a nuisance, can be easily cleaned and kept at bay. However, there is considerably less weathering and erosion in space. As a result, the microscopic particles are extremely rough and abrasive. They are also electrostatically charged, so they cling to everything they make contact with. This was first noted to be a major problem during the Apollo missions. Dust would stick to the spacesuits, and could not be wiped off as predicted. Dust was brought back into the spacecraft, and was even inhaled by astronauts. This is a major health hazard. Atmospheric storms and other events can also cause dust to coat surfaces of spacecraft. This can cause abrasive damage to the craft. The coating can also reduce the effectiveness of thermal insulation and solar panels.' A group of engineers at Kennedy Space Center's Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory have developed a new technology, called the Electrodynamic Dust Shield, to help alleviate these problems. It is based off of the electric curtain concept developed at NASA in 1967. "The EDS is an active dust mitigation technology that uses traveling electric fields to transport electrostatically charged dust particles along surfaces. To generate the traveling electric fields, the EDS consists of a multilayer dielectric coating with an embedded thin electrode grid

  1. Disentangling forms of Lorentz violation with complementary clock comparison experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Altschul, Brett

    2009-03-15

    Atomic clock comparisons provide some of the most precise tests of Lorentz and CPT symmetries in the laboratory. With data from multiple such experiments using different nuclei, it is possible to constrain new regions of the parameter space for Lorentz violation. Relativistic effects in the nuclei allow us to disentangle forms of Lorentz violation which could not be separately measured in purely nonrelativistic experiments. The disentangled bounds in the neutron sectors are at the 10{sup -28} GeV level, far better than could be obtained with any other current technique.

  2. TOMOGRAPHIC SITE CHARACTERIZATION USING CPT, ERT, AND GPR

    SciTech Connect

    Rexford M. Morey; Susanne M. Conklin; Stephen P. Farrington, P.E.; James D. Shinn II, P.E.

    1999-07-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the cleanup of inactive DOE sites and for bringing DOE sites and facilities into compliance with federal, state, and local laws and regulations. The DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM) needs advanced technologies that can make environmental restoration and waste management operations more efficient and less costly. These techniques are required to better characterize the physical, hydrogeological, and chemical properties of the subsurface while minimizing and optimizing the use of boreholes and monitoring wells. Today the cone penetrometer technique (CPT) is demonstrating the value of a minimally invasive deployment system for site characterization. Applied Research Associates, Inc. is developing two new sensor packages for site characterization and monitoring. The two new methods are: (1) Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT); and (2) Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) Tomography. These sensor systems are now integrated with the CPT. The results of this program now make it possible to install ERT and GPR units by CPT methods and thereby reduce installation costs and total costs for ERT and GPR surveys. These two techniques can complement each other in regions of low resistivity where ERT is more effective and regions of high resistivity where GPR is more effective. The results show that CPT-installed GeoWells can be used for both ERT and GPR borehole tomographic subsurface imaging. These two imaging techniques can be used for environmental site characterization and monitoring have numerous and diverse applications within site cleanup and waste management operations.

  3. WMAP 7 year constraints on CPT violation from large angle CMB anisotropies

    SciTech Connect

    Gruppuso, A.; Mandolesi, N.; Rosa, A. De; Finelli, F.; Paci, F. E-mail: paolo.natoli@gmail.com E-mail: derosa@iasfbo.inaf.it E-mail: fpaci@apc.univ-paris7.fr

    2012-02-01

    We constrain the rotation angle α of the linear polarization of CMB photons using the large angular scale (up to ∼ 4°) signal in WMAP 7 year data. At these scales, the CMB polarization pattern probes mostly the reionization era. A genuine rotation may be interpreted as cosmological birefringence, which is a well known tracer of new physics, through the breakdown of fundamental symmetries. Our analysis provides α = −1.6°±1.7° (3.4°) at 68% (95%) C.L. for the multipoles range Δl = 2−47 not including an instrumental systematic uncertainty that the WMAP team estimates at ±1.5°. This improves the bound obtained by WMAP team (Komatsu et al., 2010). Moreover we show, for the first time at low multipoles, the angular power spectrum α{sub l} in search of a possible scale dependence of the birefringence effect. Our findings are compatible with no detection at all angular scales probed here. We finally forecast the capabilities of Planck in tightening the present constraints.

  4. Search for Lorentz invariance and CPT violation with muon antineutrinos in the MINOS Near Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, P.; et al.

    2012-02-01

    We have searched for sidereal variations in the rate of antineutrino interactions in the MINOS Near Detector. Using antineutrinos produced by the NuMI beam, we find no statistically significant sidereal modulation in the rate. When this result is placed in the context of the Standard Model Extension theory we are able to place upper limits on the coefficients defining the theory. These limits are used in combination with the results from an earlier analysis of MINOS neutrino data to further constrain the coefficients.

  5. Study of atomic permanent electric dipole moments for CP violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latha, K. V. P.

    2012-07-01

    Permanent electric dipole moments of non-degenerate physical systems are direct evidences of Parity (P) and time-reversal (T) symmetry violations. These symmetries are inturn closely related to CP violation through the CPT theorem. CP violation is a pre-requisite for the matter anti-matter asymmety in the Universe. If C or CP were good symmetries of nature, particle production would create anti-particle production in equal number and there wouldn't be a baryon asymmetry. The magnitude of CP violation predicted by the Standard Model is insufficient to account for the observed baryon asymmetry. We have performed an atomic physics calculation of the electric dipole moment of the Hg(mercury), which to date is the most accurate calculation as it incorporates important electron correlation effects. Using the P and T violating coupling constants at the atomic level, it is possible to extract the CP violating parameters at the elementary particle level. Our calculation is model independent many-body calculation and hence, our calculated parameters can be used not only as a test for models of particle physics, but also for a better understanding of the process of baryogenesis in the early universe. In my talk I would like to highlight our latest results on the P and T violating parameters of the Hg, Yb and Ra atoms at the atomic level and relate them to some important CP violating parameters at the elementary particle level.

  6. Carl Neumann's Contributions to Electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlote, Karl-Heinz

    2004-09-01

    I examine the publications of Carl Neumann (1832 1925) on electrodynamics, which constitute a major part of his work and which illuminate his approach to mathematical physics. I show how Neumann contributed to physics at an important stage in its development and how his work led to a polemic with Hermann Helmholtz (1821 1894). Neumann advanced and extended the ideas of the Königsberg school of mathematical physics. His investigations were aimed at founding a mathematically exact physical theory of electrodynamics, following the approach of Carl G.J. Jacobi (1804 1851) on the foundation of a physical theory as outlined in Jacobi’s lectures on analytical mechanics. Neumann’s work also shows how he clung to principles that impeded him in appreciating and developing new ideas such as those on field theory that were proposed by Michael Faraday (1791 1867) and James Clerk Maxwell (1831 1879).

  7. Accelerator and electrodynamics capability review

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Kevin W

    2010-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) uses capability reviews to assess the science, technology and engineering (STE) quality and institutional integration and to advise Laboratory Management on the current and future health of the STE. Capability reviews address the STE integration that LANL uses to meet mission requirements. The Capability Review Committees serve a dual role of providing assessment of the Laboratory's technical contributions and integration towards its missions and providing advice to Laboratory Management. The assessments and advice are documented in reports prepared by the Capability Review Committees that are delivered to the Director and to the Principal Associate Director for Science, Technology and Engineering (PADSTE). Laboratory Management will use this report for STE assessment and planning. LANL has defined fifteen STE capabilities. Electrodynamics and Accelerators is one of the seven STE capabilities that LANL Management (Director, PADSTE, technical Associate Directors) has identified for review in Fiscal Year (FY) 2010. Accelerators and electrodynamics at LANL comprise a blend of large-scale facilities and innovative small-scale research with a growing focus on national security applications. This review is organized into five topical areas: (1) Free Electron Lasers; (2) Linear Accelerator Science and Technology; (3) Advanced Electromagnetics; (4) Next Generation Accelerator Concepts; and (5) National Security Accelerator Applications. The focus is on innovative technology with an emphasis on applications relevant to Laboratory mission. The role of Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) in support of accelerators/electrodynamics will be discussed. The review provides an opportunity for interaction with early career staff. Program sponsors and customers will provide their input on the value of the accelerator and electrodynamics capability to the Laboratory mission.

  8. Some problems of classical electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginzburg, I. F.

    2011-12-01

    In this lecture, I discuss issues that usually escape attention of students in electrodynamics. These are the questions of (1) what the photon observed in nature "looks like," (2) how an interference pattern arises from a source containing a lot of incoherently emitting atoms, and (3) how light "slows down" in a medium. Answers to these questions, if discussed at all, are scattered over various textbooks. Here, I follow our textbook [1].

  9. Electrodynamics on extrasolar giant planets

    SciTech Connect

    Koskinen, T. T.; Yelle, R. V.; Lavvas, P.; Cho, J. Y-K.

    2014-11-20

    Strong ionization on close-in extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) suggests that their atmospheres may be affected by ion drag and resistive heating arising from wind-driven electrodynamics. Recent models of ion drag on these planets, however, are based on thermal ionization only and do not include the upper atmosphere above the 1 mbar level. These models are also based on simplified equations of resistive magnetohydrodynamics that are not always valid in extrasolar planet atmospheres. We show that photoionization dominates over thermal ionization over much of the dayside atmosphere above the 100 mbar level, creating an upper ionosphere dominated by ionization of H and He and a lower ionosphere dominated by ionization of metals such as Na, K, and Mg. The resulting dayside electron densities on close-in exoplanets are higher than those encountered in any planetary ionosphere of the solar system, and the conductivities are comparable to the chromosphere of the Sun. Based on these results and assumed magnetic fields, we constrain the conductivity regimes on close-in EGPs and use a generalized Ohm's law to study the basic effects of electrodynamics in their atmospheres. We find that ion drag is important above the 10 mbar level where it can also significantly alter the energy balance through resistive heating. Due to frequent collisions of the electrons and ions with the neutral atmosphere, however, ion drag is largely negligible in the lower atmosphere below the 10 mbar level for a reasonable range of planetary magnetic moments. We find that the atmospheric conductivity decreases by several orders of magnitude in the night side of tidally locked planets, leading to a potentially interesting large-scale dichotomy in electrodynamics between the day and night sides. A combined approach that relies on UV observations of the upper atmosphere, phase curve and Doppler measurements of global dynamics, and visual transit observations to probe the alkali metals can potentially be

  10. Understanding parity violation in molecular systems.

    PubMed

    Faglioni, Francesco; Lazzeretti, Paolo

    2002-01-01

    Parity-violation energy (E(PV)) due to weak nuclear interactions between nucleons and electrons in chiral molecular systems provides a fundamental tool to verify our understanding of electronic behavior in complex systems. We used both a relativistic and a nonrelativistic approach to study a number of simple molecules and analyze the corresponding E(PV) in terms of intuitive electrodynamic concepts. We developed a qualitative model to predict the sign of E(PV) and its behavior against selected geometric distortions. Our model provides a valuable tool to screen large sets of molecules and select interesting candidates for more expensive investigations. PMID:11800715

  11. Tomographic Site Characterization Using CPT, ERT, and GPR

    SciTech Connect

    Rexford M. Morey

    1997-05-23

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the cleanup of inactive DOE sites and for bringing DOE sites and facilities into compliance with federal, state and local laws and regulations. The DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM) needs advanced technologies that can make environmental restoration and waste management operations more efficient and less costly. These techniques are required to better characterize the physical, hydrogeological, and chemical properties of the subsurface while minimizing and optimizing the use of boreholes and monitoring wells. Today the cone penetrometer technique (CPT) is demonstrating the value of a minimally invasive deployment system fix site characterization. Applied Research Associates is developing two new sensor packages for site characterization and monitoring. The two new methods are: . Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) and . Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) Tomography. These sensor systems are now integrated with the Cone Penetrometer Technique (CPT). The results of this program now make it possible to install ERT and GPR units by CPT methods and thereby reduce installation costs and total costs for ERT and GPR surveys. These two techniques can complement each other in regions of low resistivity where ERT is more effective and regions of high resistivity where GPR is more effective. The results show that CPT-installed GeoWells can be used in both ERT and GPR borehole tomographic subsurface imaging. These two imaging techniques can be used for environmental site characterization and environmental remediation monitoring. Technologies used for site characterization and monitoring have numerous and diverse applications within site clean-up and waste management operations.

  12. Beauty for pedestrians toy models for CP violation and baryon asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Lipkin, H.J. ||

    1995-12-01

    Why are particles different from antiparticles? C and P Violation - 1956; CP Violation - 1964. Why so little new experimental information in thirty years? Where has all the antimatter gone? Toy models are presented showing: (1) How CPT and {Delta}I = 1/2 make life difficult in kaon physics by requiring equal K{sup {plus_minus}} total widths and also equal partial widths to many exclusive channels. (2) How to understand and get around CPT restrictions. (3) How CP asymmetries can occur in exclusive partial widths and still add up to equal total widths. (4) Sakharov`s 1966 scenario for how CP Violation + proton decay can explain baryon asymmetry (5) How B physics can help.

  13. Entropic information for travelling solitons in Lorentz and CPT breaking systems

    SciTech Connect

    Correa, R.A.C.; Rocha, Roldão da; Souza Dutra, A. de

    2015-08-15

    In this work we group four research topics apparently disconnected, namely solitons, Lorentz symmetry breaking, supersymmetry, and entropy. Following a recent work (Gleiser and Stamatopoulos, 2012), we show that it is possible to construct in the context of travelling wave solutions a configurational entropy measure in functional space, from the field configurations. Thus, we investigate the existence and properties of travelling solitons in Lorentz and CPT breaking scenarios for a class of models with two interacting scalar fields. Here, we obtain a complete set of exact solutions for the model studied which display both double and single-kink configurations. In fact, such models are very important in applications that include Bloch branes, Skyrmions, Yang–Mills, Q-balls, oscillons and various superstring-motivated theories. We find that the so-called Configurational Entropy (CE) for travelling solitons shows that the best value of parameter responsible to break the Lorentz symmetry is one where the energy density is distributed equally around the origin. In this way, the information-theoretical measure of travelling solitons in Lorentz symmetry violation scenarios opens a new window to probe situations where the parameters responsible for breaking the symmetries are arbitrary. In this case, the CE selects the best value of the parameter in the model.

  14. Electrodynamics at the highest energies

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Spencer R.

    2002-06-17

    At very high energies, the bremsstrahlung and pair production cross sections exhibit complex behavior due to the material in which the interactions occur. The cross sections in dense media can be dramatically different than for isolated atoms. This writeup discusses these in-medium effects, emphasizing how the cross section has different energy and target density dependencies in different regimes. Data from SLAC experiment E-146 will be presented to confirm the energy and density scaling. Finally, QCD analogs of the electrodynamics effects will be discussed.

  15. Quantum Electrodynamics for Vector Mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Djukanovic, Dalibor; Schindler, Matthias R.; Scherer, Stefan; Gegelia, Jambul

    2005-07-01

    Quantum electrodynamics for {rho} mesons is considered. It is shown that, at the tree level, the value of the gyromagnetic ratio of the {rho}{sup +} is fixed to 2 in a self-consistent effective quantum field theory. Further, the mixing parameter of the photon and the neutral vector meson is equal to the ratio of electromagnetic and strong couplings, leading to the mass difference M{sub {rho}}{sub {sup 0}}-M{sub {rho}}{sub {sup {+-}}}{approx}1 MeV at tree order.

  16. A model of nonlinear electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kruglov, S.I.

    2015-02-15

    A new model of nonlinear electrodynamics with two parameters is investigated. We also consider a model with one dimensional parameter. It was shown that the electric field of a point-like charge is not singular at the origin and there is the finiteness of the static electric energy of point-like charged particle. We obtain the canonical and symmetrical Belinfante energy–momentum tensors and dilatation currents. It is demonstrated that the dilatation symmetry and dual symmetry are broken in the models suggested. We have calculated the static electric energy of point-like particles.

  17. [Taxotere (docetaxel) and CPT 11 (irinotecan): phase I trials].

    PubMed

    Couteau, C; Yakendji, K; Terret, C; Goncalves, E; Armand, J P

    1996-01-01

    Two new drugs from two new chemotherapy compound families were developed concomitantly: Taxoter (docetaxel), a taxane derivate and CPT 11 (irinotecan) a topoisomerase inhibitor. Six phase I trials of Taxoter were performed. The limiting toxicity is neutropenia. The recommended dosage for phase II trial is 100 mg/m2 administered in 1 hour perfusion, every 21 days. Neutropenic fever is unfrequent. Other toxicities are mucositis, skin toxicity, hypersensibility reaction, weight gain and oedema. None of these toxicities were limiting. Six phase I studies were conducted to determine the maximum tolerated dose of CPT 11 (irinotecan). Two different schedules were studied: the weekly 30-90 minutes infusion and an infusion administered every three weeks in one day or daily over three or five consecutive days. The limiting toxicity of the weekly schedule is diarrhea. Therefore the recommended dosage is 100-150 mg/m2/week. While dose limiting toxicities in the three week schedule are diarrhea as well as neutropenia. The recommended dose is 350 mg/m2. Since diarrhea appeared to be the major problem in achieving high dose intensity with CPT 11, a dose escalation trial with drug support against diarrhea was performed. A recommended dosage of 500 mg/m2 is therefore described. These two drugs are under evaluation in a large spectrum of tumors. Their original mechanism of action suggests interesting therapeutic properties. Clinical studies in combination with other drugs are in progress to define the role of topoisomerase I inhibitors and taxane in cancer therapy. PMID:8672854

  18. The Carnitine Palmitoyl Transferase (CPT) System and Possible Relevance for Neuropsychiatric and Neurological Conditions.

    PubMed

    Virmani, Ashraf; Pinto, Luigi; Bauermann, Otto; Zerelli, Saf; Diedenhofen, Andreas; Binienda, Zbigniew K; Ali, Syed F; van der Leij, Feike R

    2015-10-01

    The carnitine palmitoyl transferase (CPT) system is a multiprotein complex with catalytic activity localized within a core represented by CPT1 and CPT2 in the outer and inner membrane of the mitochondria, respectively. Two proteins, the acyl-CoA synthase and a translocase also form part of this system. This system is crucial for the mitochondrial beta-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids. CPT1 has two well-known isoforms, CPT1a and CPT1b. CPT1a is the hepatic isoform and CPT1b is typically muscular; both are normally utilized by the organism for metabolic processes throughout the body. There is a strong evidence for their involvement in various disease states, e.g., metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular diseases, and in diabetes mellitus type 2. Recently, a new, third isoform of CPT was described, CPT1c. This is a neuronal isoform and is prevalently localized in brain regions such as hypothalamus, amygdala, and hippocampus. These brain regions play an important role in control of food intake and neuropsychiatric and neurological diseases. CPT activity has been implicated in several neurological and social diseases mainly related to the alteration of insulin equilibrium in the brain. These pathologies include Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and schizophrenia. Evolution of both Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease is in some way linked to brain insulin and related metabolic dysfunctions with putative links also with the diabetes type 2. Studies show that in the CNS, CPT1c affects ceramide levels, endocannabionoids, and oxidative processes and may play an important role in various brain functions such as learning. PMID:26041663

  19. Prospects of CPT tests using antiprotonic helium and antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Hayano, Ryugo S.

    2005-10-19

    Testing CPT to the highest possible precision using the laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms (a neutral three-body system consisting of an antiproton, a helium nucleus and an electron) is the current goal of ASACUSA collaboration at CERN AD. The present status and future prospects are discussed in the first half of the talk. Our program will be extended in the future to include the microwave spectroscopy of ground-state hyperfine splitting of antihydrogen. The physics motivations and possible measurement schemes are presented in the second half.

  20. Electrodynamic radioactivity detector for microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, T. L.; Davis, E. J.; Jenkins, R. W., Jr.; McRae, D. D.

    1989-03-01

    A new technique for the measurement of the radioactive decay of single microparticles has been demonstrated. Although the experiments were made with droplets of order 20 μm in diameter, microparticles in the range 0.1-100 μm can be accommodated. An electrodynamic balance and combination light-scattering photometer were used to measure the charge-loss rate and size of a charged microsphere suspended in a laser beam by superposed ac and dc electrical fields. The charged particle undergoes charge loss in the partially ionized gas atmosphere which results from radioactive decay of 14C-tagged compounds, and the rate of charge loss is proportional to the rate of decay here. The charge on a particle was determined by measuring the dc voltage necessary to stably suspend the particle against gravity while simultaneously determining the droplet size by light-scattering techniques. The parameters which affect the operation of the electrodynamic balance as a radioactivity detector are examined, and the limits of its sensitivity are explored. Radioactivity levels as low as 120 pCi have been measured, and it appears that by reducing the background contamination inside our balance activity levels on the order of 10 pCi can be detected. This new technique has application in the measurement of activity levels and source discrimination of natural and man-made aerosols and smokes and is also useful for studies involving specifically labeled radio-chemical probes.

  1. Atmospheric electrodynamics in the U. S. - 1987-1990

    SciTech Connect

    Holzworth, R.H. )

    1991-01-01

    Atmospheric electrodynamics research is summarized, focusing on three general areas: the ionosphere as a source for middle atmospheric electrodynamics, regional and global scale electrodynamics, and thunderstorms and lightning. New or improved instrumentation techniques which have furthered atmospheric electrodynamics research are also discussed. 93 refs.

  2. Electrodynamic studies of upper and lower atmospheric coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Y. T.; Cornwall, J. M.; Edgar, B. C.; Schulz, M.; Sharp, L. R.

    1981-01-01

    Theoretical interprotations and data interpretations of electrodynamical studies in upper and lower atmosphere coupling are reported. The following topics are discussed: (1) magnetosphere/ionosphere/atmosphere coupling in auroral electrodynamics; (2) middle atmosphere electrodynamics; (3) thermosphere troposphere coupling; and (4) tropospheric electrodynamics. Understanding of the near Earth space environment shows the interrelationships between various components of the Earth's atmosphere.

  3. Primordial magnetic fields and nonlinear electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kunze, Kerstin E.

    2008-01-15

    The creation of large scale magnetic fields is studied in an inflationary universe where electrodynamics is assumed to be nonlinear. After inflation ends electrodynamics becomes linear and thus the description of reheating and the subsequent radiation dominated stage are unaltered. The nonlinear regime of electrodynamics is described by Lagrangians having a power-law dependence on one of the invariants of the electromagnetic field. It is found that there is a range of parameters for which primordial magnetic fields of cosmologically interesting strengths can be created.

  4. AMPAR interacting protein CPT1C enhances surface expression of GluA1-containing receptors

    PubMed Central

    Gratacòs-Batlle, Esther; Yefimenko, Natalia; Cascos-García, Helena; Soto, David

    2015-01-01

    AMPARs mediate the vast majority of fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the brain and their biophysical and trafficking properties depend on their subunit composition and on several posttranscriptional and posttranslational modifications. Additionally, in the brain AMPARs associate with auxiliary subunits, which modify the properties of the receptors. Despite the abundance of AMPAR partners, recent proteomic studies have revealed even more interacting proteins that could potentially be involved in AMPAR regulation. Amongst these, carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C (CPT1C) has been demonstrated to form an integral part of native AMPAR complexes in brain tissue extracts. Thus, we aimed to investigate whether CPT1C might be able to modulate AMPAR function. Firstly, we confirmed that CPT1C is an interacting protein of AMPARs in heterologous expression systems. Secondly, CPT1C enhanced whole-cell currents of GluA1 homomeric and GluA1/GluA2 heteromeric receptors. However, CPT1C does not alter the biophysical properties of AMPARs and co-localization experiments revealed that AMPARs and CPT1C are not associated at the plasma membrane despite a strong level of co-localization at the intracellular level. We established that increased surface GluA1 receptor number was responsible for the enhanced AMPAR mediated currents in the presence of CPT1C. Additionally, we revealed that the palmitoylable residue C585 of GluA1 is important in the enhancement of AMPAR trafficking to the cell surface by CPT1C. Nevertheless, despite its potential as a depalmitoylating enzyme, CPT1C does not affect the palmitoylation state of GluA1. To sum up, this work suggests that CPT1C plays a role as a novel regulator of AMPAR surface expression in neurons. Fine modulation of AMPAR membrane trafficking is fundamental in normal synaptic activity and in plasticity processes and CPT1C is therefore a putative candidate to regulate neuronal AMPAR physiology. PMID:25698923

  5. Regular black holes in f (R ) gravity coupled to nonlinear electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Manuel E.; Junior, Ednaldo L. B.; Marques, Glauber T.; Zanchin, Vilson T.

    2016-07-01

    We obtain a class of regular black hole solutions in four-dimensional f (R ) gravity, R being the curvature scalar, coupled to a nonlinear electromagnetic source. The metric formalism is used and static spherically symmetric spacetimes are assumed. The resulting f (R ) and nonlinear electrodynamics functions are characterized by a one-parameter family of solutions which are generalizations of known regular black holes in general relativity coupled to nonlinear electrodynamics. The related regular black holes of general relativity are recovered when the free parameter vanishes, in which case one has f (R )∝R . We analyze the regularity of the solutions and also show that there are particular solutions that violate only the strong energy condition.

  6. Regular rotating electrically charged structures in nonlinear electrodynamics minimally coupled to gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dymnikova, Irina; Galaktionov, Evgeny

    2016-03-01

    In nonlinear electrodynamics minimally coupled to gravity, regular spherically symmetric electrically charged solutions satisfy the weak energy condition and have obligatory de Sitter center. By the Gürses-Gürsey algorithm they are transformed to regular axially symmetric solutions asymptotically Kerr-Newman for a distant observer. Rotation transforms de Sitter center into de Sitter equatorial disk embedded as a bridge into a de Sitter vacuum surface. The de Sitter surfaces satisfy p = -ρ and have properties of a perfect conductor and ideal diamagnetic. The Kerr ring singularity is replaced with the superconducting current which serves as a non-dissipative electromagnetic source of the asymptotically Kerr-Newman geometry. Violation of the weak energy condition is prevented by the basic requirement of electrodynamics of continued media.

  7. Fluctuational electrodynamics of hyperbolic metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Yu; Jacob, Zubin

    2014-06-21

    We give a detailed account of equilibrium and non-equilibrium fluctuational electrodynamics of hyperbolic metamaterials. We show the unifying aspects of two different approaches; one utilizes the second kind of fluctuation dissipation theorem and the other makes use of the scattering method. We analyze the near-field of hyperbolic media at finite temperatures and show that the lack of spatial coherence can be attributed to the multi-modal nature of super-Planckian thermal emission. We also adopt the analysis to phonon-polaritonic super-lattice metamaterials and describe the regimes suitable for experimental verification of our predicted effects. The results reveal that far-field thermal emission spectra are dominated by epsilon-near-zero and epsilon-near-pole responses as expected from Kirchoff's laws. Our work should aid both theorists and experimentalists to study complex media and engineer equilibrium and non-equilibrium fluctuations for applications in thermal photonics.

  8. The PROPEL Electrodynamic Tether Demonstration Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilen, Sven G.; Johnson, C. Les; Wiegmann, Bruce M.; Alexander, Leslie; Gilchrist, Brian E.; Hoyt, Robert P.; Elder, Craig H.; Fuhrhop, Keith P.; Scadera, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The PROPEL ("Propulsion using Electrodynamics") mission will demonstrate the operation of an electrodynamic tether propulsion system in low Earth orbit and advance its technology readiness level for multiple applications. The PROPEL mission has two primary objectives: first, to demonstrate the capability of electrodynamic tether technology to provide robust and safe, near-propellantless propulsion for orbit-raising, de-orbit, plane change, and station keeping, as well as to perform orbital power harvesting and formation flight; and, second, to fully characterize and validate the performance of an integrated electrodynamic tether propulsion system, qualifying it for infusion into future multiple satellite platforms and missions with minimal modification. This paper provides an overview of the PROPEL system and design reference missions; mission goals and required measurements; and ongoing PROPEL mission design efforts.

  9. Renormalization of high-energy Lorentz-violating QED

    SciTech Connect

    Anselmi, Damiano; Taiuti, Martina

    2010-04-15

    We study a QED extension that is unitary, CPT invariant, and super-renormalizable, but violates Lorentz symmetry at high energies, and contains higher-dimension operators (LVQED). Divergent diagrams are only one- and two-loop. We compute the one-loop renormalizations at high and low energies and analyze the relation between them. It emerges that the powerlike divergences of the low-energy theory are multiplied by arbitrary constants, inherited by the high-energy theory, and therefore can be set to zero at no cost, bypassing the hierarchy problem.

  10. The invariance of classical electromagnetism under Charge-conjugation, Parity and Time-reversal (CPT) transformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.

    1989-01-01

    The invariance of classical electromagnetism under charge-conjugation, parity, and time-reversal (CPT) is studied by considering the motion of a charged particle in electric and magnetic fields. Upon applying CPT transformations to various physical quantities and noting that the motion still behaves physically demonstrates invariance.

  11. Simultaneously improving the sensitivity and absolute accuracy of CPT magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shang-Qing; Yang, Guo-Qing; Xu, Yun-Fei; Lin, Qiang; Liu, Zhi-Heng; Chen, Zheng-Xiang

    2014-03-24

    A new method to improve the sensitivity and absolute accuracy simultaneously for coherent population trapping (CPT) magnetometer based on the differential detection method is presented. Two modulated optical beams with orthogonal circular polarizations are applied, in one of which two magnetic resonances are excited simultaneously by modulating a 3.4GHz microwave with Larmor frequency. When a microwave frequency shift is introduced, the difference in the power transmitted through the cell in each beam shows a low noise resonance. The sensitivity of 2pT/Hz @ 10Hz is achieved. Meanwhile, the absolute accuracy of ± 0.5nT within the magnetic field ranging from 20000nT to 100000nT is realized.

  12. Lethal carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) II deficiency in newborns: A molecular-genetic study

    SciTech Connect

    Taroni, F.; Gellera, C.; Cavadini, P.

    1994-09-01

    Classically, CPT II deficiency presents in young adults with recurrent episodes of paroxysmal myoglobinuria triggered by prolonged exercise, cold, or fever. More severe forms of CPT II deficiency have recently been observed in children and newborns. Here, were present biochemical and molecular studies of lethal neonatal CPT II deficiency in a premature Haitian infant of nonconsanguineous parents. He presented at birth with severe respiratory distress, cardiac arrhythmia and heart failure. His condition worsened and he died on the 4th day of life. Postmortem examination showed hypertrophied, dilated heart, and lipid storage in liver, heart and kidney. An older sibling had died unexpectantly at 4 days of age with postmortem evidence of fatty infiltration of liver, kidney, heart and muscle. Biochemical study of cultured fibroblasts demonstrated dramatic reduction of palmitate oxidation (to < 3%) and very low residual CPT II activity ({le}15%). No CPT II protein was detected by Western blot analysis of fibroblasts. However, immunoprecitation of cells pulse-labeled with L-[{sup 35}S] methionine demonstrated normal amounts of newly synthesized CPT II, thus suggesting altered stability of the enzyme. To identify the molecular defect in his patient, individual CPT II exons were amplified by genomic PCR and directly sequenced. A missense mutation was found in exon 4, resulting in the nonconservative amino acid substitution at codon 227 (Pro227Leu). SSCP analysis of a genomic PCR fragment encompassing the mutation demonstrated that the patient was homozygous and the parents were heterozygous for this mutation. The mutation was detected neither in a large number of controls nor in other CPT II deficient patients. Finally, CPT II activity in COS-1 cells transfected with mutated CPT II cDNA was <8% than that in cells transfected with wild-type cDNA, thus demonstrating the pathogenic role of this mutation.

  13. Middle Atmosphere Electrodynamics (MAE). Middle atmospheric electrodynamics during MAP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, R. A.

    1989-01-01

    The recent revival and strong motivation for research in middle atmospheric electrodynamics can be attributed, in large part, to the discovery of large (V/m) electric fields within the lower mesosphere during the decade prior to MAP. Subsequent rocket soundings appeared to verify the preliminary findings. During the MAP era, more sophisticated techniques have been employed to obtain measurements which respond positively to criticisms of earlier results, and which provide more insight regarding the character of the fields. The occurrence of mesospheric V/m electric fields now seems to require the presence of aerosols, of local winds and related dynamics, and of an atmospheric electrical conductivity less than 10(-10)S/m. Furthermore, new theoretical ideas describing the origin of the V/m fields are consistent with the measurements. The current status of results regarding V/m fields in the middle atmosphere is reviewed in light of the more widely accepted electric field structure for this region from rocket, balloon and modeling results.

