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Sample records for crabs callinectes sapidus

  1. TROPHIC ACCUMULATION AND DEPURATION OF MERCURY BY BLUE CRABS (CALLINECTES SAPIDUS) AND PINK SHRIMP (PENAEUS DUORARUM).

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mercury concentrations in blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) collected from an area of mercury-contaminated sediments in Lavaca Bay, TX, USA, are more than an order of magnitude greater than concentrations in penaeid shrimp from the same area. Laboratory feeding experiments using ...

  2. Prevalence and distribution of three protozoan symbionts in blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) populations across Louisiana, USA.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Holly A; Taylor, Sabrina S; Hawke, John P; Anderson Lively, Julie A

    2015-05-11

    Louisiana has one of the largest blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) fisheries in the USA, but little is known about blue crab diseases, parasites, and symbionts in this area. In 2013-2014, large juvenile and adult blue crabs were collected at 4 diverse sites to determine the prevalence of the protozoan symbionts associated with black gill disease (Lagenophrys callinectes), buckshot crabs (Urosporidium crescens), and bitter crab disease (Hematodinium perezi). A high aggregate prevalence of L. callinectes (93.2%) was identified across all seasons at all 4 collection sites regardless of salinity. A moderately low aggregate prevalence of U. crescens (22.4%) was identified across all seasons and sites. Prevalence of U. crescens depended on site salinity, with only 10% of infections detected at sites with <6.3 ppt salinity, and no infections detected at the low salinity site. While L. callinectes and U. crescens are commensal parasites of blue crabs, infections can result in unmarketable and unappealing meat. In the Louisiana fishery, H. perezi has been blamed circumstantially for adult mortalities in the low salinity nearshore fishing grounds. Despite this, H. perezi was not detected in any of the large crabs sampled, even from the low salinity sites. The prevalence data reported here for these 3 protozoans are the first to include blue crabs sampled seasonally at multiple locations along the Louisiana coast over the period of a year.

  3. Toxicity of the dispersant Corexit 9500 to early life stages of blue crab, Callinectes sapidus.

    PubMed

    Anderson Lively, Julie A; McKenzie, Jon

    2014-12-01

    The Deepwater Horizon well released 4.4 million barrels of light crude oil offshore of Louisiana into one of the world's largest and most productive blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) fisheries. The objectives of this paper were to determine the toxicity of the dispersant Corexit(®) 9500A used in the 2010 oil spill on juvenile and larval blue crabs, and the long-term effects of sublethal acute exposure. Only the highest treatment levels of dispersant significantly increased mortality in larval and juvenile blue crabs (100 mg/L and 1,000 mg/L, respectively). This correlated to concentrations well above levels found in the Gulf of Mexico following the spill. Smaller and younger crabs showed higher mortality than older and larger crabs. This research indicates direct application of dispersants on crab larvae could cause acute mortality, but dilution through diffusion and natural weathering processes would minimize long-term effects.

  4. The Influence of Diet Composition on Fitness of the Blue Crab, Callinectes sapidus

    PubMed Central

    Belgrad, Benjamin A.; Griffen, Blaine D.

    2016-01-01

    The physiological condition and fecundity of an organism is frequently controlled by diet. As changes in environmental conditions often cause organisms to alter their foraging behavior, a comprehensive understanding of how diet influences the fitness of an individual is central to predicting the effect of environmental change on population dynamics. We experimentally manipulated the diet of the economically and ecologically important blue crab, Callinectes sapidus, to approximate the effects of a dietary shift from primarily animal to plant tissue, a phenomenon commonly documented in crabs. Crabs whose diet consisted exclusively of animal tissue had markedly lower mortality and consumed substantially more food than crabs whose diet consisted exclusively of seaweed. The quantity of food consumed had a significant positive influence on reproductive effort and long-term energy stores. Additionally, seaweed diets produced a three-fold decrease in hepatopancreas lipid content and a simultaneous two-fold increase in crab aggression when compared to an animal diet. Our results reveal that the consumption of animal tissue substantially enhanced C. sapidus fitness, and suggest that a dietary shift to plant tissue may reduce crab population growth by decreasing fecundity as well as increasing mortality. This study has implications for C. sapidus fisheries. PMID:26784581

  5. The Influence of Diet Composition on Fitness of the Blue Crab, Callinectes sapidus.

    PubMed

    Belgrad, Benjamin A; Griffen, Blaine D

    2016-01-01

    The physiological condition and fecundity of an organism is frequently controlled by diet. As changes in environmental conditions often cause organisms to alter their foraging behavior, a comprehensive understanding of how diet influences the fitness of an individual is central to predicting the effect of environmental change on population dynamics. We experimentally manipulated the diet of the economically and ecologically important blue crab, Callinectes sapidus, to approximate the effects of a dietary shift from primarily animal to plant tissue, a phenomenon commonly documented in crabs. Crabs whose diet consisted exclusively of animal tissue had markedly lower mortality and consumed substantially more food than crabs whose diet consisted exclusively of seaweed. The quantity of food consumed had a significant positive influence on reproductive effort and long-term energy stores. Additionally, seaweed diets produced a three-fold decrease in hepatopancreas lipid content and a simultaneous two-fold increase in crab aggression when compared to an animal diet. Our results reveal that the consumption of animal tissue substantially enhanced C. sapidus fitness, and suggest that a dietary shift to plant tissue may reduce crab population growth by decreasing fecundity as well as increasing mortality. This study has implications for C. sapidus fisheries.

  6. The importance of color in mate choice of the blue crab Callinectes sapidus.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Jamie; Johnsen, Sönke

    2009-11-01

    Visual displays often play a large role in animal communication, particularly in sexual interactions. The blue crab Callinectes sapidus is both colorful and highly visually responsive, yet almost all studies of their courtship have focused on chemical cues. In the blue crab's underwater environment, however, visual cues may function more rapidly and over a longer distance than chemical cues. Given that blue crabs are aggressive and cannibalistic, visual cues may therefore allow blue crabs to quickly evaluate potential mates from safer distances. In the present study we show that courtship and mate choice behavior in C. sapidus can be stimulated by visual cues alone. Further, we show that males have a preference for females with red claw dactyls. In binary choice experiments, males displayed more often to photographs of females with red claws than to those with white claws or to those with black claws that were isoluminant to the red ones. This strongly suggests that male blue crabs made their choices based on the hue of the red claws, further suggesting that blue crabs are capable of color vision and use color in mate choice.

  7. Cadmium-binding proteins from blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) environmentally exposed to cadmium

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedow, M.A.; Kneip, T.J.; Garte, S.J.

    1982-06-01

    Two heat-stable (90/sup 0/C) cadmium-binding proteins were isolated from the hepatopancreas of Hudson River blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) by Sephadex G-75 gel filtration chromatography. These proteins have molecular weights of 10,600 and 9,400, and ultraviolet absorbance ratios at 250/280 nm of 12.4 and 5.4, respectively. Repeated freezing and thawing and prolonged (3-6 weeks) storage resulted in protein degradation or loss of Cd-binding activity. These proteins were induced by laboratory injection of CdCl/sub 2/ in blue crabs from pristine (Chesapeake Bay) areas; however, injection of CdCl/sub 2/ into Hudson River animals yielded anomalous chromatography profiles. Cadmium-binding proteins were also identified in blue crab thoracic muscle and gill. The possibility is discussed that these proteins are a type of metallothionein and could contribute to the human toxicity of this cadmium-contaminated edible crustacean.

  8. Chelal Characteristics and Foraging Behaviour of the Blue Crab Callinectes sapidusRathbun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seed, R.; Hughes, R. N.

    1997-02-01

    This paper describes the morphological and mechanical characteristics of the chelae of Callinectes sapidus, together with the predation techniques, handling times and prey size selection of this voracious predator when presented with marsh mussels, Geukensia demissa, or fiddler crabs, Uca pugilator, in laboratory aquaria. Callinectes sapidusis heterochelous but differences in claw size and mechanical advantage between male and female crabs are statistically indistinguishable. Handling times for mussels and fiddler crabs increased steeply with prey size. Fiddler crabs are intrinsically more profitable than mussels, but the relative costs of capturing mobile prey, or excavating mussels, in natural populations is unknown. Previous laboratory experiments investigating the key stimuli used by C. sapiduswhen selecting prey are reviewed, and their results are compared with behaviour predicted by optimal foraging theory. It is concluded that crabs respond to the strongest stimuli received from the prey. Items were rejected after a given persistence time if the attack proved unsuccessful. Persistence time, however, was adjusted through experience to expectations of local prey quality and availability. The integrated result of this key-stimulus mechanism will be a close match to diets predicted by other behavioural models, including that based on optimal foraging theory.

  9. Evaluation of parenteral drugs for anesthesia in the blue crab (Callinectes sapidus).

    PubMed

    Quesada, Rolando J; Smith, Christopher D; Heard, Darryl J

    2011-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of several parenteral anesthetics in blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus). Thirty-one animals were administered one or more of the following drugs by injection into the hemolymph (i.v.) through an arthrodial membrane: etomidate, ketamine, lidocaine, pentobarbital, propofol, tiletamine-zolazepam, xylazine, and ketamine-xylazine. A subset of crabs received intracardiac ketamine. Etomidate had no effect. Lidocaine effects were ultrashort (<3 min). Pentobarbital had prolonged inductions (2 min) and often caused violent excitement and poor anesthesia. Propofol induced light anesthesia accompanied by distress and limb autotomy. Inductions with ketamine, xylazine, tiletamine-zolazepam, and ketamine-xylazine were usually fast (<60 sec). Their anesthetic effects were generally very short (5-10 min) but predictable, smooth, and with good muscle relaxation. The latter two protocols induced a deep plane of anesthesia more consistently but also more significant bradycardia. Intracardiac ketamine injection was fatal in four of five crabs. In conclusion, the anesthetic protocols were considered unsuitable for prolonged anesthesia. However, if very short-term anesthesia is desired, then tiletamine-zolazepam or ketamine-xylazine is recommended. Further studies are indicated to identify a safe anesthetic protocol of longer duration in C. sapidus as well as in other crab species.

  10. Evaluation of Blue Crab, Callinectes sapidus, Megalopal Settlement and Condition during the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    PubMed Central

    Grey, Erin K.; Chiasson, Susan C.; Williams, Hannah G.; Troeger, Victoria J.; Taylor, Caz M.

    2015-01-01

    The Blue Crab, Callinectes sapidus, is a commercially, culturally, and ecologically significant species in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM), whose offshore stages were likely impacted by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill (DWH). To test for DWH effects and to better understand the planktonic ecology of this species, we monitored Callinectes spp. megalopal settlement and condition at sites within and outside of the spill extent during and one year after the DWH. We tested for DWH effects by comparing 2010 settlement against baseline data available for two sites, and by testing for differences in settlement and condition inside and outside of the spill extent. We also developed time series models to better understand natural drivers of daily settlement variation (seasonal and lunar trends, hydrodynamics, wind) during 2010 and 2011. Overall, we found that neither megalopal settlement nor body weight were significantly reduced at oiled sites, but that high unexplained variation and low statistical power made detection of even large effects unlikely. Time series models revealed remarkably consistent and relatively strong seasonal and lunar trends within sites (explaining on average 28% and 9% of variation, respectively), while wind and hydrodynamic effects were weak (1–5% variation explained) and variable among sites. This study provides insights into DWH impacts as well as the natural drivers of Callinectes spp. megalopal settlement across the northern GOM. PMID:26270970

  11. Evaluation of Blue Crab, Callinectes sapidus, Megalopal Settlement and Condition during the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill.

    PubMed

    Grey, Erin K; Chiasson, Susan C; Williams, Hannah G; Troeger, Victoria J; Taylor, Caz M

    2015-01-01

    The Blue Crab, Callinectes sapidus, is a commercially, culturally, and ecologically significant species in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM), whose offshore stages were likely impacted by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill (DWH). To test for DWH effects and to better understand the planktonic ecology of this species, we monitored Callinectes spp. megalopal settlement and condition at sites within and outside of the spill extent during and one year after the DWH. We tested for DWH effects by comparing 2010 settlement against baseline data available for two sites, and by testing for differences in settlement and condition inside and outside of the spill extent. We also developed time series models to better understand natural drivers of daily settlement variation (seasonal and lunar trends, hydrodynamics, wind) during 2010 and 2011. Overall, we found that neither megalopal settlement nor body weight were significantly reduced at oiled sites, but that high unexplained variation and low statistical power made detection of even large effects unlikely. Time series models revealed remarkably consistent and relatively strong seasonal and lunar trends within sites (explaining on average 28% and 9% of variation, respectively), while wind and hydrodynamic effects were weak (1-5% variation explained) and variable among sites. This study provides insights into DWH impacts as well as the natural drivers of Callinectes spp. megalopal settlement across the northern GOM.

  12. Effects of molting on the visual acuity of the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Jamie; Johnsen, Sönke

    2011-09-15

    In crustaceans with compound eyes, the corneal lens of each facet is part of the exoskeleton and thus shed during molting. Here we used an optomotor assay to evaluate the impact of molting on visual acuity (as measured by the minimum resolvable angle, α(min)) in the female blue crab, Callinectes sapidus. We found that visual acuity decreases substantially in the days prior to molting and is gradually recovered after molting. Four days prior to molting, α(min) was 1.8 deg (N=5), a value approximating the best possible acuity in this species. In the 24 h before ecdysis occurred, α(min) increased to 15.0 deg (N=12), corresponding to an eightfold drop in visual acuity. Within 6 days after molting, α(min) returned to the pre-molting value. Micrographs of C. sapidus eyes showed that a gap between the corneal lens and the crystalline cone first appeared approximately 5 days prior to shedding and increased in width as the process progressed. This separation was likely responsible for the loss of visual acuity observed in behavioral tests. In blue crabs, mating is limited to the period of the female's pubertal molt, and a reduction in acuity during this time may have an effect on the sensory cues used in female mate choice. The results described here may be broadly applicable to all arthropods that molt and have particular importance for crustaceans that molt multiple times in their lifetime or have mating cycles that are paired with molting.

  13. Properties of bacteria that trigger hemocytopenia in the Atlantic blue crab, Callinectes sapidus.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Nathaniel G; Burnett, Louis E; Burnett, Karen G

    2011-10-01

    In the blue crab Callinectes sapidus, injection with the bacterial pathogen Vibrio campbellii causes a decrease in oxygen consumption. Histological and physiological evidence suggests that the physical obstruction of hemolymph flow through the gill vasculature, caused by aggregations of bacteria and hemocytes, underlies the decrease in aerobic function associated with bacterial infection. We sought to elucidate the bacterial properties sufficient to induce a decrease in circulating hemocytes (hemocytopenia) as an indicator for the initiation of hemocyte aggregation and subsequent impairment of respiration. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the primary component of the gram-negative bacterial cell wall, is known to interact with crustacean hemocytes. Purified LPS was covalently bound to the surfaces of polystyrene beads resembling bacteria in size. Injection of these "LPS beads" caused a decrease in circulating hemocytes comparable to that seen with V. campbellii injection, while beads alone failed to do so. These data suggest that in general, gram-negative bacteria could stimulate hemocytopenia. To test this hypothesis, crabs were injected with different bacteria--seven gram-negative and one gram-positive species--and their effects on circulating hemocytes were assessed. With one exception, all gram-negative strains caused decreases in circulating hemocytes, suggesting an important role for LPS in the induction of this response. However, LPS is not necessary to provoke the immune response given that Bacillus coral, a gram-positive species that lacks LPS, caused a decrease in circulating hemocytes. These results suggest that a wide range of bacteria could impair metabolism in C. sapidus.

  14. Use of blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) embryos for toxicity testing

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.; O`Malley, K.

    1995-12-31

    After fertilization, blue crab embryos develop in egg sacs attached to the female pleopods, often referred to as the sponge. Lipovitellin and lipid droplets in the egg sacs provide energy and nutrition for the developing embryos. Embryos were removed from the sponge and transferred to 24 well culture plates containing sea water with or without toxicants, Each well contained 10 embryos. After 7 to 10 days, embryos hatched to swimming zoea. The effects of toxicants at various concentrations on hatching were determined and the EC{sub 50} calculated. For example, the EC{sub 50} for tributyltin, fenvalerate and mercuric chloride were 50, 30 and 90 ng/liter, respectively. The hatching success of control embryos ranged from 95 to 98%. Formation of the heart, eyespot formation, appendage formation and utilization rate of lipovitellin were also effected by exposure to toxicants. At a low concentration of mercuric ion (30ng/liter) the heart formed, but there was no heart beat. Eyespot formation was abnormal in the presence of high concentrations of cadmium (2 {micro}g/liter) and zinc (5 {micro}g/liter), Crab embryos offer many advantages for toxicity testing of pure compounds or mixtures in water, including toxicity testing of sediment pore water. The crab embryos may also serve as models to understand the effect of specific toxicants on the heart and eye spots of crustaceans.

  15. Lack of transmission of Hematodinium sp. in the blue crab Callinectes sapidus through cannibalism.

    PubMed

    Li, Caiwen; Wheeler, Kersten N; Shields, Jeffrey D

    2011-10-06

    Hematodinium spp. are parasitic dinoflagellates of marine crustaceans. Outbreaks of Hematodinium sp. have impacted commercial landings of the blue crab Callinectes sapidus in the coastal bays of Virginia and Maryland (USA), with seasonal peaks in prevalence reaching 85%. The life cycle and transmission routes of the parasite in blue crabs are poorly understood. Cannibalism and waterborne transmission may be routes of transmission, although little conclusive evidence has been reported for these modes. We examined cannibalism as a route by a series of experiments wherein we repeatedly fed adult and juvenile crabs the tissues of crabs infected with Hematodinium. In each experiment, feeding was done 3 times over the course of 1 wk. Only 2 of 120 crabs were infected within 7 to 9 d after feeding, and these 2 were likely infected prior to the experimental exposures. Crabs inoculated with hemolymph from infected donors served as positive controls. They developed infections over 11 to 21 d, indicating that the Hematodinium sp. used in the cannibalism trials was infectious at the time of inoculation. Because amphipods also harbor Hematodinium-like infections, we fed tissues of infected crabs to the estuarine amphipod Leptocheirus plumulosus. Hematodinium DNA was detected in amphipods shortly after feeding, but not in animals held for longer periods, nor was it observed in histological preparations. Amphipods did not obtain infections by scavenging infected crab tissues. Our results show that Hematodinium sp. is not effectively transmitted through ingestion of diseased tissues, indicating that cannibalism may not be a major route of transmission for Hematodinium sp. in blue crabs.

  16. High Connectivity among Blue Crab (Callinectes sapidus) Populations in the Western South Atlantic

    PubMed Central

    Kersanach, Ralf; Cortinhas, Maria Cristina Silva; Prata, Pedro Fernandes Sanmartin; Dumont, Luiz Felipe Cestari; Proietti, Maíra Carneiro; Maggioni, Rodrigo; D’Incao, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Population connectivity in the blue crab Callinectes sapidus was evaluated along 740 km of the Western South Atlantic coast. Blue crabs are the most exploited portunid in Brazil. Despite their economic importance, few studies report their ecology or population structure. Here we sampled four estuarine areas in southern Brazil during winter 2013 and summer 2014 in order to evaluate diversity, gene flow and structure of these populations. Nine microsatellite markers were evaluated for 213 adult crabs, with identification of seven polymorphic loci and 183 alleles. Pairwise FST values indicated low population structure ranging from -0.00023 to 0.01755. A Mantel test revealed that the geographic distance does not influence genetic (r = -0.48), and structure/migration rates confirmed this, showing that even the populations located at the opposite extremities of our covered region presented low FST and exchanged migrants. These findings show that there is a significant amount of gene flow between blue crab populations in South Brazil, likely influenced by local current dynamics that allow the transport of a high number of larvae between estuaries. Considering the elevated gene flow, the populations can be considered a single genetic stock. However, further information on population size and dynamics, as well as fishery demands and impacts at different regions, are necessary for harvest management purposes. PMID:27064977

  17. Photo-induced toxicity of Deepwater Horizon slick oil to blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) larvae.

    PubMed

    Alloy, Matthew M; Boube, Idrissa; Griffitt, Robert J; Oris, James T; Roberts, Aaron P

    2015-09-01

    The 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill resulted in the accidental release of approximately 700 million L of crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico. Photo-induced toxicity after co-exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is 1 mechanism by which polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from oil spills may exert toxicity. Blue crab are an important commercial and ecological resource in the Gulf of Mexico, and their largely transparent larvae may make them sensitive to PAH photo-induced toxicity. The goal of the present study was to examine the sensitivity of early lifestage blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) zoea to slick oil collected during the Deepwater Horizon spill. Blue crab zoea were exposed to 1 of several dilutions of water accommodated fractions from 1 of 2 sources of oil and gradations of natural sunlight in a factorial design. Two 7-h solar exposures were carried out with a recovery period (dark) in between. Survival was found to be UV- and PAH-dependent. Toxicity was observed within the range of surface PAH concentrations reported in the Gulf of Mexico during the Deepwater Horizon spill. These findings indicate that early lifestage blue crab are sensitive to photo-induced toxicity from Deepwater Horizon slick oil.

  18. Spatial dynamics of large-scale, multistage crab (Callinectes sapidus) dispersal: Determinants and consequences for recruitment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Etherington, L.L.; Eggleston, D.B.

    2003-01-01

    We assessed determinants and consequences of multistage dispersal on spatial recruitment of the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus, within the Croatan, Albemarle, Pamlico Estuarine System (CAPES), North Carolina, U.S.A. Large-scale sampling of early juvenile crabs over 4 years indicated that spatial abundance patterns were size-dependent and resulted from primary post-larval dispersal (pre-settlement) and secondary juvenile dispersal (early post-settlement). In general, primary dispersal led to high abundances within more seaward habitats, whereas secondary dispersal (which was relatively consistent) expanded the distribution of juveniles, potentially increasing the estuarine nursery capacity. There were strong relationships between juvenile crab density and specific wind characteristics; however, these patterns were spatially explicit. Various physical processes (e.g., seasonal wind events, timing and magnitude of tropical cyclones) interacted to influence dispersal during multiple stages and determined crab recruitment patterns. Our results suggest that the nursery value of different habitats is highly dependent on the dispersal potential (primary and secondary dispersal) to and from these areas, which is largely determined by the relative position of habitats within the estuarine landscape.

  19. High Connectivity among Blue Crab (Callinectes sapidus) Populations in the Western South Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Lacerda, Ana Luzia Figueiredo; Kersanach, Ralf; Cortinhas, Maria Cristina Silva; Prata, Pedro Fernandes Sanmartin; Dumont, Luiz Felipe Cestari; Proietti, Maíra Carneiro; Maggioni, Rodrigo; D'Incao, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Population connectivity in the blue crab Callinectes sapidus was evaluated along 740 km of the Western South Atlantic coast. Blue crabs are the most exploited portunid in Brazil. Despite their economic importance, few studies report their ecology or population structure. Here we sampled four estuarine areas in southern Brazil during winter 2013 and summer 2014 in order to evaluate diversity, gene flow and structure of these populations. Nine microsatellite markers were evaluated for 213 adult crabs, with identification of seven polymorphic loci and 183 alleles. Pairwise FST values indicated low population structure ranging from -0.00023 to 0.01755. A Mantel test revealed that the geographic distance does not influence genetic (r = -0.48), and structure/migration rates confirmed this, showing that even the populations located at the opposite extremities of our covered region presented low FST and exchanged migrants. These findings show that there is a significant amount of gene flow between blue crab populations in South Brazil, likely influenced by local current dynamics that allow the transport of a high number of larvae between estuaries. Considering the elevated gene flow, the populations can be considered a single genetic stock. However, further information on population size and dynamics, as well as fishery demands and impacts at different regions, are necessary for harvest management purposes.

  20. To paddle or not: context dependent courtship display by male blue crabs, Callinectes sapidus.

    PubMed

    Kamio, Michiya; Reidenbach, Matthew A; Derby, Charles D

    2008-04-01

    The nature of the courtship signalling used by a species is shaped by many factors, one of which is its habitat. Male blue crabs, Callinectes sapidus, have a courtship display in which they elevate their body by standing high on their legs, open their chelae and paddle their swimming legs. This courtship display is not reported in other swimming (portunid) crabs and is rarely expressed in laboratory experiments on male blue crabs. In this study, we characterised this display, which we call ;courtship stationary paddling', and distinguished it from other types of paddling. To explain the species specificity of courtship stationary paddling, we hypothesised that this behaviour is an adaptation to low visibility and abundant refuges in the habitat of blue crabs, and that this behaviour enhances chemical signalling when females are relatively inaccessible to males. We used particle imaging velocimetry to visualise water currents generated during courtship stationary paddling, showing that it created water currents directed away from the male and towards the female, thus enhancing chemical signalling. We also showed that males did not perform courtship stationary paddling when females were freely walking such that males could quickly contact and cradle carry them. Rather, males typically performed courtship stationary paddling only when females were inaccessible to them. These results indicate that courtship stationary paddling is a context-dependent behaviour, occurring only when females are not accessible to males, and suggesting that it evolved as an adaptation to life in habitats with many refuges and low visibility.

  1. Genome sequence analysis of CsRV1: a pathogenic reovirus that infects the blue crab Callinectes sapidus across its trans-hemispheric range

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The blue crab, Callinectes sapidus (Rathbun 1896), which is a commercially important trophic link in coastal ecosystems of the western Atlantic, is infected in both North and South America by C. sapidus Reovirus 1 (CsRV1), a double stranded RNA virus. The 12 genome segments of a North American strai...

  2. Metallothionein-like proteins in the blue crab Callinectes sapidus: effect of water salinity and ions.

    PubMed

    De Martinez Gaspar Martins, Camila; Bianchini, Adalto

    2009-03-01

    The effect of water salinity and ions on metallothionein-like proteins (MTLP) concentration was evaluated in the blue crab Callinectes sapidus. MTLP concentration was measured in tissues (hepatopancreas and gills) of crabs acclimated to salinity 30 ppt and abruptly subjected to a hypo-osmotic shock (salinity 2 ppt). It was also measured in isolated gills (anterior and posterior) of crabs acclimated to salinity 30 ppt. Gills were perfused with and incubated in an isosmotic saline solution (ISS) or perfused with ISS and incubated in a hypo-osmotic saline solution (HSS). The effect of each single water ion on gill MTLP concentration was also analyzed in isolated and perfused gills through experiments of ion substitution in the incubation medium. In vivo, MTLP concentration was higher in hepatopancreas than in gills, being not affected by the hypo-osmotic shock. However, MTLP concentration in posterior and anterior gills significantly increased after 2 and 24 h of hypo-osmotic shock, respectively. In vitro, it was also increased when anterior and posterior gills were perfused with ISS and incubated in HSS. In isolated and perfused posterior gills, MTLP concentration was inversely correlated with the calcium concentration in the ISS used to incubate gills. Together, these findings indicate that an increased gill MTLP concentration in low salinity is an adaptive response of the blue crab C. sapidus to the hypo-osmotic stress. This response is mediated, at least in part, by the calcium concentration in the gill bath medium. The data also suggest that the trigger for this increase is purely branchial and not systemic.

  3. Spontaneous alternation and locomotor activity in three species of marine crabs: green crab (Carcinus maenas), blue crab (Callinectes sapidus), and fiddler crab (Uca pugnax).

    PubMed

    Balcı, Fuat; Ramey-Balcı, Patricia A; Ruamps, Perrine

    2014-02-01

    Spontaneous alternation refers to the tendency of organisms to explore places that they have least recently visited. Our previous work showed that alternation performance of Carcinus maenas (invasive European green crab) was significantly higher than Callinectes sapidus (native blue crab), and chance level performance (Ramey, P. A., Teichman, E., Oleksiak, J., & Balcı, F. [2009]. Spontaneous alternation in marine crabs: Invasive versus native species. Behavioural Processes, 82, 51-55.). In the current study, we first tested the robustness of these findings in the absence of visual cues, longer test durations, and wider maze dimensions. These manipulations enabled us to determine whether these two crab species relied on the visual cues provided during the spontaneous alternation task in our prior work, and allowed for better characterization of their exploratory activity in the maze. Our original findings were reproduced in the present study under these new task conditions, suggesting no role for visual cues during alternation, and emphasizing the robustness and generalizability of the corresponding interspecies differences in alternation performance. We also tested whether the lower alternation performance of C. sapidus also applied to another native crab species, Uca pugnax (fiddler crab). Spontaneous alternation performance of U. pugnax was significantly lower than C. maenas but indistinguishable from C. sapidus. Finally, we examined whether the potentially higher inherent risk-sensitivity of C. sapidus could have contributed to their lower alternation performance by testing C. maenas in the presence of a larger natural predator (stressor). Higher risk sensitivity presumably induced by the stressor led to locomotor activity patterns that better resembled those of C. sapidus, however the resultant reduction in alternation performance was not statistically significant.

  4. The male blue crab, Callinectes sapidus, uses both chromatic and achromatic cues during mate choice.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Jamie; Johnsen, Sönke

    2012-04-01

    In the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus, claw color varies by sex, sexual maturity and individual. Males rely in part on color cues to select appropriate mates, and these chromatic cues may be perceived through an opponent interaction between two photoreceptors with maximum wavelength sensitivities at 440 and 508 nm. The range of color discrimination of this dichromatic visual system may be limited, however, and it is unclear whether male blue crabs are capable of discriminating the natural variations in claw color that may be important in mate choice. By testing males' innate color preferences in binary choice tests between photographs of red-clawed females and six variations of orange-clawed females, we examined both the chromatic (opponent interaction) and achromatic (relative luminance) cues used in male mate choice. Males significantly preferred red-clawed females to orange-clawed females, except when the test colors were similar in both opponency and relative luminance. Our results are unusual in that they indicate that male mate choice in the blue crab is not guided solely by achromatic or chromatic mechanisms, suggesting that both color and intensity are used to evaluate female claw color.

  5. Immune defense reduces respiratory fitness in Callinectes sapidus, the Atlantic blue crab.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Louis E; Holman, Jeremy D; Jorgensen, Darwin D; Ikerd, Jennifer L; Burnett, Karen G

    2006-08-01

    Crustacean gills function in gas exchange, ion transport, and immune defense against microbial pathogens. Hemocyte aggregates that form in response to microbial pathogens become trapped in the fine vasculature of the gill, leading to the suggestion by others that respiration and ion regulation might by impaired during the course of an immune response. In the present study, injection of the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio campbellii into Callinectes sapidus, the Atlantic blue crab, caused a dramatic decline in oxygen uptake from 4.53 to 2.56 micromol g-1 h-1. This decline in oxygen uptake is associated with a large decrease in postbranchial PO2, from 16.2 (+/-0.46 SEM, n=7) to 13.1 kPa (+/-0.77 SEM, n=9), while prebranchial PO2 remains unchanged. In addition, injection of Vibrio results in the disappearance of a pH change across the gills, an indication of reduced CO2 excretion. The hemolymph hydrostatic pressure change across the gill circulation increases nearly 2-fold in Vibrio-injected crabs compared with a negligible change in pressure across the gill circulation in saline-injected, control crabs. This change, in combination with stability of heart rate and branchial chamber pressure, is indicative of a significant increase in vascular resistance across the gills that is induced by hemocyte nodule formation. A healthy, active blue crab can eliminate most invading bacteria, but the respiratory function of the gills is impaired. Thus, when blue crabs are engaged in the immune response, they are less equipped to engage in oxygen-fueled activities such as predator avoidance, prey capture, and migration. Furthermore, crabs are less fit to invade environments that are hypoxic.

  6. Analysis of metals in blue crabs, Callinectes sapidus, from two Connecticut estuaries

    SciTech Connect

    Jop, K.M.; Biever, R.C.; Hoberg, J.R.; Shepherd, S.P.

    1997-02-01

    Decisions involving the use and allocation of resources in the nation`s coastal and estuarine regions require reliable and continuous information about the status and trends of environmental quality in those areas. In recent years much attention has been focused on assessing environmental risks resulting from the manufacture, distribution, use and disposal of chemicals. Legislation and public concern have produced numerous regulations concerning the introduction of chemicals into surface waters which increase the potential for human exposure. There is considerable concern about the human health aspects of metal cycling especially in coastal and inland waters that are in proximity to large populations or industrial centers. Many of these compounds tend to remain in the ecosystem and eventually move from lower to higher trophic levels within the human food chain. Blue crabs, Callinectes sapidus Rathbun, are important members of the estuarine food chain due to high abundance and their multiple role as scavengers, predators and prey. Because of their omnivorous feeding characteristics and association with sediments, blue crabs are exposed and may potentially accumulate significant amount of pollutants above background seawater concentrations. This species represents one of the most valuable fishery resources in the southern states. According to Marcus and Mathews blue crabs ranked fifth in 1984 and fourth in 1985 behind shrimp, swordfish, oysters and hard clams in economic value, but first in total weight for both years in South Carolina. Although in Connecticut blue crabs are harvested mostly for personal consumption, their commercial value in other states makes the results from any environmental survey of great interest from the consideration of risk to human health. This study evaluated the level of contaminants in Blue crabs in the summer months by examining the concentration of selected metals in samples of muscle and hepatopancreas tissue. 12 refs., 3 tabs.

  7. Comparison of metal concentrations in tissues of blue crab, Callinectes sapidus from Mediterranean Lagoons.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Cengiz; Türkmen, Mustafa; Türkmen, Aysun; Tepe, Yalçın

    2011-09-01

    This study was performed to investigate the metal concentrations in muscle and gill of blue crab, Callinectes sapidus from Dörtyol Lake, Akyatan Lagoon, Paradeniz Lagoon and Çamlık Lagoon from the northeastern coastal area of Mediterranean Sea. So, the levels of cadmium, chromium, copper, iron, manganese, nickel, aluminum and zinc in tissues of specimens from the lagoons were determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer. The metal concentrations found in muscle tissue varied for Cd: 0.03-0.08, Cr: 0.05-0.13, Cu: 5.38-11.7, Fe: 21.1-38.2, Mn: 0.15-2.98, Ni: 0.24-0.45, Zn: 13.9-20.1 and Al: 1.2-13.7 mg/kg wet weight. Iron showed the highest levels in both tissues, and generally followed by zinc except gills. On the other hand, cadmium showed the lowest levels from all sites. Followed cadmium; chromium had the second lowest levels. The differences between mean metal concentrations from different sampling sites were statistically significant. Regional changes in metal concentration were observed in the tissues of the crabs, but these variations may not influence consumption advisories.

  8. Movement patterns and trajectories of ovigerous blue crabs Callinectes sapidus during the spawning migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Sarah D.; Tankersley, Richard A.; Hench, James L.; Forward, Richard B.; Luettich, Richard A.

    2004-08-01

    Female blue crabs ( Callinectes sapidus Rathbun) migrate from low salinity estuarine regions to high salinity regions near the ocean to release larvae. During this migration, ovigerous females use ebb-tide transport, a vertical migratory behavior in which they ascend into the water column during ebb tides, to move seaward to larval release areas. In order to determine the relationship of ebb-tide vertical migrations to local currents and the influence of these vertical migrations on the horizontal transport of blue crabs in the estuary, ovigerous females with mature embryos (˜1-3 days from hatching) were tracked near Beaufort Inlet, North Carolina (USA), in July and August 2001 and 2002. Crabs were tagged and tracked using ultrasonic telemetry, and currents near the crabs were measured simultaneously with a shipboard acoustic Doppler current profiler. During the two seasons, eight crabs were successfully tracked for periods ranging from 3.9-37.0 h and for distances ranging from 1.9-10.6 km. All crabs migrated seaward during the tracking periods. Crabs moved episodically during all tidal phases with periods of movement on the order of minutes to an hour. They moved with local currents in terms of both speed and direction during ebb tides, consistent with ebb-tide transport, and moved down-estuary (seaward) in opposition to local currents during flood tides. The percentage of time that crabs were active was higher during night ebb tides than during day ebb tides or flood tides and increased with increasing ebb-tide current speed. Mean migratory speeds were 0.11, 0.04, 0.08 and 0.02 m s -1 during night ebb, night flood, day ebb and day flood tides, respectively, and net migratory speeds were on the order of 5 km day -1. Due to the episodic nature of the crabs' movements, the total distances that crabs traveled during ebb tides ranged from 10-40% of the distances that passive particles could have traveled under the same conditions.

  9. Locomotory fatigue during moderate and severe hypoxia and hypercapnia in the Atlantic blue crab, Callinectes sapidus.

    PubMed

    Stover, Kristin K; Burnett, Karen G; McElroy, Eric J; Burnett, Louis E

    2013-04-01

    The Atlantic blue crab, Callinectes sapidus (Rathbun), is a highly mobile crustacean that must locomote to find food, evade predators, find mates, and avoid adverse conditions such as hypoxia. In this study we tested the effects of two levels of hypoxia (10.4 kPa, 50% air saturation = moderate hypoxia; 4 kPa, 20% air saturation = severe hypoxia) and hypercapnic hypoxia (50% air saturation O(2) with Pco(2) = 2 kPa) on fatigue during sustained continuous exercise. Fatigue was induced by an exercise trial that entailed continuous sideways hexapedal walking on an underwater treadmill. Fatigue was quantified using two methods: (1) a pull force test that measures the holding strength of the legs, and (2) the number of fatigue-resisting behaviors (180° turns and stopping). Fatigue was defined as a pull force of 67% or less of the initial pre-exercise pull force and was reached after 6.12 h of walking for crabs in well-aerated normoxic seawater, 4 h in 50% air saturation, 2.07 h in 20% air saturation, and 4.58 h in 50% air saturation and hypercapnia. The number of fatigue-resisting behaviors increased with walking time in all treatments. Performance decreased in hypoxia, with fatigue being reached more quickly as the level of hypoxia intensified. Hypercapnia in moderate hypoxia did not have a deleterious influence on behavior and lengthened slightly the time it took crabs to fatigue. In addition, severe hypoxia exacerbated changes in gait kinematics as crabs became fatigued, by significantly increasing stride length and decreasing stride frequency.

  10. Extracellular digestion during hyposaline exposure in the Dungeness crab, Cancer magister, and the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Daniel L; van Breukelen, Frank; McGaw, Iain J

    2013-12-01

    Extracellular digestive processes were examined in the Dungeness crab, Cancer magister and the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus, during hyposaline exposure. Both species are found in estuaries as adults, but vary in their ability to balance the cardiovascular and respiratory demands of concurrent osmoregulation and digestion. The weak osmoregulator, C. magister, is unable to balance the demands of osmoregulation and digestion. Concordant with observed decreases in oxygen consumption and mechanical digestion, proteolytic digestion within the foregut and hepatopancreas was delayed, resulting in a relative reduction of circulating amino acids post-feeding in low salinity. In contrast, the efficient osmoregulator, C. sapidus, balances the demands of osmoregulation and digestion, and mechanical digestion continues unabated in low salinity. Protease activity in the gut fluid and hepatopancreas showed either no change or a reduction over time. The transport of amino acids into the cells post-feeding is opposed by an efflux of amino acids at the cellular level, and resulted in a build up of amino acids in the hemolymph. Despite differences in the extracellular responses to low salinity exposure following feeding, both species were able to maintain high digestive efficiencies.

  11. Sublethal Toxicity of Crude Oil Exposure in The Blue Crab, Callinectes sapidus, at Two Life History Stages.

    PubMed

    Giltz, Sarah M; Taylor, Caz M

    2017-02-01

    The 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill occurred during peak spawning season for many Gulf of Mexico fish and invertebrates. Early life stages of important fishery species were at risk to encounter crude oil. In this study, we investigated the effect of crude oil exposure on two life stages of the blue crab (Callinectes sapidus). We tested the effects of oil exposure on the survival and growth of larval (pelagic) and juvenile (estuarine) blue crabs as well as the effects of oil on the molt frequency of juveniles. Larval crabs exposed to crude oil showed no discernable growth or mortality differences when compared to non-exposed controls. Juvenile crabs exposed to oil also showed no differences in size but exhibited increased intermolt duration (time between molts). Our study suggests that different life-stages may respond differently when exposed to crude oil and that oil exposure negatively affects growth rate of juvenile blue crabs.

  12. Disease, parasite, and commensal prevalences for blue crab Callinectes sapidus at shedding facilities in Louisiana, USA.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Holly A; Taylor, Sabrina S; Hawke, John P; Schott, Eric J; Anderson Lively, Julie A

    2015-01-15

    Blue crab diseases, parasites, and commensals are not well studied in the Gulf of Mexico, and their prevalence rates have only been sporadically determined. Commercial soft shell shedding facilities in Louisiana experience high mortality rates of pre-molt crabs, and some of these deaths may be attributable to diseases or parasites. During the active shedding season in 2013, we determined the prevalence of shell disease, Vibrio spp., Lagenophrys callinectes, and Hematodinium perezi at 4 commercial shedding facilities along the Louisiana coast. We also detected Ameson michaelis and reo-like virus infections. Shell disease was moderately prevalent at rates above 50% and varied by shedding facility, collection month, and crab size. Vibrio spp. bacteria were prevalent in the hemolymph of 37% of the pre-molt crabs. Lagenophrys callinectes was highly prevalent in the pre-molt crabs, but because it is a commensal species, it may not cause high mortality rates. Hematodinium perezi was absent in all pre-molt crabs.

  13. Calcium phosphate granules in the hepatopancreas of the blue crab Callinectes sapidus.

    PubMed

    Becker, G L; Chen, C H; Greenawalt, J W; Lehninger, A L

    1974-05-01

    The hepatopancreas of the adult male blue crab Callinectes sapidus in intermolt was found to contain substantial amounts of calcium, magnesium, and inorganic phosphorus, averaging about 260, 20, and 250 microg-atoms per g wet tissue, respectively, accounting for over 10% of the tissue dry weight. Electron microscopy of the intact tissue showed three qualitatively different granular structures having electron densities suggestive of high mineral content. After fractionation of the tissue using centrifugal techniques, almost 95% of the total mineral was found to reside in a heavy, nonmitochondrial particulate fraction(s). The bulk of the low-speed pellet consisted of relatively dense, roughly spherical granules 1-5 microm in diameter, which could be considerably purified by repeated suspension in water and low-speed sedimentation. In the electron microscope the isolated granules appeared basically similar to one of the three characteristic types of electron-dense granules seen in the intact tissue. Although the freshly isolated granules lost approximately 50% of their wet weight when dried at 105 degrees C, only 10% more was lost upon dry ashing at 450 degrees C, suggesting a fairly low content of organic material. Chemical analysis revealed calcium, magnesium, and inorganic phosphate at 5.7, 2.1, and 4.4 microg-atoms per mg dried granules, respectively, accounting for 69% of the dry weight of the fraction. By specific enzymatic assays, the freshly isolated granules were found to contain ATP, ADP, and AMP at levels of 0.13, 0.03, and 0.01 micromol/mg, or 8% of their total dry weight. The remainder of the total phosphorus contributed an additional 3%, whereas carbonate, citrate, oxalate, and protein each constituted no more than 1%. The mineral granules of the crab hepatopancreas appear to function as storage forms of calcium and phosphate during the intermolt period. This tissue appears promising as a model for study of the cellular events associated with biological

  14. Physicochemical properties of double-stranded RNA used to discover a reo-like virus from blue crab Callinectes sapidus.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Holly A; Messick, Gretchen A; Hanif, Ammar; Jagus, Rosemary; Carrion, Lee; Zmora, Oded; Schott, Eric J

    2010-12-07

    Mortality among blue crab Callinectes sapidus in soft shell production facilities is typically 25% or greater. The harvest, handling, and husbandry practices of soft shell crab production have the potential to spread or exacerbate infectious crab diseases. To investigate the possible role of viruses in soft shell crab mortalities, we took advantage of the physicochemical properties of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) to isolate a putative virus genome. Further characterization confirmed the presence of a reo-like virus that possesses 12 dsRNA genome segments. The virus was present in >50% of dead or dying soft shell crabs, but fewer than 5% of healthy hard crabs. Injection of the virus caused mortality and resulted in the appearance of viral RNA and virus inclusions in hemocytes. The genome of the virus was partially sequenced and the information used to develop a reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay that is able to detect the virus genome in as little as 7.5 pg of total RNA. The molecular tools developed during this study will allow us to quantify prevalence of the blue crab reo-like virus in captive (soft shell facilities, aquaculture operations) and wild populations and facilitate understanding of the role this virus has in blue crab life history.

  15. Comparative analysis of the proximate and elemental composition of the blue crab Callinectes sapidus, the warty crab Eriphia verrucosa, and the edible crab Cancer pagurus.

    PubMed

    Zotti, Maurizio; Coco, Laura Del; Pascali, Sandra Angelica De; Migoni, Danilo; Vizzini, Salvatrice; Mancinelli, Giorgio; Fanizzi, Francesco Paolo

    2016-02-01

    The proximate composition and element contents of claw muscle tissue of Atlantic blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) were compared with the native warty crab (Eriphia verrucosa) and the commercially edible crab (Cancer pagurus). The scope of the analysis was to profile the chemical characteristics and nutritive value of the three crab species. Elemental fingerprints showed significant inter-specific differences, whereas non-significant variations in the moisture and ash contents were observed. In the blue crab, protein content was significantly lower than in the other two species, while its carbon content resulted lower than that characterizing only the warty crab. Among micro-elements, Ba, Cr, Cu, Li, Mn, Ni, and Pb showed extremely low concentrations and negligible among-species differences. Significant inter-specific differences were observed for Na, Sr, V, Ba, Cd and Zn; in particular, cadmium and zinc were characterized in the blue crab by concentrations significantly lower than in the other two species. The analysis of the available literature on the three species indicated a general lack of comparable information on their elemental composition. The need to implement extended elemental fingerprinting techniques for shellfish quality assessment is discussed, in view of other complementary profiling methods such as NMR-based metabolomics.

  16. Mercury, lead, and cadmium in blue crabs, Callinectes sapidus, from the Atlantic coast of Florida, USA: a multipredator approach.

    PubMed

    Adams, Douglas H; Engel, Marc E

    2014-04-01

    Blue crabs, Callinectes sapidus, from the Atlantic coast of Florida were analyzed for total mercury, methylmercury, lead, and cadmium. Paired samples of two tissue types were analyzed for each crab, (1) muscle tissue (cheliped and body muscles) and (2) whole-body tissue (all organs, muscle tissue and connective tissue), for evaluation of the concentration of metals available to human consumers as well as estuarine predators. There were clear patterns of tissue-specific partitioning for each metal. Total mercury was significantly greater in muscle tissue (mean=0.078 µg/g) than in whole-body tissue (mean=0.055 µg/g). Conversely, whole-body concentrations of lead and cadmium (means=0.131 and 0.079 µg/g, respectively) were significantly greater than concentrations in muscle (means=0.02 and 0.029 µg/g, respectively). There were no significant correlations between any metal contaminant and crab size. Cadmium levels were significantly greater in the muscle tissue of females, but, no other sex-related differences were seen for other metals or tissue types. Methylmercury composed 93-100% of the total mercury in tissues. Compared to previous blue crab studies from different regions of the United States, mean concentrations of mercury, lead, and cadmium were relatively low, although isolated groups or individual blue crabs accumulated high metal concentrations.

  17. In vitro culture and developmental cycle of the parasitic dinoflagellate Hematodinium sp. from the blue crab Callinectes sapidus.

    PubMed

    Li, Caiwen; Miller, Terrence L; Small, Hamish J; Shields, Jeffrey D

    2011-12-01

    Hematodinium is a genus of parasitic dinoflagellates whose species have caused significant mortalities in marine crustacean fisheries worldwide. A species of Hematodinium infects the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus on the eastern seaboard of the USA. The mode of transmission of the parasite in blue crabs is unknown. We established several continuous in vitro cultures of Hematodinium sp. isolated from the haemolymph of infected blue crabs. One isolate has been continuously maintained in our laboratory through serial subcultivation for over 12 months, and is capable of infecting new hosts when inoculated into healthy crabs. Cells of the parasite undergo characteristic developmental changes in vitro consistent with the identifiable stages of Hematodinium sp.: filamentous trophonts, amoeboid trophonts, arachnoid trophonts and sporonts, sporoblasts, prespores and dinospores (macrospores and microspores). Additionally, we describe an unusual shunt in the life cycle wherein presumptive schizonts derived from arachnoid sporonts developed into filamentous and arachnoid trophonts that can then initiate arachnoid sporonts in new cultures. This may explain the rapid proliferation of the parasite in blue crab hosts. We also found that temperature and light intensity affected the growth and development of the parasite in vitro.

  18. Temperature correlates with annual changes in Hematodinium perezi prevalence in blue crab Callinectes sapidus in Florida, USA.

    PubMed

    Gandy, Ryan; Schott, Eric J; Crowley, Claire; Leone, Erin H

    2015-04-08

    Blue crabs Callinectes sapidus were monitored biannually throughout Florida, USA, for 2 yr using a highly sensitive, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to determine the spatial and temporal changes in prevalence and intensity of Hematodinium perezi infections during drought years. Despite persistent drought conditions, H. perezi infections were not universally found. Overall prevalence was 25.3% (95% CI: 22.8-28.1%) in 1066 crabs sampled from 6 locations (Jacksonville, Ormond Beach, Everglades City, Tampa Bay, Steinhatchee, and Panama City) from 2011 to 2012. Presence of H. perezi was consistently highest in winter season samples, ranging from 4.2-51.1% (3 locations) in 2011, to 32-83% (5 locations) in 2012. The highest prevalence and intensities were observed in the winter samples from Everglades City. Previous studies have found that the prevalence of H. perezi in C. sapidus in temperate regions of the US East Coast shows seasonal peaks in early winter in Maryland and South Carolina and in fall and spring in Georgia. The seasonality of infections in the subtropical waters of Florida reinforces the concept that temperature is a strong factor that may override other drivers, such as drought. Seasonal H. perezi infections in Florida appear to be triggered by the parasite responding to an optimal temperature during the annual rise from the low temperature of winter when salinity is elevated. However, salinity alone is not sufficient to trigger an increase in prevalence of H. perezi in Florida.

  19. Species profiles: Life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (Gulf of Mexico): Blue crab. [Callinectes sapidus

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, H.M.; McIlwain, T.D.

    1986-06-01

    The blue crab, Callinectes sapidus, is common in tidal marsh estuaries and coastal waters of the Gulf of Mexico, occupying a variety of habitats depending upon the physiological requirements of each particular stage in its life history. Spawning occurs from spring through fall in high salinity estuarine and/or coastal waters. Development through the 7 zoeal stages requires approximately 31 days and occurs offshore. The megalopal stage is usually completed within a week. Recruitment to the estuary occurs during the megalopal stage. Molt to the first crab takes place within the estuary. Juveniles exhibit wide seasonal and areal distribution. Growth is rapid and blue crabs in the Gulf of Mexico may reach maturity within a year. Factors affecting growth and survival include food availability, predation, substratum, available habitat, temperature, salinity and pollutants. Blue crabs do not conform to specific trophic levels and are characterized as opportunistic benthic omnivores. Their diverse feeding habits and their importance as prey species for a variety of organisms make them an integral part of coastal ecosystems.

  20. Acute toxicity, histopathology, and bioconcentration-retention studies with No. 2 fuel oil and the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus Rathbun

    SciTech Connect

    Melzian, B.D.

    1982-01-01

    Adult male blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus Rathbun) were exposed in a flow-through system to five concentrations, nominally 0.0 (control), 1.0, 5.0, 10.0, or 20.0 ppm of the water accommodated fraction (WAF) of No. 2 fuel oil. The 96-hour LC/sub 5//sup 0/ was 14.1 ppm. All crabs in the 5.0, 10.0, and 20.0 ppm tanks exhibited abnormal behavior prior to death including periodic beating of the maxillipedal flagella, hyperactivity, ataxia, and equilibrium loss. The ability of adult male and female blue crabs to bioconcentrate and retain No. 2 fuel oil compounds was examined after crabs were exposed for two weeks or 30-35 days in flow-through systems to three sublethal No. 2 fuel oil WAF concentrations, nominally 0.00 (control), 0.01, or 1.0 ppm. Gill, hepatopancreas, and muscle tissues were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Trace amounts of fuel oil hydrocarbons were detected in gill and hepatopancreas at 0.01 ppm exposures. All tissues bioconcentrated fuel oil compounds during 1.0 ppm WAF exposure periods, and with the exception of the gills, little depuration or metabolism of the bioconcentrated compounds occurred during a period of 30 days in clean, running seawater.

  1. A New PCR-Based Method Shows That Blue Crabs (Callinectes sapidus (Rathbun)) Consume Winter Flounder (Pseudopleuronectes americanus (Walbaum))

    PubMed Central

    Collier, Jackie L.; Fitzgerald, Sean P.; Hice, Lyndie A.; Frisk, Michael G.; McElroy, Anne E.

    2014-01-01

    Winter flounder (Pseudopleuronectes americanus) once supported robust commercial and recreational fisheries in the New York (USA) region, but since the 1990s populations have been in decline. Available data show that settlement of young-of-the-year winter flounder has not declined as sharply as adult abundance, suggesting that juveniles are experiencing higher mortality following settlement. The recent increase of blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) abundance in the New York region raises the possibility that new sources of predation may be contributing to juvenile winter flounder mortality. To investigate this possibility we developed and validated a method to specifically detect winter flounder mitochondrial control region DNA sequences in the gut contents of blue crabs. A survey of 55 crabs collected from Shinnecock Bay (along the south shore of Long Island, New York) in July, August, and September of 2011 showed that 12 of 42 blue crabs (28.6%) from which PCR-amplifiable DNA was recovered had consumed winter flounder in the wild, empirically supporting the trophic link between these species that has been widely speculated to exist. This technique overcomes difficulties with visual identification of the often unrecognizable gut contents of decapod crustaceans, and modifications of this approach offer valuable tools to more broadly address their feeding habits on a wide variety of species. PMID:24454797

  2. Real-time PCR-based assay for quantitative detection of Hematodinium sp. in the blue crab Callinectes sapidus.

    PubMed

    Nagle, L; Place, A R; Schott, E J; Jagus, R; Messick, G; Pitula, J S

    2009-03-09

    Hematodinium sp. is a parasitic dinoflagellate infecting the blue crab Callinectes sapidus and other crustaceans. PCR-based assays are currently being used to identify infections in crabs that would have been undetectable by traditional microscopic examination. We therefore sought to define the limits of quantitative PCR (qPCR) detection within the context of field collection protocols. We present a qPCR assay based on the Hematodinium sp. 18S rRNA gene that can detect 10 copies of the gene per reaction. Analysis of a cell dilution series vs. defined numbers of a cloned Hematodinium sp. 18S rRNA gene suggests a copy number of 10,000 per parasite and predicts a sensitivity of 0.001 cell equivalents. In practice, the assays are based on analysis of 1% of the DNA extracted from 200 microl of serum, yielding a theoretical detection limit of 5 cells ml(-1) hemolymph, assuming that 1 cell is present per sample. When applied to a limited field survey of blue crabs collected in Maryland coastal bays from May to August 2005, 24 of 128 crabs (18.8%) were identified as positive for Hematodinium sp. infection using qPCR. In comparison, only 6 of 128 crabs (4.7%) were identified as positive using traditional hemolymph microscopic examination. The qPCR method also detected the parasite in gill, muscle, heart and hepatopancreas tissues, with 17.2% of the crabs showing infection in at least one of these tissues. Importantly, it is now possible to enumerate parasites within defined quantities of crab tissue, which permits collection of more detailed information on the epizootiology of the pathogen.

  3. Biochemical and ultrastructural aspects of Ca2+ transport by mitochondria of the hepatopancreas of the blue crab Callinectes sapidus.

    PubMed

    Chen, C H; Greenawalt, J W; Lehninger, A L

    1974-05-01

    Mitochondria isolated from the hepatopancreas of the blue crab Callinectes sapidus show up to 12-fold stimulation of respiration on addition of Ca(2+), which is accompanied by Ca(2+) accumulation (Ca(2+):site = 1.9) and H(+) ejection (H(+):Ca(2+) = 0.85). Sr(2+) and Mn(2+) are also accumulated; Mg(2+) is not. A strongly hypertonic medium (383 mosM), Mg(2+), and phosphate are required for maximal Ca(2+) uptake. Ca(2+) uptake takes precedence over oxidative phosphorylation of ADP for respiratory energy. Once Ca(2+) is accumulated by the crab mitochondria, it is stable and only very slowly released, even by uncoupling agents. ATP hydrolysis also supports Ca(2+) uptake. Respiration-inhibited crab hepatopancreas mitochondria show both high-affinity and low-affinity Ca(2+)-binding sites, which are inactive in the presence of uncoupling agents. Crab hepatopancreas mitochondria have an enormous capacity for accumulation of Ca(2+), up to 5,500 ng-atoms Ca(2+) per mg protein, with an equivalent amount of phosphate. Freshly isolated mitochondria contain very large amounts of Ca(2+), Mg(2+), phosphate, K(+), and Na(+); their high Ca(2+) content is a reflection of the vary large amount of extra-mitochondrial Ca(2+) in the whole tissue. Electron microscopy of crab mitochondria loaded with Ca(2+) and phosphate showed large electron-dense deposits, presumably of precipitated calcium phosphate. They consisted of bundles of needle-like crystals, whereas Ca(2+)-loaded rat liver mitochondria show only amorphous deposits of calcium phosphate under similar conditions. The very pronounced capacity of crab hepatopancreas mitochondria for transport of Ca(2+) appears to be adapted to a role in the storage and release of Ca(2+) during the molting cycle of this crustacean.

  4. An insulin-like growth factor found in hepatopancreas implicates carbohydrate metabolism of the blue crab Callinectes sapidus.

    PubMed

    Chung, J Sook

    2014-04-01

    Hyperglycemia that is caused by the release of crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) from the sinus gland to hemolymph is one of the hallmark physiological phenomena, occurring in decapod crustaceans experiencing stressful conditions. However, the mechanism(s) by which such elevated glucose levels return to resting levels is still unknown. Interestingly, noted is a difference in the clearance rate of hemolymph glucose between adult females and adult males of the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus: the former with more rapid clearance than the latter. The presence of an endogenous-insulin-like molecule is suggested in C. sapidus because an injection of bovine insulin, significantly reduces the levels of hemolymph glucose that were previously elevated by emersion stress or the glucose injection. Using 5' and 3' RACE, the full-length cDNA of an insulin-like molecule is isolated from the hepatopancreas of an adult female C. sapidus and shows the same putative sequence of an insulin-like androgenic gland factor (IAG) but differs in 5' and 3' UTR sequences. A knock-down study using five injections of double-stranded RNA of CasIAG-hep (dsRNA-CasIAG-hep, 10μg/injection) over a 10-day period reduces CasIAG-hep expression by ∼50%. The levels of hemolymph glucose are also kept higher in dsRNA-CasIAG-hep injected group than those treated with dsRNA-green fluorescent protein (dsRNA-IAG-hep) or saline. Most importantly, the hepatopancreas of dsRNA-CasIAG-hep injected animals contains amounts of carbohydrate (glucose, trehalose, and glycogen) significantly lower than those of control groups, indicating that the function of CasIAG-hep in carbohydrate metabolism in crustaceans is similar to carbohydrate metabolism in vertebrates.

  5. The Effects of Acute Copper and Ammonia Challenges on Ammonia and Urea Excretion by the Blue Crab Callinectes sapidus.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Alex M; Jorge, Marianna Basso; Wood, Chris M; Martins, Camila M G; Bianchini, Adalto

    2017-04-01

    Copper (Cu) is a persistent environmental contaminant that elicits several physiological disturbances in aquatic organisms, including a disruption in ammonia regulation. We hypothesized that exposure to Cu in a model crustacean (blue crab, Callinectes sapidus) acclimated to brackish water (2 ppt) would lead to hyperammonemia by stimulating an increase in ammonia production and/or by inhibiting ammonia excretion. We further hypothesized that urea production would represent an ammonia detoxification strategy in response to Cu. In a pilot experiment, exposure to 0, 100, and 200 µg/L Cu for 6 h caused significant concentration-dependent increases in ammonia excretion (J amm). Based on these results, an acute 24-h 100 µg/L Cu exposure was conducted and this similarly caused an overall stimulation of J amm during the 24-h period, indicative of an increase in ammonia production. Terminal haemolymph total ammonia content (T amm) was unchanged, suggesting that while ammonia production was increased, there was no inhibition of the excretion mechanism. In support of our second hypothesis, urea excretion (J urea) increased in response to Cu exposure; haemolymph [urea] was unaffected. This suggested that urea production also was increased. To further test the hypothesis that J urea increased to prevent hyperammonemia during Cu exposure, crabs were exposed to high environmental ammonia (HEA; 2.5 mmol/L NH4HCO3) for 12 h in a separate experiment. This led to a fourfold increase in haemolymph T amm, whereas J urea increased only transiently and haemolymph [urea] was unchanged, indicating that urea production likely does not contribute to the attenuation of hyperammonemia in blue crabs. Overall, Cu exposure in blue crabs led to increased ammonia and urea production, which were both eliminated by excretion. These results may have important implications in aquaculture systems where crabs may be exposed to elevated Cu and/or ammonia.

  6. (1)H NMR metabolomic profiling of the blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) from the Adriatic Sea (SE Italy): A comparison with warty crab (Eriphia verrucosa), and edible crab (Cancer pagurus).

    PubMed

    Zotti, Maurizio; De Pascali, Sandra Angelica; Del Coco, Laura; Migoni, Danilo; Carrozzo, Leonardo; Mancinelli, Giorgio; Fanizzi, Francesco Paolo

    2016-04-01

    The metabolomic profile of blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) captured in the Acquatina lagoon (SE Italy) was compared to an autochthonous (Eriphia verrucosa) and to a commercial crab species (Cancer pagurus). Both lipid and aqueous extracts of raw claw muscle were analyzed by (1)H NMR spectroscopy and MVA (multivariate data analysis). Aqueous extracts were characterized by a higher inter-specific discriminating power compared to lipid fractions. Specifically, higher levels of glutamate, alanine and glycine characterized the aqueous extract of C. sapidus, while homarine, lactate, betaine and taurine characterized E. verrucosa and C. pagurus. On the other hand, only the signals of monounsaturated fatty acids distinguished the lipid profiles of the three crab species. These results support the commercial exploitation and the integration of the blue crab in human diet of European countries as an healthy and valuable seafood.

  7. The Involvement of Hemocyte Prophenoloxidase in the Shell-Hardening Process of the Blue Crab, Callinectes sapidus

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Javier V.; Chung, J. Sook

    2015-01-01

    Cuticular structures of arthropods undergo dramatic molt-related changes from being soft to becoming hard. The shell-hardening process of decapod crustaceans includes sclerotization and mineralization. Hemocyte PPO plays a central role in melanization and sclerotization particularly in wound healing in crustaceans. However, little is known about its role in the crustacean initial shell-hardening process. The earlier findings of the aggregation of heavily granulated hemocytes beneath the hypodermis during ecdysis imply that the hemocytes may be involved in the shell-hardening process. In order to determine if hemocytes and hemocyte PPO have a role in the shell-hardening of crustaceans, a knockdown study using specific CasPPO-hemo-dsRNA was carried out with juvenile blue crabs, Callinectes sapidus. Multiple injections of CasPPO-hemo-dsRNA reduce specifically the levels of CasPPO-hemo expression by 57% and PO activity by 54% in hemocyte lysate at the postmolt, while they have no effect on the total hemocyte numbers. Immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry analysis using a specific antiserum generated against CasPPO show granulocytes, semigranulocytes and hyaline cells as the cellular sources for PPO at the postmolt. Interestingly, the type of hemocytes, as the cellular sources of PPO, varies by molt stage. The granulocytes always contain PPO throughout the molt cycle. However, semigranulocytes and hyaline cells become CasPPO immune-positive only at early premolt and postmolt, indicating that PPO expression in these cells may be involved in the shell-hardening process of C. sapidus. PMID:26393802

  8. Detecting Selection in the Blue Crab, Callinectes sapidus, Using DNA Sequence Data from Multiple Nuclear Protein-Coding Genes

    PubMed Central

    Yednock, Bree K.; Neigel, Joseph E.

