Science.gov

Sample records for crack closure analysis

  1. A finite element analysis of fatigue crack closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Experiments have shown that fatigue cracks close at positive loads during constant-amplitude load cycling. The crack-closure phenomenon is caused by residual plastic deformations remaining in the wake of an advancing crack tip. The present paper is concerned with the application of a two-dimensional, nonlinear, finite-element analysis for predicting crack-closure and crack-opening stresses during cyclic loading. A two-dimensional finite-element computer program, which accounts for both elastic-plastic material behavior and changing boundary conditions associated with crack extension and intermittent contact of the crack surfaces under cyclic loading, has been developed. An efficient technique to account for changing boundary conditions was also incorporated into the nonlinear analysis program. This program was subsequently used to study crack extension and crack closure under constant-amplitude and two-level block loading. The calculated crack-closure and crack-opening stresses were qualitatively consistent with experimental observations.

  2. Fatigue Crack Closure Analysis Using Digital Image Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leser, William P.; Newman, John A.; Johnston, William M.

    2010-01-01

    Fatigue crack closure during crack growth testing is analyzed in order to evaluate the critieria of ASTM Standard E647 for measurement of fatigue crack growth rates. Of specific concern is remote closure, which occurs away from the crack tip and is a product of the load history during crack-driving-force-reduction fatigue crack growth testing. Crack closure behavior is characterized using relative displacements determined from a series of high-magnification digital images acquired as the crack is loaded. Changes in the relative displacements of features on opposite sides of the crack are used to generate crack closure data as a function of crack wake position. For the results presented in this paper, remote closure did not affect fatigue crack growth rate measurements when ASTM Standard E647 was strictly followed and only became a problem when testing parameters (e.g., load shed rate, initial crack driving force, etc.) greatly exceeded the guidelines of the accepted standard.

  3. Closure of fatigue cracks at high strains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyyer, N. S.; Dowling, N. E.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on smooth specimens to study the closure behavior of short cracks at high cyclic strains under completely reversed cycling. Testing procedures and methodology, and closure measurement techniques, are described in detail. The strain levels chosen for the study cover from predominantly elastic to grossly plastic strains. Crack closure measurements are made at different crack lengths. The study reveals that, at high strains, cracks close only as the lowest stress level in the cycle is approached. The crack opening is observed to occur in the compressive part of the loading cycle. The applied stress needed to open a short crack under high strain is found to be less than for cracks under small scale yielding. For increased plastic deformations, the value of sigma sub op/sigma sub max is observed to decrease and approaches the value of R. Comparison of the experimental results with existing analysis is made and indicates the limitations of the small scale yielding approach where gross plastic deformation behavior occurs.

  4. Acoustic emission measurement of fatigue crack closure

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.S.; Rhyim, Y.M. . Center for Advanced Aerospace Materials); Kwon, D. . Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering); Ono, K. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1995-03-01

    In this study the acoustic emission (AE) technique has been applied to measure the crack closure loads precisely and the results have been compared with those measured by the conventional techniques such as the crack opening displacement (COD) method, back face strain gage (BFS) method, and surface strain gage method. In addition, fatigue tests at high stress ratio (R=0.8) have also been conducted to compared the results with those of the above methods at R=0.1 and to verify the accuracy of each method. The material used in the present investigation was an Al-Li 8090 alloy which was supplied as a 44.5mm thick rolled plate in the solution heat treated, 6% stretched and naturally aged condition. The COD and BFS methods show relatively good agreement with each other and measure the through-thickness mean value of crack closure loads. In the plane strain condition, the crack closure levels obtained by the COD and BFS methods were lower than those by the AE and surface train gage methods. The data obtained by the surface strain gage method must be interpreted carefully, because the shape of the compliance curves is affected by the location relative to the crack tip. The intrinsic fatigue life curve (da/dN vs. [Delta]K[sub eff]) obtained by the AE technique fitted well with the curve of high stress ratio (R=0.8) test at high [Delta]K, suggesting that the AE technique is sensitive to local crack-tip behavior on a microscopic scale and can be considered as a reliable measurement method for crack closure phenomena under repetitive loads.

  5. Modeling the Interactions Between Multiple Crack Closure Mechanisms at Threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Riddell, William T.; Piascik, Robert S.

    2003-01-01

    A fatigue crack closure model is developed that includes interactions between the three closure mechanisms most likely to occur at threshold; plasticity, roughness, and oxide. This model, herein referred to as the CROP model (for Closure, Roughness, Oxide, and Plasticity), also includes the effects of out-of plane cracking and multi-axial loading. These features make the CROP closure model uniquely suited for, but not limited to, threshold applications. Rough cracks are idealized here as two-dimensional sawtooths, whose geometry induces mixed-mode crack- tip stresses. Continuum mechanics and crack-tip dislocation concepts are combined to relate crack face displacements to crack-tip loads. Geometric criteria are used to determine closure loads from crack-face displacements. Finite element results, used to verify model predictions, provide critical information about the locations where crack closure occurs.

  6. Three-dimensional measurements of fatigue crack closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, S. K.; Grandt, A. F., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth and retardation experiments conducted in polycarbonate test specimen are described. The transparent test material allows optical interferometry measurements of the fatigue crack opening (and closing) profiles. Crack surface displacements are obtained through the specimen thickness and three dimensional aspects of fatigue crack closure are discussed.

  7. Results of the second Round Robin on opening-load measurement conducted by ASTM Task Group E24.04.04 on crack closure measurement and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, E. P.

    1993-01-01

    A second experimental Round Robin on the measurement of the crack opening load in fatigue crack growth tests has been completed by the ASTM Task Group E24.04.04 on Crack Closure Measurement and Analysis. Fourteen laboratories participated in the testing of aluminum alloy compact tension specimens. Opening-load measurements were made at three crack lengths during constant Delta K, constant stress ratio tests by most of the participants. Four participants made opening-load measurements during threshold tests. All opening-load measurements were based on the analysis of specimens compliance behavior, where the displacement/strain was measured either at the crack mouth or the mid-height back face location. The Round Robin data were analyzed for opening load using two non-subjective analysis methods: the compliance offset and the correlation coefficient methods. The scatter in the opening load results was significantly reduced when some of the results were excluded from the analysis population based on an accept/reject criterion for raw data quality. The compliance offset and correlation coefficient opening load analysis methods produced similar results for data populations that had been screened to eliminate poor quality data.

  8. Results of the Round Robin on opening-load measurement conducted by ASTM Task Group E24.04.04 on Crack Closure Measurement and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Edward P.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental Round Robin on the measurement of the opening load in fatigue crack growth tests was conducted on Crack Closure Measurement and Analysis. The Round Robin evaluated the current level of consistency of opening load measurements among laboratories and to identify causes for observed inconsistency. Eleven laboratories participated in the testing of compact and middle-crack specimens. Opening-load measurements were made for crack growth at two stress-intensity factor levels, three crack lengths, and following an overload. All opening-load measurements were based on the analysis of specimen compliance data. When all of the results reported (from all participants, all measurement methods, and all data analysis methods) for a given test condition were pooled, the range of opening loads was very large--typically spanning the lower half of the fatigue loading cycle. Part of the large scatter in the reported opening-load results was ascribed to consistent differences in results produced by the various methods used to measure specimen compliance and to evaluate the opening load from the compliance data. Another significant portion of the scatter was ascribed to lab-to-lab differences in producing the compliance data when using nominally the same method of measurement.

  9. Fracture mechanics analyses of partial crack closure in shell structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jun

    2007-12-01

    This thesis presents the theoretical and finite element analyses of crack-face closure behavior in shells and its effect on the stress intensity factor under a bending load condition. Various shell geometries, such as spherical shell, cylindrical shell containing an axial crack, cylindrical shell containing a circumferential crack and shell with double curvatures, are all studied. In addition, the influence of material orthotropy on the crack closure effect in shells is also considered. The theoretical formulation is developed based on the shallow shell theory of Delale and Erdogan, incorporating the effect of crack-face closure at the compressive edges. The line-contact assumption, simulating the crack-face closure at the compressive edges, is employed so that the contact force at the closure edges is introduced, which can be translated to the mid-plane of the shell, accompanied by an additional distributed bending moment. The unknown contact force is computed by solving a mixed-boundary value problem iteratively, that is, along the crack length, either the normal displacement of the crack face at the compressive edges is equal to zero or the contact pressure is equal to zero. It is found that due to the curvature effects crack closure may not always occur on the entire length of the crack, depending on the direction of the bending load and the geometry of the shell. The crack-face closure influences significantly the magnitude of the stress intensity factors; it increases the membrane component but decreases the bending component. The maximum stress intensity factor is reduced by the crack-face closure. The significant influence of geometry and material orthotropy on rack closure behavior in shells is also predicted based on the analytical solutions. Three-dimensional FEA is performed to validate the theoretical solutions. It demonstrates that the crack face closure occurs actually over an area, not on a line, but the theoretical solutions of the stress intensity

  10. Effect of Crack Closure on Ultrasonic Detection of Fatigue Cracks at Fastener Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowles, S. J.; Harding, C. A.; Hugo, G. R.

    2009-03-01

    The ultrasonic response from closed fatigue cracks grown in aluminium alloy specimens using a representative aircraft spectrum loading has been characterised as a function of tensile applied load using pulse-echo 45° shear-wave ultrasonic C-scans with focused immersion transducers. Observed trends with crack size and applied load are described and compared to results for artificial machined defects. The results demonstrate that crack closure significantly reduces the ultrasonic response compared to open cracks or machined defects.

  11. A crack-closure model for predicting fatigue-crack growth under aircraft spectrum loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The development and application of an analytical model of cycle crack growth is presented that includes the effects of crack closure. The model was used to correlate crack growth rates under constant amplitude loading and to predict crack growth under aircraft spectrum loading on 2219-T851 aluminum alloy sheet material. The predicted crack growth lives agreed well with experimental data. The ratio of predicted to experimental lives ranged from 0.66 to 1.48. These predictions were made using data from an ASTM E24.06.01 Round Robin.

  12. Crack-closure and crack-growth measurements in surface-flawed titanium alloy Ti6Al-4V

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elber, W.

    1975-01-01

    The crack-closure and crack-growth characteristics of the titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V were determined experimentally on surface-flawed plate specimens. Under cyclic loading from zero to tension, cracks deeper than 1 mm opened at approximately 50 percent of the maximum load. Cracks shallower than 1 mm opened at higher loads. The correlation between crack-growth rate and the total stress-intensity range showed a lower threshold behavior. This behavior was attributed to the high crack-opening loads at short cracks because the lower threshold was much less evident in correlations between the crack-growth rates and the effective stress-intensity range.

  13. Floating Node Method and Virtual Crack Closure Technique for Modeling Matrix Cracking-Delamination Migration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeCarvalho, Nelson V.; Chen, B. Y.; Pinho, Silvestre T.; Baiz, P. M.; Ratcliffe, James G.; Tay, T. E.

    2013-01-01

    A novel approach is proposed for high-fidelity modeling of progressive damage and failure in composite materials that combines the Floating Node Method (FNM) and the Virtual Crack Closure Technique (VCCT) to represent multiple interacting failure mechanisms in a mesh-independent fashion. In this study, the approach is applied to the modeling of delamination migration in cross-ply tape laminates. Delamination, matrix cracking, and migration are all modeled using fracture mechanics based failure and migration criteria. The methodology proposed shows very good qualitative and quantitative agreement with experiments.

  14. Floating Node Method and Virtual Crack Closure Technique for Modeling Matrix Cracking-Delamination Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeCarvalho, N. V.; Chen, B. Y.; Pinho, S. T.; Baiz, P. M.; Ratcliffe, J. G.; Tay, T. E.

    2013-01-01

    A novel approach is proposed for high-fidelity modeling of progressive damage and failure in composite materials that combines the Floating Node Method (FNM) and the Virtual Crack Closure Technique (VCCT) to represent multiple interacting failure mechanisms in a mesh-independent fashion. In this study, the approach is applied to the modeling of delamination migration in cross-ply tape laminates. Delamination, matrix cracking, and migration are all modeled using fracture mechanics based failure and migration criteria. The methodology proposed shows very good qualitative and quantitative agreement with experiments.

  15. An Evaluation of the Plasticity-Induced Crack-Closure Concept and Measurement Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, James C., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    An assessment of the plasticity-induced crack-closure concept is made, in light of some of the questions that have been raised on the validity of the concept, and the assumptions that have been made concerning crack-dp damage below the crack-opening stress. The impact of using other crack-tip parameters, such as the cyclic crack-tip displacement, to model crack-growth rate behavior was studied. Crack-growth simulations, using a crack-closure model, showed a close relation between traditional Delta K eff, and the cyclic crack-tip displacement (Delta eff) for an aluminum alloy and a steel. Evaluations of the cyclic hysteresis energy demonstrated that the cyclic plastic damage below the crack-opening stress was negligible in the Paris crack-growth regime. Some of the standard and newly proposed remote measurement methods to determine the 'effective' crack-tip driving parameter were evaluated on middle-crack tension specimens. A potential source of the Kmax effect on crack-growth rates was studied on an aluminum alloy. Results showed that the ratio of Kmax to Kc had a strong effect on crack-growth rates at high stress ratios and at low stress ratios for very high stress levels. The crack-closure concept and the traditional crack-growth rate equations were able to correlate and predict crack-growth rates under these extreme conditions.

  16. A study of fatigue crack closure using electric potential and compliance techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, C. K.; Cassatt, G. C.

    1976-01-01

    Compared are closure data produced on the same specimen by the crack tip compliance gage and electric potential techniques. Experiments on 7075-T651 aluminum center cracked panels produced equivalent results on closure using the two techniques. The results also indicated that closure is a function of stress ratio, specimen thickness and maximum applied stress intensity. Maximum stress intensity had a strong effect on closure in the range of applied stresses used. This dependence of closure on specimen thickness and maximum stress intensity accounts for many of the discrepencies in closure behavior reported in the literature.

  17. Analytical and Experimental Study of Near-Threshold Interactions Between Crack Closure Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Riddell, William T.; Piascik, Robert S.

    2003-01-01

    The results of an analytical closure model that considers contributions and interactions between plasticity-, roughness-, and oxide-induced crack closure mechanisms are presented and compared with experimental data. The analytical model is shown to provide a good description of the combined influences of crack roughness, oxide debris, and plasticity in the near-threshold regime. Furthermore, analytical results indicate that closure mechanisms interact in a non-linear manner such that the total amount of closure is not the sum of closure contributions for each mechanism.

  18. Effects of Crack Closure and Cyclic Deformation on Thermomechanical Fatigue Crack Growth of a Near α Titanium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Kartik; Kumar, Vikas; Bhanu Sankara Rao, K.; Sundararaman, M.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, closure corrected in-phase (IP) and out-of-phase (OP) thermomechanical fatigue crack growth rates at two temperature intervals viz. 573 K to 723 K (300 °C to 450 °C) and 723 K to 873 K (450 °C to 600 °C) of Timetal 834 near α titanium alloy are presented. It is found that closure mechanisms significantly influence the stage I crack growth behavior. Surface roughness-induced crack closure (RICC) predominantly modifies the crack growth rate of near-threshold region at 573 K to 723 K (300 °C to 450 °C) test conditions. However, oxide-induced crack closure further strengthens RICC at 723 K to 873 K (450 °C to 600 °C) TMF loading. In stage II crack growth behavior, the alloy shows higher crack growth rates at 723 K to 873 K (450 °C to 600 °C) OP-TMF loading which is attributed to the combined effect of cyclic hardening occurring at the crack tip and weakening of interlamellar regions due to oxidation.

  19. A new system for crack closure of cementitious materials using shrinkable polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Jefferson, Anthony; Joseph, Christopher; Lark, Robert; Isaacs, Ben; Dunn, Simon; Weager, Brendon

    2010-05-15

    This paper presents details of an original crack-closure system for cementitious materials using shrinkable polymer tendons. The system involves the incorporation of unbonded pre-oriented polymer tendons in cementitious beams. Crack closure is achieved by thermally activating the shrinkage mechanism of the restrained polymer tendons after the cement-based material has undergone initial curing. The feasibility of the system is demonstrated in a series of small scale experiments on pre-cracked prismatic mortar specimens. The results from these tests show that, upon activation, the polymer tendon completely closes the preformed macro-cracks and imparts a significant stress across the crack faces. The potential of the system to enhance the natural autogenous crack healing process and generally improve the durability of concrete structures is addressed.

  20. Crack spectra analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tiernan, M.

    1980-09-01

    Crack spectra derived from velocity data have been shown to exhibit systematics which reflect microstructural and textural differences between samples (Warren and Tiernan, 1980). Further research into both properties and information content of crack spectra have yielded the following: Spectral features are reproducible even at low pressures; certain observed spectral features may correspond to non-in-situ crack populations created during sample retrieval; the functional form of a crack spectra may be diagnostic of the sample's grain texture; hysteresis is observed in crack spectra between up and down pressure runs - it may be due to friction between the faces of closed crack populations.

  1. Estimation of crack closure stresses for in situ toughened silicon nitride with 8 wt pct scandia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Salem, Jonathan A.; Sanders, William A.

    1992-01-01

    An 8-wt pct-scandia silicon nitride with an elongated grain structure was fabricated. The material exhibited high fracture toughness and a rising R-curve as measured by the indentation strength technique. The 'toughening' exponent m was found to be m about 0.1. The high fracture toughness and R-curve behavior was attributed mainly to bridging of the crack faces by the elongated grains. The crack closure (bridging) stress distribution in the wake region of the crack tip was estimated as a function of crack size from the R-curve data, with an arbitrarily assumed distribution function.

  2. Fatigue crack growth rate of Ti-6Al-4V considering the effects of fracture toughness and crack closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junhong; Yang, Shuo; Lin, Jiewei

    2015-03-01

    Fatigue fracture is one of the main failure modes of Ti-6Al-4V alloy, fracture toughness and crack closure have strong effects on the fatigue crack growth(FCG) rate of Ti-6Al-4V alloy. The FCG rate of Ti-6Al-4V is investigated by using experimental and analytical methods. The effects of stress ratio, crack closure and fracture toughness on the FCG rate are studied and discussed. A modified prediction model of the FCG rate is proposed, and the relationship between the fracture toughness and the stress intensity factor(SIF) range is redefined by introducing a correcting coefficient. Notched plate fatigue tests (including the fracture toughness test and the FCG rate test) are conducted to investigate the influence of affecting factors on the FCG rate. Comparisons between the predicted results of the proposed model, the Paris model, the Walker model, the Sadananda model, and the experimental data show that the proposed model gives the best agreement with the test data particularly in the near-threshold region and the Paris region, and the corresponding calculated fatigue life is also accurate in the same regions. By considering the effects of fracture toughness and crack closure, the novel FCG rate prediction model not only improves the estimating accuracy, but also extends the adaptability of the FCG rate prediction model in engineering.

  3. Effect of closure of collinear cracks on the stress-strain state and the limiting equilibrium of bent shallow shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shatskii, I. P.; Makoviichuk, N. V.

    2011-05-01

    The problem of closure of collinear cracks during bending of a shallow shell is considered within the framework of the Kirchhoff theory. Crack closure is described using the model of contact along a line on one of the shell faces. Strain and moment intensity factors and fracture load are studied as functions of shell curvature and defect location, and the distribution of contact forces along the cracks is investigated.

  4. Discrete crack growth analysis methodology for through cracks in pressurized fuselage structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potyondy, David O.; Wawrzynek, Paul A.; Ingraffea, Anthony R.

    1995-05-01

    A methodology for simulating the growth of long through cracks in the skin of pressurized aircraft fuselage structures is described. Crack trajectories are allowed to be arbitrary and are computed as part of the simulation. The interaction between the mechanical loads acting on the superstructure and the local structural response near the crack tips is accounted for by employing a hierarchical modelling strategy. The structural response for each cracked configuration is obtained using a geometrically non-linear shell finite element analysis procedure. Four stress intensity factors, two for membrane behavior and two for bending using Kirchhoff plate theory, are computed using an extension of the modified crack closure integral method. Crack trajectories are determined by applying the maximum tangential stress criterion. Crack growth results in localized mesh deletion, and the deletion regions are remeshed automatically using a newly developed all-quadrilateral meshing algorithm. The effectiveness of the methodology, and its applicability to performing practical analyses of realistic structures, is demonstrated by simulating curvilinear crack growth in a fuselage panel that is representative of a typical narrow-body aircraft. The predicted crack trajectory and fatigue life compare well with measurements of these same quantities from a full-scale pressurized panel test.

  5. Discrete crack growth analysis methodology for through cracks in pressurized fuselage structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potyondy, David O.; Wawrzynek, Paul A.; Ingraffea, Anthony R.

    1994-09-01

    A methodology for simulating the growth of long through cracks in the skin of pressurized aircraft fuselage structures is described. Crack trajectories are allowed to be arbitrary and are computed as part of the simulation. The interaction between the mechanical loads acting on the superstructure and the local structural response near the crack tips is accounted for by employing a hierarchical modeling strategy. The structural response for each cracked configuration is obtained using a geometrically nonlinear shell finite element analysis procedure. Four stress intensity factors, two for membrane behavior and two for bending using Kirchhoff plate theory, are computed using an extension of the modified crack closure integral method. Crack trajectories are determined by applying the maximum tangential stress criterion. Crack growth results in localized mesh deletion, and the deletion regions are remeshed automatically using a newly developed all-quadrilateral meshing algorithm. The effectiveness of the methodology and its applicability to performing practical analyses of realistic structures is demonstrated by simulating curvilinear crack growth in a fuselage panel that is representative of a typical narrow-body aircraft. The predicted crack trajectory and fatigue life compare well with measurements of these same quantities from a full-scale pressurized panel test.

  6. A method for the analysis of the growth of short fatigue cracks

    SciTech Connect

    McEvily, A.J.; Shin, Y.S.

    1995-10-01

    A method for the analysis of the fatigue crack growth rate for short cracks has been developed and is applied to the case of fatigue crack growth of short surface cracks in a 1045 carbon steel. The method entails three modifications to standard LEFM procedures. These modifications include the use of a material constant to bridge between smooth and cracked specimen behavior, consideration of the plastic zone size to crack length ratio, and incorporation of the development of crack closure. Comparisons are made between calculations based upon this approach and experimental data.

  7. Detection of Cracking Levels in Brittle Rocks by Parametric Analysis of the Acoustic Emission Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradian, Zabihallah; Einstein, Herbert H.; Ballivy, Gerard

    2016-03-01

    Determination of the cracking levels during the crack propagation is one of the key challenges in the field of fracture mechanics of rocks. Acoustic emission (AE) is a technique that has been used to detect cracks as they occur across the specimen. Parametric analysis of AE signals and correlating these parameters (e.g., hits and energy) to stress-strain plots of rocks let us detect cracking levels properly. The number of AE hits is related to the number of cracks, and the AE energy is related to magnitude of the cracking event. For a full understanding of the fracture process in brittle rocks, prismatic specimens of granite containing pre-existing flaws have been tested in uniaxial compression tests, and their cracking process was monitored with both AE and high-speed video imaging. In this paper, the characteristics of the AE parameters and the evolution of cracking sequences are analyzed for every cracking level. Based on micro- and macro-crack damage, a classification of cracking levels is introduced. This classification contains eight stages (1) crack closure, (2) linear elastic deformation, (3) micro-crack initiation (white patch initiation), (4) micro-crack growth (stable crack growth), (5) micro-crack coalescence (macro-crack initiation), (6) macro-crack growth (unstable crack growth), (7) macro-crack coalescence and (8) failure.

  8. Numerical Modeling of the Surface Fatigue Crack Propagation Including the Closure Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guchinsky, Ruslan; Petinov, Sergei

    2016-01-01

    Presently modeling of surface fatigue crack growth for residual life assessment of structural elements is almost entirely based on application of the Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics (LEFM). Generally, it is assumed that the crack front does not essentially change its shape, although it is not always confirmed by experiment. Furthermore, LEFM approach cannot be applied when the stress singularity vanishes due to material plasticity, one of the leading factors associated with the material degradation and fracture. Also, evaluation of stress intensity factors meets difficulties associated with changes in the stress state along the crack front circumference. An approach proposed for simulation the evolution of surface cracks based on application of the Strain-life criterion for fatigue failure and of the finite element modeling of damage accumulation. It takes into account the crack closure effect, the nonlinear behavior of damage accumulation and material compliance increasing due to the damage advance. The damage accumulation technique was applied to model the semi-elliptical crack growth from the initial defect in the steel compact specimen. The results of simulation are in good agreement with the published experimental data.

  9. Local crack closure measurements: Development of a measurement system using computer vision and a far-field microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, M.A.; Zhao, W.; McNeill, S.R.; Helm, J.D.; Piascik, R.S.; Riddell, W.T.

    1999-07-01

    An accurate and relatively simple methodology for estimating crack closure loads has been developed. Using this method, measurements may be taken at a user-specified position behind the crack tip during the entire fatigue crack growth process. The methodology has three distinct components: (a) an imaging system having adequate magnification with minimal distortion, (b) a simple, Windows-based procedure for image acquisition and image analysis, and (c) techniques for applying a random, high contrast pattern on the specimen's surface. To meet the imaging requirements, a far-field microscope objective capable of high magnifications was employed to image small regions on the order of 0.5 mm by 0.5 mm. The regions were near the crack tip. To meet the requirements of a user-friendly system, a Windows-based data-acquisition interface was developed to run the system on a common PC. Using the interface, images are acquired automatically during a loading/unloading cycle and stored digitally. Image analysis is performed on the saved images to rapidly obtain the crack opening displacement as a function of load; these data are used to estimate the crack closure load. Finally, two methodologies for applying a random, high-contrast pattern with average sizes of 4 to 20 {micro}m were developed. The first method uses 11 {micro}m filter paper and a low-pressure compressed air supply to apply small particles of photocopier toner powder to the surface of the specimen. The second method uses contact lithography to achieve a random pattern with smaller feature sizes, on the order of 2 to 8 {micro}m. Baseline tests of the overall system have demonstrated that it is both easy to use and accurate. Specifically, (a) the PC interface has demonstrated that images can be acquired automatically while the loading frame is cycling at 0.01 Hz, and (b) the crack tip opening displacement data have been shown to have errors on the order of 0.05 pixels for the toner powder patterns, corresponding to

  10. On the measurement of the crack tip stress field as a means of determining Delta K(sub eff) under conditions of fatigue crack closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallhead, Ian R.; Edwards, Lyndon; Poole, Peter

    1994-01-01

    The optical method of caustics has been successfully extended to enable stress intensity factors as low as 1MPa square root of m to be determined accurately for central fatigue cracks in 2024-T3 aluminium alloy test panels. The feasibility of using this technique to study crack closure, and to determine the effective stress intensity factor range, Delta K(sub eff), has been investigated. Comparisons have been made between the measured values of stress intensity factor, K(sub caus), and corresponding theoretical values, K(sub theo), for a range of fatigue cracks grown under different loading conditions. The values of K(sub caus) and K(sub theo) were in good agreement at maximum stress, where the cracks are fully open, while K(sub caus) exceeded K(sub theo) at minimum stress, due to crack closure. However, the levels of crack closure and values of Delta K(sub eff) obtained could not account for the variations of crack growth rate with loading conditions. It is concluded that the values of Delta K(sub eff), based on caustic measurements in a 1/square root of r stress field well outside the plastic zone, do not fully reflect local conditions which control crack tip behavior.

  11. An analytical model which combines roughness- and plasticity- induced fatigue crack closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Nong

    In this study an analytical PICC-RICC Model was developed to describe better the near-threshold fatigue behavior. The PICC-RICC Model was built upon a strip-yield type PICC model originally proposed by Newman and later modified by Hou and Lawrence. A zigzag crack growth path was introduced to simulate surface roughness. The two opposing crack surfaces were considered to be translated and thus mismatched by the mixed-mode displacements occurring near the deflected crack tip. The model is powerful and unique in that it combines the effects of RICC and PICC. Thus, the gradual transition from RICC to PICC dominated crack closure is handled naturally by this model. The influences of the geometrical features of the surface roughness, R-ratio and the cyclic load range on RICC were examined using the PICC-RICC Model. Near-threshold fatigue behavior of various materials was predicted. The effect of microstructure on the RICC level was studied. The predicted results compared favorably with experimental data. The fatigue notch size effect was investigated using the PICC-RICC model. The initial crack length (asb{i}) for propagation was estimated. The predicted notch fatigue strength compared favorably with the Initiation-Propagation (I-P) Model prediction and test data. The existence of a "worst case notch" previously postulated using the I-P Model was confirmed.

  12. Measurement and analysis of critical crack tip processes associated with variable amplitude fatigue crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudak, S. J., Jr.; Davidson, D. L.; Chan, K. S.

    1983-01-01

    Crack growth retardation following overloads can result in overly conservative life predictions in structures subjected to variable amplitude fatigue loading when linear damage accumulation procedures are employed. Crack closure is believed to control the crack growth retardation, although the specific closure mechanism is debatable. Information on the relative contributions to crack closure from: (1) plasticity left in the wake of the advancing crack and (2) crack tip residual stresses is provided. The delay period and corresponding crack growth rate transients following overloads are systematically measured as a function of load ratio (R) and overload magnitude. These responses are correlated in terms of the local 'driving force' for crack growth as measured by crack tip opening loads and delta K sub eff. The latter measurements are obtained using a scanning electron microscope equipped with a cyclic loading stage; measurements are quantified using a relatively new stereoimaging technique. Combining experimental results with analytical predictions suggests that both plastic wake and residual stress mechanism are operative, the latter becoming predominate as R increases.

  13. Fracture Analysis of Double-Side Adhesively Bonded Composite Repairs to Cracked Aluminium Plate Using Line Spring Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Yong; Su, Weiguo

    2016-06-01

    A line spring model is developed for analyzing the fracture problem of cracked metallic plate repaired with the double-sided adhesively bonded composite patch. The restraining action of the bonded patch is modeled as continuous distributed linear springs bridging the crack faces provided that the cracked plate is subjected to extensional load. The effective spring constant is determined from 1-D bonded joint theory. The hyper-singular integral equation (HSIE), which can be solved using the second kind Chebyshev polynomial expansion method, is applied to determine the crack opening displacements (COD) and the crack tip stress intensity factors (SIF) of the repaired cracked plate. The numerical result of SIF for the crack-tip correlates very well with the finite element (FE) computations based on the virtual crack closure technique (VCCT). The present analysis approaches and mathematical techniques are critical to the successful design, analysis and implementation of crack patching.

  14. FASTRAN II - FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS (UNIX VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    Predictions of fatigue crack growth behavior can be made with the Fatigue Crack Growth Structural Analysis (FASTRAN II) computer program. As cyclic loads are applied to a selected crack configuration with an initial crack size, FASTRAN II predicts crack growth as a function of cyclic load history until either a desired crack size is reached or failure occurs. FASTRAN II is based on plasticity-induced crack-closure behavior of cracks in metallic materials and accounts for load-interaction effects, such as retardation and acceleration, under variable-amplitude loading. The closure model is based on the Dugdale model with modifications to allow plastically deformed material to be left along the crack surfaces as the crack grows. Plane stress and plane strain conditions, as well as conditions between these two, can be simulated in FASTRAN II by using a constraint factor on tensile yielding at the crack front to approximately account for three-dimensional stress states. FASTRAN II contains seventeen predefined crack configurations (standard laboratory fatigue crack growth rate specimens and many common crack configurations found in structures); and the user can define one additional crack configuration. The baseline crack growth rate properties (effective stress-intensity factor against crack growth rate) may be given in either equation or tabular form. For three-dimensional crack configurations, such as surface cracks or corner cracks at holes or notches, the fatigue crack growth rate properties may be different in the crack depth and crack length directions. Final failure of the cracked structure can be modelled with fracture toughness properties using either linear-elastic fracture mechanics (brittle materials), a two-parameter fracture criterion (brittle to ductile materials), or plastic collapse (extremely ductile materials). The crack configurations in FASTRAN II can be subjected to either constant-amplitude, variable-amplitude or spectrum loading. The applied

  15. FASTRAN II - FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS (IBM PC VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    Predictions of fatigue crack growth behavior can be made with the Fatigue Crack Growth Structural Analysis (FASTRAN II) computer program. As cyclic loads are applied to a selected crack configuration with an initial crack size, FASTRAN II predicts crack growth as a function of cyclic load history until either a desired crack size is reached or failure occurs. FASTRAN II is based on plasticity-induced crack-closure behavior of cracks in metallic materials and accounts for load-interaction effects, such as retardation and acceleration, under variable-amplitude loading. The closure model is based on the Dugdale model with modifications to allow plastically deformed material to be left along the crack surfaces as the crack grows. Plane stress and plane strain conditions, as well as conditions between these two, can be simulated in FASTRAN II by using a constraint factor on tensile yielding at the crack front to approximately account for three-dimensional stress states. FASTRAN II contains seventeen predefined crack configurations (standard laboratory fatigue crack growth rate specimens and many common crack configurations found in structures); and the user can define one additional crack configuration. The baseline crack growth rate properties (effective stress-intensity factor against crack growth rate) may be given in either equation or tabular form. For three-dimensional crack configurations, such as surface cracks or corner cracks at holes or notches, the fatigue crack growth rate properties may be different in the crack depth and crack length directions. Final failure of the cracked structure can be modelled with fracture toughness properties using either linear-elastic fracture mechanics (brittle materials), a two-parameter fracture criterion (brittle to ductile materials), or plastic collapse (extremely ductile materials). The crack configurations in FASTRAN II can be subjected to either constant-amplitude, variable-amplitude or spectrum loading. The applied

  16. Analysis of local delaminations caused by angle ply matrix cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salpekar, Satish A.; Obrien, T. Kevin; Shivakumar, K. N.

    1993-01-01

    Two different families of graphite/epoxy laminates with similar layups but different stacking sequences, (0,theta,-theta) sub s and (-theta/theta/0) sub s were analyzed using three-dimensional finite element analysis for theta = 15 and 30 degrees. Delaminations were modeled in the -theta/theta interface, bounded by a matrix crack and the stress free edge. The total strain energy release rate, G, along the delamination front was computed using three different techniques: the virtual crack closure technique (VCCT), the equivalent domain Integral (EDI) technique, and a global energy balance technique. The opening fracture mode component of the strain energy release rate, Gl, along the delamination front was also computed for various delamination lengths using VCCT. The effect of residual thermal and moisture stresses on G was evaluated.

  17. Stress analysis for structures with surface cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    Two basic forms of analysis, one treating stresses around arbitrarily loaded circular cracks, the other treating stresses due to loads arbitrarily distributed on the surface of a half space, are united by a boundary-point least squares method to obtain analyses for stresses from surface cracks in places or bars. Calculations were for enough cases to show how effects from the crack vary with the depth-to-length ratio, the fractional penetration ratio, the obliquity of the load, and to some extent the fractional span ratio. The results include plots showing stress intensity factors, stress component distributions near the crack, and crack opening displacement patterns. Favorable comparisons are shown with two kinds of independent experiments, but the main method for confirming the results is by wide checking of overall satisfaction of boundary conditions, so that external confirmation is not essential. Principles involved in designing analyses which promote dependability of the results are proposed and illustrated.

  18. Influence of Finite Element Software on Energy Release Rates Computed Using the Virtual Crack Closure Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Goetze, Dirk; Ransom, Jonathon (Technical Monitor)

    2006-01-01

    Strain energy release rates were computed along straight delamination fronts of Double Cantilever Beam, End-Notched Flexure and Single Leg Bending specimens using the Virtual Crack Closure Technique (VCCT). Th e results were based on finite element analyses using ABAQUS# and ANSYS# and were calculated from the finite element results using the same post-processing routine to assure a consistent procedure. Mixed-mode strain energy release rates obtained from post-processing finite elem ent results were in good agreement for all element types used and all specimens modeled. Compared to previous studies, the models made of s olid twenty-node hexahedral elements and solid eight-node incompatible mode elements yielded excellent results. For both codes, models made of standard brick elements and elements with reduced integration did not correctly capture the distribution of the energy release rate acr oss the width of the specimens for the models chosen. The results suggested that element types with similar formulation yield matching results independent of the finite element software used. For comparison, m ixed-mode strain energy release rates were also calculated within ABAQUS#/Standard using the VCCT for ABAQUS# add on. For all specimens mod eled, mixed-mode strain energy release rates obtained from ABAQUS# finite element results using post-processing were almost identical to re sults calculated using the VCCT for ABAQUS# add on.

  19. Effects of microstructure and specimen thickness on the fatigue crack closure in Al-Li 8090 alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Rhyim, Y.M.; Chang, Y.W.; Lee, C.S.; Lee, Y.J.

    1995-04-15

    The effect of specimen thickness on the crack closure and fatigue crack propagation has been investigated in this study using an Al-Li 8090 alloy. Since the crack closure is largely affected by the microstructural variation, the closure loads are measured and compared in two different microstructures, viz., one having a planar slip mode and the other with a homogeneous slip mode. The alloy used in the present study was an Al-Li 8090 alloy with the nominal composition of Al-2.5Li-1.2Cu-0.9Mg-0.11Zr. The plate was received in the T3771 tempered condition, which was solution treated, 6% stretched and naturally aged. The as-received microstructure showed a typical pancake-shaped unrecrystallized grain structure along the rolling direction. To obtain the microstructures with different slip characteristics, two types of heat treatment were used to vary the S{prime} phase distribution. The microstructure showing the homogeneous slip behavior was obtained by aging the as-received material at 190 C for 16 hours, resulting in a homogeneous distribution of S{prime} phase along with {delta}{prime} phase (S{prime} + {delta}{prime} structure). The microstructure exhibiting the planar slip behavior was attained by solution treating the as-received alloy at 530 C for 30 minutes, followed by 16 hours aging at 190 C to produce a primarily {delta}{prime} phase microstructure ({delta}{prime} structure).

  20. Small Crack Growth and Fatigue Life Predictions for High-Strength Aluminium Alloys. Part 1; Experimental and Fracture Mechanics Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, X. R.; Newman, J. C.; Zhao, W.; Swain, M. H.; Ding, C. F.; Phillips, E. P.

    1998-01-01

    The small crack effect was investigated in two high-strength aluminium alloys: 7075-T6 bare and LC9cs clad alloy. Both experimental and analytical investigations were conducted to study crack initiation and growth of small cracks. In the experimental program, fatigue tests, small crack and large crack tests A,ere conducted under constant amplitude and Mini-TWIST spectrum loading conditions. A pronounced small crack effect was observed in both materials, especially for the negative stress ratios. For all loading conditions, most of the fatigue life of the SENT specimens was shown to be crack propagation from initial material defects or from the cladding layer. In the analysis program, three-dimensional finite element and A weight function methods were used to determine stress intensity factors and to develop SIF equations for surface and corner cracks at the notch in the SENT specimens. A plastisity-induced crack-closure model was used to correlate small and large crack data, and to make fatigue life predictions, Predicted crack-growth rates and fatigue lives agreed well with experiments. A total fatigue life prediction method for the aluminum alloys was developed and demonstrated using the crack-closure model.

  1. Crack Detection with Lamb Wave Wavenumber Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Leckey, Cara; Rogge, Matt; Yu, Lingyu

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we present our study of Lamb wave crack detection using wavenumber analysis. The aim is to demonstrate the application of wavenumber analysis to 3D Lamb wave data to enable damage detection. The 3D wavefields (including vx, vy and vz components) in time-space domain contain a wealth of information regarding the propagating waves in a damaged plate. For crack detection, three wavenumber analysis techniques are used: (i) two dimensional Fourier transform (2D-FT) which can transform the time-space wavefield into frequency-wavenumber representation while losing the spatial information; (ii) short space 2D-FT which can obtain the frequency-wavenumber spectra at various spatial locations, resulting in a space-frequency-wavenumber representation; (iii) local wavenumber analysis which can provide the distribution of the effective wavenumbers at different locations. All of these concepts are demonstrated through a numerical simulation example of an aluminum plate with a crack. The 3D elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT) was used to obtain the 3D wavefields, of which the vz (out-of-plane) wave component is compared with the experimental measurement obtained from a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (SLDV) for verification purposes. The experimental and simulated results are found to be in close agreement. The application of wavenumber analysis on 3D EFIT simulation data shows the effectiveness of the analysis for crack detection. Keywords: : Lamb wave, crack detection, wavenumber analysis, EFIT modeling

  2. ZIP3D: An elastic and elastic-plastic finite-element analysis program for cracked bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivakumar, K. N.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    ZIP3D is an elastic and an elastic-plastic finite element program to analyze cracks in three dimensional solids. The program may also be used to analyze uncracked bodies or multi-body problems involving contacting surfaces. For crack problems, the program has several unique features including the calculation of mixed-mode strain energy release rates using the three dimensional virtual crack closure technique, the calculation of the J integral using the equivalent domain integral method, the capability to extend the crack front under monotonic or cyclic loading, and the capability to close or open the crack surfaces during cyclic loading. The theories behind the various aspects of the program are explained briefly. Line-by-line data preparation is presented. Input data and results for an elastic analysis of a surface crack in a plate and for an elastic-plastic analysis of a single-edge-crack-tension specimen are also presented.

  3. Fatigue crack propagation analysis of plaque rupture.

    PubMed

    Pei, Xuan; Wu, Baijian; Li, Zhi-Yong

    2013-10-01

    Rupture of atheromatous plaque is the major cause of stroke or heart attack. Considering that the cardiovascular system is a classic fatigue environment, plaque rupture was treated as a chronic fatigue crack growth process in this study. Fracture mechanics theory was introduced to describe the stress status at the crack tip and Paris' law was used to calculate the crack growth rate. The effect of anatomical variation of an idealized plaque cross-section model was investigated. The crack initiation was considered to be either at the maximum circumferential stress location or at any other possible locations around the lumen. Although the crack automatically initialized at the maximum circumferential stress location usually propagated faster than others, it was not necessarily the most critical location where the fatigue life reached its minimum. We found that the fatigue life was minimum for cracks initialized in the following three regions: the midcap zone, the shoulder zone, and the backside zone. The anatomical variation has a significant influence on the fatigue life. Either a decrease in cap thickness or an increase in lipid pool size resulted in a significant decrease in fatigue life. Comparing to the previously used stress analysis, this fatigue model provides some possible explanations of plaque rupture at a low stress level in a pulsatile cardiovascular environment, and the method proposed here may be useful for further investigation of the mechanism of plaque rupture based on in vivo patient data.

  4. Fatigue Crack Growth Analysis Under Spectrum Loading in Various Environmental Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikheevskiy, S.; Glinka, G.; Lee, E.

    2013-03-01

    The fatigue process consists, from the engineering point of view, of three stages: crack initiation, fatigue crack growth, and the final failure. It is also known that the fatigue process near notches and cracks is governed by local strains and stresses in the regions of maximum stress and strain concentrations. Therefore, the fatigue crack growth can be considered as a process of successive crack increments, and the fatigue crack initiation and subsequent growth can be modeled as one repetitive process. The assumptions mentioned above were used to derive a fatigue crack growth model based, called later as the UniGrow model, on the analysis of cyclic elastic-plastic stresses-strains near the crack tip. The fatigue crack growth rate was determined by simulating the cyclic stress-strain response in the material volume adjacent to the crack tip and calculating the accumulated fatigue damage in a manner similar to fatigue analysis of stationary notches. The fatigue crack growth driving force was derived on the basis of the stress and strain history at the crack tip and the Smith-Watson-Topper (SWT) fatigue damage parameter, D = σmaxΔɛ/2. It was subsequently found that the fatigue crack growth was controlled by a two-parameter driving force in the form of a weighted product of the stress intensity range and the maximum stress intensity factor, Δ K p K {max/1- p }. The effect of the internal (residual) stress induced by the reversed cyclic plasticity has been accounted for and therefore the two-parameter driving force made it possible to predict the effect of the mean stress including the influence of the applied compressive stress, tensile overloads, and variable amplitude spectrum loading. It allows estimating the fatigue life under variable amplitude loading without using crack closure concepts. Several experimental fatigue crack growth datasets obtained for the Al 7075 aluminum alloy were used for the verification of the proposed unified fatigue crack growth

  5. Finite element microscopic stress analysis of cracked composite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, W. L.

    1978-01-01

    This paper considers the stress concentration problems of two types of cracked composite systems: (1) a composite system with a broken fiber (a penny-shaped crack problem), and (2) a composite system with a cracked matrix (an annular crack problem). The cracked composite systems are modeled with triangular and trapezoidal ring finite elements. Using NASTRAN (NASA Structural Analysis) finite element computer program, the stress and deformation fields in the cracked composite systems are calculated. The effect of fiber-matrix material combination on the stress concentrations and on the crack opening displacements is studied.

  6. Structural analysis of closure bolts for shipping casks

    SciTech Connect

    Mok, G.C.; Fischer, L.E.

    1993-04-01

    This paper identifies the active forces and moments in a closure bolt of a shipping cask. It examines the interactions of these forces/moments and suggest simplified methods for their analysis. The paper also evaluates the role that the forces and moments play in the structure integrity of the closure bolt and recommends stress limits and desirable practices to ensure its integrity.

  7. Fatigue Crack Growth Analysis Models for Functionally Graded Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Dag, Serkan; Yildirim, Bora; Sabuncuoglu, Baris

    2008-02-15

    The objective of this study is to develop crack growth analysis methods for functionally graded materials (FGMs) subjected to mode I cyclic loading. The study presents finite elements based computational procedures for both two and three dimensional problems to examine fatigue crack growth in functionally graded materials. Developed methods allow the computation of crack length and generation of crack front profile for a graded medium subjected to fluctuating stresses. The results presented for an elliptical crack embedded in a functionally graded medium, illustrate the competing effects of ellipse aspect ratio and material property gradation on the fatigue crack growth behavior.

  8. Analysis of small crack behavior for airframe applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclung, R. C.; Chan, K. S.; Hudak, S. J., Jr.; Davidson, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    The small fatigue crack problem is critically reviewed from the perspective of airframe applications. Different types of small cracks-microstructural, mechanical, and chemical-are carefully defined and relevant mechanisms identified. Appropriate analysis techniques, including both rigorous scientific and practical engineering treatments, are briefly described. Important materials data issues are addressed, including increased scatter in small crack data and recommended small crack test methods. Key problems requiring further study are highlighted.

  9. Stress analysis of closure bolts for shipping casks

    SciTech Connect

    Mok, G.C.; Fischer, L.E. ); Hsu, S.T. )

    1993-01-01

    This report specifies the requirements and criteria for stress analysis of closure bolts for shipping casks containing nuclear spent fuels or high level radioactive materials. The specification is based on existing information conceming the structural behavior, analysis, and design of bolted joints. The approach taken was to extend the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code requirements and criteria for bolting analysis of nuclear piping and pressure vessels to include the appropriate design and load characteristics of the shipping cask. The characteristics considered are large, flat, closure lids with metal-to-metal contact within the bolted joint; significant temperature and impact loads; and possible prying and bending effects. Specific formulas and procedures developed apply to the bolt stress analysis of a circular, flat, bolted closure. The report also includes critical load cases and desirable design practices for the bolted closure, an in-depth review of the structural behavior of bolted joints, and a comprehensive bibliography of current information on bolted joints.

  10. Characterization of oriented cracks with differential strain analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegfried, R.; Simmons, G.

    1978-01-01

    Linear strain of a rock sample as a function of hydrostatic pressure can be measured with a precision of 2 millionths. Such high-precision data for three orthogonal directions allow calculation of the distribution function for the porosity due to cracks' closing completely at a given pressure. Such data for at least six independent directions yield the zero-pressure strain tensor due to cracks' closing completely at a given pressure. The principal values and axes of this tensor distribution function provide information about the orientation of cracks as a function of closure pressure. The mathematical basis for the technique is developed, and the technique is illustrated with differential strain data for two samples, the Westerly (Rhode Island) granite and the Twin Sisters (Washington) dunite. Strain-tensor calculations reveal that each of these samples has a different type of anisotropic crack distribution.

  11. Gear crack propagation investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Ballarini, Roberto

    1996-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies were performed to investigate the effect of gear rim thickness on crack propagation life. The FRANC (FRacture ANalysis Code) computer program was used to simulate crack propagation. The FRANC program used principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics, finite element modeling, and a unique re-meshing scheme to determine crack tip stress distributions, estimate stress intensity factors, and model crack propagation. Various fatigue crack growth models were used to estimate crack propagation life based on the calculated stress intensity factors. Experimental tests were performed in a gear fatigue rig to validate predicted crack propagation results. Test gears were installed with special crack propagation gages in the tooth fillet region to measure bending fatigue crack growth. Good correlation between predicted and measured crack growth was achieved when the fatigue crack closure concept was introduced into the analysis. As the gear rim thickness decreased, the compressive cyclic stress in the gear tooth fillet region increased. This retarded crack growth and increased the number of crack propagation cycles to failure.

  12. A comparison of stress in cracked fibrous tissue specimens with varied crack location, loading, and orientation using finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Peloquin, John M; Elliott, Dawn M

    2016-04-01

    Cracks in fibrous soft tissue, such as intervertebral disc annulus fibrosus and knee meniscus, cause pain and compromise joint mechanics. A crack concentrates stress at its tip, making further failure and crack extension (fracture) more likely. Ex vivo mechanical testing is an important tool for studying the loading conditions required for crack extension, but prior work has shown that it is difficult to reproduce crack extension. Most prior work used edge crack specimens in uniaxial tension, with the crack 90° to the edge of the specimen. This configuration does not necessarily represent the loading conditions that cause in vivo crack extension. To find a potentially better choice for experiments aiming to reproduce crack extension, we used finite element analysis to compare, in factorial combination, (1) center crack vs. edge crack location, (2) biaxial vs. uniaxial loading, and (3) crack-fiber angles ranging from 0° to 90°. The simulated material was annulus fibrosus fibrocartilage with a single fiber family. We hypothesized that one of the simulated test cases would produce a stronger stress concentration than the commonly used uniaxially loaded 90° crack-fiber angle edge crack case. Stress concentrations were compared between cases in terms of fiber-parallel stress (representing risk of fiber rupture), fiber-perpendicular stress (representing risk of matrix rupture), and fiber shear stress (representing risk of fiber sliding). Fiber-perpendicular stress and fiber shear stress concentrations were greatest in edge crack specimens (of any crack-fiber angle) and center crack specimens with a 90° crack-fiber angle. However, unless the crack is parallel to the fiber direction, these stress components alone are insufficient to cause crack opening and extension. Fiber-parallel stress concentrations were greatest in center crack specimens with a 45° crack-fiber angle, either biaxially or uniaxially loaded. We therefore recommend that the 45° center crack case be

  13. Analysis of the status of pre-release cracks in prestressed concrete structures using long-gauge sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Jaber, H.; Glisic, B.

    2015-02-01

    Prestressed structures experience limited tensile stresses in concrete, which limits or completely eliminates the occurrence of cracks. However, in some cases, large tensile stresses can develop during the early age of the concrete due to thermal gradients and shrinkage effects. Such stresses can cause early-age cracks, termed ‘pre-release cracks’, which occur prior to the transfer of the prestressing force. When the prestressing force is applied to the cross-section, it is assumed that partial or full closure of the cracks occurs by virtue of the force transfer through the cracked cross-section. Verification of the closure of the cracks after the application of the prestressing force is important as it can either confirm continued structural integrity or indicate and approximate reduced structural capacity. Structural health monitoring (SHM) can be used for this purpose. This paper researches an SHM method that can be applied to prestressed beam structures to assess the condition of pre-release cracks. The sensor network used in this method consists of parallel long-gauge fiber optic strain sensors embedded in the concrete cross-sections at various locations. The same network is used for damage detection, i.e. detection and characterization of the pre-release cracks, and for monitoring the prestress force transfer. The method is validated on a real structure, a curved continuous girder. Results from the analysis confirm the safety and integrity of the structure. The method and its application are presented in this paper.

  14. Crack

    MedlinePlus

    ... sound the drug makes as it heats up. Short-Term Effects Crack is a stimulant that is absorbed through ... quickly, after about 5 or 10 minutes. Other short-term effects include: higher heart rate, breathing rate, blood pressure , ...

  15. Estimation of crown closure from AVIRIS data using regression analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staenz, K.; Williams, D. J.; Truchon, M.; Fritz, R.

    1993-01-01

    Crown closure is one of the input parameters used for forest growth and yield modelling. Preliminary work by Staenz et al. indicates that imaging spectrometer data acquired with sensors such as the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) have some potential for estimating crown closure on a stand level. The objectives of this paper are: (1) to establish a relationship between AVIRIS data and the crown closure derived from aerial photography of a forested test site within the Interior Douglas Fir biogeoclimatic zone in British Columbia, Canada; (2) to investigate the impact of atmospheric effects and the forest background on the correlation between AVIRIS data and crown closure estimates; and (3) to improve this relationship using multiple regression analysis.

  16. Dynamic fracture mechanics analysis for an edge delamination crack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Doyle, James F.

    1994-01-01

    A global/local analysis is applied to the problem of a panel with an edge delamination crack subject to an impulse loading to ascertain the dynamic J integral. The approach uses the spectral element method to obtain the global dynamic response and local resultants to obtain the J integral. The variation of J integral along the crack front is shown. The crack behavior is mixed mode (Mode 2 and Mode 3), but is dominated by the Mode 2 behavior.

  17. Modeling Fatigue Damage Onset and Progression in Composites Using an Element-Based Virtual Crack Closure Technique Combined With the Floating Node Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Carvalho, Nelson V.; Krueger, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    A new methodology is proposed to model the onset and propagation of matrix cracks and delaminations in carbon-epoxy composites subject to fatigue loading. An extended interface element, based on the Floating Node Method, is developed to represent delaminations and matrix cracks explicitly in a mesh independent fashion. Crack propagation is determined using an element-based Virtual Crack Closure Technique approach to determine mixed-mode energy release rates, and the Paris-Law relationship to obtain crack growth rate. Crack onset is determined using a stressbased onset criterion coupled with a stress vs. cycle curve and Palmgren-Miner rule to account for fatigue damage accumulation. The approach is implemented in Abaqus/Standard® via the user subroutine functionality. Verification exercises are performed to assess the accuracy and correct implementation of the approach. Finally, it was demonstrated that this approach captured the differences in failure morphology in fatigue for two laminates of identical stiffness, but with layups containing ?deg plies that were either stacked in a single group, or distributed through the laminate thickness.

  18. Modeling and analysis of gear tooth crack growth under variable-amplitude loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Juliang; Wang, Wenyi; Man, Zhihong; Khoo, Suiyang

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to reveal the pattern of gear tooth crack growth under variable-amplitude loading. To this end, a nonlinear dynamic model is proposed to describe the gear tooth crack growth. The state variables of the model are crack length and crack opening stress. The dynamics of crack growth is modeled as a modified Paris equation based on the concept of crack closure. A nonlinear second-order autoregressive equation is developed to model the dynamic behavior of the crack opening stresses. The model parameters are estimated by means of a two-step estimation method because of relatively small sample size of crack length data for G6 gear tests. The model is also validated with the crack growth data of the G6 gear.

  19. Slow Crack Growth of Brittle Materials With Exponential Crack-Velocity Formulation. Part 1; Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Nemeth, Noel N.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2002-01-01

    Extensive slow-crack-growth (SCG) analysis was made using a primary exponential crack-velocity formulation under three widely used load configurations: constant stress rate, constant stress, and cyclic stress. Although the use of the exponential formulation in determining SCG parameters of a material requires somewhat inconvenient numerical procedures, the resulting solutions presented gave almost the same degree of simplicity in both data analysis and experiments as did the power-law formulation. However, the fact that the inert strength of a material should be known in advance to determine the corresponding SCG parameters was a major drawback of the exponential formulation as compared with the power-law formulation.

  20. Filshie clip closure: determination of closure through the analysis of X-rays.

    PubMed

    Clegg, Richard Edward

    2008-11-01

    The Filshie method is a tubal occlusion method commonly used to prevent pregnancy. In medical negligence cases where it is suspected that closure of a Filshie clip may be faulty, lawyers may call on expert surgeons to assess whether or not a clip is closed on the basis of visual examination of the X-rays. However, it is not uncommon for experts to disagree. The aim of this work was to reduce the uncertainty in determining whether or not Filshie clips had been correctly closed. An estimate of the error in the estimate of the clip height was made by propagating measurement errors through a mathematical model. The effects of angle of presentation of the clip, digitisation of the image and resolution of the measurements were studied and the method was applied to two cases. The analysis indicated that measurement errors were least when the digitisation of the image was at 600dpi, angle of presentation of the clip was less than 40 degrees and the measurements could be made to an accuracy of +/-1pixel. Under these conditions it was possible to determine clip closure height with an error of less than +/-0.2mm.

  1. Stress analysis of the cracked lap shear specimens: An ASTM round robin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.

    1986-01-01

    This ASTM Round Robin was conducted to evaluate the state of the art in stress analysis of adhesively bonded joint specimens. Specifically, the participants were asked to calculate the strain-energy-release rate for two different geometry cracked lap shear (CLS) specimens at four different debond lengths. The various analytical techniques consisted of 2- and 3-dimensional finite element analysis, beam theory, plate theory, and a combination of beam theory and finite element analysis. The results were examined in terms of the total strain-energy-release rate and the mode I to mode II ratio as a function of debond length for each specimen geometry. These results basically clustered into two groups: geometric linear or geometric nonlinear analysis. The geometric nonlinear analysis is required to properly analyze the CLS specimens. The 3-D finite element analysis gave indications of edge closure plus some mode III loading. Each participant described his analytical technique and results. Nine laboratories participated.

  2. Stress analysis of the cracked-lap-shear specimen - An ASTM round-robin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.

    1987-01-01

    This ASTM Round Robin was conducted to evaluate the state of the art in stress analysis of adhesively bonded joint specimens. Specifically, the participants were asked to calculate the strain-energy-release rate for two different geometry cracked lap shear (CLS) specimens at four different debond lengths. The various analytical techniques consisted of 2- and 3-dimensional finite element analysis, beam theory, plate theory, and a combination of beam theory and finite element analysis. The results were examined in terms of the total strain-energy-release rate and the mode I to mode II ratio as a function of debond length for each specimen geometry. These results basically clustered into two groups: geometric linear or geometric nonlinear analysis. The geometric nonlinear analysis is required to properly analyze the CLS specimens. The 3-D finite element analysis gave indications of edge closure plus some mode III loading. Each participant described his analytical technique and results. Nine laboratories participated.

  3. Fatigue reliability of cracked engineering structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanning, David Bruce, Jr.

    1997-12-01

    This study investigates the reliability of engineering structures containing fatigue cracks. Stress concentrations and welded joints are probable locations for the initiation and propagation of fatigue cracks. Due to the many unknowns of loading, materials properties, crack sizes and crack shapes present at these locations, a statistics-based reliability analysis is valuable in the careful consideration of these many different random factors involved in a fatigue life analysis, several of which are expanded upon in this study. The basic problem of a crack near a stress concentration is first considered. A formulation for the aspect ratio (a/c) of a propagating semi-elliptical fatigue crack located at the toe of a welded T-joint is developed using Newman and Raju's stress intensity factor for a cracked flat plate with a weld magnification factor and compared to that of a cracked flat plate, and the reliability in terms of fatigue lifetime is calculated with the aid of Paris' crack propagation equation for membrane and bending loadings. Crack closure effects are then introduced in the consideration of short crack effects, where crack growth rates typically may exceed those found using traditional linear elastic fracture mechanics solutions for long cracks. The probability of a very small, microstructurally influenced crack growing to a size influenced by local plastic conditions is calculated utilizing the probability of a crack continuing to grow past an obstacle, such as a grain boundary. The result is then combined with the probability for failure defined using the crack closure-modified Paris equation to find an overall reliability for the structure. Last, the probability of fracture is determined when a crack front encounters regions of non-uniform toughness, such as typical in the heat affected zone of a welded joint. An expression for the effective crack lengths of the dissimilar regions is derived, and used in a weakest-link fracture model in the evaluation

  4. Analysis of Alloy 600 and X-750 stress corrosion cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.D.; Lewis, N.; Krasodomski, H.

    1993-06-01

    A few months ago, KAPL evidence supported the view that Primary or Pure Water Stress Corrosion Cracking (PWSCC) of Alloy 600 results from a hydrogen mechanism. Figure 1 shows an Analytical Electron Microscope (AEM) analysis of a stress corrosion crack (SCC) crack in an A600 split tube U-bend specimen exposed to primary water at 338{degree}C (640{degrees}F) for 462 days. The features which appear to confirm a hydrogen mechanism are: (1) A very narrow (< 200 {angstrom}) crack with a sharp tip, nearly free of deposits. (2) No evidence of severe plastic deformation in the region immediately ahead of the crack tip. (3) A line of small voids preceding the main crack tip, of which the largest is about 5 x 10{sup {minus}6} cm in length. Shen and Shewmon proposed that PWSCC of Alloy 600 occurs due to small microvoids ahead of a main crack tip. The hypothesis is that such voids result from pockets of methane gas formed by the reaction of atomic hydrogen with carbon in the base metal. The voids are about 10 x 10{sup {minus}6} cm diameter, approximately a factor of 2 larger than the largest voids.

  5. Analysis of composite tube cracking in recovery boiler floors

    SciTech Connect

    Keiser, J.R.; Taljat, B.; Wang, X.L.; Maziasz, P.J.; Hubbard, C.R.; Swindeman, R.W.; Singbeil, D.L.; Prescott, R.

    1996-08-01

    Cracking of co-extruded (generally identified as composite) floor tubes in kraft black liquor recovery boilers was first observed in Scandinavia, but this problem has now been found in many North American boilers. In most cases, cracking in the outer 304L stainless steel has not progressed into the carbon steel, but the potential for such crack propagation is a cause of concern. A multidimensional study has been initiated to characterize the cracking seen in composite floor tubes, to measure the residual stresses resulting from composite tube fabrication, and to predict the stresses in tubes under operating conditions. The characterization studies include review of available reports and documents on composite tube cracking, metallographic examination of a substantial number of cracked tubes, and evaluation of the dislocation structure in cracked tubes. Neutron and X-ray diffraction are being used to determine the residual stresses in composite tubes from two major manufacturers, and finite element analysis is being used to predict the stresses in the tubes during normal operation and under conditions where thermal fluctuations occur.

