Science.gov

Sample records for cracking units tcc

  1. New unit to thermal crack resid

    SciTech Connect

    Washimi, K. ); Limmer, H. )

    1989-09-01

    Thermal cracking conversion increases with temperature and residence time. Soakers added downstream of the cracking furnaces increase residence time in order to improve conversion at lower furnace outlet temperature, thereby increasing run length between shutdowns for decoking. This paper discusses advanced soaker technology incorporated in High-Conversion Soaker Cracking (HSC), developed by Toyo Engineering Corporation (TEC) and Mitsui Kozan Chemicals Ltd. The technology was demonstrated on a commercial scale. The process features are described.

  2. 40 CFR 63.1564 - What are my requirements for metal HAP emissions from catalytic cracking units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... emissions from catalytic cracking units? 63.1564 Section 63.1564 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Catalytic Cracking... requirements for metal HAP emissions from catalytic cracking units? (a) What emission limitations and...

  3. 40 CFR 63.1565 - What are my requirements for organic HAP emissions from catalytic cracking units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... HAP emissions from catalytic cracking units? 63.1565 Section 63.1565 Protection of Environment... Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, Sulfur Recovery Units, and Bypass Lines § 63.1565...

  4. 40 CFR 63.1565 - What are my requirements for organic HAP emissions from catalytic cracking units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, Sulfur Recovery Units, and Bypass Lines § 63... in Table 8 of this subpart that applies to you. If your catalytic cracking unit is subject to...

  5. 40 CFR 63.1565 - What are my requirements for organic HAP emissions from catalytic cracking units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, Sulfur Recovery Units, and Bypass Lines § 63... in Table 8 of this subpart that applies to you. If your catalytic cracking unit is subject to...

  6. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units 2 Table 2 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63... Catalytic Cracking Units As stated in § 63.1564(a)(2), you shall meet each operating limit in the...

  7. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units 2 Table 2 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63... Catalytic Cracking Units As stated in § 63.1564(a)(2), you shall meet each operating limit in the...

  8. 40 CFR Table 12 to Subpart Uuu of... - Initial Compliance With Organic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units 12 Table 12 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of... Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery... HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units As stated in § 63.1565(b)(4), you shall meet...

  9. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continous Monitoring Systems for Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units 3 Table 3 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of... Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery... Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units As stated in § 63.1564(b)(1), you shall meet...

  10. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continous Monitoring Systems for Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units 3 Table 3 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of... Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery... Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units As stated in § 63.1564(b)(1), you shall meet...

  11. 40 CFR Table 12 to Subpart Uuu of... - Initial Compliance With Organic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units 12 Table 12 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of... Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery... HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units As stated in § 63.1565(b)(4), you shall meet...

  12. 40 CFR Table 13 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Organic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units 13 Table 13 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of... Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery... HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units As stated in § 63.1565(c)(1), you shall meet...

  13. 40 CFR Table 13 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Organic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units 13 Table 13 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of... Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery... HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units As stated in § 63.1565(c)(1), you shall meet...

  14. 40 CFR Table 10 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Monitoring Systems for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units 10 Table 10 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of... Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery... Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units As stated in § 63.1565(b)(1), you shall meet...

  15. NSTS Orbiter auxiliary power unit turbine wheel cracking risk assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruse, T. A.; Mcclung, R. C.; Torng, T. Y.

    1992-01-01

    The present investigation of turbine-wheel cracking problems in the hydrazine-fueled APU turbine wheel of the Space Shuttle Orbiter's Main Engines has indicated the efficacy of systematic probabilistic risk assessment in flight certification and safety resolution. Nevertheless, real crack-initiation and propagation problems do not lend themselves to purely analytical studies. The high-cycle fatigue problem is noted to generally be unsuited to probabilistic modeling, due to its extremely high degree of intrinsic scatter. In the case treated, the cracks appear to trend toward crack arrest in a low cycle fatigue mode, due to a detuning of the resonance model.

  16. Crack

    MedlinePlus

    ... sound the drug makes as it heats up. Short-Term Effects Crack is a stimulant that is absorbed through ... quickly, after about 5 or 10 minutes. Other short-term effects include: higher heart rate, breathing rate, blood pressure , ...

  17. 40 CFR Table 11 to Subpart Uuu of... - Requirements for Performance Tests for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units Not...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units Not Subject to New Source Performance Standard (NSPS... Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU... From Catalytic Cracking Units Not Subject to New Source Performance Standard (NSPS) for Carbon...

  18. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Limits for Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units 7 Table 7 to Subpart UUU of Part 63... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and... With Operating Limits for Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units As stated in §...

  19. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Limits for Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units 7 Table 7 to Subpart UUU of Part 63... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and... With Operating Limits for Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units As stated in §...

  20. 40 CFR Table 14 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units 14 Table 14 to Subpart UUU of Part 63... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and... Compliance With Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units As stated in §...

  1. Crocodile head scales are not developmental units but emerge from physical cracking.

    PubMed

    Milinkovitch, Michel C; Manukyan, Liana; Debry, Adrien; Di-Poï, Nicolas; Martin, Samuel; Singh, Daljit; Lambert, Dominique; Zwicker, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Various lineages of amniotes display keratinized skin appendages (feathers, hairs, and scales) that differentiate in the embryo from genetically controlled developmental units whose spatial organization is patterned by reaction-diffusion mechanisms (RDMs). We show that, contrary to skin appendages in other amniotes (as well as body scales in crocodiles), face and jaws scales of crocodiles are random polygonal domains of highly keratinized skin, rather than genetically controlled elements, and emerge from a physical self-organizing stochastic process distinct from RDMs: cracking of the developing skin in a stress field. We suggest that the rapid growth of the crocodile embryonic facial and jaw skeleton, combined with the development of a very keratinized skin, generates the mechanical stress that causes cracking.

  2. Production of Tetraquark State Tcc at B-Factories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyima, Rashidin

    2013-12-01

    We study production of the tetraquark state Tcc via virtual photon at the B-factories in the QCD factorization framework. We predict the cross section of tetraquark state production in the leading order at the B-factories.

  3. Economics for iso-olefin production using the fluid catalytic cracking unit

    SciTech Connect

    McClung, R.G.; Witoshkin, A.; Bogert, D.C.; Winkler, W.S.

    1993-12-31

    The Clean Air Act of 1990 requires use of oxygenates in some gasolines to improve both CO and hydrocarbon auto tailpipe emissions. Various oxygenates are currently being used by the refining industry. For the fully integrated refinery having a fluid catalytic cracking unit, the most commonly used oxygenates are methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) and tertiary amyl ether (TAME). The FCC unit produces the isobutylene and iso-amylases need for manufacture of both MTBE and TAME. The economics for an assumed refinery processing scheme for several FCC cases are examined giving estimates of income and investments for each case. Up to one-third of the total gasoline pool can be made in reformulated gasoline using TAME and MTBE with the FCC unit as the sole source of feedstock. This processing route is much more economical than the alternative scheme using butane isomerization/iosbutane dehydrogenation.

  4. Embrittlement and intergranular stress corrosion cracking of stainless steels after elevated temperature exposure in refinery process units

    SciTech Connect

    Cantwell, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reports on a survey by the Subcommittee on Corrosion and Materials Engineering of the Committee on Refinery Equipment. The purpose of the survey was to determine and record the extent of industry problems with loss of ductility or embrittlement of chromium and chromium nickel stainless steels and the intergranular cracking problem with chromium nickel stainless steels in fluid catalytic cracking units. Over 100 incidents are reported.

  5. 40 CFR Table 12 to Subpart Uuu of... - Initial Compliance With Organic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 12 Table 12 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Initial Compliance... Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units 12 Table 12 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of... meet each requirement in the following table that applies to you. For each new and existing...

  6. 40 CFR Table 12 to Subpart Uuu of... - Initial Compliance With Organic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 12 Table 12 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Initial Compliance... Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units 12 Table 12 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of... meet each requirement in the following table that applies to you. For each new and existing...

  7. Analysis of cracked core spray injection line piping from the Quad Cities Units 1 and 2 boiling water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Diercks, D.R.

    1983-12-01

    Elbow assemblies and adjacent piping from the loops A and B core spray injection lines of Quad Cities Units 1 and 2 Boiling Water Reactors have been examined in order to determine the nature and causes of coolant leakages and flaw indications detected during hydrostatic tests and subsequent ultrasonic inspections. The elbow assemblies were found to contain multiple intergranular cracks in the weld heat-affected zones. The cracking was predominantly axial in orientation in the forged elbow and wedge components, whereas mixed axial and circumferential cracking was seen in the wrought piping pieces. In at least two instances, axial cracks completely penetrated the circumferential weld joining adjacent components. Based upon the observations made in the present study, the failures were attributed to intergranular stress corrosion cracking caused by the weld-induced sensitized microstructure and residual stresses present; dissolved oxygen in the reactor coolant apparently served as the corrosive species. The predominantly axial orientation of the cracks present in the forged components is believed to be related to the banded microstructure present in these components. The metallographic studies reported are supplemented by x-radiography, chemical analysis and mechanical test results, determinations of the degree of sensitization present, and measurements of weld metal delta ferrite content.

  8. Analysis of a turbine rotor containing a transverse crack at Oak Creek Unit 17

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, G. W.; Rau, C. A., Jr.; Kottke, J. J.; Menning, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    Transient increases in one, two and three per revolution vibration characteristics of a low pressure steam turbine were observed during steam temperature reduction operations. Vibration and fracture mechanics analyses suggested the presence of a transverse shaft crack which was eventually identified by ultrasonic inspection and confirmed by destructive sectioning. Signature analyses of vibration data recorded over a two-year period prior to crack identification are correlated with fatigue crack growth, which occurred intermittently during transient temperature decreases. The apparent increased response of the rotor to vibration is due to asymmetric stiffness changes introduced by the growing transverse crack. The vibration response is predicted to increase with increasing crack depths in excess of 10% of the shaft diameter. Fracture mechanics analyses predict that fatigue crack growth occurred during periods of steam temperature decrease, when high surface tensile stresses are present. These same transient thermal stresses are shown to have retarded and prevented subsequent fatigue crack growth during steady operation.

  9. Powder Cocaine and Crack Use in the United States: An Examination of Risk for Arrest and Socioeconomic Disparities in Use

    PubMed Central

    Palamar, Joseph J.; Davies, Shelby; Ompad, Danielle C.; Cleland, Charles M.; Weitzman, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background In light of the current sentencing disparity (18:1) between crack and powder cocaine possession in the United States, we examined socioeconomic correlates of use of each, and relations between use and arrest, to determine who may be at highest risk for arrest and imprisonment. Methods We conducted secondary data analyses on the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2009–2012. Data were analyzed for adults age ≥18 to determine associations between use and arrest. Socioeconomic correlates of lifetime and annual use of powder cocaine and of crack were delineated using multivariable logistic regression and correlates of frequency of recent use were examined using generalized negative binomial regression. Results Crack users were at higher risk than powder cocaine users for reporting a lifetime arrest or multiple recent arrests. Racial minorities were at low risk for powder cocaine use and Hispanics were at low risk for crack use. Blacks were at increased risk for lifetime and recent crack use, but not when controlling for other socioeconomic variables. However, blacks who did use either powder cocaine or crack tended to use at higher frequencies. Higher education and higher family income were negatively associated with crack use although these factors were sometimes risk factors for powder cocaine use. Conclusions Crack users are at higher risk of arrest and tend to be of lower socioeconomic status compared to powder cocaine users. These findings can inform US Congress as they review the proposed Smarter Sentencing Act of 2014, which would help eliminate cocaine-related sentencing disparities. PMID:25702933

  10. 40 CFR Table 13 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Organic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... monoxide (CO) in 40 CFR 60.103 CO emissions from your catalyst regenerator vent or CO boiler serving the... CO concentration at or below 500 ppmv (dry basis). 2. Not subject to the NSPS for CO in 40 CFR 60.103... catalytic cracking unit . . . Subject to this emission limit for your catalyst regenerator vent . . . If...

  11. 40 CFR Table 13 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Organic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... monoxide (CO) in 40 CFR 60.103 CO emissions from your catalyst regenerator vent or CO boiler serving the... CO concentration at or below 500 ppmv (dry basis). 2. Not subject to the NSPS for CO in 40 CFR 60.103... catalytic cracking unit . . . Subject to this emission limit for your catalyst regenerator vent . . . If...

  12. 40 CFR Table 12 to Subpart Uuu of... - Initial Compliance With Organic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... . . . 1. Subject to the NSPS for carbon monoxide (CO) in 40 CFR 60.103 CO emissions from your catalyst... demonstrate initial compliance. 2. Not subject to the NSPS for CO in 40 CFR 60.103 a. CO emissions from your catalyst regenerator vent or CO boiler serving the catalytic cracking unit must not exceed 500 ppmv...

  13. 40 CFR 63.1564 - What are my requirements for metal HAP emissions from catalytic cracking units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true What are my requirements for metal HAP emissions from catalytic cracking units? 63.1564 Section 63.1564 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... 4 of this subpart. (3) Establish each site-specific operating limit in Table 2 of this subpart...

  14. Types of HLA in the bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC).

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, Erkan; Uğur Özalp, Ali; Cekmen, Arman; Eren, Bülent; Onal, Bülent; Akkuş, Emre; Erdoğan, Ergun

    2013-02-01

    HLA plays a complementary role in the interaction between tumor and body immunology. The aim of this study was to determine the existence of the association between the HLA system and transitional cell carcinoma (TCC). Using standard micro-lymphocytotoxic method of Terasaki, HLA-A, B, DR and DQ antigen types of 30 patients with TCC of the bladder were compared with the control group (30 healthy people). In the TCC patient group, HLA -DQ6(1) and HLA -DQ7(3) antigens were detected with a significantly higher frequency than in the control group (p=0.018 and p=0.038, respectively), whereas HLA-A10, B4, DR53 and DQ1 antigens were detected with significantly higher frequency in the control group (p less 0.05 in all). It suggests that patients who had the antigens detected were at higher risk of TCC, and the ones who had the antigens displaying protective features as were detected in the control group, were at lesser risk.

  15. 40 CFR Table 14 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units 14 Table 14 to Subpart UUU of Part 63... Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 14 Table 14 to Subpart UUU of Part 63... in § 63.1565(c)(1), you shall meet each requirement in the following table that applies to you....

  16. Total ureterectomy and ileal ureteric replacement for TCC ureter in a solitary kidney.

    PubMed

    Banerji, John S; George, Arun J P

    2014-11-01

    Traditional treatment of upper tract transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is nephroureterectomy with a bladder cuff. This is in keeping with the nature of the disease, in that TCC is a panurothelial disease. However, there are a few rare occasions when this would mean making a subject anephric, as in a TCC in a solitary kidney or bilateral synchronous/metachronous disease. We present a case of a patient with a dysplastic, poorly functioning left kidney and with a TCC of the ureter on the right side.

  17. Total ureterectomy and ileal ureteric replacement for TCC ureter in a solitary kidney

    PubMed Central

    Banerji, John S.; George, Arun J.P.

    2014-01-01

    Traditional treatment of upper tract transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is nephroureterectomy with a bladder cuff. This is in keeping with the nature of the disease, in that TCC is a panurothelial disease. However, there are a few rare occasions when this would mean making a subject anephric, as in a TCC in a solitary kidney or bilateral synchronous/metachronous disease. We present a case of a patient with a dysplastic, poorly functioning left kidney and with a TCC of the ureter on the right side. PMID:25553174

  18. Percolation Cooling of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Lower Head by Way of Thermal Cracking and Gap Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Thomsen, K.L.

    2002-01-15

    Two partial models have been developed to elucidate the Three Mile Island Unit 2 lower head coolability by water percolation from above into the thermally cracking debris bed and into a gap between the debris and the wall. The bulk permeability of the cracked top crust is estimated based on simple fracture mechanics and application of Poiseuille's law to the fractures. The gap is considered as an abstraction representing an initially rugged interface, which probably expanded by thermal deformation and cracking in connection with the water ingress. The coupled flow and heat conduction problem for the top crust is solved in slab geometry based on the two-phase Darcy equations together with quasi-steady mass and energy conservation equations. The resulting water penetration depth is in good agreement with the depth of the so-called loose debris bed. The lower-head and bottom-crust problem is treated analogously by a two-dimensional axisymmetric model. The notion of a gap is maintained as a useful concept in the flow analysis. Simulations show that a central hot spot with a peak wall temperature of 1075 to 1100 deg. C can be obtained, but the quenching rates are not satisfactory. It is concluded that a three-dimensional model with an additional mechanism to explain the sudden water ingress to the hot spot center would be more appropriate.

  19. Charmed tetraquarks Tcc and Tcs from dynamical lattice QCD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Yoichi; Charron, Bruno; Aoki, Sinya; Doi, Takumi; Hatsuda, Tetsuo; Inoue, Takashi; Ishii, Noriyoshi; Murano, Keiko; Nemura, Hidekatsu; Sasaki, Kenji

    2014-02-01

    Charmed tetraquarks Tcc=(ccubardbar) and Tcs=(csubardbar) are studied through the S-wave meson-meson interactions, D-D, Kbar-D, D-D* and Kbar-D*, on the basis of the (2+1)-flavor lattice QCD simulations with the pion mass mπ≃410, 570 and 700 MeV. For the charm quark, the relativistic heavy quark action is employed to treat its dynamics on the lattice. Using the HAL QCD method, we extract the S-wave potentials in lattice QCD simulations, from which the meson-meson scattering phase shifts are calculated. The phase shifts in the isospin triplet (I=1) channels indicate repulsive interactions, while those in the I=0 channels suggest attraction, growing as mπ decreases. This is particularly prominent in the Tcc (JP=1+,I=0) channel, though neither bound state nor resonance are found in the range mπ=410-700 MeV. We make a qualitative comparison of our results with the phenomenological diquark picture.

  20. 40 CFR Table 14 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Operating Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Limits for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units 14 Table 14 to Subpart UUU of Part 63... Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 14 Table 14 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Continuous....1565(c)(1), you shall meet each requirement in the following table that applies to you. For each...

  1. Toxicity and bioaccumulation of biosolids-borne triclocarban (TCC) in terrestrial organisms.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Elizabeth Hodges; O'Connor, George A; McAvoy, Drew C

    2011-01-01

    Triclocarban (TCC) toxicity and bioaccumulation data are primarily limited to direct human and animal dermal exposures, animal ingestion exposures to neat and feed-spiked TCC, and/or aquatic organism exposures. Three non-human, terrestrial organism groups anticipated to be the most highly exposed to land-applied, biosolids-borne TCC are soil microbes, earthworms, and plants. The three ecological receptors are expected to be at particular risk due to unique modes of exposure (e.g. constant, direct contact with soil; uptake of amended soil and pore water), inherently greater sensitivity to environmental contaminants (e.g. increased body burdens, permeable membranes), and susceptibility to minute changes in the soil environment. The toxicities of biosolids-borne TCC to Eisenia fetida earthworms and soil microbial communities were characterized using adaptations of the USEPA Office of Prevention, Pesticides, and Toxic Substances (OPPTS) Guidelines 850.6200 (Earthworm Subchronic Toxicity Test) and 850.5100 (Soil Microbial Community Toxicity Test), respectively. The resultant calculated TCC LC50 value for E. fetida was 40 mg TCC kg amended fine sand(-1). Biosolids-borne TCC in an amended fine sand had no significant effect on soil microbial community respiration, ammonification, or nitrification. Bioaccumulation of biosolids-borne TCC by E. fetida and Paspulum notatum was measured to characterize potential biosolids-borne TCC movement through the food chain. Dry-weight TCC bioaccumulation factor (BAF) values in E. fetida and P. notatum ranged from 5.2-18 and 0.00041-0.007 (gsoil gtissue(-1)), respectively. PMID:21035164

  2. Toxicity and bioaccumulation of biosolids-borne triclocarban (TCC) in terrestrial organisms.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Elizabeth Hodges; O'Connor, George A; McAvoy, Drew C

    2011-01-01

    Triclocarban (TCC) toxicity and bioaccumulation data are primarily limited to direct human and animal dermal exposures, animal ingestion exposures to neat and feed-spiked TCC, and/or aquatic organism exposures. Three non-human, terrestrial organism groups anticipated to be the most highly exposed to land-applied, biosolids-borne TCC are soil microbes, earthworms, and plants. The three ecological receptors are expected to be at particular risk due to unique modes of exposure (e.g. constant, direct contact with soil; uptake of amended soil and pore water), inherently greater sensitivity to environmental contaminants (e.g. increased body burdens, permeable membranes), and susceptibility to minute changes in the soil environment. The toxicities of biosolids-borne TCC to Eisenia fetida earthworms and soil microbial communities were characterized using adaptations of the USEPA Office of Prevention, Pesticides, and Toxic Substances (OPPTS) Guidelines 850.6200 (Earthworm Subchronic Toxicity Test) and 850.5100 (Soil Microbial Community Toxicity Test), respectively. The resultant calculated TCC LC50 value for E. fetida was 40 mg TCC kg amended fine sand(-1). Biosolids-borne TCC in an amended fine sand had no significant effect on soil microbial community respiration, ammonification, or nitrification. Bioaccumulation of biosolids-borne TCC by E. fetida and Paspulum notatum was measured to characterize potential biosolids-borne TCC movement through the food chain. Dry-weight TCC bioaccumulation factor (BAF) values in E. fetida and P. notatum ranged from 5.2-18 and 0.00041-0.007 (gsoil gtissue(-1)), respectively.

  3. [Terminal complement complex (TCC) levels in urine in patients with renal diseases].

    PubMed

    Yasuda, K

    2001-03-01

    The terminal complement complex (TCC) has been reported to play an important role in the pathogenesis of proteinuria not only in experimental nephritis but also in human glomerulonephritis. In order to clarify the clinical significance of TCC, the author investigated a total of 129 pediatric patients with the following glomerular diseases: idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (INS; 40 cases), IgA nephropathy (IgAN; 48 cases), mesangio-capillary glomerulonephritis (MPGN; 16 cases), lupus nephritis (LN; 16 cases), purpura nephritis (5 cases) and membranous nephritis (4 cases). Results were analyzed in relation to the responsiveness to steroid treatment in INS and the degree of proteinuria and histopathologic severity in glonerulonephritis groups. In 40 patients who underwent renal biopsy, the localizations of vitronectin and clusterin, both of which are regulatory proteins for TCC, were examined by immunofluorescence microscopy in conjunction with that of TCC for the study of the mechanism of local defense in glomerulonephritis. The urinary TCC levels were elevated in 9 (90%) of 10 patients with steroid-resistant INS, while they were elevated only in 2 of 30 steroid-responsive patients. In glomerulonephritis groups, urinary TCC levels were elevated in 13 of 48 patients with IgAN, 6 of 16 with MPGN, 8 of 16 with LN, 2 of 5 purpural nephritis and 1 of 4 with membranous nephritis. Urinary TCC levels correlated with histological severity in IgAN and showed a reciprocal relation to C3 levels in MPGN and LN. Immunofluorescence findings showed that localization of TCC was quite similar to that of C3 in glomerulonephritis groups. Vitronectin and clusterin were also demonstrated to deposit in similar pattern to TCC. These results suggest that in INS urinary TCC levels could predict the responsiveness to steroid therapy and might be useful as a non-invasive diagnostic method in differential diagnosis of INS. In IgAN, urinary TCC could be a useful marker of histologic severity. The

  4. Investigation of intergranular stress corrosion cracking in the fuel pool at Three Mile Island Unit 1

    SciTech Connect

    Czajkowski, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    An intergranular stress corrosion cracking failure of 304 stainless steel pipe in 2000 ppM B as H/sub 3/BO/sub 3/ + H/sub 2/O at 100/sup 0/C has been investigated. Constant extension rate testing has produced an intergranular type failure in material in air. Chemical analysis was performed on both the base metal and weld material, in addition to fractography, EPR testing and optical microscopy in discerning the mode of failure. Various effects of Cl/sup -/, O/sub 2/, and MnS are discussed. The results have indicated that the cause of failure was the severe sensitization coupled with probable contamination by S and possibly by Cl ions.

  5. Should anyone be riding to glory on the now-descending limb of the crack-cocaine epidemic curve in the United States?1

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Maria A.; Anthony, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Many pre-clinical and clinical researchers do not appreciate the recent decline in United States (US) population-level incidence of crack-cocaine smoking. At present, no more than about 200 young people start using crack-cocaine each day. Ten years ago, the corresponding estimated daily rate was 1,000. This short communication looks into these trends, surrounding evidence on this important public health topic, and checks whether duration-reducing treatment interventions might be responsible, versus selected alternatives. Methods Via analyses of standardized computer-assisted self-interview data from the US National Surveys on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH, 2002–2011; n>500,000), we evaluated change in incidence estimates, perceived difficulty to acquire crack, risk of using cocaine, treatment entries, and persistence once crack use has started. Results We draw attention to a marked overall decline in year-specific incidence rates for crack-cocaine smoking from 2002–2011, especially 2007–2011. There is some variation in estimates of difficulty to acquire crack (p<0.001) and observed risk of using cocaine among ‘at risk’ susceptibles (p<0.001), but no appreciable shifts in duration of crack smoking among active users (p>0.05) nor in proportion of crack users receiving treatment (p>0.05). Conclusions Changing epidemiology of crack-cocaine smoking may rest largely on reductions in newly incident use with no major direct effects due to US cocaine treatment, incarceration, or interdiction. Concurrently, we see quite modest declines in survey-based estimates of cocaine-attributed perceived risk and cocaine availability. As such, we posit that no specific US agency should claim it is ‘riding to glory’ on the descending limb of this epidemic curve. PMID:24629632

  6. Measured physicochemical characteristics and biosolids-borne concentrations of the antimicrobial Triclocarban (TCC).

    PubMed

    Snyder, Elizabeth Hodges; O'Connor, George A; McAvoy, Drew C

    2010-06-01

    Triclocarban (TCC) is an active ingredient in antibacterial bar soaps, a common constituent of domestic wastewater, and the subject of recent criticism by consumer advocate groups and academic researchers alike. Activated sludge treatment readily removes TCC from the liquid waste stream and concentrates the antimicrobial in the solid fraction, which is often processed to produce biosolids intended for land application. Greater than half of the biosolids generated in the US are land-applied, resulting in a systematic release of biosolids-borne TCC into the terrestrial and, potentially, the aquatic environment. Multiple data gaps in the TCC literature (including basic physicochemical properties and biosolids concentrations) prevent an accurate, quantitative risk assessment of biosolids-borne TCC. We utilized the USEPA Office of Prevention, Pesticides, and Toxic Substances (OPPTS) harmonized test guidelines to measure TCC solubility and log K(ow) values as 0.045 mg L(-1) and 3.5, respectively. The measured physicochemical 2 properties differed from computer model predictions. The mean concentration of TCC in 23 biosolids representative of multiple sludge processing methods was 19+/-11 mg kg(-1).

  7. Measured physicochemical characteristics and biosolids-borne concentrations of the antimicrobial Triclocarban (TCC).

    PubMed

    Snyder, Elizabeth Hodges; O'Connor, George A; McAvoy, Drew C

    2010-06-01

    Triclocarban (TCC) is an active ingredient in antibacterial bar soaps, a common constituent of domestic wastewater, and the subject of recent criticism by consumer advocate groups and academic researchers alike. Activated sludge treatment readily removes TCC from the liquid waste stream and concentrates the antimicrobial in the solid fraction, which is often processed to produce biosolids intended for land application. Greater than half of the biosolids generated in the US are land-applied, resulting in a systematic release of biosolids-borne TCC into the terrestrial and, potentially, the aquatic environment. Multiple data gaps in the TCC literature (including basic physicochemical properties and biosolids concentrations) prevent an accurate, quantitative risk assessment of biosolids-borne TCC. We utilized the USEPA Office of Prevention, Pesticides, and Toxic Substances (OPPTS) harmonized test guidelines to measure TCC solubility and log K(ow) values as 0.045 mg L(-1) and 3.5, respectively. The measured physicochemical 2 properties differed from computer model predictions. The mean concentration of TCC in 23 biosolids representative of multiple sludge processing methods was 19+/-11 mg kg(-1). PMID:20385403

  8. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Uuu of... - Metal HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... waste heat boiler in which you burn auxiliary or in supplemental liquid or solid fossil fuel, the... British thermal units (lb/million Btu) of heat input attributable to the liquid or solid fossil fuel; and... auxiliary or supplemental liquid or solid fossil fuel, the incremental rate of PM must not exceed 43.0...

  9. Advanced control improves MHC-VGO unit operation. [Mild HydroCracking-Vacuum Gas Oil

    SciTech Connect

    Richard, L.; Watson, D. ); Danzinger, F.; Tuppinger, D.; Schuster, R.; Wilmsen, W. )

    1995-03-01

    Constraint and multivariable predictive (MPC) controllers were implemented on an FCC preheater (MHC-VGO unit), which runs in mild hydrocracking (MHC) mode. In only a few weeks following commissioning, better control provided an average reduction in steam use of 38%, an average reduction of 22% in DEA use and a 5 to 10% reduction in fuel consumption. OMV's refinery in Schwechat was commissioned in 1960 and is now one of the largest and most complex inland-refineries in Europe with an annual crude oil processing capacity of 10 million metric tons. Every product stream is desulfurized by hydrodesulfurization (HDS) units. As part of a refinery-wide advanced control (ADVC) project which includes 27 units implemented on four process computers and two DCSs, advanced controls were installed on the MHC-VGO unit. The entire project was executed over a period of two and a half years. The paper describes the process, advanced control, the weighted average bed temperature controller, feed maximization control, stripper feed temperature control, stripping steam/feed ratio controller, stripper pressure minimization, H[sub 2]/oil controller, recycle/DEA ratio controller, stripper bottoms level controller, and advanced control benefits.