    2014-01-01

    The identification of genes involved in the adaptive evolution of non-model organisms with uncharacterized genomes constitutes a major challenge. This study employed a rigorous and targeted candidate gene approach to test for positive selection on protein-coding genes of the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus. Four genes with putative roles in physiological adaptation to environmental stress were chosen as candidates. A fifth gene not expected to play a role in environmental adaptation was used as a control. Large samples (n>800) of DNA sequences from C. sapidus were used in tests of selective neutrality based on sequence polymorphisms. In combination with these, sequences from the congener C. similis were used in neutrality tests based on interspecific divergence. In multiple tests, significant departures from neutral expectations and indicative of positive selection were found for the candidate gene trehalose 6-phosphate synthase (tps). These departures could not be explained by any of the historical population expansion or bottleneck scenarios that were evaluated in coalescent simulations. Evidence was also found for balancing selection at ATP-synthase subunit 9 (atps) using a maximum likelihood version of the Hudson, Kreitmen, and Aguadé test, and positive selection favoring amino acid replacements within ATP/ADP translocase (ant) was detected using the McDonald-Kreitman test. In contrast, test statistics for the control gene, ribosomal protein L12 (rpl), which presumably has experienced the same demographic effects as the candidate loci, were not significantly different from neutral expectations and could readily be explained by demographic effects. Together, these findings demonstrate the utility of the candidate gene approach for investigating adaptation at the molecular level in a marine invertebrate for which extensive genomic resources are not available. PMID:24896825

  9. The Involvement of Hemocyte Prophenoloxidase in the Shell-Hardening Process of the Blue Crab, Callinectes sapidus.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Javier V; Chung, J Sook

    2015-01-01

    Cuticular structures of arthropods undergo dramatic molt-related changes from being soft to becoming hard. The shell-hardening process of decapod crustaceans includes sclerotization and mineralization. Hemocyte PPO plays a central role in melanization and sclerotization particularly in wound healing in crustaceans. However, little is known about its role in the crustacean initial shell-hardening process. The earlier findings of the aggregation of heavily granulated hemocytes beneath the hypodermis during ecdysis imply that the hemocytes may be involved in the shell-hardening process. In order to determine if hemocytes and hemocyte PPO have a role in the shell-hardening of crustaceans, a knockdown study using specific CasPPO-hemo-dsRNA was carried out with juvenile blue crabs, Callinectes sapidus. Multiple injections of CasPPO-hemo-dsRNA reduce specifically the levels of CasPPO-hemo expression by 57% and PO activity by 54% in hemocyte lysate at the postmolt, while they have no effect on the total hemocyte numbers. Immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry analysis using a specific antiserum generated against CasPPO show granulocytes, semigranulocytes and hyaline cells as the cellular sources for PPO at the postmolt. Interestingly, the type of hemocytes, as the cellular sources of PPO, varies by molt stage. The granulocytes always contain PPO throughout the molt cycle. However, semigranulocytes and hyaline cells become CasPPO immune-positive only at early premolt and postmolt, indicating that PPO expression in these cells may be involved in the shell-hardening process of C. sapidus.

  10. Detecting selection in the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus, using DNA sequence data from multiple nuclear protein-coding genes.

    PubMed

    Yednock, Bree K; Neigel, Joseph E

    2014-01-01

    The identification of genes involved in the adaptive evolution of non-model organisms with uncharacterized genomes constitutes a major challenge. This study employed a rigorous and targeted candidate gene approach to test for positive selection on protein-coding genes of the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus. Four genes with putative roles in physiological adaptation to environmental stress were chosen as candidates. A fifth gene not expected to play a role in environmental adaptation was used as a control. Large samples (n>800) of DNA sequences from C. sapidus were used in tests of selective neutrality based on sequence polymorphisms. In combination with these, sequences from the congener C. similis were used in neutrality tests based on interspecific divergence. In multiple tests, significant departures from neutral expectations and indicative of positive selection were found for the candidate gene trehalose 6-phosphate synthase (tps). These departures could not be explained by any of the historical population expansion or bottleneck scenarios that were evaluated in coalescent simulations. Evidence was also found for balancing selection at ATP-synthase subunit 9 (atps) using a maximum likelihood version of the Hudson, Kreitmen, and Aguadé test, and positive selection favoring amino acid replacements within ATP/ADP translocase (ant) was detected using the McDonald-Kreitman test. In contrast, test statistics for the control gene, ribosomal protein L12 (rpl), which presumably has experienced the same demographic effects as the candidate loci, were not significantly different from neutral expectations and could readily be explained by demographic effects. Together, these findings demonstrate the utility of the candidate gene approach for investigating adaptation at the molecular level in a marine invertebrate for which extensive genomic resources are not available.

  11. Epidermal carbonic anhydrase activity and exoskeletal metal content during the molting cycle of the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus.

    PubMed

    Calhoun, Stacy; Zou, Enmin

    2016-03-01

    During the crustacean molting cycle, the exoskeleton is first mineralized in postmolt and intermolt and then presumably demineralized in premolt in order for epidermal retraction to occur. The mineralization process calls for divalent metal ions, such as Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) , and bicarbonate ions whereas protons are necessary for dissolution of carbonate salts. Carbonic anhydrase (CA) has been suggested to be involved in exoskeletal mineralization by providing bicarbonate ions through catalyzing the reaction of carbon dioxide hydration. However, results of earlier studies on the role of epidermal CA in metal incorporation in crustacean exoskeleton are not consistent. This study was aimed to provide further evidence to support the notion that epidermal CA is involved in exoskeletal mineralization using the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus (Rathbun 1896), as the model crustacean. Significant increases first in calcium and magnesium then in manganese post-ecdysis indicate significant metal deposition during postmolt and intermolt. Significant positive correlation between calcium or magnesium content and epidermal CA activity in postmolt and intermolt constitutes evidence that CA is involved in the mineralization of the crustacean exoskeleton. Additionally, we proposed a hypothetical model to describe the role of epidermal CA in both mineralization and demineralization of the exoskeleton based on the results of epidermal CA activity and exoskeletal metal content during the molting cycle. Furthermore, we found that the pattern of epidermal CA activity during the molting cycle of C. sapidus is similar to that of ecdysteroids reported for the same species, suggesting that epidermal CA activity may be under control of the molting hormones.

  12. Acute toxicity of current and alternative oil spill chemical dispersants to early life stage blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus).

    PubMed

    Pie, Hannah V; Mitchelmore, Carys L

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the acute toxicity of five oil spill chemical dispersants on the ecologically and economically important coastal and estuarine species, blue crab Callinectes sapidus. Static, non-renewal 48 h acute toxicity tests were performed on stage-II blue crab zoea. The median lethal concentration (LC50) was calculated for each dispersant at 24 h and 48 h using nominal concentrations for each dispersant tested. The 48 h LC50 values from the most to the least toxic ranged from 10.1 mg L(-1) for Dispersit SPC 1000 to 76.5 mg L(-1) for Orca. For all dispersants, the swimming activity and mobility of larvae decreased with increasing dispersant concentration within 24h of exposure and reached relative immobility at concentrations below LC50 values. These results show that the dispersants examined in this study are only slightly toxic after 48 h exposure to the earliest life stage of blue crabs that might likely be exposed to dispersants in the environment, with the exception of Dispersit SPC 1000 that bordered between slightly and moderately toxic. Although the dispersants themselves appear to not cause substantial acute toxicity, sublethal and potentially delayed impacts, such as, reduced mobility or food source availability could indirectly remove larvae from the population and need to be further examined, as do larval responses in standard chronic toxicity tests. Furthermore, dispersants are not released into the environment in isolation and so the impact of dispersed-oil using these dispersant formulations also needs to be investigated to translate into real-world situations.

  13. Copper accumulation and toxicity in isolated cells from gills and hepatopancreas of the blue crab (Callinectes sapidus).

    PubMed

    Paganini, Christianne L; Bianchini, Adalto

    2009-06-01

    In the present study, we used fresh preparations of mixed-cell populations to evaluate accumulation and toxicity of dissolved copper (1-100 microM) in isolated cells from posterior gills and hepatopancreas of the blue crab (Callinectes sapidus). For both gill and hepatopancreatic cells, significant increases in copper accumulation were observed after exposure to 50 or 100 microM copper. In gill cells, a linear increase in copper accumulation was observed over time. In hepatopancreatic cells, a maximum level of copper accumulation was achieved after 1 h of exposure, remaining unchanged up to 6 h. After 6 h of exposure, copper content in gill cells was 6.6-fold higher than that in hepatopancreatic cells. In both cell types, copper accumulation always followed a linear relationship with copper concentration in the incubation medium. Significant decreases in cell viability were observed after exposure to either 10 microM copper (gill cells) or 100 microM copper (gill and hepatopancreatic cells). Furthermore, an exponential rise to maximum-type relationship was observed between copper accumulation and toxicity in gill cells. Altogether, these findings indicate that the premise behind the biotic ligand model (BLM) approach is verified in isolated cells from posterior gills of the blue crab (i.e., toxicity is driven by copper accumulation in the biotic ligand, the gill cell). Therefore, these cells can be used as a model for the development of an in vitro BLM version for marine conditions. Isolated cells from the hepatopancreas, however, could be used as a model to better understand the mechanism of copper tolerance at a cellular level in crustaceans.

  14. Genome Sequence Analysis of CsRV1: A Pathogenic Reovirus that Infects the Blue Crab Callinectes sapidus Across Its Trans-Hemispheric Range

    PubMed Central

    Bachvaroff, Tsvetan R.; Warg, Janet V.; Neill, John D.; Killian, Mary L.; Vinagre, Anapaula S.; Brown, Shanai; Almeida, Andréa Santos e; Schott, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    The blue crab, Callinectes sapidus Rathbun, 1896, which is a commercially important trophic link in coastal ecosystems of the western Atlantic, is infected in both North and South America by C. sapidus Reovirus 1 (CsRV1), a double stranded RNA virus. The 12 genome segments of a North American strain of CsRV1 were sequenced using Ion Torrent technology. Putative functions could be assigned for 3 of the 13 proteins encoded in the genome, based on their similarity to proteins encoded in other reovirus genomes. Comparison of the CsRV1 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) sequence to genomes of other crab-infecting reoviruses shows that it is similar to the mud crab reovirus found in Scylla serrata and WX-2012 in Eriocheir sinensis, Chinese mitten crab, and supports the idea that there is a distinct “Crabreo” genus, different from Seadornavirus and Cardoreovirus, the two closest genera in the Reoviridae. A region of 98% nucleotide sequence identity between CsRV1 and the only available sequence of the P virus of Macropipus depurator suggests that these two viruses may be closely related. An 860 nucleotide region of the CsRV1 RdRP gene was amplified and sequenced from 15 infected crabs collected from across the geographic range of C. sapidus. Pairwise analysis of predicted protein sequences shows that CsRV1 strains in Brazil can be distinguished from those in North America based on conserved residues in this gene. The sequencing, annotation, and preliminary population metrics of the genome of CsRV1 should facilitate additional studies in diverse disciplines, including structure-function relationships of reovirus proteins, investigations into the evolution of the Reoviridae, and biogeographic research on the connectivity of C. sapidus populations across the Northern and Southern hemispheres. PMID:26904003

  15. Genome Sequence Analysis of CsRV1: A Pathogenic Reovirus that Infects the Blue Crab Callinectes sapidus Across Its Trans-Hemispheric Range.

    PubMed

    Flowers, Emily M; Bachvaroff, Tsvetan R; Warg, Janet V; Neill, John D; Killian, Mary L; Vinagre, Anapaula S; Brown, Shanai; Almeida, Andréa Santos E; Schott, Eric J

    2016-01-01

    The blue crab, Callinectes sapidus Rathbun, 1896, which is a commercially important trophic link in coastal ecosystems of the western Atlantic, is infected in both North and South America by C. sapidus Reovirus 1 (CsRV1), a double stranded RNA virus. The 12 genome segments of a North American strain of CsRV1 were sequenced using Ion Torrent technology. Putative functions could be assigned for 3 of the 13 proteins encoded in the genome, based on their similarity to proteins encoded in other reovirus genomes. Comparison of the CsRV1 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) sequence to genomes of other crab-infecting reoviruses shows that it is similar to the mud crab reovirus found in Scylla serrata and WX-2012 in Eriocheir sinensis, Chinese mitten crab, and supports the idea that there is a distinct "Crabreo" genus, different from Seadornavirus and Cardoreovirus, the two closest genera in the Reoviridae. A region of 98% nucleotide sequence identity between CsRV1 and the only available sequence of the P virus of Macropipus depurator suggests that these two viruses may be closely related. An 860 nucleotide region of the CsRV1 RdRP gene was amplified and sequenced from 15 infected crabs collected from across the geographic range of C. sapidus. Pairwise analysis of predicted protein sequences shows that CsRV1 strains in Brazil can be distinguished from those in North America based on conserved residues in this gene. The sequencing, annotation, and preliminary population metrics of the genome of CsRV1 should facilitate additional studies in diverse disciplines, including structure-function relationships of reovirus proteins, investigations into the evolution of the Reoviridae, and biogeographic research on the connectivity of C. sapidus populations across the Northern and Southern hemispheres.

  16. Ecdysteroids Regulate the Levels of Molt-Inhibiting Hormone (MIH) Expression in the Blue Crab, Callinectes sapidus

    PubMed Central

    Techa, Sirinart; Chung, J. Sook

    2015-01-01

    Arthropod molt is coordinated through the interplay between ecdysteroids and neuropeptide hormones. In crustaceans, changes in the activity of Y-organs during the molt cycle have been regulated by molt-inhibiting hormone (MIH) and crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH). Little has been known of the mode of direct effects of ecdysteroids on the levels of MIH and CHH in the eyestalk ganglia during the molt cycle. This study focused on a putative feedback of ecdysteroids on the expression levels of MIH transcripts using in vitro incubation study with ecdysteroids and in vivo RNAi in the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus. Our results show a specific expression of ecdysone receptor (EcR) in which EcR1 is the major isoform in eyestalk ganglia. The initial elevation of MIH expression at the early premolt stages is replicated by in vitro incubations of eyestalk ganglia with ecdysteroids that mimic the intrinsic conditions of D0 stage: the concentration (75 ng/ml) and composition (ponasterone A and 20-hydroxyecdysone at a 3:1 (w:w) ratio). Additionally, multiple injections of EcR1-dsRNA reduce MIH expression by 67%, compared to the controls. Our data provide evidence on a putative feedback mechanism of hormonal regulation during molting cycle, specifically how the molt cycle is repeated during the life cycle of crustaceans. The elevated concentrations of ecdysteroids at early premolt stage may act positively on the levels of MIH expression in the eyestalk ganglia. Subsequently, the increased MIH titers in the hemolymph at postmolt would inhibit the synthesis and release of ecdysteroids by Y-organs, resulting in re-setting the subsequent molt cycle. PMID:25849453

  17. Ecdysteroids regulate the levels of Molt-Inhibiting Hormone (MIH) expression in the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus.

    PubMed

    Techa, Sirinart; Chung, J Sook

    2015-01-01

    Arthropod molt is coordinated through the interplay between ecdysteroids and neuropeptide hormones. In crustaceans, changes in the activity of Y-organs during the molt cycle have been regulated by molt-inhibiting hormone (MIH) and crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH). Little has been known of the mode of direct effects of ecdysteroids on the levels of MIH and CHH in the eyestalk ganglia during the molt cycle. This study focused on a putative feedback of ecdysteroids on the expression levels of MIH transcripts using in vitro incubation study with ecdysteroids and in vivo RNAi in the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus. Our results show a specific expression of ecdysone receptor (EcR) in which EcR1 is the major isoform in eyestalk ganglia. The initial elevation of MIH expression at the early premolt stages is replicated by in vitro incubations of eyestalk ganglia with ecdysteroids that mimic the intrinsic conditions of D0 stage: the concentration (75 ng/ml) and composition (ponasterone A and 20-hydroxyecdysone at a 3:1 (w:w) ratio). Additionally, multiple injections of EcR1-dsRNA reduce MIH expression by 67%, compared to the controls. Our data provide evidence on a putative feedback mechanism of hormonal regulation during molting cycle, specifically how the molt cycle is repeated during the life cycle of crustaceans. The elevated concentrations of ecdysteroids at early premolt stage may act positively on the levels of MIH expression in the eyestalk ganglia. Subsequently, the increased MIH titers in the hemolymph at postmolt would inhibit the synthesis and release of ecdysteroids by Y-organs, resulting in re-setting the subsequent molt cycle.

  18. Impact of molt-disrupting BDE-47 on epidermal ecdysteroid signaling in the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus, in vitro.

    PubMed

    Booth, Ashley; Zou, Enmin

    2016-08-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are environmentally pervasive flame retardants that have been linked with endocrine disruption in a variety of organisms. BDE-47, one of the most prevalent congeners found in aquatic environments, has recently been shown to inhibit crustacean molting, but little is known about the specific mechanism through which molt-inhibition occurs. This study examined whether the inhibitory effect on molting arises from the disruption of hormone signaling in the epidermis using the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus, as the model crustacean. First, we partially sequenced cDNA of N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase (NAG) from the epidermis, a terminal enzyme in the molting hormone-signaling cascades that is commonly used as the biomarker for ecdysteroid signaling. This partial cDNA sequence was then used to create primers for quantification of NAG gene expression. Then, a new tissue culture technique was developed and dubbed the epidermis-with-exoskeleton (EWE) method, wherein epidermal tissue, along with the overlying exoskeleton, is immersed in a medium of physiologically relevant osmolarity. Using this EWE tissue culture method, we assessed the inducibility of NAG mRNA by 20-hydroxyecdysone (20-HE) in vitro. Exposures to 1μM 20-HE were found to induce NAG mRNA at a significantly higher level than the control. Using NAG expression as a biomarker for ecdysteroid signaling, the effects of BDE-47 were measured. BDE-47 alone at 100nM and a combination of 1μM BDE-47 and 1μM 20-HE were found to significantly increase NAG mRNA. A trend of increasing NAG gene expression in the binary BDE-47 exposure as compared to 1μM BDE-47 and 1μM 20-HE alone is suggestive of a synergistic effect of these two chemicals on ecdysteroid signaling in the cultured epidermis. Discussion on the mechanism for inhibition of crustacean molting by BDE-47 is presented.

  19. The effects of predation by wading birds (Ardeidae) and blue crabs ( Callinectes sapidus) on the population size structure of the common mummichog, Fundulus heteroclitus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneib, R. T.

    1982-02-01

    Preliminary observations suggested that predation by herons and egretsaffected the size structure of a mummichog ( Fundulus heteroclitus) population in Tar Landing Marsh, North Carolina. The hypothesis was tested by placing 300 mummichogs represented equally in three size classes into each half of an enclosed, divided, high marsh pool. Nylon cord was strung in a grid over one side to inhibit predation by wading birds. Although mummichog losses were higher in the side of the pool which was open to bird predation, the same trend in size-specific losses also occurred in the bird-exclusion side. Repeating the experiment after the removal of several blue crabs ( Callinectes sapidus) improved mummichog survivorship and suggested that crabs and not birds were responsible for the fish losses previously observed. In a final experiment, birds were excluded and crabs were removed from one side but added to the other side of the pool. After 24 days losses due to C. sapidus occurred in all mummichog size classes, but size-specific predation by blue crabs produced the highest losses (90%) among the largest (>70 mm total length) fish. Blue crab predation on mummichog populations may influence the community structure of salt marsh infauna and may also function in the movement of marsh production to open coastal waters.

  20. Cloning of an insulin-like androgenic gland factor (IAG) from the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus: implications for eyestalk regulation of IAG expression.

    PubMed

    Chung, J Sook; Manor, R; Sagi, A

    2011-08-01

    In malacostracan crustaceans, sex differentiation is uniquely regulated by a hormone secreted by the male-specific androgenic gland (AG). An isopod AG hormone was the first to be structurally elucidated and was found to belong to the insulin superfamily of proteins. Recently, it has been found that the AGs of several decapod crustaceans express insulin-like androgenic gland factors (IAGs), whose function is believed to be similar to that of the isopod AG hormone. Here we report the isolation from the blue crab Callinectes sapidus of the full-length cDNA encoding a candidate insulin-like AG hormone, termed Cas-IAG. The predicted protein Cas-IAG was encoded as a precursor consisting of a signal peptide, the B chain, the C peptide, and the A chain in that order. While the AG was the main source of Cas-IAG expression, as found in other decapod species, the hepatopancreas of male Callinectes sapidus crabs displayed minor Cas-IAG expression. Eyestalk ablation confirmed the presence of a possible endocrine axis between the eyestalk ganglia and the AG, implying that Cas-IAG expression is negatively regulated by (a) substance(s) present in the eyestalk ganglia.

  1. The role of alternate hosts in the ecology and life history of Hematodinium sp., a parasitic dinoflagellate of the blue crab (Callinectes sapidus).

    PubMed

    Lohan, Katrina M Pagenkopp; Reece, Kimberly S; Miller, Terrence L; Wheeler, Kersten N; Small, Hamish J; Shields, Jeffrey D

    2012-02-01

    Hematodinium sp. infections are relatively common in some American blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) populations in estuaries of the western Atlantic Ocean. Outbreaks of disease caused by Hematodinium sp. can be extensive and can cause substantial mortalities in blue crab populations in high salinities. We examined several species of crustaceans to determine if the same species of Hematodinium that infects C. sapidus is found in other crustaceans from the same localities. Over a 2-yr period, 1,829 crustaceans were collected from the Delmarva Peninsula, Virginia, examined for the presence of infections. A portion of the first internal transcribed spacer (ITS1) region of the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene complex from Hematodinium sp. was amplified and sequences were compared among 35 individual crustaceans putatively infected with the parasite, as determined by microscopic examination, and 4 crustaceans putatively infected based only on PCR analysis. Of the 18 crustacean species examined, 5 were infected with Hematodinium sp. after microscopic examination and PCR analysis, including 3 new host records, and an additional species was positive only via PCR analysis. The ITS1 rRNA sequences of Hematodinium sp. from the infected crustaceans were highly similar to each other and to that reported from C. sapidus (>98%). The similarity among these ITS1 sequences and similarities in the histopathology of infected hosts is evidence that the same species of Hematodinium found in C. sapidus infects a broad range of crustaceans along the Delmarva Peninsula. Our data indicate that the species of Hematodinium found in blue crabs from estuaries along the east coast of North America is a host generalist, capable of infecting hosts in different families within the Order Decapoda. Additionally, evidence indicates that it may be capable of infecting crustaceans within the Order Amphipoda.

  2. Seasonal variations in reproductive activity of the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus: Vitellogenin expression and levels of vitellogenin in the hemolymph during ovarian development.

    PubMed

    Thongda, Willawan; Chung, J Sook; Tsutsui, Naoaki; Zmora, Nilli; Katenta, Anna

    2015-01-01

    In general, season affects the physiology and behavior of most animals. Warmer temperatures accelerate growth and reproduction of ectotherms, whereas these processes are slowed or halted in colder temperatures. Female blue crabs, Callinectes sapidus inhabiting the Chesapeake Bay, exhibit a seasonal migratory behavior that is closely tied with spawning and the release of larvae. To better understand reproductive activities of the migratory adult females, we examined two reproductive parameters of these crabs sampled monthly (April-December, 2006): the levels of vitellogenin (VtG) in the hemolymph and VtG expression in the hepatopancreas and ovary. The full-length cDNA of VtG (CasVtG-ova) has been isolated from the ovary. The putative CasVtG sequence found in the ovary is >99% identical to that of the hepatopancreas and is related most closely to the sequences reported in other crab species. In female C. sapidus, the hepatopancreas produces over 99% of the total VtG toward the ovarian development. Ovarian stages 2 and 3 in the sampled females are characterized by significant high levels of VtG in hemolymph and VtG expression in both the hepatopancreas and ovary. However, during the southbound migration in fall, females at ovarian stages 2 and 3 have decreased VtG levels, compared to those in spring and summer. The decreased vitellogenesis activity during the fall migration suggests seasonal adaptation to ensure successful spawning and the larval release.

  3. mRNA Expression and activity of ion-transporting proteins in gills of the blue crab Callinectes sapidus: effects of waterborne copper.

    PubMed

    Martins, Camila M G; Almeida, Daniela Volcan; Marins, Luis Fernando Fernandes; Bianchini, Adalto

    2011-01-01

    Waterborne Cu effects on the transcription of genes encoding ion-transporting proteins and the activities of these proteins were evaluated in gills of the blue crab Callinectes sapidus acclimated to diluted (2‰) and full (30‰) seawater. Crabs were exposed (96 h) to an environmentally relevant concentration of dissolved Cu (0.78 µM) and had their posterior (osmoregulating) gills dissected for enzymatic and molecular analysis. Endpoints analyzed were the activity of key enzymes involved in crab osmoregulation (sodium-potassium adenosine triphosphatase [Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase], hydrogen adenosine triphosphatase [H(+)-ATPase], and carbonic anhydrase [CA]) and the mRNA expression of genes encoding these enzymes and the sodium-potassium-chloride (Na(+)/K(+)/2Cl⁻) cotransporter. Copper effects were observed only in crabs acclimated to diluted seawater (hyperosmoregulating crabs) and were associated with an inhibition of the expression of mRNA of genes encoding the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and the Na(+)/K(+)/2Cl⁻ cotransporter. However, Cu did not affect Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity, indicating that the gene transcription is downregulated before a significant inhibition of the enzyme activity can be observed. This also suggests the existence of a compensatory response of this enzyme to prevent osmoregulatory disturbances after short-term exposure to environmentally relevant Cu concentrations. These findings suggest that Cu is a potential ionoregulatory toxicant in blue crabs C. sapidus acclimated to low salinity. The lack of Cu effect on blue crabs acclimated to full seawater would be due to the reduced ion uptake needed for the regulation of the hemolymph osmotic concentration in full seawater (30‰). Also, this could be explained considering the lower bioavailability of toxic Cu (free ion) associated with the higher ionic content and dissolved organic matter concentration in high salinity (30‰) than in diluted seawater (2‰).

  4. A second copper zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) in the blue crab Callinectes sapidus: cloning and up-regulated expression in the hemocytes after immune challenge.

    PubMed

    Sook Chung, J; Bachvaroff, T R; Trant, J; Place, A

    2012-01-01

    The full-length cDNA (1362 nucleotides, GenBank JF736621) encoding an extracellular copper zinc superoxide dismutase initially isolated from an EST library of the blue crab Callinectes sapidus was characterized using 3' RACE and named Cas-ecCuZnSOD-2. The open reading frame of Cas-ecCuZnSOD-2 contains 203 deduced amino acids with the conserved active catalytic center for copper and zinc binding and the post-translational modification at two putative N-glycosylation and nine phosphorylation sites. Overall, the deduced amino acids of Cas-ecCuZnSOD-2 shared only 35% sequence identity with that of Cas-ecCuZnSOD (GenBank AF264031) which was previously found in C. sapidus, while it showed ∼75% sequence identity to Scylla paramamosain ecCuZnSOD (GenBank FJ774661). The expression profile of Cas-ecCuZnSOD-2 and the other three C. sapidus SODs: ecCuZn, cytMn- and mitMn SODs was largely ubiquitous among the tested tissues obtained from a juvenile female at intermolt: brain, eyestalk ganglia, pericardial organs, and thoracic ganglia complex (nervous system); hepatopancreas (digestive system); heart, artery and hemocytes (circulatory system); gill and antennal gland (excretory system), hypodermis, and Y-organ (endocrine organ). Our study reports, for the first time in the crustaceans, expression analyses for all four Cas-SODs in hemocytes after immune challenges. Crabs challenged with lipopolysaccharides (LPS) injection had a remarkable induction of Cas-ecCuZnSOD-2 expression along with three other SODs in hemocytes, suggesting that Cas-SODs including Cas-ecCuZnSOD-2 are involved in the defense system, possibly innate immunity and immunocompetency of C. sapidus.

  5. Effects of salinity on the accumulation of hemocyte aggregates and bacteria in the gills of Callinectes sapidus, the Atlantic blue crab, injected with Vibrio campbellii.

    PubMed

    Ikerd, Jennifer L; Burnett, Karen G; Burnett, Louis E

    2015-05-01

    In addition to respiration and ion regulation, crustacean gills accumulate and eliminate injected particles, along with hemocyte aggregates that form in response to those particles. Here we report that the dose of Vibrio campbellii previously shown to induce a decrease in respiration and hemolymph flow across the gill in the Atlantic blue crab, Callinectes sapidus, also triggered the formation of aggregates containing four or more hemocytes in the gills, compared with saline-injected controls. More bacteria were trapped and rendered non-culturable per unit weight by anterior respiratory gills than posterior gills specialized for ion regulation. Further, more bacteria accumulated in the anterior gills of animals held at 30 ppt than those at 10 ppt. Thus, the role of the gills in immune defense comes at an energetic cost to this and likely to other crustaceans; this cost is influenced by acclimation salinity and the position and specialized function of individual gills.

  6. Energy metabolism and metabolic depression during exercise in Callinectes sapidus, the Atlantic blue crab: effects of the bacterial pathogen Vibrio campbellii.

    PubMed

    Thibodeaux, Lindy K; Burnett, Karen G; Burnett, Louis E

    2009-11-01

    Callinectes sapidus (Rathbun), the Atlantic blue crab, commonly harbors low to moderate amounts of bacteria in hemolymph and other tissues. These bacteria are typically dominated by Vibrio spp., which are known to cause mortality in the blue crab. The dose-dependent lethality of an isolate of Vibrio campbellii was determined in crabs; the mean 48 h LD(50) (half-maximal lethal dose) was 6.2 x 10(5) colony forming units g(-1) crab. Injection of a sublethal dose of V. campbellii into the hemolymph of the crab resulted in a rapid and large depression (30-42%) of metabolic rate, which persisted for 24 h. Because gills are an organ of immune function as well as respiration, we were interested in how bacteria injected into the crab would affect the energetic costs associated with walking. Overall metabolism (aerobic and anaerobic) more than doubled in crabs walking for 30 min at 8 m min(-1). The metabolic depression resulting from bacterial injection persisted throughout the exercise period and patterns of phosphagen and adenylate consumption within walking leg muscle were not affected by treatment. The ability of crabs to supply required energy for walking is largely unaffected by exposure to Vibrio; however, Vibrio-injected crabs are less aerobic while doing so. This depressed metabolic condition in response to bacteria, present during moderate activity, could be a passive result of mounting an immune response or may indicate an actively regulated metabolic depression. A compromised metabolism can affect the performance of daily activities, such as feeding and predator avoidance or affect the ability to cope with environmental stressors, such as hypoxia.

  7. Trehalose metabolism in the blue crab Callinectes sapidus: isolation of multiple structural cDNA isoforms of trehalose-6-phosphate synthase and their expression in muscles.

    PubMed

    Shi, Q; Chung, J Sook

    2014-02-15

    Adult blue crab Callinectes sapidus exhibit behavioral and ecological dimorphisms: females migrating from the low salinity water to the high salinity area vs. males remaining in the same areas. The flesh basal muscle of the swimming paddle shows a dimorphic color pattern in that levator (Lev) and depressor (Dep) of females tend to be much darker than those of males, while both genders have the same light colored remoter (Rem) and promoter (Pro). The full-length cDNA sequence of four structural isoforms of trehalose-6-phosphate synthase (TPS) is isolated from chela muscles of an adult female, C. sapidus. Two isoforms of the C. sapidus TPS encode functional domains of TPS and trehalose-6-phosphorylase (TPP) in tandem as a fused gene product of Escherichia coli Ost A and Ost B. The other two isoforms contain only a single TPS domain. In both males and females, the darker (Lev+Dep) muscles exhibit greater amounts of trehalose, TPS and trehalase activities than the light colored (Rem+Pro). The fact that adult females show higher levels of trehalase activity in the basal muscles and of glucose in Lev+Dep than those of adult males suggests that there may be a metabolic dimorphism. Moreover, the involvement of trehalose in energy metabolism that was examined under the condition of strenuous swimming activity mimicked in adult females demonstrates the intrinsic trehalose metabolism in Lev+Dep, which subsequently results in hemolymphatic hyperglycemia and hyperlactemia. Our data support that trehalose serves as an additional carbohydrate source of hemolymphatic hyperglycemia in this species. Behavioral and ecological dimorphisms of C. sapidus adults may be supported by a functional dimorphism in energy metabolism.

  8. POP levels in blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) and edible fish from the eastern Mediterranean coast.

    PubMed

    Tekin, Serkan; Pazi, Idil

    2017-01-01

    Organochlorinated pesticides and Aroclors were measured in the muscle of two edible fish species (gray mullet, sea bream) and blue crab, collected from eastern Mediterranean coast in 2013. The concentration of organochlorinated pesticides (OCPs) and Aroclors in biota samples which were collected at six sites ranged from 1.0-8.6 and 9-47.5 ng g(-1) wet weight, respectively. Total DDT concentrations in seafood samples were compared to tolerance level established by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA); the concentrations were detected below the tolerence level. Health risk assessment was conducted related to the consumption of chemically contaminated seafood. The estimated daily intake of OCPs calculated by using the estimated daily fish consumption in Turkey was far below the acceptable daily intake as established by FAO/WHO. Our data indicated that consumption of blue crab, gray mullet, and sea bream collected from the Mediterranean coast of Turkey could pose "no risk" for human health in terms of OCPs.

  9. PCR-based prevalence of a fatal reovirus of the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus (Rathbun) along the northern Atlantic coast of the USA.

    PubMed

    Flowers, E M; Simmonds, K; Messick, G A; Sullivan, L; Schott, E J

    2016-06-01

    There is a need for more information on the relationship between diseases and fluctuations of wild populations of marine animals. In the case of Callinectes sapidus reovirus 1 (CsRV1, also known as RLV), there is a lack of baseline information on range, prevalence and outbreaks, from which to develop an understanding of population-level impacts. An RT-qPCR assay was developed that is capable of detecting 10 copies of the CsRV1 genome. In collaboration with state, federal and academic partners, blue crabs were collected from sites throughout the north-eastern United States to assess the northern range of this pathogen. In addition, archived crab samples from the Chesapeake Bay were assessed for CsRV1 by RT-qPCR and histology. PCR-based assessments indicate that CsRV1 was present at all but one site. Prevalence of CsRV1 as assessed by RT-qPCR was highly variable between locations, and CsRV1 prevalence varied between years at a given location. Mean CsRV1 prevalence as assessed by RT-qPCR was >15% each year, and peak prevalence was 79%. The wide geographic range and highly variable prevalence of CsRV1 indicate that more study is needed to understand CsRV1 dynamics and the role the virus plays in blue crab natural mortality.

  10. The effects of fipronil and the photodegradation product fipronil desulfinyl on growth and gene expression in juvenile blue crabs, Callinectes sapidus, at different salinities.

    PubMed

    Goff, Andrew D; Saranjampour, Parichehr; Ryan, Lauren M; Hladik, Michelle L; Covi, Joseph A; Armbrust, Kevin L; Brander, Susanne M

    2017-02-28

    Endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) are now widely established to be present in the environment at concentrations capable of affecting wild organisms. Although many studies have been conducted in fish, less is known about effects in invertebrates such as decapod crustaceans. Decapods are exposed to low concentrations of EDCs that may cause infertility, decreased growth, and developmental abnormalities. The objective herein was to evaluate effects of fipronil and its photodegradation product fipronil desulfinyl. Fipronil desulfinyl was detected in the eggs of the decapod Callinectes sapidus sampled off the coast of South Carolina. As such, to examine specific effects on C. sapidus exposed in early life, we exposed laboratory-reared juveniles to fipronil and fipronil desulfinyl for 96h at three nominal concentrations (0.01, 0.1, 0.5μg/l) and two different salinities (10, 30ppt). The size of individual crabs (weight, carapace width) and the expression of several genes critical to growth and reproduction were evaluated. Exposure to fipronil and fipronil desulfinyl resulted in significant size increases in all treatments compared to controls. Levels of expression for vitellogenin (Vtg), an egg yolk precursor, and the ecdysone receptor (EcR), which binds to ecdysteroids that control molting, were inversely correlated with increasing fipronil and fipronil desulfinyl concentrations. Effects on overall growth and on the expression of EcR and Vtg differ depending on the exposure salinity. The solubility of fipronil is demonstrated to decrease considerably at higher salinities. This suggests that fipronil and its photodegradation products may be more bioavailable to benthic organisms as salinity increases, as more chemical would partition to tissues. Our findings suggest that endocrine disruption is occurring through alterations to gene expression in C. sapidus populations exposed to environmental levels of fipronil, and that effects may be dependent upon the salinity at

  11. The effects of fipronil and the photodegradation product fipronil desulfinyl on growth and gene expression in juvenile blue crabs, Callinectes sapidus, at different salinities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goff, Andrew D.; Saranjampour, Parichehr; Ryan, Lauren M.; Hladik, Michelle; Covi, Joseph A.; Armbrust, Kevin L.; Brander, Susanne M.

    2017-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) are now widely established to be present in the environment at concentrations capable of affecting wild organisms. Although many studies have been conducted in fish, less is known about effects in invertebrates such as decapod crustaceans. Decapods are exposed to low concentrations of EDCs that may cause infertility, decreased growth, and developmental abnormalities. The objective herein was to evaluate effects of fipronil and its photodegradation product fipronil desulfinyl. Fipronil desulfinyl was detected in the eggs of the decapod Callinectes sapidus sampled off the coast of South Carolina. As such, to examine specific effects on C. sapidus exposed in early life, we exposed laboratory-reared juveniles to fipronil and fipronil desulfinyl for 96 hours at three nominal concentrations (0.01, 0.1, 0.5 μg/L) and two different salinities (10, 30 ppt). The size of individual crabs (weight, carapace width) and the expression of several genes critical to growth and reproduction were evaluated. Exposure to fipronil and fipronil desulfinyl resulted in significant size increases in all treatments compared to controls. Levels of expression for vitellogenin (Vtg), an egg yolk precursor, and the ecdysone receptor (EcR), which binds to ecdysteroids that control molting, were inversely correlated with increasing fipronil and fipronil desulfinyl concentrations. Effects on overall growth and on the expression of EcR and Vtg differ depending on the exposure salinity. The solubility of fipronil is demonstrated to decrease considerably at higher salinities. This suggests that fipronil and its photodegradation products may be more bioavailable to benthic organisms as salinity increases, as more chemical would partition to tissues. Our findings suggest that endocrine disruption is occurring through alterations to gene expression in C. sapidus populations exposed to environmental levels of fipronil, and that effects may be dependent upon the

  12. Experimental infections of Orchitophrya stellarum (Scuticociliata) in American blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) and fiddler crabs (Uca minax).

    PubMed

    Miller, Terrence L; Small, Hamish J; Peemoeller, Bhae-Jin; Gibbs, David A; Shields, Jeffrey D

    2013-11-01

    Outbreaks of an unidentified ciliate have occurred on several occasions in blue crabs from Chesapeake Bay held during winter months in flow-through systems. The parasite was initially thought to be Mesanophrys chesapeakensis, but molecular analysis identified it as Orchitophyra stellarum, a facultative parasite of sea stars (Asteroidea). We investigated the host-parasite association of O. stellarum in the blue crab host. Crabs were inoculated with the ciliate, or they were held in bath exposures after experimentally induced autotomy of limbs in order to determine potential mechanisms for infection. Crabs inoculated with the ciliate, or exposed to it after experimental autotomy, rapidly developed fatal infections. Crabs that were not experimentally injured, but were exposed to the ciliate, rarely developed infections; thus, indicating that the parasite requires a wound or break in the cuticle as a portal of entry. For comparative purposes, fiddler crabs, Uca minax, were inoculated with the ciliate in a dose-titration experiment. Low doses of the ciliate (10 per crab) were sometimes able to establish infections, but high intensity infections developed quickly at doses over 500 ciliates per crab. Chemotaxis studies were initiated to determine if the ciliate preferentially selected blue crab serum (BCS) over other nutrient sources. Cultures grown on medium with BCS or fetal bovine serum showed some conditioning in their selection for different media, but the outcome in choice experiments indicated that the ciliate was attracted to BCS and not seawater. Our findings indicate that O. stellarum is a facultative parasite of blue crabs. It can cause infections in exposed crabs at 10-15°C, but it requires a portal of entry for successful host invasion, and it may find injured hosts using chemotaxis.

  13. Expressed sequence tags from normalized cDNA libraries prepared from gill and hypodermal tissues of the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus.

    PubMed

    Coblentz, Francie E; Towle, David W; Shafer, Thomas H

    2006-06-01

    Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were produced from two normalized cDNA libraries from the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus. The gill library represented pooled RNA from respiratory and transporting gills after acclimation to either high or low salinity. The hypodermis library was from arthrodial and dorsal tissue from both pre- and post-molt crabs. Random clones were single-pass sequenced from the 5'-ends, resulting in 11,761 high quality ESTs averaging 652 bases. All the ESTs were assembled using Paracel Transcript Assembler software, producing 2176 potential transcripts-883 contigs and 1293 singlets. Of these, 1235 (56.7%) were sequenced only from the gill library, while 578 (26.6%) were exclusively hypodermal. There were 363 contigs containing ESTs from both tissues (16.7% of the putative transcripts). All contigs and singlets were compared to the public protein database using BLASTx, and descriptions of the three most similar proteins for each were recorded. Additional annotations included an Interpro analysis of protein domains and a listing of Gene Ontology (GO) categories inferred from similar proteins in GO-annotated databases. All sequences are available on a web page (http://firedev.bear.uncw.edu:8080/shaferlab/). The annotations can be searched, and BLAST alignment of user-inputted sequences against the putative transcripts is possible. In addition, the ESTs have been submitted to GenBank.

  14. D1-like dopamine receptors downregulate Na+-K+-ATPase activity and increase cAMP production in the posterior gills of the blue crab Callinectes sapidus

    PubMed Central

    Arnaldo, Francis B.; Villar, Van Anthony M.; Konkalmatt, Prasad R.; Owens, Shaun A.; Asico, Laureano D.; Jones, John E.; Yang, Jian; Lovett, Donald L.; Armando, Ines; Concepcion, Gisela P.

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine-mediated regulation of Na+-K+-ATPase activity in the posterior gills of some crustaceans has been reported to be involved in osmoregulation. The dopamine receptors of invertebrates are classified into three groups based on their structure and pharmacology: D1- and D2-like receptors and a distinct invertebrate receptor subtype (INDR). We tested the hypothesis that a D1-like receptor is expressed in the blue crab Callinectes sapidus and regulates Na+-K+-ATPase activity. RT-PCR, using degenerate primers, showed the presence of D1βR mRNA in the posterior gill. The blue crab posterior gills showed positive immunostaining for a dopamine D5 receptor (D5R or D1βR) antibody in the basolateral membrane and cytoplasm. Confocal microscopy showed colocalization of Na+-K+-ATPase and D1βR in the basolateral membrane. To determine the effect of D1-like receptor stimulation on Na+-K+-ATPase activity, intact crabs acclimated to low salinity for 6 days were given an intracardiac infusion of the D1-like receptor agonist fenoldopam, with or without the D1-like receptor antagonist SCH23390. Fenoldopam increased cAMP production twofold and decreased Na+-K+-ATPase activity by 50% in the posterior gills. This effect was blocked by coinfusion with SCH23390, which had no effect on Na+-K+-ATPase activity by itself. Fenoldopam minimally decreased D1βR protein expression (10%) but did not affect Na+-K+-ATPase α-subunit protein expression. This study shows the presence of functional D1βR in the posterior gills of euryhaline crabs chronically exposed to low salinity and highlights the evolutionarily conserved function of the dopamine receptors on sodium homeostasis. PMID:25080496

  15. D1-like dopamine receptors downregulate Na+-K+-ATPase activity and increase cAMP production in the posterior gills of the blue crab Callinectes sapidus.

    PubMed

    Arnaldo, Francis B; Villar, Van Anthony M; Konkalmatt, Prasad R; Owens, Shaun A; Asico, Laureano D; Jones, John E; Yang, Jian; Lovett, Donald L; Armando, Ines; Jose, Pedro A; Concepcion, Gisela P

    2014-09-15

    Dopamine-mediated regulation of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity in the posterior gills of some crustaceans has been reported to be involved in osmoregulation. The dopamine receptors of invertebrates are classified into three groups based on their structure and pharmacology: D1- and D2-like receptors and a distinct invertebrate receptor subtype (INDR). We tested the hypothesis that a D1-like receptor is expressed in the blue crab Callinectes sapidus and regulates Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity. RT-PCR, using degenerate primers, showed the presence of D1βR mRNA in the posterior gill. The blue crab posterior gills showed positive immunostaining for a dopamine D5 receptor (D5R or D1βR) antibody in the basolateral membrane and cytoplasm. Confocal microscopy showed colocalization of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase and D1βR in the basolateral membrane. To determine the effect of D1-like receptor stimulation on Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity, intact crabs acclimated to low salinity for 6 days were given an intracardiac infusion of the D1-like receptor agonist fenoldopam, with or without the D1-like receptor antagonist SCH23390. Fenoldopam increased cAMP production twofold and decreased Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity by 50% in the posterior gills. This effect was blocked by coinfusion with SCH23390, which had no effect on Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity by itself. Fenoldopam minimally decreased D1βR protein expression (10%) but did not affect Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase α-subunit protein expression. This study shows the presence of functional D1βR in the posterior gills of euryhaline crabs chronically exposed to low salinity and highlights the evolutionarily conserved function of the dopamine receptors on sodium homeostasis.

  16. Elevated water temperature increases the levels of reo-like virus and selected innate immunity genes in hemocytes and hepatopancreas of adult female blue crab, Callinectes sapidus.

    PubMed

    Chung, J Sook; Pitula, J S; Schott, E; Alvarez, J V; Maurer, L; Lycett, K A

    2015-11-01

    Seasonal changes in water temperature directly affect the aquatic ecosystem. The blue crab, Callinectes sapidus, inhabiting the Chesapeake Bay has been adapted to seasonal changes of the environmental conditions. In this, the animals halt their physiological process of the growth and reproduction during colder months while they resume these processes as water temperatures increase. We aimed to understand the effect of the elevated temperatures on a disease progression of reo-like virus (CsRLV) and innate immunity of adult female C. sapidus. Following a rise in water temperature from 10 to 23 °C, CsRLV levels in infected crabs rose significantly in hemocytes and multiple organs. However, in hemocytes, the elevated temperature had no effect on the levels of three innate immune genes: Cas-ecCuZnSOD-2, CasPPO and CasLpR three carbohydrate metabolic genes: CasTPS, CasGlyP; and CasTreh and the total hemocyte counts (THC). Interestingly, the hemocytes of CsRLV infected animals exposed to 23 °C for 10 days had significantly elevated levels of Cas-ecCuZnSOD-2 and CasTPS, compared to those of the uninfected ones also exposed to the same condition and compared to hatchery-raised females kept at 23 °C. Despite the lack of changes in THC, the types of hemocytes from the animals with high CsRLV levels differed from those of uninfected ones and from hatchery animals kept at 23 °C: CsRLV-infected crabs had hemocytes of smaller size with less cytosolic complexity than uninfected crabs. It therefore appears that the change in temperature influences rapid replication of CsRLV in all internal tissues examined. This implies that CsRLV may have broad tissue tropism. Interestingly, the digestive tract (mid- and hindgut) contains significantly higher levels of CsRLV than hemocytes while hepatopancreas and ovary have lower levels than hemocytes. Innate immune responses differ by tissue: midgut and hepatopancreas with upregulated Cas-ecCuZnSOD-2 similar to that found in hemocytes. By

  17. Clearance of Vibrio campbellii injected into the hemolymph of Callinectes sapidus, the Atlantic blue crab: the effects of prior exposure to bacteria and environmental hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Macey, Brett M; Rathburn, Charles K; Thibodeaux, Lindy K; Burnett, Louis E; Burnett, Karen G

    2008-12-01

    The Atlantic blue crab, Callinectes sapidus (Rathbun), lives in a bacteria-rich environment that experiences daily fluctuations in water quality. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that crustaceans with prior or ongoing exposure to bacteria in their hemolymph have an increased susceptibility to subsequent infections, and that acute exposure to low dissolved oxygen (hypoxia) and elevated carbon dioxide levels (hypercapnia) may further confound the ability of blue crabs to counter a subsequent infection. Adult male blue crabs held in well-aerated (normoxic; P O2=20.7 kPA; CO(2)<0.06 kPa; pH 7.8-8.0) or hypercapnic hypoxic (HH; P O2=4 kPa; CO(2)=1.8 kPa; pH 6.9-7.2) seawater received an injection (pre-challenge dose) of 1 x 10(5)Vibrio campbellii g(-1) crab. Control animals were injected with an equivalent dose of HEPES-buffered saline (1 microl g(-1) crab). At 2h or 24h after the pre-challenge injection, both Vibrio and saline-pre-challenged animals were injected with a dose of live V. campbellii (1 x 10(5)g(-1) crab). This second injection will be referred to as a second injection or challenge injection. Degradation in or physical removal of intact bacteria from hemolymph was quantified using real-time PCR; bacteriostasis was quantified as the percentage of intact bacteria that could not be recovered by selective plating. We demonstrated that bacteriostasis occurs in the hemolymph of blue crabs. Furthermore, blue crabs that received a challenge injection 2h after a pre-challenge dose of V. campbellii cleared culturable bacteria from their hemolymph more rapidly when compared to animals that received a pre-challenge dose of saline. This enhanced clearance of culturable bacteria was associated with an increase in antibacterial activity in the cell-free hemolymph. However, the enhanced clearance of culturable bacteria disappeared when the time interval between the pre-challenge and challenge dose was extended to 24h and when crabs were held in HH seawater

  18. Production and characterization of films based on blends of chitosan from blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) waste and pectin from Orange (Citrus sinensis Osbeck) peel.

    PubMed

    Baron, Ricardo Duran; Pérez, Latife Lúquez; Salcedo, Jesús Mejía; Córdoba, Luis Pérez; Sobral, Paulo José do Amaral

    2017-05-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and characterize films based on blends of chitosan and pectin, produced in laboratory scale, from industrial wastes. The chitosan was obtained by termoalcaline deacetylation of chitin, extracted from blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) waste and characterized according to degree of deacetylation (DD) and viscosimetric molecular weight (Mw); and pectin was extracted by conventional heating, from orange (Citrus sinensis Osbeck) peel and characterized according to degree of esterification (DE) and molecular weight (Mw). The Ch:P based films were prepared by the casting method in different Ch:P ratios [0: 100, 25:75, 50:50, 75:25 and 100:0], and compared to two controls [0:100 and 100:0], of commercial pectin and chitosan. Glycerol was used as a plasticizer at concentrations of 0.2g/g macromolecules. The addition of high concentrations of pectin in the formulations resulted in films with high solubility and an increase in moisture. No significant difference (P>0.05) in the degree of swelling (DS) and water vapor permeability (WVP) of the films was observed. Ch:P blend films were less stiff and therefore more elastic and flexible than films based on only one biopolymer. The control films presented better results in terms of color, being brighter and less opaque than other film formulations. These data suggest that chitosan or pectin obtained from agro-industrial waste is a potential matrix to produce biodegradable films for future food applications.

  19. An individual-based modeling approach to spawning-potential per-recruit models: An application to blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) in Chesapeake Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bunnell, D.B.; Miller, T.J.

    2005-01-01

    An individual-based modeling approach to estimate biological reference points for blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) in Chesapeake Bay offered several advantages over conventional models: (i) known individual variation in size and growth rate could be incorporated, (ii) the underlying discontinuous growth pattern could be simulated, and (iii) the complexity of the fishery, where vulnerability is based on size, shell status (e.g., soft, hard), maturity, and sex could be accommodated. Across a range of natural mortality (M) scenarios (0.375-1.2??year-1), we determined the exploitation fraction (??) and fishing mortality (F) that protected 20% of the spawning potential of an unfished population, the current target. As M increased, ??20% and F-20% decreased. Assuming that M = 0.9??year-1, our models estimated ??20% = 0.45, which is greater than field-based estimates of ?? in 64% of the years since 1990. Hence, the commercial fishery has likely contributed to the recent population decline in Chesapeake Bay. Comparisons of our results with conventional per-recruit approaches indicated that incorporating the complexity of the fishery was the most important advantage in our individual-based modeling approach. ?? 2005 NRC.

  20. Systematic investigation of factors controlling supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) of spiked and aged PCBs from edible tissues of the blue crab (Callinectes sapidus).

    PubMed

    Gaylor, Michael O; Harvey, Ellen; Hale, Robert C

    2015-01-01

    Systematic investigation of factors controlling supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) of spiked and naturally incurred (aged) PCBs from edible tissues of the Blue Crab (Callinectes sapidus) was undertaken. Effects of extraction pressure, temperature and time, CO2 flow rate and total volume, and collection temperature were assessed. Temperature dramatically impacted extraction efficiency, especially at lower pressures. Surprisingly, extraction of both spiked and aged PCBs was flow rate dependent, counter to prevailing views regarding the relative ease of SFE of spiked versus aged contaminants from environmental matrices. PCBs were optimally trapped on a 1:1 mixture of C18-modified and porous silica at 0°C and eluted with <2 mL isooctane at 90°C. A combined 10 min static/30 min dynamic extraction at 35.5 MPa and 150°C with a CO2 flow rate of 3 mL min(-1) yielded maximum (quantitative) recoveries of spiked and aged PCBs. Resulting solvent extracts required no cleanup and could be analyzed directly by halogen-selective GC with MS confirmation.

  1. Feedback From Peripheral Musculature to Central Pattern Generator in the Neurogenic Heart of the Crab Callinectes sapidus: Role of Mechanosensitive Dendrites

    PubMed Central

    García-Crescioni, Keyla; Fort, Timothy J.; Stern, Estee; Brezina, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    The neurogenic heart of decapod crustaceans is a very simple, self-contained, model central pattern generator (CPG)-effector system. The CPG, the nine-neuron cardiac ganglion (CG), is embedded in the myocardium itself; it generates bursts of spikes that are transmitted by the CG's five motor neurons to the periphery of the system, the myocardium, to produce its contractions. Considerable evidence suggests that a CPG-peripheral loop is completed by a return feedback pathway through which the contractions modify, in turn, the CG motor pattern. One likely pathway is provided by dendrites, presumably mechanosensitive, that the CG neurons project into the adjacent myocardial muscle. Here we have tested the role of this pathway in the heart of the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus. We performed “de-efferentation” experiments in which we cut the motor neuron axons to the myocardium and “de-afferentation” experiments in which we cut or ligated the dendrites. In the isolated CG, these manipulations had no effect on the CG motor pattern. When the CG remained embedded in the myocardium, however, these manipulations, interrupting either the efferent or afferent limb of the CPG-peripheral loop, decreased contraction amplitude, increased the frequency of the CG motor neuron spike bursts, and decreased the number of spikes per burst and burst duration. Finally, passive stretches of the myocardium likewise modulated the spike bursts, an effect that disappeared when the dendrites were cut. We conclude that feedback through the dendrites indeed operates in this system and suggest that it completes a loop through which the system self-regulates its activity. PMID:19828726

  2. Cloning of prophenoloxidase from hemocytes of the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus and its expression and enzyme activity during the molt cycle.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Javier V; Chung, J Sook

    2013-11-01

    The arthropods cuticle undergoes dramatic morphological and biochemical changes from being soft to hardness through each molting process. Prophenoloxidase (PPO) known as a key enzyme in the arthropod innate immune system involved in the melanization reaction, has been related with the initial shell-hardening process, specifically in the sclerotization of the protein matrix in the new cuticle. Since hemocytes have been reported as the main PPO source in arthropods, the transport of hemocyte PPO into the newly laid, soft cuticle has been proposed for shell-hardening occurring during and immediately after ecdysis. In order to define the role of hemocyte PPO in the shell-hardening of crustaceans, the full-length cDNA sequence (2806 nt) of hemocytes PPO of the blue crab Callinectes sapidus (CasPPO-hemo) is isolated using degenerate PCR and 5'-3' RACE. CasPPO-hemo encodes a putative PPO (672 aa) showing three hemocyanin domains: N, M, and C in order and two copper binding sites (CuA & CuB). The sequence analysis identifies the putative CasPPO-hemo as zymogen which requires the cleavage at the N-terminus for its activation. Hemocyte extract (CasHLS) contains the PO, the activity of which depends on the in vitro activation of trypsin. The expression levels of CasPPO-hemo are kept constant during the molt cycle. The increase in the number of hemocytes at early premolt correlates with the elevated PO activity, while at late premolt, the increment in hemocyte numbers does not reflect on the PO activity. The functional importance of the changes in the levels of CasHLS-PO activity during molt cycle is discussed in relation to cuticle hardening process.

  3. New functions of arthropod bursicon: inducing deposition and thickening of new cuticle and hemocyte granulation in the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus.

    PubMed

    Chung, J Sook; Katayama, Hidekazu; Dircksen, Heinrich

    2012-01-01

    Arthropod growth requires molt-associated changes in softness and stiffness of the cuticle that protects from desiccation, infection and injury. Cuticle hardening in insects depends on the blood-borne hormone, bursicon (Burs), although it has never been determined in hemolymph. Whilst also having Burs, decapod crustaceans reiterate molting many more times during their longer life span and are encased in a calcified exoskeleton, which after molting undergoes similar initial cuticle hardening processes as in insects. We investigated the role of homologous crustacean Burs in cuticular changes and growth in the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus. We found dramatic increases in size and number of Burs cells during development in paired thoracic ganglion complex (TGC) neurons with pericardial organs (POs) as neurohemal release sites. A skewed expression of Burs β/Burs α mRNA in TGC corresponds to protein contents of identified Burs β homodimer and Burs heterodimer in POs. In hemolymph, Burs is consistently present at ∼21 pM throughout the molt cycle, showing a peak of ∼89 pM at ecdysis. Since initial cuticle hardness determines the degree of molt-associated somatic increment (MSI), we applied recombinant Burs in vitro to cuticle explants of late premolt or early ecdysis. Burs stimulates cuticle thickening and granulation of hemocytes. These findings demonstrate novel cuticle-associated functions of Burs during molting, while the unambiguous and constant presence of Burs in cells and hemolymph throughout the molt cycle and life stages may implicate further functions of its homo- and heterodimer hormone isoforms in immunoprotective defense systems of arthropods.

  4. Ecdysone and retinoid-X receptors of the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus: cloning and their expression patterns in eyestalks and Y-organs during the molt cycle.

    PubMed

    Techa, Sirinart; Chung, J Sook

    2013-09-15

    Crustacean molting is known to be regulated largely by ecdysteroids and crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) neuropeptide family including molt-inhibiting hormone (MIH) and CHH. The surge of 20-OH ecdysone and/or ponasterone A initiates the molting process through binding to its conserved heterodimeric nuclear receptor: Ecdysone Receptor (EcR) and Ultraspiracle (USP)/Retinoid-X Receptor (RXR). To better understand the role of ecdysteroids in the molt regulation, the full-length cDNAs of the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus EcR1 and RXR1 were isolated from the Y-organs and their expression levels were determined in both Y-organs and eyestalks at various molt stages. Y-organs show the expression of four putative isoforms of CasEcRs and CasRXRs which differ in the length of the open reading frame but share the same domain structures as in typical nuclear receptors: AF1, DBD, HR, LBD, and AF2. The putative CasEcR isoforms are derived from a 27-aa insert in the HR and a 49-aa residue substitution in the LBD. In contrast, an insertion of a 5-aa and/or a 45-aa in the DBD and LBD gives rise to CasRXR isoforms. The eyestalks and Y-organs show the co-expression of CasEcRs and CasRXRs but at the different levels. In the eyestalks, the expression levels of CasRXRs are 3-5 times higher than those of CasEcRs, while in Y-organs, CasRXRs are 2.5-4 times higher than CasEcRs. A tissue-specific response to the changes in the levels of hemolymphatic ecdysteroids indicates that these tissues may have differences in the sensitivity or responsiveness to ecdysteroids. The presence of upstream open reading frame and internal ribosome entry site in 5' UTR sequences of C. sapidus and other arthropod EcR/RXR/USP analyzed by in silico indicates a plausible, strong control(s) of the translation of these receptors.

  5. Evaluation of lactic acid bacterium fermentation products and food-grade chemicals to control Listeria monocytogenes in blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) meat.

    PubMed Central

    Degnan, A J; Kaspar, C W; Otwell, W S; Tamplin, M L; Luchansky, J B

    1994-01-01

    Fresh blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) meat was obtained from retail markets in Florida and sampled for viable Listeria monocytogenes. The pathogen was found in crabmeat in three of four different lots tested by enrichment and at levels of 75 CFU/g in one of the same four lots by direct plating. Next, crabmeat was steam sterilized, inoculated with a three-strain mixture of L. monocytogenes (ca. 5.5 log10 CFU/g), washed with various lactic acid bacterium fermentation products (2,000 to 20,000 arbitrary units [AU]/ml of wash) or food-grade chemicals (0.25 to 4 M), and stored at 4 degrees C. Counts of the pathogen remained relatively constant in control samples during storage for 6 days, whereas in crabmeat washed with Perlac 1911 or MicroGard (10,000 to 20,000 AU), numbers initially decreased (0.5 to 1.0 log10 unit/g) but recovered to original levels within 6 days. Numbers of L. monocytogenes cells decreased 1.5 to 2.7 log10 units/g of crabmeat within 0.04 day when washed with 10,000 to 20,000 AU of Alta 2341, enterocin 1083, or Nisin per ml. Thereafter, counts increased 0.5 to 1.6 log10 units within 6 days. After washing with food-grade chemicals, modest reductions (0.4 to 0.8 log10 unit/g) were observed with sodium acetate (4 M), sodium diacetate (0.5 or 1 M), sodium lactate (1 M), or sodium nitrite (1.5 M). However, Listeria counts in crabmeat washed with 2 M sodium diacetate decreased 2.6 log10 units/g within 6 days. In addition, trisodium phosphate reduced L. monocytogenes counts from 1.7 (0.25 M) to > 4.6 (1 M) log10 units/g within 6 days.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7944362

  6. Variations in prevalence of viral, bacterial, and rhizocephalan diseases and parasites of the blue crab (Callinectes sapidus).

    PubMed

    Rogers, Holly A; Taylor, Sabrina S; Hawke, John P; Anderson Lively, Julie A

    2015-05-01

    Prevalence of blue crab diseases and parasites has not been consistently monitored in the Gulf of Mexico. To establish current prevalence levels and to more fully understand population dynamics, commercial landing trends, and effects of future natural and anthropogenic disasters on animal health, we measured the prevalence of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV), Loxothylacus texanus, shell disease, and Vibrio spp. in blue crabs collected from Louisiana in 2013 and the beginning of 2014. We used PCR to detect WSSV and L. texanus infections, visual gross diagnosis for L. texanus externae and shell disease, and standard microbiological culture techniques and biochemical testing for Vibrio spp. We found no crabs infected with WSSV or L. texanus. Absence of L. texanus parasitization was expected based on the sampled salinities and the sampling focus on large crabs. Shell disease was present at a level of 54.8% and was most prevalent in the winter and summer and least prevalent in the spring. Vibrio spp. were found in the hemolymph of 22.3% of the crabs and prevalence varied by site, season, and sex. Additionally, three of 39 crabs tested were infected with reo-like virus.

  7. Acute toxicity, accumulation and tissue distribution of copper in the blue crab Callinectes sapidus acclimated to different salinities: in vivo and in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Martins, Camila De Martinez Gaspar; Barcarolli, Indianara Fernanda; de Menezes, Eliana Jaime; Giacomin, Marina Mussoi; Wood, Chris M; Bianchini, Adalto

    2011-01-17

    In vivo and in vitro studies were performed to evaluate acute toxicity, organ-specific distribution, and tissue accumulation of copper in Callinectes sapidus acclimated to two different experimental salinities (2 and 30 ppt). Blue crabs were quite tolerant to copper. Acute dissolved copper toxicity (96-h LC(50) and its corresponding 95% confident interval) was higher at salinity 2 ppt (5.3 (3.50-8.05) μM Cu) than at 30 ppt (53.0 (27.39-102.52) μM Cu). The difference between salinities can be completely explained based on the water chemistry because it disappeared when 96-h LC(50) values were expressed as the free Cu(2+) ion (3.1 (1.93-4.95) μM free Cu at 2 ppt versus 5.6 (2.33-13.37) μM free Cu at 30 ppt) or the Cu(2+) activity (1.4 (0.88-2.26) μM Cu activity at 2 ppt versus 1.7 (0.71-4.07) μM Cu activity at 30 ppt). The relationships between gill Cu burden and % mortality were very similar at 2 and 30 ppt, in accord with the Biotic Ligand Model. In vivo experiments showed that copper concentration in the hemolymph is not dependent on metal concentration in the surrounding medium at either experimental salinity. They also showed that copper flux into the gills is higher than into other tissues analyzed, and that anterior and posterior gills are similarly important sites of copper accumulation at both experimental salinities. In vitro experiments with isolated-perfused gills showed that there is a positive relationship between copper accumulation in this tissue and the metal concentration in the incubation media for both anterior and posterior gills. A similar result was observed at both low and high salinities. Furthermore, in vitro experiments showed that copper accumulation in posterior gills is also positively and strongly dependent on the incubation time with copper. Gill copper accumulation occurred at a lower rate in the first 2h of metal exposure, increasing markedly after this "steady-state" period. This finding was corroborated by a significant

  8. Vertical distribution of first stage larvae of the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus, at the mouth of Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provenzano, Anthony J.; McConaugha, John R.; Philips, Kathleen B.; Johnson, David F.; Clark, John

    1983-05-01

    The vertical distribution of stage I blue crab larvae, near the mouth of Chesapeake Bay, was examined over four diurnal cycles. Each of two stations was occupied for 30 hours twice during the summer of 1979. On each of the four cruises, peak larval abundance occurred after a night time high slack tide, suggesting a synchronized hatch of blue crab larvae. 90-99% of all larvae collected were taken in the neuston layer. The apparent timing of the hatches to coincide with the beginning of an ebb tide and the concentration of larvae in the neuston layer strongly suggests seaward transport of these early stage larvae and the probability of offshore development.