  6. Comparison of Outcomes between Early Fascial Closure and Delayed Abdominal Closure in Patients with Open Abdomen: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Ye, Jinning; Song, Wu; Chen, Jianhui; Yuan, Yujie; Ren, Jianan

    2014-01-01

    Up to the present, the optimal time to close an open abdomen remains controversial. This study was designed to evaluate whether early fascial abdominal closure had advantages over delayed approach for open abdomen populations. Medline, Embase, and Cochrane Library were searched until April 2013. Search terms included “open abdomen,” “abdominal compartment syndrome,” “laparostomy,” “celiotomy,” “abdominal closure,” “primary,” “delayed,” “permanent,” “fascial closure,” and “definitive closure.” Open abdomen was defined as “fail to close abdominal fascia after a laparotomy.” Mortality, complications, and length of stay were compared between early and delayed fascial closure. In total, 3125 patients were included for final analysis, and 1942 (62%) patients successfully achieved early fascial closure. Vacuum assisted fascial closure had no impact on pooled fascial closure rate. Compared with delayed abdominal closure, early fascial closure significantly reduced mortality (12.3% versus 24.8%, RR, 0.53, P < 0.0001) and complication incidence (RR, 0.68, P < 0.0001). The mean interval from open abdomen to definitive closure ranged from 2.2 to 14.6 days in early fascial closure groups, but from 32.5 to 300 days in delayed closure groups. This study confirmed clinical advantages of early fascial closure over delayed approach in treatment of patients with open abdomen. PMID:24987411

  7. Elastic-plastic analysis of crack in ductile adhesive joint

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Toru; Miyazaki, Noriyuki; Yamashita, Akira; Munakata, Tsuyoshi

    1995-11-01

    The fracture of a crack in adhesive is important to the structural integrity of adhesive structures and composite materials. Though the fracture toughness of a material should be constant according to fracture mechanics, it is said that the fracture toughness of a crack in an adhesive joint depends on the bond thickness. In the present study, the elastic-plastic stress analyses of a crack in a thin adhesive layer are performed by the combination of the boundary element method and the finite element method. The effect of adhesive thickness on the J-integral, the Q`-factor which is a modified version of the Q-factor, and the crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) are investigated. It is found from the analyses that the CTOD begins to decrease at very thin bond thickness, the Q`-factor being almost constant. The decrease of the fracture toughness at very thin adhesive layer is expected by the present analysis.

  8. Elastostatic stress analysis of orthotropic rectangular center-cracked plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, G. S.; Mendelson, A.

    1972-01-01

    A mapping-collocation method was developed for the elastostatic stress analysis of finite, anisotropic plates with centrally located traction-free cracks. The method essentially consists of mapping the crack into the unit circle and satisfying the crack boundary conditions exactly with the help of Muskhelishvili's function extension concept. The conditions on the outer boundary are satisfied approximately by applying the method of least-squares boundary collocation. A parametric study of finite-plate stress intensity factors, employing this mapping-collocation method, is presented. It shows the effects of varying material properties, orientation angle, and crack-length-to-plate-width and plate-height-to-plate-width ratios for rectangular orthotropic plates under constant tensile and shear loads.

  9. Frequency domain analysis of the random loading of cracked panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, James F.

    1994-01-01

    The primary effort concerned the development of analytical methods for the accurate prediction of the effect of random loading on a panel with a crack. Of particular concern was the influence of frequency on the stress intensity factor behavior. Many modern structures, such as those found in advanced aircraft, are lightweight and susceptible to critical vibrations, and consequently dynamic response plays a very important role in their analysis. The presence of flaws and cracks can have catastrophic consequences. The stress intensity factor, K, emerges as a very significant parameter that characterizes the crack behavior. In analyzing the dynamic response of panels that contain cracks, the finite element method is used, but because this type of problem is inherently computationally intensive, a number of ways of calculating K more efficiently are explored.

  10. A review of surface-crack fracture testing. [and failure analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orange, T. W.

    1974-01-01

    A brief historical review of surface-crack testing and analysis is given together with some examples of service failures due to surface cracks. The factors which complicate the analysis and interpretation of surface-crack fracture data are discussed. Current efforts to develop consensus recommendations for tensile testing of surface-crack specimens are summarized.

  11. Crack closure and healing studies in WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant) salt using compressional wave velocity and attenuation measurements: Test methods and results

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, N.S. )

    1990-11-01

    Compressional wave ultrasonic data were used to qualitatively assess the extent of crack closure during hydrostatic compression of damaged specimens of WIPP salt. Cracks were introduced during constant strain-rate triaxial tests at low confining pressure (0.5 MPa) as specimens were taken to either 0.5, 1.0, or 1.5 percent axial strain. For three specimens taken to 1.0 percent axial strain, the pressure was increased to 5, 10 or 15 MPa. For the remaining specimens, pressure was raised to 15 MPa. Waveforms for compressional waves traveling both parallel and perpendicular to the direction of maximum principal stress were measured in the undamaged state, during constant strain-rate tests, and then monitored as functions of time while the specimens were held at pressure. Both wave velocities and amplitudes increased over time at pressure, indicating that cracks closed and perhaps healed. The recovery of ultrasonic wave characteristics depended upon both pressure and damage level. The higher the pressure, the greater the velocity recovery; however, amplitude recovery showed no clear correlation with pressure. For both amplitudes and velocities, recoveries were greatest in the specimens with the least damage. 13 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Cascaded image analysis for dynamic crack detection in material testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampel, U.; Maas, H.-G.

    Concrete probes in civil engineering material testing often show fissures or hairline-cracks. These cracks develop dynamically. Starting at a width of a few microns, they usually cannot be detected visually or in an image of a camera imaging the whole probe. Conventional image analysis techniques will detect fissures only if they show a width in the order of one pixel. To be able to detect and measure fissures with a width of a fraction of a pixel at an early stage of their development, a cascaded image analysis approach has been developed, implemented and tested. The basic idea of the approach is to detect discontinuities in dense surface deformation vector fields. These deformation vector fields between consecutive stereo image pairs, which are generated by cross correlation or least squares matching, show a precision in the order of 1/50 pixel. Hairline-cracks can be detected and measured by applying edge detection techniques such as a Sobel operator to the results of the image matching process. Cracks will show up as linear discontinuities in the deformation vector field and can be vectorized by edge chaining. In practical tests of the method, cracks with a width of 1/20 pixel could be detected, and their width could be determined at a precision of 1/50 pixel.

  13. Analysis and prediction of Multiple-Site Damage (MSD) fatigue crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawicke, D. S.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A technique was developed to calculate the stress intensity factor for multiple interacting cracks. The analysis was verified through comparison with accepted methods of calculating stress intensity factors. The technique was incorporated into a fatigue crack growth prediction model and used to predict the fatigue crack growth life for multiple-site damage (MSD). The analysis was verified through comparison with experiments conducted on uniaxially loaded flat panels with multiple cracks. Configuration with nearly equal and unequal crack distribution were examined. The fatigue crack growth predictions agreed within 20 percent of the experimental lives for all crack configurations considered.

  14. Use of Several Thermal Analysis Techniques to Study the Cracking of an Nitrile Butadiene Rubber (NBR) Insulator on the Booster Separation Motor (BSM) of the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingard, Charles D.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Two different vendor rubber formulations have been used to produce the silica-filled NBR insulators for the BSM used on both of the Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBs) of the Space Shuttle. A number of lots of the BSM insulator in 1998-99 exhibited surface cracks and/or crazing. Each insulator is bonded to the BSM aluminum aft closure with an epoxy adhesive. Induced insulator stresses from adhesive cure are likely greatest where the insulator/adhesive contour is the greatest, thus showing increased insulator surface cracking in this area. Thermal analysis testing by Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer (DMA) and Thermomechanical Analysis (TMA) was performed on one each of the two vendor BSM insulators previously bonded that exhibited the surface cracking. The TMA data from the film/fiber technique yielded the most meaningful results, with thin insulator surface samples containing cracks having roughly the same modulus (stiffness) as thin insulator bulk samples just underneath.

  15. Fatigue Crack Growth Database for Damage Tolerance Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, R. G.; Shivakumar, V.; Cardinal, J. W.; Williams, L. C.; McKeighan, P. C.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this project was to begin the process of developing a fatigue crack growth database (FCGD) of metallic materials for use in damage tolerance analysis of aircraft structure. For this initial effort, crack growth rate data in the NASGRO (Registered trademark) database, the United States Air Force Damage Tolerant Design Handbook, and other publicly available sources were examined and used to develop a database that characterizes crack growth behavior for specific applications (materials). The focus of this effort was on materials for general commercial aircraft applications, including large transport airplanes, small transport commuter airplanes, general aviation airplanes, and rotorcraft. The end products of this project are the FCGD software and this report. The specific goal of this effort was to present fatigue crack growth data in three usable formats: (1) NASGRO equation parameters, (2) Walker equation parameters, and (3) tabular data points. The development of this FCGD will begin the process of developing a consistent set of standard fatigue crack growth material properties. It is envisioned that the end product of the process will be a general repository for credible and well-documented fracture properties that may be used as a default standard in damage tolerance analyses.

  16. Crack modeling of rotating blades with cracked hexahedral finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao; Jiang, Dongxiang

    2014-06-01

    Dynamic analysis is the basis in investigating vibration features of cracked blades, where the features can be applied to monitor health state of blades, detect cracks in an early stage and prevent failures. This work presents a cracked hexahedral finite element method for dynamic analysis of cracked blades, with the purpose of addressing the contradiction between accuracy and efficiency in crack modeling of blades in rotor system. The cracked hexahedral element is first derived with strain energy release rate method, where correction of stress intensity factors of crack front and formulation of load distribution of crack surface are carried out to improve the modeling accuracy. To consider nonlinear characteristics of time-varying opening and closure effects caused by alternating loads, breathing function is proposed for the cracked hexahedral element. Second, finite element method with contact element is analyzed and used for comparison. Finally, validation of the cracked hexahedral element is carried out in terms of breathing effects of cracked blades and natural frequency in different crack depths. Good consistency is acquired between the results with developed cracked hexahedral element and contact element, while the computation time is significantly reduced in the previous one. Therefore, the developed cracked hexahedral element achieves good accuracy and high efficiency in crack modeling of rotating blades.

  17. Quantitative image analysis of WE43-T6 cracking behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, A.; Yahya, Z.

    2013-06-01

    Environment-assisted cracking of WE43 cast magnesium (4.2 wt.% Yt, 2.3 wt.% Nd, 0.7% Zr, 0.8% HRE) in the T6 peak-aged condition was induced in ambient air in notched specimens. The mechanism of fracture was studied using electron backscatter diffraction, serial sectioning and in situ observations of crack propagation. The intermetallic (rare earthed-enriched divorced intermetallic retained at grain boundaries and predominantly at triple points) material was found to play a significant role in initiating cracks which leads to failure of this material. Quantitative measurements were required for this project. The populations of the intermetallic and clusters of intermetallic particles were analyzed using image analysis of metallographic images. This is part of the work to generate a theoretical model of the effect of notch geometry on the static fatigue strength of this material.

  18. Analysis of weld solidification cracking in cast nickel aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Santella, M.L.; Feng, Z.

    1995-09-01

    A study of the response of several nickel aluminide alloys to SigmaJig testing was done to examine their weld solidification cracking behavior and the effect of Zr concentration. The alloys were based on the Ni-8Al-7.7Cr-1.5Mo-0.003B wt% composition and contained Zr concentrations of 3, 4.5, and 6 wt%. Vacuum induction melted ingots with a diameter of 2.7 in and weight about 18 lb were made of each alloy, and were used to make 2 x 2 x 0.030 in specimens for the Sigmajig test. The gas tungsten arc welds were made at travel speeds of 10, 20, and 30 ipm with heat inputs of 2--2.5 kJ/in. When an arc was established before traveling onto the test specimen centerline cracking was always observed. This problem was overcome by initiating the arc directly on the specimens. Using this approach, the 3 wt% Zr alloy withstood an applied stress of 24 ksi without cracking at a welding speed of 10 ipm. This alloy cracked at 4 ksi applied at 20 ipm, and with no applied load at 30 ipm. Only limited testing was done on the remaining alloys, but the results indicate that resistance to solidification cracking increases with Zr concentration. Zirconium has limited solid solubility and segregates strongly to interdendritic regions during solidification where it forms a Ni solid solution-Ni{sub 5}Zr eutectic. The volume fraction of the eutectic increases with Zr concentration. The solidification cracking behavior of these alloys is consistent with phenomenological theory, and is discussed in this context. The results from SigmaJig testing are analyzed using finite element modeling of the development of mechanical strains during solidification of welds. Experimental data from the test substantially agree with recent analysis results.

  19. Load interaction effects on fatigue crack growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoychev, Stoyan Ivanov

    The fatigue crack propagation rate can be either increased or decreased by the previous load history (overload, block loading, different load ratio, etc.). Currently, these load sequence effects can be explained either by using crack closure or internal stress concepts. They are studied in Part I and II of the dissertation accordingly. In Part I, the last 35 years of research in the crack closure area were carefully reviewed. A new Quadrature (Q) method for crack closure estimation, based on integration rather than differentiation of the load-displacement data, was developed and compared to the 'best' methods from the literature. The new method was able to reduce the scatter in the opening load estimations to a negligible level, but does not collapse the results for different load ratios (0.1 and 0.9). In Part II a general relationship between fatigue crack growth rate (da/dN) and the two-parameter (DeltaKtip and tipKmax) crack driving force was derived using fundamental fatigue (ε-N curve) properties. Based on this analysis, a new way of representing the da/dN data by means of the crack propagation (CP) table was proposed. In order to make the CP table sensitive to the load history effects, it was scaled using the applied and internal stresses and the corresponding stress intensity factors, characteristic for the crack tip. Two methods for calculating the internal stress intensity factors were developed, adopting the weight function and the new clamping force concepts accordingly. Finally, the CP table at the crack tip was successfully used together with the two-parameter crack driving force equation to predict da/dN for different load ratios, block loading and a single overload. Calculation of the crack closure was not needed in order to predict the experimental data accurately.

  20. Analytical modeling and vibration analysis of internally cracked rectangular plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, P. V.; Jain, N. K.; Ramtekkar, G. D.

    2014-10-01

    This study proposes an analytical model for nonlinear vibrations in a cracked rectangular isotropic plate containing a single and two perpendicular internal cracks located at the center of the plate. The two cracks are in the form of continuous line with each parallel to one of the edges of the plate. The equation of motion for isotropic cracked plate, based on classical plate theory is modified to accommodate the effect of internal cracks using the Line Spring Model. Berger's formulation for in-plane forces makes the model nonlinear. Galerkin's method used with three different boundary conditions transforms the equation into time dependent modal functions. The natural frequencies of the cracked plate are calculated for various crack lengths in case of a single crack and for various crack length ratio for the two cracks. The effect of the location of the part through crack(s) along the thickness of the plate on natural frequencies is studied considering appropriate crack compliance coefficients. It is thus deduced that the natural frequencies are maximally affected when the crack(s) are internal crack(s) symmetric about the mid-plane of the plate and are minimally affected when the crack(s) are surface crack(s), for all the three boundary conditions considered. It is also shown that crack parallel to the longer side of the plate affect the vibration characteristics more as compared to crack parallel to the shorter side. Further the application of method of multiple scales gives the nonlinear amplitudes for different aspect ratios of the cracked plate. The analytical results obtained for surface crack(s) are also assessed with FEM results. The FEM formulation is carried out in ANSYS.

  1. Metallurgical Analysis of Cracks Formed on Coal Fired Boiler Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishor, Rajat; Kyada, Tushal; Goyal, Rajesh K.; Kathayat, T. S.

    2015-02-01

    Metallurgical failure analysis was carried out for cracks observed on the outer surface of a boiler tube made of ASME SA 210 GR A1 grade steel. The cracks on the surface of the tube were observed after 6 months from the installation in service. A careful visual inspection, chemical analysis, hardness measurement, detailed microstructural analysis using optical and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were carried out to ascertain the cause for failure. Visual inspection of the failed tube revealed the presence of oxide scales and ash deposits on the surface of the tube exposed to fire. Many cracks extending longitudinally were observed on the surface of the tube. Bulging of the tube was also observed. The results of chemical analysis, hardness values and optical micrographs did not exhibit any abnormality at the region of failure. However, detailed SEM with EDS analysis confirmed the presence of various oxide scales. These scales initiated corrosion at both the inner and outer surfaces of the tube. In addition, excessive hoop stress also developed at the region of failure. It is concluded that the failure of the boiler tube took place owing to the combined effect of the corrosion caused by the oxide scales as well as the excessive hoop stress.

  2. Analysis of crack propagation as an energy absorption mechanism in metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, D. F.; Murphy, D. P.

    1981-01-01

    The crack initiation and crack propagation capability was extended to the previously developed generalized plane strain, finite element micromechanics analysis. Also, an axisymmetric analysis was developed, which contains all of the general features of the plane analysis, including elastoplastic material behavior, temperature-dependent material properties, and crack propagation. These analyses were used to generate various example problems demonstrating the inelastic response of, and crack initiation and propagation in, a boron/aluminum composite.

  3. NASGRO(registered trademark): Fracture Mechanics and Fatigue Crack Growth Analysis Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, Royce; Shivakumar, V.; Mettu, Sambi; Beek, Joachim; Williams, Leonard; Yeh, Feng; McClung, Craig; Cardinal, Joe

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes NASGRO, which is a fracture mechanics and fatigue crack growth analysis software package that is used to reduce risk of fracture in Space Shuttles. The contents include: 1) Consequences of Fracture; 2) NASA Fracture Control Requirements; 3) NASGRO Reduces Risk; 4) NASGRO Use Inside NASA; 5) NASGRO Components: Crack Growth Module; 6) NASGRO Components:Material Property Module; 7) Typical NASGRO analysis: Crack growth or component life calculation; and 8) NASGRO Sample Application: Orbiter feedline flowliner crack analysis.

  4. Cessation of environmentally-assisted cracking in a low-alloy steel: Theoretical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wire, G.L.

    1997-02-01

    Environmentally Assisted Cracking (EAC) can cause increases in fatigue crack growth rates of 40 to 100 times the rate in air for low alloy steels. The increased rates can lead to very large predicted crack growth. EAC is activated by a critical level of dissolved sulfides at the crack tip. Sulfide inclusions (MnS) in the steel produce corrosive sulfides in solution following exposure by a growing crack. In stagnant, low oxygen water conditions considered here, diffusion is the dominant mass transport mechanism acting to change the sulfide concentration within the crack. The average crack tip velocity is below the level required to produce the critical crack tip sulfide ion concentration required for EAC. Crack extension analyses also consider the breakthrough of large, hypothetical embedded defects with the attendant large freshly exposed sulfide inventory. Combrade et al. noted that a large inventory of undissolved metallurgical sulfides on crack flanks could trigger EAC, but did not quantify the effects. Diffusion analysis is extended herein to cover breakthrough of embedded defects with large sulfide inventories. The mass transport via diffusion is limited by the sulfide solubility. As a result, deep cracks in high sulfur steels are predicted to retain undissolved sulfides for extended but finite periods of time t{sub diss} which increase with the crack length and the metallurgical sulfide content in the steel. The analysis shows that the duration of EAC is limited to t{sub diss} providing V{sub eac}, the crack tip velocity associated with EAC is less than V{sub In}, the crack tip velocity below which EAC will not occur in an initially sulfide free crack. This condition on V{sub eac} need only be met for a short time following crack cleanup to turn off EAC. The predicted crack extension due to limited duration of EAC is a small fraction of the initial embedded defect size and would not greatly change calculated crack depths.

  5. Analysis of cracking in glass molds made of cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leushin, I. O.; Chistyakov, D. G.

    2014-09-01

    The cracking in the parts of cast iron molds intended for glass is considered, and this cracking substantially affects the operation of glass-blowing equipment, maintainability, and the replacement of mold sets. The processes that cause cracking in the parts of glass molds and initiate crack growth are studied.

  6. Analysis of internal crack healing mechanism under rolling deformation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Haitao; Ai, Zhengrong; Yu, Hailiang; Wu, Hongyan; Liu, Xianghua

    2014-01-01

    A new experimental method, called the 'hole filling method', is proposed to simulate the healing of internal cracks in rolled workpieces. Based on the experimental results, the evolution in the microstructure, in terms of diffusion, nucleation and recrystallisation were used to analyze the crack healing mechanism. We also validated the phenomenon of segmented healing. Internal crack healing involves plastic deformation, heat transfer and an increase in the free energy introduced by the cracks. It is proposed that internal cracks heal better under high plastic deformation followed by slow cooling after rolling. Crack healing is controlled by diffusion of atoms from the matrix to the crack surface, and also by the nucleation and growth of ferrite grain on the crack surface. The diffusion mechanism is used to explain the source of material needed for crack healing. The recrystallisation mechanism is used to explain grain nucleation and growth, accompanied by atomic migration to the crack surface.

  7. Finite-element analysis of crack growth under monotonic and cyclic loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    An elastic-plastic (incremental) finite-element analysis, in conjunction with a crack-growth criterion, was used to study crack-growth behavior under monotonic and cyclic loading. The crack-growth criterion was based on crack-tip strain. Whenever the crack-tip strain equals or exceeds a critical strain value, the crack grows. The effects of element-mesh size, critical strain, strain hardening, and specimen type (tension or bending) on crack growth under monotonic loading were investigated. Crack growth under cyclic loading (constant amplitude and simple variable amplitude) were also studied. A combined hardening theory, which incorporates features of both isotropic and kinematic hardening under cyclic loading, was also developed for smooth yield surfaces and was used in the analysis.

  8. MSFC crack growth analysis computer program, version 2 (users manual)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creager, M.

    1976-01-01

    An updated version of the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center Crack Growth Analysis Program is described. The updated computer program has significantly expanded capabilities over the original one. This increased capability includes an extensive expansion of the library of stress intensity factors, plotting capability, increased design iteration capability, and the capability of performing proof test logic analysis. The technical approaches used within the computer program are presented, and the input and output formats and options are described. Details of the stress intensity equations, example data, and example problems are presented.

  9. Crack stability analysis of low alloy steel primary coolant pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.; Kameyama, M.; Urabe, Y.

    1997-04-01

    At present, cast duplex stainless steel has been used for the primary coolant piping of PWRs in Japan and joints of dissimilar material have been applied for welding to reactor vessels and steam generators. For the primary coolant piping of the next APWR plants, application of low alloy steel that results in designing main loops with the same material is being studied. It means that there is no need to weld low alloy steel with stainless steel and that makes it possible to reduce the welding length. Attenuation of Ultra Sonic Wave Intensity is lower for low alloy steel than for stainless steel and they have advantageous inspection characteristics. In addition to that, the thermal expansion rate is smaller for low alloy steel than for stainless steel. In consideration of the above features of low alloy steel, the overall reliability of primary coolant piping is expected to be improved. Therefore, for the evaluation of crack stability of low alloy steel piping to be applied for primary loops, elastic-plastic future mechanics analysis was performed by means of a three-dimensioned FEM. The evaluation results for the low alloy steel pipings show that cracks will not grow into unstable fractures under maximum design load conditions, even when such a circumferential crack is assumed to be 6 times the size of the wall thickness.

  10. Model-Based Comprehensive Analysis of School Closure Policies for Mitigating Influenza Epidemics and Pandemics

    PubMed Central

    Fumanelli, Laura; Ajelli, Marco; Merler, Stefano; Ferguson, Neil M.; Cauchemez, Simon

    2016-01-01

    School closure policies are among the non-pharmaceutical measures taken into consideration to mitigate influenza epidemics and pandemics spread. However, a systematic review of the effectiveness of alternative closure policies has yet to emerge. Here we perform a model-based analysis of four types of school closure, ranging from the nationwide closure of all schools at the same time to reactive gradual closure, starting from class-by-class, then grades and finally the whole school. We consider policies based on triggers that are feasible to monitor, such as school absenteeism and national ILI surveillance system. We found that, under specific constraints on the average number of weeks lost per student, reactive school-by-school, gradual, and county-wide closure give comparable outcomes in terms of optimal infection attack rate reduction, peak incidence reduction or peak delay. Optimal implementations generally require short closures of one week each; this duration is long enough to break the transmission chain without leading to unnecessarily long periods of class interruption. Moreover, we found that gradual and county closures may be slightly more easily applicable in practice as they are less sensitive to the value of the excess absenteeism threshold triggering the start of the intervention. These findings suggest that policy makers could consider school closure policies more diffusely as response strategy to influenza epidemics and pandemics, and the fact that some countries already have some experience of gradual or regional closures for seasonal influenza outbreaks demonstrates that logistic and feasibility challenges of school closure strategies can be to some extent overcome. PMID:26796333

  11. Fracture analysis of stiffened panels under biaxial loading with widespread cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    An elastic-plastic finite-element analysis with a critical crack-tip opening angle (CTOA) fracture criterion was used to model stable crack growth and fracture of 2024-T3 aluminum alloy (bare and clad) panels for several thicknesses. The panels had either single or multiple-site damage (MSD) cracks subjected to uniaxial or biaxial loading. Analyses were also conducted on cracked stiffened panels with single or MSD cracks. The critical CTOA value for each thickness was determined by matching the failure load on a middle-crack tension specimen. Comparisons were made between the critical angles determined from the finite-element analyses and those measured with photographic methods. Predicted load-against-crack extension and failure loads for panels under biaxial loading, panels with MSD cracks, and panels with various numbers of stiffeners were compared with test data whenever possible. The predicted results agreed well with the test data even for large-scale plastic deformations. The analyses were also able to predict stable tearing behavior of a large lead crack in the presence of MSD cracks. The analyses were then used to study the influence of stiffeners on residual strength in the presence of widespread fatigue cracking. Small MSD cracks were found to greatly reduce the residual strength for large lead cracks even for stiffened panels.

  12. Refined two-dimensional analysis of cross-ply laminates with transverse cracks based on the assumed crack opening deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. H.; Hong, C. S.

    A refined two-dimensional analysis method, taking into account the crack opening deformation, is proposed for the evaluation of stress distributions and the prediction of stiffness reduction in transverse cracked cross-ply laminates. The interlaminar stresses which play an important role in laminate failure are evaluated by using the concept of interface layer. A series expansion of the displacements is employed and the thermal residual stresses and Poisson effects in the laminate are taken into consideration in the formulation. The stress distributions and the stiffness reductions due to transverse cracks are compared with finite element results and experimental data, respectively. The proposed method represents well the characteristics of the stress distributions. The predicted laminate stiffness reductions are in excellent agreement with experimental data for various materials. The proposed analysis can be applied as a basis for the prediction of the induced delamination onset by using appropriate failure criteria.

  13. A thermodynamic analysis of propagating subcritical cracks with cohesive zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, David H.

    1993-01-01

    The results of the so-called energetic approach to fracture with particular attention to the issue of energy dissipation due to crack propagation are applied to the case of a crack with cohesive zone. The thermodynamic admissibility of subcritical crack growth (SCG) is discussed together with some hypotheses that lead to the derivation of SCG laws. A two-phase cohesive zone model for discontinuous crack growth is presented and its thermodynamics analyzed, followed by an example of its possible application.

  14. Analysis of Multiple Cracks in an Infinite Functionally Graded Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shbeeb, N. I.; Binienda, W. K.; Kreider, K. L.

    1999-01-01

    A general methodology was constructed to develop the fundamental solution for a crack embedded in an infinite non-homogeneous material in which the shear modulus varies exponentially with the y coordinate. The fundamental solution was used to generate a solution to fully interactive multiple crack problems for stress intensity factors and strain energy release rates. Parametric studies were conducted for two crack configurations. The model displayed sensitivity to crack distance, relative angular orientation, and to the coefficient of nonhomogeneity.

  15. Analysis of surface cracks in finite plates under tension or bending loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Raju, I. S.

    1979-01-01

    Stress-intensity factors calculated with a three-dimensional, finite-element analysis for shallow and deep semielliptical surface cracks in finite elastic isotropic plates subjected to tension or bending loads are presented. A wide range of configuration parameters was investigated. The ratio of crack depth to plate thickness ranged from 0.2 to 0.8 and the ratio of crack depth to crack length ranged from 0.2 to 2.0. The effects of plate width on stress-intensity variations along the crack front was also investigated. A wide-range equation for stress-intensity factors along the crack front as a function of crack depth, crack length, plate thickness, and plate width was developed for tension and bending loads. The equation was used to predict patterns of surface-crack growth under tension or bending fatigue loads. A modified form of the equation was also used to correlate surface-crack fracture data for a brittle epoxy material within + or - 10 percent for a wide range of crack shapes and crack sizes.

  16. Purity and adulterant analysis of crack seizures in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, André R; Carvalho, Virginia M; Carvalho, Débora G; Diaz, Ernesto; Bustillos, Jose Oscar William Vega; Spinosa, Helenice de S; Chasin, Alice A M

    2014-10-01

    Cocaine represents a serious problem to society. Smoked cocaine is very addictive and it is frequently associated with violence and health issues. Knowledge of the purity and adulterants present in seized cocaine, as well as variations in drug characteristics are useful to identify drug source and estimate health impact. No data are available regarding smoked cocaine composition in most countries, and the smoked form is increasing in the Brazilian market. The purpose of the present study is to contribute to the current knowledge on the status of crack cocaine seized samples on the illicit market by the police of São Paulo. Thus, 404 samples obtained from street seizures conducted by the police were examined. The specimens were macroscopically characterized by color, form, odor, purity, and adulterant type, as well as smoke composition. Samples were screened for cocaine using modified Scott test and thin-layer chromatographic (TLC) technique. Analyses of purity and adulterants were performed with gas chromatography equipped with flame ionization detector (GC-FID). Additionally, smoke composition was analyzed by GC-mass spectrometry (MS), after samples burning. Samples showed different colors and forms, the majority of which is yellow (74.0%) or white (20.0%). Samples free of adulterants represented 76.3% of the total. Mean purity of the analyzed drug was 71.3%. Crack cocaine presented no correlations between macroscopic characteristics and purity. Smoke analysis showed compounds found also in the degradation of diesel and gasoline. Therefore, the drug marketed as crack cocaine in São Paulo has similar characteristics to coca paste. High purity can represent a greater risk of dependency and smoke compounds are possibly worsening drug health impact.

  17. A Political Analysis of Community Influence over School Closure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finnigan, Kara S.; Lavner, Mark

    2012-01-01

    This study seeks to understand community member participation in and influence over an urban school district's school closure process. Data from interviews with School Board members, district administrators, and community members, as well as district documents and newspaper articles suggest that district administrators limited participation…

  18. Closed-crack imaging and scattering behavior analysis using confocal subharmonic phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugawara, Azusa; Jinno, Kentaro; Ohara, Yoshikazu; Yamanaka, Kazushi

    2015-07-01

    To solve the underestimation of closed-crack depth, we have developed an imaging method, subharmonic phased array for crack evaluation (SPACE). However, a single-array SPACE can image only the vicinity of a transmission focal point (TFP) when the TFP is fixed. In this study, we have developed a confocal SPACE that defines multiple TFPs for imaging closed cracks over a wide area. We demonstrated its usefulness by measuring a stress corrosion crack (SCC). Moreover, we proposed a radarlike display that shows single-focus images with a line indicating the incident direction. By applying it to the SCC specimen, a moving crack response (MCR) was observed with varying incident angles. To analyze this behavior, we performed a simulation using a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method with a damped double node (DDN) model. Furthermore, we examined the ratio of the subharmonic to fundamental responses depending on the stress ratio between input wave stress and crack closure stress (σc).

  19. Crack Growth Prediction Methodology for Multi-Site Damage: Layered Analysis and Growth During Plasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Mark Anthony

    1999-01-01

    A finite element program has been developed to perform quasi-static, elastic-plastic crack growth simulations. The model provides a general framework for mixed-mode I/II elastic-plastic fracture analysis using small strain assumptions and plane stress, plane strain, and axisymmetric finite elements. Cracks are modeled explicitly in the mesh. As the cracks propagate, automatic remeshing algorithms delete the mesh local to the crack tip, extend the crack, and build a new mesh around the new tip. State variable mapping algorithms transfer stresses and displacements from the old mesh to the new mesh. The von Mises material model is implemented in the context of a non-linear Newton solution scheme. The fracture criterion is the critical crack tip opening displacement, and crack direction is predicted by the maximum tensile stress criterion at the crack tip. The implementation can accommodate multiple curving and interacting cracks. An additional fracture algorithm based on nodal release can be used to simulate fracture along a horizontal plane of symmetry. A core of plane strain elements can be used with the nodal release algorithm to simulate the triaxial state of stress near the crack tip. Verification and validation studies compare analysis results with experimental data and published three-dimensional analysis results. Fracture predictions using nodal release for compact tension, middle-crack tension, and multi-site damage test specimens produced accurate results for residual strength and link-up loads. Curving crack predictions using remeshing/mapping were compared with experimental data for an Arcan mixed-mode specimen. Loading angles from 0 degrees to 90 degrees were analyzed. The maximum tensile stress criterion was able to predict the crack direction and path for all loading angles in which the material failed in tension. Residual strength was also accurately predicted for these cases.

  20. On the variation in crack-opening stresses at different locations in a three-dimensional body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chermahini, R. G.; Blom, Anders F.

    1990-01-01

    Crack propagation and closure behavior of thin, and thick middle crack tension specimens under constant amplitude loading were investigated using a three dimensional elastic plastic finite element analysis of fatigue crack propagation and closure. In the thin specimens the crack front closed first on the exterior (free) surface and closed last in the interior during the unloading portion of cyclic loading; a load reduced displacement technique was used to determine crack opening stresses at specified locations in the plate from the displacements calculated after the seven cycle. All the locations were on the plate external surface and were located near the crack tip, behind the crack tip, at the centerline of the crack. With this technique, the opening stresses at the specified points were found to be 0.52, 0.42, and 0.39 times the maximum applied stress.

  1. Analysis of crack propagation in roller bearings using the boundary integral equation method - A mixed-mode loading problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosn, L. J.

    1988-01-01

    Crack propagation in a rotating inner raceway of a high-speed roller bearing is analyzed using the boundary integral method. The model consists of an edge plate under plane strain condition upon which varying Hertzian stress fields are superimposed. A multidomain boundary integral equation using quadratic elements was written to determine the stress intensity factors KI and KII at the crack tip for various roller positions. The multidomain formulation allows the two faces of the crack to be modeled in two different subregions, making it possible to analyze crack closure when the roller is positioned on or close to the crack line. KI and KII stress intensity factors along any direction were computed. These calculations permit determination of crack growth direction along which the average KI times the alternating KI is maximum.

  2. Local delamination in laminates with angle ply matrix cracks. Part 1: Tension tests and stress analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, T. Kevin; Hooper, S. J.

    1991-01-01

    Quasi-static tension tests were conducted on AS4/3501-6 graphite epoxy laminates. Dye penetrant enhanced x-radiography was used to document the onset of matrix cracking and the onset of local delaminations at the intersection of the matrix cracks and the free edge. Edge micrographs taken after the onset of damage were used to verify the location of the matrix cracks and local delamination through the laminate thickness. A quasi-3D finite element analysis was conducted to calculate the stresses responsible for matrix cracking in the off-axis plies. Laminated plate theory indicated that the transverse normal stresses were compressive. However, the finite element analysis yielded tensile transverse normal stresses near the free edge. Matrix cracks formed in the off-axis plies near the free edge where in-plane transverse stresses were tensile and had their greatest magnitude. The influence of the matrix crack on interlaminar stresses is also discussed.

  3. Use of Several Thermal Analysis Techniques to Study the Cracking of a Nitrile Butadiene Rubber (NBR) Insulator on the Booster Separation Motor (BSM) of the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingard, Charles D.

    1999-01-01

    Two different vendor rubber formulations have been used to produce the silica-filled NBR insulators for the BSM of each of the two Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBs) on the Space Shuttle. Each cured insulator is bonded to the BSM aluminum aft closure with an epoxy adhesive, and some of the curved areas in the rubber may have significant residual stresses. A number of recently bonded NBR insulators have shown fine surface cracks, and stressed insulator areas may be aging at a faster rate than unstressed areas, thus hastening the surface cracking. Thermal analysis data on both vendor insulators by Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) through a temperature/frequency sweep from 24 to 74 C have shown a higher flexural storage modulus and Arrhenius activation energy for the stressed area than for the unstressed area. Other thermal analysis techniques are being used to study the insulator surface vs. bulk interior for better understanding this anomaly.

  4. Fracture analysis of multi-site cracking in fuselage lap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuth, J. L.; Hutchinson, J. W.

    1994-09-01

    A two-dimensional plane stress elastic fracture mechanics analysis of a cracked lap joint fastened by rigid pins is presented and results are applied to the problem of multi-site damage (MSD) in riveted lap joints of aircraft fuselage skins. Two problems are addressed, the problem of equal length MSD cracks and the problem of alternating length MSD cracks. For the problem of equal length cracks, two models of rivet/skin interactions are studied and the role of residual stresses due to the riveting process is explored. Stress intensity factors are obtained as a function of normalized crack length. Also, the load distribution among rivet rows and the compliance change of the joint due to MSD cracking are obtained. For the problem of alternating length cracks, attention is focussed on how load is distributed between columns of rivets and how this load shedding can alter crack tip stress intensity factors. The equal and alternating length crack analyses reveal no clear-cut mechanism to explain the relative uniformity of fatigue cracks emerging from lap joint rivet holes in actual aircraft and in mechanical lap joint tests.

  5. STAC -- a new Swedish code for statistical analysis of cracks in SG-tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Poern, K.

    1997-02-01

    Steam generator (SG) tubes in pressurized water reactor plants are exposed to various types of degradation processes, among which stress corrosion cracking in particular has been observed. To be able to evaluate the safety importance of such cracking of SG-tubes one has to have a good and empirically founded knowledge about the scope and the size of the cracks as well as the rate of their continuous growth. The basis of experience is to a large extent constituted of the annually performed SG-inspections and crack sizing procedures. On the basis of this experience one can estimate the distribution of existing crack lengths, and modify this distribution with regard to maintenance (plugging) and the predicted rate of crack propagation. Finally, one can calculate the rupture probability of SG-tubes as a function of a given critical crack length. On account of the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate an introductory study has been performed in order to get a survey of what has been done elsewhere in this field. The study resulted in a proposal of a computerizable model to be able to estimate the distribution of true cracks, to modify this distribution due to the crack growth and to compute the probability of tube rupture. The model has now been implemented in a compute code, called STAC (STatistical Analysis of Cracks). This paper is aimed to give a brief outline of the model to facilitate the understanding of the possibilities and limitations associated with the model.

  6. Vibration analysis of a plate with an arbitrarily orientated surface crack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Rainah

    This research presents a vibration analysis for a thin isotropic plate containing an arbitrarily orientated surface crack. The work has been motivated by the well known applicability of various vibrational techniques for structural damage detection in which the detection and localisation of damage to thin plate structures at the earliest stage of development can optimise subsystem performance and assure a safer life, and is intended to be an enhancement to previous work on cracked plates for which the orientation of the crack angle was not included. The novelty of this research activity has been in the assimilation of a significantly enhanced crack model within the analytical model of the plate, in modal space, and taking the form of a specialised Duffing equation. The governing equation of motion of the plate model with enhanced crack modelling is proposed to represent the vibrational response of the plate and is based on classical plate theory into which a developed crack model has been assimilated.. The formulation of the angled crack is based on a simplified line-spring model, and the cracked plate is subjected to transverse harmonic excitation with arbitrarily chosen boundary conditions. In addition, the nonlinear behaviour of the cracked plate model is investigated analytically from the amplitude-frequency equation by use of the multiple scales perturbation method. For both cracked square and rectangular plate models, the influence of the boundary conditions, the crack orientation angle, crack length, and location of the point load is demonstrated. It is found that the vibration characteristics and nonlinear characteristics of the cracked plate structure can be greatly affected by the orientation of the crack in the plate. The dynamics and stability of the cracked plate model are also examined numerically using dynamical systems tools for representing the behaviour of this system for a range of parameters. Finally the validity of the developed model is shown

  7. Stress analysis and stress-intensity factors for finite geometry solids containing rectangular surface cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, J. P.; Mendelson, A.

    1977-01-01

    The line method of analysis is applied to the Navier-Cauchy equations of elastic equilibrium to calculate the displacement field in a finite geometry bar containing a variable depth rectangular surface crack under extensionally applied uniform loading. The application of this method to these equations leads to coupled sets of simultaneous ordinary differential equations whose solutions are obtained along sets of lines in a discretized region. Using the obtained displacement field, normal stresses, and the stress-intensity factor variation along the crack periphery are calculated for different crack depth to bar thickness ratios. Crack opening displacements and stress-intensity factors are also obtained for a through-thickness, center-cracked bar with variable thickness. The reported results show a considerable potential for using this method in calculating stress-intensity factors for commonly encountered surface crack geometries in finite solids

  8. Stress analysis and stress intensity factors for finite geometry solids containing rectangular surface cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, J. P.; Mendelson, A.

    1975-01-01

    The line method of analysis is applied to the Navier-Cauchy equations of elastic equilibrium to calculate the displacement field in a finite geometry bar containing a variable depth rectangular surface crack under extensionally applied uniform loading. The application of this method to these equations leads to coupled sets of simultaneous ordinary differential equations whose solutions are obtained along sets of lines in a discretized region. Using the obtained displacement field, normal stresses and the stress intensity factor variation along the crack periphery are calculated for different crack depth to bar thickness ratios. Crack opening displacements and stress intensity factors are also obtained for a through-thickness, center cracked bar with variable thickness. The reported results show a considerable potential for using this method in calculating stress intensity factors for commonly encountered surface crack geometries in finite solids.

  9. Effects of weld residual stresses on crack-opening area analysis of pipes for LBB applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, P.; Rahman, S.; Wilkowski, G.

    1997-04-01

    This paper summarizes four different studies undertaken to evaluate the effects of weld residual stresses on the crack-opening behavior of a circumferential through-wall crack in the center of a girth weld. The effect of weld residual stress on the crack-opening-area and leak-rate analyses of a pipe is not well understood. There are no simple analyses to account for these effects, and, therefore, they are frequently neglected. The four studies involved the following efforts: (1) Full-field thermoplastic finite element residual stress analyses of a crack in the center of a girth weld, (2) A comparison of the crack-opening displacements from a full-field thermoplastic residual stress analysis with a crack-face pressure elastic stress analysis to determine the residual stress effects on the crack-opening displacement, (3) The effects of hydrostatic testing on the residual stresses and the resulting crack-opening displacement, and (4) The effect of residual stresses on crack-opening displacement with different normal operating stresses.

  10. A numerical analysis of crack growth in brittle microcracking composites

    SciTech Connect

    Biner, S.B.

    1993-04-01

    A set of numerical analyses of crack growth was performed to elucidate the mechanism of microcracking on the observed fracture behavior of brittle solids and composites. The random nucleation, orientation and size effects of discrete microcracks and resulting interactions are fully accounted for in a hybrid finite element model. The results indicate that the energy expenditure due the microcrack nucleation seems not to contribute significantly to the resistance to crack growth. The main controlling parameter appears to be elastic interaction of the microcracks with the main crack in the absence of a reinforcing phase; therefore, the microcrack density plays an important role. In the case of the composites, the interaction of the main crack with the stress fields of the reinforcing phase, rather than interaction of microcracks, is the controlling parameter for the resistance to the crack growth even in the presence of a large population of microcracks. It will be also shown that the crack branching and crack kinking can readily develop as a result of microcracking.

  11. Analysis of reinforced concrete structures with occurrence of discrete cracks at arbitrary positions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaauwendraad, J.; Grootenboer, H. J.; Bouma, A. L.; Reinhardt, H. W.

    1980-01-01

    A nonlinear analysis of in-plane loaded plates is presented, which eliminates the disadvantages of the smeared crack approach. The elements used and the computational method are discussed. An example is shown in which one or more discrete cracks are dominant.

  12. Analysis of local fractures and crack growth in coal seams under compression

    SciTech Connect

    S.V. Kuznetsov; V.A. Trofimov

    2006-01-15

    An analysis is performed for the effect that a growing rock pressure in stress concentration zones has on development of local fractures of coal due to stratal water, and on closing-up of bedding joints, which confines this process. It is shown that all of unstable cracks in a seam grow dynamically until the related bedding crack closing-up.

  13. Analysis of weldability testing techniques for HAZ liquation cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wangen; Lippold, John C.; Baeslack, William A., III

    A new methodology for quantifying heat-affected zone (HAZ) liquation cracking susceptibility has been developed by considering the temperature-dependent, hot ductility of a material during welding in the context of current liquation cracking theories. This methodology defines a temperature field in the HAZ surrounding the weld pool, termed the thermal crack susceptible region (CSR) in which liquation cracking may occur. The thermal CSR is material-specific and represents a metallurgically-based quantification of weldability. Using this method, weldability test results can be more easily applied to actual welding conditions. This paper describes how this methodology can be utilized in conjunction with three widely used weldability testing techniques, namely, the Gleeble hot ductility test, and the spot and longitudinal type Varestraint tests. The method of data interpretation is addressed for each test technique and correlations among test techniques described.

  14. Analysis, prediction, and case studies of early-age cracking in bridge decks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ElSafty, Adel; Graeff, Matthew K.; El-Gharib, Georges; Abdel-Mohti, Ahmed; Mike Jackson, N.

    2016-06-01

    Early-age cracking can adversely affect strength, serviceability, and durability of concrete bridge decks. Early age is defined as the period after final setting, during which concrete properties change rapidly. Many factors can cause early-age bridge deck cracking including temperature change, hydration, plastic shrinkage, autogenous shrinkage, and drying shrinkage. The cracking may also increase the effect of freeze and thaw cycles and may lead to corrosion of reinforcement. This research paper presents an analysis of causes and factors affecting early-age cracking. It also provides a tool developed to predict the likelihood and initiation of early-age cracking of concrete bridge decks. Understanding the concrete properties is essential so that the developed tool can accurately model the mechanisms contributing to the cracking of concrete bridge decks. The user interface of the implemented computer Excel program enables the user to input the properties of the concrete being monitored. The research study and the developed spreadsheet were used to comprehensively investigate the issue of concrete deck cracking. The spreadsheet is designed to be a user-friendly calculation tool for concrete mixture proportioning, temperature prediction, thermal analysis, and tensile cracking prediction. The study also provides review and makes recommendations on the deck cracking based mainly on the Florida Department of Transportation specifications and Structures Design Guidelines, and Bridge Design Manuals of other states. The results were also compared with that of other commercially available software programs that predict early-age cracking in concrete slabs, concrete pavement, and reinforced concrete bridge decks. The outcome of this study can identify a set of recommendations to limit the deck cracking problem and maintain a longer service life of bridges.

  15. Crack Imaging and Quantification in Aluminum Plates with Guided Wave Wavenumber Analysis Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Lingyu; Tian, Zhenhua; Leckey, Cara A. C.

    2015-01-01

    Guided wavefield analysis methods for detection and quantification of crack damage in an aluminum plate are presented in this paper. New wavenumber components created by abrupt wave changes at the structural discontinuity are identified in the frequency-wavenumber spectra. It is shown that the new wavenumbers can be used to detect and characterize the crack dimensions. Two imaging based approaches, filter reconstructed imaging and spatial wavenumber imaging, are used to demonstrate how the cracks can be evaluated with wavenumber analysis. The filter reconstructed imaging is shown to be a rapid method to map the plate and any existing damage, but with less precision in estimating crack dimensions; while the spatial wavenumber imaging provides an intensity image of spatial wavenumber values with enhanced resolution of crack dimensions. These techniques are applied to simulated wavefield data, and the simulation based studies show that spatial wavenumber imaging method is able to distinguish cracks of different severities. Laboratory experimental validation is performed for a single crack case to confirm the methods' capabilities for imaging cracks in plates.

  16. Hanford tanks initiative alternatives generation and analysis plan for AX tank farm closure basis

    SciTech Connect

    Schaus, P. S.

    1997-10-22

    The purpose of this document is: (1) to review the HTI Mission Analysis and related documents to determine their suitability for use in developing performance measures for AX Tank Farm closure, (2) to determine the completeness and representativeness of selected alternative closure scenarios, (3) to determine the completeness of current plans for development of tank end-state criteria, and (4) to analyze the activities that are necessary and sufficient to recommend the end-state criteria and performance measures for the AX Tank Farm and recommend activities not currently planned to support establishment of its end-state criteria.

  17. Second moment closure analysis of the backstep flow database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parneix, S.; Laurence, D.; Durbin, P.

    1996-01-01

    A Second Moment Closure computation (SMC) is compared in detail with the Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) data of Le and Moin for the backstep flow at Re = 5,000 in an attempt to understand why the intensity of the backflow and, consequently, the friction coefficient in the recirculation bubble are severely underestimated. The data show that this recirculation bubble is far from being laminar except in the very near wall layer. A novel 'differential a priori' procedure was used, in which the full transport equation for one isolated component of the Reynolds stress tensor was solved using DNS data as input. Conclusions are then different from what would have been deduced by comparing a full simulation to a DNS. One cause of discrepancy was traced back to insufficient transfer of energy to the normal stress by pressure strain, but was not cured. A significant finding, confirmed by the DNS data in the core region of a channel flow, is that the coefficient that controls destruction of dissipation, C epsilon(sub 2), should be decreased by a factor of 2 when production is vanishing. This is also the case in the recirculation bubble, and a new formulation has cured 25% of the backflow discrepancy.

  18. Fracture analysis of axially cracked pressure tube of pressurized heavy water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, S.; Bhasin, V.; Mahajan, S.C.

    1997-04-01

    Three Dimensional (313) finite element elastic plastic fracture analysis was done for through wall axially cracked thin pressure tubes of 220 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor. The analysis was done for Zr-2 and Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes operating at 300{degrees}C and subjected to 9.5 Mpa internal pressure. Critical crack length was determined based on tearing instability concept. The analysis included the effect of crack face pressure due to the leaking fluid from tube. This effect was found to be significant for pressure tubes. The available formulae for calculating J (for axially cracked tubes) do not take into account the effect of crack face pressure. 3D finite element analysis also gives insight into variation of J across the thickness of pressure tube. It was observed that J is highest at the mid-surface of tube. The results have been presented in the form of across the thickness average J value and a peak factor on J. Peak factor on J is ratio of J at mid surface to average J value. Crack opening area for different cracked lengths was calculated from finite element results. The fracture assessment of pressure tubes was also done using Central Electricity Generating Board R-6 method. Ductile tearing was considered.

  19. Numerical method of crack analysis in 2D finite magnetoelectroelastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Minghao; Xu, Guangtao; Fan, Cuiying

    2010-04-01

    The present paper extends the hybrid extended displacement discontinuity fundamental solution method (HEDD-FSM) (Eng Anal Bound Elem 33:592-600, 2009) to analysis of cracks in 2D finite magnetoelectroelastic media. The solution of the crack is expressed approximately by a linear combination of fundamental solutions of the governing equations, which includes the extended point force fundamental solutions with sources placed at chosen points outside the domain of the problem under consideration, and the extended Crouch fundamental solutions with extended displacement discontinuities placed on the crack. The coefficients of the fundamental solutions are determined by letting the approximated solution satisfy the prescribed boundary conditions on the boundary of the domain and on the crack face. The Crouch fundamental solution for a parabolic element at the crack tip is derived to model the square root variations of near tip fields. The extended stress intensity factors are calculated under different electric and magnetic boundary conditions.

  20. Laboratory Reproduction and Failure Analysis of Cracked Orbiter Reaction Control System Niobium Thruster Injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Jeremy B.; Castner, Willard L.

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing cracks and failure analysis of an orbiter reaction control system is shown. The topics include: 1) Endeavour STS-113 Landing; 2) RCS Thruster; 3) Thruster Cross-Section; 4) RCS Injector; 5) RCS Thruster, S/N 120l 6) Counterbore Cracks; 7) Relief Radius Cracks; 8) RCS Thruster Cracking History; 9) Thruster Manufacturing Timelines; 10) Laboratory Reproduction of Injector Cracking; 11) The Brownfield Specimen; 12) HF EtchantTests/Specimen Loading; 13) Specimen #3 HF + 600F; 14) Specimen #3 IG Fracture; 15) Specimen #5 HF + 600F; 16) Specimen #5 Popcorn ; 17) Specimen #5 Cleaned and Bent; 18) HF Exposure Test Matrix; 19) Krytox143AC Tests; 20) KrytoxTests/Specimen Loading; 21) Specimen #13 Krytox + 600F; and 22) KrytoxExposure Test Matrix.

  1. Detection and characterization of stainless steel SCC by the analysis of crack related acoustic emission.

    PubMed

    Kovač, Jaka; Legat, Andraž; Zajec, Bojan; Kosec, Tadeja; Govekar, Edvard

    2015-09-01

    In the paper the results of the acoustic emission (AE) based detection and characterization of stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) in stainless steel are presented. As supportive methods for AE interpretation, electrochemical noise, specimen elongation measurements, and digital imaging of the specimen surface were used. Based on the defined qualitative and quantitative time and power spectra characteristics of the AE bursts, a manual and an automatic procedure for the detection of crack related AE bursts were introduced. The results of the analysis of the crack related AE bursts indicate that the AE method is capable of detecting large scale cracks, where, apart from intergranular crack propagation, also some small ductile fractures occur. The sizes of the corresponding ductile fracture areas can be estimated based on a relative comparison of the energies of the detected AE bursts. It has also been shown that AE burst time and power spectra features can be successfully used for the automatic detection of SCC.

  2. Analysis of the Influence of Cracked Sleepers under Static Loading on Ballasted Railway Tracks

    PubMed Central

    Montalbán Domingo, Laura; Zamorano Martín, Clara; Palenzuela Avilés, Cristina; Real Herráiz, Julia I.

    2014-01-01

    The principal causes of cracking in prestressed concrete sleepers are the dynamic loads induced by track irregularities and imperfections in the wheel-rail contact and the in-phase and out-of-phase track resonances. The most affected points are the mid-span and rail-seat sections of the sleepers. Central and rail-seat crack detection require visual inspections, as legislation establishes, and involve sleepers' renewal even though European Normative considers that thicknesses up to 0.5 mm do not imply an inadequate behaviour of the sleepers. For a better understanding of the phenomenon, the finite element method constitutes a useful tool to assess the effects of cracking from the point of view of structural behaviour in railway track structures. This paper intends to study how the cracks at central or rail-seat section in prestressed concrete sleepers influence the track behaviour under static loading. The track model considers three different sleeper models: uncracked, cracked at central section, and cracked at rail-seat section. These models were calibrated and validated using the frequencies of vibration of the first three bending modes obtained from an experimental modal analysis. The results show the insignificant influence of the central cracks and the notable effects of the rail-seat cracks regarding deflections and stresses. PMID:25530998

  3. Analysis of roller hemming process for a vehicle tailgate closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gürgen, Selim; Gökler, Mustafa İlhan; Darendeliler, Haluk; Çelikkaya, Çetin Cengiz; Erden, Kemal

    2013-05-01

    Hemming is a sheet metal joining process which is widely used for vehicle closures. As the latest hemming process type, the roller hemming process uses industrial robots therefore; main advantage of the process is achieved as flexibility with improved product quality. Trial and error method is the general approach to design the process in the industry due to limited know-how in the roller hemming. However, due to advantages of the process, the recent studies have also been focused on numerical simulations. In this study, the roller hemming process of the tailgate of a vehicle has been investigated by using the finite element method. The points of interest are selected as cycle time reduction and reducing the undesired wrinkling formation in the process. In the current roller hemming process of the tailgate, three stages including two pre-hemming and one final hemming stages are being applied. For the cycle time reduction, simulations have been performed to complete the hemming process in two stages. Effects of the roller geometry and the bending angle pairs have been investigated. The hemming process with two stages has been shown numerically to be applicable by considering the final geometry of the product and the maximum stress and strain values occurred during the process. The wrinkling formation is reduced by using a roller with larger diameter in the simulations. Then, verifications of the simulations have been done by implementing of the process. As a result of the study, approximately 33% reduction in the cycle time and 50% increase in the productivity of the tailgate have been successfully achieved in addition to reduction in the wrinkling formation during the pre-hemming stage.

  4. Individual Variation and Family-Community Ties: A Behavioral Genetic Analysis of the Intergenerational Closure in the Lives of Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleveland, H. Harrington; Crosnoe, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Intergenerational closure refers to parents' knowing the parents of their adolescents' friends. This study treated intergenerational closure - as reported by the parents of adolescent twins - as the dependent variable in a behavioral genetic analysis. The sample consisted of identical and fraternal twin pairs in the National Longitudinal Study of…

  5. Three-dimensional elastic stress and displacement analysis of finite geometry solids containing cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kring, J.; Gyekenyesi, J.; Mendelson, A.

    1977-01-01

    The line method of analysis is applied to the Navier-Cauchy equations of elastic equilibrium to calculate the displacement fields in finite geometry bars containing central, surface, and double-edge cracks under extensionally applied uniform loading. The application of this method to these equations leads to coupled sets of simultaneous ordinary differential equations whose solutions are obtained along sets of lines in a discretized region. Normal stresses and the stress intensity factor variation along the crack periphery are calculated using the obtained displacement field. The reported results demonstrate the usefulness of this method in calculating stress intensity factors for commonly encountered crack geometries in finite solids.

  6. Design and analysis of lid closure bolts for packages used to transport radioactive materials

    SciTech Connect

    Raske, D.T.; Stojimirovic, A.

    1995-07-01

    The design criterion recommended by the U.S. Department of Energy for Category I radioactive packaging is found in Section III, Division 1, of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. This criterion provides material specifications and allowable stress limits for bolts used to secure lids of containment vessels. This paper describes the design requirements for Category I containment vessel lid closure bolts, and provides an example of a bolting stress analysis. The lid-closure bolting stress analysis compares calculations based on handbook formulas with an analysis performed with a finite-element computer code. The results show that the simple handbook calculations can be sufficiently accurate to evaluate the bolt stresses that occur in rotationally rigid lid flanges designed for metal-to-metal contact.

  7. 2014/2219 Tri-Point Crack Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horton, Karla Renee

    2011-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process with potential advantages for aerospace and automotive industries dealing with light alloys. Self-reacting friction stir welding (SR-FSW) is one variation of the FSW process being developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for use in the fabrication of propellant tanks. Friction plug welding is used to seal the exit hole that remains in a circumferential SR-FSW. The objective of this study was to evaluate the deformation response at the tips of cracks located in the heat affected zone of friction plug welds and to study the fracture behavior of welds with defects in the form of fatigue cracks. The study used existing 2014-T6 to 2219-T87 self-reacting friction stir weld panels with 2219-T87 friction plug welds. Electro-discharge machined (EDM) notches were machined into the heat affected zone of the plug at the plug-to-base metal interface. Samples were then cycled to generate a fatigue crack emanating from the notch. After the fatigue crack reached a pre-defined length, a speckle pattern was applied and the ARAMIS system (a three dimensional imaging correlation system) was used to measure the deformations at the crack tip under a sequence of loads. Testing was conducted at ambient laboratory conditions. Fracture data from the testing was analyzed to evaluate residual strength capability of the panel as a function of flaw size. ARAMIS strain data was evaluated to examine strain and deformation patterns that develop around the crack tip and at the plug/weld interfaces. Four samples were used in this study, with three samples in a post-weld heat treated condition. Three samples contained large diameter plugs (M5) and one sample contained a small diameter plug (M3). Two samples were 4 inches in width and two samples were 8.5 inches in width. All samples failed through the precrack with residual strengths ranging from 37 ksi to 42 ksi.

  8. Analysis of stress corrosion cracking in alloy 718 following commercial reactor exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, Keith J.; Gussev, Maxim N.; Stevens, Jacqueline N.; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2015-08-24

    Alloy 718 is generally considered a highly corrosion-resistant material but can still be susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). The combination of factors leading to SCC susceptibility in the alloy is not always clear enough. In this paper, alloy 718 leaf spring (LS) materials that suffered stress corrosion damage during two 24-month cycles in pressurized water reactor service, operated to >45 MWd/mtU burn-up, was investigated. Compared to archival samples fabricated through the same processing conditions, little microstructural and property changes occurred in the material with in-service irradiation, contrary to high dose rate laboratory-based experiments reported in literature. Though the lack of delta phase formation along grain boundaries would suggest a more SCC resistant microstructure, grain boundary cracking in the material was extensive. Crack propagation routes were explored through focused ion beam milling of specimens near the crack tip for transmission electron microscopy as well as in polished plan view and cross-sectional samples for electron backscatter diffraction analysis. It has been shown in this study that cracks propagated mainly along random high-angle grain boundaries, with the material around cracks displaying a high local density of dislocations. The slip lines were produced through the local deformation of the leaf spring material above their yield strength. Also, the cause for local SCC appears to be related to oxidation of both slip lines and grain boundaries, which under the high in-service stresses resulted in crack development in the material.

  9. Analysis of stress corrosion cracking in alloy 718 following commercial reactor exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Keith J.; Gussev, Maxim N.; Stevens, Jacqueline N.; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2015-11-01

    Alloy 718 is generally considered a highly corrosion-resistant material but can still be susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). The combination of factors leading to SCC susceptibility in the alloy is not always clear enough. In the present work, alloy 718 leaf spring (LS) materials that suffered stress corrosion damage during two 24-month cycles in pressurized water reactor service, operated to >45 MWd/mtU burn-up, was investigated. Compared to archival samples fabricated through the same processing conditions, little microstructural and property changes occurred in the material with in-service irradiation, contrary to high dose rate laboratory-based experiments reported in literature. Though the lack of delta phase formation along grain boundaries would suggest a more SCC resistant microstructure, grain boundary cracking in the material was extensive. Crack propagation routes were explored through focused ion beam milling of specimens near the crack tip for transmission electron microscopy as well as in polished plan view and cross-sectional samples for electron backscatter diffraction analysis. It has been shown in this study that cracks propagated mainly along random high-angle grain boundaries, with the material around cracks displaying a high local density of dislocations. The slip lines were produced through the local deformation of the leaf spring material above their yield strength. The cause for local SCC appears to be related to oxidation of both slip lines and grain boundaries, which under the high in-service stresses resulted in crack development in the material.

