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Sample records for crack identification part

  1. Identification of cracks in thick beams with a cracked beam element model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Chuanchuan; Lu, Yong

    2016-12-01

    The effect of a crack on the vibration of a beam is a classical problem, and various models have been proposed, ranging from the basic stiffness reduction method to the more sophisticated model involving formulation based on the additional flexibility due to a crack. However, in the damage identification or finite element model updating applications, it is still common practice to employ a simple stiffness reduction factor to represent a crack in the identification process, whereas the use of a more realistic crack model is rather limited. In this paper, the issues with the simple stiffness reduction method, particularly concerning thick beams, are highlighted along with a review of several other crack models. A robust finite element model updating procedure is then presented for the detection of cracks in beams. The description of the crack parameters is based on the cracked beam flexibility formulated by means of the fracture mechanics, and it takes into consideration of shear deformation and coupling between translational and longitudinal vibrations, and thus is particularly suitable for thick beams. The identification procedure employs a global searching technique using Genetic Algorithms, and there is no restriction on the location, severity and the number of cracks to be identified. The procedure is verified to yield satisfactory identification for practically any configurations of cracks in a beam.

  2. Crack identification for rotating machines based on a nonlinear approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalini, A. A., Jr.; Sanches, L.; Bachschmid, N.; Steffen, V., Jr.

    2016-10-01

    In a previous contribution, a crack identification methodology based on a nonlinear approach was proposed. The technique uses external applied diagnostic forces at certain frequencies attaining combinational resonances, together with a pseudo-random optimization code, known as Differential Evolution, in order to characterize the signatures of the crack in the spectral responses of the flexible rotor. The conditions under which combinational resonances appear were determined by using the method of multiple scales. In real conditions, the breathing phenomenon arises from the stress and strain distribution on the cross-sectional area of the crack. This mechanism behavior follows the static and dynamic loads acting on the rotor. Therefore, the breathing crack can be simulated according to the Mayes' model, in which the crack transition from fully opened to fully closed is described by a cosine function. However, many contributions try to represent the crack behavior by machining a small notch on the shaft instead of the fatigue process. In this paper, the open and breathing crack models are compared regarding their dynamic behavior and the efficiency of the proposed identification technique. The additional flexibility introduced by the crack is calculated by using the linear fracture mechanics theory (LFM). The open crack model is based on LFM and the breathing crack model corresponds to the Mayes' model, which combines LFM with a given breathing mechanism. For illustration purposes, a rotor composed by a horizontal flexible shaft, two rigid discs, and two self-aligning ball bearings is used to compose a finite element model of the system. Then, numerical simulation is performed to determine the dynamic behavior of the rotor. Finally, the results of the inverse problem conveyed show that the methodology is a reliable tool that is able to estimate satisfactorily the location and depth of the crack.

  3. Cracked tooth syndrome. Part 2: restorative options for the management of cracked tooth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Banerji, S; Mehta, S B; Millar, B J

    2010-06-01

    The second of this two part series on 'cracked tooth syndrome' will focus on the available methods for the immediate, intermediate and definitive management of patients affected by this condition. Included in this article is a comprehensive account of the relative merits/drawbacks of various restorative materials and their respective techniques of application for the treatment of symptomatic, incompletely fractured posterior teeth.

  4. A wireless sensor network for online identification of rotor blade crack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai; Yan, Xiaojun

    2016-06-01

    Online identification of rotor blades’ crack can prevent serious faults in the rotor system. Current wired-based crack identification needs structure modifications to lay out lead wires, which is not suitable for online applications. To achieve the online identification of rotor blades’ crack, this note presents an innovative method based on a wireless sensor network (WSN). The WSN’s sensors distribution and system’s operation sequence are properly designed, and its effectiveness is verified by experimental tests.

  5. Fatigue cracks in Eurofer 97 steel: Part II. Comparison of small and long fatigue crack growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruml, T.; Hutař, P.; Náhlík, L.; Seitl, S.; Polák, J.

    2011-05-01

    The fatigue crack growth rate in the Eurofer 97 steel at room temperature was measured by two different methodologies. Small crack growth data were obtained using cylindrical specimens with a shallow notch and no artificial crack starters. The growth of semicircular cracks of length between 10-2000 μm was followed in symmetrical cycling with constant strain amplitude ( R ɛ = -1). Long crack data were measured using standard CT specimen and ASTM methodology, i.e. R = 0.1. The growth of cracks having the length in the range of 10-30 mm was measured. It is shown that the crack growth rates of both types of cracks are in a very good agreement if J-integral representation is used and usual assumptions of the crack closure effects are taken into account.

  6. Interaction of part-through cracks in a flat plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aksel, B.; Erdogan, F.

    1985-01-01

    The accuracy of the line spring model is determined. The effect of interaction between two and three cracks is investigated, and extensive numerical results which may be useful in applications are provided. Line spring model with Reissner's plate theory is formulated to be used for any number and configurations of cracks provided that there is symmetry. This model is used to find stress intensity factors for elliptic internal cracks, elliptic edge cracks and two opposite elliptic edge cracks. Despite the simplicity of the line spring model, the results are found to be close.

  7. Crack detection methods for concrete and steel using radio frequency identification and electrically conductive materials and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Koichi; Noguchi, Kazuya

    2008-03-01

    Radio Frequency IDentification (RFID) tag is a promising device for the management of products at a very low cost. Huge number of such low-cost sensors can be installed to the structure beforehand, after a disaster we can access to these sensors wirelessly and very easily. In this system, an electrically conductive paint or printed sheet is applied to a part of structure in which crack will occur. Copper wire is connected to the attachment on the structure and a RFID tag. When a crack occurs, the paint or printed sheet is broken, resulting in an increase in resistance. Crack width can be estimated by the ability of an RFID transmitter to communicate with the tag. By bending tests of concrete specimens, the relationships between concrete crack width and conductivity of the materials are examined. It is shown that the level of concrete crack width can be related to the ability of the paint or printed sheet to conduct electricity or not. This printed sheet is also applied for steel crack. By fatigue test of steel specimen with a notch, very small steel crack can be detected by this sensor.

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    MedlinePlus

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    MedlinePlus

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  10. Identification of breathing cracks in a beam structure with entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimarshana, Buddhi; Wu, Nan; Wu, Christine

    2016-04-01

    A cantilever beam with a breathing crack is studied to detect and evaluate the crack using entropy measures. Closed cracks in engineering structures lead to proportional complexities to their vibration responses due to weak bi-linearity imposed by the crack breathing phenomenon. Entropy is a measure of system complexity and has the potential in quantifying the complexity. The weak bi-linearity in vibration signals can be amplified using wavelet transformation to increase the sensitivity of the measurements. A mathematical model of harmonically excited unit length steel cantilever beam with a breathing crack located near the fixed end is established, and an iterative numerical method is applied to generate accurate time domain dynamic responses. The bi-linearity in time domain signals due to the crack breathing are amplified by wavelet transformation first, and then the complexities due to bi-linearity is quantified using sample entropy to detect the possible crack and estimate the crack depth. It is observed that the method is capable of identifying crack depths even at very early stages of 3% with the increase in the entropy values more than 10% compared with the healthy beam. The current study extends the entropy based damage detection of rotary machines to structural analysis and takes a step further in high-sensitivity structural health monitoring by combining wavelet transformation with entropy calculations. The proposed technique can also be applied to other types of structures, such as plates and shells.

  11. Pavement crack identification based on automatic threshold iterative method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Guofeng; Zhao, Qiancheng; Liao, Jianguo; He, Yongbiao

    2017-01-01

    Crack detection is an important issue in concrete infrastructure. Firstly, the accuracy of crack geometry parameters measurement is directly affected by the extraction accuracy, the same as the accuracy of the detection system. Due to the properties of unpredictability, randomness and irregularity, it is difficult to establish recognition model of crack. Secondly, various image noise, caused by irregular lighting conditions, dark spots, freckles and bump, exerts an influence on the crack detection accuracy. Peak threshold selection method is improved in this paper, and the processing of enhancement, smoothing and denoising is conducted before iterative threshold selection, which can complete the automatic selection of the threshold value in real time and stability.

  12. Stress Intensity Factors for Part-Through Surface Cracks in Hollow Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mettu, Sambi R.; Raju, Ivatury S.; Forman, Royce G.

    1992-01-01

    Flaws resulting from improper welding and forging are usually modeled as cracks in flat plates, hollow cylinders or spheres. The stress intensity factor solutions for these crack cases are of great practical interest. This report describes some recent efforts at improving the stress intensity factor solutions for cracks in such geometries with emphasis on hollow cylinders. Specifically, two crack configurations for cylinders are documented. One is that of a surface crack in an axial plane and the other is a part-through thumb-nail crack in a circumferential plane. The case of a part-through surface crack in flat plates is used as a limiting case for very thin cylinders. A combination of the two cases for cylinders is used to derive a relation for the case of a surface crack in a sphere. Solutions were sought which cover the entire range of the geometrical parameters such as cylinder thickness, crack aspect ratio and crack depth. Both the internal and external position of the cracks are considered for cylinders and spheres. The finite element method was employed to obtain the basic solutions. Power-law form of loading was applied in the case of flat plates and axial cracks in cylinders and uniform tension and bending loads were applied in the case of circumferential (thumb-nail) cracks in cylinders. In the case of axial cracks, the results for tensile and bending loads were used as reference solutions in a weight function scheme so that the stress intensity factors could be computed for arbitrary stress gradients in the thickness direction. For circumferential cracks, since the crack front is not straight, the above technique could not be used. Hence for this case, only the tension and bending solutions are available at this time. The stress intensity factors from the finite element method were tabulated so that results for various geometric parameters such as crack depth-to-thickness ratio (a/t), crack aspect ratio (a/c) and internal radius-to-thickness ratio (R

  13. Slow Crack Growth of Brittle Materials With Exponential Crack-Velocity Formulation. Part 1; Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Nemeth, Noel N.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2002-01-01

    Extensive slow-crack-growth (SCG) analysis was made using a primary exponential crack-velocity formulation under three widely used load configurations: constant stress rate, constant stress, and cyclic stress. Although the use of the exponential formulation in determining SCG parameters of a material requires somewhat inconvenient numerical procedures, the resulting solutions presented gave almost the same degree of simplicity in both data analysis and experiments as did the power-law formulation. However, the fact that the inert strength of a material should be known in advance to determine the corresponding SCG parameters was a major drawback of the exponential formulation as compared with the power-law formulation.

  14. Effect of Voltage Measurement on the Quantitative Identification of Transverse Cracks by Electrical Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Selvakumaran, Lakshmi; Lubineau, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Electrical tomography can be used as a structural health monitoring technique to identify different damage mechanisms in composite laminates. Previous work has established the link between transverse cracking density and mesoscale conductivity of the ply. Through the mesoscale relationship, the conductivity obtained from electrical tomography can be used as a measure of the transverse cracking density. Interpretation of this measure will be accurate provided the assumptions made during homogenization are valid. One main assumption of mesoscale homogenization is that the electric field is in the plane. Here, we test the validity of this assumption for laminates with varying anisotropy ratios and for different distances between the cracked ply and surface that is instrumented with electrodes. We also show the equivalence in electrical response between measurements from cracked laminates and their equivalent mesoscale counterparts. Finally, we propose some general guidelines on the measurement strategy for maximizing the accuracy of transverse cracks identification. PMID:27023542

  15. Identification of two cracks in a rod by minimal resonant and antiresonant frequency data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio, Lourdes; Fernández-Sáez, José; Morassi, Antonino

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we consider the identification of two cracks of equal severity in a uniform free-free rod under longitudinal vibration. Each crack is simulated by a translational spring connecting the two adjacent segments of the rod and the cracks are considered to be small. We show that the inverse problem can be formulated and solved in terms of three frequency data only, corresponding to a suitable set of low resonant and antiresonant frequencies. Closed-form expressions of the damage parameters in terms of the measured frequency shifts are obtained. The paper improves existing results available in the literature, since the use of antiresonant frequencies allows us to exclude all the symmetrical crack locations occurring when only natural frequency are used as data. The analysis also explains why the use of high frequency data introduces spurious damage locations in the inverse problem solution. Numerical simulations show that if accurate input data are available then damage identification leads to satisfactory results.

  16. Investigation of Using Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) System for Gear Tooth Crack Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    embedded sensors for early gear tooth crack detection. This study is part of the Divisional Enabling Research Program (DERP). The outcome is that Passive...RFID systems are generally not suitable for gear tooth crack detection. However, a similar concept combining a tiny radio frequency transmitter with

  17. Guided wave-based identification of multiple cracks in beams using a Bayesian approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Shuai; Ng, Ching-Tai

    2017-02-01

    A guided wave damage identification method using a model-based approach is proposed to identify multiple cracks in beam-like structures. The guided wave propagation is simulated using spectral finite element method and a crack element is proposed to take into account the mode conversion effect. The Bayesian model class selection algorithm is employed to determine the crack number and then the Bayesian statistical framework is used to identify the crack parameters and the associated uncertainties. In order to improve the efficiency and ensure the reliability of identification, the Transitional Markov Chain Monte Carlo (TMCMC) method is implemented in the Bayesian approach. A series of numerical case studies are carried out to assess the performance of the proposed method, in which the sensitivity of different guided wave modes and effect of different levels of measurement noise in identifying different numbers of cracks is studied in detail. The proposed method is also experimentally verified using guided wave data obtained from laser vibrometer. The results show that the proposed method is able to accurately identify the number, locations and sizes of the cracks, and also quantify the associated uncertainties. In addition the proposed method is robust under measurement noise and different situations of the cracks.

  18. Cracked tooth syndrome. Part 1: aetiology and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Banerji, S; Mehta, S B; Millar, B J

    2010-05-22

    Symptomatic, incompletely fractured posterior teeth can be a great source of anxiety for both the dental patient and dental operator. For the latter, challenges associated with deriving an accurate diagnosis together with the efficient and time effective management of cases of cracked tooth syndrome are largely accountable for the aforementioned problem. The aim of this series of two articles is to provide the reader with an in-depth insight into this condition, through the undertaking of a comprehensive literature review of contemporarily available data. The first article will provide details relating to the background of cracked tooth syndrome including the epidemiology, patho-physiology, aetiology and diagnosis of the syndrome, together with a consideration of factors which may influence the prognostic outcome of teeth affected by incomplete, symptomatic fractures. The second article will focus on the immediate and intermediate management of cracked teeth, and also provide a detailed account of the application of both direct and indirect restorations and restorative techniques used respectively in the management of teeth affected by this complex syndrome.

  19. Effects of crack aspect ratio on the behavior of small surface cracks in fatigue: Part I. Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravichandran, K. S.

    1997-01-01

    A simple simulation of alternate growth of a small surface crack in the surface and depth directions was performed to illustrate the changes in crack aspect ratio, induced by grain boundaries, as a function of crack size. It is shown that at small crack sizes, large variations in aspect ratio, a/c ( a is the crack depth and c is the half-surface length), occur, due to local crack front perturbations induced by grains that are oriented for crack growth. At these crack sizes, the assumption of a semicircular crack shape ( a/c=1.0) was found to cause errors in stress intensity range (Δ K) calculations. This, in turn, led to significant scatter or “anomaly” in small crack growth rates relative to large cracks. At large crack sizes, the effects of local crack front perturbations on crack aspect ratio and Δ K were found to be insignificant. As a result, the scatter in crack growth data was found to decrease to a negligible level at large crack sizes. It is suggested that the limiting crack size above which the small crack behaves as a large crack, l 2=10 d ( d = grain size), proposed by Taylor and Knott, is related to the crack size above which the effects due to aspect ratio variations are small.

  20. Identification to oil cracking in east of Sichuan Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jian Ming; Xia Li, Yan

    2016-08-01

    In Sichuan basin the Lower Palaeozoic source rock has reached high to over-mature stage, but it is still considered that it has obvious genetic link with some gas reservoirs which were formed later. Therefore, the accumulation process between ancient high to over-mature source rock and the late formation of gas reservoirs has become one of the key factors to recognize the law of natural gas accumulation in Sichuan Basin. Based on some characteristics of Carboniferous gas reservoir in eastern basin, such as the gas compositions, stable carbon isotope, it is found that the gas reservoir is oil-cracking gas. The result reveals that the formation and evolution of present gas reservoir is that an ancient oil pool experienced the processes of forming, accumulating, destructing, and thermal maturating and cracking into gas reservoir.

  1. Crack identification through scan-tuning of vibration characteristics using piezoelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shengjie; Wu, Nan; Wang, Quan

    2017-02-01

    This research develops a frequency-based methodology with a scan vibration tuning process for crack identification in beam-type structures coupled with piezoelectric materials. Piezoelectric sensor and actuator patches are mounted on the surface of the host beam synchronously to generate feedback excitations for a tuning process by applying a feedback voltage output from the piezoelectric sensors. The feedback excitations can adjust the stiffness at local section of the beam covered by piezoelectric patches so as to tune its natural vibration mode shapes to amplify the natural frequency change due to the existence of the crack. Piezoelectric patches located at different positions of the beam are activated one by one to realize the scan-tuning process. The crack is identified since the natural frequency change is magnified by the piezoelectric sensor and actuator located at the crack position. Theoretical and finite element models of the scan-tuned beam structures coupled with piezoelectric materials are established. From simulation results, the crack existence and location can be effectively detected through the scan-tuning process with 25% natural frequency change due to a crack located at the middle of the beam. Further parameter studies are conducted to study the effects of the crack location and size on the detection sensitivity.

  2. Identification of crack in functionally graded material beams using the p-version of finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhigang; Chu, Fulei

    2009-08-01

    The detection of cracks in functionally graded material (FGM) structural members has been a significant subject due to their increasing applications in various important engineering industries. A model-based approach is developed in this paper to determine the location and size of an open edge crack in an FGM beam. The p-version of finite element method is employed to estimate the transverse vibration characteristics of a cracked FGM beam. A rational approximation function of the stress intensity factor (SIF) with crack depth and material gradient as independent variables is presented in order to overcome the cumbersomeness and inaccurateness caused by the complicated expression of the analytical SIF solution in crack modeling. Subsequently the crack is represented by a massless rotational spring and its stiffness is obtained from fracture mechanics approach and the aforementioned SIF function. The proposed p-version finite element formulation and crack modeling are validated by analytical literature results of intact FGM beams and two-dimensional finite element analysis of cracked FGM beams with different supporting conditions and material gradients. The influences of crack size, crack location and material gradient on the natural frequencies of a cracked cantilever FGM beam are studied. To identify the crack parameters, the frequency contours with respect to crack location and size are plotted and the intersection of contours from different modes indicates the predicted crack location and size. Numerical experiments have demonstrated that the proposed method has excellent computational efficiency and satisfactory identification performance.

  3. Crack identification by 3D time-domain elastic or acoustic topological sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellis, Cédric; Bonnet, Marc

    2009-03-01

    The topological sensitivity analysis, based on the asymptotic behavior of a cost functional associated with the creation of a small trial flaw in a defect-free solid, provides a computationally-fast, non-iterative approach for identifying flaws embedded in solids. This concept is here considered for crack identification using time-dependent measurements on the external boundary. The topological derivative of a cost function under the nucleation of a crack of infinitesimal size is established, in the framework of time-domain elasticity or acoustics. The simplicity and efficiency of the proposed formulation is enhanced by the recourse to an adjoint solution. Numerical results obtained on a 3-D elastodynamic example using the conventional FEM demonstrate the usefulness of the topological derivative as a crack indicator function. To cite this article: C. Bellis, M. Bonnet, C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  4. Environmental fatigue of an Al-Li-Cu alloy. Part 2: Microscopic hydrogen cracking processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    Based on a fractographic analysis of fatigue crack propagation (FCP) in Al-Li-Cu alloy 2090 stressed in a variety of inert and embrittling environments, microscopic crack paths are identified and correlated with intrinsic da/dN-delta K kinetics. FCP rates in 2090 are accelerated by hydrogen producing environments (pure water vapor, moist air, and aqueous NaCl), as defined in Part 1. For these cases, subgrain boundary fatigue cracking (SGC) dominates for delta K values where the crack tip process zone, a significant fraction of the cyclic plastic zone, is sufficiently large to envelop 5 micron subgrains in the unrecrystallized microstructure. SGC may be due to strong hydrogen trapping at T1 precipitates concentrated at sub-boundaries. At low delta K, the plastic zone diameter is smaller than the subgrain size and FCP progresses along (100) planes due to either local lattice decohesion or aluminum-lithium hydride cracking. For inert environments (vacuum, helium, and oxygen), or at high delta K where the hydrogen effect on da/dN is small, FCP is along (111) slip planes; this mode does not transition with increasing delta K and plastic zone size. The SGC and (100) crystallographic cracking modes, and the governing influence of the crack tip process zone volume (delta K), support hydrogen embrittlement rather than a surface film rupture and anodic dissolution mechanism for environmental FCP. Multi-sloped log da/dN-log delta K behavior is produced by changes in process zone hydrogen-microstructure interactions, and not by purely micromechanical-microstructure interactions, in contradiction to microstructural distance-based fatigue models.

  5. Application of the line-spring model to a cylindrical shell containing a circumferential or axial part-through crack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delale, F.; Erdogan, F.

    1981-01-01

    An approximate solution was obtained for a cylindrical shell containing a part-through surface crack. It was assumed that the shell contains a circumferential or axial semi-elliptic internal or external surface crack and was subjected to a uniform membrane loading or a uniform bending moment away from the crack region. A Reissner type theory was used to account for the effects of the transverse shear deformations. The stress intensity factor at the deepest penetration point of the crack was tabulated for bending and membrane loading by varying three dimensionless length parameters of the problem formed from the shell radius, the shell thickness, the crack length, and the crack depth. The upper bounds of the stress intensity factors are provided by the results of the elasticity solution obtained from the axisymmetric crack problem for the circumferential crack, and that found from the plane strain problem for a circular ring having a radial crack for the axial crack. The line-spring model gives the expected results in comparison with the elasticity solutions. Results also compare well with the existing finite element solution of the pressurized cylinder containing an internal semi-elliptic surface crack.

  6. Multi-cracks identification method for cantilever beam structure with variable cross-sections based on measured natural frequency changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai; Yan, Xiaojun

    2017-01-01

    Cantilever beam's crack identification can provide critical information which is helpful to determine whether the structure be healthy or not. Among all crack identification methods, the methods based on measured structure's natural frequency changes own advantages of simplicity and easy for operation in practical engineering. To accurately identify multi-cracks' characteristics for cantilever beam structure with variable cross-sections, a mathematical model, which is based on the concept of modal strain energy, is established in this investigation. And to obtain cantilever beam's natural frequency result with higher resolution, a signal processing method based on Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT) is also proposed, which can overcome the disadvantage of fast Fourier transform (FFT) in the aspect of frequency resolution and incapability of handling nonlinear vibration caused by crack breathing phenomenon. Based on above mathematical model and signal processing method, the method of identifying multi-cracks on cantilever beam with variable cross-sections is presented. To verify the accuracy of this multi-cracks identification method, experimental examples are conducted, and the results show that the method proposed in this investigation can accurately identify the cracks' characteristics, including their locations and relative depths.

  7. Vibration Based Crack Detection in a Rotating Disk. Part 2; Experimental Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Sawicki, Jerzy T.; Martin, Richard E.; Haase, Wayne C.; Baaklini, George

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the experimental results concerning the detection of a crack in a rotating disk. The goal was to utilize blade tip clearance and shaft vibration measurements to monitor changes in the system's center of mass and/or blade deformation behaviors. The concept of the approach is based on the fact that the development of a disk crack results in a distorted strain field within the component. As a result, a minute deformation in the disk's geometry as well as a change in the system's center of mass occurs. Here, a notch was used to simulate an actual crack. The vibration based experimental results failed to identify the existence of a notch when utilizing the approach described above, even with a rather large, circumferential notch (l.2 in.) located approximately mid-span on the disk (disk radius = 4.63 in. with notch at r = 2.12 in.). This was somewhat expected, since the finite element based results in Part 1 of this study predicted changes in blade tip clearance as well as center of mass shifts due to a notch to be less than 0.001 in. Therefore, the small changes incurred by the notch could not be differentiated from the mechanical and electrical noise of the rotor system. Although the crack detection technique of interest failed to identify the existence ofthe notch, the vibration data produced and captured here will be utilized in upcoming studies that will focus on different data mining techniques concerning damage detection in a disk.

  8. Environmental fatigue of an Al-Li-Cu alloy. Part 3: Modeling of crack tip hydrogen damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    Environmental fatigue crack propagation rates and microscopic damage modes in Al-Li-Cu alloy 2090 (Parts 1 and 2) are described by a crack tip process zone model based on hydrogen embrittlement. Da/dN sub ENV equates to discontinuous crack advance over a distance, delta a, determined by dislocation transport of dissolved hydrogen at plastic strains above a critical value; and to the number of load cycles, delta N, required to hydrogenate process zone trap sites that fracture according to a local hydrogen concentration-tensile stress criterion. Transgranular (100) cracking occurs for process zones smaller than the subgrain size, and due to lattice decohesion or hydride formation. Intersubgranular cracking dominates when the process zone encompasses one or more subgrains so that dislocation transport provides hydrogen to strong boundary trapping sites. Multi-sloped log da/dN-log delta K behavior is produced by process zone plastic strain-hydrogen-microstructure interactions, and is determined by the DK dependent rates and proportions of each parallel cracking mode. Absolute values of the exponents and the preexponential coefficients are not predictable; however, fractographic measurements theta sub i coupled with fatigue crack propagation data for alloy 2090 established that the process zone model correctly describes fatigue crack propagation kinetics. Crack surface films hinder hydrogen uptake and reduce da/dN and alter the proportions of each fatigue crack propagation mode.

  9. Slow Crack Growth of Brittle Materials With Exponential Crack-Velocity Formulation. Part 3; Constant Stress and Cyclic Stress Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Nemeth, Noel N.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2002-01-01

    The previously determined life prediction analysis based on an exponential crack-velocity formulation was examined using a variety of experimental data on advanced structural ceramics tested under constant stress and cyclic stress loading at ambient and elevated temperatures. The data fit to the relation between the time to failure and applied stress (or maximum applied stress in cyclic loading) was very reasonable for most of the materials studied. It was also found that life prediction for cyclic stress loading from data of constant stress loading in the exponential formulation was in good agreement with the experimental data, resulting in a similar degree of accuracy as compared with the power-law formulation. The major limitation in the exponential crack-velocity formulation, however, was that the inert strength of a material must be known a priori to evaluate the important slow-crack-growth (SCG) parameter n, a significant drawback as compared with the conventional power-law crack-velocity formulation.

  10. Slow Crack Growth of Brittle Materials With Exponential Crack-Velocity Formulation. Part 2; Constant Stress Rate Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Nemeth, Noel N.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2002-01-01

    The previously determined life prediction analysis based on an exponential crack-velocity formulation was examined using a variety of experimental data on glass and advanced structural ceramics in constant stress rate and preload testing at ambient and elevated temperatures. The data fit to the relation of strength versus the log of the stress rate was very reasonable for most of the materials. Also, the preloading technique was determined equally applicable to the case of slow-crack-growth (SCG) parameter n greater than 30 for both the power-law and exponential formulations. The major limitation in the exponential crack-velocity formulation, however, was that the inert strength of a material must be known a priori to evaluate the important SCG parameter n, a significant drawback as compared with the conventional power-law crack-velocity formulation.

  11. Multivariable wavelet finite element-based vibration model for quantitative crack identification by using particle swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xingwu; Gao, Robert X.; Yan, Ruqiang; Chen, Xuefeng; Sun, Chuang; Yang, Zhibo

    2016-08-01

    Crack is one of the crucial causes of structural failure. A methodology for quantitative crack identification is proposed in this paper based on multivariable wavelet finite element method and particle swarm optimization. First, the structure with crack is modeled by multivariable wavelet finite element method (MWFEM) so that the vibration parameters of the first three natural frequencies in arbitrary crack conditions can be obtained, which is named as the forward problem. Second, the structure with crack is tested to obtain the vibration parameters of first three natural frequencies by modal testing and advanced vibration signal processing method. Then, the analyzed and measured first three natural frequencies are combined together to obtain the location and size of the crack by using particle swarm optimization. Compared with traditional wavelet finite element method, MWFEM method can achieve more accurate vibration analysis results because it interpolates all the solving variables at one time, which makes the MWFEM-based method to improve the accuracy in quantitative crack identification. In the end, the validity and superiority of the proposed method are verified by experiments of both cantilever beam and simply supported beam.

  12. Identification of embedded horizontal cracks in beams using measured mode shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y. F.; Zhu, W. D.; Liu, J.; Shao, Y. M.

    2014-11-01

    natural frequencies and MSs of the ABS cantilever beam, and the results compare well with those from the finite element method. Numerical and experimental crack identification can successfully identify the crack by locating its tips.

  13. Laser Cladding for Crack Repair of CMSX-4 Single-Crystalline Turbine Parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rottwinkel, Boris; Nölke, Christian; Kaierle, Stefan; Wesling, Volker

    2016-12-01

    The increase of the lifetime of modern single crystalline (SX) turbine blades is of high economic priority. The currently available repair methods using polycrystalline cladding of the damaged area do not address the issue of monocrystallinity and are restricted to few areas of the blade. The tip area of the blade is most prone to damage and undergoes the most wear, erosion and cracking during its lifetime. To repair such defects, the common procedure is to remove the whole tip with the damaged area and rebuild it by applying a polycrystalline solidification of the material. The repair of small cracks is conducted in the same way. To reduce repair cost, the investigation of a manufacturing process to repair these cracked areas while maintaining single-crystal solidification is of high interest as this does not diminish material properties and thereby its lifetime. To establish this single-crystal solidification, the realization of a directed temperature gradient is needed. The initial scope of this work is the computational prediction of the temperature field that arises and its verification during the process. The laser cladding process of CMSX-4 substrates was simulated and the necessary parameters calculated. These parameters were then applied to notched substrates and their microstructures analyzed. Starting with a simulation of the temperature field using ANSYS®, a process to repair parts of single crystalline nickel-based alloys was developed. It could be shown that damages to the tip area and cracks can be repaired by establishing a specific temperature gradient during the repair process in order to control the solidification process.

  14. Line Spring Model and Its Applications to Part-Through Crack Problems in Plates and Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.; Aksel, B.

    1986-01-01

    The line spring model is described and extended to cover the problem of interaction of multiple internal and surface cracks in plates and shells. The shape functions for various related crack geometries obtained from the plane strain solution and the results of some multiple crack problems are presented. The problems considered include coplanar surface cracks on the same or opposite sides of a plate, nonsymmetrically located coplanar internal elliptic cracks, and in a very limited way the surface and corner cracks in a plate of finite width and a surface crack in a cylindrical shell with fixed end.

  15. White-Etching Matter in Bearing Steel. Part I: Controlled Cracking of 52100 Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solano-Alvarez, W.; Bhadeshia, H. K. D. H.

    2014-10-01

    Although most of the research performed in bearing steel metallurgy aims to prevent crack nucleation and propagation, some applications require the exact opposite in order to study the role that disconnected surfaces inside the bulk material play when load is applied, or when fluids entrapped in surface cracks propagate tensile stresses or exacerbate corrosion. Four heat treatments have been designed to create controlled arrays of crack types and distributions in quenched and untempered steel normally used in the manufacture of bearings. The varieties of cracks studied include sparsely distributed martensite-plate cracks, fine-grain-boundary cracks, abundant martensite-plate cracks, and surface cracks. The intention was to create samples which can then be subjected to appropriate mechanical testing so that phenomena such as the appearance of "white-etching areas" or "white-etching cracks," crack-lubricant interactions, or hydrogen trapping can be studied further.

  16. Microtopographic Analysis of Part-Through Crack Growth in Alloy 304L Plate-type Tension Specimens

    SciTech Connect

    W. R. Lloyd; E. D. Steffler; J. H. Jackson

    2003-04-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) used their microtopography analysis method to examine the fracture process in two Type 304 stainless steel, part-through crack, plate-type specimens. The two specimens had different initial defect geometries – one being nearly semicircular and moderately deep, the other being longer and shallower. The microtopographic analysis allowed determination of parameters such as: the crack tip opening displacement at initiation; the crack tip opening angle during ductile tearing; the crack mouth opening at through-thickness penetration; and, the incremental crack front profiles throughout the crack growth process. In essence, these data provide a nearly complete description of the entire ductile fracture process for the two cases examined. We describe the microtopographic analysis procedure as it was applied to these two specimens. Crack growth profiles predicted by the microtopography analysis are compared with those shown by heat tinting of the actual fracture subsurface, showing excellent agreement. Several areas of ductile crack growth theory relevant to the microtopographic method of analysis are discussed, including possible effects on the accuracy of the analyses. The accuracy of the resultant data is reviewed, and found acceptable or better. Areas for additional development of the microtopography method to improve accuracy in three-dimensional ductile fracture analysis are identified.

  17. Quantitative Index and Abnormal Alarm Strategy Using Sensor-Dependent Vibration Data for Blade Crack Identification in Centrifugal Booster Fans

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinglong; Sun, Hailiang; Wang, Shuai; He, Zhengjia

    2016-01-01

    Centrifugal booster fans are important equipment used to recover blast furnace gas (BFG) for generating electricity, but blade crack faults (BCFs) in centrifugal booster fans can lead to unscheduled breakdowns and potentially serious accidents, so in this work quantitative fault identification and an abnormal alarm strategy based on acquired historical sensor-dependent vibration data is proposed for implementing condition-based maintenance for this type of equipment. Firstly, three group dependent sensors are installed to acquire running condition data. Then a discrete spectrum interpolation method and short time Fourier transform (STFT) are applied to preliminarily identify the running data in the sensor-dependent vibration data. As a result a quantitative identification and abnormal alarm strategy based on compound indexes including the largest Lyapunov exponent and relative energy ratio at the second harmonic frequency component is proposed. Then for validation the proposed blade crack quantitative identification and abnormality alarm strategy is applied to analyze acquired experimental data for centrifugal booster fans and it has successfully identified incipient blade crack faults. In addition, the related mathematical modelling work is also introduced to investigate the effects of mistuning and cracks on the vibration features of centrifugal impellers and to explore effective techniques for crack detection. PMID:27171083

  18. A pressurized cylindrical shell with a fixed end which contains an axial part-through or through crack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yahsi, O. S.; Erdogan, F.

    1983-01-01

    A cylindrical shell having a very stiff and plate or a flange is considered. It is assumed that near the end the cylinder contains an axial flaw which may be modeled as a part through surface crack or a through crack. The effect of the end constraining on the stress intensity factor which is the main fracture mechanics parameter is studied. The applied loads acting on the cylinder are assumed to be axisymmetric. Thus the crack problem under consideration is symmetric with respect to the plane of the crack and consequently only the Mode 1 stress intensity factors are nonzero. With this limitation, the general perturbation problem for a cylinder with a built in end containing an axial crack is considered. Reissner's shell theory is used to formulate the problem. The part through crack problem is treated by using a line spring model. In the case of a crack tip terminating at the fixed end it is shown that the integral equations of the shell problem has the same generalized Cauchy kernel as the corresponding plane stress elasticity problem.

  19. K-nearest neighbors based methods for identification of different gear crack levels under different motor speeds and loads: Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong

    2016-03-01

    Gears are the most commonly used components in mechanical transmission systems. Their failures may cause transmission system breakdown and result in economic loss. Identification of different gear crack levels is important to prevent any unexpected gear failure because gear cracks lead to gear tooth breakage. Signal processing based methods mainly require expertize to explain gear fault signatures which is usually not easy to be achieved by ordinary users. In order to automatically identify different gear crack levels, intelligent gear crack identification methods should be developed. The previous case studies experimentally proved that K-nearest neighbors based methods exhibit high prediction accuracies for identification of 3 different gear crack levels under different motor speeds and loads. In this short communication, to further enhance prediction accuracies of existing K-nearest neighbors based methods and extend identification of 3 different gear crack levels to identification of 5 different gear crack levels, redundant statistical features are constructed by using Daubechies 44 (db44) binary wavelet packet transform at different wavelet decomposition levels, prior to the use of a K-nearest neighbors method. The dimensionality of redundant statistical features is 620, which provides richer gear fault signatures. Since many of these statistical features are redundant and highly correlated with each other, dimensionality reduction of redundant statistical features is conducted to obtain new significant statistical features. At last, the K-nearest neighbors method is used to identify 5 different gear crack levels under different motor speeds and loads. A case study including 3 experiments is investigated to demonstrate that the developed method provides higher prediction accuracies than the existing K-nearest neighbors based methods for recognizing different gear crack levels under different motor speeds and loads. Based on the new significant statistical

  20. Material property assessment and crack identification of recycled concrete with embedded smart cement modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Pizhong; Fan, Wei; Chen, Fangliang

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, the material property assessment and crack identification of concrete using embedded smart cement modules are presented. Both the concrete samples with recycled aggregates (RA) and natural aggregates (NA) were prepared. The smart cement modules were fabricated and embedded in concrete beams to serve as either the actuators or sensors, and the elastic wave propagation-based technique was developed to detect the damage (crack) in the recycled aggregate concrete (RAC) beams and monitor the material degradation of RAC beams due to the freeze/thaw (F/T) conditioning cycles. The damage detection results and elastic modulus reduction monitoring data demonstrate that the proposed smart cement modules and associated damage detection and monitoring techniques are capable of identifying crack-type damage and monitoring material degradation of the RAC beams. Both the RAC and natural aggregate concrete (NAC) beams degrade with the increased F/T conditioning cycles. Though the RAC shows a lower reduction percentage of the modulus of elasticity from both the dynamic modulus and wave propagation tests at the given maximum F/T conditioning cycle (i.e., 300 in this study), the RAC tends to degrade faster after the 180 F/T cycles. As observed in this study, the material properties and degradation rate of RAC are comparable to those of NAC, thus making the RAC suitable for transportation construction. The findings in development of damage detection and health monitoring techniques using embedded smart cement modules resulted from this study promote the widespread application of recycled concrete in transportation construction and provide viable and effective health monitoring techniques for concrete structures in general.

  1. Evaluation of eddy-current probe signals due to cracks in ferromagnetic parts of fast reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tao; Bowler, John R.

    2017-02-01

    Eddy current testing to evaluate the condition of metallic parts in a sodium cooled fast reactor under standby conditions is challenging due to the presence of liquid sodium at 250 °C. The eddy current test system should be sensitive enough to capture small signal changes and hence an advanced inspection systems is needed. We have developed new hardware and improved numerical models to predict the eddy current probe signal due to cracks in metallic fast reactor parts by using volume integral equation method. The analytical expressions are derived for the quasi-static time-harmonic electromagnetic fields of a circular eddy current coil which interacts with conductive plate. Naturally, the method of moment is used to approximate the integral equation and obtain the discrete approximation of the field in the crack domain. A simple and accurate analytical method for dealing with the hyper-singularity element evaluation is also provided. An accurate controlled experiment is carried out on the ferromagnetic stainless steel plate with precision made notch to obtain reference impedance changes for comparison with the theoretical model predictions. Good agreement between predictions and experiment is obtained.

  2. Detection and Identification of Concrete Cracking in Reinforced Concrete by Acoustic Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtsu, Masayasu

    2003-03-01

    Cracking in concrete due to corrosion of rebars in reinforced concrete is one of critical problems in concrete structures. To clarify cracking process, acoustic emission (AE) measurement is applied. In an accelerated corrosion test, AE events are detected and monitored continuously. Comparing with permeation of chloride ions, it is found that onset of corrosion and nucleation of cracking can be qualified from AE activity. Applying SiGMA procedure, nucleation mechanisms of cracks due to expansion of corrosive product are identified. During extension of the surface crack, tensile cracks are nucleated dominantly. For the spalling crack, both the tensile and the shear cracks are generated, as the former dominates the latter approaching to a stress-free surface. In contrast, it is found that the internal crack is nucleated mainly due to shear-crack motion.

  3. A cylindrical shell with a stress-free end which contains an axial part-through or through crack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.; Yahsi, O. S.

    1983-01-01

    The interaction problem of a through or a part through crack with a stress free boundary in a semi-infinite cylindrical shell is considered. It is assumed that the crack lies in a meridional plane which is a plane of symmetry with respect to the external loads as well as the geometry. The circular boundary of the semi-infinite cylinder is assumed to be stress free. By using a transverse shear theory the problem is formulated in terms of a system of singular integral equations. The line spring model is used to treat the part through crack problem. In the case of a through crack the interaction between the perturbed stress fields due to the crack and the free boundary is quite strong and there is a considerable increase in the stress intensity factors caused by the interaction. On the other hand in the problem of a surface crack the interaction appears to be much weaker and consequently the magnification in the stress intensity factors is much less significant.

  4. Environmental fatigue of an Al-Li-Cu alloy: part I. Intrinsic crack propagation kinetics in hydrogenous environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1991-10-01

    Deleterious environmental effects on steady-state, intrinsic fatigue crack propagation (FCP) rates (da/dN) in peak-aged Al-Li-Cu alloy 2090 are established by electrical potential monitoring of short cracks with programmed constant ΔK and K maxI loading. Such rates are equally unaffected by vacuum, purified helium, and oxygen but are accelerated in order of decreasing effectiveness by aqueous 1 pct NaCl with anodic polarization, pure water’ vapor, moist air, and NaCl with cathodic polarization. While da/dN depend on ΔK4.0 for the inert gases, water vapor and chloride induce multiple power laws and a transition growth rate “plateau.” Environmental effects are strongest at low ΔK. Crack tip damage is ascribed to hydrogen embrittlement because of accelerated da/dN due to parts-per-million (ppm) levels of H2O without condensation, impeded molecular flow model predictions of the measured water vapor pressure dependence of da/dN as affected by mean crack opening, the lack of an effect of film-forming O2, the likelihood for crack tip hydrogen production in NaCl, and the environmental and ΔK-process zone volume dependencies of the microscopic cracking modes. For NaCl, growth rates decrease with decreasing loading frequency, with the addition of passivating Li2CO3 and upon cathodic polarization. These variables increase crack surface film stability to reduce hydrogen entry efficiency. Small crack effects are not observed for 2090; such cracks do not grow at abnormally high rates in single grains or in NaCl and are not arrested at grain boundaries. The hydrogen environmental FCP resistance of 2090 is similar to other 2000 series alloys and is better than 7075.

  5. Local delamination in laminates with angle ply matrix cracks. Part 1: Tension tests and stress analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, T. Kevin; Hooper, S. J.

    1991-01-01

    Quasi-static tension tests were conducted on AS4/3501-6 graphite epoxy laminates. Dye penetrant enhanced x-radiography was used to document the onset of matrix cracking and the onset of local delaminations at the intersection of the matrix cracks and the free edge. Edge micrographs taken after the onset of damage were used to verify the location of the matrix cracks and local delamination through the laminate thickness. A quasi-3D finite element analysis was conducted to calculate the stresses responsible for matrix cracking in the off-axis plies. Laminated plate theory indicated that the transverse normal stresses were compressive. However, the finite element analysis yielded tensile transverse normal stresses near the free edge. Matrix cracks formed in the off-axis plies near the free edge where in-plane transverse stresses were tensile and had their greatest magnitude. The influence of the matrix crack on interlaminar stresses is also discussed.

  6. The periglacial engine of mountain erosion - Part 1: Rates of frost cracking and frost creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, J. L.; Egholm, D. L.; Knudsen, M. F.; Jansen, J. D.; Nielsen, S. B.

    2015-10-01

    With accelerating climate cooling in the late Cenozoic, glacial and periglacial erosion became more widespread on the surface of the Earth. The resultant shift in erosion patterns significantly changed the large-scale morphology of many mountain ranges worldwide. Whereas the glacial fingerprint is easily distinguished by its characteristic fjords and U-shaped valleys, the periglacial fingerprint is more subtle but potentially prevails in some mid- to high-latitude landscapes. Previous models have advocated a frost-driven control on debris production at steep headwalls and glacial valley sides. Here we investigate the important role that periglacial processes also play in less steep parts of mountain landscapes. Understanding the influences of frost-driven processes in low-relief areas requires a focus on the consequences of an accreting soil mantle, which characterises such surfaces. We present a new model that quantifies two key physical processes: frost cracking and frost creep, as a function of both temperature and sediment thickness. Our results yield new insights into how climate and sediment transport properties combine to scale the intensity of periglacial processes. The thickness of the soil mantle strongly modulates the relation between climate and the intensity of mechanical weathering and sediment flux. Our results also point to an offset between the conditions that promote frost cracking and those that promote frost creep, indicating that a stable climate can provide optimal conditions for only one of those processes at a time. Finally, quantifying these relations also opens up the possibility of including periglacial processes in large-scale, long-term landscape evolution models, as demonstrated in a companion paper.

  7. Hidden Identification on Parts: Magnetic Machine-Readable Matrix Symbols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, Harry F.; Jones, Clyde S.; Roxby, Donald L.; Teed, James D.; Shih, William C. L.; Fitzpatrick, Gerald L.; Knisely, Craig

    2005-01-01

    All NASA parts have identification, usually expressed in terms of part number, serial number, and the like. In most cases, this identification is permanently marked directly on the part for tracking throughout its life cycle. NASA has developed a method for reading the matrix symbol through up to 15 mils (25 m) of paint (5 or 6 layers). This method of part identification involves coating selected patches on the objects with magnetic materials in matrix symbol patterns and reading the patterns by use of magneto-optical imaging equipment.

  8. Forensic odontology, Part 1. Dental identification.

    PubMed

    Hinchliffe, J

    2011-03-12

    This series is based upon fact, experience, and some personal views of the author and gives a brief glimpse of forensic odontological issues with regard to the identification of human remains (to include mass fatality incidents), biting injuries and child abuse. The aim of the first paper is to give the reader greater understanding of the role of the forensic odontologist in the identification of human remains, and emphasise the importance of keeping good quality, accurate and comprehensive dental records. Identification of the deceased greatly assists families and friends at this difficult time, as well as aiding law enforcement agencies; getting it wrong is devastating to families and unacceptable. The dental identification process must be carefully undertaken and relies upon the comparison of information from the antemortem record with findings from the postmortem examination, and the efficiency of this process is dependent on the quality and availability of the dental record. As dental team members it is our responsibility to keep and maintain accurate records of our patients. The resilience of the dental structures to postmortem assault, denture labelling, and teeth as a source of DNA, all contribute to making identification successful. Dental identification is widely used, not only in the single fatality situation, but also in mass fatality incidents and cases of missing persons.

  9. Environmental fatigue of an Al-Li-Cu alloy. Part 1: Intrinsic crack propagation kinetics in hydrogenous environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    Deleterious environmental effects on steady-state, intrinsic fatigue crack propagation (FCP) rates (da/dN) in peak aged Al-Li-Cu alloy 2090 are established by electrical potential monitoring of short cracks with programmed constant delta K and K(sub max) loading. The da/dN are equally unaffected by vacuum, purified helium, and oxygen but are accelerated in order of decreasing effectiveness by aqueous 1 percent NaCl with anodic polarization, pure water vapor, moist air, and NaCl with cathodic polarization. While da/dN depends on delta K(sup 4.0) for the inert gases, water vapor and chloride induced multiple power-laws, and a transition growth rate 'plateau'. Environmental effects are strongest at low delta K. Crack tip damage is ascribed to hydrogen embrittlement because of the following: (1) accelerated da/dN due to part-per-million levels of H2O without condensation; (2) impeded molecular flow model predictions of the measured water vapor pressure dependence of da/dN as affected by mean crack opening; (3) the lack of an effect of film-forming O2; (4) the likelihood for crack tip hydrogen production in NaCl, and (5) the environmental and delta K-process zone volume dependencies of the microscopic cracking modes. For NaCl, growth rates decrease with decreasing loading frequency, with the addition of passivating Li2CO3, and upon cathodic polarization. These variables increase crack surface film stability to reduce hydrogen entry efficiency. The hydrogen environmental FCP resistance of 2090 is similar to other 2000 series alloys and is better than 7075.

  10. Convergence rates for finite element problems with singularities. Part 1: Antiplane shear. [crack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plunkett, R.

    1980-01-01

    The problem of a finite crack in an infinite medium under antiplane shear load is considered. It is shown that the nodal forces at the tip of the crack accurately gives the order of singularity, that n energy release methods can give the strength to better than 1 percent with element size 1/10 the crack length, and that nodal forces give a much better estimate of the stress field than do the elements themselves. The finite element formulation and the factoring of tridiagonal matrices are discussed.

  11. Measurement of shrinkage and cracking in lyophilized amorphous cakes. Part IV: Effects of freezing protocol.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Sabine; Seyferth, Stefan; Lee, Geoffrey

    2015-11-10

    The shrinkage and cracking of pure trehalose cakes during lyophilization has been determined quantitatively using different protocols for the freezing step. The influences of shelf cooling rate and of a two-step freezing protocol with holding and annealing phases were investigated. A small change in the shelf cooling rate from 0.4°C to 0.2°C per minute produced surprisingly large increases in shrinkage and reductions in cracking over all trehalose concentrations up to 30% w/v. The two-step freezing protocol also increased shrinkage and reduced cracking in the final-product cakes, especially at trehalose concentrations ≥ 15% and with large vial fill height. A combination of two-step freezing with use of TopLyo vials produced less than 1.5% cracking even at high trehalose concentrations and large fill height. The results give further confirmation of the causal linkage of shrinkage and cracking during lyophilization, and also illustrate how cracking can be greatly reduced by manipulating the freezing protocol.

  12. Monte Carlo Modeling of Gamma Ray Backscattering for Crack Identification in the Aluminum alloy Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirawan, Rahadi; Waris, Abdul; Djamal, Mitra; Gunawan, H.; Kim, H. J.

    2017-01-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation study has been conducted of the Cs-37 gamma ray backscattering in the aluminum alloy plate. This simulation was performed in order to identify the existence of the crack in the aluminum alloy plate, the correlation between the backscattering peak and the crack width. We are able to analyze the absorbed energy distribution in the NaI(Tl) scintillation detector. For the experimental measurement, we are using 5 μCi of a Cs-137 gamma source and 2 in. x 2in. NaI(Tl) scintillation detector with the PMT. The aluminum alloy dimension is about 8 cm x 6 cm x 1 cm. The crack model is represented by the slit with the varying width (1 mm, 2 mm, 4 mm, and 6 mm). The existence of a crack is identified by the decreasing intensity of the gamma backscattering energy peak. These predicted results have a good agreement with the experimental measurement.

  13. Analysis of interface cracks in adhesively bonded lap shear joints, part 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S. S.; Yau, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    Conservation laws of elasticity for nonhomogeneous materials were developed and were used to study the crack behavior in adhesively bonded lap shear joints. By using these laws and the fundamental relationships in fracture mechanics of interface cracks, the problem is reduced to a pair of linear algebraic equations, and stress intensity solutions can be determined directly by information extracted from the far field. The numerical results obtained show that: (1) in the lap-shear joint with a given adherend, the opening-mode stress intensity factor, (K sub 1) is always larger than that of the shearing-mode (K sub 2); (2) (K sub 1) is not sensitive to adherent thickness abut (K sub 2) increases rapidly with increasing thickness; and (3) (K sub 1) and (K sub 2) increase simultaneously as the interfacial crack length increases.

  14. Slow and fast motion of cracks in inelastic solids. Part 1: Slow growth of cracks in a rate sensitive tresca solid. Part 2: Dynamic crack represented by the Dugdale model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wnuk, M. P.; Sih, G. C.

    1972-01-01

    An extension is proposed of the classical theory of fracture to viscoelastic and elastic-plastic materials in which the plasticity effects are confined to a narrow band encompassing the crack front. It is suggested that the Griffith-Irwin criterion of fracture, which requires that the energy release rate computed for a given boundary value problem equals the critical threshold, ought to be replaced by a differential equation governing the slow growth of a crack prior to the onset of rapid propagation. A new term which enters the equation of motion in the dissipative media is proportional to the energy lost within the end sections of the crack, and thus reflects the extent of inelastic behavior of a solid. A concept of apparent surface energy is introduced to account for the geometry dependent and the rate dependent phenomena which influence toughness of an inelastic solid. Three hypotheses regarding the condition for fracture in the subcritical range of load are compared. These are: (1) constant fracture energy (Cherepanov), (2) constant opening displacement at instability (Morozov) and (3) final stretch criterion (Wnuk).

  15. Crack Identification of Cantilever Plates Based on a Kriging Surrogate Model.

    PubMed

    Gao, Haiyang; Guo, Xinglin; Ouyang, Huajiang; Han, Fang

    2013-10-01

    This work presents an effective method to identify the tip locations of an internal crack in cantilever plates based on a Kriging surrogate model. Samples of varying crack parameters (tip locations) and their corresponding root mean square (RMS) of random responses are used to construct the initial Kriging surrogate model. Moreover, the pseudo excitation method (PEM) is employed to speed up the spectral analysis. For identifying crack parameters based on the constructed Kriging model, a robust stochastic particle swarm optimization (SPSO) algorithm is adopted for enhancing the global searching ability. To improve the accuracy of the surrogate model without using extensive samples, a small number of samples are first used. Then an optimal point-adding process is carried out to reduce computational cost. Numerical studies of a cantilever plate with an internal crack are performed. The effectiveness and efficiency of this method are demonstrated by the identified results. The effect of initial sampling size on the precision of the identified results is also investigated.

  16. Effects of Residual Impurities on Hydrogen Assisted Cracking in High Strength Steels. Part I.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    ASSISTED CRACKING IN HIGH STRENGTH STEELS BY N. BANDYOPADHYAY AND C. J. MCMAHON, JR. DEPARTMENT OF MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING SCHOOL OP...R.LL4AI 82 07 15 043.u04@ INTRODUCTION Intergranular brittle fracture in steels can be induced either by the segregation of certain solute elements to...the grain boundaries or by the segregation of absorbed hydrogen under stresstI). Alloying elements in steel are generally added because of their

  17. Vibration Based Crack Detection in a Rotating Disk. Part 1; An Analytical Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Sawicki, Jerzy T.; Baaklini, George Y.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the analytical results concerning the detection of a crack in a rotating disk. The concept of the approach is based on the fact that the development of a disk crack results in a distorted strain field within the component. As a result, a minute deformation in the disk's geometry as well as a change in the system s center of mass occurs. Finite element analyses were conducted concerning a notched disk in order to define the sensitivity of the method. The notch was used to simulate an actual crack and will be the method utilized for upcoming experiments. Various notch sizes were studied. The geometric deformations and shifts of center of mass were documented as a function of rotational speed. In addition, a rotordynamic analysis of a 2-bearing, disk and shaft system was conducted. The overall response of the system was required in order to design the experimental system for operation beyond the first critical. The results of the FE analyses of the disk indicated that the overall changes in the disk s geometry and center of mass were rather small. The difference between the maximum centrifugal radial displacements between the undamaged and damaged disks at 8000 RPM was 0.00014 in. for a 0.963 in. notch length. The shift in center of mass was also of this magnitude. The next step involves running experiments to verify the analysis.

  18. Identification of Parts Failures. FOS: Fundamentals of Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John Deere Co., Moline, IL.

    This parts failures identification manual is one of a series of power mechanics texts and visual aids covering theory of operation, diagnosis of trouble problems, and repair of automotive and off-the-road construction and agricultural equipment. Materials provide basic information with many illustrations for use by vocational students and teachers…

  19. 12 CFR Appendix D to Part 229 - Indorsement, Reconverting Bank Identification, and Truncating Bank Identification Standards

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., and Truncating Bank Identification Standards D Appendix D to Part 229 Banks and Banking FEDERAL... COLLECTION OF CHECKS (REGULATION CC) Pt. 229, App. D Appendix D to Part 229—Indorsement, Reconverting Bank... sequence number; (C) A telephone number for receipt of notification of large-dollar returned checks; and...