  9. Changes in ecdysteroid levels and expression patterns of ecdysteroid-responsive factors and neuropeptide hormones during the embryogenesis of the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus.

    PubMed

    Techa, Sirinart; Alvarez, Javier V; Sook Chung, J

    2015-04-01

    Embryogenesis requires the involvement and coordination of multiple networks of various genes, according to a timeline governing development. Crustacean embryogenesis usually includes the first molt, a process that is known to be positively controlled by ecdysteroids. We determined the amounts of ecdysteroids, as well as other related factors: the ecdysone receptor (CasEcR), the retinoid X receptor (CasRXR), the molt-inhibiting hormone (CasMIH), and crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CasCHH) during the ovarian and embryonic developments of Callinectes sapidus. In summary, the ovaries at stages 1-4 have expression levels of maternal CasEcR and CasRXR 10-50 times higher than levels seen in embryos at the yolk stage. This large difference in the amount of the these factors in C. sapidus ovaries suggests that these maternal ecdysteroid-responsive factors may be utilized at the initiation of embryogenesis. During embryogenesis, the changes in total ecdysteroids and levels of CasEcR and CasRXR expression are similar to those observed in juvenile molts. The full-length cDNA sequence of the C. sapidus BTB domain protein (CasBTBDP) initially isolated from Y-organ cDNA, contains only Broad-Complex, Tramtrack, and Bric a brac (BTB) domains. The levels of CasBTBDP are kept constant throughout embryogenesis. The expression profiles of CasMIH and CasCHH are similar to the titers of ecdysteroids. However, the timing of their appearance is followed by increases in CasEcRs and CasRXRs, implying that the expressions of these neuropeptides may be influenced by ecdysteroids. Moreover, the ecdysteroid profile during embryogenesis may track directly with the timing of organogenesis of Y-organs and their activity. Our work reports, for first time, the observed expression and changes of ecdysteroid-responsive factors, along with CasCHH and CasMIH, during embryogenesis in the crustacean C. sapidus.

  10. Structure, molting, and mineralization of the dorsal ossicle complex in the gastric mill of the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus.

    PubMed

    Vatcher, Hayley E; Roer, Robert D; Dillaman, Richard M

    2015-11-01

    This study examined the mesocardiac and urocardiac ossicles in the gastric mill of the blue crab to describe its structure, mineralization, and dynamics throughout the molt cycle, and to assess its possible utility in age determination. Morphologically, the mineralized ossicles are similar to the calcified dorsal carapace having a lamellate structure comprised of sheets of chitin/protein fibrils. Staining with acridine orange showed the same arrangement of an epicuticle, exocuticle, and endocuticle. In much of the mesocardiac and urocardiac ossicles, the endocuticle is very reduced, with the exocuticle predominating; the reverse of the dimensions of the exoskeleton. The lamellate structure of the ossicles was confirmed with scanning electron microscopy; however, elemental mapping by energy-dispersive analysis of X-rays revealed that the ossicles are mineralized with calcium phosphate, in contrast to the calcium carbonate biomineral of the exoskeleton. The medial tooth of the urocardiac ossicle is not calcified, but the epicuticle is highly elaborated and impregnated with silica. Histological examination of the ossicles demonstrated that they are molted during ecdysis, so despite the appearance of bands in the mesocardiac ossicle, it is difficult to hypothesize how the bands could represent a record of chronological age.

  11. Ultrastructure, Histochemistry, and Mineralization Patterns in the Ecdysial Suture of the Blue Crab, Callinectes sapidus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priester, Carolina; Dillaman, Richard M.; Gay, D. Mark

    2005-12-01

    The ecdysial suture is the region of the arthropod exoskeleton that splits to allow the animal to emerge during ecdysis. We examined the morphology and composition of the intermolt and premolt suture of the blue crab using light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The suture could not be identified by routine histological techniques; however 3 of 22 fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled lectins tested (Lens culinaris agglutinin, Vicia faba agglutinin, and Pisum sativum agglutinin) differentiated the suture, binding more intensely to the suture exocuticle and less intensely to the suture endocuticle. Back-scattered electron (BSE) and secondary electron observations of fracture surfaces of intermolt cuticle showed less mineralized regions in the wedge-shaped suture as did BSE analysis of premolt and intermolt resin-embedded cuticle. The prism regions of the suture exocuticle were not calcified. X-ray microanalysis of both the endocuticle and exocuticle demonstrated that the suture was less calcified than the surrounding cuticle with significantly lower magnesium and phosphorus concentrations, potentially making its mineral more soluble. The presence or absence of a glycoprotein in the organic matrix, the extent and composition of the mineral deposited, and the thickness of the cuticle all likely contribute to the suture being removed by molting fluid, thereby ensuring successful ecdysis.

  12. Molt-inhibiting hormone stimulates vitellogenesis at advanced ovarian developmental stages in the female blue crab, Callinectes sapidus 1: an ovarian stage dependent involvement

    PubMed Central

    Zmora, Nilli; Trant, John; Zohar, Yonathan; Chung, J Sook

    2009-01-01

    To understand the hormonal coordination of the antagonism between molting and reproduction in crustaceans, the terminally anecdysial mature female Callinectes sapidus was used as a model. The regulatory roles of crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) and molt-inhibiting hormone (MIH) in vitellogenesis were examined. A competitive specific RIA was used to measure the levels of MIH and CHH in the hemolymphs of mature females at pre- and mid- vitellogenic stages, and their effects on vitellogenesis at early (early 2, E2) and mid vitellogenesis (3) stages were determined in vitro. A hepatopancreas fragments incubation system was developed and the levels of vitellogenin (VtG), as well as VtG mRNA and heterogeneous nuclear (hn)VtG RNA were determined using RIA or QPCR, respectively. MIH titers were four times higher at mid-vitellogenesis than at pre-vitellogenesis, while CHH levels in the hemolymph were constant. In the in vitro incubation experiments, MIH increased both VtG mRNA levels and secretion at ovarian stage 3. At stage E2, however, MIH resulted in a mixed response: downregulation of VtG mRNA and upregulation of hnVtG RNA. CHH had no effect on any of the parameters. Actinomycin D blocked the stimulatory effects of MIH in stage 3 animals on VtG mRNA and VtG, while cycloheximide attenuated only VtG levels, confirming the MIH stimulatory effect at this stage. MIH is a key endocrine regulator in the coordination of molting and reproduction in the mature female C. sapidus, which simultaneously inhibits molt and stimulates vitellogenesis. PMID:19583852

  13. Molecular cloning of a putative crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) isoform from extra-eyestalk tissue of the blue crab (Callinectes sapidus), and determination of temporal and spatial patterns of CHH gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Junying; Chen, Hsiang-Yin; Choi, Cheol Young; Roer, Robert D; Watson, R Douglas

    2010-11-01

    Crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) is a polypeptide neurohormone involved in regulation of multiple physiological processes. We report here the cloning from thoracic ganglia of the blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) a cDNA (CsCHH-2) encoding a putative CHH isoform (CsCHH-2). CsCHH-2 is structurally similar to a putative preproCHH (CsCHH-1) previously cloned from eyestalk ganglia of C. sapidus. The two preprohormones possess an identical signal peptide and CHH precursor related peptide, but differ in the mature CHH polypeptide. An analysis by RT-PCR of the tissue distribution of CsCHH-1 and CsCHH-2 revealed the former is restricted to eyestalk neural ganglia, while the latter is widely distributed among tissues. The type of CHH transcript present in eyestalk and thoracic ganglia did not vary as a function of the molt cycle. An assessment of transcript abundance in tissues of intermolt crabs showed the abundance of the CsCHH-1 transcript in eyestalk ganglia far exceeds the abundance of the CsCHH-2 transcript in extra-eyestalk tissue. An assessment of transcript abundance during a molt cycle showed CsCHH-1 transcript abundance in eyestalk ganglia was low during intermolt, rose during premolt, reaching a peak in D(3), then fell prior to molting, and remained low during postmolt. By contrast, CsCHH-2 transcript abundance in thoracic ganglia was low during intermolt, rose sharply during D(2), then dropped in D(3) and remained low during postmolt. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that CsCHH-1 and CsCHH-2 differ with respect to physiological function.

  14. Evaluation and management of blue crab Callinectes sapidus (Rathbun, 1896) (Decapoda-Portunidae) fishery in the Estuary of Cananéia, Iguape and Ilha Comprida, São Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, J T; Verani, J R; Nordi, N

    2010-02-01

    The Estuary of Cananéia, Iguape and Ilha Comprida is a part of the Estuarine Lagoon System of Cananéia, Iguape and Paranaguá, on the south coast of São Paulo State, Brazil. It has been recognised for its high standards of environmental conservation. The objective of this paper was to assess the blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) fishing in the region, from January 1998 to December 2006, and obtain supportive data to implement technical rules for the rational exploitation and resulting conservation of this resource. The results show a remarkable decrease in the fisheries' abundance index (CPUE) up to 2005, from 9.4 to 4.0 kg/hour, mainly caused by an increase in fishing effort, from 1,960 to 13,776 hours on a yearly basis. With the decrease in the fishing effort in 2005 and 2006, the abundance index reacted positively, indicating a recovery of the exploited population. Due to the lack of appropriate regulation limiting the fishing effort and organising the fluctuating admission rates of new fishermen, there is a noticeable increase of the effort, above the sustainable level. Therefore, there is a need for measures to limit and control the admission of fishermen in this activity. One of the measures to be considered is the establishment of regular periods where fishing the species is prohibited (called 'defeso'), each year, especially from September to January. Another measure is to create a fishermen registry and special licenses, to limit the number of new entrants. Such actions require, for their implementation, a co-managed initiative, involving the blue crab fishermen themselves, governmental agencies and resource management researchers, and the integration of ecological, socioeconomic and cultural dimensions.

  15. The smell of moulting: N-acetylglucosamino-1,5-lactone is a premoult biomarker and candidate component of the courtship pheromone in the urine of the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus.

    PubMed

    Kamio, Michiya; Schmidt, Manfred; Germann, Markus W; Kubanek, Julia; Derby, Charles D

    2014-04-15

    Female blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) in their pubertal moult stage release unidentified sex pheromone molecules in their urine, causing males to respond with courtship behaviours including a display called courtship stationary paddling and a form of precopulatory guarding called cradle carry. We hypothesized that pheromones are mixtures of molecules and are more concentrated in urine of pubertal premoult females compared with other moulting stages and thus that these molecules are biomarkers (i.e. metabolites that can be used as an indicator of some biological state or condition) of pubertal premoult females. We tested this hypothesis by combining bioassay-guided fractionation and biomarker targeting. To evaluate the molecular mass of the putative pheromone by bioassay-guided fractionation, we separated urine from pubertal premoult females and intermoult males by ultrafiltration into three molecular mass fractions. The <500 Da fraction and the 500-1000 Da fraction but not the >1000 Da fraction of female urine induced male courtship stationary paddling, but none of the fractions of male urine did. Thus, female urine contains molecules of <1000 Da that stimulate courtship behaviours in males. Biomarker targeting using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectral analysis of the 500-1000 Da fraction of urine from premoult and postmoult males and females revealed a premoult biomarker. Purification, nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectrometry and high pressure liquid chromatography analysis of this premoult biomarker identified it as N-acetylglucosamino-1,5-lactone (NAGL) and showed that it is more abundant in urine of premoult females and males than in urine of either postmoult or juvenile females and males. NAGL has not been reported before as a natural product or as a molecule of the chitin metabolic pathway. Physiological and behavioural experiments demonstrated that blue crabs can detect NAGL through their olfactory pathway. Thus, we hypothesize that NAGL is a

  16. Gene transcripts encoding hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) exhibit tissue- and muscle fiber type-dependent responses to hypoxia and hypercapnic hypoxia in the Atlantic blue crab, Callinectes sapidus.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Kristin M; Follett, Chandler R; Burnett, Louis E; Lema, Sean C

    2012-09-01

    Hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) is a transcription factor that under low environmental oxygen regulates the expression of suites of genes involved in metabolism, angiogenesis, erythropoiesis, immune function, and growth. Here, we isolated and sequenced partial cDNAs encoding hif-α and arnt/hif-β from the Atlantic blue crab, Callinectes sapidus, an estuarine species that frequently encounters concurrent hypoxia (low O(2)) and hypercapnia (elevated CO(2)). We then examined the effects of acute exposure (1h) to hypoxia (H) and hypercapnic hypoxia (HH) on relative transcript abundance for hif-α and arnt/hif-β in different tissues (glycolytic muscle, oxidative muscle, hepatopancreas, gill, and gonads) using quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Our results indicate that hif-α and arnt/hif-β mRNAs were constitutively present under well-aerated normoxia (N) conditions in all tissues examined. Further, H and HH exposure resulted in both tissue-specific and muscle fiber type-specific effects on relative hif-α transcript abundance. In the gill and glycolytic muscle, relative hif-α mRNA levels were significantly lower under H and HH, compared to N, while no change (or a slight increase) was detected in oxidative muscle, hepatopancreas and gonadal tissues. H and HH did not affect relative transcript abundance for arnt/hif-β in any tissue or muscle fiber type. Thus, in crustaceans the HIF response to H and HH appears to involve changes in hif transcript abundance, with variation in hif-α and arnt/hif-β transcriptional dynamics occurring in both a tissue- and muscle fiber type-dependent manner.

  17. Molecular cloning of a plasma membrane Ca²⁺ ATPase (PMCA) from Y-organs of the blue crab (Callinectes sapidus), and determination of spatial and temporal patterns of PMCA gene expression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsiang-Yin; Roer, Robert D; Watson, R Douglas

    2013-06-10

    Existing data indicate that a stage-specific increase in intracellular free Ca(2+) stimulates ecdysteroid production by crustacean molting glands (Y-organs). The concentration of Ca(2+) in cytosol is controlled mainly by proteins intrinsic to the plasma membrane and to the membranes of organelles. Several families of proteins are involved, including Ca(2+) channels, Ca(2+) pumps (ATPases), and Ca(2+) exchangers. The family of Ca(2+) pumps includes plasma membrane calcium ATPases (PMCAs). As a step toward understanding the involvement of calcium signaling in regulation of ecdysteroidogenesis, we used a PCR-based cloning strategy (RT-PCR followed by 3'- and 5'-RACE) to clone from Y-organs of the blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) a cDNA encoding a putative PMCA. The 4292 base pair (bp) cDNA includes a 3510 bp open reading frame encoding a 1170-residue protein (Cas-PMCA). The conceptually translated protein has a relative molecular mass of 128.8×10(3) and contains all signature domains of an authentic PMCA, including ten transmembrane domains and a calmodulin binding site. The predicted membrane topography of Cas-PMCA is as expected for an authentic PMCA protein. A phylogenetic analysis of nonredundant amino acid sequences of PMCA proteins from different species showed Cas-PMCA clusters with other arthropod PMCA proteins. An assessment of tissue distribution showed the Cas-PMCA transcript to be broadly distributed in both neural and non-neural tissues. Studies using quantitative real-time PCR revealed stage-specific changes in Cas-PMCA abundance during the molting cycle, with peak expression occurring during premolt stage D2, a pattern consistent with the hypothesis that Cas-PMCA functions to maintain cellular Ca(2+) homeostasis in Y-organs.

  18. Tolerance, bioenergetics, and biochemical composition of the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus rathbun, exposed to the water-soluble fraction of South Louisiana crude oil

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.Y.

    1986-01-01

    Blue crabs were highly tolerant to petroleum hydrocarbons. Rates of energy intake decreased with increasing hydrocarbon concentration. Although energy expenditure rates of crabs exposed to 2504 ppb were not significantly higher than that of control crabs, they were significantly higher than those of crabs exposed to 820 and 1476 ppb. Molting was delayed in crabs exposed to 1476 and 2504 ppb. Crab growth was significantly reduced in a dose-dependent manner. The correlation between scope for growth and tissue growth was highly significant, indicating a bioenergetic basis for the decreased growth in crabs exposed to petroleum hydrocarbons. RNA content of crabs exposed to crude oil was significantly reduced on all sampling dates. Protein content of crabs exposed to crude oil was lower than that of control crabs on days 14 and 21. DNA content was not significantly different from that of control crabs. RNA:DNA and protein:DNA ratio were significantly reduced in crabs exposed to crude oil. The significant correlations suggest the possibility of their use as indicators of physiological condition. Significant differences in lipid content and concentration were observed. Analysis of five lipid classes indicate that structural lipids were less affected than lipids used for energy storage among crabs exposed to crude oil. The observed changes growth pattern and biochemical composition suggest that the pattern of energy utilization was altered. Among crabs exposed to petroleum hydrocarbons, growth in size took place despite little increase in tissue content. Available energy was used for growth with little being stored in lipid reserves.

  19. Vitellogenin and its messenger RNA during ovarian development in the female blue crab, Callinectes sapidus: gene expression, synthesis, transport, and cleavage.

    PubMed

    Zmora, Nili; Trant, John; Chan, Siu-Ming; Chung, J Sook

    2007-07-01

    Blue crab vitellogenin (VTG) cDNA encodes a precursor that, together with two other Brachyuran VTGs, forms a distinctive cluster within a phylogenetic tree of crustacean VTGs. Using quantitative RT-PCR, we found that VTG was primarily expressed in the hepatopancreas of a vitellogenic female, with minor expression in the ovary. VTG expression in the hepatopancreas correlated with ovarian growth, with a remarkable 8000-fold increase in expression from stage 3 to 4 of ovarian development. In contrast, the VTG levels in the hepatopancreas and hemolymph decreased in stage 4. Western blot analysis and N-terminal sequencing revealed that vitellin is composed of three subunits of approximately 78.5 kDa, 119.42 kDa, and 87.9 kDa. The processing pathway for VTG includes an initial hepatopancreatic cleavage of the primary precursor into approximately 78.5-kDa and 207.3-kDa subunits, both of which are found in the hemolymph. A second cleavage in the ovary splits the approximately 207.3-kDa subunit into approximately 119.4-kDa and approximately 87.9-kDa subunits. The hemolymph VTG profiles of mated and unmated females during ovarian development indicate that early vitellogenesis and ovarian development do not require mating, which may be essential for later stages, as VTG decreased to the basal level at stage 4 in the unmated group but remained high in the mated females. Our results encompass comprehensive overall temporal and spatial aspects of vitellogenesis, which may reflect the reproductive physiology of the female blue crab, e.g., single mating and anecdysis in adulthood.

  20. Discovery and characterization of the Crustacean hyperglycemic hormone precursor related peptides (CPRP) and orcokinin neuropeptides in the sinus glands of the blue crab Callinectes sapidus using multiple tandem mass spectrometry techniques.

    PubMed

    Hui, Limei; Cunningham, Robert; Zhang, Zichuan; Cao, Weifeng; Jia, Chenxi; Li, Lingjun

    2011-09-02

    The crustacean sinus gland (SG) is a well-defined neuroendocrine site that produces numerous hemolymph-borne agents including the most complex class of endocrine signaling molecules-neuropeptides. Via a multifaceted mass spectrometry (MS) approach, 70 neuropeptides were identified including orcokinins, orcomyotropin, crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) precursor-related peptides (CPRPs), red pigment concentrating hormone (RPCH), pigment dispersing hormone (PDH), proctolin, RFamides, RYamides, and HL/IGSL/IYRamide. Among them, 15 novel orcokinins, 9 novel CPRPs, 1 novel orcomyotropin, 1 novel Ork/Orcomyotropin-related peptide, and 1 novel PDH were de novo sequenced via collision induced dissociation (CID) from the SG of a model organism Callinectes sapidus. Electron transfer dissociation (ETD) was used for sequencing of intact CPRPs due to their large size and higher charge state. Capillary isoelectric focusing (CIEF) was employed for separation of members of the orcokinin family, which is one of the most abundant neuropeptide families observed in the SG. Collectively, our study represents the most complete characterization of neuropeptides in the SG and provides a foundation for future investigation of the physiological function of neuropeptides in the SG of C. sapidus.

  1. Use of DNA strand damage (Comet assay) and embryo hatching effects to assess contaminant exposure in blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.F.; Steinert, S.A.; Nakayama, K.; Oshima, Y.

    1999-07-01

    After fertilization, blue crab eggs are embedded in a sponge which is attached to the female abdomen during embryo development. Embryos after 9 stages in the egg sac hatch into a swimming zoea stage (stage 10). The authors have developed a bioassay where embryo development is monitored in culture plates with and without toxicants in the water. Toxicant effects are based on determining the percentage of embryos which hatch to zoea. Hatching EC{sub 50} (toxicant concentration at which 50% of the embryos fail to hatch) for a number of pesticides, organometallics and metals were determined. The test takes from 2 to 6 days depending on the embryo stage selected for the study. In addition to embryo development effects the prevalence of DNA single-strand breaks in individual embryo cells were determined using the single cell gel electrophoresis method (Comet assay). A good correlation between DNA strand breakage and embryo defects was found after exposure to genotoxic contaminants. Thus, the bioassay linking DNA damage to embryo hatching effects is rapid, sensitive and mechanistically relevant.

  2. Conservation in the first internal transcribed spacer (ITS1) region of Hematodinium perezi (genotype III) from Callinectes sapidus .

    PubMed

    Pagenkopp Lohan, Katrina M; Small, Hamish J; Shields, Jeffrey D; Place, Allen R; Reece, Kimberly S

    2013-03-13

    Hematodinium spp. infections have been reported from blue crabs Callinectes sapidus in high-salinity waters of the USA from New Jersey to Texas. Recently, H. perezi (genotype III) has been proposed as the parasite species and genotype infecting blue crabs from Virginia; however, it is unknown whether this same genotype is present in blue crabs from other locations. To address this question, we collected 317 blue crabs from Massachusetts, Virginia, Georgia, Florida, Louisiana, and Texas to test for the presence of H. perezi (III) using a specific PCR assay targeting the first internal transcribed spacer (ITS1) region of the ribosomal RNA gene complex. To examine the genetic variation within H. perezi (III), ITS1 region sequences from the parasite in blue crabs from multiple locations were compared to each other and to those of H. perezi (III) found in alternate hosts from Virginia. In total, 34 distinct ITS1 sequence variants of the parasite were identified from blue crabs alone, and 38 distinct variants were identified when alternate hosts were included. However, a single ITS1 sequence variant appeared in all geographic regions and hosts, and also in blue crabs sampled from a previous study. The high similarity among all the ITS1 region sequences examined (>98%) and the observation of a single variant found throughout a large geographic range, strongly suggests that a single species and genotype of Hematodinium, specifically H. perezi (III), infects blue crabs from Virginia to Texas and multiple alternate host species in Virginia.

  3. A novel putative lipoprotein receptor (CasLpR) in the hemocytes of the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus: cloning and up-regulated expression after the injection of LPS and LTA.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Naoaki; Chung, J Sook

    2012-03-01

    The full-length cDNA encoding a putative lipoprotein receptor (CasLpR) was isolated from the hemocytes of Callinectes sapidus using 5' and 3' RACEs. The open reading frame for CasLpR contains a precursor of putative CasLpR consisting of 1710 amino acid residues including 22 amino acid residues of the signal peptide (22 amino acids). Mature CasLpR (1688 amino acids with 5.6% of phosphorylation sites) has multiple, putative functional domains: five low-density lipoprotein receptor domains in the N-terminus, and a G-protein-coupled receptor proteolysis site domain and a 7 transmembrane receptor (secretin family) domain in the C-terminus. To date, there are no proteins with a similar domain structure in the GenBank. The expression pattern of CasLpR was exclusive in hemocytes among all tested tissues obtained from a juvenile female at intermolt stage: brain, eyestalk ganglia, pericardial organs, and thoracic ganglia complex (nervous system); hepatopancreas (digestive system); heart, artery and hemocytes (circulatory system); gill and antennal gland (excretory system), hypodermis; and Y-organ (endocrine organ). There was no CasLpR expression in the ovary of an adult female. A putative function of CasLpR was examined after challenges of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA) in vivo using qRT-PCR assays. Animals at 24 h after injection of LPS or LTA up-regulated the expression of CasLpR in hemocytes by ∼3.5 and 1.4 folds, respectively, compared to the controls that received saline injection. LPS challenge also caused the greatest increment (∼55 folds) of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) expression in these samples. These data indicate that putative CasLpR and CasHsp90 may be involved in the defense system or the stress response of C. sapidus.

  4. Histological Description of Gonadal Development of Females and Males of Callinectes sapidus Rathbun, 1896 (Decapoda: Portunidae).

    PubMed

    Carvalho-Saucedo, Liliana; Ramírez-Santiago, Cecilia; Pérez, Carlos

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes the characteristics of male and female germ cells during gonadal development and the gonadal maturity scale of the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus. A total of 20 specimens were collected monthly from June to November 2012, in two areas off the coast of the Gulf of Mexico: the San Andrés Lagoon and Alvarado Lagoon. The gonads were removed and processed following the standard technique of hematoxylin and eosin staining. An important event in oogenesis (pre-vitellogenesis) was the appearance of a perinuclear vesicle in the cytoplasm and the accumulation of yolk granules. Later, vitellogenesis began and there was an accumulation of nutritive droplets and fragmentation of the perinuclear vesicle. During spermatogenesis, the accumulation of two fluids was observed that were involved in the formation of the spermatophore and the delay of spermiogenesis. Based on the histological features of gonad maturity, five stages were described (inactive, early gametogenesis, development, maturity, and resorption), in females and males. This proposal can be useful for the study of reproductive seasonality of this species.

  5. [Biodiversity, morphometry and diet of Callinectes crabs (Decapoda: Portunidae) in Santiago de Cuba].

    PubMed

    Gómez Luna, Liliana; Sosa Montano, Antonio; Moreno Castillo, Isabel; Jover Capote, Abdiel

    2009-09-01

    On the basis of fishery intensity and proximity to river mouth, a total of 257 swimming Callinectes crabs were collected from March 2007 to April 2008 in eight localities. Captures were made with hanging nets, to a maximal depth of 1.5 m, establishing a top time of 2 hr. The genus was widely distributed, and it is represented at least by four species: C. sapidus, C. similis, C. rathbunae and C. larvatus, the last two not included in the last list of Cuban crustaceans (Crustacea: Decapoda). The size and shape of the gonopods were very useful as taxonomical criteria, considering the prevalence of males. The most abundant species were C. sapidus (47.08%), and C. similis (30.35%). C rathbunae, which was identified at 75% (6) of the localities, showed a better distribution, followed by C. sapidus, which appears in the 63% (5). Sex rate (R(s)) by species (male:female) was 6.20 for C. rathbunae, 3.58 for C. similis, 1.40 for C. larvatus and 0.40 for C. sapidus. The most abundant species had a lower R value. Morphometrical analysis and weight allowed us to know the average carapace width (CW) and weight (W). C. sapidus had an average CW = 110.57 mm (DS 21.55, n = 121) and W = 84.46 g (SD 43.25, n = 121); C. rathbunae a CW = 115.50 mm (DS 14.94, n = 36) and W = 140.44 g (DS 55.02, n = 36); C. larvatus a CW = 76.04 mm (DS 10.88, n = 22) and W = 31.70 g (DS 14.67, n = 22); and C. similis had the minimal parameter values, with a CW = 59.77 mm (DS 14.09, n = 78) and W = 13.80 g (DS 10.00, n = 78). These are the first records of the coastal crabs in the area. All values are lower than in previous reports. The largest individuals (CW>140 mm: C. rathbunae and C. sapidus) were captured in localities with adequate environmental characteristics. The stomach content suggests nine dietary categories, mainly fishes and macroalgae. The genus Callinectes has a diversified trophic spectrum. These crabs eat the available food, but they have a preference for the most abundant items.

  6. Molt-inhibiting hormone stimulates vitellogenesis at advanced ovarian developmental stages in the female blue crab, Callinectes sapidus 2: novel specific binding sites in hepatopancreas and cAMP as a second messenger

    PubMed Central

    Zmora, Nilli; Sagi, Amir; Zohar, Yonathan; Chung, J Sook

    2009-01-01

    The finding that molt-inhibiting hormone (MIH) regulates vitellogenesis in the hepatopancreas of mature Callinectes sapidus females, raised the need for the characterization of its mode of action. Using classical radioligand binding assays, we located specific, saturable, and non-cooperative binding sites for MIH in the Y-organs of juveniles (J-YO) and in the hepatopancreas of vitellogenic adult females. MIH binding to the hepatopancreas membranes had an affinity 77 times lower than that of juvenile YO membranes (KD values: 3.22 × 10-8 and 4.19 × 10-10 M/mg protein, respectively). The number of maximum binding sites (BMAX) was approximately two times higher in the hepatopancreas than in the YO (BMAX values: 9.24 × 10-9 and 4.8 × 10-9 M/mg protein, respectively). Furthermore, MIH binding site number in the hepatopancreas was dependent on ovarian stage and was twice as high at stage 3 than at stages 2 and 1. SDS-PAGE separation of [125I] MIH or [125I] crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) crosslinked to the specific binding sites in the membranes of the J-YO and hepatopancreas suggests a molecular weight of ~51 kDa for a MIH receptor in both tissues and a molecular weight of ~61 kDa for a CHH receptor in the hepatopancreas. The use of an in vitro incubation of hepatopancreas fragments suggests that MIH probably utilizes cAMP as a second messenger in this tissue, as cAMP levels increased in response to MIH. Additionally, 8-Bromo-cAMP mimicked the effects of MIH on vitellogenin (VtG) mRNA and heterogeneous nuclear (hn) VtG RNA levels. The results imply that the functions of MIH in the regulation of molt and vitellogenesis are mediated through tissue specific receptors with different kinetics and signal transduction. MIH ability to regulate vitellogenesis is associated with the appearance of MIH specific membrane binding sites in the hepatopancreas upon pubertal/final molt. PMID:19583849

  7. Bdellovibrios in Callinectus sapidus, the Blue Crab

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Jacqueline I.; Williams, Henry N.

    1992-01-01

    Bdellovibrios were recovered from the gill tissue of all of 31 crabs sampled and from all samples of epibiota obtained from the ventral shell surface of 15 crabs. The results suggest that the blue crab is a reservoir for bdellovibrios. The association with crabs may be an important factor in the ecology of the bdellovibrios. PMID:16348706

  8. Population biology of the portunid crab Callinectes arcuatus Ordway in the Gulf of Nicoya, Costa Rica, Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittel, Ana I.; Epifanio, C. E.; Chavarria, Juan Bautista

    1985-05-01

    Tropical blue crabs Callinectes arcuatus were collected by trawling in the Gulf of Nicoya on the Pacific coast of Costa Rica, Central America. The gulf population was generally dominated by females. Adult females were common in the upper, more estuarine regions of the gulf during rainy season, but appeared to migrate to the lower gulf during dry season for spawning. Biomass varied with seasonal changes in abundance, but was generally similar to biomass of C. sapidus in Chesapeake Bay. Analysis of size frequency indicated that the population is numerically dominated by adults during January and February and that juveniles are common during the remainder of the year. Extrapolation of available data suggests that female crabs reach maturity in approximately one year after hatching.

  9. Salinity-induced changes in gene expression from anterior and posterior gills of Callinectes sapidus (Crustacea: Portunidae) with implications for crustacean ecological genomics.

    PubMed

    Havird, Justin C; Mitchell, Reed T; Henry, Raymond P; Santos, Scott R

    2016-09-01

    Decapods represent one of the most ecologically diverse taxonomic groups within crustaceans, making them ideal to study physiological processes like osmoregulation. However, prior studies have failed to consider the entire transcriptomic response of the gill - the primary organ responsible for ion transport - to changing salinity. Moreover, the molecular genetic differences between non-osmoregulatory and osmoregulatory gill types, as well as the hormonal basis of osmoregulation, remain underexplored. Here, we identified and characterized differentially expressed genes (DEGs) via RNA-Seq in anterior (non-osmoregulatory) and posterior (osmoregulatory) gills during high to low salinity transfer in the blue crab Callinectes sapidus, a well-studied model for crustacean osmoregulation. Overall, we confirmed previous expression patterns for individual ion transport genes and identified novel ones with salinity-mediated expression. Notable, novel DEGs among salinities and gill types for C. sapidus included anterior gills having higher expression of structural genes such as actin and cuticle proteins while posterior gills exhibit elevated expression of ion transport and energy-related genes, with the latter likely linked to ion transport. Potential targets among recovered DEGs for hormonal regulation of ion transport between salinities and gill types included neuropeptide Y and a KCTD16-like protein. Using publically available sequence data, constituents for a "core" gill transcriptome among decapods are presented, comprising genes involved in ion transport and energy conversion and consistent with salinity transfer experiments. Lastly, rarefication analyses lead us to recommend a modest number of sequence reads (~10-15M), but with increased biological replication, be utilized in future DEG analyses of crustaceans.

  10. A comparison of calcium binding in Callinectes sapidus premolt and postmolt cuticle homogenates: implications for regulation of biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Burgess, S K; Oxendine, S L

    1995-11-01

    Cuticle tissue homogenates (CTHs) from Callinectes sapidus premolt cuticle bound approximately 367% more Ca2+ ions than did those from the postmolt cuticle. The pH-stat assay which was used to compare in vitro CaCO3 nucleation times confirmed that the premolt CTHs had greater inhibitory activity than did the postmolt CTHs. This inhibitory activity was indicated by CaCO3 nucleation times in excess of control values. Premolt nucleation times exceeded those of postmolt samples by approximately 340%. A positive correlation was observed between Ca2+ binding and calcification inhibitory activity for both premolt and postmolt CTHs. Heat pretreatment of CTHs at 70 degrees C for a 24-hr period had no significant effect on their Ca2+ binding. However, this heat pretreatment decreased their calcification inhibitory activity. Pretreatment of CTHs with Ca2+ diminished their calcification inhibitory activity. These results are consistent with a mechanism for inhibition of biocalcification by these proteins which involves their initial reversible binding to nascent calcite nuclei growth steps and kinks, rather than their in vivo interaction with free Ca2+ ions in solution.

  11. Preliminary survey of a nemertean crab egg predator, Carcinonemertes, on its host crab, Callinectes arcuatus (Decapoda, Portunidae) from Golfo de Nicoya, Pacific Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, Robert K.; Wehrtmann, Ingo S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The possible presence of egg predators in brood masses of portunid crabs from Pacific Central America has not been studied yet. This survey reports the finding of a nemertean crab egg predator on the portunid crab, Callinectes arcuatus, from the Golfo de Nicoya, Pacific Costa Rica. Nemerteans were found in the egg masses of 26 out of the 74 crabs for a prevalence of 35%. The intensity (mean number of worms/ infected crab) was estimated to be 18 with a variance of 1–123 worms/infected crab. No nemerteans were observed either in the 19 Callinectes arcuatus from Golfo Dulce (southern Pacific coast) and the 10 Portunus asper from Herradura-Jaco (central Pacific coast). This nemertean is a member of the genus Carcinonemertes, which has been reported from the Caribbean coast of Panama. However, the encountered Carcinonemertes sp. is the first published finding and report from Costa Rica and Pacific Central America. PMID:25561848

  12. Reproductive periodicity of the tropical crab Callinectes arcuatus Ordway in Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVries, M. C.; Epifanio, C. E.; Dittel, A. I.

    1983-12-01

    The Gulf of Nicoya, an estuary on the Pacific coast of Central America, contains a large population of the portunid crab Callinectes arcuatus. Results of a 12 month survey indicated that spawning activity occurs throughout the year, but with a distinct peak during the five-month dry season (December-April). Mature females were most prevalent in the upper regions of the gulf during the rainy season and appeared to migrate to the lower gulf to spawn during the dry season. Patterns of spawning and apparent migration differed from those reported in an earlier study of C. arcuatus along the Pacific coast of Mexico.

  13. Metal, metallothionein and glutathione levels in blue crab (Callinectes sp.) specimens from southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lavradas, Raquel Teixeira; Hauser-Davis, Rachel Ann; Lavandier, Ricardo Cavalcanti; Rocha, Rafael Christian Chávez; Saint' Pierre, Tatiana D; Seixas, Tércia; Kehrig, Helena Amaral; Moreira, Isabel

    2014-09-01

    Metal concentrations (Cu, Pb, Zn and Cd) were determined in muscle, gills, soft tissues and eggs in male, non-ovigerous and ovigerous female Callinectes sp. specimens from a reference site in Southeastern Brazil. Metallothionein (MT) and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels were also determined. Results demonstrate that sex has a significant influence on metal, MT and GSH concentrations. Significant maternal transfer of Pb and Zn from ovigerous females to eggs was verified, while female crabs, both ovigerous and non-ovigerous, showed elevated GSH and MT in viscera when compared to males, indicating possible MT role in excreting metals to eggs in ovigerous females of this species. Several strong statistical correlations between metals and MT indicate MTs role in detoxification of both toxic and essential elements in different organs. Pb and Zn were significantly correlated to GSH, indicating oxidative stress caused by the former and a direct link between Zn and GSH in maintaining homeostasis. Regarding human consumption, metal concentrations were lower than the maximum permissible levels established by international and Brazilian regulatory agencies, indicating that this species is safe for human consumption concerning this parameter. The presence of metals in Callinectes sp., however, is still of importance considering that this is a key species within the studied ecosystem and, therefore, plays a major role in the transference of pollutants to higher trophic levels. In addition, the presence of significant metal concentrations found in eggs must be considered in this context, since crab eggs are eaten by several other species, such as shorebirds, seabirds, and fish. Also, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first study regarding both MT and GSH levels in Callinectes sp. eggs and is of interest in the investigation of molecular mechanisms regarding metal exposure in these crustaceans. Data reported in this study support the conclusions from previous reports

  14. Commercially Important Meroplankton of the Lower Chesapeake Bay and Proposed Norfolk Disposal Site. I. Blue Crabs, Rock Crabs and Oysters.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    and 7 (k) ............ .. 25 5 Abundance (#/m3 ) of Crassostrea virginica from oblique tows (153 u mesh) at the Bay mouth Stations: east of the...f - -f -) - - - - -n -i -) .- -.- Information accumulated over the past seven decades indicates that larvae of Crassostrea virginica migrate in...O7Wcommercial importance such as oysters ( Crassostrea vir_.inica), blue crab (Callinectes sapidus), and possibly, the rock crab (Cancer irroratus). A

  15. Population ecology of the blue crab Callinectes danae (Crustacea: Portunidae) in a Brazilian tropical estuary.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Marina S L C; Barreto, Aline V; Negromonte, Aurinete O; Schwamborn, Ralf

    2012-03-01

    This paper aims at describing the population ecology of the swimming crab Callinectes danae Smith, 1869 in one of the most productive estuaries of Brazil, the Santa Cruz Channel. These crabs were monthly collected from January to December/2009 at four stations along the channel, two in the upper and two in the lower estuary. A total of 2373 specimens of C. danae were collected during the study. Males had a larger average carapace width than non-ovigerous females (60.0 ± 15.6 mm and 52.9 ± 12.4 mm, respectively), an adaptation that gives greater protection for females during the copulation. Overall sex ratio did not differ significantly from 1:1. However, evaluating sex-ratio by sampling area, males and juveniles of both sexes occurred preferentially in the upper estuary (p < 0.05), while adult females, including ovigerous, inhabited the lower estuary, an area of major marine influence (p < 0.05). While juveniles look for estuarine waters due to the benefit from the shelter and abundance of food, ovigerous females migrate to areas of greater depth and higher salinity in order to provide a more favorable environment for embryonic and larval development and to enhance larval dispersal. Recruitment of juveniles was continuous along the year, but intensified from March to June and, with less intensity, from October to December.

  16. Impacts of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on blue crab, Callinectes sapidus, larval settlement in Mississippi

    EPA Science Inventory

    The largest accidental release of crude oil in history occurred in the north-central Gulf of Mexico (GOM) between April 20 and July 15, 2010 (Alford et al., this volume). The DWH spill was unprecedented due to both its magnitude (>600,000 metric tons released) and its occurren...

  17. Prevalence and sources of Listeria monocytogenes in blue crab (Callinectus sapidus) meat and blue crab processing plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seven blue crab processing plants were sampled to determine the prevalence and sources of Listeria spp. and L. monocytogenes for two years (2006-2007). A total of 488 raw crab, 624 crab meat, and 624 environmental samples were tested by molecular and culture-based standard methods. Presumptive Liste...

  18. Prevalence, characterization and sources of Listeria monocytogenes in blue crab (Callinectus sapidus) meat and blue crab processing plants.

    PubMed

    Pagadala, Sivaranjani; Parveen, Salina; Rippen, Thomas; Luchansky, John B; Call, Jeffrey E; Tamplin, Mark L; Porto-Fett, Anna C S

    2012-09-01

    Seven blue crab processing plants were sampled to determine the prevalence and sources of Listeria spp. and Listeria monocytogenes for two years (2006-2007). A total of 488 raw crabs, 624 cooked crab meat (crab meat) and 624 environmental samples were tested by standard methods. Presumptive Listeria spp. were isolated from 19.5% of raw crabs, 10.8% of crab meat, and 69.5% of environmental samples. L. monocytogenes was isolated from 4.5% of raw crabs, 0.2% of crab meat, and 2.1% of environmental samples. Ninety-seven percent of the isolates were resistant to at least one of the ten antibiotics tested. Eight different serotypes were found among 76 L. monocytogenes isolates tested with the most common being 4b, 1/2b and 1/2a. Automated EcoRI ribotyping differentiated 11 ribotypes among the 106 L. monocytogenes isolates. Based on ribotyping analysis, the distribution of the ribotypes in each processing plant had a unique contamination pattern. A total of 92 ApaI and 88 AscI pulsotypes among the 106 L. monocytogenes isolates were found and distinct pulsotypes were observed in raw crab, crab meat and environmental samples. Ribotypes and serotypes recovered from crab processing plants included subtypes that have been associated with listeriosis cases in other food outbreaks. Our findings suggest that molecular methods may provide critical information about sources of L. monocytogenes in crab processing plants and will augment efforts to improve food safety control strategies such as targeting specific sources of contamination and use of aggressive detergents prior to sanitizing.

  19. Isolation and Characterization of Listeria monocytogenes from Blue Crab Meat (Callinectus sapidus) and Blue Crab Processing Plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram positive, intracellular food borne pathogen which causes a severe disease called listeriosis in high risk groups. However, there is limited information about the prevalence and sources of L. monocytogenes in blue crab and blue crab processing plants in Maryland. The...

  20. Occurrence of the Atlantic blue crab Callinectes sapidus Rathbun, 1896 in two Mediterranean coastal habitats: Temporary visitor or permanent resident?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancinelli, Giorgio; Carrozzo, Leonardo; Costantini, Maria Letizia; Rossi, Loreto; Marini, Gabriele; Pinna, Maurizio

    2013-12-01

    Coastal habitats worldwide are threatened by invasive alien species (IAS) that can alter community and ecosystem processes. Invasions are of particular concern for the Mediterranean Sea, and IAS-related descriptors of good ecological status have been recently proposed in European reference regulations.

  1. EFFECTS OF HYPOXIA ON GENE AND PROTEIN EXPRESSION IN THE BLUE CRAB, CALLINECTES SAPIDUS. (R829458C003)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increases in hypoxic conditions are one of the major factors responsible for declines in estuarine habitat quality, yet to date there are no indicators for recognizing populations of estuarine organisms that are suffering from chronic hypoxic stress. Here we test the hypothesi...

  2. The relationship of blue crab abundance to winter mortality of Whooping Cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pugesek, Bruce H.; Baldwin, Michael J.; Stehn, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We sampled blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) numbers in marshes on the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge, Texas from 1998-2006, while simultaneously censusing the wintering population of Whooping Cranes (Grus americana) on the refuge and surrounding habitats. This was done to determine whether mortality of wintering Whooping Cranes was related to the availability of this food source. Yearly variation in crab numbers was high, ranging from a low of 0.1 crabs to a high of 3.4 crabs per 100-m transect section. Significant non-linear increases in both juvenile and adult mortality in relation to decreasing crab abundance was observed. Results suggest that some threshold of crab abundance exists in which Whooping Cranes have higher survival on their wintering grounds.

  3. American alligator digestion rate of blue crabs and its implications for stomach contents analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nifong, James C.; Rosenblatt, Adam E.; Johnson, Nathan A.; Barichivich, William; Silliman, Brian; Heithaus, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Stomach contents analysis (SCA) provides a snap-shot observation of a consumer's diet. Interpretation of SCA data can be complicated by many factors, including variation in gastric residence times and digestion rates among prey taxa. Although some SCA methods are reported to efficiently remove all stomach contents, the effectiveness of these techniques has rarely been tested for large irregular shaped prey with hard exoskeletons. We used a controlled feeding trial to estimate gastric residency time and decomposition rate of a large crustacean prey item, the Blue Crab (Callinectes sapidus), which is consumed by American Alligators (Alligator mississippiensis), an abundant apex predator in coastal habitats of the southeastern United States. The decomposition rate of C. sapidus in the stomachs of A. mississippiensis followed a predictable pattern, and some crab pieces remained in stomachs for at least 14 days. We also found that certain portions of C. sapidus were prone to becoming caught within the stomach or esophagus, meaning not all crab parts are consistently recovered using gastric lavage techniques. However, because the state of decomposition of crabs was predictable, it is possible to estimate time since consumption for crabs recovered from wild alligators. This information, coupled with a detailed understanding of crab distributions and alligator movement tactics could help elucidate patterns of cross-ecosystem foraging by the American Alligator in coastal habitats

  4. Predator-prey interactions between blue crabs and ribbed mussels living in clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Junda

    1991-01-01

    Predator-prey interactions between blue crabs ( Callinectes sapidus) and ribbed mussels ( Geukensia demissa) were studied by manipulating different components of mussel clump structure in the laboratory to test their effects on the mussels' susceptibility to crab predation. Mussels with stronger attachment strength or those buried deeper in the sediment suffered lower mortality. Blue crabs showed no significant size selectivity when two size classes of mussles (30-40 and 50-60 mm in shell heights) were offered. When juvenile mussels were attached to adult conspecifics and completely buried in the centres of clumps as in the field, blue crabs did not actively search for them. The crabs, however, did consume juveniles as by-products when they preyed upon the adult mussels to which the juveniles were attached.

  5. Investigating physiological, cellular and molecular effects in juvenile blue crab, Callinectus sapidus, exposed to field-collected sediments contaminated by oil from the Deepwater Horizon Incident.

    PubMed

    Pie, Hannah V; Schott, Eric J; Mitchelmore, Carys L

    2015-11-01

    Juvenile blue crabs, Callinectus sapidus, were exposed for 31 days to six different sediments collected within the Pass a Loutre State Wildlife Management Area approximately 6 months or 1.5 years post-capping of the Macondo-252 well-head following the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) Incident. Based on forensic analysis to fingerprint for DWH oil, these sediments differed in their levels of DWH oil contamination, and included one reference sediment collected from a location with no detectable DWH oil present. The concentration of 50 individual parent and alkylation group polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), saturated hydrocarbons (37 total), and total extractable hydrocarbons were determined in each sediment, as were biologically relevant metals, grain size distribution, percent total organic carbon, and percent total solids. Total concentrations of 50 PAHs (TPAH50) of initial treatment sediments ranged from 187 μg kg(-1) (reference site) to 2,086,458 μg kg(-1) (the highest DWH oil contaminated site). Multiple biological endpoints were measured including mortality, growth, and ecdysis. Additionally, early biomarkers of biological stress were examined in the hemolymph and hepatopancreas of crabs, including DNA damage (Comet assay) and expression of genes encoding Cu-metallothionein (CuMT), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), and manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD). Over the 31 day exposure, there were no treatment related mortalities in juvenile blue crabs. The overall growth and molting of the crabs were not substantially different between the various sediment exposures over the exposure period. Additionally, none of the early biomarkers of biological stress were correlated with PAH concentrations. Overall, juvenile blue crabs did not appear to be negatively impacted during the 31 day exposure by DWH oil contaminated sediments collected at least 6 months post-capping of the Macondo-252 well-head.

  6. Responses of free radical metabolism to air exposure or salinity stress, in crabs (Callinectes danae and C. ornatus) with different estuarine distributions.

    PubMed

    Freire, Carolina A; Togni, Valéria G; Hermes-Lima, Marcelo

    2011-10-01

    The swimming crabs Callinectes danae and C. ornatus are found in bays and estuaries, but C. danae is more abundant in lower salinities, while C. ornatus remains restricted to areas of higher salinity. Experimental crabs of both species were submitted to: air exposure (Ae, 3h), reimmersion in 33‰ (control) sea water (SW) (Ri, 1h) following air exposure; hyposaline (Ho, 10‰ for 2h) or hypersaline (He, 40‰ for 2h) SW, then return to control 33‰ SW (RHo and RHe, for 1h). Hemolymph was sampled for osmolality and chloride determinations. Activity of antioxidant enzymes [glutathione peroxidase (GPX), catalase, glutathione-S-transferase] and levels of carbonyl proteins and lipid peroxidation (TBARS) were evaluated in hepatopancreas, muscle, anterior and posterior gills. In Ho groups, hemolymph concentrations were lower in both species, compared to He groups. C. danae displayed higher control activities of GPX (hepatopancreas and muscle) and catalase (all four tissues) than C. ornatus. C. ornatus presented increased activities of catalase and GPX in Ae, Ri, and He groups. Increased TBARS was seen in C. ornatus tissues (He group). The more euryhaline species displayed higher constitutive activities of antioxidant enzymes, and the less euryhaline species exhibited activation of these enzymes when exposed to air or hyper-salinity.

  7. Comparison of automated BAX polymerase chain reaction and standard culture methods for detection of Listeria monocyogenes in blue crab meat (Callinectus sapidus) and blue crab processing plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study compared the BAX Polymerase Chain Reaction method (BAX PCR) with the Standard Culture Method (SCM) for detection of L. monocytogenes in blue crab meat and crab processing plants. The aim of this study was to address this data gap. Raw crabs, finished products and environmental sponge samp...

  8. Hemolymph ionic regulation and adjustments in gill (Na+, K+)-ATPase activity during salinity acclimation in the swimming crab Callinectes ornatus (Decapoda, Brachyura).

    PubMed

    Garçon, Daniela P; Masui, Douglas C; Mantelatto, Fernando L M; Furriel, Rosa P M; McNamara, John C; Leone, Francisco A

    2009-09-01

    We evaluate hemolymph osmotic and ionic regulatory abilities and characterize a posterior gill microsomal (Na+, K+)-ATPase from the marine swimming crab, Callinectes ornatus, acclimated to 21 per thousand or 33 per thousand salinity. C. ornatus is isosmotic after acclimation to 21 per thousand but is hyposmotic at 33 per thousand salinity; hemolymph ions do not recover initial levels on acclimation to 21 per thousand salinity but are anisoionic compared to ambient concentrations, revealing modest regulatory ability. NH4+ modulates enzyme affinity for K+, which increases 187-fold in crabs acclimated to 33 per thousand salinity. The (Na+, K+)-ATPase redistributes into membrane fractions of different densities, suggesting that altered membrane composition results from salinity acclimation. ATP was hydrolyzed at maximum rates of 182.6 +/- 7.1 nmol Pi min(-1) mg(-1) (21 per thousand) and 76.2 +/- 3.5 nmol Pi min(-1) mg(-1) (33 per thousand), with little change in KM values (approximately 50 micromol L(-1)). K+ together with NH4+ synergistically stimulated activity to maximum rates of approximately 240 nmol Pi min(-1) mg(-1). KI values for ouabain inhibition (approximately 110 micromol L(-1)) decreased to 44.9 +/- 1.0 micromol L(-1) (21 per thousand) and 28.8 +/- 1.3 micromol L(-1) (33 per thousand) in the presence of both K+ and NH4+. Assays employing various inhibitors suggest the presence of mitochondrial F0F1-, and K+- and V-ATPase activities in the gill microsomes.

  9. Fiddler crabs (Uca spp.) as model hosts for laboratory infections of Hematodinium perezi.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Patricia A; Shields, Jeffrey D

    2017-02-01

    The parasitic dinoflagellate, Hematodinium perezi, negatively impacts the commercially important blue crab, Callinectes sapidus. The parasite is a host generalist, but it has not been reported from littoral fiddler crabs living within a few meters of habitat known to harbor infected blue crabs. In the first study, populations of three species of fiddler crab were screened for natural infections. The infection status of field-collected and lab-inoculated crabs was determined by screening fresh hemolymph with a 0.3% neutral red solution. Fiddler crabs were collected by hand in an area adjacent to where infected blue crabs were commonly collected. None of the 431 fiddlers had natural infections. In two separate studies, three species of fiddler crabs, Uca minax, U. pugnax, and U. pugilator, were evaluated for their susceptibility to H. perezi via inoculation of trophic stages. Uca minax inoculated with 10,000 cells of H. perezi were monitored for progression of the parasite. During hemolymph screenings of disease progression, filamentous trophonts, ameboid trophonts, and clump colonies were observed, indicative of active infections. In the second study, the minimum infective dose in U. minax was investigated. Fiddler crabs were inoculated with 0, 100, 1000, or 10,000 cells per crab. The minimum dose was determined to be approximately 1000 ameboid trophonts per crab. All three species of fiddler crab were susceptible to H. perezi via inoculation. The parasite was serially transferred from fiddler crabs to blue crabs without loss of infectivity. Survival studies indicated similar progression patterns to those observed in blue crabs. Based on our results fiddler crabs can serve as a laboratory model for investigating H. perezi infections and may be useful for comparative studies with blue crabs.

  10. The assemblage composition and structure of swimming crabs (Portunoidea) in continental shelf waters of southeastern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, L. S.; Frameschi, I. F.; Costa, R. C.; Castilho, A. L.; Fransozo, A.

    2015-02-01

    Three regions along the Brazilian coast characterized by the occurrence of contrasting natural phenomena, such as upwellings and continental input, were surveyed to determine the composition and structure of the assemblage of swimming crabs. Twelve monthly collections were undertaken (July 2010 to June 2011) in Macaé, Rio de Janeiro (MAC); Ubatuba, São Paulo (UBA); and São Francisco do Sul, Santa Catarina (SFS). The lowest values ​​of the phi sediment grain size measure, bottom temperature and the highest values of organic matter and salinity were measured in MAC. In all, 10,686 individuals were collected, belonging to six species of Portunoidea: Arenaeus cribrarius, Callinectes danae, Callinectes ornatus, Callinectes sapidus, Achelous spinicarpus and Achelous spinimanus. A Multiple Response Permutation Procedure (MRPP) test indicated that the species composition differed significantly among the sampling sites, showing substantial heterogeneity in the composition and abundance of species among regions. The results suggest that C. danae was more abundant in waters with lower salinity and lower organic matter content. In contrast, A. spinimanus is positively correlated with these factors, showing a greater abundance under the opposite conditions. Callinectes ornatus appeared not to show strong selectivity for particular habitat characteristics. We conclude from these findings that areas affected by different phenomena produce changes in the composition and abundance of the assemblage of Portunoidea. Although the strength of eutrophication differs between UBA and MAC, the substantial continental inflow affecting SFS favors the development of species that complete their life cycle in the estuary.

  11. Associations between dioxins/furans and dioxin-like PCBs in estuarine sediment and blue crab

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liebens, J.; Mohrherr, C.J.; Karouna-Renier, N. K.; Snyder, R.A.; Rao, K.R.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the relationships between the quantity, toxicity, and compositional profile of dioxin/furan compounds (PCDD/Fs) and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (DL-PCBs) in estuarine sediment and in the blue crab (Callinectes sapidus). Sediment and blue crab samples were collected in three small urban estuaries that are in relatively close proximity to each other. Results show that differences between PCDD/F and DL-PCB mass concentrations and total toxic equivalents (TEQ) toxicity in sediments of the three estuaries are reflected in those of the blue crab. TEQs are higher in the hepatopancreas of the crabs than in the sediment, but the concentration factor is inversely proportional to the TEQ in the sediments. Congener profiles in the crabs are systematically different from those in the sediments, and the difference is more pronounced for PCDD/Fs than for DL-PCBs, possibly due to differences in metabolization rates. Compared with sediment profiles, more lesser-chlorinated PCDD/Fs that have higher TEFs accumulate in crab hepatopancreas. This selective bioaccumulation of PCDD/Fs results in a TEQ augmentation in crab hepatopancreas compared with sediments. The bioaccumulation in the blue crab is also selective for PCDD/Fs over DL-PCBs. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  12. The crab Neohelice (= Chasmagnathus) granulata: an emergent animal model from emergent countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spivak, Eduardo D.

    2010-09-01

    Neohelice granulata (previously known as Chasmagnathus granulata and C. granulatus) is a burrowing semiterrestrial crab found in the intertidal zone of estuaries, salt marshes and mangroves of the South-western Atlantic Ocean. Beginning in the late 1989s, an explosion of publications appeared in international journals dealing with its ecology, physiology, toxicology and behavior. A bibliometric analysis using the Scopus database allowed detecting 309 papers that deal with this species during the period 1986-2009. The number of papers per year increased continuously, reaching a mean annual value of 22.6 during the last 5 years; a great majority of them were authored by researchers from Argentina and Brazil. Neohelice granulata has become now one of the most studied crab species, after Carcinus maenas, Callinectes sapidus, Scylla serrata and Cancer pagurus and C. magister, and it can be considered as an emergent animal model for biochemical, physiological and ecological research.

  13. Ecdysteriod titers during the molt cycle of the blue crab resemble those of other crustacea

    SciTech Connect

    Soumoff, C.; Skinner, D.M.

    1983-08-01

    Callinectes sapidus is the only true crab (brachyuran) whose pattern of ecdysteroid titers has been described as departing from the pattern seen in other decapods. While ecdysteroids in other crabs reach a peak just prior to ecdysis, those of C. sapidus were claimed to reach their maxima after ecdysis. The data reported here challenge these findings. Ecdysteroids were measured in hemolymph, ovaries, and whole animal extracts of blue crabs using a radioimmunoassay. In hemolymph and whole animals, ecdysteroid levels rose during premolt to a maximum at stage D/sub 3/. Ecdysteroids declined rapidly from late premolt stage D/sub 4/ through postmolt stage A/sub 2/, increased slightly at postmolt stage B, and returned to low levels where they remained during intermolt stage C. Ecdysteroid levels in males and immature females were not significantly different but mature females, having reached a terminal anecdysis, had signifincatly lower ecdysteroid levels. Ovaries of mature females accumulated ecdysteroids during vitellogenesis while the concentration of ecdysteroids in hemolymph was low.

  14. Concurrent protein synthesis is required for in vivo chitin synthesis in postmolt blue crabs

    SciTech Connect

    Horst, M.N. )

    1990-12-01

    Chitin synthesis in crustaceans involves the deposition of a protein-polysaccharide complex at the apical surface of epithelial cells which secrete the cuticle or exoskeleton. The present study involves an examination of in vivo incorporation of radiolabeled amino acids and amino sugars into the cuticle of postmolt blue crabs, Callinectes sapidus. Rates of incorporation of both 3H leucine and 3H threonine were linear with respect to time of incubation. Incorporation of 3H threonine into the endocuticle was inhibited greater than 90% in the presence of the protein synthesis inhibitor, puromycin. Linear incorporation of 14C glucosamine into the cuticle was also demonstrated; a significant improvement of radiolabeling was achieved by using 14C-N-acetylglucosamine as the labeled precursor. Incorporation of 3H-N-acetylglucosamine into the cuticle of postmolt blue crabs was inhibited 89% by puromycin, indicating that concurrent protein synthesis is required for the deposition of chitin in the blue crab. Autoradiographic analysis of control vs. puromycin-treated crabs indicates that puromycin totally blocks labeling of the new endocuticle with 3H glucosamine. These results are consistent with the notion that crustacean chitin is synthesized as a protein-polysaccharide complex. Analysis of the postmolt and intermolt blue crab cuticle indicates that the exoskeleton contains about 60% protein and 40% chitin. The predominant amino acids are arginine, glutamic acid, alanine, aspartic acid, and threonine.

  15. Orientation of the fiddler crab, Uca cumulanta: responses to chemical and visual cues.

    PubMed

    Chiussi, Roberto; Diaz, Humberto

    2002-09-01

    Behavioral responses of the fiddler crab Uca cumulanta to flat geometric shapes mimicking natural objects were measured in a circular arena by using zonal recovery as a behavioral measurement. Crabs were tested either in presence or absence of odors from two common predator species, the blue crab Callinectes sapidus, and the pufferfish Sphoeroides testudineus. The study tested the hypothesis that U. cumulanta have different behavioral responses to visual cues in the presence of chemical cues associated with predators. Escape direction tests demonstrated that U. cumulanta is able to show zonal recovery behavior based upon astronomical references. When tested in water lacking predator odor, crabs failed to exhibit a consistent orientation if a single silhouette target was interposed in the landward direction. However, when animals were tested in different predator odor concentrations, an orientation response was obtained at 10 and 20 g/liter/hr blue crab odorand 10 g/liter/hr pufferfish odor, demonstrating U. cumulanta ability to detect the potential presence of its natural predators by this odor. Thus, the hypothesis was supported, and the results suggest that behavioral responses to chemical and visual cues are involved in predator avoidance.

  16. Mitigating by-catch of diamondback terrapins in crab pots

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hart, Kristen M.; Crowder, Larry B.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic by-catch of diamondback terrapins (Malaclemys terrapin) in blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) pots is a concern for terrapin conservation along the United States Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coasts. Despite the availability of by-catch reduction devices (BRDs) for crab pots, adoption of BRDs has not been mandated and by-catch of terrapins continues. We conducted experimental fishing studies in North Carolina's year-round blue crab fishery from 2000 to 2004 to evaluate the ability of various BRDs to reduce terrapin by-catch without a concomitant reduction in the catch of blue crabs. In 4,822 crab pot days fished, we recorded only 21 terrapin captures. Estimated capture rates were 0.003 terrapins/pot per day in hard crab experimental fishing and 0.008 terrapins/pot per day in peeler experimental fishing. All terrapin captures occurred from April to mid-May within 321.4 m of the shoreline. Longer soak times produced more dead terrapins, with 4 live and 4 dead during hard crab experimental fishing and 11 live and 2 dead during peeler experimental fishing. The 4.0-cm BRDs in fall and 4.5-cm and 5.0-cm BRDs in spring reduced the catch of legal-sized male hard crabs by 26.6%, 21.2%, and 5.7%, respectively. Only the 5.0-cm BRDs did not significantly affect the catch of legal-sized hard male crabs. However, BRDs had no measurable effect on catch of target crabs in the peeler crab fishery. Our results identify 3 complementary and economically feasible tools for blue crab fishery managers to exclude terrapins from commercially fished crab pots in North Carolina: 1) gear modifications (e.g., BRDs); 2) distance-to-shore restrictions; and 3) time-of-year regulations. These measures combined could provide a reduction in terrapin by-catch of up to 95% without a significant reduction in target crab catch.