  10. Dynamical System Analysis of Reynolds Stress Closure Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girimaji, Sharath S.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, we establish the causality between the model coefficients in the standard pressure-strain correlation model and the predicted equilibrium states for homogeneous turbulence. We accomplish this by performing a comprehensive fixed point analysis of the modeled Reynolds stress and dissipation rate equations. The results from this analysis will be very useful for developing improved pressure-strain correlation models to yield observed equilibrium behavior.

  11. Microscopic image analysis of slow crack growth in vitreous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.L.

    1986-04-01

    Automated computer control, advanced video techniques, and digital image processing have been integrated into a servo-hydraulic testing system to produce a state-of-the-art testing environment. This system, in combination with an ultra high vacuum controlled environmental chamber, is used to produce high accuracy, subcritical slow crack growth data in vitreous materials. This video presentation is a review of the technologies used to extract data from the double cleavage drilled compression (DCDC) sample geometry.

  12. Component analysis of Iranian crack; a newly abused narcotic substance in iran.

    PubMed

    Farhoudian, Ali; Sadeghi, Mandana; Khoddami Vishteh, Hamid Reza; Moazen, Babak; Fekri, Monir; Rahimi Movaghar, Afarin

    2014-01-01

    Iranian crack is a new form of narcotic substance that has found widespread prevalence in Iran in the past years. Crack only nominally resembles crack cocaine as it is widely different in its clinical signs. Thus the present study aims to quantify the chemical combination of this drug. The samples included 18 specimen of Crack collected from different zones of Tehran, Iran. All specimens were in the form of inodorous cream solid powdery substance. TLC and HPLC methods were used to perform semi-quantitative and quantitative analysis of the components, respectively. The TLC analysis showed no cocaine compound in the specimens while they all revealed to contain heroin, codeine, morphine and caffeine. All but two specimens contained thebaine. None of the specimens contained amphetamine, benzodiazepines, tricyclic antidepressants, aspirin, barbiturates, tramadol and buprenorphine. Acetaminophen was found in four specimens. HPLC revealed heroin to be the foundation substance in all specimens and most of them contained a significant amount of acetylcodeine. The present analysis of the chemical combination of Crack showed that this substance is a heroin-based narcotic which is basically different from the cocaine-based crack used in Western countries. Studies like the present one at different time points, especially when abnormal clinical signs are detected, can reveal the chemical combination of the target substance and contribute to the clinical management of its acute or chronic poisoning. PMID:24734089

  13. A comparative analysis of reticular crack on ceramic plate driven by thermal shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, XiangHong; Sheng, ShiLong; Tian, Cheng; Yuan, WenJun

    2016-07-01

    Reticular crack is generally found on the surface of ceramic material that has been subjected to a thermal-shock condition. In the present study, a quantitative effect of thermal shock and quench temperature has been studied and investigated. Experimental tests were carried out to characterize the reticular crack that has been found in the Ge Kiln, which is a famous art of the ancient Chinese culture. After comparative analysis between thermal-shock cracks and the glaze crack patterns of the Ge Kiln porcelain, it is found that this study is expected to provide a powerful tool for recurrence of the long-lost firing and cooling process of the Ge Kiln porcelain.

  14. Analysis of Interface Properties of Hybrid Pre-stressed Strengthening RC Beams with Crack

    SciTech Connect

    Xie Zhihong; Huang Peiyan; Guo Yongchang; Deng Jun; Zhong Genquan

    2010-05-21

    A finite element (FE) analysis model of interface layer is established for the pre-stressed CFS-GFS hybrid strengthened beams. An elastic solution for the interfacial stress in the adhesive layer of the retrofitted beams is developed as well. The analytical results were compared with the FE results of interfacial stresses in the beams with different thickness of the adhesive and the fibre sheet. Different heights of Cracks in the interfacial layer of the concrete beam are considered in FE Model. Analysis results show the strengthening pattern is of excellent interface performance and the strength of the fiber sheet can be effectively utilized. The results also indicate the shear and normal stresses in the interfacial layer of the concrete beam release at the locations of the cracks and reach the maximal value before the concrete cracked. The shear and normal stresses in the adhesive layer increase abruptly, and the cracks in the adhesive layer then appear. The axial stresses of hybrid fiber sheet near the cracks decrease locally at the sites of the concrete cracks.

  15. Analysis of Interface Properties of Hybrid Pre-stressed Strengthening RC Beams with Crack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    zhihong, Xie; Peiyan, Huang; Yongchang, Guo; Jun, Deng; Genquan, Zhong

    2010-05-01

    A finite element (FE) analysis model of interface layer is established for the pre-stressed CFS-GFS hybrid strengthened beams. An elastic solution for the interfacial stress in the adhesive layer of the retrofitted beams is developed as well. The analytical results were compared with the FE results of interfacial stresses in the beams with different thickness of the adhesive and the fibre sheet. Different heights of Cracks in the interfacial layer of the concrete beam are considered in FE Model. Analysis results show the strengthening pattern is of excellent interface performance and the strength of the fiber sheet can be effectively utilized. The results also indicate the shear and normal stresses in the interfacial layer of the concrete beam release at the locations of the cracks and reach the maximal value before the concrete cracked. The shear and normal stresses in the adhesive layer increase abruptly, and the cracks in the adhesive layer then appear. The axial stresses of hybrid fiber sheet near the cracks decrease locally at the sites of the concrete cracks.

  16. Analysis of Delamination Growth from Matrix Cracks in Laminates Subjected to Bending Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, G. B.; Guynn, E. G.

    1986-01-01

    A major source of delamination damage in laminated composite materials is from low-velocity impact. In thin composite laminates under point loads, matrix cracks develop first in the plies, and delaminations then grow from these cracks at the ply interfaces. The purpose of this study was to quantify the combined effects of bending and transverse shear loads on delamination initiation from matrix cracks. Graphite-epoxy laminates with 90 deg. plies on the outside were used to provide a two-dimensional simulation of the damage due to low-velocity impact. Three plate bending problems were considered: a 4-point bending, 3-point bending, and an end-clamped center-loaded plate. Under bending, a matrix crack will form on the tension side of the laminate, through the outer 90 deg. plies and parallel to the fibers. Delaminations will then grow in the interface between the cracked 90 deg. ply and the next adjacent ply. Laminate plate theory was used to derive simple equations relating the total strain energy release rate, G, associated with the delamination growth from a 90 deg. ply crack to the applied bending load and laminate stiffness properties. Three different lay-ups were tested and results compared. Test results verified that the delamination always formed at the interface between the cracked 90 deg. ply and the next adjacent ply. Calculated values for total G sub c from the analysis showed good agreement for all configurations. The analysis was able to predict the delamination onset load for the cases considered. The result indicated that the opening mode component (Mode I) for delamination growth from a matrix crack may be much larger than the component due to interlaminar shear (Mode II).

  17. Recent developments in analysis of crack propagation and fracture of practical materials. [stress analysis in aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardrath, H. F.; Newman, J. C., Jr.; Elber, W.; Poe, C. C., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The limitations of linear elastic fracture mechanics in aircraft design and in the study of fatigue crack propagation in aircraft structures are discussed. NASA-Langley research to extend the capabilities of fracture mechanics to predict the maximum load that can be carried by a cracked part and to deal with aircraft design problems are reported. Achievements include: (1) improved stress intensity solutions for laboratory specimens; (2) fracture criterion for practical materials; (3) crack propagation predictions that account for mean stress and high maximum stress effects; (4) crack propagation predictions for variable amplitude loading; and (5) the prediction of crack growth and residual stress in built-up structural assemblies. These capabilities are incorporated into a first generation computerized analysis that allows for damage tolerance and tradeoffs with other disciplines to produce efficient designs that meet current airworthiness requirements.

  18. Tracking and Motion Analysis of Crack Propagations in Crystals for Molecular Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Tsap, L V; Duchaineau, M; Goldgof, D B

    2001-05-14

    This paper presents a quantitative analysis for a discovery in molecular dynamics. Recent simulations have shown that velocities of crack propagations in crystals under certain conditions can become supersonic, which is contrary to classical physics. In this research, they present a framework for tracking and motion analysis of crack propagations in crystals. It includes line segment extraction based on Canny edge maps, feature selection based on physical properties, and subsequent tracking of primary and secondary wavefronts. This tracking is completely automated; it runs in real time on three 834-image sequences using forty 250 MHZ processors. Results supporting physical observations are presented in terms of both feature tracking and velocity analysis.

  19. Crack healing in cross-ply composites observed by dynamic mechanical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Christian; Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    2015-03-01

    Cross-ply composites with healable polymer matrices are characterized using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). The [90,0]s samples are prepared by embedding layers of unidirectional glass or carbon fibers in 2MEP4FS, a polymer with thermally reversible covalent cross-links, which has been shown to be capable of healing internal cracks and fully recovering fracture toughness when the crack surfaces are kept in contact. After fabrication, cracks in the composites' transverse plies are observed due to residual thermal stresses introduced during processing. Single cantilever bending DMA measurements show the samples exhibit periods of increasing storage moduli with increasing temperature. These results are accurately modeled as a one-dimensional composite, which captures the underlying physics of the phenomenon. The effect of cracks on the stiffness is accounted for by a shear-lag model. The predicted crack density of the glass fiber composite is shown to fall within a range observed from microscopy images. Crack healing occurs as a function of temperature, with chemistry and mechanics-based rationales given for the onset and conclusion of healing. The model captures the essential physics of the phenomenon and yields results in accord with experimental observations.

  20. Coupled bending-torsional vibration analysis of rotor with rub and crack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Tejas H.; Darpe, Ashish K.

    2009-10-01

    Rotor-stator rub and fatigue crack of the shafts are two important rotor faults. They have detrimental effects on health and reliability of the rotating machinery. In this paper, modelling and vibration signature analysis of rotor with rotor-stator rub, transverse fatigue crack and unbalance is attempted. The rotor-stator interaction effects on the response of a rotor are investigated in the presence/absence of a transverse crack. The torsional vibrations are investigated for their sensitivity to rubbing using finite element model that also accounts for cross coupling of stiffness introduced due to crack. Due to the presence of both rotor-stator rub and transverse crack in a horizontal rotor, the system becomes highly nonlinear. The time localised rub excitations and nonlinear stiffness variation due to breathing of the crack influence the rotor response in both lateral and torsional modes and are explored extensively using Hilbert-Huang transform with the objective of unravelling some unique features of these faults that may be useful for fault identification.

  1. Nonlinear Steady-State Vibration Analysis of a Beam with Breathing Cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiya, Keisuke; Yoshinaga, Terumitsu

    This paper presents a method for analysis of steady-state vibration of a beam with breathing cracks, which open and close during vibration. There are several papers treating problems of vibration analysis of a beam with breathing cracks. However, due to their treatments of the condition which determines the switch between the open and closed states of the crack, it is difficult for one to obtain steady-state vibration efficiently by methods such as the incremental harmonic balance method. Since opening and closing of a breathing crack depends on the sign of the bending moment, or the curvature, of the beam, the key point to this problem is explicit treatment of the bending moment. The mixed variational principle allows one to use deflection as well as bending moment as primary variables in the governing equation. In this paper a governing equation of a beam with breathing cracks is derived by a finite element procedure based on the mixed variational principle. Then, the derived governing equations are solved by combining the iteration method and the harmonic balance method. Finally, examples of analysis by the presented method are given.

  2. Development the Methods for Preventing Hot Cracking With Use Analysis of Temperature Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ol'khovik, Evgeniy

    2016-08-01

    The reasons for formation of hot cracks in steel castings having difficult geometric shape of a revolution body are discussed in the paper. Mathematical model for the calculation of metal castings solidification and analysis of temperature conditions, which determines the conditions of hot cracking formation are proposed. The advantage of developed model is ability to use only results of thermal analysis without special calculation of stress-strain state. Criteria for evaluating of thermal conditions for directional solidification and heat dissipation in mold is developed, what allowing to correct technology of casting for defects prevention.

  3. Elastoplastic crack analysis of thermally shocked functionally graded material with neural network application

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagaki, Michihiko; Shibata; Yasunari; Kuranari, Reiji; Hagihara, Seiya

    1995-11-01

    An analytical methodology is developed for studying a cracked in a functionally graded material subjected to an intense thermal shock load. An elastoplastic material modeling of the functionally graded material is performed with the use of a micromechanics analysis and a hierarchical neural network algorithm. The material is compose of ZrO{sub 2} and Ti-6Al-4V, where the plastic flow is considered to occur in the titanium alloy phase. The elastic-plastic constitutive law for the functionally graded material is described by a micromechanics analysis on a periodic grain model subsequently processed by the use of a hierarchical neural network for arbitrary temperature and volume fraction. To detect the crack-tip fracture severity in the highly inhomogeneous media, T* integral parameter is employed for the thermal shock problem of the cracked material.

  4. Highly transient elastodynamic crack growth in a bimaterial interface: Higher order asymptotic analysis and optical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cheng; Lambros, John; Rosakis, Ares J.

    1993-12-01

    A HIGHER ORDER asymptotic analysis of the transient deformation field surrounding the tip of a crack running dynamically along a bimaterial interface is presented. An asymptotic methodology is used to reduce the problem to one of the Riemann-Hilbert type. Its solution furnishes displacement potentials which are used to evaluate explicitly the near-tip transient stress field. Crack-tip fields corresponding to crack speeds up to the lower of the two shear wave speeds are investigated. An experimental study of dynamic crack growth in PMMA steel interfaces using the optical method of CGS and high speed photography, is also described. Transonic terminal speeds (up to 1.4 cPMMAS) and initial accelerations ( $˜10 8 ms 2) are reported and discussed. Transient effects are found to be severe and more important than in homogeneous dynamic fracture. For subsonic crack growth, these experiments arc used to demonstrate the necessity of employing a fully transient expression in the analysis of optical data to predict accurately the complex dynamic stress intensity factor history.

  5. Higher-order analysis of crack tip fields in elastic power-law hardening materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, L.; Wang, T. C.; Shih, C. F.

    1993-04-01

    A HIGHER-ORDER asymptotic analysis of a stationary crack in an elastic power-law hardening material has been carried out for plane strain, Mode I. The extent to which elasticity affects the near-tip fields is determined by the strain hardening exponent n. Five terms in the asymptotic series for the stresses have been derived for n = 3. However, only three amplitudes can be independently prescribed. These are K1, K2 and K5 corresponding to amplitudes of the first-, second- and fifth-order terms. Four terms in the asymptotic series have been obtained for n = 5, 7 and 10; in these cases, the independent amplitudes are K1, K2 and K4. It is found that appropriate choices of K2 and K4 can reproduce near-tip fields representative of a broad range of crack tip constraints in moderate and low hardening materials. Indeed, fields characterized by distinctly different stress triaxiality levels (established by finite element analysis) have been matched by the asymptotic series. The zone of dominance of the asymptotic series extends over distances of about 10 crack openings ahead of the crack tip encompassing length scales that are microstructurally significant. Furthermore, the higher-order terms collectively describe a spatially uniform hydrostatic stress field (of adjustable magnitude) ahead of the crack. Our results lend support to a suggestion that J and a measure of near-tip stress triaxiality can describe the full range of near-tip states.

  6. Three-dimensional elastic-plastic finite-element analysis of fatigue crack propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goglia, G. L.; Chermahini, R. G.

    1985-01-01

    Fatigue cracks are a major problem in designing structures subjected to cyclic loading. Cracks frequently occur in structures such as aircraft and spacecraft. The inspection intervals of many aircraft structures are based on crack-propagation lives. Therefore, improved prediction of propagation lives under flight-load conditions (variable-amplitude loading) are needed to provide more realistic design criteria for these structures. The main thrust was to develop a three-dimensional, nonlinear, elastic-plastic, finite element program capable of extending a crack and changing boundary conditions for the model under consideration. The finite-element model is composed of 8-noded (linear-strain) isoparametric elements. In the analysis, the material is assumed to be elastic-perfectly plastic. The cycle stress-strain curve for the material is shown Zienkiewicz's initial-stress method, von Mises's yield criterion, and Drucker's normality condition under small-strain assumptions are used to account for plasticity. The three-dimensional analysis is capable of extending the crack and changing boundary conditions under cyclic loading.

  7. Analytical Round Robin for Elastic-Plastic Analysis of Surface Cracked Plates: Phase I Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, D. N.; Allen, P. A.

    2012-01-01

    An analytical round robin for the elastic-plastic analysis of surface cracks in flat plates was conducted with 15 participants. Experimental results from a surface crack tension test in 2219-T8 aluminum plate provided the basis for the inter-laboratory study (ILS). The study proceeded in a blind fashion given that the analysis methodology was not specified to the participants, and key experimental results were withheld. This approach allowed the ILS to serve as a current measure of the state of the art for elastic-plastic fracture mechanics analysis. The analytical results and the associated methodologies were collected for comparison, and sources of variability were studied and isolated. The results of the study revealed that the J-integral analysis methodology using the domain integral method is robust, providing reliable J-integral values without being overly sensitive to modeling details. General modeling choices such as analysis code, model size (mesh density), crack tip meshing, or boundary conditions, were not found to be sources of significant variability. For analyses controlled only by far-field boundary conditions, the greatest source of variability in the J-integral assessment is introduced through the constitutive model. This variability can be substantially reduced by using crack mouth opening displacements to anchor the assessment. Conclusions provide recommendations for analysis standardization.

  8. Sampling and analysis plan for site assessment during the closure or replacement of nonradioactive underground storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Gitt, M.J.

    1990-08-01

    The Tank Management Program is responsible for closure or replacement of nonradioactive underground storage tanks throughout the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). A Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) has been developed that complies with EPA regulations and with INEL Tank Removal Procedures for sampling activities associated with site assessment during these closure or replacement activities. The SAP will ensure that all data are valid, and it also will function as a Quality Assurance Project Plan. 18 refs., 8 figs., 11 tabs.

  9. Phase 1 sampling and analysis plan for the 304 Concretion Facility closure activities

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, J.G.

    1994-09-14

    This document provides guidance for the initial (Phase 1) sampling and analysis activities associated with the proposed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) clean closure of the 304 Concretion Facility. Over its service life, the 304 Concretion Facility housed the pilot plants associated with cladding uranium cores, was used to store engineering equipment and product chemicals, was used to treat low-level radioactive mixed waste, recyclable scrap uranium generated during nuclear fuel fabrication, and uranium-titanium alloy chips, and was used for the repackaging of spent halogenated solvents from the nuclear fuels manufacturing process. The strategy for clean closure of the 304 Concretion Facility is to decontaminate, sample (Phase 1 sampling), and evaluate results. If the evaluation indicates that a limited area requires additional decontamination for clean closure, the limited area will be decontaminated, resampled (Phase 2 sampling), and the result evaluated. If the evaluation indicates that the constituents of concern are below action levels, the facility will be clean closed. Or, if the evaluation indicates that the constituents of concern are present above action levels, the condition of the facility will be evaluated and appropriate action taken. There are a total of 37 sampling locations comprising 12 concrete core, 1 concrete chip, 9 soil, 11 wipe, and 4 asphalt core sampling locations. Analysis for inorganics and volatile organics will be performed on the concrete core and soil samples. Separate concrete core samples will be required for the inorganic and volatile organic analysis (VOA). Analysis for inorganics only will be performed on the concrete chip, wipe, and asphalt samples.

  10. Analysis of stress corrosion cracking in alloy 718 following commercial reactor exposure

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Leonard, Keith J.; Gussev, Maxim N.; Stevens, Jacqueline N.; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2015-08-24

    Alloy 718 is generally considered a highly corrosion-resistant material but can still be susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). The combination of factors leading to SCC susceptibility in the alloy is not always clear enough. In this paper, alloy 718 leaf spring (LS) materials that suffered stress corrosion damage during two 24-month cycles in pressurized water reactor service, operated to >45 MWd/mtU burn-up, was investigated. Compared to archival samples fabricated through the same processing conditions, little microstructural and property changes occurred in the material with in-service irradiation, contrary to high dose rate laboratory-based experiments reported in literature. Though the lackmore » of delta phase formation along grain boundaries would suggest a more SCC resistant microstructure, grain boundary cracking in the material was extensive. Crack propagation routes were explored through focused ion beam milling of specimens near the crack tip for transmission electron microscopy as well as in polished plan view and cross-sectional samples for electron backscatter diffraction analysis. It has been shown in this study that cracks propagated mainly along random high-angle grain boundaries, with the material around cracks displaying a high local density of dislocations. The slip lines were produced through the local deformation of the leaf spring material above their yield strength. Also, the cause for local SCC appears to be related to oxidation of both slip lines and grain boundaries, which under the high in-service stresses resulted in crack development in the material.« less

  11. Analytical modeling for vibration analysis of thin rectangular orthotropic/functionally graded plates with an internal crack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, P. V.; Jain, N. K.; Ramtekkar, G. D.

    2015-05-01

    An analytical model is presented for vibration analysis of a thin orthotropic and general functionally graded rectangular plate containing an internal crack located at the center. The continuous line crack is parallel to one of the edges of the plate. The equation of motion of the orthotropic plate is derived using the equilibrium principle. The crack terms are formulated using Line Spring Model. The effect of location of crack along the thickness of the plate on natural frequencies is analyzed using appropriate crack compliance coefficients in the Line Spring Model. By using the Berger formulation for in-plane forces, the derived equation of motion of the cracked plate is transformed into a cubic nonlinear system. Applying the Galerkin's method, the equation is converted into well known Duffing equation. The peak amplitude is obtained by employing Multiple Scales perturbation method. The effect of nonlinearity is also established by deriving frequency response equation for the cracked plate using method of multiple scales. The influence of crack length, boundary conditions and crack location along the thickness, on the natural frequencies of a square and rectangular plate is demonstrated. It is found that the vibration characteristics are affected by the length and location of crack along the thickness of the plate. It is thus deduced that the natural frequencies are minimum when crack is internal and its depth is symmetric about the mid-plane of the plate for all the three boundary conditions considered. Further, it is concluded that the presence of crack across the fibers decreases the frequency more as compared to crack along the fibers. The Effect of varying elasticity ratio on the fundamental frequencies of the cracked plate is also established.

  12. Investigation of Helicopter Longeron Cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Baughman, James; Wallace, Terryl A.

    2009-01-01

    Four cracked longerons, containing a total of eight cracks, were provided for study. Cracked regions were cut from the longerons. Load was applied to open the cracks, enabling crack surface examination. Examination revealed that crack propagation was driven by fatigue loading in all eight cases. Fatigue crack initiation appears to have occurred on the top edge of the longerons near geometric changes that affect component bending stiffness. Additionally, metallurgical analysis has revealed a local depletion in alloying elements in the crack initiation regions that may be a contributing factor. Fatigue crack propagation appeared to be initially driven by opening-mode loading, but at a crack length of approximately 0.5 inches (12.7 mm), there is evidence of mixed-mode crack loading. For the longest cracks studied, shear-mode displacements destroyed crack-surface features of interest over significant portions of the crack surfaces.

  13. An Enriched Radial Point Interpolation Method (e-RPIM) for the Analysis of Crack Tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Y. T.; Wang, W. L.; Fu, Q.

    2010-05-01

    In this paper, an enriched radial point interpolation method (e-RPIM) is developed for the determination of crack tip fields. The conventional RBF interpolation is novelly augmented by the suitable trigonometric basis functions to reflect the properties of stresses for the crack tip fields. The performance of the enriched meshfree RBF shape functions is firstly investigated using the surface fitting. The surface fitting results have proven that, comparing with the conventional RBF, the enriched RBF interpolation has: 1) a similar accuracy to fit a polynomial surface; and 2) a much better accuracy to fit a trigonometric surface then the conventional RBF interpolation. It has proven that the enriched RBF shape function will not only possess all advantages of conventional RBF interpolation, but also can accurately reflect the properties of stresses for the crack tip fields. The system of equations for the crack analysis is then derived based on the enriched RBF shape function and the meshfree weak-form. Crack problems are simulated using this newly developed e-RPIM method. It has been demonstrated that the present e-RPIM is very accurate and stable, and it has very good potential to develop a practical simulation tool for fracture mechanics problems.

  14. Analysis of Internal Cracks in Continuous Casting Slabs with Soft Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Zhang, Jiongming; Xiao, Chao; Wang, Shunxi; Song, Wei

    2016-03-01

    The formation of internal cracks in continuous casting slabs is mainly attributed to the strain status and microsegregation near the solidifying front of the slabs. By analyzing the internal cracks of medium carbon microalloy steel, the obtained conclusions are that C, P, S, etc. enrich in dendrites and exist in grain boundaries, but these are just the internal causes, and the root cracking causes the tensile stress of solidification front. When the slab passes through the straightening segments, the liquid core thickness is large, and the liquid steel in the space of columnar crystals is not completely frozen. Therefore, the reduction effect of rollers results in the strain of solidification front exceeding the critical value. However, the corresponding strain in the arc and horizontal segments does not exceed this critical value, so the solidification front in the straightening segments would be much easy to crack. The statistics analysis shows that after soft reduction and straightening process are separately carried out, the occurrence rate of intermediate cracks is reduced by 41.3%.

  15. Thermodynamic analysis on the role of hydrogen in anodic stress corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, L.; Mao, X.

    1995-11-01

    A synergistic effect of hydrogen and stress on a corrosion rate was analyzed with thermodynamics. The results showed that an interaction of stress and hydrogen could increase the corrosion rate remarkably. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of austenitic stainless steel (ASS) was investigated in boiling chloride solution to confirm the analysis. Hydrogen could be introduced into the specimen concentrated at the crack tip during SCC in boiling LiCl solution (143 C). The concentrating factor is about 3 which is consistent with calculated results according to stress induced diffusion.

  16. Mode I analysis of a cracked circular disk subject to a couple and a force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, B.

    1977-01-01

    Mode 1 stress intensity coefficients were obtained for an edge-cracked disk (round compact specimen). Results for this plane elastostatic problem, obtained by a boundary collocation analysis are presented for ratios 0.35 less than A/D less than 1, where A is the crack length and D is the disk diameter. The results presented are for two complementary types of loading. By superposition of these results the stress intensity factor K sub I for any practical load line location of a pin-loaded round compact specimen can be obtained.

  17. Small-crack effects in high-strength aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Wu, X. R.; Venneri, S. L.; Li, C. G.

    1994-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Chinese Aeronautical Establishment participated in a Fatigue and Fracture Mechanics Cooperative Program. The program objectives were to identify and characterize crack initiation and growth of small cracks (10 microns to 2 mm long) in commonly used US and PRC aluminum alloys, to improve fracture mechanics analyses of surface- and corner-crack configurations, and to develop improved life-prediction methods. Fatigue and small-crack tests were performed on single-edgenotch tension (SENT) specimens and large-crack tests were conducted on center-crack tension specimens for constant-amplitude (stress ratios of -1, 0, and 0.5) and Mini-TWIST spectrum loading. The plastic replica method was used to monitor the initiation and growth of small fatigue cracks at the semicircular notch. Crack growth results from each laboratory on 7075-T6 bare and LC9cs clad aluminum alloys agreed well and showed that fatigue life was mostly crack propagation from a material defect (inclusion particles or void) or from the cladding layer. Finite-element and weight-function methods were used to determine stress intensity factors for surface and corner cracks in the SENT specimens. Equations were then developed and used in a crack growth and crack-closure model to correlate small- and large-crack data and to make life predictions for various load histories. The cooperative program produced useful experimental data and efficient analysis methods for improving life predictions. The results should ultimately improve aircraft structural reliability and safety.

  18. Thermodynamic analysis of a process for producing high-octane gasoline components from catalytic cracking gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismailova, Z. R.; Pirieva, Kh. B.; Kasimov, A. A.; Dzhamalova, S. A.; Gadzhizade, S. M.; Nuriev, Sh. A.; Zeinalova, S. Kh.; Dzhafarov, R. P.

    2016-03-01

    The results from a thermodynamic analysis of high-octane gasoline component production from catalytic cracking gases using zeolite catalyst OMNIKAT-210P modified with Ni, Co, Cr are presented. The equilibrium constants of the reactions assumed to occur in this process are calculated, along with the equilibrium yield of the reactions.

  19. Use of measurement uncertainty analysis to assess accuracy of carbon mass balance closure for a cellulase production process.

    PubMed

    Schell, Daniel J; Sáez, Juan Carlos; Hamilton, Jenny; Tholudur, Arun; McMillan, James D

    2002-01-01

    Closing carbon mass balances is a critical and necessary step for verifying the performance of any conversion process. We developed a methodology for calculating carbon mass balance closures for a cellulase production process and then applied measurement uncertainty analysis to calculate 95% confidence limits to assess the accuracy of the results. Cellulase production experiments were conducted in 7-L fermentors using Trichoderma reesei grown on pure cellulose (Solka-floc), glucose, or lactose. All input and output carbon-containing streams were measured and carbon dioxide in the exhaust gas was quantified using a mass spectrometer. On Solka-floc, carbon mass balances ranged from 90 to 100% closure for the first 48 h but increased to 101 to 135% closure from 72 h to the end of the cultivation at 168 h. Carbon mass balance closures for soluble sugar substrates ranged from 92 to 127% over the entire course of the cultivations. The 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for carbon mass balance closure were typically +/-11 to 12 percentage points after 48 h of cultivation. Many of the carbon mass balance results did not bracket 100% closure within the 95% CIs. These results suggest that measurement problems with the experimental or analytical methods may exist. This work shows that uncertainty analysis can be a useful diagnostic tool for identifying measurement problems in complex biochemical systems.

  20. Soil sampling and analysis plan for the 3718-F Alkali Metal Treatment and Storage Facility closure activities

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnichsen, J.C.

    1997-05-01

    Amendment V.13.B.b to the approved closure plan (DOE-RL 1995a) requires that a soil sampling and analysis plan be prepared and submitted to the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) for review and approval. Amendment V.13.B.c requires that a diagram of the 3718-F Alkali Metal Treatment and Storage Facility unit (the treatment, storage, and disposal [TSD] unit) boundary that is to be closed, including the maximum extent of operation, be prepared and submitted as part is of the soil sampling and analysis plan. This document describes the sampling and analysis that is to be performed in response to these requirements and amends the closure plan. Specifically, this document supersedes Section 6.2, lines 43--46, and Section 7.3.6 of the closure plan. Results from the analysis will be compared to cleanup levels identified in the closure plan. These cleanup levels will be established using residential exposure assumptions in accordance with the Model Toxics Control Act (MTCA) Cleanup Regulation (Washington Administrative Code [WAC] 173-340) as required in Amendment V.13.B.I. Results of all sampling, including the raw analytical data, a summary of analytical results, a data validation package, and a narrative summary with conclusions will be provided to Ecology as specified in Amendment V.13.B.e. The results and process used to collect and analyze the soil samples will be certified by a licensed professional engineer. These results and a certificate of closure for the balance of the TSD unit, as outlined in Chapter 7.0 of the approved closure plan (storage shed, concrete pad, burn building, scrubber, and reaction tanks), will provide the basis for a closure determination.

  1. Analysis of a Generally Oriented Crack in a Functionally Graded Strip Sandwiched Between Two Homogeneous Half Planes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shbeeb, N.; Binienda, W. K.; Kreider, K.

    1999-01-01

    The driving forces for a generally oriented crack embedded in a Functionally Graded strip sandwiched between two half planes are analyzed using singular integral equations with Cauchy kernels, and integrated using Lobatto-Chebyshev collocation. Mixed-mode Stress Intensity Factors (SIF) and Strain Energy Release Rates (SERR) are calculated. The Stress Intensity Factors are compared for accuracy with previously published results. Parametric studies are conducted for various nonhomogeneity ratios, crack lengths. crack orientation and thickness of the strip. It is shown that the SERR is more complete and should be used for crack propagation analysis.

  2. Estimation and veering analysis of nonlinear resonant frequencies of cracked plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, A.; Castanier, M. P.; Pierre, C.

    2009-10-01

    In this paper, veering phenomena in the nonlinear vibration frequencies of a cantilevered cracked plate are investigated, and an efficient method for estimating these frequencies is proposed. Of particular interest is the vibration response in parameter regions where the natural frequency loci show veerings. For a representative finite element model, it is shown that the veerings due to crack length variation involve the switching of mode shapes and modal interactions. The nonlinearity caused by the crack closing effect is then introduced, and its effect on the vibration response near the veerings is discussed. The nonlinear forced response analysis is carried out using a hybrid frequency/time domain method, which is based on the method of harmonic balance. The nonlinear vibration response near loci veerings and crossings due to the variation of crack length is investigated in detail. Finally, a novel method for estimating the nonlinear resonant frequency is introduced by generalizing the concept of bilinear frequency approximation, and the method is validated with the results of nonlinear forced response analysis for several veering regions.

  3. Analysis of matrix cracking and local delamination in (0/theta/-theta)sub s graphite epoxy laminates under tension load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salpekar, S. A.; Obrien, T. K.

    1991-01-01

    Several 3D finite element analyses of (0/theta/-theta)sub s graphite epoxy laminates, where theta=15, 20, 25, 30, and 45 deg, subjected to axial tension load were performed. The interlaminar stresses in the theta/-theta interface were calculated with and without a matrix crack in the central -theta plies. The interlaminar normal stress changes from a small compressive stress when no matrix crack is present to a high tensile stress at the intersection of the matrix crack and free edge. The analysis of local delamination from the -theta matrix crack indicates a high strain energy release rate and a localized mode I component near the free edge, within one ply distance from the matrix crack. In order to examine the stress state causing the matrix cracking the maximum principal normal stress in a plane perpendicular to the fiber direction in the -theta ply was calculated in an uncracked laminate. The corresponding shear stress parallel to the fiber was also calculated. The principal normal stress at the laminate edge increases through the ply thickness and reached a very high tensile value at the theta/-theta interface indicating that the crack in the -theta ply may initiate at the theta/-theta interface. Crack profiles on the laminate edge in the -theta ply were constructed from the principal stress directions. The cracks were found to be more curved for layups with smaller theta angles, which is consistent with experimental observations in the literature.

  4. "That Racism Thing": A Critical Race Discourse Analysis of a Conflict over the Proposed Closure of a Black High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briscoe, Felecia M.; Khalifa, Muhammad A.

    2015-01-01

    Using critical race discourse analysis, this study examines descriptions of a heated controversy over the proposed closure of the only primarily black high school in a large urban city. Participants included community members and the district and school leaders who were key in the controversy. Based on Foucault's analysis of power we looked for…

  5. Mode I crack analysis in single crystals with anisotropic discrete dislocation plasticity: II. Stationary crack-tip fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soleymani Shishvan, Siamak; Van der Giessen, Erik

    2013-09-01

    Small-scale yielding around a stationary mode I crack in a cubic single crystal is analyzed in terms of plane-strain elastically anisotropic discrete dislocation plasticity (DDP). Two symmetric crack orientations are considered with two objectives in mind. First, we study the sensitivity to materials aspects such as dislocation source density and elastic anisotropy as well as orientation dependence. Plastic deformation around the crack tip in a single crystal is a patchy field due to the discreteness of the slip systems, as demonstrated in analytical solutions and experimental observations. While these solutions/observations have in common that the plastic zone is composed of sectors with specific slip system(s) active inside each sector, detailed comparisons—recapitulated in this paper—reveal a few, yet significant, discrepancies. In an attempt to resolve these issues, the second objective of this paper is to construct sector arrangements of active slip system(s) from the present DDP simulations and compare those with the analytical solutions. We find that the estimated sector arrangements are in best agreement with the hardening analytical solutions of Saeedvafa and Rice (1989 J. Mech. Phys. Solids 37 673-91) indeed, angular variations of stresses around the crack tip confirm this observation.

  6. Non-linear dynamical analysis of crack surface perturbations and their dependence on velocity and direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Dov; Be'ery, Ilan

    2004-04-01

    The fracture surfaces of single crystal [1 0 0] silicon specimens, fractured under three-point bending (3PB) and subjected to a high strain energy upon cracking, revealed exceptional surface perturbations, generated during the unstable propagation. While macroscopically the crack is propagating on the (1 1 1) low energy cleavage plane, microscopic examination revealed small angled deviations from and fluctuations along that plane. Furthermore, while the crack is propagating at a velocity of nearly 3000 m/s in the [1 1¯ 0] direction, its velocity in the [1 1 2¯] direction is two orders of magnitude lower, with distinctive surface perturbations. The amplitude and complexity of the perturbations increase as the normal velocity vector changes its direction and magnitude. These perturbations were recorded with a profilometer and analyzed using non-linear dynamical analysis tools. This study provides an opportunity to interpret surface phenomena of one of the most general cases of fracture and to study the effect of major variables on the nature of the perturbations involved, such as the local crack tip velocity and the crystallographic orientations. It is shown that the surface perturbations are chaotic deterministic in nature and can be described by high order non-linear differential equations; the order of the equation varying with the variations of the local velocity and direction.

  7. Three-dimensional hybrid-stress finite element analysis of composite laminates with cracks and cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S. S.

    1985-01-01

    A three-dimensional hybrid-stress finite element analysis of composite laminates containing cutouts and cracks is presented. Fully three-dimensional, hexahedral isoparametric elements of the hybrid-stress model are formulated on the basis of the Hellinger-Reissner variational principle. Traction-free edges, cutouts, and crack surfaces are modeled by imposition of exact traction boundary conditions along element surfaces. Special boundary and surface elements are constructed by introducing proper constraints on assumed stress functions. The Lagrangian multiplier technique is used to enforce ply-interface continuity conditions in hybrid bimaterial composite elements for modeling the interface region in a composite laminate. Two examples are given to illustrate the capability of the present method of approach: (1) the well-known delamination problem in an angle-ply laminate, and (2) the important problem of a composite laminate containing a circular hole. Results are presented in detail for each case. Implications of interlaminar and intralaminar crack initiation, growth and fracture in composites containing cracks and cutouts are discussed.

  8. Analysis of crack initiation and growth in the high level vibration test at Tadotsu

    SciTech Connect

    Kassir, M.K.; Park, Y.J.; Hofmayer, C.H.; Bandyopadhyay, K.K.; Shteyngart, S.

    1993-08-01

    The High Level Vibration Test data are used to assess the accuracy and usefulness of current engineering methodologies for predicting crack initiation and growth in a cast stainless steel pipe elbow under complex, large amplitude loading. The data were obtained by testing at room temperature a large scale modified model of one loop of a PWR primary coolant system at the Tadotsu Engineering Laboratory in Japan. Fatigue crack initiation time is reasonably predicted by applying a modified local strain approach (Coffin-Mason-Goodman equation) in conjunction with Miner`s rule of cumulative damage. Three fracture mechanics methodologies are applied to investigate the crack growth behavior observed in the hot leg of the model. These are: the {Delta}K methodology (Paris law), {Delta}J concepts and a recently developed limit load stress-range criterion. The report includes a discussion on the pros and cons of the analysis involved in each of the methods, the role played by the key parameters influencing the formulation and a comparison of the results with the actual crack growth behavior observed in the vibration test program. Some conclusions and recommendations for improvement of the methodologies are also provided.

  9. Stable Crack Growth During Thermal Actuation of Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jape, S.; Baxevanis, T.; Lagoudas, D. C.

    2016-03-01

    A finite element analysis of crack growth is carried out in shape memory alloys subjected to thermal variations under plane strain, mode I, constant applied loading. The crack is assumed to propagate at a critical level of the crack-tip energy release rate which is modeled using the virtual crack closure technique. The load level, applied at a high temperature at which the austenite phase is stable, is assumed sufficiently low so that the resulting crack-tip energy release rate is smaller than the critical value but sufficiently high so that the critical value is reached during cooling, initiating crack growth (Baxevanis and Lagoudas in Int J Fract 191:191-213, 2015). Stable crack growth is observed, mainly associated with the shielding effect of the transformed material left in the wake of the advancing crack. Results pertaining to the near-tip mechanical fields and fracture toughness are presented and their sensitivity to phase transformation metrics and bias load levels is investigated.

  10. Elevated temperature crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K. S.; Vanstone, R. H.; Malik, S. N.; Laflen, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    A study was performed to examine the applicability of path-independent (P-I) integrals to crack growth problems in hot section components of gas turbine aircraft engines. Alloy 718 was used and the experimental parameters included combined temperature and strain cycling, thermal gradients, elastic-plastic strain levels, and mean strains. A literature review was conducted of proposed P-I integrals, and those capable of analyzing hot section component problems were selected and programmed into the postprocessor of a finite element code. Detailed elastic-plastic finite element analyses were conducted to simulate crack growth and crack closure of the test specimen, and to evaluate the P-I integrals. It was shown that the selected P-I integrals are very effective for predicting crack growth for isothermal conditions.

  11. Sensitivity Analysis of Fatigue Crack Growth Model for API Steels in Gaseous Hydrogen

    PubMed Central

    Amaro, Robert L; Rustagi, Neha; Drexler, Elizabeth S; Slifka, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    A model to predict fatigue crack growth of API pipeline steels in high pressure gaseous hydrogen has been developed and is presented elsewhere. The model currently has several parameters that must be calibrated for each pipeline steel of interest. This work provides a sensitivity analysis of the model parameters in order to provide (a) insight to the underlying mathematical and mechanistic aspects of the model, and (b) guidance for model calibration of other API steels. PMID:26601024

  12. Sensitivity Analysis of Fatigue Crack Growth Model for API Steels in Gaseous Hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Amaro, Robert L; Rustagi, Neha; Drexler, Elizabeth S; Slifka, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    A model to predict fatigue crack growth of API pipeline steels in high pressure gaseous hydrogen has been developed and is presented elsewhere. The model currently has several parameters that must be calibrated for each pipeline steel of interest. This work provides a sensitivity analysis of the model parameters in order to provide (a) insight to the underlying mathematical and mechanistic aspects of the model, and (b) guidance for model calibration of other API steels.

  13. Determining fatigue crack opening loads from near-crack-tip displacement measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Riddell, W.T.; Piascik, R.S.; Sutton, M.A.; Zhao, W.; McNeill, S.R.; Helm, J.D.

    1999-07-01

    The aim of this research was to develop a near-crack-tip measurement method that quantifies crack closure levels in the near-threshold fatigue crack growth regime--a regime where crack closure is not well characterized by remote compliance methods. Further understanding of crack closure mechanics was gained by performing novel crack growth experiments in conjunction with numerical simulations of three-dimensional crack-front propagation. Steady-state (i.e., constant growth rate) fatigue crack growth rates were characterized by performing constant cyclic stress intensity range ({Delta}K) experiments over a wide range of stress ratios (R). Near-crack-tip (less than 0.3 mm behind) load-versus-displacement measurements were conducted on the specimen surface using a novel noncontact experimental technique (Digital Imaging Displacement System--DIDS). The experiments and simulations revealed that the three-dimensional aspects of fatigue crack closure must be considered to determine correct opening load levels from near-crack-tip load-versus-displacement data. It was shown that near-crack-front, but increase near the free surface. The interior opening load was found to collapse closure-affected data to intrinsic rates, and thus shown to relate to the true crack-front driving force parameter. Surface opening load DIDS measurements made at an optimal distance behind the crack tip were used to correlate da/dN with {Delta}K{sub eff}. Opening load determinations made less than the optimal distance behind the crack tip were shown to be too high to correlate fatigue crack growth rates.

  14. On stress analysis of a crack-layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chudnovsky, A.; Dolgopolsky, A.; Kachanov, M.

    1984-01-01

    This work considers the problem of elastic interaction of a macrocrack with an array of microcracks in the vicinity of the macrocrack tip. Using the double layer potential techniques, the solution to the problem within the framework of the plane problem of elastostatics has been obtained. Three particular problems of interest to fracture mechanics have been analyzed. It follows from analysis that microcrack array can either amplify or reduce the resulting stress field of the macrocrack-microcrack array system depending on the array's configuration. Using the obtained elastic solution the energy release rate associated with the translational motion of the macrocrack-microcrack array system has been evaluated.

  15. Numerical Analysis of Patching Efficiency in Cracked Rectangular Structural Panels Repaired with a Bonded FRP Composite Patch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, Hideki; Fujimoto, Shin-Etsu; Shibuya, Yotsugi

    Repair with bonded fiber-reinforced polymer composite patches has been recognized as an efficient and cost-effective method to extend the service life of aging aircraft. In this paper, a two-dimensional three-layered finite element model consisting of layers of composite patch, adhesive and cracked structural panel is made to analyze the stresses in cracked rectangular structural panels repaired with a bonded circular composite patch. The composite patch and structural panel are modeled as separate layers which are covered with Mindlin plate elements, whereas the adhesive is modeled as a thin elastic layer. The modified crack closure method is used to obtain stress intensity factors at the crack tip. First, by calculating the stress intensity factors, the effects of the diameter and thickness of the circular composite patch on the patching efficiency are examined. The stress intensity factors are also calculated at various hygrothermal conditions and the effect of the environment on the patching efficiency is clarified. Finally, the diagram of patching efficiency is presented to evaluate easily the patching efficiency at hygrothermal conditions.

  16. Deformation Analysis of Surface Crack in Rolling and Wire Drawing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, Tetsuo; Yoshida, Kazunari

    The surface flaw of a drawn wire has a significant influence on the quality of a product. High-surface-quality drawn wires and rods have been required for the manufacture of automobiles and machines. Wire breaks due to large surface defects are common problems in wire drawing. The authors carried out rolling and multi-pass drawing of a stainless-steel wire with an artificial scratch, and investigated the growth and disappearance of a scratch from both sides by experiments and Finite Element Analysis (FEA). When the scratch angle is small, the scratch side surfaces are pushed toward each other and the scratch becomes an overlap defect. In contrast, when the scratch angle is large, the bottom of the scratch rises, and the scratch is recovered satisfactorily. Furthermore, the scratch shape and the drawing conditions were varied, and the deformation state of a scratch was clarified.

  17. Mitigation of Crack Damage in Metallic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leser, Patrick E.; Newman, John A.; Smith, Stephen W.; Leser, William P.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Wallace, Terryl A.; Glaessgen, Edward H.; Piascik, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    A system designed to mitigate or heal crack damage in metallic materials has been developed where the protected material or component is coated with a low-melting temperature film. After a crack is formed, the material is heated, melting the film which then infiltrates the crack opening through capillary action. Upon solidification, the healing material inhibits further crack damage in two ways. While the crack healing material is intact, it acts like an adhesive that bonds or bridges the crack faces together. After fatigue loading damages, the healing material in the crack mouth inhibits further crack growth by creating artificially-high crack closure levels. Mechanical test data show that this method sucessfully arrests or retards crack growth in laboratory specimens.

  18. Microfractures produced by a laboratory scale hypervelocity impact into granite. [for lunar sample crack spectra interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegfried, R. W., II; Simmons, G.; Richter, D.; Hoerz, F.

    1977-01-01

    Differential strain analysis and scanning electron microscopy are employed to study the microcracks produced in a granite block by shock waves from a hypervelocity impact. The anisotropy of the pre-shock cracks appears to control the orientations of the microcracks. Over the range 2 to 20 kbar, total crack porosity proves to be linearly related to shock pressure. The effect of the peak shock pressure on the width and median closure pressure of the crack spectra is also investigated. The results of the microcrack study may be useful in interpreting lunar samples.

  19. Separation of crack extension modes in orthotropic delamination models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beuth, Jack L.

    1995-01-01

    In the analysis of an interface crack between dissimilar elastic materials, the mode of crack extension is typically not unique, due to oscillatory behavior of near-tip stresses and displacements. This behavior currently limits the applicability of interfacial fracture mechanics as a means to predict composite delamination. The Virtual Crack Closure Technique (VCCT) is a method used to extract mode 1 and mode 2 energy release rates from numerical fracture solutions. The mode of crack extension extracted from an oscillatory solution using the VCCT is not unique due to the dependence of mode on the virtual crack extension length, Delta. In this work, a method is presented for using the VCCT to extract Delta-independent crack extension modes for the case of an interface crack between two in-plane orthotropic materials. The method does not involve altering the analysis to eliminate its oscillatory behavior. Instead, it is argued that physically reasonable, Delta-independent modes of crack extension can be extracted from oscillatory solutions. Knowledge of near-tip fields is used to determine the explicit Delta dependence of energy release rate parameters. Energy release rates are then defined that are separated from the oscillatory dependence on Delta. A modified VCCT using these energy release rate definitions is applied to results from finite element analyses, showing that Delta-independent modes of crack extension result. The modified technique has potential as a consistent method for extracting crack extension modes from numerical solutions. The Delta-independent modes extracted using this technique can also serve as guides for testing the convergence of finite element models. Direct applications of this work include the analysis of planar composite delamination problems, where plies or debonded laminates are modeled as in-plane orthotropic materials.

  20. NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF CRACK AND STRAIN BEHAVIOR OF RC SLAB IN STEEL-CONCRETE COMPOSITE GIRDER UNDER NEGATIVE BENDING

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Junichi; Nakajima, Akinori; Suzuki, Yasuo

    The sophisticated numerical analysis method is required to simulate the strain behavior of the reinforcement and the crack width of the RC slab, although many researches are conducted on the cracking behavior of the RC slab in the composite girder under the negative bending. In this paper, the numerical analysis method is constructed to evaluate the strain behavior of the reinforcement and the crack width of the RC slab in the steel-concrete composite girder subjected to the negative bending. The analysis method using the rigid body spring model takes into account the imperfect composite action between the steel girder and the RC slab, the bond between the reinforcement and the concrete, and the shrinkage of the concrete. As a result, it is confirmed that the analysis method can simulate the crack and the strain behavior of RC slab quantitatively in the steel-concrete composite girder under the negative bending.

  1. Low-frequency nondestructive analysis of cracks in multilayer structures using a scanning magnetic microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamo, M.; Nappi, C.; Sarnelli, E.

    2010-09-01

    The use of a scanning magnetic microscope (SMM) with a high temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) for quantitative measurements in eddy current nondestructive analysis (NDA) is presented. The SQUID has been used to detect the weak magnetic field variations around a small defect, close to a structural part generating an intensive magnetic field. The experimental data for a deep crack close to a rivet in a multilayer conducting plate have been taken in a RF-shielded environment and discussed in the light of the theoretical predictions. The results show that eddy current NDA can distinguish subsurface crack signals from wider structural signals, with defects located 10 mm below the surface. Moreover, in order to visualize the structure of the probing current when a circular induction coil is used, the simulation of eddy currents in a thick unflawed conducting plate has been carried out.

  2. Phenomenon analysis of stress corrosion cracking in the vessel head penetrations of French PWR`s

    SciTech Connect

    Pichon, C.; Buisine, D.; Faidy, C.; Gelpi, A.; Vaindirlis, M.

    1995-12-31

    During a hydrotest in 1991, a leak was detected on,a reactor vessel head (RVH) penetration of a French PWR. This leak was due to a phenomenon of Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking (PWSCC) affecting these penetrations in Alloy 600. The destructive and non-destructive examinations undertaken during the following months highlighted the generic nature of the degradations. In order to well understand this phenomenon and implement the most suitable maintenance policy, a large scale scientific program was decided and performed jointly by Electricite de France and FRAMATOME. The paper will present all the results obtained in this program concerning the parameters governing the PWSCC. In particular the following fields will be developed: (1) the material, its microstructure in line with the manufacturing and its susceptibility to PWSCC; (2) the stresses and their evaluations by measurements, mock up corrosion tests and Finite Element Analysis (FEA); (3) the effect of surface finish on crack initiation; and (4) the crack growth rate. This phenomenon analysis will be useful for evaluating the risk of PWSCC on other Alloy 600 areas in PWR`s primary system.

  3. Cohesive zone finite element analysis of crack initiation from a butt joint’s interface corner

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, E. D.

    2014-09-06

    The Cohesive zone (CZ) fracture analysis techniques are used to predict the initiation of crack growth from the interface corner of an adhesively bonded butt joint. In this plane strain analysis, a thin linear elastic adhesive layer is sandwiched between rigid adherends. There is no preexisting crack in the problem analyzed, and the focus is on how the shape of the traction–separation (T–U) relationship affects the predicted joint strength. Unlike the case of a preexisting interfacial crack, the calculated results clearly indicate that the predicted joint strength depends on the shape of the T–U relationship. Most of the calculations used a rectangular T–U relationship whose shape (aspect ratio) is defined by two parameters: the interfacial strength σ* and the work of separation/unit area Γ. The principal finding of this study is that for a specified adhesive layer thickness, there is any number of σ*, Γ combinations that generate the same predicted joint strength. For each combination there is a corresponding CZ length. We developed an approximate CZ-like elasticity solution to show how such combinations arise and their connection with the CZ length.

  4. Cohesive zone finite element analysis of crack initiation from a butt joint’s interface corner

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Reedy, E. D.

    2014-09-06

    The Cohesive zone (CZ) fracture analysis techniques are used to predict the initiation of crack growth from the interface corner of an adhesively bonded butt joint. In this plane strain analysis, a thin linear elastic adhesive layer is sandwiched between rigid adherends. There is no preexisting crack in the problem analyzed, and the focus is on how the shape of the traction–separation (T–U) relationship affects the predicted joint strength. Unlike the case of a preexisting interfacial crack, the calculated results clearly indicate that the predicted joint strength depends on the shape of the T–U relationship. Most of the calculations usedmore » a rectangular T–U relationship whose shape (aspect ratio) is defined by two parameters: the interfacial strength σ* and the work of separation/unit area Γ. The principal finding of this study is that for a specified adhesive layer thickness, there is any number of σ*, Γ combinations that generate the same predicted joint strength. For each combination there is a corresponding CZ length. We developed an approximate CZ-like elasticity solution to show how such combinations arise and their connection with the CZ length.« less

  5. An application of the J-integral to an incremental analysis of blunting crack behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Merkle, J.G. )

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes an analytical approach to estimating the elastic-plastic stresses and strains near the tip of a blunting crack with a finite root radius. Rice's original derivation of the path independent J-integral considered the possibility of a finite crack tip root radius. For this problem Creager's elastic analysis gives the relation between the stress intensity factor K{sub I} and the near tip stresses. It can be shown that the relation K{sub I}{sup 2} = E{prime}J holds when the root radius is finite. Recognizing that elastic-plastic behavior is incrementally linear then allows a derivation to be performed for a bielastic specimen having a crack tip region of reduced modulus, and the result differentiated to estimate elastic-plastic behavior. The result is the incremental form of Neuber's equation. This result does not require the assumption of any particular stress-strain relation. However by assuming a pure power law stress-strain relation and using Ilyushin's principle, the ordinary deformation theory form of Neuber's equation, K{sub {sigma}} K{sub {var epsilon}} = K{sub t}{sup 2}, is obtained. Applications of the incremental form of Neuber's equation have already been made to fatigue and fracture analysis. This paper helps to provide a theoretical basis for these methods previously considered semiempirical. 26 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Supersonic Aftbody Closure Wind-Tunnel Testing, Data Analysis, and Computational Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Jerry; Martin, Grant; Kubiatko, Paul

    1999-01-01

    This paper reports on the model, test, and results from the Langley Supersonic Aftbody Closure wind tunnel test. This project is an experimental evaluation of the 1.5% Technology Concept Aircraft (TCA) aftbody closure model (Model 23) in the Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. The baseline TCA design is the result of a multidisciplinary, multipoint optimization process and was developed using linear design and analysis methods, supplemented with Euler and Navier-Stokes numerical methods. After a thorough design review, it was decided to use an upswept blade attached to the forebody as the mounting system. Structural concerns dictated that a wingtip support system would not be feasible. Only the aftbody part of the model is metric. The metric break was chosen to be at the fuselage station where prior aft-sting supported models had been truncated. Model 23 is thus a modified version of Model 20. The wing strongback, flap parts, and nacelles from Model 20 were used, whereas new aftbodies, a common forebody, and some new tails were fabricated. In summary, significant differences in longitudinal and direction stability and control characteristics between the ABF and ABB aftbody geometries were measured. Correcting the experimental data obtained for the TCA configuration with the flared aftbody to the representative of the baseline TCA closed aftbody will result in a significant reduction in longitudinal stability, a moderate reduction in stabilizer effectiveness and directional stability, and a moderate to significant reduction in rudder effectiveness. These reductions in the stability and control effectiveness levels of the baseline TCA closed aftbody are attributed to the reduction in carry-over area.

  7. Volume analysis of heat-induced cracks in human molars: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Sandholzer, Michael A.; Baron, Katharina; Heimel, Patrick; Metscher, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Only a few methods have been published dealing with the visualization of heat-induced cracks inside bones and teeth. Aims: As a novel approach this study used nondestructive X-ray microtomography (micro-CT) for volume analysis of heat-induced cracks to observe the reaction of human molars to various levels of thermal stress. Materials and Methods: Eighteen clinically extracted third molars were rehydrated and burned under controlled temperatures (400, 650, and 800°C) using an electric furnace adjusted with a 25°C increase/min. The subsequent high-resolution scans (voxel-size 17.7 μm) were made with a compact micro-CT scanner (SkyScan 1174). In total, 14 scans were automatically segmented with Definiens XD Developer 1.2 and three-dimensional (3D) models were computed with Visage Imaging Amira 5.2.2. The results of the automated segmentation were analyzed with an analysis of variance (ANOVA) and uncorrected post hoc least significant difference (LSD) tests using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) 17. A probability level of P < 0.05 was used as an index of statistical significance. Results: A temperature-dependent increase of heat-induced cracks was observed between the three temperature groups (P < 0.05, ANOVA post hoc LSD). In addition, the distributions and shape of the heat-induced changes could be classified using the computed 3D models. Conclusion: The macroscopic heat-induced changes observed in this preliminary study correspond with previous observations of unrestored human teeth, yet the current observations also take into account the entire microscopic 3D expansions of heat-induced cracks within the dental hard tissues. Using the same experimental conditions proposed in the literature, this study confirms previous results, adds new observations, and offers new perspectives in the investigation of forensic evidence. PMID:25125923

  8. Closure and ratio correlation analysis of lunar chemical and grain size data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    Major element and major element plus trace element analyses were selected from the lunar data base for Apollo 11, 12 and 15 basalt and regolith samples. Summary statistics for each of the six data sets were compiled, and the effects of closure on the Pearson product moment correlation coefficient were investigated using the Chayes and Kruskal approximation procedure. In general, there are two types of closure effects evident in these data sets: negative correlations of intermediate size which are solely the result of closure, and correlations of small absolute value which depart significantly from their expected closure correlations which are of intermediate size. It is shown that a positive closure correlation will arise only when the product of the coefficients of variation is very small (less than 0.01 for most data sets) and, in general, trace elements in the lunar data sets exhibit relatively large coefficients of variation.

  9. Code System for Fracture Mechanics Analysis of Circumferential Surface Cracks in Pipes.

    1999-07-28

    Version 00 The NRCPIPES software is designed to perform elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics analysis for a circumferential surface cracked pipe, i.e., to establish the fracture-failure condition in terms of sustainable load (or stress) or displacement. The NRCPIPES software also includes several evaluation procedures and acceptance criteria for circumferential surface flaws based on the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section XI criteria, the British R6 Revision 3 Option 1 criteria, and the original Net-Section-Collapsemore » (limit-load) analysis.« less

  10. Preliminary results on the fracture analysis of multi-site cracking of lap joints in aircraft skins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuth, J. L., Jr.; Hutchinson, John W.

    1992-07-01

    Results of a fracture mechanics analysis relevant to fatigue crack growth at rivets in lap joints of aircraft skins are presented. Multi-site damage (MSD) is receiving increased attention within the context of problems of aging aircraft. Fracture analyses previously carried out include small-scale modeling of rivet/skin interactions, larger-scale two-dimensional models of lap joints similar to that developed here, and full scale three-dimensional models of large portions of the aircraft fuselage. Fatigue testing efforts have included flat coupon specimens, two-dimensional lap joint tests, and full scale tests on specimens designed to closely duplicate aircraft sections. Most of this work is documented in the proceedings of previous symposia on the aging aircraft problem. The effect MSD has on the ability of skin stiffeners to arrest the growth of long skin cracks is a particularly important topic that remains to be addressed. One of the most striking features of MSD observed in joints of some test sections and in the joints of some of the older aircraft fuselages is the relative uniformity of the fatigue cracks from rivet to rivet along an extended row of rivets. This regularity suggests that nucleation of the cracks must not be overly difficult. Moreover, it indicates that there is some mechanism which keeps longer cracks from running away from shorter ones, or, equivalently, a mechanism for shorter cracks to catch-up with longer cracks. This basic mechanism has not been identified, and one of the objectives of the work is to see to what extent the mechanism is revealed by a fracture analysis of the MSD cracks. Another related aim is to present accurate stress intensity factor variations with crack length which can be used to estimate fatigue crack growth lifetimes once cracks have been initiated. Results are presented which illustrate the influence of load shedding from rivets with long cracks to neighboring rivets with shorter cracks. Results are also included

  11. Preliminary results on the fracture analysis of multi-site cracking of lap joints in aircraft skins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beuth, J. L., Jr.; Hutchinson, John W.

    1992-01-01

    Results of a fracture mechanics analysis relevant to fatigue crack growth at rivets in lap joints of aircraft skins are presented. Multi-site damage (MSD) is receiving increased attention within the context of problems of aging aircraft. Fracture analyses previously carried out include small-scale modeling of rivet/skin interactions, larger-scale two-dimensional models of lap joints similar to that developed here, and full scale three-dimensional models of large portions of the aircraft fuselage. Fatigue testing efforts have included flat coupon specimens, two-dimensional lap joint tests, and full scale tests on specimens designed to closely duplicate aircraft sections. Most of this work is documented in the proceedings of previous symposia on the aging aircraft problem. The effect MSD has on the ability of skin stiffeners to arrest the growth of long skin cracks is a particularly important topic that remains to be addressed. One of the most striking features of MSD observed in joints of some test sections and in the joints of some of the older aircraft fuselages is the relative uniformity of the fatigue cracks from rivet to rivet along an extended row of rivets. This regularity suggests that nucleation of the cracks must not be overly difficult. Moreover, it indicates that there is some mechanism which keeps longer cracks from running away from shorter ones, or, equivalently, a mechanism for shorter cracks to catch-up with longer cracks. This basic mechanism has not been identified, and one of the objectives of the work is to see to what extent the mechanism is revealed by a fracture analysis of the MSD cracks. Another related aim is to present accurate stress intensity factor variations with crack length which can be used to estimate fatigue crack growth lifetimes once cracks have been initiated. Results are presented which illustrate the influence of load shedding from rivets with long cracks to neighboring rivets with shorter cracks. Results are also included

  12. Free-edge stress analysis of glass-epoxy laminates with matrix cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fish, John C.; O'Brien, T. K.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of matrix cracks on the composite delamination and interlaminar stresses is investigated in (+15/90n/-15)s glass-epoxy laminates (with values of n equal to 0, 1, 2, or 3) subjected to monotonically increasing tension loads. Three-dimensional (3D) and quasi-3D (Q3D) finite-element analyses are used to model the free-edge stress states in the laminates with and without a matrix crack, respectively. The Q3D results show that in-plane transverse tensile stresses exist in the +15 deg plies near the free edges of all of the laminates used and that only the interlaminar shear stress is high at the +15/theta interface. The results of 3D analysis indicate that large tensile interlaminar normal as well as shear stresses develop at the intersection of the matrix crack and the free edge. This suggests that the interlaminar normal stress plays a significant role in the failure of these laminates.