  10. Structural, electronic, superconducting and mechanical properties of ReC and TcC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavitha, M.; Priyanga, G. Sudha; Rajeswarapalanichamy, R.; Santhosh, M.

    2015-06-01

    The structural, electronic, superconducting and mechanical properties of ReC and TcC are investigated using density functional theory calculations. The lattice constants, bulk modulus, and the density of states are obtained. The calculated lattice parameters are in good agreement with the available results. The density of states reveals that ReC and TcC exhibit metallic behavior at ambient condition. A pressure-induced structural phase transition is observed in both materials.

  11. Structural, electronic, superconducting and mechanical properties of ReC and TcC

    SciTech Connect

    Kavitha, M.; Priyanga, G. Sudha; Rajeswarapalanichamy, R. Santhosh, M.

    2015-06-24

    The structural, electronic, superconducting and mechanical properties of ReC and TcC are investigated using density functional theory calculations. The lattice constants, bulk modulus, and the density of states are obtained. The calculated lattice parameters are in good agreement with the available results. The density of states reveals that ReC and TcC exhibit metallic behavior at ambient condition. A pressure-induced structural phase transition is observed in both materials.

  12. Ureteric angioplasty balloon placement to increase localised dosage of BCG for renal pelvis TCC.

    PubMed

    Forde, J C; O'Connor, K M; Fanning, D M; Guiney, M J; Grainger, R

    2012-03-01

    Endoscopic percutaneous resection of a renal pelvis transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is a viable treatment option in those who would be rendered dialysis dependent following a nephroureterectomy. We report endoscopic percutaneous resection of an upper tract TCC recurrence in a single functioning kidney followed by antegrade renal pelvis BCG instillation with novel placement of inflated angioplasty balloon in the ureter to help localise its effect.

  13. Robust regulation of temperature in reactor-regenerator fluid catalytic cracking units

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez-Ramirez, J.; Aguilar, R.; Lopez-Isunza, F.

    1996-05-01

    FCC processes involve complex interactive dynamics which are difficult to operate and control as well as poorly known reaction kinetics. This work concerns the synthesis of temperature controllers for FCC units. The problem is addressed first for the case where perfect knowledge of the reaction kinetics is assumed, leading to an input-output linearizing state feedback. However, in most industrial FCC units, perfect knowledge of reaction kinetics and composition measurements is not available. To address the problem of robustness against uncertainties in the reaction kinetics, an adaptive model-based nonlinear controller with simplified reaction models is presented. The adaptive strategy makes use of estimates of uncertainties derived from calorimetric (energy) balances. The resulting controller is similar in form to standard input-output linearizing controllers and can be tuned analogously. Alternatively, the controller can be tuned using a single gain parameter and is computationally efficient. The performance of the closed-loop system and the controller design procedure are shown with simulations.

  14. Role of XIAP in the malignant phenotype of transitional cell cancer (TCC) and therapeutic activity of XIAP antisense oligonucleotides against multidrug-resistant TCC in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bilim, Vladimir; Kasahara, Takashi; Hara, Noboru; Takahashi, Kota; Tomita, Yoshihiko

    2003-01-01

    XIAP directly inhibits executor caspases, making it the most downstream antiapoptotic molecule. Here, we examined the expression and function of XIAP in normal urothelium and TCC. We also examined the therapeutic effect of xiap AS PODN on the cell cycle and apoptosis of multidrug-resistant T24 bladder cancer cells. XIAP was moderately expressed in normal transitional epithelium with prominent expression on the superficial layer cells. Seventy-nine of 108 (73.15%) tumor samples were positive for XIAP protein, but XIAP positivity was not correlated with tumor stage or grade. Moreover, 4 bladder cancer cell lines (SCaBER, HT1376, T24 and RT4) expressed similar levels of XIAP. xiap AS PODN dose-dependently reduced the XIAP protein level and induced apoptosis, leading to decreased cell viability by 87%. Combined administration with doxorubicin resulted in marked cytotoxicity due to escalation of apoptosis. Overexpression of XIAP in T24 cells resulted in a modest but statistically significant (p < 0.01) survival advantage compared to parental cells. Thus, XIAP expression may be critical for maintaining the viability and drug resistance of TCC, and endogenous XIAP levels are sufficient to protect cells from apoptosis. Our results suggest that XIAP may play an important role early in human TCC carcinogenesis. xiap AS may be a candidate for use as a cancer therapy for overcoming drug resistance in highly malignant TCC.

  15. Fluid catalytic cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Bartley, B.H.; Petty, R.H.

    1982-08-17

    Gaseous sulfur compounds are removed from a sulfur-containing gas mixture by reacting sulfur oxides in the gas mixture with alumina in association with bismuth. The process is particularly useful in fluid catalytic cracking of sulfur-containing petroleum charge stocks wherein sulfur is contained in coke deposited on the fluidized cracking catalyst. By the process of this invention, sulfur oxides may be removed from regenerator off-gases from a fluidized catalytic cracking unit by incorporating particulate alumina impregnated with bismuth in particulate cracking catalyst whereby sulfur oxides generated in the regeneration of the catalyst are reacted with bismuth-impregnated alumina. Sulfur oxides produced during regeneration of the catalyst by burning the coke with air are captured and converted to hydrogen sulfide in the cracking reactor. The hydrogen sulfide so produced is readily separated from petroleum products of the catalytic cracking reaction process.

  16. Debye temperature, thermal expansion, and heat capacity of TcC up to 100 GPa

    SciTech Connect

    Song, T.; Ma, Q.; Tian, J.H.; Liu, X.B.; Ouyang, Y.H.; Zhang, C.L.; Su, W.F.

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • A number of thermodynamic properties of rocksalt TcC are investigated for the first time. • The quasi-harmonic Debye model is applied to take into account the thermal effect. • The pressure and temperature up to about 100 GPa and 3000 K, respectively. - Abstract: Debye temperature, thermal expansion coefficient, and heat capacity of ideal stoichiometric TcC in the rocksalt structure have been studied systematically by using ab initio plane-wave pseudopotential density functional theory method within the generalized gradient approximation. Through the quasi-harmonic Debye model, in which the phononic effects are considered, the dependences of Debye temperature, thermal expansion coefficient, constant-volume heat capacity, and constant-pressure heat capacity on pressure and temperature are successfully predicted. All the thermodynamic properties of TcC with rocksalt phase have been predicted in the entire temperature range from 300 to 3000 K and pressure up to 100 GPa.

  17. First-principles prediction of the equation of state for TcC with rocksalt structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiao-Wei; Chu, Yan-Dong; Liu, Zi-Jiang; Song, Ting; Tian, Jun-Hong; Wei, Xiao-Ping

    2014-10-01

    The equation of state of TcC with rocksalt structure is investigated by means of first-principles density functional theory calculations combined with the quasi-harmonic Debye model in which the phononic effects are considered. Particular attention is paid to the predictions of the compressibility, the isothermal bulk modulus and its first pressure derivative which play a central role in the formulation of approximate equations of state for the first time. The properties of TcC with rocksalt structure are summarized in the pressure range of 0-80 GPa and the temperature up to 2500 K.

  18. Demographic and socioeconomic correlates of powder cocaine and crack use among high school seniors in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Palamar, Joseph J.; Ompad, Danielle C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Rates of powder cocaine and crack use have fluctuated among adolescents over recent decades. Little attention has been paid to recent trends, particularly regarding differences between users of powder cocaine and crack—two forms of the substance that are commonly reported together as “cocaine” use, despite having different effects and rates of adverse outcomes. Methods We examined data from nationally representative samples of high school seniors who participated in the Monitoring the Future study during years 2005–2011 (weighted N=65 717). Results Many demographic and socioeconomic variables were similarly correlated with lifetime use of powder cocaine and crack. Income of >$50/week from job increased the odds for use, and income of >$50/week from sources other than a job more than doubled the odds for use. High religiosity, high parent education, identifying as black, and residing with one or two parents reduced odds for use. Hispanic students were at higher odds for use of crack and females were at lower odds for using powder cocaine. Among cocaine users, residing with one or two parents lowered odds for using both forms, and more religious students and Hispanics were at higher odds for crack-only use. Conclusions Those interested in preventing initiation and adverse consequences of cocaine use should take into account the overlapping, yet different risk profiles of powder cocaine and crack users when developing programming. This is particularly important when considering differences in legal consequences for these pharmacologically similar forms of cocaine. PMID:24191647

  19. [Increased variability of (TCC)n microsatelline loci in populations of the parthenogenetic lizard Lacerta unisexualis Darevsky].

    PubMed

    Ryskov, A P; Kan, N G; Martirosian, I A; Darevskiĭ, I S; Danielian, F D; Petrosian, V G; Tokarskaia, O N

    2000-11-01

    In four isolated populations of parthenogenetic Caucasian rock lizard Lacerta unisexualis, variability of (TCC)n loci was examined using multilocus DNA fingerprinting. Unexpectedly high variability of (TCC)n microsatellites was found in all four populations. The mean similarity index was 0.825, which is higher than similarity estimates obtained for other mini- and microsatellite loci in L. unisexualis and parthenogenetic species L. dahli and L. armeniaca studied earlier. The high variation level of (TCC)n loci was shown to be at least partially associated with the presence of a diverged (TCC)n sequence fraction in the L. unisexualis genome. Mutations at some other genetically unstable (TCC)n loci may cause their structural diversity in populations of L. unisexualis.

  20. Mogoltacin enhances vincristine cytotoxicity in human transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) cell line.

    PubMed

    Behnam Rassouli, F; Matin, M M; Iranshahi, M; Bahrami, A R; Neshati, V; Mollazadeh, S; Neshati, Z

    2009-03-01

    Bladder cancer is the second common cancer of the genitourinary system throughout the world and intravesical chemotherapy is usually used to reduce tumour recurrence and progression. Human transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is an epithelial-like adherent cell line originally established from primary bladder carcinoma. Here we report the effect of mogoltacin, a sesquiterpene coumarin from Ferula badrakema on TCC cells. Mogoltacin was isolated from the fruits of F. badrakema, using silica gel column chromatography and preparative thin layer chromatography. Mogoltacin did not have any significant cytotoxicity effect on neoplastic TCC cells at 16, 32, 64, 128, 200 and 600 microg ml(-1) concentrations. In order to analyse its combination effect, TCC cells were cultured in the presence of various combining concentrations of mogoltacin and vincristine. Cells were then observed for morphological changes (by light microscopy) and cytotoxicity using MTT assay. The effect of mogoltacin on vincristine toxicity was studied after 24, 48 and 72 h of drug administration. The results of MTT assay showed that mogoltacin can significantly enhance the cytotoxicity of vincristine and confirmed the morphological observations. Results revealed that combination of 40 microg ml(-1) vincristine with 16 microg ml(-1) mogoltacin increased the cytotoxicity of vincristine after 48 h by 32.8%.

  1. Risk assessment of land-applied biosolids-borne triclocarban (TCC).

    PubMed

    Snyder, Elizabeth Hodges; O'Connor, George A

    2013-01-01

    Triclocarban (TCC) is monitored under the USEPA High Production Volume (HPV) chemical program and is predominantly used as the active ingredient in select antibacterial bar soaps and other personal care products. The compound commonly occurs at parts-per-million concentrations in processed wastewater treatment residuals (i.e. biosolids), which are frequently land-applied as fertilizers and soil conditioners. Human and ecological risk assessment parameters measured by the authors in previous studies were integrated with existing data to perform a two-tiered human health and ecological risk assessment of land-applied biosolids-borne TCC. The 14 exposure pathways identified in the Part 503 Biosolids Rule were expanded, and conservative screening-level hazard quotients (HQ values) were first calculated to estimate risk to humans and a variety of terrestrial and aquatic organisms (Tier 1). The majority of biosolids-borne TCC exposure pathways resulted in no screening-level HQ values indicative of significant risks to exposed organisms (including humans), even under worst-case land application scenarios. The two pathways for which the conservative screening-level HQ values exceeded one (i.e. Pathway 10: biosolids➔soil➔soil organism➔predator, and Pathway 16: biosolids➔soil➔surface water➔aquatic organism) were then reexamined using modified parameters and scenarios (Tier 2). Adjusted HQ values remained greater than one for Exposure Pathway 10, with the exception of the final adjusted HQ values under a one-time 5 Mg ha(-1) (agronomic) biosolids loading rate scenario for the American woodcock (Scolopax minor) and short-tailed shrew (Blarina brevicauda). Results were used to prioritize recommendations for future biosolids-borne TCC research, which include additional measurements of toxicological effects and TCC concentrations in environmental matrices at the field level.

  2. Risk assessment of land-applied biosolids-borne triclocarban (TCC).

    PubMed

    Snyder, Elizabeth Hodges; O'Connor, George A

    2013-01-01

    Triclocarban (TCC) is monitored under the USEPA High Production Volume (HPV) chemical program and is predominantly used as the active ingredient in select antibacterial bar soaps and other personal care products. The compound commonly occurs at parts-per-million concentrations in processed wastewater treatment residuals (i.e. biosolids), which are frequently land-applied as fertilizers and soil conditioners. Human and ecological risk assessment parameters measured by the authors in previous studies were integrated with existing data to perform a two-tiered human health and ecological risk assessment of land-applied biosolids-borne TCC. The 14 exposure pathways identified in the Part 503 Biosolids Rule were expanded, and conservative screening-level hazard quotients (HQ values) were first calculated to estimate risk to humans and a variety of terrestrial and aquatic organisms (Tier 1). The majority of biosolids-borne TCC exposure pathways resulted in no screening-level HQ values indicative of significant risks to exposed organisms (including humans), even under worst-case land application scenarios. The two pathways for which the conservative screening-level HQ values exceeded one (i.e. Pathway 10: biosolids➔soil➔soil organism➔predator, and Pathway 16: biosolids➔soil➔surface water➔aquatic organism) were then reexamined using modified parameters and scenarios (Tier 2). Adjusted HQ values remained greater than one for Exposure Pathway 10, with the exception of the final adjusted HQ values under a one-time 5 Mg ha(-1) (agronomic) biosolids loading rate scenario for the American woodcock (Scolopax minor) and short-tailed shrew (Blarina brevicauda). Results were used to prioritize recommendations for future biosolids-borne TCC research, which include additional measurements of toxicological effects and TCC concentrations in environmental matrices at the field level. PMID:23183124

  3. Phylogenetic, virological, and clinical characteristics of genotype C hepatitis B virus with TCC at codon 15 of the precore region.

    PubMed

    Chan, Henry Lik-Yuen; Tse, Chi-Hang; Ng, Eddie Yuen-Tok; Leung, Kwong-Sak; Lee, Kin-Hong; Tsui, Stephen Kwok-Wing; Sung, Joseph Jao-Yiu

    2006-03-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) with T-1856 of the precore region is always associated with C-1858 (i.e., TCC at nucleotides 1856 to 1858), and it is reported only in genotype C HBV isolates. We aimed to investigate the phylogenetic, virological, and clinical characteristics of HBV isolates bearing TCC at nucleotides 1856 to 1858. We have previously reported on the presence of two major subgroups in genotype C HBV, namely, HBV genotype Cs (Southeast Asia) and HBV genotype Ce (Far East). We have designed a novel 5' nuclease technology based on the nucleotide polymorphism (C or A) at nucleotide 2733 to differentiate the two genotype C HBV subgroups. The mutations at the basal core promoter and precore regions were analyzed by direct sequencing. Among 214 genotype C HBV-infected patients, 31% had TCC, 37% had CCC, 3% had CTC, and 29% had CCT at nucleotides 1856 to 1858. All except one HBV strain with TCC at nucleotides 1856 to 1858 belonged to subgroup Cs, which has been reported only in Hong Kong; Guangzhou, China; and Vietnam. HBV with TCC at nucleotides 1856 to 1858 was associated with the G1898A mutation (64%). Patients infected with HBV harboring TCC had more liver cirrhosis than those infected with HBV harboring CCC (18% versus 5%; P = 0.008), and more of the patients infected with HBV harboring TCC were positive for HBeAg (58% versus 36%; P = 0.01) and had higher median alanine aminotransferase levels (65 IU/liter versus 49 IU/liter; P = 0.006); but similar proportions of patients infected with HBV harboring TCC and those infected with HBV harboring CCT had liver cirrhosis (18% versus 13%; P = 0.43). In summary, we report that HBV with TCC at nucleotides 1856 to 1858 of the precore region might represent a specific HBV strain associated with more aggressive liver disease than other genotype C HBV strains.

  4. Changes of aerobic capacity, fat ratio and flexibility in older TCC practitioners: a five-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Lan, Ching; Chen, Ssu-Yuan; Lai, Jin-Shin

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the 5-year changes of aerobic capacity, fat ratio and flexibility in older Tai Chi Chuan (TCC) practitioners and sedentary controls. Sixty-nine community-dwelling elderly individuals (mean age: 68.6 +/- 6.3 years) completed this study. The TCC group (18 M; 17 F) had been practicing TCC regularly for 6.3 +/- 3.7 years at baseline and continued training in the study interval. The control group (16 M; 18 F) did not participate in any regular exercise program. A graded bicycle exercise testing was conducted at the baseline and at 5-year to evaluate the age-related decline in aerobic capacity. Triceps and subscapular skinfolds, and thoracolumbar flexibility were also measured. At baseline, the TCC group displayed higher peak oxygen uptake $({\\dot{\\rm V}}{\\rm O}_{2{\\rm peak}})$ and thoraolumbar flexibility, and lower fat ratio than the control group. At the 5-year follow-up, the TCC group displayed a smaller decrease in $\\dot{\\rm V}{\\rm O}_{2{\\rm peak}}$ than the sedentary group. The annual decrease of $\\dot{\\rm V}{\\rm O}_{2{\\rm peak}}$ in TCC men and women was 0.32 and 0.22 ml . kg(-1) . min(-1), respectively. In the control group, the annual decrease of $\\dot{\\rm V}{\\rm O}_{2{\\rm peak}}$ was 0.50 and 0.36 ml . kg(-1) . min(-1) in men and women, respectively. The TCC group also showed a smaller increase of body fat ratio, and a less decrease of flexibility than the control group. In conclusion, long-term practice of TCC attenuates the age-related decline of aerobic capacity, and it also reduces the increase of body fat ratio in older individuals. TCC may be prescribed as a conditioning exercise for the elderly to maintain their health fitness.

  5. Polymorphism in the spin-crossover ferric complexes [(TPA)Fe(III)(TCC)]PF6.

    PubMed

    Collet, Eric; Boillot, Marie Laure; Hebert, Johan; Moisan, Nicolas; Servol, Marina; Lorenc, Maciej; Toupet, Loïc; Buron-Le Cointe, Marylise; Tissot, Antoine; Sainton, Joelle

    2009-08-01

    We have identified two polymorphs of the molecular complex [(TPA)Fe((III))(TCC)]PF(6) [TPA = tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine and TCC = 3,4,5,6-tetrachlorocatecholate dianion]: one is monoclinic and the other is orthorhombic. By lowering the temperature both undergo a thermal spin-crossover between a high-spin (S = 5/2) and a low-spin (S = 1/2) state, which we detected by magnetic, optical and X-ray diffraction measurements. The thermal crossover is only slightly shifted between the polymorphs. Their crystalline structures consist of similar cation layers alternating with PF(6) anion layers, packed differently in the two polymorphs. The magnetic and optical properties of the polymorphs are presented.

  6. Complete Transperitoneal Laparoscopic Nephroureterectomy in Circumcaval Ureter with Upper Tract TCC: Initial Case Report.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Jaspreet Singh; Mishra, Shashikant; Sudharsan, S B; Ganpule, Arvind P; Sabnis, Ravindra B; Desai, Mahesh R

    2015-01-01

    Transitional-cell carcinoma (TCC) of the upper tract in a case of circumcaval ureter (CCU) is a rare entity. Laparoscopic transperitoneal nephroureterectomy in such case represents a unique challenge in the era of minimally invasive surgery. We report a case of complete transperitoneal laparoscopic nephroureterectomy with bladder cuff excision done for TCC in a case of CCU. This case report describes the first point of technique of the procedure done for this rare entity. A 38-year-old male patient underwent the procedure for high-grade TCC of right lower calix. The essential tenets of the procedure included performance of the technique in a manner contrary to the conventional nephroureterectomy. The case report describes the procedure in the following steps: management of lower ureter and bladder cuff followed upper tract procedure after transposition of bladder cuff posterior to inferior vena cava. The procedure was accomplished utilizing four ports and a 6 cm Pfannenstiel incision with operative time of 220 minutes and blood loss of 50 mL.

  7. Field dissipation and risk assessment of typical personal care products TCC, TCS, AHTN and HHCB in biosolid-amended soils.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng; Ying, Guang-Guo; Ma, Yi-Bing; Chen, Zhi-Feng; Lai, Hua-Jie; Peng, Feng-Jiao

    2014-02-01

    The antimicrobial agents triclocarban (TCC) and triclosan (TCS) and synthetic musks AHTN (Tonalide) and HHCB (Galaxolide) are widely used in many personal care products. These compounds may release into the soil environment through biosolid application to agricultural land and potentially affect soil organisms. This paper aimed to investigate accumulation, dissipation and potential risks of TCC, TCS, AHTN and HHCB in biosolid-amended soils of the three field trial sites (Zhejiang, Hunan and Shandong) with three treatments (CK: control without biosolid application, T1: single biosolid application, T2: repeated biosolid application every year). The one-year monitoring results showed that biosolids application could lead to accumulation of these four chemicals in the biosolid-amended soils, with the residual concentrations in the following order: TCC>TCS>AHTN>HHCB. Dissipation of TCC, TCS, AHTN and HHCB in the biosolid-amended soils followed the first-order kinetics model. Half-lives for TCC, TCS, AHTN and HHCB under the field conditions of Shandong site were 191, 258, 336 and 900 days for T1, and 51, 106, 159 and 83 days for T2, respectively. Repeated applications of biosolid led to accumulation of these personal care products and result in higher ecological risks. Based on the residual levels in the trial sites and limited toxicity data, high risks to soil organisms are expected for TCC and TCS, while low-medium risks for AHTN and HHCB.

  8. Cracking the Credit Hour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laitinen, Amy

    2012-01-01

    The basic currency of higher education--the credit hour--represents the root of many problems plaguing America's higher education system: the practice of measuring time rather than learning. "Cracking the Credit Hour" traces the history of this time-based unit, from the days of Andrew Carnegie to recent federal efforts to define a credit hour. If…

  9. Knuckle Cracking

    MedlinePlus

    ... older obese people. Question: Can cracking knuckles / joints lead to arthritis? Answer: There is no evidence of ... or damaged joints due to arthritis could potentially lead more easily to ligament injury or acute trauma ...

  10. Relation between Tcc,bb and Xc,b from QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, J. M.; Narison, S.; Navarra, F. S.; Nielsen, M.; Richard, J. M.

    2013-03-01

    We use double ratio of QCD (spectral) sum rules, to study the ratio masses of Tcc and X(3872) structures, assuming that they are described respectively by the DD* and D¯D* molecular currents. In this approach and within our approximation, we found that the masses of these two states are almost degenerated. In addition, if the observed Belle resonance X(3872) is a D¯D* molecule, then the DD* molecule should exists with approximately the same mass. We have studied an extension for the case including bottom quark. In this situation, our results indicates the same conclusion.

  11. Cracked cue ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlowicz, Michael

    The latest images sent by the Galileo spacecraft reveal that the surface of Jupiter's moon Europa may have contained a layer of “warm ice” or even liquid water. In fact, planetologists are wondering if perhaps it still does.Photos taken earlier this summer show Europa to have a crust of smooth white and brown-tinted ice scarred by long, jagged cracks; some scientists have said the moon looks like a cracked cue ball. “The scale of fracture patterns—extending a distance equivalent to the width of the western United States—dwarf the San Andreas fault in length and width,” said Ronald Greeley, a geologist from Arizona State University and a member of the Galileo imaging team. The cracks are believed to have been caused by the stress of tidal forces created by Jupiter's gravity. Warmth generated by tidal heating also may have been sufficient to soften or liquefy some of the ice.

  12. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Uuu of... - Initial Compliance With Metal HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... Subject to the NSPS for PM in 40 CFR 60.102 PM emissions must not exceed 1.0 kg/1,000 kg (1.0 lb/1,000 lb... waste heat boiler in which you burn auxiliary or supplemental liquid or solid fossil fuel, the... thermal units (lb/million Btu) of heat input attributable to the liquid or solid fossil fuel; and...

  13. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Uuu of... - Initial Compliance With Metal HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... Subject to the NSPS for PM in 40 CFR 60.102 PM emissions must not exceed 1.0 kg/1,000 kg (1.0 lb/1,000 lb... waste heat boiler in which you burn auxiliary or supplemental liquid or solid fossil fuel, the... thermal units (lb/million Btu) of heat input attributable to the liquid or solid fossil fuel; and...

  14. Triclosan (TCS) and Triclocarban (TCC) cause lifespan reduction and reproductive impairment through oxidative stress-mediated expression of the defensome in the monogonont rotifer (Brachionus koreanus).

    PubMed

    Han, Jeonghoon; Won, Eun-Ji; Hwang, Un-Ki; Kim, Il-Chan; Yim, Joung Han; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2016-01-01

    Triclosan (TCS) and Triclocarban (TCC) are used as antimicrobial agents and have been widely dispersed and detected in the marine environment. However, the toxicities of TCS and TCC have been poorly investigated in marine invertebrates. In this study, the effects of TCS and TCC on mortality, population growth, lifespan, and fecundity were examined in the monogonont rotifer (Brachionus koreanus) using cellular ROS levels, GST enzymatic activity, and gene expression of defensomes. The median lethal concentration (LC50) of TCS (393.1μg/L) and TCC (388.1μg/L) was also determined in the same species. In TCS- and TCC-exposed B. koreanus, growth retardation and reduced fecundity were observed and were shown to have a potentially deleterious effect on the life cycle of B. koreanus. In addition, time-dependent increases in ROS content (%) and GST enzymatic activity were shown in response to TCS and TCC exposure. Additionally, transcript levels of detoxification proteins (e.g., CYPs), antioxidant proteins (e.g., GST-sigma, Cu/ZnSOD, CAT), and heat shock proteins (Hsps) were modulated in response to TCS and TCC exposure over a 24h period. Our results indicate that TCS and TCC induce oxidative stress and transcriptional regulation of detoxification, antioxidant, and heat shock proteins, resulting in changes in lifespan and fecundity.

  15. Triclosan (TCS) and Triclocarban (TCC) cause lifespan reduction and reproductive impairment through oxidative stress-mediated expression of the defensome in the monogonont rotifer (Brachionus koreanus).

    PubMed

    Han, Jeonghoon; Won, Eun-Ji; Hwang, Un-Ki; Kim, Il-Chan; Yim, Joung Han; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2016-01-01

    Triclosan (TCS) and Triclocarban (TCC) are used as antimicrobial agents and have been widely dispersed and detected in the marine environment. However, the toxicities of TCS and TCC have been poorly investigated in marine invertebrates. In this study, the effects of TCS and TCC on mortality, population growth, lifespan, and fecundity were examined in the monogonont rotifer (Brachionus koreanus) using cellular ROS levels, GST enzymatic activity, and gene expression of defensomes. The median lethal concentration (LC50) of TCS (393.1μg/L) and TCC (388.1μg/L) was also determined in the same species. In TCS- and TCC-exposed B. koreanus, growth retardation and reduced fecundity were observed and were shown to have a potentially deleterious effect on the life cycle of B. koreanus. In addition, time-dependent increases in ROS content (%) and GST enzymatic activity were shown in response to TCS and TCC exposure. Additionally, transcript levels of detoxification proteins (e.g., CYPs), antioxidant proteins (e.g., GST-sigma, Cu/ZnSOD, CAT), and heat shock proteins (Hsps) were modulated in response to TCS and TCC exposure over a 24h period. Our results indicate that TCS and TCC induce oxidative stress and transcriptional regulation of detoxification, antioxidant, and heat shock proteins, resulting in changes in lifespan and fecundity. PMID:27067728

  16. Cracking behavior of structural slab bridge decks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baah, Prince

    Bridge deck cracking is a common problem throughout the United States, and it affects the durability and service life of concrete bridges. Several departments of transportation (DOTs) in the United States prefer using continuous three-span solid structural slab bridges without stringers over typical four-lane highways. Recent inspections of such bridges in Ohio revealed cracks as wide as 0.125 in. These measured crack widths are more than ten times the maximum limit recommended in ACI 224R-01 for bridge decks exposed to de-icing salts. Measurements using digital image correlation revealed that the cracks widened under truck loading, and in some cases, the cracks did not fully close after unloading. This dissertation includes details of an experimental investigation of the cracking behavior of structural concrete. Prism tests revealed that the concrete with epoxy-coated bars (ECB) develops the first crack at smaller loads, and develops larger crack widths compared to the corresponding specimens with uncoated (black) bars. Slab tests revealed that the slabs with longitudinal ECB developed first crack at smaller loads, exhibited wider cracks and a larger number of cracks, and failed at smaller ultimate loads compared to the corresponding test slabs with black bars. To develop a preventive measure, slabs with basalt and polypropylene fiber reinforced concrete were also included in the test program. These test slabs exhibited higher cracking loads, smaller crack widths, and higher ultimate loads at failure compared to the corresponding slab specimens without fibers. Merely satisfying the reinforcement spacing requirements given in AASHTO or ACI 318-11 is not adequate to limit cracking below the ACI 224R-01 recommended maximum limit, even though all the relevant design requirements are otherwise met. Addition of fiber to concrete without changing any steel reinforcing details is expected to reduce the severity and extent of cracking in reinforced concrete bridge decks.

  17. Transformation products and human metabolites of triclocarban and tricllosan in sewage sludge across the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pycke, Benny F.G.; Roll, Isaac B.; Brownawell, Bruce J.; Kinney, Chad A.; Furlong, Edward T.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Halden, Rolf U.