  14. Conjunctions and Collision Avoidance with Electrodynamic Tethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, E.

    2013-09-01

    Electrodynamic propulsion technology is currently in development by NASA, ESA, and JAXA for the purpose of affordable removal of large debris objects from LEO. At the same time, the Naval Research Laboratory is preparing a 3U CubeSat with a 1-km electrodynamic tether for a flight demonstration of electrodynamic propulsion. This type of propulsion does not require fuel. The electrodynamic thrust is the Lorentz force acting on the electric current in a long conductor (tether) in the geomagnetic field. Electrons are collected from the ambient plasma on one end and emitted back into the plasma from the other end. The electric current loop is closed through the ionosphere, as demonstrated in two previous flights. The vehicle is solar powered. To support safe navigation of electrodynamic tethers, proper conjunction analysis and collision avoidance strategies are needed. The typical lengths of electrodynamic tethers for near-term applications are measured in kilometers, and the conjunction geometry is very different from the geometry of conjunctions between compact objects. It is commonly thought that the collision cross-section in a conjunction between a tether and a compact object is represented by the product of the tether length and the size of the object. However, rigorous analysis shows that this is not the case, and that the above assumption leads to grossly overestimated collision probabilities. The paper will present the results of a detailed mathematical analysis of the conjunction geometry and collision probabilities in close approaches between electrodynamic tethers and compact objects, such as satellites, rocket bodies, and debris fragments. Electrodynamic spacecraft will not require fuel, and therefore, can thrust constantly. Their orbit transfers can take many days, but can result in major orbit changes, including large rotations of the orbital plane, both in the inclination and the node. During these orbit transfers, the electrodynamic spacecraft will

  15. Nonlinear electrodynamics and CMB polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Cuesta, Herman J. Mosquera; Lambiase, G. E-mail: lambiase@sa.infn.it

    2011-03-01

    Recently WMAP and BOOMERanG experiments have set stringent constraints on the polarization angle of photons propagating in an expanding universe: Δα = (−2.4±1.9)°. The polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation (CMB) is reviewed in the context of nonlinear electrodynamics (NLED). We compute the polarization angle of photons propagating in a cosmological background with planar symmetry. For this purpose, we use the Pagels-Tomboulis (PT) Lagrangian density describing NLED, which has the form L ∼ (X/Λ{sup 4}){sup δ−1} X, where X = ¼F{sub αβ}F{sup αβ}, and δ the parameter featuring the non-Maxwellian character of the PT nonlinear description of the electromagnetic interaction. After looking at the polarization components in the plane orthogonal to the (x)-direction of propagation of the CMB photons, the polarization angle is defined in terms of the eccentricity of the universe, a geometrical property whose evolution on cosmic time (from the last scattering surface to the present) is constrained by the strength of magnetic fields over extragalactic distances.

  16. Optimal Electrodynamic Tether Phasing Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bitzer, Matthew S.; Hall, Christopher D.

    2007-01-01

    We study the minimum-time orbit phasing maneuver problem for a constant-current electrodynamic tether (EDT). The EDT is assumed to be a point mass and the electromagnetic forces acting on the tether are always perpendicular to the local magnetic field. After deriving and non-dimensionalizing the equations of motion, the only input parameters become current and the phase angle. Solution examples, including initial Lagrange costates, time of flight, thrust plots, and thrust angle profiles, are given for a wide range of current magnitudes and phase angles. The two-dimensional cases presented use a non-tilted magnetic dipole model, and the solutions are compared to existing literature. We are able to compare similar trajectories for a constant thrust phasing maneuver and we find that the time of flight is longer for the constant thrust case with similar initial thrust values and phase angles. Full three-dimensional solutions, which use a titled magnetic dipole model, are also analyzed for orbits with small inclinations.

  17. Nanofriction in Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Fogarty, T; Cormick, C; Landa, H; Stojanović, Vladimir M; Demler, E; Morigi, Giovanna

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of cold trapped ions in a high-finesse resonator results from the interplay between the long-range Coulomb repulsion and the cavity-induced interactions. The latter are due to multiple scatterings of laser photons inside the cavity and become relevant when the laser pump is sufficiently strong to overcome photon decay. We study the stationary states of ions coupled with a mode of a standing-wave cavity as a function of the cavity and laser parameters, when the typical length scales of the two self-organizing processes, Coulomb crystallization and photon-mediated interactions, are incommensurate. The dynamics are frustrated and in specific limiting cases can be cast in terms of the Frenkel-Kontorova model, which reproduces features of friction in one dimension. We numerically recover the sliding and pinned phases. For strong cavity nonlinearities, they are in general separated by bistable regions where superlubric and stick-slip dynamics coexist. The cavity, moreover, acts as a thermal reservoir and can cool the chain vibrations to temperatures controlled by the cavity parameters and by the ions' phase. These features are imprinted in the radiation emitted by the cavity, which is readily measurable in state-of-the-art setups of cavity quantum electrodynamics. PMID:26684118

  18. Nanofriction in Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Fogarty, T; Cormick, C; Landa, H; Stojanović, Vladimir M; Demler, E; Morigi, Giovanna

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of cold trapped ions in a high-finesse resonator results from the interplay between the long-range Coulomb repulsion and the cavity-induced interactions. The latter are due to multiple scatterings of laser photons inside the cavity and become relevant when the laser pump is sufficiently strong to overcome photon decay. We study the stationary states of ions coupled with a mode of a standing-wave cavity as a function of the cavity and laser parameters, when the typical length scales of the two self-organizing processes, Coulomb crystallization and photon-mediated interactions, are incommensurate. The dynamics are frustrated and in specific limiting cases can be cast in terms of the Frenkel-Kontorova model, which reproduces features of friction in one dimension. We numerically recover the sliding and pinned phases. For strong cavity nonlinearities, they are in general separated by bistable regions where superlubric and stick-slip dynamics coexist. The cavity, moreover, acts as a thermal reservoir and can cool the chain vibrations to temperatures controlled by the cavity parameters and by the ions' phase. These features are imprinted in the radiation emitted by the cavity, which is readily measurable in state-of-the-art setups of cavity quantum electrodynamics.

  19. Nanofriction in Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogarty, T.; Cormick, C.; Landa, H.; Stojanović, Vladimir M.; Demler, E.; Morigi, Giovanna

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of cold trapped ions in a high-finesse resonator results from the interplay between the long-range Coulomb repulsion and the cavity-induced interactions. The latter are due to multiple scatterings of laser photons inside the cavity and become relevant when the laser pump is sufficiently strong to overcome photon decay. We study the stationary states of ions coupled with a mode of a standing-wave cavity as a function of the cavity and laser parameters, when the typical length scales of the two self-organizing processes, Coulomb crystallization and photon-mediated interactions, are incommensurate. The dynamics are frustrated and in specific limiting cases can be cast in terms of the Frenkel-Kontorova model, which reproduces features of friction in one dimension. We numerically recover the sliding and pinned phases. For strong cavity nonlinearities, they are in general separated by bistable regions where superlubric and stick-slip dynamics coexist. The cavity, moreover, acts as a thermal reservoir and can cool the chain vibrations to temperatures controlled by the cavity parameters and by the ions' phase. These features are imprinted in the radiation emitted by the cavity, which is readily measurable in state-of-the-art setups of cavity quantum electrodynamics.

  20. Electrodynamics of superconducting pnictide superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Perucchi, A.; Pietro, P. Di; Capitani, F.; Lupi, S.; Lee, S.; Kang, J. H.; Eom, C. B.; Jiang, J.; Weiss, J. D.; Hellstrom, E. E.; Dore, P.

    2014-06-02

    It was recently shown that superlattices where layers of the 8% Co-doped BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} superconducting pnictide are intercalated with non superconducting ultrathin layers of either SrTiO{sub 3} or of oxygen-rich BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}, can be used to control flux pinning, thereby increasing critical fields and currents, without significantly affecting the critical temperature of the pristine superconducting material. However, little is known about the electron properties of these systems. Here, we investigate the electrodynamics of these superconducting pnictide superlattices in the normal and superconducting state by using infrared reflectivity, from THz to visible range. We find that multigap structure of these superlattices is preserved, whereas some significant changes are observed in their electronic structure with respect to those of the original pnictide. Our results suggest that possible attempts to further increase the flux pinning may lead to a breakdown of the pnictide superconducting properties.

  1. Tests of Lorentz and CPT Invariance in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewes, Matthew

    2003-01-01

    I give a brief overview of recent work concerning possible signals of Lorentz violation in sensitive clock-based experiments in space. The systems under consideration include atomic clocks and electromagnetic resonators of the type planned for flight on the International Space Station.

  2. Spin-polarized dark state free CPT state preparation with co-propagating left and right circularly polarized lasers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Qu, Suping; Gu, Sihong

    2012-03-12

    We have developed and experimentally studied a coherent population trapping (CPT) state preparation scheme for atomic clock application with co-propagating left and right circularly polarized lasers. With realization of constructive interference and spin-polarized dark state free in CPT state preparation, we have obtained CPT resonance signal 3 times larger than that of the conventional scheme used in atomic clock. Polarization fluctuations and CPT signal sensitivity to laser power behaviors are both improved with the scheme. Our study reveals that it is a promising candidate for both normal-size and chip-scale CPT atomic clocks. PMID:22418521

  3. Renormalizable Electrodynamics of Scalar and Vector Mesons. Part II

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Salam, Abdus; Delbourgo, Robert

    1964-01-01

    The "gauge" technique" for solving theories introduced in an earlier paper is applied to scalar and vector electrodynamics. It is shown that for scalar electrodynamics, there is no {lambda}φ*2φ2 infinity in the theory, while with conventional subtractions vector electrodynamics is completely finite. The essential ideas of the gauge technique are explained in section 3, and a preliminary set of rules for finite computation in vector electrodynamics is set out in Eqs. (7.28) - (7.34).

  4. Confinement in Maxwell-Chern-Simons planar quantum electrodynamics and the 1/N approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, Christoph P.; Raya, Alfredo; Madrigal, Saul Sanchez

    2010-11-01

    We study the analytical structure of the fermion propagator in planar quantum electrodynamics coupled to a Chern-Simons term within a four-component spinor formalism. The dynamical generation of parity-preserving and parity-violating fermion mass terms is considered, through the solution of the corresponding Schwinger-Dyson equation for the fermion propagator at leading order of the 1/N approximation in Landau gauge. The theory undergoes a first-order phase transition toward chiral symmetry restoration when the Chern-Simons coefficient {theta} reaches a critical value which depends upon the number of fermion families considered. Parity-violating masses, however, are generated for arbitrarily large values of the said coefficient. On the confinement scenario, complete charge screening - characteristic of the 1/N approximation - is observed in the entire (N,{theta})-plane through the local and global properties of the vector part of the fermion propagator.

  5. ELECTRODYNAMICS à la HOŘAVA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Juan M.; Santiago, José A.; González-Gaxiola, O.; Zamora, Adolfo

    We study an electrodynamics consistent with anisotropic transformations of spacetime with an arbitrary dynamic exponent z. The equations of motion and conserved quantities are explicitly obtained. We show that the propagator of this theory can be regarded as a quantum correction to the usual propagator. Moreover, we obtain that both the momentum and angular momentum are not modified, but their conservation laws do change. We also show that in this theory the speed of light and the electric charge are modified with z. The magnetic monopole in this electrodynamics and its duality transformations are also investigated. For that we found that there exists a dual electrodynamics, with higher derivatives in the electric field, invariant under the same anisotropic transformations.

  6. Tests of CP and CPT symmetry with positronium

    SciTech Connect

    Namba, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Nishihara, K.; Yamazaki, T.; Asai, S.

    2008-08-08

    The 3{gamma} decay of spin-aligned triplet positronium can be used to test CP (C = charge conjugation, and P = parity operation) invariance in the lepton sector. The angular correlation (s-circumflex {center_dot}k-circumflex {sub 1})(s-circumflex {center_dot}k-circumflex {sub 1}xk-circumflex {sub 2}) is used for this test, where s is the positronium spin and |k{sub 1}|>|k{sub 2}|>|k{sub 3}| are the {gamma} momenta.We designed a new detector to test this symmetry at the 10{sup -3} level. This detector consists of a magnet, a {beta}{sup +} tagging and o-Ps creation system, {gamma}-ray detectors, and a turntable. The detector construction is almost finished and data acquisition will begin in this spring.With a similar detector, the CPT (T = time reversal) symmetry can be also tested. In this case, the angular correlation (s-circumflex {center_dot}k-circumflex {sub 1}xk-circumflex {sub 2}) is used. This test will be started after the CP test is finished.

  7. Quantum gravitational contributions to quantum electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Toms, David J

    2010-11-01

    Quantum electrodynamics describes the interactions of electrons and photons. Electric charge (the gauge coupling constant) is energy dependent, and there is a previous claim that charge is affected by gravity (described by general relativity) with the implication that the charge is reduced at high energies. However, that claim has been very controversial and the matter has not been settled. Here I report an analysis (free from the earlier controversies) demonstrating that quantum gravity corrections to quantum electrodynamics have a quadratic energy dependence that result in the electric charge vanishing at high energies, a result known as asymptotic freedom.

  8. Polymeric Coatings for Electrodynamic Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Jason A.; Kamenetzky, Rachel R.; Finckenor, Miria M.; Schuler, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Two polymeric coatings have been developed for the Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS) mission. ProSEDS is designed to provide an on-orbit demonstration of the electrodynamic propulsion capabilities of tethers in space. The ProSEDS experiment will be a secondary payload on a Delta II unmanned expendable booster scheduled for launch in August 2000. A 5-km conductive tether is attached to the Delta 11 second stage and collects current from the low Earth orbit (LEO) plasma to facilitate de-orbit of the spent stage. The conductive tether is attached to a 10-km non-conductive tether, the other end of which is attached to an endmass containing several scientific instruments. A bare metal tether would have the best conductivity but thermal concerns preclude this design. A conductive polymer developed by Triton Systems has been optimized for conductivity and thermo-optical properties. The current design for the ProSEDS conductive tether is seven strands of 28 AWG aluminum wire individually coated with 8.7 micrometers (0.35 mil) of an atomic oxygen-resistant conductive polymer composed of a mixture of 87% Clear Oxygen-Resistant polymer (COR) and 13% polyanaline (PANi), wrapped around a braided Kevlar (TM) 49 core. Extensive testing has been performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to qualify this material for flight on ProSEDS. Atomic oxygen exposure was performed, with solar absorptance and infrared emittance measured before and after exposure. Conductivity was measured before and after atomic oxygen exposure. High voltage tests, up to 1500 V, of the current collecting ability of the COR/PANi have been completed. Approximately 160 meters of the conductive tether closest to the Delta 11 second stage is insulated to prevent any electron reconnection to the tether from the plasma contactor. The insulation is composed of polyimide overcoated with TOR-BP, another polymeric coating developed by Triton for this mission. TOR-BP acts as both insulator

  9. Preliminary numerical modeling results - cone penetrometer (CPT) tip used as an electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, A L

    2006-12-19

    Figure 1 shows the resistivity models considered in this study; log10 of the resistivity is shown. The graph on the upper left hand side shows a hypothetical resisitivity well log measured along a well in the upper layered model; 10% Gaussian noise has been added to the well log data. The lower model is identical to the upper one except for one square area located within the second deepest layer. Figure 2 shows the electrode configurations considered. The ''reference'' case (upper frame) considers point electrodes located along the surface and along a vertical borehole. The ''CPT electrode'' case (middle frame) assumes that the CPT tip serves as an electrode that is electrically connected to the push rod; the surface electrodes are used in conjuction with the moving CPT electrode. The ''isolated CPT electrode'' case assumes that the electrode at the CPT tip is electrically isolated from the pushrod. Note that the separate CPT push rods in the middle and lower frames are shown separated to clarify the figure; in reality, there is only one pushrod that is changing length as the probe advances. Figure 3 shows three pole-pole measurement schemes were considered; in all cases, the ''get lost'' electrodes were the leftmost and rightmost surface electrodes. The top frame shows the reference scheme where all surface and borehole electrodes can be used. The middle frame shows two possible configurations available when a CPT mounted electrode is used. Note that only one of the four poles can be located along the borehole at any given time; electrode combinations such as the one depicted in blue (upper frame) are not possible in this case. The bottom frame shows a sample configuration where only the surface electrodes are used. Figure 4 shows the results obtained for the various measurement schemes. The white lines show the outline of the true model (shown in Figure 1, upper frame). The starting initial model for these inversions is based on the electrical resistivity log

  10. Lamb Shift in Nonrelativistic Quantum Electrodynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grotch, Howard

    1981-01-01

    The bound electron self-energy or Lamb shift is calculated in nonrelativistic quantum electrodynamics. Retardation is retained and also an interaction previously dropped in other nonrelativistic approaches is kept. Results are finite without introducing a cutoff and lead to a Lamb shift in hydrogen of 1030.9 MHz. (Author/JN)

  11. Electrodynamics in One Dimension: Radiation and Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asti, G.; Coisson, R.

    2011-01-01

    Problems involving polarized plane waves and currents on sheets perpendicular to the wavevector involve only one component of the fields, so it is possible to discuss electrodynamics in one dimension. Taking for simplicity linearly polarized sinusoidal waves, we can derive the field emitted by currents (analogous to dipole radiation in three…

  12. Electrodynamic Tethers for Novel LEO Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantner, Michael; Hoyt, Robert; Scardera, Michael; Johnson, Charles

    2011-01-01

    The exponential increase of launch system size - and cost - with deltaV makes missions requiring large total impulse cost prohibitive. Northrop Grumman and partners have matured a fundamentally different method for generating propulsion using electrodynamic tethers (EDTs) that escapes the limitations of the rocket equation. With essentially unlimited delta V, we can perform new classes of missions that are currently unaffordable or unfeasible.

  13. Linear Response Laws and Causality in Electrodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuffa, Alex J.; Scales, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Linear response laws and causality (the effect cannot precede the cause) are of fundamental importance in physics. In the context of classical electrodynamics, students often have a difficult time grasping these concepts because the physics is obscured by the intermingling of the time and frequency domains. In this paper, we analyse the linear…

  14. Testing Born-Infeld electrodynamics in waveguides.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, Rafael

    2007-12-01

    Waveguides can be employed to test nonlinear effects in electrodynamics. We solve Born-Infeld equations for TE waves in a rectangular waveguide. We show that the energy velocity acquires a dependence on the amplitude, and harmonic components appear as a consequence of the nonlinear behavior.

  15. Nonlinear quantum electrodynamics in vacuum and plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Brodin, Gert; Lundin, Joakim; Marklund, Mattias

    2010-12-14

    We consider high field physics due to quantum electrodynamics, in particular those that can be studied in the next generation of laser facilities. Effective field theories based on the Euler-Heisenberg Lagrangian are briefly reviewed, and examples involving plasma- and vacuum physics are given.

  16. Quantum Hall effect in quantum electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Penin, Alexander A.

    2009-03-15

    We consider the quantum Hall effect in quantum electrodynamics and find a deviation from the quantum-mechanical prediction for the Hall conductivity due to radiative antiscreening of electric charge in an external magnetic field. A weak dependence of the universal von Klitzing constant on the magnetic field strength, which can possibly be observed in a dedicated experiment, is predicted.

  17. Students' Difficulties with Vector Calculus in Electrodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bollen, Laurens; van Kampen, Paul; De Cock, Mieke

    2015-01-01

    Understanding Maxwell's equations in differential form is of great importance when studying the electrodynamic phenomena discussed in advanced electromagnetism courses. It is therefore necessary that students master the use of vector calculus in physical situations. In this light we investigated the difficulties second year students at KU Leuven…

  18. Strong field electrodynamics of a thin foil

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, Sergei V.; Esirkepov, Timur Zh.; Kando, Masaki; Bulanov, Stepan S.; Rykovanov, Sergey G.; Pegoraro, Francesco

    2013-12-15

    Exact solutions describing the nonlinear electrodynamics of a thin double layer foil are presented. These solutions correspond to a broad range of problems of interest for the interaction of high intensity laser pulses with overdense plasmas, such as frequency upshifting, high order harmonic generation, and high energy ion acceleration.

  19. Intensity correlations and dynamical processes in cavity quantum electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielke, Stephen Lawrence

    1998-10-01

    Dynamical processes in a cavity quantum electrodynamical system are studied with two-level atoms in an optical cavity. The initial condition for the dynamics is either an internal or external step. The internal step is caused by the escape of a photon from the system, and the external step by a change in the driving intensity. After either step there is an oscillatory exchange of energy as the system reaches steady state. The frequency of oscillation decreases with increasing input intensity. The experimental results are compared quantitatively to theoretical calculations and to transmission spectroscopy measurements. After the external step, the output intensity oscillates to a value many times larger than the steady state. Response to the internal step is measured by photon correlations. Antibunched light with sub-Poissonian statistics is observed. Antibunched light with super-Poissonian statistics, as well as bunched light with larger correlations for non-zero times are also observed. All three effects are nonclassical. The latter two have not previously been observed, and violate the Schwarz inequality.

  20. Translation of time-reversal violation in the neutral K-meson system into a table-top mechanical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiser, Andreas; Schubert, Klaus R.; Stiewe, Jürgen

    2012-08-01

    Weak interactions break time-reversal (T) symmetry in the two-state system of neutral K-mesons. We present and discuss a two-state mechanical system, i.e. a Foucault-type pendulum on a rotating table, for a full representation of {K^0}{{\\overlineK}{}^0} transitions by the pendulum motions including T violation. The pendulum moves with two different oscillation frequencies and two different magnetic dampings. Its equation of motion is identical to the differential equation for the real part of the CPT-symmetric K-meson wavefunction. The pendulum is able to represent microscopic CP and T violation with CPT symmetry owing to the macroscopic Coriolis force, which breaks the symmetry under reversal-of-motion. Video clips of the pendulum motions are given as supplementary material.

  1. Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase-1b (CPT1b) Deficiency Aggravates Pressure-Overload-Induced Cardiac Hypertrophy due to Lipotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    He, Lan; Kim, Teayoun; Long, Qinqiang; Liu, Jian; Wang, Peiyong; Zhou, Yiqun; Ding, Yishu; Prasain, Jeevan; Wood, Philip A.; Yang, Qinglin

    2012-01-01

    Background Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1(CPT1) is a rate-limiting step of mitochondrial β-oxidation by controlling the mitochondrial uptake of long-chain acyl-CoAs. The muscle isoform, CPT1b, is the predominant isoform expressed in the heart. It has been suggested that inhibiting CPT-1 activity by specific CPT-1 inhibitors exerts protective effects against cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. However, clinical and animal studies have shown mixed results, thereby posting concerns on the safety of this class of drugs. Preclinical studies using genetically modified animal models should provide a better understanding of targeting CPT1 in order to evaluate it as a safe and effective therapeutic approach. Methods and Results Heterozygous CPT1b knockout mice (CPT1b+/−) were subjected to transverse aorta constriction (TAC)-induced pressure-overload. These mice showed overtly normal cardiac structure/function under the basal condition. Under a severe pressure-overload condition induced by two weeks of transverse aorta constriction (TAC), CPT1b+/− mice were susceptible to premature death with congestive heart failure. Under a milder pressure-overload condition, CPT1b+/− mice exhibited exacerbated cardiac hypertrophy and remodeling compared with that in wild-type littermates. There were more pronounced impairments of cardiac contraction with greater eccentric cardiac hypertrophy in CPT1b+/− than in controlled mice. Moreover, the CPT1b+/− heart exhibited exacerbated mitochondrial abnormalities and myocardial lipid accumulation with elevated triglycerides and ceramide content, leading to greater cardiomyocytes apoptosis. Conclusions We conclude that CPT1b deficiency can cause lipotoxicity in the heart under pathological stress, leading to exacerbation of cardiac pathology. Therefore, caution should be applied in the clinical use of CPT-1 inhibitors. PMID:22932257

  2. A spin-orbit coupling for a neutral particle from Lorentz symmetry breaking effects in the CPT-odd sector of the Standard Model Extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belich, H.; Bakke, K.

    2015-07-01

    We start by investigating the arising of a spin-orbit coupling and a Darwin-type term that stem from Lorentz symmetry breaking effects in the CPT-odd sector of the Standard Model Extension. Then, we establish a possible scenario of the violation of the Lorentz symmetry that gives rise to a linear confining potential and an effective electric field in which determines the spin-orbit coupling for a neutral particle analogous to the Rashba coupling [E. I. Rashba, Sov. Phys. Solid State 2, 1109 (1960)]. Finally, we confine the neutral particle to a quantum dot [W.-C. Tan and J. C. Inkson, Semicond. Sci. Technol. 11, 1635 (1996)] and analyze the influence of the linear confining potential and the spin-orbit coupling on the spectrum of energy.

  3. Expression of a cDNA isolated from rat brown adipose tissue and heart identifies the product as the muscle isoform of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (M-CPT I). M-CPT I is the predominant CPT I isoform expressed in both white (epididymal) and brown adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Esser, V; Brown, N F; Cowan, A T; Foster, D W; McGarry, J D

    1996-03-22

    We set out to determine if the cDNA encoding a carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT)-like protein recently isolated from rat brown adipose tissue (BAT) by Yamazaki et al. (Yamazaki, N., Shinohara, Y., Shima, A., and Terada, H. (1995) FEBS Lett. 363, 41-45) actually encodes the muscle isoform of mitochondrial CPT I (M-CPT I). To this end, a cDNA essentially identical to the original BAT clone was isolated from a rat heart library. When expressed in COS cells, the novel cDNA and our previously described cDNA for rat liver CPT I (L-CPT I) gave rise to products with the same kinetic characteristics (sensitivity to malonyl-CoA and Km for carnitine) as CPT I in skeletal muscle and liver mitochondria, respectively. When labeled with [3H]etomoxir, recombinant L-CPT I and putative M-CPT I, although having approximately the same predicated masses (88.2 kDa), migrated differently on SDS gels, as did CPT I from liver and muscle mitochondria. The same was true for the products of in vitro transcription and translation of the L-CPT I and putative M-CPT I cDNAs. We conclude that the BAT cDNA does in fact encode M-CPT I. Northern blots using L- and M-CPT I cDNA probes revealed the presence of L-CPT I mRNA in liver and heart and its absence from skeletal muscle and BAT. M-CPT I mRNA, which was absent from liver, was readily detected in skeletal muscle and was particularly strong in heart and BAT. Whereas the signal for L-CPT I was more abundant than that for M-CPT I in RNA isolated from whole epididymal fat pad, this was reversed in purified adipocytes from this source. These findings, coupled with the kinetic properties and migration profiles on SDS gels of CPT I in brown and white adipocytes, indicate that the muscle form of the enzyme is the dominant, if not exclusive, species in both cell types.

  4. No vacuum Cerenkov radiation losses in the timelike Lorentz-violating Chern-Simons theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schober, Karl; Altschul, Brett

    2015-12-01

    In a Lorentz- and C P T -violating modification of electrodynamics that includes a timelike Chern-Simons term, there are no energy losses through vacuum Cerenkov radiation. A charge moving with a constant velocity does not lose energy, because of an unusual cancellation. Higher frequency modes of the electromagnetic field carry away positive energy, but lower frequency modes carry away a compensating negative amount of energy.

  5. Low-energy phenomenology of scalarless standard-model extensions with high-energy Lorentz violation

    SciTech Connect

    Anselmi, Damiano; Ciuffoli, Emilio

    2011-03-01

    We consider renormalizable standard model extensions that violate Lorentz symmetry at high energies, but preserve CPT, and do not contain elementary scalar fields. A Nambu-Jona-Lasinio mechanism gives masses to fermions and gauge bosons and generates composite Higgs fields at low energies. We study the effective potential at the leading order of the large-N{sub c} expansion, prove that there exists a broken phase, and study the phase space. In general, the minimum may break invariance under boosts, rotations, and CPT, but we give evidence that there exists a Lorentz invariant phase. We study the spectrum of composite bosons and the low-energy theory in the Lorentz phase. Our approach predicts relations among the parameters of the low-energy theory. We find that such relations are compatible with the experimental data within theoretical errors. We also study the mixing among generations, the emergence of the CKM matrix, and neutrino oscillations.

  6. Search for a Lorentz-violating sidereal signal with atmospheric neutrinos in IceCube

    SciTech Connect

    IceCube; etal, Abbasi, R,

    2010-11-11

    A search for sidereal modulation in the flux of atmospheric muon neutrinos in IceCube was performed. Such a signal could be an indication of Lorentz-violating physics. Neutrino oscillationmodels, derivable from extensions to the Standard Model, allow for neutrino oscillations that depend on the neutrino's direction of propagation. No such direction-dependent variation was found. Adiscrete Fourier transform method was used to constrain the Lorentz and CPT-violating coefficients in one of these models. Due to the unique high energy reach of IceCube, it was possible to improveconstraints on certain Lorentz-violating oscillations by three orders of magnitude with respect to limits set by other experiments.

  7. CPT-based probabilistic and deterministic assessment of in situ seismic soil liquefaction potential

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moss, R.E.S.; Seed, R.B.; Kayen, R.E.; Stewart, J.P.; Der Kiureghian, A.; Cetin, K.O.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a complete methodology for both probabilistic and deterministic assessment of seismic soil liquefaction triggering potential based on the cone penetration test (CPT). A comprehensive worldwide set of CPT-based liquefaction field case histories were compiled and back analyzed, and the data then used to develop probabilistic triggering correlations. Issues investigated in this study include improved normalization of CPT resistance measurements for the influence of effective overburden stress, and adjustment to CPT tip resistance for the potential influence of "thin" liquefiable layers. The effects of soil type and soil character (i.e., "fines" adjustment) for the new correlations are based on a combination of CPT tip and sleeve resistance. To quantify probability for performancebased engineering applications, Bayesian "regression" methods were used, and the uncertainties of all variables comprising both the seismic demand and the liquefaction resistance were estimated and included in the analysis. The resulting correlations were developed using a Bayesian framework and are presented in both probabilistic and deterministic formats. The results are compared to previous probabilistic and deterministic correlations. ?? 2006 ASCE.

  8. Mesoscopic cavity quantum electrodynamics with quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Childress, L.; Soerensen, A.S.; Lukin, M.D.

    2004-04-01

    We describe an electrodynamic mechanism for coherent, quantum-mechanical coupling between spatially separated quantum dots on a microchip. The technique is based on capacitive interactions between the electron charge and a superconducting transmission line resonator, and is closely related to atomic cavity quantum electrodynamics. We investigate several potential applications of this technique which have varying degrees of complexity. In particular, we demonstrate that this mechanism allows design and investigation of an on-chip double-dot microscopic maser. Moreover, the interaction may be extended to couple spatially separated electron-spin states while only virtually populating fast-decaying superpositions of charge states. This represents an effective, controllable long-range interaction, which may facilitate implementation of quantum information processing with electron-spin qubits and potentially allow coupling to other quantum systems such as atomic or superconducting qubits.

  9. Middle Atmosphere Electrodynamics During a Thunderstorm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croskey, Charles L.

    1996-01-01

    Rocket-based instrumentation investigations of middle atmospheric electrodynamics during thunderstorms were conducted in coordination with balloon-measurements at Wallops Island, Virginia. Middle atmosphere electrodynamics and energy coupling are of particular importance to associated electrical processes at lower and higher altitudes. Objectives of this research effort included: (1) investigation of thunderstorm effects on middle atmosphere electrical structure, including spatial and temporal dependence; (2) characterization of electric field transients and the associated energy deposited at various altitudes; (3) evaluation of the vertical Maxwell current density over a thunderstorm to study the coupling of energy to higher altitudes; and (4) investigation of the coupling of energy to the ionosphere and the current supplied to the 'global circuit.'

  10. Continuum mechanics, stresses, currents and electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Segev, Reuven

    2016-04-28

    The Eulerian approach to continuum mechanics does not make use of a body manifold. Rather, all fields considered are defined on the space, or the space-time, manifolds. Sections of some vector bundle represent generalized velocities which need not be associated with the motion of material points. Using the theories of de Rham currents and generalized sections of vector bundles, we formulate a weak theory of forces and stresses represented by vector-valued currents. Considering generalized velocities represented by differential forms and interpreting such a form as a generalized potential field, we present a weak formulation of pre-metric, p-form electrodynamics as a natural example of the foregoing theory. Finally, it is shown that the assumptions leading to p-form electrodynamics may be replaced by the condition that the force functional is continuous with respect to the flat topology of forms.