  17. A preliminary assessment of metal bioaccumulation in the blue crab, Callinectes danae S., from the Sao Vicente Channel, Sao Paulo State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Bordon, Isabella C A C; Sarkis, Jorge E S; Tomás, Acácio R G; Souza, Marcelo R; Scalco, Allan; Lima, Mariana; Hortellani, Marcos A

    2012-04-01

    The concentrations of metals in tissues of Callinectes danae were evaluated, aiming to determine the bioaccumulation process of this species. Gills presented the highest mean concentrations for most metals, except for Hg (

  18. Comparison of automated BAX PCR and standard culture methods for detection of Listeria monocytogenes in blue Crabmeat (Callinectus sapidus) and blue crab processing plants.

    PubMed

    Pagadala, Sivaranjani; Parveen, Salina; Schwarz, Jurgen G; Rippen, Thomas; Luchansky, John B

    2011-11-01

    This study compared the automated BAX PCR with the standard culture method (SCM) to detect Listeria monocytogenes in blue crab processing plants. Raw crabs, crabmeat, and environmental sponge samples were collected monthly from seven processing plants during the plant operating season, May through November 2006. For detection of L. monocytogenes in raw crabs and crabmeat, enrichment was performed in Listeria enrichment broth, whereas for environmental samples, demi-Fraser broth was used, and then plating on both Oxford agar and L. monocytogenes plating medium was done. Enriched samples were also analyzed by BAX PCR. A total of 960 samples were examined; 59 were positive by BAX PCR and 43 by SCM. Overall, there was no significant difference (P ≤ 0.05) between the methods for detecting the presence of L. monocytogenes in samples collected from crab processing plants. Twenty-two and 18 raw crab samples were positive for L. monocytogenes by SCM and BAX PCR, respectively. Twenty and 32 environmental samples were positive for L. monocytogenes by SCM and BAX PCR, respectively, whereas only one and nine finished products were positive. The sensitivities of BAX PCR for detecting L. monocytogenes in raw crabs, crabmeat, and environmental samples were 59.1, 100, and 60%, respectively. The results of this study indicate that BAX PCR is as sensitive as SCM for detecting L. monocytogenes in crabmeat, but more sensitive than SCM for detecting this bacterium in raw crabs and environmental samples.

  19. Na⁺,K⁺-ATPase activity in the posterior gills of the blue crab, Callinectes ornatus (Decapoda, Brachyura): modulation of ATP hydrolysis by the biogenic amines spermidine and spermine.

    PubMed

    Garçon, Daniela P; Lucena, Malson N; França, Juliana L; McNamara, John C; Fontes, Carlos F L; Leone, Francisco A

    2011-11-01

    We investigated the effect of the exogenous polyamines spermine, spermidine and putrescine on modulation by ATP, K⁺, Na⁺, NH₄⁺ and Mg²⁺ and on inhibition by ouabain of posterior gill microsomal Na⁺,K⁺-ATPase activity in the blue crab, Callinectes ornatus, acclimated to a dilute medium (21‰ salinity). This is the first kinetic demonstration of competition between spermine and spermidine for the cation sites of a crustacean Na⁺,K⁺-ATPase. Polyamine inhibition is enhanced at low cation concentrations: spermidine almost completely inhibited total ATPase activity, while spermine inhibition attained 58%; putrescine had a negligible effect on Na⁺,K⁺-ATPase activity. Spermine and spermidine affected both V and K for ATP hydrolysis but did not affect ouabain-insensitive ATPase activity. ATP hydrolysis in the absence of spermine and spermidine obeyed Michaelis-Menten behavior, in contrast to the cooperative kinetics seen for both polyamines. Modulation of V and K by K⁺, Na⁺, NH₄⁺ and Mg²⁺ varied considerably in the presence of spermine and spermidine. These findings suggest that polyamine inhibition of Na⁺,K⁺-ATPase activity may be of physiological relevance to crustaceans that occupy habitats of variable salinity.

  20. Gill-specific (Na(+), K(+))-ATPase activity and α-subunit mRNA expression during low-salinity acclimation of the ornate blue crab Callinectes ornatus (Decapoda, Brachyura).

    PubMed

    Leone, Francisco A; Garçon, Daniela P; Lucena, Malson N; Faleiros, Rogério O; Azevedo, Sergio V; Pinto, Marcelo R; McNamara, John C

    2015-08-01

    We evaluate (Na(+), K(+))-ATPase activity, and protein and gene expression of the α-subunit in posterior gills 6 and 7 of Callinectes ornatus, a euryhaline crab, during a 10-day acclimation period from seawater (33‰ S) to low salinity (21‰ S). (Na(+), K(+))-ATPase activity decreased within 1h after transfer to 21‰ S, values recovering by 24h and attaining a maximum of ≈180 nmol Pi min(-1) mg(-1) after 10 days (≈2.5-fold increase). (Na(+), K(+))-ATPase activity is ≈1.5-fold greater in gill 6 than in gill 7, independently of salinity. Relative expression of (Na(+), K(+))-ATPase α-subunit mRNA increased in both gills within 1- to 2-h exposure to low salinity, reaching an ≈8-fold maximum after 24-h exposure, decreasing slightly by 10 days acclimation to low salinity. This increase in α-subunit mRNA expression may underpin the increased (Na(+), K(+))-ATPase activity seen after 10 days acclimation to low salinity. Enzyme affinity for ATP was greater in gill 6 than in gill 7, in contrast to ouabain affinity that was greater in gill 7. Western blotting analysis identified a single immunoreactive band against the (Na(+), K(+))-ATPase α-subunit with an Mr of ≈105 kDa, independently of gill number and low salinity acclimation. Despite these differences, gills 6 and 7 appear to perform similar functions in salt uptake from the dilute medium. The partial cDNA sequence obtained for the gill (Na(+), K(+))-ATPase of C. ornatus (GenBank deposit KF056804) showed 97 to 91% identities with similar sequences from other portunid crab gills. The regulation of gill (Na(+), K(+))-ATPase activity during acclimation to low salinity is discussed.

  1. Superfund dredging restoration results in widespread regional reduction in cadmium in blue crabs.

    PubMed

    Levinton, Jeffrey S; Pochron, Sharon T; Kane, Michael W

    2006-12-15

    A nickel-cadmium battery factory released about 53 tons of mostly cadmium and nickel hydroxide suspended solid waste between 1953 and 1979 into Foundry Cove, which is tidally connected to the Hudson River estuary. A major Superfund dredging cleanup in 1994-1995 removed most of the cadmium from the sediment from within Foundry Cove. Here, we demonstrate that the cleanup reduced cadmium tissue concentrations (hepatopancreas and leg muscle) in an important fishery species, the blue crab Callinectes sapidus near Foundry Cove, but also across a broad reach of the Hudson River. Before the cleanup, cadmium concentrations in crabs were 4-5 times higher on average than after the cleanup and geographic variation in crab cadmium concentration along the Hudson River estuary was strongly reduced after the cleanup. The factor of reduction in crab tissue concentrations was far less than the factor of reduction of export of cadmium from Foundry Cove into the Hudson or the factor of reduction of cadmium sediment concentrations within the cove following the cleanup. This unique study demonstrates the efficacy of a major dredging cleanup and quantifies the spatial and temporal impact of the cleanup. It demonstrates that cleanup of a point source can have dramatic effects over large spatial scales.

  2. The bioeconomic impact of different management regulations on the Chesapeake Bay blue crab fishery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bunnell, David B.; Lipton, Douglas W.; Miller, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    The harvest of blue crabs Callinectes sapidus in Chesapeake Bay declined 46% between 1993 and 2001 and remained low through 2008. Because the total market value of this fishery has declined by an average of US $ 3.3 million per year since 1993, the commercial fishery has been challenged to maintain profitability. We developed a bioeconomic simulation model of the Chesapeake Bay blue crab fishery to aid managers in determining which regulations will maximize revenues while ensuring a sustainable harvest. We compared 15 different management scenarios, including those implemented by Maryland and Virginia between 2007 and 2009, that sought to reduce female crab harvest and nine others that used seasonal closures, different size regulations, or the elimination of fishing for specific market categories. Six scenarios produced the highest revenues: the 2008 and 2009 Maryland regulations, spring and fall closures for female blue crabs, and 152- and 165-mm maximum size limits for females. Our most important finding was that for each state the 2008 and 2009 scenarios that implemented early closures of the female crab fishery produced higher revenues than the 2007 scenario, in which no early female closures were implemented. We conclude that the use of maximum size limits for female crabs would not be feasible despite their potentially high revenue, given the likelihood that the soft-shell and peeler fisheries cannot be expanded beyond their current capacity and the potentially high mortality rate for culled individuals that are the incorrect size. Our model results support the current use of seasonal closures for females, which permit relatively high exploitation of males and soft-shell and peeler blue crabs (which have high prices) while keeping the female crab harvest sustainable. Further, our bioeconomic model allows for the inclusion of an economic viewpoint along with biological data when target reference points are set by managers.

  3. Species profiles: Life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (Mid-Atlantic): Blue crab

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, J.; Fowler, D.L.; Van Den Avyle, M.J.

    1989-03-01

    Species profiles are summaries of the literature on taxonomy, life history, and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and aquatic invertebrates. They are prepared to assist with impact assessment. The blue crab, Callinectes sapidus, occurs in lower reaches of freshwater rivers, estuaries, and coastal waters along the Atlantic seaboard and Gulf of Mexico, and the species supports the largest crab fishery in the United States. Chesapeake Bay provides the greatest production of blue crabs on the east coast. The blue crab's high abundance in estuaries, diverse feeding habits, and importance as prey for other marine animals indicate its important role in the structure and function of estuarine communities. Female blue crabs spawn in high-salinity lower estuaries of coastal areas; the resulting larvae are planktonic and develop into juveniles at 5 to 10 weeks of age. Juveniles gradually migrate into shallower, less-saline upper estuaries and rivers where they grow and mature at 1-2 yr of age. Mating occurs in the upper estuaries after which females migrate to areas having higher salinities. Growth and survival of blue crabs are strongly affected by water temperature and salinity, but tolerances vary with life stage. Larvae require temperatures of 20-30/degree/C and salinities of 10-30 ppt for proper development, but salinity and temperature tolerances are broad for advanced juveniles and adults. Blue crabs use nearly all areas within estuaries as nursery habitat, and crab populations are sensitive to changes in physical features of contamination of these areas. 94 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Determination of PCBs and total lipids in edible fish and crab tissue using supercritical fluid extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Gavlor, M.; Hale, R.; Smith, C.; Thames, J.; Mothershead, R.

    1995-12-31

    An offline supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) method has been developed to determine PCB congeners and total tissue lipid content in edible fish and crab tissues collected from several river systems in Virginia. The method is rapid and safe, requiring only 40 minutes per sample and uses nonorganic solvents for total lipid extraction and only 1.5 mL isooctane for PCB extraction. The SFE approach compares favorably with soxhlet extraction, ASE and column elution. Over 800 fish and crab tissue samples were analyzed successfully, thus demonstrating the robustness of the method. Total lipid values obtained using SFE showed considerable spatial and interspecies variability ranging from 1.8% in blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) to 36.4% in striped bass (Morone saxatilis). Total PCB concentrations also varied greatly by site and species. These ranged from below the quantitation limit (1.0 {micro}1 g/kg) to 9,910 {micro}g/kg on a dry weight basis using GCELCD. Dominant PCB congeners detected were in good agreement with those reported by other researchers. Mean total PCB concentrations did not correlate well with total tissue lipid content.

  5. Carbonic anhydrase, a respiratory enzyme in the gills of the shore crab Carcinus maenas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttcher, K.; Siebers, D.; Sender, S.

    1995-03-01

    This paper summarizes investigations on the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA) in the gills of the osmoregulating shore crab Carcinus maenas. Carbonic anhydrase, an enzyme catalyzing the reversible hydration of CO2 to HCO3 - and H+, is localized with highest activities in the posterior salt-transporting gills of the shore crab- and here CA activity is strongly dependent on salinity. Contrary to the earlier hypothesis established for the blue crab Callinectes sapidus that cytoplasmic branchial CA provides the counter ions HCO3 - and H+ for apical exchange against Na+ and Cl-, the involvement of CA in NaCl uptake mechanisms can be excluded in Carcinus. Differential and density gradient centrifugations indicate that branchial CA is a predominantly membrane-associated protein. Branchial CA was greatly inhibited by the sulfonamide acetazolamide (AZ) Ki=2.4·10-8 mol/l). Using the preparation of the isolated perfused gill, application of 10-4 mol/l AZ resulted in an 80% decrease of CO2/HCO3 - excretion. Thus we conclude that CA is localized in plasma membranes, maintaining the CO2 gradient by accelerating adjustment of the pH-dependent CO2/HCO3 - equilibrium.

  6. Chemical Tools of Octopus maya during Crab Predation Are Also Active on Conspecifics

    PubMed Central

    Pech-Puch, Dawrin; Cruz-López, Honorio; Canche-Ek, Cindy; Campos-Espinosa, Gabriela; García, Elpidio; Mascaro, Maite; Rosas, Carlos; Chávez-Velasco, Daniel; Rodríguez-Morales, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Octopus maya is a major socio-economic resource from the Yucatán Peninsula in Mexico. In this study we report for the first time the chemical composition of the saliva of O. maya and its effect on natural prey, i.e. the blue crab (Callinectes sapidus), the crown conch snail (Melongena corona bispinosa), as well as conspecifics. Salivary posterior glands were collected from octopus caught by local fishers and extracted with water; this extract paralyzed and predigested crabs when it was injected into the third pereiopod. The water extract was fractionated by membrane ultrafiltration with a molecular weight cut-off of 3kDa leading to a metabolic phase (>3kDa) and a neurotoxic fraction (<3kDa). The neurotoxic fraction injected in the crabs caused paralysis and postural changes. Crabs recovered to their initial condition within two hours, which suggests that the effects of the neurotoxic fraction were reversible. The neurotoxic fraction was also active on O. maya conspecifics, partly paralyzing and sedating them; this suggests that octopus saliva might be used among conspecifics for defense and for reduction of competition. Bioguided separation of the neurotoxic fraction by chromatography led to a paralysis fraction and a relaxing fraction. The paralyzing activity of the saliva was exerted by amino acids, while the relaxing activity was due to the presence of serotonin. Prey-handling studies revealed that O. maya punctures the eye or arthrodial membrane when predating blue crabs and uses the radula to bore through crown conch shells; these differing strategies may help O. maya to reduce the time needed to handle its prey. PMID:26895025

  7. Chemical Tools of Octopus maya during Crab Predation Are Also Active on Conspecifics.

    PubMed

    Pech-Puch, Dawrin; Cruz-López, Honorio; Canche-Ek, Cindy; Campos-Espinosa, Gabriela; García, Elpidio; Mascaro, Maite; Rosas, Carlos; Chávez-Velasco, Daniel; Rodríguez-Morales, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Octopus maya is a major socio-economic resource from the Yucatán Peninsula in Mexico. In this study we report for the first time the chemical composition of the saliva of O. maya and its effect on natural prey, i.e. the blue crab (Callinectes sapidus), the crown conch snail (Melongena corona bispinosa), as well as conspecifics. Salivary posterior glands were collected from octopus caught by local fishers and extracted with water; this extract paralyzed and predigested crabs when it was injected into the third pereiopod. The water extract was fractionated by membrane ultrafiltration with a molecular weight cut-off of 3 kDa leading to a metabolic phase (>3 kDa) and a neurotoxic fraction (<3 kDa). The neurotoxic fraction injected in the crabs caused paralysis and postural changes. Crabs recovered to their initial condition within two hours, which suggests that the effects of the neurotoxic fraction were reversible. The neurotoxic fraction was also active on O. maya conspecifics, partly paralyzing and sedating them; this suggests that octopus saliva might be used among conspecifics for defense and for reduction of competition. Bioguided separation of the neurotoxic fraction by chromatography led to a paralysis fraction and a relaxing fraction. The paralyzing activity of the saliva was exerted by amino acids, while the relaxing activity was due to the presence of serotonin. Prey-handling studies revealed that O. maya punctures the eye or arthrodial membrane when predating blue crabs and uses the radula to bore through crown conch shells; these differing strategies may help O. maya to reduce the time needed to handle its prey.

  8. A novel hormone is required for the development of reproductive phenotypes in adult female crabs.

    PubMed

    Zmora, Nilli; Chung, J Sook

    2014-01-01

    The crustacean male-specific androgenic hormone is widely accepted as a key factor in sexual differentiation and in the development of secondary sex characteristics. However, the mechanism by which the plethora of different reproductive strategies are controlled and executed in crustaceans is not known. We discovered in the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus, a hitherto unknown neurohormone, named crustacean female sex hormone (CFSH), in distinct neurosecretory cells in the eyestalk ganglia. CFSH is highly expressed in females but weakly in males, and its crucial role in developing adult female phenotypes has now been established. CFSH cDNA encodes a 225-amino acid (aa) novel protein composed of a 23-aa predicted signal peptide, 33-aa precursor-related peptide and 167-aa mature protein that did not match any other sequence in GenBank. CFSH RNA interference knockdown by multiple administrations of double-stranded RNA at the prepubertal stage causes abnormal development of brooding and mating systems upon puberty. These systems include a pair of gonopores and an egg attachment system for brooding, comprised of an enlarged semicircular abdomen and ovigerous setae. The ovigerous setae in CFSH knocked-down females were fewer and 50% shorter and the gonopores were either significantly smaller than those of controls, misplaced, or absent. We also identified CFSH in the green crab, Carcinus maenas, a species that shares a similar reproductive strategy with C. sapidus. Together, our data provide the first evidence for the presence of a female hormone in crustaceans and its importance in positively controlling anatomic features associated with brooding and mating systems. From an evolutionary standpoint, the endocrine control supporting a female-specific reproductive strategy, as previously described for many vertebrate species, has now been demonstrated for the first time in crustaceans.

  9. Direct and indirect estimates of natural mortality for Chesapeake Bay blue crab

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hewitt, D.A.; Lambert, D.M.; Hoenig, J.M.; Lipcius, R.N.; Bunnell, D.B.; Miller, T.J.

    2007-01-01

    Analyses of the population dynamics of blue crab Callinectes sapidus have been complicated by a lack of estimates of the instantaneous natural mortality rate (M). We developed the first direct estimates of M for this species by solving Baranov's catch equation for M given estimates of annual survival rate and exploitation rate. Annual survival rates were estimated from a tagging study on adult female blue crabs in Chesapeake Bay, and female-specific exploitation rates for the same stock were estimated by comparing commercial catches with abundances estimated from a dredge survey. We also used eight published methods based on life history parameters to calculate indirect estimates of M for blue crab. Direct estimates of M for adult females in Chesapeake Bay for the years 2002–2004 ranged from 0.42 to 0.87 per year and averaged 0.71 per year. Indirect estimates of M varied considerably depending on life history parameter inputs and the method used. All eight methods yielded values for M between 0.99 and 1.08 per year, and six of the eight methods yielded values between 0.82 and 1.35 per year. Our results indicate that natural mortality of blue crab is higher than previously believed, and we consider M values between 0.7 and 1.1 per year to be reasonable for the exploitable stock in Chesapeake Bay. Remaining uncertainty about Mmakes it necessary to evaluate a range of estimates in assessment models.

  10. Molecular characterization of a cytosolic manganese superoxide dismutase from the Chinese mitten crab, Eriocheir sinensis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, D X; Chen, L Q; Qin, J G; Qin, C J; Zhang, H; Wu, P; Li, E C

    2014-11-11

    A cytosolic manganese superoxide dismutase gene (Es-cMnSOD) was cloned from the Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis, using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and the rapid amplification of cDNA ends. The open reading frame of Es-cMnSOD is 867 bp in length and encodes a 288-amino acid protein without a signal peptide. The calculated molecular mass of the translated protein of Es-cMnSOD is 31.43 kDa, with an estimated isoelectric point of 6.30. The deduced amino acid sequence of Es-cMnSOD has similarities of 90, 89, 84, 87, and 81% to those of white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei MnSOD, black tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon MnSOD, giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii MnSOD, blue crab Callinectes sapidus MnSOD, and red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii MnSOD, respectively. Es-cMnSOD contains a manganese superoxide dismutase domain (DVWEHAYY) and 4 conserved amino acids responsible for binding manganese. Es-cMnSOD was expressed in the hemocytes, eyestalk, muscle, intestine, gill, and hepatopancreas. Es-cMnSOD transcripts in hemocytes of E. sinensis increased at 1.5 and 48 h after injection of Aeromonas hydrophila, indicating that the induction of the SOD system response occurred within a short period of time. This study suggests that MnSOD may play a critical role in crab immunity, allowing efficient activation of an early innate immune response in the crab.

  11. Retention of crab larvae in a coastal null zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilburg, Charles E.; Dittel, Ana I.; Epifanio, Charles E.

    2007-05-01

    Alongshelf transport in the southern Middle Atlantic Bight is forced by buoyancy-driven currents originating in three large estuaries along the bight. These currents are strongest in the coastal ocean near the southern terminus of each estuary, while the analogous region on the northern side is characterized by weak subtidal flow. We used a combination of field observations and numerical modeling to test the hypothesis that these regions of weak subtidal flow are coastal null zones that serve as retention areas for larvae. The field study consisted of a four-day, shipboard investigation of the distribution of blue crab larvae ( Callinectes sapidus) near the mouth of Delaware Bay (˜39°N, 75°W) in late summer, 2004. Hydrographic surveys of the study site were conducted with a hull-mounted, surface-measuring system. Results showed a sharp boundary between the null zone and the buoyancy-driven current to the south. Blue crab larvae were collected in surface plankton tows along a 30-km transect that encompassed these two areas. Stations with higher densities of larvae were clustered in the null zone during both ebb and flood tides. A numerical model was used to examine the physical mechanisms responsible for the observed distribution. Model results agreed with the field survey and showed that simulated larvae are aggregated in the null zone. The simulations also demonstrated that larvae spawned within the null zone have a much greater probability of settling in juvenile nursery habitat within the bay. The close agreement between field and model results provides consistent support for the hypothesis that coastal null zones associated with the buoyancy-driven circulation of large estuaries may allow retention of larvae in the vicinity of the natal spawning population.

  12. Human and crab exposure to mercury in the Caribbean coastal shoreline of Colombia: impact from an abandoned chlor-alkali plant.

    PubMed

    Olivero-Verbel, Jesus; Johnson-Restrepo, Boris; Baldiris-Avila, Rosa; Güette-Fernández, Jorge; Magallanes-Carreazo, Elizabeth; Vanegas-Ramírez, Lenis; Kunihiko, Nakamura

    2008-05-01

    Human hair samples from male and female people aged 6-85 years, as well as muscle of crabs (Callinectes sapidus and Callinectes bocourti) were collected from different fishing places along the Caribbean coastal shoreline of Colombia and analyzed for total mercury (T-Hg) in order to establish the impact of mercury-polluted sediments in Cartagena bay on the ecosystem. Hair T-Hg in inhabitants varied between 0.1 and 21.8 microg/g, with average and median of 1.52 microg/g and 1.1 microg/g, respectively. Differences between sampling locations were significant (P<0.01) and median values decreased in the order: Caño del Oro (1.5 microg/g)crabs, however, along Cartagena bay, T-Hg distribution in these organisms varied widely, with highest values detected in samples collected in front of the extinct chlor-alkali plant. Although the T-Hg median for these people is equal to the threshold risk level recommended by U.S. EPA, this study highlights the fact that contaminated sediments are still driving the distribution of mercury through the food chain, allowing its accumulation in fishermen whose diet includes marine products as sources of protein.

  13. Transport and Recruitment of Blue Crab Larvae:a Model with Advection and Mortality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garvine, R. W.; Epifanio, C. E.; Epifanio, C. C.; Wong, K.-C.

    1997-07-01

    The present paper develops a mathematical model for the transport and recruitment of blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) larvae, and applies it to the inner continental shelf of the Middle Atlantic Bight near Delaware Bay, U.S.A. Blue crab larvae develop through seven or eight planktonic zoeal stages to a megalopa stage suitable for recruitment to adult populations of east coast estuaries. The larvae are concentrated near the surface, and the currents are primarily forced by alongshelf winds and river discharge through major estuaries. Model currents are prescribed based on a realistic synthesis of their observed relationship to wind and river discharge. Besides the resulting advection, particle diffusion and biological mortality are added to determine the fate of larvae released from their parent estuary. Groups of particles were released across the source region of the outflowing buoyancy-driven current in the model estuary mouth. Most larvae were swept alongshelf to the south with the buoyancy-driven coastal current, and thus were lost as recruits to the population of their parent estuary. However, some larvae released close to the seaward edge of the emerging coastal current were able to cross the coastal current front and move seaward into inner shelf water during upwelling-favorable (northward) wind events. Some of these, in turn, were suitably placed near the parent estuary mouth so that they could be advected landward as megalopae into the estuary during a subsequent downwelling-favorable (southward) wind event and thus join the adult population. The model results for megalopae returns were computed from consecutive daily release of 1000 particles, and were compared with 4 years of blue crab megalopa settlement data for Delaware Bay. The model results for 1989 and 1990 matched the observed data remarkably well, with both years showing dominance by a single return event of a few days duration. For 1991 and 1992, the observed results showed multiple return events

  14. The spatial and temporal patterns of odors sampled by lobsters and crabs in a turbulent plume.

    PubMed

    Reidenbach, Matthew A; Koehl, M A R

    2011-09-15

    Odors are dispersed across aquatic habitats by turbulent water flow as filamentous, intermittent plumes. Many crustaceans sniff (take discrete samples of ambient water and the odors it carries) by flicking their olfactory antennules. We used planar laser-induced fluorescence to investigate how flicking antennules of different morphologies (long antennules of spiny lobsters, Panulirus argus; short antennules of blue crabs, Callinectes sapidus) sample fluctuating odor signals at different positions in a turbulent odor plume in a flume to determine whether the patterns of concentrations captured can provide information about an animal's position relative to the odor source. Lobster antennules intercept odors during a greater percentage of flicks and encounter higher peak concentrations than do crab antennules, but because crabs flick at higher frequency, the duration of odor-free gaps between encountered odor pulses is similar. For flicking antennules there were longer time gaps between odor encounters as the downstream distance to the odor source decreases, but shorter gaps along the plume centerline than near the edge. In contrast to the case for antennule flicking, almost all odor-free gaps were <500 ms at all positions in the plume if concentration was measured continuously at the same height as the antennules. Variance in concentration is lower and mean concentration is greater near the substratum, where leg chemosensors continuously sample the plume, than in the water where antennules sniff. Concentrations sampled by legs increase as an animal nears an odor source, but decrease for antennules. Both legs and antennules encounter higher concentrations near the centerline than at the edge of the plume.

  15. Revisiting the reticulum: feedforward and feedback contributions to motor program parameters in the crab cardiac ganglion microcircuit

    PubMed Central

    García-Crescioni, Keyla

    2011-01-01

    The neurogenic heartbeat of crustaceans is controlled by the cardiac ganglion (CG), a central pattern generator (CPG) microcircuit composed of nine neurons. In most decapods, five “large” motor neurons (MNs) project from the CG to the myocardium, where their excitatory synaptic signals generate the rhythmic heartbeat. The processes of four “small” premotor neurons (PMNs) are confined to the CG, where they provide excitatory drive to the MNs via impulse-mediated chemical signals and electrotonic coupling. This study explored feedforward and feedback interactions between the PMNs and the MNs in the CG of the blue crab (Callinectes sapidus). Three methods were used to compare the activity of the MNs and the PMNs in the integrated CG to their autonomous firing patterns: 1) ligatures were tightened on the ganglion trunk that connects the PMNs and MNs; 2) TTX was applied focally to suppress selectively PMN or MN activity; and 3) sucrose pools were devised to block reversibly PMN or MN impulse conduction. With all treatments, the PMNs and MNs continued to produce autonomous rhythmic bursting following disengagement. Removal of PMN influence resulted in a significantly reduced MN duty cycle that was mainly attributable to a lower autonomous burst frequency. Conversely, after removal of MN feedback, the PMN duty cycle was increased, primarily due to a prolonged burst duration. Application of sucrose to block impulse conduction without eliminating PMN oscillations disclosed significant contributions of spike-mediated PMN-to-MN signals to the initiation and prolongation of the MN burst. Together, these observations support a view of the Callinectes CG composed of two classes of spontaneously bursting neurons with distinct endogenous rhythms. Compartmentalized feedforward and feedback signaling endow this microcircuit with syncytial properties such that the intrinsic attributes of the PMNs and MNs both contribute to shaping all parameters of the motor patterns

  16. Integrated Cultural Resources Management Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-07-01

    Trachinotus sp. (pompano). Marine invertebrates are comprised of the following five species: Callinectes sapidus (Blue crab), Crassostrea virginica ...Coordinate with other MCRD components to manage cu Advise and educate other MCRD components, contracto requirements. Monitor resource condition

  17. The secretome of Pleurotus sapidus.

    PubMed

    Zorn, Holger; Peters, Thilo; Nimtz, Manfred; Berger, Ralf G

    2005-12-01

    Due to their unique capability to attack lignified biopolymers, extracellular enzymes of white-rot fungi enjoy an increasing interest in various fields of white biotechnology. The edible fungus Pleurotus sapidus was selected as a model organism for the analysis of the secretome by means of 2-DE. For enzyme production, the fungus was grown in submerged cultures either on peanut shells or on glass wool as a carrier material. Identification of the secreted enzymes was performed by tryptic digestion, ESI-MS/MS ab initio sequencing, and homology searches against public databases. The spectrum of secreted enzymes comprised various types of hydrolases and lignolytic enzymes of the manganese peroxidase/versatile peroxidase family. While peptidases were secreted mainly by the cultures grown on peanut shells, versatile peroxidase type enzymes dominated in the cultures grown on glass wool.

  18. Lunar rhythms in the egg hatching of the subtidal crustacean: Callinectes arcuatus Ordway (Decapoda: Brachyura)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVries, M. C.; Epifanio, C. E.; Dittel, A. I.

    1983-12-01

    Gravid female portunid crabs, Callinectes arcuatus, were held in a recirculating seawater system and the development of the eggs was observed. Based on morphological criteria, nine developmental stages were noted. The relationship between a given stage and the subsequent time to hatching was determined. Based on this, an index was devised that predicted hatching date from microscopic observation of an egg mass. This index was used to predict the date of hatching of eggs from 439 crabs collected in the Gulf of Nicoya, Central America, and the frequency of hatching was analysed in relation to the lunar and tidal cycles. Significantly more eggs hatched during periods of spring than neap tides. The adaptive significance of this rhythmicity is unclear at present.

  19. Good Crab, Bad Crab

    EPA Science Inventory

    Are crabs friends or foes of marsh grass, benefit or detriment to the salt marsh system? We examined Uca pugilator (sand fiddler) and Sesarma reticulatum (purple marsh crab) with Spartina patens (salt marsh hay) at two elevations (10 cm below MHW and 10 cm above MHW) in mesocosms...

  20. The metal-binding properties of the blue crab copper specific CuMT-2: a crustacean metallothionein with two cysteine triplets.

    PubMed

    Serra-Batiste, Montserrat; Cols, Neus; Alcaraz, Luis A; Donaire, Antonio; González-Duarte, Pilar; Vasák, Milan

    2010-06-01

    Most crustacean metallothioneins (MTs) contain 18 Cys residues and bind six divalent metal ions. The copper-specific CuMT-2 (MTC) of the blue crab Callinectes sapidus with 21 Cys residues, of which six are organized in two uncommon Cys-Cys-Cys sequences, represents an exception. However, its metal-binding properties are unknown. By spectroscopic and spectrometric techniques we show that all 21 Cys residues of recombinant MTC participate in the binding of Cu(I), Zn(II), and Cd(II) ions, indicating that both Cys triplets act as ligands. The fully metallated M(8) (II)-MTC (M is Zn, Cd) form possesses high- and low-affinity metal binding sites, as evidenced by the formation of Zn(6)-MTC and Cd(7)-MTC species from M(8) (II)-MTC after treatment with Chelex 100. The NMR characterization of Cd(7)-MTC suggests the presence of a two-domain structure, each domain containing one Cys triplet and encompassing either the three-metal or the four-metal thiolate cluster. Whereas the metal-Cys connectivities in the three-metal cluster located in the N-terminal domain (residues 1-31) reveal a Cd(3)Cys(9) cyclohexane-like structure, the presence of dynamic processes in the C-terminal domain (residues 32-64) precluded the determination of the organization of the four-metal cluster. Absorption and circular dichroism features accompanying the stepwise binding of Cu(I) to MTC suggest that all 21 Cys are involved in the binding of eight to nine Cu(I) ions (Cu(8-9)-MTC). The subsequent generation of Cu(12)-MTC involves structural changes consistent with a decrease in the Cu(I) coordination number. Overall, the metal-binding properties of MTC reported here contribute to a better understanding of the role of Cys triplets in MTs.

  1. Partitioning loss rates of early juvenile blue crabs from seagrass habitats into mortality and emigration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Etherington, L.L.; Eggleston, D.B.; Stockhausen, W.T.

    2003-01-01

    Determining how post-settlement processes modify patterns of settlement is vital in understanding the spatial and temporal patterns of recruitment variability of species with open populations. Generally, either single components of post-settlement loss (mortality or emigration) are examined at a time, or else the total loss is examined without discrimination of mortality and emigration components. The role of mortality in the loss of early juvenile blue crabs, Callinectes sapidus, has been addressed in a few studies; however, the relative contribution of emigration has received little attention. We conducted mark-recapture experiments to examine the relative contribution of mortality and emigration to total loss rates of early juvenile blue crabs from seagrass habitats. Loss was partitioned into emigration and mortality components using a modified version of Jackson's (1939) square-within-a-square method. The field experiments assessed the effects of two size classes of early instars (J1-J2, J3-J5), two densities of juveniles (low: 16 m-2, high: 64 m-2), and time of day (day, night) on loss rates. In general, total loss rates of experimental juveniles and colonization rates by unmarked juveniles were extremely high (range = 10-57 crabs m-2/6 h and 17-51 crabs m-2/6 h, for loss and colonization, respectively). Total loss rates were higher at night than during the day, suggesting that juveniles (or potentially their predators) exhibit increased nocturnal activity. While colonization rates did not differ by time of day, J3-J5 juveniles demonstrated higher rates of colonization than J1-J2 crabs. Overall, there was high variability in both mortality and emigration, particularly for emigration. Average probabilities of mortality across all treatment combinations ranged from 0.25-0.67/6 h, while probabilities of emigration ranged from 0.29-0.72/6 h. Although mean mortality rates were greater than emigration rates in most treatments, the proportion of experimental trials

  2. An environmental forensic approach for tropical estuaries based on metal bioaccumulation in tissues of Callinectes danae.

    PubMed

    Bordon, Isabella C A C; Sarkis, Jorge E S; Andrade, Nathalia P; Hortellani, Marcos A; Favaro, Deborah I T; Kakazu, Mauricio H; Cotrim, Marycel E B; Lavradas, Raquel T; Moreira, Isabel; Saint'Pierre, Tatiana D; Hauser-Davis, Rachel Ann

    2016-01-01

    The blue crab Callinectes danae is distributed throughout the Atlantic coast and this study aimed to evaluate a environmental forensics approach that could be applied at tropical estuarine systems where this species is distributed, based on the metal concentrations in its tissues. For this purpose, blue crab samples were collected in 9 sites (distributed in 3 areas) along the Santos Estuarine System, state of São Paulo, Brazil. The concentrations of Al, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn were determined in gills, hepatopancreas and muscle tissues. Sediment samples were collected and analyzed in these same sites. A data distribution pattern was identified during both sampling periods (August and December 2011). In order to validate this model, a new sampling campaign was performed in March 2013 at the Santos Estuarine System and also at Ilha Grande (state of Rio de Janeiro). These data were added to the previous database (composed of the August and December 2011 samples) and a discriminant analysis was applied. The results confirmed an environmental fingerprint for the Santos Estuarine System.

  3. Does a blue crab putative insulin-like peptide binding protein (ILPBP) play a role in a virus infection?

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaoshuai; Bae, Sun-Hye; Bachvaroff, Tsvetan R; Schott, Eric J; Ye, Haihui; Chung, J Sook

    2016-11-01

    Insulin-like peptides (ILPs) have regulatory roles in reproduction, development and metabolism in invertebrates. The mode of ILP actions has not been well studied in invertebrates in regard to the role of binding partners, i.e., ILP binding protein (ILPBP). In this study, the full-length cDNA of Callinectes sapidus ILPBP (Cas-ILPBP, 960 bp) has been isolated using RACE cloning, having short 5' and 3' UTRs of 30 and 162 bp, respectively. The predicted precursor of Cas-ILPBP (255 aa) contains, in order a signal peptide (23 aa), an insulin-like growth factor (IGF) binding (IB) domain (79 aa), a kazal-type serine protease inhibitor (KI) domain (36 aa) and an immunoglobulin (Ig) domain (101 aa). Phylogenetic analysis shows that Cas-ILPBP is grouped with the ILPBPs of other crustacean species, and it shares the closest relationship with the ILPBP from another crab species, Scylla paramamosain. Transcripts of Cas-ILPBP are found in all examined tissues, with the highest levels in the nervous tissues (eyestalk ganglia, brain and thoracic ganglia complex) and followed by midgut, the pericardial organ, abdominal muscle and the heart. As Cas-ILPBP contains a putative Ig domain, it is hypothesized that this protein may be involved in immunity, particularly in the adult females infected with a reo-like virus (CsRV1). The expression levels of Cas-ILPBP are examined in several tissues (hemocytes, midgut, eyestalk ganglia) from the animals carrying varying levels of CsRV1 at 17 and 23 °C water temperatures. Cas-ILPBP levels in the midgut are most significantly affected by high levels of CsRV1 infection. Reduction in Cas-ILPBP levels in the midguts is noted from the animals infected with high levels of CsRV1 that show reduced or stop feeding activity, indicating that it may play an important role in midgut functions such as digestion and nutrient absorption.

  4. Horseshoe crabs.

    PubMed

    Botton, Mark L

    2002-10-01

    Horseshoe crabs are one of evolution's success stories. These living fossils have contributed immensely to biomedical research, and their eggs are a critical link in the migration cycle of New World waders (shorebirds) Can they endure threats posed by a growing commercial fishery and the loss of essential spawning habitats?

  5. High Strength and Light-weight Materials Inspired by the Exoskeleton of Arthropods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    previous study, where Homarus americanus (American lobster ) and Callinectes sapidus (Atlantic blue crab) were investigated [1]. Image analysis via SEM...Glancey JL and Karlsson AM, Mechanical behavior of bio-inspired laminate composites, in review Page 3 of 6 (A) Blue Crab and Lobster (B...Japanese Beetle Fig. 1 Schematic of the upper structural levels of a (A) Homarus americanus (American lobster ) exoskeleton [1] and (B) Popillia

  6. Identification of a crab gill FXYD2 protein and regulation of crab microsomal Na,K-ATPase activity by mammalian FXYD2 peptide.

    PubMed

    Silva, Elias C C; Masui, Douglas C; Furriel, Rosa P; McNamara, John C; Barrabin, Hector; Scofano, Helena M; Perales, Jonas; Teixeira-Ferreira, André; Leone, Francisco A; Fontes, Carlos Frederico L

    2012-11-01

    This investigation discloses the recognition of an FXYD2 protein in a microsomal Na,K-ATPase preparation from the posterior gills of the blue crab, Callinectes danae, by a mammalian (rabbit) FXYD2 peptide specific antibody (γC(33)) and MALDI-TOF-TOF mass spectrometry techniques. This is the first demonstration of an invertebrate FXYD2 protein. The addition of exogenous pig FXYD2 peptide to the crab gill microsomal fraction stimulated Na,K-ATPase activity in a dose-dependent manner. Exogenous pig FXYD2 also considerably increased enzyme affinity for K(+), ATP and NH(4)(+). K(0.5) for Na(+) was unaffected. Exogenous pig FXYD2 increased the V(max) for stimulation of gill Na,K-ATPase activity by Na(+), K(+) and ATP, by 30% to 40%. The crab gill FXYD2 is phosphorylated by PKA, suggesting a regulatory function similar to that known for the mammalian enzyme. The PKA-phosphorylated pig FXYD2 peptide stimulated the crab gill Na,K-ATPase activity by 80%, about 2-fold greater than did the non-phosphorylated peptide. Stimulation by the PKC-phosphorylated pig FXYD2 peptide was minimal. These findings confirm the presence of an FXYD2 peptide in the crab gill Na,K-ATPase and demonstrate that this peptide plays an important role in regulating enzyme activity.

  7. Larval transport and its association with recruitment of blue crabs to Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Donald R.; Hester, Betty S.

    1989-05-01

    The blue crab ( Calinectes sapidus) harvest in Chesapeake Bay has undergone large yearly fluctuations, creating hardships in the fishing industry and uncertainties in its management. It has previously been suggested that part of the fluctuation may be due to environmental influences during a sensitive period in their life history when blue crab larvae are planktonic outside the bay. During this period, they reside principally in the neuston where wind forced transport has the maximum influence. It is shown, through vector/scalar correlations of wind stress with harvest, that approximately 36% of the harvest variation can be accounted for by the wind patterns during the months from June through September. The influence of alongshore sea level slope and cummulative estuarine discharge (both relating to transport through pressure gradient forcing) on harvest were investigated, but the results were negligible, or ambiguous at best.

  8. A Pre-Restoration Fishery Resource Utilization Assessment of an Estuarine Borrow Pit in Mobile Bay, Alabama

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    dredged material, to support establishment of natural communities such as submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) and oyster beds. A third alternative was to...and brown (n = 18, Penaeus aztecus) shrimp, blue (n = 1, Callinectes sapidus) and mud (n = 3, Rhithropanopeus harrisii) crabs, and oyster “clumps...calculated for “clumps” of oysters . Oyster clumps were most likely taken near the rim of the borrow site. Species Common Name September 2011 December

  9. An Assessment of the Potential Impacts on Zooplankton and Fish of Ocean Dredged Material at the Norfolk Disposal Site.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-07

    and lowest in fall and winter. Most species had extensive spatial distributions related to water temperature and distance from shore. The importance of...spatial and temporal distribution of ichthyoplankton and blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) larvae at the disposal site, and in the ocean waters adjacent to...2.1.2 Transport in Coastal Ocean Waters a........so***............ 2-1 2.1.3 Seasonal Stratification .......................... 2-5 2.2 SEDIMENT

  10. Dispersal and recruitment of blue crab larvae in Delaware Bay, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epifanio, C. E.; Valenti, C. C.; Pembroke, A. E.

    1984-01-01

    Results of a three-year survey of the occurrence of Callinectes sapidus larvae in the mouth of Delaware Bay indicated that stage I zoea larvae were most abundant insurface water as compared to mid-depths and near bottom. The major peak in abundance of stage I zoea larvae occurred in early August with a secondary peak in early September. Peaks in abundance of megalopae occurred five weeks after the respective peaks in zoeal abundance. Zoea stages II-VIII were not collected in the bay mouth. Results of sampling every 3 h over consecutive tidal cycles showed that stage I zoea larvae were most common in the water column on ebbing tidal currents. Megalopae were most common in the water column on flooding tidal currents, suggesting a tidally related, vertical migration. It was concluded that stage I zoea larvae are flushed from the estuary and undergo development on the continental shelf. Megalopae are then transported back to inshore waters by a combination of winds and currents and invade the estuary by means of migration into the water column on flooding tidal currents and migration to the bottom on ebbing tidal currents.

  11. Pubic Lice (Crabs)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Pubic Lice (Crabs) KidsHealth > For Teens > Pubic Lice (Crabs) A A A en español Ladilla (piojo del pubis) What Are They? Pubic lice are tiny insects that can crawl from the ...

  12. Crab Cavities for Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Burt, G.; Ambattu, P.; Carter, R.; Dexter, A.; Tahir, I.; Beard, C.; Dykes, M.; Goudket, P.; Kalinin, A.; Ma, L.; McIntosh, P.; Shulte, D.; Jones, Roger M.; Bellantoni, L.; Chase, B.; Church, M.; Khabouline, T.; Latina, A.; Adolphsen, C.; Li, Z.; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC

    2011-11-08

    Crab cavities have been proposed for a wide number of accelerators and interest in crab cavities has recently increased after the successful operation of a pair of crab cavities in KEK-B. In particular crab cavities are required for both the ILC and CLIC linear colliders for bunch alignment. Consideration of bunch structure and size constraints favour a 3.9 GHz superconducting, multi-cell cavity as the solution for ILC, whilst bunch structure and beam-loading considerations suggest an X-band copper travelling wave structure for CLIC. These two cavity solutions are very different in design but share complex design issues. Phase stabilisation, beam loading, wakefields and mode damping are fundamental issues for these crab cavities. Requirements and potential design solutions will be discussed for both colliders.

  13. CRAB Cavity in CERN SPS

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H.J.; Sen, T.; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    Beam collisions with a crossing angle at the interaction point are often necessary in colliders to reduce the effects of parasitic collisions which induce emittance growth and decrease beam lifetime. The crossing angle reduces the geometrical overlap of the beams and hence the luminosity. Crab cavity offer a promising way to compensate the crossing angle and to realize effective head-on collisions. Moreover, the crab crossing mitigates the synchro-betatron resonances due to the crossing angle. A crab cavity experiment in SPS is proposed as a proof of principle before deciding on a full crab-cavity implementation in the LHC. In this paper, we investigate the effects of a single crab cavity on beam dynamics in the SPS and life time.

  14. Robust Soldier Crab Ball Gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunji, Yukio-Pegio; Nishiyama, Yuta; Adamatzky, Andrew

    2011-09-01

    Based on the field observation of soldier crabs, we previously proposed a model for a swarm of soldier crabs. Here, we describe the interaction of coherent swarms in the simulation model, which is implemented in a logical gate. Because a swarm is generated by inherent perturbation, a swarm can be generated and maintained under highly perturbed conditions. Thus, the model reveals a robust logical gate rather than stable one. In addition, we show that the logical gate of swarms is also implemented by real soldier crabs (Mictyris guinotae).

  15. Novel Crab Cavity RF Design

    SciTech Connect

    Dudas, A.; Neubauer, M. L.; Sah, R.; Rimmer, B.; Wang, H.

    2011-03-01

    A 20-50 MV integrated transverse voltage is required for the Electron-Ion Collider. The most promising of the crab cavity designs that have been proposed in the last five years are the TEM type crab cavities because of the higher transverse impedance. The TEM design approach is extended here to a hybrid crab cavity that includes the input power coupler as an integral part of the design. A prototype was built with Phase I monies and tested at JLAB. The results reported on, and a system for achieving 20-50 MV is proposed.

  16. Dispersed oil toxicity tests with biological species indigenous to the Gulf of Mexico. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fucik, K.W.; Carr, K.A.; Balcom, B.J.

    1994-08-01

    Static and flowthrough aquatic acute toxicity testing protocols were utilized on eggs and larvae of seven commercially important invertebrates and fishes from the Gulf of Mexico. Test organisms were exposed to Central and Western Gulf oils, dispersed oil, and Corexit 9527. Species included brown shrimp (Penaeus aztecus), white shrimp (Penaeus setiferus), blue crab (Callinectes sapidus), eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica), red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus), inland silverside (Menidia berylina), and spot (Leiosomus xanthurus). Atlantic menhaden (Brevoortia tyrannus) was also tested because gulf menhaden were not available. Mysids (Mysidopsis bahia) were evaluated as part of a chronic toxicity assessment.

  17. The Great Crab Nebula Superflare

    NASA Video Gallery

    There are strange goings-on in the Crab Nebula. On April 12, 2011, NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope detected the most powerful in a series of gamma-ray flares occurring somewhere within the s...

  18. Antarctic crabs: invasion or endurance?

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Huw J; Whittle, Rowan J; Roberts, Stephen J; Belchier, Mark; Linse, Katrin

    2013-01-01

    Recent scientific interest following the "discovery" of lithodid crabs around Antarctica has centred on a hypothesis that these crabs might be poised to invade the Antarctic shelf if the recent warming trend continues, potentially decimating its native fauna. This "invasion hypothesis" suggests that decapod crabs were driven out of Antarctica 40-15 million years ago and are only now returning as "warm" enough habitats become available. The hypothesis is based on a geographically and spatially poor fossil record of a different group of crabs (Brachyura), and examination of relatively few Recent lithodid samples from the Antarctic slope. In this paper, we examine the existing lithodid fossil record and present the distribution and biogeographic patterns derived from over 16,000 records of Recent Southern Hemisphere crabs and lobsters. Globally, the lithodid fossil record consists of only two known specimens, neither of which comes from the Antarctic. Recent records show that 22 species of crabs and lobsters have been reported from the Southern Ocean, with 12 species found south of 60 °S. All are restricted to waters warmer than 0 °C, with their Antarctic distribution limited to the areas of seafloor dominated by Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW). Currently, CDW extends further and shallower onto the West Antarctic shelf than the known distribution ranges of most lithodid species examined. Geological evidence suggests that West Antarctic shelf could have been available for colonisation during the last 9,000 years. Distribution patterns, species richness, and levels of endemism all suggest that, rather than becoming extinct and recently re-invading from outside Antarctica, the lithodid crabs have likely persisted, and even radiated, on or near to Antarctic slope. We conclude there is no evidence for a modern-day "crab invasion". We recommend a repeated targeted lithodid sampling program along the West Antarctic shelf to fully test the validity of the "invasion hypothesis".

  19. Antarctic Crabs: Invasion or Endurance?

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Huw J.; Whittle, Rowan J.; Roberts, Stephen J.; Belchier, Mark; Linse, Katrin

    2013-01-01

    Recent scientific interest following the “discovery” of lithodid crabs around Antarctica has centred on a hypothesis that these crabs might be poised to invade the Antarctic shelf if the recent warming trend continues, potentially decimating its native fauna. This “invasion hypothesis” suggests that decapod crabs were driven out of Antarctica 40–15 million years ago and are only now returning as “warm” enough habitats become available. The hypothesis is based on a geographically and spatially poor fossil record of a different group of crabs (Brachyura), and examination of relatively few Recent lithodid samples from the Antarctic slope. In this paper, we examine the existing lithodid fossil record and present the distribution and biogeographic patterns derived from over 16,000 records of Recent Southern Hemisphere crabs and lobsters. Globally, the lithodid fossil record consists of only two known specimens, neither of which comes from the Antarctic. Recent records show that 22 species of crabs and lobsters have been reported from the Southern Ocean, with 12 species found south of 60°S. All are restricted to waters warmer than 0°C, with their Antarctic distribution limited to the areas of seafloor dominated by Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW). Currently, CDW extends further and shallower onto the West Antarctic shelf than the known distribution ranges of most lithodid species examined. Geological evidence suggests that West Antarctic shelf could have been available for colonisation during the last 9,000 years. Distribution patterns, species richness, and levels of endemism all suggest that, rather than becoming extinct and recently re-invading from outside Antarctica, the lithodid crabs have likely persisted, and even radiated, on or near to Antarctic slope. We conclude there is no evidence for a modern-day “crab invasion”. We recommend a repeated targeted lithodid sampling program along the West Antarctic shelf to fully test the validity of the

  20. 40 CFR 408.60 - Applicability; description of the non-remote Alaskan whole crab and crab section processing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-remote Alaskan whole crab and crab section processing subcategory. 408.60 Section 408.60 Protection of... SEAFOOD PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Non-Remote Alaskan Whole Crab and Crab Section Processing Subcategory § 408.60 Applicability; description of the non-remote Alaskan whole crab and crab...

  1. 40 CFR 408.70 - Applicability; description of the remote Alaskan whole crab and crab section processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... remote Alaskan whole crab and crab section processing subcategory. 408.70 Section 408.70 Protection of... SEAFOOD PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Remote Alaskan Whole Crab and Crab Section Processing Subcategory § 408.70 Applicability; description of the remote Alaskan whole crab and crab section...

  2. 40 CFR 408.70 - Applicability; description of the remote Alaskan whole crab and crab section processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... remote Alaskan whole crab and crab section processing subcategory. 408.70 Section 408.70 Protection of... SEAFOOD PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Remote Alaskan Whole Crab and Crab Section Processing Subcategory § 408.70 Applicability; description of the remote Alaskan whole crab and crab section...

  3. 40 CFR 408.70 - Applicability; description of the remote Alaskan whole crab and crab section processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... remote Alaskan whole crab and crab section processing subcategory. 408.70 Section 408.70 Protection of... SEAFOOD PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Remote Alaskan Whole Crab and Crab Section Processing Subcategory § 408.70 Applicability; description of the remote Alaskan whole crab and crab section...

  4. 40 CFR 408.60 - Applicability; description of the non-remote Alaskan whole crab and crab section processing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-remote Alaskan whole crab and crab section processing subcategory. 408.60 Section 408.60 Protection of... SEAFOOD PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Non-Remote Alaskan Whole Crab and Crab Section Processing Subcategory § 408.60 Applicability; description of the non-remote Alaskan whole crab and crab...

  5. 40 CFR 408.60 - Applicability; description of the non-remote Alaskan whole crab and crab section processing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-remote Alaskan whole crab and crab section processing subcategory. 408.60 Section 408.60 Protection of... SEAFOOD PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Non-Remote Alaskan Whole Crab and Crab Section Processing Subcategory § 408.60 Applicability; description of the non-remote Alaskan whole crab and crab...

  6. 40 CFR 408.70 - Applicability; description of the remote Alaskan whole crab and crab section processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... remote Alaskan whole crab and crab section processing subcategory. 408.70 Section 408.70 Protection of... SEAFOOD PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Remote Alaskan Whole Crab and Crab Section Processing Subcategory § 408.70 Applicability; description of the remote Alaskan whole crab and crab section...

  7. 40 CFR 408.60 - Applicability; description of the non-remote Alaskan whole crab and crab section processing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-remote Alaskan whole crab and crab section processing subcategory. 408.60 Section 408.60 Protection of... SEAFOOD PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Non-Remote Alaskan Whole Crab and Crab Section Processing Subcategory § 408.60 Applicability; description of the non-remote Alaskan whole crab and crab...

  8. 40 CFR 408.70 - Applicability; description of the remote Alaskan whole crab and crab section processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... remote Alaskan whole crab and crab section processing subcategory. 408.70 Section 408.70 Protection of... SEAFOOD PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Remote Alaskan Whole Crab and Crab Section Processing Subcategory § 408.70 Applicability; description of the remote Alaskan whole crab and crab section...

  9. 40 CFR 408.60 - Applicability; description of the non-remote Alaskan whole crab and crab section processing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-remote Alaskan whole crab and crab section processing subcategory. 408.60 Section 408.60 Protection of... SEAFOOD PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Non-Remote Alaskan Whole Crab and Crab Section Processing Subcategory § 408.60 Applicability; description of the non-remote Alaskan whole crab and crab...

  10. 50 CFR Table 7 to Part 680 - Initial Issuance of Crab QS by Crab QS Fishery

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... fisheries. 4 years 5. Pribilof red king and blue king crab (PIK) 4 years of the 5-year period beginning on... requirement. 4 years 6. St. Matthew blue king crab (SMB) 4 years of the 5-year period beginning on: (1... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Initial Issuance of Crab QS by Crab...

  11. 50 CFR Table 7 to Part 680 - Initial Issuance of Crab QS by Crab QS Fishery

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... fisheries. 4 years 5. Pribilof red king and blue king crab (PIK) 4 years of the 5-year period beginning on... requirement. 4 years 6. St. Matthew blue king crab (SMB) 4 years of the 5-year period beginning on: (1... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Initial Issuance of Crab QS by Crab...

  12. 50 CFR Table 7 to Part 680 - Initial Issuance of Crab QS by Crab QS Fishery

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... fisheries. 4 years 5. Pribilof red king and blue king crab (PIK) 4 years of the 5-year period beginning on... requirement. 4 years 6. St. Matthew blue king crab (SMB) 4 years of the 5-year period beginning on:(1... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Initial Issuance of Crab QS by Crab...

  13. 50 CFR Table 7 to Part 680 - Initial Issuance of Crab QS by Crab QS Fishery

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... fisheries. 4 years 5. Pribilof red king and blue king crab (PIK) 4 years of the 5-year period beginning on... requirement. 4 years 6. St. Matthew blue king crab (SMB) 4 years of the 5-year period beginning on:(1... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Initial Issuance of Crab QS by Crab...

  14. 50 CFR Table 7 to Part 680 - Initial Issuance of Crab QS by Crab QS Fishery

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... fisheries. 4 years 5. Pribilof red king and blue king crab (PIK) 4 years of the 5-year period beginning on... requirement. 4 years 6. St. Matthew blue king crab (SMB) 4 years of the 5-year period beginning on: (1... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Initial Issuance of Crab QS by Crab...

  15. Distortion of Crabbed Bunch Due to Electron Cloud and Global Crabbing

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Cai, Y.; /SLAC

    2008-08-01

    Crab cavities may be used improve the luminosity in colliding beam colliders with crab crossing. In a global crab crossing correction, only one crab cavity is installed in each ring and the crab cavities generate a horizontally titled bunch oscillating around the ring. The electron cloud in positively charged rings may distort the crabbed bunch and cause the luminosity drop. This paper briefly estimates the distortion of positron bunch due to the electron cloud with global crab and estimates the effect in the KEKB and possible LHC upgrades.

  16. Monitoring The Crab Pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rots, Arnold H.; Swank, Jean (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The monitoring of the X-ray pulses from the Crab pulsar is still ongoing at the time of this writing, and we hope to be able to continue the campaign for the life of the XTE mission. We have established beyond all doubt that: (1) the X-ray main pulse leads the radio pulse by approximately 300 microseconds, (2) this phase lag is constant and not influenced by glitches, (3) this lag does not depend on X-ray energy, (4) the relative phase of the two X-ray pulses does not vary, and (5) the spectral indices of primary, secondary, and inter-pulse are distinct and constant. At this time we are investigating whether the radio timing ephemeris can be replaced by an x-ray ephemeris and whether any long-time timing ephemeris can be established. If so, it would enable use to study variations in pulse arrival times at a longer time scales. Such a study is easier in x-rays than at radio wavelengths since the dispersion measure plays no role. These results were reported at the 2000 HEAD Meeting in Honolulu, HI. Travel was paid partly out of this grant. The remainder was applied toward the acquisition of a laptop computer that allows independent and fast analysis of all monitoring observations.

  17. Are Crab nanoshots Schwinger sparks?

    SciTech Connect

    Stebbins, Albert; Yoo, Hojin

    2015-05-21

    The highest brightness temperature ever observed are from "nanoshots" from the Crab pulsar which we argue could be the signature of bursts of vacuum e± pair production. If so this would be the first time the astronomical Schwinger effect has been observed. These "Schwinger sparks" would be an intermittent but extremely powerful, ~103 L, 10 PeV e± accelerator in the heart of the Crab. These nanosecond duration sparks are generated in a volume less than 1 m3 and the existence of such sparks has implications for the small scale structure of the magnetic field of young pulsars such as the Crab. As a result, this mechanism may also play a role in producing other enigmatic bright short radio transients such as fast radio bursts.

  18. LHC crab-cavity aspects and strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Calaga, R.; Tomas, R.; Zimmermann, F.

    2010-05-23

    The 3rd LHC Crab Cavity workshop (LHC-CC09) took place at CERN in October 2009. It reviewed the current status and identified a clear strategy towards a future crab-cavity implementation. Following the success of crab cavities in KEK-B and the strong potential for luminosity gain and leveling, CERN will pursue crab crossing for the LHC upgrade. We present a summary and outcome of the variousworkshop sessions which have led to the LHC crab-cavity strategy, covering topics like layout, cavity design, integration, machine protection, and a potential validation test in the SPS.

  19. Bioconversion of car-3-ene by a dioxygenase of Pleurotus sapidus.

    PubMed

    Lehnert, Nicole; Krings, Ulrich; Sydes, Daniel; Wittig, Maximilian; Berger, Ralf G

    2012-06-30

    Mycelium of the basidiomycete Pleurotus sapidus known to contain a novel dioxygenase was used for the bioconversion of car-3-ene [I]. After 4h of incubation 25.3mgL(-1) car-3-en-5-one [V], 5.4mgL(-1) car-3-en-2-one [VII], and 7.3mgL(-1) car-2-en-4-one [XV] accumulated as major oxidation products. The identity of the respective carenones and their corresponding alcohols was confirmed by comparison with MS and NMR spectral data obtained for synthesized authentic compounds. The peak areas of oxidation products were at least five times higher as compared with autoxidation. A radical mechanism similar to lipoxygenase catalysis was proposed and substantiated with detailed product analyses. The reduction of assumed car-3-ene hydroperoxides to the corresponding alcohols evidenced the radical initiated formation of hydroperoxides and confirmed the regio- and stereo-selectivity of the dioxygenase. The introduction of molecular oxygen into the bicyclic car-3-ene [I] molecule occurred at allylic positions of a cyclic isopentenyl moiety with a pronounced preference for the position adjacent to the non-substituted carbon atom of the C-C-double bond. This co-factor independent selective oxygenation presents an alternative to P450 mono-oxygenase based approaches for the production of terpene derived flavor compounds, pharmaceuticals and other fine chemicals.

  20. Heterologous production of a feruloyl esterase from Pleurotus sapidus synthesizing feruloyl-saccharide esters.

    PubMed

    Kelle, Sebastian; Nieter, Annabel; Krings, Ulrich; Zelena, Katerina; Linke, Diana; Berger, Ralf G

    2016-11-01

    The feruloyl esterase (FAE) gene EST1 from the basidiomycete Pleurotus sapidus was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and Pichia pastoris. Catalytically active recombinant Est1 was secreted using P. pastoris as a host. For expression in P. pastoris, the expression vector pPIC9K was applied. The EST1 gene was cloned with an N-terminal α-mating factor pre-pro sequence and expressed under the control of a methanol inducible alcohol oxidase 1 promotor. Est1 was purified to homogeneity using ion exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography. The recombinant Est1 showed optima at pH 5.0 and 50 °C, and released ferulic acid from saccharide esters and from the natural substrate destarched wheat bran. Substrate specificity profile and descriptor-based analysis demonstrated unique properties, showing that Est1 did not fit into the current FAE classification model. Transferuloylation synthesis of feruloyl-saccharide esters was proven for mono- and disaccharides.

  1. Trace elements and organochlorines in the shoalgrass community of the lower Laguna Madre, Texas.

    PubMed

    Custer, T W; Mitchell, C A

    1993-05-01

    Our objectives were to measure concentrations of seven trace elements and 14 organochlorine compounds in sediment and biota of the shoalgrass (Halodule wrightii) community of the lower Laguna Madre of south Texas and to determine whether chemicals associated with agriculture (e.g. mercury, arsenic, selenium, organochlorine pesticides) were highest near agricultural drainages. Arsenic, mercury, selenium, lead, cadmium, and organochlorines were generally at background concentrations throughout the lower Laguna Madre. Nickel and chromium concentrations were exceptionally high in shrimp and pinfish (Lagodon rhomboides), which is difficult to explain because of no known anthropogenic sources for these trace elements. For sediment and blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus), mercury was highest near agricultural drainages. Also, DDE was more frequently detected in blue crabs near agricultural drainages than farther away. In contrast, selenium concentrations did not differ among collecting sites and arsenic concentrations were lowest in shoalgrass, blue crabs, and brown shrimp (Penaeus aztecus) near agricultural drainages.

  2. Trace elements and organochlorines in the shoalgrass community of the lower Laguna Madre Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, T.W.; Mitchell, C.A.

    1993-01-01

    Our objectives were to measure concentrations of seven trace elements and 14 organochlorine compounds in sediment and biota of the shoalgrass (Halodule wrightii) community of the lower Laguna Madre of south Texas [USA] and to determine whether chemicals associated with agriculture (e.g. mercury, arsenic, selenium, organochlorine pesticides) were highest near agricultural drainage. Arsenic, mercury, selenium, lead, cadmium, and organochlorines were generally at background concentrations throughout the lower Laguna Madre. Nickel and chromium concentrations were exceptionally high in shrimp and pinfish (Lagodon rhomboides), which is difficult to explain because of no known anthropogenic sources for these trace elements. For sediment and blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus), mercury was highest near agricultural drainages. Also, DDE was more frequently detected in blue crabs near agricultural drainages than farther away. In contrast, selenium concentrations did not differ among collecting sites and arsenic concentrations were lowest n shoalgrass, blue crabs, and brown shrimp (Penaeus aztecus) near agricultural drainages.

  3. 50 CFR Table 6 to Part 680 - Crab Grade Codes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Crab Grade Codes 6 Table 6 to Part 680..., Table 6 Table 6 to Part 680—Crab Grade Codes Grade/code Description 1 Standard or premium quality crab or crab sections. 2 Lower quality product, e.g., dirty shelled crab or a pack that is of...