  20. Bayesian Identification of a Cracked Plate using a Population-Based Markov Chain Monte Carlo Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    serendipity elements, with nodes at each corner and at the middle of each side. Adjacent to the crack tip the eight-noded quads are modified as...noise variance) have been Fig. 4. (a) Nodal configuration of the Mindlin serendipity element, (b) resulting interpolation functions, (c) schematic of...repeated iterations of the forward model, great care was taken in developing an efficient model. This was accomplished by using tailored ‘‘ serendipity

  1. External characteristic determination of eggs and cracked eggs identification using spectral signature

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Chuanqi; He, Yong

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out to use hyperspectral imaging technique for determining color (L*, a* and b*) and eggshell strength and identifying cracked chicken eggs. Partial least squares (PLS) models based on full and selected wavelengths suggested by regression coefficient (RC) method were established to predict the four parameters, respectively. Partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) and RC-partial least squares-discriminant analysis (RC-PLS-DA) models were applied to identify cracked eggs. PLS models performed well with the correlation coefficient (rp) of 0.788 for L*, 0.810 for a*, 0.766 for b* and 0.835 for eggshell strength. RC-PLS models also obtained the rp of 0.771 for L*, 0.806 for a*, 0.767 for b* and 0.841 for eggshell strength. The classification results were 97.06% in PLS-DA model and 88.24% in RC-PLS-DA model. It demonstrated that hyperspectral imaging technique has the potential to be used to detect color and eggshell strength values and identify cracked chicken eggs. PMID:26882990

  2. Exploration on surrogate models for inverse identification of delamination cracks in CFRP composites using Electrical Resistance Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz Montiel, Paulina

    Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) materials are used in aerospace structures due to their superior mechanical properties and reduced weight. Non-destructive evaluation (NDE) techniques are needed for such materials to detect and measure intra-ply matrix cracking and inter-ply delamination damage without harming or altering their initial configuration. The aim of NDE techniques is to use the composite material as a sensor itself, and to use its intrinsic material properties as measure of damage. Previous literature has shown that CFRP composites are electrically conductive in the fibers direction, and that the fiber-to-fiber contact due to waviness provides electrical conduction in the direction normal to the fibers. When matrix cracking or delamination defects are introduced in the composite, they break the fiber contact network, and this increases the local resistivity of the material. The Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) provides a NDE technique that uses these inherent changes in conductive properties of the composite to map its internal damage state. As opposed to other NDE methods, this technique allows the in-situ monitoring and detection on damage, which is particularly desirable for large and complex aerospace structures. This research investigates efficient numerical modeling techniques for inverse identification of delamination damage location and size in composite laminates using ERT based NDE. Identification of damage in composites requires solving the inverse problem that minimizes the difference between the model predicted and the measured change in resistance at specified electrode locations. The direct use of numerical finite element models of the laminate in the inverse identification is computationally expensive and it requires the development of accurate surrogate models. The use of Response Surfaces and Kriging approximations for single-response surrogate modeling is investigated in this work. Since the electrical resistance changes

  3. Identification of the Onset of Cracking in Gear Teeth Using Acoustic Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullin, R.; Clarke, A.; Eaton, M. J.; Pearson, M. R.; Holford, K. M.

    2012-08-01

    The development of diagnostic methods for gear tooth faults in aerospace power transmission systems is an active research area being driven largely by the interests of military organisations or large aerospace organisations. In aerospace applications, the potential results of gear failure are serious, ranging from increased asset downtime to, at worst, catastrophic failure with life-threatening consequences. New monitoring techniques which can identify the onset of failure at earlier stages are in demand. Acoustic Emission (AE) is the most sensitive condition monitoring tool and is a passive technique that detects the stress wave emitted by a structure as cracks propagate. In this study a gear test rig that allows the fatigue loading of an individual gear tooth was utilised. The rig allows a full AE analysis of damage signatures in gear teeth without the presence of constant background noise due to rotational and frictional sources. Furthermore this approach allows validation of AE results using crack gauges or strain gauges. Utilising a new approach to AE monitoring a sensor was mounted on the gear and used to continuously capture AE data for a complete fatigue load cycle of data, rather than the traditional approach where discrete signals are captured on a threshold basis. Data was captured every 10th load cycle for the duration of the test. A developed fast fourier transform analysis technique was compared with traditional analytical methods. In this investigation the developed techniques were validated against visual inspection and were shown to be far superior to the traditional approach.

  4. Small Crack Growth and Fatigue Life Predictions for High-Strength Aluminium Alloys. Part 1; Experimental and Fracture Mechanics Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, X. R.; Newman, J. C.; Zhao, W.; Swain, M. H.; Ding, C. F.; Phillips, E. P.

    1998-01-01

    The small crack effect was investigated in two high-strength aluminium alloys: 7075-T6 bare and LC9cs clad alloy. Both experimental and analytical investigations were conducted to study crack initiation and growth of small cracks. In the experimental program, fatigue tests, small crack and large crack tests A,ere conducted under constant amplitude and Mini-TWIST spectrum loading conditions. A pronounced small crack effect was observed in both materials, especially for the negative stress ratios. For all loading conditions, most of the fatigue life of the SENT specimens was shown to be crack propagation from initial material defects or from the cladding layer. In the analysis program, three-dimensional finite element and A weight function methods were used to determine stress intensity factors and to develop SIF equations for surface and corner cracks at the notch in the SENT specimens. A plastisity-induced crack-closure model was used to correlate small and large crack data, and to make fatigue life predictions, Predicted crack-growth rates and fatigue lives agreed well with experiments. A total fatigue life prediction method for the aluminum alloys was developed and demonstrated using the crack-closure model.

  5. Improved Quick Disconnect (QD) Interface Through Fail Safe Parts Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanch-Payne, Evelyn

    2001-01-01

    An extensive review of existing Quick Disconnects (QDs) mating and demating operations was performed to determine which shuttle part interface identifications and procedures contribute to human factor errors. The research methods used consisted of interviews with engineers and technicians, examination of incident reports, critiques of video and audio tapes of QD operations, and attendance of a Hyper QD operational course. The data strongly suggests that there are inherit human factor errors involved in QD operations. To promote fail-safe operations, QD interface problem areas and recommendations were outlined and reviewed. It is suggested that dialogue, investigations and recommendations continue.

  6. Crack model for toughness of green parts with moisture or a fluid binder

    SciTech Connect

    W. Roger Cannon; Paul A. Lessing; Larry D. Zuck

    2012-09-01

    A model is presented to predict the toughness, KIC, of green ceramics based on the binding forces of meniscuses formed between particles near the tip of the critical flaw. The model considers capillary pressure, surface tension and the viscous flow of binder. Calculations were determined for moisture only but the model can also be applied to binder meniscuses. Capillary pressure is highest at low moisture content. By using well established force distance relationships for the meniscus between single particles, toughness was determined as a function of moisture content. For non-agglomerated particles, KIC increases with moisture content and decreases with contact angle and no particle size dependence was found. On the other hand, if particles are agglomerated and the meniscus is between agglomerates, the toughness is particles size dependent and the toughness reaches a maximum at low moisture content. This model assumes that the capillary pressure is transmitted throughout the green part. The calculated values of KIC agree approximately with the measured toughness values of binderless green parts having two different specific surface areas.

  7. Cracking the Dual Code: Toward a Unitary Model of Phoneme Identification

    PubMed Central

    Foss, Donald J.; Gernsbacher, Morton Ann

    2014-01-01

    The results of five experiments on the nature of the speech code and on the role of sentence context on speech processing are reported. The first three studies test predictions from the dual code model of phoneme identification (Foss, D. J., & Blank, M. A. Cognitive Psychology, 1980, 12, 1–31). According to that model, subjects in a phoneme monitoring experiment respond to a prelexical code when engaged in a relatively easy task, and to a postlexical code when the task is difficult. The experiments controlled ease of processing either by giving subjects multiple targets for which to monitor or by preceding the target with a similar-sounding phoneme that draws false alarms. The predictions from the model were not sustained. Furthermore, evidence for a paradoxical nonword superiority effect was observed. In Experiment IV reaction times (RTs) to all possible /d/-initial CVCs were gathered. RTs were unaffected by the target item's status as a word or nonword. but they were affected by the internal phonetic structure of the target-bearing item. Vowel duration correlated highly (0.627) with RTs. Experiment V examined previous work purporting to demonstrate that semantic predictability affects how the speech code is processed, in particular that semantic predictability leads to responses based upon a postlexical code. That study found “predictability” effects when words occurred in isolation; further, it found that vowel duration and other phonetic factors can account parsimoniously for the existing results. These factors also account for the apparent nonword superiority effects observed earlier. Implications of the present work for theoretical models that stress the interaction between semantic context and speech processing are discussed, as are implications for use of the phoneme monitoring task. PMID:25520528

  8. Measurement of shrinkage and cracking in lyophilized amorphous cakes, part 3: hydrophobic vials and the question of adhesion.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Sabine; Seyferth, Stefan; Lee, Geoffrey

    2015-06-01

    The importance of cake adhesion to the inside vial wall during lyophilization of amorphous trehalose cakes was determined by using hydrophobized vials. The degrees of cake shrinkage and cracking were determined independently by photographic imaging of the cake top surface in a dark cell. Additionally, measurements with microcomputed tomography were performed. Adhesion is found to be a determining factor in both cake shrinkage and cracking. The correlation between cake detachment from the vial inner wall and trehalose concentration indicates that adhesion of the frozen solute phase is a determining factor in shrinkage. The hydrophobized vials give reduced cracking at trehalose concentrations of up to 15%. The reduced wetting of the hydrophobized inside vial wall gives a planar cake topography with a uniform distribution of cracks within the cake.

  9. Effect of heat treatment upon the fatigue-crack growth behavior of Alloy 718 weldments. Part I. Macroscopic behavior

    SciTech Connect

    James, L A; Mills, W J

    1981-05-01

    Gas-tungsten-arc weldments in Alloy 718 were studied in fatigue-crack growth tests conducted at five temperatures over the range 24 to 649{sup 0}C. In general, crack growth rates increased with increasing temperature, and weldments given the conventional post-weld heat-treatment generally exhibited crack growth rates that were higher than for weldments given the modified (INEL) heat-treatment. Limited testing in the as-welded condition revealed crack growth rates significantly lower than observed for the heat-treated cases, and this was attributed to residual stresses. Three different heats of filler wire were utilized, and no heat-to-heat variations were noted. 9 figures, 6 tables.

  10. 49 CFR Appendix D to Part 512 - Vehicle Identification Number Information

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Vehicle Identification Number Information D.... 512, App. D Appendix D to Part 512—Vehicle Identification Number Information The Chief Counsel has...) characters, of vehicle identification numbers reported in information on incidents involving death or...

  11. De Novo Assembly and Characterization of Pericarp Transcriptome and Identification of Candidate Genes Mediating Fruit Cracking in Litchi chinensis Sonn.

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei-Cai; Wu, Jian-Yang; Zhang, Hong-Na; Shi, Sheng-You; Liu, Li-Qin; Shu, Bo; Liang, Qing-Zhi; Xie, Jiang-Hui; Wei, Yong-Zan

    2014-01-01

    Fruit cracking has long been a topic of great concern for growers and researchers of litchi (Litchi chinensis Sonn.). To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying fruit cracking, high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) was first used for de novo assembly and characterization of the transcriptome of cracking pericarp of litchi. Comparative transcriptomic analyses were performed on non-cracking and cracking fruits. A total of approximately 26 million and 29 million high quality reads were obtained from the two groups of samples, and were assembled into 46,641 unigenes with an average length of 993 bp. These unigenes can be useful resources for future molecular studies of the pericarp in litchi. Furthermore, four genes (LcAQP, 1; LcPIP, 1; LcNIP, 1; LcSIP, 1) involved in water transport, five genes (LcKS, 2; LcGA2ox, 2; LcGID1, 1) involved in GA metabolism, 21 genes (LcCYP707A, 2; LcGT, 9; Lcβ-Glu, 6; LcPP2C, 2; LcABI1, 1; LcABI5, 1) involved in ABA metabolism, 13 genes (LcTPC, 1; Ca2+/H+ exchanger, 3; Ca2+-ATPase, 4; LcCDPK, 2; LcCBL, 3) involved in Ca transport and 24 genes (LcPG, 5; LcEG, 1; LcPE, 3; LcEXP, 5; Lcβ-Gal, 9; LcXET, 1) involved in cell wall metabolism were identified as genes that are differentially expressed in cracked fruits compared to non-cracked fruits. Our results open new doors to further understand the molecular mechanisms behind fruit cracking in litchi and other fruits, especially Sapindaceae plants. PMID:25272225

  12. Local delamination in laminates with angle ply matrix cracks. Part 2: Delamination fracture analysis and fatigue characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, T. Kevin

    1991-01-01

    Constant amplitude tension-tension fatigue tests were conducted on AS4/3501-6 graphite/epoxy (02/ theta sub 2/ -(theta sub 2))sub s laminates, where theta was 15, 20, 25, or 30 degrees. Fatigue tests were conducted at a frequency of 5 Hz and an R-ratio of 0.1. Dye penetrant enhanced x-radiography was used to document the onset of matrix cracking in the central -(theta) degree plies, and the subsequent onset of local delaminations in the theta/ -(theta) interface at the intersection of the matrix cracks and the free edge, as a function of the number of fatigue cycles. Two strain energy release rate solutions for local delamination from matrix cracks were derived: one for a local delamination growing from an angle ply matrix crack with a uniform delamination growing from an angle ply matrix crack with a triangular shaped delamination area that extended only partially into the laminate width from the free edge. Plots of G(max) vs. N were generated to assess the accuracy of these G solutions. The influence of residual thermal and moisture stresses on G were also quantified. However, a detailed analysis of the G components and a mixed-mode fatigue failure criterion for this material may be needed to predict the fatigue behavior of these laminates.

  13. The radiation swelling effect on fracture properties and fracture mechanisms of irradiated austenitic steels. Part II. Fatigue crack growth rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margolin, B.; Minkin, A.; Smirnov, V.; Sorokin, A.; Shvetsova, V.; Potapova, V.

    2016-11-01

    The experimental data on the fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) have been obtained for austenitic steel of 18Cr-10Ni-Ti grade (Russian analog of AISI 321 steel) irradiated up to neutron dose of 150 dpa with various radiation swelling. The performed study of the fracture mechanisms for cracked specimens under cyclic loading has explained why radiation swelling affects weakly FCGR unlike its effect on fracture toughness. Mechanical modeling of fatigue crack growth has been carried out and the dependencies for prediction of FCGR in irradiated austenitic steel with and with no swelling are proposed and verified with the obtained experimental results. As input data for these dependencies, FCGR for unirradiated steel and the tensile mechanical properties for unirradiated and irradiated steels are used.

  14. On the identification of hysteretic systems. Part I: Fitness landscapes and evolutionary identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worden, K.; Manson, G.

    2012-05-01

    Fairly recent work has shown that evolutionary optimisation schemes (genetic algorithms and differential evolution) offer an effective means of identifying nonlinear dynamical systems, even when the parameter estimation problem is complicated by nonlinearity in the parameters and/or the presence of unmeasured states. In particular, an evolutionary approach to the parameter estimation problem for hysteretic systems has shown promise. The current paper considers aspects of the parameter estimation problem for systems of Bouc-Wen type. In the first place, an investigation into the nature of the objective or cost function for the optimisation is made with the aim of better understanding the performance of the identification scheme. The first part of the paper also discusses the issue of setting initial estimates or ranges for the system parameters. The data on which the analysis is based are generated by computer simulation; the specific evolutionary algorithm considered is Differential Evolution (DE). Although the DE algorithm has proved to be very effective in the identification context, a minor disadvantage manifests itself in the need to set algorithm hyperparameters for the optimisation. This observation leads to the second main objective of the current paper which is to present a recently developed variant of the DE algorithm - the Self-Adaptive Differential Evolution (SADE) algorithm - which learns and adapts a subset of its own hyperparameters throughout the optimisation process. The use of the algorithm for the hysteretic system identification problem is illustrated using the simulated data and it is shown that the algorithm can provide several orders-of-magnitude improvement on the minimisation of the problem objective function.

  15. 49 CFR Appendix D to Part 512 - Vehicle Identification Number Information

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Vehicle Identification Number Information D Appendix D to Part 512 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL.... 512, App. D Appendix D to Part 512—Vehicle Identification Number Information The Chief Counsel...

  16. 49 CFR Appendix D to Part 512 - Vehicle Identification Number Information

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Vehicle Identification Number Information D Appendix D to Part 512 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL.... 512, App. D Appendix D to Part 512—Vehicle Identification Number Information The Chief Counsel...

  17. 49 CFR Appendix D to Part 512 - Vehicle Identification Number Information

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Vehicle Identification Number Information D Appendix D to Part 512 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL.... 512, App. D Appendix D to Part 512—Vehicle Identification Number Information The Chief Counsel...

  18. 49 CFR Appendix D to Part 512 - Vehicle Identification Number Information

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vehicle Identification Number Information D Appendix D to Part 512 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL.... 512, App. D Appendix D to Part 512—Vehicle Identification Number Information The Chief Counsel...

  19. Determination of Granite Rock Massif Weathering and Cracking of Surface Layers in the Oldest Parts of Medieval Mine Depending on Used Mining Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lednická, Markéta; Kaláb, Zdeněk

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents the use of selected non-destructive testing methods for the purpose of specifying information on weathering and cracking of surface layers of granite rock massif in the medieval Jeroným Mine (the Czech Republic). This mine has been declared the National Heritage Site of the Czech Republic and its opening as a mining museum to the public is gradually prepared. Geological and geomechanical evaluation documents the possibility to find all kinds of weathering grades of rock massif in this mine. Two non-destructive methods have been tested, namely the measurement of ultrasonic pulse velocity and the measurement of Schmidt hammer rebound value. Field measurements were performed in two selected galleries to verify the application of such methods in specific conditions of underground spaces. Used mining method is one of the parameters later influencing cracking of rock massif. In selected galleries, two different mining methods were used which means that a part of a gallery profile was mined out by hand tools in the Middle Ages and another part of the profile was later mined out by blasting. Measurements in these galleries have enabled to analyse the influence of used mining methods on cracking of rock massif in the impaired zone, and, consequently, on ongoing weathering processes in those zones.

  20. Effect of heat treatment upon the fatigue-crack growth behavior of Alloy 718 weldments. Part II. Microscopic behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, W J; James, L A

    1981-05-01

    The microstructural features that influenced the room and elevated temperature fatigue-crack growth behavior of as-welded, conventional heat-treated, and modified heat-treated Alloy 718 GTA weldments were studied. Electron fractographic examination of fatigue fracture surfaces revealed that operative fatigue mechanisms were dependent on microstructure, temperature and stress intensity factor. All specimens exhibited three basic fracture surface appearances at temperatures up to 838{sup 0}C: crystallographic faceting at low stress intensity range ({Delta}K) levels, striation formation at intermediate values, and dimples coupled with striations in the highest {Delta}K regime. At 649{sup 0}C, the heat-treated welds exhibited extensive intergranular cracking. Laves and {delta}particles in the conventional heat-treated material nucleated microvoids ahead of the advancing crack front and caused an overall acceleration in crack growth rates at intermediate and high {Delta}K levels. The modified heat treatment removed many of these particles from the weld zone, thereby improving its fatigue resistance. The dramatically improved fatigue properties exhibited by the as-welded material was attributed to compressive residual stresses introduced by the welding process. 16 figures.

  1. Identification of Damaged Wheat Kernels and Cracked-Shell Hazelnuts with Impact Acoustics Time-Frequency Patterns

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new adaptive time-frequency (t-f) analysis and classification procedure is applied to impact acoustic signals for detecting hazelnuts with cracked shells and three types of damaged wheat kernels. Kernels were dropped onto a steel plate, and the resulting impact acoustic signals were recorded with ...

  2. Uncertainty law in ambient modal identification-Part I: Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Au, Siu-Kui

    2014-10-01

    Ambient vibration test has gained increasing popularity in practice as it provides an economical means for modal identification without artificial loading. Since the signal-to-noise ratio cannot be directly controlled, the uncertainty associated with the identified modal parameters is a primary concern. From a scientific point of view, it is of interest to know on what factors the uncertainty depends and what the relationship is. For planning or specification purposes, it is desirable to have an assessment of the test configuration required to achieve a specified accuracy in the modal parameters. For example, what is the minimum data duration to achieve a 30% coefficient of variation (c.o.v.) in the damping ratio? To address these questions, this work investigates the leading order behavior of the ‘posterior uncertainties’ (i.e., given data) of the modal parameters in a Bayesian identification framework. In the context of well-separated modes, small damping and sufficient data, it is shown rigorously that, among other results, the posterior c.o.v. of the natural frequency and damping ratio are asymptotically equal to ( and 1/(2, respectively; where ζ is the damping ratio; Nc is the data length as a multiple of the natural period; Bf and Bζ are data length factors that depend only on the bandwidth utilized for identification, for which explicit expressions have been derived. As the Bayesian approach allows full use of information contained in the data, the results are fundamental characteristics of the ambient modal identification problem. This paper develops the main theory. The companion paper investigates the implication of the results and verification with field test data.

  3. B Plant/WESF suspect/counterfeit parts identification program

    SciTech Connect

    Mertz, D.W.

    1996-01-12

    This document describes a suspect/counterfeit parts inspection program required by DOE conducted in accordance with Internal Memo 16710-94-DWM-048, J.A. O`Brien to J. N. Nansen, B Plant Suspect/ Counterfeit Parts Action Plan, dated May 24, 1994. The program included: physical inspection of all spare parts inventories within the plant; screening of installed B Plant/WESF (Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility) systems for applications where the use and subsequent potential failure of suspect/counterfeit parts could have critical consequences; and a physical inspection based upon this screening.

  4. Risk factors and their identification. Third Part: Examples.

    PubMed

    Balkau, B; Eschwege, E

    1995-10-01

    This is the final of a series of three articles in Diabete & Metabolisme which reviews the identification of risk factors of a disease, here: diabetes or complications of diabetes. In the first of the series [1], we gave the definition of a risk factor, along with measures of its force-relative risk and odds ratio, followed by the epidemiological definitions of the diseases: diabetes, coronary heart disease and hypertension. Risk factors were further discussed and we completed the discussion by some observations on the bias which can arise from a study or from its analysis, which can lead the researcher to the wrong conclusion. The three types of epidemiological studies which are used to determine whether factors are associated with a disease: observational or cross-sectional studies, cohort studies and case-cohort studies are described in the second of the series [2]. Examples were provided of each of these study types and their advantages and disadvantages were discussed. This final paper provides some examples of the study types and the identification of risk factors from the literature. The first examples involve diabetes and pancreatic cancer, the second birth weight and non-insulin dependent diabetes. Having found an association between a risk factor and a disease, we then discuss whether it can be considered to be a risk factor, and if so and whether it is likely to be a cause of the disease.

  5. 9 CFR 310.23 - Identification of carcasses and parts of swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... of swine. 310.23 Section 310.23 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE... and parts of swine. (a) The identification of the carcasses and parts of swine identified in... throughout post-mortem inspection. (b) If the establishment fails to provide required swine...

  6. 9 CFR 310.23 - Identification of carcasses and parts of swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... of swine. 310.23 Section 310.23 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE... and parts of swine. (a) The identification of the carcasses and parts of swine identified in... throughout post-mortem inspection. (b) If the establishment fails to provide required swine...

  7. 9 CFR 310.23 - Identification of carcasses and parts of swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... of swine. 310.23 Section 310.23 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE... and parts of swine. (a) The identification of the carcasses and parts of swine identified in... throughout post-mortem inspection. (b) If the establishment fails to provide required swine...

  8. 9 CFR 310.23 - Identification of carcasses and parts of swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... of swine. 310.23 Section 310.23 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE... and parts of swine. (a) The identification of the carcasses and parts of swine identified in... throughout post-mortem inspection. (b) If the establishment fails to provide required swine...

  9. 9 CFR 310.23 - Identification of carcasses and parts of swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... of swine. 310.23 Section 310.23 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE... and parts of swine. (a) The identification of the carcasses and parts of swine identified in... throughout post-mortem inspection. (b) If the establishment fails to provide required swine...

  10. General Aviation Interior Noise. Part 1; Source/Path Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unruh, James F.; Till, Paul D.; Palumbo, Daniel L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    There were two primary objectives of the research effort reported herein. The first objective was to identify and evaluate noise source/path identification technology applicable to single engine propeller driven aircraft that can be used to identify interior noise sources originating from structure-borne engine/propeller vibration, airborne propeller transmission, airborne engine exhaust noise, and engine case radiation. The approach taken to identify the contributions of each of these possible sources was first to conduct a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of an in-flight noise and vibration database acquired on a Cessna Model 182E aircraft. The second objective was to develop and evaluate advanced technology for noise source ranking of interior panel groups such as the aircraft windshield, instrument panel, firewall, and door/window panels within the cabin of a single engine propeller driven aircraft. The technology employed was that of Acoustic Holography (AH). AH was applied to the test aircraft by acquiring a series of in-flight microphone array measurements within the aircraft cabin and correlating the measurements via PCA. The source contributions of the various panel groups leading to the array measurements were then synthesized by solving the inverse problem using the boundary element model.

  11. The effect of potential on the high-temperature fatigue crack growth response of low alloy steels: Part II, electrochemical results

    SciTech Connect

    Moshier, W.C.; James, L.A.

    1997-04-01

    Environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in low alloy steels was found to be dependent on externally applied potential in low sulfur steels in high temperature water. EAC could be turned on when the specimen was polarized anodically above a critical potential. However, hydrogen (H) additions inhibited the ability of potential to affect EAC. The behavior was related to formation of H ions during H oxidation at the crack mouth. A mechanism based on formation of H sulfide at the crack tip and H ions at the crack mouth is presented to describe the process by which sulfides and H ions affect the critical sulfide concentration at the crack tip.

  12. Preventing Cracking of Anodized Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Charles C.; Heslin, Thomas M.

    1995-01-01

    Anodized coatings have been used as optical and thermal surfaces in spacecraft. Particulate contamination from cracked coatings is a concern for many applications. The major cause for the cracking is the difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion between the oxide coatings and the aluminum substrate. The loss of water when the coating is exposed to a vacuum also could induce cracking of the coating. Hot-water sealing was identified as the major cause for the cracking of the coatings because of the large temperature change when the parts were immersed in boiling water and the water was absorbed in the coating. when the hot-water sealing process was eliminated, the cracking resistance of the anodized coatings was greatly improved. Also, it was found that dyed black coatings were more susceptible than clear coatings to cracking during thermo-vacuum cyclings.

  13. Risk factors and their identification second part: study designs for identification of risk factors.

    PubMed

    Balkau, B; Eschwege, E

    1995-06-01

    This is the second a series of three articles which reviews the identification of risk factors of a disease, here: diabetes or complications of diabetes. In the first of the series [1], we gave the definition of a risk factor, along with measures of its force-relative risk and odds ratio, followed by the epidemiological definitions of the diseases: diabetes, coronary heart disease and hypertension. Risk factors were further discussed and we completed the discussion by some observations on the bias which can arise from a study or from its analysis, which can lead the researcher to the wrong conclusion. In this second article we define the three types of epidemiological studies which are used to determine whether factors are associated with a disease: observational or cross-sectional studies, cohort studies and casecohort studies. Examples are provided of each of these study types; their advantages and disadvantages are discussed. The final paper will provide some examples of the identification of risk factors from the literature. The first example involves diabetes and pancreatic cancer, the second birth weight and non-insulin dependent diabetes. Having found an association between a risk factor and diabetes, we will discuss whether it can be considered to be a risk factor, and if so whether it is likely to be a cause of the disease.

  14. 10 CFR 72.156 - Identification and control of materials, parts, and components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Identification and control of materials, parts, and components. 72.156 Section 72.156 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR THE INDEPENDENT STORAGE OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL, HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE, AND...

  15. Cracking catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Otterstedt, J. E. A.; Jaras, S. G.; Pudas, R.; Upson, L. L.

    1985-05-07

    A cracking catalyst having good resistance to metal poisoning has at least two particle fractions of different particle sizes, the cracking catalyzing zeolite material being concentrated to the coarser particle size fractions, and the finer particle size fractions being formed from material having relatively lower or no or insignificant cracking catalyzing activity. The particles of the finer particle size fractions have a matrix of kaolin and amorphous alumina--silica and may contain for example, an SO /SUB x/ eliminating additive such as Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, CaO and/or MgO. The coarser particle size fractions having cracking catalyzing effect have a mean particle size of from 80 to 125 ..mu..m and the finer particle size fractions a mean particle size of from 30 to 75 ..mu..m. The coarser particle size fractions have a zeolite content of at least 20 weight % and may have a zeolite content of up to 100 weight %, the remainder consisting essentially of material which has relatively lower or no or insignificant cracking-catalyzing activity and which consists of kaolin and amorphous alumina-silica. The catalyst mass as a whole may have a zeolite content of up to 50 weight %.

  16. Crack growth resistance in nuclear graphites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouagne, Pierre; Neighbour, Gareth B.; McEnaney, Brian

    2002-05-01

    Crack growth resistance curves for the non-linear fracture parameters KR, JR and R were measured for unirradiated PGA and IM1-24 graphites that are used as moderators in British Magnox and AGR nuclear reactors respectively. All the curves show an initial rising part, followed by a plateau region where the measured parameter is independent of crack length. JR and R decreased at large crack lengths. The initial rising curves were attributed to development of crack bridges in the wake of the crack front, while, in the plateau region, the crack bridging zone and the frontal process zone, ahead of the crack tip, reached steady state values. The decreases at large crack lengths were attributed to interaction of the frontal zone with the specimen end face. Microscopical evidence for graphite fragments acting as crack bridges showed that they were much smaller than filler particles, indicating that the graphite fragments are broken down during crack propagation. There was also evidence for friction points in the crack wake zone and shear cracking of some larger fragments. Inspection of KR curves showed that crack bridging contributed ~0.4 MPa m0.5 to the fracture toughness of the graphites. An analysis of JR and R curves showed that the development of the crack bridging zone in the rising part of the curves contributed ~20% to the total work of fracture. Energies absorbed during development of crack bridges and steady state crack propagation were greater for PGA than for IM1-24 graphite. These differences reflect the greater extent of irreversible processes occurring during cracking in the coarser microtexture of PGA graphite.

  17. Influence of temperature and carbon content on the cyclic deformation and fatigue behavior of {alpha}-iron. Part 2: Crack initiation and fatigue life

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, C.; Mughrabi, H.; Lochner, D.

    1998-03-02

    The crack initiation mechanisms and the fatigue life of {alpha}-iron polycrystals have been characterized in plastic-strain-controlled tests with small to intermediate plastic strain ranges {Delta}{epsilon}{sub pl} in the temperature range from 220 to 400 K. The fatigue life of pure decarburized {alpha}-iron cannot be described generally by means of a Manson-Coffin law, except under conditions under which distinct cyclic hardening occurs. A Basquin law is found to be valid, when the effective stress component {sigma}{sup *} dominates (i.e. at low temperatures and small {delta}{epsilon}{sub pl}). At low temperatures and up to room temperature, intergranular crack initiation is observed. At higher temperatures, mostly transgranular cracks develop in decarburized {alpha}-iron in the valleys of the surface rumpling, while in {alpha}-iron with small carbon contents persistent slip bands form which then act as sites of transgranular crack initiation. Crack initiation rates and crack growth rates are evaluated in a semi-quantitative manner from crack depth distributions.

  18. [Radiological diagnosis of hepatic tumors. Part II: Identification and differential diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Layer, G; Delorme, S

    2007-10-01

    Focal hepatic lesions occur in 5% of the population. The clarification of such common occurrences is of major significance because oncological diseases play an important role with respect to morbidity and mortality of the population. The first part of this review article dealt with the most important aspects of classification, epidemiology and pathology of hepatic tumors for radiologists and the current technical situation with regards to the diagnostic procedure. This second part of the review deals with the significance of radiological procedures for identification and differential diagnosis of hepatic tumors.

  19. Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) Based Corrosion Monitoring Sensors. Part 2: Application and Testing of the Coating Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-22

    Radio frequency identification ( RFID ) based corrosion monitoring sensors: Part II Application and testing of the coating materials Youliang He1...email: yohe@nrcan.gc.ca Keywords: Corrosion monitoring; Wireless sensor; RFID ; Electromagnetic interference; Coating. Abstract Cost-effective...Radio Frequency Identification ( RFID ) transponders (tags) were investigated for wireless corrosion monitoring by applying a metal-filled conductive

  20. Elevated temperature crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yau, J. F.; Malik, S. N.; Kim, K. S.; Vanstone, R. H.; Laflen, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of the Elevated Temperature Crack Growth Project is to evaluate proposed nonlinear fracture mechanics methods for application to combustor liners of aircraft gas turbine engines. During the first year of this program, proposed path-independent (P-I) integrals were reviewed for such applications. Several P-I integrals were implemented into a finite-element postprocessor which was developed and verified as part of the work. Alloy 718 was selected as the analog material for use in the forthcoming experimental work. A buttonhead, single-edge notch specimen was designed and verified for use in elevated-temperature strain control testing with significant inelastic strains. A crack mouth opening displacement measurement device was developed for further use.

  1. Fast Bayesian approach for modal identification using free vibration data, Part I - Most probable value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Feng-Liang; Ni, Yan-Chun; Au, Siu-Kui; Lam, Heung-Fai

    2016-03-01

    , are addressed. Fast computational algorithms for determining the MPV are proposed so that the method can be practically implemented. In the companion paper (Part II), analytical formulae are derived for the posterior covariance matrix so that it can be evaluated without resorting to finite difference method. The proposed method is verified using synthetic data. It is also applied to modal identification of full-scale field structures.

  2. 49 CFR Appendix D to Part 240 - Identification of State Agencies That Perform National Driver Register Checks

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... National Driver Register Checks D Appendix D to Part 240 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... CERTIFICATION OF LOCOMOTIVE ENGINEERS Pt. 240, App. D Appendix D to Part 240—Identification of State Agencies... employer or prospective employer. Under the provisions of paragraphs (d) and (e) of § 240.111, each...

  3. 49 CFR Appendix D to Part 240 - Identification of State Agencies That Perform National Driver Register Checks

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... National Driver Register Checks D Appendix D to Part 240 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... CERTIFICATION OF LOCOMOTIVE ENGINEERS Pt. 240, App. D Appendix D to Part 240—Identification of State Agencies... employer or prospective employer. Under the provisions of paragraphs (d) and (e) of § 240.111, each...

  4. 9 CFR 310.2 - Identification of carcass with certain severed parts thereof and with animal from which derived.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... severed parts thereof and with animal from which derived. 310.2 Section 310.2 Animals and Animal Products... INSPECTION § 310.2 Identification of carcass with certain severed parts thereof and with animal from which derived. (a) The head, tail, tongue, thymus gland, and all viscera of each slaughtered animal, and...

  5. Crack, crack house sex, and HIV risk.

    PubMed

    Inciardi, J A

    1995-06-01

    Limited attention has been focused on HIV risk behaviors of crack smokers and their sex partners, yet there is evidence that the crack house and the crack-using life-style may be playing significant roles in the transmission of HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases. The purposes of this research were to study the attributes and patterns of "sex for crack" exchanges, particularly those that occurred in crack houses, and to assess their potential impact on the spread of HIV. Structured interviews were conducted with 17 men and 35 women in Miami, Florida, who were regular users of crack and who had exchanged sex for crack (or for money to buy crack) during the past 30 days. In addition, participant observation was conducted in 8 Miami crack houses. Interview and observational data suggest that individuals who exchange sex for crack do so with considerable frequency, and through a variety of sexual activities. Systematic data indicated that almost a third of the men and 89% of the women had had 100 or more sex partners during the 30-day period prior to study recruitment. Not only were sexual activities anonymous, extremely frequent, varied, uninhibited (often undertaken in public areas of crack houses), and with multiple partners but, in addition, condoms were not used during the majority of contacts. Of the 37 subjects who were tested for HIV and received their test results 31% of the men and 21% of the women were HIV seropositive.

  6. Stress-corrosion cracking in metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Criteria and recommended practices for preventing stress-corrosion cracking from impairing the structural integrity and flightworthiness of space vehicles are presented. The important variables affecting stress-corrosion cracking are considered to be the environment, including time and temperature; metal composition, and structure; and sustained tensile stress. For designing spacecraft structures that are free of stress-corrosion cracking for the service life of the vehicle the following rules apply: (1) identification and control of the environments to which the structure will be exposed during construction, storage, transportation, and use; (2) selection of alloy compositions and tempers which are resistant to stress-corrosion cracking in the identified environment; (3) control of fabrication and other processes which may introduce residual tensile stresses or damage the material; (4) limitation of the combined residual and applied tensile stresses to below the threshold stress level for the onset of cracking throughout the service life of the vehicle; and (5) establishment of a thorough inspection program.

  7. Gear Crack Propagation Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Reduced weight is a major design goal in aircraft power transmissions. Some gear designs incorporate thin rims to help meet this goal. Thin rims, however, may lead to bending fatigue cracks. These cracks may propagate through a gear tooth or into the gear rim. A crack that propagates through a tooth would probably not be catastrophic, and ample warning of a failure could be possible. On the other hand, a crack that propagates through the rim would be catastrophic. Such cracks could lead to disengagement of a rotor or propeller from an engine, loss of an aircraft, and fatalities. To help create and validate tools for the gear designer, the NASA Lewis Research Center performed in-house analytical and experimental studies to investigate the effect of rim thickness on gear-tooth crack propagation. Our goal was to determine whether cracks grew through gear teeth (benign failure mode) or through gear rims (catastrophic failure mode) for various rim thicknesses. In addition, we investigated the effect of rim thickness on crack propagation life. A finite-element-based computer program simulated gear-tooth crack propagation. The analysis used principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics, and quarter-point, triangular elements were used at the crack tip to represent the stress singularity. The program had an automated crack propagation option in which cracks were grown numerically via an automated remeshing scheme. Crack-tip stress-intensity factors were estimated to determine crack-propagation direction. Also, various fatigue crack growth models were used to estimate crack-propagation life. Experiments were performed in Lewis' Spur Gear Fatigue Rig to validate predicted crack propagation results. Gears with various backup ratios were tested to validate crack-path predictions. Also, test gears were installed with special crack-propagation gages in the tooth fillet region to measure bending-fatigue crack growth. From both predictions and tests, gears with backup ratios

  8. Small crack test program for helicopter materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Annigeri, Bal; Schneider, George

    1994-01-01

    Crack propagation tests were conducted to determine crack growth behavior in five helicopter materials for surface cracks between 0.005 to 0.020 inches in depth. Constant amplitude tests were conducted at stress ratios R equals 0.1 and 0.5, and emphasis was placed on near threshold data (i.e., 10-8 to 10-6 inches/cycle). Spectrum tests were conducted using a helicopter spectrum. The test specimen was an unnotched tension specimen, and cracks were initiated from a small EDM notch. An optical/video system was used to monitor crack growth. The material for the test specimens was obtained from helicopter part forgings. Testing was conducted at stresses below yield to reflect actual stresses in helicopter parts.

  9. Crack spectra analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tiernan, M.

    1980-09-01

    Crack spectra derived from velocity data have been shown to exhibit systematics which reflect microstructural and textural differences between samples (Warren and Tiernan, 1980). Further research into both properties and information content of crack spectra have yielded the following: Spectral features are reproducible even at low pressures; certain observed spectral features may correspond to non-in-situ crack populations created during sample retrieval; the functional form of a crack spectra may be diagnostic of the sample's grain texture; hysteresis is observed in crack spectra between up and down pressure runs - it may be due to friction between the faces of closed crack populations.

  10. Forensic identification science evidence since Daubert: Part I--A quantitative analysis of the exclusion of forensic identification science evidence.

    PubMed

    Page, Mark; Taylor, Jane; Blenkin, Matt

    2011-09-01

    The U.S. Supreme Court decisions in Daubert v. Merrell Dow Pharmaceuticals Inc. and Kumho Tire Co. Ltd. v. Carmichael transformed the way scientific expert evidence was reviewed in courts across the United States. To gauge the impact of these rulings on the admission of forensic identification evidence, the authors analyzed 548 judicial opinions from cases where admission of such evidence was challenged. Eighty-one cases (15%) involved exclusion or limitation of identification evidence, with 50 (65.7%) of these failing to meet the "reliability" threshold. This was largely because of a failure to demonstrate a sufficient scientific foundation for either the technique (27 cases) or the expert's conclusions (17 cases). The incidence of exclusion/limitation because of a lack of demonstrable reliability suggests that there is a continuing need for the forensic sciences to pursue research validating their underlying theories and techniques of identification to ensure their continued acceptance by the courts.

  11. Gear crack propagation investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Ballarini, Roberto

    1996-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies were performed to investigate the effect of gear rim thickness on crack propagation life. The FRANC (FRacture ANalysis Code) computer program was used to simulate crack propagation. The FRANC program used principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics, finite element modeling, and a unique re-meshing scheme to determine crack tip stress distributions, estimate stress intensity factors, and model crack propagation. Various fatigue crack growth models were used to estimate crack propagation life based on the calculated stress intensity factors. Experimental tests were performed in a gear fatigue rig to validate predicted crack propagation results. Test gears were installed with special crack propagation gages in the tooth fillet region to measure bending fatigue crack growth. Good correlation between predicted and measured crack growth was achieved when the fatigue crack closure concept was introduced into the analysis. As the gear rim thickness decreased, the compressive cyclic stress in the gear tooth fillet region increased. This retarded crack growth and increased the number of crack propagation cycles to failure.

  12. Online stress corrosion crack and fatigue usages factor monitoring and prognostics in light water reactor components: Probabilistic modeling, system identification and data fusion based big data analytics approach

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanty, Subhasish M.; Jagielo, Bryan J.; Iverson, William I.; Bhan, Chi Bum; Soppet, William S.; Majumdar, Saurin M.; Natesan, Ken N.

    2014-12-10

    Nuclear reactors in the United States account for roughly 20% of the nation's total electric energy generation, and maintaining their safety in regards to key component structural integrity is critical not only for long term use of such plants but also for the safety of personnel and the public living around the plant. Early detection of damage signature such as of stress corrosion cracking, thermal-mechanical loading related material degradation in safety-critical components is a necessary requirement for long-term and safe operation of nuclear power plant systems.

  13. The Stress-Relief Cracking Susceptibility of a New Ferritic Steel - Part I: Single-Pass Heat-Affected Zone Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    NAWROCKI,J.G.; DUPONT,J.N.; ROBINO,CHARLES V.; MARDER,A.R.

    1999-12-15

    The stress-relief cracking susceptibility of single-pass welds in a new ferritic steel, HCM2S, has been evaluated and compared to 2.25Cr-1Mo steel using Gleeble techniques. Simulated coarse-grained heat-affected zones (CGHAZ) were produced under a range of energy inputs and tested at various post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) temperatures. Both alloys were tested at a stress of 325 MPa. The 2.25 Cr-1Mo steel was also tested at 270 MPa to normalize for the difference in yield strength between the two materials. Light optical and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the CGHAZ microstructure. The ''as-welded'' CGHAZ of each alloy consisted of lath martensite or bainite and had approximately equal prior austenite grain sizes. The as-welded hardness of the 2.25Cr-1Mo steel CGHAZ was significantly higher than that of the HCM2S alloy. Over the range studied energy input had no effect on the as-welded microstructure or hardness of either alloy. The energy input also had no effect on the stress-relief cracking susceptibility of either material. Both alloys failed intergranularly along prior austenite grain boundaries under all test conditions. The 2.25Cr-1Mo steel samples experienced significant macroductility and some microductility when tested at 325 MPa. The ductility decreased significantly when tested at 270 MPa but was still higher that than of HCM2S at each test condition. The time to failure decreased with increasing PWHT Temperature for each material. There was no significant difference in the times to failure between the two materials. Varying energy input and stress had no effect on the time-to failure. The ductility, as measured by reduction in are% increased with increasing PWHT temperature for 2.25 Cr-1Mo steel tested at both stresses. However, PWHT temperature had no effect on the ductility of HCM2S. The hardness of the CGHAZ for 2.25Cr-1Mo steel decreased significantly after PWHT, but remained constant for HCM2S. The differences in stress

  14. Subharmonic phased array for crack evaluation using surface acoustic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouchi, Akihiro; Sugawara, Azusa; Ohara, Yoshikazu; Yamanaka, Kazushi

    2015-07-01

    To accurately measure closed crack length, we proposed an imaging method using a subharmonic phased array for crack evaluation using surface acoustic waves (SAW SPACE) with water immersion. We applied SAW SPACE to the hole specimen in a fundamental array (FA) image. The hole was imaged with high resolution. Subsequently, SAW SPACE was applied to fatigue crack and stress corrosion crack (SCC) specimens. A fatigue crack was imaged in FA and subharmonic array (SA) images, and the length of this particular fatigue crack measured in the images was almost the same as that measured by optical observation. The SCC was imaged and its length was accurately measured in the SA image, whereas it was underestimated in the FA image and by optical observation. Thus, we demonstrated that SAW SPACE with water immersion is useful for the accurate measurement of closed crack length and for imaging the distribution of open and closed parts of cracks with high resolution.

  15. Oral and Craniofacial Clinical Signs Associated to Genetic Conditions in Human Identification Part I: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ayoub, Fouad; Aoun, Nicole; el Husseini, Hassan; Jassar, Houssam; Sayah, Fida; Salameh, Ziad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Forensic dentistry is one of the most reliable methods used in human identification when other technique as fingerprint, DNA, visual identification cannot be used. Genetic disorders have several manifestations that can target the intra-oral cavity, the cranio-facial area or any location in the human body. Materials and Methods: A literature search of the scientific database (Medline and Science Direct) for the years 1990 to 2014 was carried out to find out all the available papers that indicate oral, cranio-facial signs, genetic and human identification. Results: A table with 10 genetic conditions was described with oral and cranio-facial signs that can help forensic specialist in human identification. Conclusion: This review showed a correlation between genetics, facial and intra-oral signs that would help forensic ondontologist in the identification procedures. PMID:26028912

  16. Small UAS-Based Wind Feature Identification System Part 1: Integration and Validation

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez Salazar, Leopoldo; Cobano, Jose A.; Ollero, Anibal

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a system for identification of wind features, such as gusts and wind shear. These are of particular interest in the context of energy-efficient navigation of Small Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS). The proposed system generates real-time wind vector estimates and a novel algorithm to generate wind field predictions. Estimations are based on the integration of an off-the-shelf navigation system and airspeed readings in a so-called direct approach. Wind predictions use atmospheric models to characterize the wind field with different statistical analyses. During the prediction stage, the system is able to incorporate, in a big-data approach, wind measurements from previous flights in order to enhance the approximations. Wind estimates are classified and fitted into a Weibull probability density function. A Genetic Algorithm (GA) is utilized to determine the shaping and scale parameters of the distribution, which are employed to determine the most probable wind speed at a certain position. The system uses this information to characterize a wind shear or a discrete gust and also utilizes a Gaussian Process regression to characterize continuous gusts. The knowledge of the wind features is crucial for computing energy-efficient trajectories with low cost and payload. Therefore, the system provides a solution that does not require any additional sensors. The system architecture presents a modular decentralized approach, in which the main parts of the system are separated in modules and the exchange of information is managed by a communication handler to enhance upgradeability and maintainability. Validation is done providing preliminary results of both simulations and Software-In-The-Loop testing. Telemetry data collected from real flights, performed in the Seville Metropolitan Area in Andalusia (Spain), was used for testing. Results show that wind estimation and predictions can be calculated at 1 Hz and a wind map can be updated at 0.4 Hz. Predictions

  17. Evaluation of Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility Using Fracture Mechanics Techniques, Part 1. [environmental tests of aluminum alloys, stainless steels, and titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprowls, D. O.; Shumaker, M. B.; Walsh, J. D.; Coursen, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SSC) tests were performed on 13 aluminum alloys, 13 precipitation hardening stainless steels, and two titanium 6Al-4V alloy forgings to compare fracture mechanics techniques with the conventional smooth specimen procedures. Commercially fabricated plate and rolled or forged bars 2 to 2.5-in. thick were tested. Exposures were conducted outdoors in a seacoast atmosphere and in an inland industrial atmosphere to relate the accelerated tests with service type environments. With the fracture mechanics technique tests were made chiefly on bolt loaded fatigue precracked compact tension specimens of the type used for plane-strain fracture toughness tests. Additional tests of the aluminum alloy were performed on ring loaded compact tension specimens and on bolt loaded double cantilever beams. For the smooth specimen procedure 0.125-in. dia. tensile specimens were loaded axially in constant deformation type frames. For both aluminum and steel alloys comparative SCC growth rates obtained from tests of precracked specimens provide an additional useful characterization of the SCC behavior of an alloy.

  18. Investigation of Helicopter Longeron Cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Baughman, James; Wallace, Terryl A.

    2009-01-01

    Four cracked longerons, containing a total of eight cracks, were provided for study. Cracked regions were cut from the longerons. Load was applied to open the cracks, enabling crack surface examination. Examination revealed that crack propagation was driven by fatigue loading in all eight cases. Fatigue crack initiation appears to have occurred on the top edge of the longerons near geometric changes that affect component bending stiffness. Additionally, metallurgical analysis has revealed a local depletion in alloying elements in the crack initiation regions that may be a contributing factor. Fatigue crack propagation appeared to be initially driven by opening-mode loading, but at a crack length of approximately 0.5 inches (12.7 mm), there is evidence of mixed-mode crack loading. For the longest cracks studied, shear-mode displacements destroyed crack-surface features of interest over significant portions of the crack surfaces.

  19. Catalytic cracking of hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Absil, R.P.L.; Bowes, E.; Green, G.J.; Marler, D.O.; Shihabi, D.S.; Socha, R.F.

    1992-02-04

    This patent describes an improvement in a catalytic cracking process in which a hydrocarbon feed is cracked in a cracking zone in the absence of added hydrogen and in the presence of a circulating inventory of solid acidic cracking a catalyst which acquires a deposit of coke that contains chemically bound nitrogen while the cracking catalyst is in the cracking zone, the coke catalyst being circulated to t regeneration zone to convert the coke catalyst to a regenerated catalyst with the formation of a flue gas comprising nitrogen oxides: the improvement comprises incorporating into the circulating catalyst inventory an amount of additive particles comprising a synthetic porous crystalline material containing copper metal or cations, to reduce the content of nitrogen oxides in the flue gas.

  20. Elevated temperature crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K. S.; Vanstone, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this program was to extend the work performed in the base program (CR 182247) into the regime of time-dependent crack growth under isothermal and thermal mechanical fatigue (TMF) loading, where creep deformation also influences the crack growth behavior. The investigation was performed in a two-year, six-task, combined experimental and analytical program. The path-independent integrals for application to time-dependent crack growth were critically reviewed. The crack growth was simulated using a finite element method. The path-independent integrals were computed from the results of finite-element analyses. The ability of these integrals to correlate experimental crack growth data were evaluated under various loading and temperature conditions. The results indicate that some of these integrals are viable parameters for crack growth prediction at elevated temperatures.

  1. The cracked tooth.

    PubMed

    Zuckerman, G R

    1998-01-01

    Fractured molars and premolars are very common. Fractures usually result from cracks that develop and slowly extend until the tooth separates into buccal and lingual fragments. Sometimes, as these cracks expand, the patient exhibits symptoms of what is commonly referred to as "cracked tooth syndrome" (CTS). When CTS occurs, an opportunity exists to diagnose and treat these patients, to relieve their discomfort and prevent sequelae that would require more extensive treatment.

  2. Quenched catalytic cracking process

    SciTech Connect

    Krambeck, F.J.; Penick, J.E.; Schipper, P.H.

    1990-12-18

    This paper describes improvement in a fluidized catalytic cracking process wherein a fluidizable catalyst cracking catalyst and a hydrocarbon feed are charged to a reactor riser at catalytic riser cracking conditions to form catalytically cracked vapor product and spent catalyst which are discharged into a reactor vessel having a volume via a riser reactor outlet equipped with a separation means to produce a catalyst lean phase. It comprises: a majority of the cracked product, and a catalyst rich phase comprising a majority of the spend catalyst. The the catalyst rich phase is discharged into a dense bed of catalyst maintained below the riser outlet and the catalyst lean phase is discharged into the vessel for a time, and at a temperature, which cause unselective thermal cracking of the cracked product in the reactor volume before product is withdrawn from the vessel via a vessel outlet. The improvement comprises: addition, after riser cracking is completed, and after separation of cracked products from catalyst, of a quenching stream into the vessel above the dense bed of catalyst, via a quench stream addition point which allows the quench stream to contact at least a majority of the volume of the vessel above the dense bed.

  3. Elevated temperature crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K. S.; Vanstone, R. H.

    1989-01-01

    Alloy 718 crack growth experiments were conducted to assess the ability of the selected path-independent (P-I) integrals to describe the elevated temperature crack growth behavior. These tests were performed on single edge notch (SEN) specimens under displacement control with multiple extensometers to monitor the specimen and crack mouth opening displacement (CMOD). The displacements in these tests were sufficiently high to induce bulk cyclic inelastic deformation of the specimen. Under these conditions, the linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) parameter K does not correlate the crack growth data. The experimentally measured displacement gradients at the end of specimen gage length were used as the boundary conditions in elastic-plastic finite element method (FEM) analyses. These analyses were performed with a node release approach using CYANIDE, a GEAE FEM code, which included a gap element which is capable of efficiently simulating crack closure. Excellent correlation was obtained between the experimentally measured and predicted variation of stress and CMOD with crack length and the stress-CMOD loops for Alloy 718 tests conducted at 538 C. This confirmed the accuracy of the FEM crack growth simulation approach. The experimentally measured crack growth rate data correlated well the selected P-I integrals. These investigations have produced significant progress in developing P-I integrals as non-linear fracture mechanics parameters. The results suggest that this methodology has the potential of accurately describing elevated temperature crack growth behavior under the combined influence of thermal cycling and bulk elastic-inelastic deformation states.

  4. GPR abilities in investigation of the pavement transversal cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krysiński, Lech; Sudyka, Jacek

    2013-10-01

    This paper describes the results of an investigation into the capabilities of the GPR technique within the field of pavement crack diagnostics. Initially, laboratory tests were performed on prototypes simulating idealized cracks. Next, long-term visual observation and repeated GPR scanning were performed, on three roads of semi-rigid construction, several hundreds of meters long and subjected to heavy traffic. Furthermore, a road of rigid construction was tested, having a more than 70-year history of use. In several cases the cracks were probed by drillings, in order to recognize structures responsible for signal generation, or to explain reasons of signal lacking. The main result of this work is a list of GPR indications of cracks, which can be noticed on echograms. It was created through a correlation of the visually-observed cracks with the corresponding echograms, with decimeter accuracy. Several types of GPR responses were classified and linked to possible categories of crack structures, or to processes associated with the presence of cracks (as crumbling, erosion, and lithological alterations). The poor visibility of cracks was also studied, due to small crack size, or to the blurred character of the damaged area, or else to masking effects related to coarse grains in the asphalt mixture. The efficiency of the proposed method for the identification and localization of cracks is higher when a long-term GPR observation is performed.

  5. Closure of fatigue cracks at high strains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyyer, N. S.; Dowling, N. E.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on smooth specimens to study the closure behavior of short cracks at high cyclic strains under completely reversed cycling. Testing procedures and methodology, and closure measurement techniques, are described in detail. The strain levels chosen for the study cover from predominantly elastic to grossly plastic strains. Crack closure measurements are made at different crack lengths. The study reveals that, at high strains, cracks close only as the lowest stress level in the cycle is approached. The crack opening is observed to occur in the compressive part of the loading cycle. The applied stress needed to open a short crack under high strain is found to be less than for cracks under small scale yielding. For increased plastic deformations, the value of sigma sub op/sigma sub max is observed to decrease and approaches the value of R. Comparison of the experimental results with existing analysis is made and indicates the limitations of the small scale yielding approach where gross plastic deformation behavior occurs.

  6. CRACK TIP OPENING DISPLACEMENT AND ANGLE FOR A GROWING CRACK IN CARBON STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    LAM, POH-SANG

    2005-01-18

    The crack tip opening displacements and angles (CTOD/CTOA) are calculated with finite element method based on the test data of a set of constraint-dependent J-R curves for A285 carbon steel. The values of the CTOD/CTOA are initially high at initiation, but rapidly decrease to a nearly constant value. When the common practice is adopted by using only the constant part of CTOD/CTOA as the fracture criterion, the crack growth behavior is shown to be severely underestimated. However, with a bilinear form of CTOD/CTOA fracture criterion which approximates the initial non-constant portion, the experimental load vs. crack extension curves can be closely predicted. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the CTOD/CTOA is crack tip constraint dependent. The values of CTOD/CTOA for specimens with various ratios of crack length to specimen width (a/W) are reflected by the J-R curves and their slopes.

  7. Pyrolytic carbon indentation crack morphology.

    PubMed

    Ely, J L; Stupka, J; Haubold, A D

    1996-06-01

    In studying fatigue and fracture behavior of brittle materials, Vickers diamond indentation cracks are often used. Many of the studies of indentation cracks use crack system models such as the radial-median crack or Palmqvist crack. These systems are also used to study small crack growth in brittle materials, and have been studied for pyrolytic carbon. However, the true morphology of these cracks in pyrolytic carbon coatings on graphite substrates have not been described. This study examined Vickers diamond and spherical ball indentation cracks in pyrolytic carbon coatings using several techniques, including serial metallographic cross sections, indentation fracture in bending, acoustic emission, and residual surface indentation scanning. The crack systems developed using these techniques were not typical of either radial median or Palmqvist systems. The morphology is unique to this material, possibly because of the coating thickness limitations. Given the difference in crack system, the application of standard indentation crack equations in studying fracture mechanics, especially for small cracks, must be questioned.