  11. Radiative corrections in symmetrized classical electrodynamics

    PubMed

    Van Meter JR; Kerman; Chen; Hartemann

    2000-12-01

    The physics of radiation reaction for a point charge is discussed within the context of classical electrodynamics. The fundamental equations of classical electrodynamics are first symmetrized to include magnetic charges: a double four-potential formalism is introduced, in terms of which the field tensor and its dual are employed to symmetrize Maxwell's equations and the Lorentz force equation in covariant form. Within this framework, the symmetrized Dirac-Lorentz equation is derived, including radiation reaction (self-force) for a particle possessing both electric and magnetic charge. The connection with electromagnetic duality is outlined, and an in-depth discussion of nonlocal four-momentum conservation for the wave-particle system is given.

  12. Students' difficulties with vector calculus in electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollen, Laurens; van Kampen, Paul; De Cock, Mieke

    2015-12-01

    Understanding Maxwell's equations in differential form is of great importance when studying the electrodynamic phenomena discussed in advanced electromagnetism courses. It is therefore necessary that students master the use of vector calculus in physical situations. In this light we investigated the difficulties second year students at KU Leuven encounter with the divergence and curl of a vector field in mathematical and physical contexts. We have found that they are quite skilled at doing calculations, but struggle with interpreting graphical representations of vector fields and applying vector calculus to physical situations. We have found strong indications that traditional instruction is not sufficient for our students to fully understand the meaning and power of Maxwell's equations in electrodynamics.

  13. Magnetic Levitation Experiments with the Electrodynamic Wheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordrey, Vincent; Gutarra-Leon, Angel; Gaul, Nathan; Majewski, Walerian

    Our experiments explored inductive magnetic levitation using circular Halbach arrays with the strong variable magnetic field on the outer rim of the ring. Such a system is usually called an Electrodynamic Wheel (EDW). Rotating this wheel around a horizontal axis above a flat conducting surface should induce eddy currents in said surface through the variable magnetic flux. The eddy currents produce, in turn, their own magnetic fields which interact with the magnets of the EDW. We constructed two Electrodynamic Wheels with different diameters and demonstrated that the magnetic interactions produce both lift and drag forces on the EDW which can be used for levitation and propulsion of the EDW. The focus of our experiments is the direct measurement of lift and drag forces to compare with theoretical models using wheels of two different radii. Supported by Grants from the Virginia Academy of Science, Society of Physics Students, Virginia Community College System, and the NVCC Educational Foundation.

  14. Modified Nonlinear Model of Arcsin-Electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruglov, S. I.

    2016-07-01

    A new modified model of nonlinear arcsin-electrodynamics with two parameters is proposed and analyzed. We obtain the corrections to the Coulomb law. The effect of vacuum birefringence takes place when the external constant magnetic field is present. We calculate indices of refraction for two perpendicular polarizations of electromagnetic waves and estimate bounds on the parameter γ from the BMV and PVLAS experiments. It is shown that the electric field of a point-like charge is finite at the origin. We calculate the finite static electric energy of point-like particles and demonstrate that the electron mass can have the pure electromagnetic nature. The symmetrical Belinfante energy-momentum tensor and dilatation current are found. We show that the dilatation symmetry and dual symmetry are broken in the model suggested. We have investigated the gauge covariant quantization of the nonlinear electrodynamics fields as well as the gauge fixing approach based on Dirac's brackets.

  15. Continuum mechanics, stresses, currents and electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Segev, Reuven

    2016-04-28

    The Eulerian approach to continuum mechanics does not make use of a body manifold. Rather, all fields considered are defined on the space, or the space-time, manifolds. Sections of some vector bundle represent generalized velocities which need not be associated with the motion of material points. Using the theories of de Rham currents and generalized sections of vector bundles, we formulate a weak theory of forces and stresses represented by vector-valued currents. Considering generalized velocities represented by differential forms and interpreting such a form as a generalized potential field, we present a weak formulation of pre-metric, p-form electrodynamics as a natural example of the foregoing theory. Finally, it is shown that the assumptions leading to p-form electrodynamics may be replaced by the condition that the force functional is continuous with respect to the flat topology of forms. PMID:27002071

  16. Electrodynamics of planar Archimedean spiral resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleeva, N.; Averkin, A.; Abramov, N. N.; Fistul, M. V.; Karpov, A.; Zhuravel, A. P.; Ustinov, A. V.

    2015-07-01

    We present a theoretical and experimental study of electrodynamics of a planar spiral superconducting resonator of a finite length. The resonator is made in the form of a monofilar Archimedean spiral. By making use of a general model of inhomogeneous alternating current flowing along the resonator and specific boundary conditions on the surface of the strip, we obtain analytically the frequencies fn of resonances which can be excited in such system. We also calculate corresponding inhomogeneous RF current distributions ψ n ( r ) , where r is the coordinate across a spiral. We show that the resonant frequencies and current distributions are well described by simple relationships f n = f 1 n and ψ n ( r ) ≃ sin [ π n ( r / R e ) 2 ] , where n = 1 , 2... and Re is the external radius of the spiral. Our analysis of electrodynamic properties of spiral resonators' is in good agreement with direct numerical simulations and measurements made using specifically designed magnetic probe and laser scanning microscope.

  17. Quantum electrodynamical effects in dusty plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marklund, M.; Stenflo, L.; Shukla, P. K.; Brodin, G.

    2005-07-01

    A new nonlinear electromagnetic wave mode in a magnetized dusty plasma is predicted. Its existence depends on the interaction of an intense circularly polarized electromagnetic wave with a dusty plasma, where quantum electrodynamical photon-photon scattering is taken into account. Specifically, we consider a dusty electron-positron-ion plasma and show that the propagation of the new mode is admitted. It could be of significance for the physics of supernova remnants and in neutron star formation.

  18. Topological solitons in 8-spinor mie electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Rybakov, Yu. P.

    2013-10-15

    We investigate the effective 8-spinor field model suggested earlier as the generalization of nonlinear Mie electrodynamics. We first study in pure spinorial model the existence of topological solitons endowed with the nontrivial Hopf invariant Q{sub H}, which can be interpreted as the lepton number. Electromagnetic field being included as the perturbation, we estimate the energy and the spin of the localized charged configuration.

  19. Assimilative Mapping of Interhemispheric Polar Ionospheric Electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, T.; Richmond, A. D.; Knipp, D. J.; McGranaghan, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    The Earth's main magnetic field is asymmetric between hemispheres due to its non-dipolar component, leading to various hemispherical differences in the coupling among the solar wind, magnetosphere and ionosphere. Manifestation of the asymmetric coupling through different electrodynamic parameters reported in past studies is considerably diverse. To fill the gap in our current understanding, obtained so far by analyzing individual parameters separately and comparing statistical behaviors of the parameters, we quantify the degree of instantaneous inter-hemispheric imbalance of electromagnetic energy deposition (Poynting flux), field-aligned currents, and convection electric fields though global and self-consistent analysis of electrodynamic variables at both polar regions, by means of data assimilation. Inter-hemispheric assimilative maps of different high-latitude electrodynamical parameters are obtained from simultaneous analysis of multiple types of space-based and ground-based observations made available though the AMPERE, SuperDARN, SuperMAG and DMSP programs with rigorous consideration of the uncertainty associated with each observation.

  20. The ElectroDynamic Delivery Experiment (EDDE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Jerome; Levin, Eugene; Oldson, John; Carroll, Joseph

    2001-02-01

    The ElectroDynamic Delivery Experiment (EDDE) is proposed for a space demonstration. EDDE consists of an autonomous space vehicle powered by lightweight solar arrays, a bi-directional electrodynamic tether, and batteries for power leveling. The EDDE vehicle can modify its orbit repeatedly without rocket fuel, and can change all six orbital parameters by modulating and reversing the current flow in the conducting tether. The base spacecraft is connected to the service module by a 6-km-long electrodynamic tether, and is designed for 2 kW of power and a total mass of 180 kg. Tether lifetime of several years is achieved with a two-strand caduceus, with the strands connected every few meters. Tether libration is minimized by mass distribution and by active current control. The vehicle and tether system concepts are developed, the operational envelopes are examined, and potential applications are evaluated. The EDDE vehicle is about twice as fast as ion rockets for high-inclination orbital plane changes, and has much higher maximum delta-V capability. A proof-of-concept experiment is proposed for a low-cost space demonstration. This on-orbit experiment could include additional secondary payloads; for example, EDDE could place low-ΔV, free-flying inspectors into arbitrary orbits from which they could approach selected objects without concern for tether dynamics or interference. .

  1. Capacitive power transfer (CPT) system design using a class E resonant converter circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kh., Kamarudin; Saat, Shakir; Yusmarnita, Y.; Ramli. M., S.; Sufiah, A. W. Siti

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a Capacitive Power Transfer (CPT) system design using a Class E resonant converter circuit. The Class E resonant converter circuit is used to produce a high frequency of alternate current. The purpose of this circuit is to transfer the power via capacitive coupling efficiently. A major advantage of Class E resonant converter circuit is low switching losses. To be specifically, the performance of CPT system at 1MHz of operating frequency and 12V of DC supply voltage is analyzed through experimental works. Finally, a prototype of a CPT system is successfully developed which produced 2mW output power through a capacitive plate size is 12cm × 12cm at 0.1cm of air gap distance.

  2. Search for T violation in charm meson decays

    SciTech Connect

    Link, J.M.; Yager, P.M.; Anjos, J.C.; Bediaga, I.; Castromonte, C.; Machado, A.A.; Magnin, J.; Massafferri, A.; de Miranda, J.M.; Pepe, I.M.; Polycarpo, E.; dos Reis, A.C.; Carrillo, S.; Casimiro, E.; Cuautle, E.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Uribe, C.; Vazquez, F.; Agostino, L.; Cinquini, L.; Cumalat, J.P.; /Colorado U. /Fermilab /Frascati /Guanajuato U. /Illinois U., Urbana /Indiana U. /Korea U. /Kyungpook Natl. U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /North Carolina U. /Pavia U. /INFN, Pavia /Rio de Janeiro, Pont. U. Catol. /Puerto Rico U., Mayaguez /South Carolina U. /Tennessee U. /Vanderbilt U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2005-06-01

    Using data from the FOCUS (E831) experiment, they have searched for T violation in charm meson decays using the four-body decay channels D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}K{sup +} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, D{sup +} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, and D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}. The T violation asymmetry is obtained using triple-product correlations and assuming the validity of the CPT theorem. They find the asymmetry values to be A{sub T{sub viol}}(D{sup 0}) = 0.010 {+-} 0.057(stat.) {+-} 0.037(syst.), A{sub T{sub viol}}(D{sup +}) = 0.023 {+-} 0.062(stat.) {+-} 0.022(syst.), and A{sub T{sub viol}}(D{sub s}{sup +}) = -0.036 {+-} 0.067(stat.) {+-} 0.023(syst.). Each measurement is consistent with no T violation. New measurements of the CP asymmetries for some of these decay modes are also presented.

  3. Realization of Simple Quantum Algorithms with Circuit Quantum Electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dicarlo, Leonardo

    2010-03-01

    Superconducting circuits have made considerable progress in the requirements of quantum coherence, universal gate operations and qubit readout necessary to realize a quantum computer. However, simultaneously meeting these requirements makes the solid-state realization of few-qubit processors, as previously implemented in nuclear magnetic resonance, ion-trap and optical systems, an exciting challenge. We present the realization of a two-qubit superconducting processor based on circuit quantum electrodynamics (cQED), and report progress by the Yale cQED team towards a four-qubit upgrade. The architecture employs a microwave transmission-line cavity as a quantum bus coupling multiple transmon qubits. Unitary control is achieved by concatenation of high-fidelity single-qubit rotations induced via resonant microwave tones, and multi-qubit adiabatic phase gates realized by local flux control of qubit frequencies. Qubit readout uses the cavity as a quadratic detector, such that a single, calibrated measurement channel gives direct access to multi-qubit correlations. We present generation of Bell states; entanglement quantification by strong violation of Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt inequalities; and implementations of the Grover search and Deutsch-Jozsa algorithms. We report experimental progress in extending adiabatic phase gates and joint readout to four qubits, and improving qubit coherence on the road to realizing more complex quantum algorithms. Research done in collaboration with J. M. Chow, J. M. Gambetta, Lev S. Bishop, B. R. Johnson, D. I. Schuster, A. Nunnenkamp, J. Majer, A. Blais, L. Frunzio, M. H. Devoret, S. M. Girvin, and R. J. Schoelkopf.

  4. Rhabdomyolysis and Cardiomyopathy in a 20-Year-Old Patient with CPT II Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Vavlukis, M.; Eftimov, A.; Zafirovska, P.; Caparovska, E.; Pocesta, B.; Kedev, S.; Dimovski, A. J.

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To raise the awareness of adult-onset carnitite palmitoyltransferase II deficiency (CPT II) by describing clinical, biochemical, and genetic features of the disease occurring in early adulthood. Method. Review of the case characteristics and literature review. Results. We report on a 20-year-old man presenting with dyspnea, fatigue, fever, and myoglobinuria. This was the second episode with such symptoms (the previous one being three years earlier). The symptoms occurred after intense physical work, followed by a viral infection resulting in fever treated with NSAIDs. Massive rhabdomyolysis was diagnosed, resulting in acute renal failure necessitating plasmapheresis and hemodialysis, acute hepatic lesion, and respiratory insufficiency. Additionally, our patient had cardiomyopathy with volume overload. After a detailed workup, CPT II deficiency was suspected. We did a sequencing analysis for exons 1, 3, and 4 of the CPT II gene and found that the patient was homozygote for Ser 113 Leu mutation in exon 3 of the CPT II gene. The patient recovery was complete except for the cardiomiopathy with mildly impaired systolic function. Conclusion. Whenever a patient suffers recurrent episodes of myalgia, followed by myoglobinuria due to rhabdomyolysis, we should always consider the possibility of this rare condition. The definitive diagnose of this condition is achieved by genetic testing. PMID:24563797

  5. Therapeutic Targeting of CPT-11 Induced Diarrhea: A Case for Prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Swami, Umang; Goel, Sanjay; Mani, Sridhar

    2014-01-01

    CPT-11 (irinotecan), a DNA topoisomerase I inhibitor is one of the main treatments for colorectal cancer. The main dose limiting toxicities are neutropenia and late onset diarrhea. Though neutropenia is manageable, CPT-11 induced diarrhea is frequently severe, resulting in hospitalizations, dose reductions or omissions leading to ineffective treatment administration. Many potential agents have been tested in preclinical and clinical studies to prevent or ameliorate CPT-11 induced late onset diarrhea. It is predicted that prophylaxis of CPT-11 induced diarrhea will reduce sub-therapeutic dosing as well as hospitalizations and will eventually lead to dose escalations resulting in better response rates. This article reviews various experimental agents and strategies employed to prevent this debilitating toxicity. Covered topics include schedule/dose modification, intestinal alkalization, structural/chemical modification, genetic testing, anti-diarrheal therapies, transporter (ABCB1, ABCC2, BCRP2) inhibitors, enzyme (β-glucuronidase, UGT1A1, CYP3A4, carboxylesterase, COX-2) inducers and inhibitors, probiotics, antibiotics, adsorbing agents, cytokine and growth factor activators and inhibitors and other miscellaneous agents. PMID:23597015

  6. Order of Conners' CPT-II Administration within a Cognitive Test Battery Influences ADHD Indices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erdodi, Laszlo A.; Lajiness-O'Neill, Renee; Saules, Karen K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of administration sequence on Conner's continuous performance test (CPT-II) scores in clients requesting psychological assessment. It was hypothesized that when administered at the end rather than beginning of a test battery, the test scores will show higher symptom severity. If present, order effects may cause the…

  7. Maps and documentation of seismic CPT soundings in the central, eastern, and western United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holzer, Thomas L.; Noce, Thomas E.; Bennett, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Nine hundred twenty seven seismic cone penetration tests (CPT) in a variety of geologic deposits and geographic locations were conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) primarily between 1998 and 2008 for the purpose of collecting penetration test data to evaluate the liquefaction potential of different types of surficial geologic deposits (table 1). The evaluation is described in Holzer and others (in press). This open-file report summarizes the seismic CPT and geotechnical data that were collected for the evaluation, outlines the general conditions under which the data were acquired, and briefly describes the geographic location of each study area and local geologic conditions. This report also describes the field methods used to obtain the seismic CPT data and summarizes the results of shear-wave velocities measurements at 2-m intervals in each sounding. Although the average depth of the 927 soundings was 18.5 m, we estimated a time-averaged shear-wave velocity to depths of 20 m and 30 m, VS20 and VS30, respectively, for soundings deeper than 10 m and 20 m. Soil sampling also was selectively conducted in many of the study areas at representative seismic CPT soundings. These data are described and laboratory analyses of geotechnical properties of these samples are summarized in table 2.

  8. Augmenting CPT to Improve Sleep Impairment in PTSD: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Galovski, Tara E.; Mott, Juliette; Blain, Leah M.; Elwood, Lisa; Gloth, Chelsea; Fletcher, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Objective Despite the success of empirically supported treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), sleep impairment frequently remains refractory following treatment for PTSD. This single-site, randomized controlled trial examined the effectiveness of sleep-directed hypnosis as a complement to an empirically supported psychotherapy for PTSD (cognitive processing therapy; CPT). Method Participants completed either 3 weeks of hypnosis (n = 52) or a symptom monitoring control condition (n = 56) before beginning standard CPT. Multilevel modeling was used to investigate differential patterns of change to determine whether hypnosis resulted in improvements in sleep, PTSD, and depression. An intervening variable approach was then used to determine whether improvements in sleep achieved during hypnosis augmented change in PTSD and depression during CPT. Results After the initial phase of treatment (hypnosis or symptom monitoring), the hypnosis condition showed significantly greater improvement than the control condition in sleep and depression, but not PTSD. After CPT, both conditions demonstrated significant improvement in sleep and PTSD; however, the hypnosis condition demonstrated greater improvement in depressive symptoms. As sleep improved, there were corresponding improvements in PTSD and depression, with a stronger relationship between sleep and PTSD. Conclusion Hypnosis was effective in improving sleep impairment, but those improvements did not augment gains in PTSD recovery during the trauma-focused intervention. Public Health Significance: This study suggests that hypnosis may be a viable treatment option in a stepped-care approach for treating sleep impairment in individuals suffering from PTSD. PMID:26689303

  9. CPT-cGMP Is A New Ligand of Epithelial Sodium Channels.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hong-Long; Nie, Hong-Guang; Chang, Yongchang; Lian, Qizhou; Liu, Shan-Lu

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial sodium channels (ENaC) are localized at the apical membrane of the epithelium, and are responsible for salt and fluid reabsorption. Renal ENaC takes up salt, thereby controlling salt content in serum. Loss-of-function ENaC mutations lead to low blood pressure due to salt-wasting, while gain-of-function mutations cause impaired sodium excretion and subsequent hypertension as well as hypokalemia. ENaC activity is regulated by intracellular and extracellular signals, including hormones, neurotransmitters, protein kinases, and small compounds. Cyclic nucleotides are broadly involved in stimulating protein kinase A and protein kinase G signaling pathways, and, surprisingly, also appear to have a role in regulating ENaC. Increasing evidence suggests that the cGMP analog, CPT-cGMP, activates αβγ-ENaC activity reversibly through an extracellular pathway in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the parachlorophenylthio moiety and ribose 2'-hydroxy group of CPT-cGMP are essential for facilitating the opening of ENaC channels by this compound. Serving as an extracellular ligand, CPT-cGMP eliminates sodium self-inhibition, which is a novel mechanism for stimulating salt reabsorption in parallel to the traditional NO/cGMP/PKG signal pathway. In conclusion, ENaC may be a druggable target for CPT-cGMP, leading to treatments for kidney malfunctions in salt reabsorption. PMID:27019621

  10. Coexistence of VHL Disease and CPT2 Deficiency: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ferrara, Alfonso Massimiliano; Sciacco, Monica; Zovato, Stefania; Rizzati, Silvia; Colombo, Irene; Boaretto, Francesca; Moggio, Maurizio; Opocher, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is an inherited syndrome manifesting with benign and malignant tumors. Deficiency of carnitine palmitoyltransferase type II (CPT2) is a disorder of lipid metabolism that, in the muscle form, manifests with recurrent attacks of myalgias often associated with myoglobinuria. Rhabdomyolytic episodes may be complicated by life-threatening events, including acute renal failure (ARF). We report on a male patient who was tested, at 10 years of age, for VHL disease because of family history of VHL. He was diagnosed with VHL but without VHL-related manifestation at the time of diagnosis. During childhood, the patient was hospitalized several times for diffuse muscular pain, muscle weakness, and dark urine. These recurrent attacks of rhabdomyolysis were never accompanied by ARF. The patient was found to be homozygous for the mutation p.S113L of the CPT2 gene. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the coexistence of VHL disease and CPT2 deficiency in the same individual. Based on findings from animal models, the case illustrates that mutations in the VHL gene might protect against renal damage caused by CPT2 gene mutations. PMID:27034144

  11. Modelling of auroral electrodynamical processes: Magnetosphere to mesosphere. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Y.T.; Gorney, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    Research conducted on auroral electrodynamic coupling between the magnetosphere and ionosphere-atmosphere in support of the development of a global scale kinetic plasma theory is reviewed. Topics covered include electric potential structure in the evening sector, morning and dayside auroras, auroral plasma formation, electrodynamic coupling with the thermosphere, and auroral electron interaction with the atmosphere.

  12. Modelling of auroral electrodynamical processes: Magnetosphere to mesosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Y. T.; Gorney, D. J.; Kishi, A. M.; Newman, A. L.; Schulz, M.; Walterscheid, R. L.; CORNWALL; Prasad, S. S.

    1982-01-01

    Research conducted on auroral electrodynamic coupling between the magnetosphere and ionosphere-atmosphere in support of the development of a global scale kinetic plasma theory is reviewed. Topics covered include electric potential structure in the evening sector; morning and dayside auroras; auroral plasma formation; electrodynamic coupling with the thermosphere; and auroral electron interaction with the atmosphere.

  13. Effective Lagrangian in nonlinear electrodynamics and its properties of causality and unitarity

    SciTech Connect

    Shabad, Anatoly E.; Usov, Vladimir V.

    2011-05-15

    In nonlinear electrodynamics, by implementing the causality principle as the requirement that the group velocity of elementary excitations over a background field should not exceed the speed of light in the vacuum c=1, and the unitarity principle as the requirement that the residue of the propagator should be nonnegative, we establish the positive convexity of the effective Lagrangian on the class of constant fields, also the positivity of all characteristic dielectric and magnetic permittivity constants that are derivatives of the effective Lagrangian with respect to the field invariants. Violation of the general principles by the one-loop approximation in QED at exponentially large magnetic field is analyzed, resulting in complex energy ghosts that signal the instability of the magnetized vacuum. Superluminal excitations (tachyons) appear, too, but for the magnetic field exceeding its instability threshold. Also other popular Lagrangians are tested to establish that the ones leading to spontaneous vacuum magnetization possess wrong convexity.

  14. The Ptolemaic Approach to Ionospheric Electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasyliunas, V. M.

    2010-12-01

    The conventional treatment of ionospheric electrodynamics (as expounded in standard textbooks and tutorial publications) consists of a set of equations, plus verbal descriptions of the physical processes supposedly represented by the equations. Key assumptions underlying the equations are: electric field equal to the gradient of a potential, electric current driven by an Ohm's law (with both electric-field and neutral-wind terms), continuity of current then giving a second-order elliptic differential equation for calculating the potential; as a separate assumption, ion and electron bulk flows are determined by ExB drifts plus collision effects. The verbal descriptions are in several respects inconsistent with the equations; furthermore, both the descriptions and the equations are not compatible with the more rigorous physical understanding derived from the complete plasma and Maxwell's equations. The conventional ionospheric equations are applicable under restricted conditions, corresponding to a quasi-steady-state equilibrium limit, and are thus intrinsically incapable of answering questions about causal relations or dynamic developments. Within their limited range of applicability, however, the equations are in most cases adequate to explain the observations, despite the deficient treatment of plasma physics. (A historical precedent that comes to mind is that of astronomical theory at the time of Copernicus and for some decades afterwards, when the Ptolemaic scheme could explain the observations at least as well if not better than the Copernican. Some of the verbal descriptions in conventional ionospheric electrodynamics might be considered Ptolemaic also in the more literal sense of being formulated exclusively in terms of a fixed Earth.) I review the principal differences between the two approaches, point out some questions where the conventional ionospheric theory does not provide unambiguous answers even within its range of validity (e.g., topside and

  15. Cavity quantum electrodynamics: coherence in context.

    PubMed

    Mabuchi, H; Doherty, A C

    2002-11-15

    Modern cavity quantum electrodynamics (cavity QED) illuminates the most fundamental aspects of coherence and decoherence in quantum mechanics. Experiments on atoms in cavities can be described by elementary models but reveal intriguing subtleties of the interplay of coherent dynamics with external couplings. Recent activity in this area has pioneered powerful new approaches to the study of quantum coherence and has fueled the growth of quantum information science. In years to come, the purview of cavity QED will continue to grow as researchers build on a rich infrastructure to attack some of the most pressing open questions in micro- and mesoscopic physics.

  16. International Space Station Electrodynamic Tether Reboost Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, L.; Herrmann, M.

    1998-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) will require periodic reboost due to atmospheric aerodynamic drag. This is nominally achieved through the use of thruster firings by the attached Progress M spacecraft. Many Progress flights to the ISS are required annually. Electrodynamic tethers provide an attractive alternative in that they can provide periodic reboost or continuous drag cancellation using no consumables, propellant, nor conventional propulsion elements. The system could also serve as an emergency backup reboost system used only in the event resupply and reboost are delayed for some reason.

  17. Soliton configurations in generalized Mie electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Rybakov, Yu. P.

    2011-07-15

    The generalization of the Mie electrodynamics within the scope of the effective 8-spinor field model is suggested, with the Lagrangian including Higgs-like potential and higher degrees of the invariant A{sub Micro-Sign }A{sup Micro-Sign }. Using special Brioschi 8-spinor identity, we show that the model includes the Skyrme and the Faddeev models as particular cases. We investigate the large-distance asymptotic of static solutions and estimate the electromagnetic contribution to the energy of the localized charged configuration.

  18. Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics: Coherence in Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabuchi, H.; Doherty, A. C.

    2002-11-01

    Modern cavity quantum electrodynamics (cavity QED) illuminates the most fundamental aspects of coherence and decoherence in quantum mechanics. Experiments on atoms in cavities can be described by elementary models but reveal intriguing subtleties of the interplay of coherent dynamics with external couplings. Recent activity in this area has pioneered powerful new approaches to the study of quantum coherence and has fueled the growth of quantum information science. In years to come, the purview of cavity QED will continue to grow as researchers build on a rich infrastructure to attack some of the most pressing open questions in micro- and mesoscopic physics.

  19. Subclassical fields and polarization in electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Planat, Mathieu; Polonyi, Janos

    2010-08-15

    Expectation values of the electromagnetic field and the electric current are introduced at space-time resolution which belongs to the quantum domain. These allow us to approach some key features of classical electrodynamics from the underlying QED. One is the emergence of the radiation field in the retarded solution of the Maxwell equation, derived from an action principle. Another question discussed is the systematic derivation of the polarizability of a charge system. Furthermore, the decoherence and the consistency of the photon field are established by a perturbative calculation of the reduced density matrix for the electromagnetic field within the closed time path formalism.

  20. Path integral quantization of generalized quantum electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Bufalo, R.; Pimentel, B. M.; Zambrano, G. E. R.

    2011-02-15

    In this paper, a complete covariant quantization of generalized electrodynamics is shown through the path integral approach. To this goal, we first studied the Hamiltonian structure of the system following Dirac's methodology and, then, we followed the Faddeev-Senjanovic procedure to obtain the transition amplitude. The complete propagators (Schwinger-Dyson-Fradkin equations) of the correct gauge fixation and the generalized Ward-Fradkin-Takahashi identities are also obtained. Afterwards, an explicit calculation of one-loop approximations of all Green's functions and a discussion about the obtained results are presented.

  1. Testing nonlinear vacuum electrodynamics with Michelson interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schellstede, Gerold O.; Perlick, Volker; Lämmerzahl, Claus

    2015-07-01

    We discuss the theoretical foundations for testing nonlinear vacuum electrodynamics with Michelson interferometry. Apart from some nondegeneracy conditions to be imposed, our discussion applies to all nonlinear electrodynamical theories of the Plebański class, i.e., to all Lagrangians that depend only on the two Lorentz-invariant scalars quadratic in the field strength. The main idea of the experiment proposed here is to use the fact that, according to nonlinear electrodynamics, the phase velocity of light should depend on the strength and on the direction of an electromagnetic background field. There are two possible experimental setups for testing this prediction with Michelson interferometry. The first possibility is to apply a strong electromagnetic field to the beam in one arm of the interferometer and to compare the situation where the field is switched on with the situation where it is switched off. The second possibility is to place the whole interferometer in a strong electromagnetic field and to rotate it. If an electromagnetic field is placed in one arm, the interferometer could have the size of a gravitational wave detector, i.e., an arm length of several hundred meters. If the whole interferometer is placed in an electromagnetic field, one would have to do the experiment with a tabletop interferometer. As an alternative to a traditional Michelson interferometer, one could use a pair of optical resonators that are not bigger than a few centimeters. Then the whole apparatus would be placed in the background field and one would either compare the situation where the field is switched on with the situation where it is switched off or one would rotate the apparatus with the field kept switched on. We derive the theoretical foundations for these types of experiments, in the context of an unspecified nonlinear electrodynamics of the Plebański class, and we discuss their feasibility. A null result of the experiment would place bounds on the parameters of the

  2. Space Station Reboost with Electrodynamic Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vas, Irwin E.; Kelly, Thomas J.; Scarl, Ethan A.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study of an electrodynamic tether system to reboost the International Space Station (ISS). One recommendation is to use a partially bare tether for electron collection. Locations are suggested as to where the tether system is to be attached at the space station. The effects of the tether system on the microgravity environment may actually be beneficial, because the system can neutralize aerodrag during quiescent periods and, if deployed from a movable boom, can permit optimization of laboratory positioning with respect to acceleration contours. Alternative approaches to tether deployment and retrieval are discussed. It is shown that a relatively short tether system, 7 km long, operating at a power level of 5 kW could provide cumulative savings or over a billion dollars during a 10-year period ending in 2012. This savings is the direct result of a reduction in the number or nights that would otherwise be required to deliver propellant for reboost, with larger cost savings for higher tether usage. In addition to economic considerations, an electrodynamic tether promises a practical backup system that could ensure ISS survival in the event of an (otherwise) catastrophic delay in propellant delivery.

  3. Quantum-classical crossover in electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Polonyi, Janos

    2006-09-15

    A classical field theory is proposed for the electric current and the electromagnetic field interpolating between microscopic and macroscopic domains. It represents a generalization of the density functional for the dynamics of the current and the electromagnetic field in the quantum side of the crossover and reproduces standard classical electrodynamics on the other side. The effective action derived in the closed time path formalism and the equations of motion follow from the variational principle. The polarization of the Dirac-sea can be taken into account in the quadratic approximation of the action by the introduction of the deplacement field strengths as in conventional classical electrodynamics. Decoherence appears naturally as a simple one-loop effect in this formalism. It is argued that the radiation time arrow is generated from the quantum boundary conditions in time by decoherence at the quantum-classical crossover and the Abraham-Lorentz force arises from the accelerating charge or from other charges in the macroscopic or the microscopic side, respectively. The functional form of the quantum renormalization group, the generalization of the renormalization group method for the density matrix, is proposed to follow the scale dependence through the quantum-classical crossover in a systematical manner.

  4. Electrodynamics with a Future Conformal Horizon

    SciTech Connect

    Ibison, Michael

    2010-12-22

    We investigate the impact of singularities occurring at future times in the Friedmann equations expressed in conformal coordinates to determine the consequences of extending the time coordinate through the singularity for the physics of matter and radiation occupying just one side. Mostly this involves investigation of the relationship between the metric with line element ds{sup 2} a{sup 2}(t)(dt{sup 2}-dx{sup 2}) and time reversal symmetry within electrodynamics. It turns out compatibility between these two is possible only if there is a singular physical event at the time of the singularity or if the topology is not trivial. In both cases the singularity takes on the appearance of a time-like mirror. We are able to demonstrate a relationship between the broken time symmetry in electrodynamics characterized by retarded radiation and radiation reaction and the absolute conformal time relative to the time of the singularity, i.e. between the Electromagnetic and Cosmological arrows of time. It is determined that the Wheeler-Feynman reasoning but with the future absorber replaced by the Cosmological mirror leads to a conflict with observation unless matter is strongly bound electromagnetically to the environment.