  4. 50 CFR Table 6 to Part 680 - Crab Grade Codes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Crab Grade Codes 6 Table 6 to Part 680..., Table 6 Table 6 to Part 680—Crab Grade Codes Grade/code Description 1 Standard or premium quality crab or crab sections. 2 Lower quality product, e.g., dirty shelled crab or a pack that is of...

  5. 50 CFR 622.247 - Landing golden crab intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ATLANTIC Golden Crab Fishery of the South Atlantic Region § 622.247 Landing golden crab intact. The... ashore. (a) A golden crab in or from the South Atlantic EEZ must be maintained in whole condition...

  6. 50 CFR 622.247 - Landing golden crab intact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ATLANTIC Golden Crab Fishery of the South Atlantic Region § 622.247 Landing golden crab intact. The... ashore. (a) A golden crab in or from the South Atlantic EEZ must be maintained in whole condition...

  7. 50 CFR Table 9 to Part 680 - Initial Issuance of Crab PQS by Crab QS Fishery

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Islands red and blue king crab (PIK) 3 years of the 3-year period beginning on: (1) September 15-26, 1996; (2) September 15-29, 1997; and (3) September 15-28, 1998. St. Matthew blue king crab (SMB) 3 years of... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Initial Issuance of Crab PQS by Crab...

  8. 50 CFR Table 9 to Part 680 - Initial Issuance of Crab PQS by Crab QS Fishery

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Islands red and blue king crab (PIK) 3 years of the 3-year period beginning on: (1) September 15-26, 1996; (2) September 15-29, 1997; and (3) September 15-28, 1998. St. Matthew blue king crab (SMB) 3 years of... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Initial Issuance of Crab PQS by Crab...

  9. 50 CFR Table 9 to Part 680 - Initial Issuance of Crab PQS by Crab QS Fishery

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Islands red and blue king crab (PIK) 3 years of the 3-year period beginning on: (1) September 15-26, 1996; (2) September 15-29, 1997; and (3) September 15-28, 1998. St. Matthew blue king crab (SMB) 3 years of... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Initial Issuance of Crab PQS by Crab...

  10. 50 CFR Table 9 to Part 680 - Initial Issuance of Crab PQS by Crab QS Fishery

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Islands red and blue king crab (PIK) 3 years of the 3-year period beginning on: (1) September 15-26, 1996; (2) September 15-29, 1997; and (3) September 15-28, 1998. St. Matthew blue king crab (SMB) 3 years of... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Initial Issuance of Crab PQS by Crab...

  11. 50 CFR Table 9 to Part 680 - Initial Issuance of Crab PQS by Crab QS Fishery

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Islands red and blue king crab (PIK) 3 years of the 3-year period beginning on: (1) September 15-26, 1996; (2) September 15-29, 1997; and (3) September 15-28, 1998. St. Matthew blue king crab (SMB) 3 years of... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Initial Issuance of Crab PQS by Crab...

  12. Bacterial diseases of crabs: a review.

    PubMed

    Wang, W

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial diseases of crabs are manifested as bacteremias caused by organisms such as Vibrio, Aeromonas, and a Rhodobacteriales-like organism or tissue and organ tropic organisms such as chitinoclastic bacteria, Rickettsia intracellular organisms, Chlamydia-like organism, and Spiroplasma. This paper provides general information about bacterial diseases of both marine and freshwater crabs. Some bacteria pathogens such as Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio vulnificus occur commonly in blue crab haemolymph and should be paid much attention to because they may represent potential health hazards to human beings because they can cause serious diseases when the crab is consumed as raw sea food. With the development of aquaculture, new diseases associated with novel pathogens such as spiroplasmas and Rhodobacteriales-like organisms have appeared in commercially exploited crab species in recent years. Many potential approaches to control bacterial diseases of crab will be helpful and practicable in aquaculture.

  13. Hermit crabs, humans and crowded house markets.

    PubMed

    Barnes, David K A

    2002-12-01

    There is a complex and dynamic interrelationhip between hermit crabs, humans and the coastal environment. Hermit crab homes (shells) are often hard to come by, but humans are helping out by piling middens of shells and rubbish on beachers. Hermit crabs are useful to humans as fishing bait, pets and living wasted disposal systems, and so useful to other animals that they may even be hijacked.

  14. Final focus designs for crab waist colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogomyagkov, A.; Levichev, E.; Piminov, P.

    2016-12-01

    The crab waist collision scheme promises significant luminosity gain. The successful upgrade of the DA Φ NE collider proved the principle of crab waist collision and increased luminosity 3 times. Therefore, several new projects try to implement the scheme. The paper reviews interaction region designs with the crab waist collision scheme for already existent collider DA Φ NE and SuperKEKB, presently undergoing commissioning, for the projects of SuperB in Italy, CTau in Novosibirsk and FCC-ee at CERN.

  15. Does the Crab Have a Shell

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-12-01

    We present deep images of a region around the Crab Nebula made with the VLA, utilizing new imaging and deconvolution algorithms in a search for a...the observed nebula. No radio emission was detected from an extended source outside the Crab Nebula . Our limits on surface brightness are sufficiently...a steepening of the spectral index along the boundary of the Crab Nebula itself, the signature of an outer shock. However, contrary to previous

  16. OSSE Observations of the Crab Pulsar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    Crab nebula and pulsar (Leventhal, MacCallum, & Watts 1977; Ling et al. 1979; Strickman, Johnson, & Kurfess 1979; Ayre et al. 1983; Agrinier et al...emission from the Crab nebula , as well as detector background. The background portion was then subtracted from the entire light curve. The phase ranges we...detections c) References for previous upper limits d) Based on total Crab nebula plus pulsar spectrum e) Upper limits (3) f) Comments related to

  17. The Crab pulsar at VHE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanin, Roberta

    2017-03-01

    The last six years have witnessed major revisions of our knowledge about the Crab Pulsar. The consensus scenario for the origin of the high-energy pulsed emission has been challenged with the discovery of a very-high-energy power law tail extending up to 400 GeV, above the expected spectral cut off at a few GeV. Now, new measurements obtained by the MAGIC collaboration extend the energy spectrum of the Crab Pulsar even further, on the TeV regime. Above 400 GeV the pulsed emission comes mainly from the interpulse, which becomes more prominent with energy due to a harder spectral index. These findings require γ -ray production via inverse Compton scattering close to or beyond the light cylinder radius by an underlying particle population with Lorentz factors greater than 5 × 106. We will present those new results and discuss the implications in our current knowledge concerning pulsar environments.

  18. CHANGES IN THE CRAB PULSAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Scientists are learning more about how pulsars work by studying a series of Hubble Space Telescope images of the heart of the Crab Nebula. The images, taken over a period of several months, show that the Crab is a far more dynamic object than previously understood. At the center of the nebula lies the Crab Pulsar. The pulsar is a tiny object by astronomical standards -- only about six miles across -- but has a mass greater than that of the Sun and rotates at a rate of 30 times a second. As the pulsar spins its intense magnetic field whips around, acting like a sling shot, accelerating subatomic particles and sending them hurtling them into space at close to the speed of light. The tiny pulsar and its wind are the powerhouse for the entire Crab Nebula, which is 10 light-years across -- a feat comparable to an object the size of a hydrogen atom illuminating a volume of space a kilometer across. The three pictures shown here, taken from the series of Hubble images, show dramatic changes in the appearance of the central regions of the nebula. These include wisp-like structures that move outward away from the pulsar at half the speed of light, as well as a mysterious 'halo' which remains stationary, but grows brighter then fainter over time. Also seen are the effects of two polar jets that move out along the rotation axis of the pulsar. The most dynamic feature seen -- a small knot that 'dances around' so much that astronomers have been calling it a 'sprite' -- is actually a shock front (where fast-moving material runs into slower-moving material)in one of these polar jets. The telescope captured the images with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 using a filter that passes light of wavelength around 550 nanometers, near the middle of the visible part of the spectrum. The Crab Nebula is located 7,000 light-years away in the constellation Taurus. Credit: Jeff Hester and Paul Scowen (Arizona State University), and NASA

  19. Novel Geometries for the LHC Crab Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, B.; Burt, G.; Smith, J. D.A.; Rimmer, R.; Wang, H.; Delayen, J.; Calaga, R.

    2009-05-01

    In 2017 the LHC is envisioned to increase its luminosity via an upgrade. This upgrade is likely to require a large crossing angle hence a crab cavity is required to align the bunches prior to collision. There are two possible schemes for crab cavity implementation, global and local. In a global crab cavity the crab cavity is far from the IP and the bunch rotates back and forward as it traverses around the accelerator in a closed orbit. For this scheme a two-cell elliptical squashed cavity at 800 MHz is preferred. To avoid any potential beam instabilities all the parasitic modes of the cavities must be damped strongly, however crab cavities have lower order and same order modes in addition to the usual higher order modes and hence a novel damping scheme must be used to provide sufficient damping of these modes. In the local scheme two crab cavities are placed at each side of the IP two start and stop rotation of the bunches. This would require crab cavities much smaller transversely than in the global scheme but the frequency cannot be increased any higher due to the long bunch length of the LHC beam. This will require a novel compact crab cavity design. A superconducting version of a two rod coaxial deflecting cavity as a suitable design is proposed in this paper.

  20. Particle beam and crabbing and deflecting structure

    DOEpatents

    Delayen, Jean [Yorktown, VA

    2011-02-08

    A new type of structure for the deflection and crabbing of particle bunches in particle accelerators comprising a number of parallel transverse electromagnetic (TEM)-resonant) lines operating in opposite phase from each other. Such a structure is significantly more compact than conventional crabbing cavities operating the transverse magnetic TM mode, thus allowing low frequency designs.

  1. HUBBLE CAPTURES DYNAMICS OF CRAB NEBULA (color)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A new sequence of Hubble Space Telescope images of the remnant of a tremendous stellar explosion is giving astronomers a remarkable look at the dynamic relationship between the tiny Crab Pulsar and the vast nebula that it powers. This colorful photo shows a ground-based image of the entire Crab Nebula, the remnant of a supernova explosion witnessed over 900 years ago. The nebula, which is 10 light-years across, is located 7,000 light-years away in the constellation Taurus. The green, yellow and red filaments concentrated toward the edges of the nebula are remnants of the star that were ejected into space by the explosion. At the center of the Crab Nebula lies the Crab Pulsar -- the collapsed core of the exploded star. The Crab Pulsar is a rapidly rotating neutron star -- an object only about six miles across, but containing more mass than our Sun. As it rotates at a rate of 30 times per second the Crab Pulsar's powerful magnetic field sweeps around, accelerating particles, and whipping them out into the nebula at speeds close to that of light. The blue glow in the inner part of the nebula -- light emitted by energetic electrons as they spiral through the Crab's magnetic field -- is powered by the Crab Pulsar. Credit: Jeff Hester and Paul Scowen (Arizona State University), and NASA

  2. Habitat fragmentation differentially affects trophic levels and alters behavior in a multi-trophic marine system.

    PubMed

    Rielly-Carroll, Elizabeth; Freestone, Amy L

    2017-03-01

    Seagrass, an important subtidal marine ecosystem, is being lost at a rate of 110 km(2) year(-1), leading to fragmented seagrass seascapes. Habitat fragmentation is predicted to affect trophic levels differently, with higher trophic levels being more sensitive, stressing the importance of a multi-trophic perspective. Utilizing the trophic relationship between the blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) and hard clam (Mercenaria mercenaria), where adult blue crabs prey on juvenile blue crabs, and juvenile blue crabs prey on small hard clams, we examined whether predation rates, abundance, and behavior of predators and prey differed between continuous and fragmented seagrass in a multi-trophic context at two sites in Barnegat Bay, NJ. We tested the hypothesis that fragmented habitats would differentially affect trophic levels within a tri-trophic system, and our results supported this hypothesis. Densities of adult blue crabs were higher in fragmented than continuous habitats. Densities of juvenile blue crabs, the primary predator of hard clams, were lower in fragmented habitats than continuous, potentially due to increased predation by adult blue crabs. Clams experienced lower predation and burrowed to a shallower depth in fragmented habitats than in continuous habitat, likely due in part to the low densities of juvenile blue crabs, their primary predator. Our results suggest that while trophic levels are differentially affected, the impact of habitat fragmentation may be stronger on intermediate rather than top trophic levels in some marine systems.

  3. Most Detailed Image of the Crab Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This new Hubble image -- one among the largest ever produced with the Earth-orbiting observatory -- shows the most detailed view so far of the entire Crab Nebula ever made. The Crab is arguably the single most interesting object, as well as one of the most studied, in all of astronomy. The image is the largest image ever taken with Hubble's WFPC2 workhorse camera.

    The Crab Nebula is one of the most intricately structured and highly dynamical objects ever observed. The new Hubble image of the Crab was assembled from 24 individual exposures taken with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and is the highest resolution image of the entire Crab Nebula ever made.

  4. What brakes the Crab pulsar?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čadež, A.; Zampieri, L.; Barbieri, C.; Calvani, M.; Naletto, G.; Barbieri, M.; Ponikvar, D.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Optical observations provide convincing evidence that the optical phase of the Crab pulsar follows the radio one closely. Since optical data do not depend on dispersion measure variations, they provide a robust and independent confirmation of the radio timing solution. Aims: The aim of this paper is to find a global mathematical description of Crab pulsar's phase as a function of time for the complete set of published Jodrell Bank radio ephemerides (JBE) in the period 1988-2014. Methods: We apply the mathematical techniques developed for analyzing optical observations to the analysis of JBE. We break the whole period into a series of episodes and express the phase of the pulsar in each episode as the sum of two analytical functions. The first function is the best-fitting local braking index law, and the second function represents small residuals from this law with an amplitude of only a few turns, which rapidly relaxes to the local braking index law. Results: From our analysis, we demonstrate that the power law index undergoes "instantaneous" changes at the time of observed jumps in rotational frequency (glitches). We find that the phase evolution of the Crab pulsar is dominated by a series of constant braking law episodes, with the braking index changing abruptly after each episode in the range of values between 2.1 and 2.6. Deviations from such a regular phase description behave as oscillations triggered by glitches and amount to fewer than 40 turns during the above period, in which the pulsar has made more than 2 × 1010 turns. Conclusions: Our analysis does not favor the explanation that glitches are connected to phenomena occurring in the interior of the pulsar. On the contrary, timing irregularities and changes in slow down rate seem to point to electromagnetic interaction of the pulsar with the surrounding environment.

  5. Prisoners in Their Habitat? Generalist Dispersal by Habitat Specialists: A Case Study in Southern Water Vole (Arvicola sapidus)

    PubMed Central

    Centeno-Cuadros, Alejandro; Román, Jacinto; Delibes, Miguel; Godoy, José Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Habitat specialists inhabiting scarce and scattered habitat patches pose interesting questions related to dispersal such as how specialized terrestrial mammals do to colonize distant patches crossing hostile matrices. We assess dispersal patterns of the southern water vole (Arvicola sapidus), a habitat specialist whose habitat patches are distributed through less than 2% of the study area (overall 600 km2) and whose populations form a dynamic metapopulational network. We predict that individuals will require a high ability to move through the inhospitable matrix in order to avoid genetic and demographic isolations. Genotypes (N = 142) for 10 microsatellites and sequences of the whole mitochondrial Control Region (N = 47) from seven localities revealed a weak but significant genetic structure partially explained by geographic distance. None of the landscape models had a significant effect on genetic structure over that of the Euclidean distance alone and no evidence for efficient barriers to dispersal was found. Contemporary gene flow was not severely limited for A. sapidus as shown by high migration rates estimates (>10%) between non-neighbouring areas. Sex-biased dispersal tests did not support differences in dispersal rates, as shown by similar average axial parent-offspring distances, in close agreement with capture-mark-recapture estimates. As predicted, our results do not support any preferences of the species for specific landscape attributes on their dispersal pathways. Here, we combine field and molecular data to illustrate how a habitat specialist mammal might disperse like a habitat generalist, acquiring specific long-distance dispersal strategies as an adaptation to patchy, naturally fragmented, heterogeneous and unstable habitats. PMID:21931775

  6. A large bubble around the Crab Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romani, Roger W.; Reach, William T.; Koo, Bon Chul; Heiles, Carl

    1990-01-01

    IRAS and 21 cm observations of the interstellar medium around the Crab nebula show evidence of a large bubble surrounded by a partial shell. If located at the canonical 2 kpc distance of the Crab pulsar, the shell is estimated to have a radius of about 90 pc and to contain about 50,000 solar masses of swept-up gas. The way in which interior conditions of this bubble can have important implications for observations of the Crab are described, and the fashion in which presupernova evolution of the pulsar progenitor has affected its local environment is described.

  7. Ultraviolet studies of the Crab Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talavera, A.

    2017-03-01

    The Crab Nebula (Messier 1) is one of the most observed sources with the XMM-Newton space telescope of ESA. The Crab and its related pulsar are a calibration source for the on-board X-rays cameras. There are around 80 observations between 2000 and 2015. In this observations, the XMM-Newton Optical and UV Monitor (OM) has also been used. We present a preliminary study of the Crab using images obtained the OM UV filters at 291, 231 and 212 nm. Photometric data for the pulsar (PSR0531+21), created in the supernova event of AD 1054 origin of the nebula, are also presented

  8. Design of the ILC Crab Cavity System

    SciTech Connect

    Adolphsen, C.; Beard, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Burt, G.; Carter, R.; Chase, B.; Church, M.; Dexter, A.; Dykes, M.; Edwards, H.; Goudket, P; Jenkins, R.; Jones, R.M.; Kalinin, A.; Khabiboulline, T.; Ko, K.; Latina, A.; Li, Z.; Ma, L.; McIntosh, P.; Ng, C.; /SLAC /Daresbury /Fermilab /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /CERN

    2007-08-15

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) has a 14 mrad crossing angle in order to aid extraction of spent bunches. As a result of the bunch shape at the interaction point, this crossing angle at the collision causes a large luminosity loss which can be recovered by rotating the bunches prior to collision using a crab cavity. The ILC baseline crab cavity is a 9-cell superconducting dipole cavity operating at a frequency of 3.9 GHz. In this paper the design of the ILC crab cavity and its phase control system, as selected for the RDR in February 2007 is described in fuller detail.

  9. Crab Crossing Consideration for MEIC 2

    SciTech Connect

    S. Ahmed, Y.S. Derbenev, G.A. Krafft, Y. Zhang, A. Castilla, J.R. Delayen, S.D. Silva

    2011-03-01

    Crab crossing of colliding electron and ion beams is essential for accommodating the ultra high bunch repetition frequency in the conceptual design of MEIC – a high luminosity polarized electron-ion collider at Jefferson Lab. The scheme eliminates parasitic beam-beam interactions and avoids luminosity reduction by restoring head-on collisions at interaction points. In this paper, we report simulation studies of beam dynamics with crab cavities for MEIC design. The detailed study involves full 3-D simulations of particle tracking through the various configurations of crab cavities for evaluating the performance. To gain insight, beam and RF dominated fields with other parametric studies will be presented in the paper.

  10. 78 FR 40696 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Alaska Crab Cost Recovery

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-08

    ... Crab Cost Recovery AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION... and Aleutian Islands (BSAI) Crab includes the Crab Rationalization (CR) Program, a limited access system that allocates BSAI Crab resources among harvesters, processors, and coastal communities....

  11. Metals in horseshoe crabs from Delaware Bay.

    PubMed

    Burger, J; Dixon, C; Shukla, T; Tsipoura, N; Jensen, H; Fitzgerald, M; Ramos, R; Gochfeld, M

    2003-01-01

    We examined the concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, manganese, mercury, and selenium in the eggs, leg muscle, and apodeme (carapace musculature) in horseshoe crabs ( Limulus polyphemus) from eight places on the New Jersey and Delaware sides of Delaware Bay to determine whether there were locational differences. Although there were locational differences, the differences were not great. Further, contaminant levels were generally low. The levels of contaminants found in horseshoe crabs were well below those known to cause adverse effects in the crabs themselves or in organisms that consume them or their eggs. Contaminant levels have generally declined in the eggs of horseshoe crabs from 1993 to 2001, suggesting that contaminants are not likely to be a problem for secondary consumers or a cause of their decline.

  12. Monitoring the Crab Nebula with LOFT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2012-01-01

    From 2008-2010, the Crab Nebula was found to decline by 7% in the 15-50 keV band, consistently in Fermi GBM, INTEGRAL IBIS, SPI, and JEMX, RXTE PCA, and Swift BAT. From 2001-2010, the 15-50 keV flux from the Crab Nebula typically varied by about 3.5% per year. Analysis of RXTE PCA data suggests possible spectral variations correlated with the flux variations. I will present estimates of the LOFT sensitivity to these variations. Prior to 2001 and since 2010, the observed flux variations have been much smaller. Monitoring the Crab with the LOFT WFM and LAD will provide precise measurements of flux variations in the Crab Nebula if it undergoes a similarly active episode.

  13. Why do fiddler crabs build chimneys?

    PubMed

    Slatyer, R A; Fok, E S Y; Hocking, R; Backwell, P R Y

    2008-12-23

    Chimneys are mud mounds built by fiddler crabs that encircle the entrance to their burrow. Their function in many species is unknown. In Uca capricornis, crabs of both sexes and all sizes build chimneys, but females do so disproportionately more often. There are no differences in the immediate physical or social environments between crabs with and without a chimney. Chimney owners spend less time feeding and more time underground than non-owners. We show experimentally that burrows with a chimney are less likely to be located by an intruder. It is possible that some crabs construct chimneys around their burrow to conceal the entrance and reduce the risk of losing it to an intruder.

  14. Wakefield Damping for the CLIC Crab Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Ambattu, P.K.; Burt, G.; Dexter, A.C.; Carter, R.G.; Khan, V.; Jones, R.M.; Dolgashev, V.; /SLAC

    2011-12-01

    A crab cavity is required in the CLIC to allow effective head-on collision of bunches at the IP. A high operating frequency is preferred as the deflection voltage required for a given rotation angle and the RF phase tolerance for a crab cavity are inversely proportional to the operating frequency. The short bunch spacing of the CLIC scheme and the high sensitivity of the crab cavity to dipole kicks demand very high damping of the inter-bunch wakes, the major contributor to the luminosity loss of colliding bunches. This paper investigates the nature of the wakefields in the CLIC crab cavity and the possibility of using various damping schemes to suppress them effectively.

  15. Epidemiology of bitter crab disease (Hematodinium sp.) in snow crabs Chionoecetes opilio from Newfoundland, Canada.

    PubMed

    Shields, Jeffrey D; Taylor, David M; Sutton, Stephen G; O'Keefe, Paul G; Ings, Danny W; Pardy, Amanda L

    2005-05-20

    The parasitic dinoflagellate Hematodinium sp. causes a condition known as bitter crab disease (BCD) in snow crabs Chionoecetes opilio and Tanner crabs C. bairdi. As the name of the condition implies, crabs infected with BCD are unmarketable due to their bitter flavor. We surveyed the distribution of BCD in 3 regions within the snow crab fishery of Newfoundland from 1997 to 2003. Over time, the disease has become firmly established in Conception and Bonavista Bays and persists at low levels on the Avalon fishing grounds. An epizootic occurred within Bonavista and Conception Bays in 1999 and persisted in Conception Bay in 2000, reaching prevalences of over 2% to 9% in trapped and trawled male crabs and from 19 to 26% in trawled and trapped female crabs, respectively. Infections were highest in females and small males, i.e. the unfished and pre-recruit portions of the fishery. In a mortality study, all of the naturally infected crabs died and 50% of the experimentally inoculated crabs died. Patterns in the molting cycle and prevalence of infection indicate that transmission occurs during the post-molt condition, and that overt infections probably develop 2 to 4 mo later with mortalities occurring at least 3 to 4 mo thereafter. The hydrography of this bay may have contributed to the epizootic as infections were centered within the deeper confines of the bay. Analysis of various abiotic factors uncovered a significant positive association between prevalence, depth and mud/sand substrates; the nature of this relationship was not apparent but may be related to diet or alternate hosts. Lastly, given the increase in BCD in snow crabs in Newfoundland, we recommend that fishery management programs for Chionoecetes fisheries employ non-selective gear to monitor for Hematodinium infections in female and juvenile crabs because these under-sampled members of the population may forewarn of impending recruitment declines that might otherwise remain unexplained.

  16. The visual ecology of fiddler crabs.

    PubMed

    Zeil, Jochen; Hemmi, Jan M

    2006-01-01

    With their eyes on long vertical stalks, their panoramic visual field and their pronounced equatorial acute zone for vertical resolving power, the visual system of fiddler crabs is exquisitely tuned to the geometry of vision in the flat world of inter-tidal mudflats. The crabs live as burrow-centred grazers in dense, mixed-sex, mixed-age and mixed-species colonies, with the active space of an individual rarely exceeding 1 m(2). The full behavioural repertoire of fiddler crabs can thus be monitored over extended periods of time on a moment to moment basis together with the visual information they have available to guide their actions. These attributes make the crabs superb subjects for analysing visual tasks and the design of visual processing mechanisms under natural conditions, a prerequisite for understanding the evolution of visual systems. In this review we show, on the one hand, how deeply embedded fiddler crab vision is in the behavioural and the physical ecology of these animals and, on the other hand, how their behavioural options are constrained by their perceptual limitations. Studying vision in fiddler crabs reminds us that vision has a topography, that it is context-dependent and pragmatic and that there are perceptual limits to what animals can know and therefore care about.

  17. Perceptions of environmental changes and Lethargic crab disease among crab harvesters in a Brazilian coastal community

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Lethargic Crab Disease (LCD) has caused significant mortalities in the population of Ucides cordatus crabs in the Mucuri estuary in Bahia State, Brazil, and has brought social and economic problems to many crab-harvesting communities that depend on this natural resource. The present work examined the perceptions of members of a Brazilian crab harvesting community concerning environmental changes and the Lethargic Crab Disease. Methods Field work was undertaken during the period between January and April/2009, with weekly or biweekly field excursions during which open and semi-structured interviews were held with local residents in the municipality of Mucuri, Bahia State, Brazil. A total of 23 individuals were interviewed, all of whom had at least 20 years of crab-collecting experience in the study region. Key-informants (more experienced crab harvesters) were selected among the interviewees using the "native specialist" criterion. Results According to the collectors, LCD reached the Mucuri mangroves between 2004 and 2005, decimating almost all crab population in the area, and in 2007, 2008 and 2009 high mortalities of U. cordatus were again observed as a result of recurrences of this disease in the region. In addition to LCD, crabs were also suffering great stock reductions due to habitat degradation caused by deforestation, landfills, sewage effluents, domestic and industrial wastes and the introduction of exotic fish in the Mucuri River estuary. The harvesting community was found to have significant ecological knowledge about the functioning of mangrove swamp ecology, the biology of crabs, and the mass mortality that directly affected the economy of this community, and this information was largely in accordance with scientific knowledge. Conclusions The study of traditional knowledge makes it possible to better understand human interactions with the environment and aids in the elaboration of appropriate strategies for natural resource conservation

  18. A comparative study of genetic variation between Chinese mitten crab ericheir sinensis and Hepu mitten crab E. hepuensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guangdong, Liu; Xiumei, Zhang; Tianxiang, Gao; Dong, Lou

    2002-10-01

    Horizonal starch gel electrophoresis was used to investigate the biochemical genetic structure of Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis and Hepu mitten crab E. hepuensis. Sixteen putative enzyme-coding loci were examined for forty-nine chinese mitten crabs and thirty-eight Hepu mitten crabs. Nine loci, AAT-1 *, AAT-2 *, G3PDH *, GPI *, IDHP-1 *, IDHP-2 *, MDH-1 *, MDH-2 * and PGM *, are polymorphic in Chinese mitten crab, and seven, AAT-1 *, AAT-2 *, GPI *, IDHP-1 *, MDH-1 *, MDH-2 * and PGM *, are polymorphic in Hepu mitten crab. The proportion of polymorphic loci and the expected heterozygosity are 0.562 5 and 0.080 3 for Chinese mitten crab, and 0.437 5 and 0.075 4 for Hepu mitten crab. The Nei’s genetic distance between two species is 0.002 4.

  19. Predator-prey interactions mediated by prey personality and predator hunting mode.

    PubMed

    Belgrad, Benjamin A; Griffen, Blaine D

    2016-04-13

    Predator-prey interactions are important drivers in structuring ecological communities. However, despite widespread acknowledgement that individual behaviours and predator species regulate ecological processes, studies have yet to incorporate individual behavioural variations in a multipredator system. We quantified a prevalent predator avoidance behaviour to examine the simultaneous roles of prey personality and predator hunting mode in governing predator-prey interactions. Mud crabs, Panopeus herbstii, reduce their activity levels and increase their refuge use in the presence of predator cues. We measured mud crab mortality and consistent individual variations in the strength of this predator avoidance behaviour in the presence of predatory blue crabs, Callinectes sapidus, and toadfish, Opsanus tau We found that prey personality and predator species significantly interacted to affect mortality with blue crabs primarily consuming bold mud crabs and toadfish preferentially selecting shy crabs. Additionally, the strength of the predator avoidance behaviour depended upon the predation risk from the predator species. Consequently, the personality composition of populations and predator hunting mode may be valuable predictors of both direct and indirect predator-prey interaction strength. These findings support theories postulating mechanisms for maintaining intraspecies diversity and have broad implications for community dynamics.

  20. A sex-specific metabolite identified in a marine invertebrate utilizing phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Kleps, Robert A; Myers, Terrell C; Lipcius, Romuald N; Henderson, Thomas O

    2007-08-22

    Hormone level differences are generally accepted as the primary cause for sexual dimorphism in animal and human development. Levels of low molecular weight metabolites also differ between men and women in circulating amino acids, lipids and carbohydrates and within brain tissue. While investigating the metabolism of blue crab tissues using Phosphorus-31 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, we discovered that only the male blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) contained a phosphorus compound with a chemical shift well separated from the expected phosphate compounds. Spectra obtained from male gills were readily differentiated from female gill spectra. Analysis from six years of data from male and female crabs documented that the sex-specificity of this metabolite was normal for this species. Microscopic analysis of male and female gills found no differences in their gill anatomy or the presence of parasites or bacteria that might produce this phosphorus compound. Analysis of a rare gynandromorph blue crab (laterally, half male and half female) proved that this sex-specificity was an intrinsic biochemical process and was not caused by any variations in the diet or habitat of male versus female crabs. The existence of a sex-specific metabolite is a previously unrecognized, but potentially significant biochemical phenomenon. An entire enzyme system has been synthesized and activated only in one sex. Unless blue crabs are a unique species, sex-specific metabolites are likely to be present in other animals. Would the presence or absence of a sex-specific metabolite affect an animal's development, anatomy and biochemistry?

  1. Biodegradation of vegetable and agrowastes by Pleurotus sapidus: a novel strategy to produce mushroom with enhanced yield and nutrition.

    PubMed

    Singh, M P; Singh, V K

    2012-12-22

    Edible oyster mushroom Pleurotus sapidus was cultivated, on pea pod shell, cauliflower leaves, radish leaves, brassica straw in various combinations of paddy straw. The mushroom failed to grow on these vegetable wastes separately. However, it grew very well on these vegetable wastes when mixed with various combinations of paddy straw as substrate. Total yield and biological efficiency of the mushroom cultivated on substrate containing 20% and 30% vegetable wastes mixed with 70% and 80% (w/w) of paddy straw was found to be better, when compared with yield and efficiency obtained with paddy straw alone (100%). The protein content in the fruit bodies was found to be higher in the mushroom grown on paddy straw mixed with vegetable wastes than that obtained with paddy straw alone. Similarly, six amino acids (Leu, Ile, Val, Thr, Met and Phe) showed a significant increase when the mushroom was grown on a mixed substrate containing both vegetable wastes and paddy straw. On the contrary, the total sugar and reducing sugar content declined in the mushroom grown on the mixture of paddy straw and other wastes, when compared with the results obtained with paddy straw alone.

  2. 50 CFR 680.6 - Crab economic data report (EDR).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Crab economic data report (EDR). 680.6... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) SHELLFISH FISHERIES OF THE EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA General § 680.6 Crab economic data report (EDR). Persons participating in the CR crab fisheries...

  3. 50 CFR 680.21 - Crab harvesting cooperatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Crab harvesting cooperatives. 680.21... ZONE OFF ALASKA Management Measures § 680.21 Crab harvesting cooperatives. This section governs the formation and operation of crab harvesting cooperatives. The regulations in this section apply only to...

  4. 50 CFR 680.21 - Crab harvesting cooperatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Crab harvesting cooperatives. 680.21... ZONE OFF ALASKA Management Measures § 680.21 Crab harvesting cooperatives. This section governs the formation and operation of crab harvesting cooperatives. The regulations in this section apply only to...

  5. 50 CFR 680.21 - Crab harvesting cooperatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Crab harvesting cooperatives. 680.21... ZONE OFF ALASKA Management Measures § 680.21 Crab harvesting cooperatives. This section governs the formation and operation of crab harvesting cooperatives. The regulations in this section apply only to...

  6. 50 CFR 680.21 - Crab harvesting cooperatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Crab harvesting cooperatives. 680.21... ZONE OFF ALASKA Management Measures § 680.21 Crab harvesting cooperatives. This section governs the formation and operation of crab harvesting cooperatives. The regulations in this section apply only to...

  7. 50 CFR Table 5 to Part 680 - Crab Size Codes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Crab Size Codes 5 Table 5 to Part 680 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION..., Table 5 Table 5 to Part 680—Crab Size Codes Size code Description 1 Standard or large sized crab or...

  8. The Radio Spectral Index of the Crab Nebula

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-11-20

    We present the results of a new, comprehensive investigation of the radio spectral index of the Crab Nebula supernova remnant. New data at 74 MHz are...thermal material in the Crab Nebula’s filaments. Apart from some possible renewed acceleration occurring in the wisps, the dominant accelerator of relativistic electrons in the Crab Nebula is the pulsar itself.

  9. 50 CFR Table 2 to Part 680 - Crab Species Code

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., Table 2 Table 2 to Part 680—Crab Species Code Species code Common name Scientific name 900 Box Lopholithodes mandtii. 910 Dungeness Cancer magister. 921 Red king crab Paralithodes camtshaticus. 922 Blue king... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Crab Species Code 2 Table 2 to Part...

  10. 50 CFR Table 2 to Part 680 - Crab Species Code

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., Table 2 Table 2 to Part 680—Crab Species Code Species code Common name Scientific name 900 Box Lopholithodes mandtii. 910 Dungeness Cancer magister. 921 Red king crab Paralithodes camtshaticus. 922 Blue king... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Crab Species Code 2 Table 2 to Part...

  11. Positive feedback fishery: Population consequences of `crab-tiling' on the green crab Carcinus maenas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, E. V.; Thompson, R. C.; Coleman, R. A.; Attrill, M. J.

    2008-11-01

    Collection of marine invertebrates for use as fishing bait is a substantial activity in many parts of the world, often with unknown ecological consequences. As new fisheries develop, it is critical for environmental managers to have high quality ecological information regarding the potential impacts, in order to develop sound management strategies. Crab-tiling is a largely unregulated and un-researched fishery, which operates commercially in the south-west UK. The target species is the green crab Carcinus maenas. Those crabs which are pre-ecdysis and have a carapace width greater than 40 mm are collected to be sold to recreational anglers as bait. Collection involves laying artificial structures on intertidal sandflats and mudflats in estuaries. Crabs use these structures as refugia and are collected during low tide. However, the effect that this fishery has on populations of C. maenas is not known. The impact of crab-tiling on C. maenas population structure was determined by sampling crabs from tiled estuaries and non-tiled estuaries using baited drop-nets. A spatially and temporarily replicated, balanced design was used to compare crab abundance, sizes and sex ratios between estuaries. Typically, fisheries are associated with a reduction in the abundance of the target species. Crab-tiling, however, significantly increased C. maenas abundance. This was thought to be a result of the extra habitat in tiled estuaries, which probably provides protection from natural predators, such as birds and fish. Although crabs were more abundant in tiled estuaries than non-tiled estuaries, the overall percentage of reproductively active crabs in non-tiled estuaries was greater than in tiled estuaries. As with most exploited fisheries stocks, crabs in exploited (tiled) estuaries tended to be smaller, with a modal carapace width of 20-29 mm rather than 30-39 mm in non-tiled estuaries. The sex ratio of crabs however; was not significantly different between tiled and non

  12. Species profiles: Life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (Pacific Southwest): Brown rock crab, red rock crab, and yellow crab

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, J.C. ); Winn, R.N. )

    1989-12-01

    Species profiles are literature summaries of the taxonomy, morphology, distribution, life history, habitats, and environmental requirements of coastal species of fishes and aquatic invertebrates. They are designed to assist in environmental impact assessment. Rock crab'' is the common name designating three similar species of edible crabs: brown rock crab (Cancer antennarius), red rock crab (C. productus), and yellow crab (C. anthonyi). The three species co-occur in shallow coastal waters throughout the Pacific Southwest region. The yellow crab is most common in southern California on sand substrate, and the red rock crab in northernmost areas on rock or gravel substrates; the brown rock crab occurs on rock or sand substrates in all areas. Rock crabs are sought commercially to fill an increasing market demand for whole crabs that approached 2 million pounds annually in 1986. Most of the catch comes from the region of Morro Bay south to Los Angeles, including the Channel Islands. Egg-bearing females are commonly found during winter, although they may occur throughout the year.Rock crabs go through five zoeal stages and one megalopal stage during a larval period that generally requires 90--120 days. Metamorphosis and settlement of the first crab stage is on either sand or rock, and crabs may reach maturity within 1--2 years. All three species are predators on a variety of shelled mollusks, but are also considered scavengers. They are a major food for many commercially and recreationally important fishes, as well as for the threatened southern sea otter, Enhydra lutris. 63 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Novel Geometries for the LHC Crab Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    B. Hall,G. Burt,C. Lingwood,Robert Rimmer,Haipeng Wang; Hall, B.; Burt, G.; Lingwood, C.; Rimmer, Robert; Wang, Haipeng

    2010-05-01

    The planned luminosity upgrade to LHC is likely to necessitate a large crossing angle and a local crab crossing scheme. For this scheme crab cavities align bunches prior to collision. The scheme requires at least four such cavities, a pair on each beam line either side of the interaction point (IP). Upstream cavities initiate rotation and downstream cavities cancel rotation. Cancellation is usually done at a location where the optics has re-aligned the bunch. The beam line separation near the IP necessitates a more compact design than is possible with elliptical cavities such as those used at KEK. The reduction in size must be achieved without an increase in the operational frequency to maintain compatibility with the long bunch length of the LHC. This paper proposes a suitable superconducting variant of a four rod coaxial deflecting cavity (to be phased as a crab cavity), and presents analytical models and simulations of suitable designs.

  14. Novel Geometries for the LHC Crab Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    B. Hall, G. Burt, C. Lingwood, R. Rimmer, H. Wang

    2010-05-23

    The planned luminosity upgrade to LHC is likely to necessitate a large crossing angle and a local crab crossing scheme. For this scheme crab cavities align bunches prior to collision. The scheme requires at least four such cavities, a pair on each beam line either side of the interaction point (IP). Upstream cavities initiate rotation and downstream cavities cancel rotation. Cancellation is usually done at a location where the optics has re-aligned the bunch. The beam line separation near the IP necessitates a more compact design than is possible with elliptical cavities such as those used at KEK. The reduction in size must be achieved without an increase in the operational frequency to maintain compatibility with the long bunch length of the LHC. This paper proposes a suitable superconducting variant of a four rod coaxial deflecting cavity (to be phased as a crab cavity), and presents analytical models and simulations of suitable designs.

  15. Distortion of Crabbed Bunch Due to the Electron Cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L; Raubenheimer, T.; /SLAC

    2008-05-28

    In order to improve the luminosity, two crab cavities have been installed in KEKB HER and LER [1]. Since there is only one crab cavity in each ring, the crab cavity generates a horizontally titled bunch along the whole ring. The achieved specific luminosity with crabbed bunch is higher, but it is not as high as that from beam-beam simulation [2]. One of the suspicions is the electron cloud. The electron cloud in LER (positron beam) may distort the crabbed bunch and cause the luminosity drop. This note briefly estimates the bunch shape distortion due to the electron cloud in KEKB LER.

  16. Green crab (Carcinus maenas) foraging efficiency reduced by fast flows.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Elizabeth M; Smee, Delbert L; Trussell, Geoffrey C

    2011-01-01

    Predators can strongly influence prey populations and the structure and function of ecosystems, but these effects can be modified by environmental stress. For example, fluid velocity and turbulence can alter the impact of predators by limiting their environmental range and altering their foraging ability. We investigated how hydrodynamics affected the foraging behavior of the green crab (Carcinus maenas), which is invading marine habitats throughout the world. High flow velocities are known to reduce green crab predation rates and our study sought to identify the mechanisms by which flow affects green crabs. We performed a series of experiments with green crabs to determine: 1) if their ability to find prey was altered by flow in the field, 2) how flow velocity influenced their foraging efficiency, and 3) how flow velocity affected their handling time of prey. In a field study, we caught significantly fewer crabs in baited traps at sites with fast versus slow flows even though crabs were more abundant in high flow areas. This finding suggests that higher velocity flows impair the ability of green crabs to locate prey. In laboratory flume assays, green crabs foraged less efficiently when flow velocity was increased. Moreover, green crabs required significantly more time to consume prey in high velocity flows. Our data indicate that flow can impose significant chemosensory and physical constraints on green crabs. Hence, hydrodynamics may strongly influence the role that green crabs and other predators play in rocky intertidal communities.

  17. Green Crab (Carcinus maenas) Foraging Efficiency Reduced by Fast Flows

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Elizabeth M.; Smee, Delbert L.; Trussell, Geoffrey C.

    2011-01-01

    Predators can strongly influence prey populations and the structure and function of ecosystems, but these effects can be modified by environmental stress. For example, fluid velocity and turbulence can alter the impact of predators by limiting their environmental range and altering their foraging ability. We investigated how hydrodynamics affected the foraging behavior of the green crab (Carcinus maenas), which is invading marine habitats throughout the world. High flow velocities are known to reduce green crab predation rates and our study sought to identify the mechanisms by which flow affects green crabs. We performed a series of experiments with green crabs to determine: 1) if their ability to find prey was altered by flow in the field, 2) how flow velocity influenced their foraging efficiency, and 3) how flow velocity affected their handling time of prey. In a field study, we caught significantly fewer crabs in baited traps at sites with fast versus slow flows even though crabs were more abundant in high flow areas. This finding suggests that higher velocity flows impair the ability of green crabs to locate prey. In laboratory flume assays, green crabs foraged less efficiently when flow velocity was increased. Moreover, green crabs required significantly more time to consume prey in high velocity flows. Our data indicate that flow can impose significant chemosensory and physical constraints on green crabs. Hence, hydrodynamics may strongly influence the role that green crabs and other predators play in rocky intertidal communities. PMID:21687742

  18. Modeling Crabbing Dynamics in an Electron-Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Castilla, Alejandro; Morozov, Vasiliy S.; Satogata, Todd J.; Delayen, Jean R.

    2015-09-01

    A local crabbing scheme requires π/2 (mod π) horizontal betatron phase advances from an interaction point (IP) to the crab cavities on each side of it. However, realistic phase advances generated by sets of quadrupoles, or Final Focusing Blocks (FFB), between the crab cavities located in the expanded beam regions and the IP differ slightly from π/2. To understand the effect of crabbing on the beam dynamics in this case, a simple model of the optics of the Medium Energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) including local crabbing was developed using linear matrices and then studied numerically over multiple turns (1000 passes) of both electron and proton bunches. The same model was applied to both local and global crabbing schemes to determine the linear-order dynamical effects of the synchro-betatron coupling induced by crabbing.

  19. Evolution of metabolomics profile of crab paste during fermentation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Daian; Ye, Yangfang; Chen, Juanjuan; Yan, Xiaojun

    2016-02-01

    Crab paste is regularly consumed by people in the coastal area of China. The fermentation time plays a key role on the quality of crab paste. Here, we investigated the dynamic evolution of metabolite profile of crab paste during fermentation by combined use of NMR spectroscopy and multivariate data analysis. Our results showed that crab paste quality was significantly affected by fermentation. The quality change was manifested in the decline of lactate, betaine, taurine, trimethylamine-N-oxide, trigonelline, inosine, adenosine diphosphate, and 2-pyridinemethanol, and in the fluctuation of a range of amino acids as well as in the accumulation of glutamate, sucrose, formate, acetate, trimethylamine, and hypoxanthine. Trimethylamine production and its increased level with fermentation could be considered as a freshness index of crab paste. These results contribute to quality assessment of crab paste and confirm the metabolomics technique as a useful tool to provide important information on the crab paste quality.

  20. Species Profiles. Life Histories and Environmental Requirements of Coastal Fishes and Invertebrates (Pacific Southwest). Brown Rock Crab, Red Rock Crab, and Yellow Crab

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    distinguished by a slender abdomen and Two other large Cancer species, the Dungeness crab mature females by a broad abdomen that is often hirsute (C. magister...crab lives almost exclusively on animals often remained in one location for scveral days. sandy substrata; consequently the "rock crab" designation is... animals McConaugha, J.R. 1985. Nutrition and larval growth. of the Pacific coast. Dover Publications, New York. Pages 127-154 in A.M. Wenner, ed

  1. 50 CFR 648.263 - Red crab possession and landing restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., transport, land, sell, trade, or barter, up to 500 lb (226.8 kg) of red crab, or its equivalent in weight as... restrictions. (a) Vessels issued limited access red crab permits. (1) (2) Conversion to whole crab weight. (i... recovery rate is 64 percent of a whole red crab, which is equal to the weight of red crab half...

  2. 50 CFR 648.263 - Red crab possession and landing restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., transport, land, sell, trade, or barter, up to 500 lb (226.8 kg) of red crab, or its equivalent in weight as... restrictions. (a) Vessels issued limited access red crab permits. (1) (2) Conversion to whole crab weight. (i... recovery rate is 64 percent of a whole red crab, which is equal to the weight of red crab half...

  3. The paradigm that all oxygen-respiring eukaryotes have cytosolic CuZn-superoxide dismutase and that Mn-superoxide dismutase is localized to the mitochondria does not apply to a large group of marine arthropods.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, M; Brouwer, T H; Grater, W; Enghild, J J; Thogersen, I B

    1997-10-28

    The enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD), which catalyzes the dismutation of the superoxide radical, is present in the cytosol and mitochondria of all oxygen-respiring eukaryotes. The cytosolic form contains copper and zinc (CuZnSOD), whereas the mitochondrial form contains manganese (MnSOD). The latter protein is synthesized in the cytosol as a MnSOD precursor, containing an N-terminal mitochondrial-targeting sequence. CuZnSOD is sensitive toward cyanide (CN) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), but MnSOD is not. Assays for SOD activity in cytosol from the hepatopancreas of the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus, showed the presence of a CN/H2O2-insensitive form of SOD. No CN/H2O2-sensitive CuZnSOD was found. This unexpected phenomenon was shown to occur in all decapod crustacea (crabs, lobsters, shrimp) examined. The cytosolic and mitochondrial SODs of C. sapidus were purified by means of ion-exchange, size-exclusion, and reverse-phase HPLC. The cytosolic SOD is a homodimeric protein, which exists in a monomer-dimer equilibrium (24 kDa left and right arrow 48 kDa). The protein contains approximately 1 Mn per subunit. No copper or zinc is present. Amino acid sequence analysis identified the novel cytosolic SOD as a MnSOD precursor with an abnormal mitochondrial-targeting sequence. The mitochondrial SOD of C. sapidus is similar to the MnSOD found in other eukaryotes. N-Terminal amino sequences of mitochondrial and cytosolic blue crab MnSOD differ in several positions. The MnSODs are thus encoded for by two different genes. The paradigm that all eukaryotes contain intracellular CuZnSOD and that MnSOD occurs exclusively in the mitochondria appears not to apply to a large group of marine arthropods.

  4. Ocean acidification impairs crab foraging behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Dodd, Luke F.; Grabowski, Jonathan H.; Piehler, Michael F.; Westfield, Isaac; Ries, Justin B.

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic elevation of atmospheric CO2 is driving global-scale ocean acidification, which consequently influences calcification rates of many marine invertebrates and potentially alters their susceptibility to predation. Ocean acidification may also impair an organism's ability to process environmental and biological cues. These counteracting impacts make it challenging to predict how acidification will alter species interactions and community structure. To examine effects of acidification on consumptive and behavioural interactions between mud crabs (Panopeus herbstii) and oysters (Crassostrea virginica), oysters were reared with and without caged crabs for 71 days at three pCO2 levels. During subsequent predation trials, acidification reduced prey consumption, handling time and duration of unsuccessful predation attempt. These negative effects of ocean acidification on crab foraging behaviour more than offset any benefit to crabs resulting from a reduction in the net rate of oyster calcification. These findings reveal that efforts to evaluate how acidification will alter marine food webs should include quantifying impacts on both calcification rates and animal behaviour. PMID:26108629

  5. Ocean acidification impairs crab foraging behaviour.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Luke F; Grabowski, Jonathan H; Piehler, Michael F; Westfield, Isaac; Ries, Justin B

    2015-07-07

    Anthropogenic elevation of atmospheric CO2 is driving global-scale ocean acidification, which consequently influences calcification rates of many marine invertebrates and potentially alters their susceptibility to predation. Ocean acidification may also impair an organism's ability to process environmental and biological cues. These counteracting impacts make it challenging to predict how acidification will alter species interactions and community structure. To examine effects of acidification on consumptive and behavioural interactions between mud crabs (Panopeus herbstii) and oysters (Crassostrea virginica), oysters were reared with and without caged crabs for 71 days at three pCO2 levels. During subsequent predation trials, acidification reduced prey consumption, handling time and duration of unsuccessful predation attempt. These negative effects of ocean acidification on crab foraging behaviour more than offset any benefit to crabs resulting from a reduction in the net rate of oyster calcification. These findings reveal that efforts to evaluate how acidification will alter marine food webs should include quantifying impacts on both calcification rates and animal behaviour.

  6. [Biologically Active Peptides of King Crab Hepatopancreas].

    PubMed

    Bogdanov, V V; Berezin, B B; Il'ina, A P; Yamskova, V P; Yamskov, I A

    2015-01-01

    Substances of a peptide nature isolated from the hepatopancreas of the king crab Paralithodes camtschaticus exhibited physicochemical properties and membranotropic and specific activities similar to those of membranotropic homeostatic tissue-specific bioregulators previously found in different mammalian and plant tissues. Their biological effect on vertebrate tissues was demonstrated on a model of roller organotypic cultivation of Pleurodeles waltl newt liver tissue.

  7. A HYPERSPECTRAL VIEW OF THE CRAB NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Charlebois, M.; Drissen, L.; Bernier, A.-P.; Grandmont, F.; Binette, L. E-mail: ldrissen@phy.ulaval.c

    2010-05-15

    We have obtained spatially resolved spectra of the Crab nebula in the spectral ranges 450-520 nm and 650-680 nm, encompassing the H{beta}, [O III] {lambda}4959, {lambda}5007, H{alpha}, [N II] {lambda}6548, {lambda}6584, and [S II] {lambda}6717, {lambda}6731 emission lines, with the imaging Fourier transform spectrometer SpIOMM at the Observatoire du Mont-Megantic's 1.6 m telescope. We first compare our data with published observations obtained either from a Fabry-Perot interferometer or from a long-slit spectrograph. Using a spectral deconvolution technique similar to the one developed by Cadez et al., we identify and resolve multiple emission lines separated by large Doppler shifts and contained within the rapidly expanding filamentary structure of the Crab. This allows us to measure important line ratios, such as [N II]/H{alpha}, [S II]/H{alpha}, and [S II] {lambda}6717 /[S II] {lambda}6731 of individual filaments, providing a new insight on the SE-NW asymmetry in the Crab. From our analysis of the spatial distribution of the electronic density and of the respective shocked versus photoionized gas components, we deduce that the skin-less NW region must have evolved faster than the rest of the nebula. Assuming a very simple expansion model for the ejecta material, our data provide us with a complete tridimensional view of the Crab.

  8. The CMS Remote Analysis Builder (CRAB)

    SciTech Connect

    Spiga, D.; Cinquilli, M.; Servoli, L.; Lacaprara, S.; Fanzago, F.; Dorigo, A.; Merlo, M.; Farina, F.; Fanfani, A.; Codispoti, G.; Bacchi, W.; /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U /CERN /INFN, CNAF /INFN, Trieste /Fermilab

    2008-01-22

    The CMS experiment will produce several Pbytes of data every year, to be distributed over many computing centers geographically distributed in different countries. Analysis of this data will be also performed in a distributed way, using grid infrastructure. CRAB (CMS Remote Analysis Builder) is a specific tool, designed and developed by the CMS collaboration, that allows a transparent access to distributed data to end physicist. Very limited knowledge of underlying technicalities are required to the user. CRAB interacts with the local user environment, the CMS Data Management services and with the Grid middleware. It is able to use WLCG, gLite and OSG middleware. CRAB has been in production and in routine use by end-users since Spring 2004. It has been extensively used in studies to prepare the Physics Technical Design Report (PTDR) and in the analysis of reconstructed event samples generated during the Computing Software and Analysis Challenge (CSA06). This involved generating thousands of jobs per day at peak rates. In this paper we discuss the current implementation of CRAB, the experience with using it in production and the plans to improve it in the immediate future.

  9. Search for excess showers from Crab Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirov, I. N.; Stamenov, J. N.; Ushev, S. Z.; Janminchev, V. D.; Aseikin, V. S.; Nikolsky, S. I.; Nikolskaja, N. M.; Yakovlev, V. I.; Morozov, A. E.

    1985-01-01

    The arrival directions of muon poor showers registrated in the Tien Shan experiment during an effective running time about I,8.IO(4)h were analyzed. It is shown that there is a significant excess of these showers coming the direction of Crab Nebula.

  10. Corneal laceration caused by river crab

    PubMed Central

    Vinuthinee, Naidu; Azreen-Redzal, Anuar; Juanarita, Jaafar; Zunaina, Embong

    2015-01-01

    A 5-year-old boy presented with right eye pain associated with tearing and photophobia of 1-day duration. He gave a history of playing with a river crab when suddenly the crab clamped his fingers. He attempted to fling the crab off, but the crab flew and hit his right eye. Ocular examination revealed a right eye corneal ulcer with clumps of fibrin located beneath the corneal ulcer and 1.6 mm level of hypopyon. At presentation, the Seidel test was negative, with a deep anterior chamber. Culture from the corneal scrapping specimen grew Citrobacter diversus and Proteus vulgaris, and the boy was treated with topical gentamicin and ceftazidime eyedrops. Fibrin clumps beneath the corneal ulcer subsequently dislodged, and revealed a full-thickness corneal laceration wound with a positive Seidel test and shallow anterior chamber. The patient underwent emergency corneal toileting and suturing. Postoperatively, he was treated with oral ciprofloxacin 250 mg 12-hourly for 1 week, topical gentamicin, ceftazidime, and dexamethasone eyedrops for 4 weeks. Right eye vision improved to 6/9 and 6/6 with pinhole at the 2-week follow-up following corneal suture removal. PMID:25678769

  11. HUBBLE CAPTURES DYNAMICS OF CRAB NEBULA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A new sequence of Hubble Space Telescope images of the remnant of a tremendous stellar explosion is giving astronomers a remarkable look at the dynamic relationship between the tiny Crab Pulsar and the vast nebula that it powers. This picture shows a Hubble Space Telescope image of the inner parts of the Crab. The pulsar itself is visible as the left of the pair of stars near the center of the frame. Surrounding the pulsar is a complex of sharp knots and wisp-like features. This image is one of a sequence of Hubble images taken over the course of several months. This sequence shows that the inner part of the Crab Nebula is far more dynamic than previously understood. The Crab literally 'changes it stripes' every few days as these wisps stream away from the pulsar at half the speed of light. The Hubble Space Telescope photo was taken Nov. 5, 1995 by the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 at a wavelength of around 550 nanometers, in the middle of the visible part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Credit: Jeff Hester and Paul Scowen (Arizona State University), and NASA

  12. Power coupler for the ILC crab cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Burt, G.; Dexter, A.; Jenkins, R.; Beard, C.; Goudket, P.; McIntosh, P.A.; Bellantoni, Leo; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The ILC crab cavity will require the design of an appropriate power coupler. The beam-loading in dipole mode cavities is considerably more variable than accelerating cavities, hence simulations have been performed to establish the required external Q. Simulations of a suitable coupler were then performed and were verified using a normal conducting prototype with variable coupler tips.

  13. A Hyperspectral View of the Crab Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlebois, M.; Drissen, L.; Bernier, A.-P.; Grandmont, F.; Binette, L.

    2010-05-01

    We have obtained spatially resolved spectra of the Crab nebula in the spectral ranges 450-520 nm and 650-680 nm, encompassing the Hβ, [O III] λ4959, λ5007, Hα, [N II] λ6548, λ6584, and [S II] λ6717, λ6731 emission lines, with the imaging Fourier transform spectrometer SpIOMM at the Observatoire du Mont-Mégantic's 1.6 m telescope. We first compare our data with published observations obtained either from a Fabry-Perot interferometer or from a long-slit spectrograph. Using a spectral deconvolution technique similar to the one developed by Čadež et al., we identify and resolve multiple emission lines separated by large Doppler shifts and contained within the rapidly expanding filamentary structure of the Crab. This allows us to measure important line ratios, such as [N II]/Hα, [S II]/Hα, and [S II] λ6717 /[S II] λ6731 of individual filaments, providing a new insight on the SE-NW asymmetry in the Crab. From our analysis of the spatial distribution of the electronic density and of the respective shocked versus photoionized gas components, we deduce that the skin-less NW region must have evolved faster than the rest of the nebula. Assuming a very simple expansion model for the ejecta material, our data provide us with a complete tridimensional view of the Crab.

  14. Burrow surveillance in fiddler crabs. I. Description of behaviour.

    PubMed

    Hemmi, Jan M; Zeil, J

    2003-11-01

    When defending resources, animals need to reliably detect and identify potential competitors. Animals that live at high population densities would be expected to be efficient in this aspect of resource defence since the time lost in false alarms could be substantial and the failure of identifying a competitor could be very costly. How does an animal decide whether another animal is or is not a threat to a resource or a territory? Fiddler crabs [Uca vomeris (McNeill)] operate from burrows that they guard and defend vigorously against other crabs. The crabs live in dense populations, with many animals inhabiting one square metre of mudflat. We describe here the behavioural responses of foraging crabs to repeated presentations of small crab-like dummies approaching their burrows. We explore the relationship between the probability and the timing of burrow defence responses, the crab's behavioural state, and the visual appearance and direction of approach of the dummies. We find that the probability of response of resident crabs is independent of the relative position of crab and dummy but is strongly affected by the dummy's position and movement direction relative to the crab's burrow. The critical stimuli are the dummy's distance from the crab's burrow and whether the dummy is moving towards the burrow or not. The response distance (dummy-burrow distance) increases with the crab's own distance from the burrow, indicating that the crabs modify their assessment of threat depending on their own distance away from the burrow. Differences in dummy size and brightness do not affect the probability or the timing of the response. We discuss these results in the context of fiddler crab social life and, in a companion paper, identify the visual and non-visual cues involved in burrow defence.

  15. Nutritional value of winter foods for whooping cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, J.T.; Slack, R.D.; Gee, G.F.

    1996-01-01

    We measured metabolizable energy and digestibility of Whooping Crane (Grus americana) winter foods (blue crab [Callinectes sapidus]), common Rangia clam (Rangia cuneata), wolfberry fruit (Lycium carolinianurn [wolfberry]), and live oak acorn (Ouercus virginiana [acorn])] with feeding trials to captive-reared Whooping Cranes. Apparent metabolizable energy coefficients (expressed as %) were for crab (34.1), Rangia clam (75.0), wolfberry (44.8), and acorn (43.2). Digestion coefficients for protein were lower for plant foods (48.9 and 53.4) than for animal foods (69.4 and 75.2). Digestion coefficients for total lipid differed among foods: highest and lowest lipid digestibility was for acorn (87.2) and wolfberry (60.0), respectively. We also determined total energy and percent protein and lipid of the four foods and stout razor clam (Tagelus plebeius); gross energy was 2-5x higher for acorn and wolfberry on a dry-weight basis than for blue crab and stout razor clam. Crude protein was 2-3x higher for blue crab than for wolfberry and stout razor clam. Wolfberry ranked the highest of five foods for metabolic energy and total lipid nutrient availability per kg of food ingested, and blue crab ranked highest for crude protein availability.

  16. Degradation and mineralization of chitin in an estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, J.

    1987-01-01

    A method for measuring microbial degradation and mineralization of radiolabeled native chitin is described. /sup 14/C-labeled chitin was synthesized in vivo by injecting shed blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) with N-acetyl-D-(/sup 14/C)-glucosamine, allowing for its incorporation into the exoskeleton. Rates of chitin degradation and mineralization in estuarine water and sediments were determined as functions of temperature, inoculum source, and oxygen condition. Significant differences in rates between temperature treatments were evident. Q/sub 10/ values ranged from 1.2 to 2.5 for water and sediment, respectively. Increased incubation temperature also resulted in decreased lag times before onset of chitinoclastic bacterial growth and chitin degradation. The anaerobic pathway of chitin decomposition by chitinoclastic bacteria was examined with an emphasis on end product coupling to other bacterial types. Actively growing chitinoclastic bacterial isolates produced primarily acetate, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide in broth culture.

  17. Trace metal residues in shellfish from Maryland waters, 1976-1980

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenberg, M.; Topping, J.J.

    1984-10-01

    Levels of seven heavy metal residues, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury and zinc were monitored in samples of the American oyster (Crassostrea virginica), the soft shell clam (Mya arenaria), the hard shell clam (Mercenaria mercenaria) and the blue crab (Callinectes sapidus). The study was conducted from 1976 through 1980. In cases where the Food and Drug Administration has established action levels, mean and median yearly values were significantly below these levels. In cases where no action level exists, heavy metal residues in the shellfish samples were well below levels which are generally regarded as safe. No significant yearly trends in heavy metal residues were discovered. Apparent increases in arsenic levels merit further study. 22 references, 1 figure, 3 tables.

  18. Ghost fishing activity in derelict blue crab traps in Louisiana.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Julie A; Alford, Amy B

    2014-02-15

    Derelict crab traps impact the coastal ecosystem through continued catch of target species and species of conservation, economic, or recreational importance. During volunteer-supported crab trap cleanups in 2012 and 2013, we quantified ghost fishing activity in derelict crab traps in coastal Louisiana through a citizen scientist program. Volunteers removed 3607 derelict traps during these events, and over 65% of traps analyzed by citizen scientists were actively ghost fishing. Additionally, volunteers identified 19 species enmeshed in derelict traps, including a combination of fresh and saltwater species. We also detected a significant difference in the number of blue crab in actively ghost fishing derelict traps across removal locations with estimated catches varying between 2.4 and 3.5 crabs/trap. Our instantaneous estimates of ghost fishing activity are greater than those previously thought in Louisiana, further justifying current derelict crab trap prevention and removal extension and outreach programs in Louisiana and throughout the Gulf of Mexico.

  19. Accumulation and depuration of pectenotoxins in brown crab Cancer pagurus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhaoxin

    2009-06-01

    Pectenotoxins (PTXs) are a group of marine algal toxins. In this study, the accumulation and depuration of pectenotoxins in brown crab Cancer pagurus were investigated. Crabs were fed with toxic blue mussels Mytilus edulis for 21 days and then depurated for 42 days. Toxins were extracted with methanol from the digestive glands of contaminated crabs, uncontaminated crabs (control group) and from blue mussels for comparison. Extracts were analyzed by liquid chromatograph coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS). The concentrations of PTX-2, PTX-2 SA, 7- epi-PTX-2 SA, and PTX-12 were analyzed in two batches of toxic blue mussels and the crabs. A one-compartment model was applied to describe the depuration of PTXs. The half-life of PTXs was estimated to be 6-7.5 days. After depuration for 42 days, the amount of PTXs measured in the crab digestive glands was less than 1 μg/kg.

  20. Predatory blue crabs induce stronger nonconsumptive effects in eastern oysters Crassostrea virginica than scavenging blue crabs

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Miranda M.; Smee, Delbert L.