  8. Crack growth monitoring at CFRP bond lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahammer, M.; Adebahr, W.; Sachse, R.; Gröninger, S.; Kreutzbruck, M.

    2016-02-01

    With the growing need for lightweight technologies in aerospace and automotive industries, fibre-reinforced plastics, especially carbon-fibre (CFRP), are used with a continuously increasing annual growth rate. A promising joining technique for composites is adhesive bonding. While rivet holes destroy the fibres and cause stress concentration, adhesive bond lines distribute the load evenly. Today bonding is only used in secondary structures due to a lack of knowledge with regard to long-term predictability. In all industries, numerical simulation plays a critical part in the development process of new materials and structures, while it plays a vital role when it comes to CFRP adhesive bondings conducing the predictability of life time and damage tolerance. The critical issue with adhesive bondings is crack growth. In a dynamic tensile stress testing machine we dynamically load bonded CFRP coupon specimen and measure the growth rate of an artificially started crack in order to feed the models with the results. We also investigate the effect of mechanical crack stopping features. For observation of the bond line, we apply two non-contact NDT techniques: Air-coupled ultrasound in slanted transmission mode and active lockin-thermography evaluated at load frequencies. Both methods give promising results for detecting the current crack front location. While the ultrasonic technique provides a slightly higher accuracy, thermography has the advantage of true online monitoring, because the measurements are made while the cyclic load is being applied. The NDT methods are compared to visual inspection of the crack front at the specimen flanks and show high congruence. Furthermore, the effect of crack stopping features within the specimen on the crack growth is investigated. The results show, that not all crack fronts are perfectly horizontal, but all of them eventually come to a halt in the crack stopping feature vicinity.

  9. Crack layer theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chudnovsky, A.

    1984-01-01

    A damage parameter is introduced in addition to conventional parameters of continuum mechanics and consider a crack surrounded by an array of microdefects within the continuum mechanics framework. A system consisting of the main crack and surrounding damage is called crack layer (CL). Crack layer propagation is an irreversible process. The general framework of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes are employed to identify the driving forces (causes) and to derive the constitutive equation of CL propagation, that is, the relationship between the rates of the crack growth and damage dissemination from one side and the conjugated thermodynamic forces from another. The proposed law of CL propagation is in good agreement with the experimental data on fatigue CL propagation in various materials. The theory also elaborates material toughness characterization.

  10. 40 CFR Appendix Xviii to Part 86 - Statistical Outlier Identification Procedure for Light-Duty Vehicles and Light Light-Duty Trucks...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Statistical Outlier Identification... (CONTINUED) Pt. 86, App. XVIII Appendix XVIII to Part 86—Statistical Outlier Identification Procedure for..., but suffer theoretical deficiencies if statistical significance tests are required. Consequently,...

  11. 40 CFR Appendix Xviii to Part 86 - Statistical Outlier Identification Procedure for Light-Duty Vehicles and Light Light-Duty Trucks...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Statistical Outlier Identification... (CONTINUED) Pt. 86, App. XVIII Appendix XVIII to Part 86—Statistical Outlier Identification Procedure for..., but suffer theoretical deficiencies if statistical significance tests are required. Consequently,...

  12. 40 CFR Appendix Xviii to Part 86 - Statistical Outlier Identification Procedure for Light-Duty Vehicles and Light Light-Duty Trucks...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Statistical Outlier Identification... (CONTINUED) Pt. 86, App. XVIII Appendix XVIII to Part 86—Statistical Outlier Identification Procedure for..., but suffer theoretical deficiencies if statistical significance tests are required. Consequently,...

  13. A Study of Correlations within the Dimensions of Lower Limb Parts for Personal Identification in a Sudanese Population

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Altayeb Abdalla

    2014-01-01

    The presence of an isolated limb or limb parts from different individuals presents a major challenge for medicolegal investigators in establishing identification in cases of wars, mass disasters, and criminal assaults because different populations have different sizes and proportions. The measurement of lower limb dimensions showed a high success rate in establishing individual identity in terms of sex and stature in various populations. However, there is a paucity of data concerning the correlation within the lower limb parts. This study aims to assess the existence of relationships within lower limb parts and to develop regression formulae to reconstruct limb parts from one another. The tibial length, bimalleolar breadth, foot length, and foot breadth of 376 right-handed Sudanese adults were measured. The results showed that all variables were significantly larger in males than in females. A significant positive correlation (P < 0.001) was found within the lower limb parts. Sex-specific linear equations and multiple regression equations were developed to reconstruct the lower limb parts in the presence of single dimension or multiple dimensions from the same limb. The use of multiple regression equations provided a better reconstruction than simple regression equations. These results are significant in forensics and orthopedic reconstructive surgery. PMID:25386606

  14. Model measurement based identification of Francis turbine vortex rope parameters for prototype part load pressure and power pulsation prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manderla, M.; Weber, W.; Koutnik, J.

    2016-11-01

    Pressure and power fluctuations of hydro-electric power plants in part-load operation are an important measure for the quality of the power which is delivered to the electrical grid. It is well known that the unsteadiness is driven by the flow patterns in the draft tube where a vortex rope is present. However, until today the equivalent vortex rope parameters for common numerical 1D-models are a major source of uncertainty. In this work, a new optimization-based grey box method for experimental vortex rope modelling and parameter identification is presented. The combination of analytical vortex rope and test rig modelling and the usage of dynamic measurements allow the identification of the unknown vortex rope parameters. Upscaling from model to prototype size is achieved via existing nondimensional parameters. In this work, a new experimental setup and system identification method is proposed which are suitable for the determination of the full set of part load vortex rope parameters in the lab. For the vortex rope, a symmetric model with cavity compliance, bulk viscosity and two pressure excitation sources is developed and implemented which shows the best correspondence with available measurement data. Due to the non-dimensional parameter definition, scaling is possible. This finally provides a complete method for the prediction of prototype part-load pressure and power oscillations. Since the proposed method is based on a simple limited control domain, limited modelling effort and also small modelling uncertainties are some major advantages. Due to the generality of the approach, a future application to other operating conditions such as full load will be straightforward.

  15. Slow crack growth behaviour of hydroxyapatite ceramics.

    PubMed

    Benaqqa, Chahid; Chevalier, Jerome; Saädaoui, Malika; Fantozzi, Gilbert

    2005-11-01

    Among materials for medical applications, hydroxyapatite is one of the best candidates in orthopedics, since it exhibits a composition similar to the mineral part of bone. Double torsion technique was here performed to investigate slow crack growth behaviour of dense hydroxyapatite materials. Crack rate, V, versus stress intensity factor, K(I), laws were obtained for different environments and processing conditions. Stress assisted corrosion by water molecules in oxide ceramics is generally responsible for slow crack growth. The different propagation stages obtained here could be analyzed in relation to this process. The presence of a threshold defining a safety range of use was also observed. Hydroxyapatite ceramics appear to be very sensitive to slow crack growth, crack propagation occurring even at very low K(I). This can be explained by the fact that they contain hydroxyl groups (HAP: Ca(10)(PO(4))(6)(OH)(2)), favouring water adsorption on the crack surface and thus a strong decrease of surface energy in the presence of water. This study demonstrates that processing conditions must be carefully controlled, specially sintering temperature, which plays a key role on V-K(I) laws. Sintering at 50 degrees C above or below the optimal temperature, for example, may shift the V-K(I) law towards very low stress intensity factors. The influence of ageing is finally discussed.

  16. Quantity effect of radial cracks on the cracking propagation behavior and the crack morphology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jingjing; Xu, Jun; Liu, Bohan; Yao, Xuefeng; Li, Yibing

    2014-01-01

    In this letter, the quantity effect of radial cracks on the cracking propagation behavior as well as the circular crack generation on the impacted glass plate within the sandwiched glass sheets are experimentally investigated via high-speed photography system. Results show that the radial crack velocity on the backing glass layer decreases with the crack number under the same impact conditions during large quantities of repeated experiments. Thus, the "energy conversion factor" is suggested to elucidate the physical relation between the cracking number and the crack propagation speed. Besides, the number of radial crack also takes the determinative effect in the crack morphology of the impacted glass plate. This study may shed lights on understanding the cracking and propagation mechanism in laminated glass structures and provide useful tool to explore the impact information on the cracking debris.

  17. Elevated temperature crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K. S.; Vanstone, R. H.; Malik, S. N.; Laflen, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    A study was performed to examine the applicability of path-independent (P-I) integrals to crack growth problems in hot section components of gas turbine aircraft engines. Alloy 718 was used and the experimental parameters included combined temperature and strain cycling, thermal gradients, elastic-plastic strain levels, and mean strains. A literature review was conducted of proposed P-I integrals, and those capable of analyzing hot section component problems were selected and programmed into the postprocessor of a finite element code. Detailed elastic-plastic finite element analyses were conducted to simulate crack growth and crack closure of the test specimen, and to evaluate the P-I integrals. It was shown that the selected P-I integrals are very effective for predicting crack growth for isothermal conditions.

  18. Elevated Temperature Crack Propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orange, Thomas W.

    1994-01-01

    This paper is a summary of two NASA contracts on high temperature fatigue crack propagation in metals. The first evaluated the ability of fairly simple nonlinear fracture parameters to correlate crack propagation. Hastelloy-X specimens were tested under isothermal and thermomechanical cycling at temperatures up to 980 degrees C (1800 degrees F). The most successful correlating parameter was the crack tip opening displacement derived from the J-integral. The second evaluated the ability of several path-independent integrals to correlate crack propagation behavior. Inconel 718 specimens were tested under isothermal, thermomechanical, temperature gradient, and creep conditions at temperatures up to 650 degrees C (1200 degrees F). The integrals formulated by Blackburn and by Kishimoto correlated the data reasonably well under all test conditions.

  19. Elevated temperature crack propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Orange, T.W.

    1994-02-01

    This paper is a summary of two NASA contracts on high temperature fatigue crack propagation in metals. The first evaluated the ability of fairly simple nonlinear fracture parameters to correlate crack propagation. Hastelloy-X specimens were tested under isothermal and thermomechanical cycling at temperatures up to 980 degrees C (1800 degrees F). The most successful correlating parameter was the crack tip opening displacement derived from the J-integral. The second evaluated the ability of several path-independent integrals to correlate crack propagation behavior. Inconel 718 specimens were tested under isothermal, thermomechanical, temperature gradient, and creep conditions at temperatures up to 650 degrees C (1200 degrees F). The integrals formulated by Blackburn and by Kishimoto correlated the data reasonably well under all test conditions.

  20. Ethylene by Naphta Cracking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiseman, Peter

    1977-01-01

    Presents a discussion of the manufacture of ethylene by thermal cracking of hydrocarbon feedstocks that is useful for introducing the subject of industrial chemistry into a chemistry curriculum. (MLH)

  1. Inspecting cracks in foam insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambell, L. W.; Jung, G. K.

    1979-01-01

    Dye solution indicates extent of cracking by penetrating crack and showing original crack depth clearly. Solution comprised of methylene blue in denatured ethyl alcohol penetrates cracks completely and evaporates quickly and is suitable technique for usage in environmental or structural tests.

  2. Round Table Part 1: Review of future manned missions and Identification key ECLSS requirements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasseur, Christophe; Wheeler, Raymond; Tikhomirova, Natalia; Joshi, Jitendra; Dussap, Gilles; Godia, Francesc

    2016-07-01

    All forecast an end of ISS in 2024. What so ever will be the exact date date the main part of the space agencies are currently elaborating plans for future manned missions. So far mainly 3 destination are considered :" Moon, Mars and Lagrange point L2. Depending of the missions duration, crew size, safety .. the ECLSS will have major difference . In this first part of the round table it is proposed to review the main missions scenario and elaborate top level requirements.

  3. Cracked Plain, Buried Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    4 September 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a cracked plain in western Utopia Planitia. The three circular crack patterns indicate the location of three buried meteor impact craters. These landforms are located near 41.9oN, 275.9oW. The image covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates this scene from the lower left.

  4. Monitoring Growth of Closed Fatigue Crack Using Subharmonic Phased Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohara, Y.; Endo, H.; Hashimoto, M.; Shintaku, Y.; Yamanaka, K.

    2010-02-01

    To ensure the safety and reliability of atomic power plants and airplanes, the technique of monitoring closed fatigue cracks is requisite. Here we monitored the distribution of the crack depths and closure behavior in the length direction after 48000 and 87000 fatigue cycles using subharmonic phased array for crack evaluation (SPACE). The crack depths in the subharmonic images were larger than those in the fundamental images. Specifically, the difference was larger at near the side surface than at the center. The percentage of the closed part varied with the crack growth in the specimen. In addition, we fabricated shoe for SPACE to facilitate mechanical scanning. Thus, it was demonstrated that SPACE is useful in monitoring closed fatigue crack growth.

  5. Fatigue crack monitoring in aero-engines: simulation and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelman, Leonid M.; Petrunin, Ivan V.; Thompson, Chris

    2004-03-01

    A new genetic approach to fatigue crack monitoring in aero-engine blades is presented. The approach consists of simultaneously using two diagnostic features: the real and imaginary parts of the Fourier transform of vibroacoustical signals. This approach is more fundamental than traditional approaches based on the power spectral density, phase spectrum and Hartley transform; each of these approaches is a special case of the proposed approach. Numerical examples are given based on the processing of signals generated using a nonlinear model of tested blades. The generated signals are the forced vibroacoustical oscillations of cracked and un-cracked blades. The numerical examples show that crack detection ismore effective when using the new approach than when u sing the power spectral density approach. The presented experimental results using un-cracked and cracked turbuine blades from an aero-engine are matched with numerical results. The proposed approach offers an effectiveness improvement over the traditional approach based on power spectral density.

  6. Analyses of Fatigue Crack Growth and Closure Near Threshold Conditions for Large-Crack Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    A plasticity-induced crack-closure model was used to study fatigue crack growth and closure in thin 2024-T3 aluminum alloy under constant-R and constant-K(sub max) threshold testing procedures. Two methods of calculating crack-opening stresses were compared. One method was based on a contact-K analyses and the other on crack-opening-displacement (COD) analyses. These methods gave nearly identical results under constant-amplitude loading, but under threshold simulations the contact-K analyses gave lower opening stresses than the contact COD method. Crack-growth predictions tend to support the use of contact-K analyses. Crack-growth simulations showed that remote closure can cause a rapid rise in opening stresses in the near threshold regime for low-constraint and high applied stress levels. Under low applied stress levels and high constraint, a rise in opening stresses was not observed near threshold conditions. But crack-tip-opening displacement (CTOD) were of the order of measured oxide thicknesses in the 2024 alloy under constant-R simulations. In contrast, under constant-K(sub max) testing the CTOD near threshold conditions were an order-of-magnitude larger than measured oxide thicknesses. Residual-plastic deformations under both constant-R and constant-K(sub max) threshold simulations were several times larger than the expected oxide thicknesses. Thus, residual-plastic deformations, in addition to oxide and roughness, play an integral part in threshold development.

  7. Isolation and identification of Acanthamoeba species from natural water sources in the northeastern part of Thailand.

    PubMed

    Thammaratana, Thani; Laummaunwai, Porntip; Boonmars, Thidarut

    2016-04-01

    Acanthamoeba are found in the environment, particularly in water, all over the world. The genus is currently classified into 20 different genotypes, T1-T20. In this study, 63 natural water samples from 11 provinces in northeast Thailand were collected and cultured on non-nutrient agar plates. Positive samples by culture were subsequently analyzed by molecular methods. The identification of Acanthamoeba was based on morphological features and molecular techniques using PCR and DNA sequencing. The results showed that 10 samples out of 63 were positive (15.9 %). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that seven samples were T4, one sample was similar to T3, and the other two samples were similar to T5. This is the first report demonstrating the contamination of Acanthamoeba species in natural water sources in northeast Thailand.

  8. Evaluation of the effect of crack closure on fatigue crack growth of simulated short cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Telesman, J.; Fisher, D. M.

    1984-01-01

    A test program was performed to determine the influence of crack closure on fatigue crack growth (FCG) rates of short cracks. By use of the standard compact tension specimen, test procedures were devised to evaluate closure loads in the wake of the crack behind its tip. The first procedure determined the magnitude of crack closure as a function of the fatigued crack wave by incrementally removing the contacting wake surfaces and measuring closure load at each increment. The second procedure used a low-high loading sequence to simulate short crack behavior. Based on the results, it was concluded that crack closure is not the major reason for the more rapid growth of short cracks as compared to long crack growth.

  9. Cracks in Utopia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Many of the craters found on the northern plains of Mars have been partly filled or buried by some material (possibly sediment). The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image presented here (MOC2-136b, above left) shows a high-resolution view of a tiny portion of the floor of one of these northern plains craters. The crater, located in Utopia Planitia at 44oN, 258oW, is shown on the right (MOC2-136a)with a small white box to indicate the location of the MOC image. The MOC image reveals that the material covering the floor of this crater is cracked and pitted. The origin and source of material that has been deposited in this crater is unknown.

    The MOC image was acquired in June 1999 and covers an area only 1.1 kilometers (0.7 miles) wide at a resolution of 1.8 meters (6 feet) per pixel. The context picture is a mosaic of Viking 2 orbiter images 010B53 and 010B55, taken in 1976. Both images are illuminated from the left. Malin Space Science Systems and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  10. Near-IR imaging of cracks in teeth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, William A.; Simon, Jacob C.; Lucas, Seth; Chan, Kenneth H.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Staninec, Michal; Fried, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    Dental enamel is highly transparent at near-IR wavelengths and several studies have shown that these wavelengths are well suited for optical transillumination for the detection and imaging of tooth decay. We hypothesize that these wavelengths are also well suited for imaging cracks in teeth. Extracted teeth with suspected cracks were imaged at several wavelengths in the near-IR from 1300-1700-nm. Extracted teeth were also examined with optical coherence tomography to confirm the existence of suspected cracks. Several teeth of volunteers were also imaged in vivo at 1300-nm to demonstrate clinical potential. In addition we induced cracks in teeth using a carbon dioxide laser and imaged crack formation and propagation in real time using near-IR transillumination. Cracks were clearly visible using near-IR imaging at 1300-nm in both in vitro and in vivo images. Cracks and fractures also interfered with light propagation in the tooth aiding in crack identification and assessment of depth and severity.

  11. Round table part 2 : Identification of the key technologies and collaboration for air revitalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasseur, Christophe; Tikhomirov, Alexander A.; Wheeler, Raymond

    2016-07-01

    The first metabolic needs in terms of urgency is of course oxygen and in terms of contaminants CO2. Over the years, many studies have been performed to recover oxygen from Co2 our from water. Within this part 2 of the roundtable it is proposed to perform a state te of the art of the main activities in the world and to identify overlap and synergies. Recommendation for potential collaboration or exchanges will be discussed.

  12. Round table part 3 : Identification of the key technologies and collaboration for water recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasseur, Christophe; Tikhomirov, Alexander A.; Wheeler, Raymond

    2016-07-01

    The first metabolic needs in terms of mass is water. Among the years a large number of studies have been performed to recover condensate as well as from urine. Production of water is as well considered and demonstrated via Sabatier reactor. Within this part 3 of the roundtable it is proposed to perform a state of the art of the main activities in the world and to identify overlap and synergies. Recommendation for potential collaboration or exchanges will be discussed.

  13. Low resistivity, low contrast pays: Part I - concepts and methodology for identification and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Sneider, R.M. ); Kulha, J.T. )

    1994-07-01

    Major hydrocarbon accumulations have been found and produced in low resistivity, low contrast (LRLC) sands in the Gulf of Mexico Basin (GOM). In the past in the GOM, LRLC reservoirs were commonly considered wet, tight, misidentified as a shale, or overlooked. Examples of many offshore GOM producing wells are documented now in a joint publication of the Houston and New Orleans geological societies. These examples provide models for identification and evaluation of wells with similar geologic-petrophysical occurrence in the world, including southeast Asia. LRLC pays in the GOM are caused by one or more of the following: (1) thin beds or laminae of clean sands alternating with shales, silts, or shaly sands, (2) clay-coated sands, (3) glauconite-rich sands, (4) sands with interstitial dispersed clay, (5) sands with disseminated pyrite or other conductive minerals, (6) clay-lined burrows, (7) clay clasts in clean sand, (8) altered volcanic/feldspathic framework grains, and (9) very fine-grained sand with very saline water. Similar types of LRLC pay and potential pay sands are being recognized in Indonesia, Malaysia, Australia, Philippines, and Korea. Common depositional systems containing LRLC production in the GOM are (1) deep-water fans, including levee-channel complexes, (2) delta front and toe deposits, (3) shingle turbidites, and (4) alluvial and deltaic channel fills. Similar depositional systems are found in southeast Asia.

  14. A robust approach to battery fuel gauging, part I: Real time model identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasingam, B.; Avvari, G. V.; Pattipati, B.; Pattipati, K. R.; Bar-Shalom, Y.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, the first of a series of papers on battery fuel gauge (BFG), we present a real time parameter estimation strategy for robust state of charge (SOC) tracking. The proposed parameter estimation scheme has the following novel features: it models hysteresis as an error in the open circuit voltage (OCV) and employs a combination of real time, linear parameter estimation and SOC tracking technique to compensate for it. This obviates the need for modeling of hysteresis as a function of SOC and load current. We identify the presence of correlated noise that has been so far ignored in the literature and use it to enhance the accuracy of model identification. As a departure from the conventional "one model fits all" strategy, we identify four different equivalent models of the battery that represent four modes of typical battery operation and develop the framework for seamless SOC tracking by switching. The proposed parameter approach enables a robust initialization/re-initialization strategy for continuous operation of the BFG. The performance of the online parameter estimation scheme was first evaluated through simulated data. Then, the proposed algorithm was validated using hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) data collected from commercially available Li-ion batteries.

  15. Stochastic identification of composite material properties from limited experimental databases, part I: Experimental database construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrez, Loujaine; Moens, David; Vandepitte, Dirk

    2012-02-01

    Composite materials exhibit variability and uncertainties in their material properties with relation to their compositions and manufacturing processes. Conventional deterministic identification of composite material properties involves numerical-experimental characterisation techniques. These techniques do not account for the associated spatial variability and uncertainties in the identified properties. The objective of this work is to characterise spatially-stochastic macroscopic material properties of heterogeneous composite fabrics from limited-size macro-scale experimental measurements. The work is organised in a sequence of two papers. The first paper, present manuscript, is concerned with the construction of an experimental database of macroscopic material properties of heterogeneous composite fabrics from limited-size macro-scale experimental measurements. The mobility frequency response functions from a number of cantilever-beam specimens of the composite material are measured at selected points along each beam. These direct measurements are introduced to a set of deterministic inverse problems in order to reconstruct a database of heterogeneous Young's modulus spatial fields. The constructed database will be used, in the second paper of the sequence, to construct a stochastic model of the material properties that account for both aleatory uncertainties, related to sample inter-variability, as well as epistemic uncertainties due to insufficiency of the available data.

  16. Surface Enhancement Improves Crack Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The low plasticity burnishing (LPB) process produces a deep layer of surface compression in a quick and affordable manner to produce metal surfaces free of scratches, nicks, and gouges. The process, designed for easy inclusion in the manufacturing environment, can be performed with conventional Computer Numerical Control machine tools. This allows parts to be processed during manufacturing, rather than as a post process in a separate facility. A smooth, free-rolling spherical ball suspended in a fluid allows for single-point contact. The ball comes into mechanical contact only with the surface to be burnished, and can be moved in any direction. LPB can be applied to all types of carbon and alloy steel, stainless steel, cast iron, aluminum, titanium, and nickel- based super alloys. In addition to improving a surface's resistance to fatigue and damage, treatment stops the growth of shallow cracks. The LPB process is used on the leading edges of turbine blades to improve resistance to foreign object damage and crack growth. This means significant savings for aircraft owners, since maintenance requirements to inspect for fatigue damage, replace parts, and remove corrosion damage increase the cost of operation.

  17. Isolation and Identification of Ferulic Acid From Aerial Parts of Kelussia odoratissima Mozaff.

    PubMed Central

    Sajjadi, Seyed Ebrahim; Shokoohinia, Yalda; Moayedi, Narjess-Sadat

    2012-01-01

    Background Kelussia odoratissima Mozaff. is one of the newest genera of Umbelliferae which is represented by only one species. This sweet-smelling, self-growing monotypic medicinal plant is endemic to a restricted area in west of Iran and is locally called Karafse-koohi. The aerial parts of the plant are commonly used as a popular garnish and a sedative medicinal plant. There are several reports concerning antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anxiolytic and hypolipidemic activities of aerial parts of K. odoratissima. Objectives The current research aimed to evaluate some phenolic contents of the plant for the first time .It is confirmed that secondary metabolites and especially phenolic compounds have important role in the biological activities of the plant. Available information indicates that phenolic contents of K. odoratissima have not been the subject of any investigation Material and Methods Aerial parts of K. odoratissima were extracted with acetone by maceration method. Normal and reversed phase vacuum liquid chromatography used to fractionate the extract. 1H-NMR, 13CNMR, EI-Mass and IR spectra were used to elucidate isolated compound. Results The phenolic acid isolated compound was identified as 4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamic acid (ferulic acid). Conclusions Compared with previous reported antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of ferulic acid, a chemical-biological relation can be postulated. PMID:24624175

  18. Crack propagation in Hastelloy X

    SciTech Connect

    Weerasooriya, T.; Strizak, J.P.

    1980-05-01

    The fatigue and creep crack growth rates of Hastelloy X were examined both in air and impure helium. Creep crack growth rate is higher in air and impure helium at 650/sup 0/C. Initial creep crack growth from the original sharp fatigue crack is by an intergranular mode of fracture. As the cracking accelerates at higher stress intensities, growth is by a mixed mode of both intergranular and transgranular fracture. Fatigue crack growth rate increases with increasing temperature and decreasing frequency for the range of stress intensities reported in the literature and is lower in impure helium than in air.

  19. Identification of Provisions of EPA's Part 70 Operating Permits Regulation Applicable to Tribal Operating Permits Program

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document may be of assistance in applying the Title V air operating permit regulations. This document is part of the Title V Policy and Guidance Database available at www2.epa.gov/title-v-operating-permits/title-v-operating-permit-policy-and-guidance-document-index. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  20. Round table part 5 : Identification of the key technologies and collaboration for waste management and recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasseur, Christophe; Tikhomirov, Alexander A.; Wheeler, Raymond

    2016-07-01

    Any manned missions will produce solid waste with or without on board food production. Of course in case of high food production, the percentage of waste of plant origin will be much higher and may pass the 80 %. Consequently the ultimate objective of a closed loop system is not achievable without an efficient waste r4cycling system. Over the years, a large panel of investigations of technologies have been performed form microbial degradation to wet oxidation. These part 5 is aiming to be a platform of discussion on the current world wide investigations related to solid waste treatment and to allow synergies and collaborations.

  1. Crack propagation and arrest in pressurized containers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.; Delale, F.; Owczarek, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    The problem of crack propagation and arrest in a finite volume cylindrical container filled with pressurized gas is considered. It is assumed that the cylinder contains a symmetrically located longitudinal part-through crack with a relatively small net ligament. The net ligament suddenly ruptures initiating the process of fracture propagation and depressurization in the cylinder. Thus the problem is a coupled gas dynamics and solid mechanics problem the exact formulation of which does not seem to be possible. The problem is reduced to a proper initial value problem by introducing a dynamic fracture criterion which relates the crack acceleration to the difference between a load factor and the corresponding strength parameter. The results indicate that generally in gas filled cylinders fracture arrest is not possible unless the material behaves in a ductile manner and the container is relatively long.

  2. Simulation of fatigue crack growth under large scale yielding conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweizer, Christoph; Seifert, Thomas; Riedel, Hermann

    2010-07-01

    A simple mechanism based model for fatigue crack growth assumes a linear correlation between the cyclic crack-tip opening displacement (ΔCTOD) and the crack growth increment (da/dN). The objective of this work is to compare analytical estimates of ΔCTOD with results of numerical calculations under large scale yielding conditions and to verify the physical basis of the model by comparing the predicted and the measured evolution of the crack length in a 10%-chromium-steel. The material is described by a rate independent cyclic plasticity model with power-law hardening and Masing behavior. During the tension-going part of the cycle, nodes at the crack-tip are released such that the crack growth increment corresponds approximately to the crack-tip opening. The finite element analysis performed in ABAQUS is continued for so many cycles until a stabilized value of ΔCTOD is reached. The analytical model contains an interpolation formula for the J-integral, which is generalized to account for cyclic loading and crack closure. Both simulated and estimated ΔCTOD are reasonably consistent. The predicted crack length evolution is found to be in good agreement with the behavior of microcracks observed in a 10%-chromium steel.

  3. Probabilistic Aspects of the Growth and Detection of Fatigue Cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Moshe L.

    For engineering structures, fatigue, and more specifically fatigue life prediction, is a problem of great interest. The first part of this dissertation focuses on the importance of probabilistic methods in structural health management in general, and how they can be applied to fatigue failure prognosis. Paris' law, using measured values of the parameters in the law, has been used to forecast fatigue crack growth from an assumed initial probability distribution of crack lengths, represented by a truncated lognormal distribution. The evolution of this distribution with the number of cycles has been determined, and the probability of the existence of a crack larger than an undesirable value, but smaller than the value where failure may occur, has been calculated. In addition, inspections have been modeled using three typical probability of detection curves, and the effect of an inspection has been evaluated. The probability of detection concept has also been extended using a Bayesian approach to include the effect of the number of elapsed cycles and the stress range of each cycle. All statistics considered in this dissertation have been evaluated for a surface-breaking crack in a half-space and a cracked rivet hole in a lap joint, both under cyclic tensile loading. The second part of this dissertation focuses on an aspect of the diagnosis of fatigue cracks. The acoustic emission from fatigue crack growth has been calculated using the reciprocity relation, again for a surface-breaking crack in a half-space and a cracked rivet hole in a lap joint. This result, which is a stochastic quantity because the amount of crack growth is stochastic, is used to calculate the probability of detection of an acoustic wave emitted by the crack growth for these cases.

  4. Contamination Control in Hybrid Microelectronic Modules. Part 1: Identification of Critical Process and Contaminants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Himmel, R. P.

    1975-01-01

    Various hybrid processing steps, handling procedures, and materials are examined in an attempt to identify sources of contamination and to propose methods for the control of these contaminants. It is found that package sealing, assembly, and rework are especially susceptible to contamination. Moisture and loose particles are identified as the worst contaminants. The points at which contaminants are most likely to enter the hybrid package are also identified, and both general and specific methods for their detection and control are developed. In general, the most effective controls for contaminants are: clean working areas, visual inspection at each step of the process, and effective cleaning at critical process steps. Specific methods suggested include the detection of loose particles by a precap visual inspection, by preseal and post-seal electrical testing, and by a particle impact noise test. Moisture is best controlled by sealing all packages in a clean, dry, inert atmosphere after a thorough bake-out of all parts.

  5. Beginning the 21st century with advanced Automatic Parts Identification (API)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, Fred; Roxby, Don

    1994-01-01

    Under the direction of the NASA George C. Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama, the development and commercialization of an advanced Automated Parts Indentification (API) system is being undertaken by Rockwell International Corporation. The new API system is based on a variable sized, machine-readable, two-dimensioanl matrix symbol that can be applied directly onto most metallic and nonmetallic materials using safe, permanent marking methods. Its checkerboard-like structure is the most space efficient of all symbologies. This high data-density symbology can be applied to products of different material sizes and geometries using application-dependent, computer-driven marking devices. The high fidelity markings produced by these devices can then be captured using a specially designed camera linked to any IBM-compatible computer. Applications of compressed symbology technology will reduce costs and improve quality, productivity, and processes in a wide variety of federal and commercial applications.

  6. Marine Hydrokinetic Energy Site Identification and Ranking Methodology Part II: Tidal Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Kilcher, Levi; Thresher, Robert; Tinnesand, Heidi

    2016-10-01

    Marine hydrokinetic energy is a promising and growing piece of the renewable energy sector that offers high predictability and additional energy sources for a diversified energy economy. This report investigates the market opportunities for tidal energy along the U.S. coastlines. It is part one of a two-part investigation into the United States' two largest marine hydrokinetic resources (wave and tidal). Tidal energy technology is still an emerging form of renewable energy for which large-scale grid-connected project costs are currently poorly defined. Ideally, device designers would like to know the resource conditions at economical project sites so they can optimize device designs. On the other hand, project developers need detailed device cost data to identify sites where projects are economical. That is, device design and siting are, to some extent, a coupled problem. This work describes a methodology for identifying likely deployment locations based on a set of criteria that tidal energy experts in industry, academia, and national laboratories agree are likely to be important factors for all technology types. Several factors that will affect tidal project costs and siting have not been considered here -- including permitting constraints, conflicting use, seasonal resource variability, extreme event likelihood, and distance to ports -- because consistent data are unavailable or technology-independent scoring could not be identified. As the industry continues to mature and converge around a subset of device archetypes with well-defined costs, more precise investigations of project siting that include these factors will be possible. For now, these results provide a high-level guide pointing to the regions where markets and resource will one day support commercial tidal energy projects.

  7. Monitoring and Risk Identification Caused by High Water, Floods and Erosion Processes in Urban Part of Sava Riverbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskoruš, D.; Miković, N.; Ljevar, I.

    2012-04-01

    Riverbed erosion and bottom deepening are part of natural fluvial processes in the upper stream of Sava River. The increasing gradient of those changes is interconnected with the level of human influence in the river basin and riverbed as well. In time period of last forty years the consequences of riverbed erosion are become serious as well as dangerous and they threaten the stability of hydro technical structures. The increasing value of flow velocity in riverbed in urban part of river section during high water level, mud and debris flow during the floods as well, is especially dangerous for old bridges. This paper contains result of velocity measurements during high waters taken by Hydrological Service of Republic Croatia, load transport monitoring during such events and cross sections in some vulnerable location. In this paper is given one example of Jakuševac railway bridge in Zagreb, heavily destroyed during high water event on the 30 March 2009., recently reconstructed by "Croatian Railways" company. Keywords: Riverbed erosion, flow velocity, mud and debris flow, risk identification, stability of bridges

  8. Analysis of a turbine rotor containing a transverse crack at Oak Creek Unit 17

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, G. W.; Rau, C. A., Jr.; Kottke, J. J.; Menning, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    Transient increases in one, two and three per revolution vibration characteristics of a low pressure steam turbine were observed during steam temperature reduction operations. Vibration and fracture mechanics analyses suggested the presence of a transverse shaft crack which was eventually identified by ultrasonic inspection and confirmed by destructive sectioning. Signature analyses of vibration data recorded over a two-year period prior to crack identification are correlated with fatigue crack growth, which occurred intermittently during transient temperature decreases. The apparent increased response of the rotor to vibration is due to asymmetric stiffness changes introduced by the growing transverse crack. The vibration response is predicted to increase with increasing crack depths in excess of 10% of the shaft diameter. Fracture mechanics analyses predict that fatigue crack growth occurred during periods of steam temperature decrease, when high surface tensile stresses are present. These same transient thermal stresses are shown to have retarded and prevented subsequent fatigue crack growth during steady operation.

  9. Cracking the Credit Hour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laitinen, Amy

    2012-01-01

    The basic currency of higher education--the credit hour--represents the root of many problems plaguing America's higher education system: the practice of measuring time rather than learning. "Cracking the Credit Hour" traces the history of this time-based unit, from the days of Andrew Carnegie to recent federal efforts to define a credit…

  10. Round table part 4: Identification of the key technologies and collaboration for Food production and preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasseur, Christophe; Tikhomirov, Alexander A.; Wheeler, Raymond

    2016-07-01

    Although the two first metabolic needs are based on simple molecule (i.e. oxygen and water), the third metabolic needs considered a tremendously large number and diversity of molecules: food. Today, physical chemical technologies do not allow to synthetize all the spectrum of molecules and biological processes have to be considered. Moreover, the raw material products by plants or by microorganisms are generally not directly edible or palatable and would need either transformation, assembly and/or storage. In other words the challenges of the food cannot be reduced to the plant production but need to include as well the complete chain, from the production conditions and the biomass quality up to the final edible products and its acceptance. In other words all the steps have to be considered and characterize. Today these challenges requires a high level of plants characterization. This round table part 4 would allow the participants to present some of their results and express some domain of activities. Re4serach for collaboration will be identified.

  11. Vibration analysis of multiple-cracked non-uniform beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazanoglu, K.; Yesilyurt, I.; Sabuncu, M.

    2009-03-01

    This paper presents the energy-based method for the vibration identification of non-uniform Euler-Bernoulli beams having multiple open cracks. The method includes significant modifications for the energy-based method presented by Yang et al. [Crack identification in vibrating beams using the energy method, Journal of Sound and Vibration 244 (2) (2001) 339-357.] The distribution of the energy consumed is determined by taking into account not only the strain change at the cracked beam surface as in general but also the considerable effect of the stress field caused by the angular displacement of the beam due to bending. The Rayleigh-Ritz approximation method is used in the analysis. The method is adapted to the cases of multiple cracks with an approach based on the definition of strain disturbance variation along the beam. Examples are presented on cantilever beams having different truncation factors. When the results are compared with a commercial finite element program and with the results of Zheng and Fan [Natural frequencies of a non-uniform beam with multiple cracks via modified Fourier series, Journal of Sound and Vibration 242 (4) (2001) 701-717], good agreements are obtained. The effects of truncation factors and positions of cracks on the natural frequency ratios are presented in graphics.

  12. Marine Hydrokinetic Energy Site Identification and Ranking Methodology Part I: Wave Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Kilcher, Levi; Thresher, Robert

    2016-10-01

    Marine hydrokinetic energy is a promising and growing piece of the renewable energy sector that offers high predictability and additional energy sources for a diversified energy economy. This report investigates the market opportunities for wave energy along the U.S. coastlines. It is part one of a two-part investigation into the United State's two largest marine hydrokinetic resources (wave and tidal). Wave energy technology is still an emerging form of renewable energy for which large-scale, grid-connected project costs are currently poorly defined. Ideally, device designers would like to know the resource conditions at economical project sites so they can optimize device designs. On the other hand, project developers need detailed device cost data to identify sites where projects are economical. That is, device design and siting are, to some extent, a coupled problem. This work describes a methodology for identifying likely deployment locations based on a set of criteria that wave energy experts in industry, academia, and national laboratories agree are likely to be important factors for all technology types. This work groups the data for the six criteria into 'locales' that are defined as the smaller of either the local transmission grid or a state boundary. The former applies to U.S. islands (e.g., Hawaii, American Samoa) and rural villages (e.g., in Alaska); the latter applies to states in the contiguous United States. These data are then scored from 0 to 10 according to scoring functions that were developed with input from wave energy industry and academic experts. The scores are aggregated using a simple product method that includes a weighting factor for each criterion. This work presents two weighting scenarios: a long-term scenario that does not include energy price (weighted zero) and a near term scenario that includes energy price. The aggregated scores are then used to produce ranked lists of likely deployment locales. In both scenarios, Hawaii and

  13. Thermal cracking of retort oil

    SciTech Connect

    Dearth, J.D.; Smith, R.H.

    1980-10-14

    The thermal cracking of retort oil vapors in an elongated reactor is improved by passing the effluent oil vapors and gases from a retort to a thermal cracking unit before the temperature of the retort effluent falls below 680* F. This encourages the more desirable cracking reactions, increases the thermal efficiency of the process, and avoids preheater coking.

  14. Automatic image cracks detection and removal on mobile devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronin, V.; Marchuk, V.; Sizyakin, R.; Gapon, N.; Pismenskova, M.; Tokareva, S.

    2016-05-01

    Some of old photographs are damaged due to improper archiving (e.g. affected by direct sunlight, humidity, insects, etc.) or have a physical damage resulting on appearance of cracks, scratches on photographs, non-necessary signs, spots, dust, and so on. This paper focuses on detection and removal of cracks from digital images. The proposed method consists of the following steps: pre-processing, crack detection and image reconstruction. A pre-processing step is used to suppress a noise and small defects in images. For a crack identification we use modified local binary patterns to form a feature vectors, and a non-linear SVM for a crack recognition. The combined inpainting method using structure and texture restoration is applied at the image reconstruction step. Image inpainting is the process of restoring the lost or damaged regions or modifying the image contents imperceptibly. This technique detects and removes the horizontal, vertical, diagonal cracks and other defects on complex scenes of image. We implemented proposed method on some mobile platforms for automatic image enhancement. Presented examples demonstrate the effectiveness of the algorithm in cracks detection and removal.

  15. Development of Eddy Current Technique for the Detection of Stress Corrosion Cracking in Space Shuttle Primary Reaction Control Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz; Simpson, John; Koshti, Ajay

    2006-01-01

    A recent identification of stress corrosion cracking in the Space Shuttle Primary Reaction Control System (PRCS) thrusters triggered an extensive nondestructive evaluation effort to develop techniques capable of identifying such damage on installed shuttle hardware. As a part of this effort, specially designed eddy current probes inserted into the acoustic cavity were explored for the detection of such flaws and for evaluation of the remaining material between the crack tip and acoustic cavity. The technique utilizes two orthogonal eddy current probes which are scanned under stepper motor control in the acoustic cavity to identify cracks hidden with as much as 0.060 remaining wall thickness to the cavity. As crack growth rates in this area have been determined to be very slow, such an inspection provides a large safety margin for continued operation of the critical shuttle hardware. Testing has been performed on thruster components with both actual and fabricated defects. This paper will review the design and performance of the developed eddy current inspection system. Detection of flaws as a function of remaining wall thickness will be presented along with the proposed system configuration for depot level or on-vehicle inspection capabilities.

  16. Development of Eddy Current Techniques for the Detection of Cracking in Space Shuttle Primary Reaction Control Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz A.; Simpson, John W.; Koshti, Ajay

    2007-01-01

    A recent identification of cracking in the Space Shuttle Primary Reaction Control System (PRCS) thrusters triggered an extensive nondestructive evaluation effort to develop techniques capable of identifying such damage on installed shuttle hardware. As a part of this effort, specially designed eddy current probes inserted into the acoustic cavity were explored for the detection of such flaws and for evaluation of the remaining material between the crack tip and acoustic cavity. The technique utilizes two orthogonal eddy current probes which are scanned under stepper motor control in the acoustic cavity to identify cracks hidden with as much as 0.060 remaining wall thickness to the cavity. As crack growth rates in this area have been determined to be very slow, such an inspection provides a large safety margin for continued operation of the critical shuttle hardware. Testing has been performed on thruster components with both actual and fabricated defects. This paper will review the design and performance of the developed eddy current inspection system. Detection of flaws as a function of remaining wall thickness will be presented along with the proposed system configuration for depot level or on-vehicle inspection capabilities.

  17. Experimental investigation on centrifugal compressor blade crack classification using the squared envelope spectrum.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongkun; Zhang, Xuefeng; Xu, Fujian

    2013-09-18

    Centrifugal compressors are a key piece of equipment for modern production. Among the components of the centrifugal compressor, the impeller is a pivotal part as it is used to transform kinetic energy into pressure energy. Blade crack condition monitoring and classification has been broadly investigated in the industrial and academic area. In this research, a pressure pulsation (PP) sensor arranged in close vicinity to the crack area and the corresponding casing vibration signals are used to monitor blade crack information. As these signals cannot directly demonstrate the blade crack, the method employed in this research is based on the extraction of weak signal characteristics that are induced by blade cracking. A method for blade crack classification based on the signals monitored by using a squared envelope spectrum (SES) is presented. Experimental investigations on blade crack classification are carried out to verify the effectiveness of this method. The results show that it is an effective tool for blade crack classification in centrifugal compressors.

  18. A Review of Crack Closure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-01

    OVERLOAD EFFECTS [27,32,36,55,65,80-94] 104 4.3 SHORT CRACK BEHAVIOUR 113 4.4 SURFACE CRACK BEHAVIOUR 116 4.5 EFFECT OF RESIDUAL STRESS 117 4.6...Compressive Stresses Developed 16 on a Growing Fatigue Crack During a Constant Amplitude Cyclic Load Control Test. 4 Plastic Zone and Residual Compressive... Stresses Developed 18 on a Saw Cut Sharp Crack During a Constant Amplitude Cyclic Load Control Test. Residual Stresses Developed in the Plane of Crack

  19. Residual strength of thin panels with cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madenci, Erdogan

    1994-01-01

    The previous design philosophies involving safe life, fail-safe and damage tolerance concepts become inadequate for assuring the safety of aging aircraft structures. For example, the failure mechanism for the Aloha Airline accident involved the coalescence of undetected small cracks at the rivet holes causing a section of the fuselage to peel open during flight. Therefore, the fuselage structure should be designed to have sufficient residual strength under worst case crack configurations and in-flight load conditions. Residual strength is interpreted as the maximum load carrying capacity prior to unstable crack growth. Internal pressure and bending moment constitute the two major components of the external loads on the fuselage section during flight. Although the stiffeners in the form of stringers, frames and tear straps sustain part of the external loads, the significant portion of the load is taken up by the skin. In the presence of a large crack in the skin, the crack lips bulge out with considerable yielding; thus, the geometric and material nonlinearities must be included in the analysis for predicting residual strength. Also, these nonlinearities do not permit the decoupling of in-plane and out-of-plane bending deformations. The failure criterion combining the concepts of absorbed specific energy and strain energy density addresses the aforementioned concerns. The critical absorbed specific energy (local toughness) for the material is determined from the global specimen response and deformation geometry based on the uniaxial tensile test data and detailed finite element modeling of the specimen response. The use of the local toughness and stress-strain response at the continuum level eliminates the size effect. With this critical parameter and stress-strain response, the finite element analysis of the component by using STAGS along with the application of this failure criterion provides the stable crack growth calculations for residual strength predictions.

  20. Residual strength of thin panels with cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madenci, Erdogan

    1994-12-01

    The previous design philosophies involving safe life, fail-safe and damage tolerance concepts become inadequate for assuring the safety of aging aircraft structures. For example, the failure mechanism for the Aloha Airline accident involved the coalescence of undetected small cracks at the rivet holes causing a section of the fuselage to peel open during flight. Therefore, the fuselage structure should be designed to have sufficient residual strength under worst case crack configurations and in-flight load conditions. Residual strength is interpreted as the maximum load carrying capacity prior to unstable crack growth. Internal pressure and bending moment constitute the two major components of the external loads on the fuselage section during flight. Although the stiffeners in the form of stringers, frames and tear straps sustain part of the external loads, the significant portion of the load is taken up by the skin. In the presence of a large crack in the skin, the crack lips bulge out with considerable yielding; thus, the geometric and material nonlinearities must be included in the analysis for predicting residual strength. Also, these nonlinearities do not permit the decoupling of in-plane and out-of-plane bending deformations. The failure criterion combining the concepts of absorbed specific energy and strain energy density addresses the aforementioned concerns. The critical absorbed specific energy (local toughness) for the material is determined from the global specimen response and deformation geometry based on the uniaxial tensile test data and detailed finite element modeling of the specimen response. The use of the local toughness and stress-strain response at the continuum level eliminates the size effect. With this critical parameter and stress-strain response, the finite element analysis of the component by using STAGS along with the application of this failure criterion provides the stable crack growth calculations for residual strength predictions.

  1. Localization and characterization of fatigue cracks around fastener holes using spherically focused ultrasonic probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Deborah; Datuin, Marvin; Aldrin, John; Warchol, Mark; Warchol, Lyudmila; Forsyth, David

    2017-02-01

    Results are presented from laboratory experiments and simulations that demonstrate the ability to localize fatigue cracks around fastener holes using spherically focused ultrasonic probes for shear-wave inspections. For the experiments, fatigue cracks were created in aluminum plates in a testing frame under cyclic loading. With the exceptions of one specimen with a mid-bore crack and another with a "through" crack, the remaining specimens contain surface-breaking cracks. All of the specimens were inspected for the cracks intersecting the back wall, and some were flipped over and re-inspected with the crack intersecting the front surface. Parameter and variable sensitivity studies were performed using CIVA Simulation Software. In contrast to C-scans where detection and localization of small cracks can be very difficult, modeling and initial experimental results demonstrate that cracks can be accurately located in "True" B-scans (B-scans projected in the part along the beam path). Initial results show that small-amplitude diffracted/scattered signals from the crack tips and edges are essential in obtaining clear crack traces in the True B-scans. It is important therefore that experimental data be acquired with sufficient gain to capture the diffracted/scattered signals. In all of the cases studied here, saturating the high-amplitude specular reflections from the fastener hole and crack enhanced the crack trace in the True B-scans.

  2. Sudden bending of cracked laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sih, G. C.; Chen, E. P.

    1980-01-01

    A dynamic approximate laminated plate theory is developed with emphasis placed on obtaining effective solution for the crack configuration where the 1/square root of r stress singularity and the condition of plane strain are preserved. The radial distance r is measured from the crack edge. The results obtained show that the crack moment intensity tends to decrease as the crack length to laminate plate thickness is increased. Hence, a laminated plate has the desirable feature of stabilizing a through crack as it increases its length at constant load. Also, the level of the average load intensity transmitted to a through crack can be reduced by making the inner layers to be stiffer than the outer layers. The present theory, although approximate, is useful for analyzing laminate failure to crack propagation under dynamic load conditions.

  3. Elevated temperature crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, S. N.; Vanstone, R. H.; Kim, K. S.; Laflen, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose is to determine the ability of currently available P-I integrals to correlate fatigue crack propagation under conditions that simulate the turbojet engine combustor liner environment. The utility of advanced fracture mechanics measurements will also be evaluated during the course of the program. To date, an appropriate specimen design, a crack displacement measurement method, and boundary condition simulation in the computational model of the specimen were achieved. Alloy 718 was selected as an analog material based on its ability to simulate high temperature behavior at lower temperatures. Tensile and cyclic tests were run at several strain rates so that an appropriate constitutive model could be developed. Suitable P-I integrals were programmed into a finite element post-processor for eventual comparison with experimental data.

  4. Statistical crack mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Dienes, J.K.

    1983-01-01

    An alternative to the use of plasticity theory to characterize the inelastic behavior of solids is to represent the flaws by statistical methods. We have taken such an approach to study fragmentation because it offers a number of advantages. Foremost among these is that, by considering the effects of flaws, it becomes possible to address the underlying physics directly. For example, we have been able to explain why rocks exhibit large strain-rate effects (a consequence of the finite growth rate of cracks), why a spherical explosive imbedded in oil shale produces a cavity with a nearly square section (opening of bedding cracks) and why propellants may detonate following low-speed impact (a consequence of frictional hot spots).

  5. Cracked and Pitted Plain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-536, 6 November 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a typical view--at 1.5 meters (5 feet) per pixel--of surfaces in far western Utopia Planitia. In this region, the plains have developed cracks and pit chains arranged in a polygonal pattern. The pits form by collapse along the trend of a previously-formed crack. This picture is located near 45.0oN, 275.4oW. This April 2003 image covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  6. Subcritical crack growth in marble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nara, Yoshitaka; Nishida, Yuki; Toshinori, Ii; Harui, Tomoki; Tanaka, Mayu; Kashiwaya, Koki

    2016-04-01

    It is essential to study time-dependent deformation and fracturing in various rock materials to prevent natural hazards related to the failure of a rock mass. In addition, information of time-dependent fracturing is essential to ensure the long-term stability of a rock mass surrounding various structures. Subcritical crack growth is one of the main causes of time-dependent fracturing in rock. It is known that subcritical crack growth is influenced by not only stress but also surrounding environment. Studies of subcritical crack growth have been widely conducted for silicate rocks such as igneous rocks and sandstones. By contrast, information of subcritical crack growth in carbonate rocks is not enough. Specifically, influence of surrounding environment on subcritical crack growth in carbonate rock should be clarified to ensure the long-term stability of a rock mass. In this study, subcritical crack growth in marble was investigated. Especially, the influence of the temperature, relative humidity and water on subcritical crack growth in marble is investigated. As rock samples, marbles obtained in Skopje-City in Macedonia and Carrara-City in Italy were used. To measure subcritical crack growth, we used the load relaxation method of the double-torsion (DT) test. All measurements by DT test were conducted under controlled temperature and relative humidity. For both marbles, it was shown that the crack velocity in marble in air increased with increasing relative humidity at a constant temperature. Additionally, the crack velocity in water was much higher than that in air. It was also found that the crack velocity increased with increasing temperature. It is considered that temperature and water have significant influences on subcritical crack growth in marble. For Carrara marble in air, it was recognized that the value of subcritical crack growth index became low when the crack velocity was higher than 10-4 m/s. This is similar to Region II of subcritical crack growth

  7. Utopia Cracks and Polygons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-339, 23 April 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a pattern of polygonal cracks and aligned, elliptical pits in western Utopia Planitia. The picture covers an area about 3 km (about 1.9 mi) wide near 44.9oN, 274.7oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  8. Distributed Password Cracking

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    conduit to this significant source of processing power and John the Ripper is the key. BOINC is a distributed data processing system that...processed without changing significant portions of the structure. John the Ripper is a password cracking program that takes a password file and...strength of their password security policy. This thesis goes into detail on the inner workings of BOINC, John the Ripper , and the merger of the two

  9. Detection of Multiple Cracks on a Partially Obstructed Plate Structure Following the Probabilistic Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, T.; Lam, H. F.; Chow, H. M.

    2010-05-01

    This paper addresses the problem of detecting multiple cracks on thin plates utilizing measured dynamic responses from only a few points on the target plate. Most existing model-based methods in the literature focus on the detection of single-crack or multi-crack with given crack number on beams. Only very limited number of researches have been carried out for the detection of multiple cracks for plate-type structures following the model-based method. There are two phase contained in the proposed crack detection methodology. The number of cracks is first identified by adopting the Bayesian model class selection method in the first stage. After that, the posterior (updated) probability density function (PDF) of the crack parameters, such as crack locations, lengths and depths are identified in the second phase following the Bayesian statistical identification framework. Very encouraging results are obtained for the case studies showing that the proposed methodology can correctly identify the number of cracks, the corresponding crack parameters and their associated uncertainties. Some useful discussions are also made through the case studies.

  10. Investigation of Cracks Found in Helicopter Longerons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Baughman, James M.; Wallace, Terryl A.

    2009-01-01

    Four cracked longerons, containing a total of eight cracks, were provided for study. Cracked regions were cut from the longerons. Load was applied to open the cracks, enabling crack surface examination. Examination revealed that crack propagation was driven by fatigue loading in all eight cases. Fatigue crack initiation appears to have occurred on the top edge of the longerons near geometric changes that affect component bending stiffness. Additionally, metallurigical analysis has revealed a local depletion in alloying elements in the crack initiation regions that may be a contributing factor. Fatigue crack propagation appeared to be initially driven by opening-mode loading, but at a crack length of approximately 0.5 inches (12.7 mm), there is evidence of mixed-mode crack loading. For the longest cracks studied, shear-mode displacements destroyed crack-surface features of interest over significant portions of the crack surfaces.

  11. Analysis of beveled semi-elliptical surface cracks in friction stir plug welded plates made of Al 2195 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadakke Veetil, Rahul

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid state joining process primarily used for Al alloys. Friction Stir Plug Welding (FPW) is a process in which a tapered shaped plug is friction stir welded into the hole that was left in the welded part when the initial FSW tool was removed. A rectangular plate made of Al 2195 alloy with a friction welded plug and containing a semi-elliptical surface crack was analyzed using the help of the software 'FEA Crack(TM)'. Three different crack depths of deep cracks as well as shallow cracks were considered in identical plates of a quarter inch thickness. The depths were 0.08, 0.13 and 0.18 inches for deep cracks and 0.008, 0.013 and 0.018 inches for shallow cracks. A uniaxial tensile load of 1 psi was applied on one end surface with the opposite surface being fixed. For each depth, four different crack arc lengths were considered which were of 15, 30, 60 and 90 degrees. For each of these cases, the crack tube containing the crack was rotated around the plug having an inner bevel, in steps of 10 degree starting from the base position to the 90 degree (vertical) position with an additional case of 45 degree rotation in between. The stress intensity factor K was plotted against the crack front angle. The average and maximum K factor values were also plotted for each of the main crack lengths against the crack rotation angle. The same procedure was employed for shallow cracks. The results were validated using Newman-Raju equations for semi elliptical surface cracks. Non dimensional K factor plots were also made for different cases of both deep and shallow surface cracks. Researchers studying the surface cracks can now get an estimate of the value of stress intensity factor for the crack length, depth of crack and also the angular position of the crack around the plug by interpolating my results.

  12. The strain energy release approach for modeling cracks in rotors: A state of the art review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, Chris A.

