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Sample records for crab shell chitin

  1. Effect of sub- and supercritical water treatments on the physicochemical properties of crab shell chitin and its enzymatic degradation.

    PubMed

    Osada, Mitsumasa; Miura, Chika; Nakagawa, Yuko S; Kaihara, Mikio; Nikaido, Mitsuru; Totani, Kazuhide

    2015-12-10

    This study examined the effects of sub- and supercritical water pretreatments on the physicochemical properties of crab shell α-chitin and its enzymatic degradation to obtain N,N'-diacetylchitobiose (GlcNAc)2. Following sub- and supercritical water pretreatments, the protein in the crab shell was removed and the residue of crab shell contained α-chitin and CaCO3. Prolonged pretreatment led to α-chitin decomposition. The reaction of pure α-chitin in sub- and supercritical water pretreatments was investigated separately; we observed lower mean molecular weight and weaker hydrogen bonds compared with untreated α-chitin. (GlcNAc)2 yields from enzymatic degradation of subcritical (350 °C, 7 min) and supercritical water (400 °C, 2.5 min) pretreated crab shell were 8% and 6%, compared with 0% without any pretreatment. This study shows that sub- and supercritical water pretreatments of crab shell provide to an alternative method to the use of acid and base for decalcification and deproteinization of crab shell required for (GlcNAc)2 production. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Crab shell chitin whiskers reinforced natural rubber nanocomposites. 3. Effect of chemical modification of chitin whiskers.

    PubMed

    Gopalan Nair, Kalaprasad; Dufresne, Alain; Gandini, Alessandro; Belgacem, Mohamed Naceur

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to chemically modify the surface of chitin whiskers and to investigate the effect of the incorporation of these modified whiskers into a natural rubber (NR) matrix on the properties of the ensuing nanocomposite. Different chemical coupling agents were tested, namely, phenyl isocyanate (PI), alkenyl succinic anhydride (ASA) (Accosize 18 from American Cyanamid), and 3-isopropenyl-alpha,alpha'-dimethylbenzyl isocyanate (TMI). The extent of chemical modification was evaluated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and surface energy analysis. After chemical modification, nanocomposite films were obtained using a toluene natural rubber solution in which the whiskers were dispersed. Their mechanical properties were found to be inferior to those of unmodified chitin/NR composites presented in our previous study. In fact, even though there is an increase in filler-matrix interaction as a result of chemical modification of the chitin whiskers, this does not contribute to the improvement in the mechanical properties of the resulting nanocomposite. It is concluded that this loss of performance is due to the partial destruction of the three-dimensional network of chitin whiskers assumed to be present in the unmodified composites.

  3. Optimization and adsorption kinetic studies of aqueous manganese ion removal using chitin extracted from shells of edible Philippine crabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quimque, Mark Tristan J.; Jimenez, Marvin C.; Acas, Meg Ina S.; Indoc, Danrelle Keth L.; Gomez, Enjelyn C.; Tabuñag, Jenny Syl D.

    2017-01-01

    Manganese is a common contaminant in drinking water along with other metal pollutants. This paper investigates the use of chitin, extracted from crab shells obtained as restaurant throwaway, as an adsorbent in removing manganese ions from aqueous medium. In particular, this aims to optimize the adsorption parameters and look into the kinetics of the process. The adsorption experiments done in this study employed the batch equilibration method. In the optimization, the following parameters were considered: pH and concentration of Mn (II) sorbate solution, particle size and dosage of adsorbent chitin, and adsorbent-adsorbate contact time. At the optimal condition, the order of the adsorption reaction was estimated using kinetic models which describes the process best. It was found out that the adsorption of aqueous Mn (II) ions onto chitin obeys the pseudo-second order model. This model assumes that the adsorption occurred via chemisorption

  4. Extraction of chitin from red crab shell waste by cofermentation with Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. tolerans KCTC-3074 and Serratia marcescens FS-3.

    PubMed

    Jung, W J; Jo, G H; Kuk, J H; Kim, K Y; Park, R D

    2006-06-01

    For one-step extraction of chitin from red crab shell waste, cofermentation with Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. tolerans KCTC-3074, a lactic-acid-producing bacterium, and Serratia marcescens FS-3, a protease-producing bacterium, was conducted. Fermentation with single strain (L. 3074 or FS-3) was also conducted. At day 7, the pH in L. 3074, FS-3, and L. 3074+FS-3 (1:1) treatment decreased from 6.90 to 3.30, 5.88, and 3.48, respectively. Ash content in the residue after fermentation treatment of crab shells in L. 3074 and L. 3074+FS-3 (1:1) treatment drastically decreased from 41.2% to 3.19 and 1.15%, respectively. In L. 3074+FS-3 (1:1) cofermentation, the level of demineralization was the highest value of 97.2%, but the level of deproteinization in the cofermentation was 52.6% at day 7. Protein content in the treatment of FS-3 alone reduced from 22.4 to 3.62%. These results indicate that cofermentation of the shells using the two strains is efficient and applicable for the one-step extraction of crude chitin from red crab shell waste.

  5. Chitin Nanofibers Extracted from Crab Shells in Broadband Visible Antireflection Coatings with Controlling Layer-by-Layer Deposition and the Application for Durable Antifog Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Manabe, Kengo; Tanaka, Chie; Moriyama, Yukari; Tenjimbayashi, Mizuki; Nakamura, Chiaki; Tokura, Yuki; Matsubayashi, Takeshi; Kyung, Kyu-Hong; Shiratori, Seimei

    2016-11-23

    Reflection from various surfaces of many optical systems, such as photovoltaics and displays, is a critical issue for their performance, and antireflection coatings play a pivotal role in a wide variety of optical technologies, reducing light reflectance loss and hence maximizing light transmission. With the current movement toward optically transparent polymeric media and coatings for antireflection technology, the need for economical and environmentally friendly materials and methods without dependence on shape or size has clearly been apparent. Herein, we demonstrate novel antireflection coatings composed of chitin nanofibers (CHINFs), extracted from crab shell as a biomass material through an aqueous-based layer-by-layer self-assembly process to control the porosity. Increasing the number of air spaces inside the membrane led low refractive index, and precise control of refractive index derived from the stacking of the CHINFs achieved the highest transmittance with investigating the surface structure and the refractive index depending on the solution pH. At a wavelength of 550 nm, the transmittance of the coatings was 96.4%, which was 4.8% higher than that of a glass substrate, and their refractive index was 1.30. Further critical properties of the films were the durability and the antifogging performance derived from the mechanical stability and hydrophilicity of CHINFs, respectively. The present study may contribute to a development of systematically designed nanofibrous films which are suitable for optical applications operating at a broadband visible wavelength with durability and antifog surfaces.

  6. Concurrent protein synthesis is required for in vivo chitin synthesis in postmolt blue crabs

    SciTech Connect

    Horst, M.N.

    1990-12-01

    Chitin synthesis in crustaceans involves the deposition of a protein-polysaccharide complex at the apical surface of epithelial cells which secrete the cuticle or exoskeleton. The present study involves an examination of in vivo incorporation of radiolabeled amino acids and amino sugars into the cuticle of postmolt blue crabs, Callinectes sapidus. Rates of incorporation of both 3H leucine and 3H threonine were linear with respect to time of incubation. Incorporation of 3H threonine into the endocuticle was inhibited greater than 90% in the presence of the protein synthesis inhibitor, puromycin. Linear incorporation of 14C glucosamine into the cuticle was also demonstrated;more » a significant improvement of radiolabeling was achieved by using 14C-N-acetylglucosamine as the labeled precursor. Incorporation of 3H-N-acetylglucosamine into the cuticle of postmolt blue crabs was inhibited 89% by puromycin, indicating that concurrent protein synthesis is required for the deposition of chitin in the blue crab. Autoradiographic analysis of control vs. puromycin-treated crabs indicates that puromycin totally blocks labeling of the new endocuticle with 3H glucosamine. These results are consistent with the notion that crustacean chitin is synthesized as a protein-polysaccharide complex. Analysis of the postmolt and intermolt blue crab cuticle indicates that the exoskeleton contains about 60% protein and 40% chitin. The predominant amino acids are arginine, glutamic acid, alanine, aspartic acid, and threonine.« less

  7. Production and processing of a 59-kilodalton exochitinase during growth of Streptomyces lividans carrying pCHIO12 in soil microcosms amended with crab or fungal chitin.

    PubMed Central

    Vionis, A P; Niemeyer, F; Karagouni, A D; Schrempf, H

    1996-01-01

    Streptomyces lividans (pCHIO12), which carries the previously cloned Streptomyces olivaceoviridis exo-chiO1 gene on a multicopy vector, secretes a 59-kDa exochitinase, consisting of a catalytic domain (40 kDa), a central fibronectin type III-like module, and a chitin-binding domain (12 kDa). The propagation rate of S. lividans (pCHIO12) was higher in soil microcosms amended with fungal mycelia than in those containing crab chitin. Comparative biochemical and immunological studies allowed the following conclusions to be drawn. Within soil microcosm systems amended with crab shell chitin or chitin-containing Aspergillus proliferans mycelia, the strain expressed the clones exo-chiO1 gene and produced high quantities of a 59-kDa exochitinase. The enzyme was preferentially attached via its binding domain to the pellet from soil or liquid cultures. In contrast, truncated forms of 47, 40, and 25 kDa could be easily extracted from soil. The relative proportions of the 59-kDa enzyme and its truncated forms varied depending on the source of chitin and differed in soil and in liquid cultures. PMID:8633877

  8. Physicochemical properties and characterization of chitosan synthesized from fish scales, crab and shrimp shells.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Suneeta; Kumar Annamareddy, Sri Hari; Abanti, Sahoo; Kumar Rath, Pradip

    2017-11-01

    Chitosan is derived from different starting materials such as fish scales, shrimp and crab shells by the process of deacetylation of chitin, which is carried out using 40% KOH at 90°C for 6h. Prepared chitosan was characterized by Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, Scanning electron microscope and Thermogravimetric analysis. Futher the physicochemical properties of chitosan like Fat binding capacity (FBC), water binding capacity (WBC), solubility, average molecular weight, ash content, moisture and degree of deacetylation of chitosan were also studied. Crystalline index (%) values of commercial, shrimp, crab and fish chitosan were found to be 96, 82, 88 and 84% respectively. The presence of amino group was confirmed from the FTIR spectra of chitosan synthesized. TGA results demonstrated the lower thermal stability of chitosan. Relatively smother surface and nano-fiber structures were observed from SEM analysis. The degree of deacetylation of chitosan from different sources such as shells of fish, shrimp and crab were found to be 75%, 78%, and 70% respectively. In a similar way the WBC and FBC of fish, shrimp and crab shells were found to be 492, 358 and 138% and 226, 246 and 138% respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Shell use and partitioning of two sympatric species of hermit crabs on a tropical mudflat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teoh, Hong Wooi; Chong, Ving Ching

    2014-02-01

    Shell use and partitioning of two sympatric hermit crab species (Diogenes moosai and Diogenes lopochir), as determined by shell shape, size and availability, were examined from August 2009 to March 2011 in a tropical mudflat (Malaysia). Shells of 14 gastropod species were used but > 85% comprised shells of Cerithidea cingulata, Nassarius cf. olivaceus, Nassarius jacksonianus, and Thais malayensis. Shell partitioning between hermit crab species, sexes, and developmental stages was evident from occupied shells of different species, shapes, and sizes. Extreme bias in shell use pattern by male and female of both species of hermit crabs suggests that shell shape, which depends on shell species, is the major determinant of shell use. The hermit crab must however fit well into the shell so that compatibility between crab size and shell size becomes crucial. Although shell availability possibly influenced shell use and hermit crab distribution, this is not critical in a tropical setting of high gastropod diversity and abundance.

  10. Transmembrane myosin chitin synthase involved in mollusc shell formation produced in Dictyostelium is active

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenitzer, Veronika; Universitaet Regensburg, Biochemie I, Universitaetsstrasse 31, D-93053 Regensburg; Eichner, Norbert

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dictyostelium produces the 264 kDa myosin chitin synthase of bivalve mollusc Atrina. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chitin synthase activity releases chitin, partly associated with the cell surface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Membrane extracts of transgenic slime molds produce radiolabeled chitin in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chitin producing Dictyostelium cells can be characterized by atomic force microscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This model system enables us to study initial processes of chitin biomineralization. -- Abstract: Several mollusc shells contain chitin, which is formed by a transmembrane myosin motor enzyme. This protein could be involved in sensing mechanical and structural changes of the forming, mineralizing extracellular matrix. Here we report themore » heterologous expression of the transmembrane myosin chitin synthase Ar-CS1 of the bivalve mollusc Atrina rigida (2286 amino acid residues, M.W. 264 kDa/monomer) in Dictyostelium discoideum, a model organism for myosin motor proteins. Confocal laser scanning immunofluorescence microscopy (CLSM), chitin binding GFP detection of chitin on cells and released to the cell culture medium, and a radiochemical activity assay of membrane extracts revealed expression and enzymatic activity of the mollusc chitin synthase in transgenic slime mold cells. First high-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of Ar-CS1 transformed cellulose synthase deficient D. discoideumdcsA{sup -} cell lines are shown.« less

  11. Recent trends in biological extraction of chitin from marine shell wastes: a review.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Surinder; Dhillon, Gurpreet Singh

    2015-03-01

    The natural biopolymer chitin and its deacetylated product chitosan are widely used in innumerable applications ranging from biomedicine, pharmaceuticals, food, agriculture and personal care products to environmental sector. The abundant and renewable marine processing wastes are commercially exploited for the extraction of chitin. However, the traditional chitin extraction processes employ harsh chemicals at elevated temperatures for a prolonged time which can harm its physico-chemical properties and are also held responsible for the deterioration of environmental health. In view of this, green extraction methods are increasingly gaining popularity due to their environmentally friendly nature. The bioextraction of chitin from crustacean shell wastes has been increasingly researched at the laboratory scale. However, the bioextraction of chitin is not currently exploited to its maximum potential on the commercial level. Bioextraction of chitin is emerging as a green, cleaner, eco-friendly and economical process. Specifically in the chitin extraction, microorganisms-mediated fermentation processes are highly desirable due to easy handling, simplicity, rapidity, controllability through optimization of process parameters, ambient temperature and negligible solvent consumption, thus reducing environmental impact and costs. Although, chitin production from crustacean shell waste through biological means is still at its early stage of development, it is undergoing rapid progress in recent years and showing a promising prospect. Driven by reduced energy, wastewater or solvent, advances in biological extraction of chitin along with valuable by-products will have high economic and environmental impact.

  12. The influence of HCl concentration and demineralization temperature of Atrina pectinata shells on quality of chitin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugroho, Intan Lazuardi; Pursetyo, Kustiawan Tri; Masithah, Endang Dewi

    2017-02-01

    Atrina pectinata is one of shells species widely consumed by people, which means the high consumption will generate the availability of shells in the environment as waste. Chitin can be produced from the shells. Shells contain quite high minerals that it should be demineralized to reduce the mineral content from the shells. This study aimed to determine the effect of HCl concentration and temperature affect chitin characteristics as the result of demineralization process from pen shells. The method based on two steps, there were demineralization and deproteination. This study used Completely Randomized Design (CRD) with two factors, including HCl concentration (2N, 4N, and 6N) and temperature (33°C and 60°C) which consists six combination treatments and three replications. Data was analyzed by using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and followed by Duncan's Multiple Range Test. The results showed that interaction of HCl concentration and temperature has significant effect (p<0.05) to ash content of chitin. The use concentration of 6N and 33°C produced the lowest ash content. Characteristics chitin resulted from the treatment of 6N and 33°C produced ash content 25.33% ± 6.82, moisture content 3.67% ± 1.10, yield 0.72% ± 0.12 and protein content 5.86%.

  13. Towards the Shell Biorefinery: Sustainable Synthesis of the Anticancer Alkaloid Proximicin A from Chitin.

    PubMed

    Sadiq, Alejandro D; Chen, Xi; Yan, Ning; Sperry, Jonathan

    2018-02-09

    A shell biorefinery would involve fractionation of crustacean shells and incorporation of the components into value-added products, particularly those that contain nitrogen. In a proof-of-concept study that validates this concept, the anticancer alkaloid proximicin A has been synthesized from the chitin-derived platform chemical 3-acetamido-5-acetylfuran (3A5AF). This study accentuates the leading role chitin is likely to play in the sustainable production of nitrogen-containing fine chemicals that are not directly attainable from lignocellulose. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Colloidal chitin nanogels: A plethora of applications under one shell.

    PubMed

    Vishnu Priya, M; Sabitha, M; Jayakumar, R

    2016-01-20

    Chitin nanogels (CNGs) are a relatively new class of natural polymeric nanomaterials which have a large potential in the field of drug delivery and nanotherapeutics. These nanogels being very biocompatible are non-toxic when internalized by cells. In this review various properties, preparation techniques and applications of CNGs have been described. CNGs because of their nano-size possess certain unique properties which enable them to be used in a number of biomedical applications. CNGs are prepared by simple regeneration technique without using any cross-linkers. Various polymers, drugs and fluorescent dyes can be blended or incorporated or labelled with the chitin hydrogel network. Drugs and molecules encapsulated within CNGs can be used for targeted delivery, in vivo monitoring or even for therapeutic purposes. Here various applications of CNGs in the field of drug delivery, imaging, sensing and therapeutics have been discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Microbial Degradation of Lobster Shells to Extract Chitin Derivatives for Plant Disease Management

    PubMed Central

    Ilangumaran, Gayathri; Stratton, Glenn; Ravichandran, Sridhar; Shukla, Pushp S.; Potin, Philippe; Asiedu, Samuel; Prithiviraj, Balakrishnan

    2017-01-01

    Biodegradation of lobster shells by chitinolytic microorganisms are an environment safe approach to utilize lobster processing wastes for chitin derivation. In this study, we report degradation activities of two microbes, “S223” and “S224” isolated from soil samples that had the highest rate of deproteinization, demineralization and chitinolysis among ten microorganisms screened. Isolates S223 and S224 had 27.3 and 103.8 protease units mg-1 protein and 12.3 and 11.2 μg ml-1 of calcium in their samples, respectively, after 1 week of incubation with raw lobster shells. Further, S223 contained 23.8 μg ml-1 of N-Acetylglucosamine on day 3, while S224 had 27.3 μg ml-1 on day 7 of incubation with chitin. Morphological observations and 16S rDNA sequencing suggested both the isolates were Streptomyces. The culture conditions were optimized for efficient degradation of lobster shells and chitinase (∼30 kDa) was purified from crude extract by affinity chromatography. The digested lobster shell extracts induced disease resistance in Arabidopsis by induction of defense related genes (PR1 > 500-fold, PDF1.2 > 40-fold) upon Pseudomonas syringae and Botrytis cinerea infection. The study suggests that soil microbes aid in sustainable bioconversion of lobster shells and extraction of chitin derivatives that could be applied in plant protection. PMID:28529501

  16. Microbial Degradation of Lobster Shells to Extract Chitin Derivatives for Plant Disease Management.

    PubMed

    Ilangumaran, Gayathri; Stratton, Glenn; Ravichandran, Sridhar; Shukla, Pushp S; Potin, Philippe; Asiedu, Samuel; Prithiviraj, Balakrishnan

    2017-01-01

    Biodegradation of lobster shells by chitinolytic microorganisms are an environment safe approach to utilize lobster processing wastes for chitin derivation. In this study, we report degradation activities of two microbes, "S223" and "S224" isolated from soil samples that had the highest rate of deproteinization, demineralization and chitinolysis among ten microorganisms screened. Isolates S223 and S224 had 27.3 and 103.8 protease units mg -1 protein and 12.3 and 11.2 μg ml -1 of calcium in their samples, respectively, after 1 week of incubation with raw lobster shells. Further, S223 contained 23.8 μg ml -1 of N -Acetylglucosamine on day 3, while S224 had 27.3 μg ml -1 on day 7 of incubation with chitin. Morphological observations and 16S rDNA sequencing suggested both the isolates were Streptomyces . The culture conditions were optimized for efficient degradation of lobster shells and chitinase (∼30 kDa) was purified from crude extract by affinity chromatography. The digested lobster shell extracts induced disease resistance in Arabidopsis by induction of defense related genes ( PR1 > 500-fold, PDF1.2 > 40-fold) upon Pseudomonas syringae and Botrytis cinerea infection. The study suggests that soil microbes aid in sustainable bioconversion of lobster shells and extraction of chitin derivatives that could be applied in plant protection.

  17. Isolation and characterization of chitin and chitosan from marine origin.

    PubMed

    Nwe, Nitar; Furuike, Tetsuya; Tamura, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, chitin and chitosan are produced from the shells of crabs and shrimps, and bone plate of squid in laboratory to industrial scale. Production of chitosan involved deproteinization, demineralization, and deacetylation. The characteristics of chitin and chitosan mainly depend on production processes and conditions. The characteristics of these biopolymers such as appearance of polymer, turbidity of polymer solution, degree of deacetylation, and molecular weight are of major importance on applications of these polymers. This chapter addresses the production processes and conditions to produce chitin, chitosan, and chito-oligosaccharide and methods for characterization of chitin, chitosan, and chito-oligosaccharide. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Understanding to Hierarchical Microstructures of Crab (Chinese hairy) Shell as a Natural Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Chuanqiang, Zhou; Xiangxiang, Gong; School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou

    This work was done to better understand the microstructures, composition and mechanical properties of Chinese hairy crab shell. For fully revealing its hierarchical microstructure, the crab shell was observed with electron microscope under different magnifications from different facets. XRD, EDS, FTIR and TGA techniques have been used to characterize the untreated and chemically-treated crab shells, which provided enough information to determine the species and relative content of components in this biomaterial. Combined the microstructures with constituents analysis, the structural principles of crab shell was detailedly realized from different structural levels beyond former reports. To explore the relationship between structure andmore » function, the mechanical properties of shell have been measured through performing tensile tests. The contributions of organics and minerals in shell to the mechanical properties were also discussed by measuring the tensile strength of de-calcification samples treated with HCl solution.« less

  19. Utilization of waste crab shell (Scylla serrata) as a catalyst in palm olein transesterification.

    PubMed

    Boey, Peng-Lim; Maniam, Gaanty Pragas; Hamid, Shafida Abd

    2009-01-01

    Aquaculture activity has increased the population of crab, hence increasing the generation of related wastes, particularly the shell. In addition, the number of molting process in crabs compounds further the amount of waste shell generated. As such, in the present work, the application of the waste crab shell as a source of CaO in transesterification of palm olein to biodiesel (methyl ester) was investigated. Preliminary XRD results revealed that thermally activated crab shell contains mainly CaO. Parametric study has been investigated and optimal conditions were found to be methanol/oil mass ratio, 0.5:1; catalyst amount, 4 wt. %; and reaction temperature, 338 K. As compared to laboratory CaO, the catalyst from waste crab shell performs well, thus creating another low-cost catalyst source for producing biodiesel as well as adding value to the waste crab shell. Reusability of crab shell CaO has also been studied and the outcome confirmed that the catalyst is capable to be reutilized up to 11 times, without any major deterioration.

  20. Comparison and Characterisation of Regenerated Chitosan from 1-Butyl-3-methylimidazolium Chloride and Chitosan from Crab Shells

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Lyndon

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan is a biopolymer derived from chitin which is naturally occurring in the exoskeleton of crustaceans. This paper reports dissolution and regeneration of chitosan by directly dissolving in an ionic liquid solvent, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (BMIMCl). This will provide an ideal platform to solubilise these kinds of polymers to achieve the dissolution. The current study dissolved chitosan from crab shell utilising BMIMCl as a solvent and characterised the resultant regenerated polymer. The regenerated chitosan showed increased hydrogen bonding when characterised by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectral analysis. In addition, the study also compared the characteristics of regenerated and generic chitosan. The regenerated chitosan was also evaluated for antimicrobial properties and showed to possess antibacterial features similar to the commercial grade. This method can be utilised in future for blending of polymers with chitosan in a dissolved phase. PMID:26090452

  1. Optimization of extraction of chitin from procambarus clarkia shell by Box-Behnken design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Fang; Qiu, Hailong; Jia, Shaoqian; Dai, Cuiping; Kong, Qingxin; Xu, Changliang

    2018-06-01

    This paper investigated the optimizing extraction processing of chitin from procambarus clarkia shell by Box-Behnken design. Firstly, four independent variables were explored in single factor experiments, namely, concentration of hydrochloric acid, soaking time, concentration of sodium hydroxide and reaction time. Then, based on the results of the above experiments, four factors and three levels experiments were planned by Box-Behnken design. According to the experimental results, we harvested a second-order polynomial equation using multiple regression analysis. In addition, the optimum extraction process of chitin of the model was obtained: concentration of HCl solution 1.54mol/L, soaking time 19.87h, concentration of NaOH solution 2.9mol/L and reaction time 3.54h. For proving the accuracy of the model, we finished the verification experiment under the following conditions: concentration of hydrochloric acid 1.5mol/L, soaking time 20h, concentration of sodium hydroxide 3mol/L and reaction time 3.5h. The actual yield of chitin reached 18.76%, which was very close to the predicted yield (18.66%) of the model. The result indicated that the optimum extraction processing of chitin was feasible and practical.

  2. Electroless nickel – phosphorus coating on crab shell particles and its characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Arulvel, S., E-mail: gs.arulvel.research@gmail.com; Elayaperumal, A.; Jagatheeshwaran, M.S.

    Being hydrophilic material, crab shell particles have only a limited number of applications. It is, therefore, necessary to modify the surface of the crab shell particles. To make them useful ever for the applications, the main theme we proposed in this article is to utilize crab shell particles (CSP) with the core coated with nickel phosphorus (NiP) as a shell using the electroless coating process. For dealing with serious environmental problems, utilization of waste bio-shells is always an important factor to be considered. Chelating ability of crab shell particles eliminates the surface activation in this work proceeding to the coatingmore » process. The functional group, phase structure, microstructure, chemical composition and thermal analysis of CSP and NiP/CSP were characterized using Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR), x-ray diffraction analyzer (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The combination of an amorphous and crystalline structure was exhibited by CSP and NiP/CSP. NiP/CSP has shown a better thermal stability when compared to uncoated CSP. Stability test, adsorption test, and conductivity test were conducted for the study of adsorption behavior and conductivity of the particles. CSP presented a hydrophilic property in contrast to hydrophobic NiP/CSP. NiP/CSP presented a conductivity of about 44% greater compared to the CSP without any fluctuations. - Highlights: • Utilization of crab shell waste is focused on. • NiP coating on crab shell particle is fabricated using electroless process. • Thermal analysis, stability test, adsorption test and conductivity test were done. • Organic matrix of crab shell particle favors the coating process. • Results demonstrate the characterization of CSP core – NiP shell structure.« less

  3. Analysis of repeated signals during shell fights in the hermit crab Pagurus bernhardus

    PubMed Central

    Briffa, M.; Elwood, R. W.; Dick, J. T. A.

    1998-01-01

    Shell exchanges between hermit crabs may occur after a period of shell rapping, when the initiating or attacking crab brings its shell rapidly and repeatedly into contact with the shell of the non-initiator or defender, in a series of bouts. There are two opposing models of hermit crab shell exchange and the function of shell rapping. The negotiation model views shell exchange as a mutualistic activity, in which the initiator supplies information about the quality of its shell via the fundamental frequency of the rapping sound. The aggression model views shell rapping as either detrimental to the defending crab, or as providing it with information about the initiator's ability or motivation to continue, or both. The negotiation model makes no predictions about the temporal pattern of rapping, but under the aggression model it would be expected that crabs that rapped more vigorously would be more likely to effect an exchange. Repeating the signal could be expected under either model. Crabs that achieve an exchange rap more vigorously, rapping is more persistent when a clear gain in shell quality may be achieved, and the vigour is greater when the relative resource-holding potential (or 'fighting ability') is high. These findings support the aggression model rather than the negotiation model. Contrary to the predictions of game theory, crabs that do not effect an exchange appear to signal that they are about to give up. The data suggest that rapping is performed repeatedly because the accumulation of all of the performances acts as a signal of stamina.

  4. Antioxidant and antimicrobial proprieties of chitin and chitosan extracted from Parapenaeus Longirostris shrimp shell waste.

    PubMed

    Hafsa, J; Smach, M A; Charfeddine, B; Limem, K; Majdoub, H; Rouatbi, S

    2016-01-01

    Chitosan, the linear polymer, is produced by alkali deacetylation of chitin (CHI). Recently chitin and chitosan were attracted marked interest due to their biocompatibility, biodegradability and non-toxicity. In this study, chitin was extracted from shrimp shell (Parapenaeus longirostris) and chitosan was deacetylated by classical and ultrasound-assisted method. The identification of functional groups and the determination of degree of deacetylation of chitin (CHI), classical deacetylated chitosan (CDC) and ultrasound-assisted deacetylated chitosan (UDC) were carried through Fourier Transform-Infrared Spectroscopy. Their antimicrobial and antioxidant activity were also investigated. The degree of deacetylation of CHI, CDC and UDC is 33.64%, 73.68% and 83.55%, respectively. Results showed that CHI, CDC and UDC exhibited a good antimicrobial activity against (S. aureus, E. coli, P. aeruginosa, K. pneumonia) and (C. albicans and C. parapsilosis). The scavenging ability of CHI, CDC and UDC on 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radicals is ranging from 4.71% to 21.25%, 11.45% to 32.78% and 18.27% to 44.17%, respectively, at the concentrations of 0.25 to 1mg/mL. The inhibition of lipid peroxidation with thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances is ranging from 11.7% to 51.63%, 17.24% to 63.52% and 29.31% to 77.39%, respectively, at varying concentrations of 0.25 to 1mg/mL. The effectiveness of CHI, CDC and UDC is correlated with their degree of deacetylation. The results indicate the possibility of exploiting chitin and chitosan as antimicrobial agent. Copyright © 2015 Académie Nationale de Pharmacie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Applications of magnetic resonance spectroscopy to chitin from insect cuticles.

    PubMed

    Gonil, Pattarapond; Sajomsang, Warayuth

    2012-11-01

    Chitin is the second most abundant polysaccharide in nature after cellulose. At the present time, the main commercial sources of chitin are the crab and shrimp shells which are major waste products from the seafood industry. However, current chitin resources have some inherent problems including seasonal availability, limited supplies, and environmental pollution. As an alternative, insect cuticle is proposed as an unconventional but viable source of chitin. This review focuses on the recent sources of insect chitin and the application of various magnetic resonance spectroscopic techniques to native insect cuticles, particularly cicada sloughs and chitin extracted from insect sloughs. In addition, the physicochemical properties, isolation process, and degree of N-acetylation (DA) is reviewed and discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Prawn Shell Derived Chitin Nanofiber Membranes as Advanced Sustainable Separators for Li/Na-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian-Wen; Shen, Bao; Yao, Hong-Bin; Ma, Tao; Lu, Lei-Lei; Zhou, Fei; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2017-08-09

    Separators, necessary components to isolate cathodes and anodes in Li/Na-ion batteries, are consumed in large amounts per year; thus, their sustainability is a concerning issue for renewable energy storage systems. However, the eco-efficient and environmentally friendly fabrication of separators with a high mechanical strength, excellent thermal stability, and good electrolyte wettability is still challenging. Herein, we reported the fabrication of a new type of separators for Li/Na-ion batteries through the self-assembly of eco-friendly chitin nanofibers derived from prawn shells. We demonstrated that the pore size in the chitin nanofiber membrane (CNM) separator can be tuned by adjusting the amount of pore generation agent (sodium dihydrogen citrate) in the self-assembly process of chitin nanofibers. By optimizing the pore size in CNM separators, the electrochemical performance of the LiFePO 4 /Li half-cell with a CNM separator is comparable to that with a commercialized polypropylene (PP) separator. More attractively, the CNM separator showed a much better performance in the LiFePO 4 /Li cell at 120 °C and Na 3 V 2 (PO 4 ) 3 /Na cell than the PP separator. The proposed fabrication of separators by using natural raw materials will play a significant contribution to the sustainable development of renewable energy storage systems.

  7. Elemental compositions of crab and snail shells from the Kueishantao hydrothermal field in the southwestern Okinawa Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Zhigang; Ma, Yao; Wang, Xiaoyuan; Chen, Chen-Tung Arthur; Yin, Xuebo; Zhang, Suping; Zhang, Junlong; Jiang, Wei

    2018-04-01

    To reveal differences in the behavior of benthic vent animals, and the sources and sinks of biogeochemical and fluid circulations, it is necessary to constrain the chemical characteristics of benthic animals from seafloor hydrothermal fields. We measured the abundances of 27 elements in shells of the crab Xenograpsus testudinatus and the snail Anachis sp., collected from the Kueishantao hydrothermal field (KHF) in the southwestern Okinawa Trough, with the aim of improving our understanding of the compositional variations between individual vent organisms, and the sources of the rare earth elements (REEs) in their shells. The Mn, Hg, and K concentrations in the male X. testudinatus shells are found to be higher than those in female crab shells, whereas the reverse is true for the accumulation of B, implying that the accumulation of K, Mn, Hg, and B in the crab shells is influenced by sex. This is inferred to be a result of the asynchronous molting of the male and female crab shells. Snail shells are found to have higher Ca, Al, Fe, Ni, and Co concentrations than crab shells. This may be attributed to different metal accumulation times. The majority of the light rare earth element (LREE) distribution patterns in the crab and snail shells are similar to those of Kueishantao vent fluids, with the crab and snail shells also exhibiting LREE enrichment, implying that the LREEs contained in crab and snail shells in the KHF are derived from vent fluids.

  8. Electroless nickel - phosphorus coating on crab shell particles and its characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arulvel, S.; Elayaperumal, A.; Jagatheeshwaran, M. S.

    2017-04-01

    Being hydrophilic material, crab shell particles have only a limited number of applications. It is, therefore, necessary to modify the surface of the crab shell particles. To make them useful ever for the applications, the main theme we proposed in this article is to utilize crab shell particles (CSP) with the core coated with nickel phosphorus (NiP) as a shell using the electroless coating process. For dealing with serious environmental problems, utilization of waste bio-shells is always an important factor to be considered. Chelating ability of crab shell particles eliminates the surface activation in this work proceeding to the coating process. The functional group, phase structure, microstructure, chemical composition and thermal analysis of CSP and NiP/CSP were characterized using Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR), x-ray diffraction analyzer (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The combination of an amorphous and crystalline structure was exhibited by CSP and NiP/CSP. NiP/CSP has shown a better thermal stability when compared to uncoated CSP. Stability test, adsorption test, and conductivity test were conducted for the study of adsorption behavior and conductivity of the particles. CSP presented a hydrophilic property in contrast to hydrophobic NiP/CSP. NiP/CSP presented a conductivity of about 44% greater compared to the CSP without any fluctuations.

  9. Fabrication of optically transparent chitin nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shams, M. Iftekhar; Ifuku, Shinsuke; Nogi, Masaya; Oku, Takeshi; Yano, Hiroyuki

    2011-02-01

    This paper demonstrates the preparation of chitin nanofibers from crab shells using a simple mechanical treatment. The nanofibers are small enough to retain the transparency of neat acrylic resin. Possessing hydroxyl and amine/ N-acetyl functionalities, water suspension of chitin nanofibers was vacuum-filtered 9 times faster than cellulose nanofibers to prepare a nanofiber sheet of 90 mm in diameter. This is a prominent advantage of chitin nanofibers over cellulose nanofibers in terms of commercial application. Interestingly, chitin acrylic resin films exhibited much higher transparency than cellulose acrylic resin films owing to the close affinity between less hydrophilic chitin and hydrophobic resin. Furthermore, the incorporation of chitin nanofibers contributes to the significant improvement of the thermal expansion and mechanical properties of the neat acrylic resin. The properties of high light transmittance and low thermal expansion make chitin nanocomposites promising candidates for the substrate in a continuous roll-to-roll process in the manufacturing of various optoelectronic devices such as flat panel displays, bendable displays, and solar cells.

  10. Optimized production of Serratia marcescens B742 mutants for preparing chitin from shrimp shells powders.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongcai; Fang, Jiyang; Deng, Yun; Zhao, Yanyun

    2014-08-01

    To improve the deproteinization (DP) efficacy of shrimp shell powders (SSP) for preparing chitin, Serratia marcescens B742 mutants were prepared using 2% diethyl sulfate (DES), UV-irradiation, and/or microwave heating treatments. Both single-stage and multi-stage mutations were investigated for optimizing S. marcescens B742 mutation conditions. Under the optimized mutation conditions (2% DES treatment for 30min plus successive 20min UV-irradiation), the protease and chitosanase activity produced by mutant S. marcescens B742 was 240.15 and 170.6mU/mL, respectively, as compared with 212.58±1.51 and 83.75±6.51mU/mL, respectively, by wild S. marcescens B742. DP efficacy of SSP by mutant S. marcescens B742 reached 91.4±4.6% after 3d of submerged fermentation instead of 83.4±4.7% from the wild S. marcescens B742 after 4d of submerged fermentation. Molecular mass of chitosanase and protease was 41.20 and 47.10kDa, respectively, and both enzymes were verified by mass spectrometry analysis. The chitosanase from both wild and mutant S. marcescens B742 was activated by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), Tween 20, Tween 40, and Triton-100, and the protease and chitosanase were strongly inhibited by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). These results suggested that S. marcescens B742 mutants can be used in the biological production of chitin through deproteinization of SSP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Chitin nanofibers as reinforcing and antimicrobial agents in carboxymethyl cellulose films: Influence of partial deacetylation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The development of edible, environmentally friendly, mechanically strong and antimicrobial biopolymer films for active food packaging has gained considerable interest in recent years. The present work deals with the extraction and deacetylation of chitin nanofibers (ChNFs) from crab shells and their...

  12. One-pot production of chitin with high purity from lobster shells using choline chloride-malonic acid deep eutectic solvent.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ping; Gu, Zhongji; Hong, Shu; Lian, Hailan

    2017-12-01

    For the first time in this study, chitin was solely extracted from lobster shells through a fast, easy and eco-friendly method using deep eutectic solvents (DESs), consisting of mixtures of choline chloride-thiourea (CCT), choline chloride-urea (CCU), choline chloride-glycerol (CCG) and choline chloride-malonic acid (CCMA). The physiochemical properties of the isolated chitins were compared with those of the chemically prepared one and commercial one from shrimp shells. Results showed that CCT, CCU and CCG DESs had no important effect on the elimination of proteins and minerals, while chitin obtained by CCMA DES showed a high purity. The yield (20.63±3.30%) of chitin isolated by CCMA DES was higher than that (16.53±2.35%) of the chemically prepared chitin. The chitin obtained by CCMA DES could be divided into two parts with different crystallinity (67.2% and 80.6%), which also had different thermal stability. Chitin from lobster shells showed porous structure, which is expected to be used for adsorption materials and tissue engineering. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. On the mechanism of penetration of ovicidal fungi through egg-shells of parasitic nematodes. Decomposition of chitinous and ascaroside layers.

    PubMed

    Kunert, J

    1992-01-01

    The decomposition of egg-shells of Ascaris lumbricoides L. was studied microscopically using topochemical methods in a set of 32 strains of soil ovicidal fungi. It was found that even fungi displaying minimal chitinolytic activity in tests on purified chitin in vitro are able to dissolve chitin of egg-shells during the attack on live eggs. Fungi without any chitinolytic activity penetrate probably only the mechanically damaged eggs. None of the studied fungi was capable of degrading enzymatically the glycolipid (ascaroside) layer of the egg-shell which remained intact after digestion of all other components of the egg.

  14. Chitin nanowhisker-supported sulfonated poly(ether sulfone) proton exchange for fuel cell applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chan; Zhuang, Xupin; Li, Xiaojie; Wang, Wei; Cheng, Bowen; Kang, Weimin; Cai, Zhanjun; Li, Mengqin

    2016-04-20

    To balance the relationship among proton conductivity and mechanic strength of sulfonated poly(ether sulfone) (SPES) membrane, chitin nanowhisker-supported nanocomposite membranes were prepared by incorporating whiskers into SPES. The as-prepared chitin whiskers were prepared by 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical (TEMPO) mediated oxidation of α-chitin from crab shells. The structure and properties of the composite membranes were examined as proton exchange membrane (PEM). Results showed that chitin nanowhiskers were dispersed incompactly in the SPES matrix. Thermal stability, mechanical properties, water uptake and proton conductivity of the nanocomposite films were improved from those of the pure SPES film with increasing whisker content, which ascribed to strong interactions between whiskers and between SPES molecules and chitin whiskers via hydrogen bonding. These indicated that composition of filler and matrix got good properties and whisker-supported membranes are promising materials for PEM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Analysis of the finescale timing of repeated signals: does shell rapping in hermit crabs signal stamina?

    PubMed

    Briffa; Elwood

    2000-01-01

    Hermit crabs, Pagurus bernhardus, sometimes exchange shells after a period of shell rapping, when the initiating or attacking crab brings its shell rapidly and repeatedly into contact with the shell of the noninitiator or defender in a series of bouts. Bouts are separated by pauses, and raps within bouts are separated by very short periods called 'gaps'. Since within-contest variation is missed when signals are studied by averaging performance rates over entire contests, we analysed the fine within-bout structure of this repeated, aggressive signal. We found that the pattern is consistent with high levels of fatigue in initiators. The duration of the gaps between individual raps increased both within bouts and from bout to bout, and we conclude that this activity is costly to perform. Furthermore, long pauses between bouts is correlated with increased vigour of rapping in the subsequent bout, which suggests that the pause allows for recovery from fatigue induced by rapping. These between-bout pauses may be assessed by noninitiators and provide a signal of stamina. Copyright 2000 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour.

  16. Chitin degradation and electricity generation by Aeromonas hydrophila in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Shan-Wei; He, Hui; Zeng, Raymond J; Sheng, Guo-Ping

    2017-02-01

    Chitin is one of the most abundant biopolymers in nature and the main composition of shrimp and crab shells (usually as food wastes). Thus it is essential to investigate the potential of degrading chitin for energy recovery. This study investigated the anaerobic degradation of chitin by Aeromonas hydrophila, a chitinolytic and popular electroactive bacterium, in both fermentation and microbial fuel cell (MFC) systems. The primary chitin metabolites produced in MFC were succinate, lactate, acetate, formate, and ethanol. The total metabolite concentration from chitin degradation increased seven-fold in MFC compared to the fermentation system, as well as additional electricity generation. Moreover, A. hydrophila degraded GlcNAc (the intermediate of chitin hydrolysis) significantly faster (0.97 and 0.94 mM C/d/mM-GlcNAc) than chitin (0.13 and 0.03 mM C/d/mM-GlcNAc) in MFC and fermentation systems, indicating that extracellular hydrolysis of chitin was the rate-limiting step and this step could be accelerated in MFC. Furthermore, more chemicals produced by the addition of exogenous mediators in MFC. This study proves that the chitin could be degraded effectively by an electroactive bacterium in MFC, and our results suggest that this bioelectrochemical system might be useful for the degradation of recalcitrant biomass to recover energy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Chitin and Chitosan: Production and Application of Versatile Biomedical Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Elieh-Ali-Komi, Daniel; Hamblin, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Chitin is the most abundant aminopolysaccharide polymer occurring in nature, and is the building material that gives strength to the exoskeletons of crustaceans, insects, and the cell walls of fungi. Through enzymatic or chemical deacetylation, chitin can be converted to its most well-known derivative, chitosan. The main natural sources of chitin are shrimp and crab shells, which are an abundant byproduct of the food-processing industry, that provides large quantities of this biopolymer to be used in biomedical applications. In living chitin-synthesizing organisms, the synthesis and degradation of chitin require strict enzymatic control to maintain homeostasis. Chitin synthase, the pivotal enzyme in the chitin synthesis pathway, uses UDP-N-acetylglucosamine (UDPGlcNAc), produce the chitin polymer, whereas, chitinase enzymes degrade chitin. Bacteria are considered as the major mediators of chitin degradation in nature. Chitin and chitosan, owing to their unique biochemical properties such as biocompatibility, biodegradability, non-toxicity, ability to form films, etc, have found many promising biomedical applications. Nanotechnology has also increasingly applied chitin and chitosan-based materials in its most recent achievements. Chitin and chitosan have been widely employed to fabricate polymer scaffolds. Moreover, the use of chitosan to produce designed-nanocarriers and to enable microencapsulation techniques is under increasing investigation for the delivery of drugs, biologics and vaccines. Each application is likely to require uniquely designed chitosan-based nano/micro-particles with specific dimensions and cargo-release characteristics. The ability to reproducibly manufacture chitosan nano/microparticles that can encapsulate protein cargos with high loading efficiencies remains a challenge. Chitosan can be successfully used in solution, as hydrogels and/or nano/microparticles, and (with different degrees of deacetylation) an endless array of derivatives with

  18. From Lobster Shells to Plastic Objects: A Bioplastics Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Reuben; Glaisher, Samuel; Bishop, Alexandra; Katz, Jeffrey L.

    2015-01-01

    A multiple day activity for students to create large-scale plastic objects from the biopolymer chitin (major component of lobster, crab, and shrimp shells) is described. The plastic objects created are durable and made from benign materials, making them suitable for students to take home to play with. Since the student-created plastic objects are…

  19. Hierarchical Microspheres Constructed from Chitin Nanofibers Penetrated Hydroxyapatite Crystals for Bone Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Duan, Bo; Shou, Kangquan; Su, Xiaojuan; Niu, Yahui; Zheng, Guan; Huang, Yao; Yu, Aixi; Zhang, Yu; Xia, Hong; Zhang, Lina

    2017-07-10

    Chitin exists abundantly in crab and shrimp shells as the template of the minerals, which inspired us to mineralize it for fabricating bone grafting materials. In the present work, chitin nanofibrous microspheres were used as the matrix for in situ synthesis of hydroxyapatite (HA) crystals including microflakes, submicron-needles, and submicron-spheres, which were penetrated by long chitin nanofibers, leading to the hierarchical structure. The shape and size of the HA crystals could be controlled by changing the HA synthesis process. The tight interface adhesion between chitin and HA through the noncovanlent bonds occurred in the composite microspheres, and HAs were homogeneously dispersed and bounded to the chitin nanofibers. In our findings, the inherent biocompatibilities of the both chitin and HA contributed the bone cell adhesion and osteoconduction. Moreover, the chitin microsphere with submicron-needle and submicron-sphere HA crystals remarkably promoted in vitro cell adhesion and in vivo bone healing. It was demonstrated that rabbits with 1.5 cm radius defect were almost cured completely within three months in a growth factor- and cell-free state, as a result of the unique surface microstructure and biocompatibilities of the composite microspheres. The microsphere scaffold displayed excellent biofunctions and an appropriate biodegradability. This work opened up a new avenue to construct natural polymer-based organic-inorganic hybrid microspheres for bone regeneration.

  20. Effects of bean dregs and crab shell powder additives on the composting of green waste.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Sun, Xiangyang

    2018-07-01

    Composting is an effective and economic technology for the recycling of organic waste. In this study, bean dregs (BD) (at 0, 35, and 45%) and crab shell powder (CSP) (at 0, 15, and 25%) were evaluated as additives during the two-stage composting of green waste (GW). The GW used in this experiment mainly consisted of branch cuttings collected during the maintenance of the urban green landscape. Combined additions of BD and CSP improved composting conditions and compost quality in terms of composting temperature, specific surface area, average pore diameter, pH and EC values, carbon dioxide release, ammonia and nitrous oxide emissions, E 4 /E 6 ratio, elemental composition and atomic ratios, organic matter degradation, microbial numbers, enzyme activities, compost phytotoxicity, and environmental and economic benefits. The combined addition of 35% BD and 25% CSP to the two-stage composting of GW resulted in the highest quality compost product in only 22 days. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Pathologic mandibular fracture after biting crab shells following ramal bone graft.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ik Jae; Lee, Byung Ho; Eo, Mi Young; Kim, Soung Min; Lee, Jong Ho; Lee, Suk Keun

    2016-10-01

    The mandibular ramus is considered an appropriate choice for reconstruction of maxillofacial defects because of sufficient amounts of material and fewer donor site complications. Although bone harvesting from the mandibular ramus has many advantages, in rare cases it can result in pathologic fracture of the mandible. Here, we present a case of 59-year-old man who suffered a pathologic mandible fracture related to biting hard foods, such as crab shells, after a sinus bone lifting with ramal bone graft procedure performed 2 weeks prior. He underwent closed reduction by intermaxillary fixation with an arch bar over the course of 4 weeks. Three months later, the patients had a stable occlusion with normal mouth opening and sensation. To prevent this complication, the osteotomy should be performed in such a way that it is not too vertical during ramal bone harvesting. Furthermore, we wish to emphasize the importance of patients being instructed to avoid chewing hard foods for at least 4 weeks after ramal bone harvesting. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Calcium-rich biochar from the pyrolysis of crab shell for phosphorus removal.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lichun; Tan, Furong; Li, Hong; Zhu, Nengmin; He, Mingxiong; Zhu, Qili; Hu, Guoquan; Wang, Li; Zhao, Jie

    2017-08-01

    Calcium-rich biochars (CRB) prepared through pyrolysis of crab shell at various temperatures were characterized for physicochemical properties and P removal potential. Elemental analysis showed that CRB was rich in calcium (22.91%-36.14%), while poor in carbon (25.21%-9.08%). FTIR, XRD and TG analyses showed that calcite-based CRB was prepared at temperature ≤600 °C, while lime-based CRB was prepared at temperature ≥700 °C. Phosphorus removal experiment showed that P removal efficiencies in 80 mg P/L phosphate solution and biogas effluent ranged from 26% to 11%, respectively, to about 100% and 63%, respectively, depending on the pyrolysis temperature of the resulting biochar. Specifically, compared to common used CaCO 3 and Ca(OH) 2 , P removal potential of calcite-based CRB was much higher than that of CaCO 3 ; while that of lime-based CRB was close to that of Ca(OH) 2 . These results suggested that CRB was competent for P removal/recovery from wastewater. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Optimization of chitin yield from shrimp shell waste by Bacillus subtilis and impact of gamma irradiation on production of low molecular weight chitosan.

    PubMed

    Gamal, Rawia F; El-Tayeb, Tarek S; Raffat, Enas I; Ibrahim, Haytham M M; Bashandy, A S

    2016-10-01

    Chitin and chitosan have been produced from the exoskeletons of crustacean shells such as shrimps. In this study, seventy bacterial isolates, isolated from soil, were tested for proteolytic enzymes production. The most efficient one, identified as Bacillus subtilis, was employed to extract chitin from shrimp shell waste (SSW). Following one-variable-at-a-time approach, the relevant factors affecting deproteinization (DP) and demineralization (DM) were sucrose concentration (10%, w/v), SSW concentration (5%, w/v), inoculum size (15%, v/v), and fermentation time (6days). These factors were optimized subsequently using Box-Behnken design and response surface methodology. Maximum DP (97.65%) and DM (82.94%) were predicted at sucrose concentration (5%), SSW concentration (12.5%), inoculum size (10%, containing 35×10(8) CFU/mL), and fermentation time (7days). The predicted optimum values were verified by additional experiment. The values of DP (96.0%) and DM (82.1%) obtained experimentally correlated to the predicted values which justify the authenticity of optimum points. Overall 1.3-fold increase in DP% and DM% was obtained compared with 75.27% and 63.50%, respectively, before optimization. Gamma-irradiation (35kGy) reduced deacetylation time of irradiated chitin by 4.5-fold compared with non-irradiated chitin. The molecular weight of chitosan was decreased from 1.9×10(6) (non-irradiated) to 3.7×10(4)g/mol (at 35kGy). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Preparation and characterization of high purity β-chitin from squid pens (Loligo chenisis).

    PubMed

    Cuong, Hoang Ngoc; Minh, Nguyen Cong; Van Hoa, Nguyen; Trung, Trang Si

    2016-12-01

    Squid pens were extracted by a NaOH solution at 80°C for 10h to remove protein and minerals. The as-prepared β-chitin had a high molecular weight (8.5±0.1×10 3 kDa), a low protein content (0.63±0.02wt.%), and a negligible amount of minerals. This method avoids the conventional method for the removal of minerals from shrimp and crab shells by HCl. The purity of resulting products was measured by NMR and FTIR. Moreover, the morphology and crystallinity of β-chitin was characterized by SEM and XRD. The β-chitin with long chains and high purity is suitable for producing high quantity β-chitosan for various potential applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Structural and Functional Analysis of a Lytic Polysaccharide Monooxygenase Important for Efficient Utilization of Chitin in Cellvibrio japonicus*

    PubMed Central

    Forsberg, Zarah; Nelson, Cassandra E.; Dalhus, Bjørn; Mekasha, Sophanit; Loose, Jennifer S. M.; Crouch, Lucy I.; Røhr, Åsmund K.; Gardner, Jeffrey G.; Eijsink, Vincent G. H.; Vaaje-Kolstad, Gustav

    2016-01-01

    Cellvibrio japonicus is a Gram-negative soil bacterium that is primarily known for its ability to degrade plant cell wall polysaccharides through utilization of an extensive repertoire of carbohydrate-active enzymes. Several putative chitin-degrading enzymes are also found among these carbohydrate-active enzymes, such as chitinases, chitobiases, and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs). In this study, we have characterized the chitin-active LPMO, CjLPMO10A, a tri-modular enzyme containing a catalytic family AA10 LPMO module, a family 5 chitin-binding module, and a C-terminal unclassified module of unknown function. Characterization of the latter module revealed tight and specific binding to chitin, thereby unraveling a new family of chitin-binding modules (classified as CBM73). X-ray crystallographic elucidation of the CjLPMO10A catalytic module revealed that the active site of the enzyme combines structural features previously only observed in either cellulose or chitin-active LPMO10s. Analysis of the copper-binding site by EPR showed a signal signature more similar to those observed for cellulose-cleaving LPMOs. The full-length LPMO shows no activity toward cellulose but is able to bind and cleave both α- and β-chitin. Removal of the chitin-binding modules reduced LPMO activity toward α-chitin compared with the full-length enzyme. Interestingly, the full-length enzyme and the individual catalytic LPMO module boosted the activity of an endochitinase equally well, also yielding similar amounts of oxidized products. Finally, gene deletion studies show that CjLPMO10A is needed by C. japonicus to obtain efficient growth on both purified chitin and crab shell particles. PMID:26858252

  6. Structural and Functional Analysis of a Lytic Polysaccharide Monooxygenase Important for Efficient Utilization of Chitin in Cellvibrio japonicus.

    PubMed

    Forsberg, Zarah; Nelson, Cassandra E; Dalhus, Bjørn; Mekasha, Sophanit; Loose, Jennifer S M; Crouch, Lucy I; Røhr, Åsmund K; Gardner, Jeffrey G; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Vaaje-Kolstad, Gustav

    2016-04-01

    Cellvibrio japonicusis a Gram-negative soil bacterium that is primarily known for its ability to degrade plant cell wall polysaccharides through utilization of an extensive repertoire of carbohydrate-active enzymes. Several putative chitin-degrading enzymes are also found among these carbohydrate-active enzymes, such as chitinases, chitobiases, and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs). In this study, we have characterized the chitin-active LPMO,CjLPMO10A, a tri-modular enzyme containing a catalytic family AA10 LPMO module, a family 5 chitin-binding module, and a C-terminal unclassified module of unknown function. Characterization of the latter module revealed tight and specific binding to chitin, thereby unraveling a new family of chitin-binding modules (classified as CBM73). X-ray crystallographic elucidation of theCjLPMO10A catalytic module revealed that the active site of the enzyme combines structural features previously only observed in either cellulose or chitin-active LPMO10s. Analysis of the copper-binding site by EPR showed a signal signature more similar to those observed for cellulose-cleaving LPMOs. The full-length LPMO shows no activity toward cellulose but is able to bind and cleave both α- and β-chitin. Removal of the chitin-binding modules reduced LPMO activity toward α-chitin compared with the full-length enzyme. Interestingly, the full-length enzyme and the individual catalytic LPMO module boosted the activity of an endochitinase equally well, also yielding similar amounts of oxidized products. Finally, gene deletion studies show thatCjLPMO10A is needed byC. japonicusto obtain efficient growth on both purified chitin and crab shell particles. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Fabrication of nano-mosquitocides using chitosan from crab shells: Impact on non-target organisms in the aquatic environment.

    PubMed

    Murugan, Kadarkarai; Anitha, Jaganathan; Dinesh, Devakumar; Suresh, Udaiyan; Rajaganesh, Rajapandian; Chandramohan, Balamurugan; Subramaniam, Jayapal; Paulpandi, Manickam; Vadivalagan, Chitravel; Amuthavalli, Pandiyan; Wang, Lan; Hwang, Jiang-Shiou; Wei, Hui; Alsalhi, Mohamad Saleh; Devanesan, Sandhanasamy; Kumar, Suresh; Pugazhendy, Kannaiyan; Higuchi, Akon; Nicoletti, Marcello; Benelli, Giovanni

    2016-10-01

    Mosquitoes are arthropods of huge medical and veterinary relevance, since they vector pathogens and parasites of public health importance, including malaria, dengue and Zika virus. Currently, nanotechnology is considered a potential eco-friendly approach in mosquito control research. We proposed a novel method of biofabrication of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) using chitosan (Ch) from crab shells. Ch-AgNP nanocomposite was characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, FTIR, SEM, EDX and XRD. Ch-AgNP were tested against larvae and pupae of the malaria vector Anopheles stephensi obtaining LC50 ranging from 3.18 ppm (I) to 6.54 ppm (pupae). The antibacterial properties of Ch-AgNP were proved against Bacillus subtilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Salmonella typhi, while no growth inhibition was reported in assays conducted on Proteus vulgaris. Concerning non-target effects, in standard laboratory considtions the predation efficiency of Danio rerio zebrafishes was 68.8% and 61.6% against I and II instar larvae of A. stephensi, respectively. In a Ch-AgNP-contaminated environment, fish predation was boosted to 89.5% and 77.3%, respectively. Quantitative analysis of antioxidant enzymes SOD, CAT and LPO from hepatopancreas of fresh water crabs Paratelphusa hydrodromous exposed for 16 days to a Ch-AgNP-contaminated aquatic environment were conducted. Notably, deleterious effects of Ch-AgNP contaminating aquatic enviroment on the non-target crab P. hydrodromous were observed, particularly when doses higher than 8-10ppm are tested. Overall, this research highlights the potential of Ch-AGNP for the development of newer control tools against young instar populations of malaria mosquitoes, also highlighting some risks concerned the employ of nanoparticles in aquatic environments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Involvement of Hemocyte Prophenoloxidase in the Shell-Hardening Process of the Blue Crab, Callinectes sapidus

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Javier V.; Chung, J. Sook

    2015-01-01

    Cuticular structures of arthropods undergo dramatic molt-related changes from being soft to becoming hard. The shell-hardening process of decapod crustaceans includes sclerotization and mineralization. Hemocyte PPO plays a central role in melanization and sclerotization particularly in wound healing in crustaceans. However, little is known about its role in the crustacean initial shell-hardening process. The earlier findings of the aggregation of heavily granulated hemocytes beneath the hypodermis during ecdysis imply that the hemocytes may be involved in the shell-hardening process. In order to determine if hemocytes and hemocyte PPO have a role in the shell-hardening of crustaceans, a knockdown study using specific CasPPO-hemo-dsRNA was carried out with juvenile blue crabs, Callinectes sapidus. Multiple injections of CasPPO-hemo-dsRNA reduce specifically the levels of CasPPO-hemo expression by 57% and PO activity by 54% in hemocyte lysate at the postmolt, while they have no effect on the total hemocyte numbers. Immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry analysis using a specific antiserum generated against CasPPO show granulocytes, semigranulocytes and hyaline cells as the cellular sources for PPO at the postmolt. Interestingly, the type of hemocytes, as the cellular sources of PPO, varies by molt stage. The granulocytes always contain PPO throughout the molt cycle. However, semigranulocytes and hyaline cells become CasPPO immune-positive only at early premolt and postmolt, indicating that PPO expression in these cells may be involved in the shell-hardening process of C. sapidus. PMID:26393802

  9. Evolution of king crabs from hermit crab ancestors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, C. W.; Blackstone, N. W.; Buss, L. W.

    1992-02-01

    KING crabs (Family Lithodidae) are among the world's largest arthropods, having a crab-like morphology and a strongly calcified exoskeleton1-6. The hermit crabs, by contrast, have depended on gastropod shells for protection for over 150 million years5,7. Shell-living has constrained the morphological evolution of hermit crabs by requiring a decalcified asymmetrical abdomen capable of coiling into gastropod shells and by preventing crabs from growing past the size of the largest available shells1-6. Whereas reduction in shell-living and acquisition of a crab-like morphology (carcinization) has taken place independently in several hermit crab lineages, and most dramatically in king crabs1-6, the rate at which this process has occurred was entirely unknown2,7. We present molecular evidence that king crabs are not only descended from hermit crabs, but are nested within the hermit crab genus Pagurus. We estimate that loss of the shell-living habit and the complete carcinization of king crabs has taken between 13 and 25 million years.

  10. Synthesization and characterization of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) / calcium phosphate bone cement from crab shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanan, M. R. Abdul; Daud, N. M.; Ismail, L. H.; Saidin, S.

    2017-05-01

    An injectable calcium phosphate (CaP) bone cement has been widely used for musculoskeletal and bone disorder due to its biocompatible and osteoconductive properties. In this study, CaP was successfully synthesized from crab shells by a wet chemical route. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres which have been produced through a double emulsion technique were incorporated into the CaP mixture for the purpose of bone cement solidification. The ratio of both compounds, CaP and PLGA, were set at 8:2. The CaP and PLGA/CaP bone cement were analyzed by ATR-FTIR, FESEM-EDX and contact angle analyses. The bone cement was composed of CaP and PLGA where the micro-powders of CaP were agglomerated on the PLGA microspheres. Addition of the PLGA has increased the hydrophilicity of the bone cement which will be beneficial for materials degradation and bone integration.

  11. Effect of Chitin Isolated from Crustaceans and Cephalopods on Denaturation of Fish Myofibrillar Protein and the State of Water during Frozen Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arredondo Romero, Eduardo; Nakamura, Yukio; Yamashita, Yasumitsu; Ichikawa, Hisashi; Goto, Shingi; Osatomi, Kiyoshi; Nozaki, Yukinori

    From the point of view of utilization of shells as a waste product of fishery industry, the cryoprotective effect of chitin made from shell of crustaceans (Japanese fan lobster and Japanese swimming crab) and cartilage of cephalopods (spear squid) are studied. Chitin from the shells and cartilage were added to lizard fish myofibrils, and the changes of unfrozen water in myofibrils and ATPase activity of myofibrillar protein were observed during frozen storage at -250°C for 120days. The amount of unfrozen water were increased by addition of three kinds of chitin, and decreased moderately during forzen storage. Whereas, in the chitin free sample, the amount of unfrozen water were decreased rapidly during frozen storage. Changes of ATPase activity of samples showed similar tendency to that of the amount of unfrozen water. The present moderate cryoprotective effect of chitin and data of unfrozen water and ATPase activity of myofibrillar protein suggest the importance of the amount of unfrozen water in frozen matrix.

  12. The preparation and characterization of chitin and chitosan under large-scale submerged fermentation level using shrimp by-products as substrate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongcai; Yun, Sanyue; Song, Lingling; Zhang, Yiwen; Zhao, Yanyun

    2017-03-01

    The crustacean shells of crabs and shrimps produces quantities of by-products, leading to seriously environmental pollution and human health problems during industrial processing, yet they turned into high-value useful products, such as chitin and chitosan. To prepare them under large-scale submerged fermentation level, shrimp shell powders (SSPs) was fermented by successive three-step fermentation of Serratia marcescens B742, Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC 8014 and Rhizopus japonicus M193 to extract chitin and chitosan based on previously optimal conditions. Moreover, the key parameters was investigated to monitor the changes of resulted products during fermentation process. The results showed that the yield of prepared chitin and chitosan reached 21.35 and 13.11% with the recovery rate of 74.67 and 63.42%, respectively. The degree of deacetylation (DDA) and molecular mass (MM) of produced chitosan were 81.23% and 512.06kDa, respectively. The obtained chitin and chitosan was characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The established microbial fermentation method can be applied for the industrial large-scale production of chitin and chitosan, while the use of chemical reagents was significantly reduced. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Bdellovibrios in Callinectus sapidus, the Blue Crab

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Jacqueline I.; Williams, Henry N.

    1992-01-01

    Bdellovibrios were recovered from the gill tissue of all of 31 crabs sampled and from all samples of epibiota obtained from the ventral shell surface of 15 crabs. The results suggest that the blue crab is a reservoir for bdellovibrios. The association with crabs may be an important factor in the ecology of the bdellovibrios. PMID:16348706

  14. Bio-mimetic composite scaffold from mussel shells, squid pen and crab chitosan for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Shavandi, Amin; Bekhit, Alaa El-Din A; Ali, M Azam; Sun, Zhifa

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, chitosan/hydroxyapatite (HA)/β-tircalcium phosphate (β-TCP) composites were produced using squid pen derived chitosan (CHS) and commercial crab derived chitosan (CHC). CHS was prepared from squid pens by alkaline N-deacetylation. HA and β-TCP were extracted from mussel shells using a microwave irradiation method. Two different composites were prepared by incorporating 50% (w/w) HA/(β-TCP) in CHS or CHC followed by lyophilization and cross-linking of composites by tripolyphosphate (TPP). The effect of different freezing temperatures of -20, -80 and -196 °C on the physicochemical characteristics of composites was investigated. A simulated body fluid (SBF) solution was used for preliminary in vitro study for 1, 7, 14 and 28 days and the composites were characterized by XRD, FTIR, TGA, SEM, μ-CT and ICP-MS. Porosity, pore size, water uptake; water retention abilities and in vitro degradations of the prepared composites were evaluated. The CHS composites were found to have higher porosity (62%) compared to the CHC composites (porosity 42%) and better mechanical properties. The results of this study indicated that composites produced at -20 °C had higher mechanical properties and lower degradation rate compared with -80 °C. Chitosan from the squid pen is an excellent biomaterial candidate for bone tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Changes of exoskeleton surface roughness and expression of crucial participation genes for chitin formation and digestion in the mud crab (Macrophthalmus japonicus) following the antifouling biocide irgarol.

    PubMed

    Park, Kiyun; Nikapitiya, Chamilani; Kim, Won-Seok; Kwak, Tae-Soo; Kwak, Ihn-Sil

    2016-10-01

    Irgarol is a common antifoulant present in coastal sediment. The mud crab Macrophthalmus japonicus is one of the most abundant of the macrobenthos in the costal environment, and its exoskeleton has a protective function against various environmental threats. We evaluated the effects of irgarol toxicity on the exoskeleton of M. japonicus, which is the outer layer facing the environment. We analyzed transcriptional expression of exoskeleton, molting, and proteolysis-related genes in the gill and hepatopancreas of these exposed M. japonicus. In addition, changes in survival and exoskeleton surface characteristics were investigated. In the hepatopancreas, mRNA expression of chitinase 1 (Mj-chi1), chitinase 4 (Mj-chi4), and chitinase 5 (Mj-chi5) increased in M. japonicus exposed to all concentrations of irgarol. Mj-chi1 and Mj-chi4 expressions from 1 to 10μgL(-1) were dose- and time-dependent. Ecdysteroid receptor (Mj-EcR), trypsin (Mj-Tryp), and serine proteinase (Mj-SP) in the hepatopancreas were upregulated in response to different exposure levels of irgarol at day 1, 4, or 7. In contrast, gill Mj-chi5, Mj-Tryp, and Mj-SP exhibited late upregulated responses to 10μgL(-1) irgarol compared to the control at day 7. Mj-chi1 showed early upregulation upon exposure to 10μgL(-1) irgarol and Mj-chi4 showed no changes in transcription in the gill. Gill Mj-EcR presented generally downregulated expression patterns. In addition, decreased survival and change of exoskeleton surface roughness were observed in M. japonicus exposed to the three concentrations of irgarol. These results suggest that exposure to irgarol induces changes in the exoskeleton, molting, and proteolysis metabolism of M. japonicus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Chitin Research Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Khoushab, Feisal; Yamabhai, Montarop

    2010-01-01

    Two centuries after the discovery of chitin, it is widely accepted that this biopolymer is an important biomaterial in many aspects. Numerous studies on chitin have focused on its biomedical applications. In this review, various aspects of chitin research including sources, structure, biosynthesis, chitinolytic enzyme, chitin binding protein, genetic engineering approach to produce chitin, chitin and evolution, and a wide range of applications in bio- and nanotechnology will be dealt with. PMID:20714419

  17. Good Crab, Bad Crab

    EPA Science Inventory

    Are crabs friends or foes of marsh grass, benefit or detriment to the salt marsh system? We examined Uca pugilator (sand fiddler) and Sesarma reticulatum (purple marsh crab) with Spartina patens (salt marsh hay) at two elevations (10 cm below MHW and 10 cm above MHW) in mesocosms...

  18. Degradation and mineralization of chitin in an estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, J.

    1987-01-01

    A method for measuring microbial degradation and mineralization of radiolabeled native chitin is described. /sup 14/C-labeled chitin was synthesized in vivo by injecting shed blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) with N-acetyl-D-(/sup 14/C)-glucosamine, allowing for its incorporation into the exoskeleton. Rates of chitin degradation and mineralization in estuarine water and sediments were determined as functions of temperature, inoculum source, and oxygen condition. Significant differences in rates between temperature treatments were evident. Q/sub 10/ values ranged from 1.2 to 2.5 for water and sediment, respectively. Increased incubation temperature also resulted in decreased lag times before onset of chitinoclastic bacterial growth and chitin degradation.more » The anaerobic pathway of chitin decomposition by chitinoclastic bacteria was examined with an emphasis on end product coupling to other bacterial types. Actively growing chitinoclastic bacterial isolates produced primarily acetate, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide in broth culture.« less

  19. Process for electrospinning chitin fibers from chitinous biomass solution

    DOEpatents

    Swatloski, Richard P.; Barber, Patrick S.; Opichka, Terrance; Bonner, Jonathan R.; Gurau, Gabriela; Griggs, Christopher Scott; Rogers, Robin D.

    2017-06-20

    Disclosed are methods for electrospinning chitinous biomass solution to form chitin fibers, using ionic liquids or other ion-containing liquids as solvent. Chitin fibers produced thereby and articles containing such chitin fibers are also disclosed. The chitin fiber thus obtained has very high surface area and improved strength over currently commercially available chitin materials.

  20. An economically viable synthesis of biodiesel from a crude Millettia pinnata oil of Jharkhand, India as feedstock and crab shell derived catalyst.

    PubMed

    Madhu, Devarapaga; Chavan, Supriya B; Singh, Veena; Singh, Bhaskar; Sharma, Yogesh C

    2016-08-01

    Biodiesel has emerged as a prominent source to replace petroleum diesel. The cost incurred in the production of biodiesel is higher than that for refining of crude oil to obtain mineral diesel. The heterogeneous catalyst was prepared from crab shells by calcining the crushed mass at 800°C. The solid waste catalyst was characterized with XRD, XPS, BET, SEM-EDS, and FT-IR. Millettia pinnata (karanja) oil extracted from its seeds was used as a feedstock for the synthesis of biodiesel. Biodiesel was synthesized through esterification followed by transesterification in a two-step process. Characterization of biodiesel was done using proton NMR spectroscopy. Reaction parameters such as reaction time, reaction temperature, concentration of catalyst and stirrer speed were optimized. Reusability of catalyst was checked and found that there was no loss of catalytic activity up to five times. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Hermit crabs, humans and crowded house markets.