  13. Ultrasonic guided wave based horizontal crack imaging in metal plate by local wavenumber analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, C. G.; Xu, B. Q.; Luo, Y.; Xu, G. D.; Yuan, F. G.

    2015-05-01

    Ultrasonic guided waves are one of the most prominent tools for SHM in plate-like structure. However, complex propagation characteristics of guided waves as well as traditional contact ultrasonic transducers limit its application in the practical damage detection. Scanning Laser Doppler vibrometer (SLDV) technology is an effective non-contact method to obtain ultrasonic guided wavefield with ultra-high spatial resolution. Based on abundant wavefield data, wavenumber imaging algorithms are capable of not only damage location, but also assessment of damage characteristics such as size and shape. In this work, we adopt local wavenumber analysis method for horizontal crack detection in platelike structure. Instead of using SLDV in experiment, 3D finite element numerical method is adopted to obtain full ultrasonic guided wavefield data. Since the horizontal cracks result in decrease of local thickness, the wavenumber in corresponding area shows significant increase, which is used as indicators for crack imaging. The effects of different damage shapes, depths and spatial window sizes on imaging are also discussed. Numerical simulation results and imaging algorithm laid the foundation for the method applied in experiment and practice.

  14. Analysis of surface cracks at hole by a 3-D weight function method with stresses from finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, W.; Newman, J. C., Jr.; Sutton, M. A.; Shivakumar, K. N.; Wu, X. R.

    1995-01-01

    Parallel with the work in Part-1, stress intensity factors for semi-elliptical surface cracks emanating from a circular hole are determined. The 3-D weight function method with the 3D finite element solutions for the uncracked stress distribution as in Part-1 is used for the analysis. Two different loading conditions, i.e. remote tension and wedge loading, are considered for a wide range in geometrical parameters. Both single and double surface cracks are studied and compared with other solutions available in the literature. Typical crack opening displacements are also provided.

  15. Comparison Of Intake Gate Closure Methods At Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, And Mcnary Dams Using Risk-Based Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gore, Bryan F.; Blackburn, Tyrone R.; Heasler, Patrick G.; Mara, Neil L.; Phan, Hahn K.; Bardy, David M.; Hollenbeck, Robert E.

    2001-01-19

    The objective of this report is to compare the benefits and costs of modifications proposed for intake gate closure systems at four hydroelectric stations on the Lower Snake and Upper Columbia Rivers in the Walla Walla District that are unable to meet the COE 10-minute closure rule due to the installation of fish screens. The primary benefit of the proposed modifications is to reduce the risk of damage to the station and environs when emergency intake gate closure is required. Consequently, this report presents the results and methodology of an extensive risk analysis performed to assess the reliability of powerhouse systems and the costs and timing of potential damages resulting from events requiring emergency intake gate closure. As part of this analysis, the level of protection provided by the nitrogen emergency closure system was also evaluated. The nitrogen system was the basis for the original recommendation to partially disable the intake gate systems. The risk analysis quantifies this protection level.

  16. Comparison of Intake Gate Closure Methods At Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, And McNary Dams Using Risk-Based Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gore, Bryan F; Blackburn, Tye R; Heasler, Patrick G; Mara, Neil L

    2001-01-19

    The objective of this report is to compare the benefits and costs of modifications proposed for intake gate closure systems at four hydroelectric stations on the Lower Snake and Upper Columbia Rivers in the Walla Walla District that are unable to meet the COE 10-minute closure rule due to the installation of fish screens. The primary benefit of the proposed modifications is to reduce the risk of damage to the station and environs when emergency intake gate closure is required. Consequently, this report presents the results and methodology of an extensive risk analysis performed to assess the reliability of powerhouse systems and the costs and timing of potential damages resulting from events requiring emergency intake gate closure. As part of this analysis, the level of protection provided by the nitrogen emergency closure system was also evaluated. The nitrogen system was the basis for the original recommendation to partially disable the intake gate systems. The risk analysis quantifies this protection level.

  17. Predicting Peri-Device Leakage of Left Atrial Appendage Device Closure Using Novel Three-Dimensional Geometric CT Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hyemoon; Jeon, Byunghwan; Han, Dongjin; Shim, Hackjoon; Cho, In Jeong; Shim, Chi Young; Hong, Geu-Ru; Kim, Jung-Sun; Jang, Yangsoo; Chung, Namsik

    2015-01-01

    Background After left atrial appendage (LAA) device closure, peri-device leakage into the LAA persists due to incomplete occlusion. We hypothesized that pre-procedural three-dimensional (3D) geometric analysis of the interatrial septum (IAS) and LAA orifice can predict this leakage. We investigated the predictive parameters of LAA device closure obtained from baseline cardiac computerized tomography (CT) using a novel 3D analysis system. Methods We conducted a retrospective study of 22 patients who underwent LAA device closure. We defined peri-device leakage as the presence of a Doppler signal inside the LAA after device deployment (group 2, n = 5) compared with patients without peri-device leakage (group 1, n = 17). Conventional parameters were measured by cardiac CT. Angles θ and φ were defined between the IAS plane and the line, linking the LAA orifice center and foramen ovale. Results Group 2 exhibited significantly better left atrial (LA) function than group 1 (p = 0.031). Pre-procedural θ was also larger in this group (41.9° vs. 52.3°, p = 0.019). The LAA cauliflower-type morphology was more common in group 2. Overall, the patients' LA reserve significantly decreased after the procedure (21.7 mm3 vs. 17.8 mm3, p = 0.035). However, we observed no significant interval changes in pre- and post-procedural values of θ and φ in either group (all p > 0.05). Conclusion Angles between the IAS and LAA orifice might be a novel anatomical parameter for predicting peri-device leakage after LAA device closure. In addition, 3D CT analysis of the LA and LAA orifice could be used to identify clinically favorable candidates for LAA device closure. PMID:26755929

  18. Mathematical and numerical analysis of non-planer static mode-II crack in a two-layered medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, S.; Yamashita, T.

    2009-12-01

    A crack in an infinite homogeneous medium is widely assumed as a model for earthquake fault. It is, however, well known that the earth's crust is heterogeneous and its structure is approximated well by a layered medium. Hence, such structure should be taken into account to model earthquake fault reasonably. We mathematically analyze the behavior of a 2-D static mode-II non-planar crack in a two-layered elastic medium in order to understand the effect of layer boundary on earthquake faulting. Although Rani and Singh (1993) and Rivalta et al.(2002) studied similar problems, focuses of their studies were quite narrow probably because of inherent mathematical difficulty. Actually the former assumed a planar crack with uniform slip and the latter assumed a planar crack perpendicular to the layer boundary. While a serious difficulty of the analysis of mode-II crack lies in the derivation of stress distribution due to point source as a kernel function, we first overcome the difficulty by writing its expression in a sequence of complex functions in the real (not the Fourier) domain. A very important characteristic in the sequence is that it has recursive property, which makes possible to derive the kernel function explicitly and to integrate it by parts; the integration by parts is required before the boundary integral equation method (BIEM) is applied. Our kernel function is much easier to treat than the expression given by Rani and Singh (1993). This enables us to analyze arbitrarily oriented non-planar crack in a two-layered medium. Next, we calculate the spatial distribution of stress due to crack that does not intersect the layer boundary using the above derived kernel function. We find in the calculation that the existence of layer boundary amplifies or reduces the stress at the crack tip when the crack is located close to the boundary; the stress is amplified when the crack exists in the layer with lower rigidity. Our method of analysis can easily be applied to the

  19. Fracture Analysis of Semi-Elliptical Surface Cracks in Ductile Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniewicz, S. R.; Newman, J. C., Jr.; Leach, A. M.

    2004-01-01

    Accurate life assessment of structural components may require advanced life prediction criteria and methodologies. Structural components often exhibit several different types of defects, among the most prevalent being surface cracks. A semi-elliptical surface crack subjected to monotonic loading will exhibit stable crack growth until the crack has reached a critical size, at which the crack loses stability and fracture ensues (Newman, 2000). The shape and geometry of the flaw are among the most influential factors. When considering simpler crack configurations, such as a through-the-thickness crack, a three-dimensional (3D) geometry may be modeled under the approximation of two-dimensional (2D) plane stress or plane strain. The more complex surface crack is typically modeled numerically with the Finite Element Method (FEM). A semi-elliptical surface crack is illustrated in Figure 1-1.

  20. Corrosion fatigue crack propagation in metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.

    1990-01-01

    This review assesses fracture mechanics data and mechanistic models for corrosion fatigue crack propagation in structural alloys exposed to ambient temperature gases and electrolytes. Extensive stress intensity-crack growth rate data exist for ferrous, aluminum and nickel based alloys in a variety of environments. Interactive variables (viz., stress intensity range, mean stress, alloy composition and microstructure, loading frequency, temperature, gas pressure and electrode potential) strongly affect crack growth kinetics and complicate fatigue control. Mechanistic models to predict crack growth rates were formulated by coupling crack tip mechanics with occluded crack chemistry, and from both the hydrogen embrittlement and anodic dissolution/film rupture perspectives. Research is required to better define: (1) environmental effects near threshold and on crack closure; (2) damage tolerant life prediction codes and the validity of similitude; (3) the behavior of microcrack; (4) probes and improved models of crack tip damage; and (5) the cracking performance of advanced alloys and composites.

  1. Discussion paper on applicability of oil and grease analysis for RCRA closure criteria

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    A site characterization (SC) was performed for the Building 9409-5 Diked Tank Storage Facility. The initial SC indicated areas which had oil and grease levels above the criteria of the currently proposed RCRA closure plan. After further investigation, it was demonstrated that the oil and grease parameter may not be an accurate indication of a release from this facility and should not be included as a contaminant of concern in the closure criteria.

  2. Local-global analysis of crack growth in continuously reinfoced ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballarini, Roberto; Ahmed, Shamim

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a mathematical model for predicting the strength and micromechanical failure characteristics of continuously reinforced ceramic matrix composites. The local-global analysis models the vicinity of a propagating crack tip as a local heterogeneous region (LHR) consisting of spring-like representation of the matrix, fibers and interfaces. Parametric studies are conducted to investigate the effects of LHR size, component properties, and interface conditions on the strength and sequence of the failure processes in the unidirectional composite system.

  3. Separation of crack extension modes in composite delamination problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beuth, Jack L.

    1994-01-01

    This work concerns fracture mechanics modeling of composite delamination problems. In order to predict delamination resistance, an applied stress intensity factor, K, or energy release rate, G, must be compared to a mode-dependent critical value of K or G from experiment. In the interfacial fracture analysis of most applications and some tests, the mode of crack extension is not uniquely defined. It is instead a function of distance from the crack tip due to the oscillating singularity existing at the tip. In this work, a consistent method is presented of extracting crack extension modes in such cases. In particular, use of the virtual crack closure technique (VCCT) to extract modes of crack extension is studied for cases of a crack along the interface between two in-plane orthotropic materials. Modes of crack extension extracted from oscillatory analyses using VCCT are a function of the virtual crack extension length, delta. Most existing efforts to obtain delta-independent modes of crack extension involve changing the analysis in order to eliminate its oscillatory nature. One such method involves changing one or more properties of the layers to make the oscillatory exponent parameter, epsilon, equal zero. Standardized application of this method would require consistent criteria for identifying which properties can be altered without changing the physical aspects of the problem. Another method involves inserting a thin homogeneous layer (typically referred to as a resin interlayer) along the interface and placing the crack within it. The drawbacks of this method are that it requires increased modeling effort and introduces the thickness of the interlayer as an additional length parameter. The approach presented here does not attempt to alter the interfacial fracture analysis to eliminate its oscillatory behavior. Instead, the argument is made that the oscillatory behavior is non-physical and that if its effects were separated from VCCT quantities, then consistent

  4. Extracting sparse crack features from correlated background in ground penetrating radar concrete imaging using robust principal component analysis technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Xia, Tian

    2016-04-01

    Crack detection is an important application for Ground penetrating radar (GPR) to examine the concrete road or building structure conditions. The layer of rebars or utility pipes that typically exist inside the concrete structure can generate stronger scattering than small concrete cracks to affect detection effectiveness. In GPR image, the signature patterns of regularly distributed rebars or pipes can be deemed as correlated background signals, while for the small size cracks, their image features are typically irregularly and sparsely distributed. To effectively detect the cracks in concrete structure, the robust principal component analysis algorithm is developed to characterize the rank and sparsity of GPR image. For performance evaluations, simulations are conducted with various configurations.

  5. Slow Crack Growth Analysis of Brittle Materials with Finite Thickness Subjected to Constant Stress-Rate Flexural Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chio, S. R.; Gyekenyesi, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    A two-dimensional, numerical analysis of slow crack growth (SCG) was performed for brittle materials with finite thickness subjected to constant stress-rate ("dynamic fatigue") loading in flexure. The numerical solution showed that the conventional, simple, one-dimensional analytical solution can be used with a maximum error of about 5% in determining the SCG parameters of a brittle material with the conditions of a normalized thickness (a ratio of specimen thickness to initial crack size) T > 3.3 and of a SCG parameter n > 10. The change in crack shape from semicircular to elliptical configurations was significant particularly at both low stress rate and low T, attributed to predominant difference in stress intensity factor along the crack front. The numerical solution of SCG parameters was supported within the experimental range by the data obtained from constant stress-rate flexural testing for soda-lime glass microslides at ambient temperature.

  6. Practical numerical analysis of a crack near a weld subjected to primary loading and hydrogen embrittlement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askari, Ayman

    Structural failures by fracture in oil and petroleum industries can have severe consequences both in term of loss of life and of economics. This severity will increase in the future as the size and complexity of installations increase. Industry must be constantly vigilant in learning from past failures and in studying the possible effects of changes in technology on fracture risks. The combination of the effects of fabrication and operation, and of corrosive surroundings has not been clearly understood or analyzed. For structures in oil and petroleum industries, this complex interaction contributes to brittle fracture. In this research, the most common type of this combination is discussed and analyzed. The structure consists of a welded thick wall pressure vessel subject to primary loading and exposed to hydrogen at elevated temperature. To be more practical, a real case of a crack in a thick wall, welded pressure vessel under high hydrogen partial pressure and moderate temperature is selected from a petroleum refinery. This research establishes a procedure to deal with the complex interaction of issues associated with material processing and corrosive atmosphere that are active in this process. It also establishes a formal procedure to predict the active life of a structure that has a crack and is exposed to a hydrogen-enriched atmosphere. To achieve that there are five major steps to be carried out in this work: (1) Welding process simulation. (2) Post Weld Heat Treatment (PWHT) simulation. (3) Material property degradation due to hydrogen embrittlement. (4) Stress analysis of the cracked specimen. (5) Fitness for purpose analysis.

  7. Assessment of short through-wall circumferential cracks in pipes. Experiments and analysis: March 1990--December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Brust, F.W.; Scott, P.; Rahman, S.

    1995-04-01

    This topical report summarizes the work performed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC) research program entitled ``Short Cracks in Piping and Piping Welds`` that specifically focuses on pipes with short through-wall cracks. Previous NRC efforts, conducted under the Degraded Piping Program, focused on understanding the fracture behavior of larger cracks in piping and fundamental fracture mechanics developments necessary for this technology. This report gives details on: (1) material property determinations, (2) pipe fracture experiments, and (3) development, modification, and validation of fracture analysis methods. The material property data required to analyze the experimental results are included. These data were also implemented into the NRC`s PIFRAC database. Three pipe experiments with short through-wall cracks were conducted on large diameter pipe. Also, experiments were conducted on a large-diameter uncracked pipe and a pipe with a moderate-size through-wall crack. The analysis results reported here focus on simple predictive methods based on the J-Tearing theory as well as limit-load and ASME Section 11 analyses. Some of these methods were improved for short-crack-length predictions. The accuracy of the various methods was determined by comparisons with experimental results from this and other programs. 69 refs., 124 figs, 49 tabs.

  8. Implementation of thermal residual stresses in the analysis of fiber bridged matrix crack growth in titanium matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakuckas, John G., Jr.; Johnson, W. Steven

    1994-01-01

    In this research, thermal residual stresses were incorporated in an analysis of fiber-bridged matrix cracks in unidirectional and cross-ply titanium matrix composites (TMC) containing center holes or center notches. Two TMC were investigated, namely, SCS-6/Timelal-21S laminates. Experimentally, matrix crack initiation and growth were monitored during tension-tension fatigue tests conducted at room temperature and at an elevated temperature of 200 C. Analytically, thermal residual stresses were included in a fiber bridging (FB) model. The local R-ratio and stress-intensity factor in the matrix due to thermal and mechanical loadings were calculated and used to evaluate the matrix crack growth behavior in the two materials studied. The frictional shear stress term, tau, assumed in this model was used as a curve-fitting parameter to matrix crack growth data. The scatter band in the values of tau used to fit the matrix crack growth data was significantly reduced when thermal residual stresses were included in the fiber bridging analysis. For a given material system, lay-up and temperature, a single value of tau was sufficient to analyze the crack growth data. It was revealed in this study that thermal residual stresses are an important factor overlooked in the original FB models.

  9. Critical analysis of dimension reduction by a moment closure method in a population density approach to neural network modeling.

    PubMed

    Ly, Cheng; Tranchina, Daniel

    2007-08-01

    Computational techniques within the population density function (PDF) framework have provided time-saving alternatives to classical Monte Carlo simulations of neural network activity. Efficiency of the PDF method is lost as the underlying neuron model is made more realistic and the number of state variables increases. In a detailed theoretical and computational study, we elucidate strengths and weaknesses of dimension reduction by a particular moment closure method (Cai, Tao, Shelley, & McLaughlin, 2004; Cai, Tao, Rangan, & McLaughlin, 2006) as applied to integrate-and-fire neurons that receive excitatory synaptic input only. When the unitary postsynaptic conductance event has a single-exponential time course, the evolution equation for the PDF is a partial differential integral equation in two state variables, voltage and excitatory conductance. In the moment closure method, one approximates the conditional kth centered moment of excitatory conductance given voltage by the corresponding unconditioned moment. The result is a system of k coupled partial differential equations with one state variable, voltage, and k coupled ordinary differential equations. Moment closure at k = 2 works well, and at k = 3 works even better, in the regime of high dynamically varying synaptic input rates. Both closures break down at lower synaptic input rates. Phase-plane analysis of the k = 2 problem with typical parameters proves, and reveals why, no steady-state solutions exist below a synaptic input rate that gives a firing rate of 59 s(1) in the full 2D problem. Closure at k = 3 fails for similar reasons. Low firing-rate solutions can be obtained only with parameters for the amplitude or kinetics (or both) of the unitary postsynaptic conductance event that are on the edge of the physiological range. We conclude that this dimension-reduction method gives ill-posed problems for a wide range of physiological parameters, and we suggest future directions. PMID:17571938

  10. Analysis of flexural wave propagation through beams with a breathing crack using wavelet spectral finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joglekar, D. M.; Mitra, M.

    2016-08-01

    An analytical-numerical method, based on the use of wavelet spectral finite elements (WSFE), is presented for studying the nonlinear interaction of flexural waves with a breathing crack present in a slender beam. The cracked beam is discretized using wavelet spectral finite elements which use compactly supported Daubechies scaling functions for approximating the temporal dependence of the transverse displacement. Rotational spring is used to model the open crack condition, and behavior of the beam in closed-crack condition is assumed to be similar to that of an intact beam. An intermittent switching between the open- and closed-crack conditions simulates crack-breathing, leading to a set of nonlinear equations which is solved using an iterative method. Results of the proposed method are compared with those obtained using the Fourier spectral finite element (FSFE) and 1D finite element (FE) methods, which show a close agreement. Existence of the higher-order harmonic components, indicative of the crack-induced bilinearity, is confirmed in the frequency domain response. Moreover, the time domain analysis reveals separation of harmonics resulting from the dispersive nature of the waveguide, which is further used for localizing the damage. A parametric study is presented to bring out the influence of crack-severity and -location on the extent of harmonic separation and on the relative strength of higher order harmonic. In addition to elaborating the use of WSFE in addressing the nonlinear wave-damage interaction, results of the present investigation can be potentially useful in devising strategies for an inverse analysis.

  11. Vibration signal analysis for gear fault diagnosis with various crack progression scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, Omar D.; Rantatalo, Matti; Aidanpää, Jan-Olov; Kumar, Uday

    2013-12-01

    There are different analytical scenarios assumed for crack propagation in the gear tooth root. This paper presents an investigation of the performance of statistical fault detection indicators (the RMS and kurtosis) for three different series of crack propagation scenarios, to compare these scenarios from a fault diagnostics point of view. These scenarios imply different forms of cracks with propagation by a certain step of crack depth. The first scenario assumes a crack being extended through the whole tooth width with a uniform crack depth distribution, while the second scenario assumes the crack being extended through the whole tooth width with a parabolic crack depth distribution, and finally in the third scenario the crack is assumed to be propagating in both the depth and the length directions simultaneously. The time-varying gear mesh stiffness has been investigated using the programme code developed in the present research, and the crack propagation can be modelled with any of the presented crack propagation scenarios. Dynamic simulation has been performed to obtain the residual signals of all the studied cases for each crack propagation scenario. The comparison of the statistical indicators applied to the residual signals shows that in the first scenario the faults are most easily detectable, since in this scenario there is a change in the indicators implying a dramatic decrease in the gear mesh stiffness. The fault detection in the 2nd scenario is more difficult, as the crack propagates with no significant reflection on the mesh stiffness loss. The 3rd proposed scenario should receive more attention in research because it could occur in reality in case of non-uniform load distribution. However, with this scenario it is difficult to perform early fault detection, since there is a very slight change in the statistical indicators at the beginning of the crack propagation. After which, these indicators show a significant change when the crack grows deeper

  12. Investigation of Cracks Found in Helicopter Longerons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Baughman, James M.; Wallace, Terryl A.

    2009-01-01

    Four cracked longerons, containing a total of eight cracks, were provided for study. Cracked regions were cut from the longerons. Load was applied to open the cracks, enabling crack surface examination. Examination revealed that crack propagation was driven by fatigue loading in all eight cases. Fatigue crack initiation appears to have occurred on the top edge of the longerons near geometric changes that affect component bending stiffness. Additionally, metallurigical analysis has revealed a local depletion in alloying elements in the crack initiation regions that may be a contributing factor. Fatigue crack propagation appeared to be initially driven by opening-mode loading, but at a crack length of approximately 0.5 inches (12.7 mm), there is evidence of mixed-mode crack loading. For the longest cracks studied, shear-mode displacements destroyed crack-surface features of interest over significant portions of the crack surfaces.

  13. Mechanisms of fatigue crack growth in Ti-48Al at ambient and elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Soboyejo, W.O.; Mercer, C.; Aswath, P.B.

    1995-10-01

    Gamma-based titanium aluminides are of practical interest due to their potential to replace nickel- and cobalt-based alloys in aeroengines. The results of a study of crack-tip deformation on the mechanisms of fatigue crack growth in a model powder metallurgy (P/M) gamma-based titanium aluminide intermetallic (Ti-48Al) are presented in this paper. Note that compositions are quoted in atomic % unless stated otherwise. Crack-tip deformation is shown to occur by a combination of deformation-induced twinning and conventional slip at room temperature, and conventional reversed plasticity/slip only at elevated temperature (700 C). Differences between crack-tip deformation mechanisms at room- and elevated-temperature are explained by crack-tip transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. The potential effects of twin toughening are also quantified using optical interference measurements of twin process zones and micromechanical models. The implications of the different crack-tip deformation mechanisms for cyclic irreversibility are discussed for crack growth at room- and elevated-temperature. The results suggest that slower fatigue crack growth rates at elevated-temperature are due to differences in crack-tip deformation and closure mechanisms.

  14. Analysis of cracked core spray injection line piping from the Quad Cities Units 1 and 2 boiling water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Diercks, D.R.

    1983-12-01

    Elbow assemblies and adjacent piping from the loops A and B core spray injection lines of Quad Cities Units 1 and 2 Boiling Water Reactors have been examined in order to determine the nature and causes of coolant leakages and flaw indications detected during hydrostatic tests and subsequent ultrasonic inspections. The elbow assemblies were found to contain multiple intergranular cracks in the weld heat-affected zones. The cracking was predominantly axial in orientation in the forged elbow and wedge components, whereas mixed axial and circumferential cracking was seen in the wrought piping pieces. In at least two instances, axial cracks completely penetrated the circumferential weld joining adjacent components. Based upon the observations made in the present study, the failures were attributed to intergranular stress corrosion cracking caused by the weld-induced sensitized microstructure and residual stresses present; dissolved oxygen in the reactor coolant apparently served as the corrosive species. The predominantly axial orientation of the cracks present in the forged components is believed to be related to the banded microstructure present in these components. The metallographic studies reported are supplemented by x-radiography, chemical analysis and mechanical test results, determinations of the degree of sensitization present, and measurements of weld metal delta ferrite content.

  15. Monitoring of surface-fatigue crack propagation in a welded steel angle structure using guided waves and principal component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Mingyu; Qu, Yongwei; Lu, Ye; Ye, Lin; Zhou, Limin; Su, Zhongqing

    2012-04-01

    An experimental study is reported in this paper demonstrating monitoring of surface-fatigue crack propagation in a welded steel angle structure using Lamb waves generated by an active piezoceramic transducer (PZT) network which was freely surface-mounted for each PZT transducer to serve as either actuator or sensor. The fatigue crack was initiated and propagated in welding zone of a steel angle structure by three-point bending fatigue tests. Instead of directly comparing changes between a series of specific signal segments such as S0 and A0 wave modes scattered from fatigue crack tips, a variety of signal statistical parameters representing five different structural status obtained from marginal spectrum in Hilbert-huang transform (HHT), indicating energy progressive distribution along time period in the frequency domain including all wave modes of one wave signal were employed to classify and distinguish different structural conditions due to fatigue crack initiation and propagation with the combination of using principal component analysis (PCA). Results show that PCA based on marginal spectrum is effective and sensitive for monitoring the growth of fatigue crack although the received signals are extremely complicated due to wave scattered from weld, multi-boundaries, notch and fatigue crack. More importantly, this method indicates good potential for identification of integrity status of complicated structures which cause uncertain wave patterns and ambiguous sensor network arrangement.

  16. Monitoring of surface-fatigue crack propagation in a welded steel angle structure using guided waves and principal component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Mingyu; Qu, Yongwei; Lu, Ye; Ye, Lin; Zhou, Limin; Su, Zhongqing

    2011-11-01

    An experimental study is reported in this paper demonstrating monitoring of surface-fatigue crack propagation in a welded steel angle structure using Lamb waves generated by an active piezoceramic transducer (PZT) network which was freely surface-mounted for each PZT transducer to serve as either actuator or sensor. The fatigue crack was initiated and propagated in welding zone of a steel angle structure by three-point bending fatigue tests. Instead of directly comparing changes between a series of specific signal segments such as S0 and A0 wave modes scattered from fatigue crack tips, a variety of signal statistical parameters representing five different structural status obtained from marginal spectrum in Hilbert-huang transform (HHT), indicating energy progressive distribution along time period in the frequency domain including all wave modes of one wave signal were employed to classify and distinguish different structural conditions due to fatigue crack initiation and propagation with the combination of using principal component analysis (PCA). Results show that PCA based on marginal spectrum is effective and sensitive for monitoring the growth of fatigue crack although the received signals are extremely complicated due to wave scattered from weld, multi-boundaries, notch and fatigue crack. More importantly, this method indicates good potential for identification of integrity status of complicated structures which cause uncertain wave patterns and ambiguous sensor network arrangement.

  17. Environmental Crack Driving Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, M. M.

    2013-03-01

    The effect of environment on the crack driving force is considered, first by assuming quasistatic extension of a stationary crack and second, by use of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) crack growth rate models developed previously by this author and developed further here. A quasistatic thermodynamic energy balance approach, of the Griffith-Irwin type, is used to develop stationary crack threshold expressions, tilde{J}_c , which represent the conjoint mechanical and electrochemical conditions, below which stationary cracks are stable. Expressions for the electrochemical crack driving force (CDF) were derived using an analysis that is analogous to that used by Irwin to derive his "strain energy release rate," G, which Rice showed as being equivalent to his mechanical CDF, J. The derivations show that electrochemical CDFs both for active path dissolution (APD) and hydrogen embrittlement (HE) mechanisms of SCC are simply proportional to Tafel's electrochemical anodic and cathodic overpotentials, η a and η c, respectively. Phenomenological SCC models based on the kinetics of APD and HE crack growth are used to derive expressions for the kinetic threshold, J scc, below which crack growth cannot be sustained. These models show how independent mechanical and environmental CDFs may act together to drive SCC crack advance. Development of a user-friendly computational tool for calculating Tafel's overpotentials is advocated.

  18. Analysis of a turbine rotor containing a transverse crack at Oak Creek Unit 17

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, G. W.; Rau, C. A., Jr.; Kottke, J. J.; Menning, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    Transient increases in one, two and three per revolution vibration characteristics of a low pressure steam turbine were observed during steam temperature reduction operations. Vibration and fracture mechanics analyses suggested the presence of a transverse shaft crack which was eventually identified by ultrasonic inspection and confirmed by destructive sectioning. Signature analyses of vibration data recorded over a two-year period prior to crack identification are correlated with fatigue crack growth, which occurred intermittently during transient temperature decreases. The apparent increased response of the rotor to vibration is due to asymmetric stiffness changes introduced by the growing transverse crack. The vibration response is predicted to increase with increasing crack depths in excess of 10% of the shaft diameter. Fracture mechanics analyses predict that fatigue crack growth occurred during periods of steam temperature decrease, when high surface tensile stresses are present. These same transient thermal stresses are shown to have retarded and prevented subsequent fatigue crack growth during steady operation.

  19. Hospital closures and survivals: an analysis of operating characteristics and regulatory mechanisms in three states.

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, L; Dumas, M B

    1983-01-01

    This article examines factors related to hospital closures, using a longitudinal sample of surviving and closed hospitals. The hospitals are drawn from three states with different regulatory programs. Size of hospital and occupancy rate are shown to be related to likelihood of closure, while ownership, length of stay, and expenditures are not. These findings are observed both in the aggregate and within the individual states between 1960 and 1980. The three states--Arizona, Pennsylvania, and Maryland--represent different population trends and regulatory mechanisms and goals. The findings indicate that some programs appear to guarantee survival, whereas others are more neutral. PMID:6668180

  20. Three-dimensional elastic stress and displacement analysis of finite geometry solids containing cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, J. P.; Mendelson, A.

    1975-01-01

    The line method of analysis is applied to the Navier-Cauchy equations of elastic equilibrium to calculate the displacement distributions in various bodies containing cracks. The application of this method to these equations leads to coupled sets of simultaneous ordinary differential equations whose solutions are obtained along sets of lines in a discretized region. When decoupling the equations and their boundary conditions is not possible, the use of a successive approximation procedure permits the analytical solution of the resulting ordinary differential equations. The results obtained show a considerable potential for using this method in the three-dimensional analysis of finite geometry solids and suggest a possible extension of this technique to nonlinear material behavior.

  1. Three-dimensional elastic stress and displacement analysis of finite geometry solids containing cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, J. P.; Mendelson, A.

    1974-01-01

    The line method of analysis is applied to the Navier-Cauchy equations of elastic equilibrium to calculate the displacement distributions in various bodies containing cracks. The application of this method to these equations leads to coupled sets of simultaneous ordinary differential equations whose solutions are obtained along sets of lines in a discretized region. When decoupling the equations and their boundary conditions is not possible, the use of a successive approximation procedure permits the analytical solution of the resulting ordinary differential equations. The results obtained show a considerable potential for using this method in the three-dimensional analysis of finite geometry solids and suggest a possible extension of this technique to nonlinear material behavior.

  2. Failure Analysis of Cracked FS-85 Tubing and ASTAR-811C End Caps

    SciTech Connect

    ME Petrichek

    2006-02-09

    Failure analyses were performed on cracked FS-85 tubing and ASTAR-811C and caps which had been fabricated as components of biaxial creep specimens meant to support materials testing for the NR Space program. During the failure analyses of cracked FS-85 tubing, it was determined that the failure potentially could be due to two effects: possible copper contamination from the EDM (electro-discharge machined) recast layer and/or an insufficient solution anneal. to prevent similar failures in the future, a more formal analysis should be done after each processing step to ensure the quality of the material before further processing. During machining of the ASTAR-811FC rod to form end caps for biaxial creep specimens, linear defects were observed along the center portion of the end caps. These defects were only found in material that was processed from the top portion of the ingot. The linear defects were attributed to a probable residual ingot pipe that was not removed from the ingot. During the subsequent processing of the ingot to rod, the processing temperatures were not high enough to allow self healing of the ingot's residual pipe defect. To prevent this from occurring in the future, it is necessary to ensure that complete removal of the as-melted ingot pipe is verified by suitable non-destructive evaluation (NDE).

  3. A Crack Growth Evaluation Method for Interacting Multiple Cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamaya, Masayuki

    When stress corrosion cracking or corrosion fatigue occurs, multiple cracks are frequently initiated in the same area. According to section XI of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, multiple cracks are considered as a single combined crack in crack growth analysis, if the specified conditions are satisfied. In crack growth processes, however, no prescription for the interference between multiple cracks is given in this code. The JSME Post-Construction Code, issued in May 2000, prescribes the conditions of crack coalescence in the crack growth process. This study aimed to extend this prescription to more general cases. A simulation model was applied, to simulate the crack growth process, taking into account the interference between two cracks. This model made it possible to analyze multiple crack growth behaviors for many cases (e. g. different relative position and length) that could not be studied by experiment only. Based on these analyses, a new crack growth analysis method was suggested for taking into account the interference between multiple cracks.

  4. Fatigue cracks in Eurofer 97 steel: Part II. Comparison of small and long fatigue crack growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruml, T.; Hutař, P.; Náhlík, L.; Seitl, S.; Polák, J.

    2011-05-01

    The fatigue crack growth rate in the Eurofer 97 steel at room temperature was measured by two different methodologies. Small crack growth data were obtained using cylindrical specimens with a shallow notch and no artificial crack starters. The growth of semicircular cracks of length between 10-2000 μm was followed in symmetrical cycling with constant strain amplitude ( R ɛ = -1). Long crack data were measured using standard CT specimen and ASTM methodology, i.e. R = 0.1. The growth of cracks having the length in the range of 10-30 mm was measured. It is shown that the crack growth rates of both types of cracks are in a very good agreement if J-integral representation is used and usual assumptions of the crack closure effects are taken into account.

  5. Four-beam model for vibration analysis of a cantilever beam with an embedded horizontal crack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Zhu, Weidong; Charalambides, Panos G.; Shao, Yimin; Xu, Yongfeng; Wu, Kai; Xiao, Huifang

    2016-01-01

    As one of the main failure modes, embedded cracks occur in beam structures due to periodic loads. Hence it is useful to investigate the dynamic characteristics of a beam structure with an embedded crack for early crack detection and diagnosis. A new four-beam model with local flexibilities at crack tips is developed to investigate the transverse vibration of a cantilever beam with an embedded horizontal crack; two separate beam segments are used to model the crack region to allow opening of crack surfaces. Each beam segment is considered as an Euler-Bernoulli beam. The governing equations and the matching and boundary conditions of the four-beam model are derived using Hamilton's principle. The natural frequencies and mode shapes of the four-beam model are calculated using the transfer matrix method. The effects of the crack length, depth, and location on the first three natural frequencies and mode shapes of the cracked cantilever beam are investigated. A continuous wavelet transform method is used to analyze the mode shapes of the cracked cantilever beam. It is shown that sudden changes in spatial variations of the wavelet coefficients of the mode shapes can be used to identify the length and location of an embedded horizontal crack. The first three natural frequencies and mode shapes of a cantilever beam with an embedded crack from the finite element method and an experimental investigation are used to validate the proposed model. Local deformations in the vicinity of the crack tips can be described by the proposed four-beam model, which cannot be captured by previous methods.

  6. Vibration analysis of a rectangular thin isotropic plate with a part-through surface crack of arbitrary orientation and position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Tanmoy; Mohanty, A. R.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, vibration analysis of a rectangular thin isotropic plate with a part-through surface crack of arbitrary orientation and position is performed by using the Kirchhoff plate theory. Simply supported (SSSS), clamped (CCCC) and simply supported-clamped (SCSC) boundary conditions are considered for the analysis. First, the governing differential equation of a cracked plate is formulated. A modified line spring model is then used to formulate the crack terms in the governing equation. Next, by the application of Burger's formulation, the differential equation is transformed into the well-known Duffing equation with cubic and quadratic nonlinearities. The Duffing equation is then solved by the method of multiple scales (MMS) to extract the frequency response curve. Natural frequencies are evaluated for different values of length, angle and position of a part-through surface crack. Some results are compared with the published literature. Amplitude variation with different values of length, angle and position of a part-through surface crack are presented, for all three types of the plate boundary conditions.

  7. Analysis of interfacial cracks in a TBC/superalloy system under thermomechanical loading

    SciTech Connect

    Nusier, S.Q.; Newaz, G.M.

    1998-10-01

    In thermal barrier coatings (TBC) residual stresses develop during cool down from processing temperature due to the thermal expansion mismatch between the different layers (substrate, bond coat, and TBC). These residual stresses can initiate microcracks at the bond coat/TBC interface and can lead to debonding at the bond coat/TBC interface. The effect of voids or crack-like flaws at the interface can be responsible for initiating debonding and accelerating the oxidation process. Effect of oxide layer growth between bond coat and ceramic layer (TBC) can be modeled as volume increase. In this work the authors represent the change in volume as an induced pressure across the interface. Mixed-mode fracture analysis of a thin circular delamination in an-axisymmetrically multi-layer circular plate is developed. Geometrical nonlinearity is included in the analysis, since they have a large deflection case. The elastic deformation problem of a circular plate subjected to a clamped boundary condition at the edge of the delamination, an out of plane pressure load, and a compressive stress due to thermal mismatch between different layers, was solved numerically using a Rayleigh-Ritz method. The strain energy release rate was evaluated by means of the path-independent M-integral. The numerical results of this problem based on the energy method were verified using finite element method. Both methods correlate well in predicting the energy release rate for Mode I and Mode II, deflection, and postbuckling solutions. The energy release rates G, for both Mode I and Mode II using virtual crack extension method, were evaluated. The specimen was cooled down from processing temperature of 1000 C to 0 C. The variation of the properties as a function of temperature was used for analysis. It was found that the use of temperature dependent properties in contrast to constant properties provides significantly different values of J-integral and G.

  8. Non-destructive evaluation of depth of surface cracks using ultrasonic frequency analysis.

    PubMed

    Her, Shiuh-Chuan; Lin, Sheng-Tung

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasonic is one of the most common uses of a non-destructive evaluation method for crack detection and characterization. The effectiveness of the acoustic-ultrasound Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) technique for the determination of the depth of the surface crack was presented. A method for ultrasonic sizing of surface cracks combined with the time domain and frequency spectrum was adopted. The ultrasonic frequency spectrum was obtained by Fourier transform technique. A series of test specimens with various depths of surface crack ranging from 1 mm to 8 mm was fabricated. The depth of the surface crack was evaluated using the pulse-echo technique. In this work, three different longitudinal waves with frequencies of 2.25 MHz, 5 MHz and 10 MHz were employed to investigate the effect of frequency on the sizing detection of surface cracks. Reasonable accuracies were achieved with measurement errors less than 7%. PMID:25225875

  9. Non-Destructive Evaluation of Depth of Surface Cracks Using Ultrasonic Frequency Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Her, Shiuh-Chuan; Lin, Sheng-Tung

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasonic is one of the most common uses of a non-destructive evaluation method for crack detection and characterization. The effectiveness of the acoustic-ultrasound Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) technique for the determination of the depth of the surface crack was presented. A method for ultrasonic sizing of surface cracks combined with the time domain and frequency spectrum was adopted. The ultrasonic frequency spectrum was obtained by Fourier transform technique. A series of test specimens with various depths of surface crack ranging from 1 mm to 8 mm was fabricated. The depth of the surface crack was evaluated using the pulse-echo technique. In this work, three different longitudinal waves with frequencies of 2.25 MHz, 5 MHz and 10 MHz were employed to investigate the effect of frequency on the sizing detection of surface cracks. Reasonable accuracies were achieved with measurement errors less than 7%. PMID:25225875

  10. A Continuum-Atomistic Analysis of Transgranular Crack Propagation in Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamakov, V.; Saether, E.; Glaessgen, E.

    2009-01-01

    A concurrent multiscale modeling methodology that embeds a molecular dynamics (MD) region within a finite element (FEM) domain is used to study plastic processes at a crack tip in a single crystal of aluminum. The case of mode I loading is studied. A transition from deformation twinning to full dislocation emission from the crack tip is found when the crack plane is rotated around the [111] crystallographic axis. When the crack plane normal coincides with the [112] twinning direction, the crack propagates through a twinning mechanism. When the crack plane normal coincides with the [011] slip direction, the crack propagates through the emission of full dislocations. In intermediate orientations, a transition from full dislocation emission to twinning is found to occur with an increase in the stress intensity at the crack tip. This finding confirms the suggestion that the very high strain rates, inherently present in MD simulations, which produce higher stress intensities at the crack tip, over-predict the tendency for deformation twinning compared to experiments. The present study, therefore, aims to develop a more realistic and accurate predictive modeling of fracture processes.

  11. Visual Closure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groffman, Sidney

    An experimental test of visual closure based on an information-theory concept of perception was devised to test the ability to discriminate visual stimuli with reduced cues. The test is to be administered in a timed individual situation in which the subject is presented with sets of incomplete drawings of simple objects that he is required to name…

  12. Local delamination in laminates with angle ply matrix cracks. Part 2: Delamination fracture analysis and fatigue characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, T. Kevin

    1991-01-01

    Constant amplitude tension-tension fatigue tests were conducted on AS4/3501-6 graphite/epoxy (02/ theta sub 2/ -(theta sub 2))sub s laminates, where theta was 15, 20, 25, or 30 degrees. Fatigue tests were conducted at a frequency of 5 Hz and an R-ratio of 0.1. Dye penetrant enhanced x-radiography was used to document the onset of matrix cracking in the central -(theta) degree plies, and the subsequent onset of local delaminations in the theta/ -(theta) interface at the intersection of the matrix cracks and the free edge, as a function of the number of fatigue cycles. Two strain energy release rate solutions for local delamination from matrix cracks were derived: one for a local delamination growing from an angle ply matrix crack with a uniform delamination growing from an angle ply matrix crack with a triangular shaped delamination area that extended only partially into the laminate width from the free edge. Plots of G(max) vs. N were generated to assess the accuracy of these G solutions. The influence of residual thermal and moisture stresses on G were also quantified. However, a detailed analysis of the G components and a mixed-mode fatigue failure criterion for this material may be needed to predict the fatigue behavior of these laminates.

  13. Fatigue Analysis of the Piston Rod in a Kaplan Turbine Based on Crack Propagation under Unsteady Hydraulic Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Y Luo, Y.; Wang, Z. W.

    2014-03-01

    As an important component of the blade-control system in Kaplan turbines, piston rods are subjected to fluctuating forces transferred by the turbines blades from hydraulic pressure oscillations. Damage due to unsteady hydraulic loads might generate unexpected down time and high repair cost. In one running hydropower plant, the fracture failure of the piston rod was found twice at the same location. With the transient dynamic analysis, the retainer ring structure of the piston rod existed a relative high stress concentration. This predicted position of the stress concentration agreed well with the actual fracture position in the plant. However, the local strain approach was not able to explain why this position broke frequently. Since traditional structural fatigue analyses use a local stress strain approach to assess structural integrity, do not consider the effect of flaws which can significantly degrade structural life. Using linear elastic fracture mechanism (LEFM) approaches that include the effect of flaws is becoming common practice in many industries. In this research, a case involving a small semi-ellipse crack was taken into account at the stress concentration area, crack growth progress was calculated by FEM. The relationship between crack length and remaining life was obtained. The crack propagation path approximately agreed with the actual fracture section. The results showed that presence of the crack had significantly changed the local stress and strain distributions of the piston rod compared with non-flaw assumption.

  14. Slow Crack Growth Analysis of Advanced Structural Ceramics Under Combined Loading Conditions: Damage Assessment in Life Prediction Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2000-01-01

    Slow crack growth analysis was performed with three different loading histories including constant stress-rate/constant stress-rate testing (Case I loading), constant stress/constant stress-rate testing (Case II loading), and cyclic stress/constant stress-rate testing (Case III loading). Strength degradation due to slow crack growth arid/or damage accumulation was determined numerically as a Function of percentage of interruption time between the two loading sequences for a given loading history. The numerical solutions were examined with the experimental data determined at elevated temperatures using four different advanced ceramic materials, two silicon nitrides, one silicon carbide and one alumina for the Case I loading history, and alumina for the Case II loading history. The numerical solutions were in reasonable agreement with the experimental data, indicating that notwithstanding some degree of creep deformation presented for some test materials slow crack growth was a governing mechanism associated with failure for all the test material&

  15. Slow Crack Growth Analysis of Advanced Structural Ceramics Under Combined Loading Conditions: Damage Assessment in Life Prediction Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, S. R.; Gyekenyesi, J. P.

    2001-01-01

    Slow crack growth analysis was performed with three different loading histories including constant stress- rate/constant stress-rate testing (Case I loading), constant stress/constant stress-rate testing (Case II loading), and cyclic stress/constant stress-rate testing (Case III loading). Strength degradation due to slow crack growth and/or damage accumulation was determined numerically as a function of percentage of interruption time between the two loading sequences for a given loading history. The numerical solutions were examined with the experimental data determined at elevated temperatures using four different advanced ceramic materials, two silicon nitrides, one silicon carbide and one alumina for the Case I loading history, and alumina for the Case II loading history. The numerical solutions were in reasonable agreement with the experimental data, indicating that notwithstanding some degree of creep deformation presented for some test materials slow crack growth was a governing mechanism associated with failure for all the rest materials.

  16. Slow Crack Growth Analysis of Advanced Structural Ceramics Under Combined Loading Conditions: Damage Assessment in Life Prediction Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2000-01-01

    Slow crack growth analysis was performed with three different loading histories including constant stress-rate/constant stress-rate testing (Case 1 loading), constant stress/constant stress-rate testing (Case 2 loading), and cyclic stress/constant stress-rate testing (Case 2 loading). Strength degradation due to slow crack growth and/or damage accumulation was determined numerically as a function of percentage of interruption time between the two loading sequences for a given loading history. The numerical solutions were examined with the experimental data determined at elevated temperatures using four different advanced ceramic materials, two silicon nitrides, one silicon carbide and one alumina for the Case 1 loading history, and alumina for the Case 3 loading history. The numerical solutions were in reasonable agreement with the experimental data, indicating that notwithstanding some degree of creep deformation presented for some test materials slow crack growth was a governing mechanism associated with failure for all the test materials.

  17. Analysis of the dynamic characteristics of a slant-cracked cantilever beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hui; Zeng, Jin; Lang, Ziqiang; Zhang, Long; Guo, Yuzhu; Wen, Bangchun

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the dynamic characteristics of a slant-cracked cantilever beam are studied based on a new finite element (FE) model where both plane and beam elements are used to reduce the computational costs. Simulation studies show that the proposed model has the same system natural frequencies and vibration responses as those in the pure plane element model but is computationally more efficient. Based on the new model, the effects of loads such as gravity Fg, excitation force amplitude F0 and direction angles of excitation force φ, and crack parameters including slant crack angle θ, dimensionless crack depth s and dimensionless crack location p, on system dynamics have been analyzed. The results indicate that (1) the gravity has a more significant effect on the sub-harmonic resonance responses than on the super-harmonic resonance and resonance responses; (2) The amplitudes of the system responses at both excitation force frequencies fe and its harmonics such as 2fe and 3fe increase almost linearly with the increase of the excitation force amplitude F0; (3) Under the constant excitation force in the flexural direction, the tensile and compressive forces along the longitudinal direction can lead to opposite breathing behaviors of the crack within the super-harmonic and sub-harmonic resonance frequency regions; (4) Vibration is most severe under the straight crack angle (θ=90°) and near the straight crack angle such as θ=100° and 110°, and the vibration responses under smaller or larger crack angles such as θ=30° and θ=150° become weaker; (5) The resonance at 2fe is sensitive to the faint crack signals when s is small and p is large. In addition, the significant vibration responses at the multiple frequency of 3fe and the fractional frequency of 0.5fe can be regarded as a distinguishable feature of the serious crack with large s and small p.

  18. Comparative analysis of ear-hole closure identifies epimorphic regeneration as a discrete trait in mammals.

    PubMed

    Gawriluk, Thomas R; Simkin, Jennifer; Thompson, Katherine L; Biswas, Shishir K; Clare-Salzler, Zak; Kimani, John M; Kiama, Stephen G; Smith, Jeramiah J; Ezenwa, Vanessa O; Seifert, Ashley W

    2016-01-01

    Why mammals have poor regenerative ability has remained a long-standing question in biology. In regenerating vertebrates, injury can induce a process known as epimorphic regeneration to replace damaged structures. Using a 4-mm ear punch assay across multiple mammalian species, here we show that several Acomys spp. (spiny mice) and Oryctolagus cuniculus completely regenerate tissue, whereas other rodents including MRL/MpJ 'healer' mice heal similar injuries by scarring. We demonstrate ear-hole closure is independent of ear size, and closure rate can be modelled with a cubic function. Cellular and genetic analyses reveal that injury induces blastema formation in Acomys cahirinus. Despite cell cycle re-entry in Mus musculus and A. cahirinus, efficient cell cycle progression and proliferation only occurs in spiny mice. Together, our data unite blastema-mediated regeneration in spiny mice with regeneration in other vertebrates such as salamanders, newts and zebrafish, where all healthy adults regenerate in response to injury. PMID:27109826

  19. Business closure and relocation: a comparative analysis of the Loma Prieta earthquake and Hurricane Andrew.

    PubMed

    Wasileski, Gabriela; Rodríguez, Havidán; Diaz, Walter

    2011-01-01

    The occurrence of a number of large-scale disasters or catastrophes in recent years, including the Indian Ocean tsunami (2004), the Kashmir earthquake (2005), Hurricane Katrina (2005) and Hurricane Ike (2008), have raised our awareness regarding the devastating effects of disasters on human populations and the importance of developing mitigation and preparedness strategies to limit the consequences of such events. However, there is still a dearth of social science research focusing on the socio-economic impact of disasters on businesses in the United States. This paper contributes to this research literature by focusing on the impact of disasters on business closure and relocation through the use of multivariate logistic regression models, specifically focusing on the Loma Prieta earthquake (1989) and Hurricane Andrew (1992). Using a multivariate model, we examine how physical damage to the infrastructure, lifeline disruption and business characteristics, among others, impact business closure and relocation following major disasters.

  20. The growth of small corrosion fatigue cracks in alloy 2024

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Willard, Scott A.

    1993-04-01

    The corrosion fatigue crack growth characteristics of small surface and corner cracks in aluminum alloy 2024 is established. The damaging effect of salt water on the early stages of small crack growth is characterized by crack initiation at constituent particle pits, intergranular microcracking for a less than 100 micrometers, and transgranular small crack growth for a micrometer. In aqueous 1 percent NaCl and at a constant anodic potential of -700 mV(sub SCE), small cracks exhibit a factor of three increase in fatigue crack growth rates compared to laboratory air. Small cracks exhibit accelerated corrosion fatigue crack growth rates at low levels of delta-K (less than 1 MPa square root of m) below long crack delta-K (sub th). When exposed to Paris regime levels of crack tip stress intensity, small corrosion fatigue cracks exhibit growth rates similar to that observed for long cracks. Results suggest that crack closure effects influence the corrosion fatigue crack growth rates of small cracks (a less than or equal to 100 micrometers). This is evidenced by similar small and long crack growth behavior at various levels of R. Contrary to the corrosion fatigue characteristics of small cracks in high strength steels, no pronounced chemical crack length effect is observed for Al by 2024 exposed to salt water.

  1. The growth of small corrosion fatigue cracks in alloy 2024

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Willard, Scott A.

    1993-01-01

    The corrosion fatigue crack growth characteristics of small surface and corner cracks in aluminum alloy 2024 is established. The damaging effect of salt water on the early stages of small crack growth is characterized by crack initiation at constituent particle pits, intergranular microcracking for a less than 100 micrometers, and transgranular small crack growth for a micrometer. In aqueous 1 percent NaCl and at a constant anodic potential of -700 mV(sub SCE), small cracks exhibit a factor of three increase in fatigue crack growth rates compared to laboratory air. Small cracks exhibit accelerated corrosion fatigue crack growth rates at low levels of delta-K (less than 1 MPa square root of m) below long crack delta-K (sub th). When exposed to Paris regime levels of crack tip stress intensity, small corrosion fatigue cracks exhibit growth rates similar to that observed for long cracks. Results suggest that crack closure effects influence the corrosion fatigue crack growth rates of small cracks (a less than or equal to 100 micrometers). This is evidenced by similar small and long crack growth behavior at various levels of R. Contrary to the corrosion fatigue characteristics of small cracks in high strength steels, no pronounced chemical crack length effect is observed for Al by 2024 exposed to salt water.

  2. Computational fluid dynamic analysis of a closure head penetration in a pressurized water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Forsyth, D.R.; Schwirian, R.E.

    1995-09-01

    ALLOY 600 has been used typically for penetrations through the closure head in pressurized water reactors because of its thermal compatibility with carbon steel, superior resistance to chloride attack and higher strength than the austenitic stainless steels. Recent plant operating experience with this alloy has indicated that this material may be susceptible to degradation. One of the major parameters relating to degradation of the head penetrations are the operational temperatures and stress levels in the penetration.

  3. Bone stress and strain modification in diastema closure: 3D analysis using finite element method.

    PubMed

    Geramy, Allahyar; Bouserhal, Joseph; Martin, Domingo; Baghaeian, Pedram

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the stress and strain distribution in the alveolar bone between two central incisors in the process of diastema closure with a constant force. A 3-dimensional computer modeling based on finite element techniques was used for this purpose. A model of an anterior segment of the mandible containing cortical bone, spongy bone, gingivae, PDL and two central incisors with a bracket in the labial surface of each tooth were designed. The von Mises stress and strain was evaluated in alveolar bone along a path of nodes defined in a cresto-apical direction in the midline between two teeth. It was observed that stress and strain of alveolar bone increased in midline with a constant force to close the diastema regardless of the type of movement in gradual steps of diastema closure, however the stress was higher in the tipping movement than the bodily so it can be suggested that a protocol of force system modification should be introduced to compensate for the stress and strain changes caused by the reduced distance to avoid the unwanted stress alteration during the diastema closure. PMID:26277458

  4. Analysis of a Standardized Technique for Laparoscopic Cuff Closure following 1924 Total Laparoscopic Hysterectomies

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Alfred; Sten, Margaret S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To review the vaginal cuff complications from a large series of total laparoscopic hysterectomies in which the laparoscopic culdotomy closure was highly standardized. Methods. Retrospective cohort study (Canadian Task Force Classification II-3) of consecutive total and radical laparoscopic hysterectomy patients with all culdotomy closures performed laparoscopically was conducted using three guidelines: placement of all sutures 5 mm deep from the vaginal edge with a 5 mm interval, incorporation of the uterosacral ligaments with the pubocervical fascia at each angle, and, whenever possible, suturing the bladder peritoneum over the vaginal cuff edge utilizing two suture types of comparable tensile strength. Four outcomes are reviewed: dehiscence, bleeding, infection, and adhesions. Results. Of 1924 patients undergoing total laparoscopic hysterectomy, 44 patients (2.29%) experienced a vaginal cuff complication, with 19 (0.99%) requiring reoperation. Five patients (0.26%) had dehiscence after sexual penetration on days 30–83, with 3 requiring reoperation. Thirteen patients (0.68%) developed bleeding, with 9 (0.47%) requiring reoperation. Twenty-three (1.20%) patients developed infections, with 4 (0.21%) requiring reoperation. Three patients (0.16%) developed obstructive small bowel adhesions to the cuff requiring laparoscopic lysis. Conclusion. A running 5 mm deep × 5 mm apart culdotomy closure that incorporates the uterosacral ligaments with the pubocervical fascia, with reperitonealization when possible, appears to be associated with few postoperative vaginal cuff complications. PMID:27579179

  5. Analysis of a Standardized Technique for Laparoscopic Cuff Closure following 1924 Total Laparoscopic Hysterectomies.

    PubMed

    O'Hanlan, Katherine A; Emeney, Pamela L; Peters, Alfred; Sten, Margaret S; McCutcheon, Stacey P; Struck, Danielle M; Hoang, Joseph K

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To review the vaginal cuff complications from a large series of total laparoscopic hysterectomies in which the laparoscopic culdotomy closure was highly standardized. Methods. Retrospective cohort study (Canadian Task Force Classification II-3) of consecutive total and radical laparoscopic hysterectomy patients with all culdotomy closures performed laparoscopically was conducted using three guidelines: placement of all sutures 5 mm deep from the vaginal edge with a 5 mm interval, incorporation of the uterosacral ligaments with the pubocervical fascia at each angle, and, whenever possible, suturing the bladder peritoneum over the vaginal cuff edge utilizing two suture types of comparable tensile strength. Four outcomes are reviewed: dehiscence, bleeding, infection, and adhesions. Results. Of 1924 patients undergoing total laparoscopic hysterectomy, 44 patients (2.29%) experienced a vaginal cuff complication, with 19 (0.99%) requiring reoperation. Five patients (0.26%) had dehiscence after sexual penetration on days 30-83, with 3 requiring reoperation. Thirteen patients (0.68%) developed bleeding, with 9 (0.47%) requiring reoperation. Twenty-three (1.20%) patients developed infections, with 4 (0.21%) requiring reoperation. Three patients (0.16%) developed obstructive small bowel adhesions to the cuff requiring laparoscopic lysis. Conclusion. A running 5 mm deep × 5 mm apart culdotomy closure that incorporates the uterosacral ligaments with the pubocervical fascia, with reperitonealization when possible, appears to be associated with few postoperative vaginal cuff complications. PMID:27579179

  6. Troughs on Martian Ice Sheets: Analysis of Their Closure and Mass Balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fountain, A.; Kargel, J.; Lewis, K.; MacAyeal, D.; Pfeffer, T.; Zwally, J.

    2000-01-01

    At the Copenhagen workshop on Martian polar processes, Ralf Greve commented that the flow regime surrounding scarps and troughs of the Martian polar ice sheets cannot be modeled using traditional "plan view" ice-sheet models. Such models are inadequate because they typically use reduced equations that embody certain simplifications applicable only to terrestrial ice sheets where the upper ice sheet surface is smooth. In response to this suggestion, we have constructed a 2-dimensional, time dependent "side view" (two spatial dimensions: one horizontal, one vertical) model of scarp closure that is designed to overcome the difficulties described by Greve. The purpose of the model is to evaluate the scales of stress variation and styles of flow closure so as to estimate errors that may be encountered by "plan view" models. We show that there may be avenues whereby the complications associated with scarp closure can be overcome in "plan view" models through appropriate parameterizations of 3-dimensional effects. Following this, we apply the flow model to simulate the evolution of a typical scarp on the North Polar Cap of Mars. Our simulations investigate: (a) the role of "radiation trapping" (see our companion abstract) in creating and maintaining "spiral-like" scarps on the ice sheet, (b) the consequences of different flowlaws and ice compositions on scarp evolution and, in particular, scarp age, and (c) the role of dust and debris in scarp evolution.

  7. DYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF THE BULK TRITIUM SHIPPING PACKAGE SUBJECTED TO CLOSURE TORQUES AND SEQUENTIAL IMPACTS

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, T; Paul Blanton, P; Kurt Eberl, K

    2007-07-09

    This paper presents a finite-element technique to simulate the structural responses and to evaluate the cumulative damage of a radioactive material packaging requiring bolt closure-tightening torque and subjected to the scenarios of the Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC) defined in the Code of Federal Regulations Title 10 part 71 (10CFR71). Existing finite-element methods for modeling closure stresses from bolt pre-load are not readily adaptable to dynamic analyses. The HAC events are required to occur sequentially per 10CFR71 and thus the evaluation of the cumulative damage is desirable. Generally, each HAC event is analyzed separately and the cumulative damage is partially addressed by superposition. This results in relying on additional physical testing to comply with 10CFR71 requirements for assessment of cumulative damage. The proposed technique utilizes the combination of kinematic constraints, rigid-body motions and structural deformations to overcome some of the difficulties encountered in modeling the effect of cumulative damage. This methodology provides improved numerical solutions in compliance with the 10CFR71 requirements for sequential HAC tests. Analyses were performed for the Bulk Tritium Shipping Package (BTSP) designed by Savannah River National Laboratory to demonstrate the applications of the technique. The methodology proposed simulates the closure bolt torque preload followed by the sequential HAC events, the 30-foot drop and the 30-foot dynamic crush. The analytical results will be compared to the package test data.

  8. Clean closure of former hazardous waste impoundments using statistical analysis of constituent concentrations in associated media

    SciTech Connect

    McGaughey, L.; Tuck, J.; Zimmermann, M.