  5. Carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1A (CPT1A): a new tumor specific target in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pucci, Sabina; Zonetti, Maria Josè; Fisco, Tommaso; Polidoro, Chiara; Bocchinfuso, Gianfranco; Palleschi, Antonio; Novelli, Giuseppe; Spagnoli, Luigi G; Mazzarelli, Paola

    2016-04-12

    Transcriptional mechanisms epigenetically-regulated in tumoral tissues point out new targets for anti-cancer therapies. Carnitine palmitoyl transferase I (CPT1) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the transport of long-chain fatty acids for β-oxidation. Here we identified the tumor specific nuclear CPT1A as a product of the transcript variant 2, that doesn't retain the classical transferase activity and is strongly involved in the epigenetic regulation of cancer pro-survival, cell death escaping and tumor invasion pathways. The knockdown of CPT1A variant 2 by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), was sufficient to induce apoptosis in MCF-7, SK-BR3 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. The cell death triggered by CPT1A silencing correlated with reduction of HDAC activity and histone hyperacetylation. Docking experiments and molecular dynamics simulations confirmed an high binding affinity of the variant 2 for HDAC1. The CPT1A silenced cells showed an up-regulated transcription of pro-apoptotic genes (BAD, CASP9, COL18A1) and down-modulation of invasion and metastasis related-genes (TIMP-1, PDGF-A, SERPINB2). These findings provide evidence of the CPT1 variant 2 involvement in breast cancer survival, cell death escape and invasion. Thus, we propose nuclear CPT1A as a striking tumor specific target for anticancer therapeutics, more selective and effective as compared with the well-known HDAC inhibitors.

  6. Carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1A (CPT1A): a new tumor specific target in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zonetti, Maria Josè; Fisco, Tommaso; Polidoro, Chiara; Bocchinfuso, Gianfranco; Palleschi, Antonio; Novelli, Giuseppe; Spagnoli, Luigi G.

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional mechanisms epigenetically-regulated in tumoral tissues point out new targets for anti-cancer therapies. Carnitine palmitoyl transferase I (CPT1) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the transport of long-chain fatty acids for β-oxidation. Here we identified the tumor specific nuclear CPT1A as a product of the transcript variant 2, that doesn't retain the classical transferase activity and is strongly involved in the epigenetic regulation of cancer pro-survival, cell death escaping and tumor invasion pathways. The knockdown of CPT1A variant 2 by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), was sufficient to induce apoptosis in MCF-7, SK-BR3 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. The cell death triggered by CPT1A silencing correlated with reduction of HDAC activity and histone hyperacetylation. Docking experiments and molecular dynamics simulations confirmed an high binding affinity of the variant 2 for HDAC1. The CPT1A silenced cells showed an up-regulated transcription of pro-apoptotic genes (BAD, CASP9, COL18A1) and down-modulation of invasion and metastasis related-genes (TIMP-1, PDGF-A, SERPINB2). These findings provide evidence of the CPT1 variant 2 involvement in breast cancer survival, cell death escape and invasion. Thus, we propose nuclear CPT1A as a striking tumor specific target for anticancer therapeutics, more selective and effective as compared with the well-known HDAC inhibitors. PMID:26799588

  7. 48 CFR 1303.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 1303.104-7 Section 1303.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 1303.104-7 Violations...

  8. 48 CFR 403.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 403.104-7 Section 403.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 403.104-7 Violations...

  9. 48 CFR 1303.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 1303.104-7 Section 1303.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 1303.104-7 Violations...

  10. 48 CFR 603.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 603.104-7 Section 603.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF STATE GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 603.104-7 Violations or...

  11. 48 CFR 1303.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 1303.104-7 Section 1303.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 1303.104-7 Violations...

  12. 48 CFR 3.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 3.104-7 Section 3.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 3.104-7 Violations...

  13. 48 CFR 603.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 603.104-7 Section 603.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF STATE GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 603.104-7 Violations or...

  14. 48 CFR 1403.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 1403.104-7 Section 1403.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 1403.104-7 Violations...

  15. 48 CFR 403.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 403.104-7 Section 403.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 403.104-7 Violations...

  16. 48 CFR 803.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 803.104-7 Section 803.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 803.104-7 Violations...

  17. 48 CFR 803.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 803.104-7 Section 803.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 803.104-7 Violations...

  18. 48 CFR 603.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 603.104-7 Section 603.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF STATE GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 603.104-7 Violations or...

  19. 48 CFR 3.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 3.104-7 Section 3.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 3.104-7 Violations...

  20. 48 CFR 1403.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 1403.104-7 Section 1403.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 1403.104-7 Violations...

  1. 48 CFR 1303.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 1303.104-7 Section 1303.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 1303.104-7 Violations...

  2. 48 CFR 1403.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 1403.104-7 Section 1403.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 1403.104-7 Violations...

  3. 48 CFR 1403.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 1403.104-7 Section 1403.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 1403.104-7 Violations...

  4. 48 CFR 403.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 403.104-7 Section 403.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 403.104-7 Violations...

  5. 48 CFR 803.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 803.104-7 Section 803.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 803.104-7 Violations...

  6. 48 CFR 3.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 3.104-7 Section 3.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 3.104-7 Violations...

  7. 48 CFR 603.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 603.104-7 Section 603.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF STATE GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 603.104-7 Violations or...

  8. 48 CFR 3.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 3.104-7 Section 3.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 3.104-7 Violations...

  9. 48 CFR 1403.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 1403.104-7 Section 1403.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 1403.104-7 Violations...

  10. 48 CFR 803.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 803.104-7 Section 803.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 803.104-7 Violations...

  11. 48 CFR 403.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 403.104-7 Section 403.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 403.104-7 Violations...

  12. 48 CFR 603.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 603.104-7 Section 603.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF STATE GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 603.104-7 Violations or...

  13. 48 CFR 403.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 403.104-7 Section 403.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 403.104-7 Violations...

  14. 48 CFR 803.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 803.104-7 Section 803.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 803.104-7 Violations...

  15. 48 CFR 1303.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 1303.104-7 Section 1303.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 1303.104-7 Violations...

  16. CP violation in K decays

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, F.J.

    1989-05-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental progress on the manifestation of CP violation in K decays, and toward understanding whether CP violation originates in a phase, or phases, in the weak mixing matrix of quarks is reviewed. 23 refs., 10 figs.

  17. Beautiful CP violation

    SciTech Connect

    Dunietz, I.

    1997-09-24

    CP violation is observed to date only in K{sup 0} decays and is parameterizable by a single quantity {epsilon}. Because it is one of the least understood phenomena in the Standard Model and holds a clue to baryogenesis, it must be investigated further. Highly specialized searches in K{sup 0} decays are possible. Effects in B decays are much larger. In addition to the traditional B{sub d} {yields} J/{psi}K{sub S}, {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}} asymmetries, CP violation could be searched for in already existing inclusive B data samples. The rapid B{sub s}--{anti B}{sub s} oscillations cancel in untagged B{sub s} data samples, which therefore allow feasibility studies for the observation of CP violation and the extraction of CKM elements with present vertex detectors. The favored method for the extraction of the CKM angle {gamma} is shown to be unfeasible and a solution is presented involving striking direct CP violation in charged B decays. Novel methods for determining the B{sub s} mixing parameter {Delta}m are described without the traditional requirement of flavor-specific final states.

  18. The Question of Absolute Space and Time Directions in Relation to Molecular Chirality, Parity Violation, and Biomolecular Homochirality

    SciTech Connect

    Quack, Martin

    2001-03-21

    The questions of the absolute directions of space and time or the “observability” of absolute time direction as well as absolute handedness-left or right- are related to the fundamental symmetries of physics C, P, T as well as their combinations, in particular CPT, and their violations, such as parity violation. At the same time there is a relation to certain still open questions in chemistry concerning the fundamental physical- chemical principles of molecular chirality and in biochemistry concerning the selection of homochirality in evolution. In the lecture we shall introduce the concepts and then report new theoretical results from our work on parity violation in chiral molecules, showing order of magnitude increases with respect to previously accepted values. We discus as well our current experimental efforts. We shall briefly mention the construction of an absolute molecular clock.

  19. The Question of Absolute Space and Time Directions in Relation to Molecular Chirality, Parity Violation, and Biomolecular Homochirality

    SciTech Connect

    Quack, Martin

    2001-03-21

    The questions of the absolute directions of space and time or the 'observability' of absolute time direction as well as absolute handedness - left or right - are related to the fundamental symmetries of physics C, P, T as well as their combinations, in particular CPT, and their violations, such as parity violation. At the same time there is a relation to certain still open questions in chemistry concerning the fundamental physical-chemical principles of molecular chirality and in biochemistry concerning the selection of homochirality in evolution. In the lecture we shall introduce the concepts and then report new theoretical results from our work on parity violation in chiral molecules, showing order of magnitude increases with respect to previously accepted values. We discuss as well our current experimental efforts. We shall briefly mention the construction of an absolute molecular clock.

  20. Combination Solar Sail and Electrodynamic Tether Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Charles L. (Inventor); Matloff, Gregory L. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A propulsion system for a spacecraft includes a solar sail system and an electrodynamic tether system is presented. The solar sail system is used to generate propulsion to propel the spacecraft through space using solar photons and the electrodynamic tether system is used to generate propulsion to steer the spacecraft into orbit and to perform orbital maneuvers around a planet using the planet's magnetic field. The electrodynamic tether system can also be used to generate power for the spacecraft using the planet's magnetic field.

  1. Charged Lepton Electric Dipole Moment Enhancement in the Lorentz Violated Extension of the Standard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghighat, M.; Motie, I.; Rezaei, Z.

    2013-08-01

    We consider the Lorentz violated extension of the standard model. In this framework, there are terms that explicitly violate CP-symmetry. We examine the CPT-even dμν-term to find the electric dipole moment of charged leptons. We show that the form factors besides the momentum transfer, depend on a new Lorentz-scalar, constructing by dμν and the four momenta of the lepton, as well. Such an energy dependence of the electric dipole form factor leads to an enhancement of the lepton electric dipole moment at high energy, even at the zero momentum transfer. We show that at {\\vert}d/{\\vert}p2{m^2l ˜ 1 the electric dipole moment of the charged lepton can be as large as 10-14e cm.

  2. Resistance to irinotecan (CPT-11) activates epidermal growth factor receptor/nuclear factor kappa B and increases cellular metastasis and autophagy in LoVo colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Cheng; Lee, Nien-Hung; Ho, Tsung-Jung; Hsu, Hsi-Hsien; Kuo, Chia-Hua; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Lin, Yueh-Min; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Tsai, Chang-Hai; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2014-07-10

    Chemotherapy is usually applied to treat colon cancer but leads to chemoresistance, and increased metastasis and invasion. The main focus of this study is to observe effects of resistance to irinotecan (CPT-11) on metastasis, invasion and autophagy in CPT-11 resistant (CPT-11-R) LoVo colon cancer cells. CPT-11, a topoisomerase I inhibitor and a first-line chemotherapeutic drug, is used to treat colon cancer. CPT-11-R cells were constructed in a step-wise fashion with increasing CPT-11 doses. The CPT-11-R strain had a significantly lower expression of Wnt/β-catenin pathway, but induced an EGFR/IKKα/β/NF-κB pathway with elevated cell cycle, metastasis and basal autophagy.

  3. A high-performance frequency stability compact CPT clock based on a Cs-Ne microcell.

    PubMed

    Boudot, Rodolphe; Liu, Xiaochi; Abbé, Philippe; Chutani, Ravinder; Passilly, Nicolas; Galliou, Serge; Gorecki, Christophe; Giordano, Vincent

    2012-11-01

    This paper reports on a compact table-top Cs clock based on coherent population trapping (CPT) with advanced frequency stability performance. The heart of the clock is a single buffer gas Cs-Ne microfabricated cell. Using a distributed feedback (DFB) laser resonant with the Cs D1 line, the contrast of the CPT signal is found to be maximized around 80°C, a value for which the temperature dependence of the Cs clock frequency is canceled. Advanced techniques are implemented to actively stabilize the clock operation on a zero-light-shift point. The clock frequency stability is measured to be 3.8 × 10(-11) at 1 s and well below 10(-11) until 50,000 s. These results demonstrate the possibility to develop high-performance chip-scale atomic clocks using vapor cells containing a single buffer gas. PMID:23192824

  4. Dual-keel electrodynamic Maglev system

    SciTech Connect

    He, Jianliang; Rote, D.M.; Wang, Zian; Coffey, H.T.

    1995-12-31

    This paper introduces a new concept for an electrodynamic-suspension maglev system that has a dual-keel arrangement. Each keel consists of a row of superconducting magnets aboard the vehicle. The keels move in troughs in the guideway that are each lined with pairs of figure-eight-shaped null-flux coils. Each pair of null-flux coils is cross-connected to produce null-flux suspension and guidance force. The cross-connected figure-eight null-flux coils in each trough are also energized by a three-phase power supply to produce propulsive force. Preliminary analysis shows that the new system has many advantages over other EDS systems in terms of system performance and dynamic stability.

  5. Analysis of an electrodynamic maglev system

    SciTech Connect

    Davey, K.

    1999-09-01

    Electrodynamic systems (EDS's) for maglev have an advantage over electromagnetic systems (EMS's) in that the stability is built into the system. EDS's induce the currents used for levitation and guidance, while EMS's impose those currents with controlled feedback. The movement of a magnet over properly designed EDS coils results in forces to keep the system fixed in the lowest energy or null flux spot. In the past such systems have been examined through two-dimensional boundary element techniques. An approximation to the full three-dimensional time harmonic problem is obtained through LaPlace transform theory after using boundary element methods to predict the mutual coupling of the magnets with the track coils. The analytic solution offers helpful design and operation guidelines.

  6. Causal structure and electrodynamics on Finsler spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeifer, Christian; Wohlfarth, Mattias N. R.

    2011-08-01

    We present a concise new definition of Finsler spacetimes that generalizes Lorentzian metric manifolds and provides consistent backgrounds for physics. Extending standard mathematical constructions known from Finsler spaces, we show that geometric objects like the Cartan nonlinear connection and its curvature are well defined almost everywhere on Finsler spacetimes, including their null structure. This allows us to describe the complete causal structure in terms of timelike and null curves; these are essential to model physical observers and the propagation of light. We prove that the timelike directions form an open convex cone with a null boundary, as is the case in Lorentzian geometry. Moreover, we develop action integrals for physical field theories on Finsler spacetimes, and tools to deduce the corresponding equations of motion. These are applied to construct a theory of electrodynamics that confirms the claimed propagation of light along Finsler null geodesics.

  7. Enhancing nanoparticle electrodynamics with gold nanoplate mirrors.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zijie; Bao, Ying; Manna, Uttam; Shah, Raman A; Scherer, Norbert F

    2014-05-14

    Mirrors and optical cavities can modify and enhance matter-radiation interactions. Here we report that chemically synthesized Au nanoplates can serve as micrometer-size mirrors that enhance electrodynamic interactions. Because of their plasmonic properties, the Au nanoplates enhance the brightness of scattered light from Ag nanoparticles near the nanoplate surface in dark-field microscopy. More importantly, enhanced optical trapping and optical binding of Ag nanoparticles are demonstrated in interferometric optical traps created from a single laser beam and its reflection from individual Au nanoplates. The enhancement of the interparticle force constant is ≈20-fold more than expected from the increased intensity due to standing wave interference. We show that the additional stability for optical binding arises from the restricted axial thermal motion of the nanoparticles that couples to and reduces the fluctuations in the lateral plane. This new mechanism greatly advances the photonic synthesis of ultrastable nanoparticle arrays and investigation of their properties.

  8. Fluidic electrodynamics: Approach to electromagnetic propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Martins, Alexandre A.; Pinheiro, Mario J.

    2009-03-16

    We report on a new methodological approach to electrodynamics based on a fluidic viewpoint. We develop a systematic approach establishing analogies between physical magnitudes and isomorphism (structure-preserving mappings) between systems of equations. This methodological approach allows us to give a general expression for the hydromotive force, thus re-obtaining the Navier-Stokes equation departing from the appropriate electromotive force. From this ground we offer a fluidic approach to different kinds of issues with interest in propulsion, e.g., the force exerted by a charged particle on a body carrying current; the magnetic force between two parallel currents; the Magnus's force. It is shown how the intermingle between the fluid vector fields and electromagnetic fields leads to new insights on their dynamics. The new concepts introduced in this work suggest possible applications to electromagnetic (EM) propulsion devices and the mastery of the principles of producing electric fields of required configuration in plasma medium.

  9. Nonlinear electrodynamics is skilled with knots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulart, E.

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this letter is threefold: First is to show that nonlinear generalizations of electrodynamics support various types of knotted solutions in vacuum. The solutions are universal in the sense that they do not depend on the specific Lagrangian density, at least if the latter gives rise to a well-posed theory. Second, is to describe the interaction between probe waves and knotted background configurations. We show that the qualitative behaviour of this interaction may be described in terms of Robinson congruences, which appear explicitly in the causal structure of the theory. Finally, we argue that optical arrangements endowed with intense background fields could be the natural place to look for the knots experimentally.

  10. Research on Orbital Plasma Electrodynamics (ROPE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Intriligator, Devrie S.

    1998-01-01

    This final report summarizes some of the important scientific contributions to the Research on Orbital Plasma Electrodynamics (ROPE) investigation, to the Tethered Satellite System (TSS) mission, and to NASA that resulted from the work carried out under this contract at Carmel Research Center. These include Dr. Intriligator's participation in the PIT for the TSS-1R simulations and flight, her participation in ROPE team meetings and IWG meetings, her scientific analyses, and her writing and submitting technical papers to scientific journals. The scientific analyses concentrated on the characterization of energetic ions and their possible relation to pickup ion effects, correlation of particle and other effects (e.g., magnetic field, satellite surface), and collaboration with theorists including with ROPE co-investigators. In addition, scientific analyses were carried out of the effects due to satellite gas releases.

  11. Plasma Motor Generator (PMG) electrodynamic tether experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossi, Mario D.

    1995-01-01

    The Plasma Motor Generator (PMG) flight of June 26, 1993 has been the most sophisticated and most successful mission that has been carried out thus far with an electrodynamic tether. Three papers from the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Washington, DC concerned with the PMG, submitted at the Fourth International Space Conference on Tethers in Space, in Washington, DC, in April 1995, are contained in this document. The three papers are (1) Electromagnetic interactions between the PMG tether and the magneto-ionic medium of the Ionosphere; (2) Tether-current-voltage characteristics, as determined by the Hollow Cathode Operation Modes; and (3) Hawaii-Hilo ground observations on the occasion for the PMG flight of June 23, 1993.

  12. Unified theory of nonlinear electrodynamics and gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Torres-Gomez, Alexander; Krasnov, Kirill; Scarinci, Carlos

    2011-01-15

    We describe a class of unified theories of electromagnetism and gravity. The Lagrangian is of the BF type, with a potential for the B field, the gauge group is U(2) (complexified). Given a choice of the potential function the theory is a deformation of (complex) general relativity and electromagnetism, and describes just two propagating polarizations of the graviton and two of the photon. When gravity is switched off the theory becomes the usual nonlinear electrodynamics with a general structure function. The Einstein-Maxwell theory can be recovered by sending some of the parameters of the defining potential to zero, but for any generic choice of the potential the theory is indistinguishable from Einstein-Maxwell at low energies. A real theory is obtained by imposing suitable reality conditions. We also study the spherically-symmetric solution and show how the usual Reissner-Nordstrom solution is recovered.

  13. Maxwell electrodynamics subjected to quantum vacuum fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Gevorkyan, A. S.; Gevorkyan, A. A.

    2011-06-15

    The propagation of electromagnetic waves in the vacuum is considered taking into account quantum fluctuations in the limits of Maxwell-Langevin (ML) equations. For a model of 'white noise' fluctuations, using ML equations, a second order partial differential equation is found which describes the quantum distribution of virtual particles in vacuum. It is proved that in order to satisfy observed facts, the Lamb Shift etc, the virtual particles should be quantized in unperturbed vacuum. It is shown that the quantized virtual particles in toto (approximately 86 percent) are condensed on the 'ground state' energy level. It is proved that the extension of Maxwell electrodynamics with inclusion of the vacuum quantum field fluctuations may be constructed on a 6D space-time continuum with a 2D compactified subspace. Their influence on the refraction indexes of vacuum is studied.

  14. Quantum-electrodynamics corrections in pionic hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Schlesser, S.; Le Bigot, E.-O.; Indelicato, P.; Pachucki, K.

    2011-07-15

    We investigate all pure quantum-electrodynamics corrections to the np{yields}1s, n=2-4 transition energies of pionic hydrogen larger than 1 meV, which requires an accurate evaluation of all relevant contributions up to order {alpha}{sup 5}. These values are needed to extract an accurate strong interaction shift from experiment. Many small effects, such as second-order and double vacuum polarization contribution, proton and pion self-energies, finite size and recoil effects are included with exact mass dependence. Our final value differs from previous calculations by up to {approx_equal}11 ppm for the 1s state, while a recent experiment aims at a 4 ppm accuracy.

  15. Electrodynamic Dust Shield for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, Paul J.; Johansen, Michael R.; Olsen, Robert C.; Raines, Matthew G.; Phillips, James R., III; Cox, Rachel E.; Hogue, Michael D.; Pollard, Jacob R. S.; Calle, Carlos I.

    2016-01-01

    Dust mitigation technology has been highlighted by NASA and the International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG) as a Global Exploration Roadmap (GER) critical technology need in order to reduce life cycle cost and risk, and increase the probability of mission success. The Electrostatics and Surface Physics Lab in Swamp Works at the Kennedy Space Center has developed an Electrodynamic Dust Shield (EDS) to remove dust from multiple surfaces, including glass shields and thermal radiators. Further development is underway to improve the operation and reliability of the EDS as well as to perform material and component testing outside of the International Space Station (ISS) on the Materials on International Space Station Experiment (MISSE). This experiment is designed to verify that the EDS can withstand the harsh environment of space and will look to closely replicate the solar environment experienced on the Moon.

  16. Rail electrodynamics in a plasma armature railgun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolander, Glenn E.; Jamison, Keith A.; Villecco, Roger A.; Graham, Floyd R.

    1991-08-01

    Rail electrodynamics are investigated analytically by means of a model which relates rail motion to a transitory Lorentz force and the compressive restoration force. Local electric fields - generated by the magnetic field and the oscillation of the distance separating the rails - are examined to determine the extent of their influence on the laboratory frame and the projectile frame. When the projectile is accelerating, local voltage extremes are found to be related to the value of beta(t)p, with the maximums and minimums corresponding to even and odd multiples of pi, respectively. Based on these findings, rail displacements of about 2 mm are predicted for a railgun with a constant current of 2 MA. Certain criteria are proposed to minimize rail displacement and velocity and maximize the oscillation frequency. However, the model does not consider important effects such as deformation beyond the elastic regime.

  17. Dusty Plasma Experiments Using an Electrodynamic Balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, J. F.; Abbas, M. M.; Suess, S. T.; Venturini, C. C.; Comfort, R. H.

    2000-01-01

    Knowledge of the formation, distribution, physical, chemical and optical characteristics of interstellar, interplanetary, and planetary dust grains provide valuable information about many issues dealing with the origin and formation of the solar system bodies, interplanetary and interstellar environments as well as various industrial processes. Understanding the microphysics of individual grains and their interaction with the surrounding environment is key to properly model various conditions and interpret existing data. The theory and models of individual dust grains are well developed for environments that vary from dense planetary atmospheres to dusty plasmas to diffuse environments such is interplanetary space. However, experimental investigations of individual dust grains in equilibrium are less common, perhaps due to the difficult of these experiments. Laboratory measurements of dust grains have primarily measured ensemble properties or transient properties of single grains. A technique developed in the 1950's for ion spectroscopy, known as a quadrupole trap or 'Paul Trap', has recently been used to investigate single micron-sized dust grains. This scaled ion trap called an electrodynamic balance has been used for atmospheric aerosol research. A description of this technique is provided. Recent results from experiments to investigate the equilibrium potential of dust grains exposed to far ultraviolet light or to -,in electron or ion beam are presented. This laboratory technique ]ends itself to many applications that relate to planetary atmospheres, heliospheric environments, pre-stellar and pre-planetary conditions, and industrial settings. Several planned experimental approaches are presented. Potential experiments to investigate the interaction of multiple dust grains using an electrodynamic balance are proposed.

  18. Electrostatic and electrodynamic response properties of nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayaz, Yuksel

    1999-11-01

    This thesis addresses the problem of nanostructure dielectric response to excitation by electric fields, both in the electrostatic c→infinity and the electrodynamic regimes. The nanostructures treated include planar quantum wells and quantum wires embedded in the vicinity of the bounding surface of the host semiconductor medium. Various cases are analyzed, including a single well or wire, a double well or wire, a lattice of N wells or wires and an infinite superlattice of wells or wires. The host medium is considered to have phonons and/or a bulk semiconductor plasma which interact with the plasmons of the embedded quantum wells or wires, and the host plasma is treated in both the local "cold" plasma regime and the nonlocal "hot" plasma regime. New hybridized quantum plasma collective modes emerge from these studies. The techniques employed here include the variational differential formulation of integral equations for the inverse dielectric function (in electrostatic case) and the dyadic Green's function (in the electrodynamic case) for the various systems described above. These integral equations are then solved in frequency-position representation by a variety of techniques depending on the geometrical features of the particular problem. Explicit closed form solutions for the inverse dielectric function or dyadic Green's function facilitate identification of the coupled collective modes in terms of their frequency poles, and the residues at the pole positions provide the relative amplitudes with which these normal modes respond to external excitation. Interesting features found include, for example, explicit formulas showing the transference of coupling of a two dimensional (2D) quantum well plasmon from a surface phonon to a bulk phonon as the 2D quantum well is displaced away from the bounding surface, deeper into the medium.

  19. Methylation at CPT1A locus is associated with lipoprotein subfraction profiles[S

    PubMed Central

    Frazier-Wood, Alexis C.; Aslibekyan, Stella; Absher, Devin M.; Hopkins, Paul N.; Sha, Jin; Tsai, Michael Y.; Tiwari, Hemant K.; Waite, Lindsay L.; Zhi, Degui; Arnett, Donna K.

    2014-01-01

    Lipoprotein subfractions help discriminate cardiometabolic disease risk. Genetic loci validated as associating with lipoprotein measures do not account for a large proportion of the individual variation in lipoprotein measures. We hypothesized that DNA methylation levels across the genome contribute to interindividual variation in lipoprotein measures. Using data from participants of the Genetics of Lipid Lowering Drugs and Diet Network (n = 663 for discovery and n = 331 for replication stages, respectively), we conducted the first systematic screen of the genome to determine associations between methylation status at ∼470,000 cytosine-guanine dinucleotide (CpG) sites in CD4+ T cells and 14 lipoprotein subfraction measures. We modeled associations between methylation at each CpG site and each lipoprotein measure separately using linear mixed models, adjusted for age, sex, study site, cell purity, and family structure. We identified two CpGs, both in the carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1A (CPT1A) gene, which reached significant levels of association with VLDL and LDL subfraction parameters in both discovery and replication phases (P < 1.1 × 10−7 in the discovery phase, P < .004 in the replication phase, and P < 1.1 × 10−12 in the full sample). CPT1A is regulated by PPARα, a ligand for drugs used to reduce CVD. Our associations between methylation in CPT1A and lipoprotein measures highlight the epigenetic role of this gene in metabolic dysfunction. PMID:24711635

  20. A Novel Preparation Method for Camptothecin (CPT) Loaded Folic Acid Conjugated Dextran Tumor-Targeted Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zu, Yuangang; Wang, Dan; Zhao, Xiuhua; Jiang, Ru; Zhang, Qi; Zhao, Dongmei; Li, Yong; Zu, Baishi; Sun, Zhiqiang

    2011-01-01

    In this study, folic-dextran-camptothecin (Fa-DEX-CPT) tumor-targeted nanoparticles were produced with a supercritical antisolvent (SAS) technique by using dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as a solvent and carbon dioxide as an antisolvent. A factorial design was used to reveal the effect of various process parameters on the mean particle size (MPS) and morphology of the particles formed. Under the optimum operation conditions, Fa-DEX-CPT nanoparticles with a MPS of 182.21 nm were obtained. Drug encapsulation efficiency and loading efficiency were 62.13% and 36.12%, respectively. It was found that the concentrations of the camptothecin (CPT) and dextran solution had a major influence upon morphology and shape of the final product. In addition, the samples were characterized by Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) with the purpose of developing a suitable targeted drug delivery system for cancer chemotherapy. PMID:21845075

  1. Stray magnetic field influence on the CPT resonance in a coated Rb vacuum cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taskova, E.; Alipieva, E.; Todorov, G.

    2016-03-01

    Interaction of a resonant laser beam with an atomic absorption medium creates population redistribution and interference between atomic levels. This anisotropy of the medium is experimentally observed as coherent population trapping (CPT) or electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). Due to the small sub-natural width of the CPT and EIT resonances, they find wide applications in metrology, quantum optics, atom cooling. A non-compensated stray magnetic field (SMF) can change the shape and sign of the resonance or destroy it completely. In this work, we present an experimental and theoretical investigation of the influence of a stray magnetic field on the CPT resonances obtained on Zeeman sublevels of the D1 line of 87Rb in a paraffin-coated vacuum cell. The role is clarified of the polarization moments with different rank in creating the integral registered fluorescent signal in the presence of a stray magnetic field. It is shown that a transverse magnetic field plays an important role in changing the shape of the signal.

  2. Sensitivity to CPT-11 of xenografted human colorectal cancers as a function of microsatellite instability and p53 status

    PubMed Central

    Bras-Gonçalves, R A; Rosty, C; Laurent-Puig, P; Soulié, P; Dutrillaux, B; Poupon, M-F

    2000-01-01

    Biological parameters influencing the response of human colorectal cancers (CRCs) to CPT-11, a topoisomerase 1 (top1) inhibitor, were investigated using a panel of nine CRCs xenografted into nude mice. CRC xenografts differed in their p53 status (wt or mut) and in their microsatellite instability phenotype (MSI+when altered). Five CRC xenografts were established from clinical samples. All five had a functional p53, two were MSI+and three were MSI–. Tumour-bearing nude mice were treated intraperitonealy (i.p.) with CPT-11. At 10 mg kg–1of CPT-11, four injections at 4-day intervals, four of the five xenografts responded to CPT-11 (growth delay of up to 10 days); the non-responder tumour was MSI−. At 40 mg kg−1of CPT-11, six injections at 4-day intervals, the five CRCs displayed variable but marked responses with complete regressions. In order to assess the role of p53 status in CPT-11 response, four CRC lines were used. HT29 cell line was MSI−/ Ala273-mutp53, its subclone HT29A3 being transfected by wtp53. LoVo cell line was MSI+/ wtp53, its subclone X17LoVo dominantly expressed Ala273-mutp53 after transfection. LoVo tumours (MSI+/ mutp53) were more sensitive than X17LoVo (MSI+/ mutp53. HT 29 tumours (MSI−Imutp53), were refractory to CPT-11 while HT29A3 tumours (MSI−/ wtp53) were sensitive, showing that wtp53 improves the drug-response in these MSI−tumours. Levels of mRNA expression of top1, fasR, TP53 and mdr1 were semi-quantified by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. None of these parameters correlated with CPT-11 response. Taken together, these observations indicate that MSI and p53 alterations could be associated with different CPT-11 sensitivities; MSI phenotype moderately influences the CPT-11 sensitivity, MSI+being more sensitive than MSI−CRC freshly obtained from patients, mutp53 status being associated with a poor response to CPT-11. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10732766

  3. Moral Violations Reduce Oral Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Cindy; Van Boven, Leaf; Andrade, Eduardo B.; Ariely, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Consumers frequently encounter moral violations in everyday life. They watch movies and television shows about crime and deception, hear news reports of corporate fraud and tax evasion, and hear gossip about cheaters and thieves. How does exposure to moral violations influence consumption? Because moral violations arouse disgust and because disgust is an evolutionarily important signal of contamination that should provoke a multi-modal response, we hypothesize that moral violations affect a key behavioral response to disgust: reduced oral consumption. In three experiments, compared with those in control conditions, people drank less water and chocolate milk while (a) watching a film portraying the moral violations of incest, (b) writing about moral violations of cheating or theft, and (c) listening to a report about fraud and manipulation. These findings imply that “moral disgust” influences consumption in ways similar to core disgust, and thus provide evidence for the associations between moral violations, emotions, and consumer behavior. PMID:25125931

  4. Moral Violations Reduce Oral Consumption.

    PubMed

    Chan, Cindy; Van Boven, Leaf; Andrade, Eduardo B; Ariely, Dan

    2014-07-01

    Consumers frequently encounter moral violations in everyday life. They watch movies and television shows about crime and deception, hear news reports of corporate fraud and tax evasion, and hear gossip about cheaters and thieves. How does exposure to moral violations influence consumption? Because moral violations arouse disgust and because disgust is an evolutionarily important signal of contamination that should provoke a multi-modal response, we hypothesize that moral violations affect a key behavioral response to disgust: reduced oral consumption. In three experiments, compared with those in control conditions, people drank less water and chocolate milk while (a) watching a film portraying the moral violations of incest, (b) writing about moral violations of cheating or theft, and (c) listening to a report about fraud and manipulation. These findings imply that "moral disgust" influences consumption in ways similar to core disgust, and thus provide evidence for the associations between moral violations, emotions, and consumer behavior.