    PubMed

    Barnes, David K A

    2002-12-01

    There is a complex and dynamic interrelationhip between hermit crabs, humans and the coastal environment. Hermit crab homes (shells) are often hard to come by, but humans are helping out by piling middens of shells and rubbish on beachers. Hermit crabs are useful to humans as fishing bait, pets and living wasted disposal systems, and so useful to other animals that they may even be hijacked.

  2. Chitin and Cellulose Processing in Low-Temperature Electron Beam Plasma.

    PubMed

    Vasilieva, Tatiana; Chuhchin, Dmitry; Lopatin, Sergey; Varlamov, Valery; Sigarev, Andrey; Vasiliev, Michael

    2017-11-06

    Polysaccharide processing by means of low-temperature Electron Beam Plasma (EBP) is a promising alternative to the time-consuming and environmentally hazardous chemical hydrolysis in oligosaccharide production. The present paper considers mechanisms of the EBP-stimulated destruction of crab shell chitin, cellulose sulfate, and microcrystalline cellulose, as well as characterization of the produced oligosaccharides. The polysaccharide powders were treated in oxygen EBP for 1-20 min at 40 °C in a mixing reactor placed in the zone of the EBP generation. The chemical structure and molecular mass of the oligosaccharides were analyzed by size exclusion and the reversed phase chromatography, FTIR-spectroscopy, XRD-, and NMR-techniques. The EBP action on original polysaccharides reduces their crystallinity index and polymerization degree. Water-soluble products with lower molecular weight chitooligosaccharides (weight-average molecular mass, M w = 1000-2000 Da and polydispersity index 2.2) and cellulose oligosaccharides with polymerization degrees 3-10 were obtained. The ¹H-NMR analysis revealed 25-40% deacetylation of the EBP-treated chitin and FTIR-spectroscopy detected an increase of carbonyl- and carboxyl-groups in the oligosaccharides produced. Possible reactions of β-1,4-glycosidic bonds' destruction due to active oxygen species and high-energy electrons are given.

  3. An insight into the determination of trace levels of benzodiazepines in biometric systems: Use of crab shell powder as an environmentally friendly biosorbent.

    PubMed

    Samadi, Fatemeh; Sarafraz-Yazdi, Ali; Es'haghi, Zarrin

    2018-05-30

    A vortex assisted dispersive solid phase extraction approach (VADSPE) based on crab shell powder as biodegradable and biocompatible μ-sorbent was developed for simultaneous analysis of three benzodiazepines (BZPs): Oxazepam, Flurazepamand Diazepam, in biological matrixes included blood, nail, hair and urine samples. The effective parameters in VADSPE process, including the volume of uptake solvent, the dosage of sorbent, extraction time and back extraction time, were optimized using response surface methodology(RSM) based on central composite design(CCD). The suggested technique allows successful trapping of BZPs in a single-step extraction. Under the optimized extraction conditions, the proposed approach was exhibited low limits of detection (0.003-1.2 μg·mL -1 ), an acceptable linearity (0.04-20 μg·mL -1 ). Method performance was assessed by recovery experiments at spiking levels of 10 μg·mL -1 (n = 5) for BZPs in blood, nail, hair and urine samples. Relative recoveries were determined by HPLC, which were between 36%and 95.6%. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Symbiosis of sea anemones and hermit crabs: different resource utilization patterns in the Aegean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vafeiadou, Anna-Maria; Antoniadou, Chryssanthi; Chintiroglou, Chariton

    2012-09-01

    The small-scale distribution and resource utilization patterns of hermit crabs living in symbiosis with sea anemones were investigated in the Aegean Sea. Four hermit crab species, occupying shells of nine gastropod species, were found in symbiosis with the sea anemone Calliactis parasitica. Shell resource utilization patterns varied among hermit crabs, with Dardanus species utilizing a wide variety of shells. The size structure of hermit crab populations also affected shell resource utilization, with small-sized individuals inhabiting a larger variety of shells. Sea anemone utilization patterns varied both among hermit crab species and among residence shells, with larger crabs and shells hosting an increased abundance and biomass of C. parasitica. The examined biometric relationships suggested that small-sized crabs carry, proportionally to their weight, heavier shells and increased anemone biomass than larger ones. Exceptions to the above patterns are related either to local resource availability or to other environmental factors.

  5. Preparation of Chitin Nanofibers-Gold Metallic Nanocomposite by Phase Transfer Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shervani, Zameer; Taisuke, Yukawa; Ifuku, Shinsuke; Saimoto, Hiroyuki; Morimoto, Minoru

    2012-10-01

    Chitin nanofibers (CNFs)-Au(0) nanoparticles (Au NPs) blends in dispersion, flakes and thin film or sheet forms were first prepared by mixing pre-organized Au NPs prepared in triblock copolymer with diluted CNFs suspension. Water soluble polymer triblock copolymer poly (methyl vinyl ether, PMVE) in the amount 0.6 wt.% was used to prepare NPs and 0.12 wt.% net chitin content was used as CNFs suspension to prepare the blended composite. Au NPs of size 4.4 nm (σ = 1.2) were obtained when Au salt (HAuCl4ṡ3H2O (hydrogen tetrachloroaurate (III) trihydrate) was reduced by 5 equivalents of NaBH4. PMVE polymer acted as a stabilizing or capping agent for pre-organized NPs. Completion of reaction was fast, all salt reduced to metallic form in just 15 min after the addition of NaBH4. CNFs (1 wt.% chitin) which was used to prepare CNFs-Au NPs blend composite were prepared from crab shell in never dried acidic condition by established combination of chemical and mechanical processes that gave 25-40 nm width and high aspect ratio CNFs. When polymer capped Au NPs mixed with CNF suspension, all Au NPs and 56% polymer were mass transferred from water phase to entangle with more polar moieties of CNFs-water suspension as no trace of Au NPs were noticed in water-polymer mother liquor after blending with CNFs suspension. Particles size of CNFs-Au NPs composite was measured by employing TEM, SAXS and SEM techniques. CNFs-Au NPs composite were characterized in solution and compressed dried sheet form by recording digital images, UV-vis and XRD spectroscopies. CNFs-Au NPs suspension had antibacterial activity against gram positive bacteria S. aureus.

  6. Mechanical Behavior Optimization of Chitosan Extracted from Shrimp Shells as a Sustainable Material for Shopping Bags.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Giacomo; Elhussieny, Amal; Faisal, Marwa; Fahim, I S; Everitt, Nicola M

    2018-05-22

    The use of biodegradable materials for shopping bag production, and other products made from plastics, has recently been an object of intense research-with the aim of reducing the environmental burdens given by conventional materials. Chitosan is a potential material because of its biocompatibility, degradability, and non-toxicity. It is a semi-natural biopolymeric material produced by the deacetylation of chitin, which is the second most abundant natural biopolymer (after cellulose). Chitin is found in the exoskeleton of insects, marine crustaceans, and the cell walls of certain fungi and algae. The raw materials most abundantly available are the shells of crab, shrimp, and prawn. Hence, in this study chitosan was selected as one of the main components of biodegradable materials used for shopping bag production. Firstly, chitin was extracted from shrimp shell waste and then converted to chitosan. The chitosan was next ground to a powder. Although, currently, polyethylene bags are prepared by blown extrusion, in this preliminary research the chitosan powder was dissolved in a solvent and the films were cast. Composite films with several fillers were used as a reinforcement at different dosages to optimize mechanical properties, which have been assessed using tensile tests. These results were compared with those of conventional polyethylene bags used in Egypt. Overall, the chitosan films were found to have a lower ductility but appeared to be strong enough to fulfill shopping bag functions. The addition of fillers, such as chitin whiskers and rice straw, enhanced the mechanical properties of chitosan films, while the addition of chitin worsened overall mechanical behavior.

  7. A large bubble around the Crab Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romani, Roger W.; Reach, William T.; Koo, Bon Chul; Heiles, Carl

    1990-01-01

    IRAS and 21 cm observations of the interstellar medium around the Crab nebula show evidence of a large bubble surrounded by a partial shell. If located at the canonical 2 kpc distance of the Crab pulsar, the shell is estimated to have a radius of about 90 pc and to contain about 50,000 solar masses of swept-up gas. The way in which interior conditions of this bubble can have important implications for observations of the Crab are described, and the fashion in which presupernova evolution of the pulsar progenitor has affected its local environment is described.

  8. The chitin connection.

    PubMed

    Goldman, David L; Vicencio, Alfin G

    2012-01-01

    Chitin, a polymer of N-acetylglucosamine, is an essential component of the fungal cell wall. Chitosan, a deacetylated form of chitin, is also important in maintaining cell wall integrity and is essential for Cryptococcus neoformans virulence. In their article, Gilbert et al. [N. M. Gilbert, L. G. Baker, C. A. Specht, and J. K. Lodge, mBio 3(1):e00007-12, 2012] demonstrate that the enzyme responsible for chitosan synthesis, chitin deacetylase (CDA), is differentially attached to the cell membrane and wall. Bioactivity is localized to the cell membrane, where it is covalently linked via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor. Findings from this study significantly enhance our understanding of cryptococcal cell wall biology. Besides the role of chitin in supporting structural stability, chitin and host enzymes with chitinase activity have an important role in host defense and modifying the inflammatory response. Thus, chitin appears to provide a link between the fungus and host that involves both innate and adaptive immune responses. Recently, there has been increased attention to the role of chitinases in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation, especially asthma. We review these findings and explore the possible connection between fungal infections, the induction of chitinases, and asthma.

  9. Maine belowground marsh destruction from the European green crab documented by computer-aided tomography

    EPA Science Inventory

    Invasive European green crab (Carcinus maenus) populations have exploded with devastating losses to Maine’s intertidal resources including soft-shell clams, eelgrass beds, and salt marshes. This project quantified the green crab abundance in three different marsh locations ...

  10. Characterization of a Novel, Antifungal, Chitin-Binding Protein from Streptomyces tendae Tü901 That Interferes with Growth Polarity

    PubMed Central

    Bormann, Christiane; Baier, Daniel; Hörr, Ingmar; Raps, Claudia; Berger, Jürgen; Jung, Günther; Schwarz, Heinz

    1999-01-01

    The afp1 gene, which encodes the antifungal protein AFP1, was cloned from nikkomycin-producing Streptomyces tendae Tü901, using a nikkomycin-negative mutant as a host and screening transformants for antifungal activity against Paecilomyces variotii in agar diffusion assays. The 384-bp afp1 gene has a low G+C content (63%) and a transcription termination structure with a poly(T) region, unusual attributes for Streptomyces genes. AFP1 was purified from culture filtrate of S. tendae carrying the afp1 gene on the multicopy plasmid pIJ699. The purified protein had a molecular mass of 9,862 Da and lacked a 42-residue N-terminal peptide deduced from the nucleotide sequence. AFP1 was stable at extreme pH values and high temperatures and toward commercial proteinases. AFP1 had limited similarity to cellulose-binding domains of microbial plant cell wall hydrolases and bound to crab shell chitin, chitosan, and cell walls of P. variotii but showed no enzyme activity. The biological activity of AFP1, which represents the first chitin-binding protein from bacteria exhibiting antifungal activity, was directed against specific ascomycetes, and synergistic interaction with the chitin synthetase inhibitor nikkomycin inhibited growth of Aspergillus species. Microscopy studies revealed that fluorescein-labeled AFP1 strongly bound to the surface of germinated conidia and to tips of growing hyphae, causing severe alterations in cell morphogenesis that gave rise to large spherical conidia and/or swollen hyphae and to atypical branching. PMID:10601197

  11. A comparative study of sorption of chromium (III) onto chitin and chitosan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Pooja; Nagendran, R.

    2016-06-01

    Heavy metals have always been the most hazardous components in the wastewater of industries like electroplating, automobiles, mining facilities and fertilizer manufacturers. Treatment of heavy metal laden wastewater requires expensive operational and maintenance systems. Food processing industries create a huge amount of shell waste which is sold to poultry farms in powdered form but the quantity thus used is still not comparable to the left over waste. The shell contains chitin which acts as an adsorbent for the heavy metals and can be used to treat heavy metal wastewater. The paper presents a study on the use of chitin and its processed product, chitosan, to remove chromium. Shake flask experiment was conducted to compare the adsorptive capacity of chitin and chitosan for chromium removal from simulated solution and isotherm studies were carried out. The studies showed that the chitosan was a better adsorbent than chitin. Both chitin and chitosan gave best adsorption results at pH 3. Chitin exhibited maximum chromium removal of 49.98 % in 20 min, whereas chitosan showed 50 % removal efficiency at a contact time of 20 min showing higher adsorptive capacity for chromium than chitin. The Langmiur and Freundlich isotherm studies showed very good adsorption capacity and monolayer interaction according to the regression coefficient 0.973 for chitosan and 0.915 for chitin. The regression coefficient for Freundlich isotherm was 0.894 and 0.831 for chitosan and chitin, respectively.

  12. Production of Chitosan from Amusium sp Scallop Shell Waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokhati, Nur; Istirokhatun, Titik; Titik Apriyanti, Dwi; Susanto, Heru

    2017-02-01

    Chitosan is one of the natural polysaccharides, which is produced from chitin by deacetylation process. In this study, chitosan was produced from Amusium sp scallop shell waste. First, chitin was isolated by extraction via deproteinization using alkaline solution followed by demineralization using acid solution. Thereafter, chitosan was resulted from deacetylation of chitin using a high concentration of alkaline solution. The chemical structure of chitin and chitosan products was characterized using fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR).

  13. Protective Effect of Chitin Urocanate Nanofibers against Ultraviolet Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Ikuko; Yoneda, Toshikazu; Omura, Yoshihiko; Osaki, Tomohiro; Ifuku, Shinsuke; Saimoto, Hiroyuki; Azuma, Kazuo; Imagawa, Tomohiro; Tsuka, Takeshi; Murahata, Yusuke; Ito, Norihiko; Okamoto, Yoshiharu; Minami, Saburo

    2015-01-01

    Urocanic acid is a major ultraviolet (UV)-absorbing chromophore. Chitins are highly crystalline structures that are found predominantly in crustacean shells. Alpha-chitin consists of microfibers that contain nanofibrils embedded in a protein matrix. Acid hydrolysis is a common method used to prepare chitin nanofibrils (NFs). We typically obtain NFs by hydrolyzing chitin with acetic acid. However, in the present study, we used urocanic acid to prepare urocanic acid chitin NFs (UNFs) and examined its protective effect against UVB radiation. Hos: HR-1 mice coated with UNFs were UVB irradiated (302 nm, 150 mJ/cm2), and these mice showed markedly lower UVB radiation-induced cutaneous erythema than the control. Additionally, sunburn cells were rarely detected in the epidermis of UNFs-coated mice after UVB irradiation. Although the difference was not as significant as UNFs, the number of sunburn cells in mice treated with acetic acid chitin nanofibrils (ANFs) tended to be lower than in control mice. These results demonstrate that ANFs have a protective effect against UVB and suggest that the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of NFs influence the protective effect of ANFs against UVB radiation. The combination of NFs with other substances that possess UV-protective effects, such as urocanic acid, may provide an enhanced protective effect against UVB radiation. PMID:26703629

  14. Preparation of Chitin-PLA laminated composite for implantable application.

    PubMed

    Nasrin, Romana; Biswas, Shanta; Rashid, Taslim Ur; Afrin, Sanjida; Jahan, Rumana Akhter; Haque, Papia; Rahman, Mohammed Mizanur

    2017-12-01

    The present study explores the possibilities of using locally available inexpensive waste prawn shell derived chitin reinforced and bioabsorbable polylactic acid (PLA) laminated composites to develop new materials with excellent mechanical and thermal properties for implantable application such as in bone or dental implant. Chitin at different concentration (1-20% of PLA) reinforced PLA films (CTP) were fabricated by solvent casting process and laminated chitin-PLA composites (LCTP) were prepared by laminating PLA film (obtained by hot press method) with CTP also by hot press method at 160 °C. The effect of variation of chitin concentration on the resulting laminated composite's behavior was investigated. The detailed physico-mechanical, surface morphology and thermal were assessed with different characterization technique such as FT-IR, XRD, SEM and TGA. The FTIR spectra showed the characteristic peaks for chitin and PLA in the composites. SEM images showed an excellent dispersion of chitin in the films and composites. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) showed that the complete degradation of chitin, PLA film, 5% chitin reinforced PLA film (CTP2) and LCTP are 98%, 95%, 87% and 98% respectively at temperature of 500 °C. The tensile strength of the LCTP was found 25.09 MPa which is significantly higher than pure PLA film (18.55 MPa) and CTP2 film (8.83 MPa). After lamination of pure PLA and CTP2 film, the composite (LCTP) yielded 0.265-1.061% water absorption from 30 min to 24 h immerse in water that is much lower than PLA and CTP. The increased mechanical properties of the laminated films with the increase of chitin content indicated good dispersion of chitin into PLA and strong interfacial actions between the polymer and chitin. The improvement of mechanical properties and the results of antimicrobial and cytotoxicity of the composites also evaluated and revealed the composite would be a suitable candidate for implant application in biomedical sector.

  15. Benzoylurea Chitin Synthesis Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ranfeng; Liu, Chunjuan; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Qingmin

    2015-08-12

    Benzoylurea chitin synthesis inhibitors are widely used in integrated pest management (IPM) and insecticide resistance management (IRM) programs due to their low toxicity to mammals and predatory insects. In the past decades, a large number of benzoylurea derivatives have been synthesized, and 15 benzoylurea chitin synthesis inhibitors have been commercialized. This review focuses on the history of commercial benzolyphenylureas (BPUs), synthetic methods, structure-activity relationships (SAR), action mechanism research, environmental behaviors, and ecotoxicology. Furthermore, their disadvantages of high risk to aquatic invertebrates and crustaceans are pointed out. Finally, we propose that the para-substituents at anilide of benzoylphenylureas should be the functional groups, and bipartite model BPU analogues are discussed in an attempt to provide new insight for future development of BPUs.

  16. The hard parts (trophi) of the rotifer mastax do contain chitin: evidence from studies on Brachionus plicatilis.

    PubMed

    Klusemann, J; Kleinow, W; Peters, W

    1990-01-01

    The jaws (trophi) of the rotifer Brachionus plicatilis are soluble in strong acids but are resistant to long treatments by strong alkali. They show the same buoyant density as chitin and also as the chitin-containing layers of rotifer egg-shells. The presence of chitin in these structures was confirmed using the following techniques: chitosan-tests, thin-layer chromatography of trophi-hydrolysates which revealed glucosamine, by dissolving trophi with chitinase and electron microscopic WGA/gold-labelling. The content of chitin in the trophi was estimated by two different methods to be approx. 64% (50-75%).

  17. Short-Chain Chitin Oligomers: Promoters of Plant Growth

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Alexander J.; Dominguez-Nuñez, Jose Alfonso; Aranaz, Inmaculada; Poza-Carrión, César; Ramonell, Katrina; Somerville, Shauna; Berrocal-Lobo, Marta

    2017-01-01

    Chitin is the second most abundant biopolymer in nature after cellulose, and it forms an integral part of insect exoskeletons, crustacean shells, krill and the cell walls of fungal spores, where it is present as a high-molecular-weight molecule. In this study, we showed that a chitin oligosaccharide of lower molecular weight (tetramer) induced genes in Arabidopsis that are principally related to vegetative growth, development and carbon and nitrogen metabolism. Based on plant responses to this chitin tetramer, a low-molecular-weight chitin mix (CHL) enriched to 92% with dimers (2mer), trimers (3mer) and tetramers (4mer) was produced for potential use in biotechnological processes. Compared with untreated plants, CHL-treated plants had increased in vitro fresh weight (10%), radicle length (25%) and total carbon and nitrogen content (6% and 8%, respectively). Our data show that low-molecular-weight forms of chitin might play a role in nature as bio-stimulators of plant growth, and they are also a known direct source of carbon and nitrogen for soil biomass. The biochemical properties of the CHL mix might make it useful as a non-contaminating bio-stimulant of plant growth and a soil restorer for greenhouses and fields. PMID:28212295

  18. Short-Chain Chitin Oligomers: Promoters of Plant Growth.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Alexander J; Dominguez-Nuñez, Jose Alfonso; Aranaz, Inmaculada; Poza-Carrión, César; Ramonell, Katrina; Somerville, Shauna; Berrocal-Lobo, Marta

    2017-02-15

    Chitin is the second most abundant biopolymer in nature after cellulose, and it forms an integral part of insect exoskeletons, crustacean shells, krill and the cell walls of fungal spores, where it is present as a high-molecular-weight molecule. In this study, we showed that a chitin oligosaccharide of lower molecular weight (tetramer) induced genes in Arabidopsis that are principally related to vegetative growth, development and carbon and nitrogen metabolism. Based on plant responses to this chitin tetramer, a low-molecular-weight chitin mix (CHL) enriched to 92% with dimers (2mer), trimers (3mer) and tetramers (4mer) was produced for potential use in biotechnological processes. Compared with untreated plants, CHL-treated plants had increased in vitro fresh weight (10%), radicle length (25%) and total carbon and nitrogen content (6% and 8%, respectively). Our data show that low-molecular-weight forms of chitin might play a role in nature as bio-stimulators of plant growth, and they are also a known direct source of carbon and nitrogen for soil biomass. The biochemical properties of the CHL mix might make it useful as a non-contaminating bio-stimulant of plant growth and a soil restorer for greenhouses and fields.

  19. Crab Nebula

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    The Crab Nebula is a supernova remnant, all that remains of a tremendous stellar explosion. Observers in China and Japan recorded the supernova nearly 1,000 years ago, in 1054. Credit: NASA, ESA, J. Hester and A. Loll (Arizona State University) The Hubble Space Telescope is a project of international cooperation between NASA and the European Space Agency. NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center manages the telescope. The Space Telescope Science Institute conducts Hubble science operations. Goddard is responsible for HST project management, including mission and science operations, servicing missions, and all associated development activities. To learn more about the Hubble Space Telescope go here: www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/hubble/main/index.html NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is home to the nation's largest organization of combined scientists, engineers and technologists that build spacecraft, instruments and new technology to study the Earth, the sun, our solar system, and the universe. Follow us on Twitter Join us on Facebook

  20. Crystallinity of chitin and carbonate mineral components independently record crustacean biomineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mergelsberg, S. T.; Michel, F. M.; Mukhopadhyay, B.; Dove, P. M.

    2016-02-01

    Some of the earliest evidence for crustacean organisms is attributed to the discovery of Peytoia nathorsti, a predatory arthropod from 500 Ma (Cong, P. et al., 2014). These animals presumably began with a soft exoskeleton and evolved to fill diverse ecological niches while adopting a mineralized skeleton that is rarely preserved in its entirety (Klompmaker, A.A. et al., 2015). That is, one or more of the primary skeleton components (calcium carbonate minerals, the polysaccharide chitin, and minor proteins) were subject to decomposition during fossilization and preservation. These missing pieces present a significant obstacle to reconstructing ecosystem variability over long time periods. Our recent study of the exoskeletons from ten Malacostraca species suggests the physical and chemical structure of chitin holds promise as a secondary proxy for reconstructing skeleton reinforcement. Using high-energy X-ray diffraction and a novel Raman spectroscopy technique to enhance resolution, we determined the detailed nanostructures of chitin and the associated calcium carbonate minerals that comprise the cuticles of multiple body parts. Crab cuticles from the order Brachyura (Dungeness and Rock crabs) exhibit elevated crystallinities of the chitin and calcite in the more reinforced structures (such as the claw). In contrast, the cuticle of lobster body parts show a much greater variability of calcium carbonate crystallinity and a very consistent crystallinity of chitin. Calcite and chitin crystallinity exhibit a dependency within a species (body part to body part), but these dependencies can be different between taxa. Insights from this study suggest high resolution structural analyses hold promise for developing new proxies for the paleo-environment and paleo-ecology of specific Malacostraca animals, regardless of how well the specimen is preserved.

  1. Crab-shell induced synthesis of ordered macroporous carbon nanofiber arrays coupled with MnCo2O4 nanoparticles as bifunctional oxygen catalysts for rechargeable Zn-air batteries.

    PubMed

    Bin, Duan; Guo, Ziyang; Tamirat, Andebet Gedamu; Ma, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yonggang; Xia, Yongyao

    2017-08-10

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) are traditionally carried out using noble metals (such as Pt) and metal oxides (such as RuO 2 and IrO 2 ) as catalysts, respectively. Nevertheless, several key issues such as high cost, poor stability, and detrimental environmental effects limit the catalytic activity of these noble metal- and metal oxide-based catalysts. Herein, we have designed and synthesized macroporous carbon nanofiber arrays by using a natural crab shell template. Subsequently, spinel MnCo 2 O 4 nanoparticles were embedded into the nitrogen-doped macroporous carbon nanofiber arrays (NMCNAs) by a hydrothermal method. Accompanied by the good conductivity, large surface area and doping of nitrogen, the as-prepared MnCo 2 O 4 /NMCNA exhibited remarkable catalytic performance and outstanding stability for both ORR and OER in alkaline media. The macroporous superstructures play vital role in reducing the ion transport resistance and facilitating the diffusion of gaseous products (O 2 ). Finally, rechargeable Zn-air batteries using the MnCo 2 O 4 /NMCNA catalyst displayed appreciably lower overpotentials, higher power density and better stability than commercial Pt/C, thus raising the prospect of functional low-cost, non-precious-metal bifunctional catalysts in metal-air batteries.

  2. Chitins and chitosans as immunoadjuvants and non-allergenic drug carriers.

    PubMed

    Muzzarelli, Riccardo A A

    2010-02-21

    amplified during many infections and diseases, the common feature of chitinase-like proteins and chitinase activity in all organisms appears to be the biochemical defense of the host. Unfortunately, conceptual and methodological errors are present in certain recent articles dealing with chitin and allergy, i.e., (1) omitted consideration of mammalian chitinase and/or chitotriosidase secretion, accompanied by inactive chitinase-like proteins, as an ancestral defensive means against invasion, capable to prevent the insurgence of allergy; (2) omitted consideration of the fact that the mammalian organism recognizes more promptly the secreted water soluble chitinase produced by a pathogen, rather than the insoluble and well protected chitin within the pathogen itself; (3) superficial and incomplete reports and investigations on chitin as an allergen, without mentioning the potent allergen from crustacean flesh, tropomyosine; (4) limited perception of the importance of the chemical/biochemical characteristics of the isolated chitin or chitosan for the replication of experiments and optimization of results; and (5) lack of interdisciplinarity. There is quite a large body of knowledge today on the use of chitosans as biomaterials, and more specifically as drug carriers for a variety of applications: the delivery routes being the same as those adopted for the immunological studies. Said articles, that devote attention to the safety and biocompatibility aspects, never reported intolerance or allergy in individuals and animals, even when the quantities of chitosan used in single experiments were quite large. Therefore, it is concluded that crab, shrimp, prawn and lobster chitins, as well as chitosans of all grades, once purified, should not be considered as "crustacean derivatives", because the isolation procedures have removed proteins, fats and other contaminants to such an extent as to allow them to be classified as chemicals regardless of their origin.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of polypyrrole grafted chitin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaprasad, A. T.; Latha, D.; Rao, Vijayalakshmi

    2017-05-01

    Synthesis and characterization of chitin grafted with polypyrrole (PPy) is reported in this paper. Chitin is soaked in pyrrole solution of various concentrations for different time intervals and polymerized using ammonium peroxy disulphate (APS) as an initiator. Grafting percentage of polypyrrole onto chitin is calculated from weight of chitin before and after grafting. Grafting of polymer is further verified by dissolution studies. The grafted polymer samples are characterized by FTIR, UV-Vis absorption spectrum, XRD, DSC, TGA, AFM, SEM and conductivity studies.

  4. Alkali- or acid-induced changes in structure, moisture absorption ability and deacetylating reaction of β-chitin extracted from jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) pens.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jooyeoun; Zhao, Yanyun

    2014-01-01

    Alkali- or acid-induced structural modifications in β-chitin from squid (Dosidicus gigas, d'Orbigny, 1835) pens and their moisture absorption ability (MAA) and deacetylating reaction were investigated and compared with α-chitin from shrimp shells. β-Chitin was converted into the α-form after 3h in 40% NaOH or 1-3 h in 40% HCl solution, and α-chitin obtained from NaOH treatment had higher MAA than had native α-chitin, due to polymorphic destructions. In contrast, induced α-chitin from acid treatment of β-chitin had few polymorphic modifications, showing no significant change (P>0.05) in MAA. β-Chitin was more susceptible to alkali deacetylation than was α-chitin, and required a lower concentration of NaOH and shorter reaction time. These results demonstrate that alkali- or acid-treated β-chitin retained high susceptibility toward solvents, which in turn resulted in good biological activity of β-chitosan for use as a natural antioxidant and antimicrobial substance or application as edible coatings and films for various food applications. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. On the function of chitin synthase extracellular domains in biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Ingrid M; Lüke, Florian; Eichner, Norbert; Guth, Christina; Clausen-Schaumann, Hauke

    2013-08-01

    Molluscs with various shell architectures evolved around 542-525 million years ago, as part of a larger phenomenon related to the diversification of metazoan phyla. Molluscs deposit minerals in a chitin matrix. The mollusc chitin is synthesized by transmembrane enzymes that contain several unique extracellular domains. Here we investigate the assembly mechanism of the chitin synthase Ar-CS1 via its extracellular domain ArCS1_E22. The corresponding transmembrane protein ArCS1_E22TM accumulates in membrane fractions of the expression host Dictyostelium discoideum. Soluble recombinant ArCS1_E22 proteins can be purified as monomers only at basic pH. According to confocal fluorescence microscopy experiments, immunolabeled ArCS1_E22 proteins adsorb preferably to aragonitic nacre platelets at pH 7.75. At pH 8.2 or pH 9.0 the fluorescence signal is less intense, indicating that protein-mineral interaction is reduced with increasing pH. Furthermore, ArCS1_E22 forms regular nanostructures on cationic substrates as revealed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments on modified mica cleavage planes. These experiments suggest that the extracellular domain ArCS1_E22 is involved in regulating the multiple enzyme activities of Ar-CS1 such as chitin synthesis and myosin movements by interaction with mineral surfaces and eventually by protein assembly. The protein complexes could locally probe the status of mineralization according to pH unless ions and pCO2 are balanced with suitable buffer substances. Taking into account that the intact enzyme could act as a force sensor, the results presented here provide further evidence that shell formation is coordinated physiologically with precise adjustment of cellular activities to the structure, topography and stiffness at the mineralizing interface. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Chitin-induced T6SS in Vibrio cholerae is dependent on ChiS activation.

    PubMed

    Chourashi, Rhishita; Das, Suman; Dhar, Debarpan; Okamoto, Keinosuke; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K; Chatterjee, Nabendu Sekhar

    2018-05-01

    Vibrio cholerae regularly colonizes the chitinous exoskeleton of crustacean shells in the aquatic region. The type 6 secretion system (T6SS) in V. cholerae is an interbacterial killing device. This system is thought to provide a competitive advantage to V. cholerae in a polymicrobial community of the aquatic region under nutrient-poor conditions. V. cholerae chitin sensing is known to be initiated by the activation of a two-component sensor histidine kinase ChiS in the presence of GlcNAc2 (N,N'-diacetylchitobiose) residues generated by the action of chitinases on chitin. It is known that T6SS in V. cholerae is generally induced by chitin. However, the effect of ChiS activation on T6SS is unknown. Here, we found that ChiS inactivation resulted in impaired bacterial killing and reduced expression of T6SS genes. Active ChiS positively affected T6SS-mediated natural transformation in V. cholerae. ChiS depletion or inactivation also resulted in reduced colonization on insoluble chitin surfaces. Therefore, we have shown that V. cholerae colonization on chitinous surfaces activates ChiS, which promotes T6SS-dependent bacterial killing and horizontal gene transfer. We also highlight the importance of chitinases in T6SS upregulation.

  7. Changes in the selection differential exerted on a marine snail during the ontogeny of a predatory shore crab.

    PubMed

    Pakes, D; Boulding, E G

    2010-08-01

    Empirical estimates of selection gradients caused by predators are common, yet no one has quantified how these estimates vary with predator ontogeny. We used logistic regression to investigate how selection on gastropod shell thickness changed with predator size. Only small and medium purple shore crabs (Hemigrapsus nudus) exerted a linear selection gradient for increased shell-thickness within a single population of the intertidal snail (Littorina subrotundata). The shape of the fitness function for shell thickness was confirmed to be linear for small and medium crabs but was humped for large male crabs, suggesting no directional selection. A second experiment using two prey species to amplify shell thickness differences established that the selection differential on adult snails decreased linearly as crab size increased. We observed differences in size distribution and sex ratios among three natural shore crab populations that may cause spatial and temporal variation in predator-mediated selection on local snail populations.

  8. Removal of 2,4-D from aqueous solutions by adsorption processes using two biopolymers: chitin and chitosan and their optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Harmoudi, H.; El Gaini, L.; Daoudi, E.; Rhazi, M.; Boughaleb, Y.; El Mhammedi, M. A.; Migalska-Zalas, A.; Bakasse, M.

    2014-07-01

    Chitin, extracted primarily from exoskeleton shellfish, is one of the most abundant biopolymer in the world. It is estimated to be produced annually almost as much as cellulose. The development of fishing activities in Morocco (coastline of 3500 km on both the Atlantic and the Mediterranean) induced an important fish industry waste. The aim of this work is to recover chitin, extracted from shellfish waste, and chitosan, produced by deacetylation of chitin, in the adsorption of organic pesticide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetate (2,4-D). The chitosan samples were prepared from chitin from crustacean shells. The chitin deacetylation was carried out in aqueous sodium hydroxide. Characterization of chitin and chitosan was performed by infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance and theoretical calculation of UV-Vis spectra and optical parameters. Analysis of theoretical spectra shows a substantial sensitivity to the hydroxyl and amino groups. The presented hydroxyl group in chitin determines the conformation of the molecule and also the stereochemistry of chemical reactions and kinetics. The presence of functional groups causes the substantial changes of both absorption spectra as well as permanent dipole moment. The adsorption of 2,4-D by chitin and chitosan was performed at different pH values, the pesticide-adsorbent contact time and initial pesticide concentration. The adsorption is described by Langmuir-type isotherm and Freundlich-type isotherm. Recovery tests of 2,4-D confirm the initial interest in using chitin and chitosan as a depolluting agent.

  9. Hermit crabs in the diet of Pigeon Guillemots at Kachemak Bay, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Litzow, Michael A.; Piatt, John F.; Figurski, Jared D.

    1998-01-01

    Guillemots (Cepphus spp.) feed their chicks a diet that is almost exclusively fish. We observed Pigeon Guillemots (C. columba) at two colonies in Alaska where hermit crabs (Crustacea: Anomura) were a major part of the diet for some nestlings. Hermit crabs were delivered to three of five observed nests at one colony, comprised between 2% and 22% of the items delivered at those nests, and were the second most common food type at one nest. Hermit crabs may be an attractive prey item when lipid-rich forage fish are scarce, and crabs living in gastropod shells that have been softened by encrustations of Suberites sponges may be vulnerable to guillemot predation.

  10. Chitin Scaffolds in Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Jayakumar, Rangasamy; Chennazhi, Krishna Prasad; Srinivasan, Sowmya; Nair, Shantikumar V.; Furuike, Tetsuya; Tamura, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Tissue engineering/regeneration is based on the hypothesis that healthy stem/progenitor cells either recruited or delivered to an injured site, can eventually regenerate lost or damaged tissue. Most of the researchers working in tissue engineering and regenerative technology attempt to create tissue replacements by culturing cells onto synthetic porous three-dimensional polymeric scaffolds, which is currently regarded as an ideal approach to enhance functional tissue regeneration by creating and maintaining channels that facilitate progenitor cell migration, proliferation and differentiation. The requirements that must be satisfied by such scaffolds include providing a space with the proper size, shape and porosity for tissue development and permitting cells from the surrounding tissue to migrate into the matrix. Recently, chitin scaffolds have been widely used in tissue engineering due to their non-toxic, biodegradable and biocompatible nature. The advantage of chitin as a tissue engineering biomaterial lies in that it can be easily processed into gel and scaffold forms for a variety of biomedical applications. Moreover, chitin has been shown to enhance some biological activities such as immunological, antibacterial, drug delivery and have been shown to promote better healing at a faster rate and exhibit greater compatibility with humans. This review provides an overview of the current status of tissue engineering/regenerative medicine research using chitin scaffolds for bone, cartilage and wound healing applications. We also outline the key challenges in this field and the most likely directions for future development and we hope that this review will be helpful to the researchers working in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:21673928

  11. Differentiations of Chitin Content and Surface Morphologies of Chitins Extracted from Male and Female Grasshopper Species

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Murat; Lelešius, Evaldas; Nagrockaitė, Radvilė; Sargin, Idris; Arslan, Gulsin; Mol, Abbas; Baran, Talat; Can, Esra; Bitim, Betul

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we used Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), elemental analysis (EA), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffractometry (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to investigate chitin structure isolated from both sexes of four grasshopper species. FT-IR, EA, XRD, and TGA showed that the chitin was in the alpha form. With respect to gender, two main differences were observed. First, we observed that the quantity of chitin was greater in males than in females and the dry weight of chitin between species ranged from 4.71% to 11.84%. Second, using SEM, we observed that the male chitin surface structure contained 25 – 90nm wide nanofibers and 90 – 250 nm nanopores, while no pores or nanofibers were observed in the chitin surface structure of the majority of females (nanofibers were observed only in M. desertus females). In contrast, the elemental analysis, thermal properties, and crystalline index values for chitin were similar in males and females. Also, we carried out enzymatic digestion of the isolated chitins using commercial chitinase from Streptomyces griseus. We observed that there were no big differences in digestion rate of the chitins from both sexes and commercial chitin. The digestion rates were for grasshoppers’ chitins; 88.45–95.48% and for commercial chitin; 94.95%. PMID:25635814

  12. Degree of Acetylization Chitosan Gonggong Snail Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiza, H.; Iskandar, I.; Aldo, N.

    2018-04-01

    Chitosan is a polysaccharide obtained from the deacetylation of chitin, which is generally derived from crustacean animal waste and animal skins other sea. One marine animals that have compounds that can be processed chitin chitosan is derived from the snail Gonggong marine waters of Riau Islands province. The purpose of this study was to determine the degree of chitosan from the shells of snails asetilisasi Gonggong. This research is an experimental research laboratory. The results of this study indicate that the degree of chitosan shell snail deasetilisasi Gonggong is 70.27%.

  13. Go Fly a Chitin: The Mystery of Chitin and Chitinases in Vertebrate Tissues.

    PubMed

    Stern, Robert

    2017-01-01

    A controversy arose decades ago whether the DG42 gene product expressed during frog embryogenesis synthesized hyaluronan or chitin. Both sets of investigators were correct. It is now possible to understand how prescient those findings were. Synthesis of a seven to nine chitin sugar chain fragment is required before hyaluronan synthesis begins. Thus, DG42 indeed synthesizes both hyaluronan and chitin. Hyaluronan turns over rapidly in vertebrate tissues, but chitin oligomers are difficult to degrade. They accumulate and can cause pathology. Chitin is a simple beta-linked repeating sugar homopolymer found prominently in the building block structures of fungi, molluscs, arthropods, and other forms of invertebrate life. It is a highly resistant insoluble material requiring chitin synthases for production and chitinases for degradation. Mysteriously, chitins and chitinases also occur in vertebrate tissues, while it had previously been assumed that no chitins were contained therein. That assumption is now challenged based on recent biochemical evidence. Chitin does accumulate in many tissues, but may be particularly toxic to neurons. Its accumulation in the brain may account for the cognitive decline found in patients with Alzheimer's disease. The DG42 observations together with the participation of chitins and chitinases in several human diseases, among which in addition to Alzheimer's disease include Gaucher's disease, asthma, and aspects of abnormal immune recognition justify a reexamination of these topics. The purpose of this review is to summarize data in order to place chitins and their attendant enzymes in a rational framework in an attempt to create a cohesive story.

  14. Chitosan but Not Chitin Activates the Inflammasome by a Mechanism Dependent upon Phagocytosis*

    PubMed Central

    Bueter, Chelsea L.; Lee, Chrono K.; Rathinam, Vijay A. K.; Healy, Gloria J.; Taron, Christopher H.; Specht, Charles A.; Levitz, Stuart M.

    2011-01-01

    Chitin is an abundant polysaccharide found in fungal cell walls, crustacean shells, and insect exoskeletons. The immunological properties of both chitin and its deacetylated derivative chitosan are of relevance because of frequent natural exposure and their use in medical applications. Depending on the preparation studied and the end point measured, these compounds have been reported to induce allergic responses, inflammatory responses, or no response at all. We prepared highly purified chitosan and chitin and examined the capacity of these glycans to stimulate murine macrophages to release the inflammasome-associated cytokine IL-1β. We found that although chitosan was a potent NLRP3 inflammasome activator, acetylation of the chitosan to chitin resulted in a near total loss of activity. The size of the chitosan particles played an important role, with small particles eliciting the greatest activity. An inverse relationship between size and stimulatory activity was demonstrated using chitosan passed through size exclusion filters as well as with chitosan-coated beads of defined size. Partial digestion of chitosan with pepsin resulted in a larger fraction of small phagocytosable particles and more potent inflammasome activity. Inhibition of phagocytosis with cytochalasin D abolished the IL-1β stimulatory activity of chitosan, offering an explanation for why the largest particles were nearly devoid of activity. Thus, the deacetylated polysaccharide chitosan potently activates the NLRP3 inflammasome in a phagocytosis-dependent manner. In contrast, chitin is relatively inert. PMID:21862582

  15. Chitosan but not chitin activates the inflammasome by a mechanism dependent upon phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Bueter, Chelsea L; Lee, Chrono K; Rathinam, Vijay A K; Healy, Gloria J; Taron, Christopher H; Specht, Charles A; Levitz, Stuart M

    2011-10-14

    Chitin is an abundant polysaccharide found in fungal cell walls, crustacean shells, and insect exoskeletons. The immunological properties of both chitin and its deacetylated derivative chitosan are of relevance because of frequent natural exposure and their use in medical applications. Depending on the preparation studied and the end point measured, these compounds have been reported to induce allergic responses, inflammatory responses, or no response at all. We prepared highly purified chitosan and chitin and examined the capacity of these glycans to stimulate murine macrophages to release the inflammasome-associated cytokine IL-1β. We found that although chitosan was a potent NLRP3 inflammasome activator, acetylation of the chitosan to chitin resulted in a near total loss of activity. The size of the chitosan particles played an important role, with small particles eliciting the greatest activity. An inverse relationship between size and stimulatory activity was demonstrated using chitosan passed through size exclusion filters as well as with chitosan-coated beads of defined size. Partial digestion of chitosan with pepsin resulted in a larger fraction of small phagocytosable particles and more potent inflammasome activity. Inhibition of phagocytosis with cytochalasin D abolished the IL-1β stimulatory activity of chitosan, offering an explanation for why the largest particles were nearly devoid of activity. Thus, the deacetylated polysaccharide chitosan potently activates the NLRP3 inflammasome in a phagocytosis-dependent manner. In contrast, chitin is relatively inert.

  16. "Chitin-specific" peroxidases in plants.

    PubMed

    Maksimov, I V; Cherepanova, E A; Khairullin, R M

    2003-01-01

    The activity of various plant peroxidases and the ability of their individual isoforms to bind chitin was studied. Some increase in peroxidase activity was observed in crude extracts in the presence of chitin. Activated peroxidases of some species fell in the fraction not sorbed on chitin and those of other species can bind chitin. Only anionic isoperoxidases from oat (Avena sativa), rice (Oryza sativa), horseradish (Armoracia rusticana), garden radish (Raphanus sativus var. radicula), peanut (Arachis hypogaea), and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum Link et Otto) were sorbed on chitin. Both anionic and cationic isoforms from pea (Pisum sativum), galega(Galega orientalis), cucumber (Cucumis sativus), and zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) were sorbed on chitin. Peroxidase activation under the influence of chitin was correlated to the processes that occur during hypersensitive reaction and lignification of sites, in which pathogenic fungus penetrates into a plant. The role of chitin-specific isoperoxidases in inhibition of fungal growth and connection of this phenomenon with structural characteristics of isoperoxidases are also discussed.

  17. Chitin-natural clay nanotubes hybrid hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingxian; Zhang, Yun; Li, Jingjing; Zhou, Changren

    2013-07-01

    Novel hybrid hydrogel was synthesized from chitin NaOH/urea aqueous solution in presence of halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) via crosslinking with epichlorohydrin. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra and atomic force microscopy (AFM) results confirmed the interfacial interactions in the chitin-HNTs hybrid hydrogel. The compressive strength and shear modulus of chitin hydrogel were significantly increased by HNTs as shown in the static compressive experiment and rheology measurement. The hybrid hydrogels showed highly porous microstructures by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The swelling ratio of chitin hydrogel decreased because of the addition of HNTs. The malachite green's absorption experiment result showed that the hybrid hydrogel exhibited much higher absorption rate than the pure chitin hydrogel. The prepared hybrid hydrogel had potential applications in waste treatment and biomedical areas. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Biosorption Of Heavy Metals From Mining Influenced Water Onto Chitin Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mining influenced water (MIW) emanating from mine sites poses a major environmental concern due to its impact on water contamination caused by low pH and the presence of high concentrations of toxic metals. Chitorem SC-20® (raw crushed crab shells containing 40% w/w C...

  19. Shell Biorefinery: Dream or Reality?

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Yang, Huiying; Yan, Ning

    2016-09-12

    Shell biorefinery, referring to the fractionation of crustacean shells into their major components and the transformation of each component into value-added chemicals and materials, has attracted growing attention in recent years. Since the large quantities of waste shells remain underexploited, their valorization can potentially bring both ecological and economic benefits. This Review provides an overview of the current status of shell biorefinery. It first describes the structural features of crustacean shells, including their composition and their interactions. Then, various fractionation methods for the shells are introduced. The last section is dedicated to the valorization of chitin and its derivatives for chemicals, porous carbon materials and functional polymers. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Do I stand out or blend in? Conspicuousness awareness and consistent behavioural differences in hermit crabs

    PubMed Central

    Briffa, Mark; Twyman, Claire

    2011-01-01

    Animals titrate their behaviour against the level of risk and an individual's conspicuousness should influence decisions such as when to flee and for how long to hide. Conspicuousness will vary with variation in substrate colour. Since hermit crabs frequently change the shells they occupy, shell colour will also influence conspicuousness and to be aware of their conspicuousness would require information on both of these factors to be integrated. Reduced boldness in high-contrast shell and substrate combinations compared with situations of low contrast indicates that hermit crabs are aware of current conspicuousness. Differences between individuals remained consistent across conspicuousness levels indicating the presence of animal personalities. PMID:20980296

  1. Do I stand out or blend in? Conspicuousness awareness and consistent behavioural differences in hermit crabs.

    PubMed

    Briffa, Mark; Twyman, Claire

    2011-06-23

    Animals titrate their behaviour against the level of risk and an individual's conspicuousness should influence decisions such as when to flee and for how long to hide. Conspicuousness will vary with variation in substrate colour. Since hermit crabs frequently change the shells they occupy, shell colour will also influence conspicuousness and to be aware of their conspicuousness would require information on both of these factors to be integrated. Reduced boldness in high-contrast shell and substrate combinations compared with situations of low contrast indicates that hermit crabs are aware of current conspicuousness. Differences between individuals remained consistent across conspicuousness levels indicating the presence of animal personalities.

  2. A Lethal Virus of the Blue Crab Callinectes sapidus May Be Present Throughout its Trans-hemispheric Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schott, E. J.; Flowers, E. M.; Vinagre, A.; Brown, S.; Almeida, A.

    2016-02-01

    Blue crabs, Callinectes sapidus, are key epibenthic predators and support valuable fisheries throughout North and South America. On both continents, they are also used to produce soft shell crabs, a value added product. On the Atlantic coast of the USA, mortality of blue crabs in soft shell production is often 25% or greater. A majority of those crabs have been found to be infected with a reovirus lethal to blue crabs. The CsRV1 virus infects multiple ectodermal and mesodermal tissues and was first described as RLV (reo-like virus) in the late 1970s. However its potential for affecting large numbers of crabs was not fully recognized until 2010 when molecular methods were developed to study its prevalence in aquaculture and the wild. Using a sensitive Rt-qPCR assay for the virus, a multi-year survey of crabs from the mid-Atlantic USA coast and Chesapeake Bay revealed that approximately 20% of adult and juvenile crabs were positive for CsRV1 genomic RNA. If blue crabs in the wild die from CsRV1 infections as rapidly as captive infected crabs, it suggests that significant numbers of wild blue crabs die from CsRV1 infections. Crab fishery managers in the Chesapeake Bay recently recognized that there is a need to better understand the role of diseases in natural mortality. The CsRV1 virus is found in C. sapidus throughout the USA range, and has been discovered in diseased Brazilian C. sapidus from Rio Grande do Sul. Genetic analysis of the virus shows that strains of CsRV1 found in Brazil are distinct from the strains identified in the USA. This pan-hemispheric range suggests that the virus has long been a component of blue crab ecology. Much more study is needed to understand the history and impacts of CsRV1 throughout the USA, Brazil, and the vast coastline in between.

  3. Analysis of Chitin in Contaminated Fuels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-09-01

    medium (12) Glucosamine hydrochloride (Iml = 8.6 mg glucosamine ). Store frozen at -IOOC. 2. Procedure. a. Take at least 10 bottles (bottle dimensions are...DISCUSSION 6. Discussion 5 V CONCLUSIONS 7. Conclusions 5 :1IBLIOGRAPHY 7 APIYFNDIX - Analytical Procedure for the Determination of Chitin As Glucosamine 8...concentration of the aminosugar. Chitin, a polymer of glucosamine . is present in the cell wall of most fungi3 and, thus, if determined quantitatively serves to

  4. Anti-Icing Chitin Coating System Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-30

    chitosan additives plus eight control samples were selected for the initial fungi testing. AsDeraillus oryzae (ATCC No. 10196) and Aspergillus niger...Task II work will determine the chitin/chitosan- paint suspensions standard ASTM test characteristics . Tasks III, IV and V will then center on the...five minutes to determine if full exposure of the chitin would increase the icephobic characteristics . Samples P2- BT-100 & 200-D and S7-BT-100 & 200-D

  5. Effect of Chitin Isolated from Crustaceans and Cephalopods on Denaturation of Fish Myofibrillar Protein and the State of Water during Frozen Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Yasumitsu; Zhang, Nong; Nozaki, Yukinori

    The effect of chitin hydrolysate made from shell of crustaceans and cartilage of cephalopods on the denaturation and the state of water of lizard fish myofibrillar protein (Mf) during frozen storage at -250°C for 120 days were investigated. 5.0% chitin hydrolysate (dried matter) added Mf samples were frozen at -25°C and storage for 120 days, and the change of inactivation of Mf Ca-ATPase and the change of unfrozen water in Mf were examined during the frozen storage. The decrease of Mf Ca-ATPase during frozen storage were slow by addition of chitin hydrolysate. The amount of unfrozen water in Mf were increased by addition of chitin hydrolysate, and decreaced gradually during frozen storage. On the other hand, the amount of unfrozen water of the control were decreaced suddenly during frozen storage. Above results suggest that chitin hydrolysate has cryoprotective effect on Mf. It is guessed that the mechanism of cryoprotective effect of chitin hydrolysate may be caused by an interaction between hydration sphere of Mf and equatorial OH groups in the molecular structure of chitin hydrolysate.

  6. Current Status and New Perspectives on Chitin and Chitosan as Functional Biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Philibert, Tuyishime; Lee, Byong H; Fabien, Nsanzabera

    2017-04-01

    The natural biopolymer chitin and its deacetylated product chitosan are found abundantly in nature as structural building blocks and are used in all sectors of human activities like materials science, nutrition, health care, and energy. Far from being fully recognized, these polymers are able to open opportunities for completely novel applications due to their exceptional properties which an economic value is intrinsically entrapped. On a commercial scale, chitosan is mainly obtained from crustacean shells rather than from the fungal and insect sources. Significant efforts have been devoted to commercialize chitosan extracted from fungal and insect sources to completely replace crustacean-derived chitosan. However, the traditional chitin extraction processes are laden with many disadvantages. The present review discusses the potential bioextraction of chitosan from fungal, insect, and crustacean as well as its superior physico-chemical properties. The different aspects of fungal, insects, and crustacean chitosan extraction methods and various parameters having an effect on the yield of chitin and chitosan are discussed in detail. In addition, this review also deals with essential attributes of chitosan for high value-added applications in different fields and highlighted new perspectives on the production of chitin and deacetylated chitosan from different sources with the concomitant reduction of the environmental impact.

  7. Chitin Liquid-Crystal-Templated Oxide Semiconductor Aerogels.

    PubMed

    Chau, Trang The Lieu; Le, Dung Quang Tien; Le, Hoa Thi; Nguyen, Cuong Duc; Nguyen, Long Viet; Nguyen, Thanh-Dinh

    2017-09-13

    Chitin nanocrystals have been used as a liquid crystalline template to fabricate layered oxide semiconductor aerogels. Anisotropic chitin liquid crystals are transformed to sponge-like aerogels by hydrothermally cross-linked gelation and lyophilization-induced solidification. The hydrothermal gelation of chitin aqueous suspensions then proceeds with peroxotitanate to form hydrogel composites that recover to form aerogels after freeze-drying. The homogeneous peroxotitanate/chitin composites are calcined to generate freestanding titania aerogels that exhibit the nanostructural integrity of layered chitin template. Our extended investigations show that coassembling chitin nanocrystals with other metal-based precursors also yielded semiconductor aerogels of perovskite BaTiO 3 and CuO x nanocrystals. The potential of these materials is great to investigate these chitin sponges for biomedicine and these semiconductor aerogels for photocatalysis, gas sensing, and other applications. Our results present a new aerogel templating method of highly porous, ultralight materials with chitin liquid crystals.

  8. Chitin receptor CERK1 links salt stress and chitin-triggered innate immunity in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Catherine; Liang, Yan; Stacey, Gary

    2017-03-01

    In nature, plants need to respond to multiple environmental stresses that require the involvement and fine-tuning of different stress signaling pathways. Cross-tolerance, in which plants pre-treated with chitin (a fungal microbe-associated molecular pattern) have improved salt tolerance, was observed in Arabidopsis, but is not well understood. Here, we show a unique link between chitin and salt signaling mediated by the chitin receptor CHITIN ELICITOR RECEPTOR KINASE 1 (CERK1). Transcriptome analysis revealed that salt stress-induced genes are highly correlated with chitin-induced genes, although this was not observed with other microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) or with other abiotic stresses. The cerk1 mutant was more susceptible to NaCl than was the wild type. cerk1 plants had an irregular increase of cytosolic calcium ([Ca 2+ ] cyt ) after NaCl treatment. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) and co-immunoprecipitation experiments indicated that CERK1 physically interacts with ANNEXIN 1 (ANN1), which was reported to form a calcium-permeable channel that contributes to the NaCl-induced [Ca 2+ ] cyt signal. In turn, ann1 mutants showed elevated chitin-induced rapid responses. In short, molecular components previously shown to function in chitin or salt signaling physically interact and intimately link the downstream responses to fungal attack and salt stress. © 2016 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Chitin and Its Effects on Inflammatory and Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Elieh Ali Komi, Daniel; Sharma, Lokesh; Dela Cruz, Charles S

    2018-04-01

    Chitin, a potential allergy-promoting pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP), is a linear polymer composed of N-acetylglucosamine residues which are linked by β-(1,4)-glycosidic bonds. Mammalians are potential hosts for chitin-containing protozoa, fungi, arthropods, and nematodes; however, mammalians themselves do not synthetize chitin and thus it is considered as a potential target for recognition by mammalian immune system. Chitin is sensed primarily in the lungs or gut where it activates a variety of innate (eosinophils, macrophages) and adaptive immune cells (IL-4/IL-13 expressing T helper type-2 lymphocytes). Chitin induces cytokine production, leukocyte recruitment, and alternative macrophage activation. Intranasal or intraperitoneal administration of chitin (varying in size, degree of acetylation and purity) to mice has been applied as a routine approach to investigate chitin's priming effects on innate and adaptive immunity. Structural chitin present in microorganisms is actively degraded by host true chitinases, including acidic mammalian chitinases and chitotriosidase into smaller fragments that can be sensed by mammalian receptors such as FIBCD1, NKR-P1, and RegIIIc. Immune recognition of chitin also involves pattern recognition receptors, mainly via TLR-2 and Dectin-1, to activate immune cells to induce cytokine production and creation of an immune network that results in inflammatory and allergic responses. In this review, we will focus on various immunological aspects of the interaction between chitin and host immune system such as sensing, interactions with immune cells, chitinases as chitin degrading enzymes, and immunologic applications of chitin.

  10. Chitin Adsorbents for Toxic Metals: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Anastopoulos, Ioannis; Bhatnagar, Amit; Bikiaris, Dimitrios N.; Kyzas, George Z.

    2017-01-01

    Wastewater treatment is still a critical issue all over the world. Among examined methods for the decontamination of wastewaters, adsorption is a promising, cheap, environmentally friendly and efficient procedure. There are various types of adsorbents that have been used to remove different pollutants such as agricultural waste, compost, nanomaterials, algae, etc., Chitin (poly-β-(1,4)-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine) is the second most abundant natural biopolymer and it has attracted scientific attention as an inexpensive adsorbent for toxic metals. This review article provides information about the use of chitin as an adsorbent. A list of chitin adsorbents with maximum adsorption capacity and the best isotherm and kinetic fitting models are provided. Moreover, thermodynamic studies, regeneration studies, the mechanism of adsorption and the experimental conditions are also discussed in depth. PMID:28067848

  11. 2-acylamido analogues of N-acetylglucosamine prime formation of chitin oligosaccharides by yeast chitin synthase 2

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Chitin, a polymer of beta-1,4-linked N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), is a key component of the cell walls of fungi and the exoskeletons of arthropods. Chitin synthases (CSs) transfer GlcNAc from UDP-GlcNAc to pre-existing chitin chains in reactions that are typically stimulated by free GlcNAc. The eff...

  12. Effect of purification method of β-chitin from squid pen on the properties of β-chitin nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Suenaga, Shin; Nikaido, Nozomi; Totani, Kazuhide; Kawasaki, Kazunori; Ito, Yoshihito; Yamashita, Kazuhiko; Osada, Mitsumasa

    2016-10-01

    The relationship between purification methods of β-chitin from squid pen and the physicochemical properties of β-chitin nanofibers (NFs) were investigated. Two types of β-chitin were prepared, with β-chitin (a→b) subjected to acid treatment for decalcification and then base treatment for deproteinization, while β-chitin (b→a) was treated in the opposite order. These β-chitins were disintegrated into NFs using wet pulverization. The β-chitin (b→a) NF dispersion has higher transmittance and viscosity than the β-chitin (a→b) NF dispersion. For the first time, we succeeded in obtaining 3D images of the β-chitin NF dispersion in water by using quick-freeze deep-etch replication with high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy. The β-chitin (b→a) NF dispersion has a denser and more uniform 3D network structure than the β-chitin (a→b) NF dispersion. Widths of the β-chitin (a→b) and (b→a) NFs were approximately 8-25 and 3-10nm, respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Non-indigenous predators threaten ecosystem engineers: Interactive effects of green crab and oyster size on American oyster mortality.

    PubMed

    Pickering, Tyler R; Poirier, Luke A; Barrett, Timothy J; McKenna, Shawn; Davidson, Jeff; Quijón, Pedro A

    2017-06-01

    Non-indigenous green crabs (Carcinus maenas) are emerging as important predators of autogenic engineers like American oysters (Crassostrea virginica) throughout the eastern seaboard of Canada and the United States. To document the spreading distribution of green crabs, we carried out surveys in seven sites of Prince Edward Island during three fall seasons. To assess the potential impact of green crabs on oyster mortality in relation to predator and prey size, we conducted multiple predator-prey manipulations in the field and laboratory. The surveys confirmed an ongoing green crab spread into new productive oyster habitats while rapidly increasing in numbers in areas where crabs had established already. The experiments measured mortality rates on four sizes of oysters exposed to three sizes of crab, and lasted 3-5 days. The outcomes of experiments conducted in Vexar ® bags, laboratory tanks and field cages were consistent and were heavily dependent on both crab size and oyster size: while little predation occurred on large oysters, large and medium green crabs preyed heavily on small sizes. Oysters reached a refuge within the 35-55 mm shell length range; below that range, oysters suffered high mortality due to green crab predation and thus require management measures to enhance their survival. These results are most directly applicable to aquaculture operations and restoration initiatives but have implications for oyster sustainability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. 50 CFR Table 7 to Part 680 - Initial Issuance of Crab QS by Crab QS Fishery

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... used to calculate QS for each QS fishery is: 1. Bristol Bay red king crab (BBR) 4 years of the 5-year..., Western Aleutian Island golden (brown) king crab, Bering Sea snow crab, or Bristol Bay red king crab fisheries. 4 years 5. Pribilof red king and blue king crab (PIK) 4 years of the 5-year period beginning on...

  15. Synthesis and physicochemical characterization of chitin dihexanoate--A new biocompatible chitin derivative--In comparison to chitin dibutyrate.

    PubMed

    Skołucka-Szary, Karolina; Ramięga, Aleksandra; Piaskowska, Wanda; Janicki, Bartosz; Grala, Magdalena; Rieske, Piotr; Bartczak, Zbigniew; Piaskowski, Sylwester

    2016-03-01

    Chitin dihexanoate (DHCH) is the novel biocompatible and technologically friendly highly substituted chitin diester. Here we described optimization of DHCH and chitin dibutyrate (dibutyryl chitin, DBC) synthesis conditions (temperature and reaction time) to obtain desired polymers with high reaction yield, high substitution degree (close to 2) and appropriately high molecular weights. A two-step procedure, employing acidic anhydrides (hexanoic or butyric anhydride) as the acylation agent and methanesulfonic acid both as the catalyst and the reaction medium, was applied. Chemical structures of DBC and DHCH were confirmed by NMR ((1)H and (13)C) and IR investigations. Mechanical properties, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry and biocompatibility (Neutral red uptake assay, Skin Sensitization and Irritation Tests) were assessed. Both polymers proved highly biocompatible (non-cytotoxic in vitro, non-irritating and non-allergic to skin) and soluble in several organic solvents (dimethylformamide, N,N-dimethylacetamide, dimethyl sulfoxide, acetone, ethanol and others). It is worth emphasizing that DHCH and DBC can be easily processed by solvent casting method and the salt-leaching method, what gives the opportunity to prepare highly porous structures, which can be further successfully applied as the material for wound dressings and scaffolds for tissue engineering. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Biodegradation of the chitin-protein complex in crustacean cuticle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Artur, Stankiewicz B.; Mastalerz, Maria; Hof, C.H.J.; Bierstedt, A.; Flannery, M.B.; Briggs, D.E.G.; Evershed, R.P.

    1998-01-01

    Arthropod cuticles consist predominantly of chitin cross-linked with proteins. While there is some experimental evidence that this chitin-protein complex may resist decay, the chemical changes that occur during degradation have not been investigated in detail. The stomatopod crustacean Neogonodactylus oerstedii was decayed in the laboratory under anoxic conditions. A combination of pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and FTIR revealed extensive chemical changes after just 2 weeks that resulted in a cuticle composition dominated by chitin. Quantitative analysis of amino acids (by HPLC) and chitin showed that the major loss of proteins and chitin occurred between weeks 1 and 2. After 8 weeks tyrosine, tryptophan and valine are the most prominent amino acid moieties, showing their resistance to degradation. The presence of cyclic ketones in the pyrolysates indicates that mucopolysaccharides or other bound non-chitinous carbohydrates are also resistant to decay. There is no evidence of structural degradation of chitin prior to 8 weeks when FTIR revealed a reduction in chitin-specific bands. The chemical changes are paralleled by structural changes in the cuticle, which becomes an increasingly open structure consisting of loose chitinous fibres. The rapid rate of decay in the experiments suggests that where chitin and protein are preserved in fossil cuticles degradation must have been inhibited.Arthropod cuticles consist predominantly of chitin cross-linked with proteins. While there is some experimental evidence that this chitin-protein complex may resist decay, the chemical changes that occur during degradation have not been investigated in detail. The stomatopod crustacean Neogonodactylus oerstedii was decayed in the laboratory under anoxic conditions. A combination of pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and FTIR revealed extensive chemical changes after just 2 weeks that resulted in a cuticle composition dominated by chitin. Quantitative

  17. LYM2-dependent chitin perception limits molecular flux via plasmodesmata

    PubMed Central

    Faulkner, Christine; Petutschnig, Elena; Benitez-Alfonso, Yoselin; Beck, Martina; Robatzek, Silke; Lipka, Volker; Maule, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Chitin acts as a pathogen-associated molecular pattern from fungal pathogens whose perception triggers a range of defense responses. We show that LYSIN MOTIF DOMAIN-CONTAINING GLYCOSYLPHOSPHATIDYLINOSITOL-ANCHORED PROTEIN 2 (LYM2), the Arabidopsis homolog of a rice chitin receptor-like protein, mediates a reduction in molecular flux via plasmodesmata in the presence of chitin. For this response, lym2-1 mutants are insensitive to the presence of chitin, but not to the flagellin derivative flg22. Surprisingly, the chitin-recognition receptor CHITIN ELCITOR RECEPTOR KINASE 1 (CERK1) is not required for chitin-induced changes to plasmodesmata flux, suggesting that there are at least two chitin-activated response pathways in Arabidopsis and that LYM2 is not required for CERK1-mediated chitin-triggered defense responses, indicating that these pathways are independent. In accordance with a role in the regulation of intercellular flux, LYM2 is resident at the plasma membrane and is enriched at plasmodesmata. Chitin-triggered regulation of molecular flux between cells is required for defense responses against the fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea, and thus we conclude that the regulation of symplastic continuity and molecular flux between cells is a vital component of chitin-triggered immunity in Arabidopsis. PMID:23674687

  18. EVOLUTION OF THE CRAB NEBULA IN A LOW ENERGY SUPERNOVA

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Haifeng; Chevalier, Roger A., E-mail: hy4px@virginia.edu, E-mail: rac5x@virginia.edu

    The nature of the supernova leading to the Crab Nebula has long been controversial because of the low energy that is present in the observed nebula. One possibility is that there is significant energy in extended fast material around the Crab but searches for such material have not led to detections. An electron capture supernova model can plausibly account for the low energy and the observed abundances in the Crab. Here, we examine the evolution of the Crab pulsar wind nebula inside a freely expanding supernova and find that the observed properties are most consistent with a low energy event.more » Both the velocity and radius of the shell material, and the amount of gas swept up by the pulsar wind point to a low explosion energy (∼10{sup 50} erg). We do not favor a model in which circumstellar interaction powers the supernova luminosity near maximum light because the required mass would limit the freely expanding ejecta.« less

  19. The bioeconomic impact of different management regulations on the Chesapeake Bay blue crab fishery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bunnell, David B.; Lipton, Douglas W.; Miller, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    The harvest of blue crabs Callinectes sapidus in Chesapeake Bay declined 46% between 1993 and 2001 and remained low through 2008. Because the total market value of this fishery has declined by an average of US $ 3.3 million per year since 1993, the commercial fishery has been challenged to maintain profitability. We developed a bioeconomic simulation model of the Chesapeake Bay blue crab fishery to aid managers in determining which regulations will maximize revenues while ensuring a sustainable harvest. We compared 15 different management scenarios, including those implemented by Maryland and Virginia between 2007 and 2009, that sought to reduce female crab harvest and nine others that used seasonal closures, different size regulations, or the elimination of fishing for specific market categories. Six scenarios produced the highest revenues: the 2008 and 2009 Maryland regulations, spring and fall closures for female blue crabs, and 152- and 165-mm maximum size limits for females. Our most important finding was that for each state the 2008 and 2009 scenarios that implemented early closures of the female crab fishery produced higher revenues than the 2007 scenario, in which no early female closures were implemented. We conclude that the use of maximum size limits for female crabs would not be feasible despite their potentially high revenue, given the likelihood that the soft-shell and peeler fisheries cannot be expanded beyond their current capacity and the potentially high mortality rate for culled individuals that are the incorrect size. Our model results support the current use of seasonal closures for females, which permit relatively high exploitation of males and soft-shell and peeler blue crabs (which have high prices) while keeping the female crab harvest sustainable. Further, our bioeconomic model allows for the inclusion of an economic viewpoint along with biological data when target reference points are set by managers.

  20. Identification of mud crab reovirus VP12 and its interaction with the voltage-dependent anion-selective channel protein of mud crab Scylla paramamosain.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hai-Dong; Su, Hong-Jun; Zou, Wei-Bin; Liu, Shan-Shan; Yan, Wen-Rui; Wang, Qian-Qian; Yuan, Li-Li; Chan, Siuming Francis; Yu, Xiao-Qiang; He, Jian-Guo; Weng, Shao-Ping

    2015-05-01

    Mud crab reovirus (MCRV) is the causative agent of a severe disease in cultured mud crab (Scylla paramamosain), which has caused huge economic losses in China. MCRV is a double-stranded RNA virus with 12 genomic segments. In this paper, SDS-PAGE, mass spectrometry and Western blot analyses revealed that the VP12 protein encoded by S12 gene is a structural protein of MCRV. Immune electron microscopy assay indicated that MCRV VP12 is a component of MCRV outer shell capsid. Yeast two hybrid cDNA library of mud crab was constructed and mud crab voltage-dependent anion-selective channel (mcVDAC) was obtained by MCRV VP12 screening. The full length of mcVDAC was 1180 bp with an open reading frame (ORF) of 849 bp encoding a 282 amino acid protein. The mcVDAC had a constitutive expression pattern in different tissues of mud crab. The interaction between MCRV VP12 and mcVDAC was determined by co-immunoprecipitation assay. The results of this study have provided an insight on the mechanisms of MCRV infection and the interactions between the virus and mud crab. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Chitin: 'Forgotten' Source of Nitrogen: From Modern Chitin to Thermally Mature Kerogen: Lessons from Nitrogen Isotope Ratios

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schimmelmann, A.; Wintsch, R.P.; Lewan, M.D.; DeNiro, M.J.

    1998-01-01

    Chitinous biomass represents a major pool of organic nitrogen in living biota and is likely to have contributed some of the fossil organic nitrogen in kerogen. We review the nitrogen isotope biogeochemistry of chitin and present preliminary results suggesting interaction between kerogen and ammonium during thermal maturation. Modern arthropod chitin may shift its nitrogen isotope ratio by a few per mil depending on the chemical method of chitin preparation, mostly because N-containing non-amino-sugar components in chemically complex chitin cannot be removed quantitatively. Acid hydrolysis of chemically complex chitin and subsequent ion-chromatographic purification of the "deacetylated chitin-monomer" D-glucosamine (in hydrochloride form) provides a chemically well-defined, pure amino-sugar substrate for reproducible, high-precision determination of ??15N values in chitin. ??15N values of chitin exhibited a variability of about one per mil within an individual's exoskeleton. The nitrogen isotope ratio differed between old and new exoskeletons by up to 4 per mil. A strong dietary influence on the ??15N value of chitin is indicated by the observation of increasing ??15N values of chitin from marine crustaceans with increasing trophic level. Partial biodegradation of exoskeletons does not significantly influence ??15N values of remaining, chemically preserved amino sugar in chitin. Diagenesis and increasing thermal maturity of sedimentary organic matter, including chitin-derived nitrogen-rich moieties, result in humic compounds much different from chitin and may significantly change bulk ??15N values. Hydrous pyrolysis of immature source rocks at 330??C in contact with 15N-enriched NH4Cl, under conditions of artificial oil generation, demonstrates the abiogenic incorporation of inorganic nitrogen into carbon-bound nitrogen in kerogen. Not all organic nitrogen in natural, thermally mature kerogen is therefore necessarily derived from original organic matter, but may

  2. Variations in prevalence of viral, bacterial, and rhizocephalan diseases and parasites of the blue crab (Callinectes sapidus).