    1994-12-31

    In 1988--89, six former hazardous waste impoundments at a chemical manufacturing plant in California were remediated by stabilization and excavation of waste. Affected soil and wastes were consolidated beneath a RCRA cap constructed over four of the impoundments. Verification samples for clean closure were collected beneath the two remaining excavated impoundments for clean closure and results were submitted to the California EPA`s Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC). DTSC noted high concentrations of arsenic and chromium in the verification samples and requested the installation of a RCRA cap over the two remaining excavated impoundments, concluding that the levels of arsenic and chromium were above acceptable levels from their health based risk assessment. In late 1993, AWD Technologies (AWM) prepared a submittal to DTSC which re-evaluated the verification data for clean closure of the two remaining excavated impoundments. A standard statistical technique was used to determine the upper and lower confidence limits for arsenic and chromium, the constituents of concern. Evaluation of groundwater data from wells in the vicinity also indicated that groundwater had not been affected by either arsenic or chromium. AWD`s evaluation concluded that no reduction in risk would be expected if a cap were constructed over the impoundments.

  9. The analysis of fatigue crack growth mechanism and oxidation and fatigue life at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H. W.

    1988-01-01

    Two quantitative models based on experimentally observed fatigue damage processes have been made: (1) a model of low cycle fatigue life based on fatigue crack growth under general-yielding cyclic loading; and (2) a model of accelerated fatigue crack growth at elevated temperatures based on grain boundary oxidation. These two quantitative models agree very well with the experimental observations.

  10. Retrospective analysis of a VACM (vacuum-assisted closure and mesh-mediated fascial traction) treatment manual for temporary abdominal wall closure - results of 58 consecutive patients.

    PubMed

    Beltzer, Christian; Eisenächer, Alexander; Badendieck, Steffen; Doll, Dietrich; Küper, Markus; Lenz, Stefan; Krapohl, Björn Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Einleitung: Das optimale Behandlungskonzept eines temporären Bauchdeckenverschlusses (temporary abdominal closure, TAC) bei kritisch kranken viszeralchirurgischen Patienten mit offenem Abdomen („open abdomen“, OA) ist weiterhin unklar. Durch eine VACM-Therapie (vacuum-assisted closure and mesh-mediated fascial traction) scheinen sich gegenüber anderen Verfahren des TAC höhere Faszienverschlussraten (delayed primary fascial closure rate, FCR) realisieren zu lassen. Material und Methoden: Patienten unserer Klinik (n=58), welche in den Jahren 2005 bis 2008 mittels eines VAC/VACM-Behandlungsmanuals behandelt wurden, wurden retrospektiv analysiert. Ergebnisse: Die FCR aller Patienten betrug insgesamt 48,3% (95%-Konfidenzintervall: 34,95–61,78). Bei Patienten, bei denen im Verlauf ein Vicryl-Netz auf Faszienebene implantiert wurde (VACM-Therapie), konnte eine FCR von 61,3% realisiert werden. Die Letalität der mittels VACM therapierten Patienten betrug 45,2% (95%-KI: 27,32–63,97).Schlussfolgerung: Die Ergebnisse der eigenen Untersuchung bestätigen bisherige Studienergebnisse, die eine akzeptable FCR bei non-trauma-Patienten durch Anwendung der VACM-Therapie zeigen konnten. Die VACM-Therapie scheint aktuell Therapiekonzept der ersten Wahl bei Patienten mit OA und Indikation zum TAC zu sein.

  11. Retrospective analysis of a VACM (vacuum-assisted closure and mesh-mediated fascial traction) treatment manual for temporary abdominal wall closure – results of 58 consecutive patients

    PubMed Central

    Beltzer, Christian; Eisenächer, Alexander; Badendieck, Steffen; Doll, Dietrich; Küper, Markus; Lenz, Stefan; Krapohl, Björn Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The optimal treatment concept for temporary abdominal closure (TAC) in critically ill visceral surgery patients with open abdomen (OA) continues to be unclear. The VACM (vacuum-assisted closure and mesh-mediated fascial traction) therapy seems to permit higher delayed primary fascial closure rates (FCR) than other TAC procedures. Material and methods: Patients of our clinic (n=58) who were treated by application of a VAC/VACM treatment manual in the period from 2005 to 2008 were retrospectively analysed. Results: The overall FCR of all patients was 48.3% (95% confidence interval: 34.95–61.78). An FCR of 61.3% was achieved in patients who had a vicryl mesh implanted at the fascial level (VACM therapy) in the course of treatment. Mortality among patients treated with VACM therapy was 45.2% (95% CI: 27.32–63.97). Conclusions: The results of our own study confirm the results of previous studies which showed an acceptable FCR among non-trauma patients who were treated with VACM therapy. VACM therapy currently appears to be the treatment regime of choice for patients with OA requiring TAC. PMID:27547691

  12. Symmetric-Galerkin boundary element transient analysis of the DSIFs for the interaction of a crack with a circular inclusion

    SciTech Connect

    Phan, Anh-Vu; Gray, Leonard J; Salvadori, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    A dynamic analysis of crack-inclusion interaction is described in this paper. The analysis employs a two-dimensional symmetric-Galerkin boundary integral formulation for multi-domain elastodynamic fracture analysis in the frequency domain. The multi-domain technique is based on the assumption of perfectly bonded inclusions. The numerical implementation of this boundary integral formulation is carried out with standard quadratic elements, allowing the use of an improved quarter-point element for accurately determining frequency responses of the dynamic stress intensity factors (DSIFs). To deal with singular and hypersingular integrals, the formulation is decomposed into two parts: the rst part is identical to that for elastostatics while the second part contains at most logarithmic singularities. The treatment of the elastostatic singular and hypersingular singular integrals employs an exterior limit to the boundary, while the weakly singular integrals in the second part are handled by Gauss quadrature. Time histories (transient responses) of the DSIFs are obtained in a post-processing step by applying the fast Fourier transform (FFT) and inverse FFT to the frequency responses of these DSIFs. Two numerical examples are presented for the computation of the DSIFs due to crack-inclusion interaction under two types of impact loading: Heaviside step loading and blast loading. The numerical results are consistent and con rm the well known crack tip shielding mechanism observed during the interaction between a crack and a much stiffer inclusion.

  13. Duct closure

    DOEpatents

    Vowell, Kennison L.

    1987-01-01

    A closure for an inclined duct having an open upper end and defining downwardly extending passageway. The closure includes a cap for sealing engagement with the open upper end of the duct. Associated with the cap are an array of vertically aligned plug members, each of which has a cross-sectional area substantially conforming to the cross-sectional area of the passageway at least adjacent the upper end of the passageway. The plug members are interconnected in a manner to provide for free movement only in the plane in which the duct is inclined. The uppermost plug member is attached to the cap means and the cap means is in turn connected to a hoist means which is located directly over the open end of the duct.

  14. surf3d: A 3-D finite-element program for the analysis of surface and corner cracks in solids subjected to mode-1 loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    A computer program, surf3d, that uses the 3D finite-element method to calculate the stress-intensity factors for surface, corner, and embedded cracks in finite-thickness plates with and without circular holes, was developed. The cracks are assumed to be either elliptic or part eliptic in shape. The computer program uses eight-noded hexahedral elements to model the solid. The program uses a skyline storage and solver. The stress-intensity factors are evaluated using the force method, the crack-opening displacement method, and the 3-D virtual crack closure methods. In the manual the input to and the output of the surf3d program are described. This manual also demonstrates the use of the program and describes the calculation of the stress-intensity factors. Several examples with sample data files are included with the manual. To facilitate modeling of the user's crack configuration and loading, a companion program (a preprocessor program) that generates the data for the surf3d called gensurf was also developed. The gensurf program is a three dimensional mesh generator program that requires minimal input and that builds a complete data file for surf3d. The program surf3d is operational on Unix machines such as CRAY Y-MP, CRAY-2, and Convex C-220.

  15. 3013 DE INNER CONTAINER CLOSURE WELD CORROSION EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J.

    2013-09-30

    Destructive evaluation (DE) of 3013 containers is one part of the U. S. Department of Energy Integrated Surveillance Program. During standard DE of 3013 containers, visual examinations for pitting and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) are performed on the accessible surfaces of the outer, inner, and convenience containers, which make up the 3013 container. As a result of 3013 DE additional analysis, the area near the inner container closure weld has been identified as being a region of increased corrosion susceptibility, which may provide a pathway for corrosive gases to the outer container. This area has a higher residual stress, an altered microstructure, and less corrosion resistant weld oxides as a result of the welding process as well as a lower temperature than other areas of the container, which may increase the absorption of moisture on the surface. The deposition of moisture in this stressed region could lead to pitting and stress corrosion cracking. During FY2013, the inner container closure weld area was more closely evaluated on several archived samples from DE containers. These containers included FY09 DE2, FY12 DE4, FY12 DE6 and FY12 DE7 and the Hanford High Moisture Container. The additional examinations included visual observations with a stereomicroscope, scanning electron microscopy along with energy dispersive spectroscopy for chemical analysis, and serial metallography of the sidewall and lid that are part of the inner container closure weld region. Pitting was observed in all the samples taken from the closure weld regions of the examined inner containers. This pitting was generally less 20 μm with most less than 5m. These pits were similar in depth to those observed in the vapor exposed surfaces of teardrops in the shelf life corrosion testing. Cracking was not observed on either the vapor-exposed surfaces of the teardrop coupons or the inner container closure weld region. Further testing is necessary to determine if the conditions

  16. Analysis of delamination in cross-ply laminates initiating from impact induced matrix cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salpekar, S. A.

    1993-01-01

    Two-dimensional finite element analyses of (02/90(8)/02) glass/epoxy and graphite/epoxy composite laminates were performed to investigate some of the characteristics of damage development due to an impact load. A cross section through the thickness of the laminate with fixed ends, and carrying a transverse load in the center, was analyzed. Inclined matrix cracks, such as those produced by a low-velocity impact, were modeled in the 90 deg ply group. The introduction of the matrix cracks caused large interlaminar tensile and shear stresses in the vicinity of both crack tips in the 0/90 and 90/0 interfaces, indicating that matrix cracking may give rise to delamination. The ratio of Mode I to total strain energy release rate, G(I)/G(total), at the beginning of delamination, calculated at the two (top and bottom) matrix crack tips was 60 and 28 percent, respectively, in the glass/epoxy laminate. The corresponding ratio was 97 and 77 percent in the graphite/epoxy laminate. Thus, a significant Mode I component of strain energy release rate may be present at the delamination initiation due to an impact load. The value of strain energy release rate at either crack tip increased due to an increase in the delamination length at the other crack tip and may give rise to an unstable delamination growth under constant load.

  17. A numerical analysis of crack propagation in microcracking ceramic and ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Biner, S.B.

    1993-10-01

    A set of numerical analyses of crack growth was performed to elucidate the mechanism of microcracking on the observed fracture behavior of ceramics and ceramic composites. The random nucleation, orientation and size effects of discrete microcracks and resulting interactions are fully accounted for in a hybrid finite element model. The results indicate that the energy expenditure due the microcrack nucleation seems not to contribute significantly to the resistance to crack growth. The main controlling parameter appears to be elastic interaction of the microcracks with the main crack in the absence of a reinforcing phase; therefore, the microcrack density plays an important role. In the case of the composites, the interaction of the main crack with the stress fields of the reinforcing phase, rather than interaction of microcracks, is the controlling parameter for the resistance to the crack growth even in the presence of a large population of microcracks. It will be also shown that the crack branching and crack kinking can readily develop as a result of microcracking.

  18. Safety and Effectiveness of Closure Devices Applied to a Stented Common Femoral Artery: A Retrospective Analysis.

    PubMed

    Shammas, Nicolas W; Shammas, Gail A; Harris, Thomas; Voelliger, Cara M; Shammas, Andrew N; Jerin, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Bailout stenting of the common femoral artery (CFA) may become necessary with failed balloon angioplasty or atherectomy or in case of bleeding requiring a covered stent over the arteriotomy site. Reaccessing the CFA through a previously placed stent may occur during angiography. The safety and effectiveness of applying a closure device, or manual compression to achieve hemostasis through an accessed stented CFA are unknown. All patients in our practice that underwent CFA stenting were identified using billing records for 3 years (January 1, 2010-February 28, 2013). Patients were included if there has been documentation of access through the stented CFA segment on angiography. In-hospital and up to 2 weeks postdischarge major adverse events were recorded from medical records. A total of 48 patients were included in the study. The mean age was 65.9 ± 10.9 years, males 60.4%. Perclose (Abbott Vascular, Santa Clara, CA) was used in 85.7%, AngioSeal (St. Jude Medical, St. Paul, MN) in 8.3%, Mynx (Access Closure, Santa Clara, CA) in 2%, and manual compression in 4% of the patients. Major adverse events consisted of in-hospital mortality in two patients: one probably related to index access-site thrombosis complicated by subsequent acute renal failure following reintervention; the other mortality was related to major bleeding possibly related to the index access site. The remaining patients had no adverse events and there were no reported problems at 2 weeks follow-up. Accessing and applying closure device in stented CFA can be accomplished successfully in approximately 96% of the patients with low major adverse events. PMID:27574383

  19. COD measurements at various positions along a crack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharpe, W. N., Jr.; Su, X.

    1988-01-01

    Load versus crack-opening-displacement (COD) was measured at various positions along the border of a fatigue crack as it grew from a small surface crack on the edge of an aluminum specimen into a through-the-thickness crack. Displacements were measured with a laser-based interferometric system with a gage length of 70 microns and a resolution of 0.01 micron. These load-COD curves can be used to determine opening loads and thereby investigate the effect of closure on the growth of small cracks. In general, the opening loads decrease as the crack grows.

  20. Microcrack closure in rocks under stress: direct observation

    SciTech Connect

    Batzle, M.L.; Simmons, G.; Siegfried, R.W.

    1980-12-10

    Microcrack closure in rocks under increasing stress was observed directly with a scanning electron microscope. Uniaxial stresses to 300 bars were applied with a small hydraulic press to specimens of Westerly (RI) granite, both unheated and previously heat cycled to 500/sup 0/C, and of Frederick (MD) diabase, heat cycled to 700/sup 0/C. Closure characteristics (rate, final closure pressure, etc.) depend on crack orientation, shape, surface roughness, and on the nature of fracture intersections and interactions. Cracks perpendicular to the applied stress closed while those parallel to the stress tended to open. Long, narrow cracks (low aspect ratio) closed at relatively low pressures. At some intersections, one fracture would open while another simultaneously closed, depending upon their orientations. Many fractures closed uniformly even though offset by other fractures. Local stress concentrations often caused new fracturing at low applied stress. Some fractures were propped open until material lodged inside was crushed. Significant irreversible damage occurred during the first stress cycle. Closure characteristics varied significantly among the samples. The unheated granite has cracks with rough, pitted, and mismatched walls. Only partial closure occurred under stress with many sections remaining open. Crack porosity is reduced but continues to be interconnected. Fractures in the preheated granite and diabase are also irregular, but the walls are well-matched and closure is nearly complete. The cracks in the heated granite closed at lower stresses than in the diabase. As the maximum stress was approached for the heated granite, new transgranular cracks formed and preexisting cracks were enlarged. The variations in closure rate and character were also observed in strain measurements.

  1. Small fatigue cracks; Proceedings of the Second International Conference/Workshop, Santa Barbara, CA, Jan. 5-10, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, R.O.; Lankford, J.

    1986-01-01

    Topics discussed in this volume include crack initiation and stage I growth, microstructure effects, crack closure, environment effects, the role of notches, analytical modeling, fracture mechanics characterization, experimental techniques, and engineering applications. Papers are presented on fatigue crack initiation along slip bands, the effect of microplastic surface deformation on the growth of small cracks, short fatigue crack behavior in relation to three-dimensional aspects and the crack closure effect, the influence of crack depth on crack electrochemistry and fatigue crack growth, and nondamaging notches in fatigue. Consideration is also given to models of small fatigue cracks, short crack theory, assessment of the growth of small flaws from residual strength data, the relevance of short crack behavior to the integrity of major rotating aero engine components, and the relevance of short fatigue crack growth data to the durability and damage tolerance analyses of aircraft.

  2. Comparative analysis of ear-hole closure identifies epimorphic regeneration as a discrete trait in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Gawriluk, Thomas R.; Simkin, Jennifer; Thompson, Katherine L.; Biswas, Shishir K.; Clare-Salzler, Zak; Kimani, John M.; Kiama, Stephen G.; Smith, Jeramiah J.; Ezenwa, Vanessa O.; Seifert, Ashley W.

    2016-01-01

    Why mammals have poor regenerative ability has remained a long-standing question in biology. In regenerating vertebrates, injury can induce a process known as epimorphic regeneration to replace damaged structures. Using a 4-mm ear punch assay across multiple mammalian species, here we show that several Acomys spp. (spiny mice) and Oryctolagus cuniculus completely regenerate tissue, whereas other rodents including MRL/MpJ ‘healer' mice heal similar injuries by scarring. We demonstrate ear-hole closure is independent of ear size, and closure rate can be modelled with a cubic function. Cellular and genetic analyses reveal that injury induces blastema formation in Acomys cahirinus. Despite cell cycle re-entry in Mus musculus and A. cahirinus, efficient cell cycle progression and proliferation only occurs in spiny mice. Together, our data unite blastema-mediated regeneration in spiny mice with regeneration in other vertebrates such as salamanders, newts and zebrafish, where all healthy adults regenerate in response to injury. PMID:27109826

  3. An Analysis of the Impact of Valve Closure Time on the Course of Water Hammer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodura, Apoloniusz

    2016-06-01

    The knowledge of transient flow in pressure pipelines is very important for the designing and describing of pressure networks. The water hammer is the most common example of transient flow in pressure pipelines. During this phenomenon, the transformation of kinetic energy into pressure energy causes significant changes in pressure, which can lead to serious problems in the management of pressure networks. The phenomenon is very complex, and a large number of different factors influence its course. In the case of a water hammer caused by valve closing, the characteristic of gate closure is one of the most important factors. However, this factor is rarely investigated. In this paper, the results of physical experiments with water hammer in steel and PE pipelines are described and analyzed. For each water hammer, characteristics of pressure change and valve closing were recorded. The measurements were compared with the results of calculations perfomed by common methods used by engineers - Michaud's equation and Wood and Jones's method. The comparison revealed very significant differences between the results of calculations and the results of experiments. In addition, it was shown that, the characteristic of butterfly valve closure has a significant influence on water hammer, which should be taken into account in analyzing this phenomenon. Comparison of the results of experiments with the results of calculations? may lead to new, improved calculation methods and to new methods to describe transient flow.

  4. Analysis of early creep closures in geomechanically connected underground rooms in salt

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, D.E. ); Jones, R.L. ); DeVries, K.L. )

    1991-07-01

    The waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Project is chartered to develop a technology base for the safe disposal of the radioactive Transuranic (TRU) waste forms generated by the US defense programs. The WIPP facility has been constructed in the bedded geologic salt deposits of southeastern New Mexico and is in preliminary operation in anticipation of receipt of small quantities of radioactive waste for experimental purposes. In accord with existing regulations, the requirement is to assure that any proposed repository isolates the radioactive waste from the accessible environment and mankind for a long period of time. As a part of this requirement, the creep closure of the salt and waste encapsulation must be predicted far into the future. This necessitates significant developments in the predictive technology of the structural response of underground excavations in salt. To provide a database for the validation of the predictive technology, a series of large scale in situ experiments were fielded at the WIPP under the auspices of the Thermal/Structural Interactions (TSI) Program. One of these experiments was a three room mine-by test. In this paper, we present the results of the early time (unheated) response of this test, showing the influence of adjacent excavations on each other and of multiple rooms on the closure rates. Also, the in situ results are compared with analyses making use of the most recent numerical predictive capability developed for describing the structural response of salt. 7 refs, 6 figs.

  5. Structural zooming research and development of an interactive computer graphical interface for stress analysis of cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerstle, Walter

    1989-01-01

    Engineering problems sometimes involve the numerical solution of boundary value problems over domains containing geometric feature with widely varying scales. Often, a detailed solution is required at one or more of these features. Small details in large structures may have profound effects upon global performance. Conversely, large-scale conditions may effect local performance. Many man-hours and CPU-hours are currently spent in modeling such problems. With the structural zooming technique, it is now possible to design an integrated program which allows the analyst to interactively focus upon a small region of interest, to modify the local geometry, and then to obtain highly accurate responses in that region which reflect both the properties of the overall structure and the local detail. A boundary integral equation analysis program, called BOAST, was recently developed for the stress analysis of cracks. This program can accurately analyze two-dimensional linear elastic fracture mechanics problems with far less computational effort than existing finite element codes. An interactive computer graphical interface to BOAST was written. The graphical interface would have several requirements: it would be menu-driven, with mouse input; all aspects of input would be entered graphically; the results of a BOAST analysis would be displayed pictorially but also the user would be able to probe interactively to get numerical values of displacement and stress at desired locations within the analysis domain; the entire procedure would be integrated into a single, easy to use package; and it would be written using calls to the graphic package called HOOPS. The program is nearing completion. All of the preprocessing features are working satisfactorily and were debugged. The postprocessing features are under development, and rudimentary postprocessing should be available by the end of the summer. The program was developed and run on a VAX workstation, and must be ported to the SUN

  6. Wave propagation analysis of edge cracked circular beams under impact force.

    PubMed

    Akbaş, Şeref Doğuşcan

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents responses of an edge circular cantilever beam under the effect of an impact force. The beam is excited by a transverse triangular force impulse modulated by a harmonic motion. The Kelvin-Voigt model for the material of the beam is used. The cracked beam is modelled as an assembly of two sub-beams connected through a massless elastic rotational spring. The considered problem is investigated within the Bernoulli-Euler beam theory by using energy based finite element method. The system of equations of motion is derived by using Lagrange's equations. The obtained system of linear differential equations is reduced to a linear algebraic equation system and solved in the time domain by using Newmark average acceleration method. In the study, the effects of the location of crack, the depth of the crack, on the characteristics of the reflected waves are investigated in detail. Also, the positions of the cracks are calculated by using reflected waves. PMID:24972050

  7. Wave Propagation Analysis of Edge Cracked Circular Beams under Impact Force

    PubMed Central

    Akbaş, Şeref Doğuşcan

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents responses of an edge circular cantilever beam under the effect of an impact force. The beam is excited by a transverse triangular force impulse modulated by a harmonic motion. The Kelvin–Voigt model for the material of the beam is used. The cracked beam is modelled as an assembly of two sub-beams connected through a massless elastic rotational spring. The considered problem is investigated within the Bernoulli-Euler beam theory by using energy based finite element method. The system of equations of motion is derived by using Lagrange's equations. The obtained system of linear differential equations is reduced to a linear algebraic equation system and solved in the time domain by using Newmark average acceleration method. In the study, the effects of the location of crack, the depth of the crack, on the characteristics of the reflected waves are investigated in detail. Also, the positions of the cracks are calculated by using reflected waves. PMID:24972050

  8. Analysis of fatigue, fatique-crack propagation, and fracture data. [design of metallic aerospace structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaske, C. E.; Feddersen, C. E.; Davies, K. B.; Rice, R. C.

    1973-01-01

    Analytical methods have been developed for consolidation of fatigue, fatigue-crack propagation, and fracture data for use in design of metallic aerospace structural components. To evaluate these methods, a comprehensive file of data on 2024 and 7075 aluminums, Ti-6A1-4V, and 300M and D6Ac steels was established. Data were obtained from both published literature and unpublished reports furnished by aerospace companies. Fatigue and fatigue-crack-propagation analyses were restricted to information obtained from constant-amplitude load or strain cycling of specimens in air at room temperature. Fracture toughness data were from tests of center-cracked tension panels, part-through crack specimens, and compact-tension specimens.

  9. [Analysis of cracking gas compressor fouling by pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Hu, Yunfeng; Fang, Fei; Wei, Tao; Liu, Shuqing; Jiang, Guangshen; Cai, Jun

    2013-06-01

    The fouling from the different sections of the cracked gas compressor in Daqing Petrochemical Corporation was analyzed by pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py/GC-MS). All the samples were cracked in RJ-1 tube furnace cracker at the cracking temperature of 500 degrees C, and separated with a 60 m DB-1 capillary column. An electron impact ionization (EI) source was used with the ionizing voltage of 70 eV. The results showed the formation of fouling was closely related with cyclopentadiene which accounted for about 50% of the cracking products. Other components detected were 1-butylene, propylene, methane and n-butane. This Py/GC-MS method can be used as an effective approach to analyze the causes of fouling in the petrochemical plants. PMID:24063202

  10. Free Vibration Analysis of Patch Repaired Plates with a Through Crack by p-Convergent Layerwise Element

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jae S.; Yang, Seung H.; Woo, Kwang S.

    2014-01-01

    The high-order layerwise element models have been used for damaged plates and shells in the presence of singularities such as crack, cutout, and delamination. In this study, the extension of a proposed finite element model has been tested for free vibration analysis of composite laminated systems. For the elements, three-dimensional displacement fields can be captured by layer-by-layer representation. For the elements, higher-order shape functions are derived by combination of one- and two-dimensional shape functions based on higher-order Lobatto shape functions, not using pure higher-order three-dimensional shape functions. The present model can relieve difficulty of aspect ratios in modeling very thin thickness of bonding layer. For verification of the model, natural frequencies and corresponding mode shapes are calculated and then compared with reference values for uncracked and cracked plates. Also, the vibration characteristics of one-sided patch repaired plates with a through internal crack are investigated with respect to variation of crack length, size and thickness of patch, and shear modulus of adhesive, respectively. PMID:25215321

  11. Three-dimensional elastic stress and displacement analysis of finite circular geometry solids containing cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, J. P.; Mendelson, A.; Kring, J.

    1973-01-01

    A seminumerical method is presented for solving a set of coupled partial differential equations subject to mixed and coupled boundary conditions. The use of this method is illustrated by obtaining solutions for two circular geometry and mixed boundary value problems in three-dimensional elasticity. Stress and displacement distributions are calculated in an axisymmetric, circular bar of finite dimensions containing a penny-shaped crack. Approximate results for an annular plate containing internal surface cracks are also presented.

  12. Analysis of delamination in cross ply laminates initiating from impact induced matrix cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salpekar, S. A.

    1991-01-01

    Several two dimensional finite element analyses of (0 sub 2/90 sub 8/0 sub 2) glass/epoxy and graphite-epoxy composite laminates were performed to study some of the characteristics of damage development due to an impact load. A cross section through the thickness of the laminate with fixed ends, and carrying a transverse load in the center was analyzed. Inclined matrix cracks such as those produced by low velocity impact were modeled in the 90 deg ply group. The introduction of the matrix cracks caused large interlaminar tension and shear stresses in the vicinity of both crack tips in the 0/90 and 90/0 interfaces. The large interlaminar stresses at the ends of the matrix cracks indicate that matrix cracking may give rise to delamination. The ratio of mode I to total strain energy release rate at the beginning of delamination calculated at the two matrix crack tips was 60 and 28 pct., respectively, in the glass/epoxy laminate. The corresponding ratio was 97 and 77 pct. in the graphite-epoxy laminate. Thus, a significant mode I component of strain energy release rate may be present at the delamination initiation due to an impact load.

  13. Dynamic calibration and analysis of crack tip propagation in energetic materials using real-time radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butt, Ali

    Crack propagation in a solid rocket motor environment is difficult to measure directly. This experimental and analytical study evaluated the viability of real-time radiography for detecting bore regression and propellant crack propagation speed. The scope included the quantitative interpretation of crack tip velocity from simulated radiographic images of a burning, center-perforated grain and actual real-time radiographs taken on a rapid-prototyped model that dynamically produced the surface movements modeled in the simulation. The simplified motor simulation portrayed a bore crack that propagated radially at a speed that was 10 times the burning rate of the bore. Comparing the experimental image interpretation with the calibrated surface inputs, measurement accuracies were quantified. The average measurements of the bore radius were within 3% of the calibrated values with a maximum error of 7%. The crack tip speed could be characterized with image processing algorithms, but not with the dynamic calibration data. The laboratory data revealed that noise in the transmitted X-Ray intensity makes sensing the crack tip propagation using changes in the centerline transmitted intensity level impractical using the algorithms employed.

  14. Measurement of fatigue crack growth kinetics of Copper-Kapton laminates by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pickard, J.M.; Walters, R.R.

    1986-01-01

    Copper-Kapton laminates fabricated with epoxy and Du Pont WA acrylic adhesives are used in printed circuit applications that are of current interest to the Department of Energy. Kinetics for fatigue crack growth at the Cu-epoxy interface were measured under a helium atmosphere over the temperature range of 473 to 563 K by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). A least squares treatment of data derived on the basis of a first-order fatigue mechanism resulted in: log(k(T)/s/sup -1/ = (14.6 +- 0.4) - (175.4 +- 3.8)/2.303RT, where k(T) is the rate coefficient for thermal fatigue, T is absolute temperature, and R is the ideal gas law constant (R = 0.00831 kJ/K mol). Error estimates for the pre-exponential factor and activation energy correspond to one standard deviation. Arguments are presented which indicate that the upper temperature limit for continuous use of the laminate is 85/sup 0/C. It is concluded that the laminate will meet and possibly exceed the 27-y shelf life required by the DOE.

  15. Residual thermal and moisture influences on the strain energy release rate analysis of local delaminations from matrix cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, T. K.

    1991-01-01

    An analysis utilizing laminated plate theory is developed to calculate the strain energy release rate associated with local delaminations originating at off-axis, single ply, matrix cracks in laminates subjected to uniaxial loads. The analysis includes the contribution of residual thermal and moisture stresses to the strain energy released. Examples are calculated for the strain energy release rate associated with local delaminations originating at 90 degrees and angle-ply (non-90 degrees) matrix ply cracks in glass epoxy and graphite epoxy laminates. The solution developed may be used to assess the relative contribution of mechanical, residual thermal, and moisture stresses on the strain energy release rate for local delamination for a variety of layups and materials.

  16. A second-order closure analysis of turbulent diffusion flames. [combustion physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varma, A. K.; Fishburne, E. S.; Beddini, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    A complete second-order closure computer program for the investigation of compressible, turbulent, reacting shear layers was developed. The equations for the means and the second order correlations were derived from the time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations and contain third order and higher order correlations, which have to be modeled in terms of the lower-order correlations to close the system of equations. In addition to fluid mechanical turbulence models and parameters used in previous studies of a variety of incompressible and compressible shear flows, a number of additional scalar correlations were modeled for chemically reacting flows, and a typical eddy model developed for the joint probability density function for all the scalars. The program which is capable of handling multi-species, multistep chemical reactions, was used to calculate nonreacting and reacting flows in a hydrogen-air diffusion flame.

  17. Avoidance of crack inducement when laser welding hot-formed car body components - a variable analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, Johnny K.

    The Volvo XC60 car body contains numerous parts in Ultra High Strength Steels (UHSS) in order to guarantee the structural integrity of the car in the event of a crash situation. Most of the parts are manufactured in a hot-forming process, so called presshardening, resulting in component tensile strength in the range of 1,500 MPa. As this type of material also presents fairly high carbon content (˜0.22%) it brings a challenge when it comes to welding. The Volvo XC60 car body is at the same time to a large extent assembled by laser welding technology. In early development stages of the project (Y413), it was observed that laser welding of hot-formed components presented a number of challenges due to the unique conditions offered by this welding method. The presentation will thoroughly describe the modes of procedure how to avoid crack inducement during the welding operation. A variable analysis approach was used based on the present circumstances at the production facility in the Gent plant. Crucial variables at laser welding such as gap between sheets, focal point position, welding speed and laser weld position relative to the flange edge were included in a test matrix and welding trials were carried out accordingly in the Pilot Plant in Gothenburg. The paper will discuss those welding results, the subsequent analysis and plausible theoretic explanations. From the lessons learnt in this research, the optimum laser welding parameters were then transferred to the laser welding stations in the Gent plant. There it has been proven, that also at high volume automotive manufacturing, it is possible to provide an outstanding weld quality also at such difficult pre-conditions. The presentation ends with some facts and figures and experiences from high volume series production, which also includes aspects on quality assurance.

  18. Comparison of fatigue crack propagation in Modes I and III

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, R.O.

    1985-06-01

    The propagation behavior of fatigue cracks in Mode III (anti-plane shear), measured under cyclic torsion, is described and compared with more commonly encountered behavior under Mode I (tensile opening) loads. It is shown that a unique, global characterization of Mode III growth rates, akin to the Paris ''law'' in Mode I, is only possible if characterizating parameters appropriate to large-scale yielding are employed and allowance is made for crack tip shielding from sliding crack surface interference (i.e., friction and abrasion) between mating fracture surfaces. Based on the crack tip stress and deformation fields for Mode III stationary cracks, the cyclic crack tip displacement, (..delta..CTD/sub III/, and plastic strain intensity range ..delta..GAMMA/sub III/, have been proposed and are found to provide an adequate description of behavior in a range of steels, provided crack surface interference is minimized. The magnitude of this interference, which is somewhat analogous to crack closure in Mode I, is further examined in the light of the complex fractography of torsional fatigue failures and the question of a ''fatigue threshold'' for Mode III crack growth. Finally, micro-mechanical models for cyclic crack extension in anti-plane shear are briefly described, and the contrasting behavior between Mode III and Mode I cracks subjected to simple variable amplitude spectra is examined in terms of the differing role of crack tip blunting and closure in influencing shear, as opposed to tensile opening, modes of crack growth.

  19. Residual stress effect on fatigue crack growth in thick wall cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Kiciak, A.; Glinka, G.; Burns, D.J.

    1995-11-01

    Recently derived weight functions for a single, semi-elliptical, longitudinal crack in a thick wall cylinder with the diameter ratio D{sub 0}/D{sub i} = 2, have been used to analyze fatigue crack propagation in autofrettaged and non-autofrettaged, pressurized cylinders. Two levels of autofrettage, 30 and 60%, have been considered. The influences of the level of autofrettage, surface crack closure, and different sets of parameters of crack closure, and different sets of parameters of crack propagation relation have been investigated. The development of cracks has been compared to the experimental results. The results of analyses confirm beneficial influence of autofrettage. It has been shown that the discrepancies between the observed and calculated crack developments cannot be ascribed to the influence of surface crack closure. The comparison of the experiments and predictions unveils the need for an additional series of experiments.

  20. Percutaneous closure versus medical therapy alone for cryptogenic stroke patients with a patent foramen ovale: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Pickett, Christopher A; Villines, Todd C; Ferguson, Michael A; Hulten, Edward A

    2014-08-01

    Of cryptogenic stroke patients younger than 55 years of age, up to 61% have had a patent foramen ovale (PFO). Observational studies have revealed reductions in recurrent neurologic events through PFO closure versus medical therapy, and randomized controlled trials have shown nonsignificant trends toward benefit. We systematically searched for randomized controlled trials of percutaneous PFO closure with medical therapy versus medical therapy alone in patients with cryptogenic stroke and performed a meta-analysis of treatment outcomes. The primary endpoint was combined death, stroke, and transient ischemic attack. We included 3 trials. Of 2,303 total patients, 1,150 underwent PFO closure and 1,153 received medical therapy (median follow-up period, 2.6 yr). The pooled incidence of the primary endpoint was 1.2 events per 100 patient-years in the closure group (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.2-2.3) and 1.8 in the therapy group (95% CI, 0.7-2.9) (P=0.32); the number needed to treat was 167 (range, 100-500). The corresponding pooled hazard ratio was 0.67 (95% CI, 0.44-1.01; P=0.054) in favor of closure. Closure was associated with an increased risk of atrial fibrillation: relative risk=3.51 (95% CI, 1.44-8.55; P=0.006). When stratified by device, use of the Amplatzer™ PFO Occluder resulted in significant stroke-prevention benefit over medical therapy alone: hazard ratio=0.44 (95% CI, 0.21-0.95; P=0.037). When compared with medical therapy alone, PFO closure with medical therapy showed a trend toward a decreased hazard of combined events, although the absolute event reduction was small and the number needed to treat was high.

  1. A nonlinear fracture mechanics approach to the growth of small cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    An analytical model of crack closure is used to study the crack growth and closure behavior of small cracks in plates and at notches. The calculated crack opening stresses for small and large cracks, together with elastic and elastic plastic fracture mechanics analyses, are used to correlate crack growth rate data. At equivalent elastic stress intensity factor levels, calculations predict that small cracks in plates and at notches should grow faster than large cracks because the applied stress needed to open a small crack is less than that needed to open a large crack. These predictions agree with observed trends in test data. The calculations from the model also imply that many of the stress intensity factor thresholds that are developed in tests with large cracks and with load reduction schemes do not apply to the growth of small cracks. The current calculations are based upon continuum mechanics principles and, thus, some crack size and grain structure exist where the underlying fracture mechanics assumptions become invalid because of material inhomogeneity (grains, inclusions, etc.). Admittedly, much more effort is needed to develop the mechanics of a noncontinuum. Nevertheless, these results indicate the importance of crack closure in predicting the growth of small cracks from large crack data.

  2. JSC Materials Laboratory Reproduction and Failure Analysis of Cracked Orbiter Reaction Control System Niobium Thruster Injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Willard L.; Jacobs, Jeremy B.

    2006-01-01

    In April 2004 a Space Shuttle Orbiter Reaction Control System (RCS) thruster was found to be cracked while undergoing a nozzle (niobium/C103 alloy) retrofit. As a failure resulting from an in-flight RCS thruster burn-through (initiated from a crack) could be catastrophic, an official Space Shuttle Program flight constraint was issued until flight safety could be adequately demonstrated. This paper describes the laboratory test program which was undertaken to reproduce the cracking in order to fully understand and bound the driving environments. The associated rationale developed to justify continued safe flight of the Orbiter RCS system is also described. The laboratory testing successfully reproduced the niobium cracking, and established specific bounding conditions necessary to cause cracking in the C103 thruster injectors. Each of the following conditions is necessary in combination together: 1) a mechanically disturbed / cold-worked free surface, 2) an externally applied sustained tensile stress near yield strength, 3) presence of fluorine-containing fluids on exposed tensile / cold-worked free surfaces, and 4) sustained exposure to temperatures greater than 400 F. As a result of this work, it was concluded that fluorine-containing materials (e.g. HF acid, Krytox , Brayco etc.) should be carefully controlled or altogether eliminated during processing of niobium and its alloys.

  3. CLOSURE DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Linzell, S.M.; Dorcy, D.J.

    1958-08-26

    A quick opening type of stuffing box employing two banks of rotatable shoes, each of which has a caraming action that forces a neoprene sealing surface against a pipe or rod where it passes through a wall is presented. A ring having a handle or wrench attached is placed eccentric to and between the two banks of shoes. Head bolts from the shoes fit into slots in this ring, which are so arranged that when the ring is rotated a quarter turn in one direction the shoes are thrust inwardly to cramp the neopnrene about the pipe, malting a tight seal. Moving the ring in the reverse direction moves the shoes outwardly and frees the pipe which then may be readily removed from the stuffing box. This device has particular application as a closure for the end of a coolant tube of a neutronic reactor.

  4. Modeling and monitoring of tooth fillet crack growth in dynamic simulation of spur gear set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilbault, Raynald; Lalonde, Sébastien; Thomas, Marc

    2015-05-01

    This study integrates a linear elastic fracture mechanics analysis of the tooth fillet crack propagation into a nonlinear dynamic model of spur gear sets. An original formulation establishes the rigidity of sound and damaged teeth. The formula incorporates the contribution of the flexible gear body and real crack trajectories in the fillet zone. The work also develops a KI prediction formula. A validation of the equation estimates shows that the predicted KI are in close agreement with published numerical and experimental values. The representation also relies on the Paris-Erdogan equation completed with crack closure effects. The analysis considers that during dN fatigue cycles, a harmonic mean of ΔK assures optimal evaluations. The paper evaluates the influence of the mesh frequency distance from the resonances of the system. The obtained results indicate that while the dependence may demonstrate obvious nonlinearities, the crack progression rate increases with a mesh frequency augmentation. The study develops a tooth fillet crack propagation detection procedure based on residual signals (RS) prepared in the frequency domain. The proposed approach accepts any gear conditions as reference signature. The standard deviation and mean values of the RS are evaluated as gear condition descriptors. A trend tracking of their responses obtained from a moving linear regression completes the analysis. Globally, the results show that, regardless of the reference signal, both descriptors are sensitive to the tooth fillet crack and sharply react to tooth breakage. On average, the mean value detected the crack propagation after a size increase of 3.69 percent as compared to the reference condition, whereas the standard deviation required crack progressions of 12.24 percent. Moreover, the mean descriptor shows evolutions closer to the crack size progression.

  5. Phase Transformation Surfaces Analysis for SMA Around a Crack Tip with Curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laydi, Mohamed Rachid; Lexcellent, Christian

    2015-09-01

    Under loading, for a shape memory alloy, the stress concentration around the crack tip, inside a plate, is a serious fracture problem. The tip shape constitutes an important data. In a recent paper (Lexcellent et al. in Int J Fract 169:1-13, 2011), the determination of phase transformation surfaces around a crack tip without curvature was investigated. For crack with curvature, the approximate stress field solution proposed by Creager and Paris is used (Int J Fract 3:247-252, 1967). The knowledge of phase transformation surfaces dimensions and shapes can help us to define a fracture criterion. The study is focussed on mode I because this opening mode is the most dangerous for the structure. Also, comparisons between experiments and computing can be made. Qualitative agreement was obtained.

  6. Analysis Of Potentiometric Methods Used For Crack Detection In Forging Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilc, Jozef; Drbúl, Mário; Stančeková, Dana; Varga, Daniel; Martinček, Juraj; Kuždák, Viktor

    2015-12-01

    Increased use of forging tools in mass production causes their increased wear and creates pressure to design more efficient renovation process. Renovation is complicated because of the identification of cracks expanding from the surface to the core material. Given that the production of forging tools is expensive, caused by the cost of tool steels and the thermo-chemical treatment, it is important to design forging tool with its easy renovation in mind. It is important to choose the right renovation technology, which will be able to restore the instrument to its original state while maintaining financial rentability. Choosing the right technology is difficult because of nitrided and heat-treated surface for high hardness and wear resistance. Article discusses the use of non-destructive method of detecting cracks taking into account the size of the cracks formed during working process.

  7. Analysis of high pressure boil-off situation during MSIV closure ATWS in a typical BWR/4

    SciTech Connect

    Neymotin, L.Y.; Slovik, G.C.; Saha, P.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to provide a best-estimate analysis of the MSIV Closure ATWS in the Browns Ferry Unit 1 BWR with Mark 1 containment. The calculations have been performed using the RAMONA-3B code which has a three-dimensional neutron kinetics model coupled with one-dimensional (multi-channel core representation), four-equation, nonhomogeneous, nonequilibrium thermal hydraulics. The code also allows for one-dimensional neutronic core representation. The 1-D capability of the code has been employed in this calculation since a thorough sensitivity study showed that for a full ATWS, a one-dimensional (axial) neutron kinetics adequately describes the core behavior. (Note that the core steady-state symmetry in this case was preserved throughout the transient so that radial effects could be neglected.) The calculation described in the paper was started from a steady-state fuel condition corresponding to the end of Cycle 5 of the Browns Ferry reactor.

  8. A correlation analysis of percent canopy closure versus TMS spectral response for selected forest sites in the San Juan National Forest, Colorado

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butera, M. K.

    1983-01-01

    The correlation of canopy closure with the signal response of individual thematic mapper simulator (TMS) bands for selected forest sites in the San Juan National Forest, Colorado was investigated. Ground truth consisted of a photointerpreted determination of percent canopy closure of 0 to 100 percent for 32 sites. The sites selected were situated on plateaus at an elevation of approximately 3 km with slope or = 10 percent. The predominant tree species were ponderosa pine and aspen. The mean TMS response per band per site was calculated from data acquired by aircraft during mid-September, 1981. A correlation analysis of TMS response vs. canopy closure resulted in the following correlation coefficients for bands 1 through 7, respectively: -0.757, -0.663, -0.666, -0.088, -0.797, -0.763. Two model regressions were applied to the TMS data set to create a map of predicted percent forest canopy closure for the study area. Results indicated percent predictive accuracies of 71, 74, and 57 for percent canopy closure classes of 0-25, 25-75, and 75-100, respectively.

  9. Crack mitigation in concrete bridge decks through experimental analysis and computer modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Douglas M.

    Bridge deck cracking can cause deterioration of bridge decks, leading to a shorter life span and poor performance. Throughout the US, cracking has been identified as a problem, with transverse cracking along the deck at regular spacings being the most prominent type. This problem is usually caused by drying shrinkage within the concrete. The material properties, restraint, and distances without expansion joints all affect the crack pattern within the deck. This study will delve into the reasons that bridge decks crack, the strains that are associated with drying shrinkage, and possible methods for abating its effects. The research is divided into two parts, the first being laboratory experimentation, which was conducted through the use of two 7 ft. x 10 ft. experimental concrete bridge bays. Each bay was instrumented with strain and temperature gages throughout the deck and girders, which collected data for six months. The first deck was poured with a control concrete mix used currently in Illinois. The second deck was poured with a type K expansive concrete, which could battle the effects of shrinkage. For both decks, the results suggest a compressive strain throughout the rebar and along the top surface of the concrete, except for the locations where cracks are found (at these locations the strain slopes upward into tension). The strain in the type K deck, though, was notably less than that in the control deck and the onset of cracking was delayed by three weeks, giving the indication of an improvement over the current mix design. The second portion of the research was focused on using a finite element model to replicate the bridge bay and study the results. Equivalent temperature loading was used to apply the shrinkage loads recorded during the experimental portion of the research. The model was then expanded to encompass a full-scale bridge and in order to provide some insight into shrinkage strain in the real world. The end goal is to help alleviate cracking

  10. Dynamic finite element analysis of the crack-inclusion interaction in aligned CNF composites under impact loading conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Huat Tung

    The interaction between a crack and an inclusion of microfiber in an aligned carbon nanofiber (CNF) toughened composite under impact loading conditions was studied by using dynamic finite element analysis (FEA). The nanocomposite material used in this study was T300/Epon 862 enhanced with aligned carbon nanofibers (CNFs). The dynamic stress intensity factors (DSIFs) were evaluated to describe the dynamic fracture behavior of the fracture model. In this study, a numerical homogenization model using FEA was first employed to determine the effective material properties of the equivalent matrix material of Epon 862 and aligned CNFs. The effects of T300 microfiber inclusion eccentricity and CNF alignment angle on the DSIFs were examined in this study. The displacement extrapolation method for monoclinic materials was utilized to calculate the DSIFs. The numerical results demonstrated a mechanism known as "crack-tip shielding" and demonstrated that the CNF alignment angle has an impact on the DSIFs.

  11. Fracture and crack growth in orthotropic laminates. Part 1: Analysis of a hybrid, unidirectional laminate with damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goree, J. G.

    1982-01-01

    The fracture behavior of unifirectional hybrid (buffer strip) composite laminates is studied. Three particular solutions are discussed: (1) broken fibers in a unidirectional half plane; (2) adjoined half planes of different fiber and matrix properties and (3) the solution of two half planes bounding a third distinct region of finite width. This finite width region represents a buffer strip and the potential of this strip to arrest a crack that originates in one of the half planes is investigated. The analysis is based on a materials modeling approach using the classical shear lag assumption to described the stress transfer between fibers. Explicit fiber and matrix properties of the three regions are retained and changes in the laminate behavior as a function of the relative material properties, buffer strip width and initial crack length are discussed.

  12. Influence of hydrogen environment on fatigue crack growth in forged Ti-6Al-4V: fractographic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaddam, R.; Pederson, R.; Hörnqvist, M.; Antti, M.-L.

    2013-12-01

    The influence of high-pressure gaseous hydrogen environment (15 MPa) on the fatigue crack growth in forged Ti-6A1-4V at room temperature is investigated. It is observed that the fatigue crack growth (FCG) rate is fluctuating at 20 <= ΔK <= 26 MPa√m, and increase drastically at ΔK > 26 MPa√m in hydrogen environment. The effect of hydrogen on the FCG rate is dependent on the stress intensity level (ΔK). Detailed fractographic analysis of the fracture surfaces is performed at different ΔK using field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). The differences in appearance of fracture surfaces in air and hydrogen are discussed.

  13. Knuckle Cracking

    MedlinePlus

    ... older obese people. Question: Can cracking knuckles / joints lead to arthritis? Answer: There is no evidence of ... or damaged joints due to arthritis could potentially lead more easily to ligament injury or acute trauma ...

  14. Performance Assessment/Composite Analysis Modeling to Support a Holistic Strategy for the Closure of F Area, a Large Nuclear Complex at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    COOK, JAMES

    2004-02-18

    A performance-based approach is being used at the Savannah River Site to close the F area Complex. F Area consists of a number of large industrial facilities including plutonium separations, uranium fuel fabrication, tanks for storing high level waste and a number of smaller operations. A major part of the overall closure strategy is the use of techniques derived from the Performance Assessment and Composite Analysis requirements for low level waste disposal at DOE sites. This process will provide a means of demonstrating the basis for deactivation, decommissioning and closure decisions to management, stakeholders and regulators.

  15. Analysis of Extensive Cross-Flow Separation using Higher-Order RANS Closure Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morison, J. H.; Panaras, A. G.; Gatski, T. B.; Georgantopoulos, G. A.

    2003-01-01

    The turbulent flow fields associated with the incompressible flow over a 6:1 prolate spheroid at high angle of attack, and the supersonic flow over an ogive cylinder are studied. Both these flows are characterized by large separation and vortical flow regions and therefore provide a challenging database for comparison of turbulent closure models. Of interest is the ability to predict the effects of separation and associated vortical motion common to both flows. Two turbulent models are investigated that each represent the class of linear eddy-viscosity models (LEVMs) and explicit algebraic stress models (EASMs). Since the EASM accounts for anisotropic effects, the in- fluence of these effects on flow field predictions can be assessed. The EASM model is shown to both improve the separation location prediction and pressure trough under the secondary vortex on the 6:1 prolate spheroid at high angle of attack and high Reynolds number, and improve the prediction of the separation location on a supersonic ogive cylinder.

  16. Microcrack closure in rocks under stress - Direct observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batzle, M. L.; Simmons, G.; Siegfried, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    Direct observations of the closure of microcracks in rocks under increasing stress are reported. Uniaxial stresses up to 300 bars were applied to untreated and previously heated samples of Westerly granite and Frederick diabase by a small hydraulic press which fit entirely within a scanning electron microscope. Crack closure characteristics are found to depend on crack orientation, with cracks perpendicular to the applied stress closing and those parallel tending to open, as well as crack aspect ratio, crack intersection properties, stress concentrations and surface roughness. Uniaxial and hydrostatic stress measurements are found to be strongly dependent on fracture content as observed by SEM, and the observed hysteresis in strain measurements in the first stress cycles is also related to microscopic processes

  17. Crack Propagation Analysis Using Acoustic Emission Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring Systems

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kral, Zachary; Horn, Walter; Steck, James

    2013-01-01

    Aerospace systems are expected to remain in service well beyond their designed life. Consequently, maintenance is an important issue. A novel method of implementing artificial neural networks and acoustic emission sensors to form a structural health monitoring (SHM) system for aerospace inspection routines was the focus of this research. Simple structural elements, consisting of flat aluminum plates of AL 2024-T3, were subjected to increasing static tensile loading. As the loading increased, designed cracks extended in length, releasing strain waves in the process. Strain wave signals, measured by acoustic emission sensors, were further analyzed in post-processing by artificial neural networks (ANN).more » Several experiments were performed to determine the severity and location of the crack extensions in the structure. ANNs were trained on a portion of the data acquired by the sensors and the ANNs were then validated with the remaining data. The combination of a system of acoustic emission sensors, and an ANN could determine crack extension accurately. The difference between predicted and actual crack extensions was determined to be between 0.004 in. and 0.015 in. with 95% confidence. These ANNs, coupled with acoustic emission sensors, showed promise for the creation of an SHM system for aerospace systems.« less

  18. STS-133 Space Shuttle External Tank Intertank Stringer Crack Investigation Stress Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steeve, Brian E.

    2012-01-01

    The first attempt to launch the STS-133 Space Shuttle mission in the fall of 2010 was halted due to indications of a gaseous hydrogen leak at the External Tank ground umbilical carrier plate seal. Subsequent inspection of the external tank (figure 1) hardware and recorded video footage revealed that the foam insulation covering the forward end of the intertank near the liquid oxygen tank had cracked severely enough to have been cause for halting the launch attempt on its own (figure 2). An investigation into the cause of the insulation crack revealed that two adjacent hat-section sheet metal stringers (figure 3) had cracks up to nine inches long in the forward ends of the stringer flanges, or feet, near the fasteners that attach the stringer to the skin of the intertank (figure 4). A repair of those two stringers was implemented and the investigation effort widened to understand the root cause of the stringer cracks and to determine whether there was sufficient flight rationale to launch with the repairs and the other installed stringers.

  19. Crack Propagation Analysis Using Acoustic Emission Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring Systems

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Walter; Steck, James

    2013-01-01

    Aerospace systems are expected to remain in service well beyond their designed life. Consequently, maintenance is an important issue. A novel method of implementing artificial neural networks and acoustic emission sensors to form a structural health monitoring (SHM) system for aerospace inspection routines was the focus of this research. Simple structural elements, consisting of flat aluminum plates of AL 2024-T3, were subjected to increasing static tensile loading. As the loading increased, designed cracks extended in length, releasing strain waves in the process. Strain wave signals, measured by acoustic emission sensors, were further analyzed in post-processing by artificial neural networks (ANN). Several experiments were performed to determine the severity and location of the crack extensions in the structure. ANNs were trained on a portion of the data acquired by the sensors and the ANNs were then validated with the remaining data. The combination of a system of acoustic emission sensors, and an ANN could determine crack extension accurately. The difference between predicted and actual crack extensions was determined to be between 0.004 in. and 0.015 in. with 95% confidence. These ANNs, coupled with acoustic emission sensors, showed promise for the creation of an SHM system for aerospace systems. PMID:24023536

  20. Crack propagation analysis using acoustic emission sensors for structural health monitoring systems.

    PubMed

    Kral, Zachary; Horn, Walter; Steck, James

    2013-01-01

    Aerospace systems are expected to remain in service well beyond their designed life. Consequently, maintenance is an important issue. A novel method of implementing artificial neural networks and acoustic emission sensors to form a structural health monitoring (SHM) system for aerospace inspection routines was the focus of this research. Simple structural elements, consisting of flat aluminum plates of AL 2024-T3, were subjected to increasing static tensile loading. As the loading increased, designed cracks extended in length, releasing strain waves in the process. Strain wave signals, measured by acoustic emission sensors, were further analyzed in post-processing by artificial neural networks (ANN). Several experiments were performed to determine the severity and location of the crack extensions in the structure. ANNs were trained on a portion of the data acquired by the sensors and the ANNs were then validated with the remaining data. The combination of a system of acoustic emission sensors, and an ANN could determine crack extension accurately. The difference between predicted and actual crack extensions was determined to be between 0.004 in. and 0.015 in. with 95% confidence. These ANNs, coupled with acoustic emission sensors, showed promise for the creation of an SHM system for aerospace systems. PMID:24023536

  1. Thermal Contraction Crack Polygons on Earth and Mars: Morphological Analysis and Climate Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, J. S.

    2007-12-01

    The generation of thermal contraction crack polygons on Earth and Mars is a complex process, governed by the interplay between climate or microclimate conditions and the physical properties of the cracking medium. The morphological evolution of thermal contraction crack polygons is controlled in large part by local climatic and geological conditions: principally, the presence or absence of a seasonally wet active layer; the abundance of windblown, crack-filling material (snow or sediment); and the temperature and humidity conditions controlling the transport of water vapor between the ice-rich substrate and the atmosphere. Thermal contraction cracking of ice- rich soils is expected under present Mars conditions for latitudes polewards of 30 degrees, and a correlation between polygon size and latitude is predicted: larger stresses generated polewards will produce finer polygon networks. Observations confirm this general prediction, and a latitude dependence of polygon morphological type is observed, suggesting that the latitudinal range of current climate conditions is partially responsible for the difference in morphology. In particular, some hypothesize that localized melting and freeze-thaw processing are a significant source of the variety in polygon morphologies observed. A suite of thermal contraction crack polygon morphologies has been documented in the Upland Stable Zone (USZ) and Intermediate Mixed Zone (IMZ) of the Antarctic Dry Valleys, forming under known microclimate and subsurface rheological conditions, informing a comparison with polygonally patterned ground observed on Mars. We address the questions. What do current climate conditions suggest about the equilibrium conditions under which polygons are evolving on the martian surface? Is the decreasing spacing of thermal contract crack polygon networks polewards entirely a climate signal, or is there also a substrate rheology signal? What polygon features require freeze-thaw processing, and what

  2. Replica-based Crack Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Smith, Stephen W.; Piascik, R. S.; Willard, Scott A.; Dawicke, David S.

    2007-01-01

    A surface replica-based crack inspection method has recently been developed for use in Space Shuttle main engine (SSME) hydrogen feedline flowliners. These flowliners exist to ensure favorable flow of liquid hydrogen over gimble joint bellows, and consist of two rings each containing 38 elongated slots. In the summer of 2002, multiple cracks ranging from 0.1 inches to 0.6 inches long were discovered; each orbiter contained at least one cracked flowliner. These long cracks were repaired and eddy current inspections ensured that no cracks longer than 0.075 inches were present. However, subsequent fracture-mechanics review of flight rationale required detection of smaller cracks, and was the driving force for development of higher-resolution inspection method. Acetate tape surface replicas have been used for decades to detect and monitor small cracks. However, acetate tape replicas have primarily been limited to laboratory specimens because complexities involved in making these replicas - requiring acetate tape to be dissolved with acetone - are not well suited for a crack inspection tool. More recently developed silicon-based replicas are better suited for use as a crack detection tool. A commercially available silicon-based replica product has been determined to be acceptable for use in SSME hydrogen feedlines. A method has been developed using this product and a scanning electron microscope for analysis, which can find cracks as small as 0.005 inches and other features (e.g., pits, scratches, tool marks, etc.) as small as 0.001 inches. The resolution of this method has been validated with dozens of cracks generated in a laboratory setting and this method has been used to locate 55 cracks (ranging in size from 0.040 inches to 0.004 inches) on space flight hardware. These cracks were removed by polishing away the cracked material and a second round of replicas confirmed the repair.

  3. Laplace-SGBEM analysis of the dynamic stress intensity factors and the dynamic T-stress for the interaction between a crack and auxetic inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Kibum

    A dynamic analysis of the interaction between a crack and an auxetic (negative Poisson ratio)/non-auxetic inclusion is presented. The two most important fracture parameters, namely the stress intensity factors and the T-stress are analyzed by using the symmetric Galerkin boundary element method in the Laplace domain for three different models of crack-inclusion interaction. To investigate the effects of auxetic inclusions on the fracture behavior of composites reinforced by this new type of material, comparisons of the dynamic stress intensity factors and the dynamic T-stress are made between the use of auxetic inclusions as opposed to the use of traditional inclusions. Furthermore, the technique presented in this research can be employed to analyze for the interaction between a crack and a cluster of auxetic/non-auxetic inclusions. Results from the latter models can be employed in crack growth analysis in auxetic-fiber-reinforced composites.

  4. Test Analysis Correlation of the Single Stringer Bending Tests for the Space Shuttle ET-137 Intertank Stringer Crack Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Dawn R.; Saxon, Joseph B.; Wingate, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    , occurred as the LOX liquid level crossed the LOX tank / Intertank interface ring frame. Hence, cryogenically-induced displacements were suspected as a contributing cause of the stringer cracks. To study the behavior of Intertank stringers subjected to similar displacements, static load tests of individual stringers, colloquially known as "single stringer bending tests" were performed. Approximately thirty stringers were tested, many of which were cut from the partially completed Intertank for what would have been ET-139. In addition to the tests, finite element (FE) analyses of the test configuration were also performed. In this paper, the FE analyses and test-analysis correlation for stringer test S6-8 are presented. Stringer S6-8 is a "short chord" configuration with no doubler panels.

  5. Shuttle Fuel Feedliner Cracking Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesman, Tomas E.; Turner, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of material covered during 'Space Shuttle Fuel Feedliner Cracking Investigation MSFC Fluids Workshop' held November 19-21, 2002. Topics covered include: cracks on fuel feed lines of Orbiter space shuttles, fluid driven cracking analysis, liner structural modes, structural motion in a fluid, fluid borne drivers, three dimensional computational fluid dynamics models, fluid borne drivers from pumps, amplification mechanisms, flow parameter mapping, and flight engine flow map.

  6. Network Meta-analysis of Randomized Trials on the Safety of Vascular Closure Devices for Femoral Arterial Puncture Site Haemostasis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jun; Zou, Junjie; Ma, Hao; Jiao, Yuanyong; Yang, Hongyu; Zhang, Xiwei; Miao, Yi

    2015-09-08

    The safety of vascular closure devices (VCDs) is still debated. The emergence of more related randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and newer VCDs makes it necessary to further evaluate the safety of VCDs. Relevant RCTs were identified by searching PubMed, EMBASE, Google Scholar and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials electronic databases updated in December 2014. Traditional and network meta-analyses were conducted to evaluate the rate of combined adverse vascular events (CAVEs) and haematomas by calculating the risk ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Forty RCTs including 16868 patients were included. Traditional meta-analysis demonstrated that there was no significant difference in the rate of CAVEs between all the VCDs and manual compression (MC). Subgroup analysis showed that FemoSeal and VCDs reported after the year 2005 reduced CAVEs. Moreover, the use of VCDs reduced the risk of haematomas compared with MC. Network meta-analysis showed that AngioSeal, which might be the best VCD among all the included VCDs, was associated with reduced rates of both CAVE and haematomas compared with MC. In conclusion, the use of VCDs is associated with a decreased risk of haematomas, and FemoSeal and AngioSeal appears to be better than MC for reducing the rate of CAVEs.

  7. Fatigue crack growth behaviour of Al-Li alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saravanakumar, R.; Ramakrishna, K. S.; Kanna, B. Avinash

    2013-06-01

    Al-Li alloys are being used in aircraft structures due to its low density and inherent mechanical properties. Fatigue Crack Growth (FCG) resistance is usually high compared to conventional Al-alloys attributed to increased modulus and crack closure. Extensive investigations concern about the FCG resistance and crack closure in Al-Li alloys. The present work reviews the FCG resistance in Al-Li alloys and the mechanisms associated with it. The alloy 8090 is taken for the consideration and sometimes compared with 2024.