    2017-01-01

    By influencing critical prey traits such as foraging or habitat selection, predators can affect entire ecosystems, but the nature of cues that trigger prey reactions to predators are not well understood. Predators may scavenge to supplement their energetic needs and scavenging frequency may vary among individuals within a species due to preferences and prey availability. Yet prey reactions to consumers that are primarily scavengers versus those that are active foragers have not been investigated, even though variation in prey reactions to scavengers or predators might influence cascading nonconsumptive effects in food webs. Oysters Crassostrea virginica react to crab predators by growing stronger shells. We exposed oysters to exudates from crabs fed live oysters or fed aged oyster tissue to simulate scavenging, and to controls without crab cues. Oysters grew stronger shells when exposed to either crab exudate, but their shells were significantly stronger when crabs were fed live oysters. The stronger response to predators than scavengers could be due to inherent differences in diet cues representative of reduced risk in the presence of scavengers or to degradation of conspecific alarm cues in aged treatments, which may mask risk from potential predators subsisting by scavenging. PMID:28265512

  1. Status of LHC crab activity simulations and beam studies

    SciTech Connect

    Calaga,R.; Assman, R.; Barranco, J.; Barranco, J.; Calaga, R.; Caspers, F.; Ciapala, E.; De-Maria, R.; Koutchouk, J. P.; Linnecar, T.; Metral, E.; Morita, A.; Solyak, N.; Sun, Y.; Tomas, R.; Tuckmantel, J.; Weiler, T.; Zimmermann, F.

    2009-05-04

    The LHC crab cavity program is advancing rapidly towards a first prototype which is anticipated to be tested during the early stages of the LHC phase I upgrade and commissioning. The general project status and some aspects related to crab optics, collimation, aperture constraints, impedances, noise effects. beam transparency and machine protection critical for a safe and robust operation of LHC beams with crab cavities are addressed here.

  2. A 150-million-year-old crab larva and its implications for the early rise of brachyuran crabs.

    PubMed

    Haug, Joachim T; Martin, Joel W; Haug, Carolin

    2015-03-09

    True crabs (Brachyura) are the most successful group of decapod crustaceans. This success is most likely coupled to their life history, including two specialised larval forms, zoea and megalopa. The group is comparably young, starting to diversify only about 100 million years ago (mya), with a dramatic increase in species richness beginning approximately 50 mya. Early evolution of crabs is still very incompletely known. Here, we report a fossil crab larva, 150 mya, documented with up-to-date imaging techniques. It is only the second find of any fossil crab larva, but the first complete one, the first megalopa, and the oldest one (other fossil ca. 110 mya). Despite its age, the new fossil possesses a very modern morphology, being indistinguishable from many extant crab larvae. Hence, modern morphologies must have been present significantly earlier than formerly anticipated. We briefly discuss the impact of this find on our understanding of early crab evolution.

  3. Crab Crossing Schemes and Studies for Electron Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect

    S. Ahmed, Y. Derbenev, V. Morozov, A. Castilla, G.A. Krafft, B. Yunn, Y. Zhang, J.R. Delayen

    2011-09-01

    This report shows our progress in crab crossing consideration for future electron-ion collider envisioned at JLab. In this design phase, we are evaluating two crabbing schemes viz., the deflecting and dispersive. The mathematical formulations and lattice design for these schemes are discussed in this paper. Numerical simulations involving particle tracking through a realistic deflecting RF cavity and optics illustrate the desired crab tilt of 25 mrad for 1.35 MV. Evolution of beam propagation are shown which provides the physical insight of the crabbing phenomenon.

  4. Compact Superconducting Crabbing and Deflecting Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    De Silva, Payagalage Subashini Uddika

    2012-09-01

    Recently, new geometries for superconducting crabbing and deflecting cavities have been developed that have significantly improved properties over those the standard TM{sub 110} cavities. They are smaller, have low surface fields, high shunt impedance and, more importantly for some of them, no lower-order-mode with a well-separated fundamental mode. This talk will present the status of the development of these cavities.

  5. Pulsating Radio Sources near the Crab Nebula.

    PubMed

    Staelin, D H; Reifenstein, E C

    1968-12-27

    Two new pulsating radio sources, designated NP 0527 and NP 0532, were found near the Crab Nebula and could be coincident with it. Both sources are sporadic, and no periodicities are evident. The pulse dispersions indicate that 1.58 +/- 0.03 and 1.74 +/- 0.02 x 10(20) electrons per square centimeter lie in the direction of NP 0527 and NP 0532, respectively.

  6. Multiband observations of the Crab Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krassilchtchikov, A. M.; Bykov, A. M.; Castelletti, G. M.; Dubner, G. M.; Kargaltsev, O. Yu; Pavlov, G. G.

    2017-01-01

    Results of simultaneous imaging of the Crab Nebula in the radio (JVLA), optical (HST), and X-ray (Chandra) bands are presented. The images show a variety of small-scale structures, including wisps mainly located to the north-west of the pulsar and knots forming a ring-like structure associated with the termination shock of the pulsar wind. The locations of the structures in different bands do not coincide with each other.

  7. Status of the ILC Crab Cavity Development

    SciTech Connect

    Burt, G.; Dexter, A.; Beard, C.; Goudket, P.; McIntosh, P.; Bellantoni, L.; Grimm, T.; Li, Z.; Xiao, L.; /SLAC

    2011-10-20

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) will require two dipole cavities to 'crab' the electron and positron bunches prior to their collision. It is proposed to use two 9 cell SCRF dipole cavities operating at a frequency of 3.9 GHz, with a transverse gradient of 3.8MV/m in order to provide the required transverse kick. Extensive numerical modelling of this cavity and its couplers has been performed. Aluminium prototypes have been manufactured and tested to measure the RF properties of the cavity and couplers. In addition single cell niobium prototypes have been manufactured and tested in a vertical cryostat. The International Collider (ILC) [1] collides bunches of electrons and positrons at a crossing angle of 14 mrad. The angle between these bunches causes a loss in luminosity due to geometric effects [2]. The luminosity lost from this geometric effect can be recovered by rotating the bunches into alignment prior to collision. One possible method of rotating the bunches is to use a crab cavity [3]. A crab cavity is a transverse defecting cavity, where the phase of the cavity is such that the head and tail of the bunch receive equal and opposite kicks. As the bunches are only 500 nm wide in the horizontal plane, the cavity phase must be strictly controlled to avoid the bunch centre being deflected too much. In order to keep the phase stability within the required limits it is required that the cavity be superconducting to avoid thermal effects in both the cavity and its RF source. At the location of the crab cavity in the ILC there is only 23 cm separation between the centre of the cavity and the extraction line, hence the cavity must be small enough to fit in this space. This, along with the difficulty of making high frequency SRF components, set the frequency of the cavity to 3.9 GHz.

  8. CMS distributed data analysis with CRAB3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascheroni, M.; Balcas, J.; Belforte, S.; Bockelman, B. P.; Hernandez, J. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Konstantinov, P. B.; Silva, J. M. D.; Ali, M. A. B. M.; Melo, A. M.; Riahi, H.; Tanasijczuk, A. J.; Yusli, M. N. B.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A. E.; Vaandering, E.

    2015-12-01

    The CMS Remote Analysis Builder (CRAB) is a distributed workflow management tool which facilitates analysis tasks by isolating users from the technical details of the Grid infrastructure. Throughout LHC Run 1, CRAB has been successfully employed by an average of 350 distinct users each week executing about 200,000 jobs per day. CRAB has been significantly upgraded in order to face the new challenges posed by LHC Run 2. Components of the new system include 1) a lightweight client, 2) a central primary server which communicates with the clients through a REST interface, 3) secondary servers which manage user analysis tasks and submit jobs to the CMS resource provisioning system, and 4) a central service to asynchronously move user data from temporary storage in the execution site to the desired storage location. The new system improves the robustness, scalability and sustainability of the service. Here we provide an overview of the new system, operation, and user support, report on its current status, and identify lessons learned from the commissioning phase and production roll-out.

  9. CRAB: Distributed analysis tool for CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sala, Leonardo; CMS Collaboration

    2012-12-01

    CMS has a distributed computing model, based on a hierarchy of tiered regional computing centers and adopts a data driven model for the end user analysis. This model foresees that jobs are submitted to the analysis resources where data are hosted. The increasing complexity of the whole computing infrastructure makes the simple analysis work flow more and more complicated for the end user. CMS has developed and deployed a dedicated tool named CRAB (CMS Remote Analysis Builder) in order to guarantee the physicists an efficient access to the distributed data whilst hiding the underlying complexity. This tool is used by CMS to enable the running of physics analysis jobs in a transparent manner over data distributed across sites. It factorizes out the interaction with the underlying batch farms, grid infrastructure and CMS data management tools, allowing the user to deal only with a simple and intuitive interface. We present the CRAB architecture, as well as the current status and lessons learnt in deploying this tool for use by the CMS collaboration. We also present the future development of the CRAB system.

  10. CMS distributed data analysis with CRAB3

    SciTech Connect

    Mascheroni, M.; Balcas, J.; Belforte, S.; Bockelman, B. P.; Hernandez, J. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Konstantinov, P. B.; Silva, J. M. D.; Ali, M. A. B. M.; Melo, A. M.; Riahi, H.; Tanasijczuk, A. J.; Yusli, M. N. B.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A. E.; Vaandering, E.

    2015-12-23

    The CMS Remote Analysis Builder (CRAB) is a distributed workflow management tool which facilitates analysis tasks by isolating users from the technical details of the Grid infrastructure. Throughout LHC Run 1, CRAB has been successfully employed by an average of 350 distinct users each week executing about 200,000 jobs per day.CRAB has been significantly upgraded in order to face the new challenges posed by LHC Run 2. Components of the new system include 1) a lightweight client, 2) a central primary server which communicates with the clients through a REST interface, 3) secondary servers which manage user analysis tasks and submit jobs to the CMS resource provisioning system, and 4) a central service to asynchronously move user data from temporary storage in the execution site to the desired storage location. Furthermore, the new system improves the robustness, scalability and sustainability of the service.Here we provide an overview of the new system, operation, and user support, report on its current status, and identify lessons learned from the commissioning phase and production roll-out.

  11. CMS distributed data analysis with CRAB3

    DOE PAGES

    Mascheroni, M.; Balcas, J.; Belforte, S.; ...

    2015-12-23

    The CMS Remote Analysis Builder (CRAB) is a distributed workflow management tool which facilitates analysis tasks by isolating users from the technical details of the Grid infrastructure. Throughout LHC Run 1, CRAB has been successfully employed by an average of 350 distinct users each week executing about 200,000 jobs per day.CRAB has been significantly upgraded in order to face the new challenges posed by LHC Run 2. Components of the new system include 1) a lightweight client, 2) a central primary server which communicates with the clients through a REST interface, 3) secondary servers which manage user analysis tasks andmore » submit jobs to the CMS resource provisioning system, and 4) a central service to asynchronously move user data from temporary storage in the execution site to the desired storage location. Furthermore, the new system improves the robustness, scalability and sustainability of the service.Here we provide an overview of the new system, operation, and user support, report on its current status, and identify lessons learned from the commissioning phase and production roll-out.« less

  12. The inner knot of the Crab nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyutikov, Maxim; Komissarov, Serguei S.; Porth, Oliver

    2016-02-01

    We model the inner knot of the Crab nebula as a synchrotron emission coming from the non-spherical MHD termination shock of relativistic pulsar wind. The post-shock flow is mildly relativistic; as a result the Doppler beaming has a strong impact on the shock appearance. The model can reproduce the knot location, size, elongation, brightness distribution, luminosity and polarization provided the effective magnetization of the section of the pulsar wind producing the knot is low, σ ≤ 1. In the striped wind model, this implies that the striped zone is rather wide, with the magnetic inclination angle of the Crab pulsar ≥45°; this agrees with the previous model-dependent estimate based on the gamma-ray emission of the pulsar. We conclude that the tiny knot is indeed a bright spot on the surface of a quasi-stationary magnetic relativistic shock and that this shock is a site of efficient particle acceleration. On the other hand, the deduced low magnetization of the knot plasma implies that this is an unlikely site for the Crab's gamma-ray flares, if they are related to the fast relativistic magnetic reconnection events.

  13. The Porcelain Crab Transcriptome and PCAD, the Porcelain Crab Microarray and Sequence Database

    SciTech Connect

    Tagmount, Abderrahmane; Wang, Mei; Lindquist, Erika; Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Teranishi, Kristen S.; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Wong, Mike; Stillman, Jonathon H.

    2010-01-27

    Background: With the emergence of a completed genome sequence of the freshwater crustacean Daphnia pulex, construction of genomic-scale sequence databases for additional crustacean sequences are important for comparative genomics and annotation. Porcelain crabs, genus Petrolisthes, have been powerful crustacean models for environmental and evolutionary physiology with respect to thermal adaptation and understanding responses of marine organisms to climate change. Here, we present a large-scale EST sequencing and cDNA microarray database project for the porcelain crab Petrolisthes cinctipes. Methodology/Principal Findings: A set of ~;;30K unique sequences (UniSeqs) representing ~;;19K clusters were generated from ~;;98K high quality ESTs from a set of tissue specific non-normalized and mixed-tissue normalized cDNA libraries from the porcelain crab Petrolisthes cinctipes. Homology for each UniSeq was assessed using BLAST, InterProScan, GO and KEGG database searches. Approximately 66percent of the UniSeqs had homology in at least one of the databases. All EST and UniSeq sequences along with annotation results and coordinated cDNA microarray datasets have been made publicly accessible at the Porcelain Crab Array Database (PCAD), a feature-enriched version of the Stanford and Longhorn Array Databases.Conclusions/Significance: The EST project presented here represents the third largest sequencing effort for any crustacean, and the largest effort for any crab species. Our assembly and clustering results suggest that our porcelain crab EST data set is equally diverse to the much larger EST set generated in the Daphnia pulex genome sequencing project, and thus will be an important resource to the Daphnia research community. Our homology results support the pancrustacea hypothesis and suggest that Malacostraca may be ancestral to Branchiopoda and Hexapoda. Our results also suggest that our cDNA microarrays cover as much of the transcriptome as can reasonably be captured in

  14. Burrow surveillance in fiddler crabs. II. The sensory cues.

    PubMed

    Hemmi, Jan M; Zeil, J

    2003-11-01

    Using crab-like dummies, we have shown previously that fiddler crabs [Uca vomeris (McNeill)] defend their burrows against intruders in a burrow-centred frame of reference. The crabs respond whenever an intruder approaches to within a certain distance of the burrow entrance, and this distance is independent of the approach direction. We show here that the crabs combine information from the path integration system on the location of their invisible burrow and visual information on the retinal position of an intruder to make this allocentric judgement. Excluding all alternative visual cues, we propose that the crabs employ a small set of matched visual filters to determine the relationship between a crab-like object and the invisible burrow. To account for the constantly varying distance between the crabs and their burrows, the state of the path integrator may select the appropriate one of these retinal 'warning zones'. We have shown before that burrow-owning fiddler crabs are extremely responsive to potential burrow snatchers, which we simulated with crab-like dummies moving across the substratum towards the burrow of residents. The crab's decision to respond to these dummies depends mainly on the spatial arrangement between itself, its burrow and the approaching dummy. The most important factor predicting response probability is the dummy's distance from the crab's burrow: the crabs are more likely to respond the closer the dummy approaches the burrow. The dummy-burrow distance not only determines the overall response probability but also the timing of burrow defence responses (i.e. when the crabs decide to react). Most interestingly, this response distance is independent of the dummy's direction of approach to the burrow. In addition, the crabs respond earlier to a dummy approaching their burrow if they themselves are further away from it, indicating that knowledge of their own distance from the burrow has an influence on their decision to respond. These results

  15. 50 CFR 680.6 - Crab economic data report (EDR).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Crab economic data report (EDR). 680.6... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) SHELLFISH FISHERIES OF THE EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA General § 680.6 Crab economic data report (EDR). (a) Requirements. (1) Any owner or leaseholder of...

  16. X-Ray Spectral Evolution of the Crab Pulse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, A. K.; Pravdo, S. H.; Angelini, L.

    1997-01-01

    The Crab Pulsar was observed with the X-ray detectors on the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) on May 2, 1996. The large area, high time resolution, extended energy range, and moderate energy resolution of the RXTE instruments provided an unprecedented measurement of the Crab pulsar spectrum as it evolved in phase across the 33 msec pulse.

  17. 50 CFR Table 2 to Part 680 - Crab Species Code

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Crab Species Code 2 Table 2 to Part 680 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION..., Table 2 Table 2 to Part 680—Crab Species Code Species code Common name Scientific name 900...

  18. 50 CFR Table 4 to Part 680 - Crab Process Codes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Crab Process Codes 4 Table 4 to Part 680 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION..., Table 4 Table 4 to Part 680—Crab Process Codes Process code Description 0 Other (specify). 1 Fresh....

  19. 50 CFR Table 6 to Part 680 - Crab Grade Codes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Crab Grade Codes 6 Table 6 to Part 680 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION..., Table 6 Table 6 to Part 680—Crab Grade Codes Grade/code Description 1 Standard or premium quality...

  20. Land crabs as key drivers in tropical coastal forest recruitment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindquist, E.S.; Krauss, K.W.; Green, P.T.; O'Dowd, D. J.; Sherman, P.M.; Smith, T. J.

    2009-01-01

    Plant populations are regulated by a diverse assortment of abiotic and biotic factors that influence seed dispersal and viability, and seedling establishment and growth at the microsite. Rarely does one animal guild exert as significant an influence on different plant assemblages as land crabs. We review three tropical coastal ecosystems-mangroves, island maritime forests, and mainland coastal terrestrial forests-where land crabs directly influence forest composition by limiting tree establishment and recruitment. Land crabs differentially prey on seeds, propagules and seedlings along nutrient, chemical and physical environmental gradients. In all of these ecosystems, but especially mangroves, abiotic gradients are well studied, strong and influence plant species distributions. However, we suggest that crab predation has primacy over many of these environmental factors by acting as the first limiting factor of tropical tree recruitment to drive the potential structural and compositional organisation of coastal forests. We show that the influence of crabs varies relative to tidal gradient, shoreline distance, canopy position, time, season, tree species and fruiting periodicity. Crabs also facilitate forest growth and development through such activities as excavation of burrows, creation of soil mounds, aeration of soils, removal of leaf litter into burrows and creation of carbon-rich soil microhabitats. For all three systems, land crabs influence the distribution, density and size-class structure of tree populations. Indeed, crabs are among the major drivers of tree recruitment in tropical coastal forest ecosystems, and their conservation should be included in management plans of these forests. ?? 2009 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  1. 50 CFR 680.21 - Crab harvesting cooperatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Crab harvesting cooperatives. 680.21 Section 680.21 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND... IFQ permit issued to the crab harvesting cooperative for the current fishing season. (2) Transfer...

  2. 50 CFR 680.6 - Crab economic data report (EDR).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Crab economic data report (EDR). 680.6... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) SHELLFISH FISHERIES OF THE EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA General § 680.6 Crab economic data report (EDR). (a) Requirements. (1) Any owner or leaseholder of...

  3. Enhanced gamma-ray activity from the Crab nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buehler, R.; Ciprini, S.

    2016-01-01

    Preliminary LAT analysis indicates enhanced gamma-ray activity from the Crab nebula. The daily-averaged gamma-ray emission (E > 100 MeV) from the direction of the Crab Nebula has surpassed 4.0 x 10^-6 ph cm^-2 s^-1 five times in the last 12 days.

  4. Crabbed Waist Collisions in DAFNE and Super-B Design

    SciTech Connect

    Raimondi, P.; Alesini, D.; Biagini, M.E.; Biscari, C.; Boni, R.; Boscolo, M.; Bossi, F.; Buonomo, B.; Clozza, A.; Delle Monache, G.O.; Demma, T.; Di Pasquale, E.; Di Pirro, G.; Drago, A.; Gallo, A.; Ghigo, A.; Guiducci, S.; Ligi, C.; Marcellini, F.; Mazzitelli, Giovanni; Milardi, C.; /Frascati /Orsay, LAL /CERN /Rome III U. /Rome U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /KEK, Tsukuba /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Cosenza /SLAC /Frascati

    2011-11-02

    The new idea of increasing the luminosity of a collider with crab waist collisions and first experimental results from the DA{Phi}NE {Phi}-Factory at LNF, Frascati, using this concept are presented. Consequences for the design of future factories will be discussed. An outlook to the performance reach with crab waist collisions is given, with emphasis on future B Factories.

  5. 50 CFR Table 5 to Part 680 - Crab Size Codes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Crab Size Codes 5 Table 5 to Part 680 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) SHELLFISH FISHERIES OF THE EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 680, Table 5 Table 5 to Part 680—Crab...

  6. 50 CFR Table 5 to Part 680 - Crab Size Codes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Crab Size Codes 5 Table 5 to Part 680 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) SHELLFISH FISHERIES OF THE EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 680, Table 5 Table 5 to Part 680—Crab...

  7. Crabs in Labs: The Shore Crab (Carcinus maenas) as Teaching Material.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogarth, P. J.

    1983-01-01

    The shore crab (Carcinus maenas) is an excellent subject for school study, both in the field and the laboratory. It is easily collected and maintained and can be used for a wide range of investigations. Some background details are given and possible areas of investigation suggested. (Author)

  8. SMALL ANGLE CRAB COMPENSATION FOR LHC IR UPGRADE

    SciTech Connect

    CALAGA,R.; DORDA, U.; OHMI, D.; OIDE, K.; TOMAS, R.; ZIMMERMANN, F.

    2007-06-25

    A small angle (< 1 mrad) crab scheme is an attractive option for the LHC luminosity upgrade to recover the geometric luminosity loss from the finite crossing angle [I]. The luminosity loss increases steeply to unacceptable levels as the IP beta function is reduced below its nominal value (see Fig. 1 in Ref. [2]). The crab compensation in the LHC can be accomplished using only two sets of deflecting RF cavities, placed in collision-free straight sections of the LHC to nullify the effective crossing angles at IPI & IP5. We also explore a 400 MHz superconducting cavity design and discuss the pertinent RF challenges. We present IR optics configurations with low-angle crab crossing, study the beam-beam performance and proton-beam emittance growth in the presence of crab compensation, lattice errors, and crab RF noise sources.

  9. The Decapod Crustacean Circulatory System: A Case That Is neither Open nor Closed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGaw, Iain J.

    2005-02-01

    Historically, the decapod crustacean circulatory system has been classed as open. However, recent work on the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus, suggests the circulatory system may be more complex than previously described. Corrosion casting techniques were refined and used to map the circulatory system of a variety of crab species (order: Decapoda; family: Cancridae) to determine if the complexity observed in the blue crab was present in other species. Seven arteries arose from the single chambered heart. The anterior aorta, the paired anterolateral arteries, and the paired hepatic arteries exited from the anterior aspect of the heart. The small-diameter posterior aorta exited posteriorly from the heart. Exiting from the ventral surface of the heart, the sternal artery branched to supply the legs and mouthparts of the crab. These arteries were more complex than previously described, with arterioles perfusing all areas of the body. The arterioles split into fine capillary-like vessels. Most of these capillaries were blind ending. However, in several areas (antennal gland, supraesophageal ganglion) complete capillary beds were present. After passing through the capillary-like vessels, blood drained into a series of sinuses. However, rather than being arbitrary spaces as previously described, scanning electron micrographs showed the sinuses to be distinct units. Most of the sinuses formed a series of flattened membrane-bound lacunae. This complexity may qualify the decapod crustacean circulatory system as one that is "partially closed" rather than open.

  10. 50 CFR Table 2b to Part 679 - Species Codes: FMP Prohibited Species and CR Crab

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... CR Crab 2b Table 2b to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL... CR Crab Species Description Code CR Crab Groundfish PSC CRAB Box Lopholithodes mandtii 900 ✓ Dungeness Cancer magister 910 ✓ King, blue Paralithodes platypus 922 ✓ ✓ King, golden (brown)...

  11. 50 CFR Table 2b to Part 679 - Species Codes: FMP Prohibited Species and CR Crab

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... CR Crab 2b Table 2b to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL... CR Crab Species Description Code CR Crab Groundfish PSC CRAB Box Lopholithodes mandtii 900 ✓ Dungeness Cancer magister 910 ✓ King, blue Paralithodes platypus 922 ✓ ✓ King, golden (brown)...

  12. 50 CFR Table 2b to Part 679 - Species Codes: FMP Prohibited Species and CR Crab

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... CR Crab 2b Table 2b to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL... CR Crab Species Description Code CR Crab Groundfish PSC CRAB Box Lopholithodes mandtii 900 ✓ Dungeness Cancer magister 910 ✓ King, blue Paralithodes platypus 922 ✓ ✓ King, golden (brown)...

  13. 50 CFR Table 2b to Part 679 - Species Codes: FMP Prohibited Species and CR Crab

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... CR Crab 2b Table 2b to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL... CR Crab Species Description Code CR Crab Groundfish PSC CRAB Box Lopholithodes mandtii 900 ✓ Dungeness Cancer magister 910 ✓ King, blue Paralithodes platypus 922 ✓ ✓ King, golden (brown)...

  14. 50 CFR Table 2b to Part 679 - Species Codes: FMP Prohibited Species and CR Crab

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... CR Crab 2b Table 2b to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL... CR Crab Species Description Code CR Crab Groundfish PSC CRAB Box Lopholithodes mandtii 900 ✓ Dungeness Cancer magister 910 ✓ King, blue Paralithodes platypus 922 ✓ ✓ King, golden (brown)...

  15. Chitin extraction from crab shells by Bacillus bacteria. Biological activities of fermented crab supernatants.

    PubMed

    Hajji, Sawssen; Ghorbel-Bellaaj, Olfa; Younes, Islem; Jellouli, Kemel; Nasri, Moncef

    2015-08-01

    Crab shells waste were fermented using six protease-producing Bacillus species (Bacillus subtilis A26, Bacillus mojavensis A21, Bacillus pumilus A1, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens An6, Bacillus licheniformis NH1 and Bacillus cereus BG1) for the production of chitin and fermented-crab supernatants (FCSs). In medium containing only crab shells, the highest demineralization DM was obtained with B. licheniformis NH1 (83±0.5%) and B. pumilus A1 (80±0.6%), while the highest deproteinization (DP) was achieved with A1 (94±1%) followed by NH1 (90±1.5%) strains. Cultures conducted in medium containing crab shells waste supplemented with 5% (w/v) glucose, were found to remarkably promote demineralization efficiency, and enhance slightly deproteinization rates. FTIR spectra of chitins showed the characteristics bands of α-chitin. FCSs showed varying degrees of antioxidant activities which were in a dose-dependent manner (p<0.01). In fact, FCS produced by B. amyloliquefaciens An6 exhibited the highest DPPH free radical-scavenging activity (92% at 4 mg/ml), while the lowest hydroxyl radical-scavenging activity (60% at 4 mg/ml) was obtained with B. subtilis A26 hydrolysates. However, the highest reducing power (OD700nm=2 at 0.5 mg/ml) was obtained by B.amyloliquefaciens An6 hydrolysates. These results suggest that crab hydrolysates are good sources of natural antioxidants. Further, FCSs were found to exhibit antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

  16. Switching skeletons: hydrostatic support in molting crabs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Jennifer R A.; Kier, William M.; Walker, I. D. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Skeletal support systems are essential for support, movement, muscular antagonism, and locomotion. Crustaceans shed their rigid exoskeleton at each molt yet are still capable of forceful movement. We hypothesize that the soft water-inflated body of newly molted crabs may rely on a hydrostatic skeleton, similar to that of worms and polyps. We measured internal hydrostatic pressure and the force exerted during claw adduction and observed a strong correlation between force and hydrostatic pressure, consistent with hydrostatic skeletal support. This alternation between the two basic skeletal types may be widespread among arthropods.

  17. Effects of pesticides on crab cheliped regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Costlow, J.D. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The mud crab cheliped regeneration bioassay has proven to be a sensitive and reliable bioassay in studies of the potential sublethal effects of pesticides, including teratogenesis, spontaneous autotomy, and duration of the various stages of development. The assay has also been demonstated to be a useful indication of mortality associated with the impact of these chemicals of anthropogenic origin during the megalopal and early postlarval stages of development. Four pesticides were tested here using the cheliped regeneration bioassay technique. Although carbofuran is approximately 5--6 times more toxic than methomyl, both compounds yield very similar results in terms of sublethal effects.

  18. Element Masses in the Crab Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibley, Adam R.; Katz, Andrea M.; Satterfield, Timothy J.; Vanderveer, Steven J.; MacAlpine, Gordon M.

    2016-10-01

    Using our previously published element abundance or mass-fraction distributions in the Crab Nebula, we derived actual mass distributions and estimates for overall nebular masses of hydrogen, helium, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and sulfur. As with the previous work, computations were carried out for photoionization models involving constant hydrogen density and also constant nuclear density. In addition, employing new flux measurements for [Ni ii] λ7378, along with combined photoionization models and analytic computations, a nickel abundance distribution was mapped and a nebular stable nickel mass estimate was derived.

  19. Habitat Suitability Index Models: Red king crab

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jewett, Stephen C.; Onuf, Christopher P.

    1988-01-01

    A review and synthesis of existing information were used to develop a Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) model for evaluating habitat of different life stages of red king crab (Paralithodes camtschatica). A model consolidates habitat use information into a framework appropriate for field application, and is scaled to produce an index between 0.0 (unsuitable habitat) and 1.0 (optimum habitat) in Alaskan coastal waters, especially in the Gulf of Alaska and the southeastern Bering Sea. HSI models are designed to be used with Habitat Evaluation Procedures previously developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

  20. Abundance, Health and Status of Sand Crabs at Ocean Beach, San Francisco: Comparisons From two Summers, 2003 and 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad-Saydah, A.; MacCormack, D.; Velarde, M.; Masters, D.; Walton, M.

    2004-12-01

    Interns from the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco monitored Pacific mole crabs, Emerita analoga, commonly known as sand crabs, at Ocean Beach, San Francisco for the second consecutive summer. Comparisons from two data sets revealed trends in crab abundance, size and location. Changes in abundance and location may have been related to water temperature and predation. Dissections of random crabs from all gender classes allowed inspection of parasitism on the crabs. The dissections revealed increased numbers of parasites in larger crabs (especially females with eggs) and in crabs collected later in the summer season. Crab parasitism may be connected to population changes of species predating the sand crabs.

  1. Polychlorinated biphenyls in blue crabs from South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus, J.M.; Mathews, T.D.

    1987-11-01

    Blue crabs are important members of the estuarine food web due to their numbers and their multiple roles as scavengers, predators and prey. Because of their omnivorous feeding characteristics, wide distribution an close association with bottom sediments, the potential exists for blue crabs to bioaccumulate pollutants residing in those sediments as has been shown for fiddler crabs. It follows that human health risk upon consumption of such crabs and biomagnification through the food web become primary concerns. During the spring of 1985, commercial crab fishermen in Beaufort County, South Carolina contacted the South Carolina Wildlife and Marine Resources Department (SCWMRD) concerning their perceptions of significantly declining catch rates in the Campbell Creek-Whale Branch area. Using knowledge of previously documented elevated polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) levels in the sediments of the upper portion of Campbell Creek, the SCWMRD initiated analysis of crab tissue from the area to ascertain the body burdens of PCBs. Initial screening results indicated potentially significant levels of PCBs in blue crabs at which time, SCWMRD contacted the SC Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) for more intensive study and definition of the situation. The work reported here was conducted between June and October 1985.

  2. Symbiotic crabs maintain coral health by clearing sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Hannah L.; Holbrook, Sally J.; Schmitt, Russell J.; Brooks, Andrew J.

    2006-11-01

    Stony corals are the foundation of coral reef ecosystems and form associations with other reef species. Many of these associations may be ecologically important and play a role in maintaining the health and diversity of reef systems, rendering it critical to understand the influence of symbiotic organisms in mediating responses to perturbation. This study demonstrates the importance of an association with trapeziid crabs in reducing adverse effects of sediments deposited on corals. In a field experiment, mortality rates of two species of branching corals were significantly lowered by the presence of crabs. All outplanted corals with crabs survived whereas 45-80% of corals without crabs died within a month. For surviving corals that lacked crabs, growth was slower and tissue bleaching and sediment load were higher. Laboratory experiments revealed that corals with crabs shed substantially more of the sediments deposited on coral surfaces, but also that crabs were most effective at removing grain sizes that were most damaging to coral tissues. The mechanism underlying this symbiotic relationship has not been recognized previously, and its role in maintaining coral health is likely to become even more critical as reefs worldwide experience increasing sedimentation.

  3. Mangrove crabs as ecosystem engineers; with emphasis on sediment processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, Erik

    2008-02-01

    The benthic fauna in mangrove forests is usually dominated by burrowing sesarmid (Grapsidae) and fiddler crabs (Ocypodidae). They are herbivores that retain, bury, macerate and ingest litter and microalgal mats. Most species within these two groups actively dig and maintain burrows in the sediment as a refuge from predation and environmental extremes. Based on the current knowledge on the biology and ecology of these crabs, it seems obvious that their activities have considerable impact on ecosystem functioning. However, no convincing conceptual framework has yet been defined into which the role of these crabs can be identified and characterized. The attributes by which these abundant animals affect the microbial and biogeochemical functional diversity fit well into the concept of ecosystem engineering. The conceptualization of mangrove benthic communities within this framework is distinguished and documented by examples provided from the most recent literature on mangrove ecosystem functioning. It appears that the features and processes driving the engineering effects on distribution and activity of associated organisms operate differently for sesarmid and fiddler crabs. The most obvious and well-documented difference between engineering effects of the two types of crab seems to be associated with foraging. More attention must be devoted in the future to elucidate engineering aspects related to crab burrows in mangrove environments. Particularly comparative work on the burrow-dwelling life styles of the two types of crab is needed.

  4. OBSERVATIONS OF THE CRAB NEBULA'S ASYMMETRICAL DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Loll, A. M.; Desch, S. J.; Scowen, P. A.; Foy, J. P.

    2013-03-10

    We present the first Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Planetary Camera-2 imaging survey of the entire Crab Nebula, in the filters F502N ([O III] emission), F673N ([S II]), F631N ([O I]), and F547M (continuum). We use our mosaics to characterize the pulsar wind nebula (PWN) and its three-dimensional structure, the ionizational structure in the filaments forming at its periphery, the speed of the shock driven by the PWN into surrounding ejecta (by inferring the cooling rates behind the shock), and the morphology and ionizational structure of the Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) fingers. We quantify a number of asymmetries between the northwest (NW) and southeast (SE) quadrants of the Crab Nebula. The lack of observed filaments in the NW, and our observations of the spatial extent of [O III] emission lead us to conclude that cooling rates are slower, and therefore the shock speeds are greater, in the NW quadrant of the nebula, compared with the SE. We conclude that R-T fingers are longer, more ionizationally stratified, and apparently more massive in the NW than in the SE, and the R-T instability appears more fully developed in the NW.

  5. Territorial battles between fiddler crab species

    PubMed Central

    Backwell, P. R. Y.

    2017-01-01

    Many species worldwide are impacted by habitat loss. This may result in increased competition both within species and between species. Many studies have demonstrated that when two previously non-overlapping species are forced to compete over a resource, one species is likely to become dominant over the other. This study explores the impact a larger species of fiddler crab (Tabuca elegans—previously known as Uca elegans) has when invading an area previously used solely by a smaller species (Austruca mjoebergi—previously known as Uca mjoebergi). Here we show that, while there are some detrimental effects of living next to a heterospecific, they are relatively minor. New heterospecific neighbours fight more regularly with resident crabs, but each fight is no longer or more escalated than those between the resident and a new conspecific male. The residents are not specifically targeted by intruding heterospecifics, thus, given the large advantage of having a heterospecific neighbour in terms of lowered competition for females, the overall impact of species mixing is probably not as negative as might have been predicted. PMID:28280560

  6. Territorial battles between fiddler crab species.

    PubMed

    Clark, H L; Backwell, P R Y

    2017-01-01

    Many species worldwide are impacted by habitat loss. This may result in increased competition both within species and between species. Many studies have demonstrated that when two previously non-overlapping species are forced to compete over a resource, one species is likely to become dominant over the other. This study explores the impact a larger species of fiddler crab (Tabuca elegans-previously known as Uca elegans) has when invading an area previously used solely by a smaller species (Austruca mjoebergi-previously known as Uca mjoebergi). Here we show that, while there are some detrimental effects of living next to a heterospecific, they are relatively minor. New heterospecific neighbours fight more regularly with resident crabs, but each fight is no longer or more escalated than those between the resident and a new conspecific male. The residents are not specifically targeted by intruding heterospecifics, thus, given the large advantage of having a heterospecific neighbour in terms of lowered competition for females, the overall impact of species mixing is probably not as negative as might have been predicted.

  7. Melatonin and locomotor activity in the fiddler crab Uca pugilator.

    PubMed

    Tilden, Andrea R; Shanahan, J Kearney; Khilji, Zahra S; Owen, Jeffrey G; Sterio, Thomas W; Thurston, Kristy T

    2003-05-01

    The influence of melatonin on locomotor activity levels was measured in the fiddler crab Uca pugilator. First, activity in untreated, laboratory-acclimated crabs was measured over 48 hours in a 12L:12D photoperiod; this study showed a nocturnal increase in activity. In eyestalk-ablated crabs, overall activity was significantly reduced, and no significant activity pattern occurred. Next, crabs were injected with melatonin or saline (controls) at various times during the 12L:12D photoperiod (0900h, 1200h, and twice at 2100h; each trial was separated by 3-4 days) and monitored for 3 hr post-injection. Control crabs had low activity during early photophase, high at mid-photophase, increasing activity during the first scotophase trial, and decreasing activity during the second scotophase trial. Melatonin had no significant influence on activity when injected during the early-photophase activity trough or early-scotophase activity decline, but significantly increased activity when injected during the mid-photophase activity peak and early-scotophase activity incline. Next, crabs were injected during an early scotophase activity trough and monitored throughout the twelve-hour scotophase. Melatonin did not increase activity until the mid-scotophase activity increase, approximately 6 hours later, showing that the pharmacological dosage persisted in the crabs' systems and had later effects during the incline and peak of activity but not the trough. Eyestalk-ablated crabs were injected with melatonin or saline during early photo- and scotophase. Melatonin significantly increased activity in the photophase but not the scotophase trial, indicating that the responsiveness to melatonin continues following eyestalk removal, but the timing may not match that of intact crabs. Melatonin may be involved in the transmission of environmental timing information from the eyestalks to locomotor centers in U. pugilator.

  8. Effects of Underwater Turbine Noise on Crab Larval Metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Pine, Matthew K; Jeffs, Andrew G; Radford, Craig A

    2016-01-01

    The development of marine tidal turbines has advanced at a rapid rate over the last decade but with little detailed understanding of the potential noise impacts on invertebrates. Previous research has shown that underwater reef noise plays an important role in mediating metamorphosis in many larval crabs and fishes. New research suggests that underwater estuarine noise may also mediate metamorphosis in estuarine crab larvae and that the noise emitted from underwater tidal and sea-based wind turbines may significantly influence larval metamorphosis in estuarine crabs.

  9. CEPC partial double ring scheme and crab-waist parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dou; Gao, Jie; Su, Feng; Zhang, Yuan; Zhai, Jiyuan; Wang, Yiwei; Bai, Sha; Geng, Huiping; Bian, Tianjian; Cui, Xiaohao; Wang, Na; Duan, Zhe; Guo, Yuanyuan; Qin, Qing

    2016-11-01

    In order to avoid the pretzel orbit, CEPC is proposed to use partial double ring scheme in CDR. In this paper, a general method of how to make an consistent machine parameter design of CEPC with crab-waist by using analytical expression of maximum beam-beam tune shift and beamstrahlung beam lifetime started from given IP vertical beta, beam power and other technical limitations were developed. FFS with crab sextupoles will be developed and the arc lattice will be redesigned to acheive the lower emittance for crab-waist scheme.

  10. Seasonal effects of leached mirex on selected estuarine animals.

    PubMed

    Tagatz, M E; Borthwick, P W; Forester, J

    1975-01-01

    Four 28-day seasonal experiments were conducted using selected estuarine animals in outdoor tanks that received continuous flow of mirex-laden water. Mirex (dodecachlorooctahydro-1,3,4-metheno-2H-cyclobuta [cd] pentalene) leached from fire ant bait (0.3% mirex) by fresh water and then mixed with salt water was toxic to blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus), pink shrimp (Penaeus duorarum), and grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio) but not to sheepshead minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus), at concentrations less than 0.53 mug/L in water. The amount of leaching was greatest in summer and least in spring. Greatest mortality occurred in summer at the highest water temperature and concentration of mirex; least mortality occurred in spring at the next to the lowest temperature and at the lowest concentration. Earliest deaths of blue crabs occurred after six days of exposure and shrimps after two days. Small juvenile crabs were more sensitive to leached mirex than were large juveniles. Mirex did not appear to affect growth or frequency of molting in crabs. All exposed animals concentrated mirex. Among animals that survived for 28 days, sheepshead minnows concentrated mirex 40,800X above the concentration in the water, blue crabs 2,300X, pink shrimp 10,000X, and grass shrimp 10,800X. Sand substrata contained mirex up to 770X that in the water. Most control and exposed animals in samples examined histologically had normal tissues, but alteration in gills of some exposed fish and natural pathogens in some exposed and control crabs and shrimp were observed. The experiments demonstrated that mirex can be leached from bait by fresh water, concentrated by estuarine organisms, and can be toxic to crabs and shrimps.

  11. Evolutionary history of true crabs (Crustacea: Decapoda: Brachyura) and the origin of freshwater crabs.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Ling Ming; Schubart, Christoph D; Ahyong, Shane T; Lai, Joelle C Y; Au, Eugene Y C; Chan, Tin-Yam; Ng, Peter K L; Chu, Ka Hou

    2014-05-01

    Crabs of the infra-order Brachyura are one of the most diverse groups of crustaceans with approximately 7,000 described species in 98 families, occurring in marine, freshwater, and terrestrial habitats. The relationships among the brachyuran families are poorly understood due to the high morphological complexity of the group. Here, we reconstruct the most comprehensive phylogeny of Brachyura to date using sequence data of six nuclear protein-coding genes and two mitochondrial rRNA genes from more than 140 species belonging to 58 families. The gene tree confirms that the "Podotremata," are paraphyletic. Within the monophyletic Eubrachyura, the reciprocal monophyly of the two subsections, Heterotremata and Thoracotremata, is supported. Monophyly of many superfamilies, however, is not recovered, indicating the prevalence of morphological convergence and the need for further taxonomic studies. Freshwater crabs were derived early in the evolution of Eubrachyura and are shown to have at least two independent origins. Bayesian relaxed molecular methods estimate that freshwater crabs separated from their closest marine sister taxa ~135 Ma, that is, after the break up of Pangaea (∼200 Ma) and that a Gondwanan origin of these freshwater representatives is untenable. Most extant families and superfamilies arose during the late Cretaceous and early Tertiary.

  12. Quaternary ammonium sulfanilamide: a membrane-impermeant carbonic anhydrase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Henry, R P

    1987-05-01

    A novel carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibitor, quaternary ammonium sulfanilamide (QAS), was tested for potency as a CA inhibitor and for its ability to be excluded from permeating biological membranes. Inhibitor titration plots of QAS vs. pure bovine CA II and CA from the gills of the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus, yielded Ki values of approximately 15 microM; thus QAS is a relatively weak but effective CA inhibitor. Permeability of the QAS was directly tested by two independent methods. The inhibitor was excluded from human erythrocytes incubated in 5 mM QAS for 24 h as determined using an 18O-labeled mass spectrometer CA assay for intact cells. Also QAS injected into the hemolymph of C. sapidus (1 or 10 mM) did not cross the basal membrane of the gill. The compound was cleared from the hemolymph by 96 h after injection, and at no time during that period could the QAS be detected in homogenates of gill tissue. Total branchial CA activity was only slightly reduced following the QAS injection. These data indicate that QAS is a CA inhibitor to which biological membranes are impermeable and that can be used in vivo or in vitro in the study of membrane-associated CA.

  13. CLIC Crab Cavity Design Optimisation for Maximum Luminosity

    SciTech Connect

    Dexter, A.C.; Burt, G.; Ambattu, P.K.; Dolgashev, V.; Jones, R.; /Manchester U.

    2012-04-25

    The bunch size and crossing angle planned for CERN's compact linear collider CLIC dictate that crab cavities on opposing linacs will be needed to rotate bunches of particles into alignment at the interaction point if the desired luminosity is to be achieved. Wakefield effects, RF phase errors between crab cavities on opposing linacs and unpredictable beam loading can each act to reduce luminosity below that anticipated for bunches colliding in perfect alignment. Unlike acceleration cavities, which are normally optimised for gradient, crab cavities must be optimised primarily for luminosity. Accepting the crab cavity technology choice of a 12 GHz, normal conducting, travelling wave structure as explained in the text, this paper develops an analytical approach to optimise cell number and iris diameter.

  14. Domoic acid excretion in dungeness crabs, razor clams and mussels.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Irvin R; Skillman, Ann; Woodruff, Dana

    2008-07-01

    Domoic acid (DA) is a neurotoxic amino acid produced by several marine algal species of the Pseudo-nitzschia (PN) genus. We studied the elimination of DA from hemolymph after intravascular (IV) injection in razor clams (Siliqua patula), mussels (Mytilus edulis) and Dungeness crabs (Cancer magister). Crabs were also injected with two other organic acids, dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) and kainic acid (KA). For IV dosing, hemolymph was repetitively sampled and DA concentrations measured by HPLC-UV. Toxicokinetic analysis of DA in crabs suggested most of the injected dose remained within hemolymph compartment with little extravascular distribution. This observation is in sharp contrast to results obtained from clams and mussels which exhibited similarly large apparent volumes of distribution despite large differences in overall clearance. These findings suggest fundamentally different storage and elimination processes are occurring for DA between bivalves and crabs.

  15. Crab cavities: Past, present, and future of a challenging device

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Q.

    2015-05-03

    In two-ring facilities operating with a crossing-angle collision scheme, luminosity can be limited due to an incomplete overlapping of the colliding bunches. Crab cavities then are introduced to restore head-on collisions by providing the destined opposite deflection to the head and tail of the bunch. An increase in luminosity was demonstrated at KEKB with global crab-crossing, while the Large Hardron Collider (LHC) at CERN currently is designing local crab crossing for the Hi-Lumi upgrade. Future colliders may investigate both approaches. In this paper, we review the challenges in the technology, and the implementation of crab cavities, while discussing experience in earlier colliders, ongoing R&D, and proposed implementations for future facilities, such as HiLumi-LHC, CERN’s compact linear collider (CLIC), the international linear collider (ILC), and the electron-ion collider under design at BNL (eRHIC).

  16. EVOLUTION OF THE CRAB NEBULA IN A LOW ENERGY SUPERNOVA

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Haifeng; Chevalier, Roger A. E-mail: rac5x@virginia.edu

    2015-06-20

    The nature of the supernova leading to the Crab Nebula has long been controversial because of the low energy that is present in the observed nebula. One possibility is that there is significant energy in extended fast material around the Crab but searches for such material have not led to detections. An electron capture supernova model can plausibly account for the low energy and the observed abundances in the Crab. Here, we examine the evolution of the Crab pulsar wind nebula inside a freely expanding supernova and find that the observed properties are most consistent with a low energy event. Both the velocity and radius of the shell material, and the amount of gas swept up by the pulsar wind point to a low explosion energy (∼10{sup 50} erg). We do not favor a model in which circumstellar interaction powers the supernova luminosity near maximum light because the required mass would limit the freely expanding ejecta.

  17. The surprising Crab pulsar and its nebula: a review.

    PubMed

    Bühler, R; Blandford, R

    2014-06-01

    The Crab nebula and its pulsar (referred to together as 'the Crab') have historically played a central role in astrophysics. True to this legacy, several unique discoveries have been made recently. The Crab was found to emit gamma-ray pulsations up to energies of 400 GeV, beyond what was previously expected from pulsars. Strong gamma-ray flares, of durations of a few days, were discovered from within the nebula, while the source was previously expected to be stable in flux on these time scales. Here we review these intriguing and suggestive developments. In this context we give an overview of the observational properties of the Crab and our current understanding of pulsars and their nebulae.

  18. Evolution of the Crab Nebula in a Low Energy Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Haifeng; Chevalier, Roger A.

    2015-06-01

    The nature of the supernova leading to the Crab Nebula has long been controversial because of the low energy that is present in the observed nebula. One possibility is that there is significant energy in extended fast material around the Crab but searches for such material have not led to detections. An electron capture supernova model can plausibly account for the low energy and the observed abundances in the Crab. Here, we examine the evolution of the Crab pulsar wind nebula inside a freely expanding supernova and find that the observed properties are most consistent with a low energy event. Both the velocity and radius of the shell material, and the amount of gas swept up by the pulsar wind point to a low explosion energy (∼1050 erg). We do not favor a model in which circumstellar interaction powers the supernova luminosity near maximum light because the required mass would limit the freely expanding ejecta.

  19. The Crab Nebula: A Flickering X-ray Candle

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Crab Nebula, created by a supernova seen nearly a thousand years ago, is one of the sky's most famous "star wrecks." For decades, most astronomers have regarded it as the steadiest beacon at X-...

  20. Thermal biology of prey (Melongena corona bispinosa, Strombus pugilis, Callinectes similis, Libinia dubia) and predators (Ocyurus chrysurus, Centropomus undecimalis) of Octopus maya from the Yucatan Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Noyola Regil, Javier; Mascaro, Maite; Díaz, Fernando; Denisse Re, Ana; Sánchez-Zamora, Adolfo; Caamal-Monsreal, Claudia; Rosas, Carlos

    2015-10-01

    On the Yucatan Peninsula there is an upwelling which allows access to a body of cold water that controls temperature in this area. This modulates the ecology and distribution of organisms that inhabit the continental shelf. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of different acclimation temperatures on the thermal biology of prey as mollusc, crustacean (Melongena corona bispinosa, Strombus pugilis, Callinectes similis, Libinia dubia) and predators as fish (Ocyurus chrysurus, Centropomus undecimalis) of Octopus maya. Octopus prey preferred temperatures between 23.5°C and 26.0°C, while predators preferred temperatures 26.4-28.5°C. The species with largest thermal windows were M. corona bispinosa (328.8°C(2)), C. similis (322.8°C(2)), L. dubia (319.2°C(2)), C. undecimalis (288.6°C(2)), O. chrysurus (237.5°C(2)), while the smallest thermal window was for S. pugilis (202.0°C(2)). The acclimation response ratios (ARR) estimated for prey ranged from 0.24-0.55 in animals exposed to CTMax and 0.21-0.65 in those exposed to CTMin. Amongst predators, ARR ranged from 0.30 to 0.60 and 0.41 to 0.53 for animals exposed to CTMax and CTMin, respectively. Correlating the optimal temperature limits of prey and predators with surface temperatures on the continental shelf and those 4m deep showed that the main prey, Callinectes similis and L. dubia, shared a thermal niche and that an increase in temperature could force these species to migrate to other sites to find optimal temperatures for their physiological functions. As a consequence the continental shelf community would undergo a structural change. Predators were found to be near their optimal temperatures in surface temperatures on the continental shelf. We conclude that they would remain in the area in a warming scenario. The size of the thermal window was related to the type of ecosystem inhabited by these species. These ARR intervals allowed us to categorize the species as temperate or tropical

  1. Design of Superconducting Parallel Bar Deflecting and Crabbing rf Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Jean Delayen, Haipeng Wang

    2009-05-01

    A new concept for a deflecting and crabbing rf structure based on half-wave resonant lines was introduced recently*. It offers significant advantages to existing designs and, because of it compactness, allows low frequency operation. This concept has been further refined and optimized for superconducting implementation. Results of this optimization and application to a 400 MHz crabbing cavity and a 499 MHz deflecting cavity are presented.

  2. Lincoln Co. Scrap Metal, Crab Orchard, Kentucky

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The City of Crab Orchard, KY (population less than 1,000) received a $200,000 EPA Brownfields cleanup grant in 2010 to cleanup up the Lincoln County ScrapMetal property. The site, a former scrap metal recycler and general junkyard, was located in the middle of downtown. The city has experienced a dramatic decline in growth over the past few years. The abandoned two-acre site is located in the city’s center, directly across the street from City Hall. It is the largest property on Main Street. The property was an eyesore, and posed potential health risks to area residents, and deterred investment. Its blighted status did little to help the commercial and private properties that surround it. The site was also home to a dilapidated building that once served as the Odd Fellows meeting hall.

  3. Crab pulsar timing 1982-87

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyne, A. G.; Pritchard, R. S.; Smith, F. G.

    1988-08-01

    Observations of the arrival times of pulses from the pulsar in the Crab Nebula over a six-year interval are presented. The data are intended to permit the investigation of the interior of the neutron star through the study of glitches and timing noise and to provide an ephemeris for high-energy observations. The first and second frequency derivatives provide a value for the braking index of n = 2.509 + or - 0.001, which is consistent with previous observations. The third frequency derivative can now be determined over an 18-yr span and is as expected for this braking index. The predominant deviations from a simple slow-down model form a sinusoid with a period of 20 months, attributable to an oscillation of the bulk of the neutron superfluid in the pulsar. One conspicuous glitch occurred in August, 1986 and the subsequent recovery was studied from only one hour after the event.

  4. The Crab-like supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seward, Frederick D.

    1989-01-01

    Recent observational and theoretical investigations of Galactic and extragalactic SNRs suspected of having neutron central stars are reviewed, with an emphasis on Einstein X-ray observations. Sections are devoted to the Crab Nebula and its twin SNR 0540-69.3, SNR with observationally well determined and indistinct central X-ray nebulae, SNR with weak and strong unresolved internal X-ray sources, binary systems, and the relationship between X-ray and radio luminosity and pulsar energy loss. Consideration is given to radio pulsars, SNR with filled-center X-ray emission attributed to thermal processes, radio plerions and composite SNRs, MSH 15-56, and SNRs in the LMC. Extensive contour maps, sample optical images, and tables of numerical data are included.

  5. Visual motion processing subserving behavior in crabs.

    PubMed

    Tomsic, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    Motion vision originated during the Cambrian explosion more than 500 million years ago, likely triggered by the race for earliest detection between preys and predators. To successfully evade a predator's attack a prey must react quickly and reliably, which imposes a common constrain to the implementation of escape responses among different species. Thus, neural circuits subserving fast escape responses are usually straightforward and contain giant neurons. This review summarizes knowledge about a small group of motion-sensitive giant neurons thought to be central in guiding the escape performance of crabs to visual stimuli. The flexibility of the escape behavior contrasts with the stiffness of the optomotor response, indicating a task-dependent early segregation of visual pathways.

  6. OSSE observations of the Crab pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulmer, M. P.; Matz, S. M.; Cameron, R. A.; Grabelsky, D. A.; Grove, J. E.; Johnson, W. N.; Jung, G. V.; Kinzer, R. L.; Kurfess, J. D.; Leising, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented of the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment (OSSE) observations of the Crab pulsar. The pulsar energy spectra and light curves are in general agreement with previous observations, validating the OSSE pulsar data acquisition modes and data analysis algorithms. The data suggest that the spectrum of the pulsar varies throughout the light curve. The 'interpulse' region has a slightly flatter spectrum in the approx. 60 to 250 keV region and a slightly steeper spectrum at higher energies than the two main pulses. No evidence was found for any lines in the spectra with a typical sensitivity of about 10(exp -4) photons/sq cm/s.

  7. Final Report for "Compact Crab Cavity Design"

    SciTech Connect

    Smithe, David N

    2012-11-08

    The goal of this project is to provide an innovative, new crab cavity design relevant to the MEIC. Through this work, we will provide comprehensive modeling of this new cavity design, including electromagnetic, thermal, and microphonic effects. One most likely candidate configuration is the design put forward by JLab and Lancaster University, UK, researchers known as the four-rod configuration. In the Phase I, Tech-X Corporation researchers performed analysis and design optimization and iteration, utilizing their state-of-the art time-domain particle-in-cell software, on a 400 MHz design for the LHC by JLab and Lancaster University, UK, researchers known as the four-rod design.

  8. [Application of electron spin resonance spectroscopy for the detection of irradiated crustaceans (prawn, shrimp, and crabs)].

    PubMed

    Kameya, Hiromi; Takatsuki, Satoshi; Matsuda, Rieko; Tsutsumi, Tomoaki; Todoriki, Setsuko

    2014-01-01

    Prawn, shrimp and crabs sold in Japan are mostly imported from overseas. Detection of irradiated crustaceans is very important for quality assurance. In this study, we used ESR to detect radiation-induced radicals after irradiation of prawn, shrimp and crabs of major species. No radiation-induced radicals were detected in prawn (black tiger prawn) or shrimp (white leg shrimp). Radiation-induced radicals due to hydroxyapatite were detected in the claws of snow crab, red king crab, and swimming crab. Our results indicate that ESR measurement on the claw parts of these three species of crab can be used to determine their irradiation history.

  9. Variation in spatial and temporal incidence of the crustacean pathogen Hematodinium perezi in environmental samples from Atlantic Coastal Bays

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hematodinium perezi, a parasitic dinoflagellate, infects and kills blue crabs, Callinectes sapidus, along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the United States. The parasite proliferates within host hemolymph and tissues, and also produces free-swimming biflagellated dinospores that emerge from infected crabs. Infections in C. sapidus recur annually, and it is not known if biotic or environmental reservoirs contribute to reinfection and outbreaks. To address this data gap, a quantitative PCR assay based on the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) region of H. perezi rRNA genes was developed to asses the temporal and spatial incidence of the parasite in Delaware and Maryland coastal bays. Results A previously-used PCR assay for H. perezi, based on the small subunit rRNA gene sequence, was found to lack adequate species specificity to discriminate non-Hematodinium sp. dinoflagellate species in environmental samples. A new ITS2-targeted assay was developed and validated to detect H. perezi DNA in sediment and water samples using E. coli carrying the H. perezi rDNA genes. Application of the method to environmental samples identified potential hotspots in sediment in Indian River Inlet, DE and Chincoteague Bay, MD and VA. H. perezi DNA was not detected in co-occurring shrimp or snails, even during an outbreak of the parasite in C. sapidus. Conclusions H. perezi is present in water and sediment samples in Maryland and Delaware coastal bays from April through November with a wide spatial and temporal variability in incidence. Sampling sites with high levels of H. perezi DNA in both bays share characteristics of silty, organic sediments and low tidal currents. The environmental detection of H. perezi in spring, ahead of peak prevalence in crabs, points to gaps in our understanding of the parasite’s life history prior to infection in crabs as well as the mode of environmental transmission. To better understand the H. perezi life cycle will require further

  10. Dusty globules in the Crab Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenman, T.; Gahm, G. F.; Elfgren, E.

    2017-03-01

    Context. Dust grains are widespread in the Crab Nebula. A number of small, dusty globules, are visible as dark spots against the background of continuous synchrotron emission in optical images. Aims: Our aim is to catalogue such dusty globules and investigate their properties. Methods: From existing broad-band images obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope, we located 92 globules, for which we derived positions, dimensions, orientations, extinctions, masses, proper motions, and their distributions. Results: The globules have mean radii ranging from 400 to 2000 AU and are not resolved in current infrared images of the nebula. The extinction law for dust grains in these globules matches a normal interstellar extinction law. Derived masses of dust range from 1 to 60 × 10-6M⊙, and the total mass contained in globules constitute a fraction of approximately 2% or less of the total dust content of the nebula. The globules are spread over the outer part of the nebula, and a fraction of them coincide in position with emission filaments, where we find elongated globules that are aligned with these filaments. Only 10% of the globules are coincident in position with the numerous H2-emitting knots found in previous studies. All globules move outwards from the centre with transversal velocities of 60 to 1600 km s-1, along with the general expansion of the remnant. We discuss various hypotheses for the formation of globules in the Crab Nebula. Based on observations collected with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute.

  11. Burrowing and foraging activity of marsh crabs under different ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    New England salt marshes are susceptible to degradation and habitat loss as a result of increased periods of inundation as sea levels rise. Increased inundation may exacerbate marsh degradation that can result from crab burrowing and foraging. Most studies to date have focused on how crab burrowing and foraging can impact the dominant low marsh plant species, Spartina alterniflora. Here we used a mesocosm experiment to examine the relationship of foraging and burrowing activity in two dominant New England crab species, Sesarma reticulatum and Uca pugilator, and the combined effect of inundation, on the dominant high marsh plant species Spartina patens using a 3 × 2 factorial design with three crab treatments (Sesarma, Uca, control) at two levels of inundation (low, high). Plants were labeled with a nitrogen (N) stable isotope tracer to estimate plant consumption by the two crab species. At both levels of inundation, we found that S. reticulatum had a significant negative impact on both above- and below-ground biomass by physically clipping and uprooting the plants, whereas U. pugilator had no significant impact. Low inundation treatments for both crab species had significantly greater aboveground biomass than high inundation. Stable N isotope tracer levels were roughly the same for both S. reticulatum and U. pugilator tissue, suggesting that the impact of S. reticulatum on S. patens was not through consumption of the plants. Overall, our results suggest the pot

  12. Recruitment variation of eastern Bering Sea crabs: Climate-forcing or top-down effects?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jie; Kruse, Gordon H.

    2006-02-01

    During the last three decades, population abundances of eastern Bering Sea (EBS) crab stocks fluctuated greatly, driven by highly variable recruitment. In recent years, abundances of these stocks have been very low compared to historical levels. This study aims to understand recruitment variation of six stocks of red king ( Paralithodes camtschaticus), blue king ( P. platypus), Tanner ( Chionoecetes bairdi), and snow ( C. opilio) crabs in the EBS. Most crab recruitment time series are not significantly correlated with each other. Spatial distributions of three broadly distributed crab stocks (EBS snow and Tanner crabs and Bristol Bay red king crab) have changed considerably over time, possibly related in part to the regime shift in climate and physical oceanography in 1976-1977. Three climate-forcing hypotheses on larval survival have been proposed to explain crab recruitment variation of Bristol Bay red king crab and EBS Tanner and snow crabs. Some empirical evidence supports speculation that groundfish predation may play an important role in crab recruitment success in the EBS. However, spatial dynamics in the geographic distributions of groundfish and crabs over time make it difficult to relate crab recruitment strength to groundfish biomass. Comprehensive field and spatially explicit modeling studies are needed to test the hypotheses and better understand the relative importance and compound effects of bottom-up and top-down controls on crab recruitment.

  13. Biotic structure indirectly affects associated prey in a predator-specific manner via changes in the sensory environment.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Miranda L; Weissburg, Marc J

    2013-02-01

    Indirect effects, which can be either positive or negative, may be important in areas containing biotic structure, because such structure can provide refuge and habitat, produce additional sensory cues that may attract predators, and modify the sensory landscape in which predator-prey interactions occur. To determine the indirect effects of biotic structure on prey populations, we assessed predation on patches of hard clams (Mercenaria mercenaria) by large odor-mediated blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) and knobbed whelk (Busycon carica) predators at 0, 5, and 10 m from oyster reefs in intertidal salt marshes. Oyster reefs had an overall indirect negative effect on hard clams, with higher predation rates closer to the reef than farther away. Predator-specific patterns of predation showed that blue crabs consumed more clams very close to the reef, whereas whelks consumed more clams at intermediate distances. Laboratory flume experiments suggest that the oyster reef structure creates turbulence that diminishes predator foraging efficiency, particularly in rapidly mobile predators such as blue crabs, but that oyster reef chemicals ameliorate the negative impact of turbulence on foraging success for both predators. Changes in the sensory landscape, in combination with predator perceptual ability, will determine the positive and/or negative impacts of biotic structure on associated prey. Gaining an understanding of the context specificity of positive and negative sensory effects of biotic structure provides insights that are important for developing a predictive framework to assess the magnitude and distribution of indirect interactions in natural communities.