    PubMed

    Rogers, Holly A; Taylor, Sabrina S; Hawke, John P; Anderson Lively, Julie A

    2015-05-01

    Prevalence of blue crab diseases and parasites has not been consistently monitored in the Gulf of Mexico. To establish current prevalence levels and to more fully understand population dynamics, commercial landing trends, and effects of future natural and anthropogenic disasters on animal health, we measured the prevalence of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV), Loxothylacus texanus, shell disease, and Vibrio spp. in blue crabs collected from Louisiana in 2013 and the beginning of 2014. We used PCR to detect WSSV and L. texanus infections, visual gross diagnosis for L. texanus externae and shell disease, and standard microbiological culture techniques and biochemical testing for Vibrio spp. We found no crabs infected with WSSV or L. texanus. Absence of L. texanus parasitization was expected based on the sampled salinities and the sampling focus on large crabs. Shell disease was present at a level of 54.8% and was most prevalent in the winter and summer and least prevalent in the spring. Vibrio spp. were found in the hemolymph of 22.3% of the crabs and prevalence varied by site, season, and sex. Additionally, three of 39 crabs tested were infected with reo-like virus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Abundance of non-native crabs in intertidal habitats of New England with natural and artificial structure.

    PubMed

    Lovely, Christina M; O'Connor, Nancy J; Judge, Michael L

    2015-01-01

    Marine habitats containing complex physical structure (e.g., crevices) can provide shelter from predation for benthic invertebrates. To examine effects of natural and artificial structure on the abundance of intertidal juvenile crabs, 2 experiments were conducted in Kingston Bay, Massachusetts, USA, from July to September, 2012. In the first experiment, structure was manipulated in a two-factor design that was placed in the high intertidal for 3 one-week periods to test for both substrate type (sand vs. rock) and the presence or absence of artificial structure (mesh grow-out bags used in aquaculture, ∼0.5 m(2) with 62 mm(2) mesh openings). The Asian shore crab, Hemigrapsus sanguineus, and small individuals of the green crab, Carcinus maenas, were observed only in the treatments of rocks and mesh bag plus rocks. Most green crabs were small (<6 mm in carapace width) whereas H. sanguineus occurred in a wide range of sizes. In the second experiment, 3 levels of oyster-shell treatments were established using grow-out bags placed on a muddy sand substrate in the low intertidal zone: mesh grow-out bags without shells, grow-out bags with oyster shells, and grow-out bags containing live oysters. Replicate bags were deployed weekly for 7 weeks in a randomized complete block design. All crabs collected in the bags were juvenile C. maenas (1-15 mm carapace width), and numbers of crabs differed 6-fold among treatments, with most crabs present in bags with live oysters (29.5 ± 10.6 m(-2) [mean ± S.D.]) and fewest in bags without shells (4.9 ± 3.7 m(-2)). Both C. maenas and H. sanguineus occurred in habitats with natural structure (cobble rocks). The attraction of juvenile C. maenas to artificial structure consisting of plastic mesh bags containing both oyster shells and living oysters could potentially impact oyster aquaculture operations.

  4. Abundance of non-native crabs in intertidal habitats of New England with natural and artificial structure

    PubMed Central

    Lovely, Christina M.; Judge, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Marine habitats containing complex physical structure (e.g., crevices) can provide shelter from predation for benthic invertebrates. To examine effects of natural and artificial structure on the abundance of intertidal juvenile crabs, 2 experiments were conducted in Kingston Bay, Massachusetts, USA, from July to September, 2012. In the first experiment, structure was manipulated in a two-factor design that was placed in the high intertidal for 3 one-week periods to test for both substrate type (sand vs. rock) and the presence or absence of artificial structure (mesh grow-out bags used in aquaculture, ∼0.5 m2 with 62 mm2 mesh openings). The Asian shore crab, Hemigrapsus sanguineus, and small individuals of the green crab, Carcinus maenas, were observed only in the treatments of rocks and mesh bag plus rocks. Most green crabs were small (<6 mm in carapace width) whereas H. sanguineus occurred in a wide range of sizes. In the second experiment, 3 levels of oyster-shell treatments were established using grow-out bags placed on a muddy sand substrate in the low intertidal zone: mesh grow-out bags without shells, grow-out bags with oyster shells, and grow-out bags containing live oysters. Replicate bags were deployed weekly for 7 weeks in a randomized complete block design. All crabs collected in the bags were juvenile C. maenas (1–15 mm carapace width), and numbers of crabs differed 6-fold among treatments, with most crabs present in bags with live oysters (29.5 ± 10.6 m−2 [mean ± S.D.]) and fewest in bags without shells (4.9 ± 3.7 m−2). Both C. maenas and H. sanguineus occurred in habitats with natural structure (cobble rocks). The attraction of juvenile C. maenas to artificial structure consisting of plastic mesh bags containing both oyster shells and living oysters could potentially impact oyster aquaculture operations. PMID:26401456

  5. What regulates crab predation on mangrove propagules?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Nedervelde, Fleur; Cannicci, Stefano; Koedam, Nico; Bosire, Jared; Dahdouh-Guebas, Farid

    2015-02-01

    Crabs play a major role in some ecosystems. To increase our knowledge about the factors that influence crab predation on propagules in mangrove forests, we performed experiments in Gazi Bay, Kenya in July 2009. We tested whether: (1) crab density influences propagule predation rate; (2) crab size influences food competition and predation rate; (3) crabs depredate at different rates according to propagule and canopy cover species; (4) vegetation density is correlated with crab density; (5) food preferences of herbivorous crabs are determined by size, shape and nutritional value. We found that (1) propagule predation rate was positively correlated to crab density. (2) Crab competitive abilities were unrelated to their size. (3) Avicennia marina propagules were consumed more quickly than Ceriops tagal except under C. tagal canopies. (4) Crab density was negatively correlated with the density of A. marina trees and pneumatophores. (5) Crabs prefer small items with a lower C:N ratio. Vegetation density influences crab density, and crab density affects propagule availability and hence vegetation recruitment rate. Consequently, the mutual relationships between vegetation and crab populations could be important for forest restoration success and management.

  6. Climate Change Effects on Respiration Rates of Blue Crab (Callinectes sapidus) from the Patuxent River, Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyffeler, A.

    2016-02-01

    A rise in atmospheric CO2 induces a greenhouse effect that also causes ocean temperatures and CO2 levels to rise. These environmental changes may represent an additional energetic cost for blue crabs because they rely on the concentration of CO2 in the water to deposit calcium carbonate in their shells. We conducted a respiration experiment to measure the effect of climate change on crab metabolism. Crabs were collected from the Chesapeake Bay and exposed to different heated and acidified conditions. After crabs had been exposed to the environmental conditions in the chambers for two molts, they were placed in respiration chambers to measure rates of oxygen consumption. Results indicated different trends in respiration rates between the treatments, although the patterns were not statistically significant. Crabs exposed to higher temperatures showed elevated respiration rates, while crabs exposed to high CO2 demonstrated decreased respiration rates. The two factors of climate change (high temperature and high CO2) did not demonstrate the highest respiration rate, but rather the crabs exposed to high temperatures and ambient CO2 showed the highest mean respiration rate. These data suggest that crab metabolism may not change as much as expected due to climate changes.

  7. Antarctic Crabs: Invasion or Endurance?

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Huw J.; Whittle, Rowan J.; Roberts, Stephen J.; Belchier, Mark; Linse, Katrin

    2013-01-01

    Recent scientific interest following the “discovery” of lithodid crabs around Antarctica has centred on a hypothesis that these crabs might be poised to invade the Antarctic shelf if the recent warming trend continues, potentially decimating its native fauna. This “invasion hypothesis” suggests that decapod crabs were driven out of Antarctica 40–15 million years ago and are only now returning as “warm” enough habitats become available. The hypothesis is based on a geographically and spatially poor fossil record of a different group of crabs (Brachyura), and examination of relatively few Recent lithodid samples from the Antarctic slope. In this paper, we examine the existing lithodid fossil record and present the distribution and biogeographic patterns derived from over 16,000 records of Recent Southern Hemisphere crabs and lobsters. Globally, the lithodid fossil record consists of only two known specimens, neither of which comes from the Antarctic. Recent records show that 22 species of crabs and lobsters have been reported from the Southern Ocean, with 12 species found south of 60°S. All are restricted to waters warmer than 0°C, with their Antarctic distribution limited to the areas of seafloor dominated by Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW). Currently, CDW extends further and shallower onto the West Antarctic shelf than the known distribution ranges of most lithodid species examined. Geological evidence suggests that West Antarctic shelf could have been available for colonisation during the last 9,000 years. Distribution patterns, species richness, and levels of endemism all suggest that, rather than becoming extinct and recently re-invading from outside Antarctica, the lithodid crabs have likely persisted, and even radiated, on or near to Antarctic slope. We conclude there is no evidence for a modern-day “crab invasion”. We recommend a repeated targeted lithodid sampling program along the West Antarctic shelf to fully test the validity of the

  8. Chitovibrin: a chitin-binding lectin from Vibrio parahemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Gildemeister, O S; Zhu, B C; Laine, R A

    1994-12-01

    A novel 134 kDa, calcium-independent chitin-binding lectin, 'chitovibrin', is secreted by the marine bacterium Vibrio parahemolyticus, inducible with chitin or chitin-oligomers. Chitovibrin shows no apparent enzymatic activity but exhibits a strong affinity for chitin and chito-oligomers > dp9. The protein has an isoelectric pH of 3.6, shows thermal tolerance, binds chitin with an optimum at pH 6 and is active in 0-4 M NaCl. Chitovibrin appears to be completely different from other reported Vibrio lectins and may function to bind V. parahemolyticus to chitin substrates, or to capture or sequester chito-oligomers. It may be a member of a large group of recently described proteins in Vibrios related to a complex chitinoclastic (chitinivorous) system.

  9. Implications of molecular diversity of chitin and its derivatives.

    PubMed

    Khan, Faez Iqbal; Rahman, Safikur; Queen, Aarfa; Ahamad, Shahzaib; Ali, Sher; Kim, Jihoe; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2017-05-01

    Chitin is a long unbranched polysaccharide, made up of β-1,4-linked N-acetylglucosamine which forms crystalline fiber-like structure. It is present in the fungal cell walls, insect and crustacean cuticles, nematode eggshells, and protozoa cyst. We provide a critical appraisal on the chemical modifications of chitin and its derivatives in the context of their improved efficacy in medical applications without any side effect. Recent advancement in nanobiotechnology has helped to synthesize several chitin derivatives having significant biological applications. Here, we discuss the molecular diversity of chitin and its applications in enzyme immobilization, wound healing, packaging material, controlled drug release, biomedical imaging, gene therapy, agriculture, biosensor, and cosmetics. Also, we highlighted chitin and its derivatives as an antioxidant, antimicrobial agent, anticoagulant material, food additive, and hypocholesterolemic agent. We envisage that chitin and chitosan-based nanomaterials with their potential applications would augment nanobiotechnology and biomedical industries.

  10. Like night and day: Reversals of thermal gradients across ghost crab burrows and their implications for thermal ecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Gregory S.; Gregory, Emily A.; Johnstone, Charmaine; Berlino, Manuel; Green, David W.; Peterson, Nicola R.; Schoeman, David S.; Watson, Jolanta A.

    2018-04-01

    Ghost crabs, Ocypode cordimanus, inhabit relatively hostile environments subject to thermal fluctuations, including both diurnal and seasonal cycles. For many ectotherms, including ghost crabs, a major challenge is to remain cool during hot daytime temperatures. This can be achieved by adopting a fossorial lifestyle, taking advantage of thermal refuge afforded by burrows of sufficient depth. Another consideration, often overlooked, is the potential advantage associated with ready access to a thermal energy source (a "charging station") when surface temperatures are cooler. Being able to rapidly elevate body temperature during cool periods would enhance the crab's ability to maintain rate processes and carry out essential activities. We have measured ghost crab burrow temperature profiles at two times of the day with contrasting sun exposure (06:00 and 14:00), demonstrating how effective burrow depth (up to a maximum of 40 cm) provides thermal regulation below the surface of the sand (e.g., at dawn (06:00) and early afternoon (14:00) at a depth of 5 cm, temperatures (±SD) of 16.32 ± 0.96 °C and 25.04 ± 1.47 °C were recorded, respectively. Corresponding temperatures at a depth of 30 cm were 19.17 ± 0.59 °C and 19.78 ± 1.60 °C, respectively). This demonstrates that while temperature conditions at the surface vary dramatically from night to day, ghost crab burrows can maintain relatively constant temperatures at the burrow base throughout the diurnal cycle, at least during winter. As a consequence, the burrow heat signatures undergo a corresponding thermal gradient reversal between night and day, as revealed by infra-red photography. Complementing these field observations, we also determined heating and cooling times/constants for O. cordimanus in the laboratory (τ = 17.54 and 16.59 JK-1, respectively), and analysed chemical composition of their carapace (external (with β Chitin evident) and internal (predominance of α Chitin)), which is the primary thermal

  11. Chitin and Chitosan as Direct Compression Excipients in Pharmaceutical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Badwan, Adnan A.; Rashid, Iyad; Al Omari, Mahmoud M.H.; Darras, Fouad H.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the numerous uses of chitin and chitosan as new functional materials of high potential in various fields, they are still behind several directly compressible excipients already dominating pharmaceutical applications. There are, however, new attempts to exploit chitin and chitosan in co-processing techniques that provide a product with potential to act as a direct compression (DC) excipient. This review outlines the compression properties of chitin and chitosan in the context of DC pharmaceutical applications. PMID:25810109

  12. Degree of deacetylation chitosan from pen shell (Atrina pectinata) with multistage deacetylation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pursetyo, Kustiawan Tri; Purbowati, Pinta; Sulmartiwi, Laksmi

    2017-02-01

    The utilization of pen shell (Atrina pectinata) generally in some areas only as edible portion adductor muscle (meat) so the shells become fishery waste. Shells are raw materials that contain chitin and chitosan. Benefits of chitin and chitosan in various fields of modern industry are quite a lot, including in the pharmaceutical industry, biochemistry, biotechnology, biomedical, food, nutrition, paper, textile, agriculture, cosmetics, and healthcare membrane. Quality of chitosan is influenced by deacetylation degree which is one of the most important chemical characteristics. Deacetylation degree gives affect in application of chitosan, due to the value of amina chain and used to differentiate between chitin and chitosan. Deacetylation degrees of chitosan are determined by several factors such as NaOH concentration, temperature and time process. In addition, treatment of deacetylation process of chitin can give effect to deacetylation degree value of chitosan. The method that was used in this research was an experimental method with a statistical analysis of the data. The results showed that stage deacetylation process of chitin have the effect to increase deacetylation degree of chitosan. Multistage deacetylation process of chitin with 3 stage process was capable to make the deacetylation degree on average 75% with 82.91% of solubility. The increase result of deacetylation degree of chitosan is directly proportional with the increase in solubility

  13. Wet spinning of fibers made of chitosan and chitin nanofibrils.

    PubMed

    Yudin, Vladimir E; Dobrovolskaya, Irina P; Neelov, Igor M; Dresvyanina, Elena N; Popryadukhin, Pavel V; Ivan'kova, Elena M; Elokhovskii, Vladimir Yu; Kasatkin, Igor A; Okrugin, Boris M; Morganti, Pierfrancesco

    2014-08-08

    Biocompatible and bioresorbable composite fibers consisting of chitosan filled with anisotropic chitin nanofibrils with the length of 600-800 nm and cross section of about 11-12 nm as revealed by SEM and XRD were prepared by coagulation. Both chitin and chitosan components of the composite fibers displayed preferred orientations. Orientation of chitosan molecules induced by chitin nanocrystallites was confirmed by molecular modeling. The incorporation of 0.1-0.3 wt.% of chitin nanofibrils into chitosan matrix led to an increase in strength and Young modulus of the composite fibers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Dungeness crab, Cancer magister, do not extrude eggs annually in southeastern Alaska: An in situ study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swiney, K.M.; Shirley, Thomas C.; Taggart, S. James; O'Clair, Charles E.

    2003-01-01

    The reproductive biology of female Dungeness crabs was studied with crab-pot and dive-transect sampling in five bays within or near Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, southeastern Alaska, in April and September yearly from 1992 to 1998. A large percentage of nonovigerous, mature females was found in April, a time when females were expected to be brooding eggs that hatch in May and June. Our study examined differences between ovigerous and nonovigerous females collected in April and September samples to corroborate our previous laboratory study in which we found nonannual egg extrusion among Dungeness crabs. Seasonal differences in the catches of ovigerous and nonovigerous females, crab sizes, shell condition, and appendage injury were examined. Additionally, all crabs collected from two bays were tagged beginning in the fall of 1995; tagging was conducted twice annually. Our pot and dive data indicate that females, particularly larger ones, do not extrude eggs annually. Larger females have lower molting probabilities, which limits mating potential and increases reliance on stored sperm. The tagging study confirmed that at least some females do not extrude eggs in one year and then extrude eggs at a later time without molting, thus skipping at least one reproductive season. A reproductive cycle of Dungeness crabs in Alaska is introduced which includes earlier egg extrusion by larger females and nonannual egg extrusion.

  15. Composted oyster shell as lime fertilizer is more effective than fresh oyster shell.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Han; Islam, Shah Md Asraful; Hong, Sun Joo; Cho, Kye Man; Math, Renukaradhya K; Heo, Jae Young; Kim, Hoon; Yun, Han Dae

    2010-01-01

    Physio-chemical changes in oyster shell were examined, and fresh and composted oyster shell meals were compared as lime fertilizers in soybean cultivation. Structural changes in oyster shell were observed by AFM and FE-SEM. We found that grains of the oyster shell surface became smoother and smaller over time. FT-IR analysis indicated the degradation of a chitin-like compound of oyster shell. In chemical analysis, pH (12.3+/-0.24), electrical conductivity (4.1+/-0.24 dS m(-1)), and alkaline powder (53.3+/-1.12%) were highest in commercial lime. Besides, pH was higher in composted oyster shell meal (9.9+/-0.53) than in fresh oyster shell meal (8.4+/-0.32). The highest organic matter (1.1+/-0.08%), NaCl (0.54+/-0.03%), and moisture (15.1+/-1.95%) contents were found in fresh oyster shell meal. A significant higher yield of soybean (1.33 t ha(-1)) was obtained by applying composted oyster shell meal (a 21% higher yield than with fresh oyster shell meal). Thus composting of oyster shell increases the utility of oyster shell as a liming material for crop cultivation.

  16. Most Detailed Image of the Crab Nebula

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-12-01

    The Crab Nebula is one of the most intricately structured and highly dynamical objects ever observed. The new Hubble image of the Crab was assembled from 24 individual exposures taken with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope

  17. Pubic "Crab" Lice Prevention and Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... and General Public. Contact Us Parasites Home Prevention & Control Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Pubic ("crab") ... that can be taken to help prevent and control the spread of pubic ("crab") lice: All sexual ...

  18. Monitoring The Crab Pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rots, Arnold H.; Swank, Jean (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The monitoring of the X-ray pulses from the Crab pulsar is still ongoing at the time of this writing, and we hope to be able to continue the campaign for the life of the XTE mission. We have established beyond all doubt that: (1) the X-ray main pulse leads the radio pulse by approximately 300 microseconds, (2) this phase lag is constant and not influenced by glitches, (3) this lag does not depend on X-ray energy, (4) the relative phase of the two X-ray pulses does not vary, and (5) the spectral indices of primary, secondary, and inter-pulse are distinct and constant. At this time we are investigating whether the radio timing ephemeris can be replaced by an x-ray ephemeris and whether any long-time timing ephemeris can be established. If so, it would enable use to study variations in pulse arrival times at a longer time scales. Such a study is easier in x-rays than at radio wavelengths since the dispersion measure plays no role. These results were reported at the 2000 HEAD Meeting in Honolulu, HI. Travel was paid partly out of this grant. The remainder was applied toward the acquisition of a laptop computer that allows independent and fast analysis of all monitoring observations.

  19. Fabrication of cationic chitin nanofiber/alginate composite materials.

    PubMed

    Sato, Koki; Tanaka, Kohei; Takata, Yusei; Yamamoto, Kazuya; Kadokawa, Jun-Ichi

    2016-10-01

    We have already found that an amidinated chitin, which was prepared by the reaction of a partially deacetylated chitin with N,N-dimethylacetamide dimethyl acetal, was converted into an amidinium chitin bicarbonate with nanofiber morphology by CO2 gas bubbling and ultrasonic treatments in water. In this study, we performed the fabrication of composite materials of such cationic chitin nanofibers with an anionic polysaccharide, sodium alginate, by ion exchange. When the amidinium chitin bicarbonate nanofiber aqueous dispersion was added to an aqueous solution of sodium alginate, the composite material was agglomerated, which was isolated by centrifugation, filtration, and lyophilization, to form a manipulatable sheet. The morphology of the resulting sheet at nano-scale was evaluated by SEM measurement. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. What's Inside the Shell?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, John D.

    1983-01-01

    Marine hermit crabs are a simple and exciting way to introduce landlocked students to the ocean. Tips for keeping the crabs in the classroom, crab anatomy/behavior, and student activities (including a challenge to students to race their crabs) are discussed. (Author/JN)

  1. Effects of acidifying ocean conditions on growth and survival of two life stages of the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giltz, S.; Taylor, C.

    2016-02-01

    Blue crabs, Callinectes sapidus, begin their larval phase offshore and circulate for approximately 30 days before settling near shore. As crabs transition to the juvenile stage, they move into coastal or estuarine environments characterized by lower salinity. Presently the average pH of the ocean is 8.1, 30% down from the beginning of the industrial revolution and is forecasted to drop to 7.8 by 2100. Decreasing pH causes dissolution of calcium carbonate shells, but the overall effects on crustaceans, such as blue crabs, are unknown. This study investigated the effect of a lower pH environment on the growth, survival, carapace hardness and molt frequency of larval and juvenile blue crabs in the Northern Gulf of Mexico. Larval crabs showed delayed growth under low pH (7.8) conditions compared to crabs in a control (present day) pH (8.1) environment. Population crashes (complete mortality) were experienced in 55% of the low pH aquaria but not in any of the control aquaria, suggesting that acidification poses a mortality risk. Under low pH conditions the intermolt duration decreased in juveniles, but the body length and weight did not differ from crabs raised in the control pH. Larvae (in tanks that did not crash) and juveniles did not experience increased mortality from a lower pH, but there do appear to be sublethal effects on growth and molting that differ between life history stages.

  2. The kinase LYK5 is a major chitin receptor in Arabidopsis and forms a chitin-induced complex with related kinase CERK1

    DOE PAGES

    Cao, Yangrong; Liang, Yan; Tanaka, Kiwamu; ...

    2014-10-23

    Chitin is a fungal microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP) that is recognized in Arabidopsis by a lysin motif receptor kinase (LYK), AtCERK1. Previous research suggested that AtCERK1 is the major chitin receptor in plants and mediates chitin-induced signaling through homodimerization and phosphorylation. However, the reported chitin binding affinity of AtCERK1 is quite low, suggesting another receptor with high chitin binding affinity might be present. Here, we propose that AtLYK5 is the primary chitin receptor in Arabidopsis. Mutations in AtLYK5 resulted in a significant reduction in the plant chitin response. However, AtLYK5 shares overlapping function with AtLYK4 and, therefore, only AtLYK4/AtLYK5-2 doublemore » mutants show a complete loss of chitin response. AtLYK5 interacts with AtCERK1 in a chitin-dependent manner. Chitin binding to AtLYK5 is indispensable for chitin-induced AtCERK1 phosphorylation. AtLYK5 binds chitin at a much higher affinity than AtCERK1. Furthermore, the data suggest that AtLYK5 is the primary plant receptor for chitin, forming a chitin inducible complex with AtCERK1 to induce plant innate immunity.« less

  3. The kinase LYK5 is a major chitin receptor in Arabidopsis and forms a chitin-induced complex with related kinase CERK1

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Yangrong; Liang, Yan; Tanaka, Kiwamu

    Chitin is a fungal microbe-associated molecular pattern recognized in Arabidopsis by a lysin motif receptor kinase (LYK), AtCERK1. Previous research suggested that AtCERK1 is the major chitin receptor and mediates chitin-induced signaling through homodimerization and phosphorylation. However, the reported chitin binding affinity of AtCERK1 is quite low, suggesting another receptor with high chitin binding affinity might be present. Here, we propose that AtLYK5 is the primary chitin receptor in Arabidopsis. Mutations in AtLYK5 resulted in a significant reduction in chitin response. AtLYK5 shares overlapping function with AtLYK4 and, therefore, Atlyk4/Atlyk5-2 double mutants show a complete loss of chitin response. AtLYK5more » interacts with AtCERK1 in a chitin-dependent manner. Chitin binding to AtLYK5 is indispensable for chitin-induced AtCERK1 phosphorylation. AtLYK5 binds chitin at a much higher affinity than AtCERK1. The data suggest that AtLYK5 is the primary receptor for chitin, forming a chitin inducible complex with AtCERK1 to induce plant immunity.« less

  4. The kinase LYK5 is a major chitin receptor in Arabidopsis and forms a chitin-induced complex with related kinase CERK1

    DOE PAGES

    Cao, Yangrong; Liang, Yan; Tanaka, Kiwamu; ...

    2014-10-23

    Chitin is a fungal microbe-associated molecular pattern recognized in Arabidopsis by a lysin motif receptor kinase (LYK), AtCERK1. Previous research suggested that AtCERK1 is the major chitin receptor and mediates chitin-induced signaling through homodimerization and phosphorylation. However, the reported chitin binding affinity of AtCERK1 is quite low, suggesting another receptor with high chitin binding affinity might be present. Here, we propose that AtLYK5 is the primary chitin receptor in Arabidopsis. Mutations in AtLYK5 resulted in a significant reduction in chitin response. AtLYK5 shares overlapping function with AtLYK4 and, therefore, Atlyk4/Atlyk5-2 double mutants show a complete loss of chitin response. AtLYK5more » interacts with AtCERK1 in a chitin-dependent manner. Chitin binding to AtLYK5 is indispensable for chitin-induced AtCERK1 phosphorylation. AtLYK5 binds chitin at a much higher affinity than AtCERK1. The data suggest that AtLYK5 is the primary receptor for chitin, forming a chitin inducible complex with AtCERK1 to induce plant immunity.« less

  5. The kinase LYK5 is a major chitin receptor in Arabidopsis and forms a chitin-induced complex with related kinase CERK1

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yangrong; Liang, Yan; Tanaka, Kiwamu; Nguyen, Cuong T; Jedrzejczak, Robert P; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Stacey, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Chitin is a fungal microbe-associated molecular pattern recognized in Arabidopsis by a lysin motif receptor kinase (LYK), AtCERK1. Previous research suggested that AtCERK1 is the major chitin receptor and mediates chitin-induced signaling through homodimerization and phosphorylation. However, the reported chitin binding affinity of AtCERK1 is quite low, suggesting another receptor with high chitin binding affinity might be present. Here, we propose that AtLYK5 is the primary chitin receptor in Arabidopsis. Mutations in AtLYK5 resulted in a significant reduction in chitin response. However, AtLYK5 shares overlapping function with AtLYK4 and, therefore, Atlyk4/Atlyk5-2 double mutants show a complete loss of chitin response. AtLYK5 interacts with AtCERK1 in a chitin-dependent manner. Chitin binding to AtLYK5 is indispensable for chitin-induced AtCERK1 phosphorylation. AtLYK5 binds chitin at a much higher affinity than AtCERK1. The data suggest that AtLYK5 is the primary receptor for chitin, forming a chitin inducible complex with AtCERK1 to induce plant immunity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03766.001 PMID:25340959

  6. The kinase LYK5 is a major chitin receptor in Arabidopsis and forms a chitin-induced complex with related kinase CERK1

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Yangrong; Liang, Yan; Tanaka, Kiwamu

    Chitin is a fungal microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP) that is recognized in Arabidopsis by a lysin motif receptor kinase (LYK), AtCERK1. Previous research suggested that AtCERK1 is the major chitin receptor in plants and mediates chitin-induced signaling through homodimerization and phosphorylation. However, the reported chitin binding affinity of AtCERK1 is quite low, suggesting another receptor with high chitin binding affinity might be present. Here, we propose that AtLYK5 is the primary chitin receptor in Arabidopsis. Mutations in AtLYK5 resulted in a significant reduction in the plant chitin response. However, AtLYK5 shares overlapping function with AtLYK4 and, therefore, only AtLYK4/AtLYK5-2 doublemore » mutants show a complete loss of chitin response. AtLYK5 interacts with AtCERK1 in a chitin-dependent manner. Chitin binding to AtLYK5 is indispensable for chitin-induced AtCERK1 phosphorylation. AtLYK5 binds chitin at a much higher affinity than AtCERK1. Furthermore, the data suggest that AtLYK5 is the primary plant receptor for chitin, forming a chitin inducible complex with AtCERK1 to induce plant innate immunity.« less

  7. Chitin utilization by the insect-transmitted bacterium Xylella fastidiosa.

    PubMed

    Killiny, Nabil; Prado, Simone S; Almeida, Rodrigo P P

    2010-09-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is an insect-borne bacterium that colonizes xylem vessels of a large number of host plants, including several crops of economic importance. Chitin is a polysaccharide present in the cuticle of leafhopper vectors of X. fastidiosa and may serve as a carbon source for this bacterium. Biological assays showed that X. fastidiosa reached larger populations in the presence of chitin. Additionally, chitin induced phenotypic changes in this bacterium, notably increasing adhesiveness. Quantitative PCR assays indicated transcriptional changes in the presence of chitin, and an enzymatic assay demonstrated chitinolytic activity by X. fastidiosa. An ortholog of the chitinase A gene (chiA) was identified in the X. fastidiosa genome. The in silico analysis revealed that the open reading frame of chiA encodes a protein of 351 amino acids with an estimated molecular mass of 40 kDa. chiA is in a locus that consists of genes implicated in polysaccharide degradation. Moreover, this locus was also found in the genomes of closely related bacteria in the genus Xanthomonas, which are plant but not insect associated. X. fastidiosa degraded chitin when grown on a solid chitin-yeast extract-agar medium and grew in liquid medium with chitin as the sole carbon source; ChiA was also determined to be secreted. The gene encoding ChiA was cloned into Escherichia coli, and endochitinase activity was detected in the transformant, showing that the gene is functional and involved in chitin degradation. The results suggest that X. fastidiosa may use its vectors' foregut surface as a carbon source. In addition, chitin may trigger X. fastidiosa's gene regulation and biofilm formation within vectors. Further work is necessary to characterize the role of chitin and its utilization in X. fastidiosa.

  8. A Venom Gland Extracellular Chitin-Binding-Like Protein from Pupal Endoparasitoid Wasps, Pteromalus Puparum, Selectively Binds Chitin

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Chitin-binding proteins (CBPs) existed in various species and involved in different biology processes. In the present study, we cloned a full length cDNA of chitin-binding protein-like (PpCBP-like) from Pteromalus puparum, a pupal endoparasitoid of Pieris rapae. PpCBP-like encoded a 96 putative amin...

  9. 50 CFR 253.30 - Crab IFQ loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...: (1) Crab means those crab species managed under the Fishery Management Plan for Bering Sea/Aleutian... eligibility requirements to fish for crab or hold Crab QS contained in the Crab FMP implementing regulations... of any person determined by RAM to be unable to receive such certification will be declined...

  10. 50 CFR 253.30 - Crab IFQ loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...: (1) Crab means those crab species managed under the Fishery Management Plan for Bering Sea/Aleutian... eligibility requirements to fish for crab or hold Crab QS contained in the Crab FMP implementing regulations... of any person determined by RAM to be unable to receive such certification will be declined...

  11. 50 CFR 253.30 - Crab IFQ loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...: (1) Crab means those crab species managed under the Fishery Management Plan for Bering Sea/Aleutian... eligibility requirements to fish for crab or hold Crab QS contained in the Crab FMP implementing regulations... of any person determined by RAM to be unable to receive such certification will be declined...

  12. 50 CFR 253.30 - Crab IFQ loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...: (1) Crab means those crab species managed under the Fishery Management Plan for Bering Sea/Aleutian... eligibility requirements to fish for crab or hold Crab QS contained in the Crab FMP implementing regulations... of any person determined by RAM to be unable to receive such certification will be declined...

  13. Niche construction drives social dependence in hermit crabs.

    PubMed

    Laidre, Mark E

    2012-10-23

    Organisms can receive not only a genetic inheritance from their ancestors but also an ecological inheritance, involving modifications their ancestors made to the environment through niche construction. Ecological inheritances may persist as a legacy, potentially generating selection pressures that favor sociality. Yet, most proposed cases of sociality being impacted by an ecological inheritance come from organisms that live among close kin and were highly social before their niche construction began. Here, I show that in terrestrial hermit crabs (Coenobita compressus)--organisms that do not live with kin and reside alone, each in its own shell--niche-construction drives social dependence, such that individuals can only survive in remodeled shells handed down from conspecifics. These results suggest that niche construction can be an important initiator of evolutionary pressures to socialize, even among unrelated and otherwise asocial organisms. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. First report on chitinous holdfast in sponges (Porifera).

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, Hermann; Kaluzhnaya, Oksana V; Tsurkan, Mikhail V; Ereskovsky, Alexander; Tabachnick, Konstantin R; Ilan, Micha; Stelling, Allison; Galli, Roberta; Petrova, Olga V; Nekipelov, Serguei V; Sivkov, Victor N; Vyalikh, Denis; Born, René; Behm, Thomas; Ehrlich, Andre; Chernogor, Lubov I; Belikov, Sergei; Janussen, Dorte; Bazhenov, Vasilii V; Wörheide, Gert

    2013-07-07

    A holdfast is a root- or basal plate-like structure of principal importance that anchors aquatic sessile organisms, including sponges, to hard substrates. There is to date little information about the nature and origin of sponges' holdfasts in both marine and freshwater environments. This work, to our knowledge, demonstrates for the first time that chitin is an important structural component within holdfasts of the endemic freshwater demosponge Lubomirskia baicalensis. Using a variety of techniques (near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure, Raman, electrospray ionization mas spectrometry, Morgan-Elson assay and Calcofluor White staining), we show that chitin from the sponge holdfast is much closer to α-chitin than to β-chitin. Most of the three-dimensional fibrous skeleton of this sponge consists of spicule-containing proteinaceous spongin. Intriguingly, the chitinous holdfast is not spongin-based, and is ontogenetically the oldest part of the sponge body. Sequencing revealed the presence of four previously undescribed genes encoding chitin synthases in the L. baicalensis sponge. This discovery of chitin within freshwater sponge holdfasts highlights the novel and specific functions of this biopolymer within these ancient sessile invertebrates.

  15. Dopamine-Mediated Sclerotization of Regenerated Chitin in Ionic Liquid.

    PubMed

    Oh, Dongyeop X; Shin, Sara; Lim, Chanoong; Hwang, Dong Soo

    2013-09-06

    Chitin is a promising structural material for biomedical applications, due to its many advantageous properties and abundance in nature. However, its usage and development in the biomedical field have been stagnant, because of chitin's poor mechanical properties in wet conditions and the difficulties in transforming it into an applicable form. To overcome these challenges, we created a novel biomimetic chitin composite. This regenerated chitin, prepared with ionic liquid, showed improved mechanical properties in wet conditions by mimicking insect cuticle and squid beak sclerotization, i.e. , catechol-meditated cross-linking. By ionic liquid-based heat treatment, dopamine oxidation produced melanin-like compounds and dopamine-meditated cross-links without any solvent evaporation and oxidant utilization. The dopamine-meditated sclerotization increased the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of the regenerated chitin by 2.52-fold, measured after six weeks of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) submersion. In addition, the linear swelling ratio (LSR) of the chitin film was reduced by about 22%. This strategy raises a possibility of using regenerated chitin as an artificial hard tissue in wet conditions.

  16. Chitin and chitinase: Role in pathogenicity, allergenicity and health.

    PubMed

    Patel, Seema; Goyal, Arun

    2017-04-01

    Chitin, a polysaccharide with particular abundance in fungi, nematodes and arthropods is immunogenic. It acts as a threat to other organisms, to tackle which they have been endowed with chitinase enzyme. Even if this enzyme is not present in all organisms, they possess proteins having chitin-binding domain(s) (ChtBD). Many lethal viruses like Ebola, and HCV (Hepatitis C virus) have these domains to manipulate their carriers and target organisms. In keeping with the basic rule of survival, the self-origin (own body component) chitins and chitinases are protective, but that of non-self origin (from other organisms) are detrimental to health. The exogenous chitins and chitinases provoke human innate immunity to generate a deluge of inflammatory cytokines, which injure organs (leading to asthma, atopic dermatitis etc.), and in persistent situations lead to death (multiple sclerosis, systemic lupus erythromatosus (SLE), cancer, etc.). Unfortunately, chitin-chitinase-stimulated hypersensitivity is a common cause of occupational allergy. On the other hand, chitin, and its deacetylated derivative chitosan are increasingly proving useful in pharmaceutical, agriculture, and biocontrol applications. This critical review discusses the complex nexus of chitin and chitinase and assesses both their pathogenic as well as utilitarian aspects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Chitin biosynthesis: does it involve a lipid-bound intermediate

    SciTech Connect

    Bade, M.L.

    1983-01-01

    In plants and animals, mechanical support is provided by insoluble extracellular fibers of high molecular weight which, in many invertebrates and fungi, consist in part of the nitrogen-containing carbohydrate chitin. At least in animals, chitin may be covalently bonded to protein. This possibility has given rise to the persistent search for a lipid-bound intermediate in chitin biosynthesis, since for certain glycoproteins such involvement is well established. Cell-free chitin synthetase systems from yeasts have been prepared, purified, and to some extent characterized. For such systems, in the cases where the product has been unequivocally identified as chitin, involvement of a lipid-boundmore » intermediate is most unlikely. Chitin synthesis by particulate cell-free preparations has been claimed for both crustaceans and insects. Careful inspection of the evidence in the latter instances reveals either that the synthetase is probably of microorganismic origin, or that the available results do not convincingly support the conclusions drawn from them. Semi-in vitro work involving short- or longer-term culture of epithelial cells synthesizing chitin has been done successfully in a number of laboratories. In cases where the question of lipid-bound intermediates has been addressed, the evidence has tended to militate against such involvement in insects and for it in crustaceans, but the evidence is as yet inconclusive. Further work is needed.« less

  18. Comparative brain architecture of the European shore crab Carcinus maenas (Brachyura) and the common hermit crab Pagurus bernhardus (Anomura) with notes on other marine hermit crabs.

    PubMed

    Krieger, Jakob; Sombke, Andy; Seefluth, Florian; Kenning, Matthes; Hansson, Bill S; Harzsch, Steffen

    2012-04-01

    The European shore crab Carcinus maenas and the common hermit crab Pagurus bernhardus are members of the sister taxa Brachyura and Anomura (together forming the taxon Meiura) respectively. Both species share similar coastal marine habitats and thus are confronted with similar environmental conditions. This study sets out to explore variations of general brain architecture of species that live in seemingly similar habitats but belong to different major malacostracan taxa and to understand possible differences of sensory systems and related brain compartments. We examined the brains of Carcinus maenas, Pagurus bernhardus, and three other hermit crab species with immunohistochemistry against tyrosinated tubulin, f-actin, synaptic proteins, RF-amides and allatostatin. Our comparison showed that their optic neuropils within the eyestalks display strong resemblance in gross morphology as well as in detailed organization, suggesting a rather similar potential of processing visual input. Besides the well-developed visual system, the olfactory neuropils are distinct components in the brain of both C. maenas and P. bernhardus as well as the other hermit crabs, suggesting that close integration of olfactory and visual information may be useful in turbid marine environments with low visibility, as is typical for many habitats such as, e.g., the Baltic and the North Sea. Comparing the shape of the olfactory glomeruli in the anomurans showed some variations, ranging from a wedge shape to an elongate morphology. Furthermore, the tritocerebrum and the organization of the second antennae associated with the tritocerebrum seem to differ markedly in C. maenas and P. bernhardus, indicating better mechanosensory abilities in the latter close to those of other Decapoda with long second antennae, such as Astacida, Homarida, or Achelata. This aspect may also represent an adaptation to the "hermit lifestyle" in which competition for shells is a major aspect of their life history. The shore

  19. The occurrence of chitin in the hemocytes of invertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Heath-Heckman, Elizabeth A.C.; McFall-Ngai, Margaret J.

    2011-01-01

    The light-organ symbiosis of Euprymna scolopes, the Hawaiian bobtail squid, is a useful model for the study of animal–microbe interactions. Recent analyses have demonstrated that chitin breakdown products play a role in communication between E. scolopes and its bacterial symbiont Vibrio fischeri. In this study, we sought to determine the source of chitin in the symbiotic organ. We used a commercially available chitin-binding protein (CBP) conjugated to fluorescein to label the polymeric chitin in host tissues. Confocal microscopy revealed that the only cells in contact with the symbionts that labeled with the probe were the macrophage-like hemocytes, which traffic into the light-organ crypts where the bacteria reside. Labeling of extracted hemocytes by CBP was markedly decreased following treatment with purified chitinase, providing further evidence that the labeled molecule is polymeric chitin. Further, CBP-positive areas co-localized with both a halide peroxidase antibody and Lysotracker, a lysosomal marker, suggesting that the chitin-like biomolecule occurs in the lysosome or acidic vacuoles. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of hemocytes revealed mRNA coding for a chitin synthase, suggesting that the hemocytes synthesize chitin de novo. Finally, upon surveying blood cells from other invertebrate species, we observed CBP-positive regions in all granular blood cells examined, suggesting that this feature is a shared character among the invertebrates; the vertebrate blood cells that we sampled did not label with CBP. Although the function of the chitin-like material remains undetermined, its presence and subcellular location in invertebrate hemocytes suggests a conserved role for this polysaccharide in the immune system of diverse animals. PMID:21723107

  20. The chemical composition of the egg shells of the potato cyst-nematode, Heterodera rostochiensis Woll

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, A. J.; Cox, Patricia M.; Shepherd, Audrey M.

    1967-01-01

    1. Eggs of the potato cyst-nematode (Heterodera rostochiensis Woll.) were isolated by sieving a suspension of crushed cysts. Eggs were broken open by ultrasonic vibration and the egg shells separated from the released larvae by centrifuging in a potassium tartrate density gradient. About 1 mg. of dried egg shells was obtained from 1000 cysts. 2. The major constituent of the egg shells was protein (59%, calculated from nitrogen content). About 80% of the egg shells went into solution on acid hydrolysis. Of the 18 amino acids determined with the Technicon Auto-Analyser, proline was most abundant and, with aspartic acid, glycine and serine, made up about 64% by weight of the total amino acids. The small amounts of aromatic and sulphur-containing amino acids, and the presence of hydroxy-proline, indicate a collagen-like protein. 3. The egg shells gave a positive van Wisselingh colour test for chitin, and glucosamine was detected in their acid hydrolysate by chromatography. The glucosamine content of the egg shells, determined by the Elson–Morgan colorimetric method, was 7%, corresponding to about 9% chitin. 4. Dried egg shells contained about 7% of lipid, 6% of carbohydrate and 3% of ash. Polyphenols (3% by weight of the egg shells) were detected in the acid hydrolysates. 5. Neither the collagen nor the chitin showed evidence of crystallinity when examined by X-ray diffraction. PMID:6069200

  1. PARASITIC AND SYMBIOTIC FAUNA IN OYSTERS (CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA) AND MUD CRABS (PANOPEUS SPP.) FROM THE CALOOSAHATCHEE ESTUARY, FLORIDA, USA.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volety, Aswani K., S. Greg Tolley and James T. Winstead. 2002. Parasitic and Symbiotic Fauna in Oysters (Crassostrea virginica) and Mud Crabs (Panopeus spp.) from the Caloosahatchee Estuary, Florida, USA (Abstract). Presented at the 4th International Conference on Molluscan Shell...

  2. Ocean Acidification Affects Hemocyte Physiology in the Tanner Crab (Chionoecetes bairdi)

    PubMed Central

    Meseck, Shannon L.; Alix, Jennifer H.; Swiney, Katherine M.; Long, W. Christopher; Wikfors, Gary H.; Foy, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    We used flow cytometry to determine if there would be a difference in hematology, selected immune functions, and hemocyte pH (pHi), under two different, future ocean acidification scenarios (pH = 7.50, 7.80) compared to current conditions (pH = 8.09) for Chionoecetes bairdi, Tanner crab. Hemocytes were analyzed after adult Tanner crabs were held for two years under continuous exposure to acidified ocean water. Total counts of hemocytes did not vary among control and experimental treatments; however, there were significantly greater number of dead, circulating hemocytes in crabs held at the lowest pH treatment. Phagocytosis of fluorescent microbeads by hemocytes was greatest at the lowest pH treatment. These results suggest that hemocytes were dying, likely by apoptosis, at a rate faster than upregulated phagocytosis was able to remove moribund cells from circulation at the lowest pH. Crab hemolymph pH (pHe) averaged 8.09 and did not vary among pH treatments. There was no significant difference in internal pH (pHi) within hyalinocytes among pH treatments and the mean pHi (7.26) was lower than the mean pHe. In contrast, there were significant differences among treatments in pHi of the semi-granular+granular cells. Control crabs had the highest mean semi-granular+granular pHi compared to the lowest pH treatment. As physiological hemocyte functions changed from ambient conditions, interactions with the number of eggs in the second clutch, percentage of viable eggs, and calcium concentration in the adult crab shell was observed. This suggested that the energetic costs of responding to ocean acidification and maintaining defense mechanisms in Tanner crab may divert energy from other physiological processes, such as reproduction. PMID:26859148

  3. The chitin-binding domain of a GH-18 chitinase from Vibrio harveyi is crucial for chitin-chitinase interactions.

    PubMed

    Suginta, Wipa; Sirimontree, Paknisa; Sritho, Natchanok; Ohnuma, Takayuki; Fukamizo, Tamo

    2016-12-01

    Vibrio harveyi chitinase A (VhChiA) is a GH-18 glycosyl hydrolase with a structure containing three distinct domains: i) the N-terminal chitin-binding domain; ii) the (α/β) 8 TIM barrel catalytic domain; and iii) the α+β insertion domain. In this study, we cloned the gene fragment encoding the chitin-binding domain of VhChiA, termed ChBD Vh ChiA . The recombinant ChBD Vh ChiA was heterologously expressed in E. coli BL21 strain Tuner(DE3)pLacI host cells, and purified to homogeneity. CD measurements suggested that ChBD Vh ChiA contained β-sheets as major structural components and fluorescence spectroscopy showed that the protein domain was folded correctly, and suitable for functional characterization. Chitin binding assays showed that ChBD Vh ChiA bound to both α- and β-chitins, with the greatest affinity for β-colloidal chitin, but barely bound to polymeric chitosan. These results identified the tandem N-acetamido functionality on chitin chains as the specific sites of enzyme-substrate interactions. The binding affinity of the isolated domain was significantly lower than that of intact VhChiA, suggesting that the catalytic domain works synergistically with the chitin-binding domain to guide the polymeric substrate into the substrate binding cleft. These data confirm the physiological role of the chitin-binding domain of the marine bacterial GH-18 chitinase A in chitin-chitinase interactions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Clustering behavior of hermit crabs (Decapoda, Anomura) in an intertidal rocky shore at São Sebastião, southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Turra, A; Leite, F P

    2000-02-01

    The clustering behavior and cluster composition of hermit crabs as well as the patterns of shell utilization of clustered and scattered individuals were studied. This study was conducted in the intertidal region of Grande Beach, São Sebastião, southeastern Brazil. Samples were taken both in randomized transects and 1 m2 quadrats during low tide periods. Crabs were counted, measured (shield length), and sexed. Shells were identified and had their adequacy and condition (physical damage and incrustation) recorded. Clusters occurred mainly in air exposed areas and were dominated or composed only by Clibanarius antillensis. Other species like Paguristes tortugae, Pagurus criniticornis, and Calcinus tibicen were also present in these clusters, but in small numbers. Only one monospecific aggregation composed by individuals of P. criniticornis was recorded in tide pools. Almost all crabs were inactive, despite some that were submerged in tide pools. Most of the individuals of C. antillensis were clustered (70.88%). Scattered individuals were larger than clustered ones and occupied mainly shells of Tegula viridula, which seemed to be the most adequate shell to the crabs. Clustered individuals used less incrusted shells than isolated ones. In general, clustering in Grande Beach presented the same patterns of size and sex distribution, and shell utilization than others already studied, with the exception of the smaller cluster size registered in this area.

  5. Comparison of green method for chitin deacetylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar, Muslih; Anggraeni, Ayu Septi; Amin, M. Harisuddin Al

    2017-03-01

    Developing highly environmentally friendly and cost-effective approaches for the chitosan production has paramount important in the future technology. Deacetylation process is one of the most importing steps to classify the quality of chitosan. This research aimed to study the best method for deacetylation of chitin considered by several factors like the concentration of base, temperature, time and reaction method. From the green chemistry point of view, conventional refluxing method relatively wasted energy compared to another method such as maceration, grinding and sonication. The degree of deacetylation (DD) of chitosan was studied by sonication, resulted in slightly increasing of DD from 73.14 to 73.28% during the time from 0.5 h to 1 h. Deacetylation of chitin with various sodium hydroxide concentration 60, 70 and 80% gave 73.14, 76.36 and 77.88% of DD, respectively. Variation of temperature at 40, 60, and 80 °C was slightly affected on increasing DD from 67.53, 72.84 and 73.14%, respectively. The DD of chitosan significantly increased from 60.19, 74.27 and 81.20% respectively correspondent to varying NaOH concentration 60, 70 and 80% using the maceration method. Solid phase grinding method for half hour resulted in 79.49% of DD. The application of ultrasound grinding method not only was enhanced toward the deacetylation but also favoured the depolymerization process. Moreover, maceration for 7 days with 80% NaOH can be as an alternative method.

  6. 50 CFR Table 9 to Part 680 - Initial Issuance of Crab PQS by Crab QS Fishery

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... fisheries for any... Bristol Bay red king crab (BBR) 3 years of the 3-year QS base period beginning on: (1... Bristol Bay red king crab fishery during the qualifying years established for that fishery. Pribilof Islands red and blue king crab (PIK) 3 years of the 3-year period beginning on: (1) September 15-26, 1996...

  7. 50 CFR Table 9 to Part 680 - Initial Issuance of Crab PQS by Crab QS Fishery

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... fisheries for any... Bristol Bay red king crab (BBR) 3 years of the 3-year QS base period beginning on: (1... Bristol Bay red king crab fishery during the qualifying years established for that fishery. Pribilof Islands red and blue king crab (PIK) 3 years of the 3-year period beginning on: (1) September 15-26, 1996...

  8. Emerging chitin and chitosan nanofibrous materials for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Fuyuan; Deng, Hongbing; Du, Yumin; Shi, Xiaowen; Wang, Qun

    2014-07-01

    Over the past several decades, we have witnessed significant progress in chitosan and chitin based nanostructured materials. The nanofibers from chitin and chitosan with appealing physical and biological features have attracted intense attention due to their excellent biological properties related to biodegradability, biocompatibility, antibacterial activity, low immunogenicity and wound healing capacity. Various methods, such as electrospinning, self-assembly, phase separation, mechanical treatment, printing, ultrasonication and chemical treatment were employed to prepare chitin and chitosan nanofibers. These nanofibrous materials have tremendous potential to be used as drug delivery systems, tissue engineering scaffolds, wound dressing materials, antimicrobial agents, and biosensors. This review article discusses the most recent progress in the preparation and application of chitin and chitosan based nanofibrous materials in biomedical fields.

  9. Hydrogels based on cellulose and chitin: fabrication, properties, and applications

    DOE PAGES

    Shen, Xiaoping; Shamshina, Julia L.; Berton, Paula; ...

    2015-11-16

    A review of the synthesis and applications of renewable, biocompatible, and biodegradable hydrogels made from cellulose, chitin, and some of their derivatives indicates increased attention due to their excellent processability, high absorbency, porosity, bioactivity, and abundant active groups.

  10. Hydrogels based on cellulose and chitin: fabrication, properties, and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Xiaoping; Shamshina, Julia L.; Berton, Paula

    A review of the synthesis and applications of renewable, biocompatible, and biodegradable hydrogels made from cellulose, chitin, and some of their derivatives indicates increased attention due to their excellent processability, high absorbency, porosity, bioactivity, and abundant active groups.

  11. Adsorption of Methylene Blue, Bromophenol Blue, and Coomassie Brilliant Blue by α-chitin nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Dhananasekaran, Solairaj; Palanivel, Rameshthangam; Pappu, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Expelling of dyestuff into water resource system causes major thread to the environment. Adsorption is the cost effective and potential method to remove the dyes from the effluents. Therefore, an attempt was made to study the adsorption of dyestuff (Methylene Blue (MB), Bromophenol Blue (BPB) and Coomassie Brilliant Blue (CBB)) by α-chitin nanoparticles (CNP) prepared from Penaeus monodon (Fabricius, 1798) shell waste. On contrary to the most recognizable adsorption studies using chitin, this is the first study using unique nanoparticles of ⩽50 nm used for the dye adsorption process. The results showed that the adsorption process increased with increase in the concentration of CNP, contact time and temperature with the dyestuff, whereas the adsorption process decreased with increase in the initial dye concentration and strong acidic pH. The results from Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy confirmed that the interaction between dyestuff and CNP involved physical adsorption. The adsorption process obeys Langmuir isotherm (R2 values were 0.992, 0.999 and 0.992 for MB, BPB and CBB, and RL value lies between 0 and 1 for all the three dyes) and pseudo second order kinetics (R2 values were 0.996, 0.999 and 0.996 for MB, BPB and CBB) more effectively. The isotherm and kinetic models confirmed that CNP can be used as a suitable adsorbent material for the removal of dyestuff from effluents. PMID:26843977

  12. Effects of low-frequency ultrasound on heterogenous deacetylation of chitin.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Thi Hoai Duong; Ngo, Dang Nghia

    2017-11-01

    The effects of low frequency ultrasound to the heterogeneous deacetylation of chitin from the shell of white shrimp (Penaeus vannamei) were examined. The deacetylation process was carried out in the range of NaOH concentrations from 35% to 65% (w/w) with and without the ultrasound in the frequency of 37kHz, RMS=300W. The chitosan obtained was characterized in the degree of deacetylation, solubility, FT-IR and X-ray diffraction. The results showed that the behaviors of the deacetylation in two cases, with and without ultrasound, were similar but the ultrasound enhanced the deacetylation rate and therefore reduced the time of the reaction to get the same degree of deacetylation. The role of ultrasound in the process showed more clearly in the low concentration of sodium hydroxide, below 45% (w/w). At the higher concentration of sodium hydroxide, the influence of ultrasound on facilitating deacetylation decreased significantly, however, ultrasound was still keeping on its improving effect on the solubility of the chitosan obtained. The data from FT-IR and X-ray diffraction did not show any considerable change in structure of both kinds of chitosan. This study showed the potential of using low frequency ultrasound in enhancing the deacetylation of chitin for reducing the chemical consumption. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Ultrasound stimulated release of gallic acid from chitin hydrogel matrix.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Huixin; Kobayashi, Takaomi

    2017-06-01

    Ultrasound (US) stimulated drug release was examined in this study using a chitin hydrogel matrix loaded with gallic acid (GA), a drug used for wound healing and anticancer. Using phase inversion, GA-chitin hydrogels were prepared from chitin-dimethylacetamide (DMAc)/lithium chloride (LiCl) solution in the presence of GA, with 24h exposure of the solution to water vapor. The GA release from the GA-chitin hydrogel was examined under different US powers of 0-30W at 43kHz. The effects of GA loading amounts in the hydrogels (0.54, 0.43, and 0.25mg/cm 3 ) and chitin concentrations (0.1, 0.5, and 1wt%) on the release behaviors were recorded under 43kHz US exposure at 30W. Results show that US accelerated the release efficiencies for all samples. Furthermore, the release efficiency increased concomitantly with increasing US power, GA loading amount, and decrease of the chitin concentration. The highest release rate of 0.74μg/mL·min was obtained from 0.54mg/cm 3 of GA-loaded hydrogel fabricated from a 0.1wt% chitin mixture solution under 43kHz US exposure at 30W: nine times higher than that of the sample without US exposure. The hydrogel viscoelasticity demonstrated that the US irradiation rigidified the material. FT-IR showed that US can break the hydrogen bonds in the GA-chitin hydrogels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Chitin, Chitosan, and Its Derivatives for Wound Healing: Old and New Materials

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Kazuo; Izumi, Ryotaro; Osaki, Tomohiro; Ifuku, Shinsuke; Morimoto, Minoru; Saimoto, Hiroyuki; Minami, Saburo; Okamoto, Yoshiharu

    2015-01-01

    Chitin (β-(1-4)-poly-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine) is widely distributed in nature and is the second most abundant polysaccharide after cellulose. It is often converted to its more deacetylated derivative, chitosan. Previously, many reports have indicated the accelerating effects of chitin, chitosan, and its derivatives on wound healing. More recently, chemically modified or nano-fibrous chitin and chitosan have been developed, and their effects on wound healing have been evaluated. In this review, the studies on the wound-healing effects of chitin, chitosan, and its derivatives are summarized. Moreover, the development of adhesive-based chitin and chitosan are also described. The evidence indicates that chitin, chitosan, and its derivatives are beneficial for the wound healing process. More recently, it is also indicate that some nano-based materials from chitin and chitosan are beneficial than chitin and chitosan for wound healing. Clinical applications of nano-based chitin and chitosan are also expected. PMID:25780874

  15. Laboratory investigations of the effects of predator sex and size on prey selection by the Asian crab, Hemigrapsus sanguineus.

    PubMed

    Brousseau, D J.; Filipowicz, A; Baglivo, J A.

    2001-07-30

    Laboratory studies have shown that the nonindigenous Asian shore crab, Hemigrapsus sanguineus, readily consumes three species of commercial bivalves: blue mussels, Mytilus edulis, soft-shell clams, Mya arenaria, and oysters, Crassostrea virginica. Although crabs can eat bivalves of a wide size range, they preferred the smaller prey (shell characteristics among the three species. Crabs preferred M. arenaria over both M. edulis and C. virginica, and M. edulis was strongly preferred over C. virginica in pairwise comparison tests. Experiments to determine feeding rates on mussels showed that H. sanguineus can consume large numbers of mussels daily (12.7+/-11.6 mussels day(-1); sexes pooled; N=59). Mussel consumption rates increased with size of the predator and male crabs consumed more mussels than did similarly sized female crabs. The high densities of Hemigrapsus that occur in the wild, their effectiveness as predators of juvenile bivalves and their large appetites suggest an important role for these predators in restructuring the prey communities in habitats into which they have been introduced.

  16. Bacterial Chitin Hydrolysis in Two Lakes with Contrasting Trophic Statuses

    PubMed Central

    Carstens, Dörte; Keller, Esther; Vazquez, Francisco; Schubert, Carsten J.; Zeyer, Josef; Bürgmann, Helmut

    2012-01-01

    Chitin, which is a biopolymer of the amino sugar glucosamine (GlcN), is highly abundant in aquatic ecosystems, and its degradation is assigned a key role in the recycling of carbon and nitrogen. In order to study the significance of chitin decomposition in two temperate freshwater lakes with contrasting trophic and redox conditions, we measured the turnover rate of the chitin analog methylumbelliferyl-N,N′-diacetylchitobioside (MUF-DC) and the presence of chitinase (chiA) genes in zooplankton, water, and sediment samples. In contrast to the eutrophic and partially anoxic lake, chiA gene fragments were detectable throughout the oligotrophic water column and chiA copy numbers per ml of water were up to 15 times higher than in the eutrophic waters. For both lakes, the highest chiA abundance was found in the euphotic zone—the main habitat of zooplankton, but also the site of production of easily degradable algal chitin. The bulk of chitinase activity was measured in zooplankton samples and the sediments, where recalcitrant chitin is deposited. Both, chiA abundance and chitinase activity correlated well with organic carbon, nitrogen, and concentrations of particulate GlcN. Our findings show that chitin, although its overall contribution to the total organic carbon is small (∼0.01 to 0.1%), constitutes an important microbial growth substrate in these temperate freshwater lakes, particularly where other easily degradable carbon sources are scarce. PMID:22101058

  17. Dopamine-Mediated Sclerotization of Regenerated Chitin in Ionic Liquid

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Dongyeop X.; Shin, Sara; Lim, Chanoong; Hwang, Dong Soo

    2013-01-01

    Chitin is a promising structural material for biomedical applications, due to its many advantageous properties and abundance in nature. However, its usage and development in the biomedical field have been stagnant, because of chitin’s poor mechanical properties in wet conditions and the difficulties in transforming it into an applicable form. To overcome these challenges, we created a novel biomimetic chitin composite. This regenerated chitin, prepared with ionic liquid, showed improved mechanical properties in wet conditions by mimicking insect cuticle and squid beak sclerotization, i.e., catechol-meditated cross-linking. By ionic liquid-based heat treatment, dopamine oxidation produced melanin-like compounds and dopamine-meditated cross-links without any solvent evaporation and oxidant utilization. The dopamine-meditated sclerotization increased the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of the regenerated chitin by 2.52-fold, measured after six weeks of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) submersion. In addition, the linear swelling ratio (LSR) of the chitin film was reduced by about 22%. This strategy raises a possibility of using regenerated chitin as an artificial hard tissue in wet conditions. PMID:28788308

  18. Regulation of expression, activity and localization of fungal chitin synthases

    PubMed Central

    Rogg, Luise E.; Fortwendel, Jarrod R.; Juvvadi, Praveen R.; Steinbach, William J.

    2013-01-01

    The fungal cell wall represents an attractive target for pharmacologic inhibition, as many of the components are fungal-specific. Though targeted inhibition of β-glucan synthesis is effective treatment for certain fungal infections, the ability of the cell wall to dynamically compensate via the cell wall integrity pathway may limit overall efficacy. To date, chitin synthesis inhibitors have not been successfully deployed in the clinical setting. Fungal chitin synthesis is a complex and highly regulated process. Regulation of chitin synthesis occurs on multiple levels, thus targeting of these regulatory pathways may represent an exciting alternative approach. A variety of signaling pathways have been implicated in chitin synthase regulation, at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Recent research suggests that localization of chitin synthases likely represents a major regulatory mechanism. However, much of the regulatory machinery is not necessarily shared among different chitin synthases. Thus, an in depth understanding of the precise roles of each protein in cell wall maintenance and repair will be essential to identifying the most likely therapeutic targets. PMID:21526913

  19. Heterologous expression of an active chitin synthase from Rhizopus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Salgado-Lugo, Holjes; Sánchez-Arreguín, Alejandro; Ruiz-Herrera, José

    2016-12-01

    Chitin synthases are highly important enzymes in nature, where they synthesize structural components in species belonging to different eukaryotic kingdoms, including kingdom Fungi. Unfortunately, their structure and the molecular mechanism of synthesis of their microfibrilar product remain largely unknown, probably because no fungal active chitin synthases have been isolated, possibly due to their extreme hydrophobicity. In this study we have turned to the heterologous expression of the transcript from a small chitin synthase of Rhizopus oryzae (RO3G_00942, Chs1) in Escherichia coli. The enzyme was active, but accumulated mostly in inclusion bodies. High concentrations of arginine or urea solubilized the enzyme, but their dilution led to its denaturation and precipitation. Nevertheless, use of urea permitted the purification of small amounts of the enzyme. The properties of Chs1 (Km, optimum temperature and pH, effect of GlcNAc) were abnormal, probably because it lacks the hydrophobic transmembrane regions characteristic of chitin synthases. The product of the enzyme showed that, contrasting with chitin made by membrane-bound Chs's and chitosomes, was only partially in the form of short microfibrils of low crystallinity. This approach may lead to future developments to obtain active chitin synthases that permit understanding their molecular mechanism of activity, and microfibril assembly. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Squid pen-inspired chitinous functional materials: Hierarchical chitin fibers by centrifugal jet-spinning and transparent chitin fiber-reinforced composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Seung-Hwan; Kim, Joong-Kwon; Lim, Young-Woo; Hwang, Hyun-Bin; Kwon, Hee-Young; Bae, Byeong-Soo; Jin, Jungho

    2018-01-01

    Here, inspired by the fibrous composite structure of a squid pen, we introduce hierarchical chitin fibers (herein, termed "Chiber") and their transparent composites and demonstrate the potential of these chitinous functional materials as a sustainable separation-membrane and reinforcing filler for composites. We employ a centrifugal jet-spinning process to fabricate Chiber with aligned chitin nanofibrillar architectures, for which we discuss the processing-morphology relationship. A nonwoven fiber-mat made of Chiber exhibits excellent adsorbing performance for a toxic ionic dye (Congo Red), and has a low coefficient of thermal expansion comparable to that of glass fibers. Finally, we demonstrate a squid pen-mimetic transparent composite using Chiber and investigate its optical property.

  1. Limb regeneration and molting processes under chronic methoprene exposure in the mud fiddler crab, Uca pugnax.

    PubMed

    Stueckle, Todd A; Likens, Jason; Foran, Christy M

    2008-04-01

    Insect growth regulator application for wetland mosquito control remains controversial due to the potential for disruption of normal development and growth processes in non-target crustaceans and beneficial arthropods, e.g. Apis mellifera. Concerns include slow-release methoprene formulations and its environmental breakdown products which mimic an endogenous crustacean hormone and retinoids, respectively. Our primary objective was to evaluate the effect that a chronic methoprene exposure would have on male and female Uca pugnax limb regeneration and molting. After single limb autonomy, limb growth and molt stage were monitored every two days while eyestalk ablation was used to induce proecdysis. Dorsal carapace was collected 6 days post-molt to determine protein and chitin content. In post-molt crabs, methoprene-exposed individuals displayed lower percent gain in body weight. Male crabs lost more weight per body volume than females, took significantly longer to proceed through proecdysis than females exposed to 0.1 microg/L methoprene and exhibited significantly elevated frequency for abnormal limb formation at 1.0 microg/L while females displayed no such trend. Methoprene did not significantly alter extractable exoskeleton protein or chitin content. However, variable water-soluble protein expression increased with exposure at 1.0 microg/L (1 ppb) which contributed to overall variability in total protein content. Our findings suggest that adult male U. pugnax possess greater sensitivity to chronic methoprene exposure during limb regeneration and molting, potentially affecting their post-molt fitness. Furthermore, methoprene has the potential to impact post-molt biomass and exocuticle quality.

  2. CHANGES IN THE CRAB PULSAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Scientists are learning more about how pulsars work by studying a series of Hubble Space Telescope images of the heart of the Crab Nebula. The images, taken over a period of several months, show that the Crab is a far more dynamic object than previously understood. At the center of the nebula lies the Crab Pulsar. The pulsar is a tiny object by astronomical standards -- only about six miles across -- but has a mass greater than that of the Sun and rotates at a rate of 30 times a second. As the pulsar spins its intense magnetic field whips around, acting like a sling shot, accelerating subatomic particles and sending them hurtling them into space at close to the speed of light. The tiny pulsar and its wind are the powerhouse for the entire Crab Nebula, which is 10 light-years across -- a feat comparable to an object the size of a hydrogen atom illuminating a volume of space a kilometer across. The three pictures shown here, taken from the series of Hubble images, show dramatic changes in the appearance of the central regions of the nebula. These include wisp-like structures that move outward away from the pulsar at half the speed of light, as well as a mysterious 'halo' which remains stationary, but grows brighter then fainter over time. Also seen are the effects of two polar jets that move out along the rotation axis of the pulsar. The most dynamic feature seen -- a small knot that 'dances around' so much that astronomers have been calling it a 'sprite' -- is actually a shock front (where fast-moving material runs into slower-moving material)in one of these polar jets. The telescope captured the images with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 using a filter that passes light of wavelength around 550 nanometers, near the middle of the visible part of the spectrum. The Crab Nebula is located 7,000 light-years away in the constellation Taurus. Credit: Jeff Hester and Paul Scowen (Arizona State University), and NASA

  3. Helicoidal Organization of Chitin in the Cuticle of the Migratory Locust Requires the Function of the Chitin Deacetylase2 Enzyme (LmCDA2)*

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Rongrong; Liu, Weimin; Li, Daqi; Zhao, Xiaoming; Ding, Guowei; Zhang, Min; Ma, Enbo; Zhu, KunYan; Li, Sheng; Moussian, Bernard; Zhang, Jianzhen

    2016-01-01

    In the three-dimensional extracellular matrix of the insect cuticle, horizontally aligned microfibrils composed of the polysaccharide chitin and associated proteins are stacked either parallel to each other or helicoidally. The underlying molecular mechanisms that implement differential chitin organization are largely unknown. To learn more about cuticle organization, we sought to study the role of chitin deacetylases (CDA) in this process. In the body cuticle of nymphs of the migratory locust Locusta migratoria, helicoidal chitin organization is changed to an organization with unidirectional microfibril orientation when LmCDA2 expression is knocked down by RNA interference. In addition, the LmCDA2-deficient cuticle is less compact suggesting that LmCDA2 is needed for chitin packaging. Animals with reduced LmCDA2 activity die at molting, underlining that correct chitin organization is essential for survival. Interestingly, we find that LmCDA2 localizes only to the initially produced chitin microfibrils that constitute the apical site of the chitin stack. Based on our data, we hypothesize that LmCDA2-mediated chitin deacetylation at the beginning of chitin production is a decisive reaction that triggers helicoidal arrangement of subsequently assembled chitin-protein microfibrils. PMID:27637332

  4. Helicoidal Organization of Chitin in the Cuticle of the Migratory Locust Requires the Function of the Chitin Deacetylase2 Enzyme (LmCDA2).

    PubMed

    Yu, Rongrong; Liu, Weimin; Li, Daqi; Zhao, Xiaoming; Ding, Guowei; Zhang, Min; Ma, Enbo; Zhu, KunYan; Li, Sheng; Moussian, Bernard; Zhang, Jianzhen

    2016-11-18

    In the three-dimensional extracellular matrix of the insect cuticle, horizontally aligned microfibrils composed of the polysaccharide chitin and associated proteins are stacked either parallel to each other or helicoidally. The underlying molecular mechanisms that implement differential chitin organization are largely unknown. To learn more about cuticle organization, we sought to study the role of chitin deacetylases (CDA) in this process. In the body cuticle of nymphs of the migratory locust Locusta migratoria, helicoidal chitin organization is changed to an organization with unidirectional microfibril orientation when LmCDA2 expression is knocked down by RNA interference. In addition, the LmCDA2-deficient cuticle is less compact suggesting that LmCDA2 is needed for chitin packaging. Animals with reduced LmCDA2 activity die at molting, underlining that correct chitin organization is essential for survival. Interestingly, we find that LmCDA2 localizes only to the initially produced chitin microfibrils that constitute the apical site of the chitin stack. Based on our data, we hypothesize that LmCDA2-mediated chitin deacetylation at the beginning of chitin production is a decisive reaction that triggers helicoidal arrangement of subsequently assembled chitin-protein microfibrils. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. The Crab Boat Engineering Design Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Tyler S.; Ryan, Larry

    2017-01-01

    Crab cakes and football, that's what Maryland does!" (Abrams, Levy, Panay, & Dobkin, 2005). Although the Old Line State is notorious for harvesting delectable blue crabs, the movie "Wedding Crashers" failed to highlight something else Maryland does well: engineering design competitions. This article discusses how a multistate…

  6. Particle beam and crabbing and deflecting structure

    DOEpatents

    Delayen, Jean [Yorktown, VA

    2011-02-08

    A new type of structure for the deflection and crabbing of particle bunches in particle accelerators comprising a number of parallel transverse electromagnetic (TEM)-resonant) lines operating in opposite phase from each other. Such a structure is significantly more compact than conventional crabbing cavities operating the transverse magnetic TM mode, thus allowing low frequency designs.