    2014-01-01

    Removal of triclocarban (TCC) and triclosan (TCS) from wastewater is a function of adsorption, abiotic degradation, and microbial mineralization or transformation, reactions that are not currently controlled or optimized in the pollution control infrastructure of standard wastewater treatment. Here, we report on the levels of eight transformation products, human metabolites, and manufacturing byproducts of TCC and TCS in raw and treated sewage sludge. Two sample sets were studied: samples collected once from 14 wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) representing nine states, and multiple samples collected from one WWTP monitored for 12 months. Time-course analysis of significant mass fluxes (α = 0.01) indicate that transformation of TCC (dechlorination) and TCS (methylation) occurred during sewage conveyance and treatment. Strong linear correlations were found between TCC and the human metabolite 2′-hydroxy-TCC (r = 0.84), and between the TCC-dechlorination products dichlorocarbanilide (DCC) and monochlorocarbanilide (r = 0.99). Mass ratios of DCC-to-TCC and of methyl-triclosan (MeTCS)-to-TCS, serving as indicators of transformation activity, revealed that transformation was widespread under different treatment regimes across the WWTPs sampled, though the degree of transformation varied significantly among study sites (α = 0.01). The analysis of sludge sampled before and after different unit operation steps (i.e., anaerobic digestion, sludge heat treatment, and sludge drying) yielded insights into the extent and location of TCC and TCS transformation. Results showed anaerobic digestion to be important for MeTCS transformation (37–74%), whereas its contribution to partial TCC dechlorination was limited (0.4–2.1%). This longitudinal and nationwide survey is the first to report the occurrence of transformation products, human metabolites, and manufacturing byproducts of TCC and TCS in sewage sludge.

  18. Transformation products and human metabolites of triclocarban and triclosan in sewage sludge across the United States.

    PubMed

    Pycke, Benny F G; Roll, Isaac B; Brownawell, Bruce J; Kinney, Chad A; Furlong, Edward T; Kolpin, Dana W; Halden, Rolf U

    2014-07-15

    Removal of triclocarban (TCC) and triclosan (TCS) from wastewater is a function of adsorption, abiotic degradation, and microbial mineralization or transformation, reactions that are not currently controlled or optimized in the pollution control infrastructure of standard wastewater treatment. Here, we report on the levels of eight transformation products, human metabolites, and manufacturing byproducts of TCC and TCS in raw and treated sewage sludge. Two sample sets were studied: samples collected once from 14 wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) representing nine states, and multiple samples collected from one WWTP monitored for 12 months. Time-course analysis of significant mass fluxes (α=0.01) indicate that transformation of TCC (dechlorination) and TCS (methylation) occurred during sewage conveyance and treatment. Strong linear correlations were found between TCC and the human metabolite 2'-hydroxy-TCC (r=0.84), and between the TCC-dechlorination products dichlorocarbanilide (DCC) and monochlorocarbanilide (r=0.99). Mass ratios of DCC-to-TCC and of methyl-triclosan (MeTCS)-to-TCS, serving as indicators of transformation activity, revealed that transformation was widespread under different treatment regimes across the WWTPs sampled, though the degree of transformation varied significantly among study sites (α=0.01). The analysis of sludge sampled before and after different unit operation steps (i.e., anaerobic digestion, sludge heat treatment, and sludge drying) yielded insights into the extent and location of TCC and TCS transformation. Results showed anaerobic digestion to be important for MeTCS transformation (37-74%), whereas its contribution to partial TCC dechlorination was limited (0.4-2.1%). This longitudinal and nationwide survey is the first to report the occurrence of transformation products, human metabolites, and manufacturing byproducts of TCC and TCS in sewage sludge.

  19. Transformation Products and Human Metabolites of Triclocarban and Triclosan in Sewage Sludge Across the United States

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Removal of triclocarban (TCC) and triclosan (TCS) from wastewater is a function of adsorption, abiotic degradation, and microbial mineralization or transformation, reactions that are not currently controlled or optimized in the pollution control infrastructure of standard wastewater treatment. Here, we report on the levels of eight transformation products, human metabolites, and manufacturing byproducts of TCC and TCS in raw and treated sewage sludge. Two sample sets were studied: samples collected once from 14 wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) representing nine states, and multiple samples collected from one WWTP monitored for 12 months. Time-course analysis of significant mass fluxes (α = 0.01) indicate that transformation of TCC (dechlorination) and TCS (methylation) occurred during sewage conveyance and treatment. Strong linear correlations were found between TCC and the human metabolite 2′-hydroxy-TCC (r = 0.84), and between the TCC-dechlorination products dichlorocarbanilide (DCC) and monochlorocarbanilide (r = 0.99). Mass ratios of DCC-to-TCC and of methyl-triclosan (MeTCS)-to-TCS, serving as indicators of transformation activity, revealed that transformation was widespread under different treatment regimes across the WWTPs sampled, though the degree of transformation varied significantly among study sites (α = 0.01). The analysis of sludge sampled before and after different unit operation steps (i.e., anaerobic digestion, sludge heat treatment, and sludge drying) yielded insights into the extent and location of TCC and TCS transformation. Results showed anaerobic digestion to be important for MeTCS transformation (37–74%), whereas its contribution to partial TCC dechlorination was limited (0.4–2.1%). This longitudinal and nationwide survey is the first to report the occurrence of transformation products, human metabolites, and manufacturing byproducts of TCC and TCS in sewage sludge. PMID:24932693

  20. Transformation products and human metabolites of triclocarban and triclosan in sewage sludge across the United States.

    PubMed

    Pycke, Benny F G; Roll, Isaac B; Brownawell, Bruce J; Kinney, Chad A; Furlong, Edward T; Kolpin, Dana W; Halden, Rolf U

    2014-07-15

    Removal of triclocarban (TCC) and triclosan (TCS) from wastewater is a function of adsorption, abiotic degradation, and microbial mineralization or transformation, reactions that are not currently controlled or optimized in the pollution control infrastructure of standard wastewater treatment. Here, we report on the levels of eight transformation products, human metabolites, and manufacturing byproducts of TCC and TCS in raw and treated sewage sludge. Two sample sets were studied: samples collected once from 14 wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) representing nine states, and multiple samples collected from one WWTP monitored for 12 months. Time-course analysis of significant mass fluxes (α=0.01) indicate that transformation of TCC (dechlorination) and TCS (methylation) occurred during sewage conveyance and treatment. Strong linear correlations were found between TCC and the human metabolite 2'-hydroxy-TCC (r=0.84), and between the TCC-dechlorination products dichlorocarbanilide (DCC) and monochlorocarbanilide (r=0.99). Mass ratios of DCC-to-TCC and of methyl-triclosan (MeTCS)-to-TCS, serving as indicators of transformation activity, revealed that transformation was widespread under different treatment regimes across the WWTPs sampled, though the degree of transformation varied significantly among study sites (α=0.01). The analysis of sludge sampled before and after different unit operation steps (i.e., anaerobic digestion, sludge heat treatment, and sludge drying) yielded insights into the extent and location of TCC and TCS transformation. Results showed anaerobic digestion to be important for MeTCS transformation (37-74%), whereas its contribution to partial TCC dechlorination was limited (0.4-2.1%). This longitudinal and nationwide survey is the first to report the occurrence of transformation products, human metabolites, and manufacturing byproducts of TCC and TCS in sewage sludge. PMID:24932693

  1. Upgrading of cracking gasoline

    SciTech Connect

    Harandi, M.N.; Owen, H.; Ragonese, F.P.; Yurchak, S.

    1990-08-21

    This patent describes an integrated catalytic cracking and gasoline upgrading process. It comprises: withdrawing a product stream from the riser reactor of a catalytic cracking process unit; charging the product stream to a primary fractionation zone; withdrawing an intermediate gasoline stream from the primary fractionation zone, the intermediate gasoline stream comprising olefinic gasoline having an ASTM D86 boiling range from about 90{degrees} to about 170{degrees} C.; contacting a first portion of the intermediate gasoline stream and a C{sub 2}{minus}C{sub 5} olefinic stream with a catalyst under conversion conditions to form an upgraded gasoline stream; and charging a second portion of the intermediate gasoline stream together with the upgraded gasoline stream to a gasoline product storage facility.

  2. Radiosensitivity and capacity for radiation-induced sublethal damage repair of canine transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) cell lines.

    PubMed

    Parfitt, S L; Milner, R J; Salute, M E; Hintenlang, D E; Farese, J P; Bacon, N J; Bova, F J; Rajon, D A; Lurie, D M

    2011-09-01

    Understanding the inherent radiosensitivity and repair capacity of canine transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) can aid in optimizing radiation protocols to treat this disease. The objective of this study was to evaluate the parameters surviving fraction at 2 Gy (SF(2) ), α/β ratio and capacity for sublethal damage repair (SLDR) in response to radiation. Dose-response and split-dose studies were performed using the clonogenic assay. The mean SF(2) for three established TCC cell lines was high at 0.61. All the three cell lines exhibited a low to moderate α/β ratio, with the mean being 3.27. Two cell lines exhibited statistically increased survival at 4 and 24 h in the dose-response assay. Overall, our results indicate that the cell lines are moderately radioresistant, have a high repair capacity and behave similarly to a late-responding normal tissue. These findings indicate that the radiation protocols utilizing higher doses with less fractionation may be more effective for treating TCC.

  3. Deposits of terminal complement complex (TCC) in muscularis mucosae and submucosal vessels in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease of the colon.

    PubMed Central

    Halstensen, T S; Mollnes, T E; Fausa, O; Brandtzaeg, P

    1989-01-01

    Extensively washed, ethanol fixed and paraffin embedded colonic specimens from 15 patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and nine patients with Crohn's disease (CD) of the colon, ileal specimens from six patients with CD of the ileum, and histologically normal control specimens obtained from 10 patients operated for colonic carcinoma, were examined by immunohistochemistry with a monoclonal antibody specific for a neoepitope in the C9 part of the terminal complement complex (TCC). The submucosal blood vessels in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) showed significantly more TCC positivity than the controls, and vascular TCC deposition was statistically related (p less than 0.001) to degree of inflammation. Five of the six ileal CD specimens contained likewise vascular TCC deposits. In addition, five UC specimens and one colonic CD specimen contained TCC-positive fibrils in the muscularis mucosae or submucosa. There was no significant difference in vascular TCC deposits between UC and CD. The results suggested that terminal complement activation takes place in the intestinal lesions of IBD. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:2707635

  4. Surgical management for upper urinary tract transitional cell carcinoma (UUT-TCC): a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Rai, Bhavan Prasad; Shelley, Mike; Coles, Bernadette; Somani, Bhaskar; Nabi, Ghulam

    2012-11-01

    Surgical management of upper urinary tract transitional cell carcinoma (UUT-TCC) has significantly changed over the past two decades. Data for several new surgical techniques, including nephron-sparing surgery (NSS), is emerging. The study systematically reviewed the literature comparing (randomised and observational studies) surgical and oncological outcomes for various surgical techniques MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, British Nursing Index, AMED, LILACS, Web of Science, Scopus, Biosis, TRIP, Biomed Central, Dissertation Abstracts, ISI proceedings, and PubMed were searched to identify suitable studies. Data were extracted from each identified paper independently by two reviewers (B.R. and B.S.) and cross checked by a senior member of the team. The data analysis was performed using the Cochrane software Review manager version 5. Comparable data from each study was combined in a meta-analysis where possible. For dichotomous data, odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated based on the fixed-effects model and according to an intention-to-treat analysis. If the data available were deemed not suitable for a meta-analysis it was described in a narrative fashion. One randomised control trial (RCT) and 19 observational studies comparing open nephroureterectomy (ONU) and laparoscopic NU (LNU) were identified. The RCT reported the LNU group to have statistically significantly less blood loss (104 vs 430 mL, P < 0.001) and mean time to discharge (2.30 vs 3.65 days, P < 0.001) than the ONU group. At a median follow-up of 44 months, the overall 5-year cancer-specific survival (CSS; 89.9 vs 79.8%) and 5-year metastasis-free survival rates (77.4 vs 72.5%) for the ONU were better than for LNU, respectively, although not statistically significant. A meta-analysis of the observational studies favoured LNU group for lower urinary recurrence (P < 0.001) and distant metastasis. The meta-analyses for local recurrence for the two groups were comparable

  5. Crack spectra analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tiernan, M.

    1980-09-01

    Crack spectra derived from velocity data have been shown to exhibit systematics which reflect microstructural and textural differences between samples (Warren and Tiernan, 1980). Further research into both properties and information content of crack spectra have yielded the following: Spectral features are reproducible even at low pressures; certain observed spectral features may correspond to non-in-situ crack populations created during sample retrieval; the functional form of a crack spectra may be diagnostic of the sample's grain texture; hysteresis is observed in crack spectra between up and down pressure runs - it may be due to friction between the faces of closed crack populations.

  6. Gear crack propagation investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Ballarini, Roberto

    1996-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies were performed to investigate the effect of gear rim thickness on crack propagation life. The FRANC (FRacture ANalysis Code) computer program was used to simulate crack propagation. The FRANC program used principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics, finite element modeling, and a unique re-meshing scheme to determine crack tip stress distributions, estimate stress intensity factors, and model crack propagation. Various fatigue crack growth models were used to estimate crack propagation life based on the calculated stress intensity factors. Experimental tests were performed in a gear fatigue rig to validate predicted crack propagation results. Test gears were installed with special crack propagation gages in the tooth fillet region to measure bending fatigue crack growth. Good correlation between predicted and measured crack growth was achieved when the fatigue crack closure concept was introduced into the analysis. As the gear rim thickness decreased, the compressive cyclic stress in the gear tooth fillet region increased. This retarded crack growth and increased the number of crack propagation cycles to failure.

  7. Stress analysis for structures with surface cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    Two basic forms of analysis, one treating stresses around arbitrarily loaded circular cracks, the other treating stresses due to loads arbitrarily distributed on the surface of a half space, are united by a boundary-point least squares method to obtain analyses for stresses from surface cracks in places or bars. Calculations were for enough cases to show how effects from the crack vary with the depth-to-length ratio, the fractional penetration ratio, the obliquity of the load, and to some extent the fractional span ratio. The results include plots showing stress intensity factors, stress component distributions near the crack, and crack opening displacement patterns. Favorable comparisons are shown with two kinds of independent experiments, but the main method for confirming the results is by wide checking of overall satisfaction of boundary conditions, so that external confirmation is not essential. Principles involved in designing analyses which promote dependability of the results are proposed and illustrated.

  8. Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... That People Abuse » Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Listen Cocaine is a white ... Version Download "My life was built around getting cocaine and getting high." Stacey is recovering from her ...

  9. Screening of ARHSP-TCC patients expands the spectrum of SPG11 mutations and includes a large scale gene deletion.

    PubMed

    Denora, Paola S; Schlesinger, David; Casali, Carlo; Kok, Fernando; Tessa, Alessandra; Boukhris, Amir; Azzedine, Hamid; Dotti, Maria Teresa; Bruno, Claudio; Truchetto, Jeremy; Biancheri, Roberta; Fedirko, Estelle; Di Rocco, Maja; Bueno, Clarissa; Malandrini, Alessandro; Battini, Roberta; Sickl, Elisabeth; de Leva, Maria Fulvia; Boespflug-Tanguy, Odile; Silvestri, Gabriella; Simonati, Alessandro; Said, Edith; Ferbert, Andreas; Criscuolo, Chiara; Heinimann, Karl; Modoni, Anna; Weber, Peter; Palmeri, Silvia; Plasilova, Martina; Pauri, Flavia; Cassandrini, Denise; Battisti, Carla; Pini, Antonella; Tosetti, Michela; Hauser, Erwin; Masciullo, Marcella; Di Fabio, Roberto; Piccolo, Francesca; Denis, Elodie; Cioni, Giovanni; Massa, Roberto; Della Giustina, Elvio; Calabrese, Olga; Melone, Marina A B; De Michele, Giuseppe; Federico, Antonio; Bertini, Enrico; Durr, Alexandra; Brockmann, Knut; van der Knaap, Marjo S; Zatz, Mayana; Filla, Alessandro; Brice, Alexis; Stevanin, Giovanni; Santorelli, Filippo M

    2009-03-01

    Autosomal recessive spastic paraplegia with thinning of corpus callosum (ARHSP-TCC) is a complex form of HSP initially described in Japan but subsequently reported to have a worldwide distribution with a particular high frequency in multiple families from the Mediterranean basin. We recently showed that ARHSP-TCC is commonly associated with mutations in SPG11/KIAA1840 on chromosome 15q. We have now screened a collection of new patients mainly originating from Italy and Brazil, in order to further ascertain the spectrum of mutations in SPG11, enlarge the ethnic origin of SPG11 patients, determine the relative frequency at the level of single Countries (i.e., Italy), and establish whether there is one or more common mutation. In 25 index cases we identified 32 mutations; 22 are novel, including 9 nonsense, 3 small deletions, 4 insertions, 1 in/del, 1 small duplication, 1 missense, 2 splice-site, and for the first time a large genomic rearrangement. This brings the total number of SPG11 mutated patients in the SPATAX collection to 111 cases in 44 families and in 17 isolated cases, from 16 Countries, all assessed using homogeneous clinical criteria. While expanding the spectrum of mutations in SPG11, this larger series also corroborated the notion that even within apparently homogeneous population a molecular diagnosis cannot be achieved without full gene sequencing.

  10. Fluid catalytic cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Petty, R.H.; Bartley, B.H.

    1984-05-01

    A fluid catalytic cracking process is disclosed for sulfur-containing petroleum charge stocks. Sulfur contained in coke deposited on the fluidized cracking catalyst in the reactor is converted to sulfur oxides in the regenerator and removed from regenerator off-gases by incorporating a composite of alumina and bismuth oxides in a particulate cracking catalyst. Sulfur oxides produced during regeneration of the catalyst by burning the coke with air in the regenerator are captured by the alumina-bismuth oxides composite and converted to hydrogen sulfide in the cracking reactor. The hydrogen sulfide so produced is readily separated from petroleum products of the catalytic cracking reaction process.

  11. 40 CFR 63.1568 - What are my requirements for HAP emissions from sulfur recovery units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, Sulfur Recovery Units, and Bypass Lines § 63.1568 What are...

  12. 40 CFR 63.1568 - What are my requirements for HAP emissions from sulfur recovery units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, Sulfur Recovery Units, and Bypass Lines § 63.1568 What are...

  13. Environmental Crack Driving Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, M. M.

    2013-03-01

    The effect of environment on the crack driving force is considered, first by assuming quasistatic extension of a stationary crack and second, by use of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) crack growth rate models developed previously by this author and developed further here. A quasistatic thermodynamic energy balance approach, of the Griffith-Irwin type, is used to develop stationary crack threshold expressions, tilde{J}_c , which represent the conjoint mechanical and electrochemical conditions, below which stationary cracks are stable. Expressions for the electrochemical crack driving force (CDF) were derived using an analysis that is analogous to that used by Irwin to derive his "strain energy release rate," G, which Rice showed as being equivalent to his mechanical CDF, J. The derivations show that electrochemical CDFs both for active path dissolution (APD) and hydrogen embrittlement (HE) mechanisms of SCC are simply proportional to Tafel's electrochemical anodic and cathodic overpotentials, η a and η c, respectively. Phenomenological SCC models based on the kinetics of APD and HE crack growth are used to derive expressions for the kinetic threshold, J scc, below which crack growth cannot be sustained. These models show how independent mechanical and environmental CDFs may act together to drive SCC crack advance. Development of a user-friendly computational tool for calculating Tafel's overpotentials is advocated.

  14. Investigation of Helicopter Longeron Cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Baughman, James; Wallace, Terryl A.

    2009-01-01

    Four cracked longerons, containing a total of eight cracks, were provided for study. Cracked regions were cut from the longerons. Load was applied to open the cracks, enabling crack surface examination. Examination revealed that crack propagation was driven by fatigue loading in all eight cases. Fatigue crack initiation appears to have occurred on the top edge of the longerons near geometric changes that affect component bending stiffness. Additionally, metallurgical analysis has revealed a local depletion in alloying elements in the crack initiation regions that may be a contributing factor. Fatigue crack propagation appeared to be initially driven by opening-mode loading, but at a crack length of approximately 0.5 inches (12.7 mm), there is evidence of mixed-mode crack loading. For the longest cracks studied, shear-mode displacements destroyed crack-surface features of interest over significant portions of the crack surfaces.

  15. Analyzing Leakage Through Cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romine, William D.

    1993-01-01

    Two related computer programs written for use in analyzing leakage through cracks. Leakage flow laminar or turbulent. One program used to determine dimensions of crack under given flow conditions and given measured rate of leakage. Other used to determine rate of leakage of gas through crack of given dimensions under given flow conditions. Programs, written in BASIC language, accelerate and facilitate iterative calculations and parametric analyses. Solve equations of Fanno flow. Enables rapid solution of leakage problem.

  16. Crack Modelling for Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chady, T.; Napierała, L.

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, possibility of creation of three-dimensional crack models, both random type and based on real-life radiographic images is discussed. Method for storing cracks in a number of two-dimensional matrices, as well algorithm for their reconstruction into three-dimensional objects is presented. Also the possibility of using iterative algorithm for matching simulated images of cracks to real-life radiographic images is discussed.

  17. Chemolithoautotrophic arsenite oxidation by a thermophilic Anoxybacillus flavithermus strain TCC9-4 from a hot spring in Tengchong of Yunnan, China

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Dawei; Li, Ping; Jiang, Zhou; Dai, Xinyue; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Yanhong; Guo, Qinghai; Wang, Yanxin

    2015-01-01

    A new facultative chemolithoautotrophic arsenite (AsIII)-oxidizing bacterium TCC9-4 was isolated from a hot spring microbial mat in Tengchong of Yunnan, China. This strain could grow with AsIII as an energy source, CO2–HCO3- as a carbon source and oxygen as the electron acceptor in a minimal salts medium. Under chemolithoautotrophic conditions, more than 90% of 100 mg/L AsIII could be oxidized by the strain TCC9-4 in 36 h. Temperature was an important environmental factor that strongly influenced the AsIII oxidation rate and AsIII oxidase (Aio) activity; the highest Aio activity was found at the temperature of 40∘C. Addition of 0.01% yeast extract enhanced the growth significantly, but delayed the AsIII oxidation. On the basis of 16S rRNA phylogenetic sequence analysis, strain TCC9-4 was identified as Anoxybacillus flavithermus. To our best knowledge, this is the first report of arsenic (As) oxidation by A. flavithermus. The Aio gene in TCC9-4 might be quite novel relative to currently known gene sequences. The results of this study expand our current understanding of microbially mediated As oxidation in hot springs. PMID:25999920

  18. Hairpin DNA probe with 5'-TCC/CCC-3' overhangs for the creation of silver nanoclusters and miRNA assay.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xiaodong; Hao, Yuanqiang; Hu, Shengqiang; Wang, Jianxiu

    2014-01-15

    A facile strategy for the assay of target miRNA using fluorescent silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) has been described. Due to the preferable interaction between cytosine residues and Ag(+), a short cytosine-rich oligonucleotide (ODN) with only six bases 5'-TCCCCC-3' served as an efficient scaffold for the creation of the AgNCs. The AgNCs displayed a bright red emission when excited at 545nm. Such ODN base-stabilized AgNCs have been exploited for miRNA sensing. Overhangs of TCC at the 5' end (5'-TCC) and CCC at the 3' end (CCC-3') (denoted as 5'-TCC/CCC-3') appended to the hairpin ODN probe which also contains recognition sequences for target miRNA were included. Interestingly, the AgNCs/hairpin ODN probe showed similar spectral properties as that templated by 5'-TCCCCC-3'. The formation of the hairpin ODN probe/miRNA duplex separated the 5'-TCC/CCC-3' overhangs, thus disturbing the optical property or structure of the AgNCs. As a result, fluorescence quenching of the AgNCs/hairpin ODN probe was obtained, which allows for facile determination of target miRNA. The proposed method is simple and cost-effective, holding great promise for clinical applications.

  19. Automatic crack propagation tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shephard, M. S.; Weidner, T. J.; Yehia, N. A. B.; Burd, G. S.

    1985-01-01

    A finite element based approach to fully automatic crack propagation tracking is presented. The procedure presented combines fully automatic mesh generation with linear fracture mechanics techniques in a geometrically based finite element code capable of automatically tracking cracks in two-dimensional domains. The automatic mesh generator employs the modified-quadtree technique. Crack propagation increment and direction are predicted using a modified maximum dilatational strain energy density criterion employing the numerical results obtained by meshes of quadratic displacement and singular crack tip finite elements. Example problems are included to demonstrate the procedure.

  20. Survey updates amine stress corrosion cracking data

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-13

    The final report by National Association of Corrosion Engineers (NACE) task group T-8-14 has been published, revising and expanding the information on stress information on stress corrosion cracking of carbon steel in diethanolamine and diisopropanolamine service. A major conclusion of the survey was that cracking frequency was more prevalent in monoethanolamine (MEA) than in other amines. This paper reports that further examination of the DEA data indicated that some units were previously in MEA service and the reported cracks were actually associated with that period. A detailed follow-up review of the DEA data also revealed that some cases were caused by processes other than amine cracking. In many cases, further inspection or testing had been done after the original survey was submitted.

  1. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Uuu of... - Requirements for Performance Tests for Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units Not...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... this chapter, as applicable. c. Conduct gas molecular weight analysis. Method 3, 3A, or 3B in appendix.... Measure PM emissions. Method 5B or 5F (40 CFR part 60, appendix A) to determine PM emissions and associated moisture content for units without wet scrubbers. Method 5B (40 CFR part 60, appendix A)...

  2. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Uuu of... - Requirements for Performance Tests for Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units Not...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... part 60 of this chapter, as applicable. c. Conduct gas molecular weight analysis. Method 3, 3A, or 3B... a. Measure PM emissions. Method 5B or 5F (40 CFR part 60, appendix A) to determine PM emissions and associated moisture content for units without wet scrubbers. Method 5B (40 CFR part 60, appendix A)...

  3. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Uuu of... - Requirements for Performance Tests for Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units Not...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... part 60 of this chapter, as applicable. c. Conduct gas molecular weight analysis. Method 3, 3A, or 3B... a. Measure PM emissions. Method 5B or 5F (40 CFR part 60, appendix A) to determine PM emissions and associated moisture content for units without wet scrubbers. Method 5B (40 CFR part 60, appendix A)...

  4. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Uuu of... - Requirements for Performance Tests for Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units Not...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... this chapter, as applicable. c. Conduct gas molecular weight analysis. Method 3, 3A, or 3B in appendix.... Measure PM emissions. Method 5B or 5F (40 CFR part 60, appendix A) to determine PM emissions and associated moisture content for units without wet scrubbers. Method 5B (40 CFR part 60, appendix A)...

  5. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Uuu of... - Requirements for Performance Tests for Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units Not...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... part 60 of this chapter, as applicable. c. Conduct gas molecular weight analysis. Method 3, 3A, or 3B... a. Measure PM emissions. Method 5B or 5F (40 CFR part 60, appendix A) to determine PM emissions and associated moisture content for units without wet scrubbers. Method 5B (40 CFR part 60, appendix A)...

  6. BWR internal cracking issues

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, C.E. Jr.; Lund, A.L.

    1999-07-01

    The regulatory issues associated with cracking of boiling water reactor (BWR) internals is being addressed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff and is the subject of a voluntary industry initiative. The lessons learned from this effort will be applied to pressurized water reactor (PWR) internals cracking issues.

  7. Crack layer theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chudnovsky, A.

    1984-01-01

    A damage parameter is introduced in addition to conventional parameters of continuum mechanics and consider a crack surrounded by an array of microdefects within the continuum mechanics framework. A system consisting of the main crack and surrounding damage is called crack layer (CL). Crack layer propagation is an irreversible process. The general framework of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes are employed to identify the driving forces (causes) and to derive the constitutive equation of CL propagation, that is, the relationship between the rates of the crack growth and damage dissemination from one side and the conjugated thermodynamic forces from another. The proposed law of CL propagation is in good agreement with the experimental data on fatigue CL propagation in various materials. The theory also elaborates material toughness characterization.

  8. [Immunostimulatory CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG-ODN) in an orthotopic murine transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) model. Effect on local cytokine expression].

    PubMed

    Olbert, P J; Schrader, A J; Hofmann, R; Hegele, A

    2008-09-01

    CpG-oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG-ODN) are potent stimulators of the innate immune system. They promote a Th1-biased immune response with antineoplastic potential. We recently demonstrated antitumoral effects of CpG-ODN in murine transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) models. The purpose of the present work was to more precisely define the immunological nature of this immunotherapeutic approach to TCC.MB-49 TCC was established in female C57/Bl6 mice by intravesical tumor cell instillation after poly-L-lysine conditioning of the bladder (day 0) as described previously. Three groups of six mice were treated: intravesical instillation of 50 microl PBS on days 1, 3, 5, and 7 (group 1, untreated control); 10 nmol CpG 1668 on days 1, 3, 5, and 7 (group 2); and 10 nmol GpC 1668 on days 1, 3, 5, and 7 (group 3). Six native bladders served as no-treatment/no-tumor controls (group 4). Mice were sacrificed on day 11; bladders and draining lymph nodes were removed, and mRNA was prepared for quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Samples were analyzed on a Bio-Rad iCycler for IL 10, TGF-beta, IL 12, and IFNgamma expression; threshold values were compared to beta-actin as housekeeping gene.Tumor take was 100%. Three animals in group 1 had to be sacrificed in advance due to rapid tumor progression. Relative cytokine expression was comparable in groups 1 and 4. IL-10, IL-12, TGF-beta, and IFNgamma were overexpressed in groups 2 and 3. CpG-ODN treatment of murine TCC results in overexpression of both classic Th1 cytokines (IL 12 and IFNgamma) and the Th2 marker IL 10. TGF-beta expression is increased as well. These phenomena are not induced by the growing TCC but by CpG-ODN therapy. They are accompanied by an objective clinical response, as we were able to show recently. Immunostimulatory DNA holds promise to be a novel therapeutic agent in TCC.