    2008-05-01

    The strain energy release rate (SERR) theory, combined with Linear Fracture Mechanics and Rotordynamics theories, has been widely used over the last three decades in order to calculate the compliance that causes a transverse surface crack in a rotating shaft. In this paper, the basic theory of this approach is presented, along with some extensions and limitations of its usage. The SERR theory is applied to a rotating crack and gives good results. The linear or nonlinear cracked rotor behavior depends on the mechanism of opening and closure of the crack during the shaft rotation. A brief history of the SERR theory is presented. In the 1970s, this theory met with rotordynamics as a result of research conducted on the causes of rotor failures in power industries. The main goal of this research was to give the engineer an early warning about the cracked situation of the rotor—in other words, to make the identification of the crack possible. Different methods of crack identification are presented here as well as those for multi-crack identification.

  13. Combination of thermal cracking with vacuum distillation of cracked tar

    SciTech Connect

    Telyashev, G.G.; Gimaev, R.N.; Makhov, A.F.; Usmanov, R.M.; Baimbetov, A.M.; Vafin, I.A.

    1987-11-01

    A method of obtaining greater amounts of distillate feedstocks from the heavy gasoil recovered by vacuum distillation of the products of thermal cracking of petroleum resids was examined. At the Novo-Ufa Petroleum Refinery, a two-furnace thermal cracking unit was reconstructed, adding a vacuum section for distillation of the cracked tar. A simplified flow plan of this unit is shown. Vacuum resid from atmospheric-vacuum tubestill units is heated in double-pipe heat exchangers, using heat from the gasoil and cracked tar. The new method makes it possible to curtail production of boiler fuel, expand the resources of feed, and improve the quality of petroleum coke.

  14. On the Crack Bifurcation and Fanning of Crack Growth Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, Royce G.; Zanganeh, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Crack growth data obtained from ASTM load shedding method for different R values show some fanning especially for aluminum alloys. It is believed by the authors and it has been shown before that the observed fanning is due to the crack bifurcation occurs in the near threshold region which is a function of intrinsic properties of the alloy. Therefore, validity of the ASTM load shedding test procedure and results is confirmed. However, this position has been argued by some experimentalists who believe the fanning is an artifact of the test procedure and thus the obtained results are invalid. It has been shown that using a special test procedure such as using compressively pre-cracked specimens will eliminate the fanning effect. Since not using the fanned data fit can result in a significantly lower calculated cyclic life, design of a component, particularly for rotorcraft and propeller systems will considerably be impacted and therefore this study is of paramount importance. In this effort both test procedures i.e. ASTM load shedding and the proposed compressive pre-cracking have been used to study the fatigue crack growth behavior of compact tension specimens made of aluminum alloy 2524-T3. Fatigue crack growth paths have been closely observed using SEM machines to investigate the effects of compression pre-cracking on the crack bifurcation behavior. The results of this study will shed a light on resolving the existing argument by better understanding of near threshold fatigue crack growth behavior.

  15. A Study of Failure in Small Pressurized Cylindrical Shells Containing a Crack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barwell, Craig A.; Eber, Lorenz; Fyfe, Ian M.

    1998-01-01

    The deformation in the vicinity of axial cracks in thin pressurized cylinders is examined using small experimental The deformation in the vicinity of axial cracks in thin pressurized cylinders is examined using small experimental models. The loading applied was either symmetric or unsymmetric about the crack plane, the latter being caused by structural constraints such as stringers. The objective was two fold - one, to provide the experimental results which will allow computer modeling techniques to be evaluated for deformations that are significantly different from that experienced by flat plates, and the other to examine the deformations and conditions associated with the onset of crack kinking which often precedes crack curving. The stresses which control crack growth in a cylindrical geometry depend on conditions introduced by the axial bulging, which is an integral part of this type of failure. For the symmetric geometry, both the hoop and radial strain just ahead off the crack, r = a, were measured and these results compared with those obtained from a variety of structural analysis codes, in particular STAGS [1], ABAQUS and ANSYS. In addition to these measurements, the pressures at the onset of stable and unstable crack growth were obtained and the corresponding crack deformations measured as the pressures were increased to failure. For the unsymmetric cases, measurements were taken of the crack kinking angle, and the displacements in the vicinity of the crack. In general, the strains ahead of the crack showed good agreement between the three computer codes and between the codes and the experiments. In the case of crack behavior, it was determined that modeling stable tearing with a crack-tip opening displacement fracture criterion could be successfully combined with the finite-element analysis techniques as used in structural analysis codes. The analytic results obtained in this study were very compatible with the experimental observations of crack growth

  16. Shuttle Fuel Feedliner Cracking Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesman, Tomas E.; Turner, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of material covered during 'Space Shuttle Fuel Feedliner Cracking Investigation MSFC Fluids Workshop' held November 19-21, 2002. Topics covered include: cracks on fuel feed lines of Orbiter space shuttles, fluid driven cracking analysis, liner structural modes, structural motion in a fluid, fluid borne drivers, three dimensional computational fluid dynamics models, fluid borne drivers from pumps, amplification mechanisms, flow parameter mapping, and flight engine flow map.

  17. Cross-validated detection of crack initiation in aerospace materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanniamparambil, Prashanth A.; Cuadra, Jefferson; Guclu, Utku; Bartoli, Ivan; Kontsos, Antonios

    2014-03-01

    A cross-validated nondestructive evaluation approach was employed to in situ detect the onset of damage in an Aluminum alloy compact tension specimen. The approach consisted of the coordinated use primarily the acoustic emission, combined with the infrared thermography and digital image correlation methods. Both tensile loads were applied and the specimen was continuously monitored using the nondestructive approach. Crack initiation was witnessed visually and was confirmed by the characteristic load drop accompanying the ductile fracture process. The full field deformation map provided by the nondestructive approach validated the formation of a pronounced plasticity zone near the crack tip. At the time of crack initiation, a burst in the temperature field ahead of the crack tip as well as a sudden increase of the acoustic recordings were observed. Although such experiments have been attempted and reported before in the literature, the presented approach provides for the first time a cross-validated nondestructive dataset that can be used for quantitative analyses of the crack initiation information content. It further allows future development of automated procedures for real-time identification of damage precursors including the rarely explored crack incubation stage in fatigue conditions.

  18. Fatigue Crack Topography.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    continents, rihst-i- " the battlement line Nile - Lake Albert - Lake Tanganyika - Lake Malawi in Attica. Iscr~l example are all ocean ridges, for...marker band application. MARKER MARKER MARKER BANDS BANDS BANDS 6". Ist5 4..% 2M.d - W.S. 0,0 CRACK K*MAX SPECI CORD 64 8 5 q. 14 969 kg9133 0cu LR) G...AFTER HIGHEST 1-7 LOW LEVEL PEAK MARKER BLOCK BEFORE ADDED TO SEQUENCE SEVERE 1-8 FLIGHT SNO BIRD 1-9 2-40 2-5KB 2-111 2-120 LOW LEVEL 427 CYCLES

  19. Retrofitting olefin cracking plants

    SciTech Connect

    Sumner, C.; Fernandez-Baujin, J.M.

    1983-12-01

    This article discusses the retrofitting of liquid crackers which produce olefins so that gaseous feedstocks can be used. Naphtha and gas oil are the predominant design feedstocks for producing olefins. The price of gaseous feedstocks such as ethane, propane and butane have become economically more attractive than liquid feedstocks. Existing liquid crackers will be able to produce ethylene at 85% or higher capacity when cracking propane and butane feedstock with only minor changes. Topics considered include revamping for vacuum gas oil (VGO) feedstocks and revamping for liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) feedstocks.

  20. Mode II fatigue crack propagation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, R.; Kibler, J. J.

    1971-01-01

    Fatigue crack propagation rates were obtained for 2024-T3 bare aluminum plates subjected to in-plane, mode I, extensional loads and transverse, mode II, bending loads. These results were compared to the results of Iida and Kobayashi for in-plane mode I-mode II extensional loads. The engineering significance of mode I-mode II fatigue crack growth is considered in view of the present results. A fatigue crack growth equation for handling mode I-mode II fatigue crack growth rates from existing mode I data is also discussed.

  1. Three-Dimensional Gear Crack Propagation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Sane, Ashok D.; Drago, Raymond J.; Wawrzynek, Paul A.

    1998-01-01

    Three-dimensional crack growth simulation was performed on a split-tooth gear design using boundary element modeling and linear elastic fracture mechanics. Initial cracks in the fillet of the teeth produced stress intensity factors of greater magnitude (and thus, greater crack growth rates) than those in the root or groove areas of the teeth. Crack growth simulation was performed on a case study to evaluate crack propagation paths. Tooth fracture was predicted from the crack growth simulation for an initial crack in the tooth fillet region. Tooth loads on the uncracked mesh of the split-tooth design were up to five times greater than those on the cracked mesh if equal deflections of the cracked and uncracked teeth were considered. Predicted crack shapes as well as crack propagation life are presented based on calculated stress intensity factors, mixed-mode crack propagation trajectory theories, and fatigue crack growth theories.

  2. Shear fatigue crack growth - A literature survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H. W.

    1985-01-01

    Recent studies of shear crack growth are reviewed, emphasizing test methods and data analyses. The combined mode I and mode II elastic crack tip stress fields are considered. The development and design of the compact shear specimen are described, and the results of fatigue crack growth tests using compact shear specimens are reviewed. The fatigue crack growth tests are discussed and the results of inclined cracks in tensile panels, center cracks in plates under biaxial loading, cracked beam specimens with combined bending and shear loading, center-cracked panels and double edge-cracked plates under cyclic shear loading are examined and analyzed in detail.

  3. 21 CFR 137.190 - Cracked wheat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cracked wheat. 137.190 Section 137.190 Food and... Related Products § 137.190 Cracked wheat. Cracked wheat is the food prepared by so cracking or cutting... such wheat, other than moisture, remain unaltered. Cracked wheat contains not more than 15 percent...

  4. 21 CFR 137.190 - Cracked wheat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cracked wheat. 137.190 Section 137.190 Food and... Related Products § 137.190 Cracked wheat. Cracked wheat is the food prepared by so cracking or cutting... such wheat, other than moisture, remain unaltered. Cracked wheat contains not more than 15 percent...

  5. 40 CFR Table 12 to Subpart Uuu of... - Initial Compliance With Organic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units 12 Table 12 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of... Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery... HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units As stated in § 63.1565(b)(4), you shall meet...

  6. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units 2 Table 2 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63... Catalytic Cracking Units As stated in § 63.1564(a)(2), you shall meet each operating limit in the...

  7. Effect of Crack Opening on Penetrant Crack Detectability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, Devin

    2009-01-01

    Results: From the testing we were able to determine all the cracks within the test range were detectable or better with developer. Many of the indications after development lost their linearity and gave circular indications. Our tests were performed in a laboratory and our procedure would be difficult in an industrial setting. Conclusions: The "V" did not significantly affect our ability to detect the POD cracks with fluorescent penetrant. Conduct same experiment with more cracks. The 0.025 and 0.050 POD specimens are clean and documented with the SEM. Conduct water-wash fluorescent penetrant test at EAFB. The poppet cracks are tighter than the POD specimen cracks. Flight FCV poppets: 0.01 mils (0.3 microns) Langley fatigue cracked poppets: 0.02 mils (0.5 microns) POD specimen (post 5 mils): 0.05 mils (1.4 microns) We could not detect cracks in Langley fatigue-cracked poppets with fluorescent penetrant. Investigate inability of penetrant to wet the poppet surface.

  8. Plates and shells containing a surface crack under general loading conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joseph, Paul F.; Erdogan, Fazil

    1987-01-01

    Various through and part-through crack problems in plates and shells are considered. The line-spring model of Rice and Levy is generalized to the skew-symmetric case to solve surface crack problems involving mixed-mode, coplanar crack growth. Compliance functions are introduced which are valid for crack depth to thickness ratios at least up to .95. This includes expressions for tension and bending as well as expressions for in-plane shear, out-of-plane shear, and twisting. Transverse shear deformation is taken into account in the plate and shell theories and this effect is shown to be important in comparing stress intensity factors obtained from the plate theory with three-dimensional solutions. Stress intensity factors for cylinders obtained by the line-spring model also compare well with three-dimensional solution. By using the line-spring approach, stress intensity factors can be obtained for the through crack and for part-through crack of any crack front shape, without recalculation integrals that take up the bulk of the computer time. Therefore, parameter studies involving crack length, crack depth, shell type, and shell curvature are made in some detail. The results will be useful in brittle fracture and in fatigue crack propagation studies. All problems considered are of the mixed boundary value type and are reducted to strongly singular integral equations which make use of the finite-part integrals of Hadamard. The equations are solved numerically in a manner that is very efficient.

  9. Bacterial contamination of cracks in symptomatic vital teeth.

    PubMed

    Kahler, B; Moule, A; Stenzel, D

    2000-12-01

    As part of an ongoing study on the initiation of cracks in teeth, 20 teeth exhibiting symptoms consistent with the presence of dentinal cracks were examined. The presence of a cracked cusp was confirmed by the selective application of pressure either with a mirror handle or Fracfinder (Svenoka, Dental Instruments, Vasby, Sweden). Cracked cusps were fractured from the teeth after the removal of all existing restorations and were immediately placed into ten percent formalin. Subsequently, specimens were dehydrated, sputter-coated and examined under the scanning electron microscope (SEM). All the cracked cusps exhibited complete fracture of the dentine to the level of the dentino-enamel junction. No partial fractures were seen. Numerous bacteria of many morphological forms were present on the dentinal surfaces, of all fractured cusps, in all teeth. Cocci, bacilli and filamentous forms were consistently found. Many bacteria were in the process of division. While bacterial contamination of dentinal cracks has been described in histological studies, the nature and distribution of these bacterial and fungal forms has not been shown previously in any detail. Prior SEM studies investigating the nature and mechanisms of fracture have not revealed bacterial contamination of the fractured surface. This paper draws attention to the fact that all symptomatic cracks in teeth appear to 1. extend right through the dentine to the dentino-enamel junction, and 2. appear to be extensively contaminated by bacteria.

  10. Thermal-mechanical fatigue crack growth in aircraft engine materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Yi

    1993-08-01

    This thesis summarizes the major technical achievements obtained as a part of a collaborative research and development project between Ecole Polytechnique and Pratt & Whitney Canada. These achievements include: (1) a thermal-mechanical fatigue (TMF) testing rig which is capable of studying the fatigue behaviors of gas turbine materials under simultaneous changes of temperatures and strains or stress; (2) an advanced alternative current potential drop (ACPD) measurement system which is capable of performing on-line monitoring of fatigue crack initiation and growth in specimen testing under isothermal and TMF conditions; (3) fatigue crack initiation and short crack growth data for the titanium specimens designed with notch features associated with bolt holes of compressor discs; (4) thermal-mechanical fatigue crack growth data for two titanium alloys being used in PWC engine components, which explained the material fatigue behavior encountered in full-scale component testing; (5) a complete fractographic analysis for the tested specimens which enhanced the understanding of the fatigue crack growth mechanisms and helped to establish an analytical crack growth model; and (6) application of the ACPD fatigue crack monitoring technique to single tooth firtree specimen (STFT) LCF testing of PWA 1480 single crystal alloy. Finally, a comprehensive discussion concerning the results pertaining to this research project is presented.

  11. Optimization of ultrasonic array inspections using an efficient hybrid model and real crack shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felice, Maria V.; Velichko, Alexander; Wilcox, Paul D.; Barden, Tim; Dunhill, Tony

    2015-03-01

    Models which simulate the interaction of ultrasound with cracks can be used to optimize ultrasonic array inspections, but this approach can be time-consuming. To overcome this issue an efficient hybrid model is implemented which includes a finite element method that requires only a single layer of elements around the crack shape. Scattering Matrices are used to capture the scattering behavior of the individual cracks and a discussion on the angular degrees of freedom of elastodynamic scatterers is included. Real crack shapes are obtained from X-ray Computed Tomography images of cracked parts and these shapes are inputted into the hybrid model. The effect of using real crack shapes instead of straight notch shapes is demonstrated. An array optimization methodology which incorporates the hybrid model, an approximate single-scattering relative noise model and the real crack shapes is then described.

  12. A metallurgical evaluation of stress corrosion cracking in large diameter stainless steel piping

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, D.A.; Rawl, D.E. Jr.; Louthan, M.R. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Ultrasonic testing (UT) of the stainless steel piping in the primary coolant water system of SRS reactors indicates the presence of short, partly-through-wall stress corrosion cracks in the heat-affected zone of approximately 7% of the circumferential pipe welds. These cracks are thought to develop by intergranular nucleation and mixed mode propagation. Metallographic evaluations have confirmed the UT indications of crack size and provided evidence that crack growth involved the accumulation of chloride inside the growing crack. It is postulated that the development of an oxygen depletion cell inside the crack results in the migration of chloride ions to the crack tip to balance the accumulation of positively charged metallic ions. The results of this metallurgicial evaluation, combined with structural assessments of system integrity, support the existence of leak-before-break conditions in the SRS reactor piping system. 13 refs., 9 figs.

  13. Optimization of ultrasonic array inspections using an efficient hybrid model and real crack shapes

    SciTech Connect

    Felice, Maria V.; Velichko, Alexander Wilcox, Paul D.; Barden, Tim; Dunhill, Tony

    2015-03-31

    Models which simulate the interaction of ultrasound with cracks can be used to optimize ultrasonic array inspections, but this approach can be time-consuming. To overcome this issue an efficient hybrid model is implemented which includes a finite element method that requires only a single layer of elements around the crack shape. Scattering Matrices are used to capture the scattering behavior of the individual cracks and a discussion on the angular degrees of freedom of elastodynamic scatterers is included. Real crack shapes are obtained from X-ray Computed Tomography images of cracked parts and these shapes are inputted into the hybrid model. The effect of using real crack shapes instead of straight notch shapes is demonstrated. An array optimization methodology which incorporates the hybrid model, an approximate single-scattering relative noise model and the real crack shapes is then described.

  14. Crack opening area estimates in pressurized through-wall cracked elbows under bending

    SciTech Connect

    Franco, C.; Gilles, P.; Pignol, M.

    1997-04-01

    One of the most important aspects in the leak-before-break approach is the estimation of the crack opening area corresponding to potential through-wall cracks at critical locations during plant operation. In order to provide a reasonable lower bound to the leak area under such loading conditions, numerous experimental and numerical programs have been developed in USA, U.K. and FRG and widely discussed in literature. This paper aims to extend these investigations on a class of pipe elbows characteristic of PWR main coolant piping. The paper is divided in three main parts. First, a new simplified estimation scheme for leakage area is described, based on the reference stress method. This approach mainly developed in U.K. and more recently in France provides a convenient way to account for the non-linear behavior of the material. Second, the method is carried out for circumferential through-wall cracks located in PWR elbows subjected to internal pressure. Finite element crack area results are presented and comparisons are made with our predictions. Finally, in the third part, the discussion is extended to elbows under combined pressure and in plane bending moment.

  15. TOXICITY IDENTIFICATION EVALUATION WORKSHOP-PART II: WHAT WORKS, WHAT DOESN'T, AND DEVELOPMENTS FOR EFFLUENTS AND AQUEOUS MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxicity reduction evaluations (TRE) and Toxicity Identification Evaluations (TIE) case examples were the basis of a technical workshop held by SETAC. Techniques to evaluate the mixtures of toxicants by using acute and chronic toxicity endpoints that incorporate marine, estuarine...

  16. Forensic identification science evidence since Daubert: Part II--judicial reasoning in decisions to exclude forensic identification evidence on grounds of reliability.

    PubMed

    Page, Mark; Taylor, Jane; Blenkin, Matt

    2011-07-01

    Many studies regarding the legal status of forensic science have relied on the U.S. Supreme Court's mandate in Daubert v. Merrell Dow Pharmaceuticals Inc., and its progeny in order to make subsequent recommendations or rebuttals. This paper focuses on a more pragmatic approach to analyzing forensic science's immediate deficiencies by considering a qualitative analysis of actual judicial reasoning where forensic identification evidence has been excluded on reliability grounds since the Daubert precedent. Reliance on general acceptance is becoming insufficient as proof of the admissibility of forensic evidence. The citation of unfounded statistics, error rates and certainties, a failure to document the analytical process or follow standardized procedures, and the existence of observe bias represent some of the concerns that have lead to the exclusion or limitation of forensic identification evidence. Analysis of these reasons may serve to refocus forensic practitioners' testimony, resources, and research toward rectifying shortfalls in these areas.

  17. REINFORCEMENT IN CLASSROOM LEARNING. PART II, STUDIES OF REINFORCEMENT IN SIMULATED CLASSROOM SITUATIONS. PART III, IDENTIFICATION OF REINFORCERS OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TRAVERS, ROBERT M.W.; AND OTHERS

    REINFORCEMENT CONCEPTS DERIVED LARGELY FROM RESEARCH OF SUBHUMAN SUBJECTS WERE TESTED FOR APPLICABILITY TO HUMAN-LEARNING SITUATIONS SIMILAR TO THOSE THAT OCCUR IN SCHOOLS. A SERIES OF EXPLORATORY STUDIES CONDUCTED IS DESCRIBED IN PART II OF THIS REPORT. IN PART III, TWO EXPERIMENTS CONDUCTED TO DETERMINE THE REINFORCING VALUE OF DIFFERENT STIMULI…

  18. Replica-Based Crack Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Willard, Scott A.; Smith, Stephen W.; Piascik, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    Surface replication has been proposed as a method for crack detection in space shuttle main engine flowliner slots. The results of a feasibility study show that examination of surface replicas with a scanning electron microscope can result in the detection of cracks as small as 0.005 inch, and surface flaws as small as 0.001 inch, for the flowliner material.

  19. Experiences on IGSCC crack manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Veron, P.

    1997-02-01

    The author presents his experience in manufacturing IGSCC realistic defects, mainly in INCONEL 600 MA Steam Generator Tubes. From that experience he extracts some knowledge about this cracking (influence of chemistry in the environment, stress state, crack growth rate, and occurrence in laboratory condition of break before leak).

  20. Crack closure on rehydration of glass-ionomer materials.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Sharanbir K; Pilecki, Peter; Sherriff, Martyn; Watson, Timothy F

    2004-10-01

    Moisture-sensitivity of immature glass-ionomer cements suggests that hydration-induced volumetric expansion might close and potentially heal established cracks. Crack closure in glass-ionomer cements (GICs) was observed following rehydration. Circular cavities were prepared in 15 teeth: 10 were restored with resin-modified GICs (5 with Fuji II LC and 5 with Photac-Fil) and 5 were restored with a conventional GIC (Fuji IX); all were dehydrated for 1 min with air and imaged immediately by confocal microscopy. Crack formation in each was located, after which water was placed on the surface and observed for 15 min via a CCD camera. Dehydration caused cracks with measurable gaps, while rehydration resulted in varying degrees of closure: closure was limited in the conventional GIC, and complete or near complete along part/s of the crack in the resin-modified GICs. In all, closure movement became imperceptible after the first 10 min. Statistical analysis indicated no significant difference between the closure behavior of all materials. However, the resin-modified GICs appeared to show a greater potential for closure of established cracks than the conventional GIC upon rehydration.

  1. The crack problem in a reinforced cylindrical shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yahsi, O. S.; Erdogan, F.

    1986-01-01

    A partially reinforced cylinder containing an axial through crack is considered. The reinforcement is assumed to be fully bonded to the main cylinder. The composite cylinder is thus modelled by a nonhomogeneous shell having a step change in the elastic properties at the z = 0 plane, z being the axial coordinate. Using a Reissner type transverse shear theory the problem is reduced to a pair of singular integral equations. In the special case of a crack tip touching the bimaterial interface it is shown that the dominant parts of the kernels of the integral equations associated with both membrane loading and bending of the shell reduce to the generalized Cauchy kernel obtained for the corresponding plane stress case. The integral equations are solved and the stress intensity factors are given for various crack and shell dimensions. A bonded fiberglass reinforcement which may serve as a crack arrestor is used as an example.

  2. The crack problem in a reinforced cylindrical shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yahsi, O. S.; Erdogan, F.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper a partially reinforced cylinder containing an axial through crack is considered. The reinforcement is assumed to be fully bonded to the main cylinder. The composite cylinder is thus modelled by a nonhomogeneous shell having a step change in the elastic properties at the z=0 plane, z being the axial coordinate. Using a Reissner type transverse shear theory the problem is reduced to a pair of singular integral equations. In the special case of a crack tip touching the bimaterial interface it is shown that the dominant parts of the kernels of the integral equations associated with both membrane loading and bending of the shell reduce to the generalized Cauchy kernel obtained for the corresponding plane stress case. The integral equations are solved and the stress intensity factors are given for various crack and shell dimensions. A bonded fiberglass reinforcement which may serve as a crack arrestor is used as an example.

  3. Absorption Voltages and Insulation Resistance in Ceramic Capacitors with Cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Time dependence of absorption voltages (Vabs) in different types of low-voltage X5R and X7R ceramic capacitors was monitored for a maximum duration of hundred hours after polarization. To evaluate the effect of mechanical defects on Vabs, cracks in the dielectric were introduced either mechanically or by thermal shock. The maximum absorption voltage, time to roll-off, and the rate of voltage decrease are shown to depend on the crack-related leakage currents and insulation resistance in the parts. A simple model that is based on the Dow equivalent circuit for capacitors with absorption has been developed to assess the insulation resistance of capacitors. Standard measurements of the insulation resistance, contrary to the measurements based on Vabs, are not sensitive to the presence of mechanical defects and fail to reveal capacitors with cracks. Index Terms: Ceramic capacitor, insulation resistance, dielectric absorption, cracking.

  4. Hydrocarbon cracking and reforming process

    SciTech Connect

    Le, Q.N.; Schipper, P.H.; Owen, H.

    1992-03-31

    This patent describes a process for upgrading paraffinic naphtha to high octane fuel. It comprises: contacting a fresh naphtha feedstock stream containing a major amount of C{sub 7+} alkanes and naphthenes with medium pore acid cracking catalyst under low pressure selective cracking conditions effective to produce 4-C5 isoalkene and C4-C5 isoalkane, the cracking catalyst being substantially free of hydrogenation-dehydrogenation metal components and having an acid cracking activity less than 15; separating cracking effluent to obtain an olefinic fraction rich in C4-C5 isoalkene and a C6+ fraction; etherifying the C4-C5 isoalkene fraction by catalytic reaction with lower alkanol to produce tertiary-alkyl ether product; and reforming the C6+ fraction to provide high octane gasoline components.

  5. High speed thin plate fatigue crack monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz A. (Inventor); Heyman, Joseph S. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor); Fulton, James P. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A device and method are provided which non-destructively detect crack length and crack geometry in thin metallic plates. A non-contacting vibration apparatus produces resonant vibrations without introducing extraneous noise. Resulting resonant vibration shifts in cracked plates are correlated to known crack length in plates with similar resonant vibration shifts. In addition, acoustic emissions of cracks at resonance frequencies are correlated to acoustic emissions from known crack geometries.

  6. Crack Turning Mechanics of Composite Wing Skin Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, F. G.; Reeder, James R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The safety of future composite wing skin integral stiffener panels requires a full understanding of failure mechanisms of these damage tolerance critical structures under both in-plane and bending loads. Of primary interest is to derive mathematical models using fracture mechanics in anisotropic cracked plate structures, to assess the crack turning mechanisms, and thereby to enhance the residual strength in the integral stiffener composite structures. The use of fracture mechanics to assess the failure behavior in a cracked structure requires the identification of critical fracture parameters which govern the severity of stress and deformation field ahead of the flaw, and which can be evaluated using information obtained from the flaw tip. In the three-year grant, the crack-tip fields under plane deformation, crack-tip fields for anisotropic plates and anisotropic shells have been obtained. In addition, methods for determining the stress intensity factors, energy release rate, and the T-stresses have been proposed and verified. The research accomplishments can be summarized as follows: (1) Under plane deformation in anisotropic solids, the asymptotic crack-tip fields have been obtained using Stroh formalism; (2) The T-stress and the coefficient of the second term for sigma(sub y), g(sub 32), have been obtained using path-independent integral, the J-integral and Betti's reciprocal theorem together with auxiliary fields; (3) With experimental data performed by NASA, analyses indicated that the mode-I critical stress intensity factor K(sub Q) provides a satisfactory characterization of fracture initiation for a given laminate thickness, provided the failure is fiber-dominated and crack extends in a self-similar manner; (4) The high constraint specimens, especially for CT specimens, due to large T-stress and large magnitude of negative g(sub 32) term may be expected to inhibit the crack extension in the same plane and promote crack turning; (5) Crack turning out of

  7. NASA/FLAGRO - FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH COMPUTER PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, R. G.

    1994-01-01

    -intensity factor numerical values can be computed for making comparisons or checks of solutions. NASA/FLAGRO can check for failure of a part-through crack in the mode of a through crack when net ligament yielding occurs. NASA/FLAGRO has a number of special subroutines and files which provide enhanced capabilities and easy entry of data. These include crack case solutions, cyclic load spectrums, nondestructive examination initial flaw sizes, table interpolation, and material properties. The materials properties files are divided into two types, a user defined file and a fixed file. Data is entered and stored in the user defined file during program execution, while the fixed file contains already coded-in property value data for many different materials. Prompted input from CRT terminals consists of initial crack definition (which can be defined automatically), rate solution type, flaw type and geometry, material properties (if they are not in the built-in tables of material data), load spectrum data (if not included in the loads spectrum file), and design limit stress levels. NASA/FLAGRO output includes an echo of the input with any error or warning messages, the final crack size, whether or not critical crack size has been reached for the specified stress level, and a life history profile of the crack propagation. NASA/FLAGRO is modularly designed to facilitate revisions and operation on minicomputers. The program was implemented on a DEC VAX 11/780 with the VMS operating system. NASA/FLAGRO is written in FORTRAN77 and has a memory requirement of 1.4 MB. The program was developed in 1986.

  8. Subcritical crack-growth behavior in advanced silicon nitride ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatnagar, Ajay

    Advanced silicon nitride ceramics (Sisb3Nsb4) are leading candidates for structural components in gas turbine and reciprocating engines. However, widespread use of these materials has been deterred due to their low fracture toughness under tensile loads. In the last decade, novel processing techniques have allowed extrinsic toughening of this material through grain bridging processes. The extrinsic toughening mechanisms, however, are prone to subcritical crack-growth processes through environmental, mechanical and high temperature degradation mechanisms. Understanding these failure mechanisms is critical for long term reliability and design. In the first part of this study, fracture and environmentally-assisted subcritical crack-growth processes were examined in bulk Y-Si-Al-O-N oxynitride glasses with compositions typical of the grain boundary phase of silicon nitride ceramics. Both long crack as well as short crack behavior were investigated to establish a reliable fracture toughness value and to elucidate the anomalous densification behavior of the oxynitride glass under indentation loads. Environmentally assisted subcritical crack-growth processes were studied in inert, moist and wet environments under both cyclic and static loading conditions and compared to commercial soda lime and borosilicate glasses. The second part of this study involved the effect of loading, microstructure and temperature on subcritical crack-growth behavior in silicon nitride ceramics. Crack-growth rates under an alternating applied stress intensity were compared to those under static loads. The effect of microstructure on fatigue crack-growth rates was determined in silicon nitrides sintered using different processing techniques and with different grain sizes. Unique experimental techniques were used to determine subcritical crack-growth behavior from room temperature to elevated temperatures of 1250sp°C. Frictional wear models were used to explain the trends in experimental data at

  9. Excitation by flows in seals and clearances. Part 1: Introduction: Fluid-structure-interactions in rotordynamics. Part 2: Identification of rotordynamic coefficients of annular seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordmann, R.

    The fluid-structure interactions in rotor dynamics and the identification of rotor dynamic coefficients of annular seals are studied. The different fluid forces acting in the neck ring, the interstage seals, the balance pistons, the impellers and the oil film bearings of pumps are reviewed. These forces can have a large influence on the bending vibrations of a pump rotor. Theoretical and experimental models of fluid elements and of rotordynamics are presented. Simulations of the rotordynamic behavior show that the fluid forces of most elements can be described by linear-force relations. A theoretical model and an indentification procedure are presented to determine the dynamic coefficients of seals. The identified parameters confirm the assumptions in modeling and point out that the stiffness and damping characteristics of seals are significant for the stability behavior of pumps.

  10. A comprehensive theoretical, numerical and experimental approach for crack detection in power plant rotating machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoisser, C. M.; Audebert, S.

    2008-05-01

    In order to describe the state-of-the-art on cracked rotor related problems, the current work presents the comprehensive theoretical, numerical and experimental approach adopted by EDF for crack detection in power plant rotating machinery. The work mainly focuses on the theoretical cracked beam model developed in the past years by S. Andrieux and C. Varé and associates both numerical and experimental aspects related to the crack detection problem in either turboset or turbo pump units. The theoretical part consists of the derivation of a lumped cracked beam model from the three-dimensional formulation of the general problem of elasticity with unilateral contact conditions on the crack lips, valid for any shape and number of cracks in the beam section and extended to cracks not located in a cross-section. This leads to the assessment of the cracked beam rigidity as a function of the rotation angle, in case of pure bending load or bending plus shear load. In this way the function can be implemented in a 1D rotordynamics code. An extension of the cracked beam model taking into account the torsion behaviour is also proposed. It is based on the assumption of full adherence between crack lips, when the crack closes, and on an incremental formulation of deformation energy. An experimental validation has been carried out using different cracked samples, both in static and dynamic configurations, considering one or three elliptic cracks in the same cross-section and helix-shaped cracks. Concerning the static configuration, a good agreement between numerical and experimental results is found. It is shown to be equal to 1% maximal gap of the beam deflection. Concerning the dynamical analysis, the main well-known indicator 2× rev. bending vibration component at half critical speed is approximated at maximum by 18% near the crack position. Our experiments also allowed for the observation of the bending and torsion resonance frequency shifts determined by the extra

  11. TOXICITY IDENTIFICATION EVALUATION WORKSHOP: PART I: WHAT WORKS, WHAT DOESN'T, AND DEVELOPMENTS FOR EFFLUENTS AND AQUEOUS MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The science of toxicity identification evaluations (TIEs) on aqueous effluents, surface water, and sediment porewater has progressed since the USEPA published the guidance documents early 1990s. USEPA's TIE approach uses toxicity tests to bridge toxicity results and chemical-spec...

  12. FASTRAN II - FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS (UNIX VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    loads may be either tensile or compressive. Several standardized aircraft flight-load histories, such as TWIST, Mini-TWIST, FALSTAFF, Inverted FALSTAFF, Felix and Gaussian, are included as options. FASTRAN II also includes two other methods that will help the user input spectrum load histories. The two methods are: (1) a list of stress points, and (2) a flight-by-flight history of stress points. Examples are provided in the user manual. Developed as a research program, FASTRAN II has successfully predicted crack growth in many metallic materials under various aircraft spectrum loading. A computer program DKEFF which is a part of the FASTRAN II package was also developed to analyze crack growth rate data from laboratory specimens to obtain the effective stress-intensity factor against crack growth rate relations used in FASTRAN II. FASTRAN II is written in standard FORTRAN 77. It has been successfully compiled and implemented on Sun4 series computers running SunOS and on IBM PC compatibles running MS-DOS using the Lahey F77L FORTRAN compiler. Sample input and output data are included with the FASTRAN II package. The UNIX version requires 660K of RAM for execution. The standard distribution medium for the UNIX version (LAR-14865) is a .25 inch streaming magnetic tape cartridge in UNIX tar format. It is also available on a 3.5 inch diskette in UNIX tar format. The standard distribution medium for the MS-DOS version (LAR-14944) is a 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. The contents of the diskette are compressed using the PKWARE archiving tools. The utility to unarchive the files, PKUNZIP.EXE, is included. The program was developed in 1984 and revised in 1992. Sun4 and SunOS are trademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc. IBM PC is a trademark of International Business Machines Corp. MS-DOS is a trademark of Microsoft, Inc. F77L is a trademark of the Lahey Computer Systems, Inc. UNIX is a registered trademark of AT&T Bell Laboratories. PKWARE and PKUNZIP are trademarks of PKWare

  13. FASTRAN II - FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS (IBM PC VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    loads may be either tensile or compressive. Several standardized aircraft flight-load histories, such as TWIST, Mini-TWIST, FALSTAFF, Inverted FALSTAFF, Felix and Gaussian, are included as options. FASTRAN II also includes two other methods that will help the user input spectrum load histories. The two methods are: (1) a list of stress points, and (2) a flight-by-flight history of stress points. Examples are provided in the user manual. Developed as a research program, FASTRAN II has successfully predicted crack growth in many metallic materials under various aircraft spectrum loading. A computer program DKEFF which is a part of the FASTRAN II package was also developed to analyze crack growth rate data from laboratory specimens to obtain the effective stress-intensity factor against crack growth rate relations used in FASTRAN II. FASTRAN II is written in standard FORTRAN 77. It has been successfully compiled and implemented on Sun4 series computers running SunOS and on IBM PC compatibles running MS-DOS using the Lahey F77L FORTRAN compiler. Sample input and output data are included with the FASTRAN II package. The UNIX version requires 660K of RAM for execution. The standard distribution medium for the UNIX version (LAR-14865) is a .25 inch streaming magnetic tape cartridge in UNIX tar format. It is also available on a 3.5 inch diskette in UNIX tar format. The standard distribution medium for the MS-DOS version (LAR-14944) is a 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. The contents of the diskette are compressed using the PKWARE archiving tools. The utility to unarchive the files, PKUNZIP.EXE, is included. The program was developed in 1984 and revised in 1992. Sun4 and SunOS are trademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc. IBM PC is a trademark of International Business Machines Corp. MS-DOS is a trademark of Microsoft, Inc. F77L is a trademark of the Lahey Computer Systems, Inc. UNIX is a registered trademark of AT&T Bell Laboratories. PKWARE and PKUNZIP are trademarks of PKWare

  14. Analysis of Crack Arrest Toughness.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-15

    vload(m) vp tn(m) Vertical Source Load (kN) on wedge HY80 Finite Element 0.0122 0.0099 3.81x10 -4 144 Steel Calculations Experiment 0.0122 --- 3.74x10-4...curve, are bona fide measures of the fracture arrest capability of tough ductile steels . The second is that the J-values represent the crack driving...fibrous mode of crack extension. (b) A new test method for studying fast fracture and arrest in tough steels . (c) Measurements of fast fracture and crack

  15. A computational algorithm for crack determination: The multiple crack case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, Kurt; Vogelius, Michael

    1992-01-01

    An algorithm for recovering a collection of linear cracks in a homogeneous electrical conductor from boundary measurements of voltages induced by specified current fluxes is developed. The technique is a variation of Newton's method and is based on taking weighted averages of the boundary data. The method also adaptively changes the applied current flux at each iteration to maintain maximum sensitivity to the estimated locations of the cracks.

  16. Stress intensity and crack displacement for small edge cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orange, Thomas W.

    1988-01-01

    The weight function method was used to derive stress intensity factors and crack mouth displacement coefficients for small edge cracks (less than 20 percent of the specimen width) in common fracture specimen configurations. Contact stresses due to point application of loads were found to be small but significant for three-point bending and insignificant for four-point bending. The results are compared with available equations and numerical solutions from the literature and with unpublished boundary collocation results.

  17. Quantitative determination of pregnanes from aerial parts of Caralluma species using HPLC-UV and identification by LC-ESI-TOF.

    PubMed

    Avula, Bharathi; Shukla, Yatin J; Wang, Yan-Hong; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2011-01-01

    An HPLC method was developed for the quantitative determination of five pregnane derivatives from aerial parts of Caralluma species and dietary supplements. The method was validated for linearity, repeatability, LOD, and LOQ. The LOD and LOQ of five pregnane compounds were found to be in the range of 1-5 and 3-15 microg/mL, respectively, by HPLC using photodiode array detection. This method was applied to the identification of three plant materials of Caralluma species (C. fimbriata, C. umbellate, and C. attentuata) and seven dietary supplements claiming to contain C. fimbriata. An LCIMS coupled with electrospray ionization interface method was used for the identification of compounds and involved the use of [M+Na]+ ions in the positive ion mode with extracted ion chromatogram.

  18. Boundary force method for analyzing two-dimensional cracked bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, P. W.; Raju, I. S.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The Boundary Force Method (BFM) was formulated for the two-dimensional stress analysis of complex crack configurations. In this method, only the boundaries of the region of interest are modeled. The boundaries are divided into a finite number of straight-line segments, and at the center of each segment, concentrated forces and a moment are applied. This set of unknown forces and moments is calculated to satisfy the prescribed boundary conditions of the problem. The elasticity solution for the stress distribution due to concentrated forces and a moment applied at an arbitrary point in a cracked infinite plate are used as the fundamental solution. Thus, the crack need not be modeled as part of the boundary. The formulation of the BFM is described and the accuracy of the method is established by analyzing several crack configurations for which accepted stress-intensity factor solutions are known. The crack configurations investigated include mode I and mixed mode (mode I and II) problems. The results obtained are, in general, within + or - 0.5 percent of accurate numerical solutions. The versatility of the method is demonstrated through the analysis of complex crack configurations for which limited or no solutions are known.

  19. Microtubule dynamic instability: the role of cracks between protofilaments.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunlei; Li, Jun; Goodson, Holly V; Alber, Mark S

    2014-03-28

    Microtubules (MTs) are cytoplasmic protein polymers that are essential for fundamental cellular processes including the maintenance of cell shape, organelle transport and formation of the mitotic spindle. Microtubule dynamic instability is critical for these processes, but it remains poorly understood, in part because the relationship between the structure of the MT tip and the growth/depolymerization transitions is enigmatic. In previous work, we used computational models of dynamic instability to provide evidence that cracks (laterally unbonded regions) between protofilaments play a key role in the regulation of dynamic instability. Here we use computational models to investigate the connection between cracks and dynamic instability in more detail. Our work indicates that while cracks contribute to dynamic instability in a fundamental way, it is not the depth of the cracks per se that governs MT dynamic instability. Instead, what matters more is whether the cracks terminate in GTP-rich or GDP-rich regions of the MT. Based on these observations, we suggest that a functional "GTP cap" (i.e., one capable of promoting MT growth) is one where the cracks terminate in pairs of GTP-bound subunits, and that the likelihood of catastrophe rises significantly with the fraction of crack-terminating subunits that contain GDP. In addition to helping clarify the mechanism of dynamic instability, this idea could also explain how MT stabilizers work: proteins that introduce lateral cross-links between protofilaments would produce islands of GDP-bound tubulin that mimic GTP-rich regions in having strong lateral bonds, thus reducing crack propagation, suppressing catastrophe and promoting rescue.

  20. Peridynamic model for fatigue cracking.

    SciTech Connect

    Silling, Stewart Andrew; Abe Askari

    2014-10-01

    The peridynamic theory is an extension of traditional solid mechanics in which the field equations can be applied on discontinuities, such as growing cracks. This paper proposes a bond damage model within peridynamics to treat the nucleation and growth of cracks due to cyclic loading. Bond damage occurs according to the evolution of a variable called the "remaining life" of each bond that changes over time according to the cyclic strain in the bond. It is shown that the model reproduces the main features of S-N data for typical materials and also reproduces the Paris law for fatigue crack growth. Extensions of the model account for the effects of loading spectrum, fatigue limit, and variable load ratio. A three-dimensional example illustrates the nucleation and growth of a helical fatigue crack in the torsion of an aluminum alloy rod.

  1. 46 CFR 59.10-5 - Cracks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cracks. 59.10-5 Section 59.10-5 Shipping COAST GUARD... APPURTENANCES Welding Repairs to Boilers and Pressure Vessels in -Service § 59.10-5 Cracks. (a) Cracks extending... cracks are veed out so that complete penetration of the weld metal is secured. (b) Circumferential...

  2. Cocaine/Crack: The Big Lie.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. on Drug Abuse (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD.

    This pamphlet focuses on cocaine and crack use and the addictive nature of cocaine/crack. It contains a set of 21 questions about crack and cocaine, each accompanied by a clear and complete response. Interspersed throughout the booklet are photographs and quotes from former cocaine or crack users/addicts. Questions and answers focus on what…

  3. Shaft vibrations in turbomachinery excited by cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grabowski, B.

    1982-01-01

    During the past years the dynamic behavior of rotors with cracks has been investigated mainly theoretically. This paper deals with the comparison of analytical and experimental results of the dynamics of a rotor with an artificial crack. The experimental results verify the crack model used in the analysis. They show the general possibility to determine a crack by extended vibration control.

  4. 46 CFR 59.10-5 - Cracks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... APPURTENANCES Welding Repairs to Boilers and Pressure Vessels in -Service § 59.10-5 Cracks. (a) Cracks extending... corrugated furnaces may be repaired by welding provided any one crack does not exceed 20 inches in length. (e... any direction, nor more than a total of four cracks in a drum, and further provided the welding...

  5. An experimental approach to determining fatigue crack size in polyethylene tibial inserts.

    PubMed

    Lockard, Carly A; Sanders, Anthony P; Raeymaekers, Bart

    2016-02-01

    A major limiting factor to the longevity of prosthetic knee joints is fatigue crack damage of the polyethylene tibial insert. Existing methods to quantify fatigue crack damage have several shortcomings, including limited resolution, destructive testing approach, and high cost. We propose an alternative fatigue crack damage visualization and measurement method that addresses the shortcomings of existing methods. This new method is based on trans-illumination and differs from previously described methods in its ability to non-destructively measure subsurface fatigue crack damage while using a simple and cost-effective bench-top set-up. We have evaluated this method to measure fatigue crack damage in two tibial inserts. This new method improves on existing image-based techniques due to its usability for subsurface damage measurement and its decreased reliance on subjective damage identification and measurement.

  6. Fundamental understanding and life prediction of stress corrosion cracking in BWRs and energy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, P.L.; Ford, F.P.

    1998-03-01

    The objective of this paper is to present an approach for design and lifetime evaluation of environmental cracking based on experimental and fundamental modeling of the underlying processes operative in crack advance. In detailed this approach and its development and quantification for energy (hot water) systems, the requirements for a life prediction methodology will be highlighted and the shortcomings of the existing design and lifetime evaluation codes reviewed. Examples are identified of its use in a variety of cracking systems, such as stainless steels, low alloy steels, nickel base alloys, and irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking in boiling water reactor (BWR) water, as well as preliminary use for low alloy steel and Alloy 600 in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and turbine steels in steam turbines. Identification of the common aspects with environmental cracking in other hot water systems provides a secure basis for its extension to related energy systems. 166 refs., 49 figs.

  7. Microscopic origins of stochastic crack growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardee, W. J.; Morris, W. L.; Cox, B. N.

    Physical arguments are made to obtain a mathematical model of the stochastic growth of surface fatigue cracks in a ductile metal alloy. The model is a set of coupled partial differential equations for the expected statistical density of cracks per unit area. The differential equations describe the smooth, deterministic local evolution of crack states, with the stochastic effects of abrupt local changes of material in the crack path appearing as transitions between distinct subspaces of single crack state space. Results are related to observables such as statistical distributions of crack growth rate and of time for at least one crack to reach macroscopic length.

  8. Nonlinear ultrasonic imaging of thermal fatigue cracks of several tens nm gap in glass plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertl, M.; Kawashima, K.; Sekino, K.; Yasui, H.; Aida, T.

    2015-10-01

    Thermal fatigue crack of which gap distance is several tens nm in glass plate is imaged by using an immersion higher harmonic imaging technique. Some parts of the thermal fatigue crack are clearly imaged by the third harmonic amplitude of the 3.5 MHz burst wave by angular incidence. For through-transmission mode across the crack face, the seventh harmonic of a through-thickness resonant frequency also visualizes the thermal fatigue crack. If spatial resolution will reach to a few micron meters, the technique could be applied for detection of disbonds in bonded wafers.

  9. Buckling analysis of cracked functionally graded material column with piezoelectric patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleki, Vahid A.; Mohammadi, Nader

    2017-03-01

    In the current study, stability analysis of cracked functionally graded material (FGM) columns under the effect of piezoelectric patches is analytically investigated. Configuration of the patches is somehow chosen to create axial load in the column. The crack is modeled by a rotational massless spring which connects the two intact parts of the column at the crack location. After applying the boundary and compatibility conditions at the crack location and the ends of the piezoelectric patches, the governing equation of buckling behavior of the cracked FGM column is derived. The effect of important parameters on the first and second buckling load of the column such as crack parameters (location and depth), location and length of the patches and also applied voltage is studied and discussed. Results show that a crack significantly reduces the column load capacity which is dependent on location and depth of the crack. By applying static load to the column, piezoelectric patches produce local torque, and controlling this torque leads to reduced crack effects on the column. Using piezoelectric patches with proper location and length compensates the effect of the crack. Despite the first buckling load, positive voltage increases the second buckling load of the column.

  10. The kinetics of hydrocarbon cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Groten, W.A.; Wojciechowski, B.W. )

    1993-03-01

    A general kinetic model which describes the catalytic cracking of pure hydrocarbons is presented. The model includes a monomolecular cracking path based on the Langmuir adsorption isotherm as well as a bimolecular path, following Rideal kinetics, which accounts for the possibility of a chain cracking mechanism being involved. Catalyst decay is accounted for using the time-on-stream-decay function. Fitting of experimental data from n-nonane cracking on USHY at 673 K, combined with Monte Carlo simulations indicates that, in that case, the total catalytic activity could include between 0 and 90% of activity due to chain processes. This large margin of error stems from the combined effects of a large decay rate, forcing the experimenter to use average conversion data, and of experimental error. Fitting of the model to previously published cracking data for 2-methylpentane on USHY showed that the model lacks a suitable parameter to account for thermal reactions which were not accounted for in the original data set. This observation supports the impression that the model is sensitive to departures from the postulated mechanism. The above kinetic model has also been fitted to the results of n-nonane cracking at three temperatures as well as to previously published data for various other linear paraffins. 32 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Mitigation of Crack Damage in Metallic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leser, Patrick E.; Newman, John A.; Smith, Stephen W.; Leser, William P.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Wallace, Terryl A.; Glaessgen, Edward H.; Piascik, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    A system designed to mitigate or heal crack damage in metallic materials has been developed where the protected material or component is coated with a low-melting temperature film. After a crack is formed, the material is heated, melting the film which then infiltrates the crack opening through capillary action. Upon solidification, the healing material inhibits further crack damage in two ways. While the crack healing material is intact, it acts like an adhesive that bonds or bridges the crack faces together. After fatigue loading damages, the healing material in the crack mouth inhibits further crack growth by creating artificially-high crack closure levels. Mechanical test data show that this method sucessfully arrests or retards crack growth in laboratory specimens.

  12. Recent Cocaine and Crack Use Among New Drug Treatment Clients in Scotland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neale, Joanne; Robertson, Michele

    2004-01-01

    UK and US literature indicate that cocaine and crack users experience multiple problems and poor treatment outcomes (Gossop et al., 2002 , 2003 ). Using data collected as part of a Scottish national evaluation of drug treatment effectiveness, this paper: (i) provides information on the nature and extent of recent cocaine and crack use among 585…

  13. Crack Growth Simulation and Residual Strength Prediction in Airplane Fuselages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Chuin-Shan; Wawrzynek, Paul A.; Ingraffea, Anthony R.

    1999-01-01

    This is the final report for the NASA funded project entitled "Crack Growth Prediction Methodology for Multi-Site Damage." The primary objective of the project was to create a capability to simulate curvilinear fatigue crack growth and ductile tearing in aircraft fuselages subjected to widespread fatigue damage. The second objective was to validate the capability by way of comparisons to experimental results. Both objectives have been achieved and the results are detailed herein. In the first part of the report, the crack tip opening angle (CTOA) fracture criterion, obtained and correlated from coupon tests to predict fracture behavior and residual strength of built-up aircraft fuselages, is discussed. Geometrically nonlinear, elastic-plastic, thin shell finite element analyses are used to simulate stable crack growth and to predict residual strength. Both measured and predicted results of laboratory flat panel tests and full-scale fuselage panel tests show substantial reduction of residual strength due to the occurrence of multi-site damage (MSD). Detailed comparisons of n stable crack growth history, and residual strength between the predicted and experimental results are used to assess the validity of the analysis methodology. In the second part of the report, issues related to crack trajectory prediction in thin shells; an evolving methodology uses the crack turning phenomenon to improve the structural integrity of aircraft structures are discussed, A directional criterion is developed based on the maximum tangential stress theory, but taking into account the effect of T-stress and fracture toughness orthotropy. Possible extensions of the current crack growth directional criterion to handle geometrically and materially nonlinear problems are discussed. The path independent contour integral method for T-stress evaluation is derived and its accuracy is assessed using a p- and hp-version adaptive finite element method. Curvilinear crack growth is simulated in

  14. Fatigue Growth and Closure of Short Cracks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-03

    stLdy has been carried out to investigate the growth and closure behavior of shortýýcracks in 2024-T351 aluminum alloy and four different conditions of...that short cracks show lessclosure behavior than longcracks. The estimates of initlal.crack lengths based on linearelastic data were made. tThese...anomalous behavior of short cracks. Advances in small crack growth have enabled increasingly quantitative studies that affect initi- ation and growth at

  15. 49 CFR Appendix D to Part 240 - Identification of State Agencies That Perform National Driver Register Checks

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... National Driver Register Checks D Appendix D to Part 240 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... That Perform National Driver Register Checks Under the provisions of § 240.111 of this part, each... National Driver Register (NDR) be conducted and that the resulting information be furnished to his or...

  16. 49 CFR Appendix D to Part 240 - Identification of State Agencies That Perform National Driver Register Checks

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... National Driver Register Checks D Appendix D to Part 240 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... That Perform National Driver Register Checks Under the provisions of § 240.111 of this part, each... National Driver Register (NDR) be conducted and that the resulting information be furnished to his or...

  17. 49 CFR Appendix D to Part 240 - Identification of State Agencies That Perform National Driver Register Checks

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... National Driver Register Checks D Appendix D to Part 240 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... That Perform National Driver Register Checks Under the provisions of § 240.111 of this part, each... National Driver Register (NDR) be conducted and that the resulting information be furnished to his or...

  18. Formation and interpretation of dilatant echelon cracks.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollard, D.D.; Segall, P.; Delaney, P.T.

    1982-01-01

    The relative displacements of the walls of many veins, joints, and dikes demonstrate that these structures are dilatant cracks. We infer that dilatant cracks propagate in a principal stress plane, normal to the maximum tensile or least compressive stress. Arrays of echelon crack segments appear to emerge from the peripheries of some dilatant cracks. Breakdown of a parent crack into an echelon array may be initiated by a spatial or temporal rotation of the remote principal stresses about an axis parallel to the crack propagation direction. Near the parent-crack tip, a rotation of the local principal stresses is induced in the same sense, but not necessarily through the same angle. Incipient echelon cracks form at the parent-crack tip normal to the local maximum tensile stress. Further longitudinal growth along surfaces that twist about axes parallel to the propagation direction realigns each echelon crack into a remote principal stress plane. The walls of these twisted cracks may be idealized as helicoidal surfaces. An array of helicoidal cracks sweeps out less surface area than one parent crack twisting through the same angle. Thus, many echelon cracks grow from a single parent because the work done in creating the array, as measured by its surface area decreases as the number of cracks increases. -from Authors

  19. Observation of Intralaminar Cracking in the Edge Crack Torsion Specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czabaj, Michael W.; Ratcliffe, James G.; Davidson, Barry D.

    2013-01-01

    The edge crack torsion (ECT) test is evaluated to determine its suitability for measuring fracture toughness associated with mode III delamination growth onset. A series of ECT specimens with preimplanted inserts with different lengths is tested and examined using nondestructive and destructive techniques. Ultrasonic inspection of all tested specimens reveals that delamination growth occurs at one interface ply beneath the intended midplane interface. Sectioning and optical microscopy suggest that the observed delamination growth results from coalescence of angled intralaminar matrix cracks that form and extend across the midplane plies. The relative orientation of these cracks is approximately 45 deg with respect to the midplane, suggesting their formation is caused by resolved principal tensile stresses arising due to the global mode-III shear loading. Examination of ECT specimens tested to loads below the level corresponding to delamination growth onset reveals that initiation of intralaminar cracking approximately coincides with the onset of nonlinearity in the specimen's force-displacement response. The existence of intralaminar cracking prior to delamination growth onset and the resulting delamination extension at an unintended interface render the ECT test, in its current form, unsuitable for characterization of mode III delamination growth onset. The broader implications of the mechanisms observed in this study are also discussed with respect to the current understanding of shear-driven delamination in tape-laminate composites.