  7. Inter-cohort cannibalism of early benthic phase blue king crabs (Paralithodes platypus): alternate foraging strategies in different habitats lead to different functional responses.

    PubMed

    Daly, Benjamin; Long, W Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Blue king crabs (Paralithodes platypus) are commercially and ecologically important in Alaska, USA, but population abundances have fluctuated over the past several decades likely resulting from a combination of environmental and biological factors, including recruitment variability. Cannibalism between cohorts may be a source of mortality limiting recruitment success in the wild, but the degree of inter-cohort cannibalism is unknown for early benthic phase blue king crabs. In laboratory experiments, we evaluated the effects of habitat type (sand and shell) on the predator functional response and foraging behavior of year-1 blue king crabs as predators of year-0 conspecifics and examined the effects of predator presence on crypsis of prey crabs. In sand, consumption rates increased with predator size and prey density until satiation, while predation rates in shell were low regardless of predator size or prey density. These differential predation rates yielded a type III functional response in sand but a type I functional response in shell habitat. Crypsis of prey crabs was generally high and did not change in the presence of predators. Predator foraging activity was reduced in shell and may be an adaptive behavior to balance foraging efficiency and susceptibility to larger predators. Our results demonstrate that early benthic phase blue king crabs are cannibalistic between cohorts in the laboratory and that shell material is extremely effective for reducing encounter rates with conspecific predators. The distribution and abundance of such habitat may be important for recruitment success in some populations. Future studies should compare benthic habitat and species assemblages in areas with variable abundances, such as the Pribilof Islands and Saint Matthew Island in the eastern Bering Sea, to better understand possible mechanisms for recruitment variability.

  8. Inter-Cohort Cannibalism of Early Benthic Phase Blue King Crabs (Paralithodes platypus): Alternate Foraging Strategies in Different Habitats Lead to Different Functional Responses

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Benjamin; Long, W. Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Blue king crabs (Paralithodes platypus) are commercially and ecologically important in Alaska, USA, but population abundances have fluctuated over the past several decades likely resulting from a combination of environmental and biological factors, including recruitment variability. Cannibalism between cohorts may be a source of mortality limiting recruitment success in the wild, but the degree of inter-cohort cannibalism is unknown for early benthic phase blue king crabs. In laboratory experiments, we evaluated the effects of habitat type (sand and shell) on the predator functional response and foraging behavior of year-1 blue king crabs as predators of year-0 conspecifics and examined the effects of predator presence on crypsis of prey crabs. In sand, consumption rates increased with predator size and prey density until satiation, while predation rates in shell were low regardless of predator size or prey density. These differential predation rates yielded a type III functional response in sand but a type I functional response in shell habitat. Crypsis of prey crabs was generally high and did not change in the presence of predators. Predator foraging activity was reduced in shell and may be an adaptive behavior to balance foraging efficiency and susceptibility to larger predators. Our results demonstrate that early benthic phase blue king crabs are cannibalistic between cohorts in the laboratory and that shell material is extremely effective for reducing encounter rates with conspecific predators. The distribution and abundance of such habitat may be important for recruitment success in some populations. Future studies should compare benthic habitat and species assemblages in areas with variable abundances, such as the Pribilof Islands and Saint Matthew Island in the eastern Bering Sea, to better understand possible mechanisms for recruitment variability. PMID:24558414

  9. ChtVis-Tomato, a genetic reporter for in vivo visualization of chitin deposition in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Sobala, Lukasz F.; Wang, Ying; Adler, Paul N.

    2015-01-01

    Chitin is a polymer of N-acetylglucosamine that is abundant and widely found in the biological world. It is an important constituent of the cuticular exoskeleton that plays a key role in the insect life cycle. To date, the study of chitin deposition during cuticle formation has been limited by the lack of a method to detect it in living organisms. To overcome this limitation, we have developed ChtVis-Tomato, an in vivo reporter for chitin in Drosophila. ChtVis-Tomato encodes a fusion protein that contains an apical secretion signal, a chitin-binding domain (CBD), a fluorescent protein and a cleavage site to release it from the plasma membrane. The chitin reporter allowed us to study chitin deposition in time lapse experiments and by using it we have identified unexpected deposits of chitin fibers in Drosophila pupae. ChtVis-Tomato should facilitate future studies on chitin in Drosophila and other insects. PMID:26395478

  10. Shell damage and shell repair in the Antarctic limpet Nacella concinna from King George Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadée, Gerhard C.

    1999-03-01

    Nacella concinna is the most conspicuous macroinvertebrate in the intertidal of King George Island. An important predator, the Kelp gull Larus dominicanus, feeds on Nacella during spring low tides. The gulls deposit empty Nacella shells as regurgitates mainly on roosts on coastal rocks. The regurgitates were found to consist of 40% shell fragments by weight and 60% intact shells. Faeces of Kelp gulls contained much smaller fragments than the regurgitates. Some of the Nacella, particularly those too large to ingest, are handled in the intertidal. The middens are, therefore, inadequate to study size selection by Kelp gulls: the largest Nacella are underrepresented. Seventy-five per cent of the intact Nacella shells from the Larus middens showed one or more shell repairs. Such repairs may be due to unsuccessful attacks by gulls, but more probably they indicate damage caused by rolling ice blocks and stones in the intertidal and shallow subtidal. A number of living Nacella were found stranded on the beach, detached from the rocks. They showed damage along the shell margin and even one Nacella was collected without any shell left. The observed repair frequency of 75% in Nacella was much higher than in other (smaller) intertidal gastropods at Potter Peninsula (3-11%, av. 8%). Comparably high frequencies are observed for instance in tropical intertidal gastropods, where repair is due to heavy unsuccessful crab predation; however, shell-crushing crabs are absent on King George Island. This indicates that palaeontologists should be cautious in ascribing all shell repairs in fossil shells (particularly from tidal environments) to predators. Shell repair in the related Nacella deaurata, collected in a less exposed site at Port Stanley (Falkland Islands), occurred only in 13% of the specimens. Another conspicuous form of shell damage was due to grazing by Nacella on the boring algae living in other Nacella shells. Epigrowth of crustose calcareous algae inhibited such grazing

  11. Multifilament cellulose/chitin blend yarn spun from ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Mundsinger, Kai; Müller, Alexander; Beyer, Ronald; Hermanutz, Frank; Buchmeiser, Michael R

    2015-10-20

    Cellulose and chitin, both biopolymers, decompose before reaching their melting points. Therefore, processing these unmodified biopolymers into multifilament yarns is limited to solution chemistry. Especially the processing of chitin into fibers is rather limited to distinctive, often toxic or badly removable solvents often accompanied by chemical de-functionalization to chitosan (degree of acetylation, DA, <50%). This work proposes a novel method for the preparation of cellulose/chitin blend fibers using ionic liquids (ILs) as gentle, removable, recyclable and non-deacetylating solvents. Chitin and cellulose are dissolved in ethylmethylimidazolium propionate ([C2mim](+)[OPr](-)) and the obtained one-pot spinning dope is used to produce multifilament fibers by a continuous wet-spinning process. Both the rheology of the corresponding spinning dopes and the structural and physical properties of the obtained fibers have been determined for different biopolymer ratios. With respect to medical or hygienic application, the cellulose/chitin blend fiber show enhanced water retention capacity compared to pure cellulose fibers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Chitin in the Silk Gland Ducts of the Spider Nephila edulis and the Silkworm Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Gwilym J. G.; Knight, David P.; Vollrath, Fritz

    2013-01-01

    Here we report the detection and localisation of chitin in the cuticle of the spinning ducts of both the spider Nephila edulis and the silkworm Bombyx mori. Our observations demonstrate that the duct walls of both animals contain chitin notwithstanding totally independent evolutionary pathways of the systems. We conclude that chitin may well be an essential component for the construction of spinning ducts; we further conclude that in both species chitin may indicate the evolutionary origin of the spinning ducts. PMID:24015298

  13. The use of flow cytometry to monitor chitin synthesis in regenerating protoplasts of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Hector, R F; Braun, P C; Hart, J T; Kamarck, M E

    1990-01-01

    Flow cytometry was used to monitor chitin synthesis in regenerating protoplasts of the yeast Candida albicans. Comparisons of cells stained with Calcofluor White, a fluorochrome with known affinity for chitin, and cells incubated in the presence of N-[3H]-acetylglucosamine, the precursor substrate for chitin, showed a linear relationship between fluorescence and incorporation of label over time. Changes in both the fluorescence and light scatter of regenerating protoplasts treated with inhibitors of fungal chitin synthase were also quantitated by flow cytometry.

  14. A chitin deacetylase of Podospora anserina has two functional chitin binding domains and a unique mode of action.

    PubMed

    Hoßbach, Janina; Bußwinkel, Franziska; Kranz, Andreas; Wattjes, Jasper; Cord-Landwehr, Stefan; Moerschbacher, Bruno M

    2018-03-01

    Chitosan is a structurally diverse biopolymer that is commercially derived from chitin by chemical processing, but chitin deacetylases (CDAs) potentially offer a sustainable and more controllable approach allowing the production of chitosans with tailored structures and biological activities. We investigated the CDA from Podospora anserina (PaCDA) which is closely related to Colletotrichum lindemuthianum CDA in the catalytic domain, but unique in having two chitin-binding domains. We produced recombinant PaCDA in Hansenula polymorpha for biochemical characterization and found that the catalytic domain of PaCDA is also functionally similar to C. lindemuthianum CDA, though differing in detail. When studying the enzyme's mode of action on chitin oligomers by quantitative mass-spectrometric sequencing, we found almost all possible sequences up to full deacetylation but with a clear preference for specific products. Deletion muteins lacking one or both CBDs confirmed their proposed function in supporting the enzymatic conversion of the insoluble substrate colloidal chitin. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. A chitin deacetylase from the endophytic fungus Pestalotiopsis sp. efficiently inactivates the elicitor activity of chitin oligomers in rice cells.

    PubMed

    Cord-Landwehr, Stefan; Melcher, Rebecca L J; Kolkenbrock, Stephan; Moerschbacher, Bruno M

    2016-11-30

    To successfully survive in plants, endophytes need strategies to avoid being detected by the plant immune system, as the cell walls of endophytes contain easily detectible chitin. It is possible that endophytes "hide" this chitin from the plant immune system by modifying it, or oligomers derived from it, using chitin deacetylases (CDA). To explore this hypothesis, we identified and expressed a CDA from Pestalotiopsis sp. (PesCDA), an endophytic fungus, in E. coli and characterized this enzyme and its chitosan oligomer products. We found that when PesCDA modifies chitin oligomers, the products are partially deacetylated chitosan oligomers with a specific acetylation pattern: GlcNAc-GlcNAc-(GlcN) n -GlcNAc (n ≥ 1). Then, in a bioactivity assay where suspension-cultured rice cells were incubated with the PesCDA products (processed chitin hexamers), we found that, unlike the substrate hexamers, chitosan oligomer products no longer elicited the plant immune system. Thus, this endophytic enzyme can prevent the endophyte from being recognized by the plant immune system; this might represent a more general hypothesis for how certain fungi are able to live in or on their hosts.

  16. A chitin deacetylase from the endophytic fungus Pestalotiopsis sp. efficiently inactivates the elicitor activity of chitin oligomers in rice cells

    PubMed Central

    Cord-Landwehr, Stefan; Melcher, Rebecca L. J.; Kolkenbrock, Stephan; Moerschbacher, Bruno M.

    2016-01-01

    To successfully survive in plants, endophytes need strategies to avoid being detected by the plant immune system, as the cell walls of endophytes contain easily detectible chitin. It is possible that endophytes “hide” this chitin from the plant immune system by modifying it, or oligomers derived from it, using chitin deacetylases (CDA). To explore this hypothesis, we identified and expressed a CDA from Pestalotiopsis sp. (PesCDA), an endophytic fungus, in E. coli and characterized this enzyme and its chitosan oligomer products. We found that when PesCDA modifies chitin oligomers, the products are partially deacetylated chitosan oligomers with a specific acetylation pattern: GlcNAc-GlcNAc-(GlcN)n-GlcNAc (n ≥ 1). Then, in a bioactivity assay where suspension-cultured rice cells were incubated with the PesCDA products (processed chitin hexamers), we found that, unlike the substrate hexamers, chitosan oligomer products no longer elicited the plant immune system. Thus, this endophytic enzyme can prevent the endophyte from being recognized by the plant immune system; this might represent a more general hypothesis for how certain fungi are able to live in or on their hosts. PMID:27901067

  17. Ultrasonication and steam-explosion as chitin pretreatments for chitin oligosaccharide production by chitinases of Lecanicillium lecanii.

    PubMed

    Villa-Lerma, Guadalupe; González-Márquez, Humberto; Gimeno, Miquel; López-Luna, Alberto; Bárzana, Eduardo; Shirai, Keiko

    2013-10-01

    In this study, chitin oligosaccharides have been successfully produced using chitinases from submerged fermentation of Lecanicillium lecanii. The highest Hex, Chit and Prot production was 0.14, 0.26 and 2.05 U/mg of protein, respectively, which were attained varying pH from 5 to 8 after 96 h. Culture conditions conducted at constant pH of 6 resulted in significantly lower enzyme production. The crude enzyme was partially purified by salting out with (NH4)2SO4 followed by size exclusion chromatography to isolate the chitinase mixture for further chitin hydrolysis assays. In this regard, chitin substrates were pretreated with sonication and steam explosion prior to enzymatic reaction. Structural changes were observed with steam explosion with 11.28% reduction of the crystallinity index attained with the lowest chitin/water ratio (0.1g/mL). Pretreated chitins reached the highest production of reducing sugars (0.37 mg/mL) and GlcNAc (0.59 mg/mL) in 23.6% yield. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Sediment Loading from Crab Creek and Other Sources to Moses Lake, Washington, 2007 and 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Magirl, Christopher S.; Cox, Stephen E.; Mastin, Mark C.; Huffman, Raegan L.

    2010-01-01

    The average sediment-accumulation rate on the bed of Moses Lake since 1980, based on the identification of Mount St. Helens ash in lakebed cores, was 0.24 inches per year. Summed over the lake surface area, the average sediment-accumulation rate on the lakebed is 190,000 tons per year. Based on USGS stream-gaging station data, the average annual sediment load to Moses Lake from Crab Creek was 32,000 tons per year between 1943 and 2008; the post Mount St. Helens eruption annual load from Crab Creek was calculated to be 13,000 tons per year. The total mass input from Crab Creek and other fluvially derived sediment sources since 1980 has been about 20,000 tons per year. Eolian sediment loading to Moses Lake was about 50,000 tons per year before irrigation and land-use development largely stabilized the Moses Lake dune field. Currently, eolian input to the lake is less than 2,000 tons per year. Considering all sediment sources to the lake, most (from 80 to 90 percent) of post-1980 lakebed-sediment accumulation is from autochthonous, or locally formed, mineral matter, including diatom frustuals and carbonate shells, derived from biogenic production in phytoplankton and zooplankton. Suspended-sediment samples collected from Crab Creek and similar nearby waterways in 2007 and 2008 combined with other USGS data from the region indicated that a proposed Bureau of Reclamation supplemental feed of as much as 650 cubic feet per second through Crab Creek might initially contain a sediment load of as much as 1,500 tons per day. With time, however, this sediment load would decrease to about 10 tons per day in the sediment-supply-limited creek as available sediment in the channel is depleted. Sediment loads in the supplemental feed ultimately would be similar to loads in other bypass canals near Moses Lake. Considering the hydrology and geomorphology of the creek over multiple years, there is little evidence that the proposed supplemental feed would substantially increase the

  19. Crab Nebula from Five Observatories

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-05-10

    In the summer of the year 1054 AD, Chinese astronomers saw a new "guest star," that appeared six times brighter than Venus. So bright in fact, it could be seen during the daytime for several months. This "guest star" was forgotten about until 700 years later with the advent of telescopes. Astronomers saw a tentacle-like nebula in the place of the vanished star and called it the Crab Nebula. Today we know it as the expanding gaseous remnant from a star that self-detonated as a supernova, briefly shining as brightly as 400 million suns. The explosion took place 6,500 light-years away. If the blast had instead happened 50 light-years away it would have irradiated Earth, wiping out most life forms. In the late 1960s astronomers discovered the crushed heart of the doomed star, an ultra-dense neutron star that is a dynamo of intense magnetic field and radiation energizing the nebula. Astronomers therefore need to study the Crab Nebula across a broad range of electromagnetic radiation, from X-rays to radio waves. This image combines data from five different telescopes: the VLA (radio) in red; Spitzer Space Telescope (infrared) in yellow; Hubble Space Telescope (visible) in green; XMM-Newton (ultraviolet) in blue; and Chandra X-ray Observatory (X-ray) in purple. More images and an animation are available at https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21474

  20. Chitin synthases are required for survival, fecundity and egg-hatch in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The synthesis of chitin, the Beta-1,4-linked polymer of N-acetylglucosamine, is catalyzed by chitin synthase (CHS). Chitin is essential for the structural integrity of the exoskeletal cuticle and midgut peritrophic membrane (PM) of insects. To study the functions of the two chitin synthase genes, ...

  1. Responses of a Rocky Shore Gastropod to the Effluents of Predatory and Non-predatory Crabs: Avoidance and Attraction.

    PubMed

    Marko, P B; Palmer, A R

    1991-12-01

    Laboratory experiments revealed that the rocky shore gastropod, Nucella lamellosa (Gmelin), could discriminate between the effluents of predatory and non-predatory crabs. N. lamellosa turned away from seawater that had passed over the large predatory crab, Cancer productus Randall. This avoidance behavior was observed in snails from two localities that, based on differences in shell form, presumably experienced different levels of predation intensity. The scent of the non-predatory crabs Pugettia producta (Randall) and Lopholithodes mandtii Brandt had no effect on the turning behavior of snails from either site. Surprisingly, snails from both sites were attracted to the scent of a small shore crab, Hemigrapsus nudus (Dana), but moved at random in response to a common prey item Balanus glandula Darwin. These results suggest that N. lamellosa can assess from a distance the relative risks posed by different species of crabs, and respond appropriately. The unexpected attraction to H. nudus suggests that N. lamellosa may use this effluent to home in from a distance on potential refugia, because H. nudus are often associated with crevices and the undersides of boulders where N. lamellosa would be less vulnerable to larger predators.

  2. A chitin-like component in Aedes aegypti eggshells, eggs and ovaries.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Mônica F; Dos Santos, Amanda S; Marotta, Humberto R; Mansur, Juliana F; Ramos, Isabela B; Machado, Ednildo A; Souza, Gustavo H M F; Eberlin, Marcos N; Kaiser, Carlos R; Kramer, Karl J; Muthukrishnan, Subbaratnam; Vasconcellos, Ana Maria H

    2007-12-01

    An insoluble white substance was prepared from extracts of eggshells of Aedes aegypti, the yellow fever mosquito and dengue vector. Its infrared and proton NMR spectra were similar to that of standard commercial chitin. This putative chitin-like material, also obtained from ovaries, newly laid and dark eggs, was hydrolyzed in acid and a major product was identified by HPLC to be glucosamine. The eggshell acid hydrolysate was also analyzed by ESI-MS and an ion identical to a glucosamine monoprotonated species was detected. The presence of chitin was also analyzed during different developmental stages of the ovary using a fluorescent microscopy technique and probes specific for chitin. The results showed that a chitin-like material accumulates in oocytes during oogenesis. Streptomyces griseus chitinase pre-treatment of oocytes greatly reduced the chitin-derived fluorescence. Chitinase activity was detected in newborn larvae and eggs prior to hatching. Feeding experiments indicated that the chitin synthesis inhibitor lufenuron inhibited chitin synthesis, either when mosquitoes were allowed to feed directly on lufenuron-treated chickens or when an artificial feeding system was used. Lufenuron inhibited egg hatch, larval development and reduced mosquito viability. These data demonstrate for the first time that (1) a chitin-like material is present in A. aegypti eggs, ovaries and eggshells; (2) a chitin synthesis inhibitor can be used to inhibit mosquito oogenesis; and (3) chitin synthesis inhibitors have potential for controlling mosquito populations.

  3. Candida albicans Adheres to Chitin by Recognizing N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc).

    PubMed

    Ishijima, Sanae A; Yamada, Tsuyoshi; Maruyama, Naho; Abe, Shigeru

    2017-01-01

    The binding of Candida albicans cells to chitin was examined in a cell-binding assay. Microscopic observations indicated that both living and heat-killed Candida cells bound to chitin-coated substrates. C. albicans preferentially bound to chitin-coated plastic plates over chitosan-coated and uncoated plates. We prepared 125 I-labeled Candida cells for quantitative analysis of their binding to chitin. Heat-killed 125 I-labeled Candida cells bound to chitin-coated plates in a time-dependent manner until 1.5 hours after start of incubation at 4℃. The binding of 125 I-labeled Candida cells to chitin-coated plates was inhibited by adding unlabeled living or unlabeled heat-killed Candida cells. The binding of Candida to chitin was also reduced by addition of 25 mg/ml chitin or chitosan up to 10%. N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), which is a constituent of chitin, inhibited binding of Candida to chitin in a dose-dependent manner between 12.5 and 200 mM. Glucosamine, which is a constituent of chitosan, showed no such inhibitory effect. These findings suggest that the binding of Candida to chitin may be mediated by recognition of GlcNAc.

  4. Monitoring the Crab Nebula with LOFT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2012-01-01

    From 2008-2010, the Crab Nebula was found to decline by 7% in the 15-50 keV band, consistently in Fermi GBM, INTEGRAL IBIS, SPI, and JEMX, RXTE PCA, and Swift BAT. From 2001-2010, the 15-50 keV flux from the Crab Nebula typically varied by about 3.5% per year. Analysis of RXTE PCA data suggests possible spectral variations correlated with the flux variations. I will present estimates of the LOFT sensitivity to these variations. Prior to 2001 and since 2010, the observed flux variations have been much smaller. Monitoring the Crab with the LOFT WFM and LAD will provide precise measurements of flux variations in the Crab Nebula if it undergoes a similarly active episode.

  5. Experimental evaluation of new chitin-chitosan graft for duraplasty.

    PubMed

    Pogorielov, M; Kravtsova, A; Reilly, G C; Deineka, V; Tetteh, G; Kalinkevich, O; Pogorielova, O; Moskalenko, R; Tkach, G

    2017-02-01

    Natural materials such as collagen and alginate have promising applications as dural graft substitutes. These materials are able to restore the dural defect and create optimal conditions for the development of connective tissue at the site of injury. A promising material for biomedical applications is chitosan-a linear polysaccharide obtained by the deacetylation of chitin. It has been found to be nontoxic, biodegradable, biofunctional and biocompatible in addition to having antimicrobial characteristics. In this study we designed new chitin-chitosan substitutes for dura mater closure and evaluated their effectiveness and safety. Chitosan films were produced from 3 % of chitosan (molar mass-200, 500 or 700 kDa, deacetylation rate 80-90%) with addition of 20% of chitin. Antimicrobial effictively and cell viability were analysed for the different molar masses of chitosan. The film containing chitosan of molar mass 200 kDa, had the best antimicrobial and biological activity and was successfully used for experimental duraplasty in an in vivo model. In conclusion the chitin-chitosan membrane designed here met the requirements for a dura matter graft exhibiting the ability to support cell growth, inhibit microbial growth and biodegradade at an appropriate rate. Therefore this is a promising material for clinical duroplasty.

  6. Future questions in insect chitin biology: A microreview.

    PubMed

    Muthukrishnan, Subbaratnam; Arakane, Yasuyuki; Yang, Qing; Zhang, Chuan-Xi; Zhang, Jianzhen; Zhang, Wenqing; Moussian, Bernard

    2018-06-01

    This microreview stems from the Second Symposium on Insect Molecular Toxicology and Chitin Metabolism held at Shanxi University in Taiyuan, China (June 27 to 30, 2017) at the institute for Applied Biology headed by Professor Enbo Ma and Professor Jianzhen Zhang. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Characterization of Chitin and Chitosan Molecular Structure in Aqueous Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Franca, Eduardo D.; Lins, Roberto D.; Freitas, Luiz C.

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to characterize the structure of chitin and chitosan fibers in aqueous solutions. Chitin fibers, whether isolated or in the form of a β-chitin nanoparticle, adopt the so-called 2-fold helix with Φ and φ values similar to its crystalline state. In solution, the intramolecular hydrogen bond HO3(n)•••O5(n+1) responsible for the 2-fold helical motif is stabilized by hydrogen bonds with water molecules in a well-defined orientation. On the other hand, chitosan can adopt five distinct helical motifs and its conformational equilibrium is highly dependent on pH. The hydrogen bond pattern and solvation around the O3 atommore » of insoluble chitosan (basic pH) are nearly identical to these quantities in chitin. Our findings suggest that the solubility and conformation of these polysaccharides are related to the stability of the intrachain HO3(n)•••O5(n+1) hydrogen bond, which is affect by the water exchange around the O3-HO3 hydroxyl group.« less

  8. Chemical Tools of Octopus maya during Crab Predation Are Also Active on Conspecifics.

    PubMed

    Pech-Puch, Dawrin; Cruz-López, Honorio; Canche-Ek, Cindy; Campos-Espinosa, Gabriela; García, Elpidio; Mascaro, Maite; Rosas, Carlos; Chávez-Velasco, Daniel; Rodríguez-Morales, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Octopus maya is a major socio-economic resource from the Yucatán Peninsula in Mexico. In this study we report for the first time the chemical composition of the saliva of O. maya and its effect on natural prey, i.e. the blue crab (Callinectes sapidus), the crown conch snail (Melongena corona bispinosa), as well as conspecifics. Salivary posterior glands were collected from octopus caught by local fishers and extracted with water; this extract paralyzed and predigested crabs when it was injected into the third pereiopod. The water extract was fractionated by membrane ultrafiltration with a molecular weight cut-off of 3 kDa leading to a metabolic phase (>3 kDa) and a neurotoxic fraction (<3 kDa). The neurotoxic fraction injected in the crabs caused paralysis and postural changes. Crabs recovered to their initial condition within two hours, which suggests that the effects of the neurotoxic fraction were reversible. The neurotoxic fraction was also active on O. maya conspecifics, partly paralyzing and sedating them; this suggests that octopus saliva might be used among conspecifics for defense and for reduction of competition. Bioguided separation of the neurotoxic fraction by chromatography led to a paralysis fraction and a relaxing fraction. The paralyzing activity of the saliva was exerted by amino acids, while the relaxing activity was due to the presence of serotonin. Prey-handling studies revealed that O. maya punctures the eye or arthrodial membrane when predating blue crabs and uses the radula to bore through crown conch shells; these differing strategies may help O. maya to reduce the time needed to handle its prey.

  9. Chemical Tools of Octopus maya during Crab Predation Are Also Active on Conspecifics

    PubMed Central

    Pech-Puch, Dawrin; Cruz-López, Honorio; Canche-Ek, Cindy; Campos-Espinosa, Gabriela; García, Elpidio; Mascaro, Maite; Rosas, Carlos; Chávez-Velasco, Daniel; Rodríguez-Morales, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Octopus maya is a major socio-economic resource from the Yucatán Peninsula in Mexico. In this study we report for the first time the chemical composition of the saliva of O. maya and its effect on natural prey, i.e. the blue crab (Callinectes sapidus), the crown conch snail (Melongena corona bispinosa), as well as conspecifics. Salivary posterior glands were collected from octopus caught by local fishers and extracted with water; this extract paralyzed and predigested crabs when it was injected into the third pereiopod. The water extract was fractionated by membrane ultrafiltration with a molecular weight cut-off of 3kDa leading to a metabolic phase (>3kDa) and a neurotoxic fraction (<3kDa). The neurotoxic fraction injected in the crabs caused paralysis and postural changes. Crabs recovered to their initial condition within two hours, which suggests that the effects of the neurotoxic fraction were reversible. The neurotoxic fraction was also active on O. maya conspecifics, partly paralyzing and sedating them; this suggests that octopus saliva might be used among conspecifics for defense and for reduction of competition. Bioguided separation of the neurotoxic fraction by chromatography led to a paralysis fraction and a relaxing fraction. The paralyzing activity of the saliva was exerted by amino acids, while the relaxing activity was due to the presence of serotonin. Prey-handling studies revealed that O. maya punctures the eye or arthrodial membrane when predating blue crabs and uses the radula to bore through crown conch shells; these differing strategies may help O. maya to reduce the time needed to handle its prey. PMID:26895025

  10. Convolutional neural network guided blue crab knuckle detection for autonomous crab meat picking machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dongyi; Vinson, Robert; Holmes, Maxwell; Seibel, Gary; Tao, Yang

    2018-04-01

    The Atlantic blue crab is among the highest-valued seafood found in the American Eastern Seaboard. Currently, the crab processing industry is highly dependent on manual labor. However, there is great potential for vision-guided intelligent machines to automate the meat picking process. Studies show that the back-fin knuckles are robust features containing information about a crab's size, orientation, and the position of the crab's meat compartments. Our studies also make it clear that detecting the knuckles reliably in images is challenging due to the knuckle's small size, anomalous shape, and similarity to joints in the legs and claws. An accurate and reliable computer vision algorithm was proposed to detect the crab's back-fin knuckles in digital images. Convolutional neural networks (CNNs) can localize rough knuckle positions with 97.67% accuracy, transforming a global detection problem into a local detection problem. Compared to the rough localization based on human experience or other machine learning classification methods, the CNN shows the best localization results. In the rough knuckle position, a k-means clustering method is able to further extract the exact knuckle positions based on the back-fin knuckle color features. The exact knuckle position can help us to generate a crab cutline in XY plane using a template matching method. This is a pioneering research project in crab image analysis and offers advanced machine intelligence for automated crab processing.

  11. Chitin synthase III: synthetic lethal mutants and "stress related" chitin synthesis that bypasses the CSD3/CHS6 localization pathway.

    PubMed

    Osmond, B C; Specht, C A; Robbins, P W

    1999-09-28

    We screened Saccharomyces strains for mutants that are synthetically lethal with deletion of the major chitin synthase gene CHS3. In addition to finding, not surprisingly, that mutations in major cell wall-related genes such as FKS1 (glucan synthase) and mutations in any of the Golgi glycosylation complex genes (MNN9 family) are lethal in combination with chs3Delta, we found that a mutation in Srv2p, a bifunctional regulatory gene, is notably lethal in the chs3 deletion. In extending studies of fks1-chitin synthase 3 interactions, we made the surprising discovery that deletion of CSD3/CHS6, a gene normally required for Chs3p delivery and activity in vivo, was not lethal with fks1 and, in fact, that lack of Csd3p/Chs6p did not decrease the high level of stress-related chitin made in the fks1 mutant. This finding suggests that "stress response" chitin synthesis proceeds through an alternate Chs3p targeting pathway.

  12. Mechanisms causing size differences of the land hermit crab Coenobita rugosus among eco-islands in Southern Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chia-Hsuan; Soong, Keryea

    2017-01-01

    Numerous environmental factors can influence body size. Comparing populations in different ecological contexts is one potential approach to elucidating the most critical of such factors. In the current study, we found that the body size of the land hermit crab Coenobita rugosus was significantly larger on Dongsha Island in the South China Sea than on other eco-islands around Southern Taiwan. We hypothesized that this could be due to differences in (1) shell resources, (2) parasite impact, (3) competition, (4) predation, and (5) food. We found no supporting evidence for the first three hypotheses; the shells used by the hermit crabs on Dongsha were in poorer condition than were those used elsewhere, extremely few individuals in the region had ectoparasites, and the density of hermit crabs varied considerably among localities within each island. However, significantly higher percentages of C. rugosus reached age 3 years on Dongsha than at Siziwan bay in Taiwan. Two growth rate indices inferred from size structures suggested faster growth on Dongsha than at Siziwan. The condition index (i.e., the body mass/shield length ratio of C. rugosus) was also greater on Dongsha than at Siziwan. Therefore, Dongsha hermit crabs seem to have superior diet and growth performance. Seagrass debris accumulation at the shore of Dongsha was considerable, whereas none was observed at Siziwan or on the other islands, where dicot leaves were the dominant food item for the vegetarian hermit crabs. We then experimentally evaluated the possible role of seagrass as food for C. rugosus. The crabs on Dongsha preferred seagrass to dicot leaves, and their growth increment was faster when they fed on seagrass than when they fed on dicot leaves; no such differences were found in the Siziwan hermit crabs. The aforementioned results are compatible with the food hypothesis explaining the size differences among the islands. The predator hypothesis could explain the greater life span but not the other

  13. The relationship between circulating ecdysteroids and chela allometry in male tanner crabs: Evidence for a terminal molt in the genus Chionoecetes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tamone, S.L.; Taggart, S. James; Andrews, A.G.; Mondragon, Jennifer; Nielsen, J.K.

    2007-01-01

    Whether male Tanner crabs, Chionoecetes bairdi, undergo a terminal molt associated with a change in claw allometry has long been debated. We measured molting hormone levels in captured male C. bairdi to assess the potential for molting. We plotted a frequency histogram of chela height to carapace width ratios and found a bimodal distribution of crabs with a ratio of approximately 0.18 separating the two modes. Male crabs with a ratio less than 0.18 were classified as "small-clawed" (SC) while crabs with a ratio greater than 0.18 were classified as "large-clawed" (LC). Circulating molting hormones between SC and LC crabs were compared. Significantly lower ecdysteroid levels were found in LC crabs, indicating that this morphotype had negligible potential for molting. Circulating ecdysteroids were measured in SC males of different shell conditions (soft, new, old, and very old) and no significant differences were found. This research suggests that the molt to LC morphology is a terminal molt. The results from this study have important implications for fisheries management because sub-legal LC males will not recruit into the fishery and removal of larger males may have long term effects on population size structure.

  14. Perceptions of environmental changes and lethargic crab disease among crab harvesters in a Brazilian coastal community.

    PubMed

    Firmo, Angélica M S; Tognella, Mônica M P; Có, Walter L O; Barboza, Raynner R D; Alves, Rômulo R N

    2011-11-16

    Lethargic Crab Disease (LCD) has caused significant mortalities in the population of Ucides cordatus crabs in the Mucuri estuary in Bahia State, Brazil, and has brought social and economic problems to many crab-harvesting communities that depend on this natural resource. The present work examined the perceptions of members of a Brazilian crab harvesting community concerning environmental changes and the Lethargic Crab Disease. Field work was undertaken during the period between January and April/2009, with weekly or biweekly field excursions during which open and semi-structured interviews were held with local residents in the municipality of Mucuri, Bahia State, Brazil. A total of 23 individuals were interviewed, all of whom had at least 20 years of crab-collecting experience in the study region. Key-informants (more experienced crab harvesters) were selected among the interviewees using the "native specialist" criterion. According to the collectors, LCD reached the Mucuri mangroves between 2004 and 2005, decimating almost all crab population in the area, and in 2007, 2008 and 2009 high mortalities of U. cordatus were again observed as a result of recurrences of this disease in the region. In addition to LCD, crabs were also suffering great stock reductions due to habitat degradation caused by deforestation, landfills, sewage effluents, domestic and industrial wastes and the introduction of exotic fish in the Mucuri River estuary. The harvesting community was found to have significant ecological knowledge about the functioning of mangrove swamp ecology, the biology of crabs, and the mass mortality that directly affected the economy of this community, and this information was largely in accordance with scientific knowledge. The study of traditional knowledge makes it possible to better understand human interactions with the environment and aids in the elaboration of appropriate strategies for natural resource conservation.

  15. Perceptions of environmental changes and Lethargic crab disease among crab harvesters in a Brazilian coastal community

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Lethargic Crab Disease (LCD) has caused significant mortalities in the population of Ucides cordatus crabs in the Mucuri estuary in Bahia State, Brazil, and has brought social and economic problems to many crab-harvesting communities that depend on this natural resource. The present work examined the perceptions of members of a Brazilian crab harvesting community concerning environmental changes and the Lethargic Crab Disease. Methods Field work was undertaken during the period between January and April/2009, with weekly or biweekly field excursions during which open and semi-structured interviews were held with local residents in the municipality of Mucuri, Bahia State, Brazil. A total of 23 individuals were interviewed, all of whom had at least 20 years of crab-collecting experience in the study region. Key-informants (more experienced crab harvesters) were selected among the interviewees using the "native specialist" criterion. Results According to the collectors, LCD reached the Mucuri mangroves between 2004 and 2005, decimating almost all crab population in the area, and in 2007, 2008 and 2009 high mortalities of U. cordatus were again observed as a result of recurrences of this disease in the region. In addition to LCD, crabs were also suffering great stock reductions due to habitat degradation caused by deforestation, landfills, sewage effluents, domestic and industrial wastes and the introduction of exotic fish in the Mucuri River estuary. The harvesting community was found to have significant ecological knowledge about the functioning of mangrove swamp ecology, the biology of crabs, and the mass mortality that directly affected the economy of this community, and this information was largely in accordance with scientific knowledge. Conclusions The study of traditional knowledge makes it possible to better understand human interactions with the environment and aids in the elaboration of appropriate strategies for natural resource conservation

  16. A protocol for the simultaneous identification of chitin-containing particles and their associated bacteria.

    PubMed

    Biancalana, Florencia; Kopprio, Germán A; Lara, Rubén J; Alonso, Cecilia

    2017-07-01

    Chitin is the second most abundant polymer on Earth, playing a crucial role in the biogeochemical cycles. A core issue for studying its processing in aquatic systems is the identification and enumeration of chitin-containing particles and organisms, ideally in a manner that can be directly linked to bulk chitin quantification. The aim of this study was the development of such a technique. We successfully combined the methodology of bulk chitin determination using wheat germ agglutinin (FITC-WGA) for staining chitin-containing particles and organisms along with CARD-FISH staining of either chitin-containing eukaryotic cells or bacteria associated with them. Environmental chitin staining was successfully applied to natural water samples. Fungal hyphae, diatoms, and dinoflagellates, sestonic aggregates and chitin-containing structures derived from metazoa were observed. Also, hybridized bacteria attached to chitinaceous debris were clearly visualized. Finally, as proof of principle, cultured yeast cells were simultaneously-targeted by FITC-WGA and the EUK516 probe without exhibiting any interference between both stains. The presented approach appears as a powerful tool to evaluate the contribution of different size classes and organisms to chitin production and consumption, opening the possibility for application of single-cell approaches targeting the ecophysiology of chitin transformations in aquatic systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Elucidating the influence of polymorph-dependent interfacial solvent structuring at chitin surfaces.

    PubMed

    Brown, Aaron H; Walsh, Tiffany R

    2016-10-20

    Interfacial solvent structuring is thought to be influential in mediating the adsorption of biomolecules at aqueous materials interfaces. However, despite the enormous potential for exploitation of aqueous chitin interfaces in industrial, medical and drug-delivery applications, little is known at the molecular-level about such interfacial solvent structuring for chitin. Here we use molecular simulation to predict the structure of the [100] and [010] interfaces of α-chitin and β-chitin dihydrate in contact with liquid water and saline solution. We find the α-chitin [100] interface supports lateral high-density regions in the first water layer at the interface, which are also present, but not as pronounced, for β-chitin. The lateral structuring of interfacial ions at the saline/chitin interface is also more pronounced for α-chitin compared with β-chitin. Our findings provide a foundation for the systematic design of biomolecules with selective binding affinity for different chitin polymorphs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. In situ chitin isolation from body parts of a centipede and lysozyme adsorption studies.

    PubMed

    Bulut, Esra; Sargin, Idris; Arslan, Ozlem; Odabasi, Mehmet; Akyuz, Bahar; Kaya, Murat

    2017-01-01

    Isolation of structurally intact chitin samples for biotechnological applications has gained much recent attention. So far, three-dimensional chitin isolates have been obtained from only diplopods and sponges. In this study, three-dimensional chitin isolates were obtained from the body parts of centipede Scolopendra sp. (antennae, head, forcipule, collum, trunk, trunk legs and last pair of legs) without leading to structural failure. FT-IR spectra of chitin isolates confirmed that chitin samples are in α allomorph. TGA, XRD and SEM analyses and lysozyme adsorption studies revealed that each chitin isolate had different thermal stability, crystallinity and surface characteristics. Among the chitin isolates, Cu(II)-immobilized forcipule chitin showed the highest affinity for lysozyme (54.1mg/g), whereas chitin from last pair of legs exhibited the lowest affinity (3.7mg/g). This study demonstrated that structurally intact chitin isolates can be obtained from the body parts of centipede Scolopendra sp. (antennae, head, forcipule, collum, trunk, trunk legs and last pair of legs) by using a simple chemical procedure. Also, it gives a biotechnological perspective to the organisms in the group of Chilipoda. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Chitin hoops obtained from Ommatoiulus sabulosus (Diplopoda, Julidae) used for bovine serum albumin adsorption.

    PubMed

    Šatkauskienė, Ingrida; Jarusevičiūtė, Simona; Baublys, Vykintas; Maheta, Mansi; Tubelytė, Vaida

    2017-01-01

    A new hoop shaped three dimensional chitin was obtained successfully from the body segment of a diplopod species (Ommatoiulus sabulosus) by following the procedure decolorization, demineralization and deproteinization. Purity of the hoop shaped three-dimensional chitin was proved by FT-IR analysis and chitinase digestive test. The important bands for α-chitin such as 1654.2, 1619.7 and 1552cm -1 were found after FT-IR analysis. And the chitinase digestive test revealed the purity of chitin (with digestion rate of 94.7%). SEM analysis showed that the chitin surface consisted of highly porous structure with nanofibers. Thermal stability of the hoop shaped chitin was recorded quite high (DTG max =383°C). The nitrogen, carbon and hydrogen contents of the hoop shaped chitin were determined as 6.81%, 46.23% and 6.43% respectively. And also degree of acetylation (DA) of the chitin indicated the purity with 95.85%. Chitin hoops-BSA interaction was conducted at different pH, protein concentration and contact time. This new type of three-dimensional chitin obtained from the diplopod body segments can find more effective applications in further studies comparing to the conventional dust forms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Kinematics of walking in the hermit crab, Pagurus pollicarus.

    PubMed

    Chapple, William

    2012-03-01

    Hermit crabs are decapod crustaceans that have adapted to life in gastropod shells. Among their adaptations are modifications to their thoracic appendages or pereopods. The 4th and 5th pairs are adapted for shell support; walking is performed with the 2nd and 3rd pereopods, with an alternation of diagonal pairs. During stance, the walking legs are rotated backwards in the pitch plane. Two patterns of walking were studied to compare them with walking patterns described for other decapods, a lateral gait, similar to that in many brachyurans, and a forward gait resembling macruran walking. Video sequences of free walking and restrained animals were used to obtain leg segment positions from which joint angles were calculated. Leading legs in a lateral walk generated a power stroke by flexion of MC and PD joints; CB angles often did not change during slow walks. Trailing legs exhibited extension of MC and PD with a slight levation of CB. The two joints, B/IM and CP, are aligned at 90° angles to CB, MC and PD, moving dorso-anteriorly during swing and ventro-posteriorly during stance. A forward step was more complex; during swing the leg was rotated forward (yaw) and vertically (pitch), due to the action of TC. At the beginning of stance, TC started to rotate posteriorly and laterally, CB was depressed, and MC flexed. As stance progressed and the leg was directed laterally, PD and MC extended, so that at the end of stance the dactyl tip was quite posterior. During walks of the animal out of its shell, the legs were extended more anterior-laterally and the animal often toppled over, indicating that during walking in a shell its weight stabilized the animal. An open chain kinematic model in which each segment was approximated as a rectangular solid, the dimensions of which were derived from measurements on animals, was developed to estimate the CM of the animal under different load conditions. CM was normally quite anterior; removal of the chelipeds shifted it caudally

  1. Development of Microbial Fuel Cell Prototypes for Examination of the Temporal and Spatial Response of Anodic Bacterial Communities in Marine Sediments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    clumps. Approximately 3 grams of chitin (from crab shells, practical grade, coarse flakes, Sigma Aldrich, Product #C9213, CAS#1398-61-4), were then...Fig. 4A. post stirring to introduce new TOC; B. post microwaving to demonstrate power provided by microbes, C. upon addition of chitin to sand

  2. Development of Microbial Fuel Cell Prototypes for Examination of the Temporal and Spatial Response of Anodic Bacterial Communities in Marine Sediments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    clumps. Approximately 3 grams of chitin (from crab shells, practical grade, coarse flakes, Sigma Aldrich, Product #C9213, CAS#1398-61-4), were then...Fig. 4A. post stirring to introduce new TOC; B. post microwaving to demonstrate power provided by microbes, C. upon addition of chitin to sand

  3. Coupled beam motion in a storage ring with crab cavities

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, Xiaobiao

    2016-02-16

    We studied the coupled beam motion in a storage ring between the transverse and longitudinal directions introduced by crab cavities. Analytic form of the linear decoupling transformation is derived. Also, the equilibrium bunch distribution in an electron storage ring with a crab cavity is given, including contribution to the eigen-emittance induced by the crab cavity. Furthermore, application to the short pulse generation scheme using crab cavities [1] is considered.

  4. Behavioral Response of Hermit Crabs (Clibanarius digueti) to Dissolved Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, H. J.

    2015-12-01

    CO2 induced ocean acidification is currently changing the population dynamics of marine organisms. As a result of ocean acidification, marine organisms expend extra energy on modifying behaviors. The current rate of ocean acidification will deplete the marine food chain that much of the world relies on as their major food supply. The purpose of this study was to understand whether and how ocean acidification affects the behavior of hermit crabs Clibanarius digueti. We hypothesized that an increase in carbonic acid would modify grazing and individual movement, because an increase in acidification alters the normal chemical composition of the water and potentially the niche occupancy of C. digueti. A model tidal pool experiment consisting of two tanks (control and treatment) inhabited with seven living C. digueti was set up in the Ocean Biome of Biosphere-2. Each tank was also provided with uninhabited shells: two Turbo fluctuosa and four Cerithium sp. Gaseous CO2 was dissolved into a treatment tank and measured as dissolved CO2 by using a sodium hydroxide titration method. Additionally, water conditions were characterized for UV- light and temperature. Two trials were run in this experiment with tanks and treatments interchanged in each trial. We assessed whether increased CO2 affected hermit crab shell change rate. We found that shell changes only happened among C. digueti placed under increased CO2. The information from this analysis will allow us to assess whether ocean acidification affects basic behavior in hermit crabs, which could later affect population dynamics. Bringing together all of this information will allow us to measure the effects of climate change on the behavior of C.Digueti.

  5. Optimizing deacetylation process for chitosan production from green mussel (perna viridis) shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danarto, Y. C.; Distantina, Sperisa

    2016-02-01

    The green mussel (perna viridis) shell waste could be utilized for chitosan production because it contained chitin. Chitin can be derived into chitosan through the deacetylation process. Chitosan is a polysaccharides polymer that is readily soluble in dilute acid solution and easily modified into other useful compounds. This research aimed to study the chitosan production from green mussel shells. This experiment had the following stages, deproteinization process aimed to eliminate the protein content using 1N NaOH solution, demineralization process aimed to remove minerals in green mussel shells as CaCO3 using 1 N HCl solution and decolorization process aimed to eliminate the color pigments and other impurities using ethanol solvent. All process above resulted chitin. Furthermore, chemical modification of chitin into chitosan by deacetylation process. This stage was very important because it greatly affected the chitosan properties. This research studied two different treatment for deacetylation process. The first treatment was the deacetylation process using concentrated NaOH solution (50% w), at high temperatures (90 - 100 °C) for 2 hours extraction, whilw the second treatment was deacetylation process using a low concentration of NaOH solution (15% w), at room temperature for 24 hours. The results showed that deproteinization, demineralization, and decolorizaton was capable of removing protein, mineral, and pigment. This experiment yield chitin 41.6 %wt. Chitosan yield from second treatment was 39.5%w and it was better than first treatment. Chitosan from first treatment had 79.8% degree of deacetylation and 16.5 kDa molecular weight. It was better than first treatment.

  6. 50 CFR 680.6 - Crab economic data report (EDR).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Crab economic data report (EDR). 680.6... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) SHELLFISH FISHERIES OF THE EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA General § 680.6 Crab economic data report (EDR). Persons participating in the CR crab fisheries are...

  7. 50 CFR 680.6 - Crab economic data report (EDR).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Crab economic data report (EDR). 680.6... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) SHELLFISH FISHERIES OF THE EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA General § 680.6 Crab economic data report (EDR). Persons participating in the CR crab fisheries are...

  8. 50 CFR 680.6 - Crab economic data report (EDR).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Crab economic data report (EDR). 680.6... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) SHELLFISH FISHERIES OF THE EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA General § 680.6 Crab economic data report (EDR). Persons participating in the CR crab fisheries are...

  9. 50 CFR 680.21 - Crab harvesting cooperatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) Minimum number of members. Each crab harvesting cooperative must include at least four unique QS holding... IFQ permit issued to the crab harvesting cooperative for the current fishing season. (2) Transfer of... voluntary. A crab harvesting cooperative is not required to add or remove members during the fishing season...

  10. 50 CFR 680.21 - Crab harvesting cooperatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) Minimum number of members. Each crab harvesting cooperative must include at least four unique QS holding... IFQ permit issued to the crab harvesting cooperative for the current fishing season. (2) Transfer of... voluntary. A crab harvesting cooperative is not required to add or remove members during the fishing season...

  11. 50 CFR Table 2 to Part 680 - Crab Species Code

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., Table 2 Table 2 to Part 680—Crab Species Code Species code Common name Scientific name 900 Box Lopholithodes mandtii. 910 Dungeness Cancer magister. 921 Red king crab Paralithodes camtshaticus. 922 Blue king... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Crab Species Code 2 Table 2 to Part 680...

  12. 50 CFR Table 2 to Part 680 - Crab Species Code

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., Table 2 Table 2 to Part 680—Crab Species Code Species code Common name Scientific name 900 Box Lopholithodes mandtii. 910 Dungeness Cancer magister. 921 Red king crab Paralithodes camtshaticus. 922 Blue king... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Crab Species Code 2 Table 2 to Part 680...

  13. Critical habitat for ovigerous Dungeness crabs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scheding, Karen; Shirley, Thomas C.; O'Clair, Charles E.; Taggart, S. James; Kruse, Gordon H.; Bez, Nicolas; Booth, Anthony; Dorn, Martin W.; Hills, Susan; Lipcius, Romuald N.; Pelletier, Dominique; Roy, Claude; Smith, Stephen J.; Witherell, David B.

    2001-01-01

    The Dungeness crab, Cancer magister, supports an important fishery in the northeastern Pacific Ocean, yet there is limited knowledge of ovigerous female brooding locations and brooding behavior. Our earlier research suggests that ovigerous crabs aggregate at the same brooding locations for many years. Within these locations, ovigerous females occur in high densities, with the majority of the aggregation buried within the sediment. These locations often have similar water depths and sediment types and appear to be critical for this life history stage. Our study was designed to examine the bathymetric distribution of Dungeness crabs in bays with and without sea otters at eight locations within the Glacier Bay area by conducting transects with a video-equipped manned submersible. Two of the bays investigated contained large aggregations of ovigerous females. At both sites the substrate was composed primarily of sand. However, only a small percentage of the 33 km of transects were classified as sand. These data suggest that sand substrate may be a limiting resource. Since crab brooding aggregations represent a large portion of the crab population within a small area, and because they are a critical component of Dungeness life history, areas with these characteristics need to be investigated, mapped, and protected from development or exploitation. The areas requiring protection from the impact of anthropogenic wastes, fishing, and logging activities could be quite small, thus limiting conflict with alternative users.

  14. Caspofungin Treatment of Aspergillus fumigatus Results in ChsG-Dependent Upregulation of Chitin Synthesis and the Formation of Chitin-Rich Microcolonies

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Louise A.; Lee, Keunsook K.; Munro, Carol A.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of Aspergillus fumigatus with echinocandins such as caspofungin inhibits the synthesis of cell wall β-1,3-glucan, which triggers a compensatory stimulation of chitin synthesis. Activation of chitin synthesis can occur in response to sub-MICs of caspofungin and to CaCl2 and calcofluor white (CFW), agonists of the protein kinase C (PKC), and Ca2+-calcineurin signaling pathways. A. fumigatus mutants with the chs gene (encoding chitin synthase) deleted (ΔAfchs) were tested for their response to these agonists to determine the chitin synthase enzymes that were required for the compensatory upregulation of chitin synthesis. Only the ΔAfchsG mutant was hypersensitive to caspofungin, and all other ΔAfchs mutants tested remained capable of increasing their chitin content in response to treatment with CaCl2 and CFW and caspofungin. The resulting increase in cell wall chitin content correlated with reduced susceptibility to caspofungin in the wild type and all ΔAfchs mutants tested, with the exception of the ΔAfchsG mutant, which remained sensitive to caspofungin. In vitro exposure to the chitin synthase inhibitor, nikkomycin Z, along with caspofungin demonstrated synergistic efficacy that was again AfChsG dependent. Dynamic imaging using microfluidic perfusion chambers demonstrated that treatment with sub-MIC caspofungin resulted initially in hyphal tip lysis. However, thickened hyphae emerged that formed aberrant microcolonies in the continued presence of caspofungin. In addition, intrahyphal hyphae were formed in response to echinocandin treatment. These in vitro data demonstrate that A. fumigatus has the potential to survive echinocandin treatment in vivo by AfChsG-dependent upregulation of chitin synthesis. Chitin-rich cells may, therefore, persist in human tissues and act as the focus for breakthrough infections. PMID:26169407

  15. Crab Waist Collision at DAFNE

    SciTech Connect

    Milardi, C.; Alesini, D.; Biagini, M.E.

    DAFNE is an accelerator complex consisting of a double ring lepton collider working at the c.m. energy of the {Phi}-resonance (1.02 GeV) and an injection system. In its original configuration the collider consisted of two independent rings, each {approx}97 m long, sharing two 10 m long interaction regions (IR1 and IR2) where the KLOE and FINUDA or DEAR detectors were respectively installed. A full energy injection system, including an S-band linac, 180 m long transfer lines and an accumulator/damping ring, provides fast and high efficiency electron positron injection also in topping-up mode during collisions. Recently the DAFNE collider has beenmore » upgraded in order to implement a new collision scheme based on large Piwinski angle and cancellation of the synchro-betatron resonances by means of electromagnetic sextupoles (Crab-Waist compensation). The novel approach has proved to be effective in improving beam-beam interaction and collider luminosity.« less

  16. NASA's Hubble Captures the Beating Heart of the Crab Nebula

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    Peering deep into the core of the Crab Nebula, this close-up image reveals the beating heart of one of the most historic and intensively studied remnants of a supernova, an exploding star. The inner region sends out clock-like pulses of radiation and tsunamis of charged particles embedded in magnetic fields. The neutron star at the very center of the Crab Nebula has about the same mass as the sun but compressed into an incredibly dense sphere that is only a few miles across. Spinning 30 times a second, the neutron star shoots out detectable beams of energy that make it look like it's pulsating. The NASA Hubble Space Telescope snapshot is centered on the region around the neutron star (the rightmost of the two bright stars near the center of this image) and the expanding, tattered, filamentary debris surrounding it. Hubble's sharp view captures the intricate details of glowing gas, shown in red, that forms a swirling medley of cavities and filaments. Inside this shell is a ghostly blue glow that is radiation given off by electrons spiraling at nearly the speed of light in the powerful magnetic field around the crushed stellar core. The neutron star is a showcase for extreme physical processes and unimaginable cosmic violence. Bright wisps are moving outward from the neutron star at half the speed of light to form an expanding ring. It is thought that these wisps originate from a shock wave that turns the high-speed wind from the neutron star into extremely energetic particles. When this "heartbeat" radiation signature was first discovered in 1968, astronomers realized they had discovered a new type of astronomical object. Now astronomers know it's the archetype of a class of supernova remnants called pulsars - or rapidly spinning neutron stars. These interstellar "lighthouse beacons" are invaluable for doing observational experiments on a variety of astronomical phenomena, including measuring gravity waves. Observations of the Crab supernova were recorded by Chinese

  17. Transcriptome analysis of mud crab (Scylla paramamosain) gills in response to Mud crab reovirus (MCRV).

    PubMed

    Liu, Shanshan; Chen, Guanxing; Xu, Haidong; Zou, Weibin; Yan, Wenrui; Wang, Qianqian; Deng, Hengwei; Zhang, Heqian; Yu, Guojiao; He, Jianguo; Weng, Shaoping

    2017-01-01

    Mud crab (Scylla paramamosain) is an economically important marine cultured species in China's coastal area. Mud crab reovirus (MCRV) is the most important pathogen of mud crab, resulting in large economic losses in crab farming. In this paper, next-generation sequencing technology and bioinformatics analysis are used to study transcriptome differences between MCRV-infected mud crab and normal control. A total of 104.3 million clean reads were obtained, including 52.7 million and 51.6 million clean reads from MCRV-infected (CA) and controlled (HA) mud crabs respectively. 81,901, 70,059 and 67,279 unigenes were gained respectively from HA reads, CA reads and HA&CA reads. A total of 32,547 unigenes from HA&CA reads called All-Unigenes were matched to at least one database among Nr, Nt, Swiss-prot, COG, GO and KEGG databases. Among these, 13,039, 20,260 and 11,866 unigenes belonged to the 3, 258 and 25 categories of GO, KEGG pathway, and COG databases, respectively. Solexa/Illumina's DGE platform was also used, and about 13,856 differentially expressed genes (DEGs), including 4444 significantly upregulated and 9412 downregulated DEGs were detected in diseased crabs compared with the control. KEGG pathway analysis revealed that DEGs were obviously enriched in the pathways related to different diseases or infections. This transcriptome analysis provided valuable information on gene functions associated with the response to MCRV in mud crab, as well as detail information for identifying novel genes in the absence of the mud crab genome database. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Graft polymerization of acrylic acid onto chitin nanofiber to improve dispersibility in basic water.

    PubMed

    Ifuku, Shinsuke; Iwasaki, Masayoshi; Morimoto, Minoru; Saimoto, Hiroyuki

    2012-09-01

    Graft copolymerization of acrylic acid (AA) on chitin nanofibers was carried out with potassium persulfate as a free radical initiator in an aqueous medium. The molar ratio of grafted AA increased with the AA concentration. The grafted chitin nanofibers were characterized by FT-IR, FE-SEM, UV-vis, XRD, and TGA. After polymerization, the characteristic morphology of chitin nanofibers was maintained. Chitin nanofibers grafted with AA were efficiently dissociated and dispersed homogeneously in basic water because of the electrostatic repulsion effect between nanofibers. AA was grafted on the surface and amorphous part of chitin nanofibers, and the original crystalline structure of α-chitin was maintained. At 330 °C, the weight residue of the graft copolymer increased with the grafted AA content. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Chitin and carbon nanotube composites as biocompatible scaffolds for neuron growth.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nandita; Chen, Jinhu; Koziol, Krzysztof K; Hallam, Keith R; Janas, Dawid; Patil, Avinash J; Strachan, Ally; G Hanley, Jonathan; Rahatekar, Sameer S

    2016-04-21

    The design of biocompatible implants for neuron repair/regeneration ideally requires high cell adhesion as well as good electrical conductivity. Here, we have shown that plasma-treated chitin carbon nanotube composite scaffolds show very good neuron adhesion as well as support of synaptic function of neurons. The addition of carbon nanotubes to a chitin biopolymer improved the electrical conductivity and the assisted oxygen plasma treatment introduced more oxygen species onto the chitin nanotube scaffold surface. Neuron viability experiments showed excellent neuron attachment onto plasma-treated chitin nanotube composite scaffolds. The support of synaptic function was evident on chitin/nanotube composites, as confirmed by PSD-95 staining. The biocompatible and electrically-conducting chitin nanotube composite scaffold prepared in this study can be used for in vitro tissue engineering of neurons and, potentially, as an implantable electrode for stimulation and repair of neurons.

  20. Chitin and carbon nanotube composites as biocompatible scaffolds for neuron growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Nandita; Chen, Jinhu; Koziol, Krzysztof K.; Hallam, Keith R.; Janas, Dawid; Patil, Avinash J.; Strachan, Ally; G. Hanley, Jonathan; Rahatekar, Sameer S.

    2016-04-01

    The design of biocompatible implants for neuron repair/regeneration ideally requires high cell adhesion as well as good electrical conductivity. Here, we have shown that plasma-treated chitin carbon nanotube composite scaffolds show very good neuron adhesion as well as support of synaptic function of neurons. The addition of carbon nanotubes to a chitin biopolymer improved the electrical conductivity and the assisted oxygen plasma treatment introduced more oxygen species onto the chitin nanotube scaffold surface. Neuron viability experiments showed excellent neuron attachment onto plasma-treated chitin nanotube composite scaffolds. The support of synaptic function was evident on chitin/nanotube composites, as confirmed by PSD-95 staining. The biocompatible and electrically-conducting chitin nanotube composite scaffold prepared in this study can be used for in vitro tissue engineering of neurons and, potentially, as an implantable electrode for stimulation and repair of neurons.

  1. The first report of the physicochemical structure of chitin isolated from Hermetia illucens.

    PubMed

    Waśko, Adam; Bulak, Piotr; Polak-Berecka, Magdalena; Nowak, Katarzyna; Polakowski, Cezary; Bieganowski, Andrzej

    2016-11-01

    This is the first report on the physicochemical properties of chitin obtained from larvae and imagoes of black soldier flies (Hermetia illucens). Scanning electron microscopy revealed differences in surface morphologies of the two types of chitin. The crystalline index values of chitins from adult flies and larvae were 24.9% and 35%, respectively. This is a trait that differentiates these biopolymers from chitins extracted from other sources described so far. X-ray diffraction patterns and IR spectroscopy revealed that both types of samples of chitin were in an α crystalline form. Also, the results of elemental analysis, thermal stabilities and FTIR spectroscopy of the chitins from larvae and adults of H. illucens were similar, which points to a general similarity in their physicochemical structure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Self-bonded composite films based on cellulose nanofibers and chitin nanocrystals as antifungal materials.

    PubMed

    Robles, Eduardo; Salaberria, Asier M; Herrera, Rene; Fernandes, Susana C M; Labidi, Jalel

    2016-06-25

    Cellulose nanofibers and chitin nanocrystals, two main components of agricultural and aquacultural by-products, were obtained from blue agave and yellow squat lobster industrial residues. Cellulose nanofibers were obtained using high pressure homogenization, while chitin nanocrystals were obtained by hydrolysis in acid medium. Cellulose nanofibers and chitin nanocrystals were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Atomic Force Microscopy and Infrared spectroscopy. Self-bonded composite films with different composition were fabricated by hot pressing and their properties were evaluated. Antifungal activity of chitin nanocrystals was studied using a Cellometer(®) cell count device, mechanical properties at tension were measured with a universal testing machine, water vapor permeability was evaluated with a thermohygrometer and surface tension with sessile drop contact angle method. The addition of chitin nanocrystals reduced slightly the mechanical properties of the composite. Presence of chitin nanocrystals influenced the growth of Aspergillus sp fungus in the surface of the composites as expected. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of Acetyl Group on Mechanical Properties of Chitin/Chitosan Nanocrystal: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Junhe; Yu, Zechuan; Lau, Denvid

    2016-01-01

    Chitin fiber is the load-bearing component in natural chitin-based materials. In these materials, chitin is always partially deacetylated to different levels, leading to diverse material properties. In order to understand how the acetyl group enhances the fracture resistance capability of chitin fiber, we constructed atomistic models of chitin with varied acetylation degree and analyzed the hydrogen bonding pattern, fracture, and stress-strain behavior of these models. We notice that the acetyl group can contribute to the formation of hydrogen bonds that can stabilize the crystalline structure. In addition, it is found that the specimen with a higher acetylation degree presents a greater resistance against fracture. This study describes the role of the functional group, acetyl groups, in crystalline chitin. Such information could provide preliminary understanding of nanomaterials when similar functional groups are encountered. PMID:26742033

  4. Customizing Properties of β-Chitin in Squid Pen (Gladius) by Chemical Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Ianiro, Alessandro; Di Giosia, Matteo; Fermani, Simona; Samorì, Chiara; Barbalinardo, Marianna; Valle, Francesco; Pellegrini, Graziella; Biscarini, Fabio; Zerbetto, Francesco; Calvaresi, Matteo; Falini, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    The squid pen (gladius) from the Loligo vulgaris was used for preparation of β-chitin materials characterized by different chemical, micro- and nano-structural properties that preserved, almost completely the macrostructural and the mechanical ones. The β-chitin materials obtained by alkaline treatment showed porosity, wettability and swelling that are a function of the duration of the treatment. Microscopic, spectroscopic and synchrotron X-ray diffraction techniques showed that the chemical environment of the N-acetyl groups of the β-chitin chains changes after the thermal alkaline treatment. As a consequence, the crystalline packing of the β-chitin is modified, due to the intercalation of water molecules between β-chitin sheets. Potential applications of these β-chitin materials range from the nanotechnology to the regenerative medicine. The use of gladii, which are waste products of the fishing industry, has also important environmental implications. PMID:25517216

  5. Surface morphology of chitin highly related with the isolated body part of butterfly (Argynnis pandora).

    PubMed

    Kaya, Murat; Bitim, Betül; Mujtaba, Muhammad; Koyuncu, Turgay

    2015-11-01

    This study was conducted to understand the differences in the physicochemical properties of chitin samples isolated from the wings and the other body parts except the wings (OBP) of a butterfly species (Argynnis pandora). The same isolation method was used for obtaining chitin specimens from both types of body parts. The chitin content of the wings (22%) was recorded as being much higher than the OBP (8%). The extracted chitin samples were characterized via FT-IR, TGA, XRD, SEM, and elemental analysis techniques. Results of these characterizations revealed that the chitins from both structures (wings and OBP) were very similar, except for their surface morphologies. SEM results demonstrated one type of surface morphology for the wings and four different surface morphologies for the OBP. Therefore, it can be hypothesized that the surface morphology of the chitin is highly related with the body part. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Optimization of conditions for isolation of high quality chitin from shrimp processing raw byproducts using response surface methodology and its characterization.

    PubMed

    Nidheesh, T; Suresh, P V

    2015-06-01

    Chitin is one of the most abundant bioactive biopolymer on earth. It is commercially extracted from seafood processing crustacean shell byproducts by harsh thermochemical treatments. The extraction conditions, the source and pretreatment of raw material significantly affect its quality and bioactivity. In this investigation response surface methodology (RSM) has been applied to optimize and evaluate the interaction of variables for extraction of high quality chitin from shrimp processing raw byproducts. Variables such as, concentration of HCl (%, v/v) 4.5 (for wet) and 4.9 (for dry), reaction time 3 h, solid liquid ratio of HCl (w/v) 1:5.5 (for wet) and 1:7.9 (for dry) with two treatments achieved >98 % demineralization of shrimp byproduct. Variables such as, concentration of NaOH 3.6 % (w/v), reaction time 2.5 h, temperature 69.0 ± 1 °C, solid liquid ratio of NaOH 7.4 (w/v) and two treatments accomplished >98 % deproteinization of demineralized byproducts. Significant (p ≤ 0.05-0.001) interactive effects were observed between different variables. Chitin obtained in these conditions had residual content (%, w/w) of ash <0.4 and protein <0.8 and the degree of N-acetylation was >93 % with purity of >98 %. In conclusion, the optimized conditions by RSM can be applied for large scale preparation of high quality chitin from raw shrimp byproduct.

  7. Positive feedback fishery: Population consequences of `crab-tiling' on the green crab Carcinus maenas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, E. V.; Thompson, R. C.; Coleman, R. A.; Attrill, M. J.

    2008-11-01

    Collection of marine invertebrates for use as fishing bait is a substantial activity in many parts of the world, often with unknown ecological consequences. As new fisheries develop, it is critical for environmental managers to have high quality ecological information regarding the potential impacts, in order to develop sound management strategies. Crab-tiling is a largely unregulated and un-researched fishery, which operates commercially in the south-west UK. The target species is the green crab Carcinus maenas. Those crabs which are pre-ecdysis and have a carapace width greater than 40 mm are collected to be sold to recreational anglers as bait. Collection involves laying artificial structures on intertidal sandflats and mudflats in estuaries. Crabs use these structures as refugia and are collected during low tide. However, the effect that this fishery has on populations of C. maenas is not known. The impact of crab-tiling on C. maenas population structure was determined by sampling crabs from tiled estuaries and non-tiled estuaries using baited drop-nets. A spatially and temporarily replicated, balanced design was used to compare crab abundance, sizes and sex ratios between estuaries. Typically, fisheries are associated with a reduction in the abundance of the target species. Crab-tiling, however, significantly increased C. maenas abundance. This was thought to be a result of the extra habitat in tiled estuaries, which probably provides protection from natural predators, such as birds and fish. Although crabs were more abundant in tiled estuaries than non-tiled estuaries, the overall percentage of reproductively active crabs in non-tiled estuaries was greater than in tiled estuaries. As with most exploited fisheries stocks, crabs in exploited (tiled) estuaries tended to be smaller, with a modal carapace width of 20-29 mm rather than 30-39 mm in non-tiled estuaries. The sex ratio of crabs however; was not significantly different between tiled and non

  8. Occupational Exposure to Bioaerosols in Norwegian Crab Processing Plants.

    PubMed

    Thomassen, Marte R; Kamath, Sandip D; Lopata, Andreas L; Madsen, Anne Mette; Eduard, Wijnand; Bang, Berit E; Aasmoe, Lisbeth

    2016-08-01

    Aerosolization of components when processing king crab (Paralithodes camtschaticus) and edible crab (Cancer pagurus) may cause occupational health problems when inhaled by workers. A cross-sectional study was carried out in three king crab plants and one edible crab plant. Personal exposure measurements were performed throughout work shifts. Air was collected for measurement of tropomyosin, total protein, endotoxin, trypsin, and N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminidase (NAGase). T-tests and ANOVAs were used to compare the levels of exposure in the different plants and areas in the plants. Total protein and tropomyosin levels were highest in the edible crab plant, endotoxin levels were highest in king crab plants. King crab exposure levels were highest during raw processing. Tropomyosin levels were highest during raw king crab processing with geometric mean (GM) 9.6 versus 2.5ng m(-3) during cooked processing. Conversely, edible crab tropomyosin levels were highest during cooked processing with GM 45.4 versus 8.7ng m(-3) during raw processing. Endotoxin levels were higher in king crab plants than in the edible crab plant with GM = 6285.5 endotoxin units (EU) m(-3) versus 72 EU m(-3). In the edible crab plant, NAGase levels were highest during raw processing with GM = 853 pmol4-methylumbelliferone (MU) m(-3) versus 422 pmol4-MU m(-3) during cooked processing. Trypsin activity was found in both king crab and edible crab plants and levels were higher in raw than cooked processing. Differences in exposure levels between plants and worker groups (raw and cooked processing) were identified. Norwegian crab processing workers are exposed to airborne proteins, tropomyosin, endotoxins, trypsin, and NAGase in their breathing zone. Levels vary between worker groups and factories. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.

  9. Heterologous Expression of an Entamoeba histolytica Chitin Synthase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Van Dellen, Katrina L.; Bulik, Dorota A.; Specht, Charles A.; Robbins, Phillips W.; Samuelson, John C.