  9. Quantity Effect of Radial Cracks on the Cracking Propagation Behavior and the Crack Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingjing; Xu, Jun; Liu, Bohan; Yao, Xuefeng; Li, Yibing

    2014-01-01

    In this letter, the quantity effect of radial cracks on the cracking propagation behavior as well as the circular crack generation on the impacted glass plate within the sandwiched glass sheets are experimentally investigated via high-speed photography system. Results show that the radial crack velocity on the backing glass layer decreases with the crack number under the same impact conditions during large quantities of repeated experiments. Thus, the “energy conversion factor” is suggested to elucidate the physical relation between the cracking number and the crack propagation speed. Besides, the number of radial crack also takes the determinative effect in the crack morphology of the impacted glass plate. This study may shed lights on understanding the cracking and propagation mechanism in laminated glass structures and provide useful tool to explore the impact information on the cracking debris. PMID:25048684

  10. Antrodia camphorata extract induces replicative senescence in superficial TCC, and inhibits the absolute migration capability in invasive bladder carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chiung-Chi; Chen, Kuan-Chou; Peng, Robert Y; Chyau, Charng-Cherng; Su, Ching-Hua; Hsieh-Li, Hsiu Mei

    2007-01-01

    The Antrodia camphorata crude extract (ACCE), an extract obtained from a precious traditional Chinese folkloric herbal medicine Zhan-Ku (a camphor tree mushroom) since the 18th century, has showed rather significant inhibitory effects on the growth and proliferation of the transitional cell carcinomas (TCC) cell lines RT4, TSGH-8301, and T24. On treatment with ACCE at 100 microg/mL, the p53-independent overexpression of p21 with simultaneous down alteration of pRb was observed in RT4, which was thus speculative of proceeding through a mechanism of replicative senescence. On the contrary treatment with ACCE, at 50 microg/mL, resulting in simultaneous down-regulations of Cdc2 and Cyclin B1, with suppression of the absolute migrating capability of the two cell lines TSGH-8301 and T24, and eventually the cell deaths. We conclude that ACCE can be rather effective and beneficial in suppression of both the superficial cancer cell line RT4 and the metastatic cell lines (TSGH-8301 and T24) through different mechanisms.

  11. Elevated temperature crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K. S.; Vanstone, R. H.; Malik, S. N.; Laflen, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    A study was performed to examine the applicability of path-independent (P-I) integrals to crack growth problems in hot section components of gas turbine aircraft engines. Alloy 718 was used and the experimental parameters included combined temperature and strain cycling, thermal gradients, elastic-plastic strain levels, and mean strains. A literature review was conducted of proposed P-I integrals, and those capable of analyzing hot section component problems were selected and programmed into the postprocessor of a finite element code. Detailed elastic-plastic finite element analyses were conducted to simulate crack growth and crack closure of the test specimen, and to evaluate the P-I integrals. It was shown that the selected P-I integrals are very effective for predicting crack growth for isothermal conditions.

  12. Ethylene by Naphta Cracking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiseman, Peter

    1977-01-01

    Presents a discussion of the manufacture of ethylene by thermal cracking of hydrocarbon feedstocks that is useful for introducing the subject of industrial chemistry into a chemistry curriculum. (MLH)

  13. Stress corrosion cracking of carbon steel in amine systems

    SciTech Connect

    Richert, J.P.; Bagdasarian, A.J.; Shargay, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    NACE Task Group T-8-14 was formed by Group Committee T-8 on Refining Industry Corrosion to conduct a survey on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of existing amine units. The main purpose of the survey was to determine the extent of cracking problems in such units and to examine possible correlations between cracked and noncracked locations to establish possible cause(s) for cracking. A total of 294 completed survey forms were received and analyzed. Cracking was reported in monoethanolamine (MEA), diethanolamine, methyldiethanolamine, and diisopropanolamine solutions but was most prevalent in MEA units. Cracking occurs in all types of equipment and piping operating at all common temperatures. Cracking has been reported in all typical refinery streams containing H/sub 2/S, CO/sub 2/, or a combination of the two. The use of corrosion inhibitors, soda ash, caustic, filters, or reclaimers has no indicated effect on cracking tendencies. The survey results confirmed that stress relieving is a highly effective means of preventing amine SCC.

  14. Inspecting cracks in foam insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambell, L. W.; Jung, G. K.

    1979-01-01

    Dye solution indicates extent of cracking by penetrating crack and showing original crack depth clearly. Solution comprised of methylene blue in denatured ethyl alcohol penetrates cracks completely and evaporates quickly and is suitable technique for usage in environmental or structural tests.

  15. Cracked Plain, Buried Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    4 September 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a cracked plain in western Utopia Planitia. The three circular crack patterns indicate the location of three buried meteor impact craters. These landforms are located near 41.9oN, 275.9oW. The image covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates this scene from the lower left.

  16. F-actin asymmetry and the endoplasmic reticulum-associated TCC-1 protein contribute to stereotypic spindle movements in the Caenorhabditis elegans embryo.

    PubMed

    Berends, Christian W H; Muñoz, Javier; Portegijs, Vincent; Schmidt, Ruben; Grigoriev, Ilya; Boxem, Mike; Akhmanova, Anna; Heck, Albert J R; van den Heuvel, Sander

    2013-07-01

    The microtubule spindle apparatus dictates the plane of cell cleavage in animal cells. During development, dividing cells control the position of the spindle to determine the size, location, and fate of daughter cells. Spindle positioning depends on pulling forces that act between the cell periphery and astral microtubules. This involves dynein recruitment to the cell cortex by a heterotrimeric G-protein α subunit in complex with a TPR-GoLoco motif protein (GPR-1/2, Pins, LGN) and coiled-coil protein (LIN-5, Mud, NuMA). In this study, we searched for additional factors that contribute to spindle positioning in the one-cell Caenorhabditis elegans embryo. We show that cortical actin is not needed for Gα-GPR-LIN-5 localization and pulling force generation. Instead, actin accumulation in the anterior actually reduces pulling forces, possibly by increasing cortical rigidity. Examining membrane-associated proteins that copurified with GOA-1 Gα, we found that the transmembrane and coiled-coil domain protein 1 (TCC-1) contributes to proper spindle movements. TCC-1 localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane and interacts with UNC-116 kinesin-1 heavy chain in yeast two-hybrid assays. RNA interference of tcc-1 and unc-116 causes similar defects in meiotic spindle positioning, supporting the concept of TCC-1 acting with kinesin-1 in vivo. These results emphasize the contribution of membrane-associated and cortical proteins other than Gα-GPR-LIN-5 in balancing the pulling forces that position the spindle during asymmetric cell division.

  17. Production of hydrogen by thermocatalytic cracking of natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Muradov, N.Z.

    1995-09-01

    It is universally accepted that in the next few decades hydrogen production will continue to rely on fossil fuels (primarily, natural gas). On the other hand, the conventional methods of hydrogen production from natural gas (for example, steam reforming) are complex multi-step processes. These processes also result in the emission of large quantities of CO{sub 2} into the atmosphere that produce adverse ecological effects. One alternative is the one-step thermocatalytic cracking (TCC) (or decomposition) of natural gas into hydrogen and carbon. Preliminary analysis indicates that the cost of hydrogen produced by thermal decomposition of natural gas is somewhat lower than the conventional processes after by-product carbon credit is taken. In the short term, this process can be used for on-site production of hydrogen-methane mixtures in gas-filling stations and for CO{sub x}-free production of hydrogen for fuel cell driven prime movers. The experimental data on the thermocatalytic cracking of methane over various catalysts and supports in a wide range of temperatures (500-900{degrees}C) are presented in this paper. Two types of reactors were designed and built at FSEC: continuous flow and pulse fix bed catalytic reactors. The temperature dependence of the hydrogen production yield using oxide type catalysts was studied. Alumina-supported Ni- and Fe-catalysts demonstrated relatively high efficiency in the methane cracking reaction at moderate temperatures (600-800{degrees}C). Kinetic curves of hydrogen production over metal and metal oxide catalysts at different temperatures are presented in the paper. Fe-catalyst demonstrated good stability (for several hours), whereas alumina-supported Pt-catalyst rapidly lost its catalytic activity.

  18. Electroluminescent TCC, C3dg and fB/Bb epitope assays for profiling complement cascade activation in vitro using an activated complement serum calibration standard.

    PubMed

    van Vuuren, B Jansen; Bergseth, G; Mollnes, T E; Shaw, A M

    2014-01-15

    Electroluminescent assays for epitopes on the complement components C3dg, terminal complement complex (TCC) and factor B/Bb (fB/Bb) have been developed with capture and detection antibodies to produce detection limits C3dg=91±9ng/mL, TCC=3±0.1ng/mL and fB=55.7±0.1ng/mL. The assay performance was assessed against a series of zymosan and heat aggregated IgG (HAIgG) in vitro activations of complement using a calibrated activated complement serum (ACS) as calibration standard. The ACS standard was stable within 20% accuracy over a 6-month period with freeze-thaw cycles as required. Differential activation of the complement cascade was observed for TCC showing a pseudo-first order formation half-life of 3.5h after activation with zymosan. The C3dg activation fragment indicates a 10% total activation for both activation agents. The kinetic-epitope analysis for fB indicates that the capture epitope is on the fB/Bb protein fragment which can then become covered by the formation of C3bBb or C3bBbP complexes during the time course of the cascade.

  19. A Crack Growth Evaluation Method for Interacting Multiple Cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamaya, Masayuki

    When stress corrosion cracking or corrosion fatigue occurs, multiple cracks are frequently initiated in the same area. According to section XI of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, multiple cracks are considered as a single combined crack in crack growth analysis, if the specified conditions are satisfied. In crack growth processes, however, no prescription for the interference between multiple cracks is given in this code. The JSME Post-Construction Code, issued in May 2000, prescribes the conditions of crack coalescence in the crack growth process. This study aimed to extend this prescription to more general cases. A simulation model was applied, to simulate the crack growth process, taking into account the interference between two cracks. This model made it possible to analyze multiple crack growth behaviors for many cases (e. g. different relative position and length) that could not be studied by experiment only. Based on these analyses, a new crack growth analysis method was suggested for taking into account the interference between multiple cracks.

  20. Identification of breathing cracks in a beam structure with entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimarshana, Buddhi; Wu, Nan; Wu, Christine

    2016-04-01

    A cantilever beam with a breathing crack is studied to detect and evaluate the crack using entropy measures. Closed cracks in engineering structures lead to proportional complexities to their vibration responses due to weak bi-linearity imposed by the crack breathing phenomenon. Entropy is a measure of system complexity and has the potential in quantifying the complexity. The weak bi-linearity in vibration signals can be amplified using wavelet transformation to increase the sensitivity of the measurements. A mathematical model of harmonically excited unit length steel cantilever beam with a breathing crack located near the fixed end is established, and an iterative numerical method is applied to generate accurate time domain dynamic responses. The bi-linearity in time domain signals due to the crack breathing are amplified by wavelet transformation first, and then the complexities due to bi-linearity is quantified using sample entropy to detect the possible crack and estimate the crack depth. It is observed that the method is capable of identifying crack depths even at very early stages of 3% with the increase in the entropy values more than 10% compared with the healthy beam. The current study extends the entropy based damage detection of rotary machines to structural analysis and takes a step further in high-sensitivity structural health monitoring by combining wavelet transformation with entropy calculations. The proposed technique can also be applied to other types of structures, such as plates and shells.

  1. Quantifying weld solidification cracking susceptibility using the varestraint test

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, W.; Lippold, J.C.; Nelson, T.W.

    1994-12-31

    Since the introduction of the original Varestraint concept in the 1960`s, the longitudinal- and transverse-type Varestraint tests have become the most widely utilized techniques for quantifying weld solidification cracking susceptibility. Conventionally, cracking susceptibility is assessed by threshold strain to cause cracking and the degree of cracking as quantified by total crack strain to cause cracking and the degree of cracking as quantified by total crack length or maximum crack length. Although material-specific quantifications such as the brittle temperature range (BTR) have been proposed for the transverse-type test, similar quantifications have not been developed for the longitudinal type test. Various alloys including 304, 310, 316L, A-286, AL6XN, 20Cb-3, RA253, and RA333 stainless steels, 625, 690, and 718 nickel-base alloys, 2090, 2219, 5083, and 6061 aluminum alloys were investigated using both longitudinal- and transverse-type Varestraint tests. Tests were performed using a newly developed, computer-controlled Varestraint unit equipped with a 3-axis movable torch, spring-loaded fixture and a servo-hydraulic loading system. It was found that extensive cracking was observed in the fusion zone emanating radially from the solid-liquid inteface toward the fusion boundary in the longitudinal-type test, while weld centerline cracking was prevalent in the transverse-type test. The theoretical basis for the formation of the CSR is that liquation-related cracking only occurs in a certain temperature range known as the BTR. The detailed procedure in the development of the CSR in the fusion zone is described and discussed. This approach allows a weldability data base to be created and the comparison of results from different laboratories using different test techniques.

  2. Fatigue crack tip deformation and fatigue crack propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, T. S.; Liu, H. W.

    1972-01-01

    The effects of stress ratio, prestress cycling and plate thickness on the fatigue crack propagation rate are studied on 2024-T351 aluminum alloy. Fatigue crack propagation rate increases with the plate thickness and the stress ratio. Prestress cycling below the static yield strength has no noticeable effect on the fatigue crack propagation rate. However, prestress cycling above the static yield strength causes the material to strain harden and increases the fatigue crack propagation rate. Crack tip deformation is used to study the fatigue crack propagation. The crack tip strains and the crack opening displacements were measured from moire fringe patterns. The moire fringe patterns were obtained by a double exposure technique, using a very high density master grille (13,400 lines per inch).

  3. Metal resistance of zeolitic cracking catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Chester, A.W.

    1981-03-01

    The impregnation-cracking technique of metal poisoning provides a rapid method for determining the metal resistance of a series of cracking catalysts. The method is useful for determining the effects of changes in a closely related series of catalysts or in evaluating a wide spectrum of commercially available catalysts. Containment-yields parameters allow determination of metal resistance independently of other catalyst properties. Actual catalyst performance, as indicated by the adjusted yields, is determined by both metal resistance characteristics and inherent selectivity. The results obtained in these tests are, however, relative and are not quantitatively translatable to commercial performance. Further, the impregnation-cracking technique allows detailed examination of some of the fundamental phenomena involved in metal poisoning. The overall validity of the method for qualitatively rating metal resistance can be - and has been - verified by comparing the behavior of the same catalysts in commercial units. The effect of antimony on metal poisons in commercial units has been reported and is successfully mimicked by the laboratory method. Relative metal activities, synergistic effects and metal dependences are readily determined for catalysts of particular interest. The different relative metal (Ni and V) activities for coke and hydrogen production is of importance in unit design for high metal feedstocks. In commercial FCC units, conversion or throughput is limited by either coke or hydrogen yields. Thus, units designed for increased contaminant yields based on a Ni/V activity ratio of 4 may well be underdesigned for coke. A knowledge of catalyst metal resistance, as determined here, coupled with feedstock properties, should allow more efficient designs for cracking processes for high-metal residual feedstocks.

  4. Passivating metals on cracking catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Mckay, D.L.

    1980-01-15

    Metals such as nickel, vanadium and iron contaminating a cracking catalyst are passivated by contacting the cracking catalyst under elevated temperature conditions with antimony selenide, antimony sulfide, antimony sulfate, bismuth selenide, bismuth sulfide, or bismuth phosphate.

  5. Monitoring of solidification crack propagation mechanism in pulsed laser welding of 6082 aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Witzendorff, P.; Kaierle, S.; Suttmann, O.; Overmeyer, L.

    2016-03-01

    Pulsed laser sources with pulse durations in the millisecond regime can be used for spot welding and seam welding of aluminum. Seam welds are generally produced with several overlapping spot welds. Hot cracking has its origin in the solidification process of individual spot welds which determines the cracking morphology along the seam welding. This study used a monitoring unit to capture the crack geometry within individual spot welds during seam welding to investigate the conditions for initiation, propagation and healing (re-melting) of solidification cracking within overlapping pulsed laser welds. The results suggest that small crack radii and high crack angles with respect to welding direction are favorable conditions for crack healing which leads to crack-free seam welds. Optimized pulse shapes were used to produce butt welds of 0.5 mm thick 6082 aluminum alloys. Tensile tests were performed to investigate the mechanical strength in the as-welded condition.

  6. Crack patterns over uneven substrates.

    PubMed

    Nandakishore, Pawan; Goehring, Lucas

    2016-02-28

    Cracks in thin layers are influenced by what lies beneath them. From buried craters to crocodile skin, crack patterns are found over an enormous range of length scales. Regardless of absolute size, their substrates can dramatically influence how cracks form, guiding them in some cases, or shielding regions from them in others. Here we investigate how a substrate's shape affects the appearance of cracks above it, by preparing mud cracks over sinusoidally varying surfaces. We find that as the thickness of the cracking layer increases, the observed crack patterns change from wavy to ladder-like to isotropic. Two order parameters are introduced to measure the relative alignment of these crack networks, and, along with Fourier methods, are used to characterise the transitions between crack pattern types. Finally, we explain these results with a model, based on the Griffith criteria of fracture, that identifies the conditions for which straight or wavy cracks will be seen, and predicts how well-ordered the cracks will be. Our metrics and results can be applied to any situation where connected networks of cracks are expected, or found. PMID:26762761

  7. Improvement of microbead cracking catalyst manufacture

    SciTech Connect

    Mirskii, Ya.B.; Kosolapova, A.P.; Meged, N.F.

    1986-11-01

    In order to improve the manufacturing process for KMTsR microbead catalyst for use in new cracking units, the authors consider the method of increasing the content of aluminum oxide in its amorphous part. A microbead catalyst of zeolite, containing rare-earth elements of the KMTsR type was obtained by spray-drying a slurry prepared by mechanical dispersion of hydrogel beads, with the subsequent molding and processing operations the same as in the production of bead catalyst.

  8. Sudden bending of cracked laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sih, G. C.; Chen, E. P.

    1980-01-01

    A dynamic approximate laminated plate theory is developed with emphasis placed on obtaining effective solution for the crack configuration where the 1/square root of r stress singularity and the condition of plane strain are preserved. The radial distance r is measured from the crack edge. The results obtained show that the crack moment intensity tends to decrease as the crack length to laminate plate thickness is increased. Hence, a laminated plate has the desirable feature of stabilizing a through crack as it increases its length at constant load. Also, the level of the average load intensity transmitted to a through crack can be reduced by making the inner layers to be stiffer than the outer layers. The present theory, although approximate, is useful for analyzing laminate failure to crack propagation under dynamic load conditions.

  9. Elevated temperature crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yau, J. F.; Malik, S. N.; Kim, K. S.; Vanstone, R. H.; Laflen, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of the Elevated Temperature Crack Growth Project is to evaluate proposed nonlinear fracture mechanics methods for application to combustor liners of aircraft gas turbine engines. During the first year of this program, proposed path-independent (P-I) integrals were reviewed for such applications. Several P-I integrals were implemented into a finite-element postprocessor which was developed and verified as part of the work. Alloy 718 was selected as the analog material for use in the forthcoming experimental work. A buttonhead, single-edge notch specimen was designed and verified for use in elevated-temperature strain control testing with significant inelastic strains. A crack mouth opening displacement measurement device was developed for further use.

  10. Statistical crack mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Dienes, J.K.

    1983-01-01

    An alternative to the use of plasticity theory to characterize the inelastic behavior of solids is to represent the flaws by statistical methods. We have taken such an approach to study fragmentation because it offers a number of advantages. Foremost among these is that, by considering the effects of flaws, it becomes possible to address the underlying physics directly. For example, we have been able to explain why rocks exhibit large strain-rate effects (a consequence of the finite growth rate of cracks), why a spherical explosive imbedded in oil shale produces a cavity with a nearly square section (opening of bedding cracks) and why propellants may detonate following low-speed impact (a consequence of frictional hot spots).

  11. Cracked and Pitted Plain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-536, 6 November 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a typical view--at 1.5 meters (5 feet) per pixel--of surfaces in far western Utopia Planitia. In this region, the plains have developed cracks and pit chains arranged in a polygonal pattern. The pits form by collapse along the trend of a previously-formed crack. This picture is located near 45.0oN, 275.4oW. This April 2003 image covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  12. Replica-based Crack Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Smith, Stephen W.; Piascik, R. S.; Willard, Scott A.; Dawicke, David S.

    2007-01-01

    A surface replica-based crack inspection method has recently been developed for use in Space Shuttle main engine (SSME) hydrogen feedline flowliners. These flowliners exist to ensure favorable flow of liquid hydrogen over gimble joint bellows, and consist of two rings each containing 38 elongated slots. In the summer of 2002, multiple cracks ranging from 0.1 inches to 0.6 inches long were discovered; each orbiter contained at least one cracked flowliner. These long cracks were repaired and eddy current inspections ensured that no cracks longer than 0.075 inches were present. However, subsequent fracture-mechanics review of flight rationale required detection of smaller cracks, and was the driving force for development of higher-resolution inspection method. Acetate tape surface replicas have been used for decades to detect and monitor small cracks. However, acetate tape replicas have primarily been limited to laboratory specimens because complexities involved in making these replicas - requiring acetate tape to be dissolved with acetone - are not well suited for a crack inspection tool. More recently developed silicon-based replicas are better suited for use as a crack detection tool. A commercially available silicon-based replica product has been determined to be acceptable for use in SSME hydrogen feedlines. A method has been developed using this product and a scanning electron microscope for analysis, which can find cracks as small as 0.005 inches and other features (e.g., pits, scratches, tool marks, etc.) as small as 0.001 inches. The resolution of this method has been validated with dozens of cracks generated in a laboratory setting and this method has been used to locate 55 cracks (ranging in size from 0.040 inches to 0.004 inches) on space flight hardware. These cracks were removed by polishing away the cracked material and a second round of replicas confirmed the repair.

  13. Utopia Cracks and Polygons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-339, 23 April 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a pattern of polygonal cracks and aligned, elliptical pits in western Utopia Planitia. The picture covers an area about 3 km (about 1.9 mi) wide near 44.9oN, 274.7oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  14. Subcritical crack growth in marble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nara, Yoshitaka; Nishida, Yuki; Toshinori, Ii; Harui, Tomoki; Tanaka, Mayu; Kashiwaya, Koki

    2016-04-01

    It is essential to study time-dependent deformation and fracturing in various rock materials to prevent natural hazards related to the failure of a rock mass. In addition, information of time-dependent fracturing is essential to ensure the long-term stability of a rock mass surrounding various structures. Subcritical crack growth is one of the main causes of time-dependent fracturing in rock. It is known that subcritical crack growth is influenced by not only stress but also surrounding environment. Studies of subcritical crack growth have been widely conducted for silicate rocks such as igneous rocks and sandstones. By contrast, information of subcritical crack growth in carbonate rocks is not enough. Specifically, influence of surrounding environment on subcritical crack growth in carbonate rock should be clarified to ensure the long-term stability of a rock mass. In this study, subcritical crack growth in marble was investigated. Especially, the influence of the temperature, relative humidity and water on subcritical crack growth in marble is investigated. As rock samples, marbles obtained in Skopje-City in Macedonia and Carrara-City in Italy were used. To measure subcritical crack growth, we used the load relaxation method of the double-torsion (DT) test. All measurements by DT test were conducted under controlled temperature and relative humidity. For both marbles, it was shown that the crack velocity in marble in air increased with increasing relative humidity at a constant temperature. Additionally, the crack velocity in water was much higher than that in air. It was also found that the crack velocity increased with increasing temperature. It is considered that temperature and water have significant influences on subcritical crack growth in marble. For Carrara marble in air, it was recognized that the value of subcritical crack growth index became low when the crack velocity was higher than 10-4 m/s. This is similar to Region II of subcritical crack growth

  15. Investigation of Cracks Found in Helicopter Longerons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Baughman, James M.; Wallace, Terryl A.

    2009-01-01

    Four cracked longerons, containing a total of eight cracks, were provided for study. Cracked regions were cut from the longerons. Load was applied to open the cracks, enabling crack surface examination. Examination revealed that crack propagation was driven by fatigue loading in all eight cases. Fatigue crack initiation appears to have occurred on the top edge of the longerons near geometric changes that affect component bending stiffness. Additionally, metallurigical analysis has revealed a local depletion in alloying elements in the crack initiation regions that may be a contributing factor. Fatigue crack propagation appeared to be initially driven by opening-mode loading, but at a crack length of approximately 0.5 inches (12.7 mm), there is evidence of mixed-mode crack loading. For the longest cracks studied, shear-mode displacements destroyed crack-surface features of interest over significant portions of the crack surfaces.

  16. On the Crack Bifurcation and Fanning of Crack Growth Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, Royce G.; Zanganeh, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Crack growth data obtained from ASTM load shedding method for different R values show some fanning especially for aluminum alloys. It is believed by the authors and it has been shown before that the observed fanning is due to the crack bifurcation occurs in the near threshold region which is a function of intrinsic properties of the alloy. Therefore, validity of the ASTM load shedding test procedure and results is confirmed. However, this position has been argued by some experimentalists who believe the fanning is an artifact of the test procedure and thus the obtained results are invalid. It has been shown that using a special test procedure such as using compressively pre-cracked specimens will eliminate the fanning effect. Since not using the fanned data fit can result in a significantly lower calculated cyclic life, design of a component, particularly for rotorcraft and propeller systems will considerably be impacted and therefore this study is of paramount importance. In this effort both test procedures i.e. ASTM load shedding and the proposed compressive pre-cracking have been used to study the fatigue crack growth behavior of compact tension specimens made of aluminum alloy 2524-T3. Fatigue crack growth paths have been closely observed using SEM machines to investigate the effects of compression pre-cracking on the crack bifurcation behavior. The results of this study will shed a light on resolving the existing argument by better understanding of near threshold fatigue crack growth behavior.

  17. Preventing Cracking of Anodized Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Charles C.; Heslin, Thomas M.

    1995-01-01

    Anodized coatings have been used as optical and thermal surfaces in spacecraft. Particulate contamination from cracked coatings is a concern for many applications. The major cause for the cracking is the difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion between the oxide coatings and the aluminum substrate. The loss of water when the coating is exposed to a vacuum also could induce cracking of the coating. Hot-water sealing was identified as the major cause for the cracking of the coatings because of the large temperature change when the parts were immersed in boiling water and the water was absorbed in the coating. when the hot-water sealing process was eliminated, the cracking resistance of the anodized coatings was greatly improved. Also, it was found that dyed black coatings were more susceptible than clear coatings to cracking during thermo-vacuum cyclings.

  18. A comprehensive theoretical, numerical and experimental approach for crack detection in power plant rotating machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoisser, C. M.; Audebert, S.

    2008-05-01

    In order to describe the state-of-the-art on cracked rotor related problems, the current work presents the comprehensive theoretical, numerical and experimental approach adopted by EDF for crack detection in power plant rotating machinery. The work mainly focuses on the theoretical cracked beam model developed in the past years by S. Andrieux and C. Varé and associates both numerical and experimental aspects related to the crack detection problem in either turboset or turbo pump units. The theoretical part consists of the derivation of a lumped cracked beam model from the three-dimensional formulation of the general problem of elasticity with unilateral contact conditions on the crack lips, valid for any shape and number of cracks in the beam section and extended to cracks not located in a cross-section. This leads to the assessment of the cracked beam rigidity as a function of the rotation angle, in case of pure bending load or bending plus shear load. In this way the function can be implemented in a 1D rotordynamics code. An extension of the cracked beam model taking into account the torsion behaviour is also proposed. It is based on the assumption of full adherence between crack lips, when the crack closes, and on an incremental formulation of deformation energy. An experimental validation has been carried out using different cracked samples, both in static and dynamic configurations, considering one or three elliptic cracks in the same cross-section and helix-shaped cracks. Concerning the static configuration, a good agreement between numerical and experimental results is found. It is shown to be equal to 1% maximal gap of the beam deflection. Concerning the dynamical analysis, the main well-known indicator 2× rev. bending vibration component at half critical speed is approximated at maximum by 18% near the crack position. Our experiments also allowed for the observation of the bending and torsion resonance frequency shifts determined by the extra

  19. Shuttle Fuel Feedliner Cracking Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesman, Tomas E.; Turner, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of material covered during 'Space Shuttle Fuel Feedliner Cracking Investigation MSFC Fluids Workshop' held November 19-21, 2002. Topics covered include: cracks on fuel feed lines of Orbiter space shuttles, fluid driven cracking analysis, liner structural modes, structural motion in a fluid, fluid borne drivers, three dimensional computational fluid dynamics models, fluid borne drivers from pumps, amplification mechanisms, flow parameter mapping, and flight engine flow map.

  20. Catalyst for cracking kerosene

    SciTech Connect

    Hsie, C. H.

    1985-06-04

    A catalyst capable of cracking kerosene under lower pressure and temperature comprising kerosene; metal powder mixture of chromium powder, copper powder, lead powder, zinc powder, nickel powder, manganese powder in an amount of 12 to 13 parts by weight per 100 parts by weight of said kerosene; sulfuric acid in an amount of 15 to 30 parts by weight per 100 parts by weight of said kerosene; inorganic powder mixture of aluminum oxide powder, serpentine powder, alum powder, magnesium oxide powder, limestone powder, slake lime powder, silica powder, and granite powder in an amount of 150 to 170 parts by weight per 100 parts by weight of said kerosene.