  20. Parts Specialist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuqua, Lou; Fuqua, Debbie

    Designed to address the skills that an auto parts specialist must master in order to be effective in the market place, this manual consists of 13 units of instruction. Covered in the units are orientation; human relations; communications; safety; parts and systems identification; stocking, shipping, and receiving; inventory control; cataloging and…

  1. Numerical simulation of stress amplification induced by crack interaction in human femur bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alia, Noor; Daud, Ruslizam; Ramli, Mohammad Fadzli; Azman, Wan Zuki; Faizal, Ahmad; Aisyah, Siti

    2015-05-01

    This research is about numerical simulation using a computational method which study on stress amplification induced by crack interaction in human femur bone. Cracks in human femur bone usually occur because of large load or stress applied on it. Usually, the fracture takes longer time to heal itself. At present, the crack interaction is still not well understood due to bone complexity. Thus, brittle fracture behavior of bone may be underestimated and inaccurate. This study aims to investigate the geometrical effect of double co-planar edge cracks on stress intensity factor (K) in femur bone. This research focuses to analyze the amplification effect on the fracture behavior of double co-planar edge cracks, where numerical model is developed using computational method. The concept of fracture mechanics and finite element method (FEM) are used to solve the interacting cracks problems using linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) theory. As a result, this study has shown the identification of the crack interaction limit (CIL) and crack unification limit (CUL) exist in the human femur bone model developed. In future research, several improvements will be made such as varying the load, applying thickness on the model and also use different theory or method in calculating the stress intensity factor (K).

  2. The non-contact detection and identification of blood stained fingerprints using visible wavelength reflectance hyperspectral imaging: Part 1.

    PubMed

    Cadd, Samuel; Li, Bo; Beveridge, Peter; O'Hare, William T; Campbell, Andrew; Islam, Meez

    2016-05-01

    Blood is one of the most commonly encountered types of biological evidence found at scenes of violent crime and one of the most commonly observed fingerprint contaminants. Current visualisation methods rely on presumptive tests or chemical enhancement methods. Although these can successfully visualise ridge detail, they are destructive, do not confirm the presence of blood and can have a negative impact on DNA sampling. A novel application of visible wavelength reflectance hyperspectral imaging (HSI) has been used for the detection and positive identification of blood stained fingerprints in a non-contact and non-destructive manner on white ceramic tiles. The identification of blood was based on the unique visible absorption spectrum of haemoglobin between 400 and 500 nm. HSI has been used to successfully visualise ridge detail in blood stained fingerprints to the ninth depletion. Ridge detail was still detectable with diluted blood to 20-fold dilutions. Latent blood stains were detectable to 15,000-fold dilutions. Ridge detail was detectable for fingerprints up to 6 months old. HSI was also able to conclusively distinguish blood stained fingerprints from fingerprints in six paints and eleven other red/brown media with zero false positives.

  3. Crack propagation driven by crystal growth

    SciTech Connect

    A. Royne; Paul Meaking; A. Malthe-Sorenssen; B. Jamtveit; D. K. Dysthe

    2011-10-01

    Crystals that grow in confinement may exert a force on their surroundings and thereby drive crack propagation in rocks and other materials. We describe a model of crystal growth in an idealized crack geometry in which the crystal growth and crack propagation are coupled through the stress in the surrounding bulk solid. Subcritical crack propagation takes place during a transient period, which may be very long, during which the crack velocity is limited by the kinetics of crack propagation. When the crack is sufficiently large, the crack velocity becomes limited by the kinetics of crystal growth. The duration of the subcritical regime is determined by two non-dimensional parameters, which relate the kinetics of crack propagation and crystal growth to the supersaturation of the fluid and the elastic properties of the surrounding material.

  4. Corrosion fatigue crack propagation in metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.

    1990-01-01

    This review assesses fracture mechanics data and mechanistic models for corrosion fatigue crack propagation in structural alloys exposed to ambient temperature gases and electrolytes. Extensive stress intensity-crack growth rate data exist for ferrous, aluminum and nickel based alloys in a variety of environments. Interactive variables (viz., stress intensity range, mean stress, alloy composition and microstructure, loading frequency, temperature, gas pressure and electrode potential) strongly affect crack growth kinetics and complicate fatigue control. Mechanistic models to predict crack growth rates were formulated by coupling crack tip mechanics with occluded crack chemistry, and from both the hydrogen embrittlement and anodic dissolution/film rupture perspectives. Research is required to better define: (1) environmental effects near threshold and on crack closure; (2) damage tolerant life prediction codes and the validity of similitude; (3) the behavior of microcrack; (4) probes and improved models of crack tip damage; and (5) the cracking performance of advanced alloys and composites.

  5. The cause of welding cracks in aircraft steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, J

    1940-01-01

    The discussion in this article refers to gas welding of thin-walled parts of up to about 3 mm thickness. It was proven that by restricting the sulphur, carbon, and phosphorous content, and by electric-furnace production of the steel, it was possible in a short time to remove this defect. Weld hardness - i.e., martensite formation and hardness of the overheated zone - has no connection with the tendency to weld-crack development. Si, Cr, Mo, or V content has no appreciable effect, while increased manganese content tends to reduce the crack susceptibility.

  6. Longitudinal vibration of cracked beams under magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güven, Uğur

    2016-12-01

    Longitudinal vibration of a cracked beam subjected to the transverse magnetic field is addressed. One dimensional wave theory is used and the crack part of the beam is modelled as by a linear spring, in this analysis. The obtained explicit solution, for clamped-free and clamped-clamped boundary conditions, is illustrated as graphically. It is generally seen that the longitudinal frequencies increase with increase of the intensity of magnetic field. However, the results of the analysis reveal that the transverse magnetic field has a more significant effect on the variation of longitudinal vibration frequency under the clamped-clamped boundary conditions.

  7. 40 CFR Table 14 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units 14 Table 14 to Subpart UUU of Part 63... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and... Compliance With Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units As stated in §...

  8. In situ measurement of fatigue-crack growth rates in a silicon carbide ceramic at elevated temperatures using a D.C. potential system

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.; Gilbert, C.J.; Ritchie, R.O.

    1999-10-12

    The understanding of the mechanisms of fatigue-crack propagation in advanced ceramics at elevated temperatures (>800 degrees C) has in part been hampered by the experimental difficulty in directly measuring crack lengths, and hence crack-growth rates, at such high temperatures.

  9. An experimental investigation of transient fatigue crack growth phenomena under elevated temperature conditions in superalloy 718 and titanium Ti-1100. Ph.D. Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberger, A.H.

    1993-01-01

    Two transient crack growth phenomena are investigated in high temperature structural alloys. The first phenomenon examined is the growth behavior of small cracks under elastic-plastic conditions in Alloy 718 at 650 C. The second phenomenon to be investigated is the mechanism of the creep-fatigue crack growth in a new near-alpha titanium alloy, Ti-1100. Understanding these phenomena is essential for accurate fracture mechanics based residual life component management techniques. The first part of the dissertation is an experimental study of the elastic-plastic fatigue behavior of small surface cracks in Alloy 718 at 650 C conducted under conditions of total strain control. During cycling, the crack growth was continuously monitored using a direct current potential drop technique while the influence of crack closure was monitored using a laser interferometry technique measuring the crack mouth opening displacement. The crack tip plastic zone size was also measured using a post-test delta phase decoration technique. Results show that the growth rates of the small cracks correlate well with long crack data when using an appropriate elastic-plastic driving force parameter. The anomalous crack growth rates observed in some experiments were found to be experimental transients dominated by the crack initiation fracture and do not represent an intrinsic behavior of Alloy 718. The second part of this document deals with a series of crack growth experiments performed on the near-alpha titanium alloy, Ti-1100, to determine the mechanism of the creep-fatigue interaction. Based on pure creep crack growth results, the increase in the creep-fatigue crack growth rate is not amenable to separate contributions of creep crack growth and fatigue crack growth. A mechanism has been proposed to account for the increase in creep-fatigue crack growth rate based on the planar slip of titanium alloys which results in the formation of dislocation pileups at the prior beta grain boundaries.

  10. Application of system identification to analytic rotor modeling from simulated and wind tunnel dynamic test data, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohenemser, K. H.; Banerjee, D.

    1977-01-01

    An introduction to aircraft state and parameter identification methods is presented. A simplified form of the maximum likelihood method is selected to extract analytical aeroelastic rotor models from simulated and dynamic wind tunnel test results for accelerated cyclic pitch stirring excitation. The dynamic inflow characteristics for forward flight conditions from the blade flapping responses without direct inflow measurements were examined. The rotor blades are essentially rigid for inplane bending and for torsion within the frequency range of study, but flexible in out-of-plane bending. Reverse flow effects are considered for high rotor advance ratios. Two inflow models are studied; the first is based on an equivalent blade Lock number, the second is based on a time delayed momentum inflow. In addition to the inflow parameters, basic rotor parameters like the blade natural frequency and the actual blade Lock number are identified together with measurement bias values. The effect of the theoretical dynamic inflow on the rotor eigenvalues is evaluated.

  11. Radiofrequency identification and medical devices: the regulatory framework on electromagnetic compatibility. Part II: active implantable medical devices.

    PubMed

    Mattei, Eugenio; Censi, Federica; Triventi, Michele; Bartolini, Pietro; Calcagnini, Giovanni

    2012-05-01

    The number and the types of electromagnetic emitters to which patients with active implantable medical devices (AIMD) are exposed to in their daily activities have proliferated over the last decade. Radiofrequency identification (RFID) is an example of wireless technology applied in many fields. The interaction between RFID emitters and AIMD is an important issue for patients, industry and regulators, because of the risks associated with such interactions. The different AIMDs refer to different standards that address the electromagnetic immunity issue in different ways. Indeed, different test setups, immunity levels and rationales are used to guarantee that AIMDs are immune to electromagnetic nonionizing radiation. In this article, the regulatory framework concerning electromagnetic compatibility between RFID systems and AIMDs is analyzed to understand whether and how the application of the current AIMD standards allows for the effective control of the possible risks associated with RFID technology.

  12. Morphology and identification of first instars of the European and Mediterranean blowflies of forensic importance. Part II. Luciliinae.

    PubMed

    Szpila, K; Hall, M J R; Pape, T; Grzywacz, A

    2013-12-01

    First instars of Lucilia ampullacea Villeneuve, Lucilia caesar Linnaeus, Lucilia cuprina Weidemann, Lucilia richardsi Collin, Lucilia sericata Meigen and Lucilia silvarum Meigen (Diptera: Calliphoridae) are thoroughly documented with scanning electron microscopy images, light microscopy photographs and line drawings. The following morphological structures are documented: pseudocephalon, antennal complex, maxillary palpus, facial mask, cephaloskeleton, thoracic and abdominal spinulation, spiracular field, and posterior spiracles. New diagnostic features of the cephaloskeleton are presented and the spinulation of the abdominal segments is described. Earlier descriptions are summarized and major discrepancies with the current study are discussed. The present results allow for the clarification, correction and, especially, complementing existing information provided by numerous authors. The first instar larva of L. richardsi is described for the first time and an identification key to the first instars of European species of Lucilia Robineau-Desvoidy of forensic importance is presented.

  13. Data mining framework for identification of myocardial infarction stages in ultrasound: A hybrid feature extraction paradigm (PART 2).

    PubMed

    Sudarshan, Vidya K; Acharya, U Rajendra; Ng, E Y K; Tan, Ru San; Chou, Siaw Meng; Ghista, Dhanjoo N

    2016-04-01

    Early expansion of infarcted zone after Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI) has serious short and long-term consequences and contributes to increased mortality. Thus, identification of moderate and severe phases of AMI before leading to other catastrophic post-MI medical condition is most important for aggressive treatment and management. Advanced image processing techniques together with robust classifier using two-dimensional (2D) echocardiograms may aid for automated classification of the extent of infarcted myocardium. Therefore, this paper proposes novel algorithms namely Curvelet Transform (CT) and Local Configuration Pattern (LCP) for an automated detection of normal, moderately infarcted and severely infarcted myocardium using 2D echocardiograms. The methodology extracts the LCP features from CT coefficients of echocardiograms. The obtained features are subjected to Marginal Fisher Analysis (MFA) dimensionality reduction technique followed by fuzzy entropy based ranking method. Different classifiers are used to differentiate ranked features into three classes normal, moderate and severely infarcted based on the extent of damage to myocardium. The developed algorithm has achieved an accuracy of 98.99%, sensitivity of 98.48% and specificity of 100% for Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier using only six features. Furthermore, we have developed an integrated index called Myocardial Infarction Risk Index (MIRI) to detect the normal, moderately and severely infarcted myocardium using a single number. The proposed system may aid the clinicians in faster identification and quantification of the extent of infarcted myocardium using 2D echocardiogram. This system may also aid in identifying the person at risk of developing heart failure based on the extent of infarcted myocardium.

  14. Getter materials for cracking ammonia

    DOEpatents

    Boffito, Claudio; Baker, John D.

    1999-11-02

    A method is provided for cracking ammonia to produce hydrogen. The method includes the steps of passing ammonia over an ammonia-cracking catalyst which is an alloy including (1) alloys having the general formula Zr.sub.1-x Ti.sub.x M.sub.1 M.sub.2, wherein M.sub.1 and M.sub.2 are selected independently from the group consisting of Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni, and x is between about 0.0 and about 1.0 inclusive; and between about 20% and about 50% Al by weight. In another aspect, the method of the invention is used to provide methods for operating hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engines and hydrogen fuel cells. In still another aspect, the present invention provides a hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engine and a hydrogen fuel cell including the above-described ammonia-cracking catalyst.

  15. Analytical developments in support of the NASA aging aircraft program with an application to crack growth from rivets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, Daniel; Gondhalekar, Sudhir; Dawicke, Dave

    The NASA Airframe Structural Integrity Program is a multi-disciplinary program to develop analysis methodology, a fracture data base, and improved methods of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) detection of disbonds and cracks. As part of this program, analysis tools to predict crack growth rates and fracture propagation in shell structures are being developed. This paper describes a finite element model of crack growth in layered structures, such as lap splice joints. The model is developed using separate two-dimensional meshes of individual layers which can overlap in space. These layers can be connected with either rivit elements or by adhesive elements. Cracks can be modeled in any layer, with automatic remeshing during crack growth. Using the model, an investigation was made of the effect of rivet interference on fatigue crack growth from a loaded rivit hole. It was found that the interference reduced the stress intensity factor range significantly, resulting in slower crack growth.

  16. Review of Environmentally Assisted Cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadananda, K.; Vasudevan, A. K.

    2011-02-01

    Many efforts have been made in the past by several researchers to arrive at some unifying principles governing the embrittlement phenomena. An inescapable conclusion reached by all these efforts was that the behavior is very complex. Hence, recognizing the complexity of material/environment behavior, we focus our attention here only in extracting some similarities in the experimental trends to arrive at some generic principles of behavior. Crack nucleation and growth are examined under static load in the presence of internal and external environments. Stress concentration, either pre-existing or in-situ generated, appears to be a requirement for embrittlement. A chemical stress concentration factor is defined for a given material/environment system as the ratio of failure stress with and without the damaging chemical environment. All factors that affect the buildup of the required stress concentration, such as planarity of slip, stacking fault energy, etc., also affect the stress-corrosion behavior. The chemical stress concentration factor is coupled with the mechanical stress concentration factor. In addition, generic features for all systems appear to be (a) an existence of a threshold stress as a function of concentration of the damaging environment and flow properties of the material, and (b) an existence of a limiting threshold as a function of concentration, indicative of a damage saturation for that environment. Kinetics of crack growth also depends on concentration and the mode of crack growth. In general, environment appears to enhance crack tip ductility on one side by the reduction of energy for dislocation nucleation and glide, and to reduce cohesive energy for cleavage, on the other. These two opposing factors are coupled to provide environmentally induced crack nucleation and growth. The relative ratio of these two opposing factors depends on concentration and flow properties, thereby affecting limiting thresholds. The limiting concentration or

  17. Humidity Testing of PME and BME Ceramic Capacitors with Cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teverovsky, Alexander A.; Herzberger, Jaemi

    2014-01-01

    Cracks in ceramic capacitors are one of the major causes of failures during operation of electronic systems. Humidity testing has been successfully used for many years to verify the absence of cracks and assure quality of military grade capacitors. Traditionally, only precious metal electrode (PME) capacitors were used in high reliability applications and the existing requirements for humidity testing were developed for this type of parts. With the advance of base metal electrode (BME) capacitors, there is a need for assessment of the applicability of the existing techniques for the new technology capacitors. In this work, variety of different PME and BME capacitors with introduced cracks were tested in humid environments at different voltages and temperatures. Analysis of the test results indicates differences in the behavior and failure mechanisms for BME and PME capacitors and the need for different testing conditions.

  18. Quantitative image analysis of WE43-T6 cracking behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, A.; Yahya, Z.

    2013-06-01

    Environment-assisted cracking of WE43 cast magnesium (4.2 wt.% Yt, 2.3 wt.% Nd, 0.7% Zr, 0.8% HRE) in the T6 peak-aged condition was induced in ambient air in notched specimens. The mechanism of fracture was studied using electron backscatter diffraction, serial sectioning and in situ observations of crack propagation. The intermetallic (rare earthed-enriched divorced intermetallic retained at grain boundaries and predominantly at triple points) material was found to play a significant role in initiating cracks which leads to failure of this material. Quantitative measurements were required for this project. The populations of the intermetallic and clusters of intermetallic particles were analyzed using image analysis of metallographic images. This is part of the work to generate a theoretical model of the effect of notch geometry on the static fatigue strength of this material.

  19. Absorption Voltages and Insulation Resistance in Ceramic Capacitors with Cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Time dependence of absorption voltages (V(sub abs)) in different types of low-voltage X5R and X7R ceramic capacitors was monitored for a maximum duration of hundred hours after polarization. To evaluate the effect of mechanical defects on V(sub abs)), cracks in the dielectric were introduced either mechanically or by thermal shock. The maximum absorption voltage, time to roll-off, and the rate of voltage decrease are shown to depend on the crack-related leakage currents and insulation resistance in the parts. A simple model that is based on the Dow equivalent circuit for capacitors with absorption has been developed to assess the insulation resistance of capacitors. Standard measurements of the insulation resistance, contrary to the measurements based on V(sub abs)), are not sensitive to the presence of mechanical defects and fail to reveal capacitors with cracks.

  20. Slow Crack Growth of Germanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jon

    2016-01-01

    The fracture toughness and slow crack growth parameters of germanium supplied as single crystal beams and coarse grain disks were measured. Although germanium is anisotropic (A=1.7), it is not as anisotropic as SiC, NiAl, or Cu, as evidence by consistent fracture toughness on the 100, 110, and 111 planes. Germanium does not exhibit significant slow crack growth in distilled water. (n=100). Practical values for engineering design are a fracture toughness of 0.7 MPam and a Weibull modulus of m=6+/-2. For well ground and reasonable handled coupons, fracture strength should be greater than 30 MPa.

  1. Nonlinear structural crack growth monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Welch, Donald E.; Hively, Lee M.; Holdaway, Ray F.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for the detection, through nonlinear manipulation of data, of an indicator of imminent failure due to crack growth in structural elements. The method is a process of determining energy consumption due to crack growth and correlating the energy consumption with physical phenomena indicative of a failure event. The apparatus includes sensors for sensing physical data factors, processors or the like for computing a relationship between the physical data factors and phenomena indicative of the failure event, and apparatus for providing notification of the characteristics and extent of such phenomena.

  2. 9 CFR 310.2 - Identification of carcass with certain severed parts thereof and with animal from which derived.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... blood and other parts of such animal to be used in the preparation of meat food products or medical... inspection. (3) In cases where both types of devices described in paragraphs (b)(1) and (2) of this section are present on the same animal, both types may be placed in the same plastic bag or in two...

  3. 9 CFR 310.2 - Identification of carcass with certain severed parts thereof and with animal from which derived.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... blood and other parts of such animal to be used in the preparation of meat food products or medical... inspection. (3) In cases where both types of devices described in paragraphs (b)(1) and (2) of this section are present on the same animal, both types may be placed in the same plastic bag or in two...

  4. 9 CFR 310.2 - Identification of carcass with certain severed parts thereof and with animal from which derived.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... blood and other parts of such animal to be used in the preparation of meat food products or medical... inspection. (3) In cases where both types of devices described in paragraphs (b)(1) and (2) of this section are present on the same animal, both types may be placed in the same plastic bag or in two...

  5. SIF-based fracture criterion for interface cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Xing

    2016-06-01

    The complex stress intensity factor K governing the stress field of an interface crack tip may be split into two parts, i.e., hat{K} and s^{-iɛ}, so that K=hat{K}s^{-iɛ}, s is a characteristic length and ɛ is the oscillatory index. hat{K} has the same dimension as the classical stress intensity factor and characterizes the interface crack tip field. That means a criterion for interface cracks may be formulated directly with hat{K}, as Irwin (ASME J. Appl. Mech. 24:361-364, 1957) did in 1957 for the classical fracture mechanics. Then, for an interface crack, it is demonstrated that the quasi Mode I and Mode II tip fields can be defined and distinguished from the coupled mode tip fields. Built upon SIF-based fracture criteria for quasi Mode I and Mode II, the stress intensity factor (SIF)-based fracture criterion for mixed mode interface cracks is proposed and validated against existing experimental results.

  6. Crack resistance and fracture toughness of PZT ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fett, Theo; Kamlah, Marc; Munz, Dietrich; Thun, Gerhard

    2001-07-01

    Failure of PZT materials is governed by the crack resistance curve (R-curve). The R-curve was evaluated for a soft PZT: (a) in controlled fracture tests with single-edge-notched bending bars via an improved compliance method combining mechanical compliance and microscopic crack length measurement, (b) by completely stable crack extension tests with a loading device consisting of two pairs of opposite line loads. It was found that the R-curves obtained with different test methods differ strongly. A possible interpretation of the differences is given. A theoretical part deals with the determination of the stress intensity factor solution for bending bars with edge cracks as used in the experiments. Piezoelectric materials exhibit a non-linear stress-strain curve and non-symmetry in tension and compression. Under these conditions the non- linear stress distribution is computed for the bending bar and the stress intensity factor is determined by using the fracture mechanics weight function method. From these computations it results that maximum deviations from the linear-elastic solution of less than 2% occur if a/W>0.3(a=crack length, W=specimen width). In case of the roller loading, it can be shown that maximum errors must be less than 7%.

  7. Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Nickel Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R B

    2004-02-06

    Environmentally Assisted Cracking (EAC) is a general term that includes phenomena such as stress corrosion cracking (SCC), hydrogen embrittlement (HE), sulfide stress cracking (SSC), liquid metal embrittlement (LME), etc. EAC refers to a phenomenon by which a normally ductile metal looses its toughness (e.g. elongation to rupture) when it is subjected to mechanical stresses in presence of a specific corroding environment. For EAC to occur, three affecting factors must be present simultaneously. These include: (1) Mechanical tensile stresses, (2) A susceptible metal microstructure and (3) A specific aggressive environment. If any of these three factors is removed, EAC will not occur. That is, to mitigate the occurrence of EAC, engineers may for example eliminate residual stresses in a component or limit its application to certain chemicals (environment). The term environment not only includes chemical composition of the solution in contact with the component but also other variables such as temperature and applied potential. Nickel alloys are in general more resistant than stainless steels to EAC. For example, austenitic stainless steels (such as S30400) suffer SCC in presence of hot aqueous solutions containing chloride ions. Since chloride ions are ubiquitous in most industrial applications, the use of stressed stainless steels parts is seriously limited. On the other hand, nickel alloys (such as N10276) are practically immune to SCC in presence of hot chloride solutions and therefore an excellent alternative to replace the troubled stainless steels. Nonetheless, nickel alloys are not immune to other types of EAC. There are several environments (such as hot caustic and hot hydrofluoric acid) that may produce embrittlement in nickel alloys (Crum et al, 2000) (Table 1). The conditions where nickel alloys suffer EAC are highly specific and therefore avoidable by the proper design of the industrial components.

  8. Experimental study on propagation of liquid-filled crack in gelatin: Shape and velocity in hydrostatic stress condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, Akira

    1990-06-01

    The three-dimensional shape and velocity of propagating cracks in the hydrostatic stress condition were studied by using gelatin, the physical properties of which were controlled to be constant. Various liquids (with various densities, viscosities, and volumes as the governed parameters) were injected in gelatin to form liquid-filled cracks. The directions of the crack growth and the propagation of an isolated crack are governed by the density difference between injected liquid and gelatin (Δρ), that is, a buoyancy. The propagation of a crack has two critical values: the first is the transition value to brittle fracture; the second is the value where segmentation begins to occur. The condition of a stable isolated crack formation is discussed. The crack shape of an isolated crack in the direction perpendicular to the crack plane is different from that of a growing crack with a fat tear drop form: the former has an elliptical top and a nearly flat bottom. The upper termination of an isolated crack in the vertical cross section has an elliptical shape, and the lower termination has a cusped shape. The lower part of the crack occupies the preexiting fracture which has formed by fracturing at the crack top. The crack thickness (w)/crack height (h) ratio is proportional to Δρ A, if the elastic moduli are constant. The crack length l/h ratio increase with h in the primary fracture, while the l/h ratio decreases with h in the preexisting fracture except for air-filled cracks. The ascending velocity of an isolated crack is proportional to Δρ3 h4, that is, Δρ w2, if the other physical properties are constant. The height and length of a growing penny-shaped crack are approximately proportional to A 3d1/3t4/9, so that the growth rate of height is in proportion to A3d3t-5/9 (A3d is constant injection rale). Some comparisons with the two-dimensional crack theory and applications for magma-filled cracks are discussed on the basis of these results.

  9. A surface crack in shells under mixed-mode loading conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joseph, P. F.; Erdogan, F.

    1988-01-01

    The present consideration of a shallow shell's surface crack under general loading conditions notes that while the mode I state can be separated, modes II and III remain coupled. A line spring model is developed to formulate the part-through crack problem under mixed-mode conditions, and then to consider a shallow shell of arbitrary curvature having a part-through crack located on the outer or the inner surface of the shell; Reissner's transverse shear theory is used to formulate the problem under the assumption that the shell is subjected to all five moment and stress resultants.

  10. DNA barcoding for species identification from dried and powdered plant parts: a case study with authentication of the raw drug market samples of Sida cordifolia.

    PubMed

    Vassou, Sophie Lorraine; Kusuma, G; Parani, Madasamy

    2015-03-15

    The majority of the plant materials used in herbal medicine is procured from the markets in the form of dried or powdered plant parts. It is essential to use authentic plant materials to derive the benefits of herbal medicine. However, establishing the identity of these plant materials by conventional taxonomy is extremely difficult. Here we report a case study in which the species identification of the market samples of Sida cordifolia was done by DNA barcoding. As a prelude to species identification by DNA barcoding, 13 species of Sida were collected, and a reference DNA barcode library was developed using rbcL, matK, psbA-trnH and ITS2 markers. Based on the intra-species and inter-species divergence observed, psbA-trnH and ITS2 were found to be the best two-marker combination for species identification of the market samples. The study showed that none of the market samples belonged to the authentic species, S. cordifolia. Seventy-six per cent of the market samples belonged to other species of Sida. The predominant one was Sida acuta (36%) followed by S. spinosa (20%), S. alnifolia (12%), S. scabrida (4%) and S. ravii (4%). Such substitutions may not only fail to give the expected therapeutic effect, but may also give undesirable effects as in case of S. acuta which contains a 6-fold higher amount of ephedrine compared to the roots of S. cordifolia. The remaining 24% of the samples were from other genera such as Abutilon sp. (8%), Ixonanthes sp., Terminalia sp., Fagonia sp., and Tephrosia sp. (4% each). This observation is in contrast to the belief that medicinal plants are generally substituted or adulterated with closely related species. The current study strongly suggests that the raw drug market samples of herbal medicines need to be properly authenticated before use, and DNA barcoding has been found to be suitable for this purpose.

  11. Extended Kalman filtering for battery management systems of LiPB-based HEV battery packs. Part 2. Modeling and identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plett, Gregory L.

    Battery management systems in hybrid electric vehicle battery packs must estimate values descriptive of the pack's present operating condition. These include: battery state of charge, power fade, capacity fade, and instantaneous available power. The estimation mechanism must adapt to changing cell characteristics as cells age and therefore provide accurate estimates over the lifetime of the pack. In a series of three papers, we propose a method, based on extended Kalman filtering (EKF), that is able to accomplish these goals on a lithium ion polymer battery pack. We expect that it will also work well on other battery chemistries. These papers cover the required mathematical background, cell modeling and system identification requirements, and the final solution, together with results. In order to use EKF to estimate the desired quantities, we first require a mathematical model that can accurately capture the dynamics of a cell. In this paper we "evolve" a suitable model from one that is very primitive to one that is more advanced and works well in practice. The final model includes terms that describe the dynamic contributions due to open-circuit voltage, ohmic loss, polarization time constants, electro-chemical hysteresis, and the effects of temperature. We also give a means, based on EKF, whereby the constant model parameters may be determined from cell test data. Results are presented that demonstrate it is possible to achieve root-mean-squared modeling error smaller than the level of quantization error expected in an implementation.

  12. Identification of bacteria associated with underground parts of Crocus sativus by 16S rRNA gene targeted metagenomic approach.

    PubMed

    Ambardar, Sheetal; Sangwan, Naseer; Manjula, A; Rajendhran, J; Gunasekaran, P; Lal, Rup; Vakhlu, Jyoti

    2014-10-01

    Saffron (Crocus sativus L), an autumn-flowering perennial sterile plant, reproduces vegetatively by underground corms. Saffron has biannual corm-root cycle that makes it an interesting candidate to study microbial dynamics in its rhizosphere and cormosphere (area under influence of corm). Culture independent 16S rRNA gene metagenomic study of rhizosphere and cormosphere of Saffron during flowering stage revealed presence of 22 genera but none of the genus was common in all the three samples. Bulk soil bacterial community was represented by 13 genera with Acidobacteria being dominant. In rhizosphere, out of eight different genera identified, Pseudomonas was the most dominant genus. Cormosphere bacteria comprised of six different genera, dominated by the genus Pantoea. This study revealed that the bacterial composition of all the three samples is significantly different (P < 0.05) from each other. This is the first report on the identification of bacteria associated with rhizosphere, cormosphere and bulk soil of Saffron, using cultivation independent 16S rRNA gene targeted metagenomic approach.

  13. HPLC-MS(n) Identification of Betalain Profile of Different Beetroot (Beta vulgaris L. ssp. vulgaris) Parts and Cultivars.

    PubMed

    Slatnar, Ana; Stampar, Franci; Veberic, Robert; Jakopic, Jerneja

    2015-09-01

    The distribution of betalains in peel, flesh, and petioles of yellow and red beetroot cultivars has been investigated using an High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) system with electrospray mass spectrometry. Differences in the levels of betacyanins and betaxanthins between different colored cultivars were individually determined for 3 plant parts. The content of almost all analyzed compounds decreased in the following order: peel > flesh > petiole. Betanin/isobetanin pigments comprised a major portion of the relative peak area measured in red beetroot peel. Isobetanin relative peak areas were also high in leaf petioles (68.94% to 74.16%) of red colored cultivars. However, betacyanins were completely absent from the extracts of all analyzed parts of yellow beet. Glutamine-bx represented a very high relative peak area (59.54% to 64.18%) in flesh of red-colored cultivars analyzed in the study. Our results indicate that red beet cultivars can be utilized as a potential source of red and yellow natural colorants. However, differences in pigment composition among different beetroot parts must be considered and in order to maximize the pigment yields petioles can also be used as a source rich in specific betalain compounds.

  14. Crack problems in cylindrical and spherical shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.

    1976-01-01

    Standard plate or shell theories were used as a starting point to study the fracture problems in thin-walled cylindrical and spherical shells, assuming that the plane of the crack is perpendicular to the surface of the sheet. Since recent studies have shown that local shell curvatures may have a rather considerable effect on the stress intensity factor, the crack problem was considered in conjunction with a shell rather than a plate theory. The material was assumed to be isotropic and homogeneous, so that approximate solutions may be obtained by approximating the local shell crack geometry with an ideal shell which has a solution, namely a spherical shell with a meridional crack, a cylindrical shell with a circumferential crack, or a cylindrical shell with an axial crack. A method of solution for the specially orthotropic shells containing a crack was described; symmetric and skew-symmetric problems are considered in cylindrical shells with an axial crack.

  15. Crack Formation in Cement-Based Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprince, A.; Pakrastinsh, L.; Vatin, N.

    2016-04-01

    The cracking properties in cement-based composites widely influences mechanical behavior of construction structures. The challenge of present investigation is to evaluate the crack propagation near the crack tip. During experiments the tension strength and crack mouth opening displacement of several types of concrete compositions was determined. For each composition the Compact Tension (CT) specimens were prepared with dimensions 150×150×12 mm. Specimens were subjected to a tensile load. Deformations and crack mouth opening displacement were measured with extensometers. Cracks initiation and propagation were analyzed using a digital image analysis technique. The formation and propagation of the tensile cracks was traced on the surface of the specimens using a high resolution digital camera with 60 mm focal length. Images were captured during testing with a time interval of one second. The obtained experimental curve shows the stages of crack development.

  16. Interacting Cracks in an Environmentally Assisted Fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levandovsky, Artem; Balazs, Anna

    2006-03-01

    We perform the study of environmentally assisted fracture within the framework of a lattice model. Formation of an ensemble of environmentally assisted microcracks, their coalescence and formation of crack ``avalanches'' lead to a very rich dynamical picture. Under specific condition crack healing can occur due to cohesive forces, which hold material together and tend to pull atoms together even if they are separated by a crack over several lattice units. We investigate the dynamical interplay between crack formation, arrest, healing and re-cracking. The goal here is to provide an understanding of the conditions leading to the phenomena of crack healing that happens along with the crack formation. We study the morphology of crack patterns with the intentions to establish a way to enhance the healing property of a material sample.

  17. Fracture mechanics parameters for small fatigue cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a review of some common small-crack test specimens, the underlying causes of the small-crack effect, and the fracture-mechanics parameters that have been used to correlate or predict their growth behavior. This review concentrates on continuum mechanics concepts and on the nonlinear behavior of small cracks. The paper reviews some stress-intensity factor solutions for small-crack test specimens and develops some simple elastic-plastic J integral and cyclic J integral expressions that include the influence of crack-closure. These parameters were applied to small-crack growth data on two aluminum alloys, and a fatigue life prediction methodology is demonstrated. For these materials, the crack-closure transient from the plastic wake was found to be the major factor in causing the small-crack effect.

  18. Identification and characterization of polymorphisms within the 5' flanking region, first exon and part of first intron of bovine GH gene.

    PubMed

    Ferraz, A L J; Bortolossi, J C; Curi, R A; Ferro, M I T; Ferro, J A; Furlan, L R

    2006-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify and characterize polymorphisms within the 5' flanking region, first exon and part of first intron of the bovine growth hormone gene among different beef cattle breeds: Nelore (n = 25), Simmental (n = 39), Simbrasil (n = 24), Simmental x Nelore (n = 30), Canchim x Nelore (n = 30) and Angus x Nelore (n = 30). Two DNA fragments (GH1, 464 bp and GH2, 453 bp) were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and then used for polymorphism identification by SSCP. Within the GH1 fragment, five polymorphisms were identified, corresponding to three different alleles: GH1.1, GH1.2 and GH1.3 (GenBank: AY662648, AY662649 and AY662650, respectively). These allele sequences were aligned and compared with bovine GH gene nucleotide sequence (GenBank: M57764 and AF118837), resulting in the identification of five insertion/deletions (INDELs) and five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). In the GH2 fragment two alleles were identified, GH2.1 and GH2.2 (GenBank: AY662651 and AY662652, respectively). The allele sequences were compared with GenBank sequences (M57764, AF007750 and AH009106) and three INDELs and four SNPs were identified. In conclusion, we were able to identify six new polymorphisms of the bovine GH gene (one INDEL and five SNPs), which can be used as molecular markers in genetic studies.

  19. STRESS CORROSION CRACK GROWTH RESPONSE FOR ALLOY 152/52 DISSIMILAR METAL WELDS IN PWR PRIMARY WATER

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Overman, Nicole R.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2015-08-15

    As part of ongoing research into primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) susceptibility of alloy 690 and its welds, SCC tests have been conducted on alloy 152/52 dissimilar metal (DM) welds with cracks positioned with the goal to assess weld dilution and fusion line effects on SCC susceptibility. No increased crack growth rate was found when evaluating a 20% Cr dilution zone in alloy 152M joined to carbon steel (CS) that had not undergone a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT). However, high SCC crack growth rates were observed when the crack reached the fusion line of that material where it propagated both on the fusion line and in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of the carbon steel. Crack surface and crack profile examinations of the specimen revealed that cracking in the weld region was transgranular (TG) with weld grain boundaries not aligned with the geometric crack growth plane of the specimen. The application of a typical pressure vessel PWHT on a second set of alloy 152/52 – carbon steel DM weld specimens was found to eliminate the high SCC susceptibility in the fusion line and carbon steel HAZ regions. PWSCC tests were also performed on alloy 152-304SS DM weld specimens. Constant K crack growth rates did not exceed 5x10-9 mm/s in this material with post-test examinations revealing cracking primarily on the fusion line and slightly into the 304SS HAZ.

  20. The energy release rate of a pressurized crack in soft elastic materials: effects of surface tension and large deformation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tianshu; Long, Rong; Hui, Chung-Yuen

    2014-10-21

    In this paper we present a theoretical study on how surface tension affects fracture of soft solids. In classical fracture theory, the resistance to fracture is partly attributed to the energy required to create new surfaces. Thus, the energy released to the crack tip must overcome the surface energy in order to propagate a crack. In soft materials, however, surface tension can cause significant deformation and can reduce the energy release rate for crack propagation by resisting the stretch of crack surfaces. We quantify this effect by studying the inflation of a penny-shaped crack in an infinite elastic body with applied pressure. To avoid numerical difficulty caused by singular fields near the crack tip, we derived an expression for the energy release rate which depends on the applied pressure, the surface tension, the inflated crack volume and the deformed crack area. This expression is evaluated using a newly developed finite element method with surface tension elements. Our calculation shows that, when the elasto-capillary number ω ≡ σ/Ea is sufficiently large, where σ is the isotropic surface tension, E is the small strain Young's modulus and a is the initial crack radius, both the energy release rate and the crack opening displacement of an incompressible neo-Hookean solid are significantly reduced by surface tension. For a sufficiently high elasto-capillary number, the energy release rate can be negative for applied pressure less than a critical amount, suggesting that surface tension can cause crack healing in soft elastic materials.

  1. TV fatigue crack monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Exton, R. J. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus is disclosed for monitoring the development and growth of fatigue cracks in a test specimen subjected to a pulsating tensile load. A plurality of television cameras photograph a test specimen which is illuminated at the point of maximum tensile stress. The television cameras have a modified vidicon tube which has an increased persistence time thereby eliminating flicker in the displayed images.

  2. Methylecgonidine coats the crack particle.

    PubMed

    Wood, R W; Shojaie, J; Fang, C P; Graefe, J F

    1996-01-01

    Crack is a form of cocaine base self-administered by smoking. When heated, it volatilizes and may partially pyrolyze to methylecgonidine (MEG). Upon cooling, a condensation aerosol forms. Heating cocaine base in model crack pipes produced particles of about 1 micron in diameter, regardless of the amount heated; however, MEG concentration increased from < or = 2% at 10 mg per heating to as much as 5% at 30 mg per heating. Methylecgonidine was < or = 1% of the recovered material when cocaine was vaporized off a heated wire coil, but the particles were larger (2-5 microns), and the distribution disperse. The vapor pressure of MEG was higher [log P(mm Hg) = 9.994 - 3530/T] than cocaine base, consistent with MEG coating the droplet during condensation, and with evaporation during aging or dilution. Disappearance of MEG from a chamber filled with crack smoke was a two-component process, one proceeding at the rate of cocaine particle removal, and the other at the desorption rate from other surfaces. Particle diameter influences the deposition site in the respiratory tract; thus, the likely different patterns of deposition in the respiratory tract of humans and animals of crack aerosols produced by different techniques warrant consideration, as they may influence our understanding of immediate and delayed sequelae of the inhalation of cocaine and its pyrolysis product, MEG.

  3. Steam Hydrocarbon Cracking and Reforming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golombok, Michael

    2004-01-01

    The interactive methods of steam hydrocarbon reforming and cracking of the oil and chemical industries are scrutinized, with special focus on their resemblance and variations. The two methods are illustrations of equilibrium-controlled and kinetically-controlled processes, the analysis of which involves theories, which overlap and balance each…

  4. Confining crack propagation in defective graphene.

    PubMed

    López-Polín, Guillermo; Gómez-Herrero, Julio; Gómez-Navarro, Cristina

    2015-03-11

    Crack propagation in graphene is essential to understand mechanical failure in 2D materials. We report a systematic study of crack propagation in graphene as a function of defect content. Nanoindentations and subsequent images of graphene membranes with controlled induced defects show that while tears in pristine graphene span microns length, crack propagation is strongly reduced in the presence of defects. Accordingly, graphene oxide exhibits minor crack propagation. Our work suggests controlled defect creation as an approach to avoid catastrophic failure in graphene.

  5. Evaluation of fatigue cracks using nonlinearities of acousto-ultrasonic waves acquired by an active sensor network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chao; Hong, Ming; Su, Zhongqing; Wang, Qiang; Cheng, Li

    2013-01-01

    There has been increasing interest in using the nonlinear features of acousto-ultrasonic (AU) waves to detect damage onset (e.g., micro-fatigue cracks) due to their high sensitivity to damage with small dimensions. However, most existing approaches are able to infer the existence of fatigue damage qualitatively, but fail to further ascertain its location and severity. A damage characterization approach, in conjunction with the use of an active piezoelectric sensor network, was established, capable of evaluating fatigue cracks in a quantitative manner (including the co-presence of multiple fatigue cracks, and their individual locations and severities). Fundamental investigations, using both experiment and enhanced finite element analysis dedicated to the simulation of nonlinear AU waves, were carried out to link the accumulation of nonlinearities extracted from high-order AU waves to the characteristic parameters of a fatigue crack. A probability-based diagnostic imaging algorithm was developed, facilitating an intuitive presentation of identification results in images. The approach was verified experimentally by evaluating multi-fatigue cracks near rivet holes of a fatigued aluminum plate, showing satisfactory precision in characterizing real, barely visible fatigue cracks. Compared with existing methods, this approach innovatively (i) uses permanently integrated active sensor networks, conducive to automatic and online health monitoring; (ii) characterizes fatigue cracks at a quantitative level; (iii) allows detection of multiple fatigue cracks; and (iv) visualizes identification results in intuitive images.

  6. Genetic stock identification of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) populations in the southern part of the European range

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Anadromous migratory fish species such as Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) have significant economic, cultural and ecological importance, but present a complex case for management and conservation due to the range of their migration. Atlantic salmon exist in rivers across the North Atlantic, returning to their river of birth with a high degree of accuracy; however, despite continuing efforts and improvements in in-river conservation, they are in steep decline across their range. Salmon from rivers across Europe migrate along similar routes, where they have, historically, been subject to commercial netting. This mixed stock exploitation has the potential to devastate weak and declining populations where they are exploited indiscriminately. Despite various tagging and marking studies, the effect of marine exploitation and the marine element of the salmon lifecycle in general, remain the "black-box" of salmon management. In a number of Pacific salmonid species and in several regions within the range of the Atlantic salmon, genetic stock identification and mixed stock analysis have been used successfully to quantify exploitation rates and identify the natal origins of fish outside their home waters - to date this has not been attempted for Atlantic salmon in the south of their European range. Results To facilitate mixed stock analysis (MSA) of Atlantic salmon, we have produced a baseline of genetic data for salmon populations originating from the largest rivers from Spain to northern Scotland, a region in which declines have been particularly marked. Using 12 microsatellites, 3,730 individual fish from 57 river catchments have been genotyped. Detailed patterns of population genetic diversity of Atlantic salmon at a sub-continent-wide level have been evaluated, demonstrating the existence of regional genetic signatures. Critically, these appear to be independent of more commonly recognised terrestrial biogeographical and political boundaries, allowing reporting

  7. Does an eye-hand coordination test have added value as part of talent identification in table tennis? A validity and reproducibility study.

    PubMed

    Faber, Irene R; Oosterveld, Frits G J; Nijhuis-Van der Sanden, Maria W G

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the added value, i.e. discriminative and concurrent validity and reproducibility, of an eye-hand coordination test relevant to table tennis as part of talent identification. Forty-three table tennis players (7-12 years) from national (n = 13), regional (n = 11) and local training centres (n = 19) participated. During the eye-hand coordination test, children needed to throw a ball against a vertical positioned table tennis table with one hand and to catch the ball correctly with the other hand as frequently as possible in 30 seconds. Four different test versions were assessed varying the distance to the table (1 or 2 meter) and using a tennis or table tennis ball. 'Within session' reproducibility was estimated for the two attempts of the initial tests and ten youngsters were retested after 4 weeks to estimate 'between sessions' reproducibility. Validity analyses using age as covariate showed that players from the national and regional centres scored significantly higher than players from the local centre in all test versions (p<0.05). The tests at 1 meter demonstrated better discriminative ability than those at 2 meter. While all tests but one had a positive significant association with competition outcome, which were corrected for age influences, the version with a table tennis ball at 1 meter showed the highest association (r = 0.54; p = 0.001). Differences between the first and second attempts were comparable for all test versions (between -8 and +7 repetitions) with ICC's ranging from 0.72 to 0.87. The smallest differences were found for the test with a table tennis ball at 1 meter (between -3 and +3 repetitions). Best test version as part of talent identification appears to be the version with a table tennis ball at 1 meter regarding the psychometric characteristics evaluated. Longitudinal studies are necessary to evaluate the predictive value of this test.

  8. A study of crack closure in fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, T. T.; Wei, R. P.

    1973-01-01

    Crack closure phenomenon in fatigue was studied by using a Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy. The occurrence of crack closure was directly measured by an electrical-potential method, and indirectly by load-strain measurement. The experimental results showed that the onset of crack closure depends on both the stress ratio, and the maximum stress intensity factor. No crack closure was observed for stress ratio, greater than 0.3 in this alloy. A two-dimensional elastic model was used to explain the behavior of the recorded load-strain curves. Closure force was estimated by using this model. Yield level stress was found near the crack tip. Based on this estimated closure force, the crack opening displacement was calculated. This result showed that onset of crack closure detected by electrical-potential measurement and crack-opening-displacement measurement is the same. The implications of crack closure on fatigue crack are considered. The experimental results show that crack closure cannot fully account for the effect of stress ratio, on crack growth, and that it cannot be regarded as the sole cause for delay.

  9. Cracked Teeth: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Lubisich, Erinne B.; Hilton, Thomas J.; FERRACANE, JACK

    2013-01-01

    Although cracked teeth are a common problem for patients and dentists, there is a dearth of evidence-based guidelines on how to prevent, diagnose, and treat cracks in teeth. The purpose of this article is to review the literature to establish what evidence exists regarding the risk factors for cracked teeth and their prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:20590967

  10. Jumplike fatigue crack growth in compressor blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limar', L. V.; Demina, Yu. A.; Botvina, L. R.

    2014-04-01

    It is shown that power relations between the two main fractographic characteristics of fracture surfaces forming during jumplike fatigue crack growth, namely, the crack depth and the corresponding crack front length, can be used to estimate the fracture stress during vibration tests of the compressor blades of an aviation gas turbine engine, which are made of VT3-1 titanium alloy.

  11. Fatigue-Crack Propagation and Residual Static Strength of PH 15-7 Mo (TH 1050) Stainless Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1965-12-01

    section prior to the application of load.) A method of quantitatively predicting fatigue-crack growth rates in aluminum alloys was developed in...section stress. A method of calculating stress-concentration factors based on Neuber’s analysis of stresses around sharp notches (ref. 2) was...developed in the crack-growth analysis. A simple engineering method for predicting the strength of cracked aluminum parts under static loading was

  12. Isolation and Identification of Potential Allelochemicals from Aerial Parts of Avena fatua L. and Their Allelopathic Effect on Wheat.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xingang; Tian, Fajun; Tian, Yingying; Wu, Yanbing; Dong, Fengshou; Xu, Jun; Zheng, Yongquan

    2016-05-11

    Five compounds (syringic acid, tricin, acacetin, syringoside, and diosmetin) were isolated from the aerial parts of wild oats (Avena fatua L.) using chromatography columns of silica gel and Sephadex LH-20. Their chemical structures were identified by means of electrospray ionization and high-resolution mass spectrometry as well as (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic analyses. Bioassays showed that the five compounds had significant allelopathic effects on the germination and seedling growth of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). The five compounds inhibited fresh wheat as well as the shoot and root growth of wheat by approximately 50% at a concentration of 100 mg/kg, except for tricin and syringoside for shoot growth. The results of activity testing indicated that the aerial parts of wild oats had strong allelopathic potential and could cause different degrees of influence on surrounding plants. Moreover, these compounds could be key allelochemicals in wild-oat-infested wheat fields and interfere with wheat growth via allelopathy.

  13. Identification the Key Odorants in Different Parts of Hyla Rabbit Meat via Solid Phase Microextraction Using Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Jingzhi; Zhang, En

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the volatile compounds of hind leg, foreleg, abdomen and Longissimus dorsi in both male and female Hyla rabbit meat by solid phase microextraction tandem with gas chromatography mass spectrometry, and to seek out the key odorants via calculating the odor activity value and principal component analysis. Cluster analysis is used to study the flavor pattern differences in four edible parts. Sixty three volatile compounds were detected, including 23 aldehydes, 4 alcohols, 5 ketones, 11 esters, 5 aromatics, 8 acids and 7 hydrocarbons. Among them, 6 aldehydes and 3 acids were identified as the potential key odorants according to the ratio of concentration and threshold. The contents of volatile compounds in male Hyla rabbit meat were significantly higher than those in female one (p<0.05). The results of principal component analysis showed that the first two principal component cumulative variance contributions reach 87.69%; Hexanal, octanal, 2-nonenal, 2-decenal and decanal were regard as the key odorants of Hyla rabbit meat by combining odor activity value and principal component analysis. Therefore volatile compounds of rabbit meat can be effectively characterized. Cluster analysis indicated that volatile chemical compounds of Longissimus dorsi were significantly different from other three parts, which provide reliable information for rabbit processing industry and for possible future sale. PMID:28115882

  14. Identification the Key Odorants in Different Parts of Hyla Rabbit Meat via Solid Phase Microextraction Using Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yuejie; He, Zhifei; Lv, Jingzhi; Zhang, En; Li, Hongjun

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the volatile compounds of hind leg, foreleg, abdomen and Longissimus dorsi in both male and female Hyla rabbit meat by solid phase microextraction tandem with gas chromatography mass spectrometry, and to seek out the key odorants via calculating the odor activity value and principal component analysis. Cluster analysis is used to study the flavor pattern differences in four edible parts. Sixty three volatile compounds were detected, including 23 aldehydes, 4 alcohols, 5 ketones, 11 esters, 5 aromatics, 8 acids and 7 hydrocarbons. Among them, 6 aldehydes and 3 acids were identified as the potential key odorants according to the ratio of concentration and threshold. The contents of volatile compounds in male Hyla rabbit meat were significantly higher than those in female one (p<0.05). The results of principal component analysis showed that the first two principal component cumulative variance contributions reach 87.69%; Hexanal, octanal, 2-nonenal, 2-decenal and decanal were regard as the key odorants of Hyla rabbit meat by combining odor activity value and principal component analysis. Therefore volatile compounds of rabbit meat can be effectively characterized. Cluster analysis indicated that volatile chemical compounds of Longissimus dorsi were significantly different from other three parts, which provide reliable information for rabbit processing industry and for possible future sale.

  15. A study on ultrasonic detection and characterization of partially closed fatigue cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Van Wyk, L.M.

    1990-02-01

    This study consists of an ultrasonic characterization of two different fatigue cracks in 2024-T351 Aluminum. The first crack was grown with a 5 cycle overload, and the second was grown with a decreasing stress intensity. The first part of the study used through transmitted longitudinal ultrasonic waves to find a distinct change in the transmission coefficient as fatigue cycles were added following the overload and as the crack was statically loaded during the ultrasonic scanning. The second part of the study compared the differences in the through transmitted signals and the shear diffracted signals of the decreasing {Delta}K crack to a crack in the constant {Delta}K condition. In both parts of the study, estimates of the size of the closure region and the magnitude of the residual compressive stress intensity at the crack tip were made through the use of the distributed spring model. This model mathematically characterizes the reaction of an ultrasonic wave to a fatigue crack in a solid. 15 refs., 18 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Crack-opening displacements in center-crack, compact, and crack-line wedge-loaded specimens. [of flat plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The theoretical crack-opening displacements for center-crack, compact, and crack-line wedge-loaded specimens (reported in the ASTM Proposed Recommended Practice for R-Curve Determination (1974)) disagree with experimental measurements in the literature. The disagreement is a result of using approximate specimen configurations and load representation to obtain the theoretical displacements. An improved method of boundary collocation is presented which was used to obtain the theoretical displacements in these three specimen types; the actual specimen configurations and more accurate load representation were used. In the analysis of crack-opening displacements in the compact and crack-line wedge-loaded specimens, the effects of the pin-loaded holes were also included. The theoretical calculations agree with the experimental measurements reported in the literature. Also examined are accurate polynomial expressions for crack-opening displacements in both compact and crack-line wedge-loaded specimens.

  17. Applied and engineering versions of the theory of elastoplastic processes of active complex loading part 2: Identification and verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peleshko, V. A.

    2016-06-01

    quasi-isotropic elastoplastic materials. In practical calculations, in the absence of experimental data about the properties of a material under combined loading, the use of the engineering version of the model is quite acceptable. The simple identification, wide verifiability, and the availability of a software implementation of the method for solving initial-boundary value problems permit treating the proposed theory as an applied theory.

  18. The use of COD and plastic instability in crack propagation and arrest in shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.; Ratwani, M.

    1974-01-01

    The initiation, growth, and possible arrest of fracture in cylindrical shells containing initial defects are dealt with. For those defects which may be approximated by a part-through semi-elliptic surface crack which is sufficiently shallow so that part of the net ligament in the plane of the crack is still elastic, the existing flat plate solution is modified to take into account the shell curvature effect as well as the effect of the thickness and the small scale plastic deformations. The problem of large defects is then considered under the assumptions that the defect may be approximated by a relatively deep meridional part-through surface crack and the net ligament through the shell wall is fully yielded. The results given are based on an 8th order bending theory of shallow shells using a conventional plastic strip model to account for the plastic deformations around the crack border.

  19. Stress Corrosion Cracking and Fatigue Crack Growth Studies Pertinent to Spacecraft and Booster Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, L. R.; Finger, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    This experimental program was divided into two parts. The first part evaluated stress corrosion cracking in 2219-T87 aluminum and 5Al-2.5Sn (ELI) titanium alloy plate and weld metal. Both uniform height double cantilever beam and surface flawed specimens were tested in environments normally encountered during the fabrication and operation of pressure vessels in spacecraft and booster systems. The second part studied compatibility of material-environment combinations suitable for high energy upper stage propulsion systems. Surface flawed specimens having thicknesses representative of minimum gage fuel and oxidizer tanks were tested. Titanium alloys 5Al-2.5Sn (ELI), 6Al-4V annealed, and 6Al-4V STA were tested in both liquid and gaseous methane. Aluminum alloy 2219 in the T87 and T6E46 condition was tested in fluorine, a fluorine-oxygen mixture, and methane. Results were evaluated using modified linear elastic fracture mechanics parameters.

  20. Localized oxidation near cracks and lamellar boundaries in a gamma titanium aluminide alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Kameda, J.; Gold, C.R.; Lee, E.S.; Bloomer, T.E.; Yamaguchi, M.

    1995-07-01

    Small punch (SP) tests on single grained titanium aluminide (Ti-48 at. % Al) specimens with 12{degree} and 80{degree} lamellar orientations with respect to the tensile stress axis were conducted at 1,123 K in air. Brittle cracks readily extended through the thickness in the 80{degree} lamellar structure. In a SP specimen with the 12{degree} lamellar structure load-interrupted at the strain of 0.43%, surface cracks with the depth of 15--25 {mu}m were formed along lamellar boundaries. Local oxidation behavior on partly sputtered surfaces in the load-interrupted 12{degree} lamellar specimen was examined using scanning Auger microprobe (SAM). Oxygen enriched regions were observed near cracks and some lamellar layers. The mechanisms of high temperature oxygen-induced cracking are discussed in terms of the local oxidation near cracks and lamellar boundaries.