    2006-01-01

    Chitin in the cyst wall of Entamoeba histolytica is made by two chitin synthases (Chs), one of which is unique (EhCHS-1) and one of which resembles those of insects and nematodes (EhCHS-2). EhCHS-1 is deposited chitin in the lateral wall of transformed Saccharomyces cerevisiae Chs mutants, independent of accessory proteins (Chs4p to Chs7p) required by yeast Chs3p. PMID:16400183

  10. Heterologous expression of an Entamoeba histolytica chitin synthase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Van Dellen, Katrina L; Bulik, Dorota A; Specht, Charles A; Robbins, Phillips W; Samuelson, John C

    2006-01-01

    Chitin in the cyst wall of Entamoeba histolytica is made by two chitin synthases (Chs), one of which is unique (EhCHS-1) and one of which resembles those of insects and nematodes (EhCHS-2). EhCHS-1 is deposited chitin in the lateral wall of transformed Saccharomyces cerevisiae Chs mutants, independent of accessory proteins (Chs4p to Chs7p) required by yeast Chs3p.

  11. Powdered Chitin Agar as a Selective Medium for Enumeration of Actinomycetes in Water and Soil1

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, S. C.; Lockwood, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    Agar media made with 0.4% colloidal chitin plus mineral salts and adjusted to pH 8.0 was superior to four other commonly used media for the isolation and enumeration of actinomycetes from water samples. More actinomycetes developed on chitin agar, and the development of bacteria and fungi was suppressed. Frozen and vacuum-dried chitin from aqueous colloidal suspensions was finely divided and gave results comparable to those obtained with media prepared from colloidal suspensions. Images PMID:234719

  12. Efficient monitoring of CRAB jobs at CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, J. M. D.; Balcas, J.; Belforte, S.; Ciangottini, D.; Mascheroni, M.; Rupeika, E. A.; Ivanov, T. T.; Hernandez, J. M.; Vaandering, E.

    2017-10-01

    CRAB is a tool used for distributed analysis of CMS data. Users can submit sets of jobs with similar requirements (tasks) with a single request. CRAB uses a client-server architecture, where a lightweight client, a server, and ancillary services work together and are maintained by CMS operators at CERN. As with most complex software, good monitoring tools are crucial for efficient use and longterm maintainability. This work gives an overview of the monitoring tools developed to ensure the CRAB server and infrastructure are functional, help operators debug user problems, and minimize overhead and operating cost. This work also illustrates the design choices and gives a report on our experience with the tools we developed and the external ones we used.

  13. Efficient Monitoring of CRAB Jobs at CMS

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, J. M.D.; Balcas, J.; Belforte, S.

    CRAB is a tool used for distributed analysis of CMS data. Users can submit sets of jobs with similar requirements (tasks) with a single request. CRAB uses a client-server architecture, where a lightweight client, a server, and ancillary services work together and are maintained by CMS operators at CERN. As with most complex software, good monitoring tools are crucial for efficient use and longterm maintainability. This work gives an overview of the monitoring tools developed to ensure the CRAB server and infrastructure are functional, help operators debug user problems, and minimize overhead and operating cost. This work also illustrates themore » design choices and gives a report on our experience with the tools we developed and the external ones we used.« less

  14. Chitin Lengthens Power Production in a Sedimentary Microbial Fuel Cell

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    sulfate-reducing bacteria; marine I. INTRODUCTION Ocean-based energy recovery devices are often based on kinetic or solar energy harvesting . In...enhancement would scale with an increase in system size. More work is also planned on improving energy harvesting efficiency and understanding the...utilization by marine bacteria. Degradation and catabolism of chitin oligosaccharides by Vibrio furnissii,” J Biol Chem, 1991. vol 266, pp. 24276-24286

  15. Chitin synthase in the filarial parasite, Brugia malayi.

    PubMed

    Harris, M T; Lai, K; Arnold, K; Martinez, H F; Specht, C A; Fuhrman, J A

    2000-12-01

    Fragments of putative chitin synthase (chs) genes from two filarial species (Brugia malayi and Dirofilaria immitis) were amplified by PCR using degenerate primers. The full genomic and cDNA sequences were obtained for the B. malayi chs gene (Bm-chs-1); the predicted amino acid sequence is highly similar, over a large region, to two CHS sequences of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and also to two insect CHS sequences. Bm-chs-1 is abundantly transcribed in B. malayi adult females, independent of their fertilization status, but is also expressed in males and microfilariae. Oocytes and early embryos contain large amounts of Bm-chs-1 transcript by in situ hybridization, but later stage embryos within the maternal uterus show little or no Bm-chs-1 transcript. No specific hybridization could be demonstrated in maternal somatic tissues. Polyclonal antibodies were raised against a peptide expressed from a recombinant cDNA fragment of Bm-chs-1; immunostaining detected CHS protein in oocytes and early to midstage embryos. These studies characterize a gene that is likely to be essential to oogenesis and embryonic development in a parasitic nematode. Because chitin synthesis and eggshell formation begin after fertilization, the presence of CHS protein in early oocytes suggests that the enzyme must be activated as a result of fertilization. These studies also demonstrate that chitin synthesis may not be restricted to eggshell formation in nematodes, as the Bm-chs-1 gene is transcribed in life cycle stages other than adult females.

  16. Biosorption of gold from computer microprocessor leachate solutions using chitin.

    PubMed

    Côrtes, Letícia N; Tanabe, Eduardo H; Bertuol, Daniel A; Dotto, Guilherme L

    2015-11-01

    The biosorption of gold from discarded computer microprocessor (DCM) leachate solutions was studied using chitin as a biosorbent. The DCM components were leached with thiourea solutions, and two procedures were tested for recovery of gold from the leachates: (1) biosorption and (2) precipitation followed by biosorption. For each procedure, the biosorption was evaluated considering kinetic, equilibrium, and thermodynamic aspects. The general order model was able to represent the kinetic behavior, and the equilibrium was well represented by the BET model. The maximum biosorption capacities were around 35 mg g(-1) for both procedures. The biosorption of gold on chitin was a spontaneous, favorable, and exothermic process. It was found that precipitation followed by biosorption resulted in the best gold recovery, because other species were removed from the leachate solution in the precipitation step. This method enabled about 80% of the gold to be recovered, using 20 g L(-1) of chitin at 298 K for 4 h. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Chitin synthetase in encysting Giardia lamblia and Entamoeba invadens

    SciTech Connect

    Das, S.; Gillin, F.D.

    1987-05-01

    Giardia lamblia (Gl) and Entamoeba invadens (Ei) are protozoan parasites with two morphologic stages in their life cycles. Motile trophozoites colonize the intestine of humans and reptiles respectively. Water resistant cysts, which can survive outside the host, transmit infection. In vitro cyst formation of Ei from trophozoites has been reported, and the authors have recently induced in vitro encystation of Gl. Although the cyst walls of both parasites contain chitin, it synthesis by encysting trophozoites has not been reported. The authors now show that encystation conditions greatly increase chitin synthetase (CS) specific activity (incorporation of /sup 3/H GlcNAc from UDP-GlcNAcmore » into TCA-or alcohol-precipitable material). Extracts of encysting Gl incorporated 3.6 nmol/mg protein in 5 hr compared to < 0.005 in controls. Extracts of encysting Fi incorporated 4.8 n mol/mg protein, compared to 1.7 in the control. CS activity of both parasites requires preformed chitin. The Gl enzyme requires a reducing agent, is inhibited by digitonin and the CS inhibitors, polyoxin D and Nikkomycin, but not by tunicamycin. The product is digested by chitinase. Ei enzyme does not require a reducing agent and is stimulated by 1 mg/ml digitonin, but inhibited by higher concentrations. These studies demonstrate CS enzymes which may play important roles in encystation of Gl and Ei.« less

  18. Shell Games.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Bill

    1982-01-01

    The author critiques the program design and educational aspects of the Shell Games, a program developed by Apple Computer, Inc., which can be used by the teacher to design objective tests for adaptation to specific assessment needs. (For related articles, see EC 142 959-962.) (Author)

  19. Facile nanofibrillation of chitin derivatives by gas bubbling and ultrasonic treatments in water.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kohei; Yamamoto, Kazuya; Kadokawa, Jun-ichi

    2014-10-29

    In this paper, we report that nanofiber network structures were constructed from chitin derivatives by gas bubbling and ultrasonic treatments in water. When chitin was first subjected to N2 gas bubbling with ultrasonication in water, the SEM images of the product showed nanofiber network morphology. However, nanofiber network was not re-constructed by the same N2 gas bubbling and ultrasonic treatments after agglomeration. We then have paid attention to an amidine group to provide the agglomeration-nanofibrillation behavior of chitin derivatives. An amidinated chitin was synthesized by the reaction of the amino groups in a partially deacetylated chitin with N,N-dimethylacetamide dimethyl acetal, which was subjected to CO2 gas bubbling and ultrasonic treatments in water to convert into an amidinium chitin by protonation. The SEM images of the product clearly showed nanofiber network morphology. We further examined re-nanofibrillation of the agglomerated material, which was obtained by mixing the nanofibrillated amidinium chitin with water, followed by drying under reduced pressure. Consequently, the material was re-nanofibrillated by N2 gas bubbling with ultrasonication in water owing to electrostatic repulsion between the amidinium groups. Furthermore, deprotonation of the amidinium chitin and re-protonation of the resulting amidinated chitin were conducted by alkaline treatment and CO2 gas bubbling-ultrasonic treatments, respectively. The material showed the agglomeration-nanofibrillation behavior during the processes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Characterization and role of a metalloprotease induced by chitin in Serratia sp. KCK.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Soo; Golyshin, Peter N; Timmis, Kenneth N

    2007-11-01

    A metalloprotease induced by chitin in a new chitinolytic bacterium Serratia sp. Strain KCK was purified and characterized. Compared with other Serratia enzymes, it exhibited a rather broad pH activity range (pH 5.0-8.0), and thermostability. The cognate ORF, mpr, was cloned and expressed. Its deduced amino acid sequence showed high similarity to those of bacterial zinc-binding metalloproteases and a well-conserved serralysin family motif. Pretreatment of chitin with the Mpr protein promoted chitin degradation by chitinase A, which suggests that Mpr participates in, and facilitates, chitin degradation by this microorganism.

  1. Anticancer activity of silver and copper embedded chitin nanocomposites against human breast cancer (MCF-7) cells.

    PubMed

    Solairaj, Dhanasekaran; Rameshthangam, Palanivel; Arunachalam, Gnanapragasam

    2017-12-01

    Chitin is a natural biopolymer widely used in biomedical and environmental applications due to its distinctive physical, chemical and mechanical properties. Although the anticancer property of chitin nanoforms and chitin derivatives against various cancers were studied earlier, there is no report in the chitin nanostructure incorporated metal nanocomposite. The present study was aimed to investigate the cytotoxicity of chitin incorporated silver and copper nanocomposite against human breast cancer (MCF-7) cells. Cytotoxicity of chitin nanoparticles (CNP), silver nanoparticles (AgNP), copper nanoparticles (CuNP), chitin/silver nanocomposite (CNP/AgNP) and chitin/copper nanocomposite (CNP/CuNP) was evaluated. Among all the above, CNP/AgNP has shown a lower of 31 mg as inhibitory concentration (IC 50 ) value. Our study further showed the increased generation of reactive oxygen species with decreased activity of antioxidant enzymes and damage in the membrane integrity, thus confirms the cellular cytotoxic action of CNP/AgNP. In conclusion, the present study validates that, incorporating chitin nanoparticles with metallic nanostructure could be an effective and promising therapeutic agent against breast cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Drosophila Chitinase 2 is expressed in chitin producing organs for cuticle formation.

    PubMed

    Pesch, Yanina-Yasmin; Riedel, Dietmar; Behr, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    The architecture of the outer body wall cuticle is fundamental to protect arthropods against invading pathogens and numerous other harmful stresses. Such robust cuticles are formed by parallel running chitin microfibrils. Molting and also local wounding leads to dynamic assembly and disassembly of the chitin-matrix throughout development. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms that organize proper chitin-matrix formation are poorly known. Recently we identified a key region for cuticle thickening at the apical cell surface, the cuticle assembly zone, where Obstructor-A (Obst-A) coordinates the formation of the chitin-matrix. Obst-A binds chitin and the deacetylase Serpentine (Serp) in a core complex, which is required for chitin-matrix maturation and preservation. Here we present evidence that Chitinase 2 (Cht2) could be essential for this molecular machinery. We show that Cht2 is expressed in the chitin-matrix of epidermis, trachea, and the digestive system. There, Cht2 is enriched at the apical cell surface and the dense chitin-matrix. We further show that in Cht2 knockdown larvae the assembly zone is rudimentary, preventing normal cuticle formation and pore canal organization. As sequence similarities of Cht2 and the core complex proteins indicate evolutionarily conserved molecular mechanisms, our findings suggest that Cht2 is involved in chitin formation also in other insects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Deciphering the Genetic Programme Triggering Timely and Spatially-Regulated Chitin Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Rotstein, Bárbara; Casali, Andreu; Llimargas, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Organ and tissue formation requires a finely tuned temporal and spatial regulation of differentiation programmes. This is necessary to balance sufficient plasticity to undergo morphogenesis with the acquisition of the mature traits needed for physiological activity. Here we addressed this issue by analysing the deposition of the chitinous extracellular matrix of Drosophila, an essential element of the cuticle (skin) and respiratory system (tracheae) in this insect. Chitin deposition requires the activity of the chitin synthase Krotzkopf verkehrt (Kkv). Our data demonstrate that this process equally requires the activity of two other genes, namely expansion (exp) and rebuf (reb). We found that Exp and Reb have interchangeable functions, and in their absence no chitin is produced, in spite of the presence of Kkv. Conversely, when Kkv and Exp/Reb are co-expressed in the ectoderm, they promote chitin deposition, even in tissues normally devoid of this polysaccharide. Therefore, our results indicate that both functions are not only required but also sufficient to trigger chitin accumulation. We show that this mechanism is highly regulated in time and space, ensuring chitin accumulation in the correct tissues and developmental stages. Accordingly, we observed that unregulated chitin deposition disturbs morphogenesis, thus highlighting the need for tight regulation of this process. In summary, here we identify the genetic programme that triggers the timely and spatially regulated deposition of chitin and thus provide new insights into the extracellular matrix maturation required for physiological activity. PMID:25617778

  4. Elevated Chitin Content Reduces the Susceptibility of Candida Species to Caspofungin

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Louise A.; Gow, Neil A. R.

    2013-01-01

    The echinocandin antifungal drugs inhibit synthesis of the major fungal cell wall polysaccharide β(1,3)-glucan. Echinocandins have good efficacy against Candida albicans but reduced activity against other Candida species, in particular Candida parapsilosis and Candida guilliermondii. Treatment of Candida albicans with a sub-MIC level of caspofungin has been reported to cause a compensatory increase in chitin content and to select for sporadic echinocandin-resistant FKS1 point mutants that also have elevated cell wall chitin. Here we show that elevated chitin in response to caspofungin is a common response in various Candida species. Activation of chitin synthesis was observed in isolates of C. albicans, Candida tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, and C. guilliermondii and in some isolates of Candida krusei in response to caspofungin treatment. However, Candida glabrata isolates demonstrated no exposure-induced change in chitin content. Furthermore, isolates of C. albicans, C. krusei, C. parapsilosis, and C. guilliermondii which were stimulated to have higher chitin levels via activation of the calcineurin and protein kinase C (PKC) signaling pathways had reduced susceptibility to caspofungin. Isolates containing point mutations in the FKS1 gene generally had higher chitin levels and did not demonstrate a further compensatory increase in chitin content in response to caspofungin treatment. These results highlight the potential of increased chitin synthesis as a potential mechanism of tolerance to caspofungin for the major pathogenic Candida species. PMID:23089748

  5. High similarity in physicochemical properties of chitin and chitosan from nymphs and adults of a grasshopper.

    PubMed

    Erdogan, Sevil; Kaya, Murat

    2016-08-01

    This is the first study to explain the differences in the physicochemical properties of chitin and chitosan obtained from the nymphs and adults of Dociostaurus maroccanus using the same method. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and x-ray diffraction analysis results demonstrated that the chitins from both the adults and nymphs were in the α-form. The chitin contents of the adults (14%) and nymphs (12%) were of the same order of magnitude. The crystalline index values of chitins from the adult and nymph grasshoppers were 71% and 74%, respectively. Thermal stabilities of the chitins and chitosans from adult and nymph grasshoppers were close to each other. Both the adult (7.2kDa) and nymph (5.6kDa) chitosans had low molar masses. Environmental scanning electron microscopy revealed that the surface morphologies of both chitins consisted of nanofibers and nanopores together, and they were very similar to each other. Consequently, it was determined that the physicochemical properties of the chitins and chitosans from adults and nymphs of D. maroccanus were not very different, so it can be hypothesized that the development of the chitin structure in the nymph has almost been completed and the nymph chitin has the same characteristics as the adult. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Characterization of chitin and chitosan synthesized from red snapper (Lutjanus sp.) scale's waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takarina, N. D.; Fanani, A. A.

    2017-07-01

    Chitin and chitosan are natural biopolymer which are useful for industrial, medical and environmental field. Study about using fish scale sources especially saltwater fish is still limited. Red snapper (Lutjanus sp) is common tropical saltwater fish that known as important source of marine products, particularly in Indonesia. Correspondingly, the consumption of this species has generated significant amount of discarded scale wastes recently and hence can cause adverse impact on the environment. Utilizing the fish scale as alternative sources of chitin and chitosan can be one solution dealing with environmental problem. Therefore, this research aimed to characterize the chitin and chitosan derived from the red snapper scale wastes. Chitin were extracted by deproteination and demineralization while chitosan using deacetylation. Morphology of the chitin and chitosan were analyzed using electron dispersal spectroscopy (EDS) and scanning electron microscope (SEM), while degree of deacetylation using fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Proximate analysis showed that content of moisture, ash, and nitrogen in chitin were 3.20 %, 2.40 %, 0.04 %, respectively while in chitosan were 6.14 %, 1.18 %, 0.03 % respectively. Furthermore, amount of C, O, Na, Al, P and Ca elements were obtained from chitin and chitosan samples by energy dispersed spectroscopy respectively. The degree of deacetylation for both chitin and chitosan showed high value more than 75 %. Hence, by considering the chemical properties of red snapper scales, it confirms that this species is a promising alternative source for both chitin and chitosan.

  7. Physicochemical and antifungal properties of bio-nanocomposite film based on gelatin-chitin nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sahraee, Samar; Milani, Jafar M; Ghanbarzadeh, Babak; Hamishehkar, Hamed

    2017-04-01

    The gelatin-based nanocomposite films containing chitin nanoparticles (N-chitin) with concentrations of 0, 3, 5 and 10% were prepared and their physical, thermal and anti-microbial properties were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs showed that N-chitin size distribution was around 60-70nm which dispersed appropriately at low concentration in gelatin matrix. The results showed that incorporation of N-chitin significantly influenced apparent color and transparency of the gelatin films. The reduced water vapor permeability (WVP) and solubility and higher surface hydrophobicity of the nanocomposite films were obtained by enhancing N-chitin concentration in film formulation. The use of N-chitin up to 5% concentration in the gelatin based nanocomposite film led to improved mechanical properties. Also, the results of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) confirmed improved stability of nanocomposite films against melting and degradation at high temperatures in comparison to neat gelatin film. The well compatibility of chitin nanoparticles with gelatin polymer was concluded from Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra and X-ray diffraction (XRD) plots. Finally, the gelatin based nanocomposite films had anti-fungal properties against Aspergillus niger in the contact surface zone. Increasing the concentration of N-chitin up to 5% enlarged inhibition zone diameter, but the nanocomposite film containing 10% N-chitin showed smaller inhibition zone. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of Extraction Methods of Chitin from Ganoderma lucidum Mushroom Obtained in Submerged Culture

    PubMed Central

    Ospina Álvarez, Sandra Patricia; Ramírez Cadavid, David Alexander; Ossa Orozco, Claudia Patricia; Zapata Ocampo, Paola; Atehortúa, Lucía

    2014-01-01

    The chitin was isolated from the Ganoderma lucidum submerged cultures mycelium as potential source of chitin under biotechnological processes. The extraction of chitin was carried out through 5 different assays which involved mainly three phases: pulverization of the mushroom, deproteinization of the mycelia with NaOH solution, and a process of decolorization with potassium permanganate and oxalic acid. The chitin contents extracted from 9-day mycelia were 413, 339, 87, 78, and 144 mg/g−1 (milligrams of chitin/grams of dry biomass) for A1, A2, A3, A4, and A5, respectively. Obtained chitin was characterized by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and by thermal analysis (TGA). The results showed that Ganoderma lucidum chitin has similar characteristic of chitin from different fonts. The advantage of the biotechnological processes and the fact that Ganoderma lucidum fungus may be used as a potential raw material for chitin production were demonstrated. PMID:24551839

  9. Vibration of Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leissa, A. W.

    1973-01-01

    The vibrational characteristics and mechanical properties of shell structures are discussed. The subjects presented are: (1) fundamental equations of thin shell theory, (2) characteristics of thin circular cylindrical shells, (3) complicating effects in circular cylindrical shells, (4) noncircular cylindrical shell properties, (5) characteristics of spherical shells, and (6) solution of three-dimensional equations of motion for cylinders.

  10. Building Atoms Shell by Shell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sussman, Beverly

    1993-01-01

    Describes an atom-building activity where students construct three-dimensional models of atoms using a styrofoam ball as the nucleus and pom-poms, gum drops, minimarshmallows, or other small items of two different colors to represent protons and neutrons attached. Rings of various sizes with pom-poms attached represent electron shells and…

  11. 50 CFR 648.263 - Red crab possession and landing restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Red crab possession and landing... Management Measures for the Atlantic Deep-Sea Red Crab Fishery § 648.263 Red crab possession and landing restrictions. (a) Vessels issued limited access red crab permits. (1) [Reserved] (2) Conversion to whole crab...

  12. Chitin: Formation of Helically Structured Chitin/CaCO3 Hybrids through an Approach Inspired by the Biomineralization Processes of Crustacean Cuticles (Small 38/2015).

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Shunichi; Kajiyama, Satoshi; Nishimura, Tatsuya; Kato, Takashi

    2015-10-01

    Biomineral-inspired hybrids forming helically ordered structures are developed by T. Kato and co-workers on page 5127. These helical hybrids consist of liquid-crystalline chitin and CaCO3 . They resemble the structures of crustacean cuticles such as the exoskeleton of a lobster or crayfish. These hybrids are formed through CaCO3 crystallization on the liquidcrystalline chitin templates. Polymer-stabilized amorphous CaCO3 is incorporated into the liquid-crystalline chitin templates. This approach is useful for the development of new hierarchical hybrid materials from abundant natural resources. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Trade-offs between predator avoidance and electric shock avoidance in hermit crabs demonstrate a non-reflexive response to noxious stimuli consistent with prediction of pain.

    PubMed

    Magee, Barry; Elwood, Robert W

    2016-09-01

    Arthropods have long been thought to respond to noxious stimuli by reflex reaction. One way of testing if this is true is to provide the animal with a way to avoid the stimulus but to vary the potential cost of avoidance. If avoidance varies with potential cost then a decision making process is evident and the behaviour is not a mere reflex. Here we examine the responses of hermit crabs to electric shock within their shell when also exposed to predator or non-predator odours or to no odour. The electric shocks start with low voltage but increase in voltage with each repetition to determine how odour affects the voltage at which the shell is abandoned. There was no treatment effect on the voltage at which hermit crabs left their shells, however, those exposed to predator odours were less likely to evacuate their shells compared with no odour or low concentrations of non-predator odour. However, highly concentrated non-predator also inhibited evacuation. The data show that these crabs trade-off avoidance of electric shock with predator avoidance. They are thus not responding purely by reflex and the data are thus consistent with predictions of pain but do not prove pain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. SEM characterization of anatomical variation in chitin organization in insect and arthropod cuticles.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Rakkiyappan; Williams, Lee; Hung, Albert; Nowlin, Kyle; LaJeunesse, Dennis

    2016-03-01

    The cuticles of insects and arthropods have some of the most diverse material properties observed in nature, so much so that it is difficult to imagine that all cutciles are primarily composed of the same two materials: a fibrous chitin network and a matrix composed of cuticle proteins. Various factors contribute to the mechanical and optical properties of an insect or arthropod cuticle including the thickness and composition. In this paper, we also identified another factor that may contribute to the optical, surface, and mechanical properties of a cuticle, i.e. the organization of chitin nanofibers and chitin fiber bundles. Self-assembled chitin nanofibers serve as the foundation for all higher order chitin structures in the cuticles of insects and other arthropods via interactions with structural cuticle proteins. Using a technique that enables the characterization of chitin organization in the cuticle of intact insects and arthropod exoskeletons, we demonstrate a structure/function correlation of chitin organization with larger scale anatomical structures. The chitin scaffolds in cuticles display an extraordinarily diverse set of morphologies that may reflect specific mechanical or physical properties. After removal of the proteinaceous and mineral matrix of a cuticle, we observe using SEM diverse nanoscale and micro scale organization of in-situ chitin in the wing, head, eye, leg, and dorsal and ventral thoracic regions of the periodical cicada Magicicada septendecim and in other insects and arthropods. The organization of chitin also appears to have a significant role in the organization of nanoscale surface structures. While microscale bristles and hairs have long been known to be chitin based materials formed as cellular extensions, we have found a nanostructured layer of chitin in the cuticle of the wing of the dog day annual cicada Tibicen tibicens, which may be the scaffold for the nanocone arrays found on the wing. We also use this process to examine

  15. Elevated Cell Wall Chitin in Candida albicans Confers Echinocandin Resistance In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Keunsook K.; MacCallum, Donna M.; Jacobsen, Mette D.; Walker, Louise A.; Odds, Frank C.

    2012-01-01

    Candida albicans cells with increased cell wall chitin have reduced echinocandin susceptibility in vitro. The aim of this study was to investigate whether C. albicans cells with elevated chitin levels have reduced echinocandin susceptibility in vivo. BALB/c mice were infected with C. albicans cells with normal chitin levels and compared to mice infected with high-chitin cells. Caspofungin therapy was initiated at 24 h postinfection. Mice infected with chitin-normal cells were successfully treated with caspofungin, as indicated by reduced kidney fungal burdens, reduced weight loss, and decreased C. albicans density in kidney lesions. In contrast, mice infected with high-chitin C. albicans cells were less susceptible to caspofungin, as they had higher kidney fungal burdens and greater weight loss during early infection. Cells recovered from mouse kidneys at 24 h postinfection with high-chitin cells had 1.6-fold higher chitin levels than cells from mice infected with chitin-normal cells and maintained a significantly reduced susceptibility to caspofungin when tested in vitro. At 48 h postinfection, caspofungin treatment induced a further increase in chitin content of C. albicans cells harvested from kidneys compared to saline treatment. Some of the recovered clones had acquired, at a low frequency, a point mutation in FKS1 resulting in a S645Y amino acid substitution, a mutation known to confer echinocandin resistance. This occurred even in cells that had not been exposed to caspofungin. Our results suggest that the efficacy of caspofungin against C. albicans was reduced in vivo due to either elevation of chitin levels in the cell wall or acquisition of FKS1 point mutations. PMID:21986821

  16. Isolation and characterization of the metamorphic inducer of the common mud crab, Panopeus herbstii.

    PubMed

    Andrews, W R.; Targett, N M.; Epifanio, C E.

    2001-06-15

    Several items from the natural habitat of adult Panopeus herbstii were examined to determine if they had the ability to produce a metamorphic cue. These included adult conspecifics, natural rock/shell substratum, the co-occurring species Hemigrapsus sanguineus and bacterial biofilms. Adult conspecifics, H. sangineus and natural rock/shell all accelerated metamorphosis. However, adult conspecifics accelerated metamorphosis to the greatest extent. The cue associated with adult conspecifics was found to be water-soluble, stable following boiling and freezing, and of relatively small molecular size (<1 kDa). Furthermore, the cue appears to be produced from the conspecifics themselves, rather than from biofilms colonizing the surfaces of the crabs. The results of this experiment suggest that postlarvae of P. herbstii are able to distinguish suitable habitat through chemical signals, thus greatly increasing their chances for survival.

  17. Changes in physicochemical properties of chitin at developmental stages (larvae, pupa and adult) of Vespa crabro (wasp).

    PubMed

    Kaya, Murat; Sofi, Karwan; Sargin, Idris; Mujtaba, Muhammad

    2016-07-10

    It is already known that chitin in a single organism can exhibit huge differences depending on the functions it serves in different body parts, but the alterations in the characteristics of chitin in course of developmental stages of an organism still remain unknown. This study presents findings on how chitin matrix is changing physicochemically through discrete morphological stages - larva, pupa and adult - of an insect (Vespa crabro). Chitin content of the organisms were found to increase gradually as the organism grew; 2.1, 6.2 and 10.3%, with a dramatic increase in chitin deposition (nearly 3 folds) during the instar from larva to pupa. Enzymatic digestion test demonstrated that chitin isolates were close to pure. Chitin isolates were also subjected to thermal pyrolysis and no variations were observed in the thermal stability of the samples. However, it was observed that surface characteristics of chitin changed greatly as the insect grew. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A Hyperspectral View of the Crab Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlebois, M.; Drissen, L.; Bernier, A.-P.; Grandmont, F.; Binette, L.

    2010-05-01

    We have obtained spatially resolved spectra of the Crab nebula in the spectral ranges 450-520 nm and 650-680 nm, encompassing the Hβ, [O III] λ4959, λ5007, Hα, [N II] λ6548, λ6584, and [S II] λ6717, λ6731 emission lines, with the imaging Fourier transform spectrometer SpIOMM at the Observatoire du Mont-Mégantic's 1.6 m telescope. We first compare our data with published observations obtained either from a Fabry-Perot interferometer or from a long-slit spectrograph. Using a spectral deconvolution technique similar to the one developed by Čadež et al., we identify and resolve multiple emission lines separated by large Doppler shifts and contained within the rapidly expanding filamentary structure of the Crab. This allows us to measure important line ratios, such as [N II]/Hα, [S II]/Hα, and [S II] λ6717 /[S II] λ6731 of individual filaments, providing a new insight on the SE-NW asymmetry in the Crab. From our analysis of the spatial distribution of the electronic density and of the respective shocked versus photoionized gas components, we deduce that the skin-less NW region must have evolved faster than the rest of the nebula. Assuming a very simple expansion model for the ejecta material, our data provide us with a complete tridimensional view of the Crab.

  19. Ocean acidification impairs crab foraging behaviour.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Luke F; Grabowski, Jonathan H; Piehler, Michael F; Westfield, Isaac; Ries, Justin B

    2015-07-07

    Anthropogenic elevation of atmospheric CO2 is driving global-scale ocean acidification, which consequently influences calcification rates of many marine invertebrates and potentially alters their susceptibility to predation. Ocean acidification may also impair an organism's ability to process environmental and biological cues. These counteracting impacts make it challenging to predict how acidification will alter species interactions and community structure. To examine effects of acidification on consumptive and behavioural interactions between mud crabs (Panopeus herbstii) and oysters (Crassostrea virginica), oysters were reared with and without caged crabs for 71 days at three pCO2 levels. During subsequent predation trials, acidification reduced prey consumption, handling time and duration of unsuccessful predation attempt. These negative effects of ocean acidification on crab foraging behaviour more than offset any benefit to crabs resulting from a reduction in the net rate of oyster calcification. These findings reveal that efforts to evaluate how acidification will alter marine food webs should include quantifying impacts on both calcification rates and animal behaviour. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  20. Ocean acidification impairs crab foraging behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Dodd, Luke F.; Grabowski, Jonathan H.; Piehler, Michael F.; Westfield, Isaac; Ries, Justin B.

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic elevation of atmospheric CO2 is driving global-scale ocean acidification, which consequently influences calcification rates of many marine invertebrates and potentially alters their susceptibility to predation. Ocean acidification may also impair an organism's ability to process environmental and biological cues. These counteracting impacts make it challenging to predict how acidification will alter species interactions and community structure. To examine effects of acidification on consumptive and behavioural interactions between mud crabs (Panopeus herbstii) and oysters (Crassostrea virginica), oysters were reared with and without caged crabs for 71 days at three pCO2 levels. During subsequent predation trials, acidification reduced prey consumption, handling time and duration of unsuccessful predation attempt. These negative effects of ocean acidification on crab foraging behaviour more than offset any benefit to crabs resulting from a reduction in the net rate of oyster calcification. These findings reveal that efforts to evaluate how acidification will alter marine food webs should include quantifying impacts on both calcification rates and animal behaviour. PMID:26108629

  1. Shell worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Kenneth I.; Kennedy, Robert G., III; Fields, David E.

    2013-02-01

    The traditional concept of terraforming assumes ready availability of candidate planets with acceptable qualities: orbiting a star in its "Goldilocks zone", liquid water, enough mass, years longer than days, magnetic field, etc. But even stipulating affordable interstellar travel, we still might never find a good candidate elsewhere. Whatever we found likely would require centuries of heavy terraforming, just as Mars or Venus would here. Our increasing appreciation of the ubiquity of life suggests that any terra nova would already possess it. We would then face the dilemma of introducing alien life forms (us, our microbes) into another living world. Instead, we propose a novel method to create habitable environments for humanity by enclosing airless, sterile, otherwise useless planets, moons, and even large asteroids within engineered shells, which avoids the conundrum. These shells are subject to two opposing internal stresses: compression due to the primary's gravity, and tension from atmospheric pressure contained inside. By careful design, these two cancel each other resulting in zero net shell stress. Beneath the shell an Earth-like environment could be created similar in almost all respects to that of Home, except for gravity, regardless of the distance to the sun or other star. Englobing a small planet, moon, or even a dwarf planet like Ceres, would require astronomical amounts of material (quadrillions of tons) and energy, plus a great deal of time. It would be a quantum leap in difficulty over building Dyson Dots or industrializing our solar system, perhaps comparable to a mission across interstellar space with a living crew within their lifetime. But when accomplished, these constructs would be complete (albeit small) worlds, not merely large habitats. They could be stable across historic timescales, possibly geologic. Each would contain a full, self-sustaining ecology, which might evolve in curious directions over time. This has interesting implications

  2. Fractionation of rare earth and other trace elements in crabs, Ucides cordatus, from a subtropical mangrove affected by fertilizer industry.

    PubMed

    Bosco-Santos, Alice; Luiz-Silva, Wanilson; Silva-Filho, Emmanoel Vieira da; Souza, Monique Dias Corrêa de; Dantas, Elton Luiz; Navarro, Margareth Sugano

    2017-04-01

    Fractionation of rare earth elements (REE) and other trace metal concentrations (Th, U, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) between mangrove sediments and claw muscles and shells of male crabs (Ucides cordatus) from a subtropical estuary highly impacted by fertilizer industry activities was investigated. This is the first record of REE distribution in these organisms, and the results showed higher accumulations of these metals, U and Th in shells, probably related to the replacement of Ca during molting. Contents of Cd, Cr and Ni were similar in both tissues, but Cu, Zn and Pb were mostly accumulated in the claw muscle with concentrations above those considered safe for human consumption according to the Brazilian legislation. REE fractionation was different in the analyzed tissues being softer in the shells. The results provided evidences that the water absorbed during molting controls the chemistry of REE in shells. In contrast, the chemistry of REE in the claw muscle, in which was observed preferential absorption of light REE, is controlled by diet. REE fractionation obtained for the claw muscles was closely correlated to the observed in the contaminated substrate and in materials related to the production of phosphate fertilizers (contamination source), which supports their transference to this Ucides cordatus tissue without fractionation by the ingestion of sediments. Our results showed the potential use of crab tissues for monitoring REE and trace element sources in mangrove areas, with claw muscle exhibiting the contaminant source fingerprint. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Bacterial chitinolytic communities respond to chitin and pH alteration in soil.

    PubMed

    Kielak, Anna M; Cretoiu, Mariana Silvia; Semenov, Alexander V; Sørensen, Søren J; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Chitin amendment is a promising soil management strategy that may enhance the suppressiveness of soil toward plant pathogens. However, we understand very little of the effects of added chitin, including the putative successions that take place in the degradative process. We performed an experiment in moderately acid soil in which the level of chitin, next to the pH, was altered. Examination of chitinase activities revealed fast responses to the added crude chitin, with peaks of enzymatic activity occurring on day 7. PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE)-based analyses of 16S rRNA and chiA genes showed structural changes of the phylogenetically and functionally based bacterial communities following chitin addition and pH alteration. Pyrosequencing analysis indicated (i) that the diversity of chiA gene types in soil is enormous and (i) that different chiA gene types are selected by the addition of chitin at different prevailing soil pH values. Interestingly, a major role of Gram-negative bacteria versus a minor one of Actinobacteria in the immediate response to the added chitin (based on 16S rRNA gene abundance and chiA gene types) was indicated. The results of this study enhance our understanding of the response of the soil bacterial communities to chitin and are of use for both the understanding of soil suppressiveness and the possible mining of soil for novel enzymes.

  4. A simple procedure for preparing chitin oligomers through acetone precipitation after hydrolysis in concentrated hydrochloric acid.

    PubMed

    Kazami, Nao; Sakaguchi, Masayoshi; Mizutani, Daisuke; Masuda, Tatsuhiko; Wakita, Satoshi; Oyama, Fumitaka; Kawakita, Masao; Sugahara, Yasusato

    2015-11-05

    Chitin oligomers are of interest because of their numerous biologically relevant properties. To prepare chitin oligomers containing 4-6 GlcNAc units [(GlcNAc)4-6], α- and β-chitin were hydrolyzed with concentrated hydrochloric acid at 40 °C. The reactant was mixed with acetone to recover the acetone-insoluble material, and (GlcNAc)4-6 was efficiently recovered after subsequent water extraction. Composition analysis using gel permeation chromatography and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry indicated that (GlcNAc)4-6 could be isolated from the acetone-insoluble material with recoveries of approximately 17% and 21% from the starting α-chitin and β-chitin, respectively. The acetone precipitation method is highly useful for recovering chitin oligomers from the acid hydrolysate of chitin. The changes in the molecular size and higher-order structure of chitin during the course of hydrolysis were also analyzed, and a model that explains the process of oligomer accumulation is proposed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Systematic genetic dissection of chitin degradation and uptake in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Chelsea A; Dalia, Triana N; Dalia, Ankur B

    2017-10-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a natural resident of the aquatic environment, where a common nutrient is the chitinous exoskeletons of microscopic crustaceans. Chitin utilization requires chitinases, which degrade this insoluble polymer into soluble chitin oligosaccharides. These oligosaccharides also serve as an inducing cue for natural transformation in Vibrio species. There are 7 predicted endochitinase-like genes in the V. cholerae genome. Here, we systematically dissect the contribution of each gene to growth on chitin as well as induction of natural transformation. Specifically, we created a strain that lacks all 7 putative chitinases and from this strain, generated a panel of strains where each expresses a single chitinase. We also generated expression plasmids to ectopically express all 7 chitinases in our chitinase deficient strain. Through this analysis, we found that low levels of chitinase activity are sufficient for natural transformation, while growth on insoluble chitin as a sole carbon source requires more robust and concerted chitinase activity. We also assessed the role that the three uptake systems for the chitin degradation products GlcNAc, (GlcNAc) 2 and (GlcN) 2 , play in chitin utilization and competence induction. Cumulatively, this study provides mechanistic details for how this pathogen utilizes chitin to thrive and evolve in its environmental reservoir. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Chitin degradation and utilization by virulent Aeromonas hydrophila strain ML10-51K.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dunhua; Xu, De-Hai; Qiu, Junqiang; Rasmussen-Ivey, Cody R; Liles, Mark R; Beck, Benjamin H

    2017-05-01

    Virulent Aeromonas hydrophila (vAh) is one of the most important bacterial pathogens that causes persistent outbreaks of motile Aeromonas septicemia in warm-water fishes. The survivability of this pathogen in aquatic environments is of great concern. The aim of this study was to determine the capability of the vAh strain ML10-51K to degrade and utilize chitin. Genome-wide analysis revealed that ML10-51K encodes a suite of proteins for chitin metabolism. Assays in vitro showed that four chitinases, one chitobiase and one chitin-binding protein were secreted extracellularly and participated in chitin degradation. ML10-51K was shown to be able to use not only N-acetylglucosamine and colloidal chitin but also chitin flakes as sole carbon sources for growth. This study indicates that ML10-51K is a highly chitinolytic bacterium and suggests that the capability of effective chitin utilization could enable the bacterium to attain high densities when abundant chitin is available in aquatic niches.

  7. Soil Bacterial Community Shifts after Chitin Enrichment: An Integrative Metagenomic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Jacquiod, Samuel; Franqueville, Laure; Cécillon, Sébastien; M. Vogel, Timothy; Simonet, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Chitin is the second most produced biopolymer on Earth after cellulose. Chitin degrading enzymes are promising but untapped sources for developing novel industrial biocatalysts. Hidden amongst uncultivated micro-organisms, new bacterial enzymes can be discovered and exploited by metagenomic approaches through extensive cloning and screening. Enrichment is also a well-known strategy, as it allows selection of organisms adapted to feed on a specific compound. In this study, we investigated how the soil bacterial community responded to chitin enrichment in a microcosm experiment. An integrative metagenomic approach coupling phylochips and high throughput shotgun pyrosequencing was established in order to assess the taxonomical and functional changes in the soil bacterial community. Results indicate that chitin enrichment leads to an increase of Actinobacteria, γ-proteobacteria and β-proteobacteria suggesting specific selection of chitin degrading bacteria belonging to these classes. Part of enriched bacterial genera were not yet reported to be involved in chitin degradation, like the members from the Micrococcineae sub-order (Actinobacteria). An increase of the observed bacterial diversity was noticed, with detection of specific genera only in chitin treated conditions. The relative proportion of metagenomic sequences related to chitin degradation was significantly increased, even if it represents only a tiny fraction of the sequence diversity found in a soil metagenome. PMID:24278158

  8. 78 FR 40696 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Alaska Crab Cost Recovery

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-08

    ... Collection; Comment Request; Alaska Crab Cost Recovery AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric..., a limited access system that allocates BSAI Crab resources among harvesters, processors, and coastal communities. The intent of the Alaska Crab Cost Recovery is to [[Page 40697

  9. Cloning and characterization of chsD, a chitin synthase-like gene of Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Mellado, E; Specht, C A; Robbins, P W; Holden, D W

    1996-09-15

    A chitin synthase-like gene (chsD) was isolated from an Aspergillus fumigatus genomic DNA library. Comparisons with the predicted amino acid sequence from chsD reveals low but significant similarity to chitin synthases, to other N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases (NodC from Rhizopus spp., HasA from Streptococcus spp. and DG42 from vertebrates. A chsD- mutant strain constructed by gene disruption has a 20% reduction in total mycelial chitin content; however, no differences between the wild-type strain and the chsD- strain were found with respect to morphology, chitin synthase activity or virulence in a neutropenic murine model of aspergillosis. The results show that the chsD product has an important but inessential role in the synthesis of chitin in A. fumigatus.

  10. [In Vivo Study of Chitin in Fungal Hyphae Based on Confocal Raman Microscopy].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-li; Luo, Liu-bin; Zhou, Bin-xiong; Hu, Xiao-qian; Sun, Chan-jun; He, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Chitin is an important structural polysaccharide of fungal cell wall. In this paper, aerial hyphae of Colletotrichum camelliae Massee was first studied by confocal Raman microscopy in vivo. Firstly, the optimal experimental parameters of hyphae for collecting the Raman spectra were determined, and the typical Raman spectra of hyphae, chitin standard and background were acquired. By comparing analysis, characteristic peaks of chitin were found in hyphae. Then, a region of interesting on hyphae was selected for Raman scanning. Through principal component analysis, the Raman signal of hyphae and background in the scanning area can be separated clearly. Combined with loading weight plot, two main characteristic peaks of hyphae were obtained, 1 622 cm(-1) was belong to chitin and 1 368 cm(-1) was assigned to pectic polysaccharide. Finally, two and three dimension chemical images of fungal hyphae were realized based on Raman fingerprint spectra of chitin in a nondestructive way.

  11. Mining marine shellfish wastes for bioactive molecules: chitin and chitosan--Part A: extraction methods.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Maria; Carney, Brian; Slater, John; Brück, Wolfram

    2008-07-01

    Legal restrictions, high costs and environmental problems regarding the disposal of marine processing wastes have led to amplified interest in biotechnology research concerning the identification and extraction of additional high grade, low-volume by-products produced from shellfish waste treatments. Shellfish waste consisting of crustacean exoskeletons is currently the main source of biomass for chitin production. Chitin is a polysaccharide composed of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine units and the multidimensional utilization of chitin derivatives including chitosan, a deacetylated derivative of chitin, is due to a number of characteristics including: their polyelectrolyte and cationic nature, the presence of reactive groups, high adsorption capacities, bacteriostatic and fungistatic influences, making them very versatile biomolecules. Part A of this review aims to consolidate useful information concerning the methods used to extract and characterize chitin, chitosan and glucosamine obtained through industrial, microbial and enzymatic hydrolysis of shellfish waste.

  12. Preparation of monolithic silica-chitin composite under extreme biomimetic conditions.

    PubMed

    Bazhenov, Vasilii V; Wysokowski, Marcin; Petrenko, Iaroslav; Stawski, Dawid; Sapozhnikov, Philipp; Born, René; Stelling, Allison L; Kaiser, Sabine; Jesionowski, Teofil

    2015-05-01

    Chitin is a widespread renewable biopolymer that is extensively distributed in the natural world. The high thermal stability of chitin provides an opportunity to develop novel inorganic-organic composites under hydrothermal synthesis conditions in vitro. For the first time, in this work we prepared monolithic silica-chitin composite under extreme biomimetic conditions (80°C and pH 1.5) using three dimensional chitinous matrices isolated from the marine sponge Aplysina cauliformis. The resulting material was studied using light and fluorescence microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. A mechanism for the silica-chitin interaction after exposure to these hydrothermal conditions is proposed and discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Crystal defects induced by chitin and chitinolytic enzymes in the prismatic layer of Pinctada fucata.

    PubMed

    Kintsu, Hiroyuki; Okumura, Taiga; Negishi, Lumi; Ifuku, Shinsuke; Kogure, Toshihiro; Sakuda, Shohei; Suzuki, Michio

    2017-07-22

    Biomineralization, in which organisms create biogenic hard tissues, with hardness or flexibility enhanced by organic-inorganic interaction is an interesting and attractive focus for application of biomimetic functional materials. Calcites in the prismatic layer of Pinctada fucata are tougher than abiotic calcites due to small crystal defects. However, the molecular mechanism of the defect formation remains unclear. Here, chitin and two chitinolytic enzymes, chitinase and chitobiase, were identified as organic matrices related to for the formation of small crystal defects in the prismatic layer. Experiments with a chitinase inhibitor in vivo showed chitinase is necessary to form the prismatic layer. Analysis of calcite crystals, which were synthesized in a chitin hydrogel treated with chitinolytic enzymes, by electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction showed that crystal defects became larger as chitin was more degraded. These results suggest that interactions between chitin and calcium carbonate increase as chitin is thinner. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Chiral nematic self-assembly of minimally surface damaged chitin nanofibrils and its load bearing functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Dongyeop X.; Cha, Yun Jeong; Nguyen, Hoang-Linh; Je, Hwa Heon; Jho, Yong Seok; Hwang, Dong Soo; Yoon, Dong Ki

    2016-03-01

    Chitin is one of the most abundant biomaterials in nature, with 1010 tons produced annually as hierarchically organized nanofibril fillers to reinforce the exoskeletons of arthropods. This green and cheap biomaterial has attracted great attention due to its potential application to reinforce biomedical materials. Despite that, its practical use is limited since the extraction of chitin nanofibrils requires surface modification involving harsh chemical treatments, leading to difficulties in reproducing their natural prototypal hierarchical structure, i.e. chiral nematic phase. Here, we develop a chemical etching-free approach using calcium ions, called “natural way”, to disintegrate the chitin nanofibrils while keeping the essential moiety for the self-assembly, ultimately resulting in the reproduction of chitin’s natural chiral structure in a polymeric matrix. This chiral chitin nanostructure exceptionally toughens the composite. Our resultant chiral nematic phase of chitin materials can contribute to the understanding and use of the reinforcing strategy in nature.

  15. Chitin based polyurethanes using hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene, part III: surface characteristics.

    PubMed

    Zia, Khalid Mahmood; Zuber, Mohammad; Saif, Muhammad Jawwad; Jawaid, Mohammad; Mahmood, Kashif; Shahid, Muhammad; Anjum, Muhammad Naveed; Ahmad, Mirza Nadeem

    2013-11-01

    Hydroxy terminated polybutadiene (HTPB)-chitin based polyurethanes (PUs) with controlled hydrophobicity were synthesized using HTPB and toluene diisocyanate (TDI). The prepolymer was extended with different mass ratios of chitin and 1,4-butane diol (BDO). The effect of chitin contents in chain extender (CE) proportions on surface properties was studied and investigated. Incorporation of chitin contents into the final PU showed decrease in contact angle value of water drop, water absorption (%) and swelling behavior. The antibacterial activity of the prepared samples was affected by varying the chitin contents in the chemical composition of the final PU. The results demonstrated that the use of prepared material can be suggested as non-absorbable suture. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Chiral nematic self-assembly of minimally surface damaged chitin nanofibrils and its load bearing functions

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Dongyeop X.; Cha, Yun Jeong; Nguyen, Hoang-Linh; Je, Hwa Heon; Jho, Yong Seok; Hwang, Dong Soo; Yoon, Dong Ki

    2016-01-01

    Chitin is one of the most abundant biomaterials in nature, with 1010 tons produced annually as hierarchically organized nanofibril fillers to reinforce the exoskeletons of arthropods. This green and cheap biomaterial has attracted great attention due to its potential application to reinforce biomedical materials. Despite that, its practical use is limited since the extraction of chitin nanofibrils requires surface modification involving harsh chemical treatments, leading to difficulties in reproducing their natural prototypal hierarchical structure, i.e. chiral nematic phase. Here, we develop a chemical etching-free approach using calcium ions, called “natural way”, to disintegrate the chitin nanofibrils while keeping the essential moiety for the self-assembly, ultimately resulting in the reproduction of chitin’s natural chiral structure in a polymeric matrix. This chiral chitin nanostructure exceptionally toughens the composite. Our resultant chiral nematic phase of chitin materials can contribute to the understanding and use of the reinforcing strategy in nature. PMID:26988392

  17. Preparation of High Purity, High Molecular-Weight Chitin from Ionic Liquids for Use as an Adsorbate for the Extraction of Uranium from Seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Robin

    Ensuring a domestic supply of uranium is a key issue facing the wider implementation of nuclear power. Uranium is mostly mined in Kazakhstan, Australia, and Canada, and there are few high-grade uranium reserves left worldwide. Therefore, one of the most appealing potential sources of uranium is the vast quantity dissolved in the oceans (estimated to be 4.4 billion tons worldwide). There have been research efforts centered on finding a means to extract uranium from seawater for decades, but so far none have resulted in an economically viable product, due in part to the fact that the materials that have beenmore » successfully demonstrated to date are too costly (in terms of money and energy) to produce on the necessary scale. Ionic Liquids (salts which melt below 100{degrees}C) can completely dissolve raw crustacean shells, leading to recovery of a high purity, high molecular weight chitin powder and to fibers and films which can be spun directly from the extract solution suggesting that continuous processing might be feasible. The work proposed here will utilize the unprecedented control this makes possible over the chitin fiber a) to prepare electrospun nanofibers of very high surface area and in specific architectures, b) to modify the fiber surfaces chemically with selective extractant capacity, and c) to demonstrate their utility in the direct extraction and recovery of uranium from seawater. This approach will 1) provide direct extraction of chitin from shellfish waste thus saving energy over the current industrial process for obtaining chitin; 2) allow continuous processing of nanofibers for very high surface area fibers in an economical operation; 3) provide a unique high molecular weight chitin not available from the current industrial process, leading to stronger, more durable fibers; and 4) allow easy chemical modification of the large surface areas of the fibers for appending uranyl selective functionality providing selectivity and ease of stripping

  18. Chitin Utilization by the Insect-Transmitted Bacterium Xylella fastidiosa▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Killiny, Nabil; Prado, Simone S.; Almeida, Rodrigo P. P.

    2010-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is an insect-borne bacterium that colonizes xylem vessels of a large number of host plants, including several crops of economic importance. Chitin is a polysaccharide present in the cuticle of leafhopper vectors of X. fastidiosa and may serve as a carbon source for this bacterium. Biological assays showed that X. fastidiosa reached larger populations in the presence of chitin. Additionally, chitin induced phenotypic changes in this bacterium, notably increasing adhesiveness. Quantitative PCR assays indicated transcriptional changes in the presence of chitin, and an enzymatic assay demonstrated chitinolytic activity by X. fastidiosa. An ortholog of the chitinase A gene (chiA) was identified in the X. fastidiosa genome. The in silico analysis revealed that the open reading frame of chiA encodes a protein of 351 amino acids with an estimated molecular mass of 40 kDa. chiA is in a locus that consists of genes implicated in polysaccharide degradation. Moreover, this locus was also found in the genomes of closely related bacteria in the genus Xanthomonas, which are plant but not insect associated. X. fastidiosa degraded chitin when grown on a solid chitin-yeast extract-agar medium and grew in liquid medium with chitin as the sole carbon source; ChiA was also determined to be secreted. The gene encoding ChiA was cloned into Escherichia coli, and endochitinase activity was detected in the transformant, showing that the gene is functional and involved in chitin degradation. The results suggest that X. fastidiosa may use its vectors' foregut surface as a carbon source. In addition, chitin may trigger X. fastidiosa's gene regulation and biofilm formation within vectors. Further work is necessary to characterize the role of chitin and its utilization in X. fastidiosa. PMID:20656858

  19. VP24 Is a Chitin-Binding Protein Involved in White Spot Syndrome Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zaipeng; Han, Yali; Xu, Limei

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oral ingestion is the major route of infection for the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). However, the mechanism by which virus particles in the digestive tract invade host cells is unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that WSSV virions can bind to chitin through one of the major envelope proteins (VP24). Mutagenesis analysis indicated that amino acids (aa) 186 to 200 in the C terminus of VP24 were required for chitin binding. Moreover, the P-VP24186–200 peptide derived from the VP24 chitin binding region significantly inhibited the VP24-chitin interaction and the WSSV-chitin interaction, implying that VP24 participates in WSSV binding to chitin. Oral inoculation experiments showed that P-VP24186–200 treatment reduced the number of virus particles remaining in the digestive tract during the early stage of infection and greatly hindered WSSV proliferation in shrimp. These data indicate that binding of WSSV to chitin through the viral envelope protein VP24 is essential for WSSV per os infection and provide new ideas for preventing WSSV infection in shrimp farms. IMPORTANCE In this study, we show that WSSV can bind to chitin through the envelope protein VP24. The chitin-binding domain of VP24 maps to amino acids 186 to 200 in the C terminus. Binding of WSSV to chitin through the viral envelope protein VP24 is essential for WSSV per os infection. These findings not only extend our knowledge of WSSV infection but also provide new insights into strategies to prevent WSSV infection in shrimp farms. PMID:26512091

  20. Microbial responses to chitin and chitosan in oxic and anoxic agricultural soil slurries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieczorek, A. S.; Hetz, S. A.; Kolb, S.

    2014-06-01

    Microbial degradation of chitin in soil substantially contributes to carbon cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. Chitin is globally the second most abundant biopolymer after cellulose and can be deacetylated to chitosan or can be hydrolyzed to N,N'-diacetylchitobiose and oligomers of N-acetylglucosamine by aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms. Which pathway of chitin hydrolysis is preferred by soil microbial communities is unknown. Supplementation of chitin stimulated microbial activity under oxic and anoxic conditions in agricultural soil slurries, whereas chitosan had no effect. Thus, the soil microbial community likely was more adapted to chitin as a substrate. In addition, this finding suggested that direct hydrolysis of chitin was preferred to the pathway that starts with deacetylation. Chitin was apparently degraded by aerobic respiration, ammonification, and nitrification to carbon dioxide and nitrate under oxic conditions. When oxygen was absent, fermentation products (acetate, butyrate, propionate, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide) and ammonia were detected, suggesting that butyric and propionic acid fermentation, along with ammonification, were likely responsible for anaerobic chitin degradation. In total, 42 different chiA genotypes were detected of which twenty were novel at an amino acid sequence dissimilarity of less than 50%. Various chiA genotypes responded to chitin supplementation and affiliated with a novel deep-branching bacterial chiA genotype (anoxic conditions), genotypes of Beta- and Gammaproteobacteria (oxic and anoxic conditions), and Planctomycetes (oxic conditions). Thus, this study provides evidence that detected chitinolytic bacteria were catabolically diverse and occupied different ecological niches with regard to oxygen availability enabling chitin degradation under various redox conditions on community level.

  1. Microbial responses to chitin and chitosan in oxic and anoxic agricultural soil slurries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieczorek, A. S.; Hetz, S. A.; Kolb, S.

    2014-02-01

    Chitin is the second most abundant biopolymer in terrestrial ecosystems and is subject to microbial degradation. Chitin can be deacetylated to chitosan or can be hydrolyzed to N,N'-diacetylchitobiose and oligomers of N-acetylglucosamine by aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms. Which pathway of chitin hydrolysis is preferred by soil microbial communities has previously been unknown. Supplementation of chitin stimulated microbial activity under oxic and anoxic conditions in agricultural soil slurries, whereas chitosan had no effect. Thus, the soil microbial community likely was more adapted to chitin as a substrate. In addition, this finding suggested that direct hydrolysis of chitin was preferred to the pathway that starts with deacetylation. Chitin was apparently degraded by aerobic respiration, ammonification, and nitrification to carbon dioxide and nitrate under oxic conditions. When oxygen was absent, fermentation products (acetate, butyrate, propionate, hydrogen, carbon dioxide) and ammonia were detected, suggesting that butyric and propionic acid fermentation were along with ammonification likely responsible for apparent anaerobic chitin degradation. In total, 42 different chiA genotypes were detected of which twenty were novel at an amino acid sequence dissimilarity of >50%. Various chiA genotypes responded to chitin supplementation and affiliated with a novel deep-branching bacterial chiA genotype (anoxic conditions), genotypes of Beta- and Gammaproteobacteria (oxic and anoxic conditions), and Planctomycetes (oxic conditions). Thus, this study provides evidence that detected chitinolytic bacteria were catabolically diverse and occupied different ecological niches with regard to oxygen availability enabling chitin degradation under various redox conditions at the level of the community.

  2. RNA interference of chitin synthase genes inhibits chitin biosynthesis and affects larval performance in Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say).

    PubMed

    Shi, Ji-Feng; Mu, Li-Li; Chen, Xu; Guo, Wen-Chao; Li, Guo-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Dietary introduction of bacterially expressed double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) has great potential for management of Leptinotarsa decemlineata . Identification of the most attractive candidate genes for RNA interference (RNAi) is the first step. In the present paper, three complete chitin synthase cDNA sequences ( LdChSAa , LdChSAb and LdChSB ) were cloned. LdChSAa and LdChSAb , two splicing variants of LdChSA gene, were highly expressed in ectodermally-derived epidermal cells forming epidermis, trachea, foregut and hindgut, whereas LdChSB was mainly transcribed in midgut cells. Feeding bacterially expressed ds ChSA (derived from a common fragment of LdChSAa and LdChSAb ), ds ChSAa , ds ChSAb and ds ChSB in the second- and fourth-instar larvae specifically knocked down their target mRNAs. RNAi of LdChSAa + LdChSAb and LdChSAa lowered chitin contents in whole body and integument samples, and thinned tracheal taenidia. The resulting larvae failed to ecdyse, pupate, or emerge as adults. Comparably, knockdown of LdChSAb mainly affected pupal-adult molting. The LdChSAb RNAi pupae did not completely shed the old larval exuviae, which caused failure of adult emergence. In contrast, silencing of LdChSB significantly reduced foliage consumption, decreased chitin content in midgut sample, damaged midgut peritrophic matrix, and retarded larval growth. As a result, the development of the LdChSB RNAi hypomorphs was arrested. Our data reveal that these LdChS s are among the effective candidate genes for an RNAi-based control strategy against L. decemlineata .

  3. Fungal Chitin Dampens Inflammation through IL-10 Induction Mediated by NOD2 and TLR9 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Wagener, Jeanette; Malireddi, R. K. Subbarao; Lenardon, Megan D.; Köberle, Martin; Vautier, Simon; MacCallum, Donna M.; Biedermann, Tilo; Schaller, Martin; Netea, Mihai G.; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi; Brown, Gordon D.; Brown, Alistair J. P.; Gow, Neil A. R.

    2014-01-01

    Chitin is an essential structural polysaccharide of fungal pathogens and parasites, but its role in human immune responses remains largely unknown. It is the second most abundant polysaccharide in nature after cellulose and its derivatives today are widely used for medical and industrial purposes. We analysed the immunological properties of purified chitin particles derived from the opportunistic human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, which led to the selective secretion of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. We identified NOD2, TLR9 and the mannose receptor as essential fungal chitin-recognition receptors for the induction of this response. Chitin reduced LPS-induced inflammation in vivo and may therefore contribute to the resolution of the immune response once the pathogen has been defeated. Fungal chitin also induced eosinophilia in vivo, underpinning its ability to induce asthma. Polymorphisms in the identified chitin receptors, NOD2 and TLR9, predispose individuals to inflammatory conditions and dysregulated expression of chitinases and chitinase-like binding proteins, whose activity is essential to generate IL-10-inducing fungal chitin particles in vitro, have also been linked to inflammatory conditions and asthma. Chitin recognition is therefore critical for immune homeostasis and is likely to have a significant role in infectious and allergic disease. Authors Summary Chitin is the second most abundant polysaccharide in nature after cellulose and an essential component of the cell wall of all fungal pathogens. The discovery of human chitinases and chitinase-like binding proteins indicates that fungal chitin is recognised by cells of the human immune system, shaping the immune response towards the invading pathogen. We show that three immune cell receptors– the mannose receptor, NOD2 and TLR9 recognise chitin and act together to mediate an anti-inflammatory response via secretion of the cytokine IL-10. This mechanism may prevent inflammation-based damage

  4. Identification of the major allergens of Charybdis feriatus (red crab) and its cross-reactivity with Portunus pelagicus (blue crab).

    PubMed

    Misnan, Rosmilah; Murad, Shahnaz; Yadzir, Zailatul Hani Mohd; Abdullah, Noormalin

    2012-12-01

    Tropomyosin and arginine kinase have been identified as the major allergens in multiple species of crab. Charybdis feriatus is an important commercial crab in this country. To characterize the major allergens of C. feriatus using a proteomics approach and subsequently to identify the allergens involved in cross-reactivity with Portunus pelagicus. Raw and boiled extracts of the crabs were prepared from crab meat. The protein profile of the extracts was determined by SDS-PAGE and two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE). Major allergens were identified by the immunoblotting test using sera from 50 patients with crab allergy. The major allergens were further identified by 2-DE immunoblotting. The major allergenic spots were then excised, digested by trypsin and identified by mass spectrometry analysis. The immunoblotting inhibition test was performed to study the crossreactivity between red crab and blue crab allergens using sera from 20 patients with allergy to both red and blue crabs. At least 20 protein bands between 13 to 250 kDa were detected in the SDS-PAGE gel of raw extract, while boiled extract procuced fewer protein bands. Proteins of 36 kDa and 41 kDa were recognized as the major allergens of the crab. The major allergenic spot sequences of the 36 and 41 kDa proteins were identified as crab tropomyosin and arginine kinase, respectively. All IgE-binding proteins, including both major allergens, were found to be cross-creative with P. pelagicus allergens. In addition to tropomyosin, arginine kinase was also identified as the major allergen of C. feriatus among our local crab-allergic patients. Cross-reactivity of this crab with P. pelagicus was demonstrated in this study.

  5. Prevalence, characterization and sources of Listeria monocytogenes in blue crab (Callinectus sapidus) meat and blue crab processing plants.

    PubMed

    Pagadala, Sivaranjani; Parveen, Salina; Rippen, Thomas; Luchansky, John B; Call, Jeffrey E; Tamplin, Mark L; Porto-Fett, Anna C S

    2012-09-01

    Seven blue crab processing plants were sampled to determine the prevalence and sources of Listeria spp. and Listeria monocytogenes for two years (2006-2007). A total of 488 raw crabs, 624 cooked crab meat (crab meat) and 624 environmental samples were tested by standard methods. Presumptive Listeria spp. were isolated from 19.5% of raw crabs, 10.8% of crab meat, and 69.5% of environmental samples. L. monocytogenes was isolated from 4.5% of raw crabs, 0.2% of crab meat, and 2.1% of environmental samples. Ninety-seven percent of the isolates were resistant to at least one of the ten antibiotics tested. Eight different serotypes were found among 76 L. monocytogenes isolates tested with the most common being 4b, 1/2b and 1/2a. Automated EcoRI ribotyping differentiated 11 ribotypes among the 106 L. monocytogenes isolates. Based on ribotyping analysis, the distribution of the ribotypes in each processing plant had a unique contamination pattern. A total of 92 ApaI and 88 AscI pulsotypes among the 106 L. monocytogenes isolates were found and distinct pulsotypes were observed in raw crab, crab meat and environmental samples. Ribotypes and serotypes recovered from crab processing plants included subtypes that have been associated with listeriosis cases in other food outbreaks. Our findings suggest that molecular methods may provide critical information about sources of L. monocytogenes in crab processing plants and will augment efforts to improve food safety control strategies such as targeting specific sources of contamination and use of aggressive detergents prior to sanitizing. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. CMS distributed data analysis with CRAB3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascheroni, M.; Balcas, J.; Belforte, S.; Bockelman, B. P.; Hernandez, J. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Konstantinov, P. B.; Silva, J. M. D.; Ali, M. A. B. M.; Melo, A. M.; Riahi, H.; Tanasijczuk, A. J.; Yusli, M. N. B.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A. E.; Vaandering, E.

    2015-12-01

    The CMS Remote Analysis Builder (CRAB) is a distributed workflow management tool which facilitates analysis tasks by isolating users from the technical details of the Grid infrastructure. Throughout LHC Run 1, CRAB has been successfully employed by an average of 350 distinct users each week executing about 200,000 jobs per day. CRAB has been significantly upgraded in order to face the new challenges posed by LHC Run 2. Components of the new system include 1) a lightweight client, 2) a central primary server which communicates with the clients through a REST interface, 3) secondary servers which manage user analysis tasks and submit jobs to the CMS resource provisioning system, and 4) a central service to asynchronously move user data from temporary storage in the execution site to the desired storage location. The new system improves the robustness, scalability and sustainability of the service. Here we provide an overview of the new system, operation, and user support, report on its current status, and identify lessons learned from the commissioning phase and production roll-out.

  7. CMS distributed data analysis with CRAB3

    DOE PAGES

    Mascheroni, M.; Balcas, J.; Belforte, S.; ...

    2015-12-23

    The CMS Remote Analysis Builder (CRAB) is a distributed workflow management tool which facilitates analysis tasks by isolating users from the technical details of the Grid infrastructure. Throughout LHC Run 1, CRAB has been successfully employed by an average of 350 distinct users each week executing about 200,000 jobs per day.CRAB has been significantly upgraded in order to face the new challenges posed by LHC Run 2. Components of the new system include 1) a lightweight client, 2) a central primary server which communicates with the clients through a REST interface, 3) secondary servers which manage user analysis tasks andmore » submit jobs to the CMS resource provisioning system, and 4) a central service to asynchronously move user data from temporary storage in the execution site to the desired storage location. Furthermore, the new system improves the robustness, scalability and sustainability of the service.Here we provide an overview of the new system, operation, and user support, report on its current status, and identify lessons learned from the commissioning phase and production roll-out.« less

  8. Salmonella biofilm formation on Aspergillus niger involves cellulose--chitin interactions.

    PubMed

    Brandl, Maria T; Carter, Michelle Q; Parker, Craig T; Chapman, Matthew R; Huynh, Steven; Zhou, Yaguang

    2011-01-01

    Salmonella cycles between host and nonhost environments, where it can become an active member of complex microbial communities. The role of fungi in the environmental adaptation of enteric pathogens remains relatively unexplored. We have discovered that S. enterica Typhimurium rapidly attaches to and forms biofilms on the hyphae of the common fungus, Aspergillus niger. Several Salmonella enterica serovars displayed a similar interaction, whereas other bacterial species were unable to bind to the fungus. Bacterial attachment to chitin, a major constituent of fungal cell walls, mirrored this specificity. Pre-incubation of S. Typhimurium with N-acetylglucosamine, the monomeric component of chitin, reduced binding to chitin beads by as much as 727-fold and inhibited attachment to A. niger hyphae considerably. A cellulose-deficient mutant of S. Typhimurium failed to attach to chitin beads and to the fungus. Complementation of this mutant with the cellulose operon restored binding to chitin beads to 79% of that of the parental strain and allowed for attachment and biofilm formation on A. niger, indicating that cellulose is involved in bacterial attachment to the fungus via the chitin component of its cell wall. In contrast to cellulose, S. Typhimurium curli fimbriae were not required for attachment and biofilm development on the hyphae but were critical for its stability. Our results suggest that cellulose-chitin interactions are required for the production of mixed Salmonella-A. niger biofilms, and support the hypothesis that encounters with chitinaceous alternate hosts may contribute to the ecological success of human pathogens.

  9. Salmonella Biofilm Formation on Aspergillus niger Involves Cellulose – Chitin Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Brandl, Maria T.; Carter, Michelle Q.; Parker, Craig T.; Chapman, Matthew R.; Huynh, Steven; Zhou, Yaguang

    2011-01-01

    Salmonella cycles between host and nonhost environments, where it can become an active member of complex microbial communities. The role of fungi in the environmental adaptation of enteric pathogens remains relatively unexplored. We have discovered that S. enterica Typhimurium rapidly attaches to and forms biofilms on the hyphae of the common fungus, Aspergillus niger. Several Salmonella enterica serovars displayed a similar interaction, whereas other bacterial species were unable to bind to the fungus. Bacterial attachment to chitin, a major constituent of fungal cell walls, mirrored this specificity. Pre-incubation of S. Typhimurium with N-acetylglucosamine, the monomeric component of chitin, reduced binding to chitin beads by as much as 727-fold and inhibited attachment to A. niger hyphae considerably. A cellulose-deficient mutant of S. Typhimurium failed to attach to chitin beads and to the fungus. Complementation of this mutant with the cellulose operon restored binding to chitin beads to 79% of that of the parental strain and allowed for attachment and biofilm formation on A. niger, indicating that cellulose is involved in bacterial attachment to the fungus via the chitin component of its cell wall. In contrast to cellulose, S. Typhimurium curli fimbriae were not required for attachment and biofilm development on the hyphae but were critical for its stability. Our results suggest that cellulose–chitin interactions are required for the production of mixed Salmonella-A. niger biofilms, and support the hypothesis that encounters with chitinaceous alternate hosts may contribute to the ecological success of human pathogens. PMID:22003399

  10. Chitosan, the deacetylated form of chitin, is necessary for cell wall integrity in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Baker, Lorina G; Specht, Charles A; Donlin, Maureen J; Lodge, Jennifer K

    2007-05-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that causes cryptococcal meningoencephalitis, particularly in immunocompromised patients. The fungal cell wall is an excellent target for antifungal therapies as it is an essential organelle that provides cell structure and integrity, it is needed for the localization or attachment of known virulence factors, including the polysaccharide capsule, melanin, and phospholipase, and it is critical for host-pathogen interactions. In C. neoformans, chitosan produced by the enzymatic removal of acetyl groups from nascent chitin polymers has been implicated as an important component of the vegetative cell wall. In this study, we identify four putative chitin/polysaccharide deacetylases in C. neoformans. We have demonstrated that three of these deacetylases, Cda1, Cda2, and Cda3, can account for all of the chitosan produced during vegetative growth in culture, but the function for one, Fpd1, remains undetermined. The data suggest a model for chitosan production in vegetatively growing C. neoformans where the three chitin deacetylases convert chitin generated by the chitin synthase Chs3 into chitosan. Utilizing a collection of chitin/polysaccharide deacetylase deletion strains, we determined that during vegetative growth, chitosan helps to maintain cell integrity and aids in bud separation. Additionally, chitosan is necessary for maintaining normal capsule width and the lack of chitosan results in a "leaky melanin" phenotype. Our analysis indicates that chitin deacetylases and the chitosan made by them may prove to be excellent antifungal targets.