  1. Shear fatigue crack growth - A literature survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H. W.

    1985-01-01

    Recent studies of shear crack growth are reviewed, emphasizing test methods and data analyses. The combined mode I and mode II elastic crack tip stress fields are considered. The development and design of the compact shear specimen are described, and the results of fatigue crack growth tests using compact shear specimens are reviewed. The fatigue crack growth tests are discussed and the results of inclined cracks in tensile panels, center cracks in plates under biaxial loading, cracked beam specimens with combined bending and shear loading, center-cracked panels and double edge-cracked plates under cyclic shear loading are examined and analyzed in detail.

  2. Elastostatic stress analysis of orthotropic rectangular center-cracked plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, G. S.; Mendelson, A.

    1972-01-01

    A mapping-collocation method was developed for the elastostatic stress analysis of finite, anisotropic plates with centrally located traction-free cracks. The method essentially consists of mapping the crack into the unit circle and satisfying the crack boundary conditions exactly with the help of Muskhelishvili's function extension concept. The conditions on the outer boundary are satisfied approximately by applying the method of least-squares boundary collocation. A parametric study of finite-plate stress intensity factors, employing this mapping-collocation method, is presented. It shows the effects of varying material properties, orientation angle, and crack-length-to-plate-width and plate-height-to-plate-width ratios for rectangular orthotropic plates under constant tensile and shear loads.

  3. Experiences on IGSCC crack manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Veron, P.

    1997-02-01

    The author presents his experience in manufacturing IGSCC realistic defects, mainly in INCONEL 600 MA Steam Generator Tubes. From that experience he extracts some knowledge about this cracking (influence of chemistry in the environment, stress state, crack growth rate, and occurrence in laboratory condition of break before leak).

  4. Interface cracks in piezoelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govorukha, V.; Kamlah, M.; Loboda, V.; Lapusta, Y.

    2016-02-01

    Due to their intrinsic electromechanical coupling behavior, piezoelectric materials are widely used in sensors, actuators and other modern technologies. It is well known that piezoelectric ceramics are very brittle and susceptible to fracture. In many cases, fracture occurs at interfaces as debonding and cracks. This leads to an undesired degradation of electrical and mechanical performance. Because of the practical and fundamental importance of the problem, interface cracks in piezoelectric materials have been actively studied in the last few decades. This review provides a comprehensive survey of recent works on cracks situated at the interface of two materials, at least one of which has piezoelectric or piezoelectromagnetic properties. Different electric boundary conditions along the crack faces are discussed. The oscillating and contact zone models for in-plane straight interface cracks between two dissimilar piezoelectric materials or between piezoelectric and non-piezoelectric ones are reviewed. Different peculiarities related to the investigation of interface cracks in piezoelectric materials for the anti-plane case, for functionally graded and thermopiezoelectric materials are presented. Papers related to magnetoelectroelastic bimaterials, to steady state motion of interface cracks in piezoelectric bimaterials and to circular arc-cracks at the interface of piezoelectric materials are reviewed, and various methods used to address these problems are discussed. The review concludes with an outlook on future research directions.

  5. Bonded orthotropic strips with cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delale, F.; Erdogan, F.

    1979-01-01

    The elastostatic problem for a nonhomogeneous plane which consists of two sets of periodically arranged dissimilar orthotropic strips is considered. It is assumed that the plane contains a series of collinear cracks perpendicular to the interfaces and is loaded in tension away from and perpendicular to the cracks. The problem of cracks fully imbedded into the homogeneous strips is considered. The singular behavior of the stresses for two special crack geometries is studied. The first is the case of a broken laminate in which the crack tips touch the interfaces. The second is the case of cracks crossing the interfaces. An interesting result found from the analysis of the latter is that for certain orthotropic material combinations the stress state at the point of intersection of a crack and an interface may be bounded whereas in isotropic materials at this point stresses are always singular. A number of numerical examples are worked out to separate the primary material parameters influencing the stress intensity factors and the powers of stress singularity, and to determine the trends regarding the influence of the secondary parameters. Some numerical results are given for the stress intensity factors in certain basic crack geometries and for typical material combinations.

  6. Replica-Based Crack Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Willard, Scott A.; Smith, Stephen W.; Piascik, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    Surface replication has been proposed as a method for crack detection in space shuttle main engine flowliner slots. The results of a feasibility study show that examination of surface replicas with a scanning electron microscope can result in the detection of cracks as small as 0.005 inch, and surface flaws as small as 0.001 inch, for the flowliner material.

  7. High speed thin plate fatigue crack monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz A. (Inventor); Heyman, Joseph S. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor); Fulton, James P. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A device and method are provided which non-destructively detect crack length and crack geometry in thin metallic plates. A non-contacting vibration apparatus produces resonant vibrations without introducing extraneous noise. Resulting resonant vibration shifts in cracked plates are correlated to known crack length in plates with similar resonant vibration shifts. In addition, acoustic emissions of cracks at resonance frequencies are correlated to acoustic emissions from known crack geometries.

  8. Establishment and characterization of A novel Philadelphia-chromosome positive chronic myeloid leukemia cell line, TCC-S, expressing P210 and P190 BCR/ABL transcripts but missing normal ABL gene.

    PubMed

    Van, Phan Nguyen Thanh; Xinh, Phan Thi; Kano, Yasuhiko; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Sato, Yuko

    2005-03-01

    A novel Philadelphia-chromosome positive (Ph+) cell line, TCC-S, has been established from a patient with Ph+ chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in the blastic crisis. TCC-S cells were shown to express both P210 and P190 BCR/ABL transcripts by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (PCR), although quantitative-PCR revealed that TCC-S cells mainly expressed P210 BCR/ABL transcript. Karyotype analysis revealed several triploid clones which constantly harbored two der(9)del(9) (p12)t(9;22) (q34;qll)s and two del(9) (q21)s. The der(9)del(9) (p12)t(9;22) (q34;q11) is rarely found in other CML cell lines. Moreover, to the best of our knowledge, del(9) (q21) resulting in missing of a restrict region including normal ABL gene has not been found among CML cell lines previously described. Thus, TCC-S cells with only BCR/ABL gene and no normal ABL gene may be a useful tool for functional study of ABL in Ph+ CML.

  9. 40 CFR 63.1568 - What are my requirements for HAP emissions from sulfur recovery units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... emissions from sulfur recovery units? 63.1568 Section 63.1568 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, Sulfur Recovery Units, and Bypass Lines § 63.1568...

  10. Numerical simulation of out-of-plane distortion fatigue crack growth in bridge girders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MIller, Paula A.

    Aging of the United States infrastructure systems has resulted in the degradation of many operational bridge structures throughout the country. Structural deficiencies can result from material fatigue caused by cyclical loadings leading to localized structural damage. While fatigue crack growth is viewed as a serviceability problem, unstable crack growth can compromise the integrity of the structure. Multi-girder bridges designed with transverse cross bracing systems can be prone to distortion fatigue at unstiffened web gaps. Cracking is exhibited within this fatigue prone region from the application of cyclical multi-mode loadings. Focus of fatigue analysis has largely been directed at pure Mode I loading through the development of AASHTO fatigue classifications for crack initiation and the Paris Law for crack propagation. Numerical modeling approaches through the ABAQUS Extended Finite Element Method offers a unique avenue in which this detail can be assessed. Finite element simulations were developed to first evaluate the applicability of the Paris Law crack propagation under multi-mode loading against experimental data. Following the validation, fatigue crack growth in plate girders with various web gap sizes was assessed due to mixed-mode loadings. Modeling results showed enlargement of horizontal initial crack lengths within stiffer web gap regions arrested crack development. Crack directionality was also seen to change as initial crack lengths were increased. From this research it is hypothesized that deterioration of the transverse stiffener connection can be minimized by increasing the horizontal length of initial fatigue cracks. Enlargement of the crack plane away from regions of localized stress concentrations within the web gap may result in arrestment of the out-of-plane distortion induced cracking.

  11. Password Cracking Using Sony Playstations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinhans, Hugo; Butts, Jonathan; Shenoi, Sujeet

    Law enforcement agencies frequently encounter encrypted digital evidence for which the cryptographic keys are unknown or unavailable. Password cracking - whether it employs brute force or sophisticated cryptanalytic techniques - requires massive computational resources. This paper evaluates the benefits of using the Sony PlayStation 3 (PS3) to crack passwords. The PS3 offers massive computational power at relatively low cost. Moreover, multiple PS3 systems can be introduced easily to expand parallel processing when additional power is needed. This paper also describes a distributed framework designed to enable law enforcement agents to crack encrypted archives and applications in an efficient and cost-effective manner.

  12. A computational algorithm for crack determination: The multiple crack case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, Kurt; Vogelius, Michael

    1992-01-01

    An algorithm for recovering a collection of linear cracks in a homogeneous electrical conductor from boundary measurements of voltages induced by specified current fluxes is developed. The technique is a variation of Newton's method and is based on taking weighted averages of the boundary data. The method also adaptively changes the applied current flux at each iteration to maintain maximum sensitivity to the estimated locations of the cracks.

  13. Stress intensity and crack displacement for small edge cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orange, Thomas W.

    1988-01-01

    The weight function method was used to derive stress intensity factors and crack mouth displacement coefficients for small edge cracks (less than 20 percent of the specimen width) in common fracture specimen configurations. Contact stresses due to point application of loads were found to be small but significant for three-point bending and insignificant for four-point bending. The results are compared with available equations and numerical solutions from the literature and with unpublished boundary collocation results.

  14. Peridynamic model for fatigue cracking.

    SciTech Connect

    Silling, Stewart Andrew; Abe Askari

    2014-10-01

    The peridynamic theory is an extension of traditional solid mechanics in which the field equations can be applied on discontinuities, such as growing cracks. This paper proposes a bond damage model within peridynamics to treat the nucleation and growth of cracks due to cyclic loading. Bond damage occurs according to the evolution of a variable called the "remaining life" of each bond that changes over time according to the cyclic strain in the bond. It is shown that the model reproduces the main features of S-N data for typical materials and also reproduces the Paris law for fatigue crack growth. Extensions of the model account for the effects of loading spectrum, fatigue limit, and variable load ratio. A three-dimensional example illustrates the nucleation and growth of a helical fatigue crack in the torsion of an aluminum alloy rod.

  15. 21 CFR 137.190 - Cracked wheat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cracked wheat. 137.190 Section 137.190 Food and... Related Products § 137.190 Cracked wheat. Cracked wheat is the food prepared by so cracking or cutting into angular fragments cleaned wheat other than durum wheat and red durum wheat that, when tested...

  16. 21 CFR 137.190 - Cracked wheat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cracked wheat. 137.190 Section 137.190 Food and... Related Products § 137.190 Cracked wheat. Cracked wheat is the food prepared by so cracking or cutting into angular fragments cleaned wheat other than durum wheat and red durum wheat that, when tested...

  17. 21 CFR 137.190 - Cracked wheat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cracked wheat. 137.190 Section 137.190 Food and... Related Products § 137.190 Cracked wheat. Cracked wheat is the food prepared by so cracking or cutting into angular fragments cleaned wheat other than durum wheat and red durum wheat that, when tested...

  18. 21 CFR 137.190 - Cracked wheat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cracked wheat. 137.190 Section 137.190 Food and... Related Products § 137.190 Cracked wheat. Cracked wheat is the food prepared by so cracking or cutting into angular fragments cleaned wheat other than durum wheat and red durum wheat that, when tested...

  19. 21 CFR 137.190 - Cracked wheat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cracked wheat. 137.190 Section 137.190 Food and... Related Products § 137.190 Cracked wheat. Cracked wheat is the food prepared by so cracking or cutting into angular fragments cleaned wheat other than durum wheat and red durum wheat that, when tested...

  20. Cocaine/Crack: The Big Lie.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. on Drug Abuse (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD.

    This pamphlet focuses on cocaine and crack use and the addictive nature of cocaine/crack. It contains a set of 21 questions about crack and cocaine, each accompanied by a clear and complete response. Interspersed throughout the booklet are photographs and quotes from former cocaine or crack users/addicts. Questions and answers focus on what…

  1. Cracking behavior of cored structures

    SciTech Connect

    Wahid, A.; Olson, D.L.; Matlock, D.K. . Center for Welding and Joining Research); Kelly, T.J. )

    1991-01-01

    The effects of compositional gradients, are considered based on a thermodynamic analysis, referred to as the Cahn-Hillard analysis, which describes the degree to which a local surface energy is modified by the presence of a composition gradient. The analysis predicts that both ductile and brittle fracture mechanisms are enhanced by the presence of a composition gradient. Data on stress corrosion cracking and fatigue crack growth in selected FCC alloys are used to illustrate the significance of microsegregation on mechanical properties.

  2. Cracking behavior of cored structures

    SciTech Connect

    Wahid, A.; Olson, D.L.; Matlock, D.K.; Kelly, T.J.

    1991-12-31

    The effects of compositional gradients, are considered based on a thermodynamic analysis, referred to as the Cahn-Hillard analysis, which describes the degree to which a local surface energy is modified by the presence of a composition gradient. The analysis predicts that both ductile and brittle fracture mechanisms are enhanced by the presence of a composition gradient. Data on stress corrosion cracking and fatigue crack growth in selected FCC alloys are used to illustrate the significance of microsegregation on mechanical properties.

  3. Initiation and propagation of small corner cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellyin, Ferdnand; Kujawski, Daniel; Craig, David F.

    1994-01-01

    The behaviour of small corner cracks, inclined or perpendicular to loading direction, is presented. There are two aspects to this investigation: initiation of small cracks and monitoring their subsequent growth. An initial pre-cracking procedure under cyclic compression is adopted to minimize the residual damage at the tip of the growing and self-arresting crack under cyclic compression. A final fatigue specimen, cut from the larger pre-cracked specimen, has two corner flaws. The opening load of corner flaw is monitored using a novel strain gauge approach. The behaviour of small corner cracks is described in terms of growth rate relative to the size of the crack and its shape.

  4. Mitigation of Crack Damage in Metallic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leser, Patrick E.; Newman, John A.; Smith, Stephen W.; Leser, William P.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Wallace, Terryl A.; Glaessgen, Edward H.; Piascik, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    A system designed to mitigate or heal crack damage in metallic materials has been developed where the protected material or component is coated with a low-melting temperature film. After a crack is formed, the material is heated, melting the film which then infiltrates the crack opening through capillary action. Upon solidification, the healing material inhibits further crack damage in two ways. While the crack healing material is intact, it acts like an adhesive that bonds or bridges the crack faces together. After fatigue loading damages, the healing material in the crack mouth inhibits further crack growth by creating artificially-high crack closure levels. Mechanical test data show that this method sucessfully arrests or retards crack growth in laboratory specimens.

  5. Cracks in Utopia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Many of the craters found on the northern plains of Mars have been partly filled or buried by some material (possibly sediment). The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image presented here (MOC2-136b, above left) shows a high-resolution view of a tiny portion of the floor of one of these northern plains craters. The crater, located in Utopia Planitia at 44oN, 258oW, is shown on the right (MOC2-136a)with a small white box to indicate the location of the MOC image. The MOC image reveals that the material covering the floor of this crater is cracked and pitted. The origin and source of material that has been deposited in this crater is unknown.

    The MOC image was acquired in June 1999 and covers an area only 1.1 kilometers (0.7 miles) wide at a resolution of 1.8 meters (6 feet) per pixel. The context picture is a mosaic of Viking 2 orbiter images 010B53 and 010B55, taken in 1976. Both images are illuminated from the left. Malin Space Science Systems and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  6. Formation and interpretation of dilatant echelon cracks.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollard, D.D.; Segall, P.; Delaney, P.T.

    1982-01-01

    The relative displacements of the walls of many veins, joints, and dikes demonstrate that these structures are dilatant cracks. We infer that dilatant cracks propagate in a principal stress plane, normal to the maximum tensile or least compressive stress. Arrays of echelon crack segments appear to emerge from the peripheries of some dilatant cracks. Breakdown of a parent crack into an echelon array may be initiated by a spatial or temporal rotation of the remote principal stresses about an axis parallel to the crack propagation direction. Near the parent-crack tip, a rotation of the local principal stresses is induced in the same sense, but not necessarily through the same angle. Incipient echelon cracks form at the parent-crack tip normal to the local maximum tensile stress. Further longitudinal growth along surfaces that twist about axes parallel to the propagation direction realigns each echelon crack into a remote principal stress plane. The walls of these twisted cracks may be idealized as helicoidal surfaces. An array of helicoidal cracks sweeps out less surface area than one parent crack twisting through the same angle. Thus, many echelon cracks grow from a single parent because the work done in creating the array, as measured by its surface area decreases as the number of cracks increases. -from Authors

  7. Coalescence, Cracking, and Crack Healing in Drying Dispersion Droplets.

    PubMed

    van der Kooij, Hanne M; de Kool, Marleen; van der Gucht, Jasper; Sprakel, Joris

    2015-04-21

    The formation of a uniform film from a polymer dispersion is a complex phenomenon involving the interplay of many processes: evaporation and resulting fluid flows through confined geometries, particle packing and deformation, coalescence, and cracking. Understanding this multidimensional problem has proven challenging, precluding a clear understanding of film formation to date. This is especially true for drying dispersion droplets, where the particular geometry introduces additional complexity such as lateral flow toward the droplet periphery. We study the drying of these droplets using a simplified approach in which we systematically vary a single parameter: the glass transition temperature (Tg) of the polymer. We combine optical with scanning electron microscopy to elucidate these processes from the macroscopic down to the single-particle level, both qualitatively and quantitatively, over times ranging from seconds to days. Our results indicate that the polymer Tg has a marked influence on the time evolution of particle deformation and coalescence, giving rise to a distinct and sudden cracking transition. Moreover, in cracked droplets it affects the frequently overlooked time scale of crack healing, giving rise to a second transition from self-healing to permanently cracked droplets. These findings are in line with the classical Routh-Russel model for film formation yet extend its scope from particle-level dynamics to long-range polymer flow.

  8. Observation of Intralaminar Cracking in the Edge Crack Torsion Specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czabaj, Michael W.; Ratcliffe, James G.; Davidson, Barry D.

    2013-01-01

    The edge crack torsion (ECT) test is evaluated to determine its suitability for measuring fracture toughness associated with mode III delamination growth onset. A series of ECT specimens with preimplanted inserts with different lengths is tested and examined using nondestructive and destructive techniques. Ultrasonic inspection of all tested specimens reveals that delamination growth occurs at one interface ply beneath the intended midplane interface. Sectioning and optical microscopy suggest that the observed delamination growth results from coalescence of angled intralaminar matrix cracks that form and extend across the midplane plies. The relative orientation of these cracks is approximately 45 deg with respect to the midplane, suggesting their formation is caused by resolved principal tensile stresses arising due to the global mode-III shear loading. Examination of ECT specimens tested to loads below the level corresponding to delamination growth onset reveals that initiation of intralaminar cracking approximately coincides with the onset of nonlinearity in the specimen's force-displacement response. The existence of intralaminar cracking prior to delamination growth onset and the resulting delamination extension at an unintended interface render the ECT test, in its current form, unsuitable for characterization of mode III delamination growth onset. The broader implications of the mechanisms observed in this study are also discussed with respect to the current understanding of shear-driven delamination in tape-laminate composites.

  9. BWR pipe crack remedies evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Shack, W.J.; Kassner, T.F.; Maiya, P.S.; Park, J.Y.; Ruther, W.E.

    1986-10-01

    This paper presents results on: (a) the influence of simulated BWR environments on the stress-corrosion-craking (SCC) susceptibility of Types 304, 316NG, and 347 stainless (SS); (b) fracture-mechanics crack-growth-rate measurements on these materials and weld overlay specimens in different environments; and (c) residual stress measurements and metallographic evaluations of conventional pipe weldments treated by a mechanical-stress-improvement process (MSIP) as well as those produced by a narrow-gap welding procedure. Crack initiation studies on Types 304 and 316NG SS under crevice and non-crevice conditions in 289/sup 0/C water containing 0.25 ppM dissolved oxygen with low sulfate concentrations indicate that SCC initiates at very low strains (<3%) in the nuclear grade material. Crack growth measurements on fracture-mechanics-type specimens, under low-frequency cyclic loading, show that the Type 316NG steel cracks at a somewhat lower rate (approx.40%) than sensitized Type 304 SS in an impurity environment with 0.25 ppM dissolved-oxygen; however, the latter material stops cracking when sulfate is removed from the water. Crack growth in both materials ceases under simulated hydrogen-water chemistry conditions (<5 ppB oxygen) even with 100 ppB sulfate present in the water. An unexpected result was obtained in the test on a weld overlay specimen in the impurity environment, viz., the crack grew to the overlay interface at a nominal rate, branched at 90/sup 0/ in both directions, and then grew at high rate (parallel to the nominal applied load). Residual stress measurements on MSIP-treated weldments and those produced by a narrow-gap welding procedure indicate that these techniques produce compressive stresses over most of the inner surface near the weld and heat-affected zones.

  10. Salinity effects on the dynamics and patterns of desiccation cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokri, N.; Zhou, P.

    2012-12-01

    Cracking arising from desiccation is a ubiquitous phenomenon encountered in various industrial and geo-environmental applications including drying of clayey soil, cement, ceramics, gels, and many more colloidal suspensions. Presence of cracks in muddy sediments modifies the characteristics of the medium such as pore structure, porosity, and permeability which in turn influence various flow and transport processes. Thus it remains a topic of great interest in many disciplines to describe the dynamics of desiccation cracking under various boundary conditions. To this end, we conducted a comprehensive study to investigate effects of NaCl concentrations on cracking dynamics and patterns during desiccation of Bentonite. Mixtures of Bentonite and NaCl solutions were prepared with NaCl concentration varying from 2 to 10 percent in 0.5 percent increment (totally 17 configurations). The slurry was placed in a Petri dish mounted on a digital balance to record the evaporation dynamics. The atmospheric conditions were kept constant using an environmental chamber. An automatic camera was used to record the dynamics of macro-cracks (mm scale) at the surface of desiccating clay each minute. The obtained results illustrate the significant effects of salt concentration on the initiation, propagation, morphology and general dynamics of macro-cracks. We found that higher salt concentrations results in larger macro cracks' lengths attributed to the effects of NaCl on compressing the electric double layer of particles at increasing electrolyte concentrations which reduce considerably the repulsive forces among the particles and causing instability of the slurry and flocculation of the colloidal particles. Rheological measurements by means of a stress controlled rheometer revealed that the yield stress of the slurry decreases as NaCl concentration increases which may indicate aggregation of larger units in the slurry as a result of flocculation causing larger cracks' lengths due to

  11. 40 CFR 63.1566 - What are my requirements for organic HAP emissions from catalytic reforming units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, Sulfur Recovery Units, and Bypass Lines § 63.1566 What... HAP emissions from catalytic reforming units? 63.1566 Section 63.1566 Protection of...

  12. Fatigue reliability of cracked engineering structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanning, David Bruce, Jr.

    1997-12-01

    This study investigates the reliability of engineering structures containing fatigue cracks. Stress concentrations and welded joints are probable locations for the initiation and propagation of fatigue cracks. Due to the many unknowns of loading, materials properties, crack sizes and crack shapes present at these locations, a statistics-based reliability analysis is valuable in the careful consideration of these many different random factors involved in a fatigue life analysis, several of which are expanded upon in this study. The basic problem of a crack near a stress concentration is first considered. A formulation for the aspect ratio (a/c) of a propagating semi-elliptical fatigue crack located at the toe of a welded T-joint is developed using Newman and Raju's stress intensity factor for a cracked flat plate with a weld magnification factor and compared to that of a cracked flat plate, and the reliability in terms of fatigue lifetime is calculated with the aid of Paris' crack propagation equation for membrane and bending loadings. Crack closure effects are then introduced in the consideration of short crack effects, where crack growth rates typically may exceed those found using traditional linear elastic fracture mechanics solutions for long cracks. The probability of a very small, microstructurally influenced crack growing to a size influenced by local plastic conditions is calculated utilizing the probability of a crack continuing to grow past an obstacle, such as a grain boundary. The result is then combined with the probability for failure defined using the crack closure-modified Paris equation to find an overall reliability for the structure. Last, the probability of fracture is determined when a crack front encounters regions of non-uniform toughness, such as typical in the heat affected zone of a welded joint. An expression for the effective crack lengths of the dissimilar regions is derived, and used in a weakest-link fracture model in the evaluation

  13. Distributed coaxial cable crack sensors for crack mapping in RC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, Gary G.; Belarbi, Abdeldjelil; Chen, Genda; McDaniel, Ryan

    2005-05-01

    New type of distributed coaxial cable sensors for health monitoring of large-scale civil infrastructure was recently proposed and developed by the authors. This paper shows the results and performance of such sensors mounted on near surface of two flexural beams and a large scale reinforced concrete box girder that was subjected to twenty cycles of combined shear and torsion. The main objectives of this health monitoring study was to correlate the sensor's response to strain in the member, and show that magnitude of the signal's reflection coefficient is related to increases in applied load, repeated cycles, cracking, crack mapping, and yielding. The effect of multiple adjacent cracks, and signal loss was also investigated.

  14. Fatigue Crack Growth Database for Damage Tolerance Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, R. G.; Shivakumar, V.; Cardinal, J. W.; Williams, L. C.; McKeighan, P. C.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this project was to begin the process of developing a fatigue crack growth database (FCGD) of metallic materials for use in damage tolerance analysis of aircraft structure. For this initial effort, crack growth rate data in the NASGRO (Registered trademark) database, the United States Air Force Damage Tolerant Design Handbook, and other publicly available sources were examined and used to develop a database that characterizes crack growth behavior for specific applications (materials). The focus of this effort was on materials for general commercial aircraft applications, including large transport airplanes, small transport commuter airplanes, general aviation airplanes, and rotorcraft. The end products of this project are the FCGD software and this report. The specific goal of this effort was to present fatigue crack growth data in three usable formats: (1) NASGRO equation parameters, (2) Walker equation parameters, and (3) tabular data points. The development of this FCGD will begin the process of developing a consistent set of standard fatigue crack growth material properties. It is envisioned that the end product of the process will be a general repository for credible and well-documented fracture properties that may be used as a default standard in damage tolerance analyses.

  15. The influence of stress ratio and temperature on the fatigue crack growth rate behavior of ARALL

    SciTech Connect

    Salivar, G.C.; Gardini, C.A. Pratt Whitney Group, West Palm Beach, FL )

    1993-01-01

    The fatigue crack growth rate behavior of ARALL (aramid-reinforced aluminum laminate) was investigated as a function of stress ratio and temperature. The particular material was ARALL-3, a 7475-T76 aluminum alloy laminate. Tests were conducted for stress ratios of 0.1 and 0.5 at temperatures of 21, 82, and 93 C (70, 180, and 200 F) using a center-cracked panel geometry (measurements were made in English units and converted to SI units). The objective was to examine the contributions of the effects of crack closure and fiber bridging of the crack on the material behavior. Crack closure was monitored throughout the tests using compliance measurements. Fractography was used to investigate the influence of temperature on the integrity of the aluminum to epoxy/fiber bond to try to identify the effects of fiber bridging. Some crack closure, in the traditional metallic material sense, was evident through compliance measurements. However, the crack tip bridging by the fibers appears to be the dominant mechanism influencing the fatigue crack growth rate behavior in this material under these test conditions. Fractography indicates a considerable difference in fiber-bridging behavior between the room temperature and the elevated temperature tests. 19 refs.

  16. Corrosion fatigue crack propagation in metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.

    1990-01-01

    This review assesses fracture mechanics data and mechanistic models for corrosion fatigue crack propagation in structural alloys exposed to ambient temperature gases and electrolytes. Extensive stress intensity-crack growth rate data exist for ferrous, aluminum and nickel based alloys in a variety of environments. Interactive variables (viz., stress intensity range, mean stress, alloy composition and microstructure, loading frequency, temperature, gas pressure and electrode potential) strongly affect crack growth kinetics and complicate fatigue control. Mechanistic models to predict crack growth rates were formulated by coupling crack tip mechanics with occluded crack chemistry, and from both the hydrogen embrittlement and anodic dissolution/film rupture perspectives. Research is required to better define: (1) environmental effects near threshold and on crack closure; (2) damage tolerant life prediction codes and the validity of similitude; (3) the behavior of microcrack; (4) probes and improved models of crack tip damage; and (5) the cracking performance of advanced alloys and composites.

  17. Cessation of environmentally-assisted cracking in a low-alloy steel: Experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.Y.

    1997-01-01

    The presence of dissolved metallurgical sulfides in pressure vessel and piping steels has been linked to Environmentally-Assisted Cracking (EAC), a phenomenon observed in laboratory tests that results in fatigue crack growth rates as high as 100 times that in air. Previous experimental and analytical work based on diffusion as the mass transport process has shown that surface cracks that are initially clean of sulfides will not initiate EAC in most applications. This is because the average crack tip velocity would not be sufficiently high to expose enough metallurgical sulfides per unit time and produce the sulfide concentration required for EAC. However, there is a potential concern for the case of a relatively large embedded crack breaking through to the wetted surface. Such a crack would not be initially clean of sulfides, and EAC could initiate. This paper presents the results of a series of experiments conducted on two heats of an EAC susceptible, high-sulfur, low-alloy steel in 243{degrees}C low-oxygen water to further study the phenomenon of EAC persistence at low crack tip velocities. A load cycle profile that incorporated a significant load dwell period at minimum load was used. In one experiment, the fatigue cycling history was such that relatively high crack tip velocities at the start of the experiment produced a persistent case of EAC even when crack tip velocities were later reduced to levels below the EAC initiation velocity. The other series of experiments used initial crack tip velocities that were much lower and probably more realistic. Air precracking of the compact tension specimens produced an initial inventory of undissolved sulfides on the crack flanks that directly simulates the array of sulfides expected from the breakthrough of an embedded crack. In all cases, results showed EAC ceased after several hundred hours of cycling.