  8. Three-dimensional visualization and characterization of cracks in geothermal reservoir rock using image analysis of reconstructed μCT images: A preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latief, Fourier Dzar Eljabbar; Feranie, Selly

    2014-03-01

    In most geothermal reservoirs, cracks are considered very important because of the ability to transport water vapor. In most cases, characterizations of cracks are often difficult to be performed. However, through the vast development of imaging technique, many researches have been conducted in order to obtain better understanding regarding the nature of cracks. Using micro-CT (μCT) scanning devices, i.e., the Skyscan 1173, we were able to obtain 3D images of geothermal reservoir rock from West Java. The rock sample was scanned using X-ray voltage of 130 kV and current of 61 μA. The reconstructed images have spatial resolution of 59.85 μm/pixel. Using CTVox and ImageViewer, we were able to visualize the cracks both in 2D and 3D perspective. We further performed image processing and analysis, i.e.: simple segmentation of pore-solid by thresholding the gray values and binarizing the images, de-noising (despeckling), and 3D structure analysis. From these analyses, we obtain the value of porosity of 6.27%, and from further analysis, we separate the crack from the granular pore. The fraction of the cracks is 2.35% from the total volume of the sample. This preliminary study however, still contains some errors. By visualizing the produced image from the isolation, we can still observed the existence of isolated granular pores. Nonetheless, this study has confirmed that using image processing and image analysis approach of reconstructed μCT images, we were able to isolate cracks from granular pores, and also calculate the volume fraction of the cracks.

  9. Analysis of crack propagation and transport properties in rock samples using micro computer tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uribe, David; Steeb, Holger

    2016-04-01

    The use of imaged based methods to determine properties of geological materials is becoming an alternative to laboratory experiments. Furthermore, the combination of laboratory experiments and image based methods using micro computer tomography have advanced the understanding of geophysical and geochemical processes. Within the scope of the "Shynergie" project, two special topics have been studied using such combination: a) the generation and propagation of cracks in rocks (specially wing cracks) and b) the time dependence of transport properties of rocks due to chemical weathering. In this publication, we describe the design considerations of our micro CT scanner to manipulate rock samples that have been subjected to the experiments to determine the above mentioned phenomena. Additionally, we discuss the preliminary experimental results and the initial interpretations we have gathered from the observations of the digitized rock samples.

  10. Analysis of Mode III Elastodynamic Cracked Plane using the Fractal Two-Level Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, J.; Lee, Y. Y.; Leung, A. Y. T.

    2010-05-01

    In this study, the fractal two-level finite element method, which has mainly been used for static cracked plane problems, is applied to the cracked plane problem. Using the transformation process in the proposed method, the infinite dimension of the finite element matrices that are assembled for a singular region is made finite in terms of the dynamics stress intensity factors directly, and thus the computational time can be reduced significantly. The Newmark time integration scheme is then used to obtain the dynamic stress intensity factors. The results from the proposed method are in reasonable agreement with those of classical methods. The main drawback of the time integration scheme is that numerical oscillations are induced in some cases.

  11. Development of a three-phase reacting flow computer model for analysis of petroleum cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.; Petrick, M.

    1995-07-01

    A general computational fluid dynamics computer code (ICRKFLO) has been developed for the simulation of the multi-phase reacting flow in a petroleum fluid catalytic cracker riser. ICRKFLO has several unique features. A new integral reaction submodel couples calculations of hydrodynamics and cracking kinetics by making the calculations more efficient in achieving stable convergence while still preserving the major physical effects of reaction processes. A new coke transport submodel handles the process of coke formation in gas phase reactions and the subsequent deposition on the surface of adjacent particles. The code was validated by comparing with experimental results of a pilot scale fluid cracker unit. The code can predict the flow characteristics of gas, liquid, and particulate solid phases, vaporization of the oil droplets, and subsequent cracking of the oil in a riser reactor, which may lead to a better understanding of the internal processes of the riser and the impact of riser geometry and operating parameters on the riser performance.

  12. Self-protected nitrate reducing culture for intrinsic repair of concrete cracks

    PubMed Central

    Erşan, Yusuf Ç.; Gruyaert, Elke; Louis, Ghislain; Lors, Christine; De Belie, Nele; Boon, Nico

    2015-01-01

    Attentive monitoring and regular repair of concrete cracks are necessary to avoid further durability problems. As an alternative to current maintenance methods, intrinsic repair systems which enable self-healing of cracks have been investigated. Exploiting microbial induced CaCO3 precipitation (MICP) using (protected) axenic cultures is one of the proposed methods. Yet, only a few of the suggested healing agents were economically feasible for in situ application. This study presents a NO3− reducing self-protected enrichment culture as a self-healing additive for concrete. Concrete admixtures Ca(NO3)2 and Ca(HCOO)2 were used as nutrients. The enrichment culture, grown as granules (0.5–2 mm) consisting of 70% biomass and 30% inorganic salts were added into mortar without any additional protection. Upon 28 days curing, mortar specimens were subjected to direct tensile load and multiple cracks (0.1–0.6 mm) were achieved. Cracked specimens were immersed in water for 28 days and effective crack closure up to 0.5 mm crack width was achieved through calcite precipitation. Microbial activity during crack healing was monitored through weekly NOx analysis which revealed that 92 ± 2% of the available NO3− was consumed. Another set of specimens were cracked after 6 months curing, thus the effect of curing time on healing efficiency was investigated, and mineral formation at the inner crack surfaces was observed, resulting in 70% less capillary water absorption compared to healed control specimens. In conclusion, enriched mixed denitrifying cultures structured in self-protecting granules are very promising strategies to enhance microbial self-healing. PMID:26583015

  13. Self-protected nitrate reducing culture for intrinsic repair of concrete cracks.

    PubMed

    Erşan, Yusuf Ç; Gruyaert, Elke; Louis, Ghislain; Lors, Christine; De Belie, Nele; Boon, Nico

    2015-01-01

    Attentive monitoring and regular repair of concrete cracks are necessary to avoid further durability problems. As an alternative to current maintenance methods, intrinsic repair systems which enable self-healing of cracks have been investigated. Exploiting microbial induced CaCO3 precipitation (MICP) using (protected) axenic cultures is one of the proposed methods. Yet, only a few of the suggested healing agents were economically feasible for in situ application. This study presents a [Formula: see text] reducing self-protected enrichment culture as a self-healing additive for concrete. Concrete admixtures Ca(NO3)2 and Ca(HCOO)2 were used as nutrients. The enrichment culture, grown as granules (0.5-2 mm) consisting of 70% biomass and 30% inorganic salts were added into mortar without any additional protection. Upon 28 days curing, mortar specimens were subjected to direct tensile load and multiple cracks (0.1-0.6 mm) were achieved. Cracked specimens were immersed in water for 28 days and effective crack closure up to 0.5 mm crack width was achieved through calcite precipitation. Microbial activity during crack healing was monitored through weekly NOx analysis which revealed that 92 ± 2% of the available [Formula: see text] was consumed. Another set of specimens were cracked after 6 months curing, thus the effect of curing time on healing efficiency was investigated, and mineral formation at the inner crack surfaces was observed, resulting in 70% less capillary water absorption compared to healed control specimens. In conclusion, enriched mixed denitrifying cultures structured in self-protecting granules are very promising strategies to enhance microbial self-healing.

  14. On the interaction of ultrasound with cracks: Applications to fatigue crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, O.; Thompson, R. B.; Rehbein, D. K.

    1986-01-01

    Partial contact of two rough fatigue crack surfaces leads to transmission and diffraction of an acoustic signal at those contacts. Recent experimental and theoretical efforts to understand and quantify such contact in greater detail are discussed. The objective is to develop an understanding of the closure phenomenon and its application to the interpretation of fatigue data, in particular the R-ratio, spike overload/underload and threshold effects on crack propagation.

  15. Fracture Mechanics Analysis of an Annular Crack in a Three-concentric-cylinder Composite Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuguoglu, Latife H.; Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Roberts, Gary D.

    2004-01-01

    A boundary-value problem governing a three-phase concentric-cylinder model was analytically modeled to analyze annular interfacial crack problems with Love s strain functions in order to find the stress intensity factors (SIFs) and strain energy release rates (SERRs) at the tips of an interface crack in a nonhomogeneous medium. The complex form of a singular integral equation (SIE) of the second kind was formulated using Bessel s functions in the Fourier domain, and the SIF and total SERR were calculated using Jacoby polynomials. For the validity of the SIF equations to be established, the SIE of the three-concentric-cylinder model was reduced to the SIE for a two-concentric-cylinder model, and the results were compared with the previous results of Erdogan. A preliminary set of parametric studies was carried out to show the effect of interphase properties on the SERR. The method presented here provides insight about the effect of interphase properties on the crack driving force.

  16. Fatigue crack analysis of EBR-II Ni-bonded duplex tubing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, J. H.; Porter, D. L.; Lloyd, W. R.; Kisohara, N.

    2011-03-01

    Small, notched three-point bend specimens machined from duplex tubes, which were extracted from an EBR-II superheater, were fatigued through the nickel interlayer to determine propensity for crack arrest within this interlayer. Several of these specimens were fatigued in the near threshold, and steady state regimes of Paris Law behavior. Additionally, two specimens were fatigued to the edge of the nickel interlayer and then monotonically loaded. Micro-hardness profiles of the nickel interlayer were also measured. Fatigue behavior was found to be similar to previous studies in that arrest was only noted in the near threshold Paris regime (attributed to the presence of voids) and in the steady state regime exhibited an acceleration of crack growth rate through the nickel interlayer followed by a slight retardation. Monotonic loading resulted in crack branching or delamination along the interlayer. Although archival material was not available for this study, the hardness of the nickel interlayer was determined to have been lowered slightly during service by comparison to the expected hardness of a similar nickel braze prepared as specified for fabrication of these tubes.

  17. 3D numerical analysis of crack propagation of heterogeneous notched rock under uniaxial tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S. Y.; Sloan, S. W.; Sheng, D. C.; Tang, C. A.

    2016-05-01

    Macroscopic notches play an important role in evaluating the fracture process zone (FPZ) and the strengths of a heterogeneous rock mass. Crack initiation, propagation and coalescence for unnotched, single-notched and double-notched rock specimens are numerically simulated in a 3-D numerical model (RFPA3D). A feature of the code RFPA3D is that it can numerically simulate the evolution of cracks in three-dimensional space, as well as the heterogeneity of the rock mass. For the unnotched case, special attention is given to the complete stress-strain curve and the corresponding AE events for the failure process of rock specimen. By comparing with published experimental results, the simulation results from RFPA3D are found to be satisfactory. For the single-notched case, the effect of the length and the depth of the single notch and the thickness of the specimen on the failure mode and peak stress are evaluated. The 3D FPZ is very different from that in two dimensions. For the double-notched case, the effects of the separation distance and overlap distance of the double notches, as well as influence of the homogeneity index (m) are also investigated. As the overlap distance increases, the direction of the principal tensile stress at each notch-end changes from a perpendicular direction (tensile stress field) to a nearly parallel direction (compressive stress field), which affects the evolution of the cracks from the two notches.

  18. Closure and Sealing Design Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    T. Lahnalampi; J. Case

    2005-08-26

    The purpose of the ''Closure and Sealing Design Calculation'' is to illustrate closure and sealing methods for sealing shafts, ramps, and identify boreholes that require sealing in order to limit the potential of water infiltration. In addition, this calculation will provide a description of the magma that can reduce the consequences of an igneous event intersecting the repository. This calculation will also include a listing of the project requirements related to closure and sealing. The scope of this calculation is to: summarize applicable project requirements and codes relating to backfilling nonemplacement openings, removal of uncommitted materials from the subsurface, installation of drip shields, and erecting monuments; compile an inventory of boreholes that are found in the area of the subsurface repository; describe the magma bulkhead feature and location; and include figures for the proposed shaft and ramp seals. The objective of this calculation is to: categorize the boreholes for sealing by depth and proximity to the subsurface repository; develop drawing figures which show the location and geometry for the magma bulkhead; include the shaft seal figures and a proposed construction sequence; and include the ramp seal figure and a proposed construction sequence. The intent of this closure and sealing calculation is to support the License Application by providing a description of the closure and sealing methods for the Safety Analysis Report. The closure and sealing calculation will also provide input for Post Closure Activities by describing the location of the magma bulkhead. This calculation is limited to describing the final configuration of the sealing and backfill systems for the underground area. The methods and procedures used to place the backfill and remove uncommitted materials (such as concrete) from the repository and detailed design of the magma bulkhead will be the subject of separate analyses or calculations. Post-closure monitoring will not

  19. Analysis of Subcritical Crack Growth in Dental Ceramics Using Fracture Mechanics and Fractography

    PubMed Central

    Taskonak, Burak; Griggs, Jason A.; Mecholsky, John J.; Yan, Jia-Hau

    2008-01-01

    .05) but did not have significantly different fracture toughness (P>0.05). Regarding critical flaw size, stressing rate had a significant effect for In-Ceram® Zirconia specimens (P≤0.05) but not for Vitadur Alpha specimens (P>0.05). Fatigue parameters, n and ln B, were 38.4 and −12.7 for Vitadur Alpha and were 13.1 and 10.4 for In-Ceram® Zirconia. Significance Moisture assisted subcritical crack growth had a more deleterious effect on In-Ceram® Zirconia core ceramic than on Vitadur Alpha porcelain. Fracture surface analysis identified fracture surface features that can potentially mislead investigators into misidentifying the critical flaw. PMID:17845817

  20. Detection of a fatigue crack in a UH-60A planet gear carrier using vibration analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blunt, David M.; Keller, Jonathan A.

    2006-11-01

    Two new methods of detecting a fatigue crack in a planet carrier of an epicyclic transmission are developed. These are tested using vibration data from a number of US Army UH-60A Black Hawk helicopter main transmissions. Vibration measurements of faulted and un-faulted transmissions over a range of torque levels in controlled test-cell and on-aircraft conditions are used. The results show that new methods are reliable under test-cell conditions, but less effective under low-torque on-aircraft conditions.

  1. Measuring readiness for change among crack cocaine users: a descriptive analysis.

    PubMed

    Siegal, H A; Li, L; Rapp, R C; Saha, P

    2001-01-01

    This study examines the utility of the University of Rhode Island Change Assessment Scale (URICA) in assessing stages of change status with a group of 235 crack/cocaine users who had received treatment for their drug use. Cluster analyses were performed and three subgroups representing differing levels of readiness to change were identified. The three clusters demonstrated no significant differences on most demographic characteristics and other areas of functioning assessed by the Addiction Severity Index (ASI). The three clusters also showed similar improvements between the intake and six-month follow-up in these ASI life domains. The implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:11697605

  2. Analysis of early creep closures in geomechanically connected underground rooms in salt

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, D.E. ); Jones, R.L. ); DeVries, K.L. )

    1991-01-01

    Results from a large scale mine-by in situ test in salt show that excavation strains induced from an initial room have a strong influence on subsequent near-by excavations. Geomechanically connected rooms also exhibit higher deformation rates, which are shown through calculation to be consistent with the most recent predictive analysis. 7 refs. 6 figs.

  3. Analysis of the Influence of Laser Welding on Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior in a Newly Developed Nickel-Base Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckson, R. A.; Ojo, O. A.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of laser welding on fatigue crack growth (FCG) behavior of a newly developed nickel-base superalloy, Haynes 282 was studied. Laser welding resulted in cracking in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of the alloy during welding and FCG test results show that this produces deleterious effect on the fatigue crack growth behavior of Haynes 282. However, two post weld heat treatments, including a new thermal treatment schedule developed in this work, are used to significantly improve the resistance of the Haynes 282 fatigue crack growth after laser welding. The effects of laser welding and thermal treatments are discussed in terms of HAZ cracking and heterogeneity of slip, respectively.

  4. 32 CFR 989.25 - Base closure and realignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Base closure and realignment. 989.25 Section 989... PROTECTION ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ANALYSIS PROCESS (EIAP) § 989.25 Base closure and realignment. Base closure or realignment may entail special requirements for environmental analysis. The permanent base...

  5. 32 CFR 989.25 - Base closure and realignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Base closure and realignment. 989.25 Section 989... PROTECTION ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ANALYSIS PROCESS (EIAP) § 989.25 Base closure and realignment. Base closure or realignment may entail special requirements for environmental analysis. The permanent base...

  6. 32 CFR 989.25 - Base closure and realignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Base closure and realignment. 989.25 Section 989... PROTECTION ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ANALYSIS PROCESS (EIAP) § 989.25 Base closure and realignment. Base closure or realignment may entail special requirements for environmental analysis. The permanent base...

  7. 32 CFR 989.25 - Base closure and realignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Base closure and realignment. 989.25 Section 989... PROTECTION ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ANALYSIS PROCESS (EIAP) § 989.25 Base closure and realignment. Base closure or realignment may entail special requirements for environmental analysis. The permanent base...

  8. 32 CFR 989.25 - Base closure and realignment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Base closure and realignment. 989.25 Section 989... PROTECTION ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ANALYSIS PROCESS (EIAP) § 989.25 Base closure and realignment. Base closure or realignment may entail special requirements for environmental analysis. The permanent base...

  9. Crack Growth Behavior in the Threshold Region for High Cycle Fatigue Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, Royce G.; Figert, J.; Beek, J.; Ventura, J.; Martinez, J.; Samonski, F.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation describes results obtained from a research project conducted at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) that was jointly supported by the FAA Technical Center and JSC. The JSC effort was part of a multi-task FAA program involving several U.S. laboratories and initiated for the purpose of developing enhanced analysis tools to assess damage tolerance of rotorcraft and aircraft propeller systems. The research results to be covered in this presentation include a new understanding of the behavior of fatigue crack growth in the threshold region. This behavior is important for structural life analysis of aircraft propeller systems and certain rotorcraft structural components (e.g., the mast). These components are often designed to not allow fatigue crack propagation to exceed an experimentally determined fatigue crack growth threshold value. During the FAA review meetings for the program, disagreements occurred between the researchers regarding the observed fanning (spread between the da/dN curves of constant R) in the threshold region at low stress ratios, R. Some participants believed that the fanning was a result of the ASTM load shedding test method for threshold testing, and thus did not represent the true characteristics of the material. If the fanning portion of the threshold value is deleted or not included in a life analysis, a significant penalty in the calculated life and design of the component would occur. The crack growth threshold behavior was previously studied and reported by several research investigators in the time period: 1970-1980. Those investigators used electron microscopes to view the crack morphology of the fatigue fracture surfaces. Their results showed that just before reaching threshold, the crack morphology often changed from a striated to a faceted or cleavage-like morphology. This change was reported to have been caused by particular dislocation properties of the material. Based on the results of these early investigations, a

  10. Detection of gear cracks in a complex gearbox of wind turbines using supervised bounded component analysis of vibration signals collected from multi-channel sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhixiong; Yan, Xinping; Wang, Xuping; Peng, Zhongxiao

    2016-06-01

    In the complex gear transmission systems, in wind turbines a crack is one of the most common failure modes and can be fatal to the wind turbine power systems. A single sensor may suffer with issues relating to its installation position and direction, resulting in the collection of weak dynamic responses of the cracked gear. A multi-channel sensor system is hence applied in the signal acquisition and the blind source separation (BSS) technologies are employed to optimally process the information collected from multiple sensors. However, literature review finds that most of the BSS based fault detectors did not address the dependence/correlation between different moving components in the gear systems; particularly, the popular used independent component analysis (ICA) assumes mutual independence of different vibration sources. The fault detection performance may be significantly influenced by the dependence/correlation between vibration sources. In order to address this issue, this paper presents a new method based on the supervised order tracking bounded component analysis (SOTBCA) for gear crack detection in wind turbines. The bounded component analysis (BCA) is a state of art technology for dependent source separation and is applied limitedly to communication signals. To make it applicable for vibration analysis, in this work, the order tracking has been appropriately incorporated into the BCA framework to eliminate the noise and disturbance signal components. Then an autoregressive (AR) model built with prior knowledge about the crack fault is employed to supervise the reconstruction of the crack vibration source signature. The SOTBCA only outputs one source signal that has the closest distance with the AR model. Owing to the dependence tolerance ability of the BCA framework, interfering vibration sources that are dependent/correlated with the crack vibration source could be recognized by the SOTBCA, and hence, only useful fault information could be preserved in

  11. Closure Issues with Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Steven E.; Bischof, Gary H.

    Closure of the counseling relationship constitutes both an ending and a beginning. Although closure signifies the ending of the present counseling relationship, many family counselors conceptualize closure as the start of a working relationship between counselor and family that may be summoned in future times of crisis or during a difficult life…

  12. Pressure Rise Analysis When Hydrogen Leak from a Cracked Pipe in the Cryogenic Hydrogen System in J-PARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsumoto, H.; Aso, T.; Hasegawa, S.; Ushijima, I.; Kato, T.; Ohtsu, K.; Ikeda, Y.

    2006-04-01

    As one of the main experimental facilities in the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC), an intense spallation neutron source (JSNS) driven by a 1 MW proton beam is being constructed. Cryogenic hydrogen at supercritical pressure is selected as a moderator. The total nuclear heating at the moderators is estimated to be a 3.7 kW. A hydrogen system to cool the moderators has been designed. The most severe off-normal event for the cryogenic hydrogen system is considered to be a hydrogen leak when a pipe cracks. In such a case, the hydrogen must be discharged to atmosphere quickly and safely. An analytical code that simulates the pressure change during a hydrogen leak was developed. A pressure rise analysis for various sized cracks was performed, and the required sizes for relief devices were determined. A safety valve size is φ42.7 mm and a rupture disc for vacuum layer should have a diameter of 37.1 mm, respectively.

  13. Pressure Rise Analysis When Hydrogen Leak from a Cracked Pipe in the Cryogenic Hydrogen System in J-PARC

    SciTech Connect

    Tatsumoto, H.; Aso, T.; Hasegawa, S.; Ushijima, I.; Kato, T.; Ohtsu, K.; Ikeda, Y.

    2006-04-27

    As one of the main experimental facilities in the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC), an intense spallation neutron source (JSNS) driven by a 1 MW proton beam is being constructed. Cryogenic hydrogen at supercritical pressure is selected as a moderator. The total nuclear heating at the moderators is estimated to be a 3.7 kW. A hydrogen system to cool the moderators has been designed. The most severe off-normal event for the cryogenic hydrogen system is considered to be a hydrogen leak when a pipe cracks. In such a case, the hydrogen must be discharged to atmosphere quickly and safely. An analytical code that simulates the pressure change during a hydrogen leak was developed. A pressure rise analysis for various sized cracks was performed, and the required sizes for relief devices were determined. A safety valve size is {phi}42.7 mm and a rupture disc for vacuum layer should have a diameter of 37.1 mm, respectively.

  14. Analysis of Eddy Current Capabilities for the Detection of Outer Diameter Stress Corrosion Cracking in Small Bore Metallic Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz; Williams, Phillip; Simpson, John

    2007-01-01

    The use of eddy current techniques for the detection of outer diameter damage in tubing and many complex aerospace structures often requires the use of an inner diameter probe due to a lack of access to the outside of the part. In small bore structures the probe size and orientation are constrained by the inner diameter of the part, complicating the optimization of the inspection technique. Detection of flaws through a significant remaining wall thickness becomes limited not only by the standard depth of penetration, but also geometrical aspects of the probe. Recently, an orthogonal eddy current probe was developed for detection of such flaws in Space Shuttle Primary Reaction Control System (PRCS) Thrusters. In this case, the detection of deeply buried stress corrosion cracking by an inner diameter eddy current probe was sought. Probe optimization was performed based upon the limiting spatial dimensions, flaw orientation, and required detection sensitivity. Analysis of the probe/flaw interaction was performed through the use of finite and boundary element modeling techniques. Experimental data for the flaw detection capabilities, including a probability of detection study, will be presented along with the simulation data. The results of this work have led to the successful deployment of an inspection system for the detection of stress corrosion cracking in Space Shuttle Primary Reaction Control System (PRCS) Thrusters.

  15. Stress Ratio Effects on Crack Opening Loads and Crack Growth Rates in Aluminum Alloy 2024

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riddell, William T.; Piascik, Robert S.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of stress ratio (R) and crack opening behavior on fatigue crack growth rates (da/dN) for aluminum alloy (AA) 2024-T3 were investigated using constant-delta K testing, closure measurements, and fractography. Fatigue crack growth rates were obtained for a range of delta K and stress ratios. Results show that constant delta K fatigue crack growth for R ranging from near 0 to 1 is divided into three regions. In Region 1, at low R, da/dN increases with increasing R. In Region 2, at intermediate R, fatigue crack growth rates are relatively independent of R. In Region 3, at high R, further increases in da/dN are observed with increasing R.

  16. Cracking behavior of cored structures

    SciTech Connect

    Wahid, A.; Olson, D.L.; Matlock, D.K. . Center for Welding and Joining Research); Kelly, T.J. )

    1991-01-01

    The effects of compositional gradients, are considered based on a thermodynamic analysis, referred to as the Cahn-Hillard analysis, which describes the degree to which a local surface energy is modified by the presence of a composition gradient. The analysis predicts that both ductile and brittle fracture mechanisms are enhanced by the presence of a composition gradient. Data on stress corrosion cracking and fatigue crack growth in selected FCC alloys are used to illustrate the significance of microsegregation on mechanical properties.

  17. Cracking behavior of cored structures

    SciTech Connect

    Wahid, A.; Olson, D.L.; Matlock, D.K.; Kelly, T.J.

    1991-12-31

    The effects of compositional gradients, are considered based on a thermodynamic analysis, referred to as the Cahn-Hillard analysis, which describes the degree to which a local surface energy is modified by the presence of a composition gradient. The analysis predicts that both ductile and brittle fracture mechanisms are enhanced by the presence of a composition gradient. Data on stress corrosion cracking and fatigue crack growth in selected FCC alloys are used to illustrate the significance of microsegregation on mechanical properties.

  18. Model-Assisted POD for Ultrasonic Detection of Cracks at Fastener Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, C. A.; Hugo, G. R.; Bowles, S. J.

    2006-03-01

    To reduce the cost of conducting experimental probability of detection (POD) trials, methods which utilize models to account for factors that influence the inspection reliability are being developed. This paper reports the application of POD modeling to ultrasonic detection of cracks emanating from fastener holes. The differences between ultrasonic responses from EDM notches compared to fatigue cracks are examined, including the effects of natural variation in fatigue cracks and crack closure due to residual stresses.

  19. Key financial ratios can foretell hospital closures.

    PubMed

    Lynn, M L; Wertheim, P

    1993-11-01

    An analysis of various financial ratios sampled from open and closed hospitals shows that certain leverage, liquidity, capital efficiency, and resource availability ratios can predict hospital closure up to two years in advance of the closure with an accuracy of nearly 75 percent.

  20. 100-D Ponds closure plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, S.W.

    1997-09-01

    The 100-D Ponds is a Treatment, Storage, and Disposal (TSD) unit on the Hanford Facility that received both dangerous and nonregulated waste. This Closure Plan (Rev. 1) for the 100-D Ponds TSD unit consists of a RCRA Part A Dangerous Waste Permit Application (Rev. 3), a RCRA Closure Plan, and supporting information contained in the appendices to the plan. The closure plan consists of eight chapters containing facility description, process information, waste characteristics, and groundwater monitoring data. There are also chapters containing the closure strategy and performance standards. The strategy for the closure of the 100-D Ponds TSD unit is clean closure. Appendices A and B of the closure plan demonstrate that soil and groundwater beneath 100-D Ponds are below cleanup limits. All dangerous wastes or dangerous waste constituents or residues associated with the operation of the ponds have been removed, therefore, human health and the environment are protected. Discharges to the 100-D Ponds, which are located in the 100-DR-1 operable unit, were discontinued in June 1994. Contaminated sediment was removed from the ponds in August 1996. Subsequent sampling and analysis demonstrated that there is no contamination remaining in the ponds, therefore, this closure plan is a demonstration of clean closure.

  1. Contraction stresses in dental composites adjacent to and at the bonded interface as measured by crack analysis.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takatsugu; Nishide, Akihito; Swain, Michael V; Ferracane, Jack L; Sakaguchi, Ronald L; Momoi, Yasuko

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to calculate stresses produced by polymerization contraction in regions surrounding a dental resin composite restoration. Initial cracks were made with a Vickers indenter at various distances from the edge of a cylindrical hole in a soda-lime glass disk. Indentation crack lengths were measured parallel to tangents to the hole edge. Resin composites (three brands) were placed in the hole and polymerized (two light irradiation protocols) at equal radiation exposures. The crack lengths were re-measured at 2 and 10 min after irradiation. Radial tensile stresses due to polymerization contraction at the location of the cracks (σ(crack)) were calculated from the incremental crack lengths and the fracture toughness K(c) of the glass. Contraction stresses at the composite-glass bonded interface (σ(interface)) were calculated from σ(crack) on the basis of the simple mechanics of an internally pressurized thick-walled cylinder. The greater the distance or the shorter the time following polymerization, the smaller was σ(crack). Distance, material, irradiation protocol and time significantly affected σ(crack). Two-step irradiation resulted in a significant reduction in the magnitude of σ(interface) for all resin composites. The contraction stress in soda-lime glass propagated indentation cracks at various distances from the cavity, enabling calculation of the contraction stresses.

  2. ANALYSIS OF DAMAGE TO WASTE PACKAGES CAUSED BY SEISMIC EVENTS DURING POST-CLOSURE

    SciTech Connect

    Alves, S W; Blair, S C; Carlson, S R; Gerhard, M; Buscheck, T A

    2008-05-27

    This paper presents methodology and results of an analysis of damage due to seismic ground motion for waste packages emplaced in a nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. A series of three-dimensional rigid body kinematic simulations of waste packages, pallets, and drip shields subjected to seismic ground motions was performed. The simulations included strings of several waste packages and were used to characterize the number, location, and velocity of impacts that occur during seismic ground motion. Impacts were categorized as either waste package-to-waste package (WP-WP) or waste package-to-pallet (WP-P). In addition, a series of simulations was performed for WP-WP and WP-P impacts using a detailed representation of a single waste package. The detailed simulations were used to determine the amount of damage from individual impacts, and to form a damage catalog, indexed according to the type, angle, location and force/velocity of the impact. Finally, the results from the two analyses were combined to estimate the total damage to a waste package that may occur during an episode of seismic ground motion. This study addressed two waste package types, four levels of peak ground velocity (PGV), and 17 ground motions at each PGV. Selected aspects of waste package degradation, such as effective wall thickness and condition of the internals, were also considered. As expected, increasing the PGV level of the vibratory ground motion increases the damage to the waste packages. Results show that most of the damage is caused by WP-P impacts. TAD-bearing waste packages with intact internals are highly resistant to damage, even at a PGV of 4.07 m/s, which is the highest level analyzed.

  3. Bonded orthotropic strips with cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delale, F.; Erdogan, F.

    1979-01-01

    The elastostatic problem for a nonhomogeneous plane which consists of two sets of periodically arranged dissimilar orthotropic strips is considered. It is assumed that the plane contains a series of collinear cracks perpendicular to the interfaces and is loaded in tension away from and perpendicular to the cracks. The problem of cracks fully imbedded into the homogeneous strips is considered. The singular behavior of the stresses for two special crack geometries is studied. The first is the case of a broken laminate in which the crack tips touch the interfaces. The second is the case of cracks crossing the interfaces. An interesting result found from the analysis of the latter is that for certain orthotropic material combinations the stress state at the point of intersection of a crack and an interface may be bounded whereas in isotropic materials at this point stresses are always singular. A number of numerical examples are worked out to separate the primary material parameters influencing the stress intensity factors and the powers of stress singularity, and to determine the trends regarding the influence of the secondary parameters. Some numerical results are given for the stress intensity factors in certain basic crack geometries and for typical material combinations.

  4. Crack Formation in Cement-Based Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprince, A.; Pakrastinsh, L.; Vatin, N.

    2016-04-01

    The cracking properties in cement-based composites widely influences mechanical behavior of construction structures. The challenge of present investigation is to evaluate the crack propagation near the crack tip. During experiments the tension strength and crack mouth opening displacement of several types of concrete compositions was determined. For each composition the Compact Tension (CT) specimens were prepared with dimensions 150×150×12 mm. Specimens were subjected to a tensile load. Deformations and crack mouth opening displacement were measured with extensometers. Cracks initiation and propagation were analyzed using a digital image analysis technique. The formation and propagation of the tensile cracks was traced on the surface of the specimens using a high resolution digital camera with 60 mm focal length. Images were captured during testing with a time interval of one second. The obtained experimental curve shows the stages of crack development.

  5. Dynamic steady-state analysis of crack propagation in rubber-like solids using an extended finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroon, Martin

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, a computational framework for studying high-speed crack growth in rubber-like solids under conditions of plane stress and steady-state is proposed. Effects of inertia, viscoelasticity and finite strains are included. The main purpose of the study is to examine the contribution of viscoelastic dissipation to the total work of fracture required to propagate a crack in a rubber-like solid. The computational framework builds upon a previous work by the present author (Kroon in Int J Fract 169:49-60, 2011). The model was fully able to predict experimental results in terms of the local surface energy at the crack tip and the total energy release rate at different crack speeds. The predicted distributions of stress and dissipation around the propagating crack tip are presented. The predicted crack tip profiles also agree qualitatively with experimental findings.

  6. Crack growth resistance in nuclear graphites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouagne, Pierre; Neighbour, Gareth B.; McEnaney, Brian

    2002-05-01

    Crack growth resistance curves for the non-linear fracture parameters KR, JR and R were measured for unirradiated PGA and IM1-24 graphites that are used as moderators in British Magnox and AGR nuclear reactors respectively. All the curves show an initial rising part, followed by a plateau region where the measured parameter is independent of crack length. JR and R decreased at large crack lengths. The initial rising curves were attributed to development of crack bridges in the wake of the crack front, while, in the plateau region, the crack bridging zone and the frontal process zone, ahead of the crack tip, reached steady state values. The decreases at large crack lengths were attributed to interaction of the frontal zone with the specimen end face. Microscopical evidence for graphite fragments acting as crack bridges showed that they were much smaller than filler particles, indicating that the graphite fragments are broken down during crack propagation. There was also evidence for friction points in the crack wake zone and shear cracking of some larger fragments. Inspection of KR curves showed that crack bridging contributed ~0.4 MPa m0.5 to the fracture toughness of the graphites. An analysis of JR and R curves showed that the development of the crack bridging zone in the rising part of the curves contributed ~20% to the total work of fracture. Energies absorbed during development of crack bridges and steady state crack propagation were greater for PGA than for IM1-24 graphite. These differences reflect the greater extent of irreversible processes occurring during cracking in the coarser microtexture of PGA graphite.

  7. Fatigue crack propagation behavior of stainless steel welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusko, Chad S.

    The fatigue crack propagation behavior of austenitic and duplex stainless steel base and weld metals has been investigated using various fatigue crack growth test procedures, ferrite measurement techniques, light optical microscopy, stereomicroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and optical profilometry. The compliance offset method has been incorporated to measure crack closure during testing in order to determine a stress ratio at which such closure is overcome. Based on this method, an empirically determined stress ratio of 0.60 has been shown to be very successful in overcoming crack closure for all da/dN for gas metal arc and laser welds. This empirically-determined stress ratio of 0.60 has been applied to testing of stainless steel base metal and weld metal to understand the influence of microstructure. Regarding the base metal investigation, for 316L and AL6XN base metals, grain size and grain plus twin size have been shown to influence resulting crack growth behavior. The cyclic plastic zone size model has been applied to accurately model crack growth behavior for austenitic stainless steels when the average grain plus twin size is considered. Additionally, the effect of the tortuous crack paths observed for the larger grain size base metals can be explained by a literature model for crack deflection. Constant Delta K testing has been used to characterize the crack growth behavior across various regions of the gas metal arc and laser welds at the empirically determined stress ratio of 0.60. Despite an extensive range of stainless steel weld metal FN and delta-ferrite morphologies, neither delta-ferrite morphology significantly influence the room temperature crack growth behavior. However, variations in weld metal da/dN can be explained by local surface roughness resulting from large columnar grains and tortuous crack paths in the weld metal.

  8. Crack initiation observation and local stress analysis in shear fracture tests of ultra-high strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ninshu; Takada, Kenji; Sugimoto, Nao

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the local strain and stress at the crack initiation position in shear fracture test pieces of ultra-high strength steels, a butterfly shear fracture specimen was employed. The crack initiation position and propagation direction were observed during shear fracture tests by high speed cameras and investigated through analysing the fracture surface by scanning electron microscope. Further, the finite element method was employed and the stress-triaxiality at the crack initiation position was investigated. It can be obtained that the crack initiated at the position where the stress state is close to uniaxial tensile state or plane strain state more than pure shear stress state.

  9. The Impact of Hospital Closures and Hospital and Population Characteristics on Increasing Emergency Department Volume: A Geographic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, David C; Carr, Brendan G; Smith, Tony E; Tran, Van C; Polsky, Daniel; Branas, Charles C

    2015-12-01

    Emergency visits are rising nationally, whereas the number of emergency departments is shrinking. However, volume has not increased uniformly at all emergency departments. It is unclear what factors account for this variability in emergency volume growth rates. The objective of this study was to test the association of hospital and population characteristics and the effect of hospital closures with increases in emergency department volume. The study team analyzed emergency department volume at New York State hospitals from 2004 to 2010 using data from cost reports and administrative databases. Multivariate regression was used to evaluate characteristics associated with emergency volume growth. Spatial analytics and distances between hospitals were used in calculating the predicted impact of hospital closures on emergency department use. Among the 192 New York hospitals open from 2004 to 2010, the mean annual increase in emergency department visits was 2.7%, but the range was wide (-5.5% to 11.3%). Emergency volume increased nearly twice as fast at tertiary referral centers (4.8%) and nonurban hospitals (3.7% versus urban at 2.1%) after adjusting for other characteristics. The effect of hospital closures also strongly predicted variation in growth. Emergency volume is increasing faster at specific hospitals: tertiary referral centers, nonurban hospitals, and those near hospital closures. This study provides an understanding of how emergency volume varies among hospitals and predicts the effect of hospital closures in a statewide region. Understanding the impact of these factors on emergency department use is essential to ensure that these populations have access to critical emergency services. PMID:25658768

  10. The Impact of Hospital Closures and Hospital and Population Characteristics on Increasing Emergency Department Volume: A Geographic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, David C; Carr, Brendan G; Smith, Tony E; Tran, Van C; Polsky, Daniel; Branas, Charles C

    2015-12-01

    Emergency visits are rising nationally, whereas the number of emergency departments is shrinking. However, volume has not increased uniformly at all emergency departments. It is unclear what factors account for this variability in emergency volume growth rates. The objective of this study was to test the association of hospital and population characteristics and the effect of hospital closures with increases in emergency department volume. The study team analyzed emergency department volume at New York State hospitals from 2004 to 2010 using data from cost reports and administrative databases. Multivariate regression was used to evaluate characteristics associated with emergency volume growth. Spatial analytics and distances between hospitals were used in calculating the predicted impact of hospital closures on emergency department use. Among the 192 New York hospitals open from 2004 to 2010, the mean annual increase in emergency department visits was 2.7%, but the range was wide (-5.5% to 11.3%). Emergency volume increased nearly twice as fast at tertiary referral centers (4.8%) and nonurban hospitals (3.7% versus urban at 2.1%) after adjusting for other characteristics. The effect of hospital closures also strongly predicted variation in growth. Emergency volume is increasing faster at specific hospitals: tertiary referral centers, nonurban hospitals, and those near hospital closures. This study provides an understanding of how emergency volume varies among hospitals and predicts the effect of hospital closures in a statewide region. Understanding the impact of these factors on emergency department use is essential to ensure that these populations have access to critical emergency services.

  11. Total System Performance Assessment- License Appication Design Selection (LADS) Phase 1 Analysis for Post-Closure Ventilation (Design Alternative 3)

    SciTech Connect

    N. Erb

    1999-06-21

    The objective of this report is to evaluate the effect of potential changes to the TSPA-VA base case design on long-term repository performance. The design changes that are evaluated in this report include two configurations for post-closure ventilation. bow tie and open loop (Design Alternative 3 or D3). The following paragraphs briefly describe the motivation for evaluating post-closure ventilation. The bow tie configuration for post closure ventilation has been identified as a design alternative to the TSPA-VA base case model (CRWMS M&O, 1998a) that may provide improved performance by reducing the temperature and relative humidity within the waste package drifts. The bow tie configuration for post-closure ventilation is a closed-loop design. In this design. cross drifts are placed in pairs with each drift angling up on opposite sides of the repository. From the side, the cross drifts and side drifts form the shape of a bow tie. Movement of air through the system is driven by convective heating from the waste packages in the cross drifts. The open loop configuration is also being considered for its potential to improve post-closure performance of the repository. As with the bow tie configuration, the open loop is designed to decrease temperature and relative humidity within the waste package drifts. For the open loop configuration, air is drawn into the drifts from outside the mountain. The configuration for the repository with open-loop ventilation is similar to the base case repository design with a few added shafts to increase air flow through the drifts. This report documents the modeling assumptions and calculations conducted to evaluate the long-term performance of Design Alternative 3. The performance measure for this evaluation is dose rate. Results are presented that compare the dose-rate time histories with the new design alternatives to that for the TSPA-VA base case calculation (CRWMS M&O, 1998a).

  12. Oxidation Kinetics and Strength Degradation of Carbon Fibers in a Cracked Ceramic Matrix Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael C.

    2003-01-01

    Experimental results and oxidation modeling will be presented to discuss carbon fiber susceptibility to oxidation, the oxidation kinetics regimes and composite strength degradation and failure due to oxidation. Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) was used to study the oxidation rates of carbon fiber and of a pyro-carbon interphase. The analysis was used to separately obtain activation energies for the carbon constituents within a C/SiC composite. TGA was also conducted on C/SiC composite material to study carbon oxidation and crack closure as a function of temperature. In order to more closely match applications conditions C/SiC tensile coupons were also tested under stressed oxidation conditions. The stressed oxidation tests show that C/SiC is much more susceptible to oxidation when the material is under an applied load where the cracks are open and allow for oxygen ingress. The results help correlate carbon oxidation with composite strength reduction and failure.

  13. Hybrid-finite-element analysis of some nonlinear and 3-dimensional problems of engineering fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atluri, S. N.; Nakagaki, M.; Kathiresan, K.

    1980-01-01

    In this paper, efficient numerical methods for the analysis of crack-closure effects on fatigue-crack-growth-rates, in plane stress situations, and for the solution of stress-intensity factors for arbitrary shaped surface flaws in pressure vessels, are presented. For the former problem, an elastic-plastic finite element procedure valid for the case of finite deformation gradients is developed and crack growth is simulated by the translation of near-crack-tip elements with embedded plastic singularities. For the latter problem, an embedded-elastic-singularity hybrid finite element method, which leads to a direct evaluation of K-factors, is employed.

  14. Study on prestressed concrete reactor vessel structures. II-5: Crack analysis by three dimensional finite elements method of 1/20 multicavity type PCRV subjected to internal pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite elements analysis is reported of the nonlinear behavior of PCRV subjected to internal pressure by comparing calculated results with test results. As the first stage, an analysis considering the nonlinearity of cracking in concrete was attempted. As a result, it is found possible to make an analysis up to three times the design pressure (50 kg/sqcm), and calculated results agree well with test results.

  15. On the use of marker loads and replicas for measuring growth rates for small cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swain, M. H.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The initiation and growth of small cracks (5-500 microns m) from edge notches in 2024-T3 aluminum alloy sheets were studied under constant amplitude loading. Two methods were used to measure crack shape and size. In the first method, striation marker bands were periodically formed along the crack front by interrupting the constant amplitude loading by either an elevated R-ratio load sequence, or by an overload sequence. In the second method, the surface crack length was monitored by taking surface replicas at regular intervals. The marker band techniques did not provide reliable crack length and crack shape information for cracks smaller than 2 mm. The replica technique provided accurate information for surface crack length at all crack lengths, and fracture tests on specimens with small cracks provided crack-shape information. Crack growth rates were plotted against the stress intensity factor ranges. The results exhibited the small crack effect, in that the small cracks grew faster than large cracks at the same stress-intensity factor range. A crack closure model was also used to analyze the growth of small cracks from small (inclusion) defects at the notch surface.

  16. Fracture Analysis of a Functionally Graded Two-Layer Strip with a Surface Crack Intersecting the Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Licheng; Noda, Naotake

    2008-02-15

    The crack problem for a functionally graded two-layer strip under an in-plane load is investigated. The functionally graded layer is assumed to contain a surface crack intersecting the interface. An auxiliary function related to two layers is used. By using integral transform methods, the singular integral equation is obtained. The parameter influences on the stress intensity factors (SIFs) are studied.

  17. Nursing home closures and quality of care.

    PubMed

    Castle, Nicholas G

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the relationship between quality of care in nursing homes and their likelihood of closure. We hypothesize that lower-quality facilities will be more likely to close than higher-quality facilities. Using the rates of physical restraint use, urethral catheterization, contractures, pressure ulcers, and psychotropic medication use as quality measures from approximately 12,000 facilities from 1992 to 1998, the author examine cross-sectional and change score relationships between these measures and a nursing home's likelihood of closure. The descriptive analysis shows that 621 nursing homes closed in this time period, and the results for physical restraint use were robust in their positive association with closures in most analyses lending some support for this study's hypothesis. However, overall, the author concludes that nursing facility closures are relatively rare events. And the likelihood of closure, even for poor-quality facilities, is low. PMID:15643031

  18. Mass closure and source apportionment of PM2.5 by Positive Matrix Factorization analysis in urban Mediterranean environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantas, E.; Remoundaki, E.; Halari, I.; Kassomenos, P.; Theodosi, C.; Hatzikioseyian, A.; Mihalopoulos, N.

    2014-09-01

    A systematic monitoring of PM2.5 was carried out during a period of three years (from February 2010 to April 2013) at an urban site, at the National Technical University of Athens campus. Two types of 24-h PM2.5 samples have been collected: 271 samples on PTFE and 116 samples on quartz filters. Daily PM2.5 concentrations were determined for both types of samples. Total sulfur, crustal origin elements and elements of a major crustal component (Al, Si, Fe, Ca, K, Mg, Ti) trace elements (Zn, Pb, Cu, Ni, P, V, Cr, Mn) and water soluble ions (Cl-, NO3-, SO42-, Na+, K+, NH4+, Ca2+, Mg2+) were determined on the PTFE samples. Organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC) and water soluble ions were determined on the quartz samples. For the mass closure six components were considered: Secondary Inorganic Aerosol (SIA), Organic Matter (OM), Elemental Carbon (EC), Dust, Mineral anthropogenic component (MIN) and Sea Salt (SS). SIA and OM contributed in the mass of PM2.5 almost equally: 30-36% and 30% respectively. EC, SS and MIN accounted for 5, 4 and 3% respectively of the total PM2.5 mass. Dust accounted for about 3-5% in absence of dust transport event and reached a much higher percentage in case of dust transport event. These contributions justify at least 80% of the PM2.5 mass. Source apportionment analysis has been performed by Positive Matrix Factorization. The combination of the PMF results obtained by both data sets lead to the definition of six factors: 1. SO42-, NH4+, OC (industrial/regional sources, secondary aerosol) 2. EC, OC, K and trace metals (traffic and heating by biomass burning, locally emitted aerosol). 3. Ca, EC, OC and trace metals (urban-resuspended road dust reflecting exhaust emissions), 4. Secondary nitrates 5. Na, Cl (marine source) 6. Si, Al, Ti, Ca, Fe (Dust transported from Sahara). These factors reflect not only main sources contributions but also underline the key role of atmospheric dynamics and aerosol ageing processes in this Mediterranean

  19. Phacoemulsification versus combined phacotrabeculectomy in the treatment of primary angle-closure glaucoma with cataract: a Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fang; Wu, Zhi-Hong

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare the efficacy and safety of phacoemulsification (Phaco) against combined phacotrabeculectomy (Phacotrabe) in primary angle-closure glaucoma (PACG) with coexisting cataract. METHODS By searching electronically the PubMed, EMBASE, Scientific Citation Index and Cochrane Library published up from inception to January 2014, all randomized controlled trials that matched the predefined criteria were included. The quality of included trials was evaluated according to the guidelines developed by the cochrane collaboration. And the outcomes estimating efficacy and safety of two different surgical treatments were measured and synthesised by RevMan 5.0. RESULTS Five randomized controlled trials were selected and included in Meta-analysis with a total of 468 patients (468 eyes) with both PACG and cataract. We found that Phacotrabe had a greater intraocular pressure (IOP) lowing effect [preoperative IOP: weighted mean difference (WMD)=0.58, 95% confidence intervals (95% CI, -0.53 to 1.69), P=0.31; postoperative IOP: WMD=1.37, 95% CI (0.45 to 2.28), P=0.003], a lower number of anti-glaucoma medications [ risk ratio (RR) =0.05, 95% CI (0.02 to 0.18), P<0.00001] needed postoperatively and less serious damage of optic nerve [risk ratio (RR)=0.48, 95% CI (0.21 to 1.07), P=0.07], but a higher risk of complications [odds ratio (OR) =0.04, 95% CI (0.01 to 0.16), P<0.00001] compared with Phaco. The rest studies indicated that there had no significantly difference between the two surgical methods for postoperative best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) [WMD=-0.05, 95% CI (-0.14 to 0.05), P=0.32] and loss of visual field [OR=1.06, 95% CI (0.61 to 1.83), P=0.83]. CONCLUSION Phaco alone compared with Phacotrabe had a better effect in IOP reduction, whereas the security decline. Considering the number of sample size, our results remains to be further studied. PMID:27162736

  20. Fatigue crack arrest in a self-healing polymer composite

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, E. N.; White, S. R.; Sottos, Nancy R.

    2004-01-01

    A comprehensive experimental program is performed to assess the in situ fatigue behavior of a self-healing polymer. A fatigue-life-extension protocol is established for characterizing healing efficiency of the self-healing epoxy under cyclic loading. At moderate {Delta}K{sub I} and at high {Delta}K{sub I}, when a rest period is employed, in situ healing extends fatigue life though temporary crack arrest and retardation. In situ self-healing permanently arrests crack growth at low {delta}K{sub I} and at moderate {Delta}K{sub I}, when a rest period is employed. Fatigue crack retardation and arrest result from two primary crack-tip shielding mechanisms: hydrodynamic pressure in the viscous healing agent and artificial crack closure. Application of self-healing functionality to fatigue slows the crack growth rate and increases the fatigue threshold.

  1. Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material

    SciTech Connect

    G. Gordon

    2004-10-13

    Stress corrosion cracking is one of the most common corrosion-related causes for premature breach of metal structural components. Stress corrosion cracking is the initiation and propagation of cracks in structural components due to three factors that must be present simultaneously: metallurgical susceptibility, critical environment, and static (or sustained) tensile stresses. This report was prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The purpose of this report is to provide an evaluation of the potential for stress corrosion cracking of the engineered barrier system components (i.e., the drip shield, waste package outer barrier, and waste package stainless steel inner structural cylinder) under exposure conditions consistent with the repository during the regulatory period of 10,000 years after permanent closure. For the drip shield and waste package outer barrier, the critical environment is conservatively taken as any aqueous environment contacting the metal surfaces. Appendix B of this report describes the development of the SCC-relevant seismic crack density model (SCDM). The consequence of a stress corrosion cracking breach of the drip shield, the waste package outer barrier, or the stainless steel inner structural cylinder material is the initiation and propagation of tight, sometimes branching, cracks that might be induced by the combination of an aggressive environment and various tensile stresses that can develop in the drip shields or the waste packages. The Stainless Steel Type 316 inner structural cylinder of the waste package is excluded from the stress corrosion cracking evaluation because the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA) does not take credit for the inner cylinder. This document provides a detailed description of the process-level models that can be applied to assess the performance of Alloy 22

  2. Recommended Distribution Coefficients, Kd Values, for Special Analysis Risk Calculations Related to Waste Disposal and Tank Closure on the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D

    2005-08-31

    The purpose of this document is to provide a technically defensible list of distribution coefficients, or Kd values, for use in performance assessment (PA) and special analysis (SA) calculations on the SRS. Only Kd values for radionuclides that have new information related to them or that have recently been recognized as being important are discussed in this report. Some 150 Kd values are provided in this report for various waste-disposal or tank-closure environments: soil, corrosion in grout, oxidizing grout waste, gravel, clay, and reducing concrete environments. Documentation and justification for the selection of each Kd value is provided.

  3. The simulation and experimental analysis of the MFL for cracks inspection in pipelines under mechanics-magnetic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xiaochun; Xue, Li; Xu, Zhengwang

    2011-12-01

    Since the magnetic flux leakage (MFL) for cracks inspection in pipelines can be influenced by stress concentration, it is very difficult to characterize and size the crack or crack-like defects. Thus, the theory model of magnetization and permeability under mechanics-magnetic coupling was derived by thermodynamic equation firstly, and the effects of the applied stress on magnetization and permeability were analyzed theoretically. The finite element method (FEM) under mechanics-magnetic coupling was studied, and the relationship of the crack"s MFL and loaded stresses were simulated and studied using the 3D FEM. And the simulation results were verified by experiments with the help of material testing system (MTS). The simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the experimental results are basically consistent with simulation results, and the MFL density caused by cracks decreases with the applied stress increasing gradually. Therefore, the higher sensitivity sensors should be employed in the MFL measurement for pipeline cracks and the testing data should be compensated while quantitative interpretation.

  4. The effect of material heterogeneity and random loading on the mechanics of fatigue crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivatsan, T. S.; Sambandham, M.; Bharucha-Reid, A. T.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reviews experimental work on the influence of variable amplitude or random loads on the mechanics and micromechanisms of fatigue crack growth. Implications are discussed in terms of the crack driving force, local plasticity, crack closure, crack blunting, and microstructure. Due to heterogeneity in the material's microstructure, the crack growth rate varies with crack tip position. Using the weakest link theory, an expression for crack growth rate is obtained as the expectation of a random variable. This expression is used to predict the crack growth rates for aluminum alloys, a titanium alloy, and a nickel steel in the mid-range region. It is observed, using the present theory, that the crack growth rate obeys the power law for small stress intensity factor range, and that the power is a function of a material constant.

  5. User's manual for FRAC3D: Supplement to report on stress analysis for structures with surface cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, J. C.; Hopper, A. T.; Hayes, P. A.

    1978-01-01

    The FRAC3D computer program, designed for use in analyzing stresses in structures (including plates, bars, or blocks) which may contain part-circular surface cracks or embedded circular cracks is described. Instructions are provided for preparing input, including that for the supporting programs LATTICE and MATSOL as well as for FRAC3D. The course of a substantial illustrative calculation is shown with both input and output. The formulas underlying the calculations are summarized and related to the subroutines in which they are used. Many issues of strategy in using this program for analysing stresses around surface cracks are elucidated.

  6. A dynamic model of a cantilever beam with a closed, embedded horizontal crack including local flexibilities at crack tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Zhu, W. D.; Charalambides, P. G.; Shao, Y. M.; Xu, Y. F.; Fang, X. M.

    2016-11-01

    As one of major failure modes of mechanical structures subjected to periodic loads, embedded cracks due to fatigue can cause catastrophic failure of machineries. Understanding the dynamic characteristics of a structure with an embedded crack is helpful for early crack detection and diagnosis. In this work, a new three-segment beam model with local flexibilities at crack tips is developed to investigate the vibration of a cantilever beam with a closed, fully embedded horizontal crack, which is assumed to be not located at its clamped or free end or distributed near its top or bottom side. The three-segment beam model is assumed to be a linear elastic system, and it does not account for the nonlinear crack closure effect; the top and bottom segments always stay in contact at their interface during the beam vibration. It can model the effects of local deformations in the vicinity of the crack tips, which cannot be captured by previous methods in the literature. The middle segment of the beam containing the crack is modeled by a mechanically consistent, reduced bending moment. Each beam segment is assumed to be an Euler-Bernoulli beam, and the compliances at the crack tips are analytically determined using a J-integral approach and verified using commercial finite element software. Using compatibility conditions at the crack tips and the transfer matrix method, the nature frequencies and mode shapes of the cracked cantilever beam are obtained. The three-segment beam model is used to investigate the effects of local flexibilities at crack tips on the first three natural frequencies and mode shapes of the cracked cantilever beam. A stationary wavelet transform (SWT) method is used to process the mode shapes of the cracked cantilever beam; jumps in single-level SWT decomposition detail coefficients can be used to identify the length and location of an embedded horizontal crack.

  7. Crack growth direction in unidirectional off-axis graphite epoxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herakovich, C. T.; Gregory, M. A.; Beuth, J. L., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    An anisotropic elasticity crack tip stress analysis is implemented using three crack extension direction criteria (the normal stress ratio, the tensor polynominal and the strain energy density) to predict the direction of crack extension in unidirectional off axis graphite-epoxy. The theoretical predictions of crack extension direction are then compared with experimental results for 15 deg off axis tensile coupons with center cracks. Specimens of various aspect ratios and crack orientations are analyzed. It is shown that only the normal stress ratio criterion predicts the correct direction of crack growth.

  8. Fatigue crack layer propagation in silicon-iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birol, Y.; Welsch, G.; Chudnovsky, A.

    1986-01-01

    Fatigue crack propagation in metal is almost always accompanied by plastic deformation unless conditions strongly favor brittle fracture. The analysis of the plastic zone is crucial to the understanding of crack propagation behavior as it governs the crack growth kinetics. This research was undertaken to study the fatigue crack propagation in a silicon iron alloy. Kinetic and plasticity aspects of fatigue crack propagation in the alloy were obtained, including the characterization of damage evolution.

  9. Analysis of corner cracks at hole by a 3-D weight function method with stresses from finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, W.; Newman, J. C., Jr.; Sutton, M. A.; Wu, X. R.; Shivakumar, K. N.

    1995-01-01

    Stress intensity factors for quarter-elliptical corner cracks emanating from a circular hole are determined using a 3-D weight function method combined with a 3-D finite element method. The 3-D finite element method is used to analyze uncracked configuration and provide stress distribution in the region where crack is to occur. Using this stress distribution as input, the 3-D weight function method is used to determine stress intensity factors. Three different loading conditions, i.e. remote tension, remote bending and wedge loading, are considered for a wide range in geometrical parameters. The significance in using 3-D uncracked stress distribution and the difference between single and double corner cracks are studied. Typical crack opening displacements are also provided. Comparisons are made with solutions available in the literature.

  10. Size-resolved cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity and closure analysis at the HKUST Supersite in Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, J. W.; Yeung, M. C.; Li, Y. J.; Lee, B. Y. L.; Chan, C. K.

    2014-09-01

    The cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) properties of atmospheric aerosols were measured on 1-30 May 2011 at the HKUST (Hong Kong University of Science and Technology) Supersite, a coastal site in Hong Kong. Size-resolved CCN activation curves, the ratio of number concentration of CCN (NCCN) to aerosol concentration (NCN) as a function of particle size, were obtained at supersaturation (SS) = 0.15, 0.35, 0.50, and 0.70% using a DMT (Droplet Measurement Technologies) CCN counter (CCNc) and a TSI scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). The mean bulk size-integrated NCCN ranged from ~500 cm-3 at SS = 0.15% to ~2100 cm-3 at SS = 0.70%, and the mean bulk NCCN / NCN ratio ranged from 0.16 at SS = 0.15% to 0.65 at SS = 0.70%. The average critical mobility diameters (D50) at SS = 0.15, 0.35, 0.50, and 0.70% were 116, 67, 56, and 46 nm, respectively. The corresponding average hygroscopic parameters (κCCN) were 0.39, 0.36, 0.31, and 0.28. The decrease in κCCN can be attributed to the increase in organic to inorganic volume ratio as particle size decreases, as measured by an Aerodyne high resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). The κCCN correlates reasonably well with κAMS_SR based on size-resolved AMS measurements: κAMS_SR = κorg × forg + κinorg × finorg, where forg and finorg are the organic and inorganic volume fractions, respectively, κorg = 0.1 and κinorg = 0.6, with a R2 of 0.51. In closure analysis, NCCN was estimated by integrating the measured size-resolved NCN for particles larger than D50 derived from κ assuming internal mixing state. Estimates using κAMS_SR show that the measured and predicted NCCN were generally within 10% of each other at all four SS. The deviation increased to 26% when κAMS was calculated from bulk PM1 AMS measurements of particles because PM1 was dominated by particles of 200 to 500 nm in diameter, which had a larger inorganic fraction than those of D50 (particle diameter < 200 nm). A constant κ = 0

  11. Hierarchical Formation of Intrasplat Cracks in Thermal Spray Ceramic Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Cheng-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2016-06-01

    Intrasplat cracks, an essential feature of thermally sprayed ceramic coatings, play important roles in determining coating properties. However, final intrasplat crack patterns are always considered to be disordered and irregular, resulting from random cracking during splat cooling, since the detailed formation process of intrasplat cracks has scarcely been considered. In the present study, the primary formation mechanism for intrasplat cracking was explored based on both experimental observations and mechanical analysis. The results show that the intrasplat crack pattern in thermally sprayed ceramic splats presents a hierarchical structure with four sides and six neighbors, indicating that intrasplat crack patterns arise from successive domain divisions due to sequential cracking during splat cooling. The driving forces for intrasplat cracking are discussed, and the experimental data quantitatively agree well with theoretical results. This will provide insight for further coating structure designs and tailoring by tuning of intrasplat cracks.