  11. An overview of chitin or chitosan/nano ceramic composite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Deepthi, S; Venkatesan, J; Kim, Se-Kwon; Bumgardner, Joel D; Jayakumar, R

    2016-12-01

    Chitin and chitosan based nanocomposite scaffolds have been widely used for bone tissue engineering. These chitin and chitosan based scaffolds were reinforced with nanocomponents viz Hydroxyapatite (HAp), Bioglass ceramic (BGC), Silicon dioxide (SiO 2 ), Titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) and Zirconium oxide (ZrO 2 ) to develop nanocomposite scaffolds. Plenty of works have been reported on the applications and characteristics of the nanoceramic composites however, compiling the work done in this field and presenting it in a single article is a thrust area. This review is written with an aim to fill this gap and focus on the preparations and applications of chitin or chitosan/nHAp, chitin or chitosan/nBGC, chitin or chitosan/nSiO 2 , chitin or chitosan/nTiO 2 and chitin or chitosan/nZrO 2 in the field of bone tissue engineering in detail. Many reports so far exemplify the importance of ceramics in bone regeneration. The effect of nanoceramics over native ceramics in developing composites, its role in osteogenesis etc. are the gist of this review. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Chitin enhances biocontrol of Rhodotorula mucilaginosa to postharvest decay of peaches.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongyin; Yang, Qiya; Ge, Lingling; Zhang, Guochao; Zhang, Xiaoli; Zhang, Xiaoyun

    2016-07-01

    Biological control using microbial antagonists is a promising alternative approach to synthetic fungicides. However, effective biological control requires enhancing the consistency and efficacy of the antagonists used to control postharvest diseases. This study investigated the effect of chitin on the biocontrol efficacy of Rhodotorula mucilaginosa against blue mold and Rhizopus decay of peaches and on the protein expression profiles of R. mucilaginosa. The antagonistic activity of R. mucilaginosa harvested from the nutrient yeast dextrose broth (NYDB) with 0.5% chitin added was significantly improved compared with culture in NYDB without chitin. The R. mucilaginosa population cultured in chitin-supplement NYDB and nutrient yeast chitin borth (NYCB) harvested from peach wounds was more than that of R. mucilaginosa cultured in NYDB without chitin throughout the storage period except at 1 d. The protein expression profiles findings revealed that there were several differentially expressed proteins of R. mucilaginosa in the 0.5% chitin-supplemented NYDB and NYCB compared with that of R. mucilaginosa in NYDB. Most of these were cellular proteomes relating to the primary metabolic reactions such as glycoside hydrolases, phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate, and NADH dehydrogenases. Some proteins were also related to signal transmission and stress response. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Surface modification of chitin and chitosan with poly(3-hexylthiophene) via oxidative polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hai, Thien An Phung; Sugimoto, Ryuichi

    2018-03-01

    In the present work, the modification of biomaterials such as chitin and chitosan were successfully prepared by directly grafting poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) to their surfaces using simple oxidative polymerization with FeCl3. The thermal stability and crystallinity of grafted chitin and chitosan changed upon grafting with P3HT. The build-up of π-π* structure from the P3HT on the surface of chitin and chitosan resulted in the appearance of UV-vis absorption and fluorescence emission peaks in the range from 500 to 600 nm. Introducing P3HT to the surface of chitin and chitosan improved significantly the electrical property of chitin and chitosan with the increase in conductivity from 10-9 to 10-7 S/cm. Furthermore, the usual behavior of hydrophilic surface of chitin and chitosan that turned to hydrophobic with water contact angle of 97.7° and 107.0°, respectively in the presence of P3HT. The mechanism for graft reaction of P3HT to chitin and chitosan was also proposed and discussed.

  14. Recognition and Blocking of Innate Immunity Cells by Candida albicans Chitin ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Mora-Montes, Héctor M.; Netea, Mihai G.; Ferwerda, Gerben; Lenardon, Megan D.; Brown, Gordon D.; Mistry, Anita R.; Kullberg, Bart Jan; O'Callaghan, Chris A.; Sheth, Chirag C.; Odds, Frank C.; Brown, Alistair J. P.; Munro, Carol A.; Gow, Neil A. R.

    2011-01-01

    Chitin is a skeletal cell wall polysaccharide of the inner cell wall of fungal pathogens. As yet, little about its role during fungus-host immune cell interactions is known. We show here that ultrapurified chitin from Candida albicans cell walls did not stimulate cytokine production directly but blocked the recognition of C. albicans by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and murine macrophages, leading to significant reductions in cytokine production. Chitin did not affect the induction of cytokines stimulated by bacterial cells or lipopolysaccharide (LPS), indicating that blocking was not due to steric masking of specific receptors. Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), TLR4, and Mincle (the macrophage-inducible C-type lectin) were not required for interactions with chitin. Dectin-1 was required for immune blocking but did not bind chitin directly. Cytokine stimulation was significantly reduced upon stimulation of PBMCs with heat-killed chitin-deficient C. albicans cells but not with live cells. Therefore, chitin is normally not exposed to cells of the innate immune system but is capable of influencing immune recognition by blocking dectin-1-mediated engagement with fungal cell walls. PMID:21357722

  15. Green Conversion of Agroindustrial Wastes into Chitin and Chitosan by Rhizopus arrhizus and Cunninghamella elegans Strains

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Lúcia Raquel Ramos; Stamford, Thayza Christina Montenegro; Stamford-Arnaud, Thatiana Montenegro; de Alcântara, Sergio Roberto Cabral; da Silva, Antonio Cardoso; da Silva, Adamares Marques; do Nascimento, Aline Elesbão; de Campos-Takaki, Galba Maria

    2014-01-01

    This article sets out a method for producing chitin and chitosan by Cunninghamella elegans and Rhizopus arrhizus strains using a green metabolic conversion of agroindustrial wastes (corn steep liquor and molasses). The physicochemical characteristics of the biopolymers and antimicrobial activity are described. Chitin and chitosan were extracted by alkali-acid treatment, and characterized by infrared spectroscopy, viscosity and X-ray diffraction. The effectiveness of chitosan from C. elegans and R. arrhizus in inhibiting the growth of Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella enterica, Escherichia coli and Yersinia enterocolitica were evaluated by determining the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) and the minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC). The highest production of biomass (24.60 g/L), chitin (83.20 mg/g) and chitosan (49.31 mg/g) was obtained by R. arrhizus. Chitin and chitosan from both fungi showed a similar degree of deacetylation, respectively of 25% and 82%, crystallinity indices of 33.80% and 32.80% for chitin, and 20.30% and 17.80% for chitosan. Both chitin and chitosan presented similar viscosimetry of 3.79–3.40 cP and low molecular weight of 5.08 × 103 and 4.68 × 103 g/mol. They both showed identical MIC and MBC for all bacteria assayed. These results suggest that: agricultural wastes can be produced in an environmentally friendly way; chitin and chitosan can be produced economically; and that chitosan has antimicrobial potential against pathogenic bacteria. PMID:24853288

  16. Development of Coprocessed Chitin-Calcium Carbonate as Multifunctional Tablet Excipient for Direct Compression.

    PubMed

    Chaheen, Mohammad; Sanchez-Ballester, Noelia M; Bataille, Bernard; Yassine, Ahmad; Belamie, Emmanuel; Sharkawi, Tahmer

    2018-04-24

    Owing to the increasing interest in multifunctional excipients for tableting, coprocessing of individual excipients is regularly used to produce excipients of improved multifunctionality superior to individual excipients or their physical mix. The use of chitin as an excipient in tablet formulation is limited because of certain drawbacks such as poor flowability and low true density. The objective of this work is to improve these properties through coprocessing of chitin with calcium carbonate (CaCO 3 ) by precipitating CaCO 3 on chitin particles using different methods. In addition, optimization of the coprocessed chitin was carried out to improve the excipient's properties. Physicochemical (CaCO 3 content, true density, X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy) and functional testing (swelling force, flowability, tensile strength, deformation mechanism, and disintegration time) were used to characterize the coprocessed product. Results showed that the calcite CaCO 3 polymorph is precipitated on the chitin surface and that it interacts with chitin at carbonyl- and amide-group level. In addition, the coprocessed excipient has an improved true density and powder flowability, with CaCO 3 forming single layer on the chitin particles surface. Tableting studies showed that the coprocessed powder exhibited an intermediate deformation behavior between CaCO 3 (most brittle) and chitin (most plastic). Tablets showed acceptable tensile strength and rapid disintegration (2-4 s). These results show the potential use of coprocessed chitin-CaCO 3 as a multifunctional excipient for fast disintegration of tablets produced by direct compression. Copyright © 2018 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Determination of chitin content in fungal cell wall: an alternative flow cytometric method.

    PubMed

    Costa-de-Oliveira, Sofia; Silva, Ana P; Miranda, Isabel M; Salvador, Alexandre; Azevedo, Maria M; Munro, Carol A; Rodrigues, Acácio G; Pina-Vaz, Cidália

    2013-03-01

    The conventional methods used to evaluate chitin content in fungi, such as biochemical assessment of glucosamine release after acid hydrolysis or epifluorescence microscopy, are low throughput, laborious, time-consuming, and cannot evaluate a large number of cells. We developed a flow cytometric assay, efficient, and fast, based on Calcofluor White staining to measure chitin content in yeast cells. A staining index was defined, its value was directly related to chitin amount and taking into consideration the different levels of autofluorecence. Twenty-two Candida spp. and four Cryptococcus neoformans clinical isolates with distinct susceptibility profiles to caspofungin were evaluated. Candida albicans clinical isolate SC5314, and isogenic strains with deletions in chitin synthase 3 (chs3Δ/chs3Δ) and genes encoding predicted GlycosylPhosphatidylInositol (GPI)-anchored proteins (pga31Δ/Δ and pga62Δ/Δ), were used as controls. As expected, the wild-type strain displayed a significant higher chitin content (P < 0.001) than chs3Δ/chs3Δ and pga31Δ/Δ especially in the presence of caspofungin. Ca. parapsilosis, Ca. tropicalis, and Ca. albicans showed higher cell wall chitin content. Although no relationship between chitin content and antifungal drug susceptibility phenotype was found, an association was established between the paradoxical growth effect in the presence of high caspofungin concentrations and the chitin content. This novel flow cytometry protocol revealed to be a simple and reliable assay to estimate cell wall chitin content of fungi. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  18. Potential Impact of Submarine Power Cables on Crab Harvest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, A. S.; Nishimoto, M.

    2016-02-01

    Offshore renewable energy installations convert wave or wind energy to electricity and transfer the power to shore through transmission cables laid on or buried beneath the seafloor. West coast commercial fishermen, who harvest the highly prized Dungeness crab (Metacarcinus magister) and the rock crab (Cancer spp.), are concerned that the interface of crabs and electromagnetic fields (EMF) from these cables will present an electrified fence on the seafloor that their target resource will not cross. Combined with the assistance of professional fishermen, submarine transmission cables that electrify island communities and offshore oil platforms in the eastern Pacific provide an opportunity to test the harvest of crab species across power transmission cables. In situ field techniques give commercial crab species a choice to decide if they will cross fully energized, EMF emitting, power transmission cables, in response to baited traps. Each independent trial is either one of two possible responses: the crab crosses the cable to enter a trap (1) or the crab does not cross the cable to enter a trap (0). Conditions vary among sample units by the following categorical, fixed factors (i.e., covariates) of cable structure (buried or unburied); direction of cable from crab position (west or east, north or south); time and season. A generalized linear model is fit to the data to determine whether any of these factors affect the probability of crabs crossing an energized cable to enter baited traps. Additionally, the experimental design, aside from the number of runs (set of sample trials) and the dates of the runs, is the same in the Santa Barbara Channel for rock crab and Puget Sound for Dungeness crab, and allows us to compare the capture rates of the two species in the two areas. We present preliminary results from field testing in 2015.

  19. Comparative analysis of the proximate and elemental composition of the blue crab Callinectes sapidus, the warty crab Eriphia verrucosa, and the edible crab Cancer pagurus.

    PubMed

    Zotti, Maurizio; Coco, Laura Del; Pascali, Sandra Angelica De; Migoni, Danilo; Vizzini, Salvatrice; Mancinelli, Giorgio; Fanizzi, Francesco Paolo

    2016-02-01

    The proximate composition and element contents of claw muscle tissue of Atlantic blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) were compared with the native warty crab (Eriphia verrucosa) and the commercially edible crab (Cancer pagurus). The scope of the analysis was to profile the chemical characteristics and nutritive value of the three crab species. Elemental fingerprints showed significant inter-specific differences, whereas non-significant variations in the moisture and ash contents were observed. In the blue crab, protein content was significantly lower than in the other two species, while its carbon content resulted lower than that characterizing only the warty crab. Among micro-elements, Ba, Cr, Cu, Li, Mn, Ni, and Pb showed extremely low concentrations and negligible among-species differences. Significant inter-specific differences were observed for Na, Sr, V, Ba, Cd and Zn; in particular, cadmium and zinc were characterized in the blue crab by concentrations significantly lower than in the other two species. The analysis of the available literature on the three species indicated a general lack of comparable information on their elemental composition. The need to implement extended elemental fingerprinting techniques for shellfish quality assessment is discussed, in view of other complementary profiling methods such as NMR-based metabolomics.

  20. An interactional network of genes involved in chitin synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lesage, Guillaume; Shapiro, Jesse; Specht, Charles A; Sdicu, Anne-Marie; Ménard, Patrice; Hussein, Shamiza; Tong, Amy Hin Yan; Boone, Charles; Bussey, Howard

    2005-02-16

    In S. cerevisiae the beta-1,4-linked N-acetylglucosamine polymer, chitin, is synthesized by a family of 3 specialized but interacting chitin synthases encoded by CHS1, CHS2 and CHS3. Chs2p makes chitin in the primary septum, while Chs3p makes chitin in the lateral cell wall and in the bud neck, and can partially compensate for the lack of Chs2p. Chs3p requires a pathway of Bni4p, Chs4p, Chs5p, Chs6p and Chs7p for its localization and activity. Chs1p is thought to have a septum repair function after cell separation. To further explore interactions in the chitin synthase family and to find processes buffering chitin synthesis, we compiled a genetic interaction network of genes showing synthetic interactions with CHS1, CHS3 and genes involved in Chs3p localization and function and made a phenotypic analysis of their mutants. Using deletion mutants in CHS1, CHS3, CHS4, CHS5, CHS6, CHS7 and BNI4 in a synthetic genetic array analysis we assembled a network of 316 interactions among 163 genes. The interaction network with CHS3, CHS4, CHS5, CHS6, CHS7 or BNI4 forms a dense neighborhood, with many genes functioning in cell wall assembly or polarized secretion. Chitin levels were altered in 54 of the mutants in individually deleted genes, indicating a functional relationship between them and chitin synthesis. 32 of these mutants triggered the chitin stress response, with elevated chitin levels and a dependence on CHS3. A large fraction of the CHS1-interaction set was distinct from that of the CHS3 network, indicating broad roles for Chs1p in buffering both Chs2p function and more global cell wall robustness. Based on their interaction patterns and chitin levels we group interacting mutants into functional categories. Genes interacting with CHS3 are involved in the amelioration of cell wall defects and in septum or bud neck chitin synthesis, and we newly assign a number of genes to these functions. Our genetic analysis of genes not interacting with CHS3 indicate expanded

  1. An interactional network of genes involved in chitin synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Lesage, Guillaume; Shapiro, Jesse; Specht, Charles A; Sdicu, Anne-Marie; Ménard, Patrice; Hussein, Shamiza; Tong, Amy Hin Yan; Boone, Charles; Bussey, Howard

    2005-01-01

    Background In S. cerevisiae the β-1,4-linked N-acetylglucosamine polymer, chitin, is synthesized by a family of 3 specialized but interacting chitin synthases encoded by CHS1, CHS2 and CHS3. Chs2p makes chitin in the primary septum, while Chs3p makes chitin in the lateral cell wall and in the bud neck, and can partially compensate for the lack of Chs2p. Chs3p requires a pathway of Bni4p, Chs4p, Chs5p, Chs6p and Chs7p for its localization and activity. Chs1p is thought to have a septum repair function after cell separation. To further explore interactions in the chitin synthase family and to find processes buffering chitin synthesis, we compiled a genetic interaction network of genes showing synthetic interactions with CHS1, CHS3 and genes involved in Chs3p localization and function and made a phenotypic analysis of their mutants. Results Using deletion mutants in CHS1, CHS3, CHS4, CHS5, CHS6, CHS7 and BNI4 in a synthetic genetic array analysis we assembled a network of 316 interactions among 163 genes. The interaction network with CHS3, CHS4, CHS5, CHS6, CHS7 or BNI4 forms a dense neighborhood, with many genes functioning in cell wall assembly or polarized secretion. Chitin levels were altered in 54 of the mutants in individually deleted genes, indicating a functional relationship between them and chitin synthesis. 32 of these mutants triggered the chitin stress response, with elevated chitin levels and a dependence on CHS3. A large fraction of the CHS1-interaction set was distinct from that of the CHS3 network, indicating broad roles for Chs1p in buffering both Chs2p function and more global cell wall robustness. Conclusion Based on their interaction patterns and chitin levels we group interacting mutants into functional categories. Genes interacting with CHS3 are involved in the amelioration of cell wall defects and in septum or bud neck chitin synthesis, and we newly assign a number of genes to these functions. Our genetic analysis of genes not interacting with

  2. The role of chitin, chitinases, and chitinase-like proteins in pediatric lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Mack, Ines; Hector, Andreas; Ballbach, Marlene; Kohlhäufl, Julius; Fuchs, Katharina J; Weber, Alexander; Mall, Marcus A; Hartl, Dominik

    2015-12-01

    Chitin, after cellulose, the second most abundant biopolymer on earth, is a key component of insects, fungi, and house-dust mites. Lower life forms are endowed with chitinases to defend themselves against chitin-bearing pathogens. Unexpectedly, humans were also found to express chitinases as well as chitinase-like proteins that modulate immune responses. Particularly, increased levels of the chitinase-like protein YKL-40 have been associated with severe asthma, cystic fibrosis, and other inflammatory disease conditions. Here, we summarize and discuss the potential role of chitin, chitinases, and chitinase-like proteins in pediatric lung diseases.

  3. 50 CFR Table 5 to Part 680 - Crab Size Codes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Crab Size Codes 5 Table 5 to Part 680 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) SHELLFISH FISHERIES OF THE EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 680, Table 5 Table 5 to Part 680—Crab Size...

  4. 50 CFR Table 5 to Part 680 - Crab Size Codes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Crab Size Codes 5 Table 5 to Part 680 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) SHELLFISH FISHERIES OF THE EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 680, Table 5 Table 5 to Part 680—Crab Size...

  5. 50 CFR Table 5 to Part 680 - Crab Size Codes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Crab Size Codes 5 Table 5 to Part 680 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) SHELLFISH FISHERIES OF THE EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 680, Table 5 Table 5 to Part 680—Crab Size...

  6. 50 CFR 680.6 - Crab economic data report (EDR).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Crab economic data report (EDR). 680.6... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) SHELLFISH FISHERIES OF THE EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA General § 680.6 Crab economic data report (EDR). (a) Requirements. (1) Any owner or leaseholder of a...

  7. 50 CFR 680.6 - Crab economic data report (EDR).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Crab economic data report (EDR). 680.6... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) SHELLFISH FISHERIES OF THE EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA General § 680.6 Crab economic data report (EDR). (a) Requirements. (1) Any owner or leaseholder of a...

  8. Effect of Mudflat Trampling on Activity of Intertidal Crabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae Won; Kim, Sanha; Lee, Jung-Ah

    2018-03-01

    Many people visit intertidal mudflats to collect bait and seafood, or for eco-tourism and recreation, and as a consequence trample on the mudflats frequently. Trampling would not be life threatening to most animals in the intertidal flats as they have evolved hiding behavior to escape predation. However, what is the effect of trampling on the behavior of intertidal animals? In this study, the effect of mudflat trampling on the activity of crabs (e.g. fiddler crabs, sentinel crabs) living on the mudflat was explored. The number of crabs active on the mudflat surface in experimental plots (1.5 × 1.5 m2) before and after (10 min. and 30 min.) trampling of three different intensities (Heavy trampling = 60 steps; Moderate trampling = 20 steps; and No trampling) was compared in two different mudflat systems. After trampling, the number of crabs active on the surface decreased and was significantly lower than that of control plots. The more intensively trampled the mudflat was, the fewer crabs were active on the mudflat surface. Surprisingly, the number of active crabs did not recover even 30 min. after trampling. The results clearly support the hypothesis that trampling can severely interfere with the behavior of crabs living on intertidal mudflats.

  9. Geographic Variation in Camouflage Specialization by a Decorator Crab.

    PubMed

    Stachowicz, John J; Hay, Mark E

    2000-07-01

    In North Carolina, the decorator crab Libinia dubia camouflages almost exclusively with the chemically noxious alga Dictyota menstrualis. By placing this alga on its carapace, the crab behaviorally sequesters the defensive chemicals of the plant and gains protection from omnivorous consumers. However, Dictyota is absent north of North Carolina, whereas Libinia occurs as far north as New England. Crabs from three northern locations where Dictyota is absent (Rhode Island, Connecticut, and New Jersey) camouflaged to match their environment, rather than selectively accumulating any one species. When D. menstrualis was offered to crabs from northern sites, they did not distinguish between it and other seaweeds for camouflage, whereas crabs from Alabama and two locations in North Carolina used D. menstrualis almost exclusively. In addition, in winter and spring, when Dictyota was seasonally absent in North Carolina, Libinia selectively camouflaged with the sun sponge Hymeniacidon heliophila, which was chemically unpalatable to local fishes. Thus, southern crabs were consistent specialists on chemically defended species for camouflage, while northern crabs were more generalized. The geographic shift in crab behavior away from specialization coincides with a reported decrease in both total predation pressure and the frequency of omnivorous consumers. These shifts in the nature and intensity of predation pressure may favor different camouflage strategies (generalist vs. specialist), contributing to the observed geographic differences in camouflage behavior.

  10. Land crabs as key drivers in tropical coastal forest recruitment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindquist, E.S.; Krauss, K.W.; Green, P.T.; O'Dowd, D. J.; Sherman, P.M.; Smith, T. J.

    2009-01-01

    Plant populations are regulated by a diverse assortment of abiotic and biotic factors that influence seed dispersal and viability, and seedling establishment and growth at the microsite. Rarely does one animal guild exert as significant an influence on different plant assemblages as land crabs. We review three tropical coastal ecosystems-mangroves, island maritime forests, and mainland coastal terrestrial forests-where land crabs directly influence forest composition by limiting tree establishment and recruitment. Land crabs differentially prey on seeds, propagules and seedlings along nutrient, chemical and physical environmental gradients. In all of these ecosystems, but especially mangroves, abiotic gradients are well studied, strong and influence plant species distributions. However, we suggest that crab predation has primacy over many of these environmental factors by acting as the first limiting factor of tropical tree recruitment to drive the potential structural and compositional organisation of coastal forests. We show that the influence of crabs varies relative to tidal gradient, shoreline distance, canopy position, time, season, tree species and fruiting periodicity. Crabs also facilitate forest growth and development through such activities as excavation of burrows, creation of soil mounds, aeration of soils, removal of leaf litter into burrows and creation of carbon-rich soil microhabitats. For all three systems, land crabs influence the distribution, density and size-class structure of tree populations. Indeed, crabs are among the major drivers of tree recruitment in tropical coastal forest ecosystems, and their conservation should be included in management plans of these forests. ?? 2009 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  11. Mitigating by-catch of diamondback terrapins in crab pots

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hart, Kristen M.; Crowder, Larry B.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic by-catch of diamondback terrapins (Malaclemys terrapin) in blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) pots is a concern for terrapin conservation along the United States Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coasts. Despite the availability of by-catch reduction devices (BRDs) for crab pots, adoption of BRDs has not been mandated and by-catch of terrapins continues. We conducted experimental fishing studies in North Carolina's year-round blue crab fishery from 2000 to 2004 to evaluate the ability of various BRDs to reduce terrapin by-catch without a concomitant reduction in the catch of blue crabs. In 4,822 crab pot days fished, we recorded only 21 terrapin captures. Estimated capture rates were 0.003 terrapins/pot per day in hard crab experimental fishing and 0.008 terrapins/pot per day in peeler experimental fishing. All terrapin captures occurred from April to mid-May within 321.4 m of the shoreline. Longer soak times produced more dead terrapins, with 4 live and 4 dead during hard crab experimental fishing and 11 live and 2 dead during peeler experimental fishing. The 4.0-cm BRDs in fall and 4.5-cm and 5.0-cm BRDs in spring reduced the catch of legal-sized male hard crabs by 26.6%, 21.2%, and 5.7%, respectively. Only the 5.0-cm BRDs did not significantly affect the catch of legal-sized hard male crabs. However, BRDs had no measurable effect on catch of target crabs in the peeler crab fishery. Our results identify 3 complementary and economically feasible tools for blue crab fishery managers to exclude terrapins from commercially fished crab pots in North Carolina: 1) gear modifications (e.g., BRDs); 2) distance-to-shore restrictions; and 3) time-of-year regulations. These measures combined could provide a reduction in terrapin by-catch of up to 95% without a significant reduction in target crab catch.

  12. MICROBIAL FERMENTATION OF ABUNDANT BIOPOLYMERS: CELLULOSE AND CHITIN

    SciTech Connect

    Leschine, Susan

    Our research has dealt with seven major areas of investigation: i) characterization of cellulolytic members of microbial consortia, with special attention recently given to Clostridium phytofermentans, a bacterium that decomposes cellulose and produces uncommonly large amounts of ethanol, ii) investigations of the chitinase system of Cellulomonas uda; including the purification and characterization of ChiA, the major component of this enzyme system, iii) molecular cloning, sequence and structural analysis of the gene that encodes ChiA in C. uda, iv) biofilm formation by C. uda on nutritive surfaces, v) investigations of the effects of humic substances on cellulose degradation by anaerobic cellulolyticmore » microbes, vi) studies of nitrogen metabolism in cellulolytic anaerobes, and vii) understanding the molecular architecture of the multicomplex cellulase-xylanase system of Clostridium papyrosolvens. Also, progress toward completing the research of more recent projects is briefly summarized. Major accomplishments include: 1. Characterization of Clostridium phytofermentans, a cellulose-fermenting, ethanol-producing bacterium from forest soil. The characterization of a new cellulolytic species isolated from a cellulose-decomposing microbial consortium from forest soil was completed. This bacterium is remarkable for the high concentrations of ethanol produced during cellulose fermentation, typically more than twice the concentration produced by other species of cellulolytic clostridia. 2. Examination of the use of chitin as a source of carbon and nitrogen by cellulolytic microbes. We discovered that many cellulolytic anaerobes and facultative aerobes are able to use chitin as a source of both carbon and nitrogen. This major discovery expands our understanding of the biology of cellulose-fermenting bacteria and may lead to new applications for these microbes. 3. Comparative studies of the cellulase and chitinase systems of Cellulomonas uda. Results of these studies

  13. A Chitin Synthase and Its Regulator Protein Are Critical for Chitosan Production and Growth of the Fungal Pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans†

    PubMed Central

    Banks, Isaac R.; Specht, Charles A.; Donlin, Maureen J.; Gerik, Kimberly J.; Levitz, Stuart M.; Lodge, Jennifer K.

    2005-01-01

    Chitin is an essential component of the cell wall of many fungi. Chitin also can be enzymatically deacetylated to chitosan, a more flexible and soluble polymer. Cryptococcus neoformans is a fungal pathogen that causes cryptococcal meningoencephalitis, particularly in immunocompromised patients. In this work, we show that both chitin and chitosan are present in the cell wall of vegetatively growing C. neoformans yeast cells and that the levels of both rise dramatically as cells grow to higher density in liquid culture. C. neoformans has eight putative chitin synthases, and strains with any one chitin synthase deleted are viable at 30°C. In addition, C. neoformans genes encode three putative regulator proteins, which are homologs of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Skt5p. None of these three is essential for viability. However, one of the chitin synthases (Chs3) and one of the regulators (Csr2) are important for growth. Cells with deletions in either CHS3 or CSR2 have several shared phenotypes, including sensitivity to growth at 37°C. The similarity of their phenotypes also suggests that Csr2 specifically regulates chitin synthesis by Chs3. Lastly, both chs3Δ and the csr2Δ mutants are defective in chitosan production, predicting that Chs3-Csr2 complex with chitin deacetylases for conversion of chitin to chitosan. These data suggest that chitin synthesis could be an excellent antifungal target. PMID:16278457

  14. A chitin synthase and its regulator protein are critical for chitosan production and growth of the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Banks, Isaac R; Specht, Charles A; Donlin, Maureen J; Gerik, Kimberly J; Levitz, Stuart M; Lodge, Jennifer K

    2005-11-01

    Chitin is an essential component of the cell wall of many fungi. Chitin also can be enzymatically deacetylated to chitosan, a more flexible and soluble polymer. Cryptococcus neoformans is a fungal pathogen that causes cryptococcal meningoencephalitis, particularly in immunocompromised patients. In this work, we show that both chitin and chitosan are present in the cell wall of vegetatively growing C. neoformans yeast cells and that the levels of both rise dramatically as cells grow to higher density in liquid culture. C. neoformans has eight putative chitin synthases, and strains with any one chitin synthase deleted are viable at 30 degrees C. In addition, C. neoformans genes encode three putative regulator proteins, which are homologs of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Skt5p. None of these three is essential for viability. However, one of the chitin synthases (Chs3) and one of the regulators (Csr2) are important for growth. Cells with deletions in either CHS3 or CSR2 have several shared phenotypes, including sensitivity to growth at 37 degrees C. The similarity of their phenotypes also suggests that Csr2 specifically regulates chitin synthesis by Chs3. Lastly, both chs3Delta and the csr2Delta mutants are defective in chitosan production, predicting that Chs3-Csr2 complex with chitin deacetylases for conversion of chitin to chitosan. These data suggest that chitin synthesis could be an excellent antifungal target.

  15. Extraction and physicochemical characterization of chitin and chitosan from Zophobas morio larvae in varying sodium hydroxide concentration.

    PubMed

    Soon, Chu Yong; Tee, Yee Bond; Tan, Choon Hui; Rosnita, Abdul Talib; Khalina, Abdan

    2018-03-01

    Large amount of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) is consumed to remove the protein content in chitin biomass during deproteinization. However, excessive NaOH concentration used might lead to the reduction of cost effectiveness during chitin extraction. Hence, the present study aimed to extract and evaluate the physicochemical properties of chitin and chitosan isolated from superworm (Zophobas morio) larvae using 0.5M-2.0M of NaOH. The extracted chitin and chitosan were subjected to Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR), elemental analysis, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). The 0.5M NaOH treatment resulted in the highest yield of chitin (5.43%), but produced the lowest yield (65.84%) of chitosan. The extracted chitin samples had relatively high degree of acetylation (DA) (82.39%-101.39%). Both chitin and chitosan showed smooth surface with tiny pores. The extracted chitin samples were confirmed as α-chitin based on the FT-IR and TGA. The chitin samples were amorphous with low degree of crystallinity. From TGA, the Chitosan 3 extracted was partially deacetylated. Both DPPH radical scavenging and ferric-chelating assay showed positive correlation with DD of chitosan isolates. However, the chitosan isolates were not fully dissolved, resulting in lower radical scavenging and ferric-chelating ability compared to commercial chitosan. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Chitin elicits CCL2 from airway epithelial cells and induces CCR2-dependent innate allergic inflammation in the lung

    PubMed Central

    Roy, René M.; Wüthrich, Marcel; Klein, Bruce S.

    2012-01-01

    Chitin exposure in the lung induces eosinophilia and alternative activation of macrophages, and is correlated with allergic airway disease. However, the mechanism underlying chitin-induced polarization of macrophages is poorly understood. Here, we show that chitin induces alternative activation of macrophages in vivo, but does not do so directly in vitro. We further show that airway epithelial cells bind chitin in vitro and produce CCL2 in response to chitin both in vitro and in vivo. Supernatants of chitin exposed epithelial cells promoted alternative activation of macrophages in vitro, whereas antibody neutralization of CCL2 in the supernate abolished the alternative activation of macrophages. CCL2 acted redundantly in vivo, but mice lacking the CCL2 receptor, CCR2, showed impaired alternative activation of macrophages in response to chitin, as measured by arginase I, CCL17 and CCL22 expression. Furthermore, CCR2KO mice exposed to chitin had diminished ROS products in the lung, blunted eosinophil and monocyte recruitment, and impaired eosinophil functions as measured by expression of CCL5, IL13 and CCL11. Thus, airway epithelial cells secrete CCL2 in response to chitin and CCR2 signaling mediates chitin-induced alternative activation of macrophages and allergic inflammation in vivo. PMID:22851704

  17. Chitin extraction and chitosan production from cell wall of two mushroom species (Lactarius vellereus and Phyllophora ribis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdogan, S.; Kaya, M.; Akata, I.

    2017-02-01

    Chitin is an important polysaccharide found as supporting material in the cell wall of mushrooms. In this study, chitin and chitosan were obtained from the cell wall of two different mushroom species using chemical method and physicochemically characterized. The dry weight chitin contents of the mushroom species were determined as 11.4% for Lactarius vellereus and 7.9% for Phyllophora ribis. Chitosan yields of the chitins isolated from L. vellereus and P. ribis were 73.1% and 75.3%, respectively. While, the maximum degradation temperatures of L. vellereus and P. ribis chitins were found to be 354°C and 275°C by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), the maximum degradation temperature of the chitosans obtained from these chitins were recorded as 262°C and 229°C, respectively. The crystalline index values of L. vellereus and P. ribis chitins were calculated as 64% and 49%, respectively according to the X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) results. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicated that there were no nanofiber or nanopores on the surface of the chitins and chitosans obtained from these two mushroom species. The results of this study revealed that L. vellereus and P. ribis had higher chitin contents than some other insects and mushroom species recorded in the literature and these species may be used as a potential chitin sources.

  18. Three-dimensional chitin rings from body segments of a pet diplopod species: Characterization and protein interaction studies.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Murat; Mulerčikas, Povilas; Sargin, Idris; Kazlauskaitė, Sonata; Baublys, Vykintas; Akyuz, Bahar; Bulut, Esra; Tubelytė, Vaida

    2016-11-01

    Physicochemical characterization of new chitin isolates can provide valuable insights into designing of biomimetic materials. Chitin isolates with a definite three-dimensional (3D) structure can exhibit characteristics that distinguish them from other chitin specimens that are in form of powder or flakes without a definite and uniform shape. Herein, 3D chitin rings were produced from body segments of a diplopod (Archispirostreptus gigas) inhabiting tropical regions. This organism is cultured easily and can reach 38cm in length, which makes it a suitable source for isolation of chitin. The chitin rings were characterized via TGA, FT-IR, SEM and XRD analyses. Enzymatic digestion test with chitinase demonstrated that chitin isolates had high purity (digestion rate: 97.4%). The source organism had high chitin content; 21.02±2.23% on dry weight. Interactions of the chitin rings with bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein were studied under different conditions (pH: 4.0-8.0, chitin amount: 6-14mg, contact time: 30-360min, protein concentration: 0.2-1mg/mL). The highest BSA adsorption was observed at pH5.0 at 20°C. The adsorption equilibrium data exhibited a better fit to Langmuir adsorption and the pseudo-first order kinetic models. The findings presented here can be useful for further studies aiming to develop biocompatible and nontoxic biomaterials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Studies on the chitin/chitosan binding properties of six cuticular proteins analogous to peritrophin 3 from Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Qu, M; Ren, Y; Liu, Y; Yang, Q

    2017-08-01

    Chitin deacetylation is required to make the cuticle rigid and compact through chitin chain crosslinking. Thus it is presumed that specialized proteins are required to bind deacetylated chitin chains together. However, deacetylated-chitin binding proteins have not ever been reported. In a previous work, six cuticular proteins analogous to peritrophin 3 (CPAP3s) were found to be abundant in the moulting fluid of Bombyx mori. In this study, these BmCPAP3s (BmCPAP3-A1, BmCPAP3-A2, BmCPAP3-B, BmCPAP3-C, BmCPAP3-D1 and BmCPAP3-D2) were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli and purified using metal-chelating affinity chromatography. Their binding activities demonstrated that although all of the BmCPAP3s showed similar binding abilities toward crystalline chitin and colloidal chitin, they differed in their affinities toward partially and fully deacetylated chitin. Amongst them, BmCPAP3-D1 exhibited the highest binding activity toward deacetylated chitin. The gene expression pattern of BmCPAP3-D1 was similar to BmCPAP3-A1 and BmCPAP3-C at most stages except that it was dramatically upregulated at the beginning of the pupa to adult transition stage. This work is the first report of a chitin-binding protein, BmCPAP3-D1, which exhibits high binding affinity to deacetylated chitin. © 2017 The Royal Entomological Society.

  20. 50 CFR Table 2b to Part 679 - Species Codes: FMP Prohibited Species and CR Crab

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... CR Crab 2b Table 2b to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL... CR Crab Species Description Code CR Crab Groundfish PSC CRAB Box Lopholithodes mandtii 900... aequispinus 923 ✓ ✓ King, red Paralithodes camtshaticus 921 ✓ ✓ King, scarlet (deepsea) Lithodes couesi 924...

  1. 50 CFR 648.262 - Effort-control program for red crab limited access vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Effort-control program for red crab... UNITED STATES Management Measures for the Atlantic Deep-Sea Red Crab Fishery § 648.262 Effort-control program for red crab limited access vessels. (a) General. A vessel issued a limited access red crab permit...

  2. Isolation and identification of chitin in the black coral Parantipathes larix (Anthozoa: Cnidaria).

    PubMed

    Bo, Marzia; Bavestrello, Giorgio; Kurek, Denis; Paasch, Silvia; Brunner, Eike; Born, René; Galli, Roberta; Stelling, Allison L; Sivkov, Viktor N; Petrova, Olga V; Vyalikh, Denis; Kummer, Kurt; Molodtsov, Serguei L; Nowak, Dorota; Nowak, Jakub; Ehrlich, Hermann

    2012-01-01

    Until now, there is a lack of knowledge about the presence of chitin in numerous representatives of corals (Cnidaria). However, investigations concerning the chitin-based skeletal organization in different coral taxa are significant from biochemical, structural, developmental, ecological and evolutionary points of view. In this paper, we present a thorough screening for the presence of chitin within the skeletal formations of a poorly investigated Mediterranean black coral, Parantipathes larix (Esper, 1792), as a typical representative of the Schizopathidae family. Using a wide array variety of techniques ((13)C solid state NMR, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), Raman, NEXAFS, Morgan-Elson assay and Calcofluor White Staining), we unambiguously show for the first time that chitin is an important component within the skeletal stalks as well as pinnules of this coral. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Chitin biological absorbable catheters bridging sural nerve grafts transplanted into sciatic nerve defects promote nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Yong; Wang, Jian-Wei; Qin, Li-Hua; Zhang, Wei-Guang; Zhang, Pei-Xun; Jiang, Bao-Guo

    2018-06-01

    To investigate the efficacy of chitin biological absorbable catheters in a rat model of autologous nerve transplantation. A segment of sciatic nerve was removed to produce a sciatic nerve defect, and the sural nerve was cut from the ipsilateral leg and used as a graft to bridge the defect, with or without use of a chitin biological absorbable catheter surrounding the graft. The number and morphology of regenerating myelinated fibers, nerve conduction velocity, nerve function index, triceps surae muscle morphology, and sensory function were evaluated at 9 and 12 months after surgery. All of the above parameters were improved in rats in which the nerve graft was bridged with chitin biological absorbable catheters compared with rats without catheters. The results of this study indicate that use of chitin biological absorbable catheters to surround sural nerve grafts bridging sciatic nerve defects promotes recovery of structural, motor, and sensory function and improves muscle fiber morphology. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. CHITIN TRANSFORMATION AND PESTICIDE INTERACTIONS IN A SIMULATED AQUATIC MICROENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interactions between the structural animo-polysaccharide, chitin, and the organophosphate pesticide, azinphosmethyl (Guthion), have been studied in a controlled continuous flow-through microcosm. Pesticide-induced microbial population changes and increases in substrate utilizatio...

  5. Infiltration of chitin by protein coacervates defines the squid beak mechanical gradient.

    PubMed

    Tan, YerPeng; Hoon, Shawn; Guerette, Paul A; Wei, Wei; Ghadban, Ali; Hao, Cai; Miserez, Ali; Waite, J Herbert

    2015-07-01

    The beak of the jumbo squid Dosidicus gigas is a fascinating example of how seamlessly nature builds with mechanically mismatched materials. A 200-fold stiffness gradient begins in the hydrated chitin of the soft beak base and gradually increases to maximum stiffness in the dehydrated distal rostrum. Here, we combined RNA-Seq and proteomics to show that the beak contains two protein families. One family consists of chitin-binding proteins (DgCBPs) that physically join chitin chains, whereas the other family comprises highly modular histidine-rich proteins (DgHBPs). We propose that DgHBPs play multiple key roles during beak bioprocessing, first by forming concentrated coacervate solutions that diffuse into the DgCBP-chitin scaffold, and second by inducing crosslinking via an abundant GHG sequence motif. These processes generate spatially controlled desolvation, resulting in the impressive biomechanical gradient. Our findings provide novel molecular-scale strategies for designing functional gradient materials.

  6. Application of Spectroscopic Methods for Structural Analysis of Chitin and Chitosan

    PubMed Central

    Kumirska, Jolanta; Czerwicka, Małgorzata; Kaczyński, Zbigniew; Bychowska, Anna; Brzozowski, Krzysztof; Thöming, Jorg; Stepnowski, Piotr

    2010-01-01

    Chitin, the second most important natural polymer in the world, and its N-deacetylated derivative chitosan, have been identified as versatile biopolymers for a broad range of applications in medicine, agriculture and the food industry. Two of the main reasons for this are firstly the unique chemical, physicochemical and biological properties of chitin and chitosan, and secondly the unlimited supply of raw materials for their production. These polymers exhibit widely differing physicochemical properties depending on the chitin source and the conditions of chitosan production. The presence of reactive functional groups as well as the polysaccharide nature of these biopolymers enables them to undergo diverse chemical modifications. A complete chemical and physicochemical characterization of chitin, chitosan and their derivatives is not possible without using spectroscopic techniques. This review focuses on the application of spectroscopic methods for the structural analysis of these compounds. PMID:20559489

  7. Morphological and thermal studies of chitin-curcumin blends derived polyurethanes.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Kashif; Zia, Khalid Mahmood; Zuber, Mohammad; Tabasum, Shazia; Rehman, Saima; Zia, Fatima; Noreen, Aqdas

    2017-12-01

    The present study describes a novel ecofriendly series of chitin/curcumin/1,4-butane diol (BDO) blend derived polyurethanes (PUs), using hydroxy terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) and hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) along with different mole ratio of chitin, curcumin and BDO. The structural and morphological elucidation of the prepared films was done by FTIR and SEM techniques. The swelling behavior of the films was analyzed in both water and DMSO, which showed that incorporation of chitin increases the hydrophobicity and decreases the rate of swelling. Thermal analysis of synthesized PU blends revealed better thermal stability with following mole ratio 1:0.5:0.5 of chitin: curcumin: BDO as determined by TGA and DSC techniques. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Chitin-Induced Airway Epithelial Cell Innate Immune Responses Are Inhibited by Carvacrol/Thymol

    PubMed Central

    Erle, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Chitin is produced in large amounts by fungi, insects, and other organisms and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma. Airway epithelial cells are in direct contact with environmental particles and serve as the first line of defense against inhaled allergens and pathogens. The potential contributions of airway epithelial cells to chitin-induced asthma remain poorly understood. We hypothesized that chitin directly stimulates airway epithelial cells to release cytokines that promote type 2 immune responses and to induce expression of molecules which are important in innate immune responses. We found that chitin exposure rapidly induced the expression of three key type 2-promoting cytokines, IL-25, IL-33 and TSLP, in BEAS-2B transformed human bronchial epithelial cells and in A549 and H292 lung carcinoma cells. Chitin also induced the expression of the key pattern recognition receptors TLR2 and TLR4. Chitin induced the expression of miR-155, miR-146a and miR-21, each of which is known to up-regulate the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Also the expression of SOCS1 and SHIP1 which are known targets of miR-155 was repressed by chitin treatment. The monoterpene phenol carvacrol (Car) and its isomer thymol (Thy) are found in herbal essential oils and have been shown to inhibit allergic inflammation in asthma models. We found that Car/Thy inhibited the effects of chitin on type 2-promoting cytokine release and on the expression of TLRs, SOCS1, SHIP1, and miRNAs. Car/Thy could also efficiently reduce the protein levels of TLR4, inhibit the increase in TLR2 protein levels in chitin plus Car/Thy-treated cells and increase the protein levels of SHIP1 and SOCS1, which are negative regulators of TLR-mediated inflammatory responses. We conclude that direct effects of chitin on airway epithelial cells are likely to contribute to allergic airway diseases like asthma, and that Car/Thy directly inhibits epithelial cell pro-inflammatory responses to chitin. PMID

  9. Boldness in a deep sea hermit crab to simulated tactile predator attacks is unaffected by ocean acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae Won; Barry, James P.

    2016-09-01

    Despite rapidly growing interest in the effects of ocean acidification on marine animals, the ability of deep-sea animals to acclimate or adapt to reduced pH conditions has received little attention. Deep-sea species are generally thought to be less tolerant of environmental variation than shallow-living species because they inhabit relatively stable conditions for nearly all environmental parameters. To explore whether deep-sea hermit crabs ( Pagurus tanneri) can acclimate to ocean acidification over several weeks, we compared behavioral "boldness," measured as time taken to re-emerge from shells after a simulated predatory attack by a toy octopus, under ambient (pH ˜7.6) and expected future (pH ˜7.1) conditions. The boldness measure for crab behavioral responses did not differ between different pH treatments, suggesting that future deep-sea acidification would not influence anti-predatory behavior. However, we did not examine the effects of olfactory cues released by predators that may affect hermit crab behavior and could be influenced by changes in the ocean carbonate system driven by increasing CO2 levels.

  10. Potentiality of uranium biosorption from nitric acid solutions using shrimp shells.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, S H; El Sheikh, E M; Morsy, A M A

    2014-08-01

    Biosorption has gained important credibility during recent years because of its good performance and low cost. This work is concerned with studying the potentiality of the chitin component of the shrimp shells for uranium biosorption from nitric acid liquid solutions. The structural characteristics of the working chitin have been determined via Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). The surface morphology was examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The adsorption capacity of biomass was investigated experimentally. The influence of contact time, pH, metal ion concentration, solution volume to mass ratio and temperature were evaluated and the results were fitted using adsorption isotherm models. The kinetic of uranium biosorption was also investigated as well as biosorption thermodynamic. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Hydrogen and oxygen in brine shrimp chitin reflect environmental water and dietary isotopic composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielson, Kristine E.; Bowen, Gabriel J.

    2010-03-01

    Hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios of the common structural biopolymer chitin are a potential recorder of ecological and environmental information, but our understanding of the mechanisms of incorporation of H and O from environmental substrates into chitin is limited. We report the results of a set of experiments in which the isotopic compositions of environmental water and diet were varied independently in order to assess the contribution of these variables to the H and O isotopic composition of Artemia franciscana chitin. Hydrogen isotope ratios of chitin were strongly linearly correlated with both food and water, with approximately 26% of the hydrogen signal reflecting food and approximately 38% reflecting water. Oxygen isotopes were also strongly correlated with the isotopic composition of water and food, but whereas 69% of oxygen in chitin exchanged with environmental water, only 10% was derived from food. We propose that these observations reflect the position-specific, partial exchange of H and O atoms with brine shrimp body water during the processes of digestion and chitin biosynthesis. Comparison of culture experiments with a set of natural samples collected from the Great Salt Lake, UT in 2006 shows that, with some exceptions, oxygen isotope compositions of chitin track those of water, whereas hydrogen isotopes vary inversely with those of lake water. The different behavior of the two isotopic systems can be explained in terms of a dietary shift from allochthonous particulate matter with relatively higher δ 2H values in the early spring to autochthonous particulate matter with significantly lower δ 2H values in the late summer to autumn. These results suggest oxygen in chitin may be a valuable proxy for the oxygen isotopic composition of environmental water, whereas hydrogen isotope values from the same molecule may reveal ecological and biogeochemical changes within lakes.

  12. Preparation, assessment, and comparison of α-chitin nano-fiber films with different surface charges.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Jiang, Jie; Liu, Liang; Zheng, Ke; Yu, Shiyuan; Fan, Yimin

    2015-01-01

    Chitin nano-fibers with positive and negative charges have been, respectively, produced from partially deacetylated and 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical (TEMPO)-mediated oxidized α-chitin. The average diameters and lengths of the TEMPO-oxidized chitin nano-fibers (TOChN) were 14 ± 4.3 and 190 ± 140 nm, respectively, and the average diameters and lengths of the partially deacetylated chitin nano-fibers (DEChN) were 6 ± 1.7 and 320 ± 105 nm, respectively. A partially deacetylated chitin nano-fiber film (DEChN-F), a TEMPO-mediated and oxidized chitin nano-fiber film (TOChN-F), and a composite film (DE-TO-ChN-F) consisting of a combination of the two were prepared by drying the dispersions at 40 °C. The DEChN-F, TOChN-F, and DE-TO-ChN-F all have similar tensile strengths of approximately 90 MPa; however, the chitosan film (Chitosan-F) had a tensile strength of approximately 30 MPa. In addition, TOChN-F and DE-TO-ChN-F have a thermal weight loss at 210 °C, and DEChN-F has a thermal weight loss at 280 °C. DEChN-F was found to have antimicrobial activity with regards to Escherichia coli. Finally, the chitin nano-fiber films could be slightly degraded by cellulase, which provided a novel biological performance of the chitin nano-material.

  13. Preparation, assessment, and comparison of α-chitin nano-fiber films with different surface charges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Jiang, Jie; Liu, Liang; Zheng, Ke; Yu, Shiyuan; Fan, Yimin

    2015-05-01

    Chitin nano-fibers with positive and negative charges have been, respectively, produced from partially deacetylated and 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical (TEMPO)-mediated oxidized α-chitin. The average diameters and lengths of the TEMPO-oxidized chitin nano-fibers (TOChN) were 14 ± 4.3 and 190 ± 140 nm, respectively, and the average diameters and lengths of the partially deacetylated chitin nano-fibers (DEChN) were 6 ± 1.7 and 320 ± 105 nm, respectively. A partially deacetylated chitin nano-fiber film (DEChN-F), a TEMPO-mediated and oxidized chitin nano-fiber film (TOChN-F), and a composite film (DE-TO-ChN-F) consisting of a combination of the two were prepared by drying the dispersions at 40 °C. The DEChN-F, TOChN-F, and DE-TO-ChN-F all have similar tensile strengths of approximately 90 MPa; however, the chitosan film (Chitosan-F) had a tensile strength of approximately 30 MPa. In addition, TOChN-F and DE-TO-ChN-F have a thermal weight loss at 210 °C, and DEChN-F has a thermal weight loss at 280 °C. DEChN-F was found to have antimicrobial activity with regards to Escherichia coli. Finally, the chitin nano-fiber films could be slightly degraded by cellulase, which provided a novel biological performance of the chitin nano-material.

  14. Chitin, Chitosan, and Glycated Chitosan Regulate Immune Responses: The Novel Adjuvants for Cancer Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaosong; Min, Min; Du, Nan; Gu, Ying; Hode, Tomas; Naylor, Mark; Chen, Dianjun; Nordquist, Robert E.; Chen, Wei R.

    2013-01-01

    With the development of cancer immunotherapy, cancer vaccine has become a novel modality for cancer treatment, and the important role of adjuvant has been realized recently. Chitin, chitosan, and their derivatives have shown their advantages as adjuvants for cancer vaccine. In this paper, the adjuvant properties of chitin and chitosan were discussed, and some detailed information about glycated chitosan and chitosan nanoparticles was also presented to illustrate the trend for future development. PMID:23533454

  15. Nature-Inspired One-Step Green Procedure for Enhancing the Antibacterial and Antioxidant Behavior of a Chitin Film: Controlled Interfacial Assembly of Tannic Acid onto a Chitin Film.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuntao; Li, Jing; Li, Bin

    2016-07-20

    The final goal of this study was to develop antimicrobial food-contact materials based on a natural phenolic compound (tannic acid) and chitin, which is the second most abundant polysaccharide on earth, using an interfacial assembly approach. Chitin film has poor antibacterial and antioxidant ability, which limits its application in industrial fields such as active packaging. Therefore, in this study, a novel one-step green procedure was applied to introduce antibacterial and antioxidant properties into a chitin film simultaneously by incorporation of tannic acid into the chitin film through interfacial assembly. The antibacterial and antioxidant behavior of chitin film has been greatly enhanced. Hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interaction were found to be the main driving forces for interfacial assembly. Therefore, controlled interfacial assembly of tannic acid onto a chitin film demonstrated a good way to develop functional materials that can be potentially applied in industry.

  16. The New Antimicrobial Peptide SpHyastatin from the Mud Crab Scylla paramamosain with Multiple Antimicrobial Mechanisms and High Effect on Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Zhongguo; Zhu, Kexin; Peng, Hui; Chen, Bei; Liu, Jie; Chen, Fangyi; Ma, Xiaowan; Wang, Shuping; Qiao, Kun; Wang, Kejian

    2016-01-01

    SpHyastatin was first identified as a new cationic antimicrobial peptide in hemocytes of the mud crab Scylla paramamosain. Based on the amino acid sequences deduced, it was predicted that this peptide was composed of two different functional domains, a proline-rich domain (PRD) and a cysteine-rich domain (CRD). The recombinant product of SpHyastatin displayed potent antimicrobial activities against the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus and the aquatic animal pathogens Aeromonas hydrophila and Pseudomonas fluorescens. Compared with the CRD of SpHyastatin, the PRD presented better antimicrobial and chitin binding activities, but both regions were essential for allowing SpHyastatin complete antimicrobial activity. The binding properties of SpHyastatin to different microbial surface molecules suggested that this might be an initial and crucial step for performing its antimicrobial activities. Evaluated using propidium iodide uptake assays and scanning electron microscopy images, the antimicrobial mechanism of SpHyastatin was found to be prone to disrupt cell membrane integrity. Interestingly, SpHyastatin exerted its role specifically on the surface of S. aureus and Pichia pastoris whereas it directly killed P. fluorescens through simultaneous targeting the membrane and the cytoplasm, indicating that SpHyastatin could use different antimicrobial mechanisms to kill different species of microbes. As expected, the recombinant SpHyastatin increased the survival rate of crabs challenged with Vibrio parahaemolyticus. In addition, SpHyastatin could modulate some V. parahaemolyticus-responsive genes in S. paramamosain. PMID:27493644

  17. Durophagous Predation by King Crabs on the Continental Slope off Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, K.; Aronson, R. B.; Steffel, B. V.; McClintock, J. B.; Amsler, M.; Thatje, S.

    2016-02-01

    For perhaps tens of millions of years, marine communities in Antarctica have been essentially devoid of durophagous (shell-crushing) predators, which have been excluded by low temperatures. In their absence, the resident species have evolved in isolation and are slow-moving with limited defenses. Rapidly rising sea temperatures around Antarctica are now relaxing the cold-thermal barrier and appear to be allowing deep-water king crabs (Lithodidae) to move up the continental slope, into shallower water. Their potential to emerge on the continental shelf could drastically restructure the endemic communities that live there; in other areas of the world, lithodids are typically generalist predators of invertebrates. Their diet in Antarctic waters remains unknown and it has been speculated that they are opportunistic scavengers. We report the findings of a trapping study conducted in deep water off the western Antarctic Peninsula in 2015. Stomach contents were analyzed for 18 adult Paralomis birsteini trapped on the continental slope. P. birsteini feed primarily on invertebrates such as echinoderms, gastropods and polychaetes. By understanding the prey species targeted by slope-dwelling lithodids, we can begin to project the future impact of an expansion of king crabs onto the Antarctic continental shelf.

  18. Switching skeletons: hydrostatic support in molting crabs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Jennifer R A.; Kier, William M.; Walker, I. D. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Skeletal support systems are essential for support, movement, muscular antagonism, and locomotion. Crustaceans shed their rigid exoskeleton at each molt yet are still capable of forceful movement. We hypothesize that the soft water-inflated body of newly molted crabs may rely on a hydrostatic skeleton, similar to that of worms and polyps. We measured internal hydrostatic pressure and the force exerted during claw adduction and observed a strong correlation between force and hydrostatic pressure, consistent with hydrostatic skeletal support. This alternation between the two basic skeletal types may be widespread among arthropods.

  19. ELEMENT MASSES IN THE CRAB NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Sibley, Adam R.; Katz, Andrea M.; Satterfield, Timothy J.

    Using our previously published element abundance or mass-fraction distributions in the Crab Nebula, we derived actual mass distributions and estimates for overall nebular masses of hydrogen, helium, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and sulfur. As with the previous work, computations were carried out for photoionization models involving constant hydrogen density and also constant nuclear density. In addition, employing new flux measurements for [Ni ii]  λ 7378, along with combined photoionization models and analytic computations, a nickel abundance distribution was mapped and a nebular stable nickel mass estimate was derived.

  20. Habitat Suitability Index Models: Red king crab

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jewett, Stephen C.; Onuf, Christopher P.

    1988-01-01

    A review and synthesis of existing information were used to develop a Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) model for evaluating habitat of different life stages of red king crab (Paralithodes camtschatica). A model consolidates habitat use information into a framework appropriate for field application, and is scaled to produce an index between 0.0 (unsuitable habitat) and 1.0 (optimum habitat) in Alaskan coastal waters, especially in the Gulf of Alaska and the southeastern Bering Sea. HSI models are designed to be used with Habitat Evaluation Procedures previously developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

  1. Species Profiles. Life Histories and Environmental Requirements of Coastal Fishes and Invertebrates (Pacific Southwest). Brown Rock Crab, Red Rock Crab, and Yellow Crab

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    staged by examining the California (Talent 1982). pleopod tips (P. Reilly, pcrs. comm.). The specific hormonal mechanisms that control molting cycles...Coos Bay, Oregon, was correlated California, they sometimes occur near the cooling water with changes in salinity ; because red rock crabs are...discharges of coastal power plants. Adams (1970) osmoconformers, survival was low at salinities below observed both juvenile and adult brown rock crabs in the

  2. Pharyngeal Polysaccharide Deacetylases Affect Development in the Nematode C. elegans and Deacetylate Chitin In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Heustis, Ronald J.; Ng, Hong K.; Brand, Kenneth J.; Rogers, Meredith C.; Le, Linda T.; Specht, Charles A.; Fuhrman, Juliet A.

    2012-01-01

    Chitin (β-1,4-linked-N-acetylglucosamine) provides structural integrity to the nematode eggshell and pharyngeal lining. Chitin is synthesized in nematodes, but not in plants and vertebrates, which are often hosts to parasitic roundworms; hence, the chitin metabolism pathway is considered a potential target for selective interventions. Polysaccharide deacetylases (PDAs), including those that convert chitin to chitosan, have been previously demonstrated in protists, fungi and insects. We show that genes encoding PDAs are distributed throughout the phylum Nematoda, with the two paralogs F48E3.8 and C54G7.3 found in C. elegans. We confirm that the genes are somatically expressed and show that RNAi knockdown of these genes retards C. elegans development. Additionally, we show that proteins from the nematode deacetylate chitin in vitro, we quantify the substrate available in vivo as targets of these enzymes, and we show that Eosin Y (which specifically stains chitosan in fungal cells walls) stains the C. elegans pharynx. Our results suggest that one function of PDAs in nematodes may be deacetylation of the chitinous pharyngeal lining. PMID:22808160

  3. Pharyngeal polysaccharide deacetylases affect development in the nematode C. elegans and deacetylate chitin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Heustis, Ronald J; Ng, Hong K; Brand, Kenneth J; Rogers, Meredith C; Le, Linda T; Specht, Charles A; Fuhrman, Juliet A

    2012-01-01

    Chitin (β-1,4-linked-N-acetylglucosamine) provides structural integrity to the nematode eggshell and pharyngeal lining. Chitin is synthesized in nematodes, but not in plants and vertebrates, which are often hosts to parasitic roundworms; hence, the chitin metabolism pathway is considered a potential target for selective interventions. Polysaccharide deacetylases (PDAs), including those that convert chitin to chitosan, have been previously demonstrated in protists, fungi and insects. We show that genes encoding PDAs are distributed throughout the phylum Nematoda, with the two paralogs F48E3.8 and C54G7.3 found in C. elegans. We confirm that the genes are somatically expressed and show that RNAi knockdown of these genes retards C. elegans development. Additionally, we show that proteins from the nematode deacetylate chitin in vitro, we quantify the substrate available in vivo as targets of these enzymes, and we show that Eosin Y (which specifically stains chitosan in fungal cells walls) stains the C. elegans pharynx. Our results suggest that one function of PDAs in nematodes may be deacetylation of the chitinous pharyngeal lining.

  4. chs-4, a class IV chitin synthase gene from Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Din, A B; Specht, C A; Robbins, P W; Yarden, O

    1996-02-05

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, most of the cellular chitin is produced by chitin synthase III, which requires the product encoded by the CSD2/CAL1/DIT101/KT12 gene. We have identified, isolated and structurally characterized as CSD2/CAL1/DIT101/KT12 homologue in the filamentous ascomycete Neurospora crassa and have used a "reverse genetics" approach to determine its role in vivo. The yeast gene was used as a heterologous probe for the isolation of a N. crassa gene(designated chs-4) encoding a polypeptide belonging to a class of chitin synthases which we have designated class IV. The predicted polypeptide encoded by this gene is highly similar to those of S. cerevisiae and Candida albicans. N. crassa strains in which chs-4 had been inactivated by the Repeat-Induced point mutation (RIP) process grew and developed in a normal manner under standard growth conditions. However, when grown in the presence of sorbose (a carbon source which induces morphological changes accompanied by elevated chitin content), chitin levels in the chs-4RIP strain were significantly lower than those observed in the wild type. We suggest that CHS4 may serve as an auxiliary enzyme in N. crassa and that, in contrast to yeasts, it is possible that filamentous fungi may have more than one class IV chitin synthase.

  5. Umchs5, a gene coding for a class IV chitin synthase in Ustilago maydis.

    PubMed

    Xoconostle-Cázares, B; Specht, C A; Robbins, P W; Liu, Y; León, C; Ruiz-Herrera, J

    1997-12-01

    A fragment corresponding to a conserved region of a fifth gene coding for chitin synthase in the plant pathogenic fungus Ustilago maydis was amplified by means of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The amplified fragment was utilized as a probe for the identification of the whole gene in a genomic library of the fungus. The predicted gene product of Umchs5 has highest similarity with class IV chitin synthases encoded by the CHS3 genes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans, chs-4 from Neurospora crassa, and chsE from Aspergillus nidulans. Umchs5 null mutants were constructed by substitution of most of the coding sequence with the hygromycin B resistance cassette. Mutants displayed significant reduction in growth rate, chitin content, and chitin synthase activity, specially in the mycelial form. Virulence to corn plantules was also reduced in the mutants. PCR was also used to obtain a fragment of a sixth chitin synthase, Umchs6. It is suggested that multigenic control of chitin synthesis in U. maydis operates as a protection mechanism for fungal viability in which the loss of one activity is partially compensated by the remaining enzymes. Copyright 1997 Academic Press.

  6. Chitin binding proteins act synergistically with chitinases in Serratia proteamaculans 568.

    PubMed

    Purushotham, Pallinti; Arun, P V Parvati Sai; Prakash, Jogadhenu S S; Podile, Appa Rao

    2012-01-01

    Genome sequence of Serratia proteamaculans 568 revealed the presence of three family 33 chitin binding proteins (CBPs). The three Sp CBPs (Sp CBP21, Sp CBP28 and Sp CBP50) were heterologously expressed and purified. Sp CBP21 and Sp CBP50 showed binding preference to β-chitin, while Sp CBP28 did not bind to chitin and cellulose substrates. Both Sp CBP21 and Sp CBP50 were synergistic with four chitinases from S. proteamaculans 568 (Sp ChiA, Sp ChiB, Sp ChiC and Sp ChiD) in degradation of α- and β-chitin, especially in the presence of external electron donor (reduced glutathione). Sp ChiD benefited most from Sp CBP21 or Sp CBP50 on α-chitin, while Sp ChiB and Sp ChiD had major advantage with these Sp CBPs on β-chitin. Dose responsive studies indicated that both the Sp CBPs exhibit synergism ≥ 0.2 µM. The addition of both Sp CBP21 and Sp CBP50 in different ratios to a synergistic mixture did not significantly increase the activity. Highly conserved polar residues, important in binding and activity of CBP21 from S. marcescens (Sm CBP21), were present in Sp CBP21 and Sp CBP50, while Sp CBP28 had only one such polar residue. The inability of Sp CBP28 to bind to the test substrates could be attributed to the absence of important polar residues.

  7. Chitin: a cell-surface component of Phytomonas françai.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, C V; Esteves, M J; Andrade, A F; Alviano, C S; de Souza, W; Angluster, J

    1993-01-01

    The occurrence of chitin as a structural component of the surface of the phytopathogenic protozoan Phytomonas françai was demonstrated by paper and gas-liquid chromatographic analysis of the products of enzymatic and chemical hydrolysis of alkali-resistant polysaccharides, lectin binding, glycosidase digestion, and infrared spectra. Chitin was characterized by its insolubility in hot alkali and chromatographic immobility as well as by the release of glucosamine on hydrolysis with strong acid and of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) on hydrolysis with chitinase. The presence of chitin was also shown directly by binding of wheat-germ agglutinin (WGA), which recognizes GlcNAc units, to the parasite surface. Fluorescein-labeled WGA binding was completely abolished by treatment with chitinase. This effect was specific since it could be prevented by incubating the enzyme with chitin before treatment of the phytomonads. These findings indicate that chitin is an exposed cell-surface polysaccharide in Phytomonas françai. The data were confirmed by the infrared spectrum of an alkali-insoluble residue, which showed a pattern typical of chitin.

  8. Structural effect of quaternary ammonium chitin derivatives on their bactericidal activity and specificity.

    PubMed

    Morkaew, Tirut; Pinyakong, Onruthai; Tachaboonyakiat, Wanpen

    2017-08-01

    The effect of the quaternary ammonium chitin structure on the bactericidal activity and specificity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus was investigated. Quaternary ammonium chitins were synthesized by the separate acylation of chitin (CT) with carboxymethyl trimethylammonium chloride (CMA), 3-carboxypropyl trimethylammonium chloride (CPA) and N-dodecyl-N,N-(dimethylammonio)butyrate (DDMAB). The successful acylation was confirmed by newly formed ester linkage. All three derivatives had a higher surface charge than chitin due to the additional positively charged quaternary ammonium groups. The N-short alkyl substituent (methyl) of CTCMA and CTCPA increased the hydrophilicity whilst the N-long alkyl substituent (dodecyl) of CTDDMAB increased the hydrophobicity compared to chitin. Chitin did not exhibit any bactericidal activity, while CTCMA and CTCPA completely killed E. coli and S. aureus in 30 and 60min, respectively, and CTDDMAB completely killed S. aureus in 10min but did not kill E. coli after a 2-h exposure. Therefore, the N-short alkyl substituent was more effective for killing E. coli and the N-long alkyl substituent conferred specific bactericidal activity against S. aureus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Value-added organonitrogen chemicals evolution from the pyrolysis of chitin and chitosan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Zhang, Huiyan; Xiao, Rui; Wu, Shubin

    2017-01-20

    Thermogravimetric characteristics of chitin and chitosan and their potentials to produce value-added organonitrogen chemicals were separately evaluated via TG/DSC-FTIR and Py-GC/MS. Results shown that chitin had the better thermal stability and higher activation energy than chitosan because of the abundant acetamido group. Furthermore, the dominated volatilization in active pyrolysis of chitin contributed to its endothermic property, whereas the charring in chitosan led to the exothermal. During fast pyrolysis, the acetamido group in chitin and chitosan was converted into acetic acid or acetamide. Typical products from chitosan pyrolysis were aza-heterocyclic chemicals, i.e. pyridines, pyrazines, and pyrroles, with the total selectivity of 50.50% at 600°C. Herein, selectivity of pyrazine compounds was up to 22.99%. These aza-heterocyclic chemicals came from the nucleophilic addition reaction of primary amine and carbonyl. However, main reaction during chitin pyrolysis was ring-opening degradation, which led to the formation of acetamido chemicals, especially acetamido acetaldehyde with the highest selectivity of 27.27% at 450°C. In summary, chitosan had the potential to produce aza-heterocyclic chemicals, and chitin to acetamido chemicals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A carnivorous sundew plant prefers protein over chitin as a source of nitrogen from its traps.

    PubMed

    Pavlovič, Andrej; Krausko, Miroslav; Adamec, Lubomír

    2016-07-01

    Carnivorous plants have evolved in nutrient-poor wetland habitats. They capture arthropod prey, which is an additional source of plant growth limiting nutrients. One of them is nitrogen, which occurs in the form of chitin and proteins in prey carcasses. In this study, the nutritional value of chitin and protein and their digestion traits in the carnivorous sundew Drosera capensis L. were estimated using stable nitrogen isotope abundance. Plants fed on chitin derived 49% of the leaf nitrogen from chitin, while those fed on the protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) derived 70% of its leaf nitrogen from this. Moreover, leaf nitrogen content doubled in protein-fed in comparison to chitin-fed plants indicating that the proteins were digested more effectively in comparison to chitin and resulted in significantly higher chlorophyll contents. The surplus chlorophyll and absorbed nitrogen from the protein digestion were incorporated into photosynthetic proteins - the light harvesting antennae of photosystem II. The incorporation of insect nitrogen into the plant photosynthetic apparatus may explain the increased rate of photosynthesis and plant growth after feeding. This general response in many genera of carnivorous plants has been reported in many previous studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Chitinase Chi1 from Myceliophthora thermophila C1, a Thermostable Enzyme for Chitin and Chitosan Depolymerization

    PubMed Central

    2018-01-01

    A thermostable Chitinase Chi1 from Myceliophthora thermophila C1 was homologously produced and characterized. Chitinase Chi1 shows high thermostability at 40 °C (>140 h 90% activity), 50 °C (>168 h 90% activity), and 55 °C (half-life 48 h). Chitinase Chi1 has broad substrate specificity and converts chitin, chitosan, modified chitosan, and chitin oligosaccharides. The activity of Chitinase Chi1 is strongly affected by the degree of deacetylation (DDA), molecular weight (Mw), and side chain modification of chitosan. Chitinase Chi1 releases mainly (GlcNAc)2 from insoluble chitin and chito-oligosaccharides with a polymerization degree (DP) ranging from 2 to 12 from chitosan, in a processive way. Chitinase Chi1 shows higher activity toward chitin oligosaccharides (GlcNAc)4–6 than toward (GlcNAc)3 and is inactive for (GlcNAc)2. During hydrolysis, oligosaccharides bind at subsites −2 to +2 in the enzyme’s active site. Chitinase Chi1 can be used for chitin valorisation and for production of chitin- and chito-oligosaccharides at industrial scale. PMID:29359934

  12. Chitinase Chi1 from Myceliophthora thermophila C1, a Thermostable Enzyme for Chitin and Chitosan Depolymerization.

    PubMed

    Krolicka, Malgorzata; Hinz, Sandra W A; Koetsier, Martijn J; Joosten, Rob; Eggink, Gerrit; van den Broek, Lambertus A M; Boeriu, Carmen G

    2018-02-21

    A thermostable Chitinase Chi1 from Myceliophthora thermophila C1 was homologously produced and characterized. Chitinase Chi1 shows high thermostability at 40 °C (>140 h 90% activity), 50 °C (>168 h 90% activity), and 55 °C (half-life 48 h). Chitinase Chi1 has broad substrate specificity and converts chitin, chitosan, modified chitosan, and chitin oligosaccharides. The activity of Chitinase Chi1 is strongly affected by the degree of deacetylation (DDA), molecular weight (Mw), and side chain modification of chitosan. Chitinase Chi1 releases mainly (GlcNAc) 2 from insoluble chitin and chito-oligosaccharides with a polymerization degree (DP) ranging from 2 to 12 from chitosan, in a processive way. Chitinase Chi1 shows higher activity toward chitin oligosaccharides (GlcNAc) 4-6 than toward (GlcNAc) 3 and is inactive for (GlcNAc) 2 . During hydrolysis, oligosaccharides bind at subsites -2 to +2 in the enzyme's active site. Chitinase Chi1 can be used for chitin valorisation and for production of chitin- and chito-oligosaccharides at industrial scale.