  18. Getter materials for cracking ammonia

    DOEpatents

    Boffito, Claudio; Baker, John D.

    1999-11-02

    A method is provided for cracking ammonia to produce hydrogen. The method includes the steps of passing ammonia over an ammonia-cracking catalyst which is an alloy including (1) alloys having the general formula Zr.sub.1-x Ti.sub.x M.sub.1 M.sub.2, wherein M.sub.1 and M.sub.2 are selected independently from the group consisting of Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni, and x is between about 0.0 and about 1.0 inclusive; and between about 20% and about 50% Al by weight. In another aspect, the method of the invention is used to provide methods for operating hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engines and hydrogen fuel cells. In still another aspect, the present invention provides a hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engine and a hydrogen fuel cell including the above-described ammonia-cracking catalyst.

  19. Slow Crack Growth of Germanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jon

    2016-01-01

    The fracture toughness and slow crack growth parameters of germanium supplied as single crystal beams and coarse grain disks were measured. Although germanium is anisotropic (A=1.7), it is not as anisotropic as SiC, NiAl, or Cu, as evidence by consistent fracture toughness on the 100, 110, and 111 planes. Germanium does not exhibit significant slow crack growth in distilled water. (n=100). Practical values for engineering design are a fracture toughness of 0.7 MPam and a Weibull modulus of m=6+/-2. For well ground and reasonable handled coupons, fracture strength should be greater than 30 MPa.

  20. Nonlinear structural crack growth monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Welch, Donald E.; Hively, Lee M.; Holdaway, Ray F.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for the detection, through nonlinear manipulation of data, of an indicator of imminent failure due to crack growth in structural elements. The method is a process of determining energy consumption due to crack growth and correlating the energy consumption with physical phenomena indicative of a failure event. The apparatus includes sensors for sensing physical data factors, processors or the like for computing a relationship between the physical data factors and phenomena indicative of the failure event, and apparatus for providing notification of the characteristics and extent of such phenomena.

  1. Crack growth resistance in nuclear graphites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouagne, Pierre; Neighbour, Gareth B.; McEnaney, Brian

    2002-05-01

    Crack growth resistance curves for the non-linear fracture parameters KR, JR and R were measured for unirradiated PGA and IM1-24 graphites that are used as moderators in British Magnox and AGR nuclear reactors respectively. All the curves show an initial rising part, followed by a plateau region where the measured parameter is independent of crack length. JR and R decreased at large crack lengths. The initial rising curves were attributed to development of crack bridges in the wake of the crack front, while, in the plateau region, the crack bridging zone and the frontal process zone, ahead of the crack tip, reached steady state values. The decreases at large crack lengths were attributed to interaction of the frontal zone with the specimen end face. Microscopical evidence for graphite fragments acting as crack bridges showed that they were much smaller than filler particles, indicating that the graphite fragments are broken down during crack propagation. There was also evidence for friction points in the crack wake zone and shear cracking of some larger fragments. Inspection of KR curves showed that crack bridging contributed ~0.4 MPa m0.5 to the fracture toughness of the graphites. An analysis of JR and R curves showed that the development of the crack bridging zone in the rising part of the curves contributed ~20% to the total work of fracture. Energies absorbed during development of crack bridges and steady state crack propagation were greater for PGA than for IM1-24 graphite. These differences reflect the greater extent of irreversible processes occurring during cracking in the coarser microtexture of PGA graphite.

  2. Crack problems in cylindrical and spherical shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.

    1976-01-01

    Standard plate or shell theories were used as a starting point to study the fracture problems in thin-walled cylindrical and spherical shells, assuming that the plane of the crack is perpendicular to the surface of the sheet. Since recent studies have shown that local shell curvatures may have a rather considerable effect on the stress intensity factor, the crack problem was considered in conjunction with a shell rather than a plate theory. The material was assumed to be isotropic and homogeneous, so that approximate solutions may be obtained by approximating the local shell crack geometry with an ideal shell which has a solution, namely a spherical shell with a meridional crack, a cylindrical shell with a circumferential crack, or a cylindrical shell with an axial crack. A method of solution for the specially orthotropic shells containing a crack was described; symmetric and skew-symmetric problems are considered in cylindrical shells with an axial crack.

  3. Crack Formation in Cement-Based Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprince, A.; Pakrastinsh, L.; Vatin, N.

    2016-04-01

    The cracking properties in cement-based composites widely influences mechanical behavior of construction structures. The challenge of present investigation is to evaluate the crack propagation near the crack tip. During experiments the tension strength and crack mouth opening displacement of several types of concrete compositions was determined. For each composition the Compact Tension (CT) specimens were prepared with dimensions 150×150×12 mm. Specimens were subjected to a tensile load. Deformations and crack mouth opening displacement were measured with extensometers. Cracks initiation and propagation were analyzed using a digital image analysis technique. The formation and propagation of the tensile cracks was traced on the surface of the specimens using a high resolution digital camera with 60 mm focal length. Images were captured during testing with a time interval of one second. The obtained experimental curve shows the stages of crack development.

  4. Electrochemical situation in corrosion-mechanical cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, L.N.; Kalinkov, A.Yu.

    1995-01-01

    It is shown that the electrochemical situation in corrosion cracks is determined by the electromotive force of local galvanic cells at the crack tip and the polarization resistance of anodic processes.

  5. Steam Hydrocarbon Cracking and Reforming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golombok, Michael

    2004-01-01

    The interactive methods of steam hydrocarbon reforming and cracking of the oil and chemical industries are scrutinized, with special focus on their resemblance and variations. The two methods are illustrations of equilibrium-controlled and kinetically-controlled processes, the analysis of which involves theories, which overlap and balance each…

  6. Junction formation during desiccation cracking.

    PubMed

    Toga, K B; Alaca, B Erdem

    2006-08-01

    In order to provide a sound physical basis for the understanding of the formation of desiccation crack networks, an experimental study is presented addressing junction formation. Focusing on junctions, basic features of the network determining the final pattern, provides an elemental approach and imparts conceptual clarity to the rather complicated problem of the evolution of crack patterns. Using coffee-water mixtures a clear distinction between junction formation during nucleation and propagation is achieved. It is shown that for the same drying suspension, one can switch from the well-known symmetric triple junctions that are unique to the nucleation phase to propagation junctions that are purely dictated by the variations of the stress state. In the latter case, one can even manipulate the path of a propagating crack in a deterministic fashion by changing the stress state within the suspension. Clear microscopic evidence is provided for the formation of propagation junctions, and material inhomogeneity is observed to be reflected by a broad distribution of angles, in stark contrast to shrinkage cracks in homogeneous solid films.

  7. TV fatigue crack monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Exton, R. J. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus is disclosed for monitoring the development and growth of fatigue cracks in a test specimen subjected to a pulsating tensile load. A plurality of television cameras photograph a test specimen which is illuminated at the point of maximum tensile stress. The television cameras have a modified vidicon tube which has an increased persistence time thereby eliminating flicker in the displayed images.

  8. Cracks preserve kimberlite melt composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brett, R. C.; Vigouroux-Caillibot, N.; Donovan, J. J.; Russell, K.

    2009-12-01

    The chemical composition of kimberlite melts has previously been estimated by measuring aphanitic intrusive rocks (deposit composition) or by partial melting experiments on carbonated lherzolites (source composition). Pervasively altered, degassed and contaminated material preclude the determination of the primitive melt composition. Here we present data on melt compositions trapped in unaltered olivine cracks that have been healed and overgrown prior to shallow level emplacement. During the ascent of kimberlite magma the prograding crack tip samples mantle peridotite xenoliths. Xenoliths rapidly disaggregate over the first few kilometers of transport producing a population of olivine xenocrysts that are released to the fluid-rich melt. Rapid ascent of the kimberlite magma causes depressurization and creates internal elastic stresses in the olivine crystals that can only be alleviated by volumetric expansion or brittle failure. On the time scales operative during kimberlite ascent volume expansion is negligible and brittle failure occurs. Small wetting angles between the fluid-rich melt and olivine allow infiltration of the melt into the crack. These very thin cracks (<5 µm) heal rapidly and preserve primary kimberlitic material en route to the surface. We use the electron microprobe with a focused beam (interaction volume less than 2 µm) to analyze the small volumes of material found in the healed cracks of the olivine. We analyzed for 18 elements including oxygen, which we obtained by utilizing a non-linear time dependent intensity acquisition and empirically determined mass absorption coefficients. By accurately knowing the amount of oxygen in a sample, we assign oxygen molecules to all other analyzed elements (e.g. MgO, Al2O3) and the remaining oxygen is assigned to hydrogen and carbon. The analysis total is used as a constraint on the proportion of each species. Mg/Ca ratios of the cracks vary from 0.6-5 indicating a compositional continuum between alkali

  9. Crack/Cocaine: An Overview and Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minisman-Chin, Linda; And Others

    This compilation presents background information and a resource directory concerning the growing dilemma of crack-exposed infants. Information on the incidence of crack use among women of child-bearing age is reviewed. The effects of crack on young children are outlined, and ways in which parents, educators, and other professionals can help these…

  10. The transition from subsonic to supersonic cracks

    PubMed Central

    Behn, Chris; Marder, M.

    2015-01-01

    We present the full analytical solution for steady-state in-plane crack motion in a brittle triangular lattice. This allows quick numerical evaluation of solutions for very large systems, facilitating comparisons with continuum fracture theory. Cracks that propagate faster than the Rayleigh wave speed have been thought to be forbidden in the continuum theory, but clearly exist in lattice systems. Using our analytical methods, we examine in detail the motion of atoms around a crack tip as crack speed changes from subsonic to supersonic. Subsonic cracks feature displacement fields consistent with a stress intensity factor. For supersonic cracks, the stress intensity factor disappears. Subsonic cracks are characterized by small-amplitude, high-frequency oscillations in the vertical displacement of an atom along the crack line, while supersonic cracks have large-amplitude, low-frequency oscillations. Thus, while supersonic cracks are no less physical than subsonic cracks, the connection between microscopic and macroscopic behaviour must be made in a different way. This is one reason supersonic cracks in tension had been thought not to exist. PMID:25713443

  11. Cracked Teeth: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Lubisich, Erinne B.; Hilton, Thomas J.; FERRACANE, JACK

    2013-01-01

    Although cracked teeth are a common problem for patients and dentists, there is a dearth of evidence-based guidelines on how to prevent, diagnose, and treat cracks in teeth. The purpose of this article is to review the literature to establish what evidence exists regarding the risk factors for cracked teeth and their prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:20590967

  12. Evolution of Rock Cracks Under Unloading Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, R. Q.; Huang, D.

    2014-03-01

    Underground excavation normally causes instability of the mother rock due to the release and redistribution of stress within the affected zone. For gaining deep insight into the characteristics and mechanism of rock crack evolution during underground excavation, laboratory tests are carried out on 36 man-made rock specimens with single or double cracks under two different unloading conditions. The results show that the strength of rock and the evolution of cracks are clearly influenced by both the inclination angle of individual cracks with reference to the unloading direction and the combination geometry of cracks. The peak strength of rock with a single crack becomes smaller with the inclination angle. Crack propagation progresses intermittently, as evidenced by a sudden increase in deformation and repeated fluctuation of measured stress. The rock with a single crack is found to fail in three modes, i.e., shear, tension-shear, and splitting, while the rock bridge between two cracks is normally failed in shear, tension-shear, and tension. The failure mode in which a crack rock or rock bridge behaves is found to be determined by the inclination angle of the original crack, initial stress state, and unloading condition. Another observation is that the secondary cracks are relatively easily created under high initial stress and quick unloading.

  13. 46 CFR 59.10-5 - Cracks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... CFR 59.01-2). For thicknesses exceeding three-fourths inch, suitable U grooves should be employed. A... APPURTENANCES Welding Repairs to Boilers and Pressure Vessels in -Service § 59.10-5 Cracks. (a) Cracks extending... corrugated furnaces may be repaired by welding provided any one crack does not exceed 20 inches in length....

  14. 46 CFR 59.10-5 - Cracks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... CFR 59.01-2). For thicknesses exceeding three-fourths inch, suitable U grooves should be employed. A... APPURTENANCES Welding Repairs to Boilers and Pressure Vessels in -Service § 59.10-5 Cracks. (a) Cracks extending... corrugated furnaces may be repaired by welding provided any one crack does not exceed 20 inches in length....

  15. 46 CFR 59.10-5 - Cracks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... CFR 59.01-2). For thicknesses exceeding three-fourths inch, suitable U grooves should be employed. A... APPURTENANCES Welding Repairs to Boilers and Pressure Vessels in -Service § 59.10-5 Cracks. (a) Cracks extending... corrugated furnaces may be repaired by welding provided any one crack does not exceed 20 inches in length....

  16. 46 CFR 59.10-5 - Cracks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... CFR 59.01-2). For thicknesses exceeding three-fourths inch, suitable U grooves should be employed. A... APPURTENANCES Welding Repairs to Boilers and Pressure Vessels in -Service § 59.10-5 Cracks. (a) Cracks extending... corrugated furnaces may be repaired by welding provided any one crack does not exceed 20 inches in length....

  17. 46 CFR 59.10-5 - Cracks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... CFR 59.01-2). For thicknesses exceeding three-fourths inch, suitable U grooves should be employed. A... APPURTENANCES Welding Repairs to Boilers and Pressure Vessels in -Service § 59.10-5 Cracks. (a) Cracks extending... corrugated furnaces may be repaired by welding provided any one crack does not exceed 20 inches in length....

  18. Simulating the effect of slab features on vapor intrusion of crack entry.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yijun; Pennell, Kelly G; Suuberg, Eric M

    2013-01-01

    In vapor intrusion screening models, a most widely employed assumption in simulating the entry of contaminant into a building is that of a crack in the building foundation slab. Some modelers employed a perimeter crack hypothesis while others chose not to identify the crack type. However, few studies have systematically investigated the influence on vapor intrusion predictions of slab crack features, such as the shape and distribution of slab cracks and related to this overall building foundation footprint size. In this paper, predictions from a three-dimensional model of vapor intrusion are used to compare the contaminant mass flow rates into buildings with different foundation slab crack features. The simulations show that the contaminant mass flow rate into the building does not change much for different assumed slab crack shapes and locations, and the foundation footprint size does not play a significant role in determining contaminant mass flow rate through a unit area of crack. Moreover, the simulation helped reveal the distribution of subslab contaminant soil vapor concentration beneath the foundation, and the results suggest that in most cases involving no biodegradation, the variation in subslab concentration should not exceed an order of magnitude, and is often significantly less than this. PMID:23359620

  19. Transformation of several plastic wastes into fuels by catalytic cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Arandes, J.M.; Abajo, I.; Lopez-Valerio, D.; Fernandez, I.; Azkoiti, M.J.Olazar, M.; Bilbao, J.

    1997-11-01

    The thermal and catalytic cracking of several plastic wastes (polypropylene, polystyrene, polystyrene-polybutadiene) dissolved in refinery LCO has been studied in a riser simulator, under operating conditions (catalyst, temperature, contact time, C/O ratio) that are similar to commercial FCC units. The results of the product distribution show the interest of this strategy, which may be integrated into refinery operation for large-scale tertiary exploitation of plastic wastes.

  20. Cracks in Flow Liners and Their Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, C. E.; Raju, I. S.

    2005-01-01

    Cracks were detected in flow liners at the gimbal joints in the LH2 feedlines of the space shuttle's main engines. The cracks initiated at defects in the drainage slots of the flow liners and grew due to high cycle fatigue. Fracture mechanics analyses were conducted to evaluate the life of the liners. These analyses yielded extremely short lives in the presence of small surface or corner cracks. A high fidelity detection method, edge replication, was used to detect the very small cracks. The detected cracks were removed by polishing and the surface quality of the slots was reestablished to improve life of the liners.

  1. Crack modeling of rotating blades with cracked hexahedral finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao; Jiang, Dongxiang

    2014-06-01

    Dynamic analysis is the basis in investigating vibration features of cracked blades, where the features can be applied to monitor health state of blades, detect cracks in an early stage and prevent failures. This work presents a cracked hexahedral finite element method for dynamic analysis of cracked blades, with the purpose of addressing the contradiction between accuracy and efficiency in crack modeling of blades in rotor system. The cracked hexahedral element is first derived with strain energy release rate method, where correction of stress intensity factors of crack front and formulation of load distribution of crack surface are carried out to improve the modeling accuracy. To consider nonlinear characteristics of time-varying opening and closure effects caused by alternating loads, breathing function is proposed for the cracked hexahedral element. Second, finite element method with contact element is analyzed and used for comparison. Finally, validation of the cracked hexahedral element is carried out in terms of breathing effects of cracked blades and natural frequency in different crack depths. Good consistency is acquired between the results with developed cracked hexahedral element and contact element, while the computation time is significantly reduced in the previous one. Therefore, the developed cracked hexahedral element achieves good accuracy and high efficiency in crack modeling of rotating blades.

  2. Catalytic cracking of vacuum distillate with additives in fluidized catalyst bed

    SciTech Connect

    Omaraliev, T.O.; Tanashev, S.T.; Kapustin, V.M.

    1987-03-01

    The authors report on a study of the catalytic cracking of straight-run 350-500/sup 0/C vacuum distillates differing substantially in contents of aromatic hydrocarbons and resins, as influenced by the addition of an extract from the No. III lube cut from West Siberian crude. The experiments were performed in a standard catalytic cracking unit in the fluidization mode, using KMTsR zeolitic microbead catalyst.

  3. Environmentally assisted cracking of LWR materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Kassner, T.F.; Shack, W.J.

    1995-12-01

    Research on environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of light water reactor materials has focused on (a) fatigue initiation in pressure vessel and piping steels, (b) crack growth in cast duplex and austenitic stainless steels (SSs), (c) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic SSs, and (d) EAC in high- nickel alloys. The effect of strain rate during different portions of the loading cycle on fatigue life of carbon and low-alloy steels in 289{degree}C water was determined. Crack growth studies on wrought and cast SSs have been completed. The effect of dissolved-oxygen concentration in high-purity water on IASCC of irradiated Type 304 SS was investigated and trace elements in the steel that increase susceptibility to intergranular cracking were identified. Preliminary results were obtained on crack growth rates of high-nickel alloys in water that contains a wide range of dissolved oxygen and hydrogen concentrations at 289 and 320{degree}C. The program on Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Light Water Reactor Materials is currently focused on four tasks: fatigue initiation in pressure vessel and piping steels, fatigue and environmentally assisted crack growth in cast duplex and austenitic SS, irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of austenitic SSs, and environmentally assisted crack growth in high-nickel alloys. Measurements of corrosion-fatigue crack growth rates (CGRs) of wrought and cast stainless steels has been essentially completed. Recent progress in these areas is outlined in the following sections.

  4. Improved imaging algorithm for bridge crack detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jingxiao; Song, Pingli; Han, Kaihong

    2012-04-01

    This paper present an improved imaging algorithm for bridge crack detection, through optimizing the eight-direction Sobel edge detection operator, making the positioning of edge points more accurate than without the optimization, and effectively reducing the false edges information, so as to facilitate follow-up treatment. In calculating the crack geometry characteristics, we use the method of extracting skeleton on single crack length. In order to calculate crack area, we construct the template of area by making logical bitwise AND operation of the crack image. After experiment, the results show errors of the crack detection method and actual manual measurement are within an acceptable range, meet the needs of engineering applications. This algorithm is high-speed and effective for automated crack measurement, it can provide more valid data for proper planning and appropriate performance of the maintenance and rehabilitation processes of bridge.

  5. Polygon/Cracked Sedimentary Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    4 December 2004 Exposures of sedimentary rock are quite common on the surface of Mars. Less common, but found in many craters in the regions north and northwest of the giant basin, Hellas, are sedimentary rocks with distinct polygonal cracks in them. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an example from the floor of an unnamed crater near 21.0oS, 311.9oW. Such cracks might have formed by desiccation as an ancient lake dried up, or they might be related to ground ice freeze/thaw cycles or some other stresses placed on the original sediment or the rock after it became lithified. The 300 meter scale bar is about 328 yards long. The scene is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  6. Fatigue cracks in Eurofer 97 steel: Part II. Comparison of small and long fatigue crack growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruml, T.; Hutař, P.; Náhlík, L.; Seitl, S.; Polák, J.

    2011-05-01

    The fatigue crack growth rate in the Eurofer 97 steel at room temperature was measured by two different methodologies. Small crack growth data were obtained using cylindrical specimens with a shallow notch and no artificial crack starters. The growth of semicircular cracks of length between 10-2000 μm was followed in symmetrical cycling with constant strain amplitude ( R ɛ = -1). Long crack data were measured using standard CT specimen and ASTM methodology, i.e. R = 0.1. The growth of cracks having the length in the range of 10-30 mm was measured. It is shown that the crack growth rates of both types of cracks are in a very good agreement if J-integral representation is used and usual assumptions of the crack closure effects are taken into account.

  7. The Growth of Small Corrosion Fatigue Cracks in Alloy 7075

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, R. S.

    2001-01-01

    The corrosion fatigue crack growth characteristics of small (less than 35 microns) surface and corner cracks in aluminum alloy 7075 is established. The early stage of crack growth is studied by performing in situ long focal length microscope (500X) crack length measurements in laboratory air and 1% NaCl environments. To quantify the "small crack effect" in the corrosive environment, the corrosion fatigue crack propagation behavior of small cracks is compared to long through-the-thickness cracks grown under identical experimental conditions. In salt water, long crack constant K(sub max) growth rates are similar to small crack da/dN.

  8. The Growth of Small Corrosion Fatigue Cracks in Alloy 7075

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    The corrosion fatigue crack growth characteristics of small (greater than 35 micrometers) surface and corner cracks in aluminum alloy 7075 is established. The early stage of crack growth is studied by performing in situ long focal length microscope (500×) crack length measurements in laboratory air and 1% sodium chloride (NaCl) environments. To quantify the "small crack effect" in the corrosive environment, the corrosion fatigue crack propagation behavior of small cracks is compared to long through-the-thickness cracks grown under identical experimental conditions. In salt water, long crack constant K(sub max) growth rates are similar to small crack da/dN.

  9. Long-term results of dose-intensive chemotherapy with G-CSF support (TCC-NHL-91) for advanced intermediate-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: a review of 59 consecutive cases treated at a single institute.

    PubMed

    Akutsu, Miyuki; Tsunoda, Saburo; Izumi, Tohru; Tanaka, Masaru; Katano, Susumu; Inoue, Koichi; Igarashi, Seiji; Hirabayashi, Kaoru; Furukawa, Yusuke; Ohmine, Ken; Sato, Kazuya; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Ozawa, Keiya; Kirito, Keita; Nagashima, Takahiro; Teramukai, Satoshi; Fukushima, Masanori; Kano, Yasuhiko

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated the long-term outcome of very dose-intensive chemotherapy (TCC-NHL-91) for advanced intermediate-grade lymphoma, in which an eight-cycle regimen with 11 drugs was given with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) support (total 18 weeks). Fifty-nine patients were treated during February 1, 1991 and March 31, 2001 (median age: 48 years). Forty-three patients (73%) were in a high-intermediate risk or high-risk group (HI/H) according to the age-adjusted International Prognostic Index (aa-IPI). Forty-six patients received 7 or 8 cycles of therapy. Ten of 15 patients over age 60 stopped before 7 cycles. Forty-three patients with an initial bulky mass or a residual mass received involved-field radiation. Overall, 56 patients (95%) achieved complete remission (CR). Grade 4 hematotoxicity was observed in all patients. With a median follow-up of 128 months, the 10-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) rates were 76% and 61%, respectively. Neither aa-IPI risk factors nor the index itself was associated with response, OS, or PFS. One patient died of sepsis during the therapy and one died of secondary leukemia. This retrospective study suggests that the TCC-NHL-91 regimen achieves high CR, OS, and PFS in patients with advanced intermediate-grade lymphoma up to 60 years old and may be a valuable asset in the management of this disease. Further evaluation and prospective studies of the TCC-NHL-91 are warranted.

  10. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Carbon Steel Weldments

    SciTech Connect

    POH-SANG, LAM

    2005-01-13

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the role of weld residual stress on stress corrosion cracking in welded carbon steel plates prototypic to those used for nuclear waste storage tanks. Carbon steel specimen plates were butt-joined with Gas Metal Arc Welding technique. Initial cracks (seed cracks) were machined across the weld and in the heat affected zone. These specimen plates were then submerged in a simulated high level radioactive waste chemistry environment. Stress corrosion cracking occurred in the as-welded plate but not in the stress-relieved duplicate. A detailed finite element analysis to simulate exactly the welding process was carried out, and the resulting temperature history was used to calculate the residual stress distribution in the plate for characterizing the observed stress corrosion cracking. It was shown that the cracking can be predicted for the through-thickness cracks perpendicular to the weld by comparing the experimental KISCC to the calculated stress intensity factors due to the welding residual stress. The predicted crack lengths agree reasonably well with the test data. The final crack lengths appear to be dependent on the details of welding and the sequence of machining the seed cracks, consistent with the prediction.

  11. Crack Turning in Integrally Stiffened Aircraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettit, Richard Glen

    2000-01-01

    Current emphasis in the aircraft industry toward reducing manufacturing cost has created a renewed interest in integrally stiffened structures. Crack turning has been identified as an approach to improve the damage tolerance and fail-safety of this class of structures. A desired behavior is for skin cracks to turn before reaching a stiffener, instead of growing straight through. A crack in a pressurized fuselage encounters high T-stress as it nears the stiffener--a condition favorable to crack turning. Also, the tear resistance of aluminum alloys typically varies with crack orientation, a form of anisotropy that can influence the crack path. The present work addresses these issues with a study of crack turning in two-dimensions, including the effects of both T-stress and fracture anisotropy. Both effects are shown to have relation to the process zone size, an interaction that is central to this study. Following an introduction to the problem, the T-stress effect is studied for a slightly curved semi-infinite crack with a cohesive process zone, yielding a closed form expression for the future crack path in an infinite medium. For a given initial crack tip curvature and tensile T-stress, the crack path instability is found to increase with process zone size. Fracture orthotropy is treated using a simple function to interpolate between the two principal fracture resistance values in two-dimensions. An extension to three-dimensions interpolates between the six principal values of fracture resistance. Also discussed is the transition between mode I and mode II fracture in metals. For isotropic materials, there is evidence that the crack seeks out a direction of either local symmetry (pure mode I) or local asymmetry (pure mode II) growth. For orthotropic materials the favored states are not pure modal, and have mode mixity that is a function of crack orientation.

  12. Online bridge crack monitoring with smart film.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Benniu; Wang, Shuliang; Li, Xingxing; Zhou, Zhixiang; Zhang, Xu; Yang, Guang; Qiu, Minfeng

    2013-01-01

    Smart film crack monitoring method, which can be used for detecting initiation, length, width, shape, location, and propagation of cracks on real bridges, is proposed. Firstly, the fabrication of the smart film is developed. Then the feasibility of the method is analyzed and verified by the mechanical sensing character of the smart film under the two conditions of normal strain and crack initiation. Meanwhile, the coupling interference between parallel enameled wires of the smart film is discussed, and then low-frequency detecting signal and the custom communication protocol are used to decrease interference. On this basis, crack monitoring system with smart film is designed, where the collected crack data is sent to the remote monitoring center and the cracks are simulated and recurred. Finally, the monitoring system is applied to six bridges, and the effects are discussed. PMID:24489496

  13. Crack formation and prevention in colloidal drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin Young; Cho, Kun; Ryu, Seul-A.; Kim, So Youn; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-08-01

    Crack formation is a frequent result of residual stress release from colloidal films made by the evaporation of colloidal droplets containing nanoparticles. Crack prevention is a significant task in industrial applications such as painting and inkjet printing with colloidal nanoparticles. Here, we illustrate how colloidal drops evaporate and how crack generation is dependent on the particle size and initial volume fraction, through direct visualization of the individual colloids with confocal laser microscopy. To prevent crack formation, we suggest use of a versatile method to control the colloid-polymer interactions by mixing a nonadsorbing polymer with the colloidal suspension, which is known to drive gelation of the particles with short-range attraction. Gelation-driven crack prevention is a feasible and simple method to obtain crack-free, uniform coatings through drying-mediated assembly of colloidal nanoparticles.

  14. Crack propagation in bamboo's hierarchical cellular structure.

    PubMed

    Habibi, Meisam K; Lu, Yang

    2014-07-07

    Bamboo, as a natural hierarchical cellular material, exhibits remarkable mechanical properties including excellent flexibility and fracture toughness. As far as bamboo as a functionally graded bio-composite is concerned, the interactions of different constituents (bamboo fibers; parenchyma cells; and vessels.) alongside their corresponding interfacial areas with a developed crack should be of high significance. Here, by using multi-scale mechanical characterizations coupled with advanced environmental electron microscopy (ESEM), we unambiguously show that fibers' interfacial areas along with parenchyma cells' boundaries were preferred routes for crack growth in both radial and longitudinal directions. Irrespective of the honeycomb structure of fibers along with cellular configuration of parenchyma ground, the hollow vessels within bamboo culm affected the crack propagation too, by crack deflection or crack-tip energy dissipation. It is expected that the tortuous crack propagation mode exhibited in the present study could be applicable to other cellular natural materials as well.

  15. Crack formation and prevention in colloidal drops

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Young; Cho, Kun; Ryu, Seul-a; Kim, So Youn; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-01-01

    Crack formation is a frequent result of residual stress release from colloidal films made by the evaporation of colloidal droplets containing nanoparticles. Crack prevention is a significant task in industrial applications such as painting and inkjet printing with colloidal nanoparticles. Here, we illustrate how colloidal drops evaporate and how crack generation is dependent on the particle size and initial volume fraction, through direct visualization of the individual colloids with confocal laser microscopy. To prevent crack formation, we suggest use of a versatile method to control the colloid-polymer interactions by mixing a nonadsorbing polymer with the colloidal suspension, which is known to drive gelation of the particles with short-range attraction. Gelation-driven crack prevention is a feasible and simple method to obtain crack-free, uniform coatings through drying-mediated assembly of colloidal nanoparticles. PMID:26279317

  16. Meshfree Simulations of Ductile Crack Propagations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shaofan; Simonsen, Cerup B.