  14. Bioinspired algorithm for autonomous sensor-driven guidance in turbulent chemical plumes.

    PubMed

    Webster, D R; Volyanskyy, K Y; Weissburg, M J

    2012-09-01

    We designed and implemented a control algorithm for sensor-mediated chemical plume tracking in a turbulent flow environment. In our design, we focused on development of a signal processing strategy capable of replicating behavioral responses of actively tracking blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) to chemical stimuli. The control algorithm is evaluated in a hardware platform that allows motion in two directions (i.e. forward-back and left-right). The geometric arrangement of the sensor array is inspired by the location of blue crab sensor populations. Upstream motion is induced by a binary response to supra-threshold spikes of concentration, and cross-stream steering is controlled by contrast between bilaterally-separated sensors. Like animal strategies, the developed control algorithm is dynamic. This property allows the algorithm to function effectively in the highly irregular turbulent environment and produces adaptive adjustments of motion to minimize the distance to the source of a plume. Tracking trials indicate that roughly 80% of the tracks successfully stop near the plume source location. Both success rate and movement patterns of the tracker compare favorably to that of blue crabs searching for odorant plume sources, thus suggesting that our sensory-mediated behavior hypothesis are generally accurate and that the associated tracking mechanisms may be successfully implemented in hardware.

  15. Oyster reef restoration in the Northern Gulf of Mexico: effect of artificial substrate and sge on nekton and benthic macroinvertebrate assemblage use

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Laura A.; Furlong, Jessica N.; Brown, Kenneth M.; LaPeyre, Megan K.

    2013-01-01

    In the northern Gulf of Mexico (GOM), reefs built by eastern oysters, Crassostrea virginica, provide critical habitat within shallow estuaries, and recent efforts have focused on restoring reefs to benefit nekton and benthic macroinvertebrates. We compared nekton and benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages at historic, newly created (<5years) and old (>6years) shell and rock substrate reefs. Using crab traps, gill-nets, otter trawls, cast nets, and benthic macroinvertebrate collectors, 20 shallow reefs (<5m) in the northern GOM were sampled throughout the summer of 2011. We compared nekton and benthic assemblage abundance, diversity and composition across reef types. Except for benthic macroinvertebrate abundance, which was significantly higher on old rock reefs as compared to historic reefs, all reefs were similar to historic reefs, suggesting created reefs provide similar support of nekton and benthic assemblages as historic reefs. To determine refuge value of oyster structure for benthic macroinvertebrates compared to bare bottom, we tested preferences of juvenile crabs across depth and refuge complexity in the presence and absence of adult blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus). Juveniles were more likely to use deep water with predators present only when provided oyster structure. Provision of structural material to support and sustain development of benthic and mobile reef communities may be the most important factor in determining reef value to these assemblages, with biophysical characteristics related to reef location influencing assemblage patterns in areas with structure; if so, appropriately locating created reefs is critical.

  16. Accumulation of organic and inorganic contaminants in shellfish collected in estuarine waters near Pensacola, Florida: contamination profiles and risks to human consumers.

    PubMed

    Karouna-Renier, Natalie K; Snyder, Richard A; Allison, Jeffrey G; Wagner, Matthew G; Ranga Rao, K

    2007-01-01

    We conducted a screening level assessment of contaminants in blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) and oysters (Crassostrea virginica) from bays and bayous in the Pensacola, FL area. Tissue samples were analyzed for 17 dioxins/furans, 12 dioxin-like PCB (DL-PCBs) congeners, mercury, and various metals. Contaminant levels were compared to screening values (SV) calculated using U.S. EPA recommendations for establishing consumption advisories. All sampling locations exceeded the SV (0.098pgg(-1)) for dioxins/furans/DL-PCBs, based on a Florida-specific consumption rate (46gday(-1)). Arsenic (inorganic), mercury, cadmium, and zinc levels exceeded SVs in samples from select locations, and with the exception of mercury, these locations were generally downstream of known contaminated areas. We also assessed potential human health risks from consumption of these species. Risks to human health were greatest from consumption of crab hepatopancreas, suggesting that consumption of hepatopancreas, whether directly or indirectly, from crabs collected anywhere in the Pensacola Bay region should be avoided.

  17. Maine belowground marsh destruction from the European green crab documented by computer-aided tomography

    EPA Science Inventory

    Invasive European green crab (Carcinus maenus) populations have exploded with devastating losses to Maine’s intertidal resources including soft-shell clams, eelgrass beds, and salt marshes. This project quantified the green crab abundance in three different marsh locations ...

  18. Shell use: an adaptation for emigration from the sea by the coconut crab.

    PubMed

    Reese, E S

    1968-07-26

    The coconut crab. Birgus latro (L.) emigrates from the sea during the postlarval glaucothoe stage. Glaucothoes show ancestral hermit crab behavior of living in empty gastropod shells which protect them during this vulnerable time.

  19. Location of volatile odor sources by ghost crabOcypode quadrata (Fabricius).

    PubMed

    Wellins, C A; Rittschof, D; Wachowiak, M

    1989-04-01

    The ghost crab,Ocypode quadrata, was tested in the field for its ability to locate sources of volatile cues. The pure compound skatole, 3-methylindole, was a potent attractant. Crabs also located sources of complex odors such as dead fish,Lutjanus campechanus, dead mole crabs,Emerita talpoida; and peeled bananas. Ghost crabs possess concealed and reduced antennules that may not be the primary olfactory organs. Chemosensory hairs borne on the dactyls may be the primary detection system.

  20. Design and prototyping of HL-LHC double quarter wave crab cavities for SPS test

    SciTech Connect

    Verdu-Andres, S.; Skaritka, J.; Wu, Q.; Xiao, B.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Alberty, L.; Artoos, K.; Calaga, R.; Capatina, O.; Capelli, T.; Carra, F.; Leuxe, R.; Kuder, N.; Zanoni, C.; Li, Z.; Ratti, A.

    2015-05-03

    The LHC high luminosity project envisages the use of the crabbing technique for increasing and levelling the LHC luminosity. Double Quarter Wave (DQW) resonators are compact cavities especially designed to meet the technical and performance requirements for LHC beam crabbing. Two DQW crab cavities are under fabrication and will be tested with beam in the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN by 2017. This paper describes the design and prototyping of the DQW crab cavities for the SPS test.

  1. Effects of Anabaena spiroides (Cyanobacteria) aqueous extracts on the acetylcholinesterase activity of aquatic species.

    PubMed

    Monserrat, J M; Yunes, J S; Bianchini, A

    2001-06-01

    The effects of aqueous extracts from a cyanobacteria species, Anabaena spiroides, on fish (Odontesthes argentinensis), crab (Callinectes sapidus), and purified eel acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity were studied. In vitro concentrations of A. spiroides aqueous extract that inhibited 50% of enzyme activity (IC50) were 23.0, 17.2, and 45.0 mg/L of lyophilized cyanobacteria for eel, fish, and crab AChE, respectively. Eel AChE inhibition follows pseudo-first-order kinetics, the same expected for organophosphorus pesticides. Inhibition of purified eel AChE using mixtures of bioxidized malathion and aqueous extract of A. spiroides showed a competitive feature (p < 0.05), suggesting that the toxin(s) could be structurally similar to an organophosphorus pesticide and that toxins present in the aqueous extract inhibit the active site of the enzyme. The inhibition recovery assays using 2-PAM (0.3 mM) showed that (1) bioxidized malathion inhibited 27.0 +/- 1.1% of crab and 36.5 +/- 0.1% of eel AChE activities; (2) with bioxidized malathion + 2-PAM the registered inhibition was 13.2 +/- 2.1% and 3.7 +/- 0.5% in crab and eel AChE, respectively; (3) the aqueous extract from A. spiroides inhibited 17.4 +/- 2.2% and 59.9 +/- 0.5% of crab and eel AChE activity, respectively; and (4) aqueous extract + 2-PAM inhibited 22.3 +/- 2.6 and 61.5 +/- 0.2% of crab and eel AChEs. The absence of enzyme activity recovery after 2-PAM exposure could imply that the enzyme aging process was extremely quick.

  2. Characterization of the Crab Pulsar's Timing Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, D. M.; Finger, M. H.; Wilson, C. A.

    2003-01-01

    We present a power spectral analysis of the Crab pulsar's timing noise, mainly using radio measurements from Jodrell Bank taken over the period 1982-1989, an interval bounded by sparse data sampling and a large glitch. The power spectral analysis is complicated by nonuniform data sampling and the presence of a steep red power spectrum that can distort power spectra measurement by causing severe power 'leakage'. We develop a simple windowing method for computing red noise power spectra of uniformly sampled data sets and test it on Monte Carlo generated sample realizations of red power-law noise. We generalize time-domain methods of generating power-law red noise with even integer spectral indices to the case of noninteger spectral indices. The Jodrell Bank pulse phase residuals are dense and smooth enough that an interpolation onto a uniform time series is possible. A windowed power spectrum is computed revealing a periodic or nearly periodic component with a period of 568 +/- 10 days and a l/f(exp 3) power-law noise component in pulse phase with a noise strength S(sub infinity)=(1.24 +/- 0.067) x 10(exp 16) cycles(exp 2)/sec(exp 2) over the analysis frequency range f=0.003- 0.1 cycles/day. This result deviates from past analyses which characterized the pulse phase timing residuals as either l/f(sub 4) power-law noise or a quasiperiodic process. The analysis was checked using the Deeter polynomial method of power spectrum estimation that was developed for the case of nonuniform sampling, but has lower spectral resolution. The timing noise is consistent with a torque noise spectrum rising with analysis frequency as f implying blue torque noise, a result not predicted by current models of pulsar timing noise. If the periodic or nearly periodic component is due to a binary companion, we find a mass function f(M) = (6.8 +/- 2.4) x 10(exp -16) solar mass and a companion mass, M(sub c) is greater than or equal to 3.2 solar mass assuming a Crab pulsar mass of 1.4 solar

  3. Mapping of Neuropeptides in the Crustacean Stomatogastric Nervous System by Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Hui; Hui, Limei; Kellersberger, Katherine; Li, Lingjun

    2013-01-01

    Considerable effort has been devoted to characterizing the crustacean stomatogastric nervous system (STNS) with great emphasis on comprehensive analysis and mapping distribution of its diverse neuropeptide complement. Previously, immunohistochemistry (IHC) has been applied to this endeavor, yet with identification accuracy and throughput compromised. Therefore, molecular imaging methods are pursued to unequivocally determine the identity and location of the neuropeptides at a high spatial resolution. In this work, we developed a novel, multi-faceted mass spectrometric strategy combining profiling and imaging techniques to characterize and map neuropeptides from the blue crab Callinectes sapidus STNS at the network level. In total, 55 neuropeptides from 10 families were identified from the major ganglia in the C. sapidus STNS for the first time, including the stomatogastric ganglion (STG), the paired commissural ganglia (CoG), the esophageal ganglion (OG), and the connecting nerve stomatogastric nerve ( stn) using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) and the MS/MS capability of this technique. In addition, the locations of multiple neuropeptides were documented at a spatial resolution of 25 μm in the STG and upstream nerve using MALDI-TOF/TOF and high-mass-resolution and high-mass-accuracy MALDI-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) instrument. Furthermore, distributions of neuropeptides in the whole C. sapidus STNS were examined by imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). Different isoforms from the same family were simultaneously and unambiguously mapped, facilitating the functional exploration of neuropeptides present in the crustacean STNS and exemplifying the revolutionary role of this novel platform in neuronal network studies.

  4. 50 CFR 648.263 - Red crab possession and landing restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Management Measures for the Atlantic Deep-Sea Red Crab Fishery § 648.263 Red crab possession and landing...-processing prohibition. No person may fully process at sea, possess, or land, fully-processed red crab. (5... Management Unit. (2) Full-processing prohibition. No person may fully process at sea, possess, or land,...

  5. 50 CFR 648.263 - Red crab possession and landing restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Management Measures for the Atlantic Deep-Sea Red Crab Fishery § 648.263 Red crab possession and landing...-processing prohibition. No person may fully process at sea, possess, or land, fully-processed red crab. (5... Management Unit. (2) Full-processing prohibition. No person may fully process at sea, possess, or land,...

  6. 40 CFR 408.50 - Applicability; description of the remote Alaskan crab meat processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... remote Alaskan crab meat processing subcategory. 408.50 Section 408.50 Protection of Environment... PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Remote Alaskan Crab Meat Processing Subcategory § 408.50 Applicability; description of the remote Alaskan crab meat processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  7. 50 CFR Table 3a to Part 680 - Crab Delivery Condition Codes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Crab Delivery Condition Codes 3a Table 3a... ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 680, Table 3a Table 3a to Part 680—Crab Delivery Condition Codes Code Description 01 Whole crab, live. 79 Deadloss....

  8. 50 CFR Table 3a to Part 680 - Crab Delivery Condition Codes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Crab Delivery Condition Codes 3a Table 3a... ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 680, Table 3a Table 3a to Part 680—Crab Delivery Condition Codes Code Description 01 Whole crab, live. 79 Deadloss....

  9. 50 CFR 648.262 - Accountability measures for red crab limited access vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Accountability measures for red crab... UNITED STATES Management Measures for the Atlantic Deep-Sea Red Crab Fishery § 648.262 Accountability measures for red crab limited access vessels. (a) Closure authority. NMFS shall close the EEZ to...

  10. 50 CFR 648.262 - Accountability measures for red crab limited access vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Accountability measures for red crab... UNITED STATES Management Measures for the Atlantic Deep-Sea Red Crab Fishery § 648.262 Accountability measures for red crab limited access vessels. (a) Closure authority. NMFS shall close the EEZ to...

  11. 40 CFR 408.50 - Applicability; description of the remote Alaskan crab meat processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... remote Alaskan crab meat processing subcategory. 408.50 Section 408.50 Protection of Environment... PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Remote Alaskan Crab Meat Processing Subcategory § 408.50 Applicability; description of the remote Alaskan crab meat processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  12. 50 CFR Table 3a to Part 680 - Crab Delivery Condition Codes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Crab Delivery Condition Codes 3a Table 3a... ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 680, Table 3a Table 3a to Part 680—Crab Delivery Condition Codes Code Description 01 Whole crab, live. 79 Deadloss....

  13. 50 CFR 648.262 - Accountability measures for red crab limited access vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Accountability measures for red crab... UNITED STATES Management Measures for the Atlantic Deep-Sea Red Crab Fishery § 648.262 Accountability measures for red crab limited access vessels. (a) Closure authority. NMFS shall close the EEZ to...

  14. 40 CFR 408.50 - Applicability; description of the remote Alaskan crab meat processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... remote Alaskan crab meat processing subcategory. 408.50 Section 408.50 Protection of Environment... PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Remote Alaskan Crab Meat Processing Subcategory § 408.50 Applicability; description of the remote Alaskan crab meat processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  15. 40 CFR 408.50 - Applicability; description of the remote Alaskan crab meat processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... remote Alaskan crab meat processing subcategory. 408.50 Section 408.50 Protection of Environment... PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Remote Alaskan Crab Meat Processing Subcategory § 408.50 Applicability; description of the remote Alaskan crab meat processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  16. 40 CFR 408.50 - Applicability; description of the remote Alaskan crab meat processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... remote Alaskan crab meat processing subcategory. 408.50 Section 408.50 Protection of Environment... PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Remote Alaskan Crab Meat Processing Subcategory § 408.50 Applicability; description of the remote Alaskan crab meat processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  17. 76 FR 25545 - Safety Zone; Blue Crab Festival Fireworks Display, Little River, Little River, SC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-05

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Blue Crab Festival Fireworks Display... Carolina during the Blue Crab Festival Fireworks Display on Friday, ] May 13, 2011. The safety zone is... this rule because the Coast Guard did not receive notice of the Blue Crab Festival Fireworks...

  18. 40 CFR 408.20 - Applicability; description of the conventional blue crab processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... conventional blue crab processing subcategory. 408.20 Section 408.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Conventional Blue Crab Processing Subcategory § 408.20 Applicability; description of the conventional blue crab processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  19. 40 CFR 408.20 - Applicability; description of the conventional blue crab processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... conventional blue crab processing subcategory. 408.20 Section 408.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Conventional Blue Crab Processing Subcategory § 408.20 Applicability; description of the conventional blue crab processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  20. 50 CFR 600.1103 - Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands (BSAI) Crab species program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Sound blue king crab. NVDC means the U.S. Coast Guard's National Vessel Documentation Center located in...) Crab species program. 600.1103 Section 600.1103 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND... Aleutian Islands (BSAI) Crab species program. (a) Purpose. This section's purpose is to implement...

  1. 40 CFR 408.30 - Applicability; description of the mechanized blue crab processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... mechanized blue crab processing subcategory. 408.30 Section 408.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Mechanized Blue Crab Processing Subcategory § 408.30 Applicability; description of the mechanized blue crab processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  2. 40 CFR 408.30 - Applicability; description of the mechanized blue crab processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... mechanized blue crab processing subcategory. 408.30 Section 408.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Mechanized Blue Crab Processing Subcategory § 408.30 Applicability; description of the mechanized blue crab processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  3. 40 CFR 408.30 - Applicability; description of the mechanized blue crab processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... mechanized blue crab processing subcategory. 408.30 Section 408.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Mechanized Blue Crab Processing Subcategory § 408.30 Applicability; description of the mechanized blue crab processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  4. 50 CFR 600.1103 - Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands (BSAI) Crab species program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Sound blue king crab. NVDC means the U.S. Coast Guard's National Vessel Documentation Center located in...) Crab species program. 600.1103 Section 600.1103 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND... Aleutian Islands (BSAI) Crab species program. (a) Purpose. This section's purpose is to implement...

  5. 40 CFR 408.20 - Applicability; description of the conventional blue crab processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... conventional blue crab processing subcategory. 408.20 Section 408.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Conventional Blue Crab Processing Subcategory § 408.20 Applicability; description of the conventional blue crab processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  6. 40 CFR 408.20 - Applicability; description of the conventional blue crab processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... conventional blue crab processing subcategory. 408.20 Section 408.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Conventional Blue Crab Processing Subcategory § 408.20 Applicability; description of the conventional blue crab processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  7. 40 CFR 408.30 - Applicability; description of the mechanized blue crab processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... mechanized blue crab processing subcategory. 408.30 Section 408.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Mechanized Blue Crab Processing Subcategory § 408.30 Applicability; description of the mechanized blue crab processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  8. 40 CFR 408.20 - Applicability; description of the conventional blue crab processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... conventional blue crab processing subcategory. 408.20 Section 408.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Conventional Blue Crab Processing Subcategory § 408.20 Applicability; description of the conventional blue crab processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  9. 40 CFR 408.30 - Applicability; description of the mechanized blue crab processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... mechanized blue crab processing subcategory. 408.30 Section 408.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Mechanized Blue Crab Processing Subcategory § 408.30 Applicability; description of the mechanized blue crab processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  10. Patterns of activity expressed by juvenile horseshoe crabs.

    PubMed

    Dubofsky, E A; Simpson, S D; Chabot, Christopher C; Watson, Winsor H

    2013-09-01

    Adult American horseshoe crabs, Limulus polyphemus, possess endogenous circadian and circatidal clocks controlling visual sensitivity and locomotion, respectively. The goal of this study was to determine the types of activity rhythms expressed by juvenile horseshoe crabs (n = 24) when exposed to a 14:10 light/dark cycle (LD) for 10 days, followed by 10 days of constant darkness (DD). Horseshoe crab activity was recorded with a digital time-lapse video system that used an infrared-sensitive camera so animals could be monitored at night. In LD, 15 animals expressed daily patterns of activity, 6 displayed a circatidal pattern, and the remaining 3 were arrhythmic. Of the 15 animals with daily patterns of locomotion, 7 had a significant preference (P < 0.05) for diurnal activity and 3 for nocturnal activity; the remainder did not express a significant preference for day or night activity. In DD, 13 horseshoe crabs expressed circatidal rhythms and 8 maintained a pattern of about 24 h. Although these results suggest the presence of a circadian clock influencing circatidal patterns of locomotion, these apparent circadian rhythms may actually represent the expression of just one of the two bouts of activity driven by the putative circalunidian clocks that control their tidal rhythms. Overall, these results indicate that, like adults, juvenile horseshoe crabs express both daily and tidal patterns of activity and that at least one, and maybe both, of these patterns is driven by endogenous clocks.

  11. Predicting habitat associations of five intertidal crab species among estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeiren, Peter; Sheaves, Marcus

    2014-08-01

    Intertidal crab assemblages that are active on the sediment surface of tropical estuaries during tidal exposure play an important role in many fundamental ecosystem processes. Consequently, they are critical contributors to a wide range of estuarine goods and services. However, a lack of understanding of their spatial organization within a large landscape context prevents the inclusion of intertidal crabs into generally applicable ecological models and management applications. We investigated spatial distribution patterns of intertidal crabs within and among eight dry tropical estuaries spread across a 160 km stretch of coast in North East Queensland, Australia. Habitat associations were modelled for five species based on photographic sampling in 40-80 sites per estuarine up- and downstream component: Uca seismella occurred in sites with little structure, bordered by low intertidal vegetation; Macrophthalmus japonicus occupied flat muddy sites with no structure or vegetation; Metopograpsus frontalis and Metopograpsus latifrons occupied sites covered with structure in more than 10% and 25% respectively. Finally, both Metopograpsus spp. and Metopograpsus thukuhar occupied rock walls. Habitat associations were predictable among estuaries with moderate to high sensitivity and low percentages of false positives indicating that simple, physical factors were adequate to explain the spatial distribution pattern of intertidal crabs. Results provide a necessary first step in developing generally applicable understanding of the fundamental mechanisms driving spatial niche organization of intertidal crabs within a landscape context.

  12. ELEMENT DISTRIBUTIONS IN THE CRAB NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Satterfield, Timothy J.; Katz, Andrea M.; Sibley, Adam R.; MacAlpine, Gordon M.; Uomoto, Alan

    2012-07-15

    Images of the Crab Nebula have been obtained through custom interference filters that transmit emission from the expanding supernova remnant in He II {lambda}4686, H{beta}, He I {lambda}5876, [O I] {lambda}{lambda}6300, 6364, [N II] {lambda}{lambda}6548, 6583, [S II] {lambda}{lambda}6716, 6731, [S III] {lambda}9069, and [C I] {lambda}{lambda}9823, 9850. We present both raw and flux-calibrated emission-line images. Arrays of 19,440 photoionization models, with extensive input abundance ranges, were matched pixel by pixel to the calibrated data in order to derive corresponding element abundance or mass-fraction distributions for helium, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur. These maps show distinctive structure, and they illustrate regions of gas in which various stages of nucleosynthesis have apparently occurred, including the CNO cycle, helium burning, carbon burning, and oxygen burning. It is hoped that the calibrated observations and chemical abundance distribution maps will be useful for developing a better understanding of the precursor star evolution and the supernova explosive process.

  13. Unpulsed Optical Emission from the Crab Pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golden, A.; Shearer, A.; Beskin, G. M.

    2000-05-01

    Based on observations of the Crab pulsar using the TRIFFID high-speed imaging photometer in the UBV bands using the Special Astrophysical Observatory's 6 m telescope in the Russian Caucasus, we report the detection of pronounced emission during the so-called off phase of emission. Following de-extinction, this unpulsed component of emission is shown to be consistent with a power law with an exponent of α=-0.60+/-0.37, the uncertainty being dominated by the error associated with the independent CCD photometry used to reference the TRIFFID data. This suggests a steeper power-law form than that reported elsewhere in the literature for the total integrated spectrum, which is essentially flat with α~0.1, although the difference in this case is only significant at the <=2 σ level. Deeper reference integrated and TRIFFID phase-resolved photometry, in these bands in conjunction with further observations in the UV and R region, would constrain this fit further. Based on observations using the 6 m telescope at the Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences in Nizhnii Arkhyz, Russia.

  14. Dishonest signalling in a fiddler crab.

    PubMed

    Backwell, P R; Christy, J H; Telford, S R; Jennions, M D; Passmore, N I

    2000-04-07

    Animal communication theory predicts that low-frequency cheating should be common in generally honest signalling systems. However, perhaps because cheats are designed to go undetected, there are few examples of dishonest signals in natural populations. Here we present what we believe is the first example of a dishonest signal which is used commonly by males to attract mates and fight sexual rivals. After losing their large claw male fiddler crabs (Uca annulipes) grow a new one which has less mass, is a less effective weapon and costs less to use in signalling than an equivalent-length claw of the original form. Males with original claws do not differentially fight males with regenerated claws even though they are likely to win. Regenerated claws effectively bluff fighting ability and deter potential opponents before they fight. During mate searching, females do not discriminate against males with low-mass, regenerated claws, indicating that they are deceived as to the true costs males pay to produce sexual signals. Up to 44% of males in natural populations have regenerated claws, a level unanticipated by current signalling theory. The apparent rarity of cheating may be an artefact of the usual difficulty of detecting cheats and dishonesty may be quite common.

  15. 75 FR 49420 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Atlantic Deep-Sea Red Crab Fisheries; 2010 Atlantic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-13

    ... United States; Atlantic Deep-Sea Red Crab Fisheries; 2010 Atlantic Deep-Sea Red Crab Specifications In... (TAC) and corresponding fleet days-at-sea (DAS) allocation for the Atlantic deep- sea red crab fishery... the implementing regulations for the Atlantic Deep- Sea Red Crab Fishery Management Plan...

  16. 76 FR 43658 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Crab...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-21

    ... Alaska; Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Crab Rationalization Cost Recovery Program AGENCY: National... under the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Crab Rationalization Program. This action is intended to provide holders of crab allocations with the fee percentage for the 2011/2012 crab fishing year so...

  17. 50 CFR 600.1104 - Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands (BSAI) crab species fee payment and collection system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Pribilof blue king (the corresponding crab rationalization fishery is Pribilof red king and blue king crab), and (6) St. Matthew blue king (the corresponding crab rationalization fishery is also St. Matthew blue...) crab species fee payment and collection system. 600.1104 Section 600.1104 Wildlife and...

  18. 76 FR 68358 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Crab...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-04

    ... Program, the western Aleutian Islands red king crab and Pribilof Islands red and blue king crab fisheries have failed to open, and the Saint Matthew Island blue king crab fishery has only been open during the... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Crab Rationalization Program AGENCY:...

  19. 50 CFR 600.1104 - Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands (BSAI) crab species fee payment and collection system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Pribilof blue king (the corresponding crab rationalization fishery is Pribilof red king and blue king crab), and (6) St. Matthew blue king (the corresponding crab rationalization fishery is also St. Matthew blue...) crab species fee payment and collection system. 600.1104 Section 600.1104 Wildlife and...

  20. 50 CFR 600.1104 - Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands (BSAI) crab species fee payment and collection system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Pribilof blue king (the corresponding crab rationalization fishery is Pribilof red king and blue king crab), and (6) St. Matthew blue king (the corresponding crab rationalization fishery is also St. Matthew blue...) crab species fee payment and collection system. 600.1104 Section 600.1104 Wildlife and...

  1. 50 CFR 600.1104 - Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands (BSAI) crab species fee payment and collection system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Pribilof blue king (the corresponding crab rationalization fishery is Pribilof red king and blue king crab), and (6) St. Matthew blue king (the corresponding crab rationalization fishery is also St. Matthew blue...) crab species fee payment and collection system. 600.1104 Section 600.1104 Wildlife and...

  2. 50 CFR 600.1104 - Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands (BSAI) crab species fee payment and collection system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Pribilof blue king (the corresponding crab rationalization fishery is Pribilof red king and blue king crab), and (6) St. Matthew blue king (the corresponding crab rationalization fishery is also St. Matthew blue...) crab species fee payment and collection system. 600.1104 Section 600.1104 Wildlife and...

  3. 76 FR 49423 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Crab...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-10

    ... the CR Program, the western Aleutian Islands red king crab and Pribilof Islands red and blue king crab fisheries have failed to open, and the Saint Matthew Island blue king crab fishery has only been open during... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Crab Rationalization Program AGENCY:...

  4. [Study on the toxicity of horseshoe crabs in mice].

    PubMed

    Liao, Y; Li, X

    2000-05-30

    In order to study the toxicity of horseshoe crabs(tachypleus tridentatus and carcinoscorpius rotundicauda) in the sea of China, the extracts of tissues from tachypleus tridentatus and carcinoscorpius rotundicauda were injected into the abdominal cavity of mice for testing their poisoning effects. The results showed that the toxicity of carcinoscorpius rotundicauda was much higher than that of tachypleus tridentatus. The length of time from the injection to the death was much shorter for Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda than that for tachypleus tridentatus. The signs before death for Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda poisoning were restless, jumping and spasm but that for Tachypleus tridentatus was lethargy. The toxicity of adult horseshoe crabs was much higher than that of young horseshoe crabs.

  5. The surprising Crab pulsar and its nebula: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bühler, R.; Blandford, R.

    2014-06-01

    The Crab nebula and its pulsar (referred to together as ‘the Crab’) have historically played a central role in astrophysics. True to this legacy, several unique discoveries have been made recently. The Crab was found to emit gamma-ray pulsations up to energies of 400 GeV, beyond what was previously expected from pulsars. Strong gamma-ray flares, of durations of a few days, were discovered from within the nebula, while the source was previously expected to be stable in flux on these time scales. Here we review these intriguing and suggestive developments. In this context we give an overview of the observational properties of the Crab and our current understanding of pulsars and their nebulae.

  6. Chandra Observations of the Crab: A Progress Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.

    2012-01-01

    Recently there have been two important findings concerning the Crab both of which are highlighted in this workshop. One finding was the discovery, using the AGILE and Fermi satellites, of gamma-ray flares from the direction of the Crab Nebula. The other finding was the variability, up to 7%, with time scales of the order of a year of the integrated hard X-ray emission. We have been using the Chandra X-Ray observatory to monitor the Crab on a monthly cadence since just after the 2010 September gamma-ray flare. We were also fortunate to trigger series of preplanned target of opportunity observations during the 2011 April flare. Our monitoring observations are on-going and will extend, at a minimum until the fall of 2012. We present an update and overview of these observations.

  7. Double lethal coconut crab (Birgus latro L.) poisoning.

    PubMed

    Maillaud, C; Lefebvre, S; Sebat, C; Barguil, Y; Cabalion, P; Cheze, M; Hnawia, E; Nour, M; Durand, F

    2010-01-01

    We report a double lethal coconut crab Birgus latro L. poisoning in New Caledonia. Both patients died after showing gastro-intestinal symptoms, major bradycardia with marked low blood pressure, and finally asystolia. Both had significative hyperkaliemia, suggesting a digitaline-like substance intoxication. Traditional knowledge in the Loyalty Islands relates coconut crab toxicity to the consumption of the Cerbera manghas fruit by the crustacean. Elsewhere previous descriptions of human poisoning with the kernel of fruits of trees belonging to the genus Cerbera, known to contain cardiotoxic cardenolides, appear to be very similar to our cases. Cardenolides assays were performed on patient's serum samples, fruit kernel and on the crustacean guts, which lead us to suppose these two fatal cases were the result of a neriifolin intoxication, this toxin having been transmitted through the coconut crab.

  8. Associational resistance protects mangrove leaves from crab herbivory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Amy A.; Bell, Susan S.; Dawes, Clinton J.

    2012-05-01

    While associational defenses have been well documented in many plant and algal ecosystems, this study is the first to document associational resistance in mangroves. Mangrove tree crab (Aratus pisonii) density and herbivory on three life-stages of the red mangrove (Rhizophora mangle) were documented in pure red versus mixed-species and predominantly non-red mangrove stands containing black (Avicennia germinans) and white (Laguncularia racemosa) mangroves in 1999-2000 in Tampa Bay, Florida. This study first established that R. mangle is the focal species in the context of associational resistance because it is damaged more than either of the other mangrove species. Next, it was hypothesized that crab density and leaf damage on R. mangle would be lower when in mixed-species and predominantly non-red versus red mangrove stands. A non-significant trend suggested that crab density varies among stands, and crab damage on R. mangle leaves was significantly lower in mixed-species and non-red stands. Mechanisms to explain associational resistance were examined. Positive Pearson correlations between the percent of adult R. mangle in a stand and both crab density and R. mangle leaf damage provided support for the resource concentration hypothesis. Limited support was found for the attractant-decoy hypothesis because the total amount of damaged leaves of all mangrove species combined typically differed among stands, suggesting that crabs were not shifting to alternative mangrove species to offset reduced availability of R. mangle leaves. Finally, while R. mangle seedlings were shorter in non-red stands compared to others, intra-specific differences in R. mangle leaf chemistry and sclerophylly among stands failed to explain associational patterns. These combined results argue for the need for additional experiments to elucidate mechanisms responsible for defensive plant associations in mangrove ecosystems and to determine whether such associations could be of use in mangrove

  9. Habitat selection and energetics of the fiddler crab ( Uca tangeri)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaassen, Marcel; Ens, Bruno J.

    We tried to unravel the possible links between the skewed predation risk in Uca tangeri (where large individuals are more at risk from avian predators) and size-dependent changes in the physiology and habitat choice of this fiddler crab species. Over a transect running from low to high in the tidal zone of a beach in Mauritania, the temperature profile at various depths in the substrate, the water-table level of seep water, salt concentration of seep water, depth of the aerobic level, operative temperatures on the surface, and size distribution of crabs were assessed. In addition, resting metabolic rates, Q 10 and thermal and starvation tolerances were estimated. Going from low to high in the tidal zone, crab size and burrow depth increased. At the preferred burrowing depth, microclimatological conditions appeared to be equally favourable at all sites. At the surface, conditions were more favourable low in the tidal zone, where also food availability is sufficient to enable small crabs to forage in the vicinity of their burrows. Large crabs have higher energy requirements and are thereby forced to forage in flocks low in the tidal zone where food is probably more abundant. Low in the tidal zone, digging deeply is impossible as the aerobic layer is rather thin. Large crabs prefer living high in the tidal zone as (1) deep burrows ensure better protection against predators, (2) more time is available for digging holes and (3) the substrate is better suited for reproduction. Energy reserves in late summer ensured an average of 34 days of survival. It is argued that the allotment of energy to growth must be considerable even in reproducing animals; the rewards of growth being the disproportional increase in reproductive output with size.

  10. Nematodes Infect, But Do Not Manipulate Digging By, Sand Crabs, Lepidopa benedicti

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Meera; Faulkes, Zen

    2014-01-01

    We examined sand crabs (Lepidopa benedicti) for endoparasites, and found the only parasite consistently infecting the studied population were small nematodes. Because many nematodes have complex life cycles involving multiple hosts, often strongly manipulating their hosts, we hypothesized that nematodes alter the behavior of their sand crab hosts. We predicted that more heavily infected crabs would spend more time above sand than less heavily infected crabs. Our data indicate infection by nematodes was not correlated with duration of time crabs spent above sand. We also suggest that organisms living in sandy beaches may benefit from relatively low parasite loads due to the low diversity of species in the habitat. PMID:24916475

  11. Influence of Land Mosaic Composition and Structure on Patchy Populations: The Case of the Water Vole (Arvicola sapidus) in Mediterranean Farmland

    PubMed Central

    Pita, Ricardo; Mira, António; Beja, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    The ability of patchy populations to persist in human-dominated landscapes is often assessed using focal patch approaches, in which the local occurrence or abundance of a species is related to the properties of individual patches and the surrounding landscape context. However, useful additional insights could probably be gained through broader, mosaic-level approaches, whereby whole land mosaics with contrasting patch-network and matrix characteristics are the units of investigation. In this study we addressed this issue, analysing how the southern water vole (Arvicola sapidus) responds to variables describing patch-network and matrix properties within replicated Mediterranean farmland mosaics, across a gradient of agricultural intensification. Patch-network characteristics had a dominant effect, with the total amount of habitat positively influencing both the occurrence of water voles and the proportion of area occupied in land mosaics. The proportions of patches and area occupied by the species were positively influenced by mean patch size, and negatively so by patch isolation. Matrix effects were weak, although there was a tendency for a higher proportion of occupied patches in more intensive, irrigated agricultural landscapes, particularly during the dry season. In terms of conservation, results suggest that water voles may be able to cope well with, or even be favoured by, the on-going expansion of irrigated agriculture in Mediterranean dry-lands, provided that a number of patches of wet herbaceous vegetation are maintained within the farmland mosaic. Overall, our study suggests that the mosaic-level approach may provide a useful framework to understand the responses of patchy populations to land use change. PMID:23875014

  12. Observations of Crab Nebula and pulsar with VERITAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik, Ozlem

    The Crab Nebula, the standard candle in very-high-energy (VHE) astronomy, is one of the most studied sources in all of astronomy. It is scientifically important to measure the energy spectrum of the Crab Nebula close to the inverse Compton peak or above 10 TeV where a deviation from the power law, seen at energies between 300 GeV and ˜5 TeV, may occur. Additionally, it is important to search for pulsed emission from the Crab Pulsar at energies beyond 10 GeV which is the upper limit of the EGRET detection of pulsed emission. Since current models predict a cut-off in the pulsed emission between 10 and 100 GeV, measurements at energies close to this range may help to discriminate between them. With these motivations, the Crab has been observed during the 2-, 3-, and 4-telescope phases of the commissioning of the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS). The energy spectrum of the Crab Nebula between 350 GeV and 6 TeV is constructed from these data sets. A simple power law, dNdE = (3.19 +/- 0.07stat +/- 0.70 sys) x 10-7 E1TeV 2.40+/-0.03 stat+/-0.17sys TeV-1m-2s-1 , is found to give the best fit to the data obtained with the full 4-telescope array of VERITAS. Furthermore, a periodic modulation is searched for in the gamma-ray emission above 100 GeV at the Crab Pulsar period of 33 ms. The Crab data set from the 2006--2008 VERITAS observations did not show any significant pulsed excess, so an upper limit on the pulsed emission from the Crab Pulsar is obtained. This upper limit constrains the cutoff energy of the spectrum to be less than 50 GeV, assuming that the differential energy spectrum of the pulsed emission has an exponential cutoff.

  13. Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope observations of the Crab Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hennessy, Gregory S.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Cheng, Kwang P.; Bohlin, Ralph C.; Collins, Nicholas R.; Gull, Theodore P.; Hintzen, Paul; Isensee, Joan E.; Landsman, Wayne B.; Roberts, Morton S.

    1992-01-01

    We obtained ultraviolet images of the Crab Nebula with the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope during the Astro-1 Space Shuttle mission in 1990 December. The UV continuum morphology of the Crab is generally similar to that in the optical region, but the wispy structures are less conspicuous in the UV and X-ray. UV line emission from the thermal filaments is not strong. UV spectral index maps with a resolution of 10 arcsecs show a significant gradient across the nebula, with the outer parts being redder, as expected from synchrotron losses. The location of the bluest synchrotron continuum does not coincide with the pulsar.

  14. Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope observations of the Crab Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennessy, Gregory S.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Cheng, Kwang P.; Bohlin, Ralph C.; Collins, Nicholas R.; Gull, Theodore R.; Hintzen, Paul; Isensee, Joan E.; Landsman, Wayne B.; Roberts, Morton S.; Smith, Andrew M.; Smith, Eric P.; Stecher, Theodore P.

    1992-08-01

    We obtained ultraviolet images of the Crab Nebula with the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope during the Astro-1 Space Shuttle mission in 1990 December. The UV continuum morphology of the Crab is generally similar to that in the optical region, but the wispy structures are less conspicuous in the UV and X-ray. UV line emission from the thermal filaments is not strong. UV spectral index maps with a resolution of 10 arcsecs show a significant gradient across the nebula, with the outer parts being redder, as expected from synchrotron losses. The location of the bluest synchrotron continuum does not coincide with the pulsar.

  15. Species Diversity and Abundance of Marine Crabs (Portunidae: Decapoda) from a Collapsible Crab Trap Fishery at Kung Krabaen Bay, Chanthaburi Province, Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Kunsook, Chutapa; Dumrongrojwatthana, Pongchai

    2017-01-01

    The diversity and abundance of marine crabs from a collapsible crab trap fishery at Kung Krabaen Bay, Gulf of Thailand, were observed from August 2012 to June 2013 using 10 sampling stations. The results showed that there were seven families, 11 genera and 17 species (two anomuran and 15 brachyuran crabs). The two anomuran species were Clibanarius virescens (1,710 individuals) and Clibanarius infraspinatus (558 individuals). For brachyuran crabs, Portunidae was the most common family, including 10 species. The dominant species of brachyuran crabs included Thalamita crenata (897 individuals), Portunus pelagicus (806 individuals), Charybdis affinis (344 individuals), Scylla sp. (201 individuals), and Charybdis anisodon (100 individuals). The abundance of crabs was affected by the habitat type. Anomuran crabs had the highest abundance in Halodule pinifolia seagrass beds, whilst brachyurans had the highest abundance in Enhalus acoroides seagrass beds. The dominant brachyuran species were found in pelagic areas near the bay mouth, such as P. pelagicus, P. sanguinolentus, C. feriatus, C. helleri, C. natator, C. affinis, and M. hardwickii. Lastly, reforested mangroves were important habitats for Scylla tranquebarica and C. anisodon. Seasonal and physical factors influenced the abundance of some crabs, for example, the abundance of C. virescens was correlated with temperature, and the abundance of T. crenata was correlated with transparency depth. Our results revealed that Kung Krabaen Bay serves as the home to many marine crab species; however, our results also revealed that 49% of the harvested crabs (2,308 out of 4,694 individuals) were simply discarded and subsequently died. Moreover, our research noted that eight non-target species will become target species in the near future. Therefore, research on the reproductive biology of some marine crabs and an improved understanding of the importance of marine crabs by local fishermen are necessary to prevent biodiversity

  16. Species Diversity and Abundance of Marine Crabs (Portunidae: Decapoda) from a Collapsible Crab Trap Fishery at Kung Krabaen Bay, Chanthaburi Province, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kunsook, Chutapa; Dumrongrojwatthana, Pongchai

    2017-01-01

    The diversity and abundance of marine crabs from a collapsible crab trap fishery at Kung Krabaen Bay, Gulf of Thailand, were observed from August 2012 to June 2013 using 10 sampling stations. The results showed that there were seven families, 11 genera and 17 species (two anomuran and 15 brachyuran crabs). The two anomuran species were Clibanarius virescens (1,710 individuals) and Clibanarius infraspinatus (558 individuals). For brachyuran crabs, Portunidae was the most common family, including 10 species. The dominant species of brachyuran crabs included Thalamita crenata (897 individuals), Portunus pelagicus (806 individuals), Charybdis affinis (344 individuals), Scylla sp. (201 individuals), and Charybdis anisodon (100 individuals). The abundance of crabs was affected by the habitat type. Anomuran crabs had the highest abundance in Halodule pinifolia seagrass beds, whilst brachyurans had the highest abundance in Enhalus acoroides seagrass beds. The dominant brachyuran species were found in pelagic areas near the bay mouth, such as P. pelagicus, P. sanguinolentus, C. feriatus, C. helleri, C. natator, C. affinis, and M. hardwickii. Lastly, reforested mangroves were important habitats for Scylla tranquebarica and C. anisodon. Seasonal and physical factors influenced the abundance of some crabs, for example, the abundance of C. virescens was correlated with temperature, and the abundance of T. crenata was correlated with transparency depth. Our results revealed that Kung Krabaen Bay serves as the home to many marine crab species; however, our results also revealed that 49% of the harvested crabs (2,308 out of 4,694 individuals) were simply discarded and subsequently died. Moreover, our research noted that eight non-target species will become target species in the near future. Therefore, research on the reproductive biology of some marine crabs and an improved understanding of the importance of marine crabs by local fishermen are necessary to prevent biodiversity

  17. The complete mitogenome of the hydrothermal vent crab Xenograpsus testudinatus (Decapoda, Brachyura) and comparison with brachyuran crabs.

    PubMed

    Ki, Jang-Seu; Dahms, Hans-Uwe; Hwang, Jiang-Shiou; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2009-12-01

    In this study, we analyzed the complete mitochondrial (mt) genome of a hydrothermal vent crab Xenograpsus testudinatus (Decapoda: Brachyura) obtained from the hydrothermal vents off Kueishantao Island, Taiwan, which extend from the deep sea Okinawa Trench. The mitogenome of X. testudinatus was 15,796 bp in length and contained the same 37 genes (e.g. 2 rRNAs, 22 tRNAs, and 13 PCGs) found in other metazoan mitogenomes. Analysis of the structural mt gene order in X. testudinatus revealed that the 13 PCGs, excluding a translocation of ND6-Cyt b cluster, were similarly ordered when compared to the pancrustacean ground pattern; however the tRNAs were severely rearranged. Phylogenetic analysis of decapod mitogenomes showed that the molecular taxonomy of the vent crab was in accordance with its morphological systematics. Together, these findings suggest that the vent crab studied here has little mitochondrial genetic variation when compared with morphologically defined conspecifics from other marine habitats.

  18. Quantification of the indirect effects of scallop dredge fisheries on a brown crab fishery.

    PubMed

    Öndes, Fikret; Kaiser, Michel J; Murray, Lee G

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to describe the characteristics of the by-catch of Cancer pagurus in king scallop dredges in the Isle of Man, and to determine the damage, immediate mortality and estimated mortality during fishing seasons associated with scallop dredges. Based on dredge surveys, spatial and seasonal variations were observed, with the highest number of crabs found off the west coast of the Isle of Man in the autumn when berried females crabs were most frequently caught. In general, female crabs comprised 84% of the catch. The damage levels of crabs was high with 45% of crabs recorded as crushed or dead or with severe damage, whilst 24% of crabs exhibited missing limbs. Estimates of the potential mortality associated with scallop dredging led to a lower and upper estimate of possible crab by-catch mortality of 15t and 24t respectively which represented 3.0-4.8% of the commercial landings of brown crab for the Isle of Man. Heaviest mortalities of crabs occurred in autumn to the west of the Isle of Man when female berried crabs move offshore into deeper water. The use of a temporary and spatially restricted scallop dredging closure could provide a simple solution to mitigate additional crab mortality in the event that scallop dredging increased beyond current levels in the future.

  19. The use of artificial crabs for testing predatory behavior and health in the octopus.

    PubMed

    Amodio, Piero; Andrews, Paul; Salemme, Marinella; Ponte, Giovanna; Fiorito, Graziano

    2014-01-01

    The willingness of the cephalopod mollusc Octopus vulgaris to attack a live crab is traditionally used as a method to assess the overall health and welfare of octopuses in the laboratory. This method requires placing a crab in the home tank of an animal, measuring the time (latency) taken for the octopus to initiate an attack and withdrawing the crab immediately prior to capture. The same crab is commonly used to assess multiple octopuses as part of daily welfare assessment. Growing concern for the welfare of crustaceans and a review of all laboratory practices for the care and welfare of cephalopods following the inclusion of this taxon in 2010/63/EU prompted a study of the utility of an artificial crab to replace a live crab in the assessment of octopus health. On consecutive days O. vulgaris (N=21) were presented with a live, a dead or an artificial crab, and the latency to attack measured. Despite differences in the predatory performance towards the three different crab alternatives, octopuses readily attacked the artificial (and the dead) crab, showing that they can generalize and respond appropriately towards artificial prey. Researchers should consider using an artificial crab to replace the use of a live crab as part of the routine health assessment of O. vulgaris.

  20. Boxer crabs induce asexual reproduction of their associated sea anemones by splitting and intraspecific theft

    PubMed Central

    Karplus, Ilan; Achituv, Yair

    2017-01-01

    Crabs of the genus Lybia have the remarkable habit of holding a sea anemone in each of their claws. This partnership appears to be obligate, at least on the part of the crab. The present study focuses on Lybia leptochelis from the Red Sea holding anemones of the genus Alicia (family Aliciidae). These anemones have not been found free living, only in association with L. leptochelis. In an attempt to understand how the crabs acquire them, we conducted a series of behavioral experiments and molecular analyses. Laboratory observations showed that the removal of one anemone from a crab induces a “splitting” behavior, whereby the crab tears the remaining anemone into two similar parts, resulting in a complete anemone in each claw after regeneration. Furthermore, when two crabs, one holding anemones and one lacking them, are confronted, the crabs fight, almost always leading to the “theft” of a complete anemone or anemone fragment by the crab without them. Following this, crabs “split” their lone anemone into two. Individuals of Alicia sp. removed from freshly collected L. leptochelis were used for DNA analysis. By employing AFLP (Fluorescence Amplified Fragments Length Polymorphism) it was shown that each pair of anemones from a given crab is genetically identical. Furthermore, there is genetic identity between most pairs of anemone held by different crabs, with the others showing slight genetic differences. This is a unique case in which one animal induces asexual reproduction of another, consequently also affecting its genetic diversity. PMID:28168117

  1. Boxer crabs induce asexual reproduction of their associated sea anemones by splitting and intraspecific theft.

    PubMed

    Schnytzer, Yisrael; Giman, Yaniv; Karplus, Ilan; Achituv, Yair

    2017-01-01

    Crabs of the genus Lybia have the remarkable habit of holding a sea anemone in each of their claws. This partnership appears to be obligate, at least on the part of the crab. The present study focuses on Lybia leptochelis from the Red Sea holding anemones of the genus Alicia (family Aliciidae). These anemones have not been found free living, only in association with L. leptochelis. In an attempt to understand how the crabs acquire them, we conducted a series of behavioral experiments and molecular analyses. Laboratory observations showed that the removal of one anemone from a crab induces a "splitting" behavior, whereby the crab tears the remaining anemone into two similar parts, resulting in a complete anemone in each claw after regeneration. Furthermore, when two crabs, one holding anemones and one lacking them, are confronted, the crabs fight, almost always leading to the "theft" of a complete anemone or anemone fragment by the crab without them. Following this, crabs "split" their lone anemone into two. Individuals of Alicia sp. removed from freshly collected L. leptochelis were used for DNA analysis. By employing AFLP (Fluorescence Amplified Fragments Length Polymorphism) it was shown that each pair of anemones from a given crab is genetically identical. Furthermore, there is genetic identity between most pairs of anemone held by different crabs, with the others showing slight genetic differences. This is a unique case in which one animal induces asexual reproduction of another, consequently also affecting its genetic diversity.

  2. 50 CFR Table 8 to Part 680 - Initial QS and PQS Pool for Each Crab QS Fishery

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 200,000,000 PIK Pribilof Islands red and blue king crab 30,000,000 30,000,000 SMB St. Matthew blue... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Initial QS and PQS Pool for Each Crab QS... Crab QS Fishery Crab QS Fishery Initial QS Pool Initial PQS Pool BBR Bristol Bay red king crab...

  3. 50 CFR Table 8 to Part 680 - Initial QS and PQS Pool for Each Crab QS Fishery

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 200,000,000 PIK Pribilof Islands red and blue king crab 30,000,000 30,000,000 SMB St. Matthew blue... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Initial QS and PQS Pool for Each Crab QS... Crab QS Fishery Crab QS Fishery Initial QS Pool Initial PQS Pool BBR Bristol Bay red king crab...

  4. 50 CFR Table 8 to Part 680 - Initial QS and PQS Pool for Each Crab QS Fishery

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 200,000,000 PIK Pribilof Islands red and blue king crab 30,000,000 30,000,000 SMB St. Matthew blue... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Initial QS and PQS Pool for Each Crab QS... Crab QS Fishery Crab QS Fishery Initial QS Pool Initial PQS Pool BBR Bristol Bay red king crab...

  5. 50 CFR Table 8 to Part 680 - Initial QS and PQS Pool for Each Crab QS Fishery

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 200,000,000 PIK Pribilof Islands red and blue king crab 30,000,000 30,000,000 SMB St. Matthew blue... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Initial QS and PQS Pool for Each Crab QS... Crab QS Fishery Crab QS Fishery Initial QS Pool Initial PQS Pool BBR Bristol Bay red king crab...

  6. 50 CFR Table 8 to Part 680 - Initial QS and PQS Pool for Each Crab QS Fishery

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 200,000,000 PIK Pribilof Islands red and blue king crab 30,000,000 30,000,000 SMB St. Matthew blue... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Initial QS and PQS Pool for Each Crab QS... Crab QS Fishery Crab QS Fishery Initial QS Pool Initial PQS Pool BBR Bristol Bay red king crab...

  7. Simulated predator extinctions: predator identity affects survival and recruitment of oysters.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Nessa E; Grabowski, Jonathan H; Ladwig, Laura M; Bruno, John F

    2008-02-01

    The rate of species loss is increasing at a global scale, and human-induced extinctions are biased toward predator species. We examined the effects of predator extinctions on a foundation species, the eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica). We performed a factorial experiment manipulating the presence and abundance of three of the most common predatory crabs, the blue crab (Callinectes sapidus), stone crab (Menippe mercenaria), and mud crab (Panopeus herbstii) in estuaries in the eastern United States. We tested the effects of species richness and identity of predators on juvenile oyster survival, oyster recruitment, and organic matter content of sediment. We also manipulated the density of each of the predators and controlled for the loss of biomass of species by maintaining a constant mass of predators in one set of treatments and simultaneously using an additive design. This design allowed us to test the density dependence of our results and test for functional compensation by other species. The identity of predator species, but not richness, affected oyster populations. The loss of blue crabs, alone or in combination with either of the other species, affected the survival rate of juvenile oysters. Blue crabs and stone crabs both affected oyster recruitment and sediment organic matter negatively. Mud crabs at higher than ambient densities, however, could fulfill some of the functions of blue and stone crabs, suggesting a level of ecological redundancy. Importantly, the strong effects of blue crabs in all processes measured no longer occurred when individuals were present at higher-than-ambient densities. Their role as dominant predator is, therefore, dependent on their density within the system and the density of other species within their guild (e.g., mud crabs). Our findings support the hypothesis that the effects of species loss at higher trophic levels are determined by predator identity and are subject to complex intraguild interactions that are largely

  8. 50 CFR 253.30 - Crab IFQ loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... crab fishing vessel; (2) Who has been issued the appropriate documentation of eligibility by RAM; (3... credit enhancement. (g) Crew member transfer eligibility certification. The Program will accept RAM... of any person determined by RAM to be unable to receive such certification will be...

  9. 50 CFR 253.30 - Crab IFQ loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... crab fishing vessel; (2) Who has been issued the appropriate documentation of eligibility by RAM; (3... credit enhancement. (g) Crew member transfer eligibility certification. The Program will accept RAM... of any person determined by RAM to be unable to receive such certification will be...

  10. 50 CFR 253.30 - Crab IFQ loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... crab fishing vessel; (2) Who has been issued the appropriate documentation of eligibility by RAM; (3... credit enhancement. (g) Crew member transfer eligibility certification. The Program will accept RAM... of any person determined by RAM to be unable to receive such certification will be...

  11. 50 CFR 253.30 - Crab IFQ loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... crab fishing vessel; (2) Who has been issued the appropriate documentation of eligibility by RAM; (3... credit enhancement. (g) Crew member transfer eligibility certification. The Program will accept RAM... of any person determined by RAM to be unable to receive such certification will be...

  12. A Toll-like receptor in horseshoe crabs.

    PubMed

    Inamori, Kei-ichiro; Ariki, Shigeru; Kawabata, Shun-ichiro

    2004-04-01

    Non-self-recognition of invading microbes relies on the pattern-recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) derived from microbial cell-wall components. Insects and mammals conserve a signaling pathway of the innate immune system through cell-surface receptors called Tolls and Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) are an important trigger of the horseshoe crab's innate immunity to infectious microorganisms. Horseshoe crabs' granular hemocytes respond specifically to LPS stimulation, inducing the secretion of various defense molecules from the granular hemocytes. Here, we show a cDNA which we named tToll, coding for a TLR identified from hemocytes of the horseshoe crab Tachypleus tridentatus. tToll is most closely related to Drosophila Toll in both domain architecture and overall length. Human TLRs have been suggested to contain numerous PAMP-binding insertions located in the leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) of their ectodomains. However, the LRRs of tToll contained no obvious PAMP-binding insertions. Furthermore, tToll was non-specifically expressed in horseshoe crab tissues. These observations suggest that tToll does not function as an LPS receptor on granular hemocytes.

  13. Early drawings of Messier 1: pineapple or crab?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewhirst, D. W.

    1983-06-01

    Articles on the history of the Crab Nebula frequently reproduce an enigmatical drawing of it by Lord Rosse. This drawing was quickly repudiated by him and replaced by a more recognizable one which is less well known. Both drawings are discussed.

  14. 50 CFR Table 4 to Part 680 - Crab Process Codes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Crab Process Codes 4 Table 4 to Part 680... Frozen. 3 Salted/brined. 6 Cooked. 7 Live. 18 Fresh/vacuum pack. 21 Frozen/block. 22 Frozen/shatter pack. 28 Frozen/vacuum pack....

  15. 50 CFR Table 4 to Part 680 - Crab Process Codes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Crab Process Codes 4 Table 4 to Part 680... Frozen. 3 Salted/brined. 6 Cooked. 7 Live. 18 Fresh/vacuum pack. 21 Frozen/block. 22 Frozen/shatter pack. 28 Frozen/vacuum pack....

  16. 50 CFR 680.6 - Crab economic data report (EDR).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... fishing year being reported, record insurance premiums (for hull, property and indemnity, and pollution.... (vi) BSAI crab-specific vessel costs. Insurance premiums (hull, property and indemnity, and pollution...: CR fishery code; dates covered (beginning and ending day, month and year); number of days at...

  17. 50 CFR 680.6 - Crab economic data report (EDR).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... fishing year being reported, record insurance premiums (for hull, property and indemnity, and pollution.... (vi) BSAI crab-specific vessel costs. Insurance premiums (hull, property and indemnity, and pollution...: CR fishery code; dates covered (beginning and ending day, month and year); number of days at...

  18. Hard X-ray Variations in the Crab Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Cherry, M. L.; Case, G. L.; Baumgarter, W. H.; Beklen, E.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, M. S.; Camero-Arranz, A.; Chaplin, V.; Connaughton, V.; Finger, M. H.; Gehrels, N.; Greiner, J.; Jahoda, K.; Jenke, P.; Kippen, R. M.; Kouveliotou, C.; Krimm, H. A.; Kuulkers, E.; Lund, N.; Meegan, C. A.; Natalucci, L.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R.; Rodi, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    In the first two years of science operations of the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), August 2008 to August 2010, a approx.7% (70 mcrab) decline was discovered in the overall Crab Nebula flux in the 15 - 50 keV band, measured with the Earth occultation technique. This decline was independently confirmed with four other instruments: the RXTE/PCA, Swift/BAT, INTEGRAL/IBIS, and INTEGRAL/SPI. The pulsed flux measured with RXTE/PCA from 1999-2010 was consistent with the pulsar spin-down, indicating that the observed changes were nebular. From 2001 to 2010, the Crab nebula flux measured with RXTE/PCA was particularly variable, changing by up to approx.3.5% per year in the 15-50 keV band. These variations were confirmed with INTEGRAL/SPI starting in 2003, Swift/BAT starting in 2005, and Fermi GBM starting in 2008. Before 2001 and since 2010, the Crab nebula flux has appeared more stable, varying by less than 2% per year. I will present updated light curves in multiple energy bands for the Crab nebula, including recent data from Fermi GBM, Swift/BAT, and MAXI, and a 16-year long light curve from RXTE/PCA.

  19. Crab Nebula Variations in Hard X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2012-01-01

    The Crab Nebula was surprisingly variable from 2001-2010, with less variability before 2001 and since mid-2010. We presented evidence for spectral softening from RXTE, Swift/BAT, and Fermi GBM during the mid-2008-2010 flux decline. We see no clear connections between the hard X-ray variations and the GeV flares

  20. Hard X-ray Variations in the Crab Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Cherry, M. L.; Case, G. L.; Baumgartner, W. H.; Beklen, E.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, M. S.; Camero-Arranz, A.; Chaplin, V.; Connaughton, V.; Finger, M. H.; Gehrels, N.; Greiner, J.; Jahoda, K.; Jenke, P.; Kippen, R. M.; Kouveliotou, C.; Krimm, H. A.; Kuulkers, E.; Meegan, C. A.; Natalucci, L.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R.; Rodi, J. C.; Skinner, G. K.

    2013-01-01

    In the first two years of science operations of the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), August 2008 to August 2010, approximately 7% (70 mcrab) decline was discovered in the overall Crab Nebula flux in the 15 - 50 keV band, measured with the Earth occultation technique. This decline was independently confirmed with four other instruments: the RXTE/PCA, Swift/BAT, INTEGRAL/IBIS, and INTEGRAL/SPI. The pulsed flux measured with RXTE/PCA from 1999-2010 was consistent with the pulsar spin-down, indicating that the observed changes were nebular. From 2001 to 2010, the Crab nebula flux measured with RXTE/PCA was particularly variable, changing by up to approximately 3.5% per year in the 15-50 keV band. These variations were confirmed with INTEGRAL/SPI starting in 2003, Swift/BAT starting in 2005, and Fermi GBM starting in 2008. Before 2001 and since 2010, the Crab nebula flux has appeared more stable, varying by less than 2% per year. I will present updated light curves in multiple energy bands for the Crab nebula, including recent data from Fermi GBM, Swift/BAT, INTEGRAL and MAXI, and a 16-year long light curve from RXTE/PCA.

  1. Hard X-ray Variations in the Crab Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Cherry, M. L.; Case, G. L.; Baumgartner, W. H.; Beklen, E.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, M. S.; Camero-Arranz, A.; Connaughton, V.; Finger, M. H.; Gehrels, N.; Greiner, J.; Jahoda, K.; Jenke, P.; Kippen, R. M.; Kouveliotou, C.; Krimm, H. A.; Kuulkers, E.; Meegan, C. A.; Natalucci, L.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R.; Rodi, J. C.; Skinner, G. K.

    2013-01-01

    In the first two years of science operations of the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), August 2008 to August 2010, approximately 7% (70 mcrab) decline was discovered in the overall Crab Nebula flux in the 15 - 50 keV band, measured with the Earth occultation technique. This decline was independently confirmed with four other instruments: the RXTE/PCA, Swift/BAT, INTEGRAL/IBIS, and INTEGRAL/SPI. The pulsed flux measured with RXTE/PCA from 1999-2010 was consistent with the pulsar spin-down, indicating that the observed changes were nebular. From 2001 to 2010, the Crab nebula flux measured with RXTE/ PCA was particularly variable, changing by up to approximately 3.5% per year in the 15-50 keV band. These variations were confirmed with INTEGRAL/SPI starting in 2003, Swift/BAT starting in 2005, and Fermi GBM starting in 2008. Before 2001 and since 2010, the Crab nebula flux has appeared more stable, varying by less than 2% per year. I will present updated light curves in multiple energy bands for the Crab Nebula, including recent data from Fermi GBM, Swift/BAT, INTEGRAL and MAXI, and a 16-year long light curve from RXTE/PCA.

  2. X-ray observations of Crab-like supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. H.

    1983-01-01

    Distinguishing radio and morphological characteristics of Crab Nebula-like supernova remnants (SNR) are described. Radio features comprise a flat spectrum, a filled center brightness distribution, and a centrally located pulsar. The radio signals are linearly polarized and suggest a synchrotron emission mechanism. Known objects with those characteristics include the Crab Nebula, Vela X, 3C58, G21.5 - 0.9 and G74.9 + 1.2. Only the Crab Nebula exhibits pulsations, while all have unresolved X-ray sources and nonthermal X-ray spectra. Although the Crab-like SNR are distinctly different from shell-like SNR, the SNR CTB80, G326.3 - 1.8, W28 and G29.7 0.3 display characteristics of both, particularly shell-like structures and flat spectra. X-ray spectra from compact sources have also been detected from 3C58, CTB80, W28 and MSH 15 - 52 and exhibit nonthermal power law features. The X-ray spectra could be used as a measure of the evolutionary stage of the source.

  3. Classroom Applications Using Limulus Polyphemus--The American Horseshoe Crab.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Frederick C., III; Weary, Marlys

    1981-01-01

    Provides examples of several classroom activities utilizing the American horseshoe crab (Limulus Polyphemus), including raising fertilized eggs, fertilizing eggs in vitro, and testing water samples. Includes background information on the natural history, life cycle, and breeding habits of this animal. (DS)

  4. Damping of unwanted modes in SRF deflecting/crabbing cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Burt, Graeme; Wang, Haipeng

    2014-01-01

    As deflecting and crab cavities do not use the fundamental acceleration mode for their operation, the spectrum of unwanted modes is significantly different from that of accelerating cavities. The fundamental acceleration mode is now unwanted and can cause energy spread in the beam; in addition this mode frequency is often close to or lower than that of the deflecting mode, making it difficult to damp. This is made more complex in some of the compact crab cavities as there small beampipes often attenuate the fields very sharply. In addition in some crab cavities there can be an orthogonal transverse mode similar to the deflecting mode, known as the same order mode. The degeneracy of these modes must be split by polarising the cavity and if the polarisation is not large enough, dampers should be placed at either an electric or magnetic field null of the crabbing mode to effectively damp the unwanted polarisation. Various concepts for dealing with unwanted modes in various SRF deflecting cavities will be reviewed.