  12. Comparative Analysis of Crack Propagation in Roots with Hand and Rotary Instrumentation of the Root Canal -An Ex-vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Krishnaswamy, Manjunath Mysore

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Success of any endodontic treatment depends on strict adherence to ‘endodontic triad’. Preparation of root canal system is recognized as being one of the most important stages in root canal treatment. At times, we inevitably end up damaging root dentin which becomes a Gateway for infections like perforation, zipping, dentinal cracks and minute intricate fractures or even vertical root fractures, thereby resulting in failure of treatment. Several factors may be responsible for the formation of dentinal cracks like high concentration of sodium hypochlorite, compaction methods and various canal shaping methods. Aim To compare and evaluate the effects of root canal preparation techniques and instrumentation length on the development of apical root cracks. Materials and Methods Seventy extracted premolars with straight roots were mounted on resin blocks with simulated periodontal ligaments, exposing 1-2 mm of the apex followed by sectioning of 1mm of root tip for better visualization under stereomicroscope. The teeth were divided into seven groups of 10 teeth each – a control group and six experimental groups. Subgroup A & B were instrumented with: Stainless Steel hand files (SS) up to Root Canal Length (RCL) & (RCL –1 mm) respectively; sub group C & D were instrumented using ProTaper Universal (PTU) up to RCL and (RCL -1mm) respectively; subgroup E & F were instrumented using ProTaper Next (PTN) up to RCL & (RCL -1 mm) respectively. Stereomicroscopic images of the instrumentation sequence were compared for each tooth. The data was analyzed statistically using descriptive analysis by ‘Phi’ and ‘Cramers’ test to find out statistical significance between the groups. The level of significance was set at p< 0.05 using SPSS software. Results Stainless steel hand file group showed most cracks followed by ProTaper Universal & ProTaper Next though statistically not significant. Samples instrumented up to 1mm short of working length (RCL-1mm) showed

  13. Comparative Analysis of Crack Propagation in Roots with Hand and Rotary Instrumentation of the Root Canal -An Ex-vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Krishnaswamy, Manjunath Mysore

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Success of any endodontic treatment depends on strict adherence to ‘endodontic triad’. Preparation of root canal system is recognized as being one of the most important stages in root canal treatment. At times, we inevitably end up damaging root dentin which becomes a Gateway for infections like perforation, zipping, dentinal cracks and minute intricate fractures or even vertical root fractures, thereby resulting in failure of treatment. Several factors may be responsible for the formation of dentinal cracks like high concentration of sodium hypochlorite, compaction methods and various canal shaping methods. Aim To compare and evaluate the effects of root canal preparation techniques and instrumentation length on the development of apical root cracks. Materials and Methods Seventy extracted premolars with straight roots were mounted on resin blocks with simulated periodontal ligaments, exposing 1-2 mm of the apex followed by sectioning of 1mm of root tip for better visualization under stereomicroscope. The teeth were divided into seven groups of 10 teeth each – a control group and six experimental groups. Subgroup A & B were instrumented with: Stainless Steel hand files (SS) up to Root Canal Length (RCL) & (RCL –1 mm) respectively; sub group C & D were instrumented using ProTaper Universal (PTU) up to RCL and (RCL -1mm) respectively; subgroup E & F were instrumented using ProTaper Next (PTN) up to RCL & (RCL -1 mm) respectively. Stereomicroscopic images of the instrumentation sequence were compared for each tooth. The data was analyzed statistically using descriptive analysis by ‘Phi’ and ‘Cramers’ test to find out statistical significance between the groups. The level of significance was set at p< 0.05 using SPSS software. Results Stainless steel hand file group showed most cracks followed by ProTaper Universal & ProTaper Next though statistically not significant. Samples instrumented up to 1mm short of working length (RCL-1mm) showed

  14. Transcriptome Analysis of a New Peanut Seed Coat Mutant for the Physiological Regulatory Mechanism Involved in Seed Coat Cracking and Pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Liyun; Li, Bei; Pandey, Manish K.; Wu, Yanshan; Lei, Yong; Yan, Liying; Dai, Xiaofeng; Jiang, Huifang; Zhang, Juncheng; Wei, Guo; Varshney, Rajeev K.; Liao, Boshou

    2016-01-01

    Seed-coat cracking and undesirable color of seed coat highly affects external appearance and commercial value of peanuts (Arachis hypogaea L.). With an objective to find genetic solution to the above problems, a peanut mutant with cracking and brown colored seed coat (testa) was identified from an EMS treated mutant population and designated as “peanut seed coat crack and brown color mutant line (pscb).” The seed coat weight of the mutant was almost twice of the wild type, and the germination time was significantly shorter than wild type. Further, the mutant had lower level of lignin, anthocyanin, proanthocyanidin content, and highly increased level of melanin content as compared to wild type. Using RNA-Seq, we examined the seed coat transcriptome in three stages of seed development in the wild type and the pscb mutant. The RNA-Seq analysis revealed presence of highly differentially expressed phenylpropanoid and flavonoid pathway genes in all the three seed development stages, especially at 40 days after flowering (DAF40). Also, the expression of polyphenol oxidases and peroxidase were found to be activated significantly especially in the late seed developmental stage. The genome-wide comparative study of the expression profiles revealed 62 differentially expressed genes common across all the three stages. By analyzing the expression patterns and the sequences of the common differentially expressed genes of the three stages, three candidate genes namely c36498_g1 (CCoAOMT1), c40902_g2 (kinesin), and c33560_g1 (MYB3) were identified responsible for seed-coat cracking and brown color phenotype. Therefore, this study not only provided candidate genes but also provided greater insights and molecular genetic control of peanut seed-coat cracking and color variation. The information generated in this study will facilitate further identification of causal gene and diagnostic markers for breeding improved peanut varieties with smooth and desirable seed coat color. PMID

  15. Development of a Practical Methodology for Elastic-Plastic and Fully Plastic Fatigue Crack Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClung, R. C.; Chell, G. G.; Lee, Y. -D.; Russell, D. A.; Orient, G. E.

    1999-01-01

    A practical engineering methodology has been developed to analyze and predict fatigue crack growth rates under elastic-plastic and fully plastic conditions. The methodology employs the closure-corrected effective range of the J-integral, delta J(sub eff) as the governing parameter. The methodology contains original and literature J and delta J solutions for specific geometries, along with general methods for estimating J for other geometries and other loading conditions, including combined mechanical loading and combined primary and secondary loading. The methodology also contains specific practical algorithms that translate a J solution into a prediction of fatigue crack growth rate or life, including methods for determining crack opening levels, crack instability conditions, and material properties. A critical core subset of the J solutions and the practical algorithms has been implemented into independent elastic-plastic NASGRO modules. All components of the entire methodology, including the NASGRO modules, have been verified through analysis and experiment, and limits of applicability have been identified.

  16. Development of a Practical Methodology for Elastic-Plastic and Fully Plastic Fatigue Crack Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClung, R. C.; Chell, G. G.; Lee, Y.-D.; Russell, D. A.; Orient, G. E.

    1999-01-01

    A practical engineering methodology has been developed to analyze and predict fatigue crack growth rates under elastic-plastic and fully plastic conditions. The methodology employs the closure-corrected effective range of the J-integral, (Delta)J(sub eff), as the governing parameter. The methodology contains original and literature J and (Delta)J solutions for specific geometries, along with general methods for estimating J for other geometries and other loading conditions, including combined mechanical loading and combined primary and secondary loading. The methodology also contains specific practical algorithms that translate a J solution into a prediction of fatigue crack growth rate or life, including methods for determining crack opening levels, crack instability conditions, and material properties. A critical core subset of the J solutions and the practical algorithms has been implemented into independent elastic-plastic NASGRO modules. All components of the entire methodology, including the NASGRO modules, have been verified through analysis and experiment, and limits of applicability have been identified.

  17. Characterization of Residual Stress Effects on Fatigue Crack Growth of a Friction Stir Welded Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Smith, Stephen W.; Seshadri, Banavara R.; James, Mark A.; Brazill, Richard L.; Schultz, Robert W.; Donald, J. Keith; Blair, Amy

    2015-01-01

    An on-line compliance-based method to account for residual stress effects in stress-intensity factor and fatigue crack growth property determinations has been evaluated. Residual stress intensity factor results determined from specimens containing friction stir weld induced residual stresses are presented, and the on-line method results were found to be in excellent agreement with residual stress-intensity factor data obtained using the cut compliance method. Variable stress-intensity factor tests were designed to demonstrate that a simple superposition model, summing the applied stress-intensity factor with the residual stress-intensity factor, can be used to determine the total crack-tip stress-intensity factor. Finite element, VCCT (virtual crack closure technique), and J-integral analysis methods have been used to characterize weld-induced residual stress using thermal expansion/contraction in the form of an equivalent delta T (change in local temperature during welding) to simulate the welding process. This equivalent delta T was established and applied to analyze different specimen configurations to predict residual stress distributions and associated residual stress-intensity factor values. The predictions were found to agree well with experimental results obtained using the crack- and cut-compliance methods.

  18. Analysis of nonlinear frequency mixing in 1D waveguides with a breathing crack using the spectral finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joglekar, D. M.; Mitra, M.

    2015-11-01

    A breathing crack, due to its bilinear stiffness characteristics, modifies the frequency spectrum of a propagating dual-frequency elastic wave, and gives rise to sidebands around the probing frequency. This paper presents an analytical-numerical method to investigate such nonlinear frequency mixing resulting from the modulation effects induced by a breathing crack in 1D waveguides, such as axial rods and the Euler-Bernoulli beams. A transverse edge-crack is assumed to be present in both the waveguides, and the local flexibility caused by the crack is modeled using an equivalent spring approach. A simultaneous treatment of both the waveguides, in the framework of the Fourier transform based spectral finite element method, is presented for analyzing their response to a dual frequency excitation applied in the form of a tone-burst signal. The intermittent contact between the crack surfaces is accounted for by introducing bilinear contact forces acting at the nodes of the damage spectral element. Subsequently, an iterative approach is outlined for solving the resulting system of nonlinear simultaneous equations. Applicability of the proposed method is demonstrated by considering several test cases. The existence of sidebands and the higher order harmonics is confirmed in the frequency domain response of both the waveguides under investigation. A qualitative comparison with the previous experimental observations accentuates the utility of the proposed solution method. Additionally, the influence of the two constituent frequencies in the dual frequency excitation is assessed by varying the relative strengths of their amplitudes. A brief parametric study is performed for bringing out the effects of the relative crack depth and crack location on the degree of modulation, which is quantified in terms of the modulation parameter. Results of the present investigation can find their potential use in providing an analytical-numerical support to the studies geared towards the

  19. An investigation of the effects of stress ratio on the micromechanisms of long and short fatigue crack growth in Ti-6Al-4V

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, V.; Mercer, C.; Soboyejo, W.O.

    1999-07-01

    This paper presents the results of a recent study of the effects of positive stress ratios on the propagation of long and short fatigue cracks in mill annealed Ti-6Al-4V. Differences between the long fatigue crack growth rates at positive stress ratios (R = K{sub min}/K{sub max} = 0.02--0.8) are attributed largely to the effects of crack closure. Microstructurally short fatigue cracks are shown to grow at stress intensity factor ranges below the long crack fatigue threshold. Anomalously high fatigue crack growth rates and crack retardation are also shown to occur in the short crack regime until the short crack data merge with the long crack growth rate data in the Paris regime. Differences between the long and the short crack behavior are associated with differences in fatigue crack growth mechanisms.

  20. Measuring Crack Length in Coarse Grain Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jonathan A.; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2010-01-01

    Due to a coarse grain structure, crack lengths in precracked spinel specimens could not be measured optically, so the crack lengths and fracture toughness were estimated by strain gage measurements. An expression was developed via finite element analysis to correlate the measured strain with crack length in four-point flexure. The fracture toughness estimated by the strain gaged samples and another standardized method were in agreement.

  1. Crack propagation analysis of welded thin-walled joints using boundary element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashiri, F. R.; Zhao, Xiao-Ling; Grundy, P.

    Tube-to-plate nodal joints under cyclic bending are widely used in the road transport and agricultural industry. The square hollow sections (SHS) used in these constructions are thin-walled and cold formed, and they have thicknesses of less than 4mm. Some fatigue failures have been observed. The weld undercut may affect the fatigue life of welded tubular joints especially for thin-walled sections. The undercut dimensions were measured using the silicon imprint technique. Modelling of thin-walled cruciform joints, as a simplification of welded tubular joints, is described in this paper to determine the effect of weld undercut on fatigue propagation life. The Boundary Element Analysis System Software (BEASY) is used. The results of the effect of weld toe undercut from this analysis are compared with results from previous research to determine the comparative reduction in fatigue life between thin-walled joints (T=3mm) and those made of thicker sections (T=20mm). The loss in fatigue strength of the thin-walled joints is found to be relatively more than that for thicker walled joints. A 3D model of a tube to plate T-joint is also modelled using the boundary element software, BEASY. The nodal joint consists of a square hollow section, 50×50×3 SHS, fillet welded to a 10-mm thick plate, and subjected to cyclic bending stress. Fatigue analyses are carried out and the results are compared with the only available S-N design curve.

  2. Analysis of interaction effect of stress intensity factors for interface cracks and angular corners using singular integral equations of the body force method

    SciTech Connect

    Noda, Nao-Aki; Oda, Kazuhiro

    1995-11-01

    In this study, numerical solution of singular integral equations is discussed in the analysis of interface cracks and angular corners. The problems are formulated as a system of singular integral equations on the basis of the body force method. In the analysis of interface cracks, the unknown functions of the body force densities which satisfy the boundary conditions are expressed by the products of fundamental density functions and power series. In the problem of angular corners, two types of fundamental density functions are chosen to express the symmetric type stress singularity of 1/r{sup 1{minus}{lambda}1} and the skew-symmetric type stress singularity of 1/r{sup 1{minus}{lambda}2}; then the unknown functions are expressed as a linear combination of the fundamental density functions and power series. The accuracy of the present analysis is verified by comparing the present results with the results obtained by other researchers and examining the compliance with boundary conditions. The calculation shows that the present method gives rapidly converging numerical results for those problems as well as ordinary crack problems in homogeneous materials.

  3. Thermal-mechanical fatigue crack growth in Inconel X-750

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchand, N.; Pelloux, R. M.

    1984-01-01

    Thermal-mechanical fatigue crack growth (TMFCG) was studied in a gamma-gamma' nickel base superalloy Inconel X-750 under controlled load amplitude in the temperature range from 300 to 650 C. In-phase (T sub max at sigma sub max), out-of-phase (T sub min at sigma sub max), and isothermal tests at 650 C were performed on single-edge notch bars under fully reversed cyclic conditions. A dc electrical potential method was used to measure crack length. The electrical potential response obtained for each cycle of a given wave form and R value yields information on crack closure and crack extension per cycle. The macroscopic crack growth rates are reported as a function of delta k and the relative magnitude of the TMFCG are discussed in the light of the potential drop information and of the fractographic observations.

  4. Analysis of the influence of voids and a crack on the ultimate tensile strength of REBCO bulk superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasaba, K.; Oshida, Y.; Hokari, T.; Katagiri, K.

    2008-09-01

    Since the high Tc rare-earth based bulk superconductor is subjected to the tensile load in radial and circumferential direction by the Lorentz force generated in the magnetization process, the evaluation of the strength by the tensile test is indispensable. Ultimate tensile strength of the bulk superconductor depends on the defects in each sample. Many artificial specimens containing voids were generated for numerical stress calculations. The distribution of the voids diameter in each artificial specimen was based on the observations of Dy123 containing 25 wt% Dy211 (abbreviated as Dy25). Furthermore, the effect of a center crack superposed to the field of the voids on the strength was analytically evaluated. The strength depends on both the size and the location of the voids. The maximum crack length which has eventually no effect on the strength was evaluated. By the evaluation method proposed in this study, it was found that if there had been no void in the Dy25 bulk sample, the tensile strength could have been estimated to be 63 MPa. The voids increase the stress intensity factor at the crack tip. If there is a crack with 0.16 mm or more in the Dy25 superconductor bulk with the porosity 10%, the fracture may not be originated around a void but at a crack tip.

  5. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Carbon Steel Weldments

    SciTech Connect

    POH-SANG, LAM

    2005-01-13

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the role of weld residual stress on stress corrosion cracking in welded carbon steel plates prototypic to those used for nuclear waste storage tanks. Carbon steel specimen plates were butt-joined with Gas Metal Arc Welding technique. Initial cracks (seed cracks) were machined across the weld and in the heat affected zone. These specimen plates were then submerged in a simulated high level radioactive waste chemistry environment. Stress corrosion cracking occurred in the as-welded plate but not in the stress-relieved duplicate. A detailed finite element analysis to simulate exactly the welding process was carried out, and the resulting temperature history was used to calculate the residual stress distribution in the plate for characterizing the observed stress corrosion cracking. It was shown that the cracking can be predicted for the through-thickness cracks perpendicular to the weld by comparing the experimental KISCC to the calculated stress intensity factors due to the welding residual stress. The predicted crack lengths agree reasonably well with the test data. The final crack lengths appear to be dependent on the details of welding and the sequence of machining the seed cracks, consistent with the prediction.

  6. Analysis of Highly-Resolved Simulations of 2-D Humps Toward Improvement of Second-Moment Closures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeyapaul, Elbert; Rumsey Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Fully resolved simulation data of flow separation over 2-D humps has been used to analyze the modeling terms in second-moment closures of the Reynolds-averaged Navier- Stokes equations. Existing models for the pressure-strain and dissipation terms have been analyzed using a priori calculations. All pressure-strain models are incorrect in the high-strain region near separation, although a better match is observed downstream, well into the separated-flow region. Near-wall inhomogeneity causes pressure-strain models to predict incorrect signs for the normal components close to the wall. In a posteriori computations, full Reynolds stress and explicit algebraic Reynolds stress models predict the separation point with varying degrees of success. However, as with one- and two-equation models, the separation bubble size is invariably over-predicted.

  7. Atrioventricular block after ASD closure

    PubMed Central

    Asakai, Hiroko; Weskamp, Sofia; Eastaugh, Lucas; d'Udekem, Yves; Pflaumer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Objective Secundum atrial septal defect (ASD) is a common congenital heart defect. There is limited data on both early and late atrioventricular (AV) block post ASD closure. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence and risk factors of AV block associated with ASD closure. Methods A retrospective analysis of all patients who underwent ASD closure either with a device or surgical method at the Royal Children's Hospital Melbourne between 1996 and 2010 was performed. Baseline demographics, procedural details and follow-up data were collected from medical records. Results A total of 378 patients were identified; 242 in the device group and 136 in the surgical group. Fourteen patients (3.7%) had AV block (1 with second degree and 13 with first degree) at a median follow-up of 28 months; 11/242 (4.5%) in the device group and 3/135 (2.2%) in the surgical group (p=0.39). Six patients had new-onset AV block after ASD closure. In the device subgroup, patients with AV block at follow-up had a larger indexed device size compared with those without (22 (15–31) vs 18(7–38), p=0.02). Multivariate analysis revealed the presence of AV block either pre procedure or post procedure to be the only variables associated with late AV block. Conclusions Late AV block in patients with repaired ASD is rare and most likely independent of the technique used. In the device subgroup, the only risk factor identified to be associated with late AV block was the presence of either preprocedural or postprocedural AV block, so long-term follow-up for these patients should be provided. PMID:27540418

  8. Analysis of cracking phenomena in continuous casting of 1Cr13 stainless steel billets with final electromagnetic stirring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yu; Xu, Rong-jun; Fan, Zheng-jie; Li, Cheng-bin; Deng, An-yuan; Wang, En-gang

    2016-05-01

    Solidification cracking that occurs during continuous casting of 1Cr13 stainless steel was investigated with and without final electromagnetic stirring (F-EMS). The results show that cracks initiates and propagates along the grain boundaries where the elements of carbon and sulfur are enriched. The final stirrer should be appropriately placed at a location that is 7.5 m away from the meniscus, and the appropriate thickness of the liquid core in the stirring zone is 50 mm. As a stirring current of 250 A is imposed, it can promote columnar-equiaxed transition, decrease the secondary dendrite arm spacing, and reduce the segregation of both carbon and sulfur. F-EMS can effectively decrease the amount of cracks in 1Cr13 stainless steel.

  9. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis within the post closure Performance and Safety Assessment of the French deep geological radwaste disposal: methodology, tool and examples of results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepin, G.

    2009-04-01

    Within the framework of the December 30, 1991 french act, Andra submitted to the French Parliament in December 2005 a report on the feasibility of a high-level and long-lived radwaste disposal in the Callovo-Oxfodien clay layer (Meuse/Haute-Marne site). Further to 2006 french act, Andra is now involved in licensing of the reversible disposal up to 2015, which requires a great scientific and technical knowledge. Studies are based on many years of research carried out in France, in particular in Andra's Meuse/Haute-Marne Underground Research Laboratory (MHM URL), and international programs on radwastes, engineered barriers and deep clay formations. Intensive programs on hydraulic, solute transfer and radionuclides behaviour (solubility, retention) were and are carried out on Callovo-Oxfordian argilites (undisturbed and damaged), concrete materials and swelling clay based material, in order to provide a sound database. All these data allowed to perform firstly a sound description of the expected phenomenological evolution of the repository and its geological environment (including release and migration of radionuclides) from operating period to post closure period up to one million years, secondly a sound post-closure performance and safety assessment covering the different waste types (ILLW, HLW). Various safety scenarii were defined to quantify radiological impacts and to evaluate performance of the components and safety functions in post closure using specific indicators (concentration, molar rate, water flux…). According to the RFS III2.f (french safety rule related to deep geological radwaste disposad), there is no risk analysis in post closure and assessments are performed using deterministic situations, models and values. To complete analysis, propagation of uncertainties from models and input data in Performance and Safey Assessment (PA/SA) models is done using both deterministic and multiparametric probabilistic approach, with two main objectives: (i) to

  10. Quick actuating closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, III, Dorsey E. (Inventor); Updike, deceased, Benjamin T. (Inventor); Allred, Johnny W. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A quick actuating closure for a pressure vessel 80 in which a wedge ring 30 with a conical outer surface 31 is moved forward to force shear blocks 40, with conical inner surfaces 41, radially outward to lock an end closure plug 70 within an opening 81 in the pressure vessel 80. A seal ring 60 and a preload ramp 50 sit between the shear blocks 40 and the end closure plug 70 to provide a backup sealing capability. Conical surfaces 44 and 55 of the preload ramp 50 and the shear blocks 40 interact to force the seal ring 60 into shoulders 73 and 85 in the end closure plug 70 and opening 81 to form a tight seal. The end closure plug 70 is unlocked by moving the wedge ring 30 rearward, which causes T-bars 32 of the wedge ring 30 riding within T -slots 42 of the shear blocks 40 to force them radially inward. The end closure plug 70 is then removed, allowing access to the interior of the pressure vessel 80.

  11. Dynamic modelling of a one-stage spur gear system and vibration-based tooth crack detection analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, Omar D.; Rantatalo, Matti; Aidanpää, Jan-Olov

    2015-03-01

    For the purpose of simulation and vibration-based condition monitoring of a geared system, it is important to model the system with an appropriate number of degrees of freedom (DOF). In earlier papers several models were suggested and it is therefore of interest to evaluate their limitations. In the present study a 12 DOF gear dynamic model including a gyroscopic effect was developed and the equations of motions were derived. A one-stage reduction gear was modelled using three different dynamic models (with 6, 8 and 8 reduced to 6 DOF), as well as the developed model (with 12 DOF), which is referred as the fourth model in this paper. The time-varying mesh stiffness was calculated, and dynamic simulation was then performed for different crack sizes. Time domain scalar indicators (the RMS, kurtosis and the crest factor) were applied for fault detection analysis. The results of the first model show a clearly visible difference from those of the other studied models, which were made more realistic by including two more DOF to describe the motor and load. Both the symmetric and the asymmetric disc cases were studied using the fourth model. In the case of disc symmetry, the results of the obtained response are close to those obtained from both the second and third models. Furthermore, the second model showed a slight influence from inter-tooth friction, and therefore the third model is adequate for simulating the pinion's y-displacement in the case of the symmetric disc. In the case of the asymmetric disc, the results deviate from those obtained in the symmetric case. Therefore, for simulating the pinion's y-displacement, the fourth model can be considered for more accurate modelling in the case of the asymmetric disc.

  12. Prediction of Crack Growth under Variable-Amplitude Loading in Thin-Sheet 2024-T3 Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The present paper is concerned with the application of a "plasticity-induced" crack closure model to study fatigue crack growth under various load histories. The model was based on the Dugdale model but modified to leave plastically deformed material in the wake of the advancing crack. The model was used to correlate crack growth rates under constant-amplitude loading and then used to predict crack growth under variable-amplitude and spectrum loading on thin-sheet 2024- T3 aluminum alloys. Predicted crack-opening stresses agreed well with test data from the literature. The crack-growth lives agreed within a factor of two for single and repeated spike overloads/underloads and within 20 percent for spectrum loading. Differences were attributed to fretting-product-debris-induced closure and three-dimensional affects not included in the model.

  13. Analysis of acoustic and physical-mechanical parameters of Cr-Mo-Va steel in the vicinity of the crack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Alexander; Logov, Alexander; Ababkov, Nikolai

    2016-01-01

    The efficiency assessment of acoustic quality monitoring application for research of damages, in particular, the cracks arising at long operation of the heat power equipment is resulted in the present work. The differential equations were first derived describing the change in time delay of surface acoustic waves in the vicinity of the crack, which are directly depending on: a) the argument; b) the plane of states in an implicit form from the parameter of model; c) on a plane of conditions for logarithmic characteristics.

  14. [Desiccation cracking of soil body: a review].

    PubMed

    Pei, Yin-Ge; Xu, Ze-Min; Zhang, Jia-Ming

    2012-04-01

    Desiccation cracking of soil body is a complex physical process, which can affect the strength, stability, and permeability of soil body, and involve in several disciplines such as soil science, agricultural science, engineering geology, and environmental science. This paper introduced the significances of the study on the desiccation cracking of soil body, reviewed the related theoretical and applied researches and the quantitative analysis of crack morphology, and discussed the deficiencies in the research fields, research contents, and research methods. The future research directions about the desiccation cracking of soil body were pointed out.

  15. Crack shape developments and leak rates for circumferential complex-cracked pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Brickstad, B.; Bergman, M.

    1997-04-01

    A computerized procedure has been developed that predicts the growth of an initial circumferential surface crack through a pipe and further on to failure. The crack growth mechanism can either be fatigue or stress corrosion. Consideration is taken to complex crack shapes and for the through-wall cracks, crack opening areas and leak rates are also calculated. The procedure is based on a large number of three-dimensional finite element calculations of cracked pipes. The results from these calculations are stored in a database from which the PC-program, denoted LBBPIPE, reads all necessary information. In this paper, a sensitivity analysis is presented for cracked pipes subjected to both stress corrosion and vibration fatigue.

  16. Occupancy estimation and the closure assumption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rota, Christopher T.; Fletcher, Robert J.; Dorazio, Robert M.; Betts, Matthew G.

    2009-01-01

    1. Recent advances in occupancy estimation that adjust for imperfect detection have provided substantial improvements over traditional approaches and are receiving considerable use in applied ecology. To estimate and adjust for detectability, occupancy modelling requires multiple surveys at a site and requires the assumption of 'closure' between surveys, i.e. no changes in occupancy between surveys. Violations of this assumption could bias parameter estimates; however, little work has assessed model sensitivity to violations of this assumption or how commonly such violations occur in nature. 2. We apply a modelling procedure that can test for closure to two avian point-count data sets in Montana and New Hampshire, USA, that exemplify time-scales at which closure is often assumed. These data sets illustrate different sampling designs that allow testing for closure but are currently rarely employed in field investigations. Using a simulation study, we then evaluate the sensitivity of parameter estimates to changes in site occupancy and evaluate a power analysis developed for sampling designs that is aimed at limiting the likelihood of closure. 3. Application of our approach to point-count data indicates that habitats may frequently be open to changes in site occupancy at time-scales typical of many occupancy investigations, with 71% and 100% of species investigated in Montana and New Hampshire respectively, showing violation of closure across time periods of 3 weeks and 8 days respectively. 4. Simulations suggest that models assuming closure are sensitive to changes in occupancy. Power analyses further suggest that the modelling procedure we apply can effectively test for closure. 5. Synthesis and applications. Our demonstration that sites may be open to changes in site occupancy over time-scales typical of many occupancy investigations, combined with the sensitivity of models to violations of the closure assumption, highlights the importance of properly addressing

  17. The effect of initiation feature and environment on fatigue crack formation and early propagation in aluminum zinc magnesium copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, James T.

    The current research provides insight into fatigue crack formation and progression in the poorly understood size regime that bridges safe-life and damage tolerance approaches; particular attention is given to the influences of corrosion-induced degradation and time-cycle dependent loading environment effects. Quantitative analysis of crack formation life (Ni), microstructurally small crack (<500 microm) propagation kinetics (da/dN), and the effect of cold loading environment provide the means to validate mechanism-based modeling. Both pristine and corroded (L-S surface) 7075-T651 specimens were fatigued at 23°C, -50°C and -90°C under various applied stresses. Microscopy of programmed loading-induced crack surface marks produced an unparalleled Ni and small crack da/dN database. Results show that fatigue crack formation involves a complex interaction of elastic stress concentration, due to a 3-dimensional macro-pit, coupled with local micro-feature (and constituent) induced plastic strain concentration. Such interactions cause high Ni variability, but, from an engineering perspective, a broadly corroded surface should contain an extreme group of features driving Ni to ˜0. At low-applied stresses, Ni consumes a significant portion of total life, which is well predicted by coupling elastic-plastic FEA with empirical low-cycle fatigue life models. All pristine and corroded da/dN were uniquely correlated using complex continuum stress intensity (K) and crack opening solutions which account for the stress concentrating formation feature. Multiple crack growth regimes were observed, typical of environment enhanced fatigue in Al alloys. Such behavior is not captured by prominent mechanics-based small crack models. Furthermore, neither local closure nor slip-based models captured the order of magnitude variability in da/dN attributed to microstructure. Low temperature loading produces an order of magnitude increase in Ni, and even larger reduction in da/dN, due to

  18. Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... That People Abuse » Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Listen Cocaine is a white ... Version Download "My life was built around getting cocaine and getting high." Stacey is recovering from her ...

  19. Bolt preload selection for pulsed-loaded vessel closures

    SciTech Connect

    Duffey, T.A.; Lewis, B.B.; Bowers, S.M.

    1995-02-01

    Bounding, closed-form solutions are developed for selecting the bolt preload for a square, flat plate closure subjected to a pressure pulse load. The solutions consider the limiting case in which preload is primarily dependent on closure bending response as well as the limiting case in which preload depends on elastic bolt response. The selection of bolt preload is illustrated. Also presented in the paper is a detailed finite element analysis of dynamically loaded, bolted circular closure. The responses of the structure, closure, and bolts are included, and results are obtained for various preloads. The analysis illustrates a method of bolt preload modeling for use in general finite element computer programs.

  20. TRANSPORT THROUGH CRACKED CONCRETE: LITERATURE REVIEW

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.

    2012-05-11

    Concrete containment structures and cement-based fills and waste forms are used at the Savannah River Site to enhance the performance of shallow land disposal systems designed for containment of low-level radioactive waste. Understanding and measuring transport through cracked concrete is important for describing the initial condition of radioactive waste containment structures at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and for predicting performance of these structures over time. This report transmits the results of a literature review on transport through cracked concrete which was performed by Professor Jason Weiss, Purdue University per SRR0000678 (RFP-RQ00001029-WY). This review complements the NRC-sponsored literature review and assessment of factors relevant to performance of grouted systems for radioactive waste disposal. This review was performed by The Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses, San Antonio, TX, and The University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen Scotland and was focused on tank closure. The objective of the literature review on transport through cracked concrete was to identify information in the open literature which can be applied to SRS transport models for cementitious containment structures, fills, and waste forms. In addition, the literature review was intended to: (1) Provide a framework for describing and classifying cracks in containment structures and cementitious materials used in radioactive waste disposal, (2) Document the state of knowledge and research related to transport through cracks in concrete for various exposure conditions, (3) Provide information or methodology for answering several specific questions related to cracking and transport in concrete, and (4) Provide information that can be used to design experiments on transport through cracked samples and actual structures.

  1. Crack Width Analysis of Floor Slabs from Hyster 550 FS Lift Truck with 55 Kip Pay Load

    SciTech Connect

    BLACK, D.G.

    2003-06-05

    This calculation determines the probable crack width experienced by the slab on grade floor at Building 2404WA from a Hyster 550 FS lift truck having tire pressures of 124 psi while moving and placing Standard Waste Disposal Boxes within the building.

  2. Eccentric annular crack under general nonuniform internal pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeini-Ardakani, S.; Kamali, M. T.; Shodja, H. M.

    2016-08-01

    For a better approximation of ring-shaped and toroidal cracks, a new eccentric annular crack model is proposed and an analytical approach for determination of the corresponding stress intensity factors is given. The crack is subjected to arbitrary mode I loading. A rigorous solution is provided by mapping the eccentric annular crack to a concentric annular crack. The analysis leads to two decoupled Fredholm integral equations of the second kind. For the sake of verification, the problem of a conventional annular crack is examined. Furthermore, for various crack configurations of an eccentric annular crack under uniform tension, the stress intensity factors pertaining to the inner and outer crack edges are delineated in dimensionless plots.

  3. Environmental Effects on Fatigue Crack Growth in 7075 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonakdar, A.; Wang, F.; Williams, J. J.; Chawla, N.

    2012-08-01

    The fatigue behavior of aluminum alloys is greatly influenced by the environmental conditions. In this article, fatigue crack growth rates were measured for 7075-T651 Al alloy under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV, ~10-10 Torr), dry air, and water vapor. Standard compact tension (CT) specimens were tested along the L-T orientation under various load ratios of 0.1, 0.5, and 0.8. Fracture surfaces and crack morphologies were studied using scanning electron microscopy and crack deflection analysis. The crack growth behavior under vacuum was affected by friction and possible rewelding of crack surfaces, causing an asymmetry in the crack growth behavior, from load shedding to constant load. The enhancement of crack growth at higher moisture levels was observed and is discussed in terms of moisture decreasing friction between the crack faces. The effect of crack deflection as a function of R ratio and environment is also presented.

  4. Fatigue-crack propagation in advanced aerospace materials: Aluminum-lithium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Venkateswara Rao, K.T.; Ritchie, R.O.

    1988-10-01

    Characteristics of fatigue-crack propagation behavior are reviewed for recently developed commercial aluminum-lithium alloys, with emphasis on the underlying micromechanisms associated with crack advance and their implications to damage-tolerant design. Specifically, crack-growth kinetics in Alcoa 2090-T8E41, Alcan 8090 and 8091, and Pechiney 2091 alloys, and in certain powder-metallurgy alloys, are examined as a function of microstructure, plate orientation, temperature, crack size, load ratio and loading sequence. In general, it is found that growth rates for long (> 10 mm) cracks are nearly 2--3 orders of magnitude slower than in traditional 2000 and 7000 series alloys at comparable stress-intensity levels. In additions, Al-Li alloys shown enhanced crack-growth retardations following the application of tensile overloads and retain superior fatigue properties even after prolonged exposure at overaging temperatures; however, they are less impressive in the presence of compression overloads and further show accelerated crack-growth behavior for microstructurally-small (2--1000 {mu}m) cracks (some three orders of magnitude faster than long cracks). These contrasting observations are attributed to a very prominent role of crack-tip shielding during fatigue-crack growth in Al-Li alloys, promoted largely by the tortuous and zig-zag nature of the crack-path morphologies. Such crack paths result in locally reduced crack-tip stress intensities, due to crack deflection and consequent crack wedging from fracture-surface asperities (roughness-induced crack closure); however, such mechanisms are far less potent in the presence of compressive loads, which act to crush the asperities, and for small cracks, where the limited crack wake severely restricts the shielding effect. 50 refs., 21 figs.

  5. Dynamic analysis of rectangular plates with a single side crack and in contact with water on one side based on the Rayleigh-Ritz method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, Xiaohui; Lu, Wenxiu; Chu, Fulei

    2012-10-01

    A computational method is proposed based on the Rayleigh-Ritz method for the analysis of dynamic characteristics of a baffled rectangular plate with an arbitrary side crack and in contact with an infinite water domain on one side. Based on the hypothesis that the water is incompressible, inviscid and the motion is irrotational, the added mass density expressed by the displacement trial functions is obtained by means of Green function method. The behavior of crack is described by the corner functions, and the natural frequencies and the corresponding modes are calculated through the Rayleigh-Ritz technique. The validity and the accuracy of the proposed method are demonstrated based on the comparison with the results obtained by ANSYS and those published in other literature, and the influences of water on the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the rectangular plates with side cracks are investigated. It is illustrated that the differences between dry and wet mode shapes increase with increasing mode order on the whole, except for the completely free plates, and the differences are evident for some higher modes.

  6. Dislocation shielding of a cohesive crack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhandakkar, Tanmay K.; Chng, Audrey C.; Curtin, W. A.; Gao, Huajian

    2010-04-01

    Dislocation interaction with a cohesive crack is of increasing importance to computational modelling of crack nucleation/growth and related toughening mechanisms in confined structures and under cyclic fatigue conditions. Here, dislocation shielding of a Dugdale cohesive crack described by a rectangular traction-separation law is studied. The shielding is completely characterized by three non-dimensional parameters representing the effective fracture toughness, the cohesive strength, and the distance between the dislocations and the crack tip. A closed form analytical solution shows that, while the classical singular crack model predicts that a dislocation can shield or anti-shield a crack depending on the sign of its Burgers vector, at low cohesive strengths a dislocation always shields the cohesive crack irrespective of the Burgers vector. A numerical study shows the transition in shielding from the classical solution of Lin and Thomson (1986) in the high strength limit to the solution in the low strength limit. An asymptotic analysis yields an approximate analytical model for the shielding over the full range of cohesive strengths. A discrete dislocation (DD) simulation of a large (>10 3) number of edge dislocations interacting with a cohesive crack described by a trapezoidal traction-separation law confirms the transition in shielding, showing that the cohesive crack does behave like a singular crack at very high cohesive strengths (˜7 GPa), but that significant deviations in shielding between singular and cohesive crack predictions arise at cohesive strengths around 1GPa, consistent with the analytic models. Both analytical and numerical studies indicate that an appropriate crack tip model is essential for accurately quantifying dislocation shielding for cohesive strengths in the GPa range.

  7. Expansive Soil Crack Depth under Cumulative Damage

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Bei-xiao; Chen, Sheng-shui; Han, Hua-qiang; Zheng, Cheng-feng

    2014-01-01

    The crack developing depth is a key problem to slope stability of the expansive soil and its project governance and the crack appears under the roles of dry-wet cycle and gradually develops. It is believed from the analysis that, because of its own cohesion, the expansive soil will have a certain amount of deformation under pulling stress but without cracks. The soil body will crack only when the deformation exceeds the ultimate tensile strain that causes cracks. And it is also believed that, due to the combined effect of various environmental factors, particularly changes of the internal water content, the inherent basic physical properties of expansive soil are weakened, and irreversible cumulative damages are eventually formed, resulting in the development of expansive soil cracks in depth. Starting from the perspective of volumetric strain that is caused by water loss, considering the influences of water loss rate and dry-wet cycle on crack developing depth, the crack developing depth calculation model which considers the water loss rate and the cumulative damages is established. Both the proposal of water loss rate and the application of cumulative damage theory to the expansive soil crack development problems try to avoid difficulties in matrix suction measurement, which will surely play a good role in promoting and improving the research of unsaturated expansive soil. PMID:24737974

  8. Expansive soil crack depth under cumulative damage.

    PubMed

    Shi, Bei-xiao; Chen, Sheng-shui; Han, Hua-qiang; Zheng, Cheng-feng

    2014-01-01

    The crack developing depth is a key problem to slope stability of the expansive soil and its project governance and the crack appears under the roles of dry-wet cycle and gradually develops. It is believed from the analysis that, because of its own cohesion, the expansive soil will have a certain amount of deformation under pulling stress but without cracks. The soil body will crack only when the deformation exceeds the ultimate tensile strain that causes cracks. And it is also believed that, due to the combined effect of various environmental factors, particularly changes of the internal water content, the inherent basic physical properties of expansive soil are weakened, and irreversible cumulative damages are eventually formed, resulting in the development of expansive soil cracks in depth. Starting from the perspective of volumetric strain that is caused by water loss, considering the influences of water loss rate and dry-wet cycle on crack developing depth, the crack developing depth calculation model which considers the water loss rate and the cumulative damages is established. Both the proposal of water loss rate and the application of cumulative damage theory to the expansive soil crack development problems try to avoid difficulties in matrix suction measurement, which will surely play a good role in promoting and improving the research of unsaturated expansive soil. PMID:24737974

  9. An eddy closure for potential vorticity

    SciTech Connect

    Ringler, Todd D

    2009-01-01

    The Gent-McWilliams (GM) parameterization is extended to include a direct influence in the momentum equation. The extension is carried out in two stages; an analysis of the inviscid system is followed by an analysis of the viscous system. In the inviscid analysis the momentum equation is modified such that potential vorticity is conserved along particle trajectories following a transport velocity that includes the Bolus velocity in a manner exactly analogous to the continuity and tracer equations. In addition (and in contrast to traditional GM closures), the new formulation of the inviscid momentum equation results in a conservative exchange between potential and kinetic forms of energy. The inviscid form of the eddy closure conserves total energy to within an error proportional to the time derivative of the Bolus velocity. The hypothesis that the viscous term in the momentum equation should give rise to potential vorticity being diffused along isopycnals in a manner analogous to other tracers is examined in detail. While the form of the momentum closure that follows from a strict adherence to this hypothesis is not immediately interpretable within the constructs of traditional momentum closures, three approximations to this hypothesis results in a form of dissipation that is consistent with traditional Laplacian diffusion. The first two approximations are that relative vorticity, not potential vorticity, is diffused along isopyncals and that the flow is in approximate geostrophic balance. An additional approximation to the Jacobian term is required when the dissipation coefficient varies in space. More importantly, the critique of this hypothesis results in the conclusion that the viscosity parameter in the momentum equation should be identical to the tradition GM closure parameter {Kappa}. Overall, we deem the viscous form of the eddy closure for potential vorticity as a viable closure for use in ocean circulation models.

  10. Fluid catalytic cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Petty, R.H.; Bartley, B.H.

    1984-05-01

    A fluid catalytic cracking process is disclosed for sulfur-containing petroleum charge stocks. Sulfur contained in coke deposited on the fluidized cracking catalyst in the reactor is converted to sulfur oxides in the regenerator and removed from regenerator off-gases by incorporating a composite of alumina and bismuth oxides in a particulate cracking catalyst. Sulfur oxides produced during regeneration of the catalyst by burning the coke with air in the regenerator are captured by the alumina-bismuth oxides composite and converted to hydrogen sulfide in the cracking reactor. The hydrogen sulfide so produced is readily separated from petroleum products of the catalytic cracking reaction process.

  11. The influence of stress ratio and temperature on the fatigue crack growth rate behavior of ARALL

    SciTech Connect

    Salivar, G.C.; Gardini, C.A. Pratt Whitney Group, West Palm Beach, FL )

    1993-01-01

    The fatigue crack growth rate behavior of ARALL (aramid-reinforced aluminum laminate) was investigated as a function of stress ratio and temperature. The particular material was ARALL-3, a 7475-T76 aluminum alloy laminate. Tests were conducted for stress ratios of 0.1 and 0.5 at temperatures of 21, 82, and 93 C (70, 180, and 200 F) using a center-cracked panel geometry (measurements were made in English units and converted to SI units). The objective was to examine the contributions of the effects of crack closure and fiber bridging of the crack on the material behavior. Crack closure was monitored throughout the tests using compliance measurements. Fractography was used to investigate the influence of temperature on the integrity of the aluminum to epoxy/fiber bond to try to identify the effects of fiber bridging. Some crack closure, in the traditional metallic material sense, was evident through compliance measurements. However, the crack tip bridging by the fibers appears to be the dominant mechanism influencing the fatigue crack growth rate behavior in this material under these test conditions. Fractography indicates a considerable difference in fiber-bridging behavior between the room temperature and the elevated temperature tests. 19 refs.

  12. Steam Hydrocarbon Cracking and Reforming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golombok, Michael

    2004-01-01

    The interactive methods of steam hydrocarbon reforming and cracking of the oil and chemical industries are scrutinized, with special focus on their resemblance and variations. The two methods are illustrations of equilibrium-controlled and kinetically-controlled processes, the analysis of which involves theories, which overlap and balance each…

  13. Achieving closure at Fernald

    SciTech Connect

    Bradburne, John; Patton, Tisha C.

    2001-02-25

    When Fluor Fernald took over the management of the Fernald Environmental Management Project in 1992, the estimated closure date of the site was more than 25 years into the future. Fluor Fernald, in conjunction with DOE-Fernald, introduced the Accelerated Cleanup Plan, which was designed to substantially shorten that schedule and save taxpayers more than $3 billion. The management of Fluor Fernald believes there are three fundamental concerns that must be addressed by any contractor hoping to achieve closure of a site within the DOE complex. They are relationship management, resource management and contract management. Relationship management refers to the interaction between the site and local residents, regulators, union leadership, the workforce at large, the media, and any other interested stakeholder groups. Resource management is of course related to the effective administration of the site knowledge base and the skills of the workforce, the attraction and retention of qualified a nd competent technical personnel, and the best recognition and use of appropriate new technologies. Perhaps most importantly, resource management must also include a plan for survival in a flat-funding environment. Lastly, creative and disciplined contract management will be essential to effecting the closure of any DOE site. Fluor Fernald, together with DOE-Fernald, is breaking new ground in the closure arena, and ''business as usual'' has become a thing of the past. How Fluor Fernald has managed its work at the site over the last eight years, and how it will manage the new site closure contract in the future, will be an integral part of achieving successful closure at Fernald.

  14. Seeding Cracks Using a Fatigue Tester for Accelerated Gear Tooth Breaking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nenadic, Nenad G.; Wodenscheck, Joseph A.; Thurston, Michael G.; Lewicki, David G.

    2011-01-01

    This report describes fatigue-induced seeded cracks in spur gears and compares them to cracks created using a more traditional seeding method, notching. Finite element analysis (FEA) compares the effective compliance of a cracked tooth to the effective compliance of a notched tooth where the crack and the notch are of the same depth. In this analysis, cracks are propagated to the desired depth using FRANC2D and effective compliances are computed in ANSYS. A compliance-based feature for detecting cracks on the fatigue tester is described. The initiated cracks are examined using both nondestructive and destructive methods. The destructive examination reveals variability in the shape of crack surfaces.

  15. Fracture mechanics by three-dimensional crack-tip synchrotron X-ray microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Withers, P. J.

    2015-01-01

    To better understand the relationship between the nucleation and growth of defects and the local stresses and phase changes that cause them, we need both imaging and stress mapping. Here, we explore how this can be achieved by bringing together synchrotron X-ray diffraction and tomographic imaging. Conventionally, these are undertaken on separate synchrotron beamlines; however, instruments capable of both imaging and diffraction are beginning to emerge, such as ID15 at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility and JEEP at the Diamond Light Source. This review explores the concept of three-dimensional crack-tip X-ray microscopy, bringing them together to probe the crack-tip behaviour under realistic environmental and loading conditions and to extract quantitative fracture mechanics information about the local crack-tip environment. X-ray diffraction provides information about the crack-tip stress field, phase transformations, plastic zone and crack-face tractions and forces. Time-lapse CT, besides providing information about the three-dimensional nature of the crack and its local growth rate, can also provide information as to the activation of extrinsic toughening mechanisms such as crack deflection, crack-tip zone shielding, crack bridging and crack closure. It is shown how crack-tip microscopy allows a quantitative measure of the crack-tip driving force via the stress intensity factor or the crack-tip opening displacement. Finally, further opportunities for synchrotron X-ray microscopy are explored. PMID:25624521

  16. Structural analysis of closure cap barriers: A pre-test study for the Bentonite Mat Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Chung

    1993-10-01

    According to the EPA-recommended closure cap design a waste site can either be covered with a single layer cap made of 36 inches of compacted soil (clay) or with a multilayer cap consisting of an upper vegetative layer underlain by a drainage layer over a low permeability layer. The Bentonite Mat Demonstration Project (BMDP) is a field demonstration study to determine the construction/installation requirements, permeability, and subsidence performance characteristics of a composite barrier. The composite barrier will consist of on-site sandy-clay blanketed by a bentonite mat and a flexible High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) liner (also called flexible membrane liner). Construction of one control test pad and three bentonite test pads are planned. The control test pad will be used to establish baseline data. Underneath the composite clay cap is a four-foot loose sand layer in which cavities will be created by evacuation of sand. The present work provides a mathematical model for the BMDP. The mathematical model will be used to simulate the mechanical and structural responses of the composite clay cap during the testing processes. Based upon engineering experience and technical references, a set of nominal soil parameters have been selected. Currently, detailed soil test data and cavity configuration data are not available to validate the mathematical model. Since the configuration of the cavities created in the testing process is irregular and unpredictable, two extreme configurations are considered in this mathematical model, viz., the circular cavity and the infinitely long trench in the sand underneath the cap. This approach will provide bounds for the testing results.

  17. Tank closure reducing grout

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, T.B.

    1997-04-18

    A reducing grout has been developed for closing high level waste tanks at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. The grout has a low redox potential, which minimizes the mobility of Sr{sup 90}, the radionuclide with the highest dose potential after closure. The grout also has a high pH which reduces the solubility of the plutonium isotopes. The grout has a high compressive strength and low permeability, which enhances its ability to limit the migration of contaminants after closure. The grout was designed and tested by Construction Technology Laboratories, Inc. Placement methods were developed by the Savannah River Site personnel.

  18. 40 CFR 264.258 - Closure and post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Closure and post-closure care. 264.258... Waste Piles § 264.258 Closure and post-closure care. (a) At closure, the owner or operator must remove... facility and perform post-closure care in accordance with the closure and post-closure care...

  19. Fracture Mechanics Analyses for Interface Crack Problems - A Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Shivakumar, Kunigal; Raju, Ivatury S.

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments in fracture mechanics analyses of the interfacial crack problem are reviewed. The intent of the review is to renew the awareness of the oscillatory singularity at the crack tip of a bimaterial interface and the problems that occur when calculating mode mixity using numerical methods such as the finite element method in conjunction with the virtual crack closure technique. Established approaches to overcome the nonconvergence issue of the individual mode strain energy release rates are reviewed. In the recent literature many attempts to overcome the nonconvergence issue have been developed. Among the many approaches found only a few methods hold the promise of providing practical solutions. These are the resin interlayer method, the method that chooses the crack tip element size greater than the oscillation zone, the crack tip element method that is based on plate theory and the crack surface displacement extrapolation method. Each of the methods is validated on a very limited set of simple interface crack problems. However, their utility for a wide range of interfacial crack problems is yet to be established.

  20. Fatigue-Life Prediction Methodology Using Small-Crack Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newmann, James C., Jr.; Phillips, Edward P.; Swain, M. H.

    1997-01-01

    This paper reviews the capabilities of a plasticity-induced crack-closure model to predict fatigue lives of metallic materials using 'small-crack theory' for various materials and loading conditions. Crack-tip constraint factors, to account for three-dimensional state-of-stress effects, were selected to correlate large-crack growth rate data as a function of the effective-stress-intensity factor range (delta K(eff)) under constant-amplitude loading. Some modifications to the delta k(eff)-rate relations were needed in the near-threshold regime to fit measured small-crack growth rate behavior and fatigue endurance limits. The model was then used to calculate small- and large-crack growth rates, and to predict total fatigue lives, for notched and un-notched specimens made of two aluminum alloys and a steel under constant-amplitude and spectrum loading. Fatigue lives were calculated using the crack-growth relations and microstructural features like those that initiated cracks for the aluminum alloys and steel for edge-notched specimens. An equivalent-initial-flaw-size concept was used to calculate fatigue lives in other cases. Results from the tests and analyses agreed well.

  1. Analysis of a Griffith crack at the interface of two piezoelectric materials under anti-plane loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gherrous, M.; Ferdjani, H.

    2016-11-01

    The main objective of this work is the contribution to the study of the piezoelectric structures which contain preexisting defect (crack). For that, we consider a Griffith crack located at the interface of two piezoelectric materials in a semi-infinite plane structure. The structure is subjected to an anti-plane shearing combined with an in-plane electric displacement. Using integral Fourier transforms, the equations of piezoelectricity are converted analytically to a system of singular integral equations. The singular integral equations are further reduced to a system of algebraic equations and solved numerically by using Chebyshev polynomials. The stress intensity factor and the electric displacement intensity factor are calculated and used for the determination of the energy release rate which will be taken as fracture criterion. At the end, numerical results are presented for various parameters of the problem; they are also presented for an infinite plane structure.

  2. On the driving force for crack growth during thermal actuation of shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxevanis, T.; Parrinello, A. F.; Lagoudas, D. C.

    2016-04-01

    The effect of thermomechanically induced phase transformation on the driving force for crack growth in polycrystalline shape memory alloys is analyzed in an infinite center-cracked plate subjected to a thermal actuation cycle under mechanical load in plain strain. Finite element calculations are carried out to determine the mechanical fields near the static crack and the crack-tip energy release rate using the virtual crack closure technique. A substantial increase of the energy release rate - an order of magnitude for some material systems - is observed during the thermal cycle due to the stress redistribution induced by large scale phase transformation. Thus, phase transformation occurring due to thermal variations under mechanical load may result in crack growth if the crack-tip energy release rate reaches a material specific critical value.

  3. Kinetics of Cyclic Oxidation and Cracking and Finite Element Analysis of MA956 and Sapphire/MA956 Composite System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kang N.; Arya, Vinod K.; Halford, Gary R.; Barrett, Charles A.

    1996-01-01

    Sapphire fiber-reinforced MA956 composites hold promise for significant weight savings and increased high-temperature structural capability, as compared to unreinforced MA956. As part of an overall assessment of the high-temperature characteristics of this material system, cyclic oxidation behavior was studied at 1093 C and 1204 C. Initially, both sets of coupons exhibited parabolic oxidation kinetics. Later, monolithic MA956 exhibited spallation and a linear weight loss, whereas the composite showed a linear weight gain without spallation. Weight loss of the monolithic MA956 resulted from the linking of a multiplicity of randomly oriented and closely spaced surface cracks that facilitated ready spallation. By contrast, cracking of the composite's oxide layer was nonintersecting and aligned nominally parallel with the orientation of the subsurface reinforcing fibers. Oxidative lifetime of monolithic MA956 was projected from the observed oxidation kinetics. Linear elastic, finite element continuum, and micromechanics analyses were performed on coupons of the monolithic and composite materials. Results of the analyses qualitatively agreed well with the observed oxide cracking and spallation behavior of both the MA956 and the Sapphire/MA956 composite coupons.

  4. Ultrasonic inspection of multiple-rivet-hole lap joint cracks using global analysis with local finite element approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuiyan, Yeasin; Shen, Yanfeng; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasonic inspection of multiple-rivet-hole lap joint cracks has been introduced using combined analytical and finite element approach (CAFA). Finite element analyses have been performed on local damage area in spite of the whole large structure and transfer function based analytical model is used to analyze the full structure. "Scattered cube" of complex valued wave damage interaction coefficient (WDIC) that involves scattering and mode conversion of Lamb waves around the damage is used as coupling between analytical and FEM simulation. WDIC is captured for multiple angles of incident Lamb mode (S0 and A0) over the frequency domain to analyze the cracks of multiple-rivet-hole lap joint. By analyzing the scattered cube of WDICs over the frequency domain and azimuthal angles the optimum parameters can be determined for each angle of incidence and the most sensitive signals are obtained using WaveformRevealer2D (WFR2D). These sensitive signals confirm the detection of the butterfly cracks in rivet holes through the installment of the transmitting and sensing PWASs in the proper locations and selecting the right frequency of excitation.

  5. Analysis of composite material interface crack face contact and friction effects using a new node-pairs contact algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Zhi-Peng; He, Yu-Bo; Wan, Shui

    2014-06-01

    A new node-pairs contact algorithm is proposed to deal with a composite material or bi-material interface crack face contact and friction problem (e.g., resistant coating and thermal barrier coatings) subjected to complicated load conditions. To decrease the calculation scale and calculation errors, the local Lagrange multipliers are solved only on a pair of contact nodes using the Jacobi iteration method, and the constraint modification of the tangential multipliers are required. After the calculation of the present node-pairs Lagrange multiplier, it is turned to next contact node-pairs until all node-pairs have finished. Compared with an ordinary contact algorithm, the new local node-pairs contact algorithm is allowed a more precise element on the contact face without the stiffness matrix singularity. The stress intensity factors (SIFs) and the contact region of an infinite plate central crack are calculated and show good agreement with those in the literature. The contact zone near the crack tip as well as its influence on singularity of stress fields are studied. Furthermore, the frictional contacts are also considered and found to have a significant influence on the SIFs. The normalized mode-II stress intensity factors K̂II for the friction coefficient decrease by 16% when f changes from 1 to 0.

  6. Research on pavement crack recognition methods based on image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yingchun; Zhang, Yamin

    2011-06-01

    In order to overview and analysis briefly pavement crack recognition methods , then find the current existing problems in pavement crack image processing, the popular methods of crack image processing such as neural network method, morphology method, fuzzy logic method and traditional image processing .etc. are discussed, and some effective solutions to those problems are presented.

  7. Moving singularity creep crack growth analysis with the /Delta T/c and C/asterisk/ integrals. [path-independent vector and energy rate line integrals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stonesifer, R. B.; Atluri, S. N.

    1982-01-01

    The physical meaning of (Delta T)c and its applicability to creep crack growth are reviewed. Numerical evaluation of (Delta T)c and C(asterisk) is discussed with results being given for compact specimen and strip geometries. A moving crack-tip singularity, creep crack growth simulation procedure is described and demonstrated. The results of several crack growth simulation analyses indicate that creep crack growth in 304 stainless steel occurs under essentially steady-state conditions. Based on this result, a simple methodology for predicting creep crack growth behavior is summarized.

  8. Near threshold fatigue crack growth in ultrafinegrained copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzaghi, M.; Fintová, S.; Sarrazin-Baudoux, C.; Kunz, L.; Petit, J.

    2014-08-01

    The near threshold fatigue crack growth in ultrafine-grained (UFG) copper at room temperature was studied in comparison to conventional coarse-grained (CG) copper. The fatigue crack growth rates da/dN in UFG copper were enhanced at ΔK <= 7 MPa√m compared to the CG material. The crack closure shielding, as evaluated using the compliance variation technique, was shown to explain these differences. The effective stress intensity factor amplitude AKeff appears to be the same driving force in both materials. Tests performed in high vacuum on UFG copper demonstrate the existence of a huge effect of environment with growth rates higher of about two orders of magnitude in air compared to high vacuum. This environmental effect on the crack path and the related microstructure is discussed on the basis of fractography observations performed using scanning electron microscope and completed with field emission scanning electron microscope combined with the focused ion beam technique.

  9. Fatigue crack growth in metastable austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, Z.; Chang, G.; Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1988-06-01

    The research reported here is an investigation of the influence of the mechanically induced martensitic transformation on the fatigue crack growth rate in 304-type steels. The alloys 304L and 304LN were used to test the influence of composition, the testing temperatures 298 K and 77 K were used to study the influence of test temperature, and various load ratios (R) were used to determine the influence of the load ratio. It was found that decreasing the mechanical stability of the austenite by changing composition or lowering temperature decreases the fatigue crack growth rate. The R-ratio effect is more subtle. The fatigue crack growth rate increases with increasing R-ratio, even though this change increases the martensite transformation. Transformation-induced crack closure can explain the results in the threshold regime, but cannot explain the R-ratio effect at higher cyclic stress intensities. 26 refs., 6 figs.

  10. ROCKET PORT CLOSURE

    DOEpatents

    Mattingly, J.T.

    1963-02-12

    This invention provides a simple pressure-actuated closure whereby windowless observation ports are opened to the atmosphere at preselected altitudes. The closure comprises a disk which seals a windowless observation port in rocket hull. An evacuated instrument compartment is affixed to the rocket hull adjacent the inner surface of the disk, while the outer disk surface is exposed to the atmosphere through which the rocket is traveling. The pressure differential between the evacuated instrument compartment and the relatively high pressure external atmosphere forces the disk against the edge of the observation port, thereby effecting a tight seai. The instrument compartment is evacuated to a pressure equal to the atmospheric pressure existing at the altitude at which it is desiretl that the closure should open. When the rocket reaches this preselected altitude, the inwardly directed atmospheric force on the disk is just equaled by the residual air pressure force within the instrument compartment. Consequently, the closure disk falls away and uncovers the open observation port. The separation of the disk from the rocket hull actuates a switch which energizes the mechanism of a detecting instrument disposed within the instrument compartment. (AE C)

  11. Stress intensity factors in two bonded elastic layers containing cracks perpendicular to and on the interface. I Analysis. II - Solution and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, M.-C.; Erdogan, F.

    1983-01-01

    The basic crack problem which is essential for the study of subcritical crack propagation and fracture of layered structural materials is considered. Because of the apparent analytical difficulties, the problem is idealized as one of plane strain or plane stress. An additional simplifying assumption is made by restricting the formulation of the problem to crack geometries and loading conditions which have a plane of symmetry perpendicular to the interface. The general problem is formulated in terms of a coupled systems of four integral equations. For each relevant crack configuration of practical interest, the singular behavior of the solution near and at the ends and points of intersection of the cracks is investigated and the related characteristic equations are obtained. The edge crack terminating at and crossing the interface, the T-shaped crack consisting of a broken layer and a delamination crack, the cross-shaped crack which consists of a delamination crack intersecting a crack which is perpendicular to the interface, and a delamination crack initiating from a stress-free boundary of the bonded layers are some of the practical crack geometries considered. Previously announced in STAR as N80-18428 and N80-18429

  12. Meta-Analysis of Prevention of Surgical Site Infections following Incision Closure with Triclosan-Coated Sutures: Robustness to New Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Edmiston, Charles E.; Leaper, David

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: A systematic literature review (SLR) and meta-analysis of surgical site infections (SSIs) after surgical incision closure with triclosan-coated sutures (TS) compared with non-antibacterial coated sutures (NTS) published previously by the authors suggested that fewer SSIs occurred in the TS study arm. However, the results were vulnerable to the removal of one key randomized controlled trial (RCT) because of insufficient data. Furthermore, recently published RCTs highlighted the need for an update of the SLR to challenge the robustness of results. Methods: The protocol for the new SLR included more stringent tests of robustness than used initially and the meta-analysis was updated with the results of two new RCTs as well as the count of patients and SSIs by U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) incision class. Results: The updated SLR included 15 RCTs with 4,800 patients. No publication bias was suggested in the analysis. The predominant effect estimated a relative risk of 0.67 (95% CI: 0.54–0.84, p=0.00053) with an overall lower frequency of SSI in the TS arm than in the NTS arm. Results were robust to sensitivity analysis. Conclusions: The two additional peer-reviewed double-blind RCTs of this update confirmed the predominant effect found in the authors' previous meta-analysis and established the robustness of conclusions that were lacking previously. This SLR and meta-analysis showed that the use of triclosan antimicrobial sutures reduced the incidence of SSI after clean, clean-contaminated, and contaminated surgery. The two additional peer-reviewed double blind RCTs reinforced the evidence level of this SLR (CEBM level 1a). PMID:24738988

  13. Matrix cracking of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites in shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, Varun P.; Zok, Frank W.