  5. Pulsar radiation in post-Maxwellian vacuum nonlinear electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisov, V. I.; Shvilkin, B. N.; Sokolov, V. A.; Vasili'ev, M. I.

    2016-08-01

    The effects of nonlinear vacuum electrodynamics are most clearly pronounced in a strong electromagnetic field close to Schwinger limit. Electromagnetic fields of such intensity can be obtained in laboratory conditions only on very few extreme laser facilities and during a short time interval. At the same time, the astrophysical compact objects with a strong electromagnetic field such as pulsars and magnetars are the best suited to study the effects of nonlinear vacuum electrodynamics. We present analytical calculations for pulsar proper radiation in parametrized post-Maxwellian nonlinear vacuum electrodynamics. Based on the obtained solutions, the effect of nonlinear vacuum corrections to pulsar spin down is being investigated. The analysis of torque functions show that the nonlinear vacuum electrodynamics corrections to the electromagnetic radiation for some pulsars may be comparable to the energy loss by gravitational radiation.

  6. Investigation of electrodynamic stabilization and control of long orbiting tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, G.; Grossi, M. D.; Dobrowolny, M.; Arnold, D. A.

    1980-01-01

    The possibility of using electrodynamic forces to control pendular oscillations during the retrieval of a subsatellite is investigated. The use of the tether for transferring payloads between orbits is studied.

  7. Quantum Electrodynamics Effects in Heavy Ions and Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Shabaev, V. M.; Andreev, O. V.; Bondarev, A. I.; Glazov, D. A.; Kozhedub, Y. S.; Maiorova, A. V.; Tupitsyn, I. I.; Plunien, G.; Volotka, A. V.

    2011-05-11

    Quantum electrodynamics theory of heavy ions and atoms is considered. The current status of calculations of the binding energies, the hyperfine splitting and g factor values in heavy few-electron ions is reviewed. The theoretical predictions are compared with available experimental data. A special attention is focused on tests of quantum electrodynamics in strong electromagnetic fields and on determination of the fundamental constants. Recent progress in calculations of the parity nonconservation effects with heavy atoms and ions is also reported.

  8. Exact asymptotic form for the {beta} function in quantum electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Suslov, I. M.

    2009-06-15

    It is shown that the asymptotic form of the Gell-Mann-Low function in quantum electrodynamics can be determined exactly: {beta}(g) = g for g {sup {yields}} {infinity}, where g = e{sup 2} is the running fine-structure constant. This solves the problem of electrodynamics at small distances L (for which dependence g {infinity} L{sup -2} holds) and completely eliminates the problem of 'zero charge.'.

  9. An Experiment on the Limits of Quantum Electro-dynamics

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Barber, W. C.; Richter, B.; Panofsky, W. K. H.; O'Neill, G. K.; Gittelman, B.

    1959-06-01

    The limitations of previously performed or suggested electrodynamic cutoff experiments are reviewed, and an electron-electron scattering experiment to be performed with storage rings to investigate further the limits of the validity of quantum electrodynamics is described. The foreseen experimental problems are discussed, and the results of the associated calculations are given. The parameters and status of the equipment are summarized. (D.C.W.)

  10. Elimination of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Cells in Stromal Microenvironment by Targeting CPT with an Anti-Angina Drug Perhexiline

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pan-pan; Liu, Jinyun; Jiang, Wen-qi; Carew, Jennifer S.; Ogasawara, Marcia A.; Pelicano, Hélène; Croce, Carlo M.; Estrov, Zeev; Xu, Rui-hua; Keating, Michael J.; Huang, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common adult leukemia in the western countries and is currently incurable due in part to difficulty in eliminating the leukemia cells protected by stromal microenvironment. Based on previous observations that CLL cells exhibit mitochondrial dysfunction and altered lipid metabolism and that carnitine palmitoyltransferases (CPT) play a major role in transporting fatty acid into mitochondria to support cancer cell metabolism, we tested several clinically relevant inhibitors of lipid metabolism for their ability to eliminate primary CLL cells. We discovered that Perhexiline, an anti-angina agent that inhibits CPT, was highly effective in killing CLL cells in stromal microenvironment at clinically achievable concentrations. These effective concentrations caused low toxicity to normal lymphocytes and normal stromal cells. Mechanistic study revealed that CLL cells expressed high levels of CPT1 and CPT2. Suppression of fatty acid transport into mitochondria by inhibiting CPT using Perhexiline resulted in a depletion of cardiolipin, a key component of mitochondrial membranes, and compromised mitochondrial integrity leading to rapid depolarization and massive CLL cell death. The therapeutic activity of Perhexiline was further demonstrated in vivo using a CLL transgenic mouse model. Perhexiline significantly prolonged the overall animal survival by only 4 drug injections. Our study suggests that targeting CPT using an anti-angina drug is able to effectively eliminate leukemia cells in vivo, and is a novel therapeutic strategy for potential clinical treatment of CLL. PMID:27065330

  11. Lorentz violation naturalness revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belenchia, Alessio; Gambassi, Andrea; Liberati, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    We revisit here the naturalness problem of Lorentz invariance violations on a simple toy model of a scalar field coupled to a fermion field via a Yukawa interaction. We first review some well-known results concerning the low-energy percolation of Lorentz violation from high energies, presenting some details of the analysis not explicitly discussed in the literature and discussing some previously unnoticed subtleties. We then show how a separation between the scale of validity of the effective field theory and that one of Lorentz invariance violations can hinder this low-energy percolation. While such protection mechanism was previously considered in the literature, we provide here a simple illustration of how it works and of its general features. Finally, we consider a case in which dissipation is present, showing that the dissipative behaviour does not percolate generically to lower mass dimension operators albeit dispersion does. Moreover, we show that a scale separation can protect from unsuppressed low-energy percolation also in this case.

  12. Impediments to enhancement of CPT-11 anticancer activity by E. coli directed beta-glucuronidase therapy.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yuan-Ting; Chen, Kai-Chuan; Cheng, Chiu-Min; Cheng, Tian-Lu; Tao, Mi-Hua; Roffler, Steve R

    2015-01-01

    CPT-11 is a camptothecin analog used for the clinical treatment of colorectal adenocarcinoma. CPT-11 is converted into the therapeutic anti-cancer agent SN-38 by liver enzymes and can be further metabolized to a non-toxic glucuronide SN-38G, resulting in low SN-38 but high SN-38G concentrations in the circulation. We previously demonstrated that adenoviral expression of membrane-anchored beta-glucuronidase could promote conversion of SN-38G to SN-38 in tumors and increase the anticancer activity of CPT-11. Here, we identified impediments to effective tumor therapy with E. coli that were engineered to constitutively express highly active E. coli beta-glucuronidase intracellularly to enhance the anticancer activity of CPT-11. The engineered bacteria, E. coli (lux/βG), could hydrolyze SN-38G to SN-38, increased the sensitivity of cultured tumor cells to SN-38G by about 100 fold and selectively accumulated in tumors. However, E. coli (lux/βG) did not more effectively increase CPT-11 anticancer activity in human tumor xenografts as compared to non-engineered E. coli. SN-38G conversion to SN-38 by E. coli (lux/βG) appeared to be limited by slow uptake into bacteria as well as by segregation of E. coli in necrotic regions of tumors that may be relatively inaccessible to systemically-administered drug molecules. Studies using a fluorescent glucuronide probe showed that significantly greater glucuronide hydrolysis could be achieved in mice pretreated with E. coli (lux/βG) by direct intratumoral injection of the glucuronide probe or by intratumoral lysis of bacteria to release intracellular beta-glucuronidase. Our study suggests that the distribution of beta-glucuronidase, and possibly other therapeutic proteins, in the tumor microenvironment might be an important barrier for effective bacterial-based tumor therapy. Expression of secreted therapeutic proteins or induction of therapeutic protein release from bacteria might therefore be a promising strategy to enhance anti

  13. Impediments to Enhancement of CPT-11 Anticancer Activity by E. coli Directed Beta-Glucuronidase Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Yuan-Ting; Chen, Kai-Chuan; Cheng, Chiu-Min; Cheng, Tian-Lu; Tao, Mi-Hua; Roffler, Steve R.

    2015-01-01

    CPT-11 is a camptothecin analog used for the clinical treatment of colorectal adenocarcinoma. CPT-11 is converted into the therapeutic anti-cancer agent SN-38 by liver enzymes and can be further metabolized to a non-toxic glucuronide SN-38G, resulting in low SN-38 but high SN-38G concentrations in the circulation. We previously demonstrated that adenoviral expression of membrane-anchored beta-glucuronidase could promote conversion of SN-38G to SN-38 in tumors and increase the anticancer activity of CPT-11. Here, we identified impediments to effective tumor therapy with E. coli that were engineered to constitutively express highly active E. coli beta-glucuronidase intracellularly to enhance the anticancer activity of CPT-11. The engineered bacteria, E. coli (lux/βG), could hydrolyze SN-38G to SN-38, increased the sensitivity of cultured tumor cells to SN-38G by about 100 fold and selectively accumulated in tumors. However, E. coli (lux/βG) did not more effectively increase CPT-11 anticancer activity in human tumor xenografts as compared to non-engineered E. coli. SN-38G conversion to SN-38 by E. coli (lux/βG) appeared to be limited by slow uptake into bacteria as well as by segregation of E. coli in necrotic regions of tumors that may be relatively inaccessible to systemically-administered drug molecules. Studies using a fluorescent glucuronide probe showed that significantly greater glucuronide hydrolysis could be achieved in mice pretreated with E. coli (lux/βG) by direct intratumoral injection of the glucuronide probe or by intratumoral lysis of bacteria to release intracellular beta-glucuronidase. Our study suggests that the distribution of beta-glucuronidase, and possibly other therapeutic proteins, in the tumor microenvironment might be an important barrier for effective bacterial-based tumor therapy. Expression of secreted therapeutic proteins or induction of therapeutic protein release from bacteria might therefore be a promising strategy to enhance anti

  14. Expression of the rat liver carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT-Ialpha) gene is regulated by Sp1 and nuclear factor Y: chromosomal localization and promoter characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Steffen, M L; Harrison, W R; Elder, F F; Cook, G A; Park, E A

    1999-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT)-I catalyses the transfer of long-chain fatty acids from CoA to carnitine for translocation across the mitochondrial inner membrane. Expression of the 'liver' isoform of the CPT-I gene (CPT-Ialpha) is subject to developmental, hormonal and tissue-specific regulation. To understand the basis for control of CPT-Ialpha gene expression, we have characterized the proximal promoter of the CPT-Ialpha gene. Here, we report the sequence of 6839 base pairs of the promoter and the localization of the rat CPT-Ialpha gene to region q43 on chromosome 1. Our studies show that the first 200 base pairs of the promoter are sufficient to drive transcription of the CPT-Ialpha gene. Within this region are two sites that bind both Sp1 and Sp3 transcription factors. In addition, nuclear factor Y (NF-Y) binds the proximal promoter. Mutation at the Sp1 or NF-Y sites severely decreases transcription from the CPT-Ialpha promoter. Other protein binding sites were identified within the first 200 base pairs of the promoter by DNase I footprinting, and these elements contribute to CPT-Ialpha gene expression. Our studies demonstrate that CPT-Ialpha is a TATA-less gene which utilizes NF-Y and Sp proteins to drive basal expression. PMID:10333485

  15. Conductive Tether Coating for Electrodynamic Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Jason A.; Schuler, Pete

    2000-01-01

    The Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS), which is an on-orbit demonstration of the propulsion capabilities of electrodynamic tethers in space, is a secondary payload on a Delta 11 unmanned expendable booster. The ProSEDS tether consists of a 5 km bare electrodynamic tether and a 1 0-km non-conductive leader tether. Near the Delta 11, 160 m of the conductive tether is insulated to prevent plasma electron collection from the plasma contactor and for other science requirements. The remainder of the 5-km conductive tether is coated with a new conductive coating to collect plasma electrons. A bare metal tether easily collects electrons from the plasma, but thermal concerns preclude this design. A highly emissive conductive polymer developed by Triton Systems, Inc. has been optimized for both conductivity and thermo-optical properties. The current design for the ProSEDS conductive tether is seven individually coated strands of 28 AWG aluminum wire, coated with an atomic oxygen-resistant conductive polymer composed of a mixture of COR (Colorless Oxygen Resistant) and polyanaline (PANI) known as C-COR (Conductive-Colorless Oxygen Resistant). The conductive-coated wire strands are cold-welded to individually coated strands of the insulated tether. The insulated tether is coated with 1 mil of polyimide and an atomic oxygen resistant polymer TOR-BP. The insulated tether must stand off the entire voltage of the tether (1 200 V) at various times during the mission. All seven wires are twisted around a Kevlar-29 core using the Hi-wire design. Extensive testing has been performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center to qualify both the conductive coating and insulating coating for use on the ProSEDS tether. The conductive coating has been exposed to a plasma to verify the coatings ability to collect electrons from the space plasma from 0 to 1500 V, and to verify the coatings ability to collect electrons after atomic oxygen exposure. The insulated coating has been

  16. Lorentz violation and {alpha} decay

    SciTech Connect

    Altschul, Brett

    2009-01-01

    Relating the effective Lorentz violation coefficients for composite particles to the coefficients for their constituent fields is a challenging problem. We calculate the Lorentz violation coefficients relevant to the dynamics of an {alpha} particle in terms of proton and neutron coefficients. The {alpha}-particle coefficients would lead to anisotropies in the {alpha} decays of nuclei, and because the decay process involves quantum tunneling, the effects of any Lorentz violations could be exponentially enhanced.

  17. In situ DOX-calcium phosphate mineralized CPT-amphiphilic gelatin nanoparticle for intracellular controlled sequential release of multiple drugs.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei-Ming; Su, Chia-Wei; Chen, Yu-Wei; Chen, San-Yuan

    2015-03-01

    A co-delivery strategy has been developed to achieve the synergistic effect of a hydrophobic drug (camptothecin, CPT) and a hydrophilic drug (doxorubicin, DOX) by utilizing the unique structure of amphiphilic gelatin/camptothecin @calcium phosphate-doxorubicin (AG/CPT@CaP-DOX) nanoparticles as a carriers in order to replace double emulsions while preserving the advantages of inorganic materials. The hydrophobic agent (CPT) was encapsulated via emulsion with an amphiphilic gelatin core, and subsequently mineralized by CaP-hydrophilic drug (DOX) through precipitation to form a CaP shell on the CPT-AG amphiphilic gelatin core so that drug molecules with different characteristics (i.e. hydrophobic and hydrophilic) can be encapsulated in different regions to avoid their interaction. The existence of the CaP shell can protect the DOX against free release and cause an increased transfer of DOX across membranes, overcoming multidrug resistance. Release studies from core-shell carriers showed the possibility of achieving sequential release of more than one type of drug by controlling the pH-sensitive CaP shell and degradable AG core. The highly pH-responsive behavior of the carrier can modulate the dual-drug-release of DOX/CPT, specifically in acidic intracellular pH environments. The AG/CPT@CaP-DOX nanoparticles also exhibited higher drug efficiencies against MCF-7/ADR cells than MCF-7 cells, thanks to a synergistic cell cycle arrest/apoptosis-inducing effect between CPT and DOX. As such, this core-shell system can serve as a general platform for the localized, controlled, sequential delivery of multiple drugs to treat several diseases, especially for multidrug-resistant cancer cells.

  18. Supersymmetric Lepton Flavor Violation

    SciTech Connect

    Ilakovac, Amon; Pilaftsis, Apostolos

    2010-02-10

    We study a new supersymmetric mechanism for lepton flavor violation in a minimal extension of the MSSM with low-mass heavy singlet neutrinos, which is fully independent of the flavour structure of the soft SUSY breaking sector. We find that l->l'gamma processes are forbidden in the SUSY limit, whilst the processes l->l'l{sub 1}l{sub 2} and mu->e conversion in nuclei can be enhanced well above the observable level, via large neutrino Yukawa-coupling effects.

  19. CP Violation in B Mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Lazzaro, Alfio; /Milan U. /INFN, Milan

    2007-05-11

    Symmetries and their conservation laws play a fundamental role in Physics. Among them, the discrete symmetries corresponding to charge (C), parity (P), and time (T) transformations are extensively used in the theory of the elementary particles and their interactions (so called Standard Model (SM)) to give the basis of the fundamental physical description of nature. Eventual discoveries of violations of these symmetries become a crucial test for our understanding of the nature. It was assumed that the three discrete symmetries were not violated until 1956 when it was found that P is violated in the weak interaction. Soon it was understood that also the C is violated in the weak interaction. At that time these two violated symmetries were replaced by their combination, CP, which was considered a new fundamental symmetry. In 1964 also the CP was found violated in the case of the neutral K meson system. Since that year there were many achievements in theories and experiments in order to explain this symmetry violation. In the last five years the main contribution comes from the discovery of the CP violation in B meson system. In this note we will describe briefly how the CP violation is described in the SM and the main experimental results obtained in the B mesons system.

  20. Electrodynamic Maglev coil design and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Davey, K.R.

    1997-09-01

    Electrodynamic Maglev systems are distinguished from electromagnetic systems in that the currents yielding lift and guidance forces are induced by the movement of the vehicle. Above a threshold speed, such a system is inherently stable, and has the additional benefit of having greater flexibility to system construction tolerances in that the magnet vertical position can change by as much as 5 cm. A stacked magnet design is considered which couples into a set of interleave coils which are interconnected in such a way as to yield both lift and guidance forces. A mutual coupling analysis is embraced wherein the mutual inductance between the permanent magnets on board the vehicle and the coils are computed using closed form analytical expressions for filaments. The derivatives of these expressions are then averaged to compute both the induced current and the forces on the coils as a function of the system geometry and speed. A full transient analysis must be performed to accurately account for entry and exit effects. The results are compared to those experimentally measured on a test track and extrapolations are offered to suggest future design considerations.

  1. Dark aspects of massive spinor electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Edward J.; Kouwn, Seyen; Oh, Phillial; Park, Chan-Gyung

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the cosmology of massive spinor electrodynamics when torsion is non-vanishing. A non-minimal interaction is introduced between the torsion and the vector field and the coupling constant between them plays an important role in subsequential cosmology. It is shown that the mass of the vector field and torsion conspire to generate dark energy and pressureless dark matter, and for generic values of the coupling constant, the theory effectively provides an interacting model between them with an additional energy density of the form ~ 1/a6. The evolution equations mimic ΛCDM behavior up to 1/a3 term and the additional term represents a deviation from ΛCDM. We show that the deviation is compatible with the observational data, if it is very small. We find that the non-minimal interaction is responsible for generating an effective cosmological constant which is directly proportional to the mass squared of the vector field and the mass of the photon within its current observational limit could be the source of the dark energy.

  2. Resolution of a paradox in classical electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, Fabrizio

    2006-05-15

    It is an early result of electrostatics in curved space that the gravitational mass of a charge distribution changes by an amount equal to U{sub es}/c{sup 2}, where U{sub es} is the internal electrostatic potential energy and c is the speed of light, if the system is supported at rest by external forces. This fact, independently rediscovered in recent years in the case of a simple dipole, confirms a very reasonable expectation grounded in the mass-energy equivalency equation. However, it is an unsolved paradox of classical electrodynamics that the renormalized mass of an accelerated dipole calculated from the self-forces due to the distortion of the Coulomb field differs in general from that expected from the energy correction, U{sub es}/c{sup 2}, unless the acceleration is transversal to the orientation of the dipole. Here we show that this apparent paradox disappears for any dipole orientation if the self-force is evaluated by means of Whittaker's exact solution for the field of the single charge in a homogeneous gravitational field described in the Rindler metric. The discussion is supported by computer algebra results, diagrams of the electric fields distorted by gravitation, and a brief analysis of the prospects for realistic experimentation. The gravitational correction to dipole-dipole interactions is also discussed.

  3. PT-symmetric quantum electrodynamics and unitarity.

    PubMed

    Milton, Kimball A; Abalo, E K; Parashar, Prachi; Pourtolami, Nima; Wagner, J

    2013-04-28

    More than 15 years ago, a new approach to quantum mechanics was suggested, in which Hermiticity of the Hamiltonian was to be replaced by invariance under a discrete symmetry, the product of parity and time-reversal symmetry, PT. It was shown that, if PT is unbroken, energies were, in fact, positive, and unitarity was satisfied. Since quantum mechanics is quantum field theory in one dimension--time--it was natural to extend this idea to higher-dimensional field theory, and in fact an apparently viable version of PT-invariant quantum electrodynamics (QED) was proposed. However, it has proved difficult to establish that the unitarity of the scattering matrix, for example, the Källén spectral representation for the photon propagator, can be maintained in this theory. This has led to questions of whether, in fact, even quantum mechanical systems are consistent with probability conservation when Green's functions are examined, since the latter have to possess physical requirements of analyticity. The status of PT QED will be reviewed in this paper, as well as the general issue of unitarity.

  4. Circuit quantum electrodynamics with a spin qubit.

    PubMed

    Petersson, K D; McFaul, L W; Schroer, M D; Jung, M; Taylor, J M; Houck, A A; Petta, J R

    2012-10-18

    Electron spins trapped in quantum dots have been proposed as basic building blocks of a future quantum processor. Although fast, 180-picosecond, two-quantum-bit (two-qubit) operations can be realized using nearest-neighbour exchange coupling, a scalable, spin-based quantum computing architecture will almost certainly require long-range qubit interactions. Circuit quantum electrodynamics (cQED) allows spatially separated superconducting qubits to interact via a superconducting microwave cavity that acts as a 'quantum bus', making possible two-qubit entanglement and the implementation of simple quantum algorithms. Here we combine the cQED architecture with spin qubits by coupling an indium arsenide nanowire double quantum dot to a superconducting cavity. The architecture allows us to achieve a charge-cavity coupling rate of about 30 megahertz, consistent with coupling rates obtained in gallium arsenide quantum dots. Furthermore, the strong spin-orbit interaction of indium arsenide allows us to drive spin rotations electrically with a local gate electrode, and the charge-cavity interaction provides a measurement of the resulting spin dynamics. Our results demonstrate how the cQED architecture can be used as a sensitive probe of single-spin physics and that a spin-cavity coupling rate of about one megahertz is feasible, presenting the possibility of long-range spin coupling via superconducting microwave cavities.

  5. Electrodynamic Dust Shield for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, P. J.; Johansen, M. R.; Olsen, R. C.; Raines, M. G.; Phillips, J. R., III; Pollard, J. R. S.; Calle, C. I.

    2016-01-01

    The International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG) has chosen dust mitigation technology as a Global Exploration Roadmap (GER) critical technology need in order to reduce life cycle cost and risk, and increase the probability of mission success. NASA has also included Particulate Contamination Prevention and Mitigation as a cross-cutting technology to be developed for contamination prevention, cleaning and protection. This technology has been highlighted due to the detrimental effect of dust on both human and robotic missions. During manned Apollo missions, dust caused issues with both equipment and crew. Contamination of equipment caused many issues including incorrect instrument readings and increased temperatures due to masking of thermal radiators. The astronauts were directly affected by dust that covered space suits, obscured face shields and later propagated to the cabin and into the crew's eyes and lungs. Robotic missions on Mars were affected when solar panels were obscured by dust thereby reducing the effectiveness of the solar panels. The Electrostatics and Surface Physics Lab in Swamp Works at the Kennedy Space Center has been developing an Electrodynamic Dust Shield (EDS) to remove dust from multiple surfaces, including glass shields and thermal radiators. This technology has been tested in lab environments and has evolved over several years. Tests of the technology include reduced gravity flights (one-sixth g) in which Apollo Lunar dust samples were successfully removed from glass shields while under vacuum (10(exp -6) kPa).

  6. Dark aspects of massive spinor electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Edward J.; Kouwn, Seyen; Oh, Phillial; Park, Chan-Gyung E-mail: seyen@ewha.ac.kr E-mail: parkc@jbnu.ac.kr

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the cosmology of massive spinor electrodynamics when torsion is non-vanishing. A non-minimal interaction is introduced between the torsion and the vector field and the coupling constant between them plays an important role in subsequential cosmology. It is shown that the mass of the vector field and torsion conspire to generate dark energy and pressureless dark matter, and for generic values of the coupling constant, the theory effectively provides an interacting model between them with an additional energy density of the form ∼ 1/a{sup 6}. The evolution equations mimic ΛCDM behavior up to 1/a{sup 3} term and the additional term represents a deviation from ΛCDM. We show that the deviation is compatible with the observational data, if it is very small. We find that the non-minimal interaction is responsible for generating an effective cosmological constant which is directly proportional to the mass squared of the vector field and the mass of the photon within its current observational limit could be the source of the dark energy.

  7. 7 CFR 632.41 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 632.41 Section 632.41 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING RURAL ABANDONED MINE PROGRAM Appeals and Violations § 632.41 Violations. (a) Actions causing violation. The following actions constitute violation of a contract by a land user:...

  8. 7 CFR 632.41 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 632.41 Section 632.41 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING RURAL ABANDONED MINE PROGRAM Appeals and Violations § 632.41 Violations. (a) Actions causing violation. The following actions constitute violation of a contract by a land user:...

  9. 7 CFR 632.41 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 632.41 Section 632.41 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING RURAL ABANDONED MINE PROGRAM Appeals and Violations § 632.41 Violations. (a) Actions causing violation. The following actions constitute violation of a contract by a land user:...

  10. 7 CFR 632.41 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 632.41 Section 632.41 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING RURAL ABANDONED MINE PROGRAM Appeals and Violations § 632.41 Violations. (a) Actions causing violation. The following actions constitute violation of a contract by a land user:...

  11. Theory of Light Scattering in Axion Electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochiai, Tetsuyuki

    2012-09-01

    Taking account of the axion term in the Maxwell Lagrangian, we present a rigorous theory of light scattering in piecewise-constant axion fields. In particular, we focus on axionic substances with confined and/or curved geometries, and the scattering matrices of an axionic slab, cylinder, and sphere are derived analytically. The axion term generates a surface current with off-diagonal optical conductivity, giving rise to a new type of photospin--orbit interaction. As a result, various novel light-scattering phenomena can take place. We demonstrate enhanced Faraday rotation, parity-violating light scattering, and strong perturbation of dipole radiation.

  12. 48 CFR 2803.104-10 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... violations. 2803.104-10 Section 2803.104-10 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE General IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 2803.104-10 Violations... interest of the Government, then the contracting officer may be authorized to award the contract...

  13. 48 CFR 2803.104-10 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 2803.104-10 Section 2803.104-10 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 2803.104-10...

  14. 48 CFR 2803.104-10 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 2803.104-10 Section 2803.104-10 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 2803.104-10...

  15. 48 CFR 2803.104-10 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 2803.104-10 Section 2803.104-10 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 2803.104-10...

  16. 48 CFR 2803.104-10 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 2803.104-10 Section 2803.104-10 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 2803.104-10...

  17. 48 CFR 3.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... reported violation or possible violation has any impact on the pending award or selection of the contractor. (1) If the contracting officer concludes that there is no impact on the procurement, the contracting... supporting a determination that there is no impact on the procurement to an individual designated...

  18. Propulsion and Levitation with a Large Electrodynamic Wheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaul, Nathan; Lane, Hannah

    We constructed an electrodynamic wheel using a motorized bicycle wheel with a radius of 12 inches and 36 one-inch cube magnets attached to the rim of the wheel. The radial magnetic field on the outside of the wheel was maximized by arranging the magnets into a series of Halbach arrays which amplify the field on one side of the array and reduce it on the other side. Rotating the wheel produces a rapidly oscillating magnetic field. When a conductive metal ``track'' is placed in this area of strong magnetic flux, eddy currents are produced in the track. These eddy currents create magnetic fields that interact with the magnetic fields from the electrodynamic wheel. The interaction of the magnetic fields produces lift and drag forces on the track which were measured with force gauges. Measurements were taken at a variety of wheel speeds, and the results were compared to the theoretical prediction that there should be a linear relationship between the lift and drag forces with increasing wheel speed. Partial levitation was achieved with the current electrodynamic wheel. In the future, the wheel will be upgraded to include 72 magnets rather than 36 magnets. This will double the frequency at which the magnetic field oscillates, increasing the magnetic flux. Electrodynamic wheels have applications to the transportation industry, since multiple electrodynamic wheels could be used on a vehicle to produce a lift and propulsion force over a conductive track.

  19. Ananas comosus L. Leaf Phenols and p-Coumaric Acid Regulate Liver Fat Metabolism by Upregulating CPT-1 Expression.

    PubMed

    Xie, Weidong; Zhang, Shaobo; Lei, Fan; Ouyang, Xiaoxi; Du, Lijun

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the effect and action mechanisms of pineapple leaf phenols (PLPs) on liver fat metabolism in high-fat diet-fed mice. Results show that PLP significantly reduced abdominal fat and liver lipid accumulation in high-fat diet-fed mice. The effects of PLP were comparable with those of FB. Furthermore, at the protein level, PLP upregulated the expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT-1), whereas FB had no effects on CPT-1 compared with the HFD controls. Regarding mRNA expression, PLP mainly promoted the expression of CPT-1, PGC1a, UCP-1, and AMPK in the mitochondria, whereas FB mostly enhanced the expression of Ech1, Acox1, Acaa1, and Ehhadh in peroxisomes. PLP seemed to enhance fat metabolism in the mitochondria, whereas FB mainly exerted the effect in peroxisomes. In addition, p-coumaric acid (CA), one of the main components from PLP, significantly inhibited fat accumulation in oleic acid-induced HepG2 cells. CA also significantly upregulated CPT-1 mRNA and protein expressions in HepG2 cells. We, firstly, found that PLP enhanced liver fat metabolism by upregulating CPT-1 expression in the mitochondria and might be promising in treatment of fatty liver diseases as alternative natural products. CA may be one of the active components of PLP.

  20. The inhibitory effects of camptothecin (CPT) and its derivatives on the substrate uptakes mediated by human solute carrier transporters (SLCs).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jian; Chan, Ting; Zhu, Ling; Yan, Xiufeng; Cao, Zhisong; Wang, Yang; Zhou, Fanfan

    2016-09-01

    1. Camptothecin (CPT) and its derivatives are potent candidate compounds in treating cancers. However, their clinical applications are largely restricted by severe toxicities. 2. The solute carrier transporters (SLCs), particularly the organic anion transporting polypeptides and organic anion/cation transporters (OATs/OCTs) are widely expressed in human key organs and responsible for the cellular influx of many substances including endogenous substrates and many clinically important drugs. Drug-drug interactions through SLCs often result in unsatisfied therapeutic outcomes and/or unexpected toxicities. 3. This study investigated the inhibitory effects of CPT and its eight derivatives on the cellular uptake of specific substrates mediated by the essential SLCs in over-expressing Human embryonic kidney 293 cells. 4. Our data revealed that CPT, 10-hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT), 10-methoxycamptothecin (MCPT) and 9-nitrocamptothecin (9NC) significantly inhibit the uptake activity of OAT3. 9NC also inhibited the substrate transport mediated by OAT1. The substrate uptakes of OAT1, OCTN1 and OCTN2 were significantly decreased in the presence of CZ112, while CPT-11 potently down-regulated the transport activity of OCT1 and OCT3. 5. In summary, our study demonstrated that CPT and its eight derivatives selectively inhibit the substrate uptakes mediated by the essential SLCs. This information contributes to understanding the localized toxicity of CPTs and provides novel molecular targets for the therapeutic optimization of CPTs in the future.