  13. Interaction of chitin/chitosan with salivary and other epithelial cells-An overview.

    PubMed

    Patil, Sharvari Vijaykumar; Nanduri, Lalitha S Y

    2017-11-01

    Chitin and its deacetylated form, chitosan, have been widely used for tissue engineering of both epithelial and mesenchymal tissues. Epithelial cells characterised by their sheet-like tight cellular arrangement and polarised nature, constitute a major component in various organs and play a variety of roles including protection, secretion and maintenance of tissue homeostasis. Regeneration of damaged epithelial tissues has been studied using biomaterials such as chitin, chitosan, hyaluronan, gelatin and alginate. Chitin and chitosan are known to promote proliferation of various embryonic and adult epithelial cells. However it is not clearly understood how this activity is achieved or what are the mechanisms involved in the chitin/chitosan driven proliferation of epithelial cells. Mechanistic understanding of influence of chitin/chitosan on epithelial cells will guide us to develop more targeted regenerative scaffold/hydrogel systems. Therefore, current review attempts to elicit a mechanistic insight into how chitin and chitosan interact with salivary, mammary, skin, nasal, lung, intestinal and bladder epithelial cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Squid-derived chitin oligosaccharides are a chemotactic signal during colonization by Vibrio fischeri.

    PubMed

    Mandel, Mark J; Schaefer, Amy L; Brennan, Caitlin A; Heath-Heckman, Elizabeth A C; Deloney-Marino, Cindy R; McFall-Ngai, Margaret J; Ruby, Edward G

    2012-07-01

    Chitin, a polymer of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), is noted as the second most abundant biopolymer in nature. Chitin serves many functions for marine bacteria in the family Vibrionaceae ("vibrios"), in some instances providing a physical attachment site, inducing natural genetic competence, and serving as an attractant for chemotaxis. The marine luminous bacterium Vibrio fischeri is the specific symbiont in the light-emitting organ of the Hawaiian bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes. The bacterium provides the squid with luminescence that the animal uses in an antipredatory defense, while the squid supports the symbiont's nutritional requirements. V. fischeri cells are harvested from seawater during each host generation, and V. fischeri is the only species that can complete this process in nature. Furthermore, chitin is located in squid hemocytes and plays a nutritional role in the symbiosis. We demonstrate here that chitin oligosaccharides produced by the squid host serve as a chemotactic signal for colonizing bacteria. V. fischeri uses the gradient of host chitin to enter the squid light organ duct and colonize the animal. We provide evidence that chitin serves a novel function in an animal-bacterial mutualism, as an animal-produced bacterium-attracting synomone.

  15. Are vent crab behavioral preferences adaptations for habitat choice?

    PubMed

    Dahms, Hans-Uwe; Tseng, Li-Chun; Hwang, Jiang-Shiou

    2017-01-01

    Hydrothermal vent organisms are adapted to their extreme and patchily distributed habitats. They are expected to have evolved mechanisms that keep them in their specific habitation. Since little is known about the recruitment or habitat selection of HV organisms such as brachyurans, we examined the properties of several hydrothermal vent-associated cues on the behavior of the hydrothermal vent (HV) crab Xenograpsus testudinatus in the laboratory that were contrasted by the offering of non-vent cues. This crab species is endemic and dominates the vent fauna of Turtle Island off the NE coast of Taiwan. HV crabs were separately and in combination offered the following vent-specific cues: (1) sulfuric sediment, (3) air-bubbling, (4) elevated temperature, (5) dead settled zooplankton, (7) other crabs, and (8) shade. The non-vent-specific cues were: (2) quarz sediment, (6) dead fish, (8) light. These cues were provided on either side of a two-choice chamber. The movement of individual crabs was monitored: as initial and final choices, and as the proportion of time the crabs spent in each compartment (resident time). Cues were offered alone and no such cue as a control in the same set-up. Sulfuric sediments and dead fish were significantly more attractive to females, and other crabs irrespective of gender were significantly more attractive to males. When compared to expected distributions, crabs, irrespective of gender, significantly avoided light and tended to select other crabs, air-bubbling, sulfuric sediment, elevated temperature, dead fish, dead zooplankton, and quarz sediments in the order of decreasing importance. Data do not support the hypothesis that dead settled zooplankton was particularly attractive nor that the other gender was selected. A combination of several vent-associated cues (sulfuric sediment, elevated temperature, air-bubbling) facilitated the strongest attraction to the crabs as reflected by all response variables. The 'first choice' responses

  16. The diversity of shell matrix proteins: genome-wide investigation of the pearl oyster, Pinctada fucata.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Endo, Hirotoshi; Hashimoto, Naoki; Limura, Kurin; Isowa, Yukinobu; Kinoshita, Shigeharu; Kotaki, Tomohiro; Masaoka, Tetsuji; Miki, Takumi; Nakayama, Seiji; Nogawa, Chihiro; Notazawa, Atsuto; Ohmori, Fumito; Sarashina, Isao; Suzuki, Michio; Takagi, Ryousuke; Takahashi, Jun; Takeuchi, Takeshi; Yokoo, Naoki; Satoh, Nori; Toyohara, Haruhiko; Miyashita, Tomoyuki; Wada, Hiroshi; Samata, Tetsuro; Endo, Kazuyoshi; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Asakawa, Shuichi; Watabe, Shugo

    2013-10-01

    In molluscs, shell matrix proteins are associated with biomineralization, a biologically controlled process that involves nucleation and growth of calcium carbonate crystals. Identification and characterization of shell matrix proteins are important for better understanding of the adaptive radiation of a large variety of molluscs. We searched the draft genome sequence of the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata and annotated 30 different kinds of shell matrix proteins. Of these, we could identified Perlucin, ependymin-related protein and SPARC as common genes shared by bivalves and gastropods; however, most gastropod shell matrix proteins were not found in the P. fucata genome. Glycinerich proteins were conserved in the genus Pinctada. Another important finding with regard to these annotated genes was that numerous shell matrix proteins are encoded by more than one gene; e.g., three ACCBP-like proteins, three CaLPs, five chitin synthase-like proteins, two N16 proteins (pearlins), 10 N19 proteins, two nacreins, four Pifs, nine shematrins, two prismalin-14 proteins, and 21 tyrosinases. This diversity of shell matrix proteins may be implicated in the morphological diversity of mollusc shells. The annotated genes reported here can be searched in P. fucata gene models version 1.1 and genome assembly version 1.0 ( http://marinegenomics.oist.jp/pinctada_fucata ). These genes should provide a useful resource for studies of the genetic basis of biomineralization and evaluation of the role of shell matrix proteins as an evolutionary toolkit among the molluscs.

  17. Identification and first insights into the structure and biosynthesis of chitin from the freshwater sponge Spongilla lacustris.

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, Hermann; Kaluzhnaya, Oksana V; Brunner, Eike; Tsurkan, Mikhail V; Ereskovsky, Alexander; Ilan, Micha; Tabachnick, Konstantin R; Bazhenov, Vasilii V; Paasch, Silvia; Kammer, Martin; Born, René; Stelling, Allison; Galli, Roberta; Belikov, Sergei; Petrova, Olga V; Sivkov, Victor V; Vyalikh, Denis; Hunoldt, Sebastian; Wörheide, Gert

    2013-09-01

    This work demonstrates that chitin is an important structural component within the skeletal fibers of the freshwater sponge Spongilla lacustris. Using a variety of analytical techniques ((13)C solid state NMR, FT-IR, Raman, NEXAFS, ESI-MS, Morgan-Elson assay and Calcofluor White Staining); we show that this sponge chitin is much closer to α-chitin, known to be present in other animals, than to β-chitin. Genetic analysis confirmed the presence of chitin synthases, which are described for the first time in a sponge. The presence of chitin in both marine (demosponges and hexactinellids) and freshwater sponges indicates that this important structural biopolymer was already present in their common ancestor. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A selective biomarker for confirming nitrofurazone residues in crab and shrimp using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuai; Guo, Yuanming; Yan, Zhongyong; Sun, Xiumei; Zhang, Xiaojun

    2015-12-01

    Reliably detecting nitrofurazone (NFZ) residues in farmed crab and shrimp was previously hindered by lack of appropriately specific analytical methodology. Parent NFZ rapidly breaks down in meat, and the commonly used side-chain metabolite, semicarbazide (SEM), is non-specific as it occurs naturally in crustacean shell often leading to 'false positive' detections in meat. Using 5-nitro-2-furaldehyde (NF) as marker metabolite, following pre-column derivatization with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH), ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) analysis in negative electrospray ionization mode enabled confirmation of NFZ residues in deliberately treated whole crab, crab meat and shrimp meat, with a limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) below 1 ng g(-1). Meanwhile, the derivatives of DNPH-NF were synthesized for the first time, purified by preparative liquid chromatography and structure characterized with nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-NMR). The purity of derivative was checked by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tunable ultraviolet (UPLC-TUV), and the contents were beyond 99.9%. For comparison purposes, crustacean samples were analysed using both NF and SEM marker metabolites. NFZ treatment was revealed by both NF and SEM marker metabolites, but untreated crab also showed measurable levels of SEM which could potentially be misinterpreted as evidence of illegal NFZ use.

  19. A methodology for quantifying trace elements in the exoskeletons of Florida stone crab (Menippe mercenaria) larvae using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP–OES)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gravinese, Philip M.; Flannery, Jennifer A.; Toth, Lauren T.

    2016-11-23

    The larvae of the Florida stone crab, Menippe mercenaria, migrate through a variety of habitats as they develop and, therefore, experience a broad range of environmental conditions through ontogeny. Environmental variability experienced by the larvae may result in distinct elemental signatures within the exoskeletons, which could provide a tool for tracking the environmental history of larval stone crab populations. A method was developed to examine trace-element ratios, specifically magnesium-to-calcium (Mg/Ca) and strontium-to-calcium (Sr/Ca) ratios, in the exoskeletons of M. mercenaria larvae. Two developmental stages of stone crab larvae were analyzed—stage III and stage V. Specimens were reared in a laboratory environment under stable conditions to quantify the average ratios of Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca of larval stone crab exoskeletons and to determine if the ratios differed through ontogeny. The elemental compositions (Ca, Mg, and Sr) in samples of stage III larvae (n = 50 per sample) from 11 different broods (mean Sr/Ca = 5.916 ± 0.161 millimole per mole [mmol mol−1]; mean Mg/Ca = 218.275 ± 59.957 mmol mol−1) and stage V larvae (n = 10 per sample) from 12 different broods (mean Sr/Ca = 6.110 ± 0.300 mmol mol−1; mean Mg/Ca = 267.081 ± 67.211 mmol mol–1) were measured using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP–OES). The ratio of Sr/Ca significantly increased from stage III to stage V larvae, suggesting an ontogenic shift in Sr/Ca ratios between larval stages. The ratio of Mg/Ca did not change significantly between larval stages, but variability among broods was high. The method used to examine the trace-element ratios provided robust, highly reproducible estimates of Sr/Ca and Mg/Ca ratios in the larvae of M. mercenaria, demonstrating that ICP–OES can be used to determine the trace-element composition of chitinous organisms like the Florida stone crab.

  20. Fabrication of magnetic and fluorescent chitin and dibutyrylchitin sub-micron particles by oil-in-water emulsification.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Fernandez, Barbara; Chakravarty, Shatadru; Nkansah, Michael K; Shapiro, Erik M

    2016-11-01

    Chitin is a carbohydrate polymer with unique pharmacological and immunological properties, however, because of its unwieldy chemistry, the synthesis of discreet sized sub-micron particles has not been well reported. This work describes a facile and flexible method to fabricate biocompatible chitin and dibutyrylchitin sub-micron particles. This technique is based on an oil-in-water emulsification/evaporation method and involves the hydrophobization of chitin by the addition of labile butyryl groups onto chitin, disrupting intermolecular hydrogen bonds and enabling solubility in the organic solvent used as the oil phase during fabrication. The subsequent removal of butyryl groups post-fabrication through alkaline saponification regenerates native chitin while keeping particles morphology intact. Examples of encapsulation of hydrophobic dyes and nanocrystals are demonstrated, specifically using iron oxide nanocrystals and coumarin 6. The prepared particles had diameters between 300-400nm for dibutyrylchitin and 500-600nm for chitin and were highly cytocompatible. Moreover, they were able to encapsulate high amounts of iron oxide nanocrystals and were able to label mammalian cells. We describe a technique to prepare sub-micron particles of highly acetylated chitin (>90%) and dibutyrylchitin and demonstrate their utility as carriers for imaging. Chitin is a polysaccharide capable of stimulating the immune system, a property that depends on the acetamide groups, but its insolubility limits its use. No method for sub-micron particle preparation with highly acetylated chitins have been published. The only approach for the preparation of sub-micron particles uses low acetylation chitins. Dibutyrylchitin, a soluble chitin derivative, was used to prepare particles by oil in water emulsification. Butyryl groups were then removed, forming chitin particles. These particles could be suitable for encapsulation of hydrophobic payloads for drug delivery and cell imaging, as well as

  1. The Porcelain Crab Transcriptome and PCAD, the Porcelain Crab Microarray and Sequence Database

    SciTech Connect

    Tagmount, Abderrahmane; Wang, Mei; Lindquist, Erika

    2010-01-27

    Background: With the emergence of a completed genome sequence of the freshwater crustacean Daphnia pulex, construction of genomic-scale sequence databases for additional crustacean sequences are important for comparative genomics and annotation. Porcelain crabs, genus Petrolisthes, have been powerful crustacean models for environmental and evolutionary physiology with respect to thermal adaptation and understanding responses of marine organisms to climate change. Here, we present a large-scale EST sequencing and cDNA microarray database project for the porcelain crab Petrolisthes cinctipes. Methodology/Principal Findings: A set of ~;;30K unique sequences (UniSeqs) representing ~;;19K clusters were generated from ~;;98K high quality ESTs from a set ofmore » tissue specific non-normalized and mixed-tissue normalized cDNA libraries from the porcelain crab Petrolisthes cinctipes. Homology for each UniSeq was assessed using BLAST, InterProScan, GO and KEGG database searches. Approximately 66percent of the UniSeqs had homology in at least one of the databases. All EST and UniSeq sequences along with annotation results and coordinated cDNA microarray datasets have been made publicly accessible at the Porcelain Crab Array Database (PCAD), a feature-enriched version of the Stanford and Longhorn Array Databases.Conclusions/Significance: The EST project presented here represents the third largest sequencing effort for any crustacean, and the largest effort for any crab species. Our assembly and clustering results suggest that our porcelain crab EST data set is equally diverse to the much larger EST set generated in the Daphnia pulex genome sequencing project, and thus will be an important resource to the Daphnia research community. Our homology results support the pancrustacea hypothesis and suggest that Malacostraca may be ancestral to Branchiopoda and Hexapoda. Our results also suggest that our cDNA microarrays cover as much of the transcriptome as can reasonably be

  2. OBSERVATIONS OF THE CRAB NEBULA'S ASYMMETRICAL DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Loll, A. M.; Desch, S. J.; Scowen, P. A.

    2013-03-10

    We present the first Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Planetary Camera-2 imaging survey of the entire Crab Nebula, in the filters F502N ([O III] emission), F673N ([S II]), F631N ([O I]), and F547M (continuum). We use our mosaics to characterize the pulsar wind nebula (PWN) and its three-dimensional structure, the ionizational structure in the filaments forming at its periphery, the speed of the shock driven by the PWN into surrounding ejecta (by inferring the cooling rates behind the shock), and the morphology and ionizational structure of the Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) fingers. We quantify a number of asymmetries between the northwest (NW)more » and southeast (SE) quadrants of the Crab Nebula. The lack of observed filaments in the NW, and our observations of the spatial extent of [O III] emission lead us to conclude that cooling rates are slower, and therefore the shock speeds are greater, in the NW quadrant of the nebula, compared with the SE. We conclude that R-T fingers are longer, more ionizationally stratified, and apparently more massive in the NW than in the SE, and the R-T instability appears more fully developed in the NW.« less

  3. Crab digestive phospholipase: a new invertebrate member.

    PubMed

    Cherif, Slim; Ben Bacha, Abir; Ben Ali, Yassine; Horchani, Habib; Rekik, Wiem; Gargouri, Youssef

    2010-01-01

    Crab digestive phospholipase (CDPL) was purified from the hepatopancreas of Carcinus mediterraneus crabs. Homogeneous enzyme was obtained after two chromatography steps: anion exchange and size exclusion HPLC column. Homogeneous CDPL has a molecular mass of 14 kDa as determined by SDS/PAGE analysis. Unlike known digestive phospholipases like porcine PLA(2) (PPPL), CDPL displayed its maximal activity at 50 degrees C and not at 37 degrees C. A specific activity of 40 U/mg for the purified CDPL was measured using PC as substrate under optimal conditions (pH 8 and 50 degrees C) in the presence of 8 mM sodium deoxycholate (NaDC) and 10 mM CaCl(2). In contrast to PPPL, purified CDPL was completely inactivated at 60 degrees C. The N-terminal sequence was determined by automatic Edman degradation. No similarity between 12 N-terminal amino acid residues of CDPL was found with those of known digestive phospholipases. CDPL appears to be a new member of invertebrate phospholipases, and it is potentially useful for treat phospholipid-rich industrial effluents, or to synthesize useful chemical compounds which can be used in the food industry.

  4. Soil Calcium Availability Influences Shell Ecophenotype Formation in the Sub-Antarctic Land Snail, Notodiscus hookeri

    PubMed Central

    Charrier, Maryvonne; Marie, Arul; Guillaume, Damien; Bédouet, Laurent; Le Lannic, Joseph; Roiland, Claire; Berland, Sophie; Pierre, Jean-Sébastien; Le Floch, Marie; Frenot, Yves; Lebouvier, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Ecophenotypes reflect local matches between organisms and their environment, and show plasticity across generations in response to current living conditions. Plastic responses in shell morphology and shell growth have been widely studied in gastropods and are often related to environmental calcium availability, which influences shell biomineralisation. To date, all of these studies have overlooked micro-scale structure of the shell, in addition to how it is related to species responses in the context of environmental pressure. This study is the first to demonstrate that environmental factors induce a bi-modal variation in the shell micro-scale structure of a land gastropod. Notodiscus hookeri is the only native land snail present in the Crozet Archipelago (sub-Antarctic region). The adults have evolved into two ecophenotypes, which are referred to here as MS (mineral shell) and OS (organic shell). The MS-ecophenotype is characterised by a thick mineralised shell. It is primarily distributed along the coastline, and could be associated to the presence of exchangeable calcium in the clay minerals of the soils. The Os-ecophenotype is characterised by a thin organic shell. It is primarily distributed at high altitudes in the mesic and xeric fell-fields in soils with large particles that lack clay and exchangeable calcium. Snails of the Os-ecophenotype are characterised by thinner and larger shell sizes compared to snails of the MS- ecophenotype, indicating a trade-off between mineral thickness and shell size. This pattern increased along a temporal scale; whereby, older adult snails were more clearly separated into two clusters compared to the younger adult snails. The prevalence of glycine-rich proteins in the organic shell layer of N. hookeri, along with the absence of chitin, differs to the organic scaffolds of molluscan biominerals. The present study provides new insights for testing the adaptive value of phenotypic plasticity in response to spatial and temporal

  5. Soil calcium availability influences shell ecophenotype formation in the sub-antarctic land snail, Notodiscus hookeri.

    PubMed

    Charrier, Maryvonne; Marie, Arul; Guillaume, Damien; Bédouet, Laurent; Le Lannic, Joseph; Roiland, Claire; Berland, Sophie; Pierre, Jean-Sébastien; Le Floch, Marie; Frenot, Yves; Lebouvier, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Ecophenotypes reflect local matches between organisms and their environment, and show plasticity across generations in response to current living conditions. Plastic responses in shell morphology and shell growth have been widely studied in gastropods and are often related to environmental calcium availability, which influences shell biomineralisation. To date, all of these studies have overlooked micro-scale structure of the shell, in addition to how it is related to species responses in the context of environmental pressure. This study is the first to demonstrate that environmental factors induce a bi-modal variation in the shell micro-scale structure of a land gastropod. Notodiscus hookeri is the only native land snail present in the Crozet Archipelago (sub-Antarctic region). The adults have evolved into two ecophenotypes, which are referred to here as MS (mineral shell) and OS (organic shell). The MS-ecophenotype is characterised by a thick mineralised shell. It is primarily distributed along the coastline, and could be associated to the presence of exchangeable calcium in the clay minerals of the soils. The Os-ecophenotype is characterised by a thin organic shell. It is primarily distributed at high altitudes in the mesic and xeric fell-fields in soils with large particles that lack clay and exchangeable calcium. Snails of the Os-ecophenotype are characterised by thinner and larger shell sizes compared to snails of the MS-ecophenotype, indicating a trade-off between mineral thickness and shell size. This pattern increased along a temporal scale; whereby, older adult snails were more clearly separated into two clusters compared to the younger adult snails. The prevalence of glycine-rich proteins in the organic shell layer of N. hookeri, along with the absence of chitin, differs to the organic scaffolds of molluscan biominerals. The present study provides new insights for testing the adaptive value of phenotypic plasticity in response to spatial and temporal

  6. Chitin amendment increases soil suppressiveness toward plant pathogens and modulates the actinobacterial and oxalobacteraceal communities in an experimental agricultural field.

    PubMed

    Cretoiu, Mariana Silvia; Korthals, Gerard W; Visser, Johnny H M; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2013-09-01

    A long-term experiment on the effect of chitin addition to soil on the suppression of soilborne pathogens was set up and monitored for 8 years in an experimental field, Vredepeel, The Netherlands. Chitinous matter obtained from shrimps was added to soil top layers on two different occasions, and the suppressiveness of soil toward Verticillium dahliae, as well as plant-pathogenic nematodes, was assessed, in addition to analyses of the abundances and community structures of members of the soil microbiota. The data revealed that chitin amendment had raised the suppressiveness of soil, in particular toward Verticillium dahliae, 9 months after the (second) treatment, extending to 2 years following treatment. Moreover, major effects of the added chitin on the soil microbial communities were detected. First, shifts in both the abundances and structures of the chitin-treated soil microbial communities, both of total soil bacteria and fungi, were found. In addition, the abundances and structures of soil actinobacteria and the Oxalobacteraceae were affected by chitin. At the functional gene level, the abundance of specific (family-18 glycoside hydrolase) chitinase genes carried by the soil bacteria also revealed upshifts as a result of the added chitin. The effects of chitin noted for the Oxalobacteraceae were specifically related to significant upshifts in the abundances of the species Duganella violaceinigra and Massilia plicata. These effects of chitin persisted over the time of the experiment.

  7. Chitin Amendment Increases Soil Suppressiveness toward Plant Pathogens and Modulates the Actinobacterial and Oxalobacteraceal Communities in an Experimental Agricultural Field

    PubMed Central

    Cretoiu, Mariana Silvia; Korthals, Gerard W.; Visser, Johnny H. M.

    2013-01-01

    A long-term experiment on the effect of chitin addition to soil on the suppression of soilborne pathogens was set up and monitored for 8 years in an experimental field, Vredepeel, The Netherlands. Chitinous matter obtained from shrimps was added to soil top layers on two different occasions, and the suppressiveness of soil toward Verticillium dahliae, as well as plant-pathogenic nematodes, was assessed, in addition to analyses of the abundances and community structures of members of the soil microbiota. The data revealed that chitin amendment had raised the suppressiveness of soil, in particular toward Verticillium dahliae, 9 months after the (second) treatment, extending to 2 years following treatment. Moreover, major effects of the added chitin on the soil microbial communities were detected. First, shifts in both the abundances and structures of the chitin-treated soil microbial communities, both of total soil bacteria and fungi, were found. In addition, the abundances and structures of soil actinobacteria and the Oxalobacteraceae were affected by chitin. At the functional gene level, the abundance of specific (family-18 glycoside hydrolase) chitinase genes carried by the soil bacteria also revealed upshifts as a result of the added chitin. The effects of chitin noted for the Oxalobacteraceae were specifically related to significant upshifts in the abundances of the species Duganella violaceinigra and Massilia plicata. These effects of chitin persisted over the time of the experiment. PMID:23811512

  8. Feeding behaviour: hydrothermal vent crabs feast on sea 'snow'.

    PubMed

    Jeng, M-S; Ng, N K; Ng, P K L

    2004-12-23

    The crab Xenograpsus testudinatus lives at enormously high densities around the sulphur-rich hydrothermal vents found in shallow waters off Taiwan, even though this acidic environment is low in nutrients. Here we show that these crabs swarm out of their crevices at slack water and feed on the vast numbers of zooplankton that are killed by the vents' sulphurous plumes, and that rain down like marine 'snow'. This opportunistic feeding behaviour explains how the crabs are able to survive in the adverse toxic environment of these shallow hydrothermal vents.

  9. Proximate and mineral composition of crab meat consumed in Bahrain.

    PubMed

    Musaiger, Abdulrahman O; Al-Rumaidh, Mohammed J

    2005-06-01

    The proximate, mineral and heavy metals of raw and cooked crab meat, Portunus pelagicus, consumed in Bahrain were studied. The crab meat contains a good level of protein (17.5-18.8%), with very low proportion of fat (0.6-1.4%). The levels of sodium, potassium, calcium and phosphorus were found to be higher than other minerals. Traces of heavy metals (lead, mercury, cadmium) were also reported. Traditional cooking had a considerable effect on proximate and mineral contents of crab meat.

  10. Robotic crabs reveal that female fiddler crabs are sensitive to changes in male display rate.

    PubMed

    Mowles, Sophie L; Jennions, Michael D; Backwell, Patricia R Y

    2018-01-01

    Males often produce dynamic, repetitive courtship displays that can be demanding to perform and might advertise male quality to females. A key feature of demanding displays is that they can change in intensity: escalating as a male increases his signalling effort, but de-escalating as a signaller becomes fatigued. Here, we investigated whether female fiddler crabs, Uca mjoebergi , are sensitive to changes in male courtship wave rate. We performed playback experiments using robotic male crabs that had the same mean wave rate, but either escalated, de-escalated or remained constant. Females demonstrated a strong preference for escalating robots, but showed mixed responses to robots that de-escalated ('fast' to 'slow') compared to those that waved at a constant 'medium' rate. These findings demonstrate that females can discern changes in male display rate, and prefer males that escalate, but that females are also sensitive to past display rates indicative of prior vigour. © 2018 The Authors.

  11. Search for Thermal X-ray Features from the Crab nebula with Hitomi Soft X-ray Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujimoto, M.; Mori, K.; Lee, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Tominaga, N.; Moriya, T.; Sato, T.; Bamba, A.

    2017-10-01

    The Crab nebula originates from a core-collapse SN in 1054. It has an anomalously low observed ejecta mass for a Fe-core collapse SN. Intensive searches were made for an undetected massive shell to solve this discrepancy. An alternative idea is that the SN1054 is an electron-capture (EC) explosion with a lower explosion energy than Fe-core collapse SNe. In the X-rays, imaging searches were performed for the plasma emission from the shell in the Crab outskirts. However, the extreme brightness hampers access to its vicinity. We used spectroscopic technique using the X-ray micro-calorimeter onboard Hitomi. We searched for the emission or absorption features by the thermal plasma and set a new limit. We re-evaluated the existing data to claim that the X-ray plasma mass is < 1 M_{⊙} for a wide range of assumed parameters. We further performed hydrodynamic simulation for two SN models (Fe core versus EC) under two environments (uniform ISM versus progenitor wind). We found that the observed mass limit can be compatible with both SN models if the environment has a low density of <0.03 cm^{-3} (Fe core) or <0.1 cm^{-3} (EC) for the uniform density, or <10^{14} g cm^{-1} for the wind density parameter for the wind environment.

  12. First Report on Chitin in a Non-Verongiid Marine Demosponge: The Mycale euplectellioides Case.

    PubMed

    Żółtowska-Aksamitowska, Sonia; Shaala, Lamiaa A; Youssef, Diaa T A; Elhady, Sameh S; Tsurkan, Mikhail V; Petrenko, Iaroslav; Wysokowski, Marcin; Tabachnick, Konstantin; Meissner, Heike; Ivanenko, Viatcheslav N; Bechmann, Nicole; Joseph, Yvonne; Jesionowski, Teofil; Ehrlich, Hermann

    2018-02-20

    Sponges (Porifera) are recognized as aquatic multicellular organisms which developed an effective biochemical pathway over millions of years of evolution to produce both biologically active secondary metabolites and biopolymer-based skeletal structures. Among marine demosponges, only representatives of the Verongiida order are known to synthetize biologically active substances as well as skeletons made of structural polysaccharide chitin. The unique three-dimensional (3D) architecture of such chitinous skeletons opens the widow for their recent applications as adsorbents, as well as scaffolds for tissue engineering and biomimetics. This study has the ambitious goal of monitoring other orders beyond Verongiida demosponges and finding alternative sources of naturally prestructured chitinous scaffolds; especially in those demosponge species which can be cultivated at large scales using marine farming conditions. Special attention has been paid to the demosponge Mycale euplectellioides (Heteroscleromorpha: Poecilosclerida: Mycalidae) collected in the Red Sea. For the first time, we present here a detailed study of the isolation of chitin from the skeleton of this sponge, as well as its identification using diverse bioanalytical tools. Calcofluor white staining, Fourier-transform Infrared Spcetcroscopy (FTIR), electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and fluorescence microscopy, as well as a chitinase digestion assay were applied in order to confirm with strong evidence the finding of a-chitin in the skeleton of M. euplectellioides . We suggest that the discovery of chitin within representatives of the Mycale genus is a promising step in their evaluation of these globally distributed sponges as new renewable sources for both biologically active metabolites and chitin, which are of prospective use for pharmacology and biomaterials oriented biomedicine, respectively.

  13. Antifungal curcumin promotes chitin accumulation associated with decreased virulence of Sporothrix schenckii.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lilin; Zhang, Jing; Song, Tianzhang; Yuan, Liyan; Zhou, Junjie; Yin, Hongling; He, Tailong; Gao, Wenchao; Sun, Yao; Hu, Xuchu; Huang, Huaiqiu

    2016-05-01

    Curcumin, a yellow polyphenol compound, is known to possess antifungal activity for a range of pathogenic fungi. However, the fungicidal mechanism of curcumin (CUR) has not been identified. We have occasionally found that chitin redistributes to the cell wall outer layer of Sporothrix schenckii (S. schenckii) upon sublethal CUR treatment. Whether CUR can affect chitin synthesis via the protein kinase C (PKC) signaling pathway has not been investigated. This study describes a direct fungicidal activity of CUR against S. schenckii demonstrated by the results of a checkerboard microdilution assay and, for the first time, a synergistic effect of CUR with terbinafine (TRB). Furthermore, the results of real-time PCR showed that sublethal CUR upregulated the transcription of PKC, chitin synthase1 (CHS1), and chitin synthase3 (CHS3) in S. schenckii. The fluorescence staining results using wheat germ agglutinin-fluorescein isothiocyanate (WGA-FITC) and calcofluor white (CFW) consistently showed that chitin exposure and total chitin content were increased on the conidial cell wall of S. schenckii by sublethal CUR treatment. A histopathological analysis of mice infected with CUR-treated conidia showed dampened inflammation in the local lesion and a reduced fungal burden. The ELISA results showed proinflammatory cytokine secretion at an early stage from macrophages stimulated by the CUR-treated conidia. The present data led to the conclusion that CUR is a potential antifungal agent and that its fungicidal mechanism may involve chitin accumulation on the cell wall of S. schenckii, which is associated with decreased virulence in infected mice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Deletion of a Chitin Synthase Gene in a Citric Acid Producing Strain of Aspergillus niger

    SciTech Connect

    Rinker, Torri E.; Baker, Scott E.

    Citric acid production by the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is carried out in a process that causes the organism to drastically alter its morphology. This altered morphology includes hyphal swelling and highly limited polar growth resulting in clumps of swollen cells that eventually aggregate into pellets of approximately 100 microns in diameter. In this pelleted form, A. niger has increased citric acid production as compared to growth in filamentous form. Chitin is a crucial component of the cell wall of filamentous fungi. Alterations in the deposition or production of chitin may have profound effects on the morphology of the organism.more » In order to study the role of chitin synthesis in pellet formation we have deleted a chitin synthase gene (csmA) in Aspergillus niger strain ATCC 11414 using a PCR based deletion construct. This class of chitin synthases is only found in filamentous fungi and is not present in yeasts. The csmA genes contain a myosin motor domain at the N-terminus and a chitin synthesis domain at the C-terminus. They are believed to contribute to the specialized polar growth observed in filamentous fungi that is lacking in yeasts. The csmA deletion strain (csmAΔ) was subjected to minimal media with and without osmotic stabilizers as well as tested in citric acid production media. Without osmotic stabilizers, the mutant germlings were abnormally swollen, primarily in the subapical regions, and contained large vacuoles. However, this swelling is ultimately not inhibitory to growth as the germlings are able to recover and undergo polar growth. Colony formation was largely unaffected in the absence of osmotic stabilizers. In citric acid production media csmAΔ was observed to have a 2.5 fold increase in citric acid production. The controlled expression of this class of chitin synthases may be useful for improving production of organic acids in filamentous fungi.« less

  15. Embryonic desiccation resistance in Aedes aegypti: presumptive role of the chitinized Serosal Cuticle

    PubMed Central

    Rezende, Gustavo Lazzaro; Martins, Ademir Jesus; Gentile, Carla; Farnesi, Luana Cristina; Pelajo-Machado, Marcelo; Peixoto, Alexandre Afrânio; Valle, Denise

    2008-01-01

    Background One of the major problems concerning dengue transmission is that embryos of its main vector, the mosquito Aedes aegypti, resist desiccation, surviving several months under dry conditions. The serosal cuticle (SC) contributes to mosquito egg desiccation resistance, but the kinetics of SC secretion during embryogenesis is unknown. It has been argued that mosquito SC contains chitin as one of its components, however conclusive evidence is still missing. Results We observed an abrupt acquisition of desiccation resistance during Ae. aegypti embryogenesis associated with serosal cuticle secretion, occurring at complete germ band extension, between 11 and 13 hours after egglaying. After SC formation embryos are viable on dry for at least several days. The presence of chitin as one of the SC constituents was confirmed through Calcofluor and WGA labeling and chitin quantitation. The Ae. aegypti Chitin Synthase A gene (AaCHS1) possesses two alternatively spliced variants, AaCHS1a and AaCHS1b, differentially expressed during Ae. aegypti embryonic development. It was verified that at the moment of serosal cuticle formation, AaCHS1a is the sole variant specifically expressed. Conclusion In addition to the peritrophic matrix and exoskeleton, these findings confirm chitin is also present in the mosquito serosal cuticle. They also point to the role of the chitinized SC in the desiccation resistance of Ae. aegypti eggs. AaCHS1a expression would be responsible for SC chitin synthesis. With this embryological approach we expect to shed new light regarding this important physiological process related to the Ae. aegypti life cycle. PMID:18789161

  16. First Report on Chitin in a Non-Verongiid Marine Demosponge: The Mycale euplectellioides Case

    PubMed Central

    Żółtowska-Aksamitowska, Sonia; Petrenko, Iaroslav; Wysokowski, Marcin; Tabachnick, Konstantin; Meissner, Heike; Jesionowski, Teofil; Ehrlich, Hermann

    2018-01-01

    Sponges (Porifera) are recognized as aquatic multicellular organisms which developed an effective biochemical pathway over millions of years of evolution to produce both biologically active secondary metabolites and biopolymer-based skeletal structures. Among marine demosponges, only representatives of the Verongiida order are known to synthetize biologically active substances as well as skeletons made of structural polysaccharide chitin. The unique three-dimensional (3D) architecture of such chitinous skeletons opens the widow for their recent applications as adsorbents, as well as scaffolds for tissue engineering and biomimetics. This study has the ambitious goal of monitoring other orders beyond Verongiida demosponges and finding alternative sources of naturally prestructured chitinous scaffolds; especially in those demosponge species which can be cultivated at large scales using marine farming conditions. Special attention has been paid to the demosponge Mycale euplectellioides (Heteroscleromorpha: Poecilosclerida: Mycalidae) collected in the Red Sea. For the first time, we present here a detailed study of the isolation of chitin from the skeleton of this sponge, as well as its identification using diverse bioanalytical tools. Calcofluor white staining, Fourier-transform Infrared Spcetcroscopy (FTIR), electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and fluorescence microscopy, as well as a chitinase digestion assay were applied in order to confirm with strong evidence the finding of a-chitin in the skeleton of M. euplectellioides. We suggest that the discovery of chitin within representatives of the Mycale genus is a promising step in their evaluation of these globally distributed sponges as new renewable sources for both biologically active metabolites and chitin, which are of prospective use for pharmacology and biomaterials oriented biomedicine, respectively. PMID:29461501

  17. Comparison of automated BAX polymerase chain reaction and standard culture methods for detection of Listeria monocyogenes in blue crab meat (Callinectus sapidus) and blue crab processing plants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study compared the BAX Polymerase Chain Reaction method (BAX PCR) with the Standard Culture Method (SCM) for detection of L. monocytogenes in blue crab meat and crab processing plants. The aim of this study was to address this data gap. Raw crabs, finished products and environmental sponge samp...

  18. Chitin synthase III: Synthetic lethal mutants and “stress related” chitin synthesis that bypasses the CSD3/CHS6 localization pathway

    PubMed Central

    Osmond, Barbara C.; Specht, Charles A.; Robbins, Phillips W.

    1999-01-01

    We screened Saccharomyces strains for mutants that are synthetically lethal with deletion of the major chitin synthase gene CHS3. In addition to finding, not surprisingly, that mutations in major cell wall-related genes such as FKS1 (glucan synthase) and mutations in any of the Golgi glycosylation complex genes (MNN9 family) are lethal in combination with chs3Δ, we found that a mutation in Srv2p, a bifunctional regulatory gene, is notably lethal in the chs3 deletion. In extending studies of fks1-chitin synthase 3 interactions, we made the surprising discovery that deletion of CSD3/CHS6, a gene normally required for Chs3p delivery and activity in vivo, was not lethal with fks1 and, in fact, that lack of Csd3p/Chs6p did not decrease the high level of stress-related chitin made in the fks1 mutant. This finding suggests that “stress response” chitin synthesis proceeds through an alternate Chs3p targeting pathway. PMID:10500155

  19. Classification Shell Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Etzold, Carol

    1983-01-01

    Discusses shell classification exercises. Through keying students advanced from the "I know what a shell looks like" stage to become involved in the classification process: observing, labeling, making decisions about categories, and identifying marine animals. (Author/JN)

  20. Evolutionary history of true crabs (Crustacea: Decapoda: Brachyura) and the origin of freshwater crabs.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Ling Ming; Schubart, Christoph D; Ahyong, Shane T; Lai, Joelle C Y; Au, Eugene Y C; Chan, Tin-Yam; Ng, Peter K L; Chu, Ka Hou

    2014-05-01

    Crabs of the infra-order Brachyura are one of the most diverse groups of crustaceans with approximately 7,000 described species in 98 families, occurring in marine, freshwater, and terrestrial habitats. The relationships among the brachyuran families are poorly understood due to the high morphological complexity of the group. Here, we reconstruct the most comprehensive phylogeny of Brachyura to date using sequence data of six nuclear protein-coding genes and two mitochondrial rRNA genes from more than 140 species belonging to 58 families. The gene tree confirms that the "Podotremata," are paraphyletic. Within the monophyletic Eubrachyura, the reciprocal monophyly of the two subsections, Heterotremata and Thoracotremata, is supported. Monophyly of many superfamilies, however, is not recovered, indicating the prevalence of morphological convergence and the need for further taxonomic studies. Freshwater crabs were derived early in the evolution of Eubrachyura and are shown to have at least two independent origins. Bayesian relaxed molecular methods estimate that freshwater crabs separated from their closest marine sister taxa ~135 Ma, that is, after the break up of Pangaea (∼200 Ma) and that a Gondwanan origin of these freshwater representatives is untenable. Most extant families and superfamilies arose during the late Cretaceous and early Tertiary.

  1. Analysis of chitin-binding proteins from Manduca sexta provides new insights into evolution of peritrophin A-type chitin-binding domains in insects.

    PubMed

    Tetreau, Guillaume; Dittmer, Neal T; Cao, Xiaolong; Agrawal, Sinu; Chen, Yun-Ru; Muthukrishnan, Subbaratnam; Haobo, Jiang; Blissard, Gary W; Kanost, Michael R; Wang, Ping

    2015-07-01

    In insects, chitin is a major structural component of the cuticle and the peritrophic membrane (PM). In nature, chitin is always associated with proteins among which chitin-binding proteins (CBPs) are the most important for forming, maintaining and regulating the functions of these extracellular structures. In this study, a genome-wide search for genes encoding proteins with ChtBD2-type (peritrophin A-type) chitin-binding domains (CBDs) was conducted. A total of 53 genes encoding 56 CBPs were identified, including 15 CPAP1s (cuticular proteins analogous to peritrophins with 1 CBD), 11 CPAP3s (CPAPs with 3 CBDs) and 17 PMPs (PM proteins) with a variable number of CBDs, which are structural components of cuticle or of the PM. CBDs were also identified in enzymes of chitin metabolism including 6 chitinases and 7 chitin deacetylases encoded by 6 and 5 genes, respectively. RNA-seq analysis confirmed that PMP and CPAP genes have differential spatial expression patterns. The expression of PMP genes is midgut-specific, while CPAP genes are widely expressed in different cuticle forming tissues. Phylogenetic analysis of CBDs of proteins in insects belonging to different orders revealed that CPAP1s from different species constitute a separate family with 16 different groups, including 6 new groups identified in this study. The CPAP3s are clustered into a separate family of 7 groups present in all insect orders. Altogether, they reveal that duplication events of CBDs in CPAP1s and CPAP3s occurred prior to the evolutionary radiation of insect species. In contrast to the CPAPs, all CBDs from individual PMPs are generally clustered and distinct from other PMPs in the same species in phylogenetic analyses, indicating that the duplication of CBDs in each of these PMPs occurred after divergence of insect species. Phylogenetic analysis of these three CBP families showed that the CBDs in CPAP1s form a clearly separate family, while those found in PMPs and CPAP3s were clustered

  2. Chitin butyrate coated electrospun nylon-6 fibers for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pant, Hem Raj; Kim, Han Joo; Bhatt, Lok Ranjan; Joshi, Mahesh Kumar; Kim, Eun Kyo; Kim, Jeong In; Abdal-hay, Abdalla; Hui, K. S.; Kim, Cheol Sang

    2013-11-01

    In this study, we describe the preparation and characterizations of chitin butyrate (CB) coated nylon-6 nanofibers using single-spinneret electrospinning of blends solution. The physicochemical properties of nylon-6 composite fibers with different proportions of CB to nylon-6 were determined using FE-SEM, TEM, FT-IR spectroscopy, and water contact angle measurement. FE-SEM and TEM images revealed that the nylon-6 and CB were immiscible in the as-spun nanofibers, and phase separated nanofiber morphology becomes more pronounced with increasing amounts of CB. The bone formation ability of composite fibers was evaluated by incubating in biomimetic simulated body fluid. In order to assay the cytocompatibility and cell behavior on the composite scaffolds, osteoblast cells were seeded on the matrix. Results suggest that the deposition of CB layer on the surface of nylon-6 could increase its cell compatibility and bone formation ability. Therefore, as-synthesized nanocomposite fibrous mat has great potentiality in hard tissue engineering.

  3. Chitosan-chitin nanocrystal composite scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingxian; Zheng, Huanjun; Chen, Juan; Li, Shuangli; Huang, Jianfang; Zhou, Changren

    2016-11-05

    Chitin nanocrystals (CNCs) with length and width of 300 and 20nm were uniformly dispersed in chitosan (CS) solution. The CS/CNCs composite scaffolds prepared utilizing a dispersion-based freeze dry approach exhibit significant enhancement in compressive strength and modulus compared with pure CS scaffold both in dry and wet state. A well-interconnected porous structure with size in the range of 100-200μm and over 80% porosity are found in the composite scaffolds. The crystal structure of CNCs is retained in the composite scaffolds. The incorporation of CNCs leads to increase in the scaffold density and decrease in the water swelling ratio. Moreover, the composite scaffolds are successfully applied as scaffolds for MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells, showing their excellent biocompatibility and low cytotoxicity. The results of fluorescent micrographs images reveal that CNCs can markedly promote the cell adhesion and proliferation of the osteoblast on CS. The biocompatible composite scaffolds with enhanced mechanical properties have potential application in bone tissue engineering. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Crab cavities: Past, present, and future of a challenging device

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Q.

    2015-05-03

    In two-ring facilities operating with a crossing-angle collision scheme, luminosity can be limited due to an incomplete overlapping of the colliding bunches. Crab cavities then are introduced to restore head-on collisions by providing the destined opposite deflection to the head and tail of the bunch. An increase in luminosity was demonstrated at KEKB with global crab-crossing, while the Large Hardron Collider (LHC) at CERN currently is designing local crab crossing for the Hi-Lumi upgrade. Future colliders may investigate both approaches. In this paper, we review the challenges in the technology, and the implementation of crab cavities, while discussing experience inmore » earlier colliders, ongoing R&D, and proposed implementations for future facilities, such as HiLumi-LHC, CERN’s compact linear collider (CLIC), the international linear collider (ILC), and the electron-ion collider under design at BNL (eRHIC).« less

  5. Domoic acid excretion in dungeness crabs, razor clams and mussels.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Irvin R; Skillman, Ann; Woodruff, Dana

    2008-07-01

    Domoic acid (DA) is a neurotoxic amino acid produced by several marine algal species of the Pseudo-nitzschia (PN) genus. We studied the elimination of DA from hemolymph after intravascular (IV) injection in razor clams (Siliqua patula), mussels (Mytilus edulis) and Dungeness crabs (Cancer magister). Crabs were also injected with two other organic acids, dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) and kainic acid (KA). For IV dosing, hemolymph was repetitively sampled and DA concentrations measured by HPLC-UV. Toxicokinetic analysis of DA in crabs suggested most of the injected dose remained within hemolymph compartment with little extravascular distribution. This observation is in sharp contrast to results obtained from clams and mussels which exhibited similarly large apparent volumes of distribution despite large differences in overall clearance. These findings suggest fundamentally different storage and elimination processes are occurring for DA between bivalves and crabs.

  6. The surprising Crab pulsar and its nebula: a review.

    PubMed

    Bühler, R; Blandford, R

    2014-06-01

    The Crab nebula and its pulsar (referred to together as 'the Crab') have historically played a central role in astrophysics. True to this legacy, several unique discoveries have been made recently. The Crab was found to emit gamma-ray pulsations up to energies of 400 GeV, beyond what was previously expected from pulsars. Strong gamma-ray flares, of durations of a few days, were discovered from within the nebula, while the source was previously expected to be stable in flux on these time scales. Here we review these intriguing and suggestive developments. In this context we give an overview of the observational properties of the Crab and our current understanding of pulsars and their nebulae.

  7. Shell concrete pavement.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1966-10-01

    This report describes the testing performed with reef shell, clam shell and a combination of reef and clam shell used as coarse aggregate to determine if a low modulus concrete could be developed for use as a base material as an alternate to the pres...

  8. Modification of Chitin with Kraft Lignin and Development of New Biosorbents for Removal of Cadmium(II) and Nickel(II) Ions

    PubMed Central

    Wysokowski, Marcin; Klapiszewski, Łukasz; Moszyński, Dariusz; Bartczak, Przemysław; Szatkowski, Tomasz; Majchrzak, Izabela; Siwińska-Stefańska, Katarzyna; Bazhenov, Vasilii V.; Jesionowski, Teofil

    2014-01-01

    Novel, functional materials based on chitin of marine origin and lignin were prepared. The synthesized materials were subjected to physicochemical, dispersive-morphological and electrokinetic analysis. The results confirm the effectiveness of the proposed method of synthesis of functional chitin/lignin materials. Mechanism of chitin modification by lignin is based on formation of hydrogen bonds between chitin and lignin. Additionally, the chitin/lignin materials were studied from the perspective of waste water treatment. The synthetic method presented in this work shows an attractive and facile route for producing low-cost chitin/lignin biosorbents with high efficiency of nickel and cadmium adsorption (88.0% and 98.4%, respectively). The discovery of this facile method of synthesis of functional chitin/lignin materials will also have a significant impact on the problematic issue of the utilization of chitinous waste from the seafood industry, as well as lignin by-products from the pulp and paper industry. PMID:24727394

  9. Immunotherapeutic effects of chitin in comparison with chitosan against Leishmania major infection.

    PubMed

    Hoseini, Mostafa Haji Molla; Moradi, Maryam; Alimohammadian, Mohammad Hossein; Shahgoli, Vahid Khaze; Darabi, Hayedeh; Rostami, Ali

    2016-04-01

    Chitin and chitosan microparticles (MPs) are important immune system stimulators. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective effects of these compounds in comparison with each other against Leishmania infection in BALB/c mice infected with Leishmania major (L. major). Female BALB/c mice were injected subcutaneously with 2×10(5) promastigotes. Chitin and/or chitosan MPs (<40 μm) were subcutaneously injected in the BALB/c mice with two-day intervals until two weeks. Mice in all groups were sacrificed at 12 weeks post-infection. Enumeration of viable parasites was performed using limiting dilution assay. Furthermore, the animals (5 mice/group) were sacrificed two weeks post-infection. The lymph node cells were isolated and the effects of the chitinous MPs on the proliferation and production of cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) were determined. The mean sizes of lesions were significantly smaller in chitin (0.6±0.12 mm) and chitosan treated groups (1.2±0.8 mm) than in the control group (6.2±1.7 mm) (P<0.05). The parasite load in the lymph nodes of the treated mice was significantly lower than that in the lymph nodes of controls (1.31×10(6) vs 8.24×10(7) parasite/lymph node [P=0.032] and 7.49×10(6) vs 8.24×10(7) parasite/lymph node [P=0.05] for chitin and chitosan MPs treatment, respectively). We found that chitinous MPs induced cell proliferation and that chitin but not chitosan increased TNF-α and IL-10 production. Chitin appears that it has more effect than chitosan against leishmaniasis. The current study revealed that chitinous MPs had significant activity against L. major and could be considered as new therapeutic modality in leishmaniasis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Conservation of Chitin-Induced MAPK Signaling Pathways in Rice and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kenta; Yamaguchi, Koji; Yoshimura, Satomi; Terauchi, Akira; Kawasaki, Tsutomu

    2017-06-01

    Perception of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) including chitin by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) rapidly induces activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades. However, how PRRs transmit immune signals to the MAPK cascade is largely unknown. Recently, Arabidopsis receptor-like cytoplasmic kinase PBL27 has been reported to activate MAPKs through phosphorylation of AtMAPKKK5 in the chitin signaling pathway. In this study, we found that OsRLCK185, a rice ortholog of PBL27, regulates chitin-induced MAPK activation in a similar fashion to PBL27 in rice. Upon chitin perception, OsRLCK185 is phosphorylated by OsCERK1, a component of the chitin receptor complex. OsRLCK185 interacted with OsMAPKKK11 and OsMAPKKK18, rice orthologs of AtMAPKKK5, in yeast two-hybrid assays. Silencing of both OsMAPKKK11 and OsMAPKKK18 significantly reduced chitin-induced activation of OsMPK3 and OsMPK6. Expression levels of OsMAPKKK18 were much higher than that of OsMAPKKK11 in rice cells, which was consistent with the fact that the Osmapkkk11 single mutation did not affect MAPK activation. This result suggested that OsMAPKKK18 plays a more important role than OsMAPKKK11 in the chitin-induced activation of OsMPK3 and OsMPK6. The bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) experiment indicated that OsRLCK185 interacted with OsMAPKKK18 at the plasma membrane in planta. In vitro phosphorylation experiments showed that OsRLCK185 directly phosphorylates OsMAPKKK18. Furthermore, OsMAPKKK18 interacted with the MAPKK OsMKK4, the upstream component of OsMPK3/6. These results suggested that OsRLCK185 connects the chitin receptor to the MAPK cascade consisting of OsMAPKKK18-OsMKK4-OsMPK3/6. Our data revealed that chitin-induced MAPK activation in rice and Arabidopsis is regulated by common homologous elements. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please

  11. 50 CFR Table 8 to Part 680 - Initial QS and PQS Pool for Each Crab QS Fishery

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Crab QS Fishery Crab QS Fishery Initial QS Pool Initial PQS Pool BBR Bristol Bay red king crab 400,000... 200,000,000 PIK Pribilof Islands red and blue king crab 30,000,000 30,000,000 SMB St. Matthew blue... Western Aleutian Islands red king crab 60,000,000 60,000,000 WBT Western Bering Sea Tanner crab (C. bairdi...

  12. 50 CFR Table 8 to Part 680 - Initial QS and PQS Pool for Each Crab QS Fishery

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Crab QS Fishery Crab QS Fishery Initial QS Pool Initial PQS Pool BBR Bristol Bay red king crab 400,000... 200,000,000 PIK Pribilof Islands red and blue king crab 30,000,000 30,000,000 SMB St. Matthew blue... Western Aleutian Islands red king crab 60,000,000 60,000,000 WBT Western Bering Sea Tanner crab (C. bairdi...

  13. Optical radiation from the Crab pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturrock, P. A.; Petrosian, V.; Turk, J. S.

    1974-01-01

    Possible mechanisms for producing the optical radiation from the Crab pulsar are proposed and discussed. There are severe difficulties in interpreting the radiation as being produced by an incoherent process, whether it be synchrotron radiation, inverse-Compton radiation or curvature radiation. It is proposed therefore that radiation in the optical part of the spectrum is coherent. In the polar cap model, a small bunch of electrons and positrons forms near each primary electron as a result of the pair-production cascade process. Ambient electric fields give rise to energy separation, as a result of which either the electrons or positrons will dominate the radiation from each bunch. The roll-off in the infrared is ascribed to synchrotron absorption by electrons and positrons located between the surface of the star and the force-balance radius. Various consequences of this model, which may be subjected to observational test, are discussed.

  14. Chloride fluxes in crab muscle fibres

    PubMed Central

    Richards, C. D.

    1969-01-01

    1. Isotopic techniques were used to study the efflux of Cl- from single cannulated muscle fibres of the crab Maia squinado. 2. The efflux of 36Cl- was found to be exponential with steady rate constants ranging from 0·01 to 0·07 min-1. The steady efflux was ca. 1000-2000 pM cm-2 sec-1. The efflux was slightly depressed by K+-free saline and was unaffected by 40 mM-K+ saline and NO3- saline. The influx and efflux of Cl- were presumed independent. 3. The membrane conductance calculated from 36Cl- flux data was consistent with that determined by the method of electrotonic spread for other marine crustacean muscle fibres. Cl- accounted for most of the membrane conductance. PMID:5770889

  15. Lincoln Co. Scrap Metal, Crab Orchard, Kentucky

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The City of Crab Orchard, KY (population less than 1,000) received a $200,000 EPA Brownfields cleanup grant in 2010 to cleanup up the Lincoln County ScrapMetal property. The site, a former scrap metal recycler and general junkyard, was located in the middle of downtown. The city has experienced a dramatic decline in growth over the past few years. The abandoned two-acre site is located in the city’s center, directly across the street from City Hall. It is the largest property on Main Street. The property was an eyesore, and posed potential health risks to area residents, and deterred investment. Its blighted status did little to help the commercial and private properties that surround it. The site was also home to a dilapidated building that once served as the Odd Fellows meeting hall.

  16. Knickkopf protein protects and organizes chitin in the newly synthesized insect exoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhari, Sujata S.; Arakane, Yasuyuki; Specht, Charles A.; Moussian, Bernard; Boyle, Daniel L.; Park, Yoonseong; Kramer, Karl J.; Beeman, Richard W.; Muthukrishnan, Subbaratnam

    2011-01-01

    During each molting cycle of insect development, synthesis of new cuticle occurs concurrently with the partial degradation of the overlying old exoskeleton. Protection of the newly synthesized cuticle from molting fluid enzymes has long been attributed to the presence of an impermeable envelope layer that was thought to serve as a physical barrier, preventing molting fluid enzymes from accessing the new cuticle and thereby ensuring selective degradation of only the old one. In this study, using the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, as a model insect species, we show that an entirely different and unexpected mechanism accounts for the selective action of chitinases and possibly other molting enzymes. The molting fluid enzyme chitinase, which degrades the matrix polysaccharide chitin, is not excluded from the newly synthesized cuticle as previously assumed. Instead, the new cuticle is protected from chitinase action by the T. castaneum Knickkopf (TcKnk) protein. TcKnk colocalizes with chitin in the new cuticle and organizes it into laminae. Down-regulation of TcKnk results in chitinase-dependent loss of chitin, severe molting defects, and lethality at all developmental stages. The conservation of Knickkopf across insect, crustacean, and nematode taxa suggests that its critical roles in the laminar ordering and protection of exoskeletal chitin may be common to all chitinous invertebrates. PMID:21930896

  17. Cloning and expression of two chitin deacetylase genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Mishra, C; Semino, C E; McCreath, K J; de la Vega, H; Jones, B J; Specht, C A; Robbins, P W

    1997-03-30

    Chitin deacetylase (EC 3.5.1.41), which hydrolyses the N-acetamido groups of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine residues in chitin, has been demonstrated in crude extracts from sporulating Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Two S. cerevisiae open reading frames (ORFs), identified by the Yeast Genome Project, have protein sequence homology to a chitin deacetylase from Mucor rouxii. Northern blot hybridizations show each ORF was transcribed in diploid cells after transfer to sporulation medium and prior to formation of asci. Each ORF was cloned in a vector under transcriptional control of the GAL 1, 10 promoter and introduced back into haploid strains of S. cerevisiae. Chitin deacetylase activity was detected by in vitro assays from vegetative cells grown in galactose. Chemical analysis of these cells also demonstrated the synthesis of chitosam in vivo. Both recombinant chitin deacetylases showed similar qualitative and quantitative activities toward chitooligosaccharides in vitro. A diploid strain deleted to both ORFs, when sporulated, did not show deacetylase activity. The mutant spores were hypersensitive to lytic enzymes (Glusulase or Zymolyase).

  18. Knickkopf protein protects and organizes chitin in the newly synthesized insect exoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Sujata S; Arakane, Yasuyuki; Specht, Charles A; Moussian, Bernard; Boyle, Daniel L; Park, Yoonseong; Kramer, Karl J; Beeman, Richard W; Muthukrishnan, Subbaratnam

    2011-10-11

    During each molting cycle of insect development, synthesis of new cuticle occurs concurrently with the partial degradation of the overlying old exoskeleton. Protection of the newly synthesized cuticle from molting fluid enzymes has long been attributed to the presence of an impermeable envelope layer that was thought to serve as a physical barrier, preventing molting fluid enzymes from accessing the new cuticle and thereby ensuring selective degradation of only the old one. In this study, using the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, as a model insect species, we show that an entirely different and unexpected mechanism accounts for the selective action of chitinases and possibly other molting enzymes. The molting fluid enzyme chitinase, which degrades the matrix polysaccharide chitin, is not excluded from the newly synthesized cuticle as previously assumed. Instead, the new cuticle is protected from chitinase action by the T. castaneum Knickkopf (TcKnk) protein. TcKnk colocalizes with chitin in the new cuticle and organizes it into laminae. Down-regulation of TcKnk results in chitinase-dependent loss of chitin, severe molting defects, and lethality at all developmental stages. The conservation of Knickkopf across insect, crustacean, and nematode taxa suggests that its critical roles in the laminar ordering and protection of exoskeletal chitin may be common to all chitinous invertebrates.

  19. Sesquiterpene furan compound CJ-01, a novel chitin synthase 2 inhibitor from Chloranthus japonicus SIEB.

    PubMed

    Yim, Nam Hui; Hwang, Eui Il; Yun, Bong Sik; Park, Ki Duk; Moon, Jae Sun; Lee, Sang Han; Sung, Nack Do; Kim, Sung Uk

    2008-05-01

    A novel sesquiterpene furan compound CJ-01 was isolated from the methanol extract of the whole plant of Chloranthus japonicus SIEB. by monitoring the inhibitory activity of chitin synthase 2 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Based on spectroscopic analysis, the structure of compound CJ-01 was determined as 3,4,8a-trimethyl-4a,7,8,8a-tetrahydro-4a-naphto[2,3-b]furan-9-one. The compound inhibited chitin synthase 2 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in a dose-dependent manner with an IC50 of 39.6 microg/ml, whereas it exhibited no inhibitory activities against chitin synthase 1 and 3 of S. cerevisiae up to 280 microg/ml. CJ-01 has 1.7-fold stronger inhibitory activity than polyoxin D (IC50=70 microg/ml), a well-known chitin synthase inhibitor. These results indicate that the compound is a specific inhibitor of chitin synthase 2 from S. cerevisiae. In addition, CJ-01 showed antifungal activities against various human and phytopathogenic fungi. Therefore, the compound might be an interesting lead to develop effective antifungal agents.

  20. The demosponge Pseudoceratina purpurea as a new source of fibrous chitin.

    PubMed

    Żółtowska-Aksamitowska, Sonia; Tsurkan, Mikhail V; Lim, Swee-Cheng; Meissner, Heike; Tabachnick, Konstantin; Shaala, Lamiaa A; Youssef, Diaa T A; Ivanenko, Viatcheslav N; Petrenko, Iaroslav; Wysokowski, Marcin; Bechmann, Nicole; Joseph, Yvonne; Jesionowski, Teofil; Ehrlich, Hermann

    2018-06-01

    Among marine demosponges (Porifera: Demospongiae), only representatives of the order Verongiida have been recognized to synthetize both biologically active substances as well as scaffolds-like fibrous skeletons made of structural aminopolysaccharide chitin. The unique 3D architecture of such scaffolds open perspectives for their applications in waste treatment, biomimetics and tissue engineering. Here, we focus special attention to the demosponge Pseudoceratina purpurea collected in the coastal waters of Singapore. For the first time the detailed description of the isolation of chitin from the skeleton of this sponge and its identification using diverse bioanalytical tools were carried out. Calcofluor white staining, FTIR analysis, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), SEM, and fluorescence microscopy as well as a chitinase digestion assay were applied in order to confirm with strong evidence the finding of alpha-chitin in the skeleton of P. purpurea. We suggest that the discovery of chitin within representatives of Pseudoceratinidae family is a perspective step in evaluation of these verongiid sponges as novel renewable sources for both chitin and biologically active metabolites, which are of prospective use for marine oriented biomedicine and pharmacology, respectively. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Discovery of chitin in skeletons of non-verongiid Red Sea demosponges.

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, Hermann; Shaala, Lamiaa A; Youssef, Diaa T A; Żółtowska-Aksamitowska, Sonia; Tsurkan, Mikhail; Galli, Roberta; Meissner, Heike; Wysokowski, Marcin; Petrenko, Iaroslav; Tabachnick, Konstantin R; Ivanenko, Viatcheslav N; Bechmann, Nicole; Joseph, Yvonne; Jesionowski, Teofil

    2018-01-01

    Marine demosponges (Porifera: Demospongiae) are recognized as first metazoans which have developed over millions of years of evolution effective survival strategies based on unique metabolic pathways to produce both biologically active secondary metabolites and biopolymer-based stiff skeletons with 3D architecture. Up to date, among marine demosponges, only representatives of the Verongiida order have been known to synthetize biologically active substances as well as skeletons made of structural polysaccharide chitin. This work, to our knowledge, demonstrates for the first time that chitin is an important structural component within skeletons of non-verongiid demosponges Acarnus wolffgangi and Echinoclathria gibbosa collected in the Red Sea. Calcofluor white staining, FTIR and Raman analysis, ESI-MS, SEM, and fluorescence microscopy as well as a chitinase digestion assay were applied in order to confirm, with strong evidence, the finding of α-chitin in the skeleton of both species. We suggest that, the finding of chitin within these representatives of Poecilosclerida order is a promising step in the evaluation of these sponges as novel renewable sources for both biologically active metabolites and chitin, which are of prospective application for pharmacology and biomedicine.

  2. A transcriptional regulator linking quorum sensing and chitin induction to render Vibrio cholerae naturally transformable

    PubMed Central

    Lo Scrudato, Mirella; Blokesch, Melanie

    2013-01-01

    The human pathogen Vibrio cholerae is an aquatic bacterium associated with zooplankton and their chitinous exoskeletons. On chitinous surfaces, V. cholerae initiates a developmental programme, known as natural competence, to mediate transformation, which is a mode of horizontal gene transfer. Competence facilitates the uptake of free DNA and recombination into the bacterial genome. Recent studies have indicated that chitin surfaces are required, but not sufficient to induce competence. Two additional regulatory pathways, i.e. catabolite repression and quorum sensing (QS), are components of the regulatory network that controls natural competence in V. cholerae. In this study, we investigated the link between chitin induction and QS. We show that the major regulators of these two pathways, TfoX and HapR, are both involved in the activation of a gene encoding a transcriptional regulator of the LuxR-type family, which we named QS and TfoX-dependent regulator (QstR). We demonstrate that HapR binds the promoter of qstR in a site-specific manner, indicating a role for HapR as an activator of qstR. In addition, epistasis experiments indicate that QstR compensates for the absence of HapR. We also provide evidence that QstR is required for the proper expression of a small but essential subset of competence genes and propose a new regulatory model in which QstR links chitin-induced TfoX activity with QS. PMID:23382174

  3. Investigating chitin deacetylation and chitosan hydrolysis during vegetative growth in Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Geoghegan, Ivey A; Gurr, Sarah J

    2017-09-01

    Chitin deacetylation results in the formation of chitosan, a polymer of β1,4-linked glucosamine. Chitosan is known to have important functions in the cell walls of a number of fungal species, but its role during hyphal growth has not yet been investigated. In this study, we have characterized the role of chitin deacetylation during vegetative hyphal growth in the filamentous phytopathogen Magnaporthe oryzae. We found that chitosan localizes to the septa and lateral cell walls of vegetative hyphae and identified 2 chitin deacetylases expressed during vegetative growth-CDA1 and CDA4. Deletion strains and fluorescent protein fusions demonstrated that CDA1 is necessary for chitin deacetylation in the septa and lateral cell walls of mature hyphae in colony interiors, whereas CDA4 deacetylates chitin in the hyphae at colony margins. However, although the Δcda1 strain was more resistant to cell wall hydrolysis, growth and pathogenic development were otherwise unaffected in the deletion strains. The role of chitosan hydrolysis was also investigated. A single gene encoding a putative chitosanase (CSN) was discovered in M. oryzae and found to be expressed during vegetative growth. However, chitosan localization, vegetative growth, and pathogenic development were unaffected in a CSN deletion strain, rendering the role of this enzyme unclear. © 2017 The Authors Cellular Microbiology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Acitretin and aloe-emodin loaded chitin nanogel for the treatment of psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Divya, G; Panonnummal, Rajitha; Gupta, Swati; Jayakumar, R; Sabitha, M

    2016-10-01

    The present study focuses on the development of an effective topical nanogel formulation of two anti-psoriatic drugs; Acitretin (Act) and Aloe-emodin (AE) using natural polymer chitin. Simple regeneration chemistry was used to prepare Chitin Nanogel Systems (CNGs). The developed control chitin (CNGs) nanogels, acitretin loaded chitin nanogels (ActCNGs) and aloe-emodin loaded chitin nanogels (AECNGs) were characterized by DLS, SEM, FTIR, XRD and TG-DTA. The systems were found to be spherical in shape with a size range of 98±10, 138±8 and 238±6nm having zeta potential values of +28±3, +27±3 and +25±6mV for CNGs, ActCNGs and AECNGs respectively. The in vitro haemolysis assay revealed that all the nanogel systems are blood compatible. The systems exhibited higher swelling and release at acidic pH. The ex vivo skin permeation studies using porcine skin confirmed the higher deposition of the systems at epidermal and dermal layers, which was confirmed further by fluorescent imaging. The in vivo anti-psoriatic activity study using Perry's mouse tail model and skin safety studies confirmed the potential benefit of the system for topical delivery of acitretin and aloe-emodin in psoriasis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Investigating chitin deacetylation and chitosan hydrolysis during vegetative growth in Magnaporthe oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Geoghegan, Ivey A.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Chitin deacetylation results in the formation of chitosan, a polymer of β1,4‐linked glucosamine. Chitosan is known to have important functions in the cell walls of a number of fungal species, but its role during hyphal growth has not yet been investigated. In this study, we have characterized the role of chitin deacetylation during vegetative hyphal growth in the filamentous phytopathogen Magnaporthe oryzae. We found that chitosan localizes to the septa and lateral cell walls of vegetative hyphae and identified 2 chitin deacetylases expressed during vegetative growth—CDA1 and CDA4. Deletion strains and fluorescent protein fusions demonstrated that CDA1 is necessary for chitin deacetylation in the septa and lateral cell walls of mature hyphae in colony interiors, whereas CDA4 deacetylates chitin in the hyphae at colony margins. However, although the Δcda1 strain was more resistant to cell wall hydrolysis, growth and pathogenic development were otherwise unaffected in the deletion strains. The role of chitosan hydrolysis was also investigated. A single gene encoding a putative chitosanase (CSN) was discovered in M. oryzae and found to be expressed during vegetative growth. However, chitosan localization, vegetative growth, and pathogenic development were unaffected in a CSN deletion strain, rendering the role of this enzyme unclear. PMID:28371146

  6. Thin-film Nanofibrous Composite Membranes Containing Cellulose or Chitin Barrier Layers Fabricated by Ionic Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    H Ma; B Hsiao; B Chu

    The barrier layer of high-flux ultrafiltration (UF) thin-film nanofibrous composite (TFNC) membranes for purification of wastewater (e.g., bilge water) have been prepared by using cellulose, chitin, and a cellulose-chitin blend, regenerated from an ionic liquid. The structures and properties of regenerated cellulose, chitin, and a cellulose-chitin blend were analyzed with thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD). The surface morphology, pore size and pore size distribution of TFNC membranes were determined by SEM images and molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) methods. An oil/water emulsion, a model of bilge water, was used as the feed solution, and the permeation flux andmore » rejection ratio of the membranes were investigated. TFNC membranes based on the cellulose-chitin blend exhibited 10 times higher permeation flux when compared with a commercial UF membrane (PAN10, Sepro) with a similar rejection ratio after filtration over a time period of up to 100 h, implying the practical feasibility of such membranes for UF applications.« less

  7. Viscoelastic behavior of mineralized (CaCO3) chitin based PVP-CMC hydrogel scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čadež, Vida; Saha, Nabanita; Sikirić, Maja Dutour; Saha, Petr

    2017-05-01

    Enhancement of the mechanical as well as functional properties of the perspective mineralized PVP-CMC-CaCO3 hydrogel scaffold applicable for bone tissue engineering is quite essential. Therefore, the incorporation feasibility of chitin, a bioactive, antibacterial and biodegradable material, was examined in order to test its ability to enchance mechanical properties of the PVP-CMC-CaCO3 hydrogel scaffold. Chitin based PVP-CMC hydrogels were prepared and characterized both as non-mineralized and mineralized (CaCO3) form of hydrogel scaffolds. Both α-chitin (commercially bought) and β-chitin (isolated from the cuttlebone) were individually tested. It was observed that at 1% strain all hydrogel scaffolds have linear trend, with highly pronounced elastic properties in comparison to viscous ones. The complex viscosity has directly proportional behavior with negative slope against angular frequency within the range of ω = 0.1 - 100 rad.s-1. Incorporation of β-chitin increased storage modulus of all mineralized samples, making it interesting for further research.