  1. Cracking behavior of structural slab bridge decks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baah, Prince

    Bridge deck cracking is a common problem throughout the United States, and it affects the durability and service life of concrete bridges. Several departments of transportation (DOTs) in the United States prefer using continuous three-span solid structural slab bridges without stringers over typical four-lane highways. Recent inspections of such bridges in Ohio revealed cracks as wide as 0.125 in. These measured crack widths are more than ten times the maximum limit recommended in ACI 224R-01 for bridge decks exposed to de-icing salts. Measurements using digital image correlation revealed that the cracks widened under truck loading, and in some cases, the cracks did not fully close after unloading. This dissertation includes details of an experimental investigation of the cracking behavior of structural concrete. Prism tests revealed that the concrete with epoxy-coated bars (ECB) develops the first crack at smaller loads, and develops larger crack widths compared to the corresponding specimens with uncoated (black) bars. Slab tests revealed that the slabs with longitudinal ECB developed first crack at smaller loads, exhibited wider cracks and a larger number of cracks, and failed at smaller ultimate loads compared to the corresponding test slabs with black bars. To develop a preventive measure, slabs with basalt and polypropylene fiber reinforced concrete were also included in the test program. These test slabs exhibited higher cracking loads, smaller crack widths, and higher ultimate loads at failure compared to the corresponding slab specimens without fibers. Merely satisfying the reinforcement spacing requirements given in AASHTO or ACI 318-11 is not adequate to limit cracking below the ACI 224R-01 recommended maximum limit, even though all the relevant design requirements are otherwise met. Addition of fiber to concrete without changing any steel reinforcing details is expected to reduce the severity and extent of cracking in reinforced concrete bridge decks.

  2. Identification of biophysical regions in the south-western part of the Okhotsk Sea by satellite imagery classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustapha, M. A.; Lihan, T.; Tangang, Fredolin; Saitoh, S.

    2015-03-01

    Water properties in the south-western part of the Okhotsk Sea show strong seasonal variability. This study applied a method based on Hierarchical Ascending Classification to classify biophysical regions using satellite data and to determine the seasonal variation of the characteristics of water masses in the area. Water masses in the same biophysical region have similar physical and biological characteristics and are able to explain the biological and physical processes in the ocean. This method provided classification of chlorophyll a, SST and SST gradient satellite data. Six classes explained the main patterns and important characteristics of the region. The method was also able to determine interannual variability in existence and area size of the classes which indicated occurrences of the major circulation patterns in the area and its influence on the variations of the classes.

  3. Fiber Bragg grating sensor fatigue crack real-time monitoring based on spectrum cross-correlation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Pengyu; Yuan, Mei; Dong, Shaopeng; Song, Hao; Xue, Jingfeng

    2013-01-01

    As one of the most critical tasks in structural damage monitoring, real-time fatigue crack monitoring plays an important role in improving the durability of a structure. In this paper, an online fatigue crack detection method is investigated based on the fiber Bragg grating (FBG) crack monitoring test bed (FBG-CMTB). Aiming at detecting ultrasonic spread in the structure when the crack is growing, the spectrum cross-correlation analysis algorithm and the cross-correlation function sequence are two methods that we will investigate in detail. Considering the singularity characteristic of the crack detecting signals when crack initiates, the wavelet packet analysis method is applied for feature extraction and two damage factors, crack initiation factor (CIF) and crack propagation factor (CPF), are constructed for damage initiation and propagation degree identification. To analyze the efficiency of this method, this paper presents the comparison tests based on different sensors array, FBG and acoustic emission (AE). Experimental results shows a satisfactory performance of the proposed spectrum cross-correlation analysis (SCCA) and damage feature factors on the fatigue crack online monitoring.

  4. Growth model for large branched three-dimensional hydraulic crack system in gas or oil shale.

    PubMed

    Chau, Viet T; Bažant, Zdeněk P; Su, Yewang

    2016-10-13

    Recent analysis of gas outflow histories at wellheads shows that the hydraulic crack spacing must be of the order of 0.1 m (rather than 1 m or 10 m). Consequently, the existing models, limited to one or several cracks, are unrealistic. The reality is 10(5)-10(6) almost vertical hydraulic cracks per fracking stage. Here, we study the growth of two intersecting near-orthogonal systems of parallel hydraulic cracks spaced at 0.1 m, preferably following pre-existing rock joints. One key idea is that, to model lateral cracks branching from a primary crack wall, crack pressurization, by viscous Poiseuille-type flow, of compressible (proppant-laden) frac water must be complemented with the pressurization of a sufficient volume of micropores and microcracks by Darcy-type water diffusion into the shale, to generate tension along existing crack walls, overcoming the strength limit of the cohesive-crack or crack-band model. A second key idea is that enforcing the equilibrium of stresses in cracks, pores and water, with the generation of tension in the solid phase, requires a new three-phase medium concept, which is transitional between Biot's two-phase medium and Terzaghi's effective stress and introduces the loading of the solid by pressure gradients of diffusing pore water. A computer program, combining finite elements for deformation and fracture with volume elements for water flow, is developed to validate the new model.This article is part of the themed issue 'Energy and the subsurface'.

  5. Crack modeling of rotating blades with cracked hexahedral finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao; Jiang, Dongxiang

    2014-06-01

    Dynamic analysis is the basis in investigating vibration features of cracked blades, where the features can be applied to monitor health state of blades, detect cracks in an early stage and prevent failures. This work presents a cracked hexahedral finite element method for dynamic analysis of cracked blades, with the purpose of addressing the contradiction between accuracy and efficiency in crack modeling of blades in rotor system. The cracked hexahedral element is first derived with strain energy release rate method, where correction of stress intensity factors of crack front and formulation of load distribution of crack surface are carried out to improve the modeling accuracy. To consider nonlinear characteristics of time-varying opening and closure effects caused by alternating loads, breathing function is proposed for the cracked hexahedral element. Second, finite element method with contact element is analyzed and used for comparison. Finally, validation of the cracked hexahedral element is carried out in terms of breathing effects of cracked blades and natural frequency in different crack depths. Good consistency is acquired between the results with developed cracked hexahedral element and contact element, while the computation time is significantly reduced in the previous one. Therefore, the developed cracked hexahedral element achieves good accuracy and high efficiency in crack modeling of rotating blades.

  6. Crack branching in carbon steel. Fracture mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syromyatnikova, A. S.; Alekseev, A. A.; Levin, A. I.; Lyglaev, A. V.

    2010-04-01

    The fracture surfaces of pressure vessels made of carbon steel that form during crack branching propagation are examined by fractography. Crack branching is found to occur at a crack velocity higher than a certain critical value V > V c . In this case, the material volume that is involved in fracture and depends on the elastoplastic properties of the material and the sample width has no time to dissipate the energy released upon crack motion via the damage mechanisms intrinsic in the material under given deformation conditions (in our case, via cracking according to intragranular cleavage).

  7. Crack use in São Paulo.

    PubMed

    Nappo, S A; Galduróz, J C; Noto, A R

    1996-04-01

    Documented crack use emerged in São Paulo, Brazil, from 1991 onward. Therefore, it is a recent behavior among drug users. The present work draws a profile of São Paulo crack users, employing an ethnographic approach. Twenty-five crack users were interviewed on selected social and demographic characteristics, on the drug itself and its consumption, and on the consequences of this use. Crack cocaine is harmful for the user, leading within a short period to a condition of dependence. The crack users reported ultimately lapsing into "marginality" due to social isolation, neglect of bodily needs, and breakdown of family ties and other relationships.

  8. Identification of repellent and insecticidal constituents of the essential oil of Artemisia rupestris L. aerial parts against Liposcelis bostrychophila Badonnel.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin Chao; Li, Yin Ping; Li, He Qin; Deng, Zhi Wei; Zhou, Ligang; Liu, Zhi Long; Du, Shu Shan

    2013-09-03

    The aim of this research was to determine the chemical composition and insecticidal and repellent activity of the essential oil of Artemisia rupestris L. aerial parts against the booklice Liposcelis bostrychophila Badonnel and isolation of insecticidal and repellent constituents from the essential oil. The essential oil of A. rupestris was obtained by hydrodistillation and analyzed by GC-MS. A total of 30 components of the essential oil of A. rupestris was identified and the principal compounds in the essential oil were α-terpinyl acetate (37.18%), spathulenol (10.65%), α-terpineol (10.09%), and linalool (7.56%), followed by 4-terpineol (3.92%) and patchoulol (3.05%). Based on bioactivity-guided fractionation, the four active constituents were isolated from the essential oil and identified as α-terpineol, α-terpinyl acetate, 4-terpineol and linalool. The essential oil of A. rupestris exhibited contact toxicity against L. bostrychophila with LD₅₀ value of 414.48 µg/cm². α-Terpinyl acetate (LD₅₀ = 92.59 µg/cm²) exhibited stronger contact toxicity against booklice than α-terpineol (LD₅₀ = 140.30 µg/cm²), 4-terpineol (LD₅₀ = 211.35 µg/cm²), and linalool (LD5₅₀ = 393.16 µg/cm²). The essential oil of A. rupestris (LC₅₀ = 6.67 mg/L air) also possessed fumigant toxicity against L. bostrychophila while the four constituents, 4-terpineol, α-terpineol, α-terpinyl acetate and linalool had LC₅₀ values of 0.34, 1.12, 1.26 and 1.96 mg/L air, respectively. α-Terpinol and α-terpinyl acetate showed strong repellency against L. bostrychophila, while linalool and 4-terpinol exhibited weak repellency. The results indicate that the essential oil of A. rupestris aerial parts and its constituent compounds have potential for development into natural insecticides or fumigants as well as repellents for control of insects in stored grains.

  9. Improved imaging algorithm for bridge crack detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jingxiao; Song, Pingli; Han, Kaihong

    2012-04-01

    This paper present an improved imaging algorithm for bridge crack detection, through optimizing the eight-direction Sobel edge detection operator, making the positioning of edge points more accurate than without the optimization, and effectively reducing the false edges information, so as to facilitate follow-up treatment. In calculating the crack geometry characteristics, we use the method of extracting skeleton on single crack length. In order to calculate crack area, we construct the template of area by making logical bitwise AND operation of the crack image. After experiment, the results show errors of the crack detection method and actual manual measurement are within an acceptable range, meet the needs of engineering applications. This algorithm is high-speed and effective for automated crack measurement, it can provide more valid data for proper planning and appropriate performance of the maintenance and rehabilitation processes of bridge.

  10. Identification of saline water intrusion in part of Cauvery deltaic region, Tamil Nadu, Southern India: using GIS and VES methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanachandrasamy, G.; Ramkumar, T.; Venkatramanan, S.; Chung, S. Y.; Vasudevan, S.

    2016-06-01

    We use electrical resistivity data arrayed in a 2715 km2 region with 30 locations to identify the saline water intrusion zone in part of Cauvery deltaic region, offshore Eastern India. From this dataset we are able to derive information on groundwater quality, thickness of aquifer zone, structural and stratigraphic conditions relevant to groundwater conditions, and permeability of aquifer systems. A total of 30 vertical electrode soundings (VES) were carried out by Schlumberger electrode arrangement to indicate complete lithology of this region using curve matching techniques. The electrical soundings exhibited that H and HK type curves were suitable for 16 shallow locations, and QH, KQ, K, KH, QQ, and HA curves were fit for other location. Low resistivity values suggested that saline water intrusion occurred in this region. According to final GIS map, most of the region was severely affected by seawater intrusion due to the use of over-exploitation of groundwater.The deteriorated groundwater resources in this coastal region should raise environmental and health concerns.

  11. Noncontact monitoring of fatigue crack growth using high frequency guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masserey, B.; Fromme, P.

    2014-03-01

    The development of fatigue cracks at fastener holes due to stress concentration is a common problem in aircraft maintenance. This contribution investigates the use of high frequency guided waves for the non-contact monitoring of fatigue crack growth in tensile, aluminium specimens. High frequency guided ultrasonic waves have a good sensitivity for defect detection and can propagate along the structure, thus having the potential for the inspection of difficult to access parts by means of non-contact measurements. Experimentally the required guided wave modes are excited using standard wedge transducers and measured using a laser interferometer. The growth of fatigue cracks during cyclic loading was monitored optically and the resulting changes in the signal caused by crack growth are quantified. Full three-dimensional simulation of the scattering of the high frequency guided ultrasonic waves at the fastener hole and crack has been implemented using the Finite Difference (FD) method. The comparison of the results shows a good agreement of the measured and predicted scattered field of the guided wave at quarter-elliptical and through-thickness fatigue cracks. The measurements show a good sensitivity for the early detection of fatigue damage and for the monitoring of fatigue crack growth at a fastener hole. The sensitivity and repeatability are ascertained, and the robustness of the methodology for practical in-situ ultrasonic monitoring of fatigue crack growth is discussed.

  12. Experimental Investigation on Centrifugal Compressor Blade Crack Classification Using the Squared Envelope Spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongkun; Zhang, Xuefeng; Xu, Fujian

    2013-01-01

    Centrifugal compressors are a key piece of equipment for modern production. Among the components of the centrifugal compressor, the impeller is a pivotal part as it is used to transform kinetic energy into pressure energy. Blade crack condition monitoring and classification has been broadly investigated in the industrial and academic area. In this research, a pressure pulsation (PP) sensor arranged in close vicinity to the crack area and the corresponding casing vibration signals are used to monitor blade crack information. As these signals cannot directly demonstrate the blade crack, the method employed in this research is based on the extraction of weak signal characteristics that are induced by blade cracking. A method for blade crack classification based on the signals monitored by using a squared envelope spectrum (SES) is presented. Experimental investigations on blade crack classification are carried out to verify the effectiveness of this method. The results show that it is an effective tool for blade crack classification in centrifugal compressors. PMID:24051521

  13. Acoustic harmonic generation measurement applications: Detection of tight cracks in powder metallurgy compacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, D. J.; Foley, J. C.

    2000-05-01

    Standard linear ultrasonic testing techniques have long been employed for locating and characterizing relatively open cracks in a wide variety of materials, from metallic alloys and ceramics to composites. In all these materials, the detection of open cracks easily accomplished because the void between the two crack surfaces provides sufficient acoustic impedance mismatch to reflect the incident energy. Closed or partially closed cracks, however, may often go undetected because contacting interfaces allow transmission of ultrasound. In the green (unsintered) state, powder metallurgy compacts typically contain high residual stresses that have the ability to close cracks formed during the compaction process, a result of oxide films, improper powder lubricant, mold design, etc. After sintering, the reduction of residual stresses may no longer be sufficient to close the crack. Although the crack may be more easily detected, it is obvious most desirable to discover defects prior to sintering. It has been shown that the displacements of an interface may be highly nonlinear if a stress wave of sufficient intensity propagates across it, a result of the stress wave either opening or closing the interface. Current efforts involve the application of nonlinear acoustic techniques, in particular acoustic harmonic generation measurements, for the detection and characterization of tightly closed cracks in powder metallurgy parts. A description of the equipment and the measurement technique will be discussed and initial experimental results on sintered and green compacts will be presented.—This work was performed at the Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University under USDOE Contract No. W-7405-ENG-82.

  14. Polygon/Cracked Sedimentary Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    4 December 2004 Exposures of sedimentary rock are quite common on the surface of Mars. Less common, but found in many craters in the regions north and northwest of the giant basin, Hellas, are sedimentary rocks with distinct polygonal cracks in them. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an example from the floor of an unnamed crater near 21.0oS, 311.9oW. Such cracks might have formed by desiccation as an ancient lake dried up, or they might be related to ground ice freeze/thaw cycles or some other stresses placed on the original sediment or the rock after it became lithified. The 300 meter scale bar is about 328 yards long. The scene is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  15. Biaxial Fatigue Cracking from Notch

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-04

    Leevers (reference 11) noticed that the variation in  from 0 to 2 has little effect on the da/dN in PVC ( polyvinyl - chloride ), but reduces the da/dN...under biaxial rotating and bending. Ahmad (reference 2) formulated a model for the biaxial fatigue crack growth in aggressive environment, outlined by...1962, Vol. 90, pp. 238-239. 20. ASM Handbook , Vol. 12 Fractography: 1992, p. 430, 438. 21. Metals Handbook , Vol. 9 Fractography and Atlas of

  16. Predicting the Mineral Composition of Dust Aerosols. Part 2; Model Evaluation and Identification of Key Processes with Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perlwitz, J. P.; Garcia-Pando, C. Perez; Miller, R. L.

    2015-01-01

    A global compilation of nearly sixty measurement studies is used to evaluate two methods of simulating the mineral composition of dust aerosols in an Earth system model. Both methods are based upon a Mean Mineralogical Table (MMT) that relates the soil mineral fractions to a global atlas of arid soil type. The Soil Mineral Fraction (SMF) method assumes that the aerosol mineral fractions match the fractions of the soil. The MMT is based upon soil measurements after wet sieving, a process that destroys aggregates of soil particles that would have been emitted from the original, undisturbed soil. The second method approximately reconstructs the emitted aggregates. This model is referred to as the Aerosol Mineral Fraction (AMF) method because the mineral fractions of the aerosols differ from those of the wet-sieved parent soil, partly due to reaggregation. The AMF method remedies some of the deficiencies of the SMF method in comparison to observations. Only the AMF method exhibits phyllosilicate mass at silt sizes, where they are abundant according to observations. In addition, the AMF quartz fraction of silt particles is in better agreement with measured values, in contrast to the overestimated SMF fraction. Measurements at distinct clay and silt particle sizes are shown to be more useful for evaluation of the models, in contrast to the sum over all particles sizes that is susceptible to compensating errors, as illustrated by the SMF experiment. Model errors suggest that allocation of the emitted silt fraction of each mineral into the corresponding transported size categories is an important remaining source of uncertainty. Evaluation of both models and the MMT is hindered by the limited number of size-resolved measurements of mineral content that sparsely sample aerosols from the major dust sources. The importance of climate processes dependent upon aerosol mineral composition shows the need for global and routine mineral measurements.

  17. Computerized evaluation of holographic interferograms for fatigue crack detection in riveted lap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiang

    Using an innovative portable holographic inspection and testing system (PHITS) developed at the Australian Defence Force Academy, fatigue cracks in riveted lap joints can be detected by visually inspecting the abnormal fringe changes recorded on holographic interferograms. In this thesis, for automatic crack detection, some modern digital image processing techniques are investigated and applied to holographic interferogram evaluation. Fringe analysis algorithms are developed for identification of the crack-induced fringe changes. Theoretical analysis of PHITS and riveted lap joints and two typical experiments demonstrate that the fatigue cracks in lightly-clamped joints induce two characteristic fringe changes: local fringe discontinuities at the cracking sites; and the global crescent fringe distribution near to the edge of the rivet hole. Both of the fringe features are used for crack detection in this thesis. As a basis of the fringe feature extraction, an algorithm for local fringe orientation calculation is proposed. For high orientation accuracy and computational efficiency, Gaussian gradient filtering and neighboring direction averaging are used to minimize the effects of image background variations and random noise. The neighboring direction averaging is also used to approximate the fringe directions in centerlines of bright and dark fringes. Experimental results indicate that for high orientation accuracy the scales of the Gaussian filter and neighboring direction averaging should be chosen according to the local fringe spacings. The orientation histogram technique is applied to detect the local fringe discontinuity due to the fatigue cracks. The Fourier descriptor technique is used to characterize the global fringe distribution change from a circular to a crescent distribution with the fatigue crack growth. Experiments and computer simulations are conducted to analyze the detectability and reliability of crack detection using the two techniques. Results

  18. Crack, sex work, and HIV.

    PubMed

    Leggett, T

    1999-01-01

    South Africa's long isolation, and perhaps deliberate efforts by the apartheid government, have led to an unusual pattern of drug abuse in the country. Drugs not commonly used in other countries, such as Mandrax and Welconol, are widespread in South Africa, while the street drugs commonly found in other countries, such as cocaine and heroin, have been relatively rare. However, this is changing, as international drug traffickers now import a broad range of drugs, including heroin and cocaine. Demand for these drugs has been established in South Africa, including among the urban lower classes. Immigration, especially of other Africans and particularly Nigerians, has accelerated the trend. While both mandrax and crack cocaine are smoked, the former is a sedative and the latter is a stimulant with pro-sexual effects. These sexual effects, together with very strong addictive potential, have led to very high HIV seroprevalence in user populations. Addiction often leads female users into prostitution, with prostitutes being a prime conduit for the spread of both the drug and HIV infection. Desperate to earn funds to meet their crack consumption needs, drug-addicted female prostitutes in South Africa service many clients and engage in practices shunned by their nonaddicted peers, such as unprotected and anal sex. There will be serious long-term effects of crack cocaine consumption, together with prostitution, upon all of South African society.

  19. The Origin of Griffith Cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, John

    2011-12-01

    As a result of the extremely strong interatomic bonds, pores and cracks are difficult to form in metals. They seem unlikely to be created intrinsically by the normal mechanisms involved in the formation of a solid by solidification from liquid, or condensation from vapor phases, or probably, by lattice mechanisms in the solid state. It is proposed here that initiation sites for pores and cracks for most failures of metals can only be initiated from unbonded interfaces. Such unbonded defects are introduced into metals only via extrinsic ( entrainment) mechanisms resulting from production processes, particularly melting and casting. Only entrained inclusions, particularly bifilms, have unbonded interfaces that can be opened to constitute Griffith cracks and can explain the initiation of macroscopic fracture and related microscopic processes, such as a decohesion between the second phases and a matrix. In the absence of entrained defects, metals would be predicted to fail in tension only either (1) at high stresses probably in excess of 20 GPa or (2) by ductile flow to the point of 100 pct reduction in area. Improved melting and casting processes giving freedom from entrained defects promise unprecedented performance and reliability of engineering metals.

  20. The Growth of Small Corrosion Fatigue Cracks in Alloy 7075

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, R. S.

    2001-01-01

    The corrosion fatigue crack growth characteristics of small (less than 35 microns) surface and corner cracks in aluminum alloy 7075 is established. The early stage of crack growth is studied by performing in situ long focal length microscope (500X) crack length measurements in laboratory air and 1% NaCl environments. To quantify the "small crack effect" in the corrosive environment, the corrosion fatigue crack propagation behavior of small cracks is compared to long through-the-thickness cracks grown under identical experimental conditions. In salt water, long crack constant K(sub max) growth rates are similar to small crack da/dN.

  1. The Growth of Small Corrosion Fatigue Cracks in Alloy 7075

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    The corrosion fatigue crack growth characteristics of small (greater than 35 micrometers) surface and corner cracks in aluminum alloy 7075 is established. The early stage of crack growth is studied by performing in situ long focal length microscope (500×) crack length measurements in laboratory air and 1% sodium chloride (NaCl) environments. To quantify the "small crack effect" in the corrosive environment, the corrosion fatigue crack propagation behavior of small cracks is compared to long through-the-thickness cracks grown under identical experimental conditions. In salt water, long crack constant K(sub max) growth rates are similar to small crack da/dN.

  2. Identification of chlorophyll ( with application of IRS-P4 OCM data and Geographical Information System - a case study of part of Bay of Bengal, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavan Dayaker, T.

    2002-05-01

    As 60 - 70 % of the world's population live within 20 - 30 km of the coastline, coastal zone management and optimisation of ocean resources have grown in of importance. The study of the ocean encompasses its physical chemical, biological properties and its interaction with land and biological productivity. Mapping of coastal zone gives us insight about how to conserve its eco-balance and implement effective coastal zone management. Effective Coastal Zone Management will need accurate and comprehensive scientific data, on which decisions can be based. In the present study Ocean Color Monitor ( OCM ) data is used for identification of chlorophyll, which inturn indicates the presence of phytoplankton, which is the primary producer in the food chain, and also to fish . The study area is part of Bay of Bengal Sea near the coastal region of Andhra Pradesh, India. Remote sensing in optical region is found useful in understanding the spatial distribution of ocean water constituents, in which phytoplankton pigment which impart a green colour to the sea water, has a definite response in the visible region, which enables plant material to be distinguished from the other suspended matter. Normalised Differential Vegetative Index ( NDVI ), which is mainly used on land applications for the identification of vegetation based on chlorophyll absorption, is used on water surface in the present study. The positive value of NDVI is an indication of the presence of pigment concentration / chlorophyll / phytoplankton / fish. The successful launch of the IRS - P4 satellite which provides us a challenging opportunity to study ocean resources and its characteristics and see how best we can benefit, over a period of time, in several areas of human survival specifically related to food security on a sustained basis. This study is first of its kind in utilising the latest technology to explore the marine resources for mapping the fishing zones and the results, clearly indicate that NDVI can

  3. Predicting failure of specimens with either surface cracks or corner cracks at holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A previously developed fracture criterion was applied to fracture data for surface-cracked specimens subjected to remote tensile loading and for specimens with a corner crack (or cracks) emanating from a circular hole subjected to either remote tensile loading or pin loading in the hole. The failure stresses calculated from this criterion were consistent with experimental failure stresses for both surface and corner cracks for a wide range of crack shapes and crack sizes in specimens of aluminum alloy, titanium alloy, and steel. Empirical equations for the elastic stress-intensity factors for a surface crack and for a corner crack (or cracks) emanating from a circular hole in a finite-thickness and finite-width specimen were also developed.

  4. Failure Diagram for Chemically Assisted Crack Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadananda, K.; Vasudevan, A. K.

    2011-02-01

    A failure diagram that combines the thresholds for failure of a smooth specimen to that of a fracture mechanics specimen, similar to the modified Kitagawa diagram in fatigue, is presented. For a given material/environment system, the diagram defines conditions under which a crack initiated at the threshold stress in a smooth specimen becomes a propagating crack, by satisfying the threshold stress intensity of a long crack. In analogy with fatigue, it is shown that internal stresses or local stress concentrations are required to provide the necessary mechanical crack tip driving forces, on one hand, and reaction/transportation kinetics to provide the chemical potential gradients, on the other. Together, they help in the initiation and propagation of the cracks. The chemical driving forces can be expressed as equivalent mechanical stresses using the failure diagram. Both internal stresses and their gradients, in conjunction with the chemical driving forces, have to meet the minimum magnitude and the minimum gradients to sustain the growth of a microcrack formed. Otherwise, nonpropagating conditions will prevail or a crack formed will remain dormant. It is shown that the processes underlying the crack nucleation in a smooth specimen and the crack growth of a fracture mechanics specimen are essentially the same. Both require building up of internal stresses by local plasticity. The process involves intermittent crack tip blunting and microcrack nucleation until the crack becomes unstable under the applied stress.

  5. Modelling and measurement of crack closure and crack growth following overloads and underloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dexter, R. J.; Hudak, S. J.; Davidson, D. L.

    1989-01-01

    Ignoring crack growth retardation following overloads can result in overly conservative life predictions in structures subjected to variable amplitude fatigue loading. Crack closure is believed to contribute to the crack growth retardation, although the specific closure mechanism is dabatable. The delay period and corresponding crack growth rate transients following overload and overload/underload cycles were systematically measured as a function of load ratio and overload magnitude. These responses are correlated in terms of the local 'driving force' for crack growth, i.e. the effective stress intensity factor range. Experimental results are compared with the predictions of a Dugdale-type (1960) crack closure model, and improvements in the model are suggested.

  6. Crack Turning in Integrally Stiffened Aircraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettit, Richard Glen

    2000-01-01

    Current emphasis in the aircraft industry toward reducing manufacturing cost has created a renewed interest in integrally stiffened structures. Crack turning has been identified as an approach to improve the damage tolerance and fail-safety of this class of structures. A desired behavior is for skin cracks to turn before reaching a stiffener, instead of growing straight through. A crack in a pressurized fuselage encounters high T-stress as it nears the stiffener--a condition favorable to crack turning. Also, the tear resistance of aluminum alloys typically varies with crack orientation, a form of anisotropy that can influence the crack path. The present work addresses these issues with a study of crack turning in two-dimensions, including the effects of both T-stress and fracture anisotropy. Both effects are shown to have relation to the process zone size, an interaction that is central to this study. Following an introduction to the problem, the T-stress effect is studied for a slightly curved semi-infinite crack with a cohesive process zone, yielding a closed form expression for the future crack path in an infinite medium. For a given initial crack tip curvature and tensile T-stress, the crack path instability is found to increase with process zone size. Fracture orthotropy is treated using a simple function to interpolate between the two principal fracture resistance values in two-dimensions. An extension to three-dimensions interpolates between the six principal values of fracture resistance. Also discussed is the transition between mode I and mode II fracture in metals. For isotropic materials, there is evidence that the crack seeks out a direction of either local symmetry (pure mode I) or local asymmetry (pure mode II) growth. For orthotropic materials the favored states are not pure modal, and have mode mixity that is a function of crack orientation.

  7. Oxidation effects on the fatigue crack growth behavior of alloy 718 at high temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Molins, R.; Hochstetter, G.; Chassaigne, J.C.; Andrieu, E.

    1997-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate oxidation assisted crack growth phenomena encountered in nickel-based alloys at high temperatures. Fatigue crack growth tests conducted at 650 C and under a range of oxygen partial pressures revealed the existence of a transition pressure. This pressure is in no way correlated to the loading conditions, but rather it varies with the chromium content in the alloy, and is furthermore directly linked to the oxidation mechanisms which were identified by using analytical TEM. By means of specific mechanical tests, superimposing a square wave oxygen pressure cycle to a fatigue or creep-fatigue mechanical cycle, various fundamental aspects of the local interaction between oxidation and deformation at the crack tip were investigated. Embrittlement is due partly to the nickel oxide nucleation and partly to the stress relaxation ability of the material. Chemical and microstructural modifications are recommended in order to improve the cracking resistance.

  8. Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Creep Crack Growth.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-03-20

    components, such as superalloy jet-engine parts, low-alloy and stainless steel assemblies in conventional and nuclear power plants, and titanium and...alloy systems. 2 0 II. LITERATURE REVIEW Creep crack growth has been extensively studied in aluminum alloys, titanium alloys, nickel, iron and cobalt...base superalloys, carbon steels , chromium molybdenum-vanadium and in stainless steels . The effects of the test temperature, the test environment, alloy

  9. Identification marking by means of laser peening

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Dane, C. Brent; Harris, Fritz

    2002-01-01

    The invention is a method and apparatus for marking components by inducing a shock wave on the surface that results in an indented (strained) layer and a residual compressive stress in the surface layer. One embodiment of the laser peenmarking system rapidly imprints, with single laser pulses, a complete identification code or three-dimensional pattern and leaves the surface in a state of deep residual compressive stress. A state of compressive stress in parts made of metal or other materials is highly desirable to make them resistant to fatigue failure and stress corrosion cracking. This process employs a laser peening system and beam spatial modulation hardware or imaging technology that can be setup to impress full three dimensional patterns into metal surfaces at the pulse rate of the laser, a rate that is at least an order of magnitude faster than competing marking technologies.

  10. Crack Closure Characteristics Considering Center Cracked and Compact Tension Specimens.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    adjacent elements differed in size by no more than a factor of 2. The fine mesh elements near the crack tip were much smaller than the -7 2CTS with an area...N .1- £KO.~.-N 0 0 td t + U.Us* 0 C.+ *4 w O mcow K O4 ’ 4u 0. X Ulf! W I 2 0 Z K0 NO- N Cos.@-0S W.N a-1 WW m .M0 000004.*0 00 4-W-M. R800*x -3-o" 0

  11. Crossing grain boundaries in metals by slip bands, cleavage and fatigue cracks.

    PubMed

    Pineau, André

    2015-03-28

    The size and the character (low and large angle, special boundaries, tilt and twist boundaries, twins) of the grain boundaries (GBs) in polycrystalline materials influence their strength and their fracture toughness. Recent studies devoted to nanocrystalline (NC) materials have shown a deviation from the Hall-Petch law. Special GBs formed by Σ3 twins in face-centred cubic metals are also known to have a strong effect on the mechanical behaviour of these metals, in particular their work-hardening rate. Grain orientation influences also crack path, the fracture toughness of body-centred cubic (BCC) metals and the fatigue crack growth rate of microstructurally short cracks. This paper deals both with slip transfer at GBs and with the interactions between propagating cracks with GBs. In the analysis of slip transfer, the emphasis is placed on twin boundaries (TBs) for which the dislocation reactions during slip transfer are analysed theoretically, experimentally and using the results of atomic molecular simulations published in the literature. It is shown that in a number of situations this transfer leads to a normal motion of the TB owing to the displacement of partial dislocations along the TB. This motion can generate a de-twinning effect observed in particular in NC metals. Crack propagation across GBs is also considered. It is shown that cleavage crack path behaviour in BCC metals is largely dependent on the twist component of the GBs. A mechanism for the propagation of these twisted cracks involving a segmentation of the crack front and the existence of intergranular parts is discussed and verified for a pressure vessel steel. A similar segmentation seems to occur for short fatigue cracks although, quite surprisingly, this crossing mechanism for fatigue cracks does not seem to have been examined in very much detail in the literature. Metallurgical methods used to improve the strength of the materials, via grain boundaries, are briefly discussed.

  12. Characterization of the roles of electrochemistry, convection and crack chemistry in stress corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, P.L.; Young, L.M.

    1995-12-31

    Understanding the role of ionic current flow within a crack and near the crack tip is fundamental to modeling of environmentally assisted crack advance. Critical conceptual issues and models related to ionic current flow within cracks, and the associated ``crevice`` chemistry and metal oxidation that results, are presented and examined in the light of experimental evidence. Various advanced techniques have been developed to evaluate the roles of electrochemistry, transport, and crack chemistry in stress corrosion cracking, with emphasis on high temperature ``pure`` water. These include high resolution crack length measurement by dc potential drop performed simultaneously with microsampling, electrochemical microprobe mapping, microinjection of species, and micropolarization of the crack. Conceptual issues addressed include the importance of the corrosion potential vs. oxidant concentration, the absence of oxidants and associated low corrosion potential within cracks, the location and role of macrocell currents associated with potential gradients from differential aeration cells, the localized nature of the microcell currents associated with dissolution at the crack tip, the importance of pH and adsorbed species on repassivation and crack advance, and the role of convection in crack chemistry and crack advance. Correct concepts are shown to be an essential pre-cursor to quantitative modeling.

  13. Crack-Arrest Techniques in Reinforced Concrete Structural Elements. Report 1. Laboratory Tests

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-11-01

    Control Charac-teristics of Various Types of Bar in Reinforced Concrete Beams," Research Report 18, Part 1, Dec 1966, Cement and Concrete Associa- tion...AD/A-002 661 CRACK-ARREST TECHNIQUES IN REINFORCED CONCRETE STRUCTURAL ELEMENTS. REPORT 1. LABORATORY TESTS Frank B. Cox Army Engineer Waterways...ACCESSION NO. 3. FECIPI§NT’S CATALOG NUMBER 4. TITLE (and Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT &-PERIOD COVERED CRACK-ARREST TECHNIQUES IN REINFORCED CONCRETE

  14. Analytical and numerical evaluation of crack-tip plasticity of an axisymmetrically loaded penny-shaped crack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaiyat, Sumitra; Jin, Xiaoqing; Keer, Leon M.; Kiattikomol, Kraiwood

    2008-01-01

    Analytical and numerical approaches are used to solve an axisymmetric crack problem with a refined Barenblatt-Dugdale approach. The analytical method utilizes potential theory in classical linear elasticity, where a suitable potential is selected for the treatment of the mixed boundary problem. The closed-form solution for the problem with constant pressure applied near the tip of a penny-shaped crack is studied to illustrate the methodology of the analysis and also to provide a fundamental solution for the numerical approach. Taking advantage of the superposition principle, an exact solution is derived to predict the extent of the plastic zone where a Tresca yield condition is imposed, which also provides a useful benchmark for the numerical study presented in the second part. For an axisymmetric crack, the numerical discretization is required only in the radial direction, which renders the programming work efficient. Through an iterative scheme, the numerical method is able to determine the size of the crack tip plasticity, which is governed by the nonlinear von Mises criterion. The relationships between the applied load and the length of the plastic zone are compared for three different yielding conditions. To cite this article: S. Chaiyat et al., C. R. Mecanique 336 (2008).

  15. A probabilistic model of brittle crack formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chudnovsky, A.; Kunin, B.

    1987-01-01

    Probability of a brittle crack formation in an elastic solid with fluctuating strength is considered. A set Omega of all possible crack trajectories reflecting the fluctuation of the strength field is introduced. The probability P(X) that crack penetration depth exceeds X is expressed as a functional integral over Omega of a conditional probability of the same event taking place along a particular path. Various techniques are considered to evaluate the integral. Under rather nonrestrictive assumptions, the integral is reduced to solving a diffusion-type equation. A new characteristic of fracture process, 'crack diffusion coefficient', is introduced. An illustrative example is then considered where the integration is reduced to solving an ordinary differential equation. The effect of the crack diffusion coefficient and of the magnitude of strength fluctuations on probability density of crack penetration depth is presented. Practical implications of the proposed model are discussed.

  16. Crack Propagation in Bamboo's Hierarchical Cellular Structure

    PubMed Central

    Habibi, Meisam K.; Lu, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Bamboo, as a natural hierarchical cellular material, exhibits remarkable mechanical properties including excellent flexibility and fracture toughness. As far as bamboo as a functionally graded bio-composite is concerned, the interactions of different constituents (bamboo fibers; parenchyma cells; and vessels.) alongside their corresponding interfacial areas with a developed crack should be of high significance. Here, by using multi-scale mechanical characterizations coupled with advanced environmental electron microscopy (ESEM), we unambiguously show that fibers' interfacial areas along with parenchyma cells' boundaries were preferred routes for crack growth in both radial and longitudinal directions. Irrespective of the honeycomb structure of fibers along with cellular configuration of parenchyma ground, the hollow vessels within bamboo culm affected the crack propagation too, by crack deflection or crack-tip energy dissipation. It is expected that the tortuous crack propagation mode exhibited in the present study could be applicable to other cellular natural materials as well. PMID:24998298

  17. Crack propagation in bamboo's hierarchical cellular structure.

    PubMed

    Habibi, Meisam K; Lu, Yang

    2014-07-07

    Bamboo, as a natural hierarchical cellular material, exhibits remarkable mechanical properties including excellent flexibility and fracture toughness. As far as bamboo as a functionally graded bio-composite is concerned, the interactions of different constituents (bamboo fibers; parenchyma cells; and vessels.) alongside their corresponding interfacial areas with a developed crack should be of high significance. Here, by using multi-scale mechanical characterizations coupled with advanced environmental electron microscopy (ESEM), we unambiguously show that fibers' interfacial areas along with parenchyma cells' boundaries were preferred routes for crack growth in both radial and longitudinal directions. Irrespective of the honeycomb structure of fibers along with cellular configuration of parenchyma ground, the hollow vessels within bamboo culm affected the crack propagation too, by crack deflection or crack-tip energy dissipation. It is expected that the tortuous crack propagation mode exhibited in the present study could be applicable to other cellular natural materials as well.

  18. Drug user settings: a crack house typology.

    PubMed

    Geter, R S

    1994-06-01

    Both lay persons and members of the scientific community have come to view the inner-city crack house as a facility where drug dealers and crack addicts sell, buy, and use crack cocaine. It is suggested in this article that the term "crack house" be unbundled into four more meaningful terms based on the physical conditions of the house, its functionality, and the social relationships that it supports. Two typologies are proposed. The first separates drug houses into four general categories: (1) Crack House, (2) Cop House, (3) Drug House III, and (4) Drug House IV. The second typology categorizes the Crack House into four types: (A) the Party House, (B) the Hit House, (C) the Smoke House, and (D) the Bandominium. Each of these types is explored in detail.

  19. Prediction of thermal cycling induced matrix cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmanus, Hugh L.

    1992-01-01

    Thermal fatigue has been observed to cause matrix cracking in laminated composite materials. A method is presented to predict transverse matrix cracks in composite laminates subjected to cyclic thermal load. Shear lag stress approximations and a simple energy-based fracture criteria are used to predict crack densities as a function of temperature. Prediction of crack densities as a function of thermal cycling is accomplished by assuming that fatigue degrades the material's inherent resistance to cracking. The method is implemented as a computer program. A simple experiment provides data on progressive cracking of a laminate with decreasing temperature. Existing data on thermal fatigue is also used. Correlations of the analytical predictions to the data are very good. A parametric study using the analytical method is presented which provides insight into material behavior under cyclical thermal loads.

  20. Online bridge crack monitoring with smart film.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Benniu; Wang, Shuliang; Li, Xingxing; Zhou, Zhixiang; Zhang, Xu; Yang, Guang; Qiu, Minfeng

    2013-01-01

    Smart film crack monitoring method, which can be used for detecting initiation, length, width, shape, location, and propagation of cracks on real bridges, is proposed. Firstly, the fabrication of the smart film is developed. Then the feasibility of the method is analyzed and verified by the mechanical sensing character of the smart film under the two conditions of normal strain and crack initiation. Meanwhile, the coupling interference between parallel enameled wires of the smart film is discussed, and then low-frequency detecting signal and the custom communication protocol are used to decrease interference. On this basis, crack monitoring system with smart film is designed, where the collected crack data is sent to the remote monitoring center and the cracks are simulated and recurred. Finally, the monitoring system is applied to six bridges, and the effects are discussed.

  1. Online Bridge Crack Monitoring with Smart Film

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuliang; Li, Xingxing; Zhou, Zhixiang; Zhang, Xu; Yang, Guang; Qiu, Minfeng

    2013-01-01

    Smart film crack monitoring method, which can be used for detecting initiation, length, width, shape, location, and propagation of cracks on real bridges, is proposed. Firstly, the fabrication of the smart film is developed. Then the feasibility of the method is analyzed and verified by the mechanical sensing character of the smart film under the two conditions of normal strain and crack initiation. Meanwhile, the coupling interference between parallel enameled wires of the smart film is discussed, and then low-frequency detecting signal and the custom communication protocol are used to decrease interference. On this basis, crack monitoring system with smart film is designed, where the collected crack data is sent to the remote monitoring center and the cracks are simulated and recurred. Finally, the monitoring system is applied to six bridges, and the effects are discussed. PMID:24489496

  2. Identification of paleoearthquakes based on geomorphological evidence and their tectonic implications for the southern part of the active Anqiu-Juxian fault, eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Qisong; Jiang, Wenliang; Zhang, Jingfa; Jiang, Hongbo; Luo, Yi; Wang, Xin

    2016-12-01

    This study utilized an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) photogrammetry system to acquire orthoimages and generate a digital elevation model (DEM) covering the southern part of the Anqiu-Juxian fault for geomorphological analysis and paleoearthquake identification. Six offset gullies were identified and analyzed on the orthoimages. Our results indicate that at least three large and several moderate earthquakes have occurred along the fault zone. Knickpoints recognized from the DEM reveal several paleoearthquakes. An average Holocene horizontal slip rate of 2.86 ± 0.35 mm yr-1 was estimated from the offset gullies, which is consistent with previous results from field surveys. The tectonic evolution of this fault zone is most likely related to subduction of the Pacific plate under the Eurasian plate, which gave rise to the right-lateral strike-slip and thrust movement of the Tan-Lu fault zone. This study provided valuable information regarding fault activity and paleoearthquake occurrence along the Anqiu-Juxian fault zone during the Holocene and demonstrated the potential of using UAVs for studies involving tectonic geomorphology.

  3. Measuring Crack Length in Coarse Grain Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jonathan A.; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2010-01-01

    Due to a coarse grain structure, crack lengths in precracked spinel specimens could not be measured optically, so the crack lengths and fracture toughness were estimated by strain gage measurements. An expression was developed via finite element analysis to correlate the measured strain with crack length in four-point flexure. The fracture toughness estimated by the strain gaged samples and another standardized method were in agreement.

  4. Crack Path Prediction Near an Elliptical Inhomogeneity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    Prediction Near an Elliptical Inhomogeneity 1L162618AH80 6. AUTHOR(S) Edward M. Patton 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8 . PERFORMING...oriented crack. Erdogan and Gupta [ 8 ] later solved the problem in which the crack crosses the interface. These solutions are based on the Green’s...the crack propagation direction 8 is greatest. This criterion implies that the stress parallel to that direction would be a minimum, or that the

  5. Acoustic emission for characterising the crack propagation in strain-hardening cement-based composites (SHCC)

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, S.C.; Pirskawetz, S.; Zijl, G.P.A.G. van; Schmidt, W.

    2015-03-15

    This paper presents the analysis of crack propagation in strain-hardening cement-based composite (SHCC) under tensile and flexural load by using acoustic emission (AE). AE is a non-destructive technique to monitor the development of structural damage due to external forces. The main objective of this research was to characterise the cracking behaviour in SHCC in direct tensile and flexural tests by using AE. A better understanding of the development of microcracks in SHCC will lead to a better understanding of pseudo strain-hardening behaviour of SHCC and its general performance. ARAMIS optical deformation analysis was also used in direct tensile tests to observe crack propagation in SHCC materials. For the direct tensile tests, SHCC specimens were prepared with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fibre with three different volume percentages (1%, 1.85% and 2.5%). For the flexural test beam specimens, only a fibre dosage of 1.85% was applied. It was found that the application of AE in SHCC can be a good option to analyse the crack growth in the specimens under increasing load, the location of the cracks and most importantly the identification of matrix cracking and fibre rupture or slippage.

  6. Thermomechanical Manipulation of Crack-Tip Stress Field for Resistance to Stress Corrosion Crack Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh Raman, R. K.; Ibrahim, R. N.; Wu, F.; Rihan, R.

    2008-12-01

    Corrosion-assisted propagation of an existing crack is profoundly influenced by the stress intensity at the crack tip. This article presents the first results of thermomechanical conditioning (TMC) for local manipulation of material at and ahead of the crack tip, in an attempt to retard/stop crack propagation. Prenotched round tensile specimens of mild steel were subjected to rotating bending to generate a fatigue precrack, and then to apply localized thermomechanical conditioning. The threshold stress intensity factor ( K ISCC ) for stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of precracked specimens with and without TMC was determined in a caustic environment. Results suggest that TMC can increase K ISCC . Finite element analysis of the specimens suggests development of compressive stresses at and around the crack tip, which is expected to improve the resistance to stress corrosion crack propagation (since stress corrosion cracks can propagate only under tensile loading).

  7. Small fatigue crack propagation in Y2O3 strengthened steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutař, P.; Kuběna, I.; Ševčík, M.; Šmíd, M.; Kruml, T.; Náhlík, L.

    2014-09-01

    This paper is focused on two type of Y2O3 strengthened steels (Fe-14Cr ODS and ODS-EUROFER). Small fatigue crack propagation was experimentally measured using special small cylindrical specimens (diameter 2 and 2.6 mm) with shallow notch grinded in the gauge length. In the middle of this notch, a pre-crack of length of 50 μm was fabricated using a focused ion beam technique. Fatigue crack growth rate was measured for different applied total strain amplitudes and described using plastic part of the J-integral. Obtained results were compared with published data of EUROFER 97. The effect of the oxide dispersion on small fatigue crack propagation was found rather insignificant. Ferritic Fe-14Cr ODS steel shows more brittle behaviour, i.e. for the same cyclic plasticity, characterised by the plastic part of the J-integral, the small cracks grow faster. A new methodology for residual lifetime prediction of structures containing physically small cracks, based on plastic part of the J-integral, is presented.

  8. Catalytic cracking of heavy oils

    SciTech Connect

    Otterstedt, J.E.; Gevert, B.; Sterte, J. )

    1987-08-01

    Of the many factors which influence product yields in a fluid catalytic cracker, the feed stock quality and the catalyst composition are of particular interest as they can be controlled only to a limited extent by the refiner. In the past decade there has been a trend towards using heavier feedstocks in the FCC-unit, which is expected to continue in the foreseeable future. It is therefore important to study how molecular types, characteristic not only of heavy petroleum oil but also of e.g. coal liquid, shale oil and biomass oil, respond to cracking over catalysts of different compositions.

  9. Fatigue Crack Closure - A Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-01

    gauge along the crack line. They used CCT speci- mens of high tensile strength steel ( HY80 ). The measured value of U was found to be a minimum at the...ultrasonic surface wave technique on 12.5mm thick specimens of 2024-T851, 2024-T351, Al 2219, Ti-6AI-4V and 17-4 PH steel . Most of the results were...medium and high strength steels . Exami- nation of the fracture surfaces suggested that raising the mean stress in low fracture toughness steels could

  10. Crack Healing in Quartz: Influence of Crack Morphology and pOH-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallon, J. A.; Kronenberg, A. K.; Popp, R. K.; Lamb, W. M.

    2004-12-01

    Crack healing in quartz has been investigated by optical microscopy and interferometry of rhombohedral r-cleavage cracks in polished Brazilian quartz prisms that were hydrothermally annealed. Quartz prisms were pre-cracked at room temperature and then annealed at temperatures T of 250° and 400° C for 2.4 to 240 hours, fluid pressure Pf = 41 MPa (equal to confining pressure Pc), and varying pOH- (from 5.4 to 1.2 at 250° C for fluids consisting of distilled water and NaOH solutions). Crack morphologies before and after annealing were recorded for each sample in plane light digital images and apertures were determined from interference fringes recorded using transmitted monochromatic light (λ = 598 nm). As documented in previous studies (Smith and Evans, 1984; Brantley et al., 1990; Beeler and Hickman, 1996), crack healing of quartz is driven by reductions in surface energy and healing rates appear to be limited by diffusional solute transport; sharply defined crack tips become blunted and break up into fluid-filled tubes and inclusions. However, fluid inclusion geometries are also observed with nonequilibrium shapes that depend on initial surface roughness. Crack healing is significant at 400° C after short run durations (24 hr) with healing rates reaching 10-5 mm/s. Crack healing is also observed at T=250° C, but only for smooth cracks with apertures < 0.6 μ m or for cracks subject to low pOH-. The extent of crack healing is sensitive to crack aperture and to hackles formed by fine-scale crack branching during crack growth. Initial crack apertures appear to be governed by the presence of fine particles, often found in the vicinity of hackles, which maintain the separation of crack surfaces. Where rough cracks exhibit healing, hackles are sites of either enhanced or reduced loss of fluid-solid interface depending on slight mismatches and sense of twist of opposing crack surfaces. Hackles of open r-cleavage cracks are replaced either by (1) healed curvilinear

  11. Competition between fatigue crack propagation and wear

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, H.; Keer, L.M.; Cheng, W.; Cheng, H.S. )

    1993-01-01

    Based on a semi-empirical derivation of the Paris fatigue law, the fatigue crack length a is related to the yield limit or flow stress, which ultimately is related to the hardness of the material. The analysis considers together the cyclic loading, which tends to increase the surface crack length, and the wear, which tends to decrease the crack length at the surface, and shows that under certain conditions a stable crack length may be developed. Experiments conducted on two test groups (Rc = 58.5 and Rc = 62.7) tend to support the present analysis. 10 refs.

  12. Combustion in cracks of PBX 9501

    SciTech Connect

    Berghout, H. L.; Son, S. F.; Bolme, C. A.; Hill, L. G.; Asay, B. W.; Dickson, P. M.; Henson, B. F.; Smilowitz, L. B.

    2002-01-01

    Recent experiments involving the combustion of PBX 9501 explosive under confined conditions reveal the importance of crack and flaws in reaction violence. Experiments on room temperature confined disks of pristine and thermally damaged PBX 9501 reveal that crack ignition depends on hot gases entering existing or pressure induced cracks rather than on energy release at the crack tip. PBX 9501 slot combustion experiments show that the reaction propagation rate in the slot does not depend on the external pressure. We have observed 1500 d s in long slots of highly-confined PBX 9501. We present experiments that examine the combustion of mechanically and thermally damaged samples of PBX 9501.

  13. Investigations of Low Temperature Time Dependent Cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Van der Sluys, W A; Robitz, E S; Young, B A; Bloom, J

    2002-09-30

    The objective of this project was to investigate metallurgical and mechanical phenomena associated with time dependent cracking of cold bent carbon steel piping at temperatures between 327 C and 360 C. Boiler piping failures have demonstrated that understanding the fundamental metallurgical and mechanical parameters controlling these failures is insufficient to eliminate it from the field. The results of the project consisted of the development of a testing methodology to reproduce low temperature time dependent cracking in laboratory specimens. This methodology was used to evaluate the cracking resistance of candidate heats in order to identify the factors that enhance cracking sensitivity. The resultant data was integrated into current available life prediction tools.

  14. [Desiccation cracking of soil body: a review].

    PubMed

    Pei, Yin-Ge; Xu, Ze-Min; Zhang, Jia-Ming

    2012-04-01

    Desiccation cracking of soil body is a complex physical process, which can affect the strength, stability, and permeability of soil body, and involve in several disciplines such as soil science, agricultural science, engineering geology, and environmental science. This paper introduced the significances of the study on the desiccation cracking of soil body, reviewed the related theoretical and applied researches and the quantitative analysis of crack morphology, and discussed the deficiencies in the research fields, research contents, and research methods. The future research directions about the desiccation cracking of soil body were pointed out.

  15. Fatigue crack propagation at polymer adhesive interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ritter, J.E.

    1996-12-31

    Delamination of polymer adhesive interfaces often occurs due to slow crack growth under either monotonic or cyclic loading. The author`s previous research showed that moisture-assisted crack growth at epoxy/glass and epoxy acrylate/glass interfaces under monotonic loading was directly related to the applied energy release rate and relative humidity and that cyclic loading could enhance crack growth. The purpose of the present research is to compare crack growth along epoxy acrylate/glass and epoxy/PMMA interfaces under monotonic and cyclic loading.

  16. On cracking of charged anisotropic polytropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azam, M.; Mardan, S. A.

    2017-01-01

    Recently in [1], the role of electromagnetic field on the cracking of spherical polytropes has been investigated without perturbing charge parameter explicitly. In this study, we have examined the occurrence of cracking of anisotropic spherical polytropes through perturbing parameters like anisotropic pressure, energy density and charge. We consider two different types of polytropes in this study. We discuss the occurrence of cracking in two different ways (i) by perturbing polytropic constant, anisotropy and charge parameter (ii) by perturbing polytropic index, anisotropy and charge parameter for each case. We conclude that cracking appears for a wide range of parameters in both cases. Also, our results are reduced to [2] in the absence of charge.

  17. Controlled crack growth specimen for brittle systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calomino, Anthony M.; Brewer, David N.

    1992-01-01

    A pure Mode 1 fracture specimen and test procedure has been developed which provides extended, stable, through-thickness crack growth in ceramics and other brittle, nonmetallic materials. Fixed displacement loading, applied at the crack mouth, promotes stable crack extension by reducing the stored elastic strain energy. Extremely fine control of applied displacements is achieved by utilizing the Poisson's expansion of a compressively loaded cylindrical pin. Stable cracks were successfully grown in soda-lime glass and monolithic Al2O3 for lengths in excess of 2O mm without uncontrollable catastrophic failure.

  18. Cracks in Sheets Draped on Curved Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Noah P.; Koning, Vinzenz; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Irvine, William T. M.

    Conforming materials to surfaces with Gaussian curvature has proven a versatile tool to guide the behavior of mechanical defects such as folds, blisters, scars, and pleats. In this talk, we show how curvature can likewise be used to control material failure. In our experiments, thin elastic sheets are confined on curved geometries that stimulate or suppress the growth of cracks, and steer or arrest their propagation. By redistributing stresses in a sheet, curvature provides a geometric tool for protecting certain regions and guiding crack patterns. A simple model captures crack behavior at the onset of propagation, while a 2D phase-field model successfully captures the crack's full phenomenology.

  19. Controlled crack growth specimen for brittle systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calomino, Anthony M.; Brewer, David N.

    1990-01-01

    A pure Mode 1 fracture specimen and test procedure has been developed which provides extended, stable, through-thickness crack growth in ceramics and other brittle, nonmetallic materials. Fixed displacement loading, applied at the crack mouth, promotes stable crack extension by reducing the stored elastic strain energy. Extremely fine control of applied displacements is achieved by utilizing the Poisson's expansion of a compressively loaded cylindrical pin. Stable cracks were successfully grown in soda-lime glass and monolithic Al2O3 for lengths in excess of 20 mm without uncontrollable catastrophic failure.

  20. Fracture Mechanics of Crack Growth During Sonic-IR Inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. C.; Riddell, W. T.; Lick, Kyle; Wong, Chang-Hwa

    2007-03-01

    In past studies, we showed that cracks synthesized under carefully controlled conditions will propagate when subjected to sonic IR testing. The extent or severity of the propagation observed depended on several parameters including the stress intensity factor (which corresponds to crack growth rate) under which the crack was synthesized, the tightness of the crack closure, and the initial crack length. Furthermore, we showed that crack propagation during sonic IR testing occurs for 2024 aluminum, titanium and 304 stainless steel specimens. In this study, we extend the range of experimental conditions for synthesizing cracks to further elucidate their effect on the crack propagation, and we focus more specifically on the stress intensity factor. The stress intensity factor not only determines the rate of crack growth, but it has two profound effects on crack characteristics: the establishment of plastic zones around the crack tip and the variation of the topography of the mating crack surfaces. These two factors strongly affect crack propagation.