    2005-03-01

    In this work, a meshfree method is used to simulate ductile crack growth and propagation under finite deformation and large scale yielding conditions. A so-called parametric visibility condition and its related particle splitting procedure have been developed to automatically adapt the evolving strong continuity or fracture configuration due to an arbitrary crack growth in ductile materials. It is shown that the proposed meshfree crack adaption and re-interpolation procedure is versatile in numerical simulations, and it can capture some essential features of ductile fracture and ductile crack surface morphology, such as the rough zig-zag pattern of crack surface and the ductile crack front damage zone, which have been difficult to capture in previous numerical simulations.

  17. How to crack nuts: acquisition process in captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) observing a model.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Satoshi; Morimura, Naruki; Houki, Chiharu

    2009-10-01

    Stone tool use for nut cracking consists of placing a hard-shelled nut onto a stone anvil and then cracking the shell open by pounding it with a stone hammer to get to the kernel. We investigated the acquisition of tool use for nut cracking in a group of captive chimpanzees to clarify what kind of understanding of the tools and actions will lead to the acquisition of this type of tool use in the presence of a skilled model. A human experimenter trained a male chimpanzee until he mastered the use of a hammer and anvil stone to crack open macadamia nuts. He was then put in a nut-cracking situation together with his group mates, who were naïve to this tool use; we did not have a control group without a model. The results showed that the process of acquisition could be broken down into several steps, including recognition of applying pressure to the nut,emergence of the use of a combination of three objects, emergence of the hitting action, using a tool for hitting, and hitting the nut. The chimpanzees recognized these different components separately and practiced them one after another. They gradually united these factors in their behavior leading to their first success. Their behavior did not clearly improve immediately after observing successful nut cracking by a peer, but observation of a skilled group member seemed to have a gradual, long-term influence on the acquisition of nut cracking by naïve chimpanzees.

  18. Change of Hot Cracking Susceptibility in Welding of High Strength Aluminum Alloy AA 7075

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzer, M.; Hofmann, K.; Mann, V.; Hugger, F.; Roth, S.; Schmidt, M.

    High strength aluminum alloys are known as hard to weld alloys due to their high hot crack susceptibility. However, they have high potential for applications in light weight constructions of automotive industry and therefore it is needed to increase weldability. One major issue is the high hot cracking susceptibility. Vaporization during laser beam welding leads to a change of concentration of the volatile elements magnesium and zinc. Hence, solidification range of the weld and therefore hot cracking susceptibility changes. Additionally, different welding velocities lead to changed solidification conditions with certain influence on hot cracking. This paper discusses the influence of energy per unit length during laser beam welding of AA 7075 on the change of element concentration in the weld seam and the resulting influence on hot cracking susceptibility. Therefore EDS-measurements of weld seams generated with different velocities are performed to determine the change of element concentration. These quantitative data is used to numerically calculate the solidification range in order to evaluate its influence on the hot cracking susceptibility. Besides that, relative hot crack length and mechanical properties are measured. The results increase knowledge about welding of high strength aluminum alloy AA 7075 and hence support further developing of the welding process.

  19. Micro-crack enhanced permeability in tight rocks: An experimental and microstructural study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delle Piane, Claudio; Arena, Alessio; Sarout, Joel; Esteban, Lionel; Cazes, Emilie

    2015-12-01

    The elastic and hydraulic response of a rock and its stress sensitivity are strongly affected by the presence of micro-cracks. Therefore, a full characterization and quantification of cracks at the micro-scale is essential for understanding the physical and transport properties of rocks under stress. As yet, there is no uniquely accepted method to precisely quantify the density and geometrical characteristics of such microstructural features. In this contribution, we present results of quantitative analyses of 2D scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images and 3D X-ray microtomograms acquired on three samples of Carrara Marble artificially cracked by thermal shock. New semi-automatic workflows have been developed to perform these 2D and 3D analyses. The main outcome is the quantification of average length, aspect ratio, and density per unit surface (2D) or volume (3D) of micro-cracks observed. The thermal treatment only opens grain boundaries and does not result in the creation of new intragranular cracks. The results are consistent with the degree of thermal cracking artificially induced on the rock sample prior to the imaging/analysis procedure, i.e., more and wider micro-cracks are measured on samples heated to higher temperatures. The results of these quantitative microstructural analyses are also consistent with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data independently acquired on the same samples saturated with water.

  20. A clamped rectangular plate containing a crack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, R.; Erdogan, F.

    1985-01-01

    The general problem of a rectangular plate clamped along two parallel sides and containing a crack parallel to the clamps is considered. The problem is formulated in terms of a system of singular integral equations and the asymptotic behavior of the stress state near the corners is investigated. Numerical examples are considered for a clamped plate without a crack and with a centrally located crack, and the stress intensity factors and the stresses along the clamps are calculated.

  1. Measuring Crack Length in Coarse Grain Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jonathan A.; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2010-01-01

    Due to a coarse grain structure, crack lengths in precracked spinel specimens could not be measured optically, so the crack lengths and fracture toughness were estimated by strain gage measurements. An expression was developed via finite element analysis to correlate the measured strain with crack length in four-point flexure. The fracture toughness estimated by the strain gaged samples and another standardized method were in agreement.

  2. Dislocation shielding of a cohesive crack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhandakkar, Tanmay K.; Chng, Audrey C.; Curtin, W. A.; Gao, Huajian

    2010-04-01

    Dislocation interaction with a cohesive crack is of increasing importance to computational modelling of crack nucleation/growth and related toughening mechanisms in confined structures and under cyclic fatigue conditions. Here, dislocation shielding of a Dugdale cohesive crack described by a rectangular traction-separation law is studied. The shielding is completely characterized by three non-dimensional parameters representing the effective fracture toughness, the cohesive strength, and the distance between the dislocations and the crack tip. A closed form analytical solution shows that, while the classical singular crack model predicts that a dislocation can shield or anti-shield a crack depending on the sign of its Burgers vector, at low cohesive strengths a dislocation always shields the cohesive crack irrespective of the Burgers vector. A numerical study shows the transition in shielding from the classical solution of Lin and Thomson (1986) in the high strength limit to the solution in the low strength limit. An asymptotic analysis yields an approximate analytical model for the shielding over the full range of cohesive strengths. A discrete dislocation (DD) simulation of a large (>10 3) number of edge dislocations interacting with a cohesive crack described by a trapezoidal traction-separation law confirms the transition in shielding, showing that the cohesive crack does behave like a singular crack at very high cohesive strengths (˜7 GPa), but that significant deviations in shielding between singular and cohesive crack predictions arise at cohesive strengths around 1GPa, consistent with the analytic models. Both analytical and numerical studies indicate that an appropriate crack tip model is essential for accurately quantifying dislocation shielding for cohesive strengths in the GPa range.

  3. Crack shapes and stress intensity factors for edge-cracked specimens.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orange, T. W.

    1972-01-01

    A simple stress intensity factor expression is given for a deep edge crack in a plate in tension. The shapes of cracks opened by tension or bending are approximated by conic sections, and the conic section coefficients are related to plate geometry by very simple empirical equations. The magnitude of the crack displacement is a function of applied load, plate geometry, and the elastic constants of the plate material. The shape of a loaded crack in a semiinfinite plate is, approximately, a portion of an ellipse whose semimajor axis is about three times the crack length. As the crack length (relative to the plate width) increases, the crack shape becomes parabolic, then hyperbolic, the acuity of the hyperbola increasing with the relative crack length.

  4. Passive wireless antenna sensors for crack detection and shear/compression sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad, Irshad

    Despite the fact that engineering components and structures are carefully designed against fatigue failures, 50 to 90% of mechanical failures are due to fatigue crack development. The severity of the failure depends on both the crack length and its orientation. Many types of sensors are available that can detect fatigue crack propagation. However, crack orientation detection has been rarely reported in the literature. We evaluated a patch antenna sensor capable of detecting crack propagation as well as crack orientation changes. The aim of these sensors would be to evaluate the real-time health condition of metallic structures to avoid catastrophic failures. The proposed crack sensing system consists of a dielectric substrate with a ground plane on one side of the substrate and an antenna patch printed on the other side of the substrate. The ground plane and the antenna patch, both conductive in nature, form an electromagnetic resonant cavity that radiates at distinct frequencies. These frequencies are monitored to evaluate the condition of cracks. A wireless sensor array can be realized by implementing a wireless interrogation unit. The scientific merits of this research are: 1) high sensitivity: it was demonstrated that the antenna sensors can detect crack growth with a sub-millimeter resolution; 2) passive wireless operation: based on microstrip antennas, the antenna sensors encode the sensing information in the backscattered antenna signal and thus can transmit the information without needing a local battery; 3) thin and conformal: the entire sensor unit is less than a millimeter thick and highly conformal; 4) crack orientation detection: the crack orientation on the structure can be precisely evaluated based on a single parameter, which only few sensors can accomplish. In addition to crack detection, the patch antenna sensors are also investigated for measuring shear and pressure forces, with an aim to study the formation, diagnostics and prevention of foot

  5. Impact of severe cracked germanium (111) substrate on aluminum indium gallium phosphate light-emitting-diode's electro-optical performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annaniah, Luruthudass; Devarajan, Mutharasu

    2016-07-01

    Cracked die is a serious failure mode in the Light Emitting Diode (LED) industry - affecting LED quality and long-term reliability performance. In this paper an investigation has been carried out to find the correlation between severe cracked germanium (Ge) substrate of an aluminum indium gallium phosphate (AlInGaP) LED and its electro-optical performance after the Temperature Cycle (TC) test. The LED dice were indented at several bond forces using a die bonder. The indented dice were analysed using a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The result showed that severe cracks were observed at 180 gF onward. As the force of indentation increases, crack formation also becomes more severe thus resulting in the chipping of the substrate. The cracked dies were packaged and the TC test was performed. The results did not show any electro-optical failure or degradation, even after a 1000 cycle TC test. Several mechanically cross-sectioned cracked die LEDs, were analysed using SEM and found that no crack reached the active layer. This shows that severely cracked Ge substrate are able to withstand a -40°C/+100°C TC test up to 1000 cycles and LED optical performance is not affected. A small leakage current was observed in all of the cracked die LEDs in comparison to the reference unit. However, this value is smaller than the product specification and is of no concern.

  6. Expansive Soil Crack Depth under Cumulative Damage

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Bei-xiao; Chen, Sheng-shui; Han, Hua-qiang; Zheng, Cheng-feng

    2014-01-01

    The crack developing depth is a key problem to slope stability of the expansive soil and its project governance and the crack appears under the roles of dry-wet cycle and gradually develops. It is believed from the analysis that, because of its own cohesion, the expansive soil will have a certain amount of deformation under pulling stress but without cracks. The soil body will crack only when the deformation exceeds the ultimate tensile strain that causes cracks. And it is also believed that, due to the combined effect of various environmental factors, particularly changes of the internal water content, the inherent basic physical properties of expansive soil are weakened, and irreversible cumulative damages are eventually formed, resulting in the development of expansive soil cracks in depth. Starting from the perspective of volumetric strain that is caused by water loss, considering the influences of water loss rate and dry-wet cycle on crack developing depth, the crack developing depth calculation model which considers the water loss rate and the cumulative damages is established. Both the proposal of water loss rate and the application of cumulative damage theory to the expansive soil crack development problems try to avoid difficulties in matrix suction measurement, which will surely play a good role in promoting and improving the research of unsaturated expansive soil. PMID:24737974

  7. Combustion in cracks of PBX 9501

    SciTech Connect

    Berghout, H. L.; Son, S. F.; Bolme, C. A.; Hill, L. G.; Asay, B. W.; Dickson, P. M.; Henson, B. F.; Smilowitz, L. B.

    2002-01-01

    Recent experiments involving the combustion of PBX 9501 explosive under confined conditions reveal the importance of crack and flaws in reaction violence. Experiments on room temperature confined disks of pristine and thermally damaged PBX 9501 reveal that crack ignition depends on hot gases entering existing or pressure induced cracks rather than on energy release at the crack tip. PBX 9501 slot combustion experiments show that the reaction propagation rate in the slot does not depend on the external pressure. We have observed 1500 d s in long slots of highly-confined PBX 9501. We present experiments that examine the combustion of mechanically and thermally damaged samples of PBX 9501.

  8. Crack depth determination with inductive thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oswald-Tranta, B.; Schmidt, R.

    2015-05-01

    Castings, forgings and other steel products are nowadays usually tested with magnetic particle inspection, in order to detect surface cracks. An alternative method is active thermography with inductive heating, which is quicker, it can be well automated and as in this paper presented, even the depth of a crack can be estimated. The induced eddy current, due to its very small penetration depth in ferro-magnetic materials, flows around a surface crack, heating this selectively. The surface temperature is recorded during and after the short inductive heating pulse with an infrared camera. Using Fourier transformation the whole IR image sequence is evaluated and the phase image is processed to detect surface cracks. The level and the local distribution of the phase around a crack correspond to its depth. Analytical calculations were used to model the signal distribution around cracks with different depth and a relationship has been derived between the depth of a crack and its phase value. Additionally, also the influence of the heating pulse duration has been investigated. Samples with artificial and with natural cracks have been tested. Results are presented comparing the calculated and measured phase values depending on the crack depth. Keywords: inductive heating, eddy current, infrared

  9. Controlled crack growth specimen for brittle systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calomino, Anthony M.; Brewer, David N.

    1992-01-01

    A pure Mode 1 fracture specimen and test procedure has been developed which provides extended, stable, through-thickness crack growth in ceramics and other brittle, nonmetallic materials. Fixed displacement loading, applied at the crack mouth, promotes stable crack extension by reducing the stored elastic strain energy. Extremely fine control of applied displacements is achieved by utilizing the Poisson's expansion of a compressively loaded cylindrical pin. Stable cracks were successfully grown in soda-lime glass and monolithic Al2O3 for lengths in excess of 2O mm without uncontrollable catastrophic failure.

  10. Controlled crack growth specimen for brittle systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calomino, Anthony M.; Brewer, David N.

    1990-01-01

    A pure Mode 1 fracture specimen and test procedure has been developed which provides extended, stable, through-thickness crack growth in ceramics and other brittle, nonmetallic materials. Fixed displacement loading, applied at the crack mouth, promotes stable crack extension by reducing the stored elastic strain energy. Extremely fine control of applied displacements is achieved by utilizing the Poisson's expansion of a compressively loaded cylindrical pin. Stable cracks were successfully grown in soda-lime glass and monolithic Al2O3 for lengths in excess of 20 mm without uncontrollable catastrophic failure.

  11. Dynamics of cracking in drying colloidal sheets.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Rajarshi; Tirumkudulu, Mahesh S

    2016-04-01

    Colloidal dispersions are known to display a fascinating network of cracks on drying. We probe the fracture mechanics of free-standing films of aqueous polymer-particle dispersions. Thin films of the dispersion are cast between a pair of plain steel wires and allowed to dry under ambient conditions. The strain induced on the particle network during drying is relieved by cracking. The stress which causes the films to crack has been calculated by measuring the deflection of the wires. The critical cracking stress varied inversely to the two-thirds' power of the film thickness. We also measure the velocity of the tip of a moving crack. The motion of a crack has been modeled as a competition between the release of the elastic energy stored in the particle network, the increase in surface energy as a result of the growth of a crack, the rate of viscous dissipation of the interstitial fluid and the kinetic energy associated with a moving crack. There is fair agreement between the measured crack velocities and predictions.

  12. [Desiccation cracking of soil body: a review].

    PubMed

    Pei, Yin-Ge; Xu, Ze-Min; Zhang, Jia-Ming

    2012-04-01

    Desiccation cracking of soil body is a complex physical process, which can affect the strength, stability, and permeability of soil body, and involve in several disciplines such as soil science, agricultural science, engineering geology, and environmental science. This paper introduced the significances of the study on the desiccation cracking of soil body, reviewed the related theoretical and applied researches and the quantitative analysis of crack morphology, and discussed the deficiencies in the research fields, research contents, and research methods. The future research directions about the desiccation cracking of soil body were pointed out.

  13. Expansive soil crack depth under cumulative damage.

    PubMed

    Shi, Bei-xiao; Chen, Sheng-shui; Han, Hua-qiang; Zheng, Cheng-feng

    2014-01-01

    The crack developing depth is a key problem to slope stability of the expansive soil and its project governance and the crack appears under the roles of dry-wet cycle and gradually develops. It is believed from the analysis that, because of its own cohesion, the expansive soil will have a certain amount of deformation under pulling stress but without cracks. The soil body will crack only when the deformation exceeds the ultimate tensile strain that causes cracks. And it is also believed that, due to the combined effect of various environmental factors, particularly changes of the internal water content, the inherent basic physical properties of expansive soil are weakened, and irreversible cumulative damages are eventually formed, resulting in the development of expansive soil cracks in depth. Starting from the perspective of volumetric strain that is caused by water loss, considering the influences of water loss rate and dry-wet cycle on crack developing depth, the crack developing depth calculation model which considers the water loss rate and the cumulative damages is established. Both the proposal of water loss rate and the application of cumulative damage theory to the expansive soil crack development problems try to avoid difficulties in matrix suction measurement, which will surely play a good role in promoting and improving the research of unsaturated expansive soil. PMID:24737974

  14. Fatigue crack propagation at polymer adhesive interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ritter, J.E.

    1996-12-31

    Delamination of polymer adhesive interfaces often occurs due to slow crack growth under either monotonic or cyclic loading. The author`s previous research showed that moisture-assisted crack growth at epoxy/glass and epoxy acrylate/glass interfaces under monotonic loading was directly related to the applied energy release rate and relative humidity and that cyclic loading could enhance crack growth. The purpose of the present research is to compare crack growth along epoxy acrylate/glass and epoxy/PMMA interfaces under monotonic and cyclic loading.

  15. Investigations of Low Temperature Time Dependent Cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Van der Sluys, W A; Robitz, E S; Young, B A; Bloom, J

    2002-09-30

    The objective of this project was to investigate metallurgical and mechanical phenomena associated with time dependent cracking of cold bent carbon steel piping at temperatures between 327 C and 360 C. Boiler piping failures have demonstrated that understanding the fundamental metallurgical and mechanical parameters controlling these failures is insufficient to eliminate it from the field. The results of the project consisted of the development of a testing methodology to reproduce low temperature time dependent cracking in laboratory specimens. This methodology was used to evaluate the cracking resistance of candidate heats in order to identify the factors that enhance cracking sensitivity. The resultant data was integrated into current available life prediction tools.

  16. Dynamics of cracking in drying colloidal sheets.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Rajarshi; Tirumkudulu, Mahesh S

    2016-04-01

    Colloidal dispersions are known to display a fascinating network of cracks on drying. We probe the fracture mechanics of free-standing films of aqueous polymer-particle dispersions. Thin films of the dispersion are cast between a pair of plain steel wires and allowed to dry under ambient conditions. The strain induced on the particle network during drying is relieved by cracking. The stress which causes the films to crack has been calculated by measuring the deflection of the wires. The critical cracking stress varied inversely to the two-thirds' power of the film thickness. We also measure the velocity of the tip of a moving crack. The motion of a crack has been modeled as a competition between the release of the elastic energy stored in the particle network, the increase in surface energy as a result of the growth of a crack, the rate of viscous dissipation of the interstitial fluid and the kinetic energy associated with a moving crack. There is fair agreement between the measured crack velocities and predictions. PMID:26924546

  17. Crack Healing in Quartz: Influence of Crack Morphology and pOH-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallon, J. A.; Kronenberg, A. K.; Popp, R. K.; Lamb, W. M.

    2004-12-01

    Crack healing in quartz has been investigated by optical microscopy and interferometry of rhombohedral r-cleavage cracks in polished Brazilian quartz prisms that were hydrothermally annealed. Quartz prisms were pre-cracked at room temperature and then annealed at temperatures T of 250° and 400° C for 2.4 to 240 hours, fluid pressure Pf = 41 MPa (equal to confining pressure Pc), and varying pOH- (from 5.4 to 1.2 at 250° C for fluids consisting of distilled water and NaOH solutions). Crack morphologies before and after annealing were recorded for each sample in plane light digital images and apertures were determined from interference fringes recorded using transmitted monochromatic light (λ = 598 nm). As documented in previous studies (Smith and Evans, 1984; Brantley et al., 1990; Beeler and Hickman, 1996), crack healing of quartz is driven by reductions in surface energy and healing rates appear to be limited by diffusional solute transport; sharply defined crack tips become blunted and break up into fluid-filled tubes and inclusions. However, fluid inclusion geometries are also observed with nonequilibrium shapes that depend on initial surface roughness. Crack healing is significant at 400° C after short run durations (24 hr) with healing rates reaching 10-5 mm/s. Crack healing is also observed at T=250° C, but only for smooth cracks with apertures < 0.6 μ m or for cracks subject to low pOH-. The extent of crack healing is sensitive to crack aperture and to hackles formed by fine-scale crack branching during crack growth. Initial crack apertures appear to be governed by the presence of fine particles, often found in the vicinity of hackles, which maintain the separation of crack surfaces. Where rough cracks exhibit healing, hackles are sites of either enhanced or reduced loss of fluid-solid interface depending on slight mismatches and sense of twist of opposing crack surfaces. Hackles of open r-cleavage cracks are replaced either by (1) healed curvilinear

  18. Fatigue Crack Closure Analysis Using Digital Image Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leser, William P.; Newman, John A.; Johnston, William M.

    2010-01-01

    Fatigue crack closure during crack growth testing is analyzed in order to evaluate the critieria of ASTM Standard E647 for measurement of fatigue crack growth rates. Of specific concern is remote closure, which occurs away from the crack tip and is a product of the load history during crack-driving-force-reduction fatigue crack growth testing. Crack closure behavior is characterized using relative displacements determined from a series of high-magnification digital images acquired as the crack is loaded. Changes in the relative displacements of features on opposite sides of the crack are used to generate crack closure data as a function of crack wake position. For the results presented in this paper, remote closure did not affect fatigue crack growth rate measurements when ASTM Standard E647 was strictly followed and only became a problem when testing parameters (e.g., load shed rate, initial crack driving force, etc.) greatly exceeded the guidelines of the accepted standard.

  19. Statistical distribution of time to crack initiation and initial crack size using service data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heller, R. A.; Yang, J. N.

    1977-01-01

    Crack growth inspection data gathered during the service life of the C-130 Hercules airplane were used in conjunction with a crack propagation rule to estimate the distribution of crack initiation times and of initial crack sizes. A Bayesian statistical approach was used to calculate the fraction of undetected initiation times as a function of the inspection time and the reliability of the inspection procedure used.

  20. Liquid metal embrittlement. [crack propagation in metals with liquid metal in crack space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiller, W. A.

    1973-01-01

    Crack propagation is discussed for metals with liquid metal in the crack space. The change in electrochemical potential of an electron in a metal due to changes in stress level along the crack surface was investigated along with the change in local chemistry, and interfacial energy due to atomic redistribution in the liquid. Coupled elastic-elastrostatic equations, stress effects on electron energy states, and crack propagation via surface roughening are discussed.

  1. Effect of Crack Closure on Ultrasonic Detection of Fatigue Cracks at Fastener Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowles, S. J.; Harding, C. A.; Hugo, G. R.

    2009-03-01

    The ultrasonic response from closed fatigue cracks grown in aluminium alloy specimens using a representative aircraft spectrum loading has been characterised as a function of tensile applied load using pulse-echo 45° shear-wave ultrasonic C-scans with focused immersion transducers. Observed trends with crack size and applied load are described and compared to results for artificial machined defects. The results demonstrate that crack closure significantly reduces the ultrasonic response compared to open cracks or machined defects.

  2. Determining fatigue crack opening loads from near-crack-tip displacement measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Riddell, W.T.; Piascik, R.S.; Sutton, M.A.; Zhao, W.; McNeill, S.R.; Helm, J.D.

    1999-07-01

    The aim of this research was to develop a near-crack-tip measurement method that quantifies crack closure levels in the near-threshold fatigue crack growth regime--a regime where crack closure is not well characterized by remote compliance methods. Further understanding of crack closure mechanics was gained by performing novel crack growth experiments in conjunction with numerical simulations of three-dimensional crack-front propagation. Steady-state (i.e., constant growth rate) fatigue crack growth rates were characterized by performing constant cyclic stress intensity range ({Delta}K) experiments over a wide range of stress ratios (R). Near-crack-tip (less than 0.3 mm behind) load-versus-displacement measurements were conducted on the specimen surface using a novel noncontact experimental technique (Digital Imaging Displacement System--DIDS). The experiments and simulations revealed that the three-dimensional aspects of fatigue crack closure must be considered to determine correct opening load levels from near-crack-tip load-versus-displacement data. It was shown that near-crack-front, but increase near the free surface. The interior opening load was found to collapse closure-affected data to intrinsic rates, and thus shown to relate to the true crack-front driving force parameter. Surface opening load DIDS measurements made at an optimal distance behind the crack tip were used to correlate da/dN with {Delta}K{sub eff}. Opening load determinations made less than the optimal distance behind the crack tip were shown to be too high to correlate fatigue crack growth rates.

  3. Study of methods for automated crack inspection of electrically poled piezoelectric ceramics.

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Pin; Hwang, Stephen C.; Jokiel, Bernhard, Jr.; Burns, George Robert

    2004-06-01

    The goal of this project was to identify a viable, non-destructive methodology for the detection of cracks in electrically poled piezoelectric ceramics used in neutron generator power supply units. The following methods were investigated: Impedance Spectroscopy, Scanning Acoustic Microscopy, Lock-in Thermography, Photo-acoustic Microscopy, and Scanned Vicinal Light. In addition to the exploration of these techniques for crack detection, special consideration was given to the feasibility of integrating these approaches to the Automatic Visual Inspection System (AVIS) that was developed for mapping defects such as chips, pits and voids in piezoelectric ceramic components. Scanned Vicinal Light was shown to be the most effective method of automatically detecting and quantifying cracks in ceramic components. This method is also very effective for crack detection in other translucent ceramics.

  4. Analytical modeling and vibration analysis of internally cracked rectangular plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, P. V.; Jain, N. K.; Ramtekkar, G. D.

    2014-10-01

    This study proposes an analytical model for nonlinear vibrations in a cracked rectangular isotropic plate containing a single and two perpendicular internal cracks located at the center of the plate. The two cracks are in the form of continuous line with each parallel to one of the edges of the plate. The equation of motion for isotropic cracked plate, based on classical plate theory is modified to accommodate the effect of internal cracks using the Line Spring Model. Berger's formulation for in-plane forces makes the model nonlinear. Galerkin's method used with three different boundary conditions transforms the equation into time dependent modal functions. The natural frequencies of the cracked plate are calculated for various crack lengths in case of a single crack and for various crack length ratio for the two cracks. The effect of the location of the part through crack(s) along the thickness of the plate on natural frequencies is studied considering appropriate crack compliance coefficients. It is thus deduced that the natural frequencies are maximally affected when the crack(s) are internal crack(s) symmetric about the mid-plane of the plate and are minimally affected when the crack(s) are surface crack(s), for all the three boundary conditions considered. It is also shown that crack parallel to the longer side of the plate affect the vibration characteristics more as compared to crack parallel to the shorter side. Further the application of method of multiple scales gives the nonlinear amplitudes for different aspect ratios of the cracked plate. The analytical results obtained for surface crack(s) are also assessed with FEM results. The FEM formulation is carried out in ANSYS.

  5. A Creaking and Cracking Comet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faurschou Hviid, Stubbe; Hüttig, Christian; Groussin, Olivier; Mottola, Stefano; Keller, Horst Uwe; OSIRIS Team

    2016-10-01

    Since the middle of 2014 the OSIRIS cameras on the ESA Rosetta mission have been monitoring the evolution of the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko as it passed through perihelion. During the perihelion passage several change events have been observed on the nucleus surface. For example existing large scale cracks have expanded and new large scale cracks have been created. Also several large scale "wave pattern" like change events have been observed in the Imhotep and Hapi regions. These are events not directly correlated with any normal visible cometary activity. One interpretation is that these are events likely caused by "seismic" activity. The seismic activity is created by the self-gravity stress of the non-spherical comet nucleus and stress created by the non-gravitational forces acting on the comet. The non-gravitational forces are changing the rotation period of the comet (~20min/perihelion passage) which induces a changing mechanical stress pattern through the perihelion passage. Also the diurnal cycle with its changing activity pattern is causing a periodic wobble in the stress pattern that can act as a trigger for a comet quake. The stress pattern has been modeled using a finite element model that includes self-gravity, the comet spin and the non-gravitational forces based on a cometary activity model. This paper will discuss what can be learned about the comet nucleus structure and about the cometary material properties from these events and from the FEM model.

  6. Surface Enhancement Improves Crack Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The low plasticity burnishing (LPB) process produces a deep layer of surface compression in a quick and affordable manner to produce metal surfaces free of scratches, nicks, and gouges. The process, designed for easy inclusion in the manufacturing environment, can be performed with conventional Computer Numerical Control machine tools. This allows parts to be processed during manufacturing, rather than as a post process in a separate facility. A smooth, free-rolling spherical ball suspended in a fluid allows for single-point contact. The ball comes into mechanical contact only with the surface to be burnished, and can be moved in any direction. LPB can be applied to all types of carbon and alloy steel, stainless steel, cast iron, aluminum, titanium, and nickel- based super alloys. In addition to improving a surface's resistance to fatigue and damage, treatment stops the growth of shallow cracks. The LPB process is used on the leading edges of turbine blades to improve resistance to foreign object damage and crack growth. This means significant savings for aircraft owners, since maintenance requirements to inspect for fatigue damage, replace parts, and remove corrosion damage increase the cost of operation.