  8. Bioconversion of Chitin to Bioactive Chitooligosaccharides: Amelioration and Coastal Pollution Reduction by Microbial Resources.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manish; Brar, Amandeep; Vivekanand, V; Pareek, Nidhi

    2018-04-10

    Chitin-metabolizing products are of high industrial relevance in current scenario due to their wide biological applications, relatively lower cost, greater abundance, and sustainable supply. Chitooligosaccharides have remarkably wide spectrum of applications in therapeutics such as antitumor agents, immunomodulators, drug delivery, gene therapy, wound dressings, as chitinase inhibitors to prevent malaria. Hypocholesterolemic and antimicrobial activities of chitooligosaccharides make them a molecule of choice for food industry, and their functional profile depends on the physicochemical characteristics. Recently, chitin-based nanomaterials are also gaining tremendous importance in biomedical and agricultural applications. Crystallinity and insolubility of chitin imposes a major hurdle in the way of polymer utilization. Chemical production processes are known to produce chitooligosaccharides with variable degree of polymerization and properties along with ecological concerns. Biological production routes mainly involve chitinases, chitosanases, and chitin-binding proteins. Development of bio-catalytic production routes for chitin will not only enhance the production of commercially viable chitooligosaccharides with defined molecular properties but will also provide a means to combat marine pollution with value addition.

  9. Chitin's Functionality as a Novel Disintegrant: Benchmarking Against Commonly Used Disintegrants in Different Physicochemical Environments.

    PubMed

    Chaheen, Mohammad; Soulairol, Ian; Bataille, Bernard; Yassine, Ahmad; Belamie, Emmanuel; Sharkawi, Tahmer

    2017-07-01

    Disintegrants are used as excipients to ensure rapid disintegration of pharmaceutical tablets and further ensure proper dissolution of the active pharmaceutical ingredient. This study investigates disintegration mechanisms of chitin and common disintegrants. Swelling assessment (swelling force and swelling ratio) in different media, and compaction behavior (pure or mixed with other excipients) tabletability, deformation (Heckel modeling), and compact disintegration times were investigated on the tested disintegrants (alginic acid calcium salt, crospovidone, sodium starch glycolate, croscarmellose sodium, and chitin). Results show that the physicochemical properties of the disintegration medium such as pH and ionic strength, as well as other formulation ingredients, affect the disintegrant functionalities. Heckel analysis using the mean yield pressure "Py" shows that alginic acid calcium salt is the most brittle among the studied disintegrants, while crospovidone has the most plastic deformation mechanism, followed by chitin. Chitin showed good tabletability and disintegration properties that were not influenced by the physicochemical formulation environment. Chitin is largely available and easily modifiable and thus a promising material that could be used as a multifunctional excipient in tablet formulation. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of wound healing potential of β-chitin hydrogel/nano zinc oxide composite bandage.

    PubMed

    P T, Sudheesh Kumar; Lakshmanan, Vinoth-Kumar; Raj, Mincy; Biswas, Raja; Hiroshi, Tamura; Nair, Shantikumar V; Jayakumar, Rangasamy

    2013-02-01

    β-chitin hydrogel/nZnO composite bandage was fabricated and evaluated in detail as an alternative to existing bandages. β-chitin hydrogel was synthesized by dissolving β-chitin powder in Methanol/CaCl(2) solvent, followed by the addition of distilled water. ZnO nanoparticles were added to the β-chitin hydrogel and stirred for homogenized distribution. The resultant slurry was frozen at 0°C for 12 h. The frozen samples were lyophilized for 24 h to obtain porous composite bandages. The bandages showed controlled swelling and degradation. The composite bandages showed blood clotting ability as well as platelet activation, which was higher when compared to the control. The antibacterial activity of the bandages were proven against Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Escherichia coli (E.coli). Cytocompatibility of the composite bandages were assessed using human dermal fibroblast cells (HDF) and these cells on the composite bandages were viable similar to the Kaltostat control bandages and bare β-chitin hydrogel based bandages. The viability was reduced to 50-60% in bandages with higher concentration of zinc oxide nanoparticles (nZnO) and showed 80-90% viability with lower concentration of nZnO. In vivo evaluation in Sprague Dawley rats (S.D. rats) showed faster healing and higher collagen deposition ability of composite bandages when compared to the control. The prepared bandages can be used on various types of infected wounds with large volume of exudates.

  11. Complement Component 3C3 and C3a Receptor Are Required in Chitin-Dependent Allergic Sensitization to Aspergillus fumigatus but Dispensable in Chitin-Induced Innate Allergic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Roy, René M.; Paes, Hugo C.; Nanjappa, Som G.; Sorkness, Ron; Gasper, David; Sterkel, Alana; Wüthrich, Marcel; Klein, Bruce S.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Levels of the anaphylatoxin C3a are increased in patients with asthma compared with those in nonasthmatics and increase further still during asthma exacerbations. However, the role of C3a during sensitization to allergen is poorly understood. Sensitization to fungal allergens, such as Aspergillus fumigatus, is a strong risk factor for the development of asthma. Exposure to chitin, a structural polysaccharide of the fungal cell wall, induces innate allergic inflammation and may promote sensitization to fungal allergens. Here, we found that coincubation of chitin with serum or intratracheal administration of chitin in mice resulted in the generation of C3a. We established a model of chitin-dependent sensitization to soluble Aspergillus antigens to test the contribution of complement to these events. C3−/− and C3aR−/− mice were protected from chitin-dependent sensitization to Aspergillus and had reduced lung eosinophilia and type 2 cytokines and serum IgE. In contrast, complement-deficient mice were not protected against chitin-induced innate allergic inflammation. In sensitized mice, plasmacytoid dendritic cells from complement-deficient animals acquired a tolerogenic profile associated with enhanced regulatory T cell responses and suppressed Th2 and Th17 responses specific for Aspergillus. Thus, chitin induces the generation of C3a in the lung, and chitin-dependent allergic sensitization to Aspergillus requires C3aR signaling, which suppresses regulatory dendritic cells and T cells and induces allergy-promoting T cells. PMID:23549917

  12. Dusty globules in the Crab Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenman, T.; Gahm, G. F.; Elfgren, E.

    2017-03-01

    Context. Dust grains are widespread in the Crab Nebula. A number of small, dusty globules, are visible as dark spots against the background of continuous synchrotron emission in optical images. Aims: Our aim is to catalogue such dusty globules and investigate their properties. Methods: From existing broad-band images obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope, we located 92 globules, for which we derived positions, dimensions, orientations, extinctions, masses, proper motions, and their distributions. Results: The globules have mean radii ranging from 400 to 2000 AU and are not resolved in current infrared images of the nebula. The extinction law for dust grains in these globules matches a normal interstellar extinction law. Derived masses of dust range from 1 to 60 × 10-6M⊙, and the total mass contained in globules constitute a fraction of approximately 2% or less of the total dust content of the nebula. The globules are spread over the outer part of the nebula, and a fraction of them coincide in position with emission filaments, where we find elongated globules that are aligned with these filaments. Only 10% of the globules are coincident in position with the numerous H2-emitting knots found in previous studies. All globules move outwards from the centre with transversal velocities of 60 to 1600 km s-1, along with the general expansion of the remnant. We discuss various hypotheses for the formation of globules in the Crab Nebula. Based on observations collected with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute.

  13. Fungal effector Ecp6 outcompetes host immune receptor for chitin binding through intrachain LysM dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Kombrink, Anja; Hansen, Guido; Valkenburg, Dirk-Jan

    2013-01-01

    While host immune receptors detect pathogen-associated molecular patterns to activate immunity, pathogens attempt to deregulate host immunity through secreted effectors. Fungi employ LysM effectors to prevent recognition of cell wall-derived chitin by host immune receptors, although the mechanism to compete for chitin binding remained unclear. Structural analysis of the LysM effector Ecp6 of the fungal tomato pathogen Cladosporium fulvum reveals a novel mechanism for chitin binding, mediated by intrachain LysM dimerization, leading to a chitin-binding groove that is deeply buried in the effector protein. This composite binding site involves two of the three LysMs of Ecp6 and mediates chitin binding with ultra-high (pM) affinity. Intriguingly, the remaining singular LysM domain of Ecp6 binds chitin with low micromolar affinity but can nevertheless still perturb chitin-triggered immunity. Conceivably, the perturbation by this LysM domain is not established through chitin sequestration but possibly through interference with the host immune receptor complex. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00790.001 PMID:23840930

  14. The Effect of Specific Surface Area of Chitin-Metal Silicate Coprocessed Excipient on the Chemical Decomposition of Cefotaxime Sodium.

    PubMed

    Al-Nimry, Suhair S; Alkhamis, Khouloud A; Alzarieni, Kawthar Z

    2017-02-01

    Chitin-metal silicates are multifunctional excipients used in tablets. Previously, a correlation between the surface acidity of chitin-calcium and chitin-magnesium silicate and the chemical decomposition of cefotaxime sodium was found but not with chitin-aluminum silicate. This lack of correlation could be due to the catalytic effect of silica alumina or the difference in surface area of the excipients. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of the specific surface area of the excipient on the chemical decomposition of cefotaxime sodium in the solid state. Chitin was purified and coprocessed with different metal silicates to prepare the excipients. The specific surface area was determined using gas adsorption. The chemical decomposition was studied at constant temperature and relative humidity. Also, the degradation in solution was studied. A correlation was found between the degradation rate constant and the surface area of chitin-aluminum and chitin-calcium silicate but not with chitin-magnesium silicate. This was due to the small average pore diameter of this excipient. Also, the degradation in solution was slower than in solid state. In conclusion, the stability of cefotaxime sodium was dependent on the surface area of the excipient in contact with the drug. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Chitin-Like Molecules Associate with Cryptococcus neoformans Glucuronoxylomannan To Form a Glycan Complex with Previously Unknown Properties

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Caroline L.; Fonseca, Fernanda L.; Rodrigues, Jessica; Guimarães, Allan J.; Cinelli, Leonardo P.; Miranda, Kildare; Nimrichter, Leonardo; Casadevall, Arturo; Travassos, Luiz R.

    2012-01-01

    In prior studies, we demonstrated that glucuronoxylomannan (GXM), the major capsular polysaccharide of the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans, interacts with chitin oligomers at the cell wall-capsule interface. The structural determinants regulating these carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions, as well as the functions of these structures, have remained unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that glycan complexes composed of chitooligomers and GXM are formed during fungal growth and macrophage infection by C. neoformans. To investigate the required determinants for the assembly of chitin-GXM complexes, we developed a quantitative scanning electron microscopy-based method using different polysaccharide samples as inhibitors of the interaction of chitin with GXM. This assay revealed that chitin-GXM association involves noncovalent bonds and large GXM fibers and depends on the N-acetyl amino group of chitin. Carboxyl and O-acetyl groups of GXM are not required for polysaccharide-polysaccharide interactions. Glycan complex structures composed of cryptococcal GXM and chitin-derived oligomers were tested for their ability to induce pulmonary cytokines in mice. They were significantly more efficient than either GXM or chitin oligomers alone in inducing the production of lung interleukin 10 (IL-10), IL-17, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). These results indicate that association of chitin-derived structures with GXM through their N-acetyl amino groups generates glycan complexes with previously unknown properties. PMID:22562469

  16. Fiddler crabs (Uca spp.) as model hosts for laboratory infections of Hematodinium perezi.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Patricia A; Shields, Jeffrey D

    2017-02-01

    The parasitic dinoflagellate, Hematodinium perezi, negatively impacts the commercially important blue crab, Callinectes sapidus. The parasite is a host generalist, but it has not been reported from littoral fiddler crabs living within a few meters of habitat known to harbor infected blue crabs. In the first study, populations of three species of fiddler crab were screened for natural infections. The infection status of field-collected and lab-inoculated crabs was determined by screening fresh hemolymph with a 0.3% neutral red solution. Fiddler crabs were collected by hand in an area adjacent to where infected blue crabs were commonly collected. None of the 431 fiddlers had natural infections. In two separate studies, three species of fiddler crabs, Uca minax, U. pugnax, and U. pugilator, were evaluated for their susceptibility to H. perezi via inoculation of trophic stages. Uca minax inoculated with 10,000 cells of H. perezi were monitored for progression of the parasite. During hemolymph screenings of disease progression, filamentous trophonts, ameboid trophonts, and clump colonies were observed, indicative of active infections. In the second study, the minimum infective dose in U. minax was investigated. Fiddler crabs were inoculated with 0, 100, 1000, or 10,000 cells per crab. The minimum dose was determined to be approximately 1000 ameboid trophonts per crab. All three species of fiddler crab were susceptible to H. perezi via inoculation. The parasite was serially transferred from fiddler crabs to blue crabs without loss of infectivity. Survival studies indicated similar progression patterns to those observed in blue crabs. Based on our results fiddler crabs can serve as a laboratory model for investigating H. perezi infections and may be useful for comparative studies with blue crabs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Extraction of chitosan from shrimp shells waste and application in antibacterial finishing of bamboo rayon.

    PubMed

    Teli, M D; Sheikh, Javed

    2012-06-01

    Chitosan can be best utilized as safe antibacterial agent for textiles but there is always a limitation of its durability. The chitin containing shellfish waste is available in huge quantities, but very low quantities are utilized for extraction of high value products like chitosan. In the current work chitosan was extracted from shrimp shells and then used as antibacterial exhaust finishing agent for grafted bamboo rayon. Chitosan bound bamboo rayon was then evaluated for antibacterial activity against both gram positive and gram negative bacteria. The product showed antibacterial activity against both types of bacterias which was durable till 30 washes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Recruitment variation of eastern Bering Sea crabs: Climate-forcing or top-down effects?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jie; Kruse, Gordon H.

    2006-02-01

    During the last three decades, population abundances of eastern Bering Sea (EBS) crab stocks fluctuated greatly, driven by highly variable recruitment. In recent years, abundances of these stocks have been very low compared to historical levels. This study aims to understand recruitment variation of six stocks of red king ( Paralithodes camtschaticus), blue king ( P. platypus), Tanner ( Chionoecetes bairdi), and snow ( C. opilio) crabs in the EBS. Most crab recruitment time series are not significantly correlated with each other. Spatial distributions of three broadly distributed crab stocks (EBS snow and Tanner crabs and Bristol Bay red king crab) have changed considerably over time, possibly related in part to the regime shift in climate and physical oceanography in 1976-1977. Three climate-forcing hypotheses on larval survival have been proposed to explain crab recruitment variation of Bristol Bay red king crab and EBS Tanner and snow crabs. Some empirical evidence supports speculation that groundfish predation may play an important role in crab recruitment success in the EBS. However, spatial dynamics in the geographic distributions of groundfish and crabs over time make it difficult to relate crab recruitment strength to groundfish biomass. Comprehensive field and spatially explicit modeling studies are needed to test the hypotheses and better understand the relative importance and compound effects of bottom-up and top-down controls on crab recruitment.

  19. Microwave-Assisted Hydrolysis of Chitosan from Shrimp Shell Waste for Glucosammine Hydrochlorid Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaeni, Ahmad; Safitri, Endang; Fuadah, Badrotul; Nyoman Sudiana, I.

    2017-05-01

    Chitin is the most widespread renewable natural sources following cellulose as the main source of chitosan. Chitin is isolated from crustacean waste and shrimp shells. Chitosan is derived from chitin throuhgt demineralisation, deproteination, decolorisation and deacetylation process using chemicals such as sodium hydroxide, hydrogen chloride and acetone. Glucosamine hydrochloride (GlcN-Cl) can be produced by hydrolysis of chitosan by using hydrogen chloride. During deacetylation and hydrolysis the solution is heated by hotplate or furnace. In this paper we use microwave instead of hotplate for production chitosan and GlcN-Cl. The research investigates effect of microwaves to amount of rendemen and their property. The chitosan was characterized its moisture content, solubility, and degree of deacetylation (DDA). Whereas the glucosammine hydrochloride characterized its functional groups using FTIR and crystallization by using X-Ray Difraction (XRD). The experimental results show that the use of microwave energy on deacetilation of chitosan and hydrolisis processes can decrease time consuming and reactant concentration during production. the DDA value obtained was very high from 70 to 85%. The results also show that microwaves meet chitosan and GlcN-Cl standards.

  20. Effects of Chitin and Its Derivative Chitosan on Postharvest Decay of Fruits: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongyin; Li, Renping; Liu, Weimin

    2011-01-01

    Considerable economic losses to harvested fruits are caused by postharvest fungal decay during transportation and storage, which can be significantly controlled by synthetic fungicides. However, considering public concern over pesticide residues in food and the environment, there is a need for safer alternatives for the control of postharvest decay to substitute synthetic fungicides. As the second most abundant biopolymer renewable source in nature, chitin and its derivative chitosan are widely used in controlling postharvest decay of fruits. This review aims to introduce the effect of chitin and chitosan on postharvest decay in fruits and the possible modes of action involved. We found most of the actions discussed in these researches rest on physiological mechanisms. All of the mechanisms are summarized to lay the groundwork for further studies which should focus on the molecular mechanisms of chitin and chitosan in controlling postharvest decay of fruits. PMID:21541034

  1. Cytotoxicity and mechanical behavior of chitin-bentonite clay based polyurethane bio-nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Zia, Khalid Mahmood; Zuber, Mohammad; Barikani, Mehdi; Hussain, Rizwan; Jamil, Tahir; Anjum, Sohail

    2011-12-01

    Chitin based polyurethane bio-nanocomposites (PUBNC) were prepared using chitin, Delite HPS bentonite nanoclay enriched in montmorillonite (MMT), 4,4'-diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI) and polycaprolactone polyol CAPA 231 (3000 g/mol(-1)). The prepolymers having different concentration of Delite HPS bentonite nanoclay were extended with 2 moles of chitin. The structures of the resulted polymers were determined by FT-IR technique. The effect of nanoclay contents on mechanical properties and in vitro biocompatibility was investigated. The mechanical properties of the synthesized materials were improved with increase in the Delite HPS bentonite nanoclay contents. Optimum mechanical properties were obtained from the PU bio-nanocomposite samples having 4% Delite HPS bentonite nanoclay. The results revealed that the final PU bio-nanocomposite having 2% Delite HPS bentonite nanoclay contents is ideal contenders for surgical threads with on going investigations into their in vitro biocompatibility, non-toxicity, and mechanical properties. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Gut immunity in a protochordate involves a secreted immunoglobulin-type mediator binding host chitin and bacteria.

    PubMed

    Dishaw, Larry J; Leigh, Brittany; Cannon, John P; Liberti, Assunta; Mueller, M Gail; Skapura, Diana P; Karrer, Charlotte R; Pinto, Maria R; De Santis, Rosaria; Litman, Gary W

    2016-02-15

    Protochordate variable region-containing chitin-binding proteins (VCBPs) consist of immunoglobulin-type V domains and a chitin-binding domain (CBD). VCBP V domains facilitate phagocytosis of bacteria by granulocytic amoebocytes; the function of the CBD is not understood. Here we show that the gut mucosa of Ciona intestinalis contains an extensive matrix of chitin fibrils to which VCBPs bind early in gut development, before feeding. Later in development, VCBPs and bacteria colocalize to chitin-rich mucus along the intestinal wall. VCBP-C influences biofilm formation in vitro and, collectively, the findings of this study suggest that VCBP-C may influence the overall settlement and colonization of bacteria in the Ciona gut. Basic relationships between soluble immunoglobulin-type molecules, endogenous chitin and bacteria arose early in chordate evolution and are integral to the overall function of the gut barrier.

  3. Isolation and identification of chitin from heavy mineralized skeleton of Suberea clavata (Verongida: Demospongiae: Porifera) marine demosponge.

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, Hermann; Bazhenov, Vasilii V; Debitus, Cecile; de Voogd, Nicole; Galli, Roberta; Tsurkan, Mikhail V; Wysokowski, Marcin; Meissner, Heike; Bulut, Esra; Kaya, Murat; Jesionowski, Teofil

    2017-11-01

    Since the discovery of chitin in skeletal structures of sponges (Porifera) in 2007, studies on search of novel species which possess this structural aminopolysaccharide continue up today. The most potential source of chitin is suggested to be localized in the four families of sponges related to the order Verongida (Demospongiae) which nevertheless require further clarification. Here, we report for the first time the isolation and identification of α-chitin from the Suberea clavata demosponge (Aplysinidae: Verongida). Raman spectroscopy, Calcofluor White staining, chitinase test and ESI-MS techniques were used to identify chitin. We suggest that the presence of chitin within fibrous skeletons of diverse species of Verongida order, and, especially in all species of the Aplysinidae family, may be useful for the identification of novel, previously unidentified marine demosponges. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. AFM PeakForce QNM mode: Evidencing nanometre-scale mechanical properties of chitin-silica hybrid nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Smolyakov, G; Pruvost, S; Cardoso, L; Alonso, B; Belamie, E; Duchet-Rumeau, J

    2016-10-20

    PeakForce Quantitative Nanomechanical Mapping (QNM) AFM mode was used to explore the mechanical properties of textured chitin-silica hybrid films at the nanoscale. The influence of the force applied by the tip on the sample surface was studied for standard homogeneous samples, for chitin nanorods and for chitin-silica hybrid nanocomposites. Thick films of superimposed chitin nanorods showed a monotonous increase of DMT modulus (based on the Derjaguin-Muller-Toporov model) owing to an increase in modulus at the interface between nanorods due to geometrical constraints of the AFM acquisition. A similar variation of DMT modulus was obtained for chitin-silica hybrid thick films related to mechanical strengthening induced by the presence of silica. This work revealed the role of the organic-inorganic interface, at the nanoscale, in the mechanical behaviour of textured materials using PeakForce QNM mode, with optimized analysis conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Chitin recognition via chitotriosidase promotes pathologic type-2 helper T cell responses to cryptococcal infection.

    PubMed

    Wiesner, Darin L; Specht, Charles A; Lee, Chrono K; Smith, Kyle D; Mukaremera, Liliane; Lee, S Thera; Lee, Chun G; Elias, Jack A; Nielsen, Judith N; Boulware, David R; Bohjanen, Paul R; Jenkins, Marc K; Levitz, Stuart M; Nielsen, Kirsten

    2015-03-01

    Pulmonary mycoses are often associated with type-2 helper T (Th2) cell responses. However, mechanisms of Th2 cell accumulation are multifactorial and incompletely known. To investigate Th2 cell responses to pulmonary fungal infection, we developed a peptide-MHCII tetramer to track antigen-specific CD4+ T cells produced in response to infection with the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. We noted massive accruement of pathologic cryptococcal antigen-specific Th2 cells in the lungs following infection that was coordinated by lung-resident CD11b+ IRF4-dependent conventional dendritic cells. Other researchers have demonstrated that this dendritic cell subset is also capable of priming protective Th17 cell responses to another pulmonary fungal infection, Aspergillus fumigatus. Thus, higher order detection of specific features of fungal infection by these dendritic cells must direct Th2 cell lineage commitment. Since chitin-containing parasites commonly elicit Th2 responses, we hypothesized that recognition of fungal chitin is an important determinant of Th2 cell-mediated mycosis. Using C. neoformans mutants or purified chitin, we found that chitin abundance impacted Th2 cell accumulation and disease. Importantly, we determined Th2 cell induction depended on cleavage of chitin via the mammalian chitinase, chitotriosidase, an enzyme that was also prevalent in humans experiencing overt cryptococcosis. The data presented herein offers a new perspective on fungal disease susceptibility, whereby chitin recognition via chitotriosidase leads to the initiation of harmful Th2 cell differentiation by CD11b+ conventional dendritic cells in response to pulmonary fungal infection.

  6. Lipo-chitin oligosaccharides, plant symbiosis signalling molecules that modulate mammalian angiogenesis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Djordjevic, Michael A; Bezos, Anna; Susanti; Marmuse, Laurence; Driguez, Hugues; Samain, Eric; Vauzeilles, Boris; Beau, Jean-Marie; Kordbacheh, Farzaneh; Rolfe, Barry G; Schwörer, Ralf; Daines, Alison M; Gresshoff, Peter M; Parish, Christopher R

    2014-01-01

    Lipochitin oligosaccharides (LCOs) are signaling molecules required by ecologically and agronomically important bacteria and fungi to establish symbioses with diverse land plants. In plants, oligo-chitins and LCOs can differentially interact with different lysin motif (LysM) receptors and affect innate immunity responses or symbiosis-related pathways. In animals, oligo-chitins also induce innate immunity and other physiological responses but LCO recognition has not been demonstrated. Here LCO and LCO-like compounds are shown to be biologically active in mammals in a structure dependent way through the modulation of angiogenesis, a tightly-regulated process involving the induction and growth of new blood vessels from existing vessels. The testing of 24 LCO, LCO-like or oligo-chitin compounds resulted in structure-dependent effects on angiogenesis in vitro leading to promotion, or inhibition or nil effects. Like plants, the mammalian LCO biological activity depended upon the presence and type of terminal substitutions. Un-substituted oligo-chitins of similar chain lengths were unable to modulate angiogenesis indicating that mammalian cells, like plant cells, can distinguish between LCOs and un-substituted oligo-chitins. The cellular mode-of-action of the biologically active LCOs in mammals was determined. The stimulation or inhibition of endothelial cell adhesion to vitronectin or fibronectin correlated with their pro- or anti-angiogenic activity. Importantly, novel and more easily synthesised LCO-like disaccharide molecules were also biologically active and de-acetylated chitobiose was shown to be the primary structural basis of recognition. Given this, simpler chitin disaccharides derivatives based on the structure of biologically active LCOs were synthesised and purified and these showed biological activity in mammalian cells. Since important chronic disease states are linked to either insufficient or excessive angiogenesis, LCO and LCO-like molecules may have the

  7. Chitin Binding Proteins Act Synergistically with Chitinases in Serratia proteamaculans 568

    PubMed Central

    Purushotham, Pallinti; Arun, P. V. Parvati Sai; Prakash, Jogadhenu S. S.; Podile, Appa Rao

    2012-01-01

    Genome sequence of Serratia proteamaculans 568 revealed the presence of three family 33 chitin binding proteins (CBPs). The three Sp CBPs (Sp CBP21, Sp CBP28 and Sp CBP50) were heterologously expressed and purified. Sp CBP21 and Sp CBP50 showed binding preference to β-chitin, while Sp CBP28 did not bind to chitin and cellulose substrates. Both Sp CBP21 and Sp CBP50 were synergistic with four chitinases from S. proteamaculans 568 (Sp ChiA, Sp ChiB, Sp ChiC and Sp ChiD) in degradation of α- and β-chitin, especially in the presence of external electron donor (reduced glutathione). Sp ChiD benefited most from Sp CBP21 or Sp CBP50 on α-chitin, while Sp ChiB and Sp ChiD had major advantage with these Sp CBPs on β-chitin. Dose responsive studies indicated that both the Sp CBPs exhibit synergism ≥0.2 µM. The addition of both Sp CBP21 and Sp CBP50 in different ratios to a synergistic mixture did not significantly increase the activity. Highly conserved polar residues, important in binding and activity of CBP21 from S. marcescens (Sm CBP21), were present in Sp CBP21 and Sp CBP50, while Sp CBP28 had only one such polar residue. The inability of Sp CBP28 to bind to the test substrates could be attributed to the absence of important polar residues. PMID:22590591

  8. N-acetylglucosamine, the building block of chitin, inhibits growth of Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Gaderer, Romana; Seidl-Seiboth, Verena; de Vries, Ronald P; Seiboth, Bernhard; Kappel, Lisa

    2017-10-01

    N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) is the monomer of the polysaccharide chitin, an essential structural component of the fungal cell wall and the arthropod exoskeleton. We recently showed that the genes encoding the enzymes for GlcNAc catabolism are clustered in several ascomycetes. In the present study we tested these fungi for growth on GlcNAc and chitin. All fungi, containing the GlcNAc gene cluster, could grow on GlcNAc with the exception of four independent Neurospora crassa wild-type isolates, which were however able to grow on chitin. GlcNAc even inhibited their growth in the presence of other carbon sources. Genes involved in GlcNAc catabolism were strongly upregulated in the presence of GlcNAc, but during growth on chitin their expression was not increased. Deletion of hxk-3 (encoding the first catabolic enzyme, GlcNAc-hexokinase) and ngt-1 (encoding the GlcNAc transporter) improved growth of N. crassa on GlcNAc in the presence of glycerol. A crucial step in GlcNAc catabolism is enzymatic conversion from glucosamine-6-phosphate to fructose-6-phosphate, catalyzed by the glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase, DAM-1. To assess, if DAM-1 is compromised in N. crassa, the orthologue from Trichoderma reesei, Trdam1, was expressed in N. crassa. Trdam1 expression partially alleviated the negative effects of GlcNAc in the presence of a second carbon source, but did not fully restore growth on GlcNAc. Our results indicate that the GlcNAc-catabolism pathway is bypassed during growth of N. crassa on chitin by use of an alternative pathway, emphasizing the different strategies that have evolved in the fungal kingdom for chitin utilization. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Chitin Recognition via Chitotriosidase Promotes Pathologic Type-2 Helper T Cell Responses to Cryptococcal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wiesner, Darin L.; Specht, Charles A.; Lee, Chrono K.; Smith, Kyle D.; Mukaremera, Liliane; Lee, S. Thera; Lee, Chun G.; Elias, Jack A.; Nielsen, Judith N.; Boulware, David R.; Bohjanen, Paul R.; Jenkins, Marc K.; Levitz, Stuart M.; Nielsen, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary mycoses are often associated with type-2 helper T (Th2) cell responses. However, mechanisms of Th2 cell accumulation are multifactorial and incompletely known. To investigate Th2 cell responses to pulmonary fungal infection, we developed a peptide-MHCII tetramer to track antigen-specific CD4+ T cells produced in response to infection with the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. We noted massive accruement of pathologic cryptococcal antigen-specific Th2 cells in the lungs following infection that was coordinated by lung-resident CD11b+ IRF4-dependent conventional dendritic cells. Other researchers have demonstrated that this dendritic cell subset is also capable of priming protective Th17 cell responses to another pulmonary fungal infection, Aspergillus fumigatus. Thus, higher order detection of specific features of fungal infection by these dendritic cells must direct Th2 cell lineage commitment. Since chitin-containing parasites commonly elicit Th2 responses, we hypothesized that recognition of fungal chitin is an important determinant of Th2 cell-mediated mycosis. Using C. neoformans mutants or purified chitin, we found that chitin abundance impacted Th2 cell accumulation and disease. Importantly, we determined Th2 cell induction depended on cleavage of chitin via the mammalian chitinase, chitotriosidase, an enzyme that was also prevalent in humans experiencing overt cryptococcosis. The data presented herein offers a new perspective on fungal disease susceptibility, whereby chitin recognition via chitotriosidase leads to the initiation of harmful Th2 cell differentiation by CD11b+ conventional dendritic cells in response to pulmonary fungal infection. PMID:25764512

  10. The isotopic biosignatures of photo- vs. thiotrophic bivalves: are they preserved in fossil shells?

    PubMed

    Dreier, A; Loh, W; Blumenberg, M; Thiel, V; Hause-Reitner, D; Hoppert, M

    2014-09-01

    Symbiont-bearing and non-symbiotic marine bivalves were used as model organisms to establish biosignatures for the detection of distinctive symbioses in ancient bivalves. For this purpose, the isotopic composition of lipids (δ13C) and bulk organic shell matrix (δ13C, δ34S, δ15N) from shells of several thiotrophic, phototrophic, or non-symbiotic bivalves were compared (phototrophic: Fragum fragum, Fragum unedo, Tridacna maxima; thiotrophic: Codakia tigerina, Fimbria fimbriata, Anodontia sp.; non-symbiotic: Tapes dorsatus, Vasticardium vertebratum, Scutarcopagia sp.). ∆13C values of bulk organic shell matrices, most likely representing mainly original shell protein/chitin biomass, were depleted in thio- and phototrophic bivalves compared to non-symbiotic bivalves. As the bulk organic shell matrix also showed a major depletion of δ15N (down to -2.2 ‰) for thiotrophic bivalves, combined δ13C and δ15N values are useful to differentiate between thio-, phototrophic, and non-symbiotic lifestyles. However, the use of these isotopic signatures for the study of ancient bivalves is limited by the preservation of the bulk organic shell matrix in fossils. Substantial alteration was clearly shown by detailed microscopic analyses of fossil (late Pleistocene) T. maxima and Trachycardium lacunosum shell, demonstrating a severe loss of quantity and quality of bulk organic shell matrix with time. Likewise, the composition and δ13C-values of lipids from empty shells indicated that a large part of these compounds derived from prokaryotic decomposers. The use of lipids from ancient shells for the reconstruction of the bivalve's life style therefore appears to be restricted. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Characterization of chitin extracted from fish scales of marine fish species purchased from local markets in North Sulawesi, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumengan, I. F. M.; Suptijah, P.; Wullur, S.; Talumepa, A.

    2017-10-01

    Chitin is a biodegradable biopolymer with a variety of commercial applications, including in the food food-supplement industries as a marine-derived nutraceutical. The purpose of this study was to characterize the molecular structure of chitin extracted from fish scales of important marine fish purchased from local markets in North Sulawesi. Chitin compound material was obtained from a specific fish scale, and then sequentially carrying out a boiling treatment to separate it from a complex with collagen. From the scales of two fish species, parrotfish (Chlorurus sordidus) and red snapper (Lutjanus argentimaculatus), the rendemen of chitin obtained were 45 % and 33%, respectively. Structural characteristics of the chitin were discussed by FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared) analysis data. FTIR analysis was done using infrared spectroscopy, which is the resulting spectrum represents the molecular absorption and transmission, creating a molecular fingerprint of the sample. The molecular structure of chitin, C18H26N2O10, where the hydroxyl group on the second carbon replaced by acetyl amide, was shown by the infrared spectra. In the infrared spectra, chitin from parrot fish scales indicated the amide band at 1627.13 cm-1, and chitin from red snapper fish scales the amide band at 1648.09 cm-1 which are a typical one for marine chitin. The hydroxyl and amino bands at the ranged spectra up to 3500 cm-1. The yields of chitin isolated from fish scale were relatively huge. Some treatments are necessary to confirm the molecular conformation and deacetylation behavior. All products from the extraction of fish scales could be more accessible for structural modifications to develop biocompatible materials for pharmaceutical purposes.

  12. Eco-Friendly Extraction of Biopolymer Chitin and Carotenoids from Shrimp Waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prameela, K.; Venkatesh, K.; Divya vani, K.; Sudesh Kumar, E.; Mohan, CH Murali

    2017-08-01

    Astaxanthin a nutraceutical and chitin a natural biopolymer present in shrimp waste. In current chemical extraction methods HCl and NaOH are used for extraction and these chemicals are introduced into aquatic ecosystems are spoiling aquatic flora and fauna, pollute the environment and destroy astaxanthin. Lactobacillus species were isolated from gut of Solenocera melantho and characterized phenotypically and genotypically. Initial screening experiments have shown to be an effective and identified as Lactobacillus plantaram based on morphological, biochemical characteristics and molecular analysis. Efficiency of fermentation has shown with good yield of astaxanthin and recovery of chitin. Hence this alternative microbial process is having advantage than existing hazardous, non-economical chemical process.

  13. Location on chitin in the cyst wall of Entamoeba invadens with colloidal gold tracers.

    PubMed

    Arroyo-Begovich, A; Cárabez-Trejo, A

    1982-04-01

    Chitin was located in the cyst wall of Entamoeba invadens with colloidal gold-linked wheat germ agglutinin. Cysts stained differentially from trophozoites when encysting cultures were treated with the gold tracer; cysts acquired a wine-red coloration while, in general trophozoites remained unstained. Observation of cells with the electron microscope revealed that the tracer particles were bound specifically to the walls of the surface of the cyst when cells were exposed in suspension, and to the cyst wall cross-section, when cells were exposed to the tracer in thin section, indicating that chitin fibers were distributed on the surface as well as throughout the matrix of the cyst wall.

  14. 50 CFR 648.263 - Red crab possession and landing restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE NORTHEASTERN UNITED STATES Management Measures for the Atlantic Deep-Sea Red Crab Fishery § 648.263 Red crab possession and landing...

  15. Behavioral thermoregulation in Hemigrapsus nudus, the amphibious purple shore crab.

    PubMed

    McGaw, I J

    2003-02-01

    The thermoregulatory behavior of Hemigrapsus nudus, the amphibious purple shore crab, was examined in both aquatic and aerial environments. Crabs warmed and cooled more rapidly in water than in air. Acclimation in water of 16 degrees C (summer temperatures) raised the critical thermal maximum temperature (CTMax); acclimation in water of 10 degrees C (winter temperatures) lowered the critical thermal minimum temperature (CTMin). The changes occurred in both water and air. However, these survival regimes did not reflect the thermal preferences of the animals. In water, the thermal preference of crabs acclimated to 16 degrees C was 14.6 degrees C, and they avoided water warmer than 25.5 degrees C. These values were significantly lower than those of the crabs acclimated to 10 degrees C; these animals demonstrated temperature preferences for water that was 17 degrees C, and they avoided water that was warmer than 26.9 degrees C. This temperature preference was also exhibited in air, where 10 degrees C acclimated crabs exited from under rocks at a temperature that was 3.2 degrees C higher than that at which the 16 degrees C acclimated animals responded. This behavioral pattern was possibly due to a decreased thermal tolerance of 16 degrees C acclimated crabs, related with the molting process. H. nudus was better able to survive prolonged exposure to cold temperatures than to warm temperatures, and there was a trend towards lower exit temperatures with the lower acclimation (10 degrees C) temperature. Using a complex series of behaviors, the crabs were able to precisely control body temperature independent of the medium, by shuttling between air and water. The time spent in either air or water was influenced more strongly by the temperature than by the medium. In the field, this species may experience ranges in temperatures of up to 20 degrees C; however, it is able to utilize thermal microhabitats underneath rocks to maintain its body temperature within fairly narrow

  16. Design and prototyping of HL-LHC double quarter wave crab cavities for SPS test

    SciTech Connect

    Verdu-Andres, S.; Skaritka, J.; Wu, Q.

    2015-05-03

    The LHC high luminosity project envisages the use of the crabbing technique for increasing and levelling the LHC luminosity. Double Quarter Wave (DQW) resonators are compact cavities especially designed to meet the technical and performance requirements for LHC beam crabbing. Two DQW crab cavities are under fabrication and will be tested with beam in the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN by 2017. This paper describes the design and prototyping of the DQW crab cavities for the SPS test.

  17. Multiple shell fusion targets

    DOEpatents

    Lindl, J.D.; Bangerter, R.O.

    1975-10-31

    Multiple shell fusion targets for use with electron beam and ion beam implosion systems are described. The multiple shell targets are of the low-power type and use a separate relatively low Z, low density ablator at large radius for the outer shell, which reduces the focusing and power requirements of the implosion system while maintaining reasonable aspect ratios. The targets use a high Z, high density pusher shell placed at a much smaller radius in order to obtain an aspect ratio small enough to protect against fluid instability. Velocity multiplication between these shells further lowers the power requirements. Careful tuning of the power profile and intershell density results in a low entropy implosion which allows breakeven at low powers. For example, with ion beams as a power source, breakeven at 10-20 Terrawatts with 10 MeV alpha particles for imploding a multiple shell target can be accomplished.

  18. 40 CFR 408.50 - Applicability; description of the remote Alaskan crab meat processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... remote Alaskan crab meat processing subcategory. 408.50 Section 408.50 Protection of Environment... PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Remote Alaskan Crab Meat Processing Subcategory § 408.50 Applicability; description of the remote Alaskan crab meat processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are...

  19. 40 CFR 408.20 - Applicability; description of the conventional blue crab processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... conventional blue crab processing subcategory. 408.20 Section 408.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Conventional Blue Crab Processing Subcategory § 408.20 Applicability; description of the conventional blue crab processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges...

  20. 40 CFR 408.20 - Applicability; description of the conventional blue crab processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... conventional blue crab processing subcategory. 408.20 Section 408.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Conventional Blue Crab Processing Subcategory § 408.20 Applicability; description of the conventional blue crab processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges...

  1. 40 CFR 408.30 - Applicability; description of the mechanized blue crab processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... mechanized blue crab processing subcategory. 408.30 Section 408.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Mechanized Blue Crab Processing Subcategory § 408.30 Applicability; description of the mechanized blue crab processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges...

  2. 40 CFR 408.30 - Applicability; description of the mechanized blue crab processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... mechanized blue crab processing subcategory. 408.30 Section 408.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Mechanized Blue Crab Processing Subcategory § 408.30 Applicability; description of the mechanized blue crab processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges...

  3. 40 CFR 408.30 - Applicability; description of the mechanized blue crab processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... mechanized blue crab processing subcategory. 408.30 Section 408.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Mechanized Blue Crab Processing Subcategory § 408.30 Applicability; description of the mechanized blue crab processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges...

  4. 40 CFR 408.30 - Applicability; description of the mechanized blue crab processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... mechanized blue crab processing subcategory. 408.30 Section 408.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Mechanized Blue Crab Processing Subcategory § 408.30 Applicability; description of the mechanized blue crab processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges...

  5. 40 CFR 408.20 - Applicability; description of the conventional blue crab processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... conventional blue crab processing subcategory. 408.20 Section 408.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Conventional Blue Crab Processing Subcategory § 408.20 Applicability; description of the conventional blue crab processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges...

  6. 40 CFR 408.20 - Applicability; description of the conventional blue crab processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... conventional blue crab processing subcategory. 408.20 Section 408.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Conventional Blue Crab Processing Subcategory § 408.20 Applicability; description of the conventional blue crab processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges...

  7. 40 CFR 408.20 - Applicability; description of the conventional blue crab processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... conventional blue crab processing subcategory. 408.20 Section 408.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Conventional Blue Crab Processing Subcategory § 408.20 Applicability; description of the conventional blue crab processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges...

  8. 40 CFR 408.30 - Applicability; description of the mechanized blue crab processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... mechanized blue crab processing subcategory. 408.30 Section 408.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Mechanized Blue Crab Processing Subcategory § 408.30 Applicability; description of the mechanized blue crab processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges...

  9. Species Profiles. Life Histories and Environmental Requirements of Coastal Fishes and Invertebrates (Pacific Northwest). Dungeness Crab.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-08-01

    variety of factors crab eggs has been linked to increased including depth, latitude, tempera- egg mortality because of mechanical ture, salinity and...time. crabs seem less dependent on epibenthic cover and can be found over more exposed substrates. Most crabs Temperature- Salinity Interactions remain...13 Salinity . .. ....... ........................................ 14 Temperature- Salinity Interactions. .. .... ....... ....... 14

  10. 50 CFR 648.262 - Accountability measures for red crab limited access vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Accountability measures for red crab... UNITED STATES Management Measures for the Atlantic Deep-Sea Red Crab Fishery § 648.262 Accountability measures for red crab limited access vessels. (a) Closure authority. NMFS shall close the EEZ to fishing...

  11. 76 FR 25545 - Safety Zone; Blue Crab Festival Fireworks Display, Little River, Little River, SC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-05

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone; Blue Crab Festival Fireworks Display, Little River, Little River, SC AGENCY: Coast... zone on the waters of Little River in Little River, South Carolina during the Blue Crab Festival... this rule because the Coast Guard did not receive notice of the Blue Crab Festival Fireworks Display...

  12. 40 CFR 408.50 - Applicability; description of the remote Alaskan crab meat processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... remote Alaskan crab meat processing subcategory. 408.50 Section 408.50 Protection of Environment... PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Remote Alaskan Crab Meat Processing Subcategory § 408.50 Applicability; description of the remote Alaskan crab meat processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are...

  13. Species-specific crab predation on the hydrozoan clinging jellyfish Gonionemus sp. (Cnidaria, Hydrozoa), subsequent crab mortality, and possible ecological consequences.

    PubMed

    Carman, Mary R; Grunden, David W; Govindarajan, Annette F

    2017-01-01

    Here we report a unique trophic interaction between the cryptogenic and sometimes highly toxic hydrozoan clinging jellyfish Gonionemus sp. and the spider crab Libinia dubia . We assessed species-specific predation on the Gonionemus medusae by crabs found in eelgrass meadows in Massachusetts, USA. The native spider crab species L. dubia consumed Gonionemus medusae, often enthusiastically, but the invasive green crab Carcinus maenus avoided consumption in all trials. One out of two blue crabs ( Callinectes sapidus ) also consumed Gonionemus , but this species was too rare in our study system to evaluate further. Libinia crabs could consume up to 30 jellyfish, which was the maximum jellyfish density treatment in our experiments, over a 24-hour period. Gonionemus consumption was associated with Libinia mortality. Spider crab mortality increased with Gonionemus consumption, and 100% of spider crabs tested died within 24 h of consuming jellyfish in our maximum jellyfish density containers. As the numbers of Gonionemus medusae used in our experiments likely underestimate the number of medusae that could be encountered by spider crabs over a 24-hour period in the field, we expect that Gonionemus may be having a negative effect on natural Libinia populations. Furthermore, given that Libinia overlaps in habitat and resource use with Carcinus , which avoids Gonionemus consumption, Carcinus populations could be indirectly benefiting from this unusual crab-jellyfish trophic relationship.

  14. Habits and customs of crab catchers in southern Bahia, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Firmo, Angélica M S; Tognella, Mônica M P; Tenório, Gabrielle D; Barboza, Raynner R D; Alves, Rômulo R N

    2017-08-23

    Brazilian mangrove forests are widely distributed along the coast and exploited by groups of people with customs and habits as diverse as the biology of the mangrove ecosystems. This study identifies different methods of extracting crabs that inhabit the mangrove belts; some of these activities, such as catching individual crabs by hand, are aimed at maintaining natural stocks of this species in Mucuri (south Bahia), Brazil. In the studied community, illegal hunting activities that violate Brazilian legislation limiting the use of tangle-netting in mangrove ecosystem were observed. According to our observations, fishermen, to catch individual crabs, use the tangle-netting technique seeking to increase income and are from families that have no tradition of extraction. This analysis leads us to conclude that catchers from economically marginalised social groups enter mangroves for purposes of survival rather than for purposes of subsistence, because the catching by tangle-netting is a predatory technique. Tangle-netting  technique increase caught but also increases their mortality rate. We emphasise that traditional catching methods are unique to Brazil and that manual capturing of crab should be preserved through public policies aimed at maintaining the crab population.

  15. Patterns of activity expressed by juvenile horseshoe crabs.

    PubMed

    Dubofsky, E A; Simpson, S D; Chabot, Christopher C; Watson, Winsor H

    2013-09-01

    Adult American horseshoe crabs, Limulus polyphemus, possess endogenous circadian and circatidal clocks controlling visual sensitivity and locomotion, respectively. The goal of this study was to determine the types of activity rhythms expressed by juvenile horseshoe crabs (n = 24) when exposed to a 14:10 light/dark cycle (LD) for 10 days, followed by 10 days of constant darkness (DD). Horseshoe crab activity was recorded with a digital time-lapse video system that used an infrared-sensitive camera so animals could be monitored at night. In LD, 15 animals expressed daily patterns of activity, 6 displayed a circatidal pattern, and the remaining 3 were arrhythmic. Of the 15 animals with daily patterns of locomotion, 7 had a significant preference (P < 0.05) for diurnal activity and 3 for nocturnal activity; the remainder did not express a significant preference for day or night activity. In DD, 13 horseshoe crabs expressed circatidal rhythms and 8 maintained a pattern of about 24 h. Although these results suggest the presence of a circadian clock influencing circatidal patterns of locomotion, these apparent circadian rhythms may actually represent the expression of just one of the two bouts of activity driven by the putative circalunidian clocks that control their tidal rhythms. Overall, these results indicate that, like adults, juvenile horseshoe crabs express both daily and tidal patterns of activity and that at least one, and maybe both, of these patterns is driven by endogenous clocks.

  16. Chitin-induced and CHITIN ELICITOR RECEPTOR KINASE1 (CERK1) phosphorylation-dependent endocytosis of Arabidopsis thaliana LYSIN MOTIF-CONTAINING RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE5 (LYK5).

    PubMed

    Erwig, Jan; Ghareeb, Hassan; Kopischke, Michaela; Hacke, Ronja; Matei, Alexandra; Petutschnig, Elena; Lipka, Volker

    2017-07-01

    To detect potential pathogens, plants perceive the fungal polysaccharide chitin through receptor complexes containing lysin motif receptor-like kinases (LysM-RLKs). To investigate the ligand-induced spatial dynamics of chitin receptor components, we studied the subcellular behaviour of two Arabidopsis thaliana LysM-RLKs involved in chitin signalling, CHITIN ELICITOR RECEPTOR KINASE1 (CERK1) and LYSIN MOTIF-CONTAINING RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE5. We performed standard and quantitative confocal laser scanning microscopy on stably transformed A. thaliana plants expressing fluorescently tagged CERK1 and LYK5 from their native promoters. Microscopy approaches were complemented by biochemical analyses in plants and in vitro. Both CERK1 and LYK5 localized to the plasma membrane and showed constitutive endomembrane trafficking. After chitin treatment, however, CERK1 remained at the plasma membrane while LYK5 relocalized into mobile intracellular vesicles. Detailed analyses revealed that chitin perception transiently induced the internalization of LYK5 into late endocytic compartments. Plants that lacked CERK1 or expressed an enzymatically inactive CERK1 variant did not exhibit chitin-induced endocytosis of LYK5. CERK1 could phosphorylate LYK5 in vitro and chitin treatment induced CERK1-dependent phosphorylation of LYK5 in planta. Our results suggest that chitin-induced phosphorylation by CERK1 triggers LYK5 internalization. Thus, our work identifies phosphorylation as a key regulatory step in endocytosis of plant RLKs and also provides evidence for receptor complex dissociation after ligand perception. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  17. Search for thermal X-ray features from the Crab nebula with the Hitomi soft X-ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitomi Collaboration; Aharonian, Felix; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Akimoto, Fumie; Allen, Steven W.; Angelini, Lorella; Audard, Marc; Awaki, Hisamitsu; Axelsson, Magnus; Bamba, Aya; Bautz, Marshall W.; Blandford, Roger; Brenneman, Laura W.; Brown, Gregory V.; Bulbul, Esra; Cackett, Edward M.; Chernyakova, Maria; Chiao, Meng P.; Coppi, Paolo S.; Costantini, Elisa; de Plaa, Jelle; de Vries, Cor P.; den Herder, Jan-Willem; Done, Chris; Dotani, Tadayasu; Ebisawa, Ken; Eckart, Megan E.; Enoto, Teruaki; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Fabian, Andrew C.; Ferrigno, Carlo; Foster, Adam R.; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Furuzawa, Akihiro; Galeazzi, Massimiliano; Gallo, Luigi C.; Gandhi, Poshak; Giustini, Margherita; Goldwurm, Andrea; Gu, Liyi; Guainazzi, Matteo; Haba, Yoshito; Hagino, Kouichi; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Harrus, Ilana M.; Hatsukade, Isamu; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Hayashi, Takayuki; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Hiraga, Junko S.; Hornschemeier, Ann; Hoshino, Akio; Hughes, John P.; Ichinohe, Yuto; Iizuka, Ryo; Inoue, Hajime; Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Ishida, Manabu; Ishikawa, Kumi; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Kaastra, Jelle; Kallman, Tim; Kamae, Tsuneyoshi; Kataoka, Jun; Katsuda, Satoru; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Kitaguchi, Takao; Kitamoto, Shunji; Kitayama, Tetsu; Kohmura, Takayoshi; Kokubun, Motohide; Koyama, Katsuji; Koyama, Shu; Kretschmar, Peter; Krimm, Hans A.; Kubota, Aya; Kunieda, Hideyo; Laurent, Philippe; Lee, Shiu-Hang; Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Limousin, Olivier; Loewenstein, Michael; Long, Knox S.; Lumb, David; Madejski, Greg; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Maier, Daniel; Makishima, Kazuo; Markevitch, Maxim; Matsumoto, Hironori; Matsushita, Kyoko; McCammon, Dan; McNamara, Brian R.; Mehdipour, Missagh; Miller, Eric D.; Miller, Jon M.; Mineshige, Shin; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Miyazawa, Takuya; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Mori, Hideyuki; Mori, Koji; Mukai, Koji; Murakami, Hiroshi; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Nakagawa, Takao; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Nakamori, Takeshi; Nakashima, Shinya; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Nobukawa, Kumiko K.; Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Noda, Hirofumi; Odaka, Hirokazu; Ohashi, Takaya; Ohno, Masanori; Okajima, Takashi; Ota, Naomi; Ozaki, Masanobu; Paerels, Frits; Paltani, Stéphane; Petre, Robert; Pinto, Ciro; Porter, Frederick S.; Pottschmidt, Katja; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Safi-Harb, Samar; Saito, Shinya; Sakai, Kazuhiro; Sasaki, Toru; Sato, Goro; Sato, Kosuke; Sato, Rie; Sato, Toshiki; Sawada, Makoto; Schartel, Norbert; Serlemtsos, Peter J.; Seta, Hiromi; Shidatsu, Megumi; Simionescu, Aurora; Smith, Randall K.; Soong, Yang; Stawarz, Łukasz; Sugawara, Yasuharu; Sugita, Satoshi; Szymkowiak, Andrew; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Takeda, Shin'ichiro; Takei, Yoh; Tamagawa, Toru; Tamura, Takayuki; Tanaka, Takaaki; Tanaka, Yasuo; Tanaka, Yasuyuki T.; Tashiro, Makoto S.; Tawara, Yuzuru; Terada, Yukikatsu; Terashima, Yuichi; Tombesi, Francesco; Tomida, Hiroshi; Tsuboi, Yohko; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Tsuru, Takeshi Go; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Uchiyama, Hideki; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Ueda, Shutaro; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Uno, Shin'ichiro; Urry, C. Megan; Ursino, Eugenio; Watanabe, Shin; Werner, Norbert; Wilkins, Dan R.; Williams, Brian J.; Yamada, Shinya; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Yamauchi, Makoto; Yamauchi, Shigeo; Yaqoob, Tahir; Yatsu, Yoichi; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Zhuravleva, Irina; Zoghbi, Abderahmen; Tominaga, Nozomu; Moriya, Takashi J.

    2018-03-01

    The Crab nebula originated from a core-collapse supernova (SN) explosion observed in 1054 AD. When viewed as a supernova remnant (SNR), it has an anomalously low observed ejecta mass and kinetic energy for an Fe-core-collapse SN. Intensive searches have been made for a massive shell that solves this discrepancy, but none has been detected. An alternative idea is that SN 1054 is an electron-capture (EC) explosion with a lower explosion energy by an order of magnitude than Fe-core-collapse SNe. X-ray imaging searches were performed for the plasma emission from the shell in the Crab outskirts to set a stringent upper limit on the X-ray emitting mass. However, the extreme brightness of the source hampers access to its vicinity. We thus employed spectroscopic technique using the X-ray micro-calorimeter on board the Hitomi satellite. By exploiting its superb energy resolution, we set an upper limit for emission or absorption features from as yet undetected thermal plasma in the 2-12 keV range. We also re-evaluated the existing Chandra and XMM-Newton data. By assembling these results, a new upper limit was obtained for the X-ray plasma mass of ≲ 1 M⊙ for a wide range of assumed shell radius, size, and plasma temperature values both in and out of collisional equilibrium. To compare with the observation, we further performed hydrodynamic simulations of the Crab SNR for two SN models (Fe-core versus EC) under two SN environments (uniform interstellar medium versus progenitor wind). We found that the observed mass limit can be compatible with both SN models if the SN environment has a low density of ≲ 0.03 cm-3 (Fe core) or ≲ 0.1 cm-3 (EC) for the uniform density, or a progenitor wind density somewhat less than that provided by a mass loss rate of 10-5 M⊙ yr-1 at 20 km s-1 for the wind environment.

  18. Behavioral Response of Hermit Crabs (Clibanarius digueti) to Dissolved Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, H. J.

    2016-02-01

    CO2 induced ocean acidification is currently changing the population dynamics of marine organisms. This can involve increased stress in populations, and alteration in individual physiology, which can eventually be expressed through an organism's behavior. If sustained, CO2 induced ocean acidification has the potential to cause major impacts on marine food chains, including on services they provide. The purpose of this study was to understand whether and how ocean acidification affects the behavior of hermit crab Clibanarius digueti, a crustacean inhabiting the littoral zone. We hypothesized that an increase in dissolved carbonic acid would modify grazing and individual movement, because an increase in acidification alters the normal chemical composition of the water and potentially the physiology of C. digueti. A model tidal pool experiment consisting of two tanks (control and treatment) inhabited with seven living C. digueti was set up in the Ocean Biome of Biosphere-2. Each tank was also provided with uninhabited shells: two Turbo fluctuosa and four Cerithium sp. Gaseous CO2 was dissolved into the treatment tank and measured as dissolved CO2 by using a NaOH titration method. Additionally, water conditions were characterized for light and temperature. Two trials were run in this experiment with tanks and treatments interchanged in each trial. We found a marked treatment effect on C. digueti behavior. The population experiencing increased CO2 performed daily shell changes after first day of exposure for each of the 4-day trials, as compared to individuals unexposed to dissolved CO2, that experienced no shell changes. From this study we conclude that the behavior of C. Digueti can be a good indicator of changes in dissolved CO2. This would allow us to better interpret patterns in marine animal behavior in response to climate change.

  19. Chitin Synthases with a Myosin Motor-Like Domain Control the Resistance of Aspergillus fumigatus to Echinocandins

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Ortigosa, Cristina; Aimanianda, Vishukumar; Muszkieta, Laetitia; Mouyna, Isabelle; Alsteens, David; Pire, Stéphane; Beau, Remi; Krappmann, Sven; Beauvais, Anne; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2012-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus has two chitin synthases (CSMA and CSMB) with a myosin motor-like domain (MMD) arranged in a head-to-head configuration. To understand the function of these chitin synthases, single and double csm mutant strains were constructed and analyzed. Although there was a slight reduction in mycelial growth of the mutants, the total chitin synthase activity and the cell wall chitin content were similar in the mycelium of all of the mutants and the parental strain. In the conidia, chitin content in the ΔcsmA strain cell wall was less than half the amount found in the parental strain. In contrast, the ΔcsmB mutant strain and, unexpectedly, the ΔcsmA/ΔcsmB mutant strain did not show any modification of chitin content in their conidial cell walls. In contrast to the hydrophobic conidia of the parental strain, conidia of all of the csm mutants were hydrophilic due to the presence of an amorphous material covering the hydrophobic surface-rodlet layer. The deletion of CSM genes also resulted in an increased susceptibility of resting and germinating conidia to echinocandins. These results show that the deletion of the CSMA and CSMB genes induced a significant disorganization of the cell wall structure, even though they contribute only weakly to the overall cell wall chitin synthesis. PMID:22964252

  20. A LysM receptor-like kinase plays a critical role in chitin signaling and fungal resistance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jinrong; Zhang, Xue-Cheng; Neece, David; Ramonell, Katrina M; Clough, Steve; Kim, Sung-Yong; Stacey, Minviluz G; Stacey, Gary

    2008-02-01

    Chitin, a polymer of N-acetyl-d-glucosamine, is found in fungal cell walls but not in plants. Plant cells can perceive chitin fragments (chitooligosaccharides) leading to gene induction and defense responses. We identified a LysM receptor-like protein (LysM RLK1) required for chitin signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana. The mutation in this gene blocked the induction of almost all chitooligosaccharide-responsive genes and led to more susceptibility to fungal pathogens but had no effect on infection by a bacterial pathogen. Additionally, exogenously applied chitooligosaccharides enhanced resistance against both fungal and bacterial pathogens in the wild-type plants but not in the mutant. Together, our data indicate that LysM RLK1 is essential for chitin signaling in plants (likely as part of the receptor complex) and is involved in chitin-mediated plant innate immunity. The LysM RLK1-mediated chitin signaling pathway is unique, but it may share a conserved downstream pathway with the FLS2/flagellin- and EFR/EF-Tu-mediated signaling pathways. Additionally, our work suggests a possible evolutionary relationship between the chitin and Nod factor perception mechanisms due to the similarities between their potential receptors and between the signal molecules perceived by them.

  1. Identification and Characterization of Novel Chitin-Binding Proteins from the Larval Cuticle of Silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhaoming; Zhang, Weiwei; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Xiaolu; Zhao, Ping; Xia, Qingyou

    2016-05-06

    Cuticle is mainly made of chitin filaments embedded in a matrix of cuticular proteins (CPs). Cuticular chitins have minor differences, whereas CPs are widely variable with respect to their sequences and structures. To understand the molecular basis underlying the mechanical properties of cuticle, it is necessary to know which CPs interact with chitin and how they are assembled into the cuticle structure. In the present study, a chitin-binding assay was performed followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to identify the extracted proteins from the larval cuticle of silkworm, Bombyx mori. There were 463 proteins identified from the silkworm larval cuticle, 200 of which were recovered in the chitin-binding fraction. A total of 103 proteins were annotated as CPs, which were classified into 11 CP families based on their conserved motifs, including CPR, CPAP, CPT, CPF and CPFL, CPCFC, chitin_bind 3, BmCPH2 homologues, BmCPH9 homologues, BmCPG1 homologues, BmCPG20 homologues, and BmCPG21 homologues. A total of five CP families were newly identified in the chitin-binding fraction, thereby providing new information and insight into the composition, structure, and function of the silkworm larval cuticle.

  2. Analysis of functions of the chitin deacetylase gene family in Tribolium castaneum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The expression profiles of nine genes encoding chitin deacetylase (CDA)-like proteins were studied during development and in various tissues of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, by RT-PCR. TcCDA1, TcCDA2 and TcCDA5 were expressed throughout all stages of development, while TcCDA6 – 9 were ...

  3. Proteomic investigation of the secretome of Cellvibrio japonicus during growth on chitin.

    PubMed

    Tuveng, Tina Rise; Arntzen, Magnus Øverlie; Bengtsson, Oskar; Gardner, Jeffrey G; Vaaje-Kolstad, Gustav; Eijsink, Vincent G H

    2016-07-01

    Studies of the secretomes of microbes grown on insoluble substrates are important for the discovery of novel proteins involved in biomass conversion. However, data in literature and this study indicate that secretome samples tend to be contaminated with cytoplasmic proteins. We have examined the secretome of the Gram-negative soil bacterium Cellvibrio japonicus using a simple plate-based culturing technique that yields samples with high fractions (60-75%) of proteins that are predicted to be secreted. By combining this approach with label-free quantification using the MaxLFQ algorithm, we have mapped and quantified proteins secreted by C. japonicus during growth on α- and β-chitin. Hierarchical clustering of the detected protein quantities revealed groups of up-regulated proteins that include all five putative C. japonicus chitinases as well as a chitin-specific lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase (CjLPMO10A). A small set of secreted proteins were co-regulated with known chitin-specific enzymes, including several with unknown catalytic functions. These proteins provide interesting targets for further studies aimed at unraveling the enzymatic machineries used by C. japonicus for recalcitrant polysaccharide degradation. Studies of chitin degradation indicated that C. japonicus indeed produces an efficient chitinolytic enzyme cocktail. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with the dataset identifier PXD002843 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD002843). © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Participation of chitin-binding peroxidase isoforms in the wilt pathogenesis of cotton

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Specific chitin-binding isozymes of peroxidase (POX) play an important role in pathogenesis of plant diseases caused with fungi. We studied the dynamics of peroxidase activity in two varieties of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.); one was a susceptible and the other resistant to the plant pathogen Vert...

  5. MOLECULAR TRACERS FOR SMOKE FROM CHARRING/BURNING OF CHITIN BIOPOLYMER. (R823990)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Monosaccharide derivatives from the breakdown of cellulose are the major organic components of smoke particles emitted to the atmosphere from biomass burning. In urban areas a related biopolymer, chitin, may contribute markers to smoke from grilling/charring o...

  6. Spontaneous Chitin Accumulation in Airways and Age-Related Fibrotic Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Van Dyken, Steven J; Liang, Hong-Erh; Naikawadi, Ram P; Woodruff, Prescott G; Wolters, Paul J; Erle, David J; Locksley, Richard M

    2017-04-20

    The environmentally widespread polysaccharide chitin is degraded and recycled by ubiquitous bacterial and fungal chitinases. Although vertebrates express active chitinases from evolutionarily conserved loci, their role in mammalian physiology is unclear. We show that distinct lung epithelial cells secrete acidic mammalian chitinase (AMCase), which is required for airway chitinase activity. AMCase-deficient mice exhibit premature morbidity and mortality, concomitant with accumulation of environmentally derived chitin polymers in the airways and expression of pro-fibrotic cytokines. Over time, these mice develop spontaneous pulmonary fibrosis, which is ameliorated by restoration of lung chitinase activity by genetic or therapeutic approaches. AMCase-deficient epithelial cells express fibrosis-associated gene sets linked with cell stress pathways. Mice with lung fibrosis due to telomere dysfunction and humans with interstitial lung disease also accumulate excess chitin polymers in their airways. These data suggest that altered chitin clearance could exacerbate fibrogenic pathways in the setting of lung diseases characterized by epithelial cell dysfunction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Unique synteny and alternate splicing of the chitin synthases in closely related heliothine moths

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two chitin synthase genes were characterized in the genomes of two heliothine moths: the corn earworm/cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). In both moths, the coding sequences for the two ge...

  8. Potential of chitosan (chemically-modified chitin) for extraction of lead-arsenate contaminated soils

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Arsenic (As), phosphorous (P), and lead (Pb) contamination in soils represents a health risk to humans and the environment. Chitosan (poly-N-acetyl glucosamine) is a non-toxic and inexpensive food industry byproduct derived from chitin that has been used as an adsorbent of heavy metals. The object...

  9. Reduction of the Algicidal Properties of Copper and Mercury Ions by Chitin and Chitosan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair, Hal S.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    When chitin and chitosan were added to growing cultures of Chlorella containing various quantities of toxic metals (copper and mercury), it was found that the presence of these materials reduced the toxic effect of the metals. Background information, procedures, and results are provided for this experiment. (Author/JN)

  10. Effect of acidity on the physicochemical properties of α- and β-chitin nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Suenaga, Shin; Totani, Kazuhide; Nomura, Yoshihiro; Yamashita, Kazuhiko; Shimada, Iori; Fukunaga, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Nobuhide; Osada, Mitsumasa

    2017-09-01

    We have investigated whether acidity can be used to control the physicochemical properties of chitin nanofibers (ChNFs). In this study, we define acidity as the molar ratio of dissociated protons from the acid to the amino groups in the raw chitin powder. The effect of acidity on the physicochemical properties of α- and β-ChNFs was compared. The transmittance and viscosity of the β-ChNFs drastically and continuously increased with increasing acidity, while those of the α-ChNFs were not affected by acidity. These differences are because of the higher ability for cationization based on the more flexible crystal structure of β-chitin than α-chitin. In addition, the effect of the acid species on the transmittance of β-ChNFs was investigated. The transmittance of β-ChNFs can be expressed by the acidity regardless of the acid species, such as hydrochloric acid, phosphoric acid, and acetic acid. These results indicate that the acidity defined in this work is an effective parameter to define and control the physicochemical properties of ChNFs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Defense Against Pathogens: Structural Insights into the Mechanism of Chitin Induced Activation of Innate Immunity.

    PubMed

    Squeglia, Flavia; Berisio, Rita; Shibuya, Naoto; Kaku, Hanae

    2017-11-24

    Pattern recognition receptors on the plant cell surface mediate the recognition of microbe-associated molecular patterns, in a process which activates downstream immune signaling. These receptors are plasma membrane-localized kinases which need to be autophosphorylated to activate downstream responses. Perception of attacks from fungi occurs through recognition of chitin, a polymer of an N-acetylglucosamine which is a characteristic component of the cell walls of fungi. This process is regulated in Arabidopsis by chitin elicitor receptor kinase CERK1. A more complex process characterizes rice, in which regulation of chitin perception is operated by a complex composed of OsCERK1, a homolog of CERK1, and the chitin elicitor binding protein OsCEBiP. Recent literature has provided a mechanistic description of the complex regulation of activation of innate immunity in rice and an advance in the structural description of molecular players involved in this process. This review describes the current status of the understanding of molecular events involved in innate immunity activation in rice. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. Papain incorporated chitin dressings for wound debridement sterilized by gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Durgeshwer; Singh, Rita

    2012-11-01

    Wound debridement is essential for the removal of necrotic or nonviable tissue from the wound surface to create an environment conducive to healing. Nonsurgical enzymatic debridement is an attractive method due to its effectiveness and ease of use. Papain is a proteolytic enzyme derived from the fruit of Carica papaya and is capable of breaking down a variety of necrotic tissue substrates. The present study was focused on the use of gamma radiation for sterilization of papain dressing with wound debriding activity. Membranes with papain were prepared using 0.5% chitin in lithium chloride/dimethylacetamide solvent and sterilized by gamma radiation. Fluid absorption capacity of chitin-papain membranes without glycerol was 14.30±6.57% in 6 h. Incorporation of glycerol resulted in significant (p<0.001) increase in the absorption capacity. Moisture vapour transmission rate of the membranes was 4285.77±455.61 g/m2/24 h at 24 h. Gamma irradiation at 25 kGy was found suitable for sterilization of the dressings. Infrared (IR) spectral scanning has shown that papain was stable on gamma irradiation at 25-35 kGy. The irradiated chitin-papain membranes were impermeable to different bacterial strains and also exhibited strong bactericidal action against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The fluid handling characteristics and the antimicrobial properties of chitin-papain membranes sterilized by gamma radiation were found suitable for use as wound dressing with debriding activity.

  13. [Applications of near infrared reflectance spectroscopy in detecting chitin, ergosterol and mycotoxins].

    PubMed

    Yi, Yong-Yan; Li, De-Rong; Zhang, Yun-Wei; Yang, Fu-Yu

    2009-07-01

    The invasion extent and harmfulness of fungi can be determined by chitin, ergosterol and mycotoxins. It is important to monitor chitin, ergosterol and mycotoxins changes to prevent contamination of forage and feed products, and effectively control the sustainable development of the mildew. Predication of these chemical materials was often completed by laboratory analysis, which was time-consuming and cumbersome and could not reflect the results in time in the past. Near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) is a rapid, convenient, highly efficient, nondestructive and low-cost analytical technique, which has been widely used in various fields such as food field and feed field for quantitative and qualitative analysis. It has a great potentiality of application in quality analysis. In this paper, the principle and the characteristic of NIRS and its applications in food, forage, feed and other agriculture prod