  5. Characteristics of Yeasts Isolated from Pacific Crab Meat

    PubMed Central

    Eklund, M. W.; Spinelli, J.; Miyauchi, D.; Groninger, H.

    1965-01-01

    A total of 202 cultures of yeasts were isolated and characterized from king crab and Dungeness crab meat. A yeastlike organism, resembling Aureobasidium pullulans, and 15 different species distributed among the genera Rhodotorula, Cryptococcus, Torulopsis, Candida, and Trichosporon were represented. Nine of the species grew at 5 C or lower. Although two of the species grew at 37 C, none of the isolates had the characteristics of pathogenic species. Members of the Cryptococcus and Candida failed to grow at 37 C. Furthermore, species of the former genus were not pathogenic to mice. The pigmentation of the Rhodotorula cultures decreased in intensity as the incubation temperature was decreased. Biochemical activities of the different species were studied by use of triglycerides, lecithin, and proteins (casein, gelatin, and crab-meat protein) as substrates. Eight of the species could attack triglycerides; eight, lecithin; five, gelatin; one, casein; and one, crab protein. An organism, tentatively identified as Trichosporon sp., was very active in attacking each of the substrates tested and grew well at 0.5 C. PMID:5866045

  6. Aggression and Food Resource Competition between Sympatric Hermit Crab Species

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Mark V.; O’Grady, Matthew; Colborn, Jeremiah; Van Ness, Kimberly; Hill, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    The vertical zonation patterns of intertidal organisms have been topics of interest to marine ecologists for many years, with interspecific food competition being implicated as a contributing factor to intertidal community organization. In this study, we used behavioral bioassays to examine the potential roles that interspecific aggression and food competition have on the structuring of intertidal hermit crab assemblages. We studied two ecologically similar, sympatric hermit crab species, Clibanarius digueti [1] and Paguristes perrieri [2], which occupy adjacent zones within the intertidal region of the Gulf of California. During the search phase of foraging, C. digueti showed higher frequencies of aggressive behaviors than P. perrieri. In competition assays, C. digueti gained increased access to food resources compared to P. perrieri. The results suggest that food competition may play an important role in structuring intertidal hermit crab assemblages, and that the zonation patterns of Gulf of California hermit crab species may be the result of geographical displacement by the dominant food competitor (C. digueti). PMID:24632897

  7. Aerobic response to exercise of the fastest land crab.

    PubMed

    Full, R J; Herreid, C F

    1983-04-01

    To view the aerobic response to exercise, the ghost crab Ocypode guadichaudii was run in a treadmill respirometer at three velocities (0.13, 0.19, and 0.28 km/h) while oxygen consumption (VO2) was monitored. A steady-state VO2 that increased linearly with velocity was attained. VO2 transient periods at the beginning and end of exercise were extremely rapid with half times from 50 to 150 s. The magnitude of oxygen deficit and debt were small and both showed increases with an increase in velocity. Oxygen debt was measured at each velocity after 4-, 10-, and 20-min exercise bouts. No change in the magnitude of oxygen debt was observed with respect to exercise duration. Maximal VO2 was 11.9 times the average resting VO2. Oxygen uptake kinetics have shown only very sluggish and reduced rates in five other more sedentary crab species previously tested. The aerobic response pattern observed in the present study is more comparable to that of exercising mammals and highly aerobic ectothermic vertebrates. This suggests that the ghost crab meets the energy demand of sustained exercise by aerobic ATP production in contrast to many other crab species.

  8. Project "Flappy Crab": An Edu-Game for Music Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardoso Gomes, Cristina Maria; Guerreiro Figueiredo, Mauro Jorge; Bidarra, José; Cardoso Gomes, José Duarte

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses some possibilities of gamification and remixing process for music education. Analyses also the concepts of gamification, mashup, remix and presents its possible usage in education--music teaching--through the development of the project/educational game "Flappy Crab". The article begins with a brief introduction to…

  9. Use of Terrestrial Hermit Crabs in the Study of Habituation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolan, Laurence J.

    2004-01-01

    For small colleges, the use of invertebrates in undergraduate learning laboratory experiments may be a valuable alternative to the use of vertebrate species. This article describes a habituation experiment using terrestrial hermit crabs. All of the materials required are inexpensive and readily available. What makes this experiment unique is that…

  10. X-ray Pulsar in the Crab Nebula.

    PubMed

    Fritz, G; Henry, R C; Meekins, J F; Chubb, T A; Friedman, H

    1969-05-09

    X-ray pulsations have been observed in the Crab Nebula at a frequency closely matching the radio and optical pulsations. About 5 percent of the total x-ray power of the nebula appears in the pulsed component. The x-ray pulsations have the form of a main pulse and an interpulse separated by about 12 milliseconds.

  11. Three-Dimensional Concentration Measurements around Actively Tracking Blue Crabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickman, B. D.; Jackson, J. L.; Weissburg, M. J.; Webster, D. R.

    2006-11-01

    Many aquatic arthropods locate food, suitable habitats, and mates solely through information extracted by chemical signals in their environment. Chemical plumes detected by larger animals are influenced by turbulence that creates an intermittent and unpredictable chemical stimulus environment. To link the stimulus pattern to behavior, we have developed a measurement system to quantify the instantaneous odor concentration surrounding a freely tracking blue crab through three-dimensional laser-induced fluorescence (3DLIF). A blue crab receives chemical stimulus at several locations, including the antennules near the mouth region and the distal tips of the legs and claws. Hence, three-dimensional measurements of the concentration field are required to link behavior to plume structure. During trials, crabs began their search 150 cm downstream of a source, and walking kinematics were recording simultaneously. The crabs were reversibly ``blindfolded'' during tracking to prevent aversive reactions to the intense laser light. Our experiments allow us to examine how hypothesized navigational cues, such as concentration bursts at the antennules and spatial asymmetry in concentration at the distributed chemosensory organs on the legs and claws, results in particular decisions during navigation.

  12. Space Movie Reveals Shocking Secrets Of The Crab Pulsa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-09-01

    Just when it seemed like the summer movie season had ended, two of NASA's Great Observatories have produced their own action movie. Multiple observations made over several months with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Hubble Space Telescope captured the spectacle of matter and antimatter propelled to near the speed of light by the Crab pulsar, a rapidly rotating neutron star the size of Manhattan. "Through this movie, the Crab Nebula has come to life," said Jeff Hester of Arizona State University in Tempe, lead author of a paper in the September 20th issue of The Astrophysical Journal Letters. "We can see how this awesome cosmic generator actually works." The Crab was first observed by Chinese astronomers in 1054 A.D. and has since become one of the most studied objects in the sky. By combining the power of both Chandra and Hubble, the movie reveals features never seen in still images. By understanding the Crab, astronomers hope to unlock the secrets of how similar objects across the universe are powered. Crab Nebula Composite Image Crab Nebula Composite Image Bright wisps can be seen moving outward at half the speed of light to form an expanding ring that is visible in both X-ray and optical images. These wisps appear to originate from a shock wave that shows up as an inner X-ray ring. This ring consists of about two dozen knots that form, brighten and fade, jitter around, and occasionally undergo outbursts that give rise to expanding clouds of particles, but remain in roughly the same location. "These data leave little doubt that the inner X-ray ring is the location of the shock wave that turns the high-speed wind from the pulsar into extremely energetic particles," said Koji Mori of Penn State University in University Park, a coauthor of the paper. Another dramatic feature of the movie is a turbulent jet that lies perpendicular to the inner and outer rings. Violent internal motions are obvious, as is a slow motion outward into the surrounding nebula of

  13. Signals from 'crabworld': cuticular reflections in a fiddler crab colony.

    PubMed

    Zeil, J; Hofmann, M

    2001-07-01

    Fiddler crabs inhabit intertidal sand- and mudflats, where they live in dense colonies and are active on the surface during low tide. They exhibit a rich behavioural repertoire, with frequent interactions between animals in the context of territorial and mating activities. Male fiddler crabs have one massively enlarged and conspicuously coloured claw, which they use in waving displays and in fights with other males. The crabs carry their eyes on long, vertically oriented stalks high above the body and, as a consequence, see the bodies of conspecifics in the ventral visual field, below the local visual horizon, and against the mudflat surface as background. We filmed events in a colony of Uca vomeris with a normal video camera and an ultraviolet-sensitive camera placed at the eye height of an average crab, approximately 2-3 cm above ground. We also used a spectrographic imager and linear polarized filters to analyse the cues potentially available to the animals for detecting, monitoring and possibly identifying each other. Areas of high contrast in mudflat scenes include specular reflections on the wet cuticle of crabs that are horizontally polarised. Besides specular reflections, some parts of the cuticle generate high-contrast signals against the mudflat background, both at wavelengths between 400 and 700 nm, and in the ultraviolet region between 300 and 400 nm. Uca vomeris can be very colourful: the different parts of the large claw of the male are white, orange or red. The carapace colours of both males and females can range from a mottled yellowish green brown, to a brilliant light blue. White and blue colours contrast starkly with the mudflat background, especially in the ultraviolet wavelengths. Under stress, the blue and white colours can change within minutes to a duller and darker blue or to a dull white.

  14. Spatial and temporal patterns of subtidal and intertidal crabs excursions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, A. C. F.; Boaventura, D. M.; Thompson, R. C.; Hawkins, S. J.

    2014-01-01

    Highly mobile predators such as fish and crabs are known to migrate from the subtidal zone to forage in the intertidal zone at high-tide. The extent and variation of these habitat linking movements along the vertical shore gradient have not been examined before for several species simultaneously, hence not accounting for species interactions. Here, the foraging excursions of Carcinus maenas (L.), Necora puber (Linnaeus, 1767) and Cancer pagurus (Linnaeus, 1758) were assessed in a one-year mark-recapture study on two replicated rocky shores in southwest U.K. A comparison between the abundance of individuals present on the shore at high-tide with those present in refuges exposed at low-tide indicated considerable intertidal migration by all species, showing strong linkage between subtidal and intertidal habitats. Estimates of population size based on recapture of marked individuals indicated that an average of ~ 4000 individuals combined for the three crab species, can be present on the shore during one tidal cycle. There was also a high fidelity of individuals and species to particular shore levels. Underlying mechanisms for these spatial patterns such as prey availability and agonistic interactions are discussed. Survival rates were estimated using the Cormack-Jolly-Seber model from multi-recapture analysis and found to be considerably high with a minimum of 30% for all species. Growth rates were found to vary intraspecifically with size and between seasons. Understanding the temporal and spatial variations in predation pressure by crabs on rocky shores is dependent on knowing who, when and how many of these commercially important crab species depend on intertidal foraging. Previous studies have shown that the diet of these species is strongly based on intertidal prey including key species such as limpets; hence intertidal crab migration could be associated with considerable impacts on intertidal assemblages.

  15. Density affects mating mode and large male mating advantage in a fiddler crab.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Pablo D; Daleo, Pedro; Iribarne, Oscar O

    2010-12-01

    Fiddler crabs show two different mating modes: either females search and crabs mate underground in male burrows, or males search and crabs mate on the surface near female burrows. We explored the relationship between crab density, body size, the searching behavior of both sexes, and the occurrence of both mating modes in the fiddler crab Uca uruguayensis. We found that crabs change their mating mode depending on their size and crab density. Crabs mated mostly on the surface at low densities, and underground at high densities. The proportion of wandering receptive females but not courting males accounted for the variation in mating modes. This suggests that whether crabs mate underground (or on the surface) is determined by the presence (or absence) of searching females. We found that the change in the mating mode affected the level of assortative mating; males mating underground were bigger than those mating on the surface, suggesting active female choice. Given that fiddler crabs experience multiple reproductive cycles, they are prone to showing behavioral plasticity in their mating strategy whenever the payoffs of using different mating modes differ between reproductive events. Our results suggest that the incorporation of different levels of environmental variability may be important in theoretical models aimed at improving our understanding of the evolution of alternative mating tactics and strategies.

  16. Estimated Entrainment of Dungeness Crab During Dredging For The Columbia River Channel Improvement Project

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, Walter H.; Williams, Greg D.; Skalski, John R.

    2002-12-01

    The studies reported here focus on issues regarding the entrainment of Dungeness crab related to the proposed Columbia River Channel Improvement Project and provided direct measurements of crab entrainment rates at three locations (Desdomona Shoals, Upper Sands, and Miller Sands) from RM4 to RM24 during summer 2002. Entrainment rates for all age classes of crabs ranged from zero at Miller Sands to 0.224 crabs per cy at Desdemona Shoals in June 2002. The overall entrainment rate at Desdomona Shoals in September was 0.120 crabs per cy. A modified Dredge Impact Model (DIM) used the summer 2002 entrainment rates to project crab entrainment and adult equivalent loss and loss to the fishery for the Channel Improvement Project. To improve the projections, entrainment data from Flavel Bar is needed. The literature, analyses of salinity intrusion scenarios, and the summer 2002 site-specific data on entrainment and salinity all indicate that bottom salinity influences crab distribution and entrainment, especially at lower salinities. It is now clear from field measurements of entrainment rates and salinity during a period of low river flow (90-150 Kcfs) and high salinity intrusion that entrainment rates are zero where bottom salinity is less than 16 o/oo most of the time. Further, entrainment rates of 2+ and older crab fall with decreasing salinity in a clear and consistent manner. More elaboration of the crab distribution- salinity model, especially concerning salinity and the movements of 1+ crab, is needed.

  17. Black yeast-like fungi associated with Lethargic Crab Disease (LCD) in the mangrove-land crab, Ucides cordatus (Ocypodidae).

    PubMed

    Vicente, Vania A; Orélis-Ribeiro, R; Najafzadeh, M J; Sun, Jiufeng; Guerra, Raquel Schier; Miesch, Stephanie; Ostrensky, Antonio; Meis, Jacques F; Klaassen, Corné H; de Hoog, G S; Boeger, Walter A

    2012-07-06

    Lethargic Crab Disease (LCD) caused extensive epizootic mortality of the mangrove land crab Ucides cordatus (Brachyura: Ocypodidae) along the Brazilian coast, mainly in the Northeastern region. The disease was named after the symptoms of slow movement of infected crabs. Causative agents were suspected to be two black yeast-like fungi of the family Herpotrichiellaceae (ascomycete order Chaetothyriales), judged by infected tissue biopsies from moribund U. cordatus. The aim of the present study is to prove that two species are involved in the disease: the recently described black yeast Exophiala cancerae, but also a less virulent, hitherto undescribed fonsecaea-like species, introduced here as the novel species Fonsecaea brasiliensis. Strains were identified by ITS rDNA sequencing, and species borderlines were established by multilocus sequencing and AFLP analysis. Fonsecaea brasiliensis proved to be closely related to the pathogenic species Cladophialophora devriesii which originally was isolated from a systemic infection in a human patient. The virulence of F. brasiliensis is lower than that of E. cancerae, as established by artificial inoculation of mangrove crabs.

  18. Comparative brain architecture of the European shore crab Carcinus maenas (Brachyura) and the common hermit crab Pagurus bernhardus (Anomura) with notes on other marine hermit crabs.

    PubMed

    Krieger, Jakob; Sombke, Andy; Seefluth, Florian; Kenning, Matthes; Hansson, Bill S; Harzsch, Steffen

    2012-04-01

    The European shore crab Carcinus maenas and the common hermit crab Pagurus bernhardus are members of the sister taxa Brachyura and Anomura (together forming the taxon Meiura) respectively. Both species share similar coastal marine habitats and thus are confronted with similar environmental conditions. This study sets out to explore variations of general brain architecture of species that live in seemingly similar habitats but belong to different major malacostracan taxa and to understand possible differences of sensory systems and related brain compartments. We examined the brains of Carcinus maenas, Pagurus bernhardus, and three other hermit crab species with immunohistochemistry against tyrosinated tubulin, f-actin, synaptic proteins, RF-amides and allatostatin. Our comparison showed that their optic neuropils within the eyestalks display strong resemblance in gross morphology as well as in detailed organization, suggesting a rather similar potential of processing visual input. Besides the well-developed visual system, the olfactory neuropils are distinct components in the brain of both C. maenas and P. bernhardus as well as the other hermit crabs, suggesting that close integration of olfactory and visual information may be useful in turbid marine environments with low visibility, as is typical for many habitats such as, e.g., the Baltic and the North Sea. Comparing the shape of the olfactory glomeruli in the anomurans showed some variations, ranging from a wedge shape to an elongate morphology. Furthermore, the tritocerebrum and the organization of the second antennae associated with the tritocerebrum seem to differ markedly in C. maenas and P. bernhardus, indicating better mechanosensory abilities in the latter close to those of other Decapoda with long second antennae, such as Astacida, Homarida, or Achelata. This aspect may also represent an adaptation to the "hermit lifestyle" in which competition for shells is a major aspect of their life history. The shore

  19. Mangrove expansion into salt marshes alters associated faunal communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smee, Delbert L.; Sanchez, James A.; Diskin, Meredith; Trettin, Carl

    2017-03-01

    Climate change is altering the distribution of foundation species, with potential effects on organisms that inhabit these environments and changes to valuable ecosystem functions. In the Gulf of Mexico, black mangroves (Avicennia germinans) are expanding northward into salt marshes dominated by Spartina alterniflora (hereafter Spartina). Salt marshes are essential habitats for many organisms, including ecologically and economically important species such as blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) and Penaeid shrimp (e.g., Penaeus aztecus), which may be affected by vegetation changes. Black mangroves occupied higher tidal elevations than Spartina, and Spartina was present only at its lowest tidal elevations in sites when mangroves were established. We compared nekton and infaunal communities within monoculture stands of Spartina that were bordered by mangroves to nearby areas where mangroves had not yet become established. Nekton and infaunal communities were significantly different in Spartina stands bordered by mangroves, even though salinity and temperature were not different. Overall abundance and biomass of nekton and infauna was significantly higher in marshes without mangroves, although crabs and fish were more abundant in mangrove areas. Black mangrove expansion as well as other ongoing vegetation shifts will continue in a warming climate. Understanding how these changes affect associated species is necessary for management, mitigation, and conservation.

  20. Combining Capillary Electrophoresis Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry and Stable Isotopic Labeling Techniques for Comparative Crustacean Peptidomics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junhua; Zhang, Yuzhuo; Xiang, Feng; Zhang, Zichuan; Li, Lingjun

    2010-01-01

    Herein we describe a sensitive and straightforward off-line capillary electrophoresis (CE) matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) interface in conjunction with stable isotopic labeling (SIL) technique for comparative neuropeptidomic analysis in crustacean model organisms. Two SIL schemes, including a binary H/D formaldehyde labeling technique and novel, laboratory-developed multiplexed dimethylated leucine-based isobaric tagging reagents, have been evaluated in these proof-of-concept experiments. We employ these isotopic labeling techniques in conjunction with CE-MALDI MS for quantitative peptidomic analyses of the pericardial organs isolated from two crustacean species, the European green crab Carcinus maenas and the blue crab Callinectes sapidus. Isotopically labeled peptide pairs are found to co-migrate in CE fractions and quantitative changes in relative abundances of peptide pairs are obtained by comparing peak intensities of respective peptide pairs. Several neuropeptide families exhibit changes in response to salinity stress, suggesting potential physiological functions of these signaling peptides. PMID:20334868

  1. Tidal salt marshes of the southeast Atlantic Coast: A community profile

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegert, R.G.; Freeman, B.J.

    1990-09-01

    This report is part of a series of community profiles on the ecology of wetland and marine communities. This particular profile considers tidal marshes of the southeastern Atlantic coast, from North Carolina south to northern Florida. Alone among the earth's ecosystems, coastal communities are subjected to a bidirectional flooding sometimes occurring twice each day; this flooding affects successional development, species composition, stability, and productivity. In the tidally influenced salt marsh, salinity ranges from less than 1 ppt to that of seawater. Dominant plant species include cordgrasses (Spartina alterniflora and S. cynosuroides), black needlerush (Juncus romerianus), and salt marsh bulrush (Scirpus robustus). Both terrestrail and aquatic animals occur in salt marshes and include herons, egrets ospreys (Pandion haliaetus), bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), alligators (Alligator Mississippiensis), manatees (Trichecus manatus), oysters, mussels, and fiddler crabs. Currently, the only significant direct commercial use of the tidal salt marshes is by crabbers seeking the blue crab Callinectes sapidus, but the marshes are quite important recreationally, aesthetically, and educationally. 151 refs., 45 figs., 6 tabs.

  2. CRABS IN CRISIS:BIOGEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTIONS, ABUNDANCES, AND VULNERABILITIES TO CLIMATE CHANGE OF BRACHYURAN AND LITHODID CRABS FROM THE GULF OF CALIFORNIA TO THE BEAUFORT SEA

    EPA Science Inventory

    To predict the relative vulnerability of near-coastal species to climate change we analyzed the biogeographic and abundance patterns of the brachyuran or ‘True’ crabs (n=368) and lithodid or ‘King’ crabs (n=20) that are found in the twelve MEOW (“Mar...

  3. Flocking and feeding in the fiddler crab ( UCA tangeri): Prey availability as risk-taking behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ens, B. J.; Klaassen, M.; Zwarts, L.

    For a full understanding of prey availability, it is necessary to study risk-taking behaviour of the prey. Fiddler crabs are ideally suited for such a study, as they have to leave their safe burrow to feed on the surface of the intertidal flats during low tide, thereby exposing themselves to avian predators. A study in an intertidal area along the coast of Mauritania showed that small crabs always stayed in the vicinity of their burrow, but large crabs wandered in large flocks (also referred to as droves) to feed on sea-grass beds downshore. Transplanting downshore feeding substrate to the burrowing zone of the small crabs proved that they too preferred to feed on it. Since small crabs can be preyed upon by more species of birds, this suggests that the decision not to leave the burrowing zone might be related to the risk of being fed upon by birds. We calculated predation risk from measurements on the density and feeding activity of the crabs, as well as the feeding density, the intake rate and the size selection of the avian predators. Per hour on the surface, crabs in a flock were more at risk than crabs feeding near their burrow. Thus, though flocking crabs may have benefited from 'swamping the predator' by emerging in maximum numbers during some tides only, this did not reduce their risk of predation below that of non-flocking crabs. Furthermore we found that irrespective of activity, large crabs suffered a higher mortality per tide from avian predators than small crabs. This suggests that large crabs could not sufficiently reduce their foraging time to compensate for the increased risk while foraging in a flock, even though they probably experienced better feeding conditions than small crabs staying near their burrow. The greater energy demands of large crabs were reflected in a greater surface area grazed. Thus, with increasing size a fiddler crab has to feed further away from its burrow and so may derive less protection from staying near to it. It seems that

  4. Metals in horseshoe crab eggs from Delaware Bay, USA: temporal patterns from 1993 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Burger, Joanna; Tsipoura, Nellie

    2014-10-01

    The health of horseshoe crab (Limulus polyphemus) eggs is important not only to maintain horseshoe crab populations, but because they are a resource for higher trophic levels, such as fish and shorebirds. We examined the concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, manganese, mercury, and selenium in the eggs of horseshoe crabs from Delaware Bay (between New Jersey and Delaware, USA) in 1993, 1994, 1995, 1999, 2000, and 2012 to determine if there were significant temporal changes and if levels appear to pose a health risk to the crabs themselves, or to predators that consume them. All metal levels declined in horseshoe crab eggs between 1994 and 2012, although the declines were much less consistent for lead and chromium than that for mercury and cadmium. Levels of contaminants found in these eggs are well below those known to cause adverse effects in the crabs themselves or to organisms that consume them, such as migrating shorebirds.

  5. Heavy metals in red crabs, Chaceon quinquedens, from the Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Perry, Harriet; Isphording, Wayne; Trigg, Christine; Riedel, Ralf

    2015-12-30

    The red crab, Chaceon quinquedens, is distributed in deep waters of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) and is most abundant in an area associated with sediment deposition from the Mississippi River. Sediment geochemistry and biological and ecological traits of red crabs favor accumulation of contaminants. Red crabs, sediment, and bottom water samples were taken from three distinct geographic locations representing areas with differing exposure to contaminant laden effluents from the Mississippi River. Inductively coupled plasma spectrophotometry and atomic absorption spectrophotometry were employed to determine levels of heavy metals in red crab muscle tissue. Ion site partitioning was used to determine metal speciation in sediments. Red crabs showed evidence of heavy metal bioaccumulation in all sample areas with high variability in contaminant levels in individual crabs for some metals. Bioavailability of metals in sediment did not always result in accumulation in muscle tissue.

  6. OSSE observations of the Crab pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulmer, M. P.; Lomatch, S.; Matz, S. M.; Grabelsky, D. A.; Purcell, W. R.; Grove, J. E.; Johnson, W. N.; Kinzer, R. L.; Kurfess, J. D.; Strickman, M. S.

    1994-01-01

    We present results of the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment (OSSE) observations of the Crab pulsar, made during MJD 48373-48406 (1991 April 27 - 1991 May 30) and MJD 48798-48804 (1992 June 25 - 1992 July 1). Pulsar light curves and spectra over the approximately 0.05 to 10 MeV range are presented. The arrival time of the gamma-ray peak and the radio peak agree to within 30 microsec which is better than the approximately 300 microsec accuracy of the measurements. The overall pulse phase averaged spectrum in the 0.1 - 10 MeV range is well-fit by a power law of the form 0.05 x (E/0.13 MeV)exp(-(1.99 +/- 0.03)) photons/sq cm/s. The outer-gap model (with gap parameter equal to 0.46) provided to us by Ho agrees with the data to better than 20%. The spectra of the bridge and second peak are slightly harder than the first peak as measured by the hardness ratio (approximately 110 - 220 keV)/(approximately 50 - 105 keV): P1 = 0.54 +/- 0.01, P2 = 0.63 +/- 0.01, bridge = 0.68 +/- 0.03. The phase of the two peaks in the light curve is constant over the 50 - 550 keV range to within the accuracy of the measurements (better than 0.02 in phase). No evidence was found for variability of the light curve on timescales from 2 minutes (less than a factor of 1.8) to 1 year (less than a factor of 1.06), where these are 3 sigma upper limits. However, when we examine the historical database, we find, in agreement with Nolan et al. (1993), that there is evidence for a 13 year variation in the ratio of the intensity of peak 2 to peak 1. We show that if this is interpreted as being due to precession (which changes the relative view of the intrinsic gamma-ray pulse as seen on earth), the variation is consistent with models of neutron star structure. The optical data may be in conflict with the interpretation however. We found no statistically significant lines in the 50 - 550 keV range in the spectrum. The average 3 sigma upper limits in 10(exp

  7. Estimating Dungeness crab (Cancer magister) abundance: Crab pots and dive transects compared

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taggart, S. James; O'Clair, Charles E.; Shirley, Thomas C.; Mondragon, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    Dungeness crabs (Cancer magister) were sampled with commercial pots and counted by scuba divers on benthic transects at eight sites near Glacier Bay, Alaska. Catch per unit of effort (CPUE) from pots was compared to the density estimates from dives to evaluate the bias and power of the two techniques. Yearly sampling was conducted in two seasons: April and September, from 1992 to 2000. Male CPUE estimates from pots were significantly lower in April than in the following September; a step-wise regression demonstrated that season accounted for more of the variation in male CPUE than did temperature. In both April and September, pot sampling was significantly biased against females. When females were categorized as ovigerous and nonovigerous, it was clear that ovigerous females accounted for the majority of the bias because pots were not biased against nonovigerous females. We compared the power of pots and dive transects in detecting trends in populations and found that pots had much higher power than dive transects. Despite their low power, the dive transects were very useful for detecting bias in our pot sampling and in identifying the optimal times of year to sample so that pot bias could be avoided.

  8. Bacteria associated with crabs from cold waters with emphasis on the occurrence of potential human pathogens.

    PubMed Central

    Faghri, M A; Pennington, C L; Cronholm, L S; Atlas, R M

    1984-01-01

    A diverse array of bacterial species, including several potential human pathogens, was isolated from edible crabs collected in cold waters. Crabs collected near Kodiak Island, Alaska, contained higher levels of bacteria than crabs collected away from regions of human habitation. The bacteria associated with the crabs collected near Kodiak included Yersinia enterocolitica, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species; the pathogenicity of these isolates was demonstrated in mice. Although coliforms were not found, the bacterial species associated with the tissues of crabs collected near Kodiak indicate possible fecal contamination that may have occurred through contact with sewage. Compared with surrounding waters and sediments, the crab tissues contained much higher proportions of gram-positive cocci. As revealed by indirect plate counts and direct scanning electron microscopic observations, muscle and hemolymph tissues contained much lower levels of bacteria than shell and gill tissues. After the death of a crab, however, the numbers of bacteria associated with hemolymph and muscle tissues increased significantly. Microcosm studies showed that certain bacterial populations, e.g., Vibrio cholerae, can be bioaccumulated in crab gill tissues. The results of this study indicate the need for careful review of waste disposal practices where edible crabs may be contaminated with microorganisms that are potential human pathogens and the need for surveillance of shellfish for pathogenic microorganisms that naturally occur in marine ecosystems. Images PMID:6742824

  9. Crabs Mediate Interactions between Native and Invasive Salt Marsh Plants: A Mesocosm Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-dong; Jia, Xin; Chen, Yang-yun; Shao, Jun-jiong; Wu, Xin-ru; Shang, Lei; Li, Bo

    2013-01-01

    Soil disturbance has been widely recognized as an important factor influencing the structure and dynamics of plant communities. Although soil reworkers were shown to increase habitat complexity and raise the risk of plant invasion, their role in regulating the interactions between native and invasive species remains unclear. We proposed that crab activities, via improving soil nitrogen availability, may indirectly affect the interactions between invasive Spartina alterniflora and native Phragmites australis and Scirpus mariqueter in salt marsh ecosystems. We conducted a two-year mesocosm experiment consisting of five species combinations, i.e., monocultures of three species and pair-wise mixtures of invasive and native species, with crabs being either present or absent for each combination. We found that crabs could mitigate soil nitrogen depletion in the mesocosm over the two years. Plant performance of all species, at both the ramet-level (height and biomass per ramet) and plot-level (density, total above- and belowground biomass), were promoted by crab activities. These plants responded to crab disturbance primarily by clonal propagation, as plot-level performance was more sensitive to crabs than ramet-level. Moreover, crab activities altered the competition between Spartina and native plants in favor of the former, since Spartina was more promoted than native plants by crab activities. Our results suggested that crab activities may increase the competition ability of Spartina over native Phragmites and Scirpus through alleviating soil nitrogen limitation. PMID:24023926

  10. Multipole Field Effects for the Superconducting Parallel-Bar Deflecting/Crabbing Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    De Silva, Payagalage Subashini Uddika; Delayen, Jean Roger

    2012-09-01

    The superconducting parallel-bar deflecting/crabbing cavity is currently being considered as one of the design options in rf separation for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade and for the crabbing cavity for the proposed LHC luminosity upgrade. Knowledge of multipole field effects is important for accurate beam dynamics study of rf structures. The multipole components can be accurately determined numerically using the electromagnetic surface field data in the rf structure. This paper discusses the detailed analysis of those components for the fundamental deflecting/crabbing mode and higher order modes in the parallel-bar deflecting/crabbing cavity.

  11. The Crab nebula and pulsar in the MeV energy range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Much, R.; Bennett, K.; Buccheri, R.; Busetta, M.; Diehl, R.; Forrest, D.; Hermsen, W.; Kuiper, L.; Lichti, G. G.; Mcconnell, M.

    1995-01-01

    The imaging Compton Telescope (COMPTEL) is sensitive in the energy range of 0.75 to 30 MeV. COMPTEL observed the Crab several times during the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) sky survey and CGRO Phase II. Both the Crab pulsar and nebula are detected over the entire COMPTEL energy range. The phase-averaged energy spectra of the Crab Pulsar and Nebula are presented. The combined observations provide sufficient statistics for a phase-resolved analysis of the Crab pulsar spectrum.

  12. Hermit crabs in the diet of Pigeon Guillemots at Kachemak Bay, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Litzow, Michael A.; Piatt, John F.; Figurski, Jared D.

    1998-01-01

    Guillemots (Cepphus spp.) feed their chicks a diet that is almost exclusively fish. We observed Pigeon Guillemots (C. columba) at two colonies in Alaska where hermit crabs (Crustacea: Anomura) were a major part of the diet for some nestlings. Hermit crabs were delivered to three of five observed nests at one colony, comprised between 2% and 22% of the items delivered at those nests, and were the second most common food type at one nest. Hermit crabs may be an attractive prey item when lipid-rich forage fish are scarce, and crabs living in gastropod shells that have been softened by encrustations of Suberites sponges may be vulnerable to guillemot predation.

  13. Spatial patterns and movements of red king and Tanner crabs: Implications for the design of marine protected areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taggart, S.J.; Mondragon, Jennifer; Andrews, A.G.; Nielsen, J.K.

    2008-01-01

    Most examples of positive population responses to marine protected areas (MPAs) have been documented for tropical reef species with very small home ranges; the utility of MPAs for commercially harvested temperate species that have large movement patterns remains poorly tested. We measured the distribution and abundance of red king Paralithodes camtschaticus and Tanner Chionoecetes bairdi crabs inside and outside of MPAs in Glacier Bay National Park, Alaska, USA. By tagging a sub-sample of crabs with sonic tags, we estimated the movement of adult crabs from one of the MPAs (Muir Inlet) into the central portion of Glacier Bay where fishing still occurs. Tanner crabs and red king crabs moved similar average distances per day, although Tanner crabs had a higher transfer out of the Muir Inlet MPA into the central bay. Tanner crab movements were characterized by large variation among individual crabs, both in distance and direction traveled, while red king crabs migrated seasonally between 2 specific areas. Although Tanner crabs exhibited relatively large movements, distribution and abundance data suggest that they may be restricted at large spatial scales by habitat barriers. MPAs that are effective at protecting king and especially Tanner crab brood stock from fishing mortality will likely need to be larger than is typical of MPAs worldwide. However, by incorporating information on the seasonal movements of red king crabs and the location of habitat barriers for Tanner crabs, MPAs could likely be designed that would effectively protect adults from fishing mortality. ?? Inter-Research 2008.

  14. Zoothamnium duplicatum infestation of cultured horseshoe crabs (Limulus polyphemus).

    PubMed

    Shinn, Andrew P; Mühlhölzl, Alexander P; Coates, Christopher J; Metochis, Christoforos; Freeman, Mark A

    2015-02-01

    An outbreak of the sessile peritrich Zoothamnium duplicatum in a pilot, commercial-scale Limulus polyphemus hatchery resulted in the loss of ∼96% (40,000) second/third instar larvae over a 61day period. peritrich growth was heavy, leading to mechanical obstruction of the gills and physical damage. The peritrichs were controlled without resultant loss of juvenile crabs by administering 10ppm chlorine in freshwater for 1h and the addition of aquarium grade sand; a medium into which the crabs could burrow and facilitate cleaning of the carapace. Peritrich identity was confirmed from a partial SSU rDNA contiguous sequence of 1343bp (99.7% similarity to Z. duplicatum).

  15. [Ecological economic analysis of a rice-crab model].

    PubMed

    Chen, Feixing; Zhang, Zengjie

    2002-03-01

    Based on field investigation and experimental data analysis, ecological economic principles were applied to study the structure and function, the characteristics of material and energy flows, and the economic and ecological benefits of a rice-crab model. The results show that rice-crab model had a higher integral benefit than rice model, and its net income, cost-benefit ratio, and labor productivity were increased by 382%, 67.7% and 295%, respectively. In view of the ecological benefits produced, the total nitrogen, alkaline-hydrolyzal nitrogen, total phosphorus, rapidly available phosphorus, rapidly available potassium, and organic matter in the soil after 1-year carb breeding were increased by 10.6%, 3.3%, 5.8%, 11.7%, 3.5% and 10.5%, respectively. Moreover, 6.375 kg N.hm-2 of non-point source pollution load could be cut down annually.

  16. SHORT-LIVED RADIO BURSTS FROM THE CRAB PULSAR

    SciTech Connect

    Crossley, J. H.; Eilek, J. A.; Hankins, T. H.; Kern, J. S.

    2010-10-20

    Our high-time-resolution observations reveal that individual main pulses from the Crab pulsar contain one or more short-lived microbursts. Both the energy and duration of bursts measured above 1 GHz can vary dramatically in less than a millisecond. These fluctuations are too rapid to be caused by propagation through turbulence in the Crab Nebula or in the interstellar medium; they must be intrinsic to the radio emission process in the pulsar. The mean duration of a burst varies with frequency as {nu}{sup -2}, significantly different from the broadening caused by interstellar scattering. We compare the properties of the bursts to some simple models of microstructure in the radio emission region.

  17. Gamma ray observations of the Crab pulsar - Past, present, future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Gerald J.

    1992-01-01

    The paper describes some of the high-energy observations of the Crab-Nebula pulsar, PSR0531+22. The pulse profiles of the Crab pulsar obtained in balloon-borne observations in 1967 and 1980 are presented. At present, gamma-ray scintillation detectors aboard the Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) form the basis of the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE). The pulsar, which is observed daily by the BATSE, is used by all four GRO/BATSE detectors as a calibration source since it emits a steady, strong, well-known spectrum of gamma rays over the entire energy range to which detectors are sensitive. The paper presents an example of a pulse profile obtained with the BATSE.

  18. Feeding Behavior of a Crab According to Cheliped Number

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Diogo Nunes; Christofoletti, Ronaldo Adriano; Barreto, Rodrigo Egydio

    2015-01-01

    Cheliped loss through autotomy is a common reflexive response in decapod crustaceans. Cheliped loss has direct and indirect effects on feeding behavior which can affect population dynamics and the role of species in the community. In this study, we assessed the impact of autotomy (0, 1, or 2 cheliped loss) on feeding behavior in the crab Pachygrapsus transversus, an omnivorous and abundant species that inhabits subtropical intertidal rocky shores along the South Atlantic Ocean. Autotomy altered crab feeding patterns and foraging behavior; however, the time spent foraging on animal prey or algae was not affected. These results indicate a plasticity of feeding behavior in P. transversus, allowing them to maintain feeding when injured. PMID:26682546

  19. The ecology of fiddler crab Uca forcipata in mangrove forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhtari, Mohammad; Ghaffar, Mazlan Abd; Usup, Gires; Cob, Zaidi Che

    2013-11-01

    Fiddler crab burrows increase oxygen dispersion in anoxic mangrove sediment and promote iron reduction and nitrification process over sulfate reduction in subsurface sediment. Therefore it is expected to accelerate decomposition rate under oxic and suboxic conditions. In this study the effect of environmental parameters on the local distribution of U. forcipata and subsequently the effect of crab burrows on sediment characteristics were investigated. Our result indicated that U. forcipata prefers to live in the open mudflats under the shade of mangrove trees. The most important factors determining their presence were sediment texture, porosity, organic content, water content, carbon content and temperature. Measurement of redox potential and iron pools clearly indicated a distinct oxidized layer around burrows although sediment porosity, organic and water content did not differ significantly between burrowed and non-burrowed mudflats and even among the burrow profiles. This result implies the oxidation created by burrowing activity of U .forcipata was not efficient to change physical properties of mangrove sediments.

  20. THE CRAB PULSAR AT CENTIMETER WAVELENGTHS. I. ENSEMBLE CHARACTERISTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Hankins, T. H.; Eilek, J. A.; Jones, G.

    2015-04-01

    We have observed the pulsar in the Crab Nebula at high radio frequencies and high time resolution. We present continuously sampled data at 640 ns time resolution and individual bright pulses recorded at down to 0.25 ns time resolution. Combining our new data with previous data from our group and from the literature shows the dramatic changes in the pulsar’s radio emission between low and high radio frequencies. Below about 5 GHz the mean profile is dominated by the bright Main Pulse and Low-Frequency Interpulse. Everything changes, however, above about 5 GHz; the Main Pulse disappears and the mean profile of the Crab pulsar is dominated by the High-Frequency Interpulse (which is quite different from its low-frequency counterpart) and the two High-Frequency Components. We present detailed observational characteristics of these different components which future models of the pulsar’s magnetosphere must explain.

  1. SUPERCONDUCTING RF-DIPOLE DEFLECTING AND CRABBING CAVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, Jean; De Silva, Paygalage Subashini

    2013-09-01

    Recent interests in designing compact deflecting and crabbing structures for future accelerators and colliders have initiated the development of novel rf structures. The superconducting rf-dipole cavity is one of the first compact designs with attractive properties such as higher gradients, higher shunt impedance, the absence of lower order modes and widely separated higher order modes. Two rf-dipole designs of 400 MHz and 499 MHz have been designed, fabricated and tested as proof-of-principle designs of compact deflecting and crabbing cavities for the LHC high luminosity upgrade and Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade. The first rf tests have been performed on the rf-dipole geometries at 4.2 K and 2.0 K in a vertical test assembly with excellent results. The cavities have achieved high gradients with high intrinsic quality factors, and multipacting levels were easily processed.

  2. A New Color Image of the Crab Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wainscoat, R. J.; Kormendy, J.

    1997-03-01

    A new color image of the Crab Nebula is presented. This is a 2782 × 1904 pixel mosaic of CCD frames taken through B (blue), V (green), and R (red) filters; it was carefully color balanced so that the Sun would appear white. The resolution of the final image is approximately 0.8 arcsec FWHM. The technique by which this image was constructed is described, and some aspects of the structure of the Crab Nebula revealed by the image are discussed. We also discuss the weaknesses of this technique for producing ``true-color'' images, and describe how our image would differ from what the human eye might see in a very large wide-field telescope. The structure of the inner part of the synchrotron nebula is compared with recent high-resolution images from the Hubble Space Telescope and from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. (SECTION: Interstellar Medium and Nebulae)

  3. Laboratory culture and maintenance of the horseshoe crab (Limulus polyphemus).

    PubMed

    Smith, Stephen A; Berkson, Jim

    2005-01-01

    Often referred to as a living fossil, the American horseshoe crab, Limulus polyphemus, is one of the most-studied invertebrate animals in the world. It has served as a model in Nobel Prize-winning eye research, and researchers use a component of its blood to detect bacterial contamination in medical devices and drugs. The authors review the conditions necessary for housing these animals in the laboratory.

  4. NLC Crab Cavity Phase Stability(LCC-0136)

    SciTech Connect

    Frisch, J

    2004-03-04

    The NLC design includes a pair of ''Crab Cavities'' to rotate the bunches at the IP and allow a larger crossing angle. These cavities must be phased relative to each other with very high stability. Slow drifts can be measured with the electron beam, and corrected with feedback. Pulse to pulse jitter in measurement and in the cavity drive is a potential problem. We try to estimate the size of these effects.

  5. Species Profiles. Life Histories and Environmental Requirements of Coastal Fishes and Invertebrates (Mid-Atlantic). BAY SCALLOP,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-01

    combination of naked flagellates (Isochrysis galbana Predators and Monochrysis lutheri ) (Loosanoff and Davis 1963; Sastry 1965). In shallow water areas...either flagellates (M. lutheri (Callinectes sapidus) (Castagna 1975). and Dunaliella tertiolecta) or diatoms In water deeper than 2 m (6.6 ft

  6. Differential escape from parasites by two competing introduced crabs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blakeslee, April M.; Keogh, Carolyn L.; Byers, James E.; Kuris, Armand M.; Lafferty, Kevin D.; Torchin, Mark E.

    2009-01-01

    Although introduced species often interact with one another in their novel communities, the role of parasites in these interactions remains less clear. We examined parasite richness and prevalence in 2 shorecrab species with different invasion histories and residency times in an introduced region where their distributions overlap broadly. On the northeastern coast of the USA, the Asian shorecrab Hemigrapsus sanguineus was discovered 20 yr ago, while the European green crab Carcinus maenas has been established for over 200 yr. We used literature and field surveys to evaluate parasitism in both crabs in their native and introduced ranges. We found only 1 parasite species infecting H. sanguineus on the US East Coast compared to 6 species in its native range, while C. maenas was host to 3 parasite species on the East Coast compared to 10 in its native range. The prevalence of parasite infection was also lower for both crabs in the introduced range compared to their native ranges; however, the difference was almost twice as much for H. sanguineus as for C. maenas. There are several explanations that could contribute to C. maenas' greater parasite diversity than that of H. sanguineus on the US East Coast, including differences in susceptibility, time since introduction, manner of introduction (vector), distance from native range, taxonomic isolation, and the potential for parasite identification bias. Our study underscores not just that non-native species lose parasites upon introduction, but that they may do so differentially, with ramifications for their direct interactions and with potential community-level influences.

  7. Silurian horseshoe crab illuminates the evolution of arthropod limbs.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Derek E G; Siveter, Derek J; Siveter, David J; Sutton, Mark D; Garwood, Russell J; Legg, David

    2012-09-25

    The basic arrangement of limbs in euarthropods consists of a uniramous head appendage followed by a series of biramous appendages. The body is divided into functional units or tagmata which are usually distinguished by further differentiation of the limbs. The living horseshoe crabs are remnants of a much larger diversity of aquatic chelicerates. The limbs of the anterior and posterior divisions of the body of living horseshoe crabs differ in the loss of the outer and inner ramus, respectively, of an ancestral biramous limb. Here we report a new fossil horseshoe crab from the mid-Silurian Lagerstätte in Herefordshire, United Kingdom (approximately 425 Myr B.P.), a site that has yielded a remarkably preserved assemblage of soft-bodied fossils. The limbs of the new form can be homologized with those of living Limulus, but retain an ancestral biramous morphology. Remarkably, however, the two limb branches originate separately, providing fossil evidence to suggest that repression or loss of gene expression might have given rise to the appendage morphology of Limulus. Both branches of the prosomal limbs of this new fossil are robust and segmented in contrast to their morphology in Cambrian arthropods, revealing that a true biramous limb was once present in chelicerates as well as in the mandibulates.

  8. X-ray spectra of the Crab pulsar and nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pravdo, S. H.; Serlemitsos, P. J.

    1981-01-01

    The spectrum of the Crab pulsar was measued from 2 to 50 keV as a function of pulse phase and a progressive hardening and subsequent softening of the spectrum across the pulse was found. The fraction of the pulsed flux which exhibits spectral variability is 0.14 and is concentrated solely in the region between the two peaks. A model is suggested in which the pulsed X-ray emission from the Crab pulsar consists of two components: one which has no spectral dependence with pulse phase and which is physically related to the double peaked gama ray pulse and, perhaps, the radio and optical pulses; and another component which exhibits spectral variability with pulse phase is confined to and comprises the interpeak emission, and which is only seen at X-ray energies. These results and studies of the binary X-ray pulsar Hercules X-1 suggest a phenomonological similarity. If the spectrally varying component in the Crab pulsar arises from a hot, magnetized plasma near the neutron star surface then higher energy spectral observations of this phase region might reveal spectral features which can be used to determine the surface field strength.

  9. Protistan parasites as mortality drivers in cold water crab fisheries.

    PubMed

    Frank Morado, J; Siddeek, M S M; Mullowney, Darrell R; Dawe, Earl G

    2012-06-01

    From a historical perspective, several protistan taxa, including the recently re-aligned Microsporidia, have been associated with or identified as causes of mortalities in crustacean populations. Depending upon the host species, associated protistan prevalences could be as low as 5% or approach 100%. It has generally been assumed that reported prevalences translated directly into significant mortalities that could impact the distribution and abundance of affected populations. However, this assumption may be incorrect especially when the dynamics of host-pathogen-environment interactions are not entirely understood. We will discuss the presumed impact of several protistan pathogens on temperate and cold water commercial crab species. By using selected examples such as a ciliate in the Dungeness crab (Cancer magister) and Hematodinium sp. infections in North Pacific crabs, we will attempt to contrast differences between prevalence and mortality, acute and chronic infections/mortalities, age or size selectivity of affected population, and geographically restricted and widespread epizootics. We will also briefly discuss the potential impact of environmental changes such as climate change and ocean acidification on both host and protistan pathogen.

  10. [Detection of allergenic substances (shrimp, crab) in processed seafood].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hiroko; Saita, Kiyotaka; Akaboshi, Chie; Ohsawa, Nobuhiko; Hashiguchi, Shigeki; Miyazawa, Maki

    2014-01-01

    We have carried out a study (2009-2012) on processed seafood products in order to determine the level of contamination with shrimp and crab. In 2010-2012, after the Allergy Labeling Regulation went into effect, the detection rate of crustacean protein in processed seafood products including small fish, such as niboshi, tukudani and so on (both boiled and dried), was 63%. Detection rates for processed seafood products in which crustacean protein levels were below 1 μg/g were 36% with and 58% without advisory labels, allowing us to conclude that 60% of labels were adequate. On the other hand, the detection rate for processed seafood products with crustacean protein levels higher than the baseline of 10 μg/g was 9%, of which 60% carried no advisory labels. The rate of shrimp DNA detection using the Akiami primer in processed foods containing shrimp and crab was high (73%). This suggests that it is necessary to test these products using the Akiami primer for supplemental analyses of shrimp DNA. The PCR analysis for crab DNA detection failed due to combined detection of mantis shrimp DNA, which accounted for 8% of the total detected.

  11. Observation and Spectral Measurements of the Crab Nebula with Milagro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdo, A. A.; Allen, B. T.; Aune, T.; Benbow, W.; Berley, D.; Chen, C.; Christopher, G. E.; DeYoung, T.; Dingus, B. L.; Falcone, A.; Fleysher, L.; Fleysher, R.; Gonzalez, M. M.; Goodman, J. A.; Gordo, J. B.; Hays, E.; Hoffman, C. M.; Huntemeyer, P. H.; Kolterman, B. E.; Linnemann, J. T.; McEnery, J. E.; Morgan, T.; Mincer, A. I.; Nemethy, P.

    2011-01-01

    The Crab Nebula was detected with the Milagro experiment at a statistical significance of 17 standard deviations over the lifetime of the experiment. The experiment was sensitive to approximately 100 GeV - 100 TeV gamma ray air showers by observing the particle footprint reaching the ground. The fraction of detectors recording signals from photons at the ground is a suitable proxy for the energy of the primary particle and has been used to measure the photon energy spectrum of the Crab Nebula between 1 and 100 TeV. The TeV emission is believed to be caused by inverse-Compton up-scattering scattering of ambient photons by an energetic electron population. The location of a Te V steepening or cutoff in the energy spectrum reveals important details about the underlying electron population. We describe the experiment and the technique for distinguishing gamma-ray events from the much more-abundant hadronic events. We describe the calculation of the significance of the excess from the Crab and how the energy spectrum is fit.

  12. Natural visual cues eliciting predator avoidance in fiddler crabs.

    PubMed

    Smolka, Jochen; Zeil, Jochen; Hemmi, Jan M

    2011-12-07

    To efficiently provide an animal with relevant information, the design of its visual system should reflect the distribution of natural signals and the animal's tasks. In many behavioural contexts, however, we know comparatively little about the moment-to-moment information-processing challenges animals face in their daily lives. In predator avoidance, for instance, we lack an accurate description of the natural signal stream and its value for risk assessment throughout the prey's defensive behaviour. We characterized the visual signals generated by real, potentially predatory events by video-recording bird approaches towards an Uca vomeris colony. Using four synchronized cameras allowed us to simultaneously monitor predator avoidance responses of crabs. We reconstructed the signals generated by dangerous and non-dangerous flying animals, identified the cues that triggered escape responses and compared them with those triggering responses to dummy predators. Fiddler crabs responded to a combination of multiple visual cues (including retinal speed, elevation and visual flicker) that reflect the visual signatures of distinct bird and insect behaviours. This allowed crabs to discriminate between dangerous and non-dangerous events. The results demonstrate the importance of measuring natural sensory signatures of biologically relevant events in order to understand biological information processing and its effects on behavioural organization.

  13. Giant Pulses in Crab and B1133+16

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karuppusamy, R.; Stappers, B. W.

    2008-02-01

    Giant Pulses (GP) from pulsars are usually considered to be 10 or more times stronger than the average pulse emitted by the pulsar. The emission mechanism of these pulses are not fully understood yet. The only common aspect of pulsars with GP emission is that they have a high magnetic field at the velocity of light cylinder. So far, GP studies mostly concentrated on the giant pulses from high magnetic field pulsar and pulses with very high signal to noise ratio. With the possibility of high time resolution and flexibilty offered by the Pulsar Machine II (PuMa-II), an analysis of weak giant pulses, and giant pulses at low frequency from normal pulsars can be undertaken. The default coherent dedispersion used in data reduction is a clear advantage in the study of single pulses at low sky frequencies. We detect giant pulse emission from the nearby low magnetic field pulsar, B1133+16 at low oberving frequencies. Detection of weak giants in the Crab pulsar are greatly aided by the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope(WSRT) and PuMa-II combination: 1. The synthesized beam of WSRT resolves out the Crab nebula, and reduces the nebular noise contribution. 2. PuMa-II can record 160 MHz of bandwidth and can coherently dedisperse the full bandwidth giving us an excellent time resolution and sensitivity. We will present results of a study of GPs from the Crab pulsar and PSR B1133+16.

  14. Silurian horseshoe crab illuminates the evolution of arthropod limbs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Derek E. G.; Siveter, Derek J.; Siveter, David J.; Sutton, Mark D.; Garwood, Russell J.; Legg, David

    2012-09-01

    The basic arrangement of limbs in euarthropods consists of a uniramous head appendage followed by a series of biramous appendages. The body is divided into functional units or tagmata which are usually distinguished by further differentiation of the limbs. The living horseshoe crabs are remnants of a much larger diversity of aquatic chelicerates. The limbs of the anterior and posterior divisions of the body of living horseshoe crabs differ in the loss of the outer and inner ramus, respectively, of an ancestral biramous limb. Here we report a new fossil horseshoe crab from the mid-Silurian Lagerstätte in Herefordshire, United Kingdom (approximately 425 Myr B.P.), a site that has yielded a remarkably preserved assemblage of soft-bodied fossils. The limbs of the new form can be homologized with those of living Limulus, but retain an ancestral biramous morphology. Remarkably, however, the two limb branches originate separately, providing fossil evidence to suggest that repression or loss of gene expression might have given rise to the appendage morphology of Limulus. Both branches of the prosomal limbs of this new fossil are robust and segmented in contrast to their morphology in Cambrian arthropods, revealing that a true biramous limb was once present in chelicerates as well as in the mandibulates.

  15. a Surprise from the Pulsar in the Crab Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-11-01

    New observations of the spectrum of the rapidly spinning neutron star (the `pulsar') in the Crab Nebula have been carried out with the ESO 3.5-metre New Technology Telescope (NTT) by a group of Italian astronomers [1]. Because of greatly improved spectral resolution which allows to register even very fine details in the pulsar's spectrum, they are able to determine for the first time with high accuracy the overall dependance of the emission on wavelength, i.e. the `shape' of the spectrum. Quite unexpectedly, they also detect a hitherto unknown 100 A (10 nm) broad `absorption dip', which can be securely attributed to the pulsar. These results open an exciting new window for the study of the extreme physical processes close to a pulsar. The Nature of Pulsars It is estimated that there may be as many as 100 million neutron stars in our Galaxy. A neutron star is the superdense remnant of the extremely violent supernova explosion that occurs at the end of the life of a comparatively massive star. In fact, all stars that are more than about 6 times heavier than the Sun are believed to end their lives as supernovae. During the explosion, the central core of the dying star collapses in a few milliseconds and the matter at the centre is compressed to a density comparable to that of an atomic nucleus. Due to the enormous inward pressure, the atomic particles are squeezed together into a kind of neutron jam. The outcome is the formation of a neutron star with a diameter of 10-15 kilometres, weighing as much as the Sun. In accordance with the physical law that implies that the rotation momentum of the exploding star must be conserved, newborn neutron stars will rotate very rapidly around their axis, in some cases as fast as 100 times per second. In the same way, the new neutron star is expected to possess a strong magnetic field. Of these myriads of neutron stars, about 700 have been observed to emit radio pulses (hence the name `pulsar'). A few of these can also be detected

  16. Effect of food availability on the growth and thermal physiology of juvenile Dungeness crabs (Metacarcinus magister).

    PubMed

    McLean, Katherine M; Todgham, Anne E

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile Dungeness crabs spend ~1 year in the San Francisco Estuary, where they undergo considerable growth before returning to the coastal ocean. Previous studies suggest that competition, food scarcity and avoidance of conspecifics may cause some juvenile Dungeness crabs in the San Francisco Estuary to become food limited. Food limitation may force these crabs to forage in higher temperature intertidal environments in the estuary, exposing them to stressful conditions in order to sustain growth and, potentially, necessitating physiological trade-offs in energy allocation between growth and stress tolerance. To investigate the effects of food limitation on aerobic metabolism and physiological performance of crabs, we assessed growth, moulting frequency, metabolic rate, citrate synthase and malate dehydrogenase enzyme activity and cardiac performance, as an index of temperature sensitivity and upper temperature tolerance. Summer- and winter-caught crabs were acclimated to either a high- or a low-food ration for 5 weeks. Overall, our results demonstrated that while food limitation had a negative effect on growth of juvenile Dungeness crabs in both the summer and the winter feeding trials, crabs in the low-food group maintained both metabolic rate at ambient San Francisco Estuary temperatures (15°C; summer trial only) and upper temperature tolerance as determined by failure of cardiac function when compared with crabs in the high-food group (summer and winter trials). Therefore, the ability to maintain stress tolerance when food is limited appears to come as a physiological trade-off to growth. Food-limited crabs were unable to increase their metabolic rate to the same level as that achieved by well-fed crabs; therefore, if exposure to elevated temperatures persists and requires more energy than can be met by crabs in their food-limited state, physiological performance may be compromised.

  17. Acanthocephala Parasite (Profilicollis spp.) Loads in Correlation to Pacific Mole Crab (Emerita analoga) Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, T.; Huang, S.; Galathe, M.; Jenkins, M.; Ramirez, A.; Crosby, L.; Barrera, J.; FitzHoward, S.

    2013-12-01

    Since 2002, San Francisco Bay students have been conducting marine ecosystem monitoring through a joint project with the Long-term Monitoring Program and Experiential Training for Students (LiMPETS), in conjunction with the Gulf of Farallones National Marine Sanctuary. Each year students collect population and demographic data on Pacific mole crabs (Emerita analoga), an indicator species that lives in the sandy beach habitat in temperate regions along the Pacific Ocean. Pacific mole crabs are filter feeding crustaceans that inhabit the intertidal swash zone and are known to be an intermediate host for parasitic ';spiny-headed' worms in the phylum Acanthocephala (Profilicollis spp.). Sampling takes place during their reproductive period, which occurs from spring to fall, and includes measuring total body length of the Pacific mole crabs and dissecting them to determine presence of Acanthocephalan parasites. We hypothesize that due to larger body mass, larger Pacific mole crabs will have a greater number of Acanthocephala parasites.We conducted several analyses using the LiMPETS long-term data. Specifically, we compared body length, crab gender, and parasite abundance from Pacific mole crabs sampled from four beaches located in the county and city of San Francisco. Our results indicated that larger Pacific mole crabs do not necessarily have more parasites, but are more likely to have at least one parasite, while female Pacific mole crabs carrying eggs, have more parasites than males or females without eggs. We also found that parasite loads per mole crab was highest in the spring. Further analysis will be conducted to determine factors affecting Pacific mole crab parasite loads. Studying Pacific mole crabs help evaluate the health of California's intertidal systems and how human activities, geologic changes, and climate changes all make huge impacts to the intertidal ecosystems.

  18. Effect of food availability on the growth and thermal physiology of juvenile Dungeness crabs (Metacarcinus magister)

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Katherine M.; Todgham, Anne E.

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile Dungeness crabs spend ~1 year in the San Francisco Estuary, where they undergo considerable growth before returning to the coastal ocean. Previous studies suggest that competition, food scarcity and avoidance of conspecifics may cause some juvenile Dungeness crabs in the San Francisco Estuary to become food limited. Food limitation may force these crabs to forage in higher temperature intertidal environments in the estuary, exposing them to stressful conditions in order to sustain growth and, potentially, necessitating physiological trade-offs in energy allocation between growth and stress tolerance. To investigate the effects of food limitation on aerobic metabolism and physiological performance of crabs, we assessed growth, moulting frequency, metabolic rate, citrate synthase and malate dehydrogenase enzyme activity and cardiac performance, as an index of temperature sensitivity and upper temperature tolerance. Summer- and winter-caught crabs were acclimated to either a high- or a low-food ration for 5 weeks. Overall, our results demonstrated that while food limitation had a negative effect on growth of juvenile Dungeness crabs in both the summer and the winter feeding trials, crabs in the low-food group maintained both metabolic rate at ambient San Francisco Estuary temperatures (15°C; summer trial only) and upper temperature tolerance as determined by failure of cardiac function when compared with crabs in the high-food group (summer and winter trials). Therefore, the ability to maintain stress tolerance when food is limited appears to come as a physiological trade-off to growth. Food-limited crabs were unable to increase their metabolic rate to the same level as that achieved by well-fed crabs; therefore, if exposure to elevated temperatures persists and requires more energy than can be met by crabs in their food-limited state, physiological performance may be compromised. PMID:27293698

  19. Effects of coral bleaching on the obligate coral-dwelling crab Trapezia cymodoce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stella, J. S.; Munday, P. L.; Jones, G. P.

    2011-09-01

    Corals are an essential and threatened habitat for a diverse range of reef-associated animals. Episodes of coral bleaching are predicted to increase in frequency and intensity over coming decades, yet the effects of coral-host bleaching on the associated animal communities remain poorly understood. The present study investigated the effects of host-colony bleaching on the obligate coral-dwelling crab, Trapezia cymodoce, during a natural bleaching event in the lagoon of Lizard Island, Australia. Branching corals, which harbour the highest diversity of coral associates, comprised 13% of live coral cover at the study site, with 83% affected by bleaching. Crabs on healthy and bleached colonies of Pocillopora damicornis were monitored over a 5-week period to determine whether coral bleaching affected crab density and movement patterns. All coral colonies initially contained one breeding pair of crabs. There was a significant decline in crab density on bleached corals after 5 weeks, with many corals losing one or both crabs, yet all healthy colonies retained a mating pair. Fecundity of crabs collected from bleached and healthy colonies of P. damicornis was also compared. The size of egg clutches of crabs collected from bleached hosts was 40% smaller than those from healthy hosts, indicating a significant reduction in fecundity. A laboratory experiment on movement patterns found that host-colony bleaching also prompted crabs to emigrate in search of more suitable colonies. Emigrant crabs engaged in aggressive interactions with occupants of healthy hosts, with larger crabs always usurping occupants of a smaller size. Decreased densities and clutch sizes, along with increased competitive interactions, could potentially result in a population decline of these important coral associates with cascading effects on coral health.

  20. Identification of tropomyosin and arginine kinase as major allergens of Portunus pelagicus (blue swimming crab).

    PubMed

    Rosmilah, M; Shahnaz, M; Zailatul, H M Y; Noormalin, A; Normilah, I

    2012-09-01

    Crab is an important source of food allergen. Tropomyosin represents the main crab allergen and is responsible for IgE cross-reactivity between various species of crustaceans. Recently, other new crab allergens including arginine kinase have been identified. However, information on allergens of the local Portunidcrab is not available. Thus, the aim of this study was to identify the major allergens of Portunus pelagicus (blue swimming crab) using the allergenomics approach. Raw and cooked extracts of the crab were prepared from the crab meat. Protein profile and IgE binding pattern were demonstrated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and immunoblotting using sera from 30 patients with crab allergy. The major allergens of the crab were then identified by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE), followed by mass spectrometry analysis of the peptide digests. The SDS-PAGE of raw extract revealed approximately 20 protein fractions over a wide molecular weight range, while cooked extract demonstrated fewer protein bands. The raw extract also demonstrated a higher number of IgE reactive bands than the cooked extract. A heat-resistant protein of 36 kDa has been identified as the major allergen in both raw and cooked extracts. In addition, a heat-sensitive protein of 41 kDa was also recognized as a major allergen in raw crab. The 2-DE gel profile of the raw extract demonstrated about >100 distinct proteins spots and immunoblotting of the 2-DE profile demonstrated at least 12 different major IgE reactive spots with molecular masses between 13 to 250 kDa and isoelectric point (pI) values ranging from 4.0 to 7.0. The 36 and 41 kDa proteins were identified as the crab tropomyosin and arginine kinase, respectively by mass spectrometry. Therefore, this study confirmed that tropomyosin and arginine kinase are the major allergens of the local Portunid crab, P. pelagicus.