  1. Heterologous expression of human carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) II in yeast: A model for the molecular analysis of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation defects

    SciTech Connect

    Cavadini, P.; Invernizzi, F.; Baratta, S.

    1994-09-01

    The CPT enzyme system, which is composed of two distinct mitochondrial membrane-bound proteins (CPT I and CPT II), provides the mechanism whereby long-chain fatty acids are transferred from the cytosol to the mitochondrial matrix to undergo {beta}-oxidation. Here, we report the development of an expression system for investigating genotype/phenotype correlations in CPT II deficiency and, potentially, other mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation defects. To explore yeast as an expression system, we introduced a cDNA encoding the entire human CPT II precursor into Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Expression was programmed by using an inducible galactose operon promoter (GAL1). Following induction, human CPT II was expressed at high levels, with activity 4- to 16-fold greater than in human fibroblasts. Levels of expression paralleled those of respiration, being higher in cells grown on a nonfermentable carbon source than in those grown on glucose. Immunoprecipitation of pulse-labeled transformed cells demonstrated that human CPT II expressed in yeast was targeted to mitochondria with correct proteolytic processing of its 25-residue mitochondrial leader sequence. Preliminary results on the expression of a number of mutant CPT II alleles associated with different clinical phenotypes demonstrated the value of this system for examining the functional consequences of disease-causing mutations and investigating genotype/phenotype correlations in patients with CPT II deficiency.

  2. Circuit quantum electrodynamics with a spin qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersson, Karl

    2013-03-01

    Electron spins in quantum dots have been proposed as the building blocks of a quantum information processor. While both fast one and two qubit operations have been demonstrated, coupling distant spins remains a daunting challenge. In contrast, circuit quantum electrodynamics (cQED) has enabled superconducting qubits to be readily coupled over large distances via a superconducting microwave cavity. I will present our recent work aimed at integrating spin qubits with the cQED architecture.[2] Our approach is to use spin qubits formed in strong spin-orbit materials such as InAs nanowires to enable a large effective coupling of the spin to the microwave cavity field. For an InAs nanowire double quantum dot coupled to the superconducting microwave cavity we achieve a charge-cavity coupling rate of ~ 30 MHz. Combining this large charge-cavity coupling rate with electrically driven spin qubit rotations we demonstrate that the cQED architecture can be used a sensitive probe of single spin dynamics. In another experiment, we can apply a source-drain bias to drive current through the double quantum dot and observe gain in the cavity transmission. We additionally measure photon emission from the cavity without any input field applied. Our results suggest that long-range spin coupling via superconducting microwave cavities is feasible and present new avenues for exploring quantum optics on a chip. Research was performed in collaboration with Will McFaul, Michael Schroer, Minkyung Jung, Jake Taylor, Andrew Houck and Jason Petta. We acknowledge support from the Sloan and Packard Foundations, Army Research Office, and DARPA QuEST.

  3. Topological vortices in generalized Born-Infeld-Higgs electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casana, R.; Hora, E. da; Rubiera-Garcia, D.; Santos, C. dos

    2015-08-01

    A consistent BPS formalism to study the existence of topological axially symmetric vortices in generalized versions of the Born-Infeld-Higgs electrodynamics is implemented. Such a generalization modifies the field dynamics via the introduction of three nonnegative functions depending only in the Higgs field, namely, , , and . A set of first-order differential equations is attained when these functions satisfy a constraint related to the Ampère law. Such a constraint allows one to minimize the system's energy in such way that it becomes proportional to the magnetic flux. Our results provides an enhancement of the role of topological vortex solutions in Born-Infeld-Higgs electrodynamics. Finally, we analyze a set of models entailing the recovery of a generalized version of Maxwell-Higgs electrodynamics in a certain limit of the theory.

  4. Characterization of a small moving-magnet electrodynamic linear motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jin; Garrett, Steven

    2005-10-01

    The mechanical and electrodynamic parameters of a small, potentially inexpensive, moving-magnet electrodynamic linear motor are determined experimentally. Employing the formalism introduced by Wakeland, these parameters are used to predict the electromechanical efficiency of the motor. The transduction coefficient, Bl, was observed to be a function of position. But as shown in the paper, the variation in Bl with position has a smaller effect on the driver's output power because Bl is largest around the equilibrium position, where the piston velocity is also largest. By mechanical colinear joining of the armatures of two such motors, an electrodynamic load (dynamometer) is created to measure the efficiency as a function of energy dissipated in the dynamometer. The measured efficiencies are shown to be in good agreement with the predictions if a position-averaged effective transduction coefficient is introduced. Based on these results, this linear motor is judged to be an attractive power source in small electrically driven thermoacoustic refrigerator applications.

  5. Causality violation and paradoxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnikov, S. V.

    1997-03-01

    Paradoxes that can supposedly occur if causality is violated are discussed. It is shown that the existence of ``trajectories of multiplicity zero'' (i.e., trajectories that describe, say, a ball hitting its younger self so that the latter cannot fall into the time machine) is not paradoxical by itself. This apparent paradox can be resolved (at least sometimes) without any harm to local physics or to the time machine. Also a simple model is adduced for which the absence of true paradoxes caused by self-interaction in an acausal world is proved. The conclusion is made that the paradoxes appear if and (within this model) only if the fact is neglected that no conditions fixed to the past of a time machine guarantee that a system remains isolated after it intersects the Cauchy horizon.

  6. Wilson fermions and axion electrodynamics in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Bermudez, A; Mazza, L; Rizzi, M; Goldman, N; Lewenstein, M; Martin-Delgado, M A

    2010-11-01

    We show that ultracold Fermi gases in optical superlattices can be used as quantum simulators of relativistic lattice fermions in 3+1 dimensions. By exploiting laser-assisted tunneling, we find an analogue of the so-called naive Dirac fermions, and thus provide a realization of the fermion doubling problem. Moreover, we show how to implement Wilson fermions, and discuss how their mass can be inverted by tuning the laser intensities. In this regime, our atomic gas corresponds to a phase of matter where Maxwell electrodynamics is replaced by axion electrodynamics: a 3D topological insulator.

  7. Engineering squeezed states of microwave radiation with circuit quantum electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Li Pengbo; Li Fuli

    2011-03-15

    We introduce a squeezed state source for microwave radiation with tunable parameters in circuit quantum electrodynamics. We show that when a superconducting artificial multilevel atom interacting with a transmission line resonator is suitably driven by external classical fields, two-mode squeezed states of the cavity modes can be engineered in a controllable fashion from the vacuum state via adiabatic following of the ground state of the system. This scheme appears to be robust against decoherence and is realizable with present techniques in circuit quantum electrodynamics.

  8. Optical-lattice Hamiltonians for relativistic quantum electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kapit, Eliot; Mueller, Erich

    2011-03-15

    We show how interpenetrating optical lattices containing Bose-Fermi mixtures can be constructed to emulate the thermodynamics of quantum electrodynamics (QED). We present models of neutral atoms on lattices in 1+1, 2+1, and 3+1 dimensions whose low-energy effective action reduces to that of photons coupled to Dirac fermions of the corresponding dimensionality. We give special attention to (2+1)-dimensional quantum electrodynamics (QED3) and discuss how two of its most interesting features, chiral symmetry breaking and Chern-Simons physics, could be observed experimentally.

  9. Time-dependent Kohn-Sham approach to quantum electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggenthaler, M.; Mackenroth, F.; Bauer, D.

    2011-10-15

    We prove a generalization of the van Leeuwen theorem toward quantum electrodynamics, providing the formal foundations of a time-dependent Kohn-Sham construction for coupled quantized matter and electromagnetic fields. We circumvent the symmetry-causality problems associated with the action-functional approach to Kohn-Sham systems. We show that the effective external four-potential and four-current of the Kohn-Sham system are uniquely defined and that the effective four-current takes a very simple form. Further we rederive the Runge-Gross theorem for quantum electrodynamics.

  10. Wilson Fermions and Axion Electrodynamics in Optical Lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Bermudez, A.; Martin-Delgado, M. A.; Mazza, L.; Rizzi, M.; Goldman, N.; Lewenstein, M.

    2010-11-05

    We show that ultracold Fermi gases in optical superlattices can be used as quantum simulators of relativistic lattice fermions in 3+1 dimensions. By exploiting laser-assisted tunneling, we find an analogue of the so-called naive Dirac fermions, and thus provide a realization of the fermion doubling problem. Moreover, we show how to implement Wilson fermions, and discuss how their mass can be inverted by tuning the laser intensities. In this regime, our atomic gas corresponds to a phase of matter where Maxwell electrodynamics is replaced by axion electrodynamics: a 3D topological insulator.

  11. Distinct CPT-induced deaths in lung cancer cells caused by clathrin-mediated internalization of CP micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu-Sheng; Cheng, Ru-You; Lo, Yu-Lun; Hsu, Chin; Chen, Su-Hwei; Chiu, Chien-Chih; Wang, Li-Fang

    2016-02-01

    We previously synthesized a chondroitin sulfate-graft-poly(ε-caprolactone) copolymer (H-CP) with a high content of poly(ε-caprolactone) (18.7 mol%), which self-assembled in water into a rod-like micelle to encapsulate hydrophobic camptothecin (CPT) in the core (micelle/CPT) for tumor-targeted drug delivery. As a result of the recognition of the micelle by CD44, the micelle/CPT entered CRL-5802 cells efficiently and released CPT efficaciously, resulting in higher tumor suppression than commercial CPT-11. In this study, H1299 cells were found to have a higher CD44 expression than CRL-5802 cells. However, the lower CD44-expressing CRL-5802 cells had a higher percentage of cell death and higher cellular uptake of the micelle/CPT than the higher CD44-expressing H1299 cells. Examination of the internalization pathway of the micelle/CPT in the presence of different endocytic chemical inhibitors showed that the CRL-5802 cells involved clathrin-mediated endocytosis, which was not found in the H1299 cells. Analysis of the cell cycle of the two cell lines exposed to the micelle/CPT revealed that the CRL-5802 cells arrested mainly in the S phase and the H1299 cells arrested mainly in the G2-M phase. A consistent result was also found in the evaluation of γ-H2AX expression, which was about three-fold higher in the CRL-5802 cells than in the H1299 cells. A near-infrared dye, IR780, was encapsulated into the micelle to observe the in vivo biodistribution of the micelle/IR780 in tumor-bearing mice. The CRL-5802 tumor showed a higher fluorescence intensity than the H1299 tumor at any tracing time after 1 h. Thus we tentatively concluded that CRL-5802 cells utilized the clathrin-mediated internalization pathway and arrested in the S phase on exposure to the micelle/CPT; all are possible reasons for the better therapeutic outcome in CRL-5802 cells than in H1299 cells.We previously synthesized a chondroitin sulfate-graft-poly(ε-caprolactone) copolymer (H-CP) with a high content of

  12. Electrodynamic Bare Tether Systems as a Thruster for the Momentum-Exchange/Electrodynamic Reboost(MXER)Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Krivorutsky, E. N.; Gallagher, D. L.

    2006-01-01

    The concept of electrodynamic tether propulsion has a number of attractive features and has been widely discussed for different applications. Different system designs have been proposed and compared during the last 10 years. In spite of this, the choice of proper design for any particular mission is a unique problem. Such characteristics of tether performance as system acceleration, efficiency, etc., should be calculated and compared on the basis of the known capability of a tether to collect electrical current. We discuss the choice of parameters for circular and tape tethers with regard to the Momentum-Exchange/Electrodynamic Reboost (MXER) tether project.

  13. Electrodynamic Dust Shield for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, Paul J.; Johansen, Michael R.; Olsen, Robert C.; Raines, Matthew G.; Phillips, James R., III; Cox, Rachel E.; Hogue, Michael D.; Calle, Carlos I.; Pollard, Jacob R. S.

    2016-01-01

    The International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG) has chosen dust mitigation technology as a Global Exploration Roadmap (GER) critical technology need in order to reduce life cycle cost and risk, and increase the probability of mission success. NASA has also included Particulate Contamination Prevention and Mitigation as a cross-cutting technology to be developed for contamination prevention, cleaning and protection. This technology has been highlighted due to the detrimental effect of dust on both human and robotic missions. During manned Apollo missions, dust caused issues with both equipment and crew. Contamination of equipment caused many issues including incorrect instrument readings and increased temperatures due to masking of thermal radiators. The astronauts were directly affected by dust that covered space suits, obscured face shields and later propagated to the cabin and into the crew's eyes and lungs. Robotic missions on Mars were affected when solar panels were obscured by dust thereby reducing the effectiveness of the solar panels. The Electrostatics and Surface Physics Lab in Swamp Works at the Kennedy Space Center has been developing an Electrodynamic Dust Shield (EDS) to remove dust from multiple surfaces, including glass shields and thermal radiators. This technology has been tested in lab environments and has evolved over several years. Tests of the technology include reduced gravity flights (6g) in which Apollo Lunar dust samples were successfully removed from glass shields while under vacuum (1 millipascal). Further development of the technology is underway to reduce the size of the EDS as well as to perform material and component testing outside of the International Space Station (ISS) on the Materials on International Space Station Experiment X (MISSE-X). This experiment is designed to verify that the EDS can withstand the harsh environment of space and will look to closely replicate the solar environment experienced on the moon

  14. CP violation studies at Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Haim, E.; /Paris U., VI-VII

    2007-04-01

    We present an overview of a few recent results related to CP-violation from the Tevatron. First, we discuss a measurement of the dimuon charge asymmetry from D{O} , that extracts the CP-violation parameter of B{sup 0} mixing and decay. This is followed by the CDF measurement of the CP-violating asymmetry in B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decays. Finally we give the CDF result on the ratio R = BR(B{yields}D0K)/BR(B{yields}D0{pi}).

  15. On some electrodynamic properties of binary pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sironi, Lorenzo

    2006-07-01

    The main purpose of my thesis is to examine some electrodynamic properties of binary pulsars, trying to understand the peculiar physical processes that can happen in their magnetospheres; the ultimate aim is to discuss if such systems can be the source of the observed flux of cosmic rays between the knee and the ankle, since the mechanisms of acceleration for the cosmic rays in this range of energies are still unknown. Attention around binary pulsars has arisen after the recent discovery (December 2003) of the first double neutron star system in which both the stars are visible as pulsars (PSR J0737-3039); the inspection of the physical features of this binary pulsar has led to some intriguing possibilities up to now unexplored. In this thesis I will first of all review what is already known about the main properties of this binary system. I will describe in particular the possibility to go further in the verification of the predictions of general relativity with the so-called post-Keplerian parameters; I will discuss the possibility of studying the optical properties of the magnetospheres, since the inclination angle of the orbit is nearly 90° and some orbital phases show an eclipse of the light from one pulsar due to absorption by the magnetosphere of the companion; I will rapidly summarize how the discovery of that binary pulsar can enlarge our knowledge about the origin and evolution of double neutron star systems; lastly, I will examine the increase in the estimate of the Galactic double neutron star merger rate due to the discovery of PSR J0737-3039. I will then summarize the current knowledge about the magnetosphere of a single pulsar. After describing the Gold-Pacini model for the energy loss of the oblique rotator (in which the magnetic and rotational axes are not parallel), I will discuss the Goldreich-Julian model for the aligned axisymmetric rotator in the force-free approximation in which the inertial and gravitational forces are neglected with

  16. Application of Science Aesthetics in the Teaching of Electrodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Haiyan

    2010-01-01

    As the important part of the theoretical physics, the electrodynamics is a theoretical basic course of the physics and relative subjects. To adapt the demands for cultivating the target of highly-quality talents in the 21st century, the aesthetic principle can be used in the teaching to stimulate students' learning desire and cultivate students'…

  17. Apparent Paradoxes in Classical Electrodynamics: Relativistic Transformation of Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kholmetskii, A. L.; Yarman, T.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we analyse a number of paradoxical teaching problems of classical electrodynamics, dealing with the relativistic transformation of force for complex macro systems, consisting of a number of subsystems with nonzero relative velocities such as electric circuits that change their shape in the course of time. (Contains 7 figures.)

  18. Electrodynamics, Differential Forms and the Method of Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Low, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper gives a brief description of how Maxwell's equations are expressed in the language of differential forms and use this to provide an elegant demonstration of how the method of images (well known in electrostatics) also works for electrodynamics in the presence of an infinite plane conducting boundary. The paper should be accessible to an…

  19. Scaling limit of quantum electrodynamics with spatial cutoffs

    SciTech Connect

    Takaesu, Toshimitsu

    2011-02-15

    In this paper, the Hamiltonian of quantum electrodynamics with spatial cutoffs is investigated. A scaled total Hamiltonian is introduced and its asymptotic behavior is investigated. In the main theorem, it is shown that the scaled total Hamiltonian converges to a self-adjoint operator in the strong resolvent sense, and the effective potential of the Dirac field is derived.

  20. A Toy Model of Quantum Electrodynamics in (1 + 1) Dimensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boozer, A. D.

    2008-01-01

    We present a toy model of quantum electrodynamics (QED) in (1 + 1) dimensions. The QED model is much simpler than QED in (3 + 1) dimensions but exhibits many of the same physical phenomena, and serves as a pedagogical introduction to both QED and quantum field theory in general. We show how the QED model can be derived by quantizing a toy model of…

  1. A Toy Model of Electrodynamics in (1 + 1) Dimensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boozer, A. D.

    2007-01-01

    A model is presented that describes a scalar field interacting with a point particle in (1+1) dimensions. The model exhibits many of the same phenomena that appear in classical electrodynamics, such as radiation and radiation damping, yet has a much simpler mathematical structure. By studying these phenomena in a highly simplified model, the…

  2. Electrodynamic aspects of the first tethered satellite mission

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrowolny, M.; Melchioni, E.

    1993-08-01

    They authors provide a brief review of the physics basis for the tethered satellite program whose development began in 1984. They describe the electrodynamic effects which can be seen or induced by means of a conducting tether orbiting through the ionosphere. They also describe the first mission, in terms of the equipment, mission objective, and the actual experiment launched in July 1992.

  3. Speeded Recognition of Ungrammaticality: Double Violations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Timothy E.; Biederman, Irving

    1979-01-01

    The speed at which sentences with various kinds of violations could be rejected was studied. Compatible with the sequential model was the finding that noun-verb and adjective-noun double violations did not result in shorter reaction times than noun-verb single violations, although double violations were judged less acceptable. (Author/RD)

  4. 10 CFR 30.63 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 30.63 Section 30.63 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the... Energy Act: (1) For violations of— (i) Sections 53, 57, 62, 63, 81, 82, 101, 103, 104, 107, or 109 of...

  5. 5 CFR 1312.31 - Security violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Security violations. 1312.31 Section 1312... Classified Information § 1312.31 Security violations. (a) A security violation notice is issued by the United... discovery of an alleged security violation, the USSS implements their standard procedures which include...

  6. 10 CFR 25.37 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 25.37 Section 25.37 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION ACCESS AUTHORIZATION Violations § 25.37 Violations. (a) An injunction or other court order may be obtained to prohibit a violation of any provision of: (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended;...

  7. 10 CFR 75.51 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 75.51 Section 75.51 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the... Energy Act: (1) For violations of— (i) Sections 53, 57, 62, 63, 81, 82, 101, 103, 104, 107, or 109 of...

  8. 21 CFR 1230.46 - Violation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Violation. 1230.46 Section 1230.46 Food and Drugs... POISON ACT Imports § 1230.46 Violation. (a) If a violation of the Federal Caustic Poison Act is disclosed, the chief of the district shall send to the importer due notice of the nature of the violation and...

  9. 10 CFR 30.63 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 30.63 Section 30.63 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the... Energy Act: (1) For violations of— (i) Sections 53, 57, 62, 63, 81, 82, 101, 103, 104, 107, or 109 of...

  10. 10 CFR 32.301 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 32.301 Section 32.301 Energy NUCLEAR... BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Violations § 32.301 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as...

  11. 10 CFR 34.121 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 34.121 Section 34.121 Energy NUCLEAR... RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Violations § 34.121 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as...

  12. 10 CFR 26.823 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 26.823 Section 26.823 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Inspections, Violations, and Penalties § 26.823 Violations. (a) An injunction or other court order may be obtained to prohibit a violation of any provision...

  13. 10 CFR 11.30 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 11.30 Section 11.30 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... MATERIAL Violations § 11.30 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; (2) Title II...

  14. 29 CFR 503.19 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Violations. 503.19 Section 503.19 Labor Regulations... IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT Enforcement § 503.19 Violations. (a) Types of violations. Pursuant to the statutory provisions governing enforcement of the H-2B program, 8 U.S.C. 1184(c)(14)(A), a violation...

  15. 43 CFR 4150.1 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Violations. 4150.1 Section 4150.1 Public... Grazing Use § 4150.1 Violations. Violation of § 4140.1(b)(1) constitutes unauthorized grazing use. (a) The authorized officer shall determine whether a violation is nonwillful, willful, or repeated willful....

  16. 10 CFR 25.37 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 25.37 Section 25.37 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION ACCESS AUTHORIZATION Violations § 25.37 Violations. (a) An injunction or other court order may be obtained to prohibit a violation of any provision of: (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended;...

  17. 10 CFR 33.21 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 33.21 Section 33.21 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES OF BROAD SCOPE FOR BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Violations § 33.21 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the...

  18. 10 CFR 63.171 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 63.171 Section 63.171 Energy NUCLEAR... MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Violations § 63.171 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended;...

  19. 10 CFR 74.83 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 74.83 Section 74.83 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the... Energy Act: (1) For violations of— (i) Sections 53, 57, 62, 63, 81, 82, 101, 103, 104, 107, or 109 of...

  20. 29 CFR 503.19 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Violations. 503.19 Section 503.19 Labor Regulations... IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT Enforcement § 503.19 Violations. (a) Types of violations. Pursuant to the statutory provisions governing enforcement of the H-2B program, 8 U.S.C. 1184(c)(14)(A), a violation...

  1. 10 CFR 30.63 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 30.63 Section 30.63 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the... Energy Act: (1) For violations of— (i) Sections 53, 57, 62, 63, 81, 82, 101, 103, 104, 107, or 109 of...

  2. 10 CFR 75.51 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 75.51 Section 75.51 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the... Energy Act: (1) For violations of— (i) Sections 53, 57, 62, 63, 81, 82, 101, 103, 104, 107, or 109 of...

  3. 10 CFR 34.121 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 34.121 Section 34.121 Energy NUCLEAR... RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Violations § 34.121 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as...

  4. 10 CFR 30.63 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 30.63 Section 30.63 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the... Energy Act: (1) For violations of— (i) Sections 53, 57, 62, 63, 81, 82, 101, 103, 104, 107, or 109 of...

  5. 10 CFR 26.823 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 26.823 Section 26.823 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Inspections, Violations, and Penalties § 26.823 Violations. (a) An injunction or other court order may be obtained to prohibit a violation of any provision...

  6. 43 CFR 4150.1 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Violations. 4150.1 Section 4150.1 Public... Grazing Use § 4150.1 Violations. Violation of § 4140.1(b)(1) constitutes unauthorized grazing use. (a) The authorized officer shall determine whether a violation is nonwillful, willful, or repeated willful....

  7. 10 CFR 34.121 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 34.121 Section 34.121 Energy NUCLEAR... RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Violations § 34.121 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as...

  8. 7 CFR 634.29 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 634.29 Section 634.29 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING RURAL CLEAN WATER PROGRAM Participant RCWP Contracts § 634.29 Violations. (a) Actions causing violations. The following actions constitute violation of a contract by a participant:...

  9. 10 CFR 50.110 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 50.110 Section 50.110 Energy NUCLEAR... Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the... Energy Act: (1) For violations of— (i) Sections 53, 57, 62, 63, 81, 82, 101, 103, 104, 107, or 109 of...

  10. 10 CFR 26.823 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 26.823 Section 26.823 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Inspections, Violations, and Penalties § 26.823 Violations. (a) An injunction or other court order may be obtained to prohibit a violation of any provision...

  11. 10 CFR 11.30 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 11.30 Section 11.30 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... MATERIAL Violations § 11.30 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; (2) Title II...

  12. 10 CFR 39.101 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 39.101 Section 39.101 Energy NUCLEAR... Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the... Energy Act: (1) For violations of— (i) Sections 53, 57, 62, 63, 81, 82, 101, 103, 104, 107, or 109 of...

  13. 10 CFR 74.83 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 74.83 Section 74.83 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the... Energy Act: (1) For violations of— (i) Sections 53, 57, 62, 63, 81, 82, 101, 103, 104, 107, or 109 of...

  14. 10 CFR 30.63 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 30.63 Section 30.63 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the... Energy Act: (1) For violations of— (i) Sections 53, 57, 62, 63, 81, 82, 101, 103, 104, 107, or 109 of...

  15. 10 CFR 50.110 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 50.110 Section 50.110 Energy NUCLEAR... Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the... Energy Act: (1) For violations of— (i) Sections 53, 57, 62, 63, 81, 82, 101, 103, 104, 107, or 109 of...

  16. 10 CFR 39.101 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 39.101 Section 39.101 Energy NUCLEAR... Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the... Energy Act: (1) For violations of— (i) Sections 53, 57, 62, 63, 81, 82, 101, 103, 104, 107, or 109 of...

  17. 10 CFR 75.51 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 75.51 Section 75.51 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the... Energy Act: (1) For violations of— (i) Sections 53, 57, 62, 63, 81, 82, 101, 103, 104, 107, or 109 of...

  18. 7 CFR 247.20 - Program violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Program violations. 247.20 Section 247.20 Agriculture... CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS COMMODITY SUPPLEMENTAL FOOD PROGRAM § 247.20 Program violations. (a) What are program violations in CSFP? Program violations are actions taken by CSFP applicants or participants,...

  19. 43 CFR 4150.1 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Violations. 4150.1 Section 4150.1 Public... Grazing Use § 4150.1 Violations. Violation of § 4140.1(b)(1) constitutes unauthorized grazing use. (a) The authorized officer shall determine whether a violation is nonwillful, willful, or repeated willful....

  20. 10 CFR 25.37 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 25.37 Section 25.37 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION ACCESS AUTHORIZATION Violations § 25.37 Violations. (a) An injunction or other court order may be obtained to prohibit a violation of any provision of: (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended;...

  1. 10 CFR 95.61 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 95.61 Section 95.61 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... RESTRICTED DATA Violations § 95.61 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended;...

  2. 10 CFR 34.121 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 34.121 Section 34.121 Energy NUCLEAR... RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Violations § 34.121 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as...

  3. 7 CFR 634.29 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 634.29 Section 634.29 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING RURAL CLEAN WATER PROGRAM Participant RCWP Contracts § 634.29 Violations. (a) Actions causing violations. The following actions constitute violation of a contract by a participant:...

  4. 10 CFR 95.61 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 95.61 Section 95.61 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... RESTRICTED DATA Violations § 95.61 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended;...

  5. 5 CFR 1312.31 - Security violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Security violations. 1312.31 Section 1312... Classified Information § 1312.31 Security violations. (a) A security violation notice is issued by the United... discovery of an alleged security violation, the USSS implements their standard procedures which include...

  6. 10 CFR 50.110 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 50.110 Section 50.110 Energy NUCLEAR... Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the... Energy Act: (1) For violations of— (i) Sections 53, 57, 62, 63, 81, 82, 101, 103, 104, 107, or 109 of...

  7. 10 CFR 74.83 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 74.83 Section 74.83 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the... Energy Act: (1) For violations of— (i) Sections 53, 57, 62, 63, 81, 82, 101, 103, 104, 107, or 109 of...

  8. 10 CFR 32.301 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 32.301 Section 32.301 Energy NUCLEAR... BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Violations § 32.301 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as...

  9. 7 CFR 634.29 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 634.29 Section 634.29 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING RURAL CLEAN WATER PROGRAM Participant RCWP Contracts § 634.29 Violations. (a) Actions causing violations. The following actions constitute violation of a contract by a participant:...

  10. 7 CFR 634.29 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 634.29 Section 634.29 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING RURAL CLEAN WATER PROGRAM Participant RCWP Contracts § 634.29 Violations. (a) Actions causing violations. The following actions constitute violation of a contract by a participant:...

  11. 10 CFR 33.21 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 33.21 Section 33.21 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES OF BROAD SCOPE FOR BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Violations § 33.21 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the...

  12. 10 CFR 26.823 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 26.823 Section 26.823 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Inspections, Violations, and Penalties § 26.823 Violations. (a) An injunction or other court order may be obtained to prohibit a violation of any provision...

  13. 10 CFR 95.61 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 95.61 Section 95.61 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... RESTRICTED DATA Violations § 95.61 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended;...

  14. 29 CFR 503.19 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Violations. 503.19 Section 503.19 Labor Regulations... IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT Enforcement § 503.19 Violations. (a) Types of violations. Pursuant to the statutory provisions governing enforcement of the H-2B program, 8 U.S.C. 1184(c)(14)(A), a violation...

  15. 10 CFR 25.37 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 25.37 Section 25.37 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION ACCESS AUTHORIZATION Violations § 25.37 Violations. (a) An injunction or other court order may be obtained to prohibit a violation of any provision of: (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended;...

  16. 21 CFR 1230.46 - Violation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Violation. 1230.46 Section 1230.46 Food and Drugs... POISON ACT Imports § 1230.46 Violation. (a) If a violation of the Federal Caustic Poison Act is disclosed, the chief of the district shall send to the importer due notice of the nature of the violation and...

  17. 10 CFR 33.21 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 33.21 Section 33.21 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES OF BROAD SCOPE FOR BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Violations § 33.21 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the...

  18. 10 CFR 11.30 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 11.30 Section 11.30 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... MATERIAL Violations § 11.30 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; (2) Title II...

  19. 10 CFR 75.51 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 75.51 Section 75.51 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the... Energy Act: (1) For violations of— (i) Sections 53, 57, 62, 63, 81, 82, 101, 103, 104, 107, or 109 of...

  20. 10 CFR 34.121 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 34.121 Section 34.121 Energy NUCLEAR... RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Violations § 34.121 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as...

  1. 10 CFR 74.83 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 74.83 Section 74.83 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the... Energy Act: (1) For violations of— (i) Sections 53, 57, 62, 63, 81, 82, 101, 103, 104, 107, or 109 of...

  2. 5 CFR 1312.31 - Security violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Security violations. 1312.31 Section 1312... Classified Information § 1312.31 Security violations. (a) A security violation notice is issued by the United... discovery of an alleged security violation, the USSS implements their standard procedures which include...

  3. 10 CFR 11.30 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 11.30 Section 11.30 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... MATERIAL Violations § 11.30 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; (2) Title II...

  4. 10 CFR 74.83 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 74.83 Section 74.83 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the... Energy Act: (1) For violations of— (i) Sections 53, 57, 62, 63, 81, 82, 101, 103, 104, 107, or 109 of...

  5. 10 CFR 32.301 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 32.301 Section 32.301 Energy NUCLEAR... BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Violations § 32.301 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as...

  6. 7 CFR 634.29 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 634.29 Section 634.29 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING RURAL CLEAN WATER PROGRAM Participant RCWP Contracts § 634.29 Violations. (a) Actions causing violations. The following actions constitute violation of a contract by a participant:...

  7. 10 CFR 32.301 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 32.301 Section 32.301 Energy NUCLEAR... BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Violations § 32.301 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as...

  8. 10 CFR 95.61 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 95.61 Section 95.61 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... RESTRICTED DATA Violations § 95.61 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended;...

  9. 10 CFR 32.301 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 32.301 Section 32.301 Energy NUCLEAR... BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Violations § 32.301 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as...

  10. 10 CFR 39.101 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 39.101 Section 39.101 Energy NUCLEAR... Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the... Energy Act: (1) For violations of— (i) Sections 53, 57, 62, 63, 81, 82, 101, 103, 104, 107, or 109 of...

  11. 10 CFR 50.110 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 50.110 Section 50.110 Energy NUCLEAR... Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the... Energy Act: (1) For violations of— (i) Sections 53, 57, 62, 63, 81, 82, 101, 103, 104, 107, or 109 of...

  12. 10 CFR 75.51 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 75.51 Section 75.51 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the... Energy Act: (1) For violations of— (i) Sections 53, 57, 62, 63, 81, 82, 101, 103, 104, 107, or 109 of...