  1. Fatigue Crack Closure Analysis Using Digital Image Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leser, William P.; Newman, John A.; Johnston, William M.

    2010-01-01

    Fatigue crack closure during crack growth testing is analyzed in order to evaluate the critieria of ASTM Standard E647 for measurement of fatigue crack growth rates. Of specific concern is remote closure, which occurs away from the crack tip and is a product of the load history during crack-driving-force-reduction fatigue crack growth testing. Crack closure behavior is characterized using relative displacements determined from a series of high-magnification digital images acquired as the crack is loaded. Changes in the relative displacements of features on opposite sides of the crack are used to generate crack closure data as a function of crack wake position. For the results presented in this paper, remote closure did not affect fatigue crack growth rate measurements when ASTM Standard E647 was strictly followed and only became a problem when testing parameters (e.g., load shed rate, initial crack driving force, etc.) greatly exceeded the guidelines of the accepted standard.

  2. Liquid metal embrittlement. [crack propagation in metals with liquid metal in crack space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiller, W. A.

    1973-01-01

    Crack propagation is discussed for metals with liquid metal in the crack space. The change in electrochemical potential of an electron in a metal due to changes in stress level along the crack surface was investigated along with the change in local chemistry, and interfacial energy due to atomic redistribution in the liquid. Coupled elastic-elastrostatic equations, stress effects on electron energy states, and crack propagation via surface roughening are discussed.

  3. Determining fatigue crack opening loads from near-crack-tip displacement measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Riddell, W.T.; Piascik, R.S.; Sutton, M.A.; Zhao, W.; McNeill, S.R.; Helm, J.D.

    1999-07-01

    The aim of this research was to develop a near-crack-tip measurement method that quantifies crack closure levels in the near-threshold fatigue crack growth regime--a regime where crack closure is not well characterized by remote compliance methods. Further understanding of crack closure mechanics was gained by performing novel crack growth experiments in conjunction with numerical simulations of three-dimensional crack-front propagation. Steady-state (i.e., constant growth rate) fatigue crack growth rates were characterized by performing constant cyclic stress intensity range ({Delta}K) experiments over a wide range of stress ratios (R). Near-crack-tip (less than 0.3 mm behind) load-versus-displacement measurements were conducted on the specimen surface using a novel noncontact experimental technique (Digital Imaging Displacement System--DIDS). The experiments and simulations revealed that the three-dimensional aspects of fatigue crack closure must be considered to determine correct opening load levels from near-crack-tip load-versus-displacement data. It was shown that near-crack-front, but increase near the free surface. The interior opening load was found to collapse closure-affected data to intrinsic rates, and thus shown to relate to the true crack-front driving force parameter. Surface opening load DIDS measurements made at an optimal distance behind the crack tip were used to correlate da/dN with {Delta}K{sub eff}. Opening load determinations made less than the optimal distance behind the crack tip were shown to be too high to correlate fatigue crack growth rates.

  4. Effect of Crack Closure on Ultrasonic Detection of Fatigue Cracks at Fastener Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowles, S. J.; Harding, C. A.; Hugo, G. R.

    2009-03-01

    The ultrasonic response from closed fatigue cracks grown in aluminium alloy specimens using a representative aircraft spectrum loading has been characterised as a function of tensile applied load using pulse-echo 45° shear-wave ultrasonic C-scans with focused immersion transducers. Observed trends with crack size and applied load are described and compared to results for artificial machined defects. The results demonstrate that crack closure significantly reduces the ultrasonic response compared to open cracks or machined defects.

  5. 40 CFR Table 14 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units 14 Table 14 to Subpart UUU of Part 63... Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 14 Table 14 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units As...

  6. 40 CFR Table 14 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units 14 Table 14 to Subpart UUU of Part 63... Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 14 Table 14 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units As...

  7. Analysis of the interaction of two parallel surface cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Jeeyeon

    The objective of this research is to analyze and predict the interaction of surface cracks that occur in parallel planes. Multiple cracks may form in aging aircraft that forms at stress concentrations such as fastener holes and notched components by stress corrosion and fatigue cracking. The lifetime of the structures are significantly affected by the interaction between these cracks. Depending on relative positions and orientations of neighboring cracks, local stress fields and crack driving forces can be affected by the presence of adjacent cracks. Even small subcritical cracks may rapidly grow to a size that will cause failure in service due to interaction and coalescence with other cracks. The interaction behavior and crack propagation direction of two parallel surface cracks is studied using three-dimensional finite element analysis (FEA). FEA models with wide range of crack configurations in a finite plate under tension are evaluated to investigate the correlation between the crack shapes and the separation distance between two cracks. The relative distance (vertical and horizontal) between two cracks and size and shape of these cracks are varied to create different stress interaction fields. Stress intensity factors (SIF) along the crack fronts are obtained from FEA, and then, cracking behaviors of the cracks are predicted by considering the influence of the interaction on the SIF and the coalescence of two cracks. The results obtained are then compared with existing experimental and analytical data for validation. All of the data analyses are presented in tabular forms and figures.

  8. Clay with Desiccation Cracks is an Advection Dominated Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baram, S.; Kurtzman, D.; Sher, Y.; Ronen, Z.; Dahan, O.

    2012-04-01

    Heavy clay sediments are regarded "safe" from the hydrological point of view due to their low hydraulic conductivities. However, the formation of desiccation cracks in dispersive clays may dramatically change their bulk hydraulic properties. The impact of desiccation cracks on water percolation, dissolved salts and contaminants transport and redox related reactions (microbial ammonium oxidation and denitrification) were investigated in 6 -12 m clay layer near a diary farm waste lagoon. The study implemented unique vadose-zone monitoring systems that enable in-situ measurements of the temporal variation of the sediment's water content along with frequent sampling of the sediment's pore water along the entire vadose zone (> 30 m). Results from four years of continuous measurements showed quick rises in sediment water content following rain events and temporal wastewater overflows. The percolation pattern indicated dominance of preferential flow through a desiccation-cracks network crossing the entire clay sediment layer. High water-propagation velocities (0.4 - 23.6 m h-1) were observed, indicating that the desiccation-crack network remains open and serves as a preferential flow pathway year-round, even at high sediment water content (~0.50 m3 m-3). The rapid percolation bypassed the most bio-geo-active parts of the soil, transporting even highly sorptive contaminants (testosterone and estrogen) in to the deep sections of the vadose zone, accelerating the underlying groundwater contamination. The ammonium and nitrate concentrations in the vadose zone and the high number of nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria (~108 gene copies gdry-sediemt-1, each) found in the sediment indicated that the entire vadose zone is aerated even at high water content conditions (~0.55 m3 m-3). The dissolved salts concentration in the pore-water and the δ2H-H2O and δ18O-H2O values of the pore-water substantially increased with depth (becoming less depleted) in the clay sediment

  9. Evaluation of Three Methods in the Diagnosis of Dentin Cracks Caused by Apical Resection

    PubMed Central

    Ghorbanzadeh, Abdollah; Aminifar, Soran; Shadan, Leila; Ghanati, Hamed

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare three various methods in the diagnosis of dentinal cracks formed in the apical third after root resection. Materials and Methods: One hundred extracted human maxillary central incisors were selected. The root canals were prepared with step-back technique. Then 3mm from the apical end of all roots was cut perpendicular to the long axis of the tooth. The apical end of each root was evaluated to make sure there were no cracks. Fifty specimens were randomly chosen and connected to an apparatus especially designed for application of force (50–60N) by a universal testing machine for crack formation. The cracked (no=50) and non-cracked (no=50) specimens were examined by three methods of fiber optic transillumination, methylene blue staining and combination of the two. Sensitivity and specificity of the methods were evaluated. The most suitable method for detecting cracks was determined using Youden index. To compare agreement between studied methods with the gold standard, kappa statistics and odds ratio of McNemar were utilized. Results: The sensitivity of transillumination, staining and the combination method were 82.0, 50.0 and 90.0%, respectively. The staining technique had the lowest sensitivity and the highest specificity. Both transillumination and the combination method had Youden index of 0.56, but the combination method diagnosed truly cracked samples more than the other techniques. Conclusion: The efficacy of transillumination in identification of apical root-end cracks undetectable by unaided vision was similar to the combination method. However, the efficacy of 2% methylene blue without transillumination was significantly lower than the other two methodologies. PMID:23724218

  10. Noncontact measurement of guided ultrasonic wave scattering for fatigue crack characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromme, P.

    2013-04-01

    Fatigue cracks can develop in aerospace structures at locations of stress concentration such as fasteners. For the safe operation of the aircraft fatigue cracks need to be detected before reaching a critical length. Guided ultrasonic waves offer an efficient method for the detection and characterization of fatigue cracks in large aerospace structures. Noncontact excitation of guided waves was achieved using electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMAT). The transducers were developed for the specific excitation of the A0 Lamb mode. Based on the induced eddy currents in the plate a simple theoretical model was developed and reasonably good agreement with the measurements was achieved. However, the detection sensitivity for fatigue cracks depends on the location and orientation of the crack relative to the measurement locations. Crack-like defects have a directionality pattern of the scattered field depending on the angle of the incident wave relative to the defect orientation and on the ratio of the characteristic defect size to wavelength. The detailed angular dependency of the guided wave field scattered at crack-like defects in plate structures has been measured using a noncontact laser interferometer. Good agreement with 3D Finite Element simulation predictions was achieved for machined part-through and through-thickness notches. The amplitude of the scattered wave was quantified for a variation of angle of the incident wave relative to the defect orientation and the defect depth. These results provide the basis for the defect characterization in aerospace structures using guided wave sensors.

  11. A Creaking and Cracking Comet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faurschou Hviid, Stubbe; Hüttig, Christian; Groussin, Olivier; Mottola, Stefano; Keller, Horst Uwe; OSIRIS Team

    2016-10-01

    Since the middle of 2014 the OSIRIS cameras on the ESA Rosetta mission have been monitoring the evolution of the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko as it passed through perihelion. During the perihelion passage several change events have been observed on the nucleus surface. For example existing large scale cracks have expanded and new large scale cracks have been created. Also several large scale "wave pattern" like change events have been observed in the Imhotep and Hapi regions. These are events not directly correlated with any normal visible cometary activity. One interpretation is that these are events likely caused by "seismic" activity. The seismic activity is created by the self-gravity stress of the non-spherical comet nucleus and stress created by the non-gravitational forces acting on the comet. The non-gravitational forces are changing the rotation period of the comet (~20min/perihelion passage) which induces a changing mechanical stress pattern through the perihelion passage. Also the diurnal cycle with its changing activity pattern is causing a periodic wobble in the stress pattern that can act as a trigger for a comet quake. The stress pattern has been modeled using a finite element model that includes self-gravity, the comet spin and the non-gravitational forces based on a cometary activity model. This paper will discuss what can be learned about the comet nucleus structure and about the cometary material properties from these events and from the FEM model.

  12. Laboratory Study of Crack Development and Crack Interaction in Concrete Blocks due to Swelling of Cracking Agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frühwirt, Thomas; Plößer, Arne; Konietzky, Heinz

    2015-04-01

    The main focus of this work was to investigate temporary and spatial features of crack development in concrete blocks due to the action of a swelling agent. A commercial available cement-based mortar which shows heavily swelling behaviour when hydrating is used to provide inside pressure in boreholes in conrete blocks and hence serves as cracking agent. As no data for the swelling behaviour of the cracking agent were available the maximum axial swelling stress and axial free swelling strain were determined experimentally. In a first series of tests on concrete blocks the influence of an external mechanical, unidirectional stress on the development-time and orientation of cracks has been investigated for a range of loading levels. The stress state in the blocks prepared with a single borehole was determined by a superposition of internal stresses caused by swelling pressure and external mechanical loading. For a second series of tests prismatic blocks with two boreholes where prepared. This test setup allowed to realize different orientation of boreholes with respect to the uniaxial loading direction. Complementary tests were done using the cracking agent in both, only one or none of the boreholes. Different modes of crack interaction and influence of filled or unfilled boreholes have been observed. Features of crack development showed significant sensitivity to external loading. Starting even at very low load levels crack orientation was primarely determined by the direction of the external load. Temporal change in crack development due to the different load levels was insignificant and no consistent conclusion could be drawn. Crack interaction phenomena only were observed with two boreholes orientated primarely in direction of the external loading. Even in these cases crack orientation was mainly determined by the external stress field and only locally influenced by other cracks or the unfilled borehole. The work provides us with an extensive catalogue of

  13. Effect of precrack halos on kic determined by the surface crack in flexure method. Final report, August 1995-May 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Swab, J.J.; Quinn, G.D.

    1997-12-01

    The surface crack in flexure (SCF) method, which is used to determine the fracture toughness of dense ceramics necessitates the measurement of precrack sizes by fractographic examination. Stable crack extension may occur from flaws under ambient room-temperature conditions, even in the relatively short time under load during fast fracture strength or fracture toughness testing. In this paper, fractographic techniques are used to characterize evidence of stable crack extension, a halo, around Knoop indentation surface cracks. Optical examination of the fracture surfaces of a high-purity Al2O3, an AlN, a glass-ceramic, and a MgF2 revealed the presence of a halo around the periphery of each precrack. The halo in the AlN was merely an optical effect due to crack reorientation, while the halo in the MgF2 was due to indentation-induced residual stresses initiating crack growth. However, for the Al2O3 and the glass-ceramic, environmentally assisted slow crack growth (SCG) was the cause of the halo. In the latter two materials, this stable crack extension must be included as part of the critical crack size in order to determine the appropriate fracture toughness.

  14. Hydrogen induced cracking tests of high strength steels and nickel-iron base alloys using the bolt-loaded specimen

    SciTech Connect

    Vigilante, G.N.; Underwood, J.H.; Crayon, D.; Tauscher, S.; Sage, T.; Troiano, E.

    1997-12-31

    Hydrogen induced cracking tests were conducted on high strength steels and nickel-iron base alloys using the constant displacement bolt-loaded compact specimen. The bolt-loaded specimen was subjected to both acid and electrochemical cell environments in order to produce hydrogen. The materials tested were A723, Maraging 200, PH 13-8 Mo, Alloy 718, Alloy 706, and A286, and ranged in yield strength from 760--1400 MPa. The effects of chemical composition, refinement, heat treatment, and strength on hydrogen induced crack growth rates and thresholds were examined. In general, all high strength steels tested exhibited similar crack growth rates and thresholds were examined. In general, all high strength steels tested exhibited similar crack growth rates and threshold levels. In comparison, the nickel-iron base alloys tested exhibited up to three orders of magnitude lower crack growth rates than the high strength steels tested. It is widely known that high strength steels and nickel base alloys exhibit different crack growth rates, in part, because of their different crystal cell structure. In the high strength steels tested, refinement and heat treatment had some effect on hydrogen induced cracking, though strength was the predominant factor influencing susceptibility to cracking. When the yield strength of one of the high strength steels tested was increased moderately, from 1130 MPa to 1275 MPa, the incubation times decreased by over two orders of magnitude, the crack growth rates increased by an order of magnitude, and the threshold stress intensity was slightly lower.

  15. Elastic plastic fracture mechanics methodology for surface cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ernst, Hugo A.; Lambert, D. M.

    1994-01-01

    The Elastic Plastic Fracture Mechanics Methodology has evolved significantly in the last several years. Nevertheless, some of these concepts need to be extended further before the whole methodology can be safely applied to structural parts. Specifically, there is a need to include the effect of constraint in the characterization of material resistance to crack growth and also to extend these methods to the case of 3D defects. As a consequence, this project was started as a 36 month research program with the general objective of developing an elastic plastic fracture mechanics methodology to assess the structural reliability of pressure vessels and other parts of interest to NASA which may contain flaws. The project is divided into three tasks that deal with (1) constraint and thickness effects, (2) three-dimensional cracks, and (3) the Leak-Before-Burst (LBB) criterion. This report period (March 1994 to August 1994) is a continuation of attempts to characterize three dimensional aspects of fracture present in 'two dimensional' or planar configuration specimens (Chapter Two), especially, the determination of, and use of, crack face separation data. Also, included, are a variety of fracture resistance testing results (J(m)R-curve format) and a discussion regarding two materials of NASA interest (6061-T651 Aluminum alloy and 1N718-STA1 nickel-base super alloy) involving a bases for like constraint in terms of ligament dimensions, and their comparison to the resulting J(m)R-curves (Chapter Two).

  16. Development of crack shape: LBB methodology for cracked pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Moulin, D.; Chapuliot, S.; Drubay, B.

    1997-04-01

    For structures like vessels or pipes containing a fluid, the Leak-Before-Break (LBB) assessment requires to demonstrate that it is possible, during the lifetime of the component, to detect a rate of leakage due to a possible defect, the growth of which would result in a leak before-break of the component. This LBB assessment could be an important contribution to the overall structural integrity argument for many components. The aim of this paper is to review some practices used for LBB assessment and to describe how some new R & D results have been used to provide a simplified approach of fracture mechanics analysis and especially the evaluation of crack shape and size during the lifetime of the component.

  17. The growth of small corrosion fatigue cracks in alloy 2024

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Willard, Scott A.

    1993-01-01

    The corrosion fatigue crack growth characteristics of small surface and corner cracks in aluminum alloy 2024 is established. The damaging effect of salt water on the early stages of small crack growth is characterized by crack initiation at constituent particle pits, intergranular microcracking for a less than 100 micrometers, and transgranular small crack growth for a micrometer. In aqueous 1 percent NaCl and at a constant anodic potential of -700 mV(sub SCE), small cracks exhibit a factor of three increase in fatigue crack growth rates compared to laboratory air. Small cracks exhibit accelerated corrosion fatigue crack growth rates at low levels of delta-K (less than 1 MPa square root of m) below long crack delta-K (sub th). When exposed to Paris regime levels of crack tip stress intensity, small corrosion fatigue cracks exhibit growth rates similar to that observed for long cracks. Results suggest that crack closure effects influence the corrosion fatigue crack growth rates of small cracks (a less than or equal to 100 micrometers). This is evidenced by similar small and long crack growth behavior at various levels of R. Contrary to the corrosion fatigue characteristics of small cracks in high strength steels, no pronounced chemical crack length effect is observed for Al by 2024 exposed to salt water.

  18. Fatigue life and crack growth prediction methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Phillips, E. P.; Everett, R. A., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The capabilities of a plasticity-induced crack-closure model and life-prediction code to predict fatigue crack growth and fatigue lives of metallic materials are reviewed. Crack-tip constraint factors, to account for three-dimensional effects, were selected to correlate large-crack growth rate data as a function of the effective-stress-intensity factor range (delta(K(sub eff))) under constant-amplitude loading. Some modifications to the delta(K(sub eff))-rate relations were needed in the near threshold regime to fit small-crack growth rate behavior and endurance limits. The model was then used to calculate small- and large-crack growth rates, and in some cases total fatigue lives, for several aluminum and titanium alloys under constant-amplitude, variable-amplitude, and spectrum loading. Fatigue lives were calculated using the crack growth relations and microstructural features like those that initiated cracks. Results from the tests and analyses agreed well.

  19. Grain boundary resistance to fatigue crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, QI; Liu, H. W.

    1993-01-01

    Results of an experimental study tracing the grain boundary effect on the fatigue crack growth rate are reported. Direct experimental evidence for the grain boundary blockage mechanism is presented. The orientation difference between two neighboring grains directly contributed to the extent of crack growth retardation.

  20. Use of vacuum residue in thermal cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Mikulla, K.D.; Wernicke, H.J.

    1981-03-24

    Vacuum residue is used for production of olefins by first separating, preferably by solvent extraction, the asphalt therein , blending resultant asphalt depleted fraction with a lighter fraction, E.G., a vacuum gas oil, and then subjecting the blend to a conventional catalytic hydrogenation step prior to thermal cracking. The hydrogenate may be separated into fractions with the heavy fraction only being thermally cracked.

  1. Characterization of crack growth under combined loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, A.; Smith, F. W.; Holston, A., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Room-temperature static and cyclic tests were made on 21 aluminum plates in the shape of a 91.4x91.4-cm Maltese cross with 45 deg flaws to develop crack growth and fracture toughness data under mixed-mode conditions. During cyclic testing, it was impossible to maintain a high proportion of shear-mode deformation on the crack tips. Cracks either branched or turned. Under static loading, cracks remained straight if shear stress intensity exceeded normal stress intensity. Mixed-mode crack growth rate data compared reasonably well with published single-mode data, and measured crack displacements agreed with the straight and branched crack analyses. Values of critical strain energy release rate at fracture for pure shear were approximately 50% higher than for pure normal opening, and there was a large reduction in normal stress intensity at fracture in the presence of high shear stress intensity. Net section stresses were well into the inelastic range when fracture occurred under high shear on the cracks.

  2. The crack-inclusion interaction problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xue-Hui, L.; Erdogan, F.

    1984-01-01

    The general plane elastostatic problem of interaction between a crack and an inclusion is considered. The Green's functions for a pair of dislocations and a pair of concentrated body forces are used to generate the crack and the inclusion. Integral equations are obtained for a line crack and an elastic line inclusion having an arbitrary relative orientation and size. The nature of stress singularity around the end points of rigid and elastic inclusions is described and three special cases of this intersection problem are studied. The problem is solved for an arbitrary uniform stress state away from the crack-inclusion region. The nonintersecting crack-inclusion problem is considered for various relative size, orientation, and stiffness parameters, and the stress intensity factors at the ends of the inclusion and the crack are calculated. For the crack-inclusion intersection case, special stress intensity factors are defined and are calculated for various values of the parameters defining the relative size and orientation of the crack and the inclusion and the stiffness of the inclusion.

  3. Positioning Community Art Practices in Urban Cracks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verschelden, Griet; Van Eeghem, Elly; Steel, Riet; De Visscher, Sven; Dekeyrel, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    This article addresses the position of community art practices and the role of practitioners in urban cracks. Community art practices raise possibilities for a reconceptualisation of the concept of community and an extension of the concept of art in public space. Urban cracks are conceptualised as spatial, temporal and relational manifestations of…

  4. Entering a Crack: An Encounter with Gossip

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Linda

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, I enter a crack to think otherwise about the concept "gossip". Drawing on previous scholarship engaging with Deleuzian concepts to inform research methodologies, this paper builds on this body of work. Following Deleuze and Guattari, the paper undertakes a mapping of gossip, subsequent to an encounter with a crack.…

  5. Seismic wave propagation in cracked porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pointer, Tim; Liu, Enru; Hudson, John A.

    2000-07-01

    The movement of interstitial fluids within a cracked solid can have a significant effect on the properties of seismic waves of long wavelength propagating through the solid. We consider three distinct mechanisms of wave-induced fluid flow: flow through connections between cracks in an otherwise non-porous material, fluid movement within partially saturated cracks, and diffusion from the cracks into a porous matrix material. In each case the cracks may be aligned or randomly oriented, leading, respectively, to anisotropic or isotropic wave speeds and attenuation factors. In general, seismic velocities exhibit behaviour that is intermediate between that of empty cracks and that of isolated liquid-filled cracks if fluid flow is significant. In the range of frequencies for which considerable fluid flow occurs there is high attenuation and dispersion of seismic waves. Fluid flow may be on either a wavelength scale or a local scale depending on the model and whether the cracks are aligned or randomly oriented, resulting in completely different effects on seismic wave propagation. A numerical analysis shows that all models can have an effect over the exploration seismic frequency range.

  6. Effect of size on cracking of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glucklick, J.

    1971-01-01

    Brittle behavior of large mild steel elements, glass plasticity, and fatigue specimen size sensitivity are manifestations of strain-energy size effect. Specimens physical size effect on material cracking initiation occurs according to flaw distribution statistics. Fracture size effect depends on stability or instability of crack propagation.

  7. Development of the drug-exposed infant identification algorithm (DEIIA) and its application to measuring part C early intervention referral and eligibility in Massachusetts, 1998-2005.

    PubMed

    Derrington, Taletha Mae

    2013-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to develop an algorithm using government-collected administrative data to identify prenatally drug-exposed infants (DEI) and determine the percent who were referred to and eligible for Part C Early Intervention (EI) in Massachusetts. Data from the population-based Pregnancy to Early Life Longitudinal (PELL) Data System were used to develop the Drug-Exposed Infant Identification Algorithm (DEIIA). The DEIIA uses positive toxicology screens on the birth certificate and International Classification of Diseases, 9th Edition, Clinical Modification diagnostic codes in hospital records of the mother (prenatal and birth) and infant (birth and postnatal) to identify infants affected by substance abuse/dependence, withdrawal, and/or prenatal exposure to non-medical use of controlled substances. PELL-EI data linkages were used to determine the percent referred, evaluated, and eligible. The DEIIA identified 7,348 drug-exposed infants born in Massachusetts from 1998 to 2005 to resident mothers (1.2 % of all births). Most DEI (82.6 %) were identified from maternal/infant birth hospital records. Sixty-one percent of all DEI were referred to EI; 87.2 % of those referred were evaluated, and 89.4 % of those evaluated were found eligible. EI data contained information on drug exposure for 59.9 % of referred DEI. Only 2.8 % of MA resident births who were referred to EI but not identified by the DEIIA had drug indicators in EI data. DEI referrals to EI are federally mandated, but many are not referred. The DEIIA uses data available in most states and could be used as a public health screening tool to improve access to developmental services for DEI.

  8. Analysis of surface cracks at hole by a 3-D weight function method with stresses from finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, W.; Newman, J. C., Jr.; Sutton, M. A.; Shivakumar, K. N.; Wu, X. R.

    1995-01-01

    Parallel with the work in Part-1, stress intensity factors for semi-elliptical surface cracks emanating from a circular hole are determined. The 3-D weight function method with the 3D finite element solutions for the uncracked stress distribution as in Part-1 is used for the analysis. Two different loading conditions, i.e. remote tension and wedge loading, are considered for a wide range in geometrical parameters. Both single and double surface cracks are studied and compared with other solutions available in the literature. Typical crack opening displacements are also provided.

  9. Sonic IR crack detection of aircraft turbine engine blades with multi-frequency ultrasound excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ding; Han, Xiaoyan; Newaz, Golam

    2014-02-18

    Effectively and accurately detecting cracks or defects in critical engine components, such as turbine engine blades, is very important for aircraft safety. Sonic Infrared (IR) Imaging is such a technology with great potential for these applications. This technology combines ultrasound excitation and IR imaging to identify cracks and flaws in targets. In general, failure of engine components, such as blades, begins with tiny cracks. Since the attenuation of the ultrasound wave propagation in turbine engine blades is small, the efficiency of crack detection in turbine engine blades can be quite high. The authors at Wayne State University have been developing the technology as a reliable tool for the future field use in aircraft engines and engine parts. One part of the development is to use finite element modeling to assist our understanding of effects of different parameters on crack heating while experimentally hard to achieve. The development has been focused with single frequency ultrasound excitation and some results have been presented in a previous conference. We are currently working on multi-frequency excitation models. The study will provide results and insights of the efficiency of different frequency excitation sources to foster the development of the technology for crack detection in aircraft engine components.

  10. A three-dimensional multiscale model of intergranular hydrogen-assisted cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimoli, J. J.; Ortiz, M.

    2010-07-01

    We present a three-dimensional model of intergranular hydrogen-embrittlement (HE) that accounts for: (i) the degradation of grain-boundary strength that arises from hydrogen coverage; (ii) grain-boundary diffusion of hydrogen; and (iii) a continuum model of plastic deformation that explicitly resolves the three-dimensional polycrystalline structure of the material. The polycrystalline structure of the specimen along the crack propagation path is resolved explicitly by the computational mesh. The texture of the polycrystal is assumed to be random and the grains are elastically anisotropic and deform plastically by crystallographic slip. We use the impurity-dependent cohesive model in order to account for the embrittling of grain boundaries due to hydrogen coverage. We have carried out three-dimensional finite-element calculations of crack-growth initiation and propagation in AISI 4340 steel double-cantilever specimens in contact with an aggressive environment and compared the predicted initiation times and crack-growth curves with the experimental data. The calculated crack-growth curves exhibit a number of qualitative features that are in keeping with observation, including: an incubation time followed by a well-defined crack-growth initiation transition for sufficiently large loading; the existence of a threshold intensity factor K Iscc below which there is no crack propagation; a subsequent steeply rising part of the curve known as stage I; a plateau, or stage II, characterized by a load-insensitive crack-growth rate; and a limiting stress-intensity factor K Ic , or toughness, at which pure mechanical failure occurs. The calculated dependence of the crack-growth initiation time on applied stress-intensity factor exhibits power-law behavior and the corresponding characteristic exponents are in the ball-park of experimental observation. The stage-II calculated crack-growth rates are in good overall agreement with experimental measurements.

  11. An Experimental Study of Penny-shaped Fluid-driven Cracks in an Elastic Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Howard

    2015-11-01

    When a pressurized fluid is injected into an elastic matrix, the fluid generates a fracture that grows along a plane and forms a fluid-filled disc-like shape. For example, such problems occur in various natural and industrial applications involving the subsurface of Earth, such as hydraulic fracturing operations. We report a laboratory study of such a fluid-driven crack in a gelatin matrix, study the crack shape as a function of time, and investigate the influence of different experimental parameters such as the injection flow rate, Young's modulus of the matrix, and fluid viscosity. We find that the crack radius increases with time as a power law, which has been predicted both for the limit where viscous effects in the flow along the crack opening control the rate of crack propagation, as well as the limit where fracture toughness controls crack propagation. We vary experimental parameters to probe the physical limits and highlight that for our typical parameters both effects can be significant. Also, we measure the time evolution of crack shape, which has not been studied before. The rescaled crack shapes collapse at longer times, based on an appropriate scaling argument, and again we compare the scaling arguments in different physical limits. The gelatin system provides a useful laboratory model for further studies of fluid-driven cracks, some of which we will mention as they are inspired by the physics of hydraulic fracturing. This work is part of the PhD thesis of Ching-Yao Lai and is a collaboration with Drs. Zhong Zheng and Jason Wexler (Princeton University) and Professor Emilie Dressaire (NYU). Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering.

  12. Crack tip field and fatigue crack growth in general yielding and low cycle fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minzhong, Z.; Liu, H. W.

    1984-01-01

    Fatigue life consists of crack nucleation and crack propagation periods. Fatigue crack nucleation period is shorter relative to the propagation period at higher stresses. Crack nucleation period of low cycle fatigue might even be shortened by material and fabrication defects and by environmental attack. In these cases, fatigue life is largely crack propagation period. The characteristic crack tip field was studied by the finite element method, and the crack tip field is related to the far field parameters: the deformation work density, and the product of applied stress and applied strain. The cyclic carck growth rates in specimens in general yielding as measured by Solomon are analyzed in terms of J-integral. A generalized crack behavior in terms of delta is developed. The relations between J and the far field parameters and the relation for the general cyclic crack growth behavior are used to analyze fatigue lives of specimens under general-yielding cyclic-load. Fatigue life is related to the applied stress and strain ranges, the deformation work density, crack nucleus size, fracture toughness, fatigue crack growth threshold, Young's modulus, and the cyclic yield stress and strain. The fatigue lives of two aluminum alloys correlate well with the deformation work density as depicted by the derived theory. The general relation is reduced to Coffin-Manson low cycle fatigue law in the high strain region.

  13. Singular invariant integrals for elastic bodies with thin elastic inclusions and cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khludnev, A. M.; Shcherbakov, V. V.

    2016-12-01

    Equilibrium problems for an elastic body with partially delaminated thin elastic inclusions are considered. The inclusions are modeled within the framework of the Euler-Bernoulli and Timoshenko models of elastic beams. The presence of delamination means the existence of a crack between the inclusion and the elastic matrix. Displacements of the opposite crack faces are constrained with nonpenetration conditions. Formulas of the Griffith type giving the first derivatives of energy functionals with respect to the crack length are established. It is shown that the formulas for the derivatives admit representation in the form of invariant integrals independent of the smooth closed curve surrounding the crack tip. The obtained invariant integrals consist of the sum of regular and singular parts and are analogues of the classical Eshelby-Cherepanov-Rice J-integral.

  14. Solution for the fragment-size distribution in a crack-branching model of fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kekäläinen, P.; Åström, J. A.; Timonen, J.

    2007-08-01

    It is well established that rapidly propagating cracks in brittle material are unstable such that they generate side branches. It is also known that cracks are attracted by free surfaces, which means that they attract each other. This information is used here to formulate a generic model of fragmentation in which the small-size part of the fragment-size distribution results from merged crack branches in the damage zones along the paths of the propagating cracks. This model is solved under rather general assumptions for the fragment-size distribution. The model leads to a generic distribution S-γexp(-S/S0) for fragment sizes S , where γ=(2d-1)/(d) with d the Euclidean dimension, and S0 is a material dependent parameter.

  15. Influence of environment on the fatigue crack growth behaviour of 12% Cr steel.

    PubMed

    Schönbauer, Bernd M; Stanzl-Tschegg, Stefanie E

    2013-12-01

    In the present work, the influence of different environments on the fatigue crack growth behaviour of 12% Cr steam turbine blade steel is investigated. Fatigue crack growth rates (FCGRs) in the near threshold regime are measured with ultrasonic fatigue testing technique. Fatigue tests are performed in vacuum, air and different aqueous environments with defined chloride and oxygen content. Furthermore, the influence of different stress ratios is investigated. It is found that crack propagation is not necessarily enhanced with increasing corrosiveness. In the aqueous environments, the FCGRs below 10⁻⁸ m/cycle are lower than in air. The threshold stress intensity factor ranges are higher or equal. Observation of the fracture surfaces shows oxide formation and partly intergranular fracture for specimens tested in aqueous environments. Crack closure effects seem to be responsible for this unexpected behaviour.

  16. Analysis of fatigue, fatique-crack propagation, and fracture data. [design of metallic aerospace structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaske, C. E.; Feddersen, C. E.; Davies, K. B.; Rice, R. C.

    1973-01-01

    Analytical methods have been developed for consolidation of fatigue, fatigue-crack propagation, and fracture data for use in design of metallic aerospace structural components. To evaluate these methods, a comprehensive file of data on 2024 and 7075 aluminums, Ti-6A1-4V, and 300M and D6Ac steels was established. Data were obtained from both published literature and unpublished reports furnished by aerospace companies. Fatigue and fatigue-crack-propagation analyses were restricted to information obtained from constant-amplitude load or strain cycling of specimens in air at room temperature. Fracture toughness data were from tests of center-cracked tension panels, part-through crack specimens, and compact-tension specimens.

  17. Method of continuously determining crack length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakaran, Ramamurthy (Inventor); Lopez, Osvaldo F. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The determination of crack lengths in an accurate and straight forward manner is very useful in studying and preventing load created flaws and cracks. A crack length sensor according to the present invention is fabricated in a rectangular or other geometrical form from a conductive powder impregnated polymer material. The long edges of the sensor are silver painted on both sides and the sensor is then bonded to a test specimen via an adhesive having sufficient thickness to also serve as an insulator. A lead wire is connected to each of the two outwardly facing silver painted edges. The resistance across the sensor changes as a function of the crack length in the specimen and sensor. The novel aspect of the present invention includes the use of relatively uncomplicated sensors and instrumentation to effectively measure the length of generated cracks.

  18. The crack problem for a nonhomogeneous plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delale, F.; Erdogan, F.

    1982-01-01

    The plane elasticity problem for a nonhomogeneous medium containing a crack is considered. It is assumed that the Poisson's ratio of the medium is constant and the Young's modulus E varies exponentially with the coordinate parallel to the crack. First the half plane problem is formulated and the solution is given for arbitrary tractions along the boundary. Then the integral equation for the crack problem is derived. It is shown that the integral equation having the derivative of the crack surface displacement as the density function has a simple Cauchy type kernel. Hence, its solution and the stresses around the crack tips have the conventional square root singularity. The solution is given for various loading conditions. The results show that the effect of the Poisson's ratio and consequently that of the thickness constraint on the stress intensity factors are rather negligible.

  19. Stress analysis for structures with surface cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    Two basic forms of analysis, one treating stresses around arbitrarily loaded circular cracks, the other treating stresses due to loads arbitrarily distributed on the surface of a half space, are united by a boundary-point least squares method to obtain analyses for stresses from surface cracks in places or bars. Calculations were for enough cases to show how effects from the crack vary with the depth-to-length ratio, the fractional penetration ratio, the obliquity of the load, and to some extent the fractional span ratio. The results include plots showing stress intensity factors, stress component distributions near the crack, and crack opening displacement patterns. Favorable comparisons are shown with two kinds of independent experiments, but the main method for confirming the results is by wide checking of overall satisfaction of boundary conditions, so that external confirmation is not essential. Principles involved in designing analyses which promote dependability of the results are proposed and illustrated.

  20. Strain rate effects in stress corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Parkins, R.N. . Dept. of Metallurgy and Engineering Materials)

    1990-03-01

    Slow strain rate testing (SSRT) was initially developed as a rapid, ad hoc laboratory method for assessing the propensity for metals an environments to promote stress corrosion cracking. It is now clear, however, that there are good theoretical reasons why strain rate, as opposed to stress per se, will often be the controlling parameter in determining whether or not cracks are nucleated and, if so, are propagated. The synergistic effects of the time dependence of corrosion-related reactions and microplastic strain provide the basis for mechanistic understanding of stress corrosion cracking in high-pressure pipelines and other structures. However, while this may be readily comprehended in the context of laboratory slow strain tests, its extension to service situations may be less apparent. Laboratory work involving realistic stressing conditions, including low-frequency cyclic loading, shows that strain or creep rates give good correlation with thresholds for cracking and with crack growth kinetics.

  1. Fatigue Crack Detection Using Digital Image Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cawley, P.; Hutt, T. D.

    2009-03-01

    At present, detecting structural defects such as cracking and corrosion before they become critical is largely achieved by time consuming techniques such as eddy current and ultrasonic testing. These techniques require point-by-point scanning over the area to be tested. Digital Image Correlation could provide a cheaper and quicker testing technique. It works by correlating images of the structure surface in unloaded and loaded states taken with a standard digital camera, giving the displacement and strain fields. The specific case of a crack at a hole in an aluminium plate was investigated. It was found that the strain concentration around the crack tip is too localised to detect; however the displacement jump across the crack could be seen. This technique allows the cracks to be detected and would allow rapid testing of a structure if it can easily be loaded.

  2. Measurement and analysis of critical crack tip processes during fatigue crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, D. L.; Hudak, S. J.; Dexter, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    The mechanics of fatigue crack growth under constant-amplitudes and variable-amplitude loading were examined. Critical loading histories involving relatively simple overload and overload/underload cycles were studied to provide a basic understanding of the underlying physical processes controlling crack growth. The material used for this study was 7091-T7E69, a powder metallurgy aluminum alloy. Local crack-tip parameters were measured at various times before, during, and after the overloads, these include crack-tip opening loads and displacements, and crack-tip strain fields. The latter were useed, in combination with the materials cyclic and monotonic stress-strain properties, to compute crack-tip residual stresses. The experimental results are also compared with analytical predictions obtained using the FAST-2 computer code. The sensitivity of the analytical model to constant-amplitude fatigue crack growth rate properties and to through-thickness constrain are studied.

  3. Crack shape developments and leak rates for circumferential complex-cracked pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Brickstad, B.; Bergman, M.

    1997-04-01

    A computerized procedure has been developed that predicts the growth of an initial circumferential surface crack through a pipe and further on to failure. The crack growth mechanism can either be fatigue or stress corrosion. Consideration is taken to complex crack shapes and for the through-wall cracks, crack opening areas and leak rates are also calculated. The procedure is based on a large number of three-dimensional finite element calculations of cracked pipes. The results from these calculations are stored in a database from which the PC-program, denoted LBBPIPE, reads all necessary information. In this paper, a sensitivity analysis is presented for cracked pipes subjected to both stress corrosion and vibration fatigue.

  4. Micromechanical predictions of crack initiation, propagation and crack growth resistance in boron/aluminum composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahishi, J. M.; Adams, D. F.

    1982-01-01

    An elastoplastic, axisymmetric finite element model has been used to predict the initiation and propagation of a crack in a composite model consisting of a single broken boron fiber embedded in an annular sheath of aluminum matrix. The accuracy of the axisymmetric finite element model for crack problems has been established by solving the classical problem of a penny-shaped crack in a thick cylindrical rod under axial tension. Also, the stress intensity factors predicted by the present numerical model are compared with continuum results. A constant displacement boundary condition applied during an increment of crack growth permits a substantial amount of stable crack growth in the matrix material. The concept of Crack Growth Resistance Curves (KR-curves) has been used to determine the point of crack instability

  5. Life prediction for bridged fatigue cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, B.N.

    1994-08-01

    One of the more promising classes of composites touted for high temperature applications, and certainly the most available, is that of relatively brittle matrices, either ceramic or intermetallic, reinforced by strong, aligned, continuous fibers. Under cyclic loading in the fiber direction, these materials develop matrix cracks that often run perpendicular to the fibers, while the fibers remain intact in the crack wake, supplying bridging tractions across the fracture surfaces. The bridging tractions shield the crack tip from the applied load, dramatically reducing the crack velocity from that expected in an unreinforced material subjected to the same value, {Delta}K{sub a}, of the cyclic applied stress intensity factor. An important issue in reliability is the prediction of the growth rates of the bridged cracks. The growth rates of matrix fatigue cracks bridged by sliding fibers are now commonly predicted by models based on the micromechanics of frictional interfaces. However, there exist many reasons, both theoretical and experimental, for suspecting that the most popular micromechanical models are probably wrong in detail in the context of fatigue cracks. Furthermore, a review of crack growth data reveals that the validity of the micromechanics-based predictive model has never been tested and may never be tested. In this paper, two alternative approaches are suggested to the engineering problem of predicting the growth rates of bridged cracks without explicit recourse to micromechanics. Instead, it is shown that the material properties required to analyze bridging effects can be deduced directly from crack growth data. Some experiments are proposed to test the validity of the proposals.

  6. Investigating Reaction-Driven Cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelemen, P. B.; Hirth, G.; Savage, H. M.

    2013-12-01

    Many metamorphic reactions lead to large volume changes, and potentially to reaction-driven cracking [1,2]. Large-scale hydration of mantle peridotite to produce serpentine or talc is invoked to explain the rheology of plate boundaries, the nature of earthquakes, and the seismic properties of slow-spread ocean crust and the 'mantle wedge' above subduction zones. Carbonation of peridotite may be an important sink in the global carbon cycle. Zones of 100% magnesite + quartz replacing peridotite, up to 200 m thick, formed where oceanic mantle was thrust over carbonate-bearing metasediments in Oman. Talc + carbonate is an important component of the matrix in subduction mélanges at Santa Catalina Island , California, and the Sanbagawa metamorphic belt, Japan. Engineered systems to emulate natural mineral carbonation could provide relatively inexpensive CO2 capture and storage [3]. More generally, engineered reaction-driven cracking could supplement or replace hydraulic fracture in geothermal systems, solution mining, and extraction of tight oil and gas. The controls on reaction-driven cracking are poorly understood. Hydration and carbonation reactions can be self-limiting, since they potentially reduce permeability and armor reactive surfaces [4]. Also, in some cases, hydration or carbonation may take place at constant volume. Small changes in volume due to precipitation of solid products increases stress, destabilizing solid reactants, until precipitation and dissolution rates become equal at a steady state stress [5]. In a third case, volume change due to precipitation of solid products causes brittle failure. This has been invoked on qualitative grounds to explain, e.g., complete serpentinization of mantle peridotite [6]. Below ~ 300°C, the available potential energy for hydration and carbonation of olivine could produce stresses of 100's of MPa [2], sufficient to fracture rocks to 10 km depth or more, causing brittle failure below the steady state stress required

  7. Environmental stress cracking of polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahan, K. I.

    1980-01-01

    A two point bending method for use in studying the environmental stress cracking and crazing phenomena is described and demonstrated for a variety of polymer/solvent systems. Critical strain values obtained from these curves are reported for various polymer/solvent systems including a considerable number of systems for which critical strain values have not been previously reported. Polymers studied using this technique include polycarbonate (PC), ABS, high impact styrene (HIS), polyphenylene oxide (PPO), and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). Critical strain values obtained using this method compared favorably with available existing data. The major advantage of the technique is the ability to obtain time vs. strain curves over a short period of time. The data obtained suggests that over a short period of time the transition in most of the polymer solvent systems is more gradual than previously believed.

  8. Plane strain crack growth models for fatigue crack growth life predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, J.M.; Daniewicz, S.R.; Hechmer, J.L.

    1996-02-01

    Experimental data and analytical models have shown that a growing fatigue crack produces a plastic wake. This, in turn, leads to residual compressive stresses acting over the crack faces during the unloading portion of the fatigue cycle. This crack closure effect results in an applied stress intensity factor during unloading which is greater than that associated with the K{sub min}, thus producing a crack-driving force which is less than {Delta}K = K{sub max} {minus} K{sub min}. Life predictions which do not account for this crack closure effect give inaccurate life estimates, especially for fully reversed loadings. This paper discusses the development of a crack closure expression for the 4-point bend specimen using numerical results obtained from a modified strip-yield model. Data from tests of eight 4-point bend specimens were used to estimate the specimen constraint factor (stress triaxiality effect). The constraint factor was then used in the estimation of the crack opening stresses for each of the bend tests. The numerically estimated crack opening stresses were used to develop an effective stress intensity factor range, {Delta}K{sub eff}. The resulting crack growth rate data when plotted versus {Delta}K{sub eff} resulted in a material fatigue crack growth rate property curve independent of test specimen type, stress level, and R-ratio. Fatigue crack growth rate data from center-cracked panels using Newman`s crack closure model, from compact specimens using Eason`s R-ratio expression, and from bend specimens using the model discussed in this paper are all shown to fall along the same straight line (on log-log paper) when plotted versus {Delta}K{sub eff}, even though crack closure differs for each specimen type.

  9. Establishing the Foundations of the Mechanics of Fracture of Materials Compressed Along Cracks (Review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guz, A. N.

    2014-01-01

    The basic results of establishing the foundations of the mechanics of fracture of homogeneous materials compressed along cracks and inhomogeneous (composite) materials compressed along interface cracks are analyzed. These results were obtained using elastic, plastic, and viscoelastic material models. This review consists of three parts. The first part discusses the basic concept that the start (onset) of fracture is the mechanism of local instability near the cracks located in a single plane or parallel planes. The fracture criterion and the basic problems arising in this division of fracture mechanics are also formulated. Two basic approaches to establishing the foundations of the mechanics of fracture of materials compressed along cracks are outlined. One approach, so-called beam approximation, is based on various applied theories of stability of thin-walled systems (including the Bernoulli, Kirchhoff-Love, Timoshenko-type hypotheses, etc.). This approach is essentially approximate and introduces an irreducible error into the calculated stresses. The other approach is based on the basic equations and methods of the three-dimensional linearized theory of stability of deformable bodies for finite and small subcritical strains. This approach does not introduce major errors typical for the former approach and allows obtaining results with accuracy acceptable for mechanics. The second part offers a brief analysis of the basic results obtained with the first approach and a more detailed analysis of the basic results obtained with the second approach, including the consideration of the exact solutions for interacting cracks in a single plane and in parallel planes and results for some structural materials. The third part reports new results for interacting cracks in very closely spaced (or coinciding, as an asymptotic case) planes. These results may be considered a transition from the second approach (three-dimensional linearized theory of elastic stability) to the

  10. Analysis Of Potentiometric Methods Used For Crack Detection In Forging Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilc, Jozef; Drbúl, Mário; Stančeková, Dana; Varga, Daniel; Martinček, Juraj; Kuždák, Viktor

    2015-12-01

    Increased use of forging tools in mass production causes their increased wear and creates pressure to design more efficient renovation process. Renovation is complicated because of the identification of cracks expanding from the surface to the core material. Given that the production of forging tools is expensive, caused by the cost of tool steels and the thermo-chemical treatment, it is important to design forging tool with its easy renovation in mind. It is important to choose the right renovation technology, which will be able to restore the instrument to its original state while maintaining financial rentability. Choosing the right technology is difficult because of nitrided and heat-treated surface for high hardness and wear resistance. Article discusses the use of non-destructive method of detecting cracks taking into account the size of the cracks formed during working process.

  11. Fatigue-crack monitoring in-flight using acoustic emission - hardware, technique, and testing

    SciTech Connect

    Hutton, P.H.; Skorpik, J.R.; Lemon, D.K.

    1981-07-01

    The three programs described represent a logical evolutionary process toward effective flaw surveillance in aircraft using AE. The Macchi tests showed that an AE system can withstand extended in-flight service and collect meaningful information relative to fatigue crack growth at a single specific location. The MIrage aircraft work seeks to extend the methods demonstrated on the Macchi into a more complex circumstance. We are now attempting to detect and locate crack growth at any of twenty fastener locations in a relatively complex geometry. The DARPA pattern recognition program seeks to develop signal identification capability that would pave the way for general monitoring of aircraft structures using AE to detect fatigue crack growth. It appears that AE technology may be capable of enhancing aircraft safety assurance while reducing inspection requirements with the associated costs.

  12. Three-Dimensional Gear Crack Propagation Studied

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.

    1999-01-01

    Gears used in current helicopters and turboprops are designed for light weight, high margins of safety, and high reliability. However, unexpected gear failures may occur even with adequate tooth design. To design an extremely safe system, the designer must ask and address the question, "What happens when a failure occurs?" With gear-tooth bending fatigue, tooth or rim fractures may occur. A crack that propagates through a rim will be catastrophic, leading to disengagement of the rotor or propeller, loss of an aircraft, and possible fatalities. This failure mode should be avoided. A crack that propagates through a tooth may or may not be catastrophic, depending on the design and operating conditions. Also, early warning of this failure mode may be possible because of advances in modern diagnostic systems. One concept proposed to address bending fatigue fracture from a safety aspect is a splittooth gear design. The prime objective of this design would be to control crack propagation in a desired direction such that at least half of the tooth would remain operational should a bending failure occur. A study at the NASA Lewis Research Center analytically validated the crack-propagation failsafe characteristics of a split-tooth gear. It used a specially developed three-dimensional crack analysis program that was based on boundary element modeling and principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics. Crack shapes as well as the crack-propagation life were predicted on the basis of the calculated stress intensity factors, mixed-mode crack-propagation trajectory theories, and fatigue crack-growth theories. The preceding figures show the effect of the location of initial cracks on crack propagation. Initial cracks in the fillet of the teeth produced stress intensity factors of greater magnitude (and thus, greater crack growth rates) than those in the root or groove areas of the teeth. Crack growth was simulated in a case study to evaluate crack-propagation paths. Tooth

  13. Modeling of Lamb Waves and Application to Crack Identification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    displaced structure does not look naturally deformed , especially close to the applied displacement nodes (top right and left corners). The ratio of...the piezoelectric material and the structure is challenging. The paper models a simple parallelogram , homogeneous aluminum plate. The next step

  14. Hierarchically-Driven Approach for Quantifying Fatigue Crack Initiation and Short Crack Growth Behavior in Aerospace Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-31

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0308 Hierarchically-Driven Approach for Quantifying Fatigue Crack Initiation and Short Crack Growth Behavior inAerospace...Quantifying Fatigue Crack Initiation and Short Crack Growth Behavior inAerospace Materials 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA9550-13-1-0144 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...Approach for Quantifying Fatigue Crack Initiation and Short Crack Growth Behavior inAerospace Materials Principal Investigator K.N. Solanki

  15. Lattice theory of three-dimensional cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esterling, D. M.

    1976-01-01

    The problem of the stability of a three-dimensional crack is analyzed within a lattice-statics approximation. The consequence of introducing a jog into the crack face as well as the effects of various nonlinear-force laws are studied. The phenomenon of lattice trapping (upper and lower bounds on the applied stress for an equilibrium crack of given length) is again obtained. It is possible to obtain some physical insight into which aspects of the force law are critical for crack stability. In particular, the inadequacy of a thermodynamic approach - which relates the critical stress to a surface energy corresponding to the area under the cohesive-force-vs-displacement curve - is demonstrated. Surface energy is a global property of the cohesive-force law. Crack stability is sensitive to much more refined aspects of the cohesive-force law. Crack healing is sensitive to the long-range portion of the cohesive force. Crack expansion is sensitive to the position of the maximum in the cohesive-force relation.

  16. Ultrasonic characterization of fatigue crack closure

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, R.B.; Buck, O.; Rehbein, D.K.

    1991-01-01

    The characterization of fatigue crack closure is an important objective because of its influence on fatigue crack propagation, particularly under conditions of variable amplitude loading. This paper describes a nontraditional technique for characterizing closure, in which ultrasonic scattering measurements are used to obtain estimates of the number density and size of asperities bridging the crack faces, with subsequent estimates of the crack tip shielding being based on those geometrical parameters. The paper first reviews the experimental configuration and the basic elasto-dynamic theory underlying the technique. It then presents recent results obtained in studies of the influence of block overloads and load shedding on the growth of fatigue cracks in aluminum alloys. In both cases, the change in the closure state after the overload can be unambiguously seen even in the raw data. Moreover, data analysis suggests that it may be possible to predict when the crack will reinitiate based on more subtle changes in the ultrasonically inferred closure state. In the case of load shedding, a massive closure region is observed, whose characteristics appear consistent with the notion that threshold phenomena can be explained in terms of crack closure. 20 refs., 10 figs.

  17. Evolution of Residual Stresses with Fatigue Crack Growth in a Variable Polarity Plasma Arc Welded Aluminum Alloy Compact Tension Specimen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liljedahl, C. D. M.; Zanellato, O.; Edwards, L.; Fitzpatrick, M. E.

    2008-10-01

    The evolution of the residual stresses during fatigue crack growth in a welded compact tension C(T) specimen was measured using neutron diffraction. The measurements were performed by growing a fatigue crack in a sample in situ on a neutron diffractometer. The stresses were found to be unaffected by crack growth through the compressive part of the initial residual stress field. The residual stresses at the crack tip increased when the crack entered the tensile residual stress field to maintain residual stress equilibrium. Finite element (FE) modeling of the evolution of the residual stresses showed good correlation with the experimental results. The residual stress evolution was found to be governed by redistribution of the initial stress field and only slightly affected by fatigue-induced effects at the measured spatial resolution (2 mm × 2 mm × 7 mm).

  18. Recent developments in analysis of crack propagation and fracture of practical materials. [stress analysis in aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardrath, H. F.; Newman, J. C., Jr.; Elber, W.; Poe, C. C., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The limitations of linear elastic fracture mechanics in aircraft design and in the study of fatigue crack propagation in aircraft structures are discussed. NASA-Langley research to extend the capabilities of fracture mechanics to predict the maximum load that can be carried by a cracked part and to deal with aircraft design problems are reported. Achievements include: (1) improved stress intensity solutions for laboratory specimens; (2) fracture criterion for practical materials; (3) crack propagation predictions that account for mean stress and high maximum stress effects; (4) crack propagation predictions for variable amplitude loading; and (5) the prediction of crack growth and residual stress in built-up structural assemblies. These capabilities are incorporated into a first generation computerized analysis that allows for damage tolerance and tradeoffs with other disciplines to produce efficient designs that meet current airworthiness requirements.

  19. Slow crack propagation in composite restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Montes-G, G M; Draughn, R A

    1987-05-01

    The double-torsion test technique was used to study slow crack propagation in a set of dental composite resins including two glass-filled and two microfilled materials. The microstructure within each pair was the same but one of the resins was selfcured and the other photocured. The fracture behavior was dependent on the filler concentration and the presence of absorbed water. Wet materials fractured by slow crack growth in the range of crack velocity studied (10(-7) to 10(-3) m/s), and the microfilled composites, which contain a lower concentration of inorganic filler, had lower stress intensity factors (K1c) than the glass-filled composites tested. Dry specimens of the microfilled materials and the selfcured, glass-filled composite also showed unstable, stick-slip fracture behavior indicative of a crack blunting mechanism which leads to an elevation of the stress intensity factor for crack initiation over K1c for stable crack growth. The plasticizing effect of water increased the viscoelastic response of the materials measured by the slope of curves of slow crack growth. Analysis of fracture surfaces showed that cracks propagated at low velocities (10(-7) to 10(-5) m/s) by the apparent failure of the filler/matrix interfacial bond, and absorbed water affected the strength or fracture resistance of the interface. At high crack velocities the properties of the composite depend on the properties of the polymeric matrix, the filler, and the filler volume fraction, but at low velocities the interface is the controlling factor in the durability of these composites exposed to an aqueous environment.