  7. What can cracked polymer do

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Kexin; Zhou, Chuanhong; Kohli, Punit; Poudel, Anish; Chu, Tsuchin

    2015-03-01

    Buckling, delamination, and cracking are very well known phenomenon observed in most thin films. They were theoretically explained by the existence of mechanical instability due to the residue stress generated when a thin film is deposited on substrates or undergoing environmental stimulus. Buckled structures at micro- or nano-scale have been of great interests and have been used extensively in many applications including particles self-assembling, surface wettability modification, and micro-electronic device fabrication. However, peeling of a layer from a substrate due to delamination or fractures on a thin film due to cracking is mostly taken as an undesirable result. Therefore, strategies are inspired for preventing or removing these often undesired structures. We found that after being heated above its decomposition temperature and then cooled to room temperature, a PDMS thin film showed micro-fibers of 100 μm width and up to 1.5 cm in length. By studying the formation mechanism, control of the dimensions and of the growth pattern on a substrate for PDMS micro-fibers were realized. Giving credit to their high flexibility and optical transparency, a PDMS micro-fiber were utilized in high resolution near field imaging achieved by attaching a micro-lens on the fiber. Interestingly, a surface covered by PDMS micro-fibers will turn from superhydrophobic into superhydrophilic by further heating providing potential applications in surface wettability modification. In future, we will investigate and simulate the growth of PDMS micro-fiber and look for more possible applications.

  8. Load interaction effects on fatigue crack growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoychev, Stoyan Ivanov

    The fatigue crack propagation rate can be either increased or decreased by the previous load history (overload, block loading, different load ratio, etc.). Currently, these load sequence effects can be explained either by using crack closure or internal stress concepts. They are studied in Part I and II of the dissertation accordingly. In Part I, the last 35 years of research in the crack closure area were carefully reviewed. A new Quadrature (Q) method for crack closure estimation, based on integration rather than differentiation of the load-displacement data, was developed and compared to the 'best' methods from the literature. The new method was able to reduce the scatter in the opening load estimations to a negligible level, but does not collapse the results for different load ratios (0.1 and 0.9). In Part II a general relationship between fatigue crack growth rate (da/dN) and the two-parameter (DeltaKtip and tipKmax) crack driving force was derived using fundamental fatigue (ε-N curve) properties. Based on this analysis, a new way of representing the da/dN data by means of the crack propagation (CP) table was proposed. In order to make the CP table sensitive to the load history effects, it was scaled using the applied and internal stresses and the corresponding stress intensity factors, characteristic for the crack tip. Two methods for calculating the internal stress intensity factors were developed, adopting the weight function and the new clamping force concepts accordingly. Finally, the CP table at the crack tip was successfully used together with the two-parameter crack driving force equation to predict da/dN for different load ratios, block loading and a single overload. Calculation of the crack closure was not needed in order to predict the experimental data accurately.

  9. Laboratory Study of Crack Development and Crack Interaction in Concrete Blocks due to Swelling of Cracking Agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frühwirt, Thomas; Plößer, Arne; Konietzky, Heinz

    2015-04-01

    The main focus of this work was to investigate temporary and spatial features of crack development in concrete blocks due to the action of a swelling agent. A commercial available cement-based mortar which shows heavily swelling behaviour when hydrating is used to provide inside pressure in boreholes in conrete blocks and hence serves as cracking agent. As no data for the swelling behaviour of the cracking agent were available the maximum axial swelling stress and axial free swelling strain were determined experimentally. In a first series of tests on concrete blocks the influence of an external mechanical, unidirectional stress on the development-time and orientation of cracks has been investigated for a range of loading levels. The stress state in the blocks prepared with a single borehole was determined by a superposition of internal stresses caused by swelling pressure and external mechanical loading. For a second series of tests prismatic blocks with two boreholes where prepared. This test setup allowed to realize different orientation of boreholes with respect to the uniaxial loading direction. Complementary tests were done using the cracking agent in both, only one or none of the boreholes. Different modes of crack interaction and influence of filled or unfilled boreholes have been observed. Features of crack development showed significant sensitivity to external loading. Starting even at very low load levels crack orientation was primarely determined by the direction of the external load. Temporal change in crack development due to the different load levels was insignificant and no consistent conclusion could be drawn. Crack interaction phenomena only were observed with two boreholes orientated primarely in direction of the external loading. Even in these cases crack orientation was mainly determined by the external stress field and only locally influenced by other cracks or the unfilled borehole. The work provides us with an extensive catalogue of

  10. Development of crack shape: LBB methodology for cracked pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Moulin, D.; Chapuliot, S.; Drubay, B.

    1997-04-01

    For structures like vessels or pipes containing a fluid, the Leak-Before-Break (LBB) assessment requires to demonstrate that it is possible, during the lifetime of the component, to detect a rate of leakage due to a possible defect, the growth of which would result in a leak before-break of the component. This LBB assessment could be an important contribution to the overall structural integrity argument for many components. The aim of this paper is to review some practices used for LBB assessment and to describe how some new R & D results have been used to provide a simplified approach of fracture mechanics analysis and especially the evaluation of crack shape and size during the lifetime of the component.

  11. The growth of small corrosion fatigue cracks in alloy 2024

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Willard, Scott A.

    1993-04-01

    The corrosion fatigue crack growth characteristics of small surface and corner cracks in aluminum alloy 2024 is established. The damaging effect of salt water on the early stages of small crack growth is characterized by crack initiation at constituent particle pits, intergranular microcracking for a less than 100 micrometers, and transgranular small crack growth for a micrometer. In aqueous 1 percent NaCl and at a constant anodic potential of -700 mV(sub SCE), small cracks exhibit a factor of three increase in fatigue crack growth rates compared to laboratory air. Small cracks exhibit accelerated corrosion fatigue crack growth rates at low levels of delta-K (less than 1 MPa square root of m) below long crack delta-K (sub th). When exposed to Paris regime levels of crack tip stress intensity, small corrosion fatigue cracks exhibit growth rates similar to that observed for long cracks. Results suggest that crack closure effects influence the corrosion fatigue crack growth rates of small cracks (a less than or equal to 100 micrometers). This is evidenced by similar small and long crack growth behavior at various levels of R. Contrary to the corrosion fatigue characteristics of small cracks in high strength steels, no pronounced chemical crack length effect is observed for Al by 2024 exposed to salt water.

  12. The growth of small corrosion fatigue cracks in alloy 2024

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Willard, Scott A.

    1993-01-01

    The corrosion fatigue crack growth characteristics of small surface and corner cracks in aluminum alloy 2024 is established. The damaging effect of salt water on the early stages of small crack growth is characterized by crack initiation at constituent particle pits, intergranular microcracking for a less than 100 micrometers, and transgranular small crack growth for a micrometer. In aqueous 1 percent NaCl and at a constant anodic potential of -700 mV(sub SCE), small cracks exhibit a factor of three increase in fatigue crack growth rates compared to laboratory air. Small cracks exhibit accelerated corrosion fatigue crack growth rates at low levels of delta-K (less than 1 MPa square root of m) below long crack delta-K (sub th). When exposed to Paris regime levels of crack tip stress intensity, small corrosion fatigue cracks exhibit growth rates similar to that observed for long cracks. Results suggest that crack closure effects influence the corrosion fatigue crack growth rates of small cracks (a less than or equal to 100 micrometers). This is evidenced by similar small and long crack growth behavior at various levels of R. Contrary to the corrosion fatigue characteristics of small cracks in high strength steels, no pronounced chemical crack length effect is observed for Al by 2024 exposed to salt water.

  13. A crack-closure model for predicting fatigue-crack growth under aircraft spectrum loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The development and application of an analytical model of cycle crack growth is presented that includes the effects of crack closure. The model was used to correlate crack growth rates under constant amplitude loading and to predict crack growth under aircraft spectrum loading on 2219-T851 aluminum alloy sheet material. The predicted crack growth lives agreed well with experimental data. The ratio of predicted to experimental lives ranged from 0.66 to 1.48. These predictions were made using data from an ASTM E24.06.01 Round Robin.

  14. Positioning Community Art Practices in Urban Cracks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verschelden, Griet; Van Eeghem, Elly; Steel, Riet; De Visscher, Sven; Dekeyrel, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    This article addresses the position of community art practices and the role of practitioners in urban cracks. Community art practices raise possibilities for a reconceptualisation of the concept of community and an extension of the concept of art in public space. Urban cracks are conceptualised as spatial, temporal and relational manifestations of…

  15. Crack propagation directions in unfilled resins.

    PubMed

    Baran, G; Sadeghipour, K; Jayaraman, S; Silage, D; Paul, D; Boberick, K

    1998-11-01

    Posterior composite restorative materials undergo accelerated wear in the occlusal contact area, primarily through a fatigue mechanism. To facilitate the timely development of new and improved materials, a predictive wear model is desirable. The objective of this study was to develop a finite element model enabling investigators to predict crack propagation directions in resins used as the matrix material in composites, and to verify these predictions by observing cracks formed during the pin-on-disc wear of a 60:40 BISGMA:TEGDMA resin and an EBPADMA resin. Laser confocal scanning microscopy was used to measure crack locations. Finite element studies were done by means of ABAQUS software, modeling a cylinder sliding on a material with pre-existing surface-breaking cracks. Variables included modulus, cylinder/material friction coefficient, crack face friction, and yield behavior. Experimental results were surprising, since most crack directions were opposite previously published observations. The majority of surface cracks, though initially orthogonal to the surface, changed direction to run 20 to 30 degrees from the horizontal in the direction of indenter movement. Finite element modeling established the importance of subsurface shear stresses, since calculations provided evidence that cracks propagate in the direction of maximum K(II)(theta), in the same direction as the motion of the indenter, and at an angle of approximately 20 degrees. These findings provide the foundation for a predictive model of sliding wear in unfilled glassy resins.

  16. Entering a Crack: An Encounter with Gossip

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Linda

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, I enter a crack to think otherwise about the concept "gossip". Drawing on previous scholarship engaging with Deleuzian concepts to inform research methodologies, this paper builds on this body of work. Following Deleuze and Guattari, the paper undertakes a mapping of gossip, subsequent to an encounter with a crack.…

  17. Preventing Cracks in Silicon-Reactor Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutwack, R.

    1987-01-01

    Correct placement helps prevent contamination while eliminating crack-causing deposits. Repositioning quartz liner in silicon fluidized-bed reactor prevents cracking of liner when cools. Liner protects stainless-steel walls of reactor from abrasion by particles in fluidized bed. Prevents contamination of newly formed silicon by material abraded from wall and ensures high-quality product.

  18. Helping Crack-Affected Children Succeed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, Mary Bellis

    1993-01-01

    Crack-affected children who experience early intervention can be mainstreamed successfully into regular classes. These children can be overwhelmed by stimuli and need stability, routine, and sameness in the intervention classroom. Teachers have discovered effective methods for working with crack-affected children. (16 references) (MLF)

  19. Characterization of crack growth under combined loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, A.; Smith, F. W.; Holston, A., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Room-temperature static and cyclic tests were made on 21 aluminum plates in the shape of a 91.4x91.4-cm Maltese cross with 45 deg flaws to develop crack growth and fracture toughness data under mixed-mode conditions. During cyclic testing, it was impossible to maintain a high proportion of shear-mode deformation on the crack tips. Cracks either branched or turned. Under static loading, cracks remained straight if shear stress intensity exceeded normal stress intensity. Mixed-mode crack growth rate data compared reasonably well with published single-mode data, and measured crack displacements agreed with the straight and branched crack analyses. Values of critical strain energy release rate at fracture for pure shear were approximately 50% higher than for pure normal opening, and there was a large reduction in normal stress intensity at fracture in the presence of high shear stress intensity. Net section stresses were well into the inelastic range when fracture occurred under high shear on the cracks.

  20. Small crack test program for helicopter materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Annigeri, Bal; Schneider, George

    1994-01-01

    Crack propagation tests were conducted to determine crack growth behavior in five helicopter materials for surface cracks between 0.005 to 0.020 inches in depth. Constant amplitude tests were conducted at stress ratios R equals 0.1 and 0.5, and emphasis was placed on near threshold data (i.e., 10-8 to 10-6 inches/cycle). Spectrum tests were conducted using a helicopter spectrum. The test specimen was an unnotched tension specimen, and cracks were initiated from a small EDM notch. An optical/video system was used to monitor crack growth. The material for the test specimens was obtained from helicopter part forgings. Testing was conducted at stresses below yield to reflect actual stresses in helicopter parts.

  1. Stress-corrosion cracking in metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Criteria and recommended practices for preventing stress-corrosion cracking from impairing the structural integrity and flightworthiness of space vehicles are presented. The important variables affecting stress-corrosion cracking are considered to be the environment, including time and temperature; metal composition, and structure; and sustained tensile stress. For designing spacecraft structures that are free of stress-corrosion cracking for the service life of the vehicle the following rules apply: (1) identification and control of the environments to which the structure will be exposed during construction, storage, transportation, and use; (2) selection of alloy compositions and tempers which are resistant to stress-corrosion cracking in the identified environment; (3) control of fabrication and other processes which may introduce residual tensile stresses or damage the material; (4) limitation of the combined residual and applied tensile stresses to below the threshold stress level for the onset of cracking throughout the service life of the vehicle; and (5) establishment of a thorough inspection program.

  2. Fatigue crack growth automated testing method

    SciTech Connect

    Hatch, P.W.; VanDenAvyle, J.A.; Laing, J.

    1989-06-01

    A computer controlled servo-hydraulic mechanical test system has been configured to conduct automated fatigue crack growth testing. This provides two major benefits: it allows continuous cycling of specimens without operator attention over evenings and weekends; and complex load histories, including random loading and spectrum loading, can be applied to the specimens to simulate cyclic loading of engineering structures. The software is written in MTS Multi-User Basic to control test machine output and acquire data at predetermined intervals. Compact tension specimens are cycled according to ASTM specification E647-86. Fatigue crack growth is measured via specimen compliance during the test using a compliance/crack length calibration determined earlier by visual crack length measurements. This setup was used to measure crack growth rates in 6063 aluminum alloy for a variety of cyclic loadings, including spectrum loads. Data collected compared well with tests run manually. 13 figs.

  3. Small crack test program for helicopter materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annigeri, Bal; Schneider, George

    1994-09-01

    Crack propagation tests were conducted to determine crack growth behavior in five helicopter materials for surface cracks between 0.005 to 0.020 inches in depth. Constant amplitude tests were conducted at stress ratios R equals 0.1 and 0.5, and emphasis was placed on near threshold data (i.e., 10-8 to 10-6 inches/cycle). Spectrum tests were conducted using a helicopter spectrum. The test specimen was an unnotched tension specimen, and cracks were initiated from a small EDM notch. An optical/video system was used to monitor crack growth. The material for the test specimens was obtained from helicopter part forgings. Testing was conducted at stresses below yield to reflect actual stresses in helicopter parts.

  4. Method of continuously determining crack length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakaran, Ramamurthy (Inventor); Lopez, Osvaldo F. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The determination of crack lengths in an accurate and straight forward manner is very useful in studying and preventing load created flaws and cracks. A crack length sensor according to the present invention is fabricated in a rectangular or other geometrical form from a conductive powder impregnated polymer material. The long edges of the sensor are silver painted on both sides and the sensor is then bonded to a test specimen via an adhesive having sufficient thickness to also serve as an insulator. A lead wire is connected to each of the two outwardly facing silver painted edges. The resistance across the sensor changes as a function of the crack length in the specimen and sensor. The novel aspect of the present invention includes the use of relatively uncomplicated sensors and instrumentation to effectively measure the length of generated cracks.

  5. Strain rate effects in stress corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Parkins, R.N. . Dept. of Metallurgy and Engineering Materials)

    1990-03-01

    Slow strain rate testing (SSRT) was initially developed as a rapid, ad hoc laboratory method for assessing the propensity for metals an environments to promote stress corrosion cracking. It is now clear, however, that there are good theoretical reasons why strain rate, as opposed to stress per se, will often be the controlling parameter in determining whether or not cracks are nucleated and, if so, are propagated. The synergistic effects of the time dependence of corrosion-related reactions and microplastic strain provide the basis for mechanistic understanding of stress corrosion cracking in high-pressure pipelines and other structures. However, while this may be readily comprehended in the context of laboratory slow strain tests, its extension to service situations may be less apparent. Laboratory work involving realistic stressing conditions, including low-frequency cyclic loading, shows that strain or creep rates give good correlation with thresholds for cracking and with crack growth kinetics.

  6. Fracture toughness and crack growth of Zerodur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viens, Michael J.

    1990-01-01

    The fracture toughness and crack growth parameters of Zerodur, a low expansion glass ceramic material, were determined. The fracture toughness was determined using indentation techniques and was found to be 0.9 MPa x m(sup 1/2). The crack growth parameters were determined using indented biaxial specimens subjected to static and dynamic loading in an aqueous environment. The crack growth parameters n and 1n(B) were found to be 30.7 and -6.837, respectively. The crack growth parameters were also determined using indented biaxial specimens subjected to dynamic loading in an ambient 50 percent relative humidity environment. The crack growth parameters n and 1n(B) at 50 percent relative humidity were found to be 59.3 and -17.51, respectively.

  7. Crack tip field and fatigue crack growth in general yielding and low cycle fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minzhong, Z.; Liu, H. W.

    1984-01-01

    Fatigue life consists of crack nucleation and crack propagation periods. Fatigue crack nucleation period is shorter relative to the propagation period at higher stresses. Crack nucleation period of low cycle fatigue might even be shortened by material and fabrication defects and by environmental attack. In these cases, fatigue life is largely crack propagation period. The characteristic crack tip field was studied by the finite element method, and the crack tip field is related to the far field parameters: the deformation work density, and the product of applied stress and applied strain. The cyclic carck growth rates in specimens in general yielding as measured by Solomon are analyzed in terms of J-integral. A generalized crack behavior in terms of delta is developed. The relations between J and the far field parameters and the relation for the general cyclic crack growth behavior are used to analyze fatigue lives of specimens under general-yielding cyclic-load. Fatigue life is related to the applied stress and strain ranges, the deformation work density, crack nucleus size, fracture toughness, fatigue crack growth threshold, Young's modulus, and the cyclic yield stress and strain. The fatigue lives of two aluminum alloys correlate well with the deformation work density as depicted by the derived theory. The general relation is reduced to Coffin-Manson low cycle fatigue law in the high strain region.

  8. Crack shape developments and leak rates for circumferential complex-cracked pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Brickstad, B.; Bergman, M.

    1997-04-01

    A computerized procedure has been developed that predicts the growth of an initial circumferential surface crack through a pipe and further on to failure. The crack growth mechanism can either be fatigue or stress corrosion. Consideration is taken to complex crack shapes and for the through-wall cracks, crack opening areas and leak rates are also calculated. The procedure is based on a large number of three-dimensional finite element calculations of cracked pipes. The results from these calculations are stored in a database from which the PC-program, denoted LBBPIPE, reads all necessary information. In this paper, a sensitivity analysis is presented for cracked pipes subjected to both stress corrosion and vibration fatigue.

  9. Environmental stress cracking of polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahan, K. I.

    1980-01-01

    A two point bending method for use in studying the environmental stress cracking and crazing phenomena is described and demonstrated for a variety of polymer/solvent systems. Critical strain values obtained from these curves are reported for various polymer/solvent systems including a considerable number of systems for which critical strain values have not been previously reported. Polymers studied using this technique include polycarbonate (PC), ABS, high impact styrene (HIS), polyphenylene oxide (PPO), and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). Critical strain values obtained using this method compared favorably with available existing data. The major advantage of the technique is the ability to obtain time vs. strain curves over a short period of time. The data obtained suggests that over a short period of time the transition in most of the polymer solvent systems is more gradual than previously believed.

  10. Investigating Reaction-Driven Cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelemen, P. B.; Hirth, G.; Savage, H. M.

    2013-12-01

    Many metamorphic reactions lead to large volume changes, and potentially to reaction-driven cracking [1,2]. Large-scale hydration of mantle peridotite to produce serpentine or talc is invoked to explain the rheology of plate boundaries, the nature of earthquakes, and the seismic properties of slow-spread ocean crust and the 'mantle wedge' above subduction zones. Carbonation of peridotite may be an important sink in the global carbon cycle. Zones of 100% magnesite + quartz replacing peridotite, up to 200 m thick, formed where oceanic mantle was thrust over carbonate-bearing metasediments in Oman. Talc + carbonate is an important component of the matrix in subduction mélanges at Santa Catalina Island , California, and the Sanbagawa metamorphic belt, Japan. Engineered systems to emulate natural mineral carbonation could provide relatively inexpensive CO2 capture and storage [3]. More generally, engineered reaction-driven cracking could supplement or replace hydraulic fracture in geothermal systems, solution mining, and extraction of tight oil and gas. The controls on reaction-driven cracking are poorly understood. Hydration and carbonation reactions can be self-limiting, since they potentially reduce permeability and armor reactive surfaces [4]. Also, in some cases, hydration or carbonation may take place at constant volume. Small changes in volume due to precipitation of solid products increases stress, destabilizing solid reactants, until precipitation and dissolution rates become equal at a steady state stress [5]. In a third case, volume change due to precipitation of solid products causes brittle failure. This has been invoked on qualitative grounds to explain, e.g., complete serpentinization of mantle peridotite [6]. Below ~ 300°C, the available potential energy for hydration and carbonation of olivine could produce stresses of 100's of MPa [2], sufficient to fracture rocks to 10 km depth or more, causing brittle failure below the steady state stress required

  11. Investigations of soil cracking and preferential flow in a weighing lysimeter filled with cracking clay soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greve, A.; Andersen, M. S.; Acworth, R. I.

    2010-10-01

    SummaryAn improved understanding of deep drainage processes in irrigated cracking soils is needed for sustainable irrigation management. To investigate the effect of crack dynamics and macropore flow on drainage in cracking soils, a series of irrigation experiments was carried out in a weighing lysimeter. Subsurface soil cracks of the initially very dry soil were investigated with a videoscope and changes in the surface expression of cracks in response to irrigation events were monitored by time-lapse photography. A bromide tracer was applied to one irrigation event. Variations in the combined soil and moisture mass and the volume of drainage out of the soil column was logged and the drainage EC and bromide content were determined. No drainage occurred out of the soil column during the first 3 out of 6 irrigation events, even though substantial surface runoff into the cracks occurred and, at least initially, soil cracks provided an uninterrupted flow path through the profile. The breakthrough of the bromide tracer, as well as an initially low EC of the drainage water indicate that preferential flow accounted for a substantial part of the first of the two drainage events, even though the soil cracks were sealed on the surface at the onset of the irrigation causing the drainage. The results show that lateral infiltration of macropore flow into the soil matrix can be substantial and should not be neglected while simulating macropore flow and deep drainage in cracking soils. The results also indicate that soil cracks can remain pathways for preferential flow even after they are closed at the soil surface. The type of water application appears to have an impact on the location of crack formation, with flood irrigation favouring reappearance of cracks at previous crack locations and simulated rainfall resulting in shifting crack locations.

  12. Atomic simulation of fatigue crack propagation in Ni3Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lei; Xiao, Shifang; Deng, Huiqiu; Hu, Wangyu

    2015-03-01

    The fatigue crack propagation behavior of Ni3Al was studied using molecular dynamics simulation at room temperature. The simulation results showed that the deformation mechanisms and the crack propagation path were significantly influenced by the orientation of initial crack. The formation process of slip bands around the crack tip was investigated in various cracks and indicated that the slip bands were able to hinder the initiation and propagation of cracks. Besides, the crack growth rate was also calculated by the Paris equation, and the results revealed that the crack growth rate increased with the increasing stress intensity factor range.

  13. A comparison of stress in cracked fibrous tissue specimens with varied crack location, loading, and orientation using finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Peloquin, John M; Elliott, Dawn M

    2016-04-01

    Cracks in fibrous soft tissue, such as intervertebral disc annulus fibrosus and knee meniscus, cause pain and compromise joint mechanics. A crack concentrates stress at its tip, making further failure and crack extension (fracture) more likely. Ex vivo mechanical testing is an important tool for studying the loading conditions required for crack extension, but prior work has shown that it is difficult to reproduce crack extension. Most prior work used edge crack specimens in uniaxial tension, with the crack 90° to the edge of the specimen. This configuration does not necessarily represent the loading conditions that cause in vivo crack extension. To find a potentially better choice for experiments aiming to reproduce crack extension, we used finite element analysis to compare, in factorial combination, (1) center crack vs. edge crack location, (2) biaxial vs. uniaxial loading, and (3) crack-fiber angles ranging from 0° to 90°. The simulated material was annulus fibrosus fibrocartilage with a single fiber family. We hypothesized that one of the simulated test cases would produce a stronger stress concentration than the commonly used uniaxially loaded 90° crack-fiber angle edge crack case. Stress concentrations were compared between cases in terms of fiber-parallel stress (representing risk of fiber rupture), fiber-perpendicular stress (representing risk of matrix rupture), and fiber shear stress (representing risk of fiber sliding). Fiber-perpendicular stress and fiber shear stress concentrations were greatest in edge crack specimens (of any crack-fiber angle) and center crack specimens with a 90° crack-fiber angle. However, unless the crack is parallel to the fiber direction, these stress components alone are insufficient to cause crack opening and extension. Fiber-parallel stress concentrations were greatest in center crack specimens with a 45° crack-fiber angle, either biaxially or uniaxially loaded. We therefore recommend that the 45° center crack case be

  14. Environmentally assisted cracking of light-water reactor materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Kassner, T.F.; Shack, W.J.

    1996-02-01

    Environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of lightwater reactor (LWR) materials has affected nuclear reactors from the very introduction of the technology. Corrosion problems have afflicted steam generators from the very introduction of pressurized water reactor (PWR) technology. Shippingport, the first commercial PWR operated in the United States, developed leaking cracks in two Type 304 stainless steel (SS) steam generator tubes as early as 1957, after only 150 h of operation. Stress corrosion cracks were observed in the heat-affected zones of welds in austenitic SS piping and associated components in boiling-water reactors (BRWs) as early as 1965. The degradation of steam generator tubing in PWRs and the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of austenitic SS piping in BWRs have been the most visible and most expensive examples of EAC in LWRs, and the repair and replacement of steam generators and recirculation piping has cost hundreds of millions of dollars. However, other problems associated with the effects of the environment on reactor structures and components am important concerns in operating plants and for extended reactor lifetimes. Cast duplex austenitic-ferritic SSs are used extensively in the nuclear industry to fabricate pump casings and valve bodies for LWRs and primary coolant piping in many PWRs. Embrittlement of the ferrite phase in cast duplex SS may occur after 10 to 20 years at reactor operating temperatures, which could influence the mechanical response and integrity of pressure boundary components during high strain-rate loading (e.g., seismic events). The problem is of most concern in PWRs where slightly higher temperatures are typical and cast SS piping is widely used.

  15. Subcritical crack growth in two titanium alloys.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D. N.

    1973-01-01

    Measurement of subcritical crack growth during static loading of precracked titanium alloys in salt water using samples too thin for plane strain loading to predominate was examined as a method for determining the critical stress intensity for crack propagation in salt water. Significant internal crack growth followed by arrest was found at quite low stress intensities, but crack growth rates were relatively low. Assuming these techniques provided a reliable measurement of the critical stress intensity, the value for annealed Ti-4Al-1.5Mo-0.5V alloy was apparently about 35 ksi-in. to the 1/2 power, while that for annealed Ti-4Al-3Mo-1V was below 45 ksi-in. to the 1/2 power. Crack growth was also observed in tests conducted in both alloys in an air environment. At 65 ksi-in. to the 1/2 power, the extent of crack growth was greater in air than in salt water. Ti-4Al-3Mo-1V showed arrested crack growth in air at a stress intensity of 45 ksi-in. to the 1/2 power.

  16. Lattice theory of three-dimensional cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esterling, D. M.

    1976-01-01

    The problem of the stability of a three-dimensional crack is analyzed within a lattice-statics approximation. The consequence of introducing a jog into the crack face as well as the effects of various nonlinear-force laws are studied. The phenomenon of lattice trapping (upper and lower bounds on the applied stress for an equilibrium crack of given length) is again obtained. It is possible to obtain some physical insight into which aspects of the force law are critical for crack stability. In particular, the inadequacy of a thermodynamic approach - which relates the critical stress to a surface energy corresponding to the area under the cohesive-force-vs-displacement curve - is demonstrated. Surface energy is a global property of the cohesive-force law. Crack stability is sensitive to much more refined aspects of the cohesive-force law. Crack healing is sensitive to the long-range portion of the cohesive force. Crack expansion is sensitive to the position of the maximum in the cohesive-force relation.

  17. Closure of fatigue cracks at high strains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyyer, N. S.; Dowling, N. E.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on smooth specimens to study the closure behavior of short cracks at high cyclic strains under completely reversed cycling. Testing procedures and methodology, and closure measurement techniques, are described in detail. The strain levels chosen for the study cover from predominantly elastic to grossly plastic strains. Crack closure measurements are made at different crack lengths. The study reveals that, at high strains, cracks close only as the lowest stress level in the cycle is approached. The crack opening is observed to occur in the compressive part of the loading cycle. The applied stress needed to open a short crack under high strain is found to be less than for cracks under small scale yielding. For increased plastic deformations, the value of sigma sub op/sigma sub max is observed to decrease and approaches the value of R. Comparison of the experimental results with existing analysis is made and indicates the limitations of the small scale yielding approach where gross plastic deformation behavior occurs.

  18. Crack-closure and crack-growth measurements in surface-flawed titanium alloy Ti6Al-4V

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elber, W.