  13. 10 CFR 25.37 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 25.37 Section 25.37 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION ACCESS AUTHORIZATION Violations § 25.37 Violations. (a) An injunction or other court order may be obtained to prohibit a violation of any provision of: (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended;...

  14. 10 CFR 33.21 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 33.21 Section 33.21 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES OF BROAD SCOPE FOR BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Violations § 33.21 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the...

  15. 43 CFR 4150.1 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Violations. 4150.1 Section 4150.1 Public... Grazing Use § 4150.1 Violations. Violation of § 4140.1(b)(1) constitutes unauthorized grazing use. (a) The authorized officer shall determine whether a violation is nonwillful, willful, or repeated willful....

  16. 21 CFR 1230.46 - Violation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Violation. 1230.46 Section 1230.46 Food and Drugs... POISON ACT Imports § 1230.46 Violation. (a) If a violation of the Federal Caustic Poison Act is disclosed, the chief of the district shall send to the importer due notice of the nature of the violation and...

  17. 10 CFR 63.171 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 63.171 Section 63.171 Energy NUCLEAR... MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Violations § 63.171 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended;...

  18. 10 CFR 50.110 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 50.110 Section 50.110 Energy NUCLEAR... Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the... Energy Act: (1) For violations of— (i) Sections 53, 57, 62, 63, 81, 82, 101, 103, 104, 107, or 109 of...

  19. 10 CFR 33.21 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 33.21 Section 33.21 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES OF BROAD SCOPE FOR BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Violations § 33.21 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the...

  20. 10 CFR 26.823 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 26.823 Section 26.823 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Inspections, Violations, and Penalties § 26.823 Violations. (a) An injunction or other court order may be obtained to prohibit a violation of any provision...

  1. 10 CFR 11.30 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 11.30 Section 11.30 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... MATERIAL Violations § 11.30 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; (2) Title II...

  2. 21 CFR 1230.46 - Violation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Violation. 1230.46 Section 1230.46 Food and Drugs... POISON ACT Imports § 1230.46 Violation. (a) If a violation of the Federal Caustic Poison Act is disclosed, the chief of the district shall send to the importer due notice of the nature of the violation and...

  3. 21 CFR 1230.46 - Violation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Violation. 1230.46 Section 1230.46 Food and Drugs... POISON ACT Imports § 1230.46 Violation. (a) If a violation of the Federal Caustic Poison Act is disclosed, the chief of the district shall send to the importer due notice of the nature of the violation and...

  4. 7 CFR 632.42 - Violation procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... conservationist, that a violation did not occur or that the violation was of such a nature that no penalty of... refused. (2) The notice setting forth the nature of the alleged violation is to give the land user an... decision is to state whether the violation is of such a nature as to warrant termination of the...

  5. CPT site characterization for seismic hazards in the New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liao, T.; Mayne, P.W.; Tuttle, M.P.; Schweig, E.S.; Van Arsdale, R.B.

    2002-01-01

    A series of cone penetration tests (CPTs) were conducted in the vicinity of the New Madrid seismic zone in central USA for quantifying seismic hazards, obtaining geotechnical soil properties, and conducting studies at liquefaction sites related to the 1811-1812 and prehistoric New Madrid earthquakes. The seismic piezocone provides four independent measurements for delineating the stratigraphy, liquefaction potential, and site amplification parameters. At the same location, two independent assessments of soil liquefaction susceptibility can be made using both the normalized tip resistance (qc1N) and shear wave velocity (Vs1). In lieu of traditional deterministic approaches, the CPT data can be processed using probability curves to assess the level and likelihood of future liquefaction occurrence. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A unified classification model for modeling of seismic liquefaction potential of soil based on CPT.

    PubMed

    Samui, Pijush; Hariharan, R

    2015-07-01

    The evaluation of liquefaction potential of soil due to an earthquake is an important step in geosciences. This article examines the capability of Minimax Probability Machine (MPM) for the prediction of seismic liquefaction potential of soil based on the Cone Penetration Test (CPT) data. The dataset has been taken from Chi-Chi earthquake. MPM is developed based on the use of hyperplanes. It has been adopted as a classification tool. This article uses two models (MODEL I and MODEL II). MODEL I employs Cone Resistance (q c) and Cyclic Stress Ratio (CSR) as input variables. q c and Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA) have been taken as inputs for MODEL II. The developed MPM gives 100% accuracy. The results show that the developed MPM can predict liquefaction potential of soil based on q c and PGA. PMID:26199749

  7. A unified classification model for modeling of seismic liquefaction potential of soil based on CPT.

    PubMed

    Samui, Pijush; Hariharan, R

    2015-07-01

    The evaluation of liquefaction potential of soil due to an earthquake is an important step in geosciences. This article examines the capability of Minimax Probability Machine (MPM) for the prediction of seismic liquefaction potential of soil based on the Cone Penetration Test (CPT) data. The dataset has been taken from Chi-Chi earthquake. MPM is developed based on the use of hyperplanes. It has been adopted as a classification tool. This article uses two models (MODEL I and MODEL II). MODEL I employs Cone Resistance (q c) and Cyclic Stress Ratio (CSR) as input variables. q c and Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA) have been taken as inputs for MODEL II. The developed MPM gives 100% accuracy. The results show that the developed MPM can predict liquefaction potential of soil based on q c and PGA.

  8. C P -violating baryon oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeen, David; Nelson, Ann E.

    2016-10-01

    We enumerate the conditions necessary for C P violation to be manifest in n -n ¯ oscillations and build a simple model that can give rise to such effects. We discuss a possible connection between neutron oscillations and dark matter, provided the mass of the latter lies between mp-me and mp+me. We apply our results to a possible baryogenesis scenario involving C P violation in the oscillations of the Ξ0.

  9. CP Violation in B Mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roe, Natalie A.

    2001-04-01

    Our world manifestly violates CP, the symmetry between matter and antimatter; there is no observational evidence for any significant amount of antimatter in the Universe. Andrei Sakharov was the first to point out that, in the context of Big Bang theory, a matter-dominated universe requires CP violation at the quantum level. Indeed, CP violation was subsequently observed as a tiny effect in K-meson decays, and it can be naturally accommodated in the Standard Model of fundamental particles with 3 generations of quarks. However, to produce the observed baryon asymmetry, baryogenesis calculations require more CP violation than the Standard Model affords. This is an intriguing puzzle whose solution will require input from both particle physics and cosmology, and it has inspired particle physicists to study CP violation with greater precision in a new generation of experiments. We are now entering this exciting new era in CP violation studies. Several new or upgraded experiments plan a program of detailed measurements of CP violating effects in B mesons. The predicted asymmetries are large, observable in a variety of decay channels, and the theoretical uncertainties are small for the best modes. Some interesting experimental results have recently been announced, and more precise measurements will soon follow. Future experiments are already planned to make even more definitive measurements. In this talk I will review the theoretical predictions and the connection to cosmology, survey the experimental scene, and describe how the study of CP violation in B mesons will allow us to make stringent tests of the Standard Model.

  10. Einstein's investigations of Galilean covariant electrodynamics prior to 1905

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, John D.

    2004-11-01

    Einstein learned from the magnet and conductor thought experiment how to use field transformation laws to extend the covariance of Maxwells electrodynamics. If he persisted in his use of this device, he would have found that the theory cleaves into two Galilean covariant parts, each with different field transformation laws. The tension between the two parts reflects a failure not mentioned by Einstein: that the relativity of motion manifested by observables in the magnet and conductor thought experiment does not extend to all observables in electrodynamics. An examination of Ritz's work shows that Einstein's early view could not have coincided with Ritz's on an emission theory of light, but only with that of a conveniently reconstructed Ritz. One Ritz-like emission theory, attributed by Pauli to Ritz, proves to be a natural extension of the Galilean covariant part of Maxwell's theory that happens also to accommodate the magnet and conductor thought experiment. Einstein's famous chasing a light beam thought experiment fails as an objection to an ether-based, electrodynamical theory of light. However it would allow Einstein to formulate his general objections to all emission theories of light in a very sharp form. Einstein found two well known experimental results of 18th and 19th century optics compelling (Fizeau's experiment, stellar aberration), while the accomplished Michelson-Morley experiment played no memorable role. I suggest they owe their importance to their providing a direct experimental grounding for Lorentz' local time, the precursor of Einstein's relativity of simultaneity, and doing it essentially independently of electrodynamical theory. I attribute Einstein's success to his determination to implement a principle of relativity in electrodynamics, but I urge that we not invest this stubbornness with any mystical prescience.

  11. Large- and Small-Scale Ring Current Electrodynamic Coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.

    2003-01-01

    In this talk we will address the two primary issues of ring current (RC) electrodynamic coupling: 1. RC self-consistent magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling that includes calculation of the magnetospheric electric field (large scale electrodynamic coupling); and 2. RC self-consistent coupling with electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves (small scale electrodynamic coupling). Our study will be based on two RC models that we have recently developed in our group. The first model by Khazanov et al. [2002] couples the system of two kinetic equations: one equation which describes the RC ion dynamics and another equation which describes the energy density evolution of EMIC waves. The second model by Khazanov et al. [2003] deals with large scale electrodynamic coupling processes and provides a self-consistent simulation of RC ions and the magnetospheric electric field. There is presently no model that addresses both of these issues simultaneously in a self-consistent calculation. However, the need exists for such a model, because these two processes directly influence each other, with the mesoscale coupling changing the drift paths of the thermal and energetic particle populations in the inner magnetosphere, thereby changing the wave interactions, and the microscale coupling altering the pitch angle distributions and ionospheric conductivities (through increased precipitation), thus changing the field-aligned currents and electric potential structure. The initial thrust of the work will be the development of a combined kinetic model of micro- and meso-scale RC electrodynamic coupling processes and to examine their interactions with each other on a global scale.

  12. IMPROVED DOWN-HOLE CPT TOOLS FOR THE DETECTION OF CHLORINATED SOLVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Martin L. Gildea; Stephen P. Farrington, P.E.; Wesley L. Bratton, Ph.D., PE

    1998-09-01

    Conventional soil and groundwater sampling procedures present many opportunities for loss of volatile organic compounds (VOC) by exposing sample media to the atmosphere during transfers between sampling devices and containers, ultimately affecting the quality of the analytical results. Inaccurate characterization data often leads to improperly designed remedial systems that slow the clean-up process and increase the cost. For these reasons, in situ methods for sample extraction and real time analysis provide attractive alternatives to conventional sampling and analysis. Under funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), the investigators continued development of a system that combines High Speed Gas Chromatography techniques with Cone Penetration Testing to achieve near-real time analysis of soils and groundwater for chlorinated and aromatic hydrocarbon contamination (PCE, TCE, BTEX) during site characterization. The system combines three new CPT tools with an up-hole analyzer. The Dynamic Thermal Desorption (DTD) probe provides the up-hole analyzer with continuously sampled soil gas, enhancing detection limits by heating the soil matrix during penetration to thermally desorb volatile organic contaminants. The CPT In Situ Purge Probe (CISP) purges a water sample in situ, transferring the purge gas up-hole for analysis. Alternatively, soil gas or purge gas from the DTD probe or the CISP can be diverted to a Downhole Trap Module (DTM), which traps contaminants on conventional trap media for later analysis in a fixed laboratory. While the effectiveness of the CISP was hampered by the tendency of fine grained materials to clog its sample inlet filter, the DTD probe and the DTM were demonstrated to perform their intended functions well.

  13. MBL-II-141, a chromone derivative, enhances irinotecan (CPT-11) anticancer efficiency in ABCG2-positive xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Honorat, Mylène; Guitton, Jérôme; Gauthier, Charlotte; Bouard, Charlotte; Lecerf-Schmidt, Florine; Peres, Basile; Terreux, Raphaël; Gervot, Héloïse; Rioufol, Catherine; Boumendjel, Ahcène; Puisieux, Alain; Di Pietro, Attilio; Payen, Léa

    2014-01-01

    ABCG2 is responsible for the multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype, and strongly modulates cancer outcomes. Its high expression at a number of physiological barriers, including blood-brain and intestinal barriers, impacts on drug pharmacokinetics parameters. We characterized MBL-II-141, a specific and potent ABCG2 inhibitor. Combination of 10 mg/kg MBL-II-141 with the anticancer agent CPT-11 completely blocked the growth of 90% freshly implanted ABCG2-positive tumors. Moreover, the same combination slowed the growth of already established tumors. As required for preclinical development, we defined the main pharmacokinetics parameters of MBL-II-141 and its influence on the kinetics of CPT-11 and its active metabolite SN-38 in mice. MBL-II-141 distribution into the brain occurred at a low, but detectable, level. Interestingly, preliminary data suggested that MBL-II-141 is well tolerated (at 50 mg/kg) and absorbed upon force-feeding. MBL-II-141 induced a potent sensitization of ABCG2-positive xenografts to CPT-11 through in vivo ABCG2 inhibition. MBL-II-141 strongly increased CPT-11 levels in the brain, and therefore would be a valuable agent to improve drug distribution into the brain to efficiently treat aggressive gliomas. Safety and other pharmacological data strongly support the reglementary preclinical development of MBL-II-141. PMID:25474134

  14. Humanized anti-hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) antibody suppresses innate irinotecan (CPT-11) resistance induced by fibroblast-derived HGF

    PubMed Central

    Kim, BoRa; Park, Byung Hee; Shin, Kum-Joo; Song, Seong-Won; Kim, Jung Ju; Kim, Hwan-Mook; Lee, Sang-Jin; Oh, Seung Hyun

    2015-01-01

    The growth factors derived from the microenvironment create an environment conducive to tumor growth and survival. HGF deprivation using neutralizing antibody enhanced chemosensitivity in colorectal cancer cells (CRC). We determined secreted HGF in fibroblast conditioned medium (CM). Combination treatment of anti-HGF antibody and irinotecan (CPT-11) directly enhanced CPT-11 sensitivity in CRC. We generated xenograft in NOD/SCID mice inoculating HCT-116 human colorectal cancer cells subcutaneously with or without fibroblast. We found that the combination of CPT-11 and anti-HGF antibody induced marked suppression of tumor development. These results suggest that HGF produced by fibroblast induce CPT-11 resistance, and that anti-HGF antibody abrogate such resistance in vivo. fibroblast-derived HGF is important determinant of chemoresistance. Anti-HGF monoclonal antibody treatment confirmed the importance of this growth factor for chemoresistance in CRC. These results present new options toward the early diagnosis of chemoresistance and suggest novel combinations of chemotherapy and anti-HGF agents to prevent or significantly delay the onset of therapy resistance. PMID:26090722

  15. Effects of antidepressants on DSP4/CPT-induced DNA damage response in neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Hilton, Benjamin A.; Cui, Kui; Zhu, Meng-Yang

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage is a form of cell stress and injury. Increased systemic DNA damage is related to the pathogenic development of neurodegenerative diseases. Depression occurs in a relatively high percentage of patients suffering from degenerative diseases, for whom antidepressants are often used to relieve depressive symptoms. However, few studies have attempted to elucidate why different groups of antidepressants have similar effects on relieving symptoms of depression. Previously, we demonstrated that neurotoxins N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP4)- and camptothecin (CPT)-induced the DNA damage response in SH-SY5Y cells, and DSP4 caused cell cycle arrest which was predominately in the S-phase. The present study shows that CPT treatment also resulted in similar cell cycle arrest. Some classic antidepressants could reduce the DNA damage response induced by DSP4 or CPT in SH-SY5Y cells. Cell viability examination demonstrated that both DSP4 and CPT caused cell death, which was prevented by spontaneous administration of some tested antidepressants. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that a majority of the tested antidepressants protect cells from being arrested in S-phase. These results suggest that blocking the DNA damage response may be an important pharmacologic characteristic of antidepressants. Exploring the underlying mechanisms may allow for advances in the effort to improve therapeutic strategies for depression appearing in degenerative and psychiatric diseases. PMID:26038195

  16. A phase I and pharmacokinetic study of MAG-CPT, a water-soluble polymer conjugate of camptothecin

    PubMed Central

    Schoemaker, N E; van Kesteren, C; Rosing, H; Jansen, S; Swart, M; Lieverst, J; Fraier, D; Breda, M; Pellizzoni, C; Spinelli, R; Porro, M Grazia; Beijnen, J H; Schellens, J H M; ten Bokkel Huinink, WW

    2002-01-01

    Polymeric drug conjugates are a new and experimental class of drug delivery systems with pharmacokinetic promises. The antineoplastic drug camptothecin was linked to a water-soluble polymeric backbone (MAG-CPT) and administrated as a 30 min infusion over 3 consecutive days every 4 weeks to patients with malignant solid tumours. The objectives of our study were to determine the maximal tolerated dose, the dose-limiting toxicities, and the plasma and urine pharmacokinetics of MAG-CPT, and to document anti-tumour activity. The starting dose was 17 mg m−2 day−1. Sixteen patients received 39 courses at seven dose levels. Maximal tolerated dose was at 68 mg m−2 day−1 and dose-limiting toxicities consisted of cumulative bladder toxicity. MAG-CPT and free camptothecin were accumulated during days 1–3 and considerable amounts of MAG-CPT could still be retrieved in plasma and urine after 4–5 weeks. The half-lives of bound and free camptothecin were equal indicating that the kinetics of free camptothecin were release rate dependent. In summary, the pharmacokinetics of camptothecin were dramatically changed, showing controlled prolonged exposure of camptothecin. Haematological toxicity was relatively mild, but serious bladder toxicity was encountered which is typical for camptothecin and was found dose limiting. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 21, 608–614. doi:10.1038/sj.bjc.6600516 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:12237769

  17. Humanized anti-hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) antibody suppresses innate irinotecan (CPT-11) resistance induced by fibroblast-derived HGF.

    PubMed

    Woo, Jong Kyu; Kang, Ju-Hee; Kim, BoRa; Park, Byung Hee; Shin, Kum-Joo; Song, Seong-Won; Kim, Jung Ju; Kim, Hwan-Mook; Lee, Sang-Jin; Oh, Seung Hyun

    2015-09-15

    The growth factors derived from the microenvironment create an environment conducive to tumor growth and survival. HGF deprivation using neutralizing antibody enhanced chemosensitivity in colorectal cancer cells (CRC). We determined secreted HGF in fibroblast conditioned medium (CM). Combination treatment of anti-HGF antibody and irinotecan (CPT-11) directly enhanced CPT-11 sensitivity in CRC. We generated xenograft in NOD/SCID mice inoculating HCT-116 human colorectal cancer cells subcutaneously with or without fibroblast. We found that the combination of CPT-11 and anti-HGF antibody induced marked suppression of tumor development. These results suggest that HGF produced by fibroblast induce CPT-11 resistance, and that anti-HGF antibody abrogate such resistance in vivo. fibroblast-derived HGF is important determinant of chemoresistance. Anti-HGF monoclonal antibody treatment confirmed the importance of this growth factor for chemoresistance in CRC. These results present new options toward the early diagnosis of chemoresistance and suggest novel combinations of chemotherapy and anti-HGF agents to prevent or significantly delay the onset of therapy resistance.

  18. [Protective effects of d-chlorpheniramine maleate pre-treatment against acute side effects of Irinotecan(CPT- 11)].

    PubMed

    Misumi, Nobuhiro; Hiraike, Mikako; Nawata, Fusako; Hashimoto, Mirai; Tanigawa, Kayoko; Takase, Izumi; Nabeshima, Aya; Honda, Shinobu

    2011-07-01

    It is wellknown that cholinomimetic side effects, such as sedation, abdominal pain, nasal flow and watery eyes, may develop in patients in the early stage of Irinotecan (CPT-11) administration; however, there have been no investigations concerning methods for preventing the development of these side effects. To assess the protective effects of pre-treatment with d-CM on cholinomimetic side effects in the early stage after Irinotecan (CPT-11) administration, we prescribed d- Chlorpheniramine maleate (d-CM) to a group of patients prior to Irinotecan (CPT-11) administration. Twenty members from the group of non-d-CM-treated patients (n=39) and 4 members from the group of treated patients (n=20) complained of side effects. The pre-administration of d-CM significantly reduced the number of patients with side effects (p<0.05). The relative risk (RR) for the frequency of side effects was 0.39 (95% CI; 0.15-0.98), demonstrating that the frequency of side effects was significantly reduced. Based on theses findings, we concluded that the pre-administration of d-CM had protective effects against side effects that might develop in the early stage after Irinotecan (CPT-11) administration.

  19. Alternative mechanism of cholera toxin acquisition by Vibrio cholerae: generalized transduction of CTXPhi by bacteriophage CP-T1.

    PubMed

    Boyd, E F; Waldor, M K

    1999-11-01

    Horizontal transfer of genes encoding virulence factors has played a central role in the evolution of many pathogenic bacteria. The unexpected discovery that the genes encoding cholera toxin (ctxAB), the main cause of the profuse secretory diarrhea characteristic of cholera, are encoded on a novel filamentous phage named CTXPhi, has resulted in a renewed interest in the potential mechanisms of transfer of virulence genes among Vibrio cholerae. We describe here an alternative mechanism of cholera toxin gene transfer into nontoxigenic V. cholerae isolates, including strains that lack both the CTXPhi receptor, the toxin coregulated pilus (TCP), and attRS, the chromosomal attachment site for CTXPhi integration. A temperature-sensitive mutant of the V. cholerae generalized transducing bacteriophage CP-T1 (CP-T1ts) was used to transfer a genetically marked derivative of the CTX prophage into four nontoxigenic V. cholerae strains, including two V. cholerae vaccine strains. We demonstrate that CTXPhi transduced by CP-T1ts can replicate and integrate into these nontoxigenic V. cholerae strains with high efficiency. In fact, CP-T1ts transduces the CTX prophage preferentially when compared with other chromosomal markers. These results reveal a potential mechanism by which CTXPhi(+) V. cholerae strains that lack the TCP receptor may have arisen. Finally, these findings indicate an additional pathway for reversion of live-attenuated V. cholerae vaccine strains.

  20. CP violation at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Boudreau, J.

    2001-04-16

    A major goal of experimental particle physics over the next decade is to measure the sides and angles of the Unitarity triangle redundantly, and as precisely as possible. Overconstraining the triangle will test the Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa model of quark mixing. The CDF collaboration, due to begin a second run in March 2001 with major upgrades to both the accelerator and the detector, will study the angle {beta} using B{sup 0} decays, the angle {gamma} using B{sup 0} and B{sub s}{sup 0} decays, and a side of the triangle through the observation of B{sub s}{sup 0}--{bar B}{sub s}{sup 0} mixing. Projected sensitivities are driven mostly by previous measurements using data from the first run. One highlight of the Run I B physics program is a measurement of the CP violating parameter sin 2{beta} = 0.79{sub {minus}0.44}{sup +0.41}, based on a tagged sample of 400 B{sup 0} decays in the mode B{sub 0}/{bar B}{sup 0} {r_arrow} J/{psi}K{sub s}{sup 0}. The technology of flavor tagging, used here as well as in numerous B{sup 0}-{bar B}{sup 0} mixing analyses in run I, is crucial and will be augmented in Run II with better particle identification capabilities. Exclusive all-hadronic final states will enter the data sample in Run II through a new displaced track trigger.

  1. Landau-Khalatnikov-Fradkin transformations in reduced quantum electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, A.; Cobos-Martínez, J. J.; Concha-Sánchez, Y.; Raya, A.

    2016-05-01

    We derive the Landau-Khalatnikov-Frandkin transformation (LKFT) for the fermion propagator in quantum electrodynamics (QED) described within a brane-world inspired framework where photons are allowed to move in dγ space-time (bulk) dimensions, while electrons remain confined to a de -dimensional brane, with deelectrodynamics, RQEDdγ,de . Specializing to the case of graphene, namely, RQED4 ,3 with massless fermions, we derive the nonperturbative form of the fermion propagator starting from its bare counterpart and then compare its weak coupling expansion to known one- and two-loop perturbative results. The agreement of the gauge-dependent terms at order α and α2 is reminiscent of the structure of LKFT in ordinary QED in arbitrary space-time dimensions and provides strong constraints for the multiplicative renormalizability of RQEDdγ,de .

  2. Electrodynamic context of magnetopause dynamics observed by magnetospheric multiscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Brian J.; Russell, Christopher T.; Strangeway, Robert J.; Plaschke, Ferdinand; Magnes, Werner; Fischer, David; Korth, Haje; Merkin, Viacheslav G.; Barnes, Robin J.; Waters, Colin L.; Cohen, Ian J.; Westlake, Joseph H.; Mauk, Barry H.; Leinweber, Hannes K.; Gershman, Daniel J.; Giles, Barbara L.; Le, Guan; Torbert, Roy B.; Burch, James L.

    2016-06-01

    Magnetopause observations by Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) and Birkeland currents observed by the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment are used to relate magnetopause encounters to ionospheric electrodynamics. MMS magnetopause crossings on 15 August and 19 September 2015 occurred earthward of expectations due to solar wind ram pressure alone and coincided with equatorward expansion of the Birkeland currents. Magnetopause erosion, consistent with expansion of the polar cap, contributed to the magnetopause crossings. The ionospheric projections of MMS during the events and at times of the magnetopause crossings indicate that MMS observations are related to the main path of flux transport in one case but not in a second. The analysis provides a way to routinely relate in situ observations to the context of in situ convection and flux transport.

  3. Atomic electron energies including relativistic effects and quantum electrodynamic corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aoyagi, M.; Chen, M. H.; Crasemann, B.; Huang, K. N.; Mark, H.

    1977-01-01

    Atomic electron energies have been calculated relativistically. Hartree-Fock-Slater wave functions served as zeroth-order eigenfunctions to compute the expectation of the total Hamiltonian. A first order correction to the local approximation was thus included. Quantum-electrodynamic corrections were made. For all orbitals in all atoms with 2 less than or equal to Z less than or equal to 106, the following quantities are listed: total energies, electron kinetic energies, electron-nucleus potential energies, electron-electron potential energies consisting of electrostatic and Breit interaction (magnetic and retardation) terms, and vacuum polarization energies. These results will serve for detailed comparison of calculations based on other approaches. The magnitude of quantum electrodynamic corrections is exhibited quantitatively for each state.

  4. Conceptual problems in classical electrodynamics: No more toils and trouble?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, Mathias

    2013-11-01

    In previous work I have argued that classical electrodynamics is beset by deep conceptual problems, which result from the problem of self-interactions. Symptomatic of these problems, I argued, is that the main approach to modeling the interactions between charges and fields is inconsistent with the principle of energy-momentum conservation. Zuchowski (2013) reports a formal result that shows that the so-called 'Abraham model' of a charged particle satisfies energy-momentum conservation and argues that this result amounts to a refutation of my inconsistency claim. In this paper I defend my claims against her criticism and argue that she has succeeded neither in refuting my inconsistency argument nor in showing that the conceptual problems of classical electrodynamics have been solved.

  5. Continuum electrodynamics and the Abraham-Minkowski momentum controversy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crenshaw, Michael E.

    2015-08-01

    Continuum electrodynamics is an axiomatic formal theory based on the macroscopic Maxwell equations and the constitutive relations. We apply the formal theory to a thermodynamically closed system consisting of an antireection coated block of dielectric situated in free-space and illuminated by a quasimonochromatic field. We show that valid theorems of the formal theory are proven false by relativity and by conservation laws. Then the axioms of the formal theory are proven false at a fundamental level of mathematical logic. We derive a new formal theory of continuum electrodynamics for macroscopic electric and magnetic fields in a four-dimensional at non-Minkowski material spacetime in which the speed of light is c/n.

  6. Structures of general relativity in dilaton-Maxwell electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kechkin, O. V.; Mosharev, P. A.

    2016-08-01

    It is shown that electro (magneto) static sector of Maxwell’s electrodynamics coupled to the dilaton field in a string theory form possesses the symmetry group of the stationary General Relativity in vacuum. Performing the Ernst formalism, we develope a technique for generation of exact solutions in this modified electrodynamics on the base of the normalized Ehlers symmetry transformation. In the electrostatic case, we construct and study a general class of spherically symmetric solutions that describes a pointlike source of the Coulomb type. It is demonstrated that this source is characterized by finite and singularity-free interaction at short distances. Also it is established that the total electrostatic energy of this source is finite and inversely proportional to the dilaton-Maxwell coupling constant.

  7. Dendrimer light-harvesting: intramolecular electrodynamics and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Andrews, David L; Bradshaw, David S; Jenkins, Robert D; Rodríguez, Justo

    2009-12-01

    In the development of highly efficient materials for harvesting solar energy, there is an increasing focus on purpose-built dendrimers and allied multi-chromophore systems. A proliferation of antenna chromophores is not the only factor determining the sought light-harvesting efficiency; the internal geometry and photophysics of these molecules are also crucially important. In particular, the mechanisms by means of which radiant energy is ultimately trapped depends on an intricate interplay of electronic, structural, energetic and symmetry properties. To better understand these processes a sound theoretical representation of the intramolecular electrodynamics is required. A suitable formalism, based on quantum electrodynamics, readily delivers physical insights into the necessary excitation channelling processes, and it affords a rigorous basis for modelling the intramolecular flow of energy.

  8. Evidence for nonlocal electrodynamics in planar Josephson junctions.

    PubMed

    Boris, A A; Rydh, A; Golod, T; Motzkau, H; Klushin, A M; Krasnov, V M

    2013-09-13

    We study the temperature dependence of the critical current modulation I(c)(H) for two types of planar Josephson junctions: a low-Tc Nb/CuNi/Nb and a high-Tc YBa2Cu3O(7-δ) bicrystal grain-boundary junction. At low T both junctions exhibit a conventional behavior, described by the local sine-Gordon equation. However, at elevated T the behavior becomes qualitatively different: the I(c)(H) modulation field ΔH becomes almost T independent and neither ΔH nor the critical field for the penetration of Josephson vortices vanish at Tc. Such an unusual behavior is in good agreement with theoretical predictions for junctions with nonlocal electrodynamics. We extract absolute values of the London penetration depth λ from our data and show that a crossover from local to nonlocal electrodynamics occurs with increasing T when λ(T) becomes larger than the electrode thickness.

  9. Electrodynamic Tether Propulsion and Power Generation at Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, D. L.; Johnson, L.; Moore, J.; Bagenal, F.

    1998-01-01

    The results of a study performed to evaluate the feasibility and merits of using an electrodynamic tether for propulsion and power generation for a spacecraft in the Jovian system are presented. The environment of the Jovian system has properties which are particularly favorable for utilization of an electrodynamic tether. Specifically, the planet has a strong magnetic field and the mass of the planet dictates high orbital velocities which, when combined with the planet's rapid rotation rate, can produce very large relative velocities between the magnetic field and the spacecraft. In a circular orbit close to the planet, tether propulsive forces are found to be as high as 50 N and power levels as high as 1 MW.

  10. Fractal electrodynamics via non-integer dimensional space approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2015-09-01

    Using the recently suggested vector calculus for non-integer dimensional space, we consider electrodynamics problems in isotropic case. This calculus allows us to describe fractal media in the framework of continuum models with non-integer dimensional space. We consider electric and magnetic fields of fractal media with charges and currents in the framework of continuum models with non-integer dimensional spaces. An application of the fractal Gauss's law, the fractal Ampere's circuital law, the fractal Poisson equation for electric potential, and equation for fractal stream of charges are suggested. Lorentz invariance and speed of light in fractal electrodynamics are discussed. An expression for effective refractive index of non-integer dimensional space is suggested.

  11. Towards hybrid circuit quantum electrodynamics with quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viennot, Jérémie J.; Delbecq, Matthieu R.; Bruhat, Laure E.; Dartiailh, Matthieu C.; Desjardins, Matthieu M.; Baillergeau, Matthieu; Cottet, Audrey; Kontos, Takis

    2016-08-01

    Cavity quantum electrodynamics allows one to study the interaction between light and matter at the most elementary level. The methods developed in this field have taught us how to probe and manipulate individual quantum systems like atoms and superconducting quantum bits with an exquisite accuracy. There is now a strong effort to extend further these methods to other quantum systems, and in particular hybrid quantum dot circuits. This could turn out to be instrumental for a noninvasive study of quantum dot circuits and a realization of scalable spin quantum bit architectures. It could also provide an interesting platform for quantum simulation of simple fermion-boson condensed matter systems. In this short review, we discuss the experimental state of the art for hybrid circuit quantum electrodynamics with quantum dots, and we present a simple theoretical modeling of experiments.

  12. Electrodynamic Tether as a Thruster for LEO Mission Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V; Krivorutsky, E. N.; Johnson, L.