  20. Crack Growth Properties of Sealing Glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jonathan A.; Tandon, R.

    2008-01-01

    The crack growth properties of several sealing glasses were measured using constant stress rate testing in 2% and 95% RH (relative humidity). Crack growth parameters measured in high humidity are systematically smaller (n and B) than those measured in low humidity, and velocities for dry environments are approx. 100x lower than for wet environments. The crack velocity is very sensitivity to small changes in RH at low RH. Confidence intervals on parameters that were estimated from propagation of errors were comparable to those from Monte Carlo simulation.

  1. MECHANICS OF CRACK BRIDGING UNDER DYNAMIC LOADS

    SciTech Connect

    N. SRIDHAR; ET AL

    2001-02-01

    A bridging law for fiber reinforced composites under dynamic crack propagation conditions has been derived. Inertial effects in the mechanism of fiber pullout during dynamic propagation of a bridged crack are critically examined for the first time. By reposing simple shear lag models of pullout as problems of dynamic wave propagation, the effect of the frictional coupling between the fibers and the matrix is accounted for in a fairly straightforward way. The solutions yield the time-dependent relationship between the crack opening displacement and the bridging traction. Engineering criteria and the role of material and geometrical parameters for significant inertial effects are identified.

  2. Fatigue-Crack-Growth Computer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, Royce G.; Shivakumar, V.; Newman, James C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Fatigue Crack Growth (NASA/FLAGRO) computer program developed as aid in predicting growth of preexisting flaws and cracks in structural components of space systems. Is enhanced version of FLAGRO4 and incorporates state-of-the-art improvements in both fracture mechanics and computer technology. Provides fracture-mechanics analyst with computerized method of evaluating "safe-crack-growth-life" capabilities of structural components. Also used to evaluate tolerance to damage of structure of given design. Designed modular to facilitate revisions and operation on minicomputers. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  3. Characterization of Surface Cracks Using Rayleigh Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Masserey, B.; Mazza, E.

    2005-04-09

    The characterization of surface cracks in steel plates using surface acoustic waves is investigated. In the experiments Rayleigh wave is generated by a standard wedge technique and the surface displacement is measured pointwise by means of a heterodyne laser interferometer. The presence of a crack in the acoustic field leads to an amplitude increase due to the scattering of the surface wave at the defect. The time-of-flight method is extended to crack depth smaller than the wavelength by correlating the time delay of the transmitted wave with the defect depth. The method is shown to provide good results for defect depths down to 0.2 mm.

  4. Slow crack growth in spinel in water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwantes, S.; Elber, W.

    1983-01-01

    Magnesium aluminate spinel was tested in a water environment at room temperature to establish its slow crack-growth behavior. Ring specimens with artificial flaws on the outside surface were loaded hydraulically on the inside surface. The time to failure was measured. Various precracking techniques were evaluated and multiple precracks were used to minimize the scatter in the static fatigue tests. Statistical analysis techniques were developed to determine the strength and crack velocities for a single flaw. Slow crack-growth rupture was observed at stress intensities as low as 70 percent of K sub c. A strengthening effect was observed in specimens that had survived long-time static fatigue tests.

  5. Crack initiation around prestressed rock bolts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijk, G.

    1982-07-01

    The stress fields in the rock in the immediate vicinities of the ends of prestressed rock bolts are considered. In particular, the tensile stresses that are likely to initiate cracks are studies. A fracture mechanics analysis shows that if cracks are initiated they will normally not be extended more than a few bore hole diameters and cause negligable reduction of the tensile force in the rock bolts. It is suggested that the initiated cracks can be considerably extended by blasting activities in the neighborhood and accordingly cause loss of bolt tension. If so retensioning of the rock bolts is quite meaningless.

  6. Prediction of Crack Growth in Aqueous Environments.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-01

    Impedance for the Propagation of a Crack Through HY80 Steel in 3.5Z NaCl Solution at 25*C Under Sinusoidal Loading Condi t ions...THE PROPAGATION OF A CRACK THROUGH HY80 STEEL IN 3.5% NaCI SOLUTION AT 25°C UNDER SINUSOIDAL LOADING CONDITIONS 49 and the properties of greatest...VELOCITY AS A FUNCTION OF TIME FOR A CRACK GROWN AT CONSTANT CURRENT IN HY80 STEEL Initial conditions CI in Table 5. 66 400 UJ x v> l/> L. 0

  7. Closing of cracks under impact loading

    SciTech Connect

    Finkel', V.M.; Fomin, I.M.; Shegai, V.V.

    1985-12-01

    The healing of cracks has been studied in crystalline materials such as diamond, sodium chloride, tungsten, molybdenum and quartz, and the possibility has also been studied of restoring material continuity to sodium chloride and lithium fluoride single crystals under conditions of relatively prolonged compression over a time range of from one to tens of seconds. Potential restoration of interatomic bonds between surfaces of failed material (reanimation) precedes collapse of a crack as a process of approach of its edges before mechanical contact. The goal of this work is to study crack closing with short-term impact.

  8. Crack tip mechanics in periodically layered composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Mahendra

    In this work, the plane strain problems of periodically layered composites consisting of alternate matrix and fiber layers weakened by a crack perpendicular or parallel to the interfaces are considered. Elasto-static analytical solutions for the crack-tip micromechanical fields under mode-I, mode-II and mixed-mode loading are developed using principles of asymptotic homogenization and the method of complex elastic potentials. In a separate formulation, the mode-I crack-tip fields for a crack normal to the interfaces are also obtained using the method of non-standard analysis. The analytical model predictions are compared with the numerical solutions obtained through refined near-tip micro-macro hybrid finite element analyses. Extensive numerical studies addressing the crack-tip location effects on the near-tip fields are presented. In all cases considered, the zero-order micro-stresses obtained from the analytical solutions are found to exhibit an overall rsp{{-}{1/2}} singularity. The numerical studies have revealed that the near-tip micro-stress field in cracked layered systems is structured in three distinct zones. In systems with isotropic layers, the stress field in the matrix phase surrounding the immediate vicinity of crack-tip is found to exhibit a universal isotropic field behavior dominated by a matrix material dependent stress intensity factor. In the far-field region, the admissible discontinuous micro-stress field is observed to depend on the microstructural heterogeneity and the global anisotropy of the system. The transition from the universal isotropic to the far field behavior takes place within a relatively small region. Crack tip amplification or shielding are shown to take place for a crack approaching a bimaterial interface. The mode-I near-tip fields for a crack normal to the interface in a laminate consisting of alternate brittle and ductile layers are also studied numerically. The Gurson constitutive model that accounts for the ductile

  9. Interfacial Crack Arrest in Sandwich Panels with Embedded Crack Stoppers Subjected to Fatigue Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martakos, G.; Andreasen, J. H.; Berggreen, C.; Thomsen, O. T.

    2017-02-01

    A novel crack arresting device has been implemented in sandwich panels and tested using a special rig to apply out-of-plane loading on the sandwich panel face-sheets. Fatigue crack propagation was induced in the face-core interface of the sandwich panels which met the crack arrester. The effect of the embedded crack arresters was evaluated in terms of the achieved enhancement of the damage tolerance of the tested sandwich panels. A finite element (FE) model of the experimental setup was used for predicting propagation rates and direction of the crack growth. The FE simulation was based on the adoption of linear fracture mechanics and a fatigue propagation law (i.e. Paris law) to predict the residual fatigue life-time and behaviour of the test specimens. Finally, a comparison between the experimental results and the numerical simulations was made to validate the numerical predictions as well as the overall performance of the crack arresters.

  10. Crack-face displacements for embedded elliptic and semi-elliptical surface cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.

    1989-01-01

    Analytical expressions for the crack-face displacements of an embedded elliptic crack in infinite solid subjected to arbitrary tractions are obtained. The tractions on the crack faces are assumed to be expressed in a polynomial form. These displacements expressions complete the exact solution of Vijayakumar and Atluri, and Nishioki and Atluri. For the special case of an embedded crack in an infinite solid subjected to uniform pressure loading, the present displacements agree with those by Green and Sneddon. The displacement equations derived were used with the finite-element alternating method (FEAM) for the analysis of a semi-elliptic surface crack in a finite solid subjected to remote tensile loading. The maximum opening displacements obtained with FEAM are compared to those with the finite-element method with singularity elements. The maximum crack opening displacements by the two methods showed good agreement.

  11. The crack problem in bonded nonhomogeneous materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.; Joseph, P. F.; Kaya, A. C.

    1991-01-01

    The plane elasticity problem for two bonded half planes containing a crack perpendicular to the interface was considered. The effect of very steep variations in the material properties near the diffusion plane on the singular behavior of the stresses and stress intensity factors were studied. The two materials were thus, assumed to have the shear moduli mu(o) and mu(o) exp (Beta x), x=0 being the diffusion plane. Of particular interest was the examination of the nature of stress singularity near a crack tip termination at the interface where the shear modulus has a discontinuous derivative. The results show that, unlike the crack problem in piecewise homogeneous materials for which the singularity is of the form r/alpha, 0 less than alpha less than 1, in this problem the stresses have a standard square-root singularity regardless of the location of the crack tip. The nonhomogeneity constant Beta has, however, considerable influence on the stress intensity factors.

  12. The Effect of Water on Crack Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaede, O.; Regenauer-Lieb, K.

    2009-04-01

    While the mechanical coupling between pore fluid and solid phase is relatively well understood, quantitative studies dealing with chemical-mechanical weakening in geological materials are rare. Many classical poroelastic problems can be addressed with the simple law of effective stress. Experimental studies show that the presence of a chemically active fluid can have effects that exceed the predictions of the law of effective stress. These chemical fluid-rock interactions alter the mechanical properties of the solid phase. Especially chemical-mechanical weakening has important ramifications for many areas of applied geosciences ranging from nuclear waste disposal over reservoir enhancement to fault stability. In this study, we model chemically induced changes of the size of the process zone around a crack tip. The knowledge of the process zone size is used to extend existing effective medium approximations of cracked solids. The stress distribution around a crack leads to a chemical potential gradient. This gradient will be a driver for mass diffusion through the solid phase. As an example, mass diffusion is towards the crack tip for a mode I crack. In this case a chemical reaction, that weakens the solid phase, will increase the size of the process zone around the crack tip. We apply our model to the prominent hydrolytic weakening effect observed in the quartz-water system (Griggs and Blacic, 1965). Hydrolytic weakening is generally attributed to water hydrolyzing the strong Si-O bonds of the quartz crystal. The hydrolysis replaces a Si-O-Si bridge with a relatively weak hydrogen bridge between two silanol groups. This enhances dislocation mobility and hence the yield stress is reduced. The plastic process zone around a crack tip is therefore larger in a wet crystal than in a dry crystal. We calculate the size of the process zone by solving this coupled mechanical-chemical problem with the Finite Element code ABAQUS. We consider single crack, collinear crack and

  13. Cracked shells under skew-symmetric loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lelale, F.

    1982-01-01

    A shell containing a through crack in one of the principal planes of curvature and under general skew-symmetric loading is considered. By employing a Reissner type shell theory which takes into account the effect of transverse shear strains, all boundary conditions on the crack surfaces are satisfied separately. Consequently, unlike those obtained from the classical shell theory, the angular distributions of the stress components around the crack tips are shown to be identical to the distributions obtained from the plane and antiplane elasticity solutions. Extensive results are given for axially and circumferentially cracked cylindrical shells, spherical shells, and toroidal shells under uniform inplane shearing, out of plane shearing, and torsion. The effect of orthotropy on the results is also studied.

  14. The interaction between inclusions and cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.

    1973-01-01

    Some current fracture theories are reviewed and a group of mechanics problems of practical interest relating to the elastic interaction between cracks and inclusions are identified and results summarized.

  15. Struggling with Fitzgerald's "Crack-Up" Essays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulcher, James

    1998-01-01

    Ponders F. Scott Fitzgerald's essays about his "crack-up" and relates them to the many complex aspects of the struggles of a teacher using post-structural literary theory and teaching two-year college students. (SR)

  16. Crack arrest in thick section steel plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, E.

    1983-03-01

    Crack arrest in thick section steel plate is considered in relation to the conditions for crack arrest in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel, when this is subjected to thermal stresses resulting from a hypothetical loss of coolant accident. The results of a theoretical analysis, based primarily on recent developments in quasi-static crack propagation theory, provide further support for the view that the arrest toughness KIa is essentially a material property. However, since the theoretical results also suggest that KIa is reduced by neutron irradiation, and because there is, as yet, no conclusive experimental data on the effect of neutron irradiation on KIa, it is proposed that with highly irradiated steel, instead of using a KIa crack arrest criterion, it is better to use a more conservative criterion, based on the concept that arrest occurs within the vessel at a position where the temperature exceeds that temperature above which the cleavage fracture mode is unable to operate.

  17. Crack instabilities of a heated glass strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adda-Bedia, Mokhtar; Pomeau, Yves

    1995-10-01

    Recently, Yuse and Sano [Nature (London) 362, 329 (1993)] have observed that a crack traveling in a glass strip submitted to a nonuniform thermal diffusion field undergoes numerous instabilities. We study two cases of quasistatic crack propagation. The crack extension condition in straight propagation is determined. An asymptotic analysis of the elastic free energy is introduced and scaling laws are derived. A linear stability analysis of the straight propagation is performed, based on the assumption that the crack tip propagation deviates from the centered straight one as soon as it is submitted to a ``physical'' singular shear stress. It is shown that a straight propagation can become unstable after which a wavy instability appears. The condition for instability as well as the selected wavelength is calculated quantitatively. The results are compared with experiments and the agreement is favorable.

  18. Survey updates amine stress corrosion cracking data

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-13

    The final report by National Association of Corrosion Engineers (NACE) task group T-8-14 has been published, revising and expanding the information on stress information on stress corrosion cracking of carbon steel in diethanolamine and diisopropanolamine service. A major conclusion of the survey was that cracking frequency was more prevalent in monoethanolamine (MEA) than in other amines. This paper reports that further examination of the DEA data indicated that some units were previously in MEA service and the reported cracks were actually associated with that period. A detailed follow-up review of the DEA data also revealed that some cases were caused by processes other than amine cracking. In many cases, further inspection or testing had been done after the original survey was submitted.

  19. Three-dimensional measurements of fatigue crack closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, S. K.; Grandt, A. F., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth and retardation experiments conducted in polycarbonate test specimen are described. The transparent test material allows optical interferometry measurements of the fatigue crack opening (and closing) profiles. Crack surface displacements are obtained through the specimen thickness and three dimensional aspects of fatigue crack closure are discussed.

  20. Effects of crack geometry and material behavior on scattering by cracks for QNDE applications

    SciTech Connect

    Achenbach, J.D.

    1989-09-15

    In work carried out on this project, the usual mathematical modeling of ultrasonic wave scattering by flaws is being extended to account for several typical characteristics of fatigue and stress-corrosion cracks, and the environment of such cracks. Work has been completed on scattering by macrocrack-microcrack configurations. We have also investigated reflection and transmission by a flaw plane consisting of an infinite array of randomly oriented cracks. In another investigation the propagation of mechanical disturbances in solids with periodically distributed cracks has been studied.

  1. Crack-mouth displacements for semielliptical surface cracks subjected to remote tension and bending loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, Ivatury S.; Newman, James C., Jr.; Atluri, Satya N.

    1992-01-01

    The exact analytical solution for an embedded elliptical crack in an infinite body subjected to arbitrary loading was used in conjunction with the finite element alternating method to obtain crack-mouth-opening displacements (CMOD) for surface cracks in finite plates subjected to remote tension. Identical surface-crack configurations were also analyzed with the finite element method using 20-noded element for plates subjected to both remote tension and bending. The CMODs from these two methods generally agreed within a few percent of each other. Comparisons made with experimental results obtained from surface cracks in welded aluminum alloy specimens subjected to tension also showed good agreement. Empirical equations were developed for CMOD for a wide range of surface-crack shapes and sizes subjected to tension and bending loads. These equations were obtained by modifying the Green-Sneddon exact solution for an elliptical crack in an infinite body to account for finite boundary effects. These equations should be useful in monitoring surface-crack growth in tests and in developing complete crack-face-displacement equations for use in three-dimensional weight-function methods.

  2. The effects of crack surface friction and roughness on crack tip stress fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballarini, Roberto; Plesha, Michael E.

    1987-01-01

    A model is presented which can be used to incorporate the effects of friction and tortuosity along crack surfaces through a constitutive law applied to the interface between opposing crack surfaces. The problem of a crack with a saw-tooth surface in an infinite medium subjected to a far-field shear stress is solved and the ratios of Mode-I stress intensity to Mode-II stress intensity are calculated for various coefficients of friction and material properties. The results show that tortuosity and friction lead to an increase in fracture loads and alter the direction of crack propagation.

  3. The effects of crack surface friction and roughness on crack tip stress fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballarini, Roberto; Plesha, Michael E.

    1987-01-01

    A model is presented which can be used to incorporate the effects of friction and tortuosity along crack surfaces through a constitutive law applied to the interface between opposing crack surfaces. The problem of a crack with a saw-tooth surface in an infinite medium subjected to a far-field shear stress is solved and the ratios of mode I stress intensity to mode II stress intensity are calculated for various coefficients of friction and material properties. The results show that tortuosity and friction lead to an increase in fracture loads and alter the direction of crack propagation.

  4. Measurement and analysis of critical crack tip processes associated with variable amplitude fatigue crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudak, S. J., Jr.; Davidson, D. L.; Chan, K. S.

    1983-01-01

    Crack growth retardation following overloads can result in overly conservative life predictions in structures subjected to variable amplitude fatigue loading when linear damage accumulation procedures are employed. Crack closure is believed to control the crack growth retardation, although the specific closure mechanism is debatable. Information on the relative contributions to crack closure from: (1) plasticity left in the wake of the advancing crack and (2) crack tip residual stresses is provided. The delay period and corresponding crack growth rate transients following overloads are systematically measured as a function of load ratio (R) and overload magnitude. These responses are correlated in terms of the local 'driving force' for crack growth as measured by crack tip opening loads and delta K sub eff. The latter measurements are obtained using a scanning electron microscope equipped with a cyclic loading stage; measurements are quantified using a relatively new stereoimaging technique. Combining experimental results with analytical predictions suggests that both plastic wake and residual stress mechanism are operative, the latter becoming predominate as R increases.

  5. The algorithm of crack and crack tip coordinates detection in optical images during fatigue test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panin, S. V.; Chemezov, V. O.; Lyubutin, P. S.; Titkov, V. V.

    2017-02-01

    An algorithm of crack detection during fatigue testing of materials, designed to automate the process of cyclic loading and tracking the crack tip, is proposed and tested. The ultimate goal of the study is aimed at controlling the displacements of the optical system with regard to the specimen under fatigue loading to ensure observation of the ‘area of interest’. It is shown that the image region that contains the crack may be detected and positioned with an average error of 1.93%. In terms of determining the crack tip position, the algorithm provides the accuracy of its localization with the average error value of 56 pixels.

  6. Composite Pressure Vessel Including Crack Arresting Barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Thomas K. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A pressure vessel includes a ported fitting having an annular flange formed on an end thereof and a tank that envelopes the annular flange. A crack arresting barrier is bonded to and forming a lining of the tank within the outer surface thereof. The crack arresting barrier includes a cured resin having a post-curing ductility rating of at least approximately 60% through the cured resin, and further includes randomly-oriented fibers positioned in and throughout the cured resin.

  7. Fatigue crack growth in aluminum laminate composites

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, P.B.; Carpenter, R.D.; Gibeling, J.C.

    1996-12-31

    Fatigue crack growth has been measured in a laminated metal composite (LMC) consisting of alternating layers of AA6090/SiC/25p metal matrix composite (MMC) and AA5182 alloy. This material was tested in both as-pressed (F temper) and aged (T6 temper) conditions. Corresponding crack growth measurements were made in self-laminates of both the MMC and AA5182 materials to examine the role of the interfaces.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulation of propagating cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullins, M.

    1982-01-01

    Steady state crack propagation is investigated numerically using a model consisting of 236 free atoms in two (010) planes of bcc alpha iron. The continuum region is modeled using the finite element method with 175 nodes and 288 elements. The model shows clear (010) plane fracture to the edge of the discrete region at moderate loads. Analysis of the results obtained indicates that models of this type can provide realistic simulation of steady state crack propagation.

  9. Atomistic observation of a crack tip approaching coherent twin boundaries.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Wang, J; Gong, S K; Mao, S X

    2014-03-18

    Coherent twin boundaries (CTBs) in nano-twinned materials could improve crack resistance. However, the role of the CTBs during crack penetration has never been explored at atomic scale. Our in situ observation on nano-twinned Ag under a high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) reveals the dynamic processes of a crack penetration across the CTBs, which involve alternated crack tip blunting, crack deflection, twinning/detwinning and slip transmission across the CTBs. The alternated blunting processes are related to the emission of different types of dislocations at the crack tip and vary with the distance of the crack tip from the CTBs.

  10. Crack growth direction in unidirectional off-axis graphite epoxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herakovich, C. T.; Gregory, M. A.; Beuth, J. L., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    An anisotropic elasticity crack tip stress analysis is implemented using three crack extension direction criteria (the normal stress ratio, the tensor polynominal and the strain energy density) to predict the direction of crack extension in unidirectional off axis graphite-epoxy. The theoretical predictions of crack extension direction are then compared with experimental results for 15 deg off axis tensile coupons with center cracks. Specimens of various aspect ratios and crack orientations are analyzed. It is shown that only the normal stress ratio criterion predicts the correct direction of crack growth.

  11. Electromagnetic pulsed thermography for natural cracks inspection.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yunlai; Tian, Gui Yun; Wang, Ping; Wang, Haitao; Gao, Bin; Woo, Wai Lok; Li, Kongjing

    2017-02-07

    Emerging integrated sensing and monitoring of material degradation and cracks are increasingly required for characterizing the structural integrity and safety of infrastructure. However, most conventional nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods are based on single modality sensing which is not adequate to evaluate structural integrity and natural cracks. This paper proposed electromagnetic pulsed thermography for fast and comprehensive defect characterization. It hybrids multiple physical phenomena i.e. magnetic flux leakage, induced eddy current and induction heating linking to physics as well as signal processing algorithms to provide abundant information of material properties and defects. New features are proposed using 1st derivation that reflects multiphysics spatial and temporal behaviors to enhance the detection of cracks with different orientations. Promising results that robust to lift-off changes and invariant features for artificial and natural cracks detection have been demonstrated that the proposed method significantly improves defect detectability. It opens up multiphysics sensing and integrated NDE with potential impact for natural understanding and better quantitative evaluation of natural cracks including stress corrosion crack (SCC) and rolling contact fatigue (RCF).

  12. Electromagnetic pulsed thermography for natural cracks inspection

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yunlai; Tian, Gui Yun; Wang, Ping; Wang, Haitao; Gao, Bin; Woo, Wai Lok; Li, Kongjing

    2017-01-01

    Emerging integrated sensing and monitoring of material degradation and cracks are increasingly required for characterizing the structural integrity and safety of infrastructure. However, most conventional nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods are based on single modality sensing which is not adequate to evaluate structural integrity and natural cracks. This paper proposed electromagnetic pulsed thermography for fast and comprehensive defect characterization. It hybrids multiple physical phenomena i.e. magnetic flux leakage, induced eddy current and induction heating linking to physics as well as signal processing algorithms to provide abundant information of material properties and defects. New features are proposed using 1st derivation that reflects multiphysics spatial and temporal behaviors to enhance the detection of cracks with different orientations. Promising results that robust to lift-off changes and invariant features for artificial and natural cracks detection have been demonstrated that the proposed method significantly improves defect detectability. It opens up multiphysics sensing and integrated NDE with potential impact for natural understanding and better quantitative evaluation of natural cracks including stress corrosion crack (SCC) and rolling contact fatigue (RCF). PMID:28169361

  13. Fatigue crack growth in lithium hydride

    SciTech Connect

    Healy, T.E.

    1993-09-01

    Subcritical fatigue crack growth, from cyclic tensile loading, was demonstrated in warm pressed Polycrystalline lithium hydride. Experiments were performed with cyclic tension-tension crack opening (mode I) loads applied to a pre-cracked compact type specimen in an argon environment at a temperature of 21C (70F). The fatigue crack growth was found to occur between 7.56 {times} 10{sup {minus}ll} M/cycle (2.98 {times} l0{sup {minus}9} in/cycle) and 2.35 {times} l0{sup {minus}8} m/cycle (9.24{times}10{sup {minus}7} in/cycle) for a range of stress intensity factors between 1.04 MPa{center_dot}{radical}m (0.95 ksi{center_dot}{radical}in) and 1.49 MPa{center_dot}{radical}m (1.36 ksi{center_dot}{radical}in). The rate of fatigue crack growth from cyclic tensile loading was found to be in excess of crack growth from sustained loading at an equivalent stress intensity factor. Furthermore, a fatigue threshold was not evident from the acquired data.

  14. Creep Behavior and Durability of Cracked CMC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, R. T.; Fox, Dennis; Smith, Craig

    2015-01-01

    To understand failure mechanisms and durability of cracked Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), Melt Infiltration (MI) SiCSiC composites with Sylramic-iBN fibers and full Chemical vapour infiltration SiCSiC composites with Sylramic-ion bombarded BN (iBN) and Hi-Nicalon -S fibers were pre-cracked between 150 to 200 megapascal and then creep and Sustained Peak Low Cycle Fatigue (SPLCF) tested at 13150 C at stress levels from 35 to 103 megapascal for up to 200 hours under furnace and burner rig conditions. In addition creep testing was also conducted on pre-cracked full Chemical vapour infiltration SiCSiC composites at 14500 C between 35 and 103 megapascal for up to 200 hours under furnace conditions. If the specimens survived the 200 hour durability tests, then they were tensile tested at room temperature to determine their residual tensile properties. The failed specimens were examined by Scanning electron microscope (SEM) to determine the failure modes and mechanisms. The influence of crack healing matrix, fiber types, crack density, testing modes and interface oxidation on durability of cracked Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) will be discussed.

  15. Electromagnetic pulsed thermography for natural cracks inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yunlai; Tian, Gui Yun; Wang, Ping; Wang, Haitao; Gao, Bin; Woo, Wai Lok; Li, Kongjing

    2017-02-01

    Emerging integrated sensing and monitoring of material degradation and cracks are increasingly required for characterizing the structural integrity and safety of infrastructure. However, most conventional nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods are based on single modality sensing which is not adequate to evaluate structural integrity and natural cracks. This paper proposed electromagnetic pulsed thermography for fast and comprehensive defect characterization. It hybrids multiple physical phenomena i.e. magnetic flux leakage, induced eddy current and induction heating linking to physics as well as signal processing algorithms to provide abundant information of material properties and defects. New features are proposed using 1st derivation that reflects multiphysics spatial and temporal behaviors to enhance the detection of cracks with different orientations. Promising results that robust to lift-off changes and invariant features for artificial and natural cracks detection have been demonstrated that the proposed method significantly improves defect detectability. It opens up multiphysics sensing and integrated NDE with potential impact for natural understanding and better quantitative evaluation of natural cracks including stress corrosion crack (SCC) and rolling contact fatigue (RCF).

  16. Ultrasonic testing of plates containing edge cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. H., Jr.; Karagulle, H.; Lee, S. S.

    1985-01-01

    The stress wave factor (SWF) signal is utilized for the nondestructive evaluation of plates containing perpendicular edge cracks. The effects of the existence lateral location and depth of the crack on the magnitude spectra of individual reflections in the SWF signal are studied. If the reflections in the SWF signal are not overlapped the short time Fourier analysis is applied. If the reflections are overlapped the short time homomorphic analysis (cepstrum analysis) is applied. Several reflections which have average resonant frequencies approximately at 0.9, 1.3, and 1.7 MHz are analyzed. It is observed that the magnitude ratios evaluated at average resonant frequencies decrease more with increasing d/h if the crack is located between the transducers, where h is plate thickness and d is crack depth. Moreover, for the plates, crack geometries, reflections, and frequencies considered, the average decibel drop depends mainly on the dimensionless parameter d/h and it is approximately -1 dB per 0.07 d/h. Changes in the average resonant frequencies of the magnitude spectra are also observed due to changes in the location of the crack.

  17. Micro-Cracking Detection in Laminated Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Tsuchin; Leyte, Alma; DiGregorio, Anthony; Russell, Samuel S.; Walker, James L.; Thom, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Porosity and fatigue cracking are two critical factors that affect the performance and safety of cryogenic fuel tanks and feedlines made from unlined laminated or weaved carbon/epoxy materials. This paper presents the experiments to induce fatigue cracking of laminated composites through thermal cycling as well as the feasibility of using Thermography and Ultrasound Spectroscopy technology (UT) to detect and measure such micro-cracking. Carbon/epoxy laminated composite panels were built and cut into strips. These specimens were partially submerged in liquid nitrogen while subjected to various loads on a test machine. Edges of some specimens were polished and etched to determine the degree of micro-cracking. The rest of specimens were then examined with Thermography and Ultrasound Spectroscopy NDE systems to investigate the feasibility of finding such micro-cracking in the laminated composites. Thermography is utilized to determine changes in thermal diffusivity. The degree of cracking may reduce the apparent thermal diffusivity and therefore change the thermal response on the surface. Thermography testing was conducted on a group of specimens where it is desired to have some correlation between the predetermined stress and the thermography data. Ultrasound Spectroscopy was used to determine peak changes between the pre-stressed and stressed samples. Data from the inspections were analyzed and the results are presented in this paper.

  18. Dynamic behaviour of a rotating cracked beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yashar, Ahmed; Ghandchi-Tehrani, Maryam; Ferguson, Neil

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a new approach to investigate and analyse the vibrational behaviour of cracked rotating cantilever beams, which can for example represent helicopter or wind turbine blades. The analytical Hamiltonian method is used in modelling the rotating beam and two numerical methods, the Rayleigh-Ritz and FEM, are used to study the natural frequencies and the mode shapes of the intact rotating beams. Subsequently, a crack is introduced into the FE model and simulations are performed to identify the modal characteristics for an open cracked rotating beam. The effect of various parameters such as non-dimensional rotating speed, hub ratio and slenderness ratio are investigated for both the intact and the cracked rotating beam, and in both directions of chordwise and flapwise motion. The veering phenomena in the natural frequencies as a function of the rotational speed and the buckling speed are considered with respect to the slenderness ratio. In addition, the mode shapes obtained for the flapwise vibration are compared using the modal assurance criterion (MAC). Finally, a new three dimensional design chart is produced, showing the effect of crack location and depth on the natural frequencies of the rotating beam. This chart will be subsequently important in identifying crack defects in rotating blades.

  19. Fatigue crack propagation analysis of plaque rupture.

    PubMed

    Pei, Xuan; Wu, Baijian; Li, Zhi-Yong

    2013-10-01

    Rupture of atheromatous plaque is the major cause of stroke or heart attack. Considering that the cardiovascular system is a classic fatigue environment, plaque rupture was treated as a chronic fatigue crack growth process in this study. Fracture mechanics theory was introduced to describe the stress status at the crack tip and Paris' law was used to calculate the crack growth rate. The effect of anatomical variation of an idealized plaque cross-section model was investigated. The crack initiation was considered to be either at the maximum circumferential stress location or at any other possible locations around the lumen. Although the crack automatically initialized at the maximum circumferential stress location usually propagated faster than others, it was not necessarily the most critical location where the fatigue life reached its minimum. We found that the fatigue life was minimum for cracks initialized in the following three regions: the midcap zone, the shoulder zone, and the backside zone. The anatomical variation has a significant influence on the fatigue life. Either a decrease in cap thickness or an increase in lipid pool size resulted in a significant decrease in fatigue life. Comparing to the previously used stress analysis, this fatigue model provides some possible explanations of plaque rupture at a low stress level in a pulsatile cardiovascular environment, and the method proposed here may be useful for further investigation of the mechanism of plaque rupture based on in vivo patient data.

  20. Chemistry and electrochemistry of environment-assisted cracking of an aluminum-zinc-magnesium-copper alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Kevin Richard

    2001-11-01

    The mechanism of environment-assisted cracking (EAC) of 7xxx-series alloys is unclear, involving uncertain contributions of hydrogen embrittlement (HE) and anodic dissolution (AD). Fundamental understanding of the EAC mechanism is lacking in part because the role of the crack environment is not well understood. The objective of this research was to characterize and understand the role of the crack chemistry and electrochemistry during aqueous EAC of AA 7050. The crack environment can differ significantly from bulk conditions. Cations, produced by AD, hydrolyze causing local acidification; anions from the bulk electrolyte concentrate within the crack to maintain charge neutrality; ohmic potential drop results from ion migration and diffusion. A positive correlation exists between da/dt and [Al3+]Tip in chromate-chloride electrolyte wherein tip dissolution dominates flank corrosion in establishing the crack chemistry. Tip pH was 2 to 4 and determined by the reaction Al3+ + H 2O = AlOH2+ + H+. The tip potential (ETip) was approximately -0.90 VSCE and independent of EApp . The low ETip and pH promote H+ reduction, generating atomic and molecular H. Hydrogen bubbles restrict ion movement, substantially increasing the effective crack resistance over bulk conditions. Absorbed atomic hydrogen facilitates HE. The spontaneous transition from slow, incubation to high-rate da/dt coincides with the establishment of a critical aggressive tip chemistry and tip depolarization. Development of the critical occluded chemistry necessary for accelerated da/dt is a competitive process between opposing forces: AD, hydrolysis and migration promote an aggressive environment whereas diffusion reduces concentration gradients, thereby retarding the formation of an aggressive chemistry. Quantitative assessment of the contribution of tip dissolution to crack advance is hindered by a lack of knowledge of two key parameters: the tip corrosion front height and the effective crack conductivity

  1. Hierarchical Formation of Intrasplat Cracks in Thermal Spray Ceramic Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Cheng-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2016-06-01

    Intrasplat cracks, an essential feature of thermally sprayed ceramic coatings, play important roles in determining coating properties. However, final intrasplat crack patterns are always considered to be disordered and irregular, resulting from random cracking during splat cooling, since the detailed formation process of intrasplat cracks has scarcely been considered. In the present study, the primary formation mechanism for intrasplat cracking was explored based on both experimental observations and mechanical analysis. The results show that the intrasplat crack pattern in thermally sprayed ceramic splats presents a hierarchical structure with four sides and six neighbors, indicating that intrasplat crack patterns arise from successive domain divisions due to sequential cracking during splat cooling. The driving forces for intrasplat cracking are discussed, and the experimental data quantitatively agree well with theoretical results. This will provide insight for further coating structure designs and tailoring by tuning of intrasplat cracks.

  2. Prevention of fatigue cracks in ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene joint components by the addition of vitamin E.

    PubMed

    Tomita, N; Kitakura, T; Onmori, N; Ikada, Y; Aoyama, E

    1999-01-01

    Flaking-type wear, so-called delamination, is often observed in polyethylene joint components. This is thought to occur partly due to crack formation and propagation at grain boundaries. This study examined the effect of vitamin E on the crack formation and/or propagation in UHMWPE by using 2-dimensional sliding fatigue testing and micro indenter testing. An in vitro sliding fatigue test was performed under two simplified articulating movements, and the cracks produced were observed by scanning acoustic tomography (SAT). Gamma-irradiated ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) specimens demonstrated a smaller area of accumulated cracks as compared to virgin specimens, when the loading movement was reciprocated on a single linear locus. However, four out of five gamma-irradiated UHMWPE specimens exhibited severe flaking-like destruction under the complicated sliding condition, suggesting that gamma irradiation accelerated crack propagation under multidirectional loading. All the gamma-irradiated vitamin-E-containing specimens demonstrated no subsurface crack formation and no flaking-like destruction. Results using micro indenter testing showed that the dynamic hardness at grain boundary was higher than that in grain, and was increased by gamma irradiation. This hardening at grain boundary was reduced by adding vitamin E. It is possible that the presence of vitamin E prevents crack propagation partly due to reduced hardness at grain boundaries. The gamma-irradiated vitamin-E-containing UHMWPE is a promising material to prevent flaking-like destruction of polyethylene joint components.

  3. Development and construction of low-cracking high-performance concrete (LC-HPC) bridge decks: Free shrinkage tests, restrained ring tests, construction experience, and crack survey results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jiqiu

    2011-12-01

    The development, construction, and evaluation of low-cracking high-performance concrete (LC-HPC) bridge decks are described based on laboratory test results and experiences gained during the construction of 13 LC-HPC bridge decks in Kansas, along with another deck bid under the LC-HPC specifications but for which the owner did not enforce the specification. This study is divided into four parts covering (1) an evaluation of the free shrinkage properties of LC-HPC candidate mixtures, (2) an investigation of the relationship between the evaporable water content in the cement paste and the free shrinkage of concrete, (3) a study of the restrained shrinkage performance of concrete using restrained ring tests, and (4) a description of the construction and preliminary evaluation of LC-HPC and control bridge decks constructed in Kansas. The first portion of the study involves evaluating the effects of the duration of curing, fly ash, and a shrinkage reducing admixture (SRA) on the free-shrinkage characteristics of concrete mixtures. The results indicate that an increase of curing period reduces free shrinkage. With 7 days of curing, concretes containing fly ash as a partial replacement for cement exhibit higher free shrinkage than concretes with 100% portland cement. When the curing period is increased to 14, 28, and 56 days, the adverse effect of adding fly ash on free shrinkage is minimized and finally reversed. The addition of an SRA significantly reduces free shrinkage for both the 100% portland cement mixture and the mixture containing fly ash. The second portion of the study investigates the relationship between the evaporable water content in the cement paste and the free shrinkage of concrete. A linear relationship between free shrinkage and evaporable water content in the cement paste is observed. For a given mixture, specimens cured for a longer period contain less evaporable water and exhibit lower free shrinkage and less weight loss in the free shrinkage

  4. Quality of Care Is Improved by Rapid Short Incubation MALDI-ToF Identification from Blood Cultures as Measured by Reduced Length of Stay and Patient Outcomes as Part of a Multi-Disciplinary Approach to Bacteremia in Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Delport, Johannes A; Strikwerda, Arend; Armstrong, Amanda; Schaus, David; John, Michael

    2016-01-01

    patients where the empirical therapy was considered to be optimal were similar with respect to length of stay; 13.04 and 10.93 days (p = 0.34). In the 2012 group there was a significant increase in the length of stay in the group needing change in excess of 30 days (p = 0.02) compared to the group where empirical therapy was considered to be optimal, this clearly showed an improvement in the quality of care received after the rapid identification was instituted in 2014. The 2012 group had a four times overall increased sepsis associated mortality risk compared to the 2014 group and when empirical antibiotics needed to be optimized this risk was 7 times compared to the 2014 group. We conclude that rapid identification of bacterial pathogens in pediatric blood cultures with a rapid incubation MALDI-TOF identification protocol plays an important role in improving quality of care as part of a multidisciplinary approach to pediatric bacteremia and sepsis.

  5. Fatigue crack layer propagation in silicon-iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birol, Y.; Welsch, G.; Chudnovsky, A.

    1986-01-01

    Fatigue crack propagation in metal is almost always accompanied by plastic deformation unless conditions strongly favor brittle fracture. The analysis of the plastic zone is crucial to the understanding of crack propagation behavior as it governs the crack growth kinetics. This research was undertaken to study the fatigue crack propagation in a silicon iron alloy. Kinetic and plasticity aspects of fatigue crack propagation in the alloy were obtained, including the characterization of damage evolution.

  6. Evaluation of the use of a singularity element in finite element analysis of center-cracked plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendelson, A.; Gross, B.; Srawley, J., E.

    1972-01-01

    Two different methods are applied to the analyses of finite width linear elastic plates with central cracks. Both methods give displacements as a primary part of the solution. One method makes use of Fourier transforms. The second method employs a coarse mesh of triangular second-order finite elements in conjunction with a single singularity element subjected to appropriate additional constraints. The displacements obtained by these two methods are in very good agreement. The results suggest considerable potential for the use of a cracked element for related crack problems, particularly in connection with the extension to nonlinear material behavior.

  7. User's manual for FRAC3D: Supplement to report on stress analysis for structures with surface cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, J. C.; Hopper, A. T.; Hayes, P. A.

    1978-01-01

    The FRAC3D computer program, designed for use in analyzing stresses in structures (including plates, bars, or blocks) which may contain part-circular surface cracks or embedded circular cracks is described. Instructions are provided for preparing input, including that for the supporting programs LATTICE and MATSOL as well as for FRAC3D. The course of a substantial illustrative calculation is shown with both input and output. The formulas underlying the calculations are summarized and related to the subroutines in which they are used. Many issues of strategy in using this program for analysing stresses around surface cracks are elucidated.

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of phosphorus(v) pesticides. Part I. Chemical shifts of protons as a means of identification of pesticides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Babad, H.; Herbert, W.; Goldberg, M.C.

    1968-01-01

    Correlations of structural and proton chemical-hift data for 40 commercial phosphorus(V) pesticides are reported. Correlations of structure with the phosphorus coupling constants are discussed, and general trends are noted which aid in the use of NMR as a tool for identification and analysis of phosphorus(V) compounds. ?? 1968.

  9. The non-contact detection and identification of blood stained fingerprints using visible wavelength hyperspectral imaging: Part II effectiveness on a range of substrates.

    PubMed

    Cadd, Samuel; Li, Bo; Beveridge, Peter; O'Hare, William T; Campbell, Andrew; Islam, Meez

    2016-05-01

    Biological samples, such as blood, are regularly encountered at violent crime scenes and successful identification is critical for criminal investigations. Blood is one of the most commonly encountered fingerprint contaminants and current identification methods involve presumptive tests or wet chemical enhancement. These are destructive however; can affect subsequent DNA sampling; and do not confirm the presence of blood, meaning they are susceptible to false positives. A novel application of visible wavelength reflectance hyperspectral imaging (HSI) has been used for the non-contact, non-destructive detection and identification of blood stained fingerprints across a range of coloured substrates of varying porosities. The identification of blood was based on the Soret γ band absorption of haemoglobin between 400 nm and 500 nm. Ridge detail was successfully visualised to the third depletion across light coloured substrates and the stain detected to the tenth depletion on both porous and non-porous substrates. A higher resolution setup for blood stained fingerprints on black tiles, detected ridge detail to the third depletion and the stain to the tenth depletion, demonstrating considerable advancements from previous work. Diluted blood stains at 1500 and 1000 fold dilutions for wet and dry stains respectively were also detected on pig skin as a replica for human skin.

  10. Biogenic Cracks in Porous Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmerle, A.; Hartung, J.; Hallatschek, O.; Goehring, L.; Herminghaus, S.

    2014-12-01

    Microorganisms growing on and inside porous rock may fracture it by various processes. Some of the mechanisms of biofouling and bioweathering are today identified and partially understood but most emphasis is on chemical weathering, while mechanical contributions have been neglected. However, as demonstrated by the perseverance of a seed germinating and cracking up a concrete block, the turgor pressure of living organisms can be very significant. Here, we present results of a systematic study of the effects of the mechanical forces of growing microbial populations on the weathering of porous media. We designed a model porous medium made of glass beads held together by polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), a curable polymer. The rheological properties of the porous medium, whose shape and size are tunable, can be controlled by the ratio of crosslinker to base used in the PDMS (see Fig. 1). Glass and PDMS being inert to most chemicals, we are able to focus on the mechanical processes of biodeterioration, excluding any chemical weathering. Inspired by recent measurements of the high pressure (~0.5 Mpa) exerted by a growing population of yeasts trapped in a microfluidic device, we show that yeast cells can be cultured homogeneously within porous medium until saturation of the porous space. We investigate then the effects of such an inner pressure on the mechanical properties of the sample. Using the same model system, we study also the complex interplay between biofilms and porous media. We focus in particular on the effects of pore size on the penetration of the biofilm within the porous sample, and on the resulting deformations of the matrix, opening new perspectives into the understanding of life in complex geometry. Figure 1. Left : cell culture growing in a model porous medium. The white spheres represent the grains, bonds are displayed in grey, and microbes in green. Right: microscopy picture of glass beads linked by PDMS bridges, scale bar: 100 μm.

  11. Development of nondestructive crack inspection technique for conveyance roll using vibro-thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imanishi, Daisuke; Nishina, Yoshiaki; Yoshinaga, Youichi

    2012-06-01

    In recent study, active thermography has reached a high status as an easy and speedy defects inspection method in a NDT field. This paper newly proposes a non-disassembly and non-contact NDT method using the Vibro-Thermography for detecting and evaluating of fatigue cracks at neck parts of the conveyance roll in the steel making plant. In this method, fatigue cracks are detected as localized high temperature areas caused by friction and impact at crack surfaces with an infrared thermography, applying a high-amplitude ultrasonic vibration. In the case of the roll surface is covered with lubricating grease or dust, the crack detectability is shown. Self reference lock-in data processing technique is applied for improvement of signal noise ratio in the crack detection process. This technique makes it possible to perform correlating process without an external reference signal. Time and cost saving inspection method in the neck part of conveyance roll is carried out using this NDT technique.

  12. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Chung, H. M.; Clark, R. W.; Gruber, E. E.; Shack, W. J.; Soppet, W. K.; Strain, R. V.

    2007-11-06

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors (LWRs) from January to December 2002. Topics that have been investigated include: (a) environmental effects on fatigue crack initiation in carbon and low-alloy steels and austenitic stainless steels (SSs), (b) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic SSs in BWRs, (c) evaluation of causes and mechanisms of irradiation-assisted cracking of austenitic SS in PWRs, and (d) cracking in Ni-alloys and welds. A critical review of the ASME Code fatigue design margins and an assessment of the conservation in the current choice of design margins are presented. The existing fatigue {var_epsilon}-N data have been evaluated to define the effects of key material, loading, and environmental parameters on the fatigue lives of carbon and low-alloy steels and austenitic SSs. Experimental data are presented on the effects of surface roughness on fatigue crack initiation in these materials in air and LWR environments. Crack growth tests were performed in BWR environments on SSs irradiated to 0.9 and 2.0 x 10{sup 21} n x cm{sup -2}. The crack growth rates (CGRs) of the irradiated steels are a factor of {approx}5 higher than the disposition curve proposed in NUREG-0313 for thermally sensitized materials. The CGRs decreased by an order of magnitude in low-dissolved oxygen (DO) environments. Slow-strain-rate tensile (SSRT) tests were conducted in high-purity 289 C water on steels irradiated to {approx}3 dpa. The bulk S content correlated well with the susceptibility to intergranular SCC in 289 C water. The IASCC susceptibility of SSs that contain >0.003 wt. % S increased drastically. bend tests in inert environments at 23 C were conducted on broken pieces of SSRT specimens and on unirradiated specimens of the same materials after hydrogen charging. The results of the tests and a review of other data in the literature

  13. Stochastic modeling of crack initiation and short-crack growth under creep and creep-fatigue conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitamura, Takayuki; Ghosn, Louis J.; Ohtani, Ryuichi

    1989-01-01

    A simplified stochastic model is proposed for crack initiation and short-crack growth under creep and creep-fatigue conditions. Material inhomogeneity provides the random nature of crack initiation and early growth. In the model, the influence of microstructure is introduced by the variability of: (1) damage accumulation along grain boundaries, (2) critical damage required for crack initiation or growth, and (3) the grain-boundary length. The probabilities of crack initiation and growth are derived by using convolution integrals. The model is calibrated and used to predict the crack density and crack-growth rate of short cracks of 304 stainless steel under creep and creep-fatigue conditions. The mean-crack initiation lives are predicted to be within an average deviation of about 10 percent from the experimental results. The predicted cumulative distributions of crack-growth rate follow the experimental data closely. The applicability of the simplified stochastic model is discussed and the future research direction is outlined.

  14. Crack-tip-opening angle measurements and crack tunneling under stable tearing in thin sheet 2024-T3 aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawicke, D. S.; Sutton, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    The stable tearing behavior of thin sheets 2024-T3 aluminum alloy was studied for middle crack tension specimens having initial cracks that were: flat cracks (low fatigue stress) and 45 degrees through-thickness slant cracks (high fatigue stress). The critical crack-tip-opening angle (CTOA) values during stable tearing were measured by two independent methods, optical microscopy and digital image correlation. Results from the two methods agreed well. The CTOA measurements and observations of the fracture surfaces showed that the initial stable tearing behavior of low and high fatigue stress tests is significantly different. The cracks in the low fatigue stress tests underwent a transition from flat-to-slant crack growth, during which the CTOA values were high and significant crack tunneling occurred. After crack growth equal to about the thickness, CTOA reached a constant value of 6 deg and after crack growth equal to about twice the thickness, crack tunneling stabilized. The initial high CTOA values, in the low fatigue crack tests, coincided with large three-dimensional crack front shape changes due to a variation in the through-thickness crack tip constraint. The cracks in the high fatigue stress tests reach the same constant CTOA value after crack growth equal to about the thickness, but produced only a slightly higher CTOA value during initial crack growth. For crack growth on the 45 degree slant, the crack front and local field variables are still highly three-dimensional. However, the constant CTOA values and stable crack front shape may allow the process to be approximated with two-dimensional models.

  15. Treatment of singularities in cracked bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivakumar, K. N.; Raju, I. S.

    1990-01-01

    Three-dimensional finite-element analyses of middle-crack tension (M-T) and bend specimens subjected to mode I loadings were performed to study the stress singularity along the crack front. The specimen was modeled using 20-node isoparametric elements. The displacements and stresses from the analysis were used to estimate the power of singularities using a log-log regression analysis along the crack front. The analyses showed that finite-sized cracked bodies have two singular stress fields of the form rho = C sub o (theta, z) r to the -1/2 power + D sub o (theta, phi) R to the lambda rho power. The first term is the cylindrical singularity with the power -1/2 and is dominant over the middle 96 pct (for Poisson's ratio = 0.3) of the crack front and becomes nearly zero at the free surface. The second singularity is a vertex singularity with the vertex point located at the intersection of the crack front and the free surface. The second term is dominant at the free surface and becomes nearly zero away from the boundary layer. The thickness of the boundary layer depends on Poisson's ratio of the material and is independent of the specimen type. The thickness of the boundary layer varied from 0 pct to about 5 pct of the total specimen thickness as Poisson's ratio varied from 0.0 to 0.45. Because there are two singular stress fields near the free surface, the strain energy release rate (G) is an appropriate parameter to measure the severity of the crack.

  16. TRANSPORT THROUGH CRACKED CONCRETE: LITERATURE REVIEW

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.

    2012-05-11

    Concrete containment structures and cement-based fills and waste forms are used at the Savannah River Site to enhance the performance of shallow land disposal systems designed for containment of low-level radioactive waste. Understanding and measuring transport through cracked concrete is important for describing the initial condition of radioactive waste containment structures at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and for predicting performance of these structures over time. This report transmits the results of a literature review on transport through cracked concrete which was performed by Professor Jason Weiss, Purdue University per SRR0000678 (RFP-RQ00001029-WY). This review complements the NRC-sponsored literature review and assessment of factors relevant to performance of grouted systems for radioactive waste disposal. This review was performed by The Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses, San Antonio, TX, and The University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen Scotland and was focused on tank closure. The objective of the literature review on transport through cracked concrete was to identify information in the open literature which can be applied to SRS transport models for cementitious containment structures, fills, and waste forms. In addition, the literature review was intended to: (1) Provide a framework for describing and classifying cracks in containment structures and cementitious materials used in radioactive waste disposal, (2) Document the state of knowledge and research related to transport through cracks in concrete for various exposure conditions, (3) Provide information or methodology for answering several specific questions related to cracking and transport in concrete, and (4) Provide information that can be used to design experiments on transport through cracked samples and actual structures.

  17. Treatment of singularities in cracked bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivakumar, K. N.; Raju, I. S.

    1989-01-01

    Three-dimensional finite-element analyses of middle-crack tension (M-T) and bend specimens subjected to mode I loadings were performed to study the stress singularity along the crack front. The specimen was modeled using 20-node isoparametric elements. The displacements and stresses from the analysis were used to estimate the power of singularities using a log-log regression analysis along the crack front. The analyses showed that finite-sized cracked bodies have two singular stress fields of the form rho = C sub o (theta, z) r to the -1/2 power + D sub o (theta, phi) R to the lambda rho power. The first term is the cylindrical singularity with the power -1/2 and is dominant over the middle 96 pct (for Poisson's ratio = 0.3) of the crack front and becomes nearly zero at the free surface. The second singularity is a vertex singularity with the vertex point located at the intersection of the crack front and the free surface. The second term is dominant at the free surface and becomes nearly zero away from the the boundary layer. The thickness of the boundary layer depends on Poisson's ratio of the material and is independent of the specimen type. The thickness of the boundary layer varied from 0 pct to about 5 pct of the total specimen thickness as Poisson's ratio varied from 0.0 to 0.45. Because there are two singular stress fields near the free surface, the strain energy release rate (G) is an appropriate parameter to measure the severity of the crack.

  18. Crack propagation modeling using Peridynamic theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafezi, M. H.; Alebrahim, R.; Kundu, T.

    2016-04-01

    Crack propagation and branching are modeled using nonlocal peridynamic theory. One major advantage of this nonlocal theory based analysis tool is the unifying approach towards material behavior modeling - irrespective of whether the crack is formed in the material or not. No separate damage law is needed for crack initiation and propagation. This theory overcomes the weaknesses of existing continuum mechanics based numerical tools (e.g. FEM, XFEM etc.) for identifying fracture modes and does not require any simplifying assumptions. Cracks grow autonomously and not necessarily along a prescribed path. However, in some special situations such as in case of ductile fracture, the damage evolution and failure depend on parameters characterizing the local stress state instead of peridynamic damage modeling technique developed for brittle fracture. For brittle fracture modeling the bond is simply broken when the failure criterion is satisfied. This simulation helps us to design more reliable modeling tool for crack propagation and branching in both brittle and ductile materials. Peridynamic analysis has been found to be very demanding computationally, particularly for real-world structures (e.g. vehicles, aircrafts, etc.). It also requires a very expensive visualization process. The goal of this paper is to bring awareness to researchers the impact of this cutting-edge simulation tool for a better understanding of the cracked material response. A computer code has been developed to implement the peridynamic theory based modeling tool for two-dimensional analysis. A good agreement between our predictions and previously published results is observed. Some interesting new results that have not been reported earlier by others are also obtained and presented in this paper. The final objective of this investigation is to increase the mechanics knowledge of self-similar and self-affine cracks.

  19. The effect of a capillary bridge on the crack opening of a penny crack.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fuqian; Zhao, Ya-Pu

    2016-02-07

    Young's relation is based on the equilibrium of horizontal components of surface tensions for a liquid droplet on a "rigid" substrate without addressing the substrate deformation induced by the net vertical component of surface tensions. Upon realizing the importance of wetting in controlling the integrity of flexible structures and electronics, the effect of a capillary bridge or a liquid droplet on the crack opening of a penny crack under the action of a far-field tensile stress is analyzed. Closed-form solutions are derived for both the crack opening and the stress intensity factor, which are functions of the size of the capillary bridge or the droplet, surface tension, and the contact angle. Both the capillary bridge and the droplet can introduce the crack closure. The minimum far-field tensile stresses needed for complete crack opening, i.e. no crack closure, are obtained analytically. The net vertical component of the surface tensions introduces the formation of a surface ridge on the crack face at the edge of the droplet for an open crack. The amplitude of the surface ridge increases with the increase of the net vertical component of the surface tensions and the decrease of the breadth width.

  20. Recent evaluations of crack-opening-area in circumferentially cracked pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, S.; Brust, F.; Ghadiali, N.; Wilkowski, G.; Miura, N.

    1997-04-01

    Leak-before-break (LBB) analyses for circumferentially cracked pipes are currently being conducted in the nuclear industry to justify elimination of pipe whip restraints and jet shields which are present because of the expected dynamic effects from pipe rupture. The application of the LBB methodology frequently requires calculation of leak rates. The leak rates depend on the crack-opening area of the through-wall crack in the pipe. In addition to LBB analyses which assume a hypothetical flaw size, there is also interest in the integrity of actual leaking cracks corresponding to current leakage detection requirements in NRC Regulatory Guide 1.45, or for assessing temporary repair of Class 2 and 3 pipes that have leaks as are being evaluated in ASME Section XI. The objectives of this study were to review, evaluate, and refine current predictive models for performing crack-opening-area analyses of circumferentially cracked pipes. The results from twenty-five full-scale pipe fracture experiments, conducted in the Degraded Piping Program, the International Piping Integrity Research Group Program, and the Short Cracks in Piping and Piping Welds Program, were used to verify the analytical models. Standard statistical analyses were performed to assess used to verify the analytical models. Standard statistical analyses were performed to assess quantitatively the accuracy of the predictive models. The evaluation also involved finite element analyses for determining the crack-opening profile often needed to perform leak-rate calculations.