    2014-12-01

    The mechanics of cracking in fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) under general loadings remains incomplete. The present paper addresses one outstanding aspect of this problem: the development of matrix cracks in unidirectional plies under shear loading. To this end, we develop a model based on potential energy differences upstream and downstream of a fully bridged steady-state matrix crack. Through a combination of analytical solutions and finite element simulations of the constituent stresses before and after cracking, we identify the dominant stress components that drive crack growth. We show that, when the axial slip lengths are much larger than the fiber diameter and when interfacial slip precedes cracking, the shear stresses in the constituents are largely unaffected by the presence of the crack; the changes that do occur are confined to a 'core' region within a distance of about one fiber diameter from the crack plane. Instead, the driving force for crack growth derives mainly from the axial stresses-tensile in the fibers and compressive in the matrix-that arise upon cracking. These stresses are well-approximated by solutions based on shear-lag analysis. Combining these solutions with the governing equation for crack growth yields an analytical estimate of the critical shear stress for matrix cracking. An analogous approach is used in deriving the critical stresses needed for matrix cracking under arbitrary in-plane loadings. The applicability of these results to cross-ply CMC laminates is briefly discussed.

  14. Fluid catalytic cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Bartley, B.H.; Petty, R.H.

    1982-08-17

    Gaseous sulfur compounds are removed from a sulfur-containing gas mixture by reacting sulfur oxides in the gas mixture with alumina in association with bismuth. The process is particularly useful in fluid catalytic cracking of sulfur-containing petroleum charge stocks wherein sulfur is contained in coke deposited on the fluidized cracking catalyst. By the process of this invention, sulfur oxides may be removed from regenerator off-gases from a fluidized catalytic cracking unit by incorporating particulate alumina impregnated with bismuth in particulate cracking catalyst whereby sulfur oxides generated in the regeneration of the catalyst are reacted with bismuth-impregnated alumina. Sulfur oxides produced during regeneration of the catalyst by burning the coke with air are captured and converted to hydrogen sulfide in the cracking reactor. The hydrogen sulfide so produced is readily separated from petroleum products of the catalytic cracking reaction process.

  15. Short-crack growth behaviour in various aircraft materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, P. R. (Compiler); Newman, James C., Jr. (Compiler)

    1990-01-01

    The results of the first phase of an AGARD Cooperative Test Program on the behavior and growth of short fatigue cracks are reviewed. The establishment of a common test method, means of data collection/analysis and crack growth modeling in an aircraft alloy AA 2024-T3 are described. The second phase allowed testing of various materials and loading conditions. The results of this second phase are described. All materials exhibited a short-crack effect to some extent. The effect was much less evident in 4340 steel than in the other materials. For the aluminum, aluminum-lithium, and titanium alloys, short cracks grew at stress-intensity factor ranges lower, in some cases much lower, than the thresholds obtained from long crack tests. Several laboratories used the same crack growth model to analyze the growth of short cracks. Reasonable agreement was found between measured and predicted short-crack growth rates and fatigue lives.

  16. Research progress on expansive soil cracks under changing environment.

    PubMed

    Shi, Bei-xiao; Zheng, Cheng-feng; Wu, Jin-kun

    2014-01-01

    Engineering problems shunned previously rise to the surface gradually with the activities of reforming the natural world in depth, the problem of expansive soil crack under the changing environment becoming a control factor of expansive soil slope stability. The problem of expansive soil crack has gradually become a research hotspot, elaborates the occurrence and development of cracks from the basic properties of expansive soil, and points out the role of controlling the crack of expansive soil strength. We summarize the existing research methods and results of expansive soil crack characteristics. Improving crack measurement and calculation method and researching the crack depth measurement, statistical analysis method, crack depth and surface feature relationship will be the future direction. PMID:25013869

  17. Analyzing Leakage Through Cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romine, William D.

    1993-01-01

    Two related computer programs written for use in analyzing leakage through cracks. Leakage flow laminar or turbulent. One program used to determine dimensions of crack under given flow conditions and given measured rate of leakage. Other used to determine rate of leakage of gas through crack of given dimensions under given flow conditions. Programs, written in BASIC language, accelerate and facilitate iterative calculations and parametric analyses. Solve equations of Fanno flow. Enables rapid solution of leakage problem.

  18. Crack Modelling for Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chady, T.; Napierała, L.

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, possibility of creation of three-dimensional crack models, both random type and based on real-life radiographic images is discussed. Method for storing cracks in a number of two-dimensional matrices, as well algorithm for their reconstruction into three-dimensional objects is presented. Also the possibility of using iterative algorithm for matching simulated images of cracks to real-life radiographic images is discussed.

  19. The role of organic proteins on the crack growth resistance of human enamel.

    PubMed

    Yahyazadehfar, Mobin; Arola, Dwayne

    2015-06-01

    With only 1% protein by weight, tooth enamel is the most highly mineralized tissue in mammals. The focus of this study was to evaluate contributions of the proteins on the fracture resistance of this unique structural material. Sections of enamel were obtained from the cusps of human molars and the crack growth resistance was quantified using a conventional fracture mechanics approach with complementary finite element analysis. In selected specimens the proteins were extracted using a potassium hydroxide treatment. Removal of the proteins resulted in approximately 40% decrease in the fracture toughness with respect to the fully proteinized control. The loss of organic content was most detrimental to the extrinsic toughening mechanisms, causing over 80% reduction in their contribution to the total energy to fracture. This degradation occurred by embrittlement of the unbroken bridging ligaments and consequent reduction in the crack closure stress. Although the organic content of tooth enamel is very small, it is essential to crack growth toughening by facilitating the formation of unbroken ligaments and in fortifying their potency. Replicating functions of the organic content will be critical to the successful development of bio-inspired materials that are designed for fracture resistance.

  20. The Role of Organic Proteins on the Crack Growth Resistance of Human Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Yahyazadehfar, Mobin; Arola, Dwayne

    2015-01-01

    With only 1% protein by weight, tooth enamel is the most highly mineralized tissue in mammals. The focus of this study was to evaluate contributions of the proteins on the fracture resistance of this unique structural material. Sections of enamel were obtained from the cusps of human molars and the crack growth resistance was quantified using a conventional fracture mechanics approach with complementary finite element analysis. In selected specimens the proteins were extracted using a potassium hydroxide treatment. Removal of the proteins resulted in approximately 40% decrease in the fracture toughness with respect to the fully proteinized control. The loss of organic content was most detrimental to the extrinsic toughening mechanisms, causing over 80% reduction in their contribution to the total energy to fracture. This degradation occurred by embrittlement of the unbroken bridging ligaments and consequent reduction in the crack closure stress. Although the organic content of tooth enamel is very small, it is essential to crack growth toughening by facilitating the formation of unbroken ligaments and in fortifying their potency. Replicating functions of the organic content will be critical to the successful development of bio-inspired materials that are designed for fracture resistance. PMID:25805107

  1. Automatic crack propagation tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shephard, M. S.; Weidner, T. J.; Yehia, N. A. B.; Burd, G. S.

    1985-01-01

    A finite element based approach to fully automatic crack propagation tracking is presented. The procedure presented combines fully automatic mesh generation with linear fracture mechanics techniques in a geometrically based finite element code capable of automatically tracking cracks in two-dimensional domains. The automatic mesh generator employs the modified-quadtree technique. Crack propagation increment and direction are predicted using a modified maximum dilatational strain energy density criterion employing the numerical results obtained by meshes of quadratic displacement and singular crack tip finite elements. Example problems are included to demonstrate the procedure.

  2. Analysis of an Interface Crack for a Functionally Graded Strip Sandwiched between Two Homogeneous Layers of Finite Thickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shbeeh, N. I.; Binienda, W. K.

    1999-01-01

    The interface crack problem for a composite layer that consists of a homogeneous substrate, coating and a non-homogeneous interface was formulated for singular integral equations with Cauchy kernels and integrated using the Lobatto-Chebyshev collocation technique. Mixed-mode Stress Intensity Factors and Strain Energy Release Rates were calculated. The Stress Intensity Factors were compared for accuracy with relevant results previously published. The parametric studies were conducted for the various thickness of each layer and for various non-homogeneity ratios. Particular application to the Zirconia thermal barrier on steel substrate is demonstrated.

  3. ZIP2DL: An Elastic-Plastic, Large-Rotation Finite-Element Stress Analysis and Crack-Growth Simulation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deng, Xiaomin; Newman, James C., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    ZIP2DL is a two-dimensional, elastic-plastic finte element program for stress analysis and crack growth simulations, developed for the NASA Langley Research Center. It has many of the salient features of the ZIP2D program. For example, ZIP2DL contains five material models (linearly elastic, elastic-perfectly plastic, power-law hardening, linear hardening, and multi-linear hardening models), and it can simulate mixed-mode crack growth for prescribed crack growth paths under plane stress, plane strain and mixed state of stress conditions. Further, as an extension of ZIP2D, it also includes a number of new capabilities. The large-deformation kinematics in ZIP2DL will allow it to handle elastic problems with large strains and large rotations, and elastic-plastic problems with small strains and large rotations. Loading conditions in terms of surface traction, concentrated load, and nodal displacement can be applied with a default linear time dependence or they can be programmed according to a user-defined time dependence through a user subroutine. The restart capability of ZIP2DL will make it possible to stop the execution of the program at any time, analyze the results and/or modify execution options and resume and continue the execution of the program. This report includes three sectons: a theoretical manual section, a user manual section, and an example manual secton. In the theoretical secton, the mathematics behind the various aspects of the program are concisely outlined. In the user manual section, a line-by-line explanation of the input data is given. In the example manual secton, three types of examples are presented to demonstrate the accuracy and illustrate the use of this program.

  4. Comparative analysis of corrosion cracking of austenitic steels with different contents of nitrogen in chloride- and hydrogen-containing media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushnikova, S. Yu.; Sagaradze, V. V.; Filippov, Yu. I.; Kataeva, N. V.; Zavalishin, V. A.; Malyshevskii, V. A.; Kalinin, G. Yu.; Kostin, S. K.

    2015-06-01

    The structural state and the resistance to stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) at constant loads have been studied using samples with a grown crack by the method of the cantilever bending on quenched austenitic stainless steels of the 20Cr-6Ni-11Mn-2Mo-N-V-Nb (Kh20N6G11M2AFB) type, with different contents of nitrogen (0.17, 0.34, 0.43, and 0.50 wt % N). The tests were conducted in a 3.5% aqueous solution of NaCl (without providing polarization) and in a similar solution under cathodic polarization, which causes the formation of hydrogen. It has been shown that, in a chloride solution without polarization, the steels do not undergo SCC for 2000 h. In the case of significant cathodic polarization via employment of a magnesium protector, there was revealed a brittle character of fracture upon SCC in all steels. It has been shown that steel with a nitrogen content of 0.43 wt % possesses the maximum absolute values of rupture stresses under the conditions of cathodic polarization.

  5. Semi-real-time monitoring of cracking on couplings by neural network analysis of acoustic emission signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godinez-Azcuaga, Valery F.; Shu, Fong; Finlayson, Richard D.; O'Donnell, Bruce W.

    2004-07-01

    This paper presents the results obtained during the development of a semi-real-time monitoring methodology based on Neural Network Pattern Recognition of Acoustic Emission (AE) signals for early detection of cracks in couplings used in aircraft and engine drive systems. AE signals were collected in order to establish a baseline of a gear-testing fixture background noise and its variations due to rotational speed and torque. Also, simulated cracking signals immersed in background noise were collected. EDM notches were machined in the driving gear and the load on the gearbox was increased until damaged was induced. Using these data, a Neural Network Signal Classifier (NNSC) was implemented and tested. The testing showed that the NNSC was capable of correctly identifying six different classes of AE signals corresponding to different gearbox operation conditions. Also, a semi-real-time classification software was implemented. This software includes functions that allow the user to view and classify AE data from a dynamic process as they are recorded at programmable time intervals. The software is capable of monitoring periodic statistics of AE data, which can be used as an indicator of damage presence and severity in a dynamic system. The semi-real-time classification software was successfully tested in situations where a delay of 10 seconds between data acquisition and classification was achieved with a hit rate of 50 hits/second per channel on eight active AE channels.

  6. Analysis of the organic liquid produced from catalytic cracking of crude palm oil in the presence of alumina supported catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramli, Anita; Razak, Rozlina Abdul

    2012-09-01

    Catalytic cracking of crude palm oil (CPO) was studied in the presence of alumina, 1% Pt/Al2O3 and 1% Pd/Al2O3 as catalyst. The CPO to catalyst weight ratio used was 1:0.05. The experiment was carried out in a simple liquid-phase batch reactor at atmospheric pressure where the sample was heated to 300-350 δC. Products formed were organic liquid products (OLP) and gaseous product with the solid residue remains in the reactor. The total conversion of CPO was only between 25 - 31% where the residue is suggested to be mainly of polimerised CPO. The OLP was analysed using a gas chromatography with FID detector. Analyses show that the selectivity to liquid fuel is influence by the catalyst used whereby Al2O3 gives the highest selectivity to gasoline while 1% Pt/Al2O3 has the highest selectivity to diesel. However, 1% Pd/Al2O3 is not a suitable catalyst for catalytic cracking of CPO to liquid fuel where less than 17.5% of OLP produced could be classified as liquid fuel.

  7. Comparative analysis of global gene expression profiles between diabetic rat wounds treated with vacuum-assisted closure therapy, moist wound healing or gauze under suction.

    PubMed

    Derrick, Kathleen L; Norbury, Kenneth; Kieswetter, Kris; Skaf, Jihad; McNulty, Amy K

    2008-12-01

    How differential gene expression affects wound healing is not well understood. In this study, Zucker diabetic fatty (fa/fa) male inbred rats were used to investigate gene expression during wound healing in an impaired wound-healing model. Whole genome microarray surveys were used to gain insight into the biological pathways and healing processes in acute excisional wounds treated with vacuum-assisted closure (V.A.C.). Therapy, moist wound healing (MWH) or gauze under suction (GUS). Global gene expression analyses after 2 days of healing indicated major differences with respect to both number of genes showing fold changes and pathway regulation between the three different wound treatments. Statistical analysis of expression profiles indicated that 5072 genes showed a >1.6-fold change with V.A.C. Therapy compared with 3601 genes with MWH and 3952 genes with GUS. Pathways and related genes associated with the early phases of wound healing diverged between treatment groups. For example, pathways involving angiogenesis, cytoskeletal regulation and inflammation were associated with elevated gene expression following V.A.C. Therapy. This study is the first to assess wound healing by whole genome interrogation in a diabetic rat model treated with different healing modalities.

  8. Criticality assessment of LLRWDF closure

    SciTech Connect

    Sarrack, A.G.; Weber, J.H.; Woody, N.D.

    1992-10-06

    During the operation of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility (LLRWDF), large amounts (greater than 100 kg) of enriched uranium (EU) were buried. This EU came primarily from the closing and decontamination of the Naval Fuels Facility in the time period from 1987--1989. Waste Management Operations (WMO) procedures were used to keep the EU boxes separated to prevent possible criticality during normal operation. Closure of the LLRWDF is currently being planned, and waste stabilization by Dynamic Compaction (DC) is proposed. Dynamic compaction will crush the containers in the LLRWDF and result in changes in their geometry. Research of the LLRWDF operations and record keeping practices have shown that the EU contents of trenches are known, but details of the arrangement of the contents cannot be proven. Reviews of the trench contents, combined with analysis of potential critical configurations, revealed that some portions of the LLRWDF can be expected to be free of criticality concerns while other sections have credible probabilities for the assembly of a critical mass, even in the uncompacted configuration. This will have an impact on the closure options and which trenches can be compacted.

  9. Comparative Analysis of EO-1 ALI and Hyperion, and Landsat ETM+ Data for Mapping Forest Crown Closure and Leaf Area Index

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Ruiliang; Gong, Peng; Yu, Qian

    2008-01-01

    In this study, a comparative analysis of capabilities of three sensors for mapping forest crown closure (CC) and leaf area index (LAI) was conducted. The three sensors are Hyperspectral Imager (Hyperion) and Advanced Land Imager (ALI) onboard EO-1 satellite and Landsat-7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+). A total of 38 mixed coniferous forest CC and 38 LAI measurements were collected at Blodgett Forest Research Station, University of California at Berkeley, USA. The analysis method consists of (1) extracting spectral vegetation indices (VIs), spectral texture information and maximum noise fractions (MNFs), (2) establishing multivariate prediction models, (3) predicting and mapping pixel-based CC and LAI values, and (4) validating the mapped CC and LAI results with field validated photo-interpreted CC and LAI values. The experimental results indicate that the Hyperion data are the most effective for mapping forest CC and LAI (CC mapped accuracy (MA) = 76.0%, LAI MA = 74.7%), followed by ALI data (CC MA = 74.5%, LAI MA = 70.7%), with ETM+ data results being least effective (CC MA = 71.1%, LAI MA = 63.4%). This analysis demonstrates that the Hyperion sensor outperforms the other two sensors: ALI and ETM+. This is because of its high spectral resolution with rich subtle spectral information, of its short-wave infrared data for constructing optimal VIs that are slightly affected by the atmosphere, and of its more available MNFs than the other two sensors to be selected for establishing prediction models. Compared to ETM+ data, ALI data are better for mapping forest CC and LAI due to ALI data with more bands and higher signal-to-noise ratios than those of ETM+ data.

  10. BWR internal cracking issues

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, C.E. Jr.; Lund, A.L.

    1999-07-01

    The regulatory issues associated with cracking of boiling water reactor (BWR) internals is being addressed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff and is the subject of a voluntary industry initiative. The lessons learned from this effort will be applied to pressurized water reactor (PWR) internals cracking issues.

  11. Ignition characteristics of cracked JP-7 fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Puri, Puneesh; Ma, Fuhua; Choi, Jeong-Yeol; Yang, Vigor

    2005-09-01

    The ignition characteristics of cracked JP-7 fuel with both oxygen and air is studied over a wide range of pressures (1-20 atm), temperatures (1200-2000 K), and equivalence ratios (0.5-1.5). Correlations of ignition delay times, of the form t=Aexp(E/RT)[F]a[O2]b, are established using the Chemkin-II package and least-squares analysis. The effect of C3 hydrocarbons in cracked JP-7 fuel is examined by comparing ignition delay times for two different cracked compositions.

  12. Slow crack growth in spinel in water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwantes, S.; Elber, W.

    1983-01-01

    Magnesium aluminate spinel was tested in a water environment at room temperature to establish its slow crack-growth behavior. Ring specimens with artificial flaws on the outside surface were loaded hydraulically on the inside surface. The time to failure was measured. Various precracking techniques were evaluated and multiple precracks were used to minimize the scatter in the static fatigue tests. Statistical analysis techniques were developed to determine the strength and crack velocities for a single flaw. Slow crack-growth rupture was observed at stress intensities as low as 70 percent of K sub c. A strengthening effect was observed in specimens that had survived long-time static fatigue tests.

  13. Crack layer theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chudnovsky, A.

    1984-01-01

    A damage parameter is introduced in addition to conventional parameters of continuum mechanics and consider a crack surrounded by an array of microdefects within the continuum mechanics framework. A system consisting of the main crack and surrounding damage is called crack layer (CL). Crack layer propagation is an irreversible process. The general framework of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes are employed to identify the driving forces (causes) and to derive the constitutive equation of CL propagation, that is, the relationship between the rates of the crack growth and damage dissemination from one side and the conjugated thermodynamic forces from another. The proposed law of CL propagation is in good agreement with the experimental data on fatigue CL propagation in various materials. The theory also elaborates material toughness characterization.

  14. Cracks preserve kimberlite melt composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brett, R. C.; Vigouroux-Caillibot, N.; Donovan, J. J.; Russell, K.

    2009-12-01

    The chemical composition of kimberlite melts has previously been estimated by measuring aphanitic intrusive rocks (deposit composition) or by partial melting experiments on carbonated lherzolites (source composition). Pervasively altered, degassed and contaminated material preclude the determination of the primitive melt composition. Here we present data on melt compositions trapped in unaltered olivine cracks that have been healed and overgrown prior to shallow level emplacement. During the ascent of kimberlite magma the prograding crack tip samples mantle peridotite xenoliths. Xenoliths rapidly disaggregate over the first few kilometers of transport producing a population of olivine xenocrysts that are released to the fluid-rich melt. Rapid ascent of the kimberlite magma causes depressurization and creates internal elastic stresses in the olivine crystals that can only be alleviated by volumetric expansion or brittle failure. On the time scales operative during kimberlite ascent volume expansion is negligible and brittle failure occurs. Small wetting angles between the fluid-rich melt and olivine allow infiltration of the melt into the crack. These very thin cracks (<5 µm) heal rapidly and preserve primary kimberlitic material en route to the surface. We use the electron microprobe with a focused beam (interaction volume less than 2 µm) to analyze the small volumes of material found in the healed cracks of the olivine. We analyzed for 18 elements including oxygen, which we obtained by utilizing a non-linear time dependent intensity acquisition and empirically determined mass absorption coefficients. By accurately knowing the amount of oxygen in a sample, we assign oxygen molecules to all other analyzed elements (e.g. MgO, Al2O3) and the remaining oxygen is assigned to hydrogen and carbon. The analysis total is used as a constraint on the proportion of each species. Mg/Ca ratios of the cracks vary from 0.6-5 indicating a compositional continuum between alkali

  15. Mixed mode fatigue crack growth in the commercial Al-Li alloys, 8090

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, I.; Gregson, P.J. . Dept. of Engineering Materials)

    1994-05-15

    Crystallographic fatigue crack propagation along planar slip bands has been recognized to occur over a particularly wide range of conditions in Al-Li alloys due to the presence of coherent, shearable [delta][prime] (Al[sub 3]Li) precipitates, in conjunction with the strong underlying crystallographic texture often developed in these materials during secondary processing. Such Stage 1 propagation typically produces a highly tortuous crack path during conventional mode 1 fatigue testing. While the net crack growth direction remains parallel to the nominal mode 1 direction, crack tortuosity has been generally recognized as beneficial to fatigue resistance, as both local mixed mode crack-tip loading conditions and roughness induced closure may significantly reduce the driving force for crack extension (i.e. crack shielding'' occurs). Recent investigations of commercial Al-Li plate in the damage tolerant condition have however shown that co-planar Stage 1 crack propagation along preferred [111]-plane orientations may give rise to sustained macroscopic crack deviation from the nominal mode 1 growth direction. Such crack growth raises a number of important questions with regard to conventional, nominally mode 1 based structure lifting and fatigue testing methods when applied to these materials. Work has therefore been carried out to characterized fatigue crack growth during sustained co-planar Stage 1 propagation in a commercial Al-Li alloy, with particular reference to mixed mode loading conditions.

  16. Autonomic closure for turbulence simulations.

    PubMed

    King, Ryan N; Hamlington, Peter E; Dahm, Werner J A

    2016-03-01

    A new approach to turbulence closure is presented that eliminates the need to specify a predefined turbulence model and instead provides for fully adaptive, self-optimizing, autonomic closures. The closure is autonomic in the sense that the simulation itself determines the optimal local, instantaneous relation between any unclosed term and resolved quantities through the solution of a nonlinear, nonparametric system identification problem. This nonparametric approach allows the autonomic closure to freely adapt to varying nonlinear, nonlocal, nonequilibrium, and other turbulence characteristics in the flow. Even a simple implementation of the autonomic closure for large eddy simulations provides remarkably more accurate results in a priori tests than do dynamic versions of traditional prescribed closures. PMID:27078285

  17. Molecular dynamics simulation of propagating cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullins, M.

    1982-01-01

    Steady state crack propagation is investigated numerically using a model consisting of 236 free atoms in two (010) planes of bcc alpha iron. The continuum region is modeled using the finite element method with 175 nodes and 288 elements. The model shows clear (010) plane fracture to the edge of the discrete region at moderate loads. Analysis of the results obtained indicates that models of this type can provide realistic simulation of steady state crack propagation.

  18. Near-threshold fatigue crack growth in 8090 Al-Li alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, X.J.; Wallace, W.; Koul, A.K.; Raizenne, M.D.

    1995-11-01

    Near-threshold fatigue crack growth was studied in 8090-T8771 Al-Li alloy tested in moist laboratory air. The testing was conducted using (1) the ASTM E-647 load-shedding procedure, (2) a power-law load-shedding procedure, and (3) a constant-amplitude (CA) loading procedure. Crack closure in the three procedures was analyzed. In reconciling fatigue crack growth rates (FCGRs) with different crack closure levels under identical testing parameters, the conventional {Delta}K{sub eff} (=K{sub max} {minus} K{sub op}) fails to correlate the test data and the modified {Delta}K{sub eff} (=K{sub max} {minus} {chi}K{sub op}, where {chi} is the shielding factor, defined by an energy approach) is proven to be the true crack driving force. A parallel slip-rupture model is proposed to describe the mechanism of near-threshold fatigue crack growth in this ally. The model explains the mode transition from crystallographic slip band cracking (SBC) to subgrain boundary cracking (SGC)/brittle fracture (BF) in terms of microstructure-environment synergy. The transition is related to the material`s short-transverse grain size.

  19. Near-threshold fatigue crack growth in 8090 Al-Li alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X. J.; Wallace, W.; Koul, A. K.; Raizenne, M. D.

    1995-11-01

    Near-threshold fatigue crack growth was studied in 8090-T8771 Al-Li alloy tested in moist laboratory air. The testing was conducted using (1) the ASTM E-647 load-shedding procedure, (2) a power-law load-shedding procedure, and (3) a constant-amplitude (CA) loading procedure. Crack closure in the three procedures was analyzed. In reconciling fatigue crack growth rates (FCGRs) with different crack closure levels under identical testing parameters, the conventional Δ K eff (= K max — K op) fails to correlate the test data and the modified Δ K eff (= K max - χKop, where χ is the shielding factor, defined by an energy approach) is proven to be the true crack driving force. A parallel slip-rupture model is proposed to describe the mechanism of near-threshold fatigue crack growth in this alloy. The model explains the mode transition from crystallographic slip band cracking (SBC) to subgrain boundary cracking (SGC)/brittle fracture (BF) in terms of a microstructure-environment synergy. The transition is related to the material’s short-transverse grain size.

  20. Influence of chemical liquids on the fatigue crack growth of the AZ31 magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhang-Zhong; He, Xian-Cong; Bai, Yun-Qiang; Ba, Zhi-Xin; Dai, Yu-Ming; Zhou, Heng-Zhi

    2012-03-01

    The fatigue crack growth behavior of an AZ31 magnesium alloy was investigated by comparing the effect of zirconate and phosphate chemical liquids. The morphology, components, and phase compositions of the chemical depositions at the fatigue crack tip were analyzed by employing scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. For samples with and without the chemical liquids, their stress-intensity factor values at the fatigue crack tip were compared by using a stress-strain gauge. The results demonstrated that a zirconate film (Zr x O y ·Zn x O y ) and a phosphate film (Zn3(PO4)2·4H2O and MgZnP2O7) could be formed on the fatigue crack-surface at the fatigue crack tip. The stress distribution was changed because of the chemical depositions and the causticity of the chemical liquids. This could decrease the stress-intensity factor value and thus effectively cause fatigue crack closure, which reduces the fatigue crack growth rate. Moreover, it was found that the fatigue crack closure effect of zirconates was more positive than that of phosphates.

  1. Crack healing in rocksalt via diffusion in adsorbed aqueous films: Microphysical modelling versus experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houben, M. E.; ten Hove, A.; Peach, C. J.; Spiers, C. J.

    Microcracks within the excavation damaged or disturbed zone (EDZ) in a salt-based radioactive waste repository (or an energy storage facility) can heal/seal by mechanical closure driven by compaction creep, by surface-energy-driven processes like diffusive mass transfer, and by recrystallization. It follows that permeability evolution in the excavation damaged zone around a backfilled or plugged cavity will in the short term be dominated by mechanical closure of the cracks, while in the longer term diffusive mass transfer effects are expected to become more important. This paper describes a contribution to assessing the integrity of radioactive waste repositories sited in rocksalt formations by developing a microphysical model for single crack healing in rocksalt. More specifically, single crack healing models for cracks containing a thin adsorbed water film are developed. These microphysical models are compared with single crack healing experiments, which conclusively demonstrate diffusion controlled healing. Calibration of unknown model parameters, related to crack surface diffusivity, against the experimental data enable crack healing rates under repository conditions to be estimated. The results show that after the stress re-equilibration that follows repository sealing, crack disconnection can be expected on a timescale of a few years at laboratory humidity levels. However, much longer times are needed under very dry conditions where adsorbed aqueous films are very thin.

  2. Nevada Test Site closure program

    SciTech Connect

    Shenk, D.P.

    1994-08-01

    This report is a summary of the history, design and development, procurement, fabrication, installation and operation of the closures used as containment devices on underground nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site. It also addresses the closure program mothball and start-up procedures. The Closure Program Document Index and equipment inventories, included as appendices, serve as location directories for future document reference and equipment use.

  3. Orbiter door closure tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acres, W. R.

    1980-01-01

    Safe reentry of the shuttle orbiter requires that the payload bay doors be closed and securely latched. Since a malfunction in the door drive or bulkhead latch systems could make safe reentry impossible, the requirement to provide tools to manually close and secure the doors was implemented. The tools would disconnect a disabled door or latch closure system and close and secure the doors if the normal system failed. The tools required to perform these tasks have evolved into a set that consists of a tubing cutter, a winch, a latching tool, and a bolt extractor. The design, fabrication, and performance tests of each tool are described.

  4. System for closure of a physical anomaly

    DOEpatents

    Bearinger, Jane P; Maitland, Duncan J; Schumann, Daniel L; Wilson, Thomas S

    2014-11-11

    Systems for closure of a physical anomaly. Closure is accomplished by a closure body with an exterior surface. The exterior surface contacts the opening of the anomaly and closes the anomaly. The closure body has a primary shape for closing the anomaly and a secondary shape for being positioned in the physical anomaly. The closure body preferably comprises a shape memory polymer.

  5. Moment closures based on minimizing the residual of the PN angular expansion in radiation transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Weixiong; McClarren, Ryan G.

    2016-06-01

    In this work we present two new closures for the spherical harmonics (PN) method in slab geometry transport problems. Our approach begins with an analysis of the squared-residual of the transport equation where we show that the standard truncation and diffusive closures do not minimize the residual of the PN expansion. Based on this analysis we derive two models, a moment-limited diffusive (ML DN) closure and a transient PN (TPN) closure that attempt to address shortcomings of common closures. The form of these closures is similar to flux-limiters for diffusion with the addition of a time-derivative in the definition of the closure. Numerical results on a pulsed plane source problem, the Gordian knot of slab-geometry transport problems, indicate that our new closure outperforms existing linear closures. Additionally, on a deep penetration problem we demonstrate that the TPN closure does not suffer from the artificial shocks that can arise in the MN entropy-based closure. Finally, results for Reed's problem demonstrate that the TPN solution is as accurate as the PN+3 solution. We further extend the TPN closure to 2D Cartesian geometry. The line source test problem demonstrates the model effectively damps oscillations and negative densities.

  6. Updated Fatigue-Crack-Growth And Fracture-Mechanics Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, Royce G.; Shivakumar, Venkataraman; Newman, James C., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    NASA/FLAGRO 2.0 developed as analytical aid in predicting growth and stability of preexisting flaws and cracks in structural components of aerospace systems. Used for fracture-control analysis of space hardware. Organized into three modules to maximize efficiency in operation. Useful in: (1) crack-instability/crack-growth analysis, (2) processing raw crack-growth data from laboratory tests, and (3) boundary-element analysis to determine stresses and stress-intensity factors. Written in FORTRAN 77 and ANSI C.

  7. Data base for crack growth properties of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, Royce G.; Lawrence, Victor B.; Nguy, Henry L.

    1988-01-01

    A computerized data base of crack growth properties of materials was developed for use in fracture control analysis of rocket engine components and other NASA space hardware. The software system has files of basic crack growth rate data, other fracture mechanics material properties such as fracture toughness and environmental crack growth threshold values, and plotting and fitting routines for deriving material properties for use in fracture control analysis. An extensive amount of data was collected and entered, and work is continuing on compiling additional data. The data base and software codes are useful both for fracture control analysis and for evaluation or development of improved crack growth theories.

  8. FINAL CLOSURE PLAN SURFACE IMPOUNDMENTS CLOSURE, SITE 300

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, J E; Scott, J E; Mathews, S E

    2004-09-29

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory of the University of California (LLNL) operates two Class II surface impoundments that store wastewater that is discharged from a number of buildings located on the Site 300 Facility (Site 300). The wastewater is the by-product of explosives processing. Reduction in the volume of water discharged from these buildings over the past several years has significantly reduced the wastewater storage needs. In addition, the impoundments were constructed in 1984, and the high-density polyethylene (HDPE) geomembrane liners are nearing the end of their service life. The purpose of this project is to clean close the surface impoundments and provide new wastewater storage using portable, above ground storage tanks at six locations. The tanks will be installed prior to closure of the impoundments and will include heaters for allowing evaporation during relatively cool weather. Golder Associates (Golder) has prepared this Final Closure Plan (Closure Plan) on behalf of LLNL to address construction associated with the clean closure of the impoundments. This Closure Plan complies with State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) Section 21400 of the California Code of Regulations Title 27 (27 CCR {section}21400). As required by these regulations and guidance, this Plan provides the following information: (1) A site characterization, including the site location, history, current operations, and geology and hydrogeology; (2) The regulatory requirements relevant to clean closure of the impoundments; (3) The closure procedures; and, (4) The procedures for validation and documentation of clean closure.

  9. Quantity Effect of Radial Cracks on the Cracking Propagation Behavior and the Crack Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingjing; Xu, Jun; Liu, Bohan; Yao, Xuefeng; Li, Yibing

    2014-01-01

    In this letter, the quantity effect of radial cracks on the cracking propagation behavior as well as the circular crack generation on the impacted glass plate within the sandwiched glass sheets are experimentally investigated via high-speed photography system. Results show that the radial crack velocity on the backing glass layer decreases with the crack number under the same impact conditions during large quantities of repeated experiments. Thus, the “energy conversion factor” is suggested to elucidate the physical relation between the cracking number and the crack propagation speed. Besides, the number of radial crack also takes the determinative effect in the crack morphology of the impacted glass plate. This study may shed lights on understanding the cracking and propagation mechanism in laminated glass structures and provide useful tool to explore the impact information on the cracking debris. PMID:25048684

  10. Real-Time Soil Characterization and Analysis Systems Used at US Department of Energy Closure Sites in Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Roybal, L. G.; Carpenter, M. V.; Giles, J. R.; Danahy, R. J.

    2003-02-25

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) have jointly developed a field-deployed analytical system to rapidly scan, characterize, and analyze surface soil contamination. The basic system consists of a sodium iodide (NaI) spectrometer and global positioning system (GPS) hardware. This hardware can be deployed from any of four different platforms depending on the scope of the survey at hand. These platforms range from a large tractor-based unit (the RTRAK) used to survey large, relatively flat areas to a hand-pushed unit where maneuverability is important, to an excavator mounted system used to scan pits and trenches. The mobile sodium iodide concept was initially developed by the FEMP to provide pre-screening analyses for soils contaminated with uranium, thorium, and radium. The initial study is documented in the RTRAK Applicability Study and provides analyses supporting the field usage of the concept. The RTRAK system produced data that required several days of post-processing and analyses to generate an estimation of field coverage and activity levels. The INEEL has provided integrated engineering, computer hardware and software support to greatly streamline the data acquisition and analysis process to the point where real-time activity and coverage maps are available to the field technicians. On-line analyses have been added to automatically convert GPS data to Ohio State-Plane coordinates, examine and correct collected spectra for energy calibration drifts common to NaI spectrometers, and strip spectra in regions of interest to provide moisture corrected activity levels for total uranium, thorium-232, and radium-226. Additionally, the software provides a number of checks and alarms to alert operators that a hand-examination of spectral data in a particular area may be required. The FEMP has estimated that this technology has produced projected site savings in excess of $34M

  11. Fatigue crack growth in an aluminum alloy-fractographic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salam, I.; Muhammad, W.; Ejaz, N.

    2016-08-01

    A two-fold approach was adopted to understand the fatigue crack growth process in an Aluminum alloy; fatigue crack growth test of samples and analysis of fractured surfaces. Fatigue crack growth tests were conducted on middle tension M(T) samples prepared from an Aluminum alloy cylinder. The tests were conducted under constant amplitude loading at R ratio 0.1. The stress applied was from 20,30 and 40 per cent of the yield stress of the material. The fatigue crack growth data was recorded. After fatigue testing, the samples were subjected to detailed scanning electron microscopic (SEM) analysis. The resulting fracture surfaces were subjected to qualitative and quantitative fractographic examinations. Quantitative fracture analysis included an estimation of crack growth rate (CGR) in different regions. The effect of the microstructural features on fatigue crack growth was examined. It was observed that in stage II (crack growth region), the failure mode changes from intergranular to transgranular as the stress level increases. In the region of intergranular failure the localized brittle failure was observed and fatigue striations are difficult to reveal. However, in the region of transgranular failure the crack path is independent of the microstructural features. In this region, localized ductile failure mode was observed and well defined fatigue striations were present in the wake of fatigue crack. The effect of interaction of growing fatigue crack with microstructural features was not substantial. The final fracture (stage III) was ductile in all the cases.

  12. Ethylene by Naphta Cracking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiseman, Peter

    1977-01-01

    Presents a discussion of the manufacture of ethylene by thermal cracking of hydrocarbon feedstocks that is useful for introducing the subject of industrial chemistry into a chemistry curriculum. (MLH)

  13. Corrosion pitting and environmentally assisted small crack growth

    PubMed Central

    Turnbull, Alan

    2014-01-01

    In many applications, corrosion pits act as precursors to cracking, but qualitative and quantitative prediction of damage evolution has been hampered by lack of insights into the process by which a crack develops from a pit. An overview is given of recent breakthroughs in characterization and understanding of the pit-to-crack transition using advanced three-dimensional imaging techniques such as X-ray computed tomography and focused ion beam machining with scanning electron microscopy. These techniques provided novel insights with respect to the location of crack development from a pit, supported by finite-element analysis. This inspired a new concept for the role of pitting in stress corrosion cracking based on the growing pit inducing local dynamic plastic strain, a critical factor in the development of stress corrosion cracks. Challenges in quantifying the subsequent growth rate of the emerging small cracks are then outlined with the potential drop technique being the most viable. A comparison is made with the growth rate for short cracks (through-thickness crack in fracture mechanics specimen) and long cracks and an electrochemical crack size effect invoked to rationalize the data. PMID:25197249

  14. Corrosion pitting and environmentally assisted small crack growth.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, Alan

    2014-09-01

    In many applications, corrosion pits act as precursors to cracking, but qualitative and quantitative prediction of damage evolution has been hampered by lack of insights into the process by which a crack develops from a pit. An overview is given of recent breakthroughs in characterization and understanding of the pit-to-crack transition using advanced three-dimensional imaging techniques such as X-ray computed tomography and focused ion beam machining with scanning electron microscopy. These techniques provided novel insights with respect to the location of crack development from a pit, supported by finite-element analysis. This inspired a new concept for the role of pitting in stress corrosion cracking based on the growing pit inducing local dynamic plastic strain, a critical factor in the development of stress corrosion cracks. Challenges in quantifying the subsequent growth rate of the emerging small cracks are then outlined with the potential drop technique being the most viable. A comparison is made with the growth rate for short cracks (through-thickness crack in fracture mechanics specimen) and long cracks and an electrochemical crack size effect invoked to rationalize the data. PMID:25197249

  15. Investigation of eddy current examination on OD fatigue crack for steam generator tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Yuying; Ding, Boyuan; Li, Ming; Liu, Jinhong; Chen, Huaidong; Meyendorf, Norbert G.

    2015-03-01

    The opening width of fatigue crack was very small, and conventional Bobbin probe was very difficult to detect it in steam generator tubes. Different sizes of 8 fatigue cracks were inspected using bobbin probe rotating probe. The analysis results showed that, bobbin probe was not sensitive for fatigue crack even for small through wall crack mixed with denting signal. On the other hand, the rotating probe was easily to detect all cracks. Finally, the OD phase to depth curve for fatigue crack using rotating probe was established and the results agreed very well with the true crack size.

  16. Application of ac tomography to crack identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saguy, H.; Rittel, D.

    2007-08-01

    The depth of penetration of alternating currents in conductors depends on their frequency and material properties. A tomographiclike technique was proposed, in which the frequency is systematically varied to detect and size flaws (emerging and hidden) in electrical conductors, based on an analysis of the skin effect [Saguy and Rittel, Appl. Phys. Lett. 89, 094107 (2006); 87, 084103 (2005)]. Initial results were reported for notched specimens [Saguy and Rittel, NDT & E Int. 40, 505 (2007)] This letter presents experimental results on the detection of actual sharp fatigue cracks, differing from notches in terms of sharpness and partial conduction through the crack flanks. The results show that hidden cracks with arbitrary crack-front shape can be accurately identified.

  17. Inspecting cracks in foam insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambell, L. W.; Jung, G. K.

    1979-01-01

    Dye solution indicates extent of cracking by penetrating crack and showing original crack depth clearly. Solution comprised of methylene blue in denatured ethyl alcohol penetrates cracks completely and evaporates quickly and is suitable technique for usage in environmental or structural tests.

  18. Cracked Plain, Buried Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    4 September 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a cracked plain in western Utopia Planitia. The three circular crack patterns indicate the location of three buried meteor impact craters. These landforms are located near 41.9oN, 275.9oW. The image covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates this scene from the lower left.

  19. Crack Growth Behavior in the Threshold Region for High Cycle Fatigue Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, Royce G.; Zanganehgheshlaghi, Mohannad

    2014-01-01

    The research results described in this paper presents a new understanding of the behavior of fatigue crack growth in the threshold region. It is believed by some crack growth experts that the ASTM load shedding test method does not produce true or valid threshold properties. The concern involves the observed fanning of threshold region da/dN data plots for some materials in which the low R-ratio data fans out or away from the high R-ratio data. This data fanning or elevation of threshold values is obviously caused by an increase in crack closure in the low R-ratio tested specimens. This increase in crack closure is assumed by some investigators to be caused by a plastic wake on the crack surfaces that was created during the load shedding test phase. This study shows that the increase in crack closure is the result of an extensive occurrence of crack bifurcation behavior in some materials, particularly in aluminum alloys, when the crack tip cyclic yield zone size becomes less than the grain size of the alloy. This behavior is related to the high stacking fault energy (SFE) property of aluminum alloys which results in easier slip characteristics. Therefore, the particular fanning behavior in aluminum alloys is a function of intrinsic dislocation property of the materials and that the fanned data represents valid material properties. However, for corrosion sensitive steel alloys used in this study the fanning was caused by a build-up of iron oxide at the crack tip from fretting corrosion.

  20. 40 CFR 264.197 - Closure and post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Closure and post-closure care. 264.197... Tank Systems § 264.197 Closure and post-closure care. (a) At closure of a tank system, the owner or..., then the owner or operator must close the tank system and perform post-closure care in accordance...

  1. 40 CFR 265.1202 - Closure and post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the closure and post-closure requirements that apply to landfills (40 CFR 264.310). ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Closure and post-closure care. 265... post-closure care. (a) At closure of a magazine or unit which stored hazardous waste under this...

  2. 40 CFR 265.258 - Closure and post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Closure and post-closure care. 265.258... DISPOSAL FACILITIES Waste Piles § 265.258 Closure and post-closure care. (a) At closure, the owner or... or decontaminated, he must close the facility and perform post-closure care in accordance with...

  3. 40 CFR 265.197 - Closure and post-closure care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Closure and post-closure care. 265.197... DISPOSAL FACILITIES Tank Systems § 265.197 Closure and post-closure care. (a) At closure of a tank system..., then the owner or operator must close the tank system and perform post-closure care in accordance...

  4. Refinement and evaluation of crack-opening-area analyses for circumferential through-wall cracks in pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, S.; Brust, F.; Ghadiali, N.; Krishnaswamy, P.; Wilkowski, G.; Choi, Y.H. |; Moberg, F.; Brickstad, B. |

    1995-04-01

    Leak-before-break (LBB) analyses for circumferentially cracked pipes are currently being conducted in the nuclear industry to justify elimination of pipe whip restraints and jet impingement shields which are present because of the expected dynamic effects from pipe rupture. The application of the LBB methodology frequently requires calculation of leak rates. These leak rates depend on the crack-opening area of a through-wall crack in the pipe. In addition to LBB analyses, which assume a hypothetical flaw size, there is also interest in the integrity of actual leaking cracks corresponding to current leakage detection requirements in NRC Regulatory Guide 1.45, or for assessing temporary repair of Class 2 and 3 pipes that have leaks as are being evaluated in ASME Section 11. This study was requested by the NRC to review, evaluate, and refine current analytical models for crack-opening-area analyses of pipes with circumferential through-wall cracks. Twenty-five pipe experiments were analyzed to determine the accuracy of the predictive models. Several practical aspects of crack-opening such as; crack-face pressure, off-center cracks, restraint of pressure-induced bending, cracks in thickness transition regions, weld residual stresses, crack-morphology models, and thermal-hydraulic analysis, were also investigated. 140 refs., 105 figs., 41 tabs.

  5. Effects of loading on the growth rates of deep stress-corrosion cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.A.; Christman, T.K.

    1990-08-01

    The goal of this research program was to determine the effects of loading on growth of stress-corrosion cracks (SCC) in line pipe steel and whether special loading procedures could actually inhibit crack growth. Of particular interest was the effect of hydrostatic retesting on the subsequent growth of existing cracks. The growth rate experiments showed that the slow-strain rate loading could successfully nucleate a group of fine cracks with depths up to 0.025 inches (0.64 mm). However, the subsequent cyclic loading at typical operating stress levels (lower than experienced during the slow- strain rate loading) produced minimal crack growth and stopped soon after the test was started. The limited growth is believed to be a real phenomenon which means this is not a suitable procedure for the measurement of average crack growth rates. These experiments indicate that cracks grown at high stress (as in the slow-strain rate phase) do not readily propagate at lower stress levels. This may be because of crack closure (compressive crack tip residual stress) induced by the initial higher stress level. If that is true, then hydrostatic retests could inhibit the growth of existing stress-corrosion cracks, especially if the hydrostatic tests are conducted at high stress levels. 15 figures, 3 tabs.

  6. 27 CFR 19.523 - Affixing closures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Liquor Bottle, Label, and Closure Requirements Closure Requirements § 19.523 Affixing closures. Each bottle or other container of spirits having...

  7. 40 CFR 258.60 - Closure criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Closure and Post-Closure Care § 258.60 Closure criteria. (a) Owners or... (a)(2) of this section, and (2) An erosion layer that provides equivalent protection from wind...

  8. Closedure - Mine Closure Technologies Resource

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauppila, Päivi; Kauppila, Tommi; Pasanen, Antti; Backnäs, Soile; Liisa Räisänen, Marja; Turunen, Kaisa; Karlsson, Teemu; Solismaa, Lauri; Hentinen, Kimmo

    2015-04-01

    Closure of mining operations is an essential part of the development of eco-efficient mining and the Green Mining concept in Finland to reduce the environmental footprint of mining. Closedure is a 2-year joint research project between Geological Survey of Finland and Technical Research Centre of Finland that aims at developing accessible tools and resources for planning, executing and monitoring mine closure. The main outcome of the Closedure project is an updatable wiki technology-based internet platform (http://mineclosure.gtk.fi) in which comprehensive guidance on the mine closure is provided and main methods and technologies related to mine closure are evaluated. Closedure also provides new data on the key issues of mine closure, such as performance of passive water treatment in Finland, applicability of test methods for evaluating cover structures for mining wastes, prediction of water effluents from mine wastes, and isotopic and geophysical methods to recognize contaminant transport paths in crystalline bedrock.

  9. Internal stress distribution for generating closure domains in laser-irradiated Fe–3%Si(110) steels

    SciTech Connect

    Iwata, Keiji; Imafuku, Muneyuki; Orihara, Hideto; Sakai, Yusuke; Ohya, Shin-Ichi; Suzuki, Tamaki; Shobu, Takahisa; Akita, Koichi; Ishiyama, Kazushi

    2015-05-07

    Internal stress distribution for generating closure domains occurring in laser-irradiated Fe–3%Si(110) steels was investigated using high-energy X-ray analysis and domain theory based on the variational principle. The measured triaxial stresses inside the specimen were compressive and the stress in the rolling direction became more dominant than stresses in the other directions. The calculations based on the variational principle of magnetic energy for closure domains showed that the measured triaxial stresses made the closure domains more stable than the basic domain without closure domains. The experimental and calculation results reveal that the laser-introduced internal stresses result in the occurrence of the closure domains.

  10. Spontaneous ileostomy closure

    PubMed Central

    Alyami, Mohammad S.; Lundberg, Peter W.; Cotte, Eddy G.; Glehen, Olivier J.

    2016-01-01

    Iatrogenic ileostomies are routinely placed during colorectal surgery for the diversion of intestinal contents to permit healing of the distal anastomosis prior to elective reversal. We present an interesting case of spontaneous closure of a diverting ileostomy without any adverse effects to the patient. A 65-year-old woman, positive for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer type-I, with locally invasive cancer of the distal colon underwent en-bloc total colectomy, hysterectomy, and bilateral salpingoophorectomy with creation of a proximal loop ileostomy. The ostomy temporarily closed without reoperation at 10 weeks, after spontaneously reopening, it definitively closed, again without surgical intervention at 18 weeks following the original surgery. This rare phenomenon has occurred following variable colorectal pathology and is poorly understood, particularly in patients with aggressive disease and adjunct perioperative interventions. PMID:27279518

  11. CPT-hole closure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noce, T.E.; Holzer, T.L.

    2003-01-01

    The long-term stability of deep holes 1.75 inches. (4.4 cm) in diameter by 98.4 feet (30 m) created by cone penetration testing (CPT) was monitored at a site in California underlain by Holocene and Pleistocene age alluvial fan deposits. Portions of the holes remained open both below and above the 28.6-foot (8.7 m)-deep water table for approximately three years, when the experiment was terminated. Hole closure appears to be a very slow process that may take decades in the stiff soils studied here. Other experience suggests holes in softer soils may also remain open. Thus, despite their small diameter, CPT holes may remain open for years and provide paths for rapid migration of contaminants. The observations confirm the need to grout holes created by CPT soundings as well as other direct-push techniques in areas where protection of shallow ground water is important.

  12. Nucleation of squat cracks in rail, calculation of crack initiation angles in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeimi, Meysam; Li, Zili; Dollevoet, Rolf

    2015-07-01

    A numerical model of wheel-track system is developed for nucleation of squat-type fatigue cracks in rail material. The model is used for estimating the angles of squat cracks in three dimensions. Contact mechanics and multi-axial fatigue analysis are combined to study the crack initiation mechanism in rails. Nonlinear material properties, actual wheel-rail geometries and realistic loading conditions are considered in the modelling process. Using a 3D explicit finite element analysis the transient rolling contact behaviour of wheel on rail is simulated. Employing the critical plane concept, the material points with the largest possibility of crack initiation are determined; based on which, the 3D orientations/angles of the possible squat cracks are estimated. Numerical estimations are compared with sample results of experimental observations on a rail specimen with squat from the site. The findings suggest a proper agreement between results of modelling and experiment. It is observed that squat cracks initiate at an in-plane angle around 13°-22° relative to the rail surface. The initiation angle seen on surface plane is calculated around 29°-48°, while the crack tend to initiate in angles around 25°-31° in the rail cross-section.

  13. Advances in Structural Integrity Analysis Methods for Aging Metallic Airframe Structures with Local Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starnes, James H., Jr.; Newman, James C., Jr.; Harris, Charles E.; Piascik, Robert S.; Young, Richard D.; Rose, Cheryl A.

    2003-01-01

    Analysis methodologies for predicting fatigue-crack growth from rivet holes in panels subjected to cyclic loads and for predicting the residual strength of aluminum fuselage structures with cracks and subjected to combined internal pressure and mechanical loads are described. The fatigue-crack growth analysis methodology is based on small-crack theory and a plasticity induced crack-closure model, and the effect of a corrosive environment on crack-growth rate is included. The residual strength analysis methodology is based on the critical crack-tip-opening-angle fracture criterion that characterizes the fracture behavior of a material of interest, and a geometric and material nonlinear finite element shell analysis code that performs the structural analysis of the fuselage structure of interest. The methodologies have been verified experimentally for structures ranging from laboratory coupons to full-scale structural components. Analytical and experimental results based on these methodologies are described and compared for laboratory coupons and flat panels, small-scale pressurized shells, and full-scale curved stiffened panels. The residual strength analysis methodology is sufficiently general to include the effects of multiple-site damage on structural behavior.

  14. Rocky Flats Closure Unit Cost Data

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, P.C.; Skokan, B.

    2007-07-01

    The Rocky Flats Closure Project has completed the process of stabilizing residual nuclear materials, decommissioning nuclear facilities, remediating environmental media and closing the Rocky Flats Site (Site). The project cost approximately $4.1 B and included the decommissioning of over 700 structures including 5 major plutonium facilities and 5 major uranium facilities, shipping over 14,600 cubic meters of transuranic and 565,000 cubic meters of low level radioactive waste, and remediating a 385-acre industrial area and the surrounding land. Actual costs were collected for a large variety of closure activities. These costs can be correlated with metrics associated with the facilities and environmental media to capture cost factors from the project that could be applicable to a variety of other closure projects both within and outside of the Department of Energy's weapons complex. The paper covers four general topics: the process to correlate the actual costs and metrics, an example of the correlated data for one large sub-project, a discussion of the results, and the additional activities that are planned to correlate and make this data available to the public. The process to collect and arrange the project control data of the Closure Project relied on the actual Closure Project cost information. It was used to correlate these actual costs with the metrics for the physical work, such as building area or waste generated, to support the development of parametric cost factors. The example provides cost factors for the Industrial Sites Project. The discussion addresses the strengths and weaknesses of the data, followed by a section identifying future activities to improve and extend the analyses and integrate it within the Department's Environmental Cost Analysis System. (authors)

  15. A Semi-Analytical Method for Determining the Energy Release Rate of Cracks in Adhesively-Bonded Single-Lap Composite Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Charles; Sun, Wenjun; Tomblin, John S.; Smeltzer, Stanley S., III

    2007-01-01

    A semi-analytical method for determining the strain energy release rate due to a prescribed interface crack in an adhesively-bonded, single-lap composite joint subjected to axial tension is presented. The field equations in terms of displacements within the joint are formulated by using first-order shear deformable, laminated plate theory together with kinematic relations and force equilibrium conditions. The stress distributions for the adherends and adhesive are determined after the appropriate boundary and loading conditions are applied and the equations for the field displacements are solved. Based on the adhesive stress distributions, the forces at the crack tip are obtained and the strain energy release rate of the crack is determined by using the virtual crack closure technique (VCCT). Additionally, the test specimen geometry from both the ASTM D3165 and D1002 test standards are utilized during the derivation of the field equations in order to correlate analytical models with future test results. The system of second-order differential field equations is solved to provide the adherend and adhesive stress response using the symbolic computation tool, Maple 9. Finite element analyses using J-integral as well as VCCT were performed to verify the developed analytical model. The finite element analyses were conducted using the commercial finite element analysis software ABAQUS. The results determined using the analytical method correlated well with the results from the finite element analyses.

  16. Behavior of cyclic fatigue cracks in monolithic silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, C.J.; Ritchie, R.O.; Dauskardt, R.H.

    1995-09-01

    Cyclic fatigue-crack propagation behavior in monolithic silicon nitride is characterized in light of current fatigue-crack growth models for ceramics toughened by grain-bridging mechanisms, with specific emphasis on the role of load ratio. Such models are based on diminished crack-tip shielding in the crack wave under cyclic loads due to frictional-wear degradation of the grain-bridging zone. The notion of cyclic crack growth promoted by diminished shielding is seen to be consistent with measured (long-crack) growth rates, fractography, in situ crack-profile analyses, and measurements of back-face strain compliance. Growth rates are found to display a much larger dependence on the maximum applied stress intensity, K{sub max}, than on the applied stress-intensity range, {Delta}K, with behavior described by the relationship da/dN {proportional_to} K{sub max}{sup 29} {Delta}K. Fatigue thresholds similarly exhibit a marked dependence on the load ratio, R = K{sub min}/K{sub max}; such effects are shown to be inconsistent with traditional models of fatigue-crack closure. In particular, when characterized in terms of K{sub max}, growth rates below {approximately} 10{sup {minus}9} m/cycle exhibit an inverse dependence on load ratio, an observation which is consistent with the grain-bridging phenomenon; specifically, with increasing R, the sliding distance between the grain bridges is decreased, leading to less frictional wear, and hence less degradation in shielding, per loading cycle. The microstructural origins of such behavior are discussed.

  17. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure report: Area 2 Bitcutter and Postshot Containment Shops Injection Wells, Correction Action Unit 90

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    This Closure Report provides documentation of the activities conducted during the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure of the Bitcutter and Postshot Containment Shops Injection Wells located in Area 2 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Oak Spring Quadrangle (USGS, 1986), Township 10 South, Range 53 East, Nye County, Nevada. This report discusses the Bitcutter Shop Inside Injection Well (CAU 90-A) closure-in-place and the Bitcutter Shop Outside Injection Well (CAU 90-B) and Postshot Containment Shop Injection Well (CAU 90-C) clean closures. This Closure Report provides background information about the unit, the results of the characterization activities and actions conducted to determine the closure design. It also provides a discussion of the drainage analysis, preliminary closure activities, final closure activities, waste management activities, and the Post-Closure Care requirements.

  18. Thermal crack damage is dominated by cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, John; Meredith, Philip; Gudmundsson, Agust

    2016-04-01

    Most studies of thermally-induced cracking to date have focused on the generation of cracks formed during heating and thermal expansion. Both the nature and mechanism of crack formation during cooling are hypothesised to be different from those formed during heating. We present in-situ acoustic emission data recorded as a proxy for crack damage evolution throughout a series of heating and cooling experiments on samples of basalt and dacite. The results show that both the rate and energy of acoustic emission are consistently much higher during cooling than during heating. When comparing the AE during the heating phase with the AE during the cooling phase of a comparable duration heating and cooling cycle; we find that there are ~ 150 times as many hits during cooling. Furthermore, the average energy of those AE are more than 3 times greater, resulting in a total AE energy that is almost 500 times higher during cooling than during heating. Seismic velocity comparisons and crack morphology analysis of our heated and cooled samples support the contemporaneous acoustic emission data and also indicate that thermal cracking is largely isotropic. These new data are important for assessing the contribution of cooling-induced damage within volcanic structures and layers such as dikes, sills and lava flows.

  19. Intrinsic fatigue crack growth rates for Al-Li-Cu-Mg alloys in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavik, D. C.; Blankenship, C. P., Jr.; Starke, E. A., Jr.; Gangloff, R. P.

    1993-01-01

    The influences of microstructure and deformation mode on inert environment intrinsic fatigue crack propagation were investigated for Al-Li-Cu-Mg alloys AA2090, AA8090, and X2095 compared to AA2024. The amount of coherent shearable delta-prime (Al3Li) precipitates and extent of localized planar slip deformation were reduced by composition (increased Cu/Li in X2095) and heat treatment (double aging of AA8090). Intrinsic growth rates, obtained at high constant K(max) to minimize crack closure and in vacuum to eliminate any environmental effect, were alloy dependent; da/dN varied up to tenfold based on applied Delta-K or Delta-K/E. When compared based on a crack tip cyclic strain or opening displacement parameter, growth rates were equivalent for all alloys except X2095-T8, which exhibited unique fatigue crack growth resistance. Tortuous fatigue crack profiles and large fracture surface facets were observed for each Al-Li alloy independent of the precipitates present, particularly delta-prime, and the localized slip deformation structure. Reduced fatigue crack propagation rates for X2095 in vacuum are not explained by either residual crack closure or slip reversibility arguments; the origin of apparent slip band facets in a homogeneous slip alloy is unclear.

  20. Crack propagation studies to determine benign or catastrophic failure modes for aerospace thin-rim gears. Ph.D. Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lewicki, D.G.

    1996-05-01

    Analytical and experimental studies were performed to investigate the effect of rim thickness on gear tooth crack propagation. The goal was to determine whether cracks grew through gear teeth (benign failure mode) or through gear rims (catastrophic failure mode) for various rim thicknesses. Gear tooth crack propagation was simulated using a finite element based computer program. Principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics were used. Quarter-point, triangular elements were used at the crack tip to represent the stress singularity. Crack tip stress intensity factors were estimated and used to determine crack propagation direction and fatigue crack growth rate. The computer program used had an automated crack propagation option in which cracks were grown numerically using an automated re-meshing scheme. In addition, experimental studies were performed in the NASA Lewis Spur Gear Fatigue Rig. Gears with various backup ratios were tested to validate crack path predictions. Also, specialized crack propagation gages were installed on the test gears to measure gear tooth crack growth rate. From both predictions and tests, gears with backup ratios (film thickness divided by tooth height) of 3.3 and 1.0 produced tooth fractures while a backup ratio of 0.3 produced rim fractures. For a backup ratio of 0.5, the experiments produced rim fractures and the predictions produced both rim and tooth fractures, depending on the initial crack conditions. Good correlation between the predicted number of crack propagation cycles and measured number of cycles was achieved using both the Paris fatigue crack growth method and the Collipfiest crack growth equation when fatigue crack closure was considered.