    2006-01-01

    Electrodynamic tether propulsion has a number of attractive features and has been widely discussed for different low earth orbit applications. Despite the commonality of application, the choice of the proper design for any particular mission is a unique problem. The flight trajectory, duration, available power and voltage, and drag force should be taken into consideration with other mission requirements. Characteristics of tether performance such as system acceleration and electrical efficiency should be calculated and assessed based on the system's capability to collect electrical current. We discuss the choice of parameters for circular, tape, and grid-sphere tether anodes and their applicability to International Space Station (ISS) reboost and Momentum Exchange Electrodynamic Reboost (MXER) applications.

  13. On the proper formulation of Maxwellian electrodynamics for continuum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weile, Daniel S.; Hopkins, David A.; Gazonas, George A.; Powers, Brian M.

    2014-05-01

    Despite the importance of electromagnetomechanical physics to processes ranging from piezoelectricity to the dynamics of electron beams, confusion abounds in the continuum mechanics literature as to how Maxwell's equations of electrodynamics should be formulated in the material frame of continuum mechanics. Current formulations in the literature conflict as to the manner in which the authors define fields, derive constitutive relations, and interpret contradictory formulations. The difficulties persist even when the phenomena described are electrostatic. This paper will demonstrate that the perplexity arises from two sources: a misunderstanding of the limitations of material frame descriptions, and the failure to appreciate the centrality of relativity theory to the formulation of electrodynamic equations in the vicinity of mechanical motion. Two new formulations of Maxwell's equations are provided that avoid the paradoxes of earlier formulations and thus describe the physics clearly and without self-contradiction.

  14. Evidence for Nonlocal Electrodynamics in Planar Josephson Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boris, A. A.; Rydh, A.; Golod, T.; Motzkau, H.; Klushin, A. M.; Krasnov, V. M.

    2013-09-01

    We study the temperature dependence of the critical current modulation Ic(H) for two types of planar Josephson junctions: a low-Tc Nb/CuNi/Nb and a high-Tc YBa2Cu3O7-δ bicrystal grain-boundary junction. At low T both junctions exhibit a conventional behavior, described by the local sine-Gordon equation. However, at elevated T the behavior becomes qualitatively different: the Ic(H) modulation field ΔH becomes almost T independent and neither ΔH nor the critical field for the penetration of Josephson vortices vanish at Tc. Such an unusual behavior is in good agreement with theoretical predictions for junctions with nonlocal electrodynamics. We extract absolute values of the London penetration depth λ from our data and show that a crossover from local to nonlocal electrodynamics occurs with increasing T when λ(T) becomes larger than the electrode thickness.

  15. CP VIOLATION HIGHLIGHTS: CIRCA 2005

    SciTech Connect

    SONI A.

    2005-02-27

    Recent highlights in CP violation phenomena, are reviewed. B-factory results imply that, CP-violation phase in the CKM matrix is the dominant contributor to the observed CP violation in K and B-physics. Deviations from the predictions of the CKM-paradigm due to beyond the Standard Model CP-odd phase are likely to be a small perturbation. Therefore, large data sample of clean B's will be needed. Precise determination of the unitarity triangle, along with time dependent CP in penguin dominated hadronic and radiative modes are discussed. Null tests in B, K and top-physics and separate determination of the K-unitarity triangle are also emphasized.

  16. Chirality and gravitational parity violation.

    PubMed

    Bargueño, Pedro

    2015-06-01

    In this review, parity-violating gravitational potentials are presented as possible sources of both true and false chirality. In particular, whereas phenomenological long-range spin-dependent gravitational potentials contain both truly and falsely chiral terms, it is shown that there are models that extend general relativity including also coupling of fermionic degrees of freedom to gravity in the presence of torsion, which give place to short-range truly chiral interactions similar to that usually considered in molecular physics. Physical mechanisms which give place to gravitational parity violation together with the expected size of the effects and their experimental constraints are discussed. Finally, the possible role of parity-violating gravity in the origin of homochirality and a road map for future research works in quantum chemistry is presented. PMID:25919812

  17. Chirality and gravitational parity violation.

    PubMed

    Bargueño, Pedro

    2015-06-01

    In this review, parity-violating gravitational potentials are presented as possible sources of both true and false chirality. In particular, whereas phenomenological long-range spin-dependent gravitational potentials contain both truly and falsely chiral terms, it is shown that there are models that extend general relativity including also coupling of fermionic degrees of freedom to gravity in the presence of torsion, which give place to short-range truly chiral interactions similar to that usually considered in molecular physics. Physical mechanisms which give place to gravitational parity violation together with the expected size of the effects and their experimental constraints are discussed. Finally, the possible role of parity-violating gravity in the origin of homochirality and a road map for future research works in quantum chemistry is presented.

  18. Quantum electrodynamics in finite volume and nonrelativistic effective field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fodor, Z.; Hoelbling, C.; Katz, S. D.; Lellouch, L.; Portelli, A.; Szabo, K. K.; Toth, B. C.

    2016-04-01

    Electromagnetic effects are increasingly being accounted for in lattice quantum chromodynamics computations. Because of their long-range nature, they lead to large finite-size effects over which it is important to gain analytical control. Nonrelativistic effective field theories provide an efficient tool to describe these effects. Here we argue that some care has to be taken when applying these methods to quantum electrodynamics in a finite volume.

  19. On the electrodynamics of Josephson effect in anisotropic superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Mints, R.G.

    1989-01-01

    Specificities of Josephson effect electrodynamics in anisotropic superconductors are of considerable interest for the study of high temperature superconductors with strongly anisotropic layered structure. In this paper the authors give the calculation for the tunnel Josephson contact of an isolated vortex, the law of dispersion of its low-amplitude oscillations, the critical field H/sub cl/ for the penetration of magnetic flux, and the maximum current across a rectangular contact.

  20. Fixed point structure of quenched, planar quantum electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Love, S.T.

    1986-07-01

    Gauge theories exhibiting a hierarchy of fermion mass scales may contain a pseudo-Nambu-Boldstone boson of spontaneously broken scale invariance. The relation between scale and chiral symmetry breaking is studied analytically in quenched, planar quantum electrodynamics in four dimensions. The model possesses a novel nonperturbative ultraviolet fixed point governing its strong coupling phase which requires the mixing of four fermion operators. 12 refs.

  1. Teleportation of atomic states via cavity quantum electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, E. S.

    2004-12-01

    In this paper, we discuss a scheme of teleportation of atomic states. The experimental realization proposed makes use of cavity quatum electrodynamics involving the interaction of Rydberg atoms with a micromaser cavity prepared in a coherent state. We start presenting a scheme to prepare atomic Bell states via the interaction of atoms with a cavity. In our scheme the cavity and some atoms play the role of auxiliary systems used to achieve the teleportation.

  2. Non-US electrodynamic launchers research and development

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, J.V.; Batteh, J.H.; Greig, J.R.; Keefer, D.; McNab, I.R.; Zabar, Z.

    1994-11-01

    Electrodynamic launcher research and development work of scientists outside the United States is analyzed and assessed by six internationally recognized US experts in the field of electromagnetic and electrothermal launchers. The assessment covers five broad technology areas: (1) Experimental railguns; (2) Railgun theory and design; (3) Induction launchers; (4) Electrothermal guns; (5) Energy storage and power supplies. The overall conclusion is that non-US work on electrodynamic launchers is maturing rapidly after a relatively late start in many countries. No foreign program challenges the US efforts in scope, but it is evident that the United States may be surpassed in some technologies within the next few years. Until recently, published Russian work focused on hypervelocity for research purposes. Within the last two years, large facilities have been described where military-oriented development has been underway since the mid-1980s. Financial support for these large facilities appears to have collapsed, leaving no effective effort to develop practical launchers for military or civilian applications. Electrodynamic launcher research in Europe is making rapid progress by focusing on a single application, tactical launchers for the military. Four major laboratories, in Britain, France, Germany, and the Netherlands, are working on this problem. Though narrower in scope than the US effort, the European work enjoys a continuity of support that has accelerated its progress. The next decade will see the deployment of electrodynamic launcher technology, probably in the form of an electrothermal-chemical upgrade for an existing gun system. The time scale for deployment of electromagnetic launchers is entirely dependent on the level of research-and-development effort. If resources remain limited, the advantage will lie with cooperative efforts that have reasonably stable funding such as the present French-German program.

  3. Clothed Particles in Quantum Electrodynamics and Quantum Chromodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shebeko, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    The notion of clothing in quantum field theory (QFT), put forward by Greenberg and Schweber and developed by M. Shirokov, is applied in quantum electrodynamics (QED) and quantum chromodynamics (QCD). Along the guideline we have derived a novel analytic expression for the QED Hamiltonian in the clothed particle representation (CPR). In addition, we are trying to realize this notion in QCD (to be definite for the gauge group SU(3)) when drawing parallels between QCD and QED.

  4. On the formulation of electrodynamics from a single principle

    SciTech Connect

    Barut, A.O. International Center for Physics and Mathematics, Edirne )

    1994-04-01

    The single postulate of Coulomb-Clausius potential between charges allows one to derive all of Maxwell's equations with an explicit form for polarizability. This primary purpose of this paper is to teach electrodynamics. The paper addresses the dual versus unitary description of the basic entities of physics: is there separate existence of, or are there separate degrees of freedom for field and particles, or either fields or particles alone. 12 refs.

  5. Coulomb field scattering in Born-Infeld electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Tennant, Daniel

    2011-02-15

    In the context of Born-Infeld electrodynamics, the electromagnetic fields interact with each other via their nonlinear couplings. A calculation will be performed where an incoming electromagnetic plane wave scatters off a Coulomb field in the geometrical optics approximation. In addition to finding the first-order angle of deflection, exact solutions for the trajectory will also be found. The possibility of electromagnetic bound states will be discussed.

  6. Chiral fermions in noncommutative electrodynamics: Renormalizability and dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Buric, Maja; Latas, Dusko; Radovanovic, Voja; Trampetic, Josip

    2011-02-15

    We analyze quantization of noncommutative chiral electrodynamics in the enveloping algebra formalism in linear order in noncommutativity parameter {theta}. Calculations show that divergences exist and cannot be removed by ordinary renormalization; however, they can be removed by the Seiberg-Witten redefinition of fields. Performing redefinitions explicitly, we obtain renormalizable Lagrangian and discuss the influence of noncommutativity on field propagation. Noncommutativity affects the propagation of chiral fermions only: half of the fermionic modes become massive and birefringent.

  7. Riemannian light cone from vanishing birefringence in premetric vacuum electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Laemmerzahl, Claus; Hehl, Friedrich W.

    2004-11-15

    We consider premetric electrodynamics with a local and linear constitutive law for the vacuum. Within this framework, we find quartic Fresnel wave surfaces for the propagation of light. If we require (i) the Fresnel equation to have only real solutions and (ii) the vanishing of birefringence in vacuum, then a Riemannian light cone is implied. No proper Finslerian structure can occur. This is generalized to dynamical equations of any order.

  8. Nonlinear electrodynamics in 3D gravity with torsion

    SciTech Connect

    Blagojevic, M.; Cvetkovic, B.; Miskovic, O.

    2009-07-15

    We study exact solutions of nonlinear electrodynamics coupled to three-dimensional gravity with torsion. We show that in any static and spherically symmetric configuration, at least one component of the electromagnetic field has to vanish. In the electric sector of the theory, we construct an exact solution, characterized by the azimuthal electric field. When the electromagnetic action is modified by a topological mass term, we find two types of the self-dual solutions.

  9. Electrodynamic Tethers for Reboost of the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Herrmann, Melody; Vas, Irwin; Estes, Bob

    1999-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) will require periodic reboost due to atmospheric aerodynamic drag. This is nominally achieved through the use of thruster firings by the attached Progress M spacecraft. Many Progress flights to the ISS are required annually. Electrodynamic tethers provide an attractive alternative in that they can provide periodic reboost or continuous drag cancellation using no consumables, propellant nor conventional propulsion elements. The system could also serve as an emergency backup reboost system used only in the event resupply and reboost are delayed for some reason. The system also has direct application to spacecraft and upper stage propulsion. Electrodynamic tethers have been demonstrated in space previously with the Plasma Motor Generator (PMG) experiment and the Tethered Satellite System (TSS-IR). The advanced electrodynamic tether proposed for ISS reboost has significant advantages over previous systems in that hi-her thrust is achievable with significantly shorter tethers and without the need for an active current collection device, hence making the system simpler and much less expensive.

  10. Large Scale High-Latitude Ionospheric Electrodynamic Fields and Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Gang

    2016-07-01

    This paper provides an overview as well as the application of the Assimilative Mapping of Ionospheric Electrodynamics (AMIE) procedure. AMIE synthesizes observations from various ground-based and space-born instruments to derive global patterns of ionospheric conductance, electric fields, ionospheric equivalent current, horizontal currents, field-aligned currents, and other related electrodynamic fields simultaneously. Examples are presented to illustrate the effects of the different data inputs on the AMIE outputs. The AMIE patterns derived from ground magnetometer data are generally similar to those derived from satellite magnetometer data. But ground magnetometer data yield a cross-polar potential drop that is about 15-45 % smaller than that derived from satellite magnetometer data. Ground magnetometers also grossly underestimate the magnetic perturbations in space when compared with the in situ satellite magnetometer data. However, when satellite magnetometer data are employed, AMIE is able to replicate the observed magnetic perturbations along the satellite tracks with a mean root-mean-square (RMS) error of 17-21 %. In addition to derive snapshots of ionospheric electrodynamic fields, the utility of AMIE can be easily expanded to obtain the average distributions of these fields along with their associated variability. Such information should be valuable to the analysis and interpretation of the Swarm observations.

  11. Electrodynamic Approach for Visualization of Sound Propagation in Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Völz, U.; Mrasek, H.; Matthies, K.; Wü; stenberg, H.; Kreutzbruck, M.

    2009-03-01

    The visualization of sound propagation in solids is vital for transducer adaptation and better understanding of complex test samples and their wave propagation modeling. In this work we present an electrodynamic technique detecting the grazing sound beam with a 10 mm-sized electrodynamic probe. The particle displacement along the sample's surface was then measured as a function of time and position. Adapting the electrodynamic probe and its coil alignment allows for measuring the displacement components in all three dimensions. Thus horizontal and vertical particle displacement with respect to the surface can be detected. A SNR of up to 40 dB could be achieved within ferromagnetic and high conductive chrome steel when using a shear wave generated by an angle beam probe. When dealing with nonconductive materials such as PMMA we obtained a reduced SNR of 12 dB. We report on measurements of the sound field in complex weld joints. One example shows a narrow gap weld joining a nickel alloy with a chrome steel. The weld of the 80 mm-thick test block shows a distinct anisotropic texture. The system enables us to visualize the wave propagation within the weld and indicates the reflection and scattering scenario and the energy losses due to both the anisotropic structure and material defects.

  12. Emergent electrodynamics of skyrmions in a chiral magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, T.; Ritz, R.; Bauer, A.; Halder, M.; Wagner, M.; Franz, C.; Pfleiderer, C.; Everschor, K.; Garst, M.; Rosch, A.

    2012-04-01

    When an electron moves in a smoothly varying non-collinear magnetic structure, its spin orientation adapts constantly, thereby inducing forces that act both on the magnetic structure and on the electron. These forces may be described by electric and magnetic fields of an emergent electrodynamics. The topologically quantized winding number of so-called skyrmions--a type of magnetic whirl discovered recently in chiral magnets--has been predicted to induce exactly one quantum of emergent magnetic flux per skyrmion. A moving skyrmion is therefore expected to induce an emergent electric field following Faraday's law of induction, which inherits this topological quantization. Here we report Hall-effect measurements that establish quantitatively the predicted emergent electrodynamics. We obtain quantitative evidence for the depinning of skyrmions from impurities (at current densities of only 106Am-2) and their subsequent motion. The combination of exceptionally small current densities and simple transport measurements offers fundamental insights into the connection between the emergent and real electrodynamics of skyrmions in chiral magnets, and might, in the long term, be important for applications.

  13. Global ionospheric dynamics and electrodynamics during geomagnetic storms (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannucci, A. J.; Tsurutani, B.; Verkhoglyadova, O. P.; Komjathy, A.; Butala, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    Globally distributed total electron content (TEC) data has become an important tool for exploring the consequences of storm-time electrodynamics. Magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling during the main phase is responsible for the largest ionospheric effects observed during geomagnetic storms, mediated by global scale electrodynamics. Recent research using case studies reveals a complex picture of M-I coupling and its relationship to interplanetary drivers such as the solar wind electric field. Periods of direct coupling exist where the solar wind electric field is strongly correlated with prompt penetration electric fields, observed as enhanced vertical plasma drifts or an enhanced electrojet in the daytime equatorial ionosphere. Periods of decoupling between low latitude electric fields and the solar wind electric field are also observed, but the factors distinguishing these two types of response have not been clearly identified. Recent studies during superstorms suggest a role for the transverse (y-component) of the interplanetary magnetic field, which affects magnetospheric current systems and therefore may affect M-I coupling, with significant ionospheric consequences. Observations of the global ionospheric response to a range of geomagnetic storm intensities are presented. Scientific understanding of the different factors that affect electrodynamic aspects of M-I coupling are discussed.

  14. Symmetry and asymmetry in electrodynamics from Rowland to Einstein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hon, Giora; Goldstein, Bernard R.

    Halfway through the paper in which he laid down the foundations for the theory of special relativity, Einstein concludes that "the asymmetry mentioned in the Introduction … disappears." Making asymmetry disappear has proved to be one of Einstein's many significant moves in his annus mirabilis of 1905. This elimination of asymmetry has led many commentators to claim that Einstein was motivated by either an aesthetic or an epistemic argument which gives priority to symmetry over asymmetry. Following closely the development of electrodynamics in the period from 1880 to 1905 and the usage of the related terms reciprocity and symmetry, we suggest a different way of understanding Einstein's motivation and the path he took. In contrast to the received view, we argue that Einstein responded to a debate in the literature on electrodynamics and that he was concerned neither with an aesthetic nor with an epistemic argument; rather, his reasoning was physical in the best sense, and most original. We will show that by providing a new perspective on the relation between electricity and magnetism, Einstein succeeded in bringing the discussion of symmetry in electrodynamics to an end.

  15. 48 CFR 903.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 903.104-7 Violations or possible... requirements of 48 CFR 3.104-7(a) (1) and (2), relative to contracting officer conclusions on the impact of a... individual designated to perform the responsibilities in 48 CFR 3.104-7(a) (1) and (2) regarding questions...

  16. 48 CFR 903.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 903.104-7 Violations or possible... requirements of 48 CFR 3.104-7(a) (1) and (2), relative to contracting officer conclusions on the impact of a... individual designated to perform the responsibilities in 48 CFR 3.104-7(a) (1) and (2) regarding questions...

  17. Prevention of irinotecan (CPT-11)-induced diarrhea by oral alkalization combined with control of defecation in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Y; Kobayashi, K; Akiyama, Y; Soma, T; Handa, S; Kudoh, S; Kudo, K

    2001-04-15

    It has been reported that 7-ethyl-10-[4-(1-piperidino)-1-piperidino]carbonyloxy-camptothecin (CPT-11) and its active metabolite, 7-ethyl-10-hydroxy-camptothecin (SN-38), have absorption characteristics of weakly basic drugs, suggesting that alkalization of the intestinal lumen might reduce reabsorption and its attendant side effects. Furthermore, stasis of stools containing these compounds is thought to induce damage to the intestinal mucosa. The prevention of CPT-11-induced side effects by oral alkalization (OA) combined with control of defecation (CD) was estimated in a case-control study of lung cancer patients. Coinciding with day 1 of CPT-11 infusion and for 4 days thereafter, OA and CD were practiced utilizing orally administered sodium bicarbonate, magnesium oxide, basic water and ursodeoxycholic acid. OA involved the daily use of all four therapeutics, and CD required doses of up to 4.0 g/day of magnesium oxide and 2 L/day of excess basic water. From three ongoing prospective phase I/II studies, we selected 37 consecutive patients who were treated with CPT-11 in combination with cisplatin in the presence of OA and CD (group B). Thirty-two control subjects who were matched to the background characteristics of the case patients were treated with the same regimen in the absence of OA and CD (group A). Toxicities induced by the CPT-11/cisplatin combination were evaluated and analyzed in group A and group B in a case-control format. The use of OA and CD resulted in significantly higher stool pH (p < 0.0001), while reducing the incidence of delayed diarrhea (> or = grade 2: group A 32.3% versus group B 9.4%; p = 0.005), nausea (p = 0.0001), vomiting (p = 0.001) and myelotoxicity, especially granulocytopenia (p = 0.03) and lymphocytopenia (p = 0.034). In addition, dose intensification was well tolerated in patients receiving OA and CD, allowing dose escalation from 35.6 +/- 6.0 to 39.9 +/- 5.6 mg/m(2)/week (p < 0.001). Tumor response rates for non-small cell lung

  18. Simulating pile load-settlement behavior from CPT data using intelligent computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkroosh, I.; Nikraz, H.

    2011-09-01

    Analysis of pile load-settlement behavior is a complex problem due to the participation of many factors involved. This paper presents a new procedure based on artificial neural networks (ANNs) for simulating the load-settlement behavior of pile foundations embedded in sand and mixed soils (subjected to axial loads). Three ANN models have been developed, a model for bored piles and two other models for driven piles (a model for each of concrete and steel piles). The data used for development of the ANN models is collected from the literature and comprise a series of in-situ piles load tests as well as cone penetration test (CPT) results. The data of each model is divided into two subsets: Training set for model calibration and independent validation set for model verification. Predictions from the ANN models are compared with the results of experimental data and with predictions of number of currently adopted load-transfer methods. Statistical analysis is used to verify the performance of the models. The results indicate that the ANN model performs very well and able to predict the pile load-settlement behaviour accurately.

  19. CPT Profiling and Laboratory Data Correlations for Deriving of Selected Geotechnical Parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulko, Roman; Drusa, Marián; Vlček, Jozef; Mečár, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Currently, can be seen a new trend in engineering geological survey, where laboratory analysis are replaced by in situ testing methods, which are more efficient and cost effective, and time saving too. A regular engineering geological survey cannot be provided by simple core drillings, macroscopic description (sometimes very subjective), and then geotechnical parameters are established based on indicative standardized values or archive values from previous geotechnical standards. The engineering geological survey is trustworthy if is composed of laboratory and in-situ testing supplemented by indirect methods of testing, [1]. The prevalence of rotary core drilling for obtaining laboratory soil samples from various depths (every 1 to 3 m), cannot be a more enhanced as continues evaluation of strata and properties e.g. by CPT Piezocone (every 1 cm). Core drillings survey generally uses small amounts of soil samples, but this is resulting to a lower representation of the subsoil and underestimation of parameters. Higher amounts of soil samples make laboratory testing time-consuming and results from this testing can be influenced by the storage and processing of the soil samples. Preference for geotechnical surveys with in situ testing is therefore a more suitable option. In situ testing using static and dynamic penetration tests can be used as a supplement or as a replacement for the (traditional) methods of surveying.

  20. Studies of neutron-rich nuclei using the CPT mass spectrometer at CARIBU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, A.; Bertone, P. F.; Buchinger, F.; Caldwell, S.; Clark, J. A.; Crawford, J. E.; Deibel, C. M.; Gulick, S.; Lascar, D.; Levand, A. F.; Li, G.; Savard, G.; Segel, R. E.; Sharma, K. S.; Sternberg, M. G.; Sun, T.; Van Schelt, J.

    2011-09-01

    The nucleosynthetic path of the astrophysical r-process and the resulting elemental abundances depend on neutron-separation energies which can be determined from the masses of the nuclei along the r-process reaction path. Due to the current lack of experimental data, mass models are often used. The mass values provided by the mass models are often too imprecise or disagree with each other. Therefore, direct high-precision mass measurements of neutron-rich nuclei are necessary to provide input parameters to the calculations and help refine the mass models. The Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) facility of Argonne National Laboratory will provide experiments with beams of short-lived neutron-rich nuclei. The Canadian Penning Trap (CPT) mass spectrometer has been relocated to the CARIBU low-energy beam line to extend measurements of the neutron-rich nuclei into the mostly unexplored region along the r-process path. This will allow precise mass measurements (~ 10 keV/c2) of more than a hundred very neutron-rich isotopes that have not previously been measured.

  1. Atomic CP-violating polarizability

    SciTech Connect

    Ravaine, Boris; Derevianko, Andrei; Kozlov, M.G.

    2005-07-15

    Searches for CP-violating effects in atoms and molecules provide important constrains on competing extensions to the standard model of elementary particles. In particular, CP violation in an atom leads to the CP-odd (T,P-odd) polarizability {beta}{sup CP}: a magnetic moment {mu}{sup CP} is induced by an electric field E{sub 0} applied to an atom, {mu}{sup CP}={beta}{sup CP}E{sub 0}. We estimate the CP-violating polarizability for rare-gas (diamagnetic) atoms He through Rn. We relate {beta}{sup CP} to the permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of the electron and to the scalar constant of the CP-odd electron-nucleus interaction. The analysis is carried out using the third-order perturbation theory and the Dirac-Hartree-Fock formalism. We find that, as a function of nuclear charge Z, {beta}{sup CP} scales steeply as Z{sup 5}R(Z), where slowly varying R(Z) is a relativistic enhancement factor. Finally, we evaluate the feasibility of setting a limit on electron EDM by measuring CP-violating magnetization of liquid Xe. We find that such an experiment could provide competitive bounds on electron EDM only if the present level of experimental sensitivity to ultraweak magnetic fields [Kominis et al., Nature 422, 596 (2003)] is improved by several orders of magnitude.

  2. CP violation in B decays

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, H.R.

    1994-02-01

    She reviews how one can test the Standard Model predictions for CP violation. This test requires sufficient independent measurements to overconstrain the model parameters and thus be sensitive to possible beyond Standard Model contributions. She addresses the challenges for theory as well as for experiment to achieve such a test.

  3. CP Violation and B Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Helen R

    2001-11-13

    These lectures provide a basic overview of topics related to the study of CP Violation in B decays. In the first lecture, I review the basics of discrete symmetries in field theories, the quantum mechanics of neutral but flavor-non-trivial mesons, and the classification of three types of CP violation. The actual second lecture which I gave will be separately published as it is my Dirac award lecture and is focused on the separate topic of strong CP Violation. In Lecture 2 here, I cover the Standard Model predictions for neutral B decays, and in particular discuss some channels of interest for CP Violation studies. Lecture 3 reviews the various tools and techniques used to deal with the hadronic physics effects. In Lecture 4, I briefly review the present and planned experiments that can study B decays. I cannot teach all the details of this subject in this short course, so my approach is instead to try to give students a grasp of the relevant concepts and an overview of the available tools. The level of these lectures is introductory. I will provide some references to more detailed treatments and current literature, but this is not a review article so I do not attempt to give complete references to all related literature. By now there are some excellent textbooks that cover this subject in great detail. I refer students to these for more details and for more complete references to the original literature.

  4. CP violation and rare decays

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, C.

    2000-01-24

    After a brief essay on the current state of particle physics and possible approaches to the opportunities that have presented themselves, the author summarizes the contributions to the Third Workshop on Physics and Detectors for DA{Phi}NE that deal with CP Violation and Rare Decays.

  5. Velocity Requirements for Causality Violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modanese, Giovanni

    We re-examine the "Regge-Tolman paradox" with reference to some recent experimental results. It is straightforward to find a formula for the velocity v of the moving system required to produce causality violation. This formula typically yields a velocity very close to the speed of light (for instance, v/c > 0.97 for X-shaped microwaves), which raises some doubts about the real physical observability of the violations. We then compute the velocity requirement introducing a delay between the reception of the primary signal and the emission of the secondary. It turns out that in principle for any delay it is possible to find moving observers able to produce active causal violation. This is mathematically due to the singularity of the Lorentz transformations for β →1. For a realistic delay due to the propagation of a luminal precursor, we find that causality violations in the reported experiments are still more unlikely (v/c > 0.989), and even in the hypothesis that the superluminal propagation velocity goes to infinity, the velocity requirement is bounded by v/c > 0.62. We also prove that if two oscopic bodies exchange energy and momentum through superluminal signals, then the swap of signal source and target is incompatible with the Lorentz transformations; therefore it is not possible to distinguish between source and target, even with reference to a definite reference frame.

  6. Physicist sentenced for export violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwynne, Peter

    2009-08-01

    J Reece Roth, a retired University of Tennessee plasma physicist convicted of violating the American Arms Export Control Act, is planning to appeal against a four-year prison sentence handed down last month. "It's an appeal against everything, including the verdict and the sentence," says his lawyer Thomas Dundon.

  7. The strong equivalence principle and its violation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Goldman, I.

    1983-01-01

    Theoretical and observational aspects of an SEP violation are discussed. A two-times theory is presented as a possible framework to handle an SEP violation, and tests performed to check the compatibility of such violation with a host of data ranging from nucleosynthesis to geophysics are summarized. Also discussed are the dynamical equations needed to analyze radar ranging data to reveal an SEP violation and in particular the method employed by Shapiro and Reasenberg (1976).

  8. Genetic evaluation of AMPD1, CPT2, and PGYM metabolic enzymes in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed

    Maltese, P E; Venturini, L; Poplavskaya, E; Bertelli, M; Cecchin, S; Granato, M; Nikulina, S Y; Salmina, A; Aksyutina, N; Capelli, E; Ricevuti, G; Lorusso, L

    2016-01-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a disease that can seriously impair one's quality of life; patients complain of excessive fatigue and myalgia following physical exertion. This disease may be associated with abnormalities in genes affecting exercise tolerance and physical performance. Adenosine monophosphate deaminase (AMPD1), carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT2), and the muscle isoform of glycogen phosphorylase (PYGM) genes provide instructions for producing enzymes that play major roles in energy production during work. The aim of this study was to look for evidence of genotype-associated excessive muscle fatigue. Three metabolic genes (AMPD1, CPT2, and PYGM) were therefore fully sequenced in 17 Italian patients with CFS. We examined polymorphisms known to alter the function of these metabolic genes, and compared their genotypic distributions in CFS patients and 50 healthy controls using chi-square tests and odds ratios. One-way analysis of variance with F-ratio was carried out to determine the associations between genotypes and disease severity using CF scores. No major genetic variations between patients and controls were found in the three genes studied, and we did not find any association between these genes and CFS. In conclusion, variations in AMPD1, CPT2, and PGYM genes are not associated with the onset, susceptibility, or severity of CFS. PMID:27525900

  9. 48 CFR 203.070 - Reporting of violations and suspected violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... and suspected violations. 203.070 Section 203.070 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... CONFLICTS OF INTEREST § 203.070 Reporting of violations and suspected violations. Report violations and... 3.203). (d) Antitrust laws (FAR 3.303). (e) Covenant Against Contingent Fees (FAR 3.405). (f)...

  10. 48 CFR 203.070 - Reporting of violations and suspected violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... and suspected violations. 203.070 Section 203.070 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... CONFLICTS OF INTEREST 203.070 Reporting of violations and suspected violations. Report violations and... 3.203). (d) Antitrust laws (FAR 3.303). (e) Covenant Against Contingent Fees (FAR 3.405)....

  11. 48 CFR 703.104-10.1 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 703.104-10.1 Section 703.104-10.1 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL... Violations or possible violations. Requests for concurrence under paragraph (a)(1) of FAR 3.104-10 shall...

  12. 48 CFR 703.104-10.1 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 703.104-10.1 Section 703.104-10.1 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL... Violations or possible violations. Requests for concurrence under paragraph (a)(1) of FAR 3.104-10 shall...

  13. 48 CFR 703.104-10.1 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 703.104-10.1 Section 703.104-10.1 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL... Violations or possible violations. Requests for concurrence under paragraph (a)(1) of FAR 3.104-10 shall...

  14. 48 CFR 703.104-10.1 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 703.104-10.1 Section 703.104-10.1 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL... Violations or possible violations. Requests for concurrence under paragraph (a)(1) of FAR 3.104-10 shall...

  15. 48 CFR 303.104-7 - Violations or possible violations of the Procurement Integrity Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Violations or possible violations of the Procurement Integrity Act. 303.104-7 Section 303.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations... Safeguards 303.104-7 Violations or possible violations of the Procurement Integrity Act. (a)(1)...

  16. 10 CFR 76.131 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

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    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 76.131 Section 76.131 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS Enforcement § 76.131 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of...

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

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    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 76.131 Section 76.131 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS Enforcement § 76.131 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of...

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

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    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 76.131 Section 76.131 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS Enforcement § 76.131 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of...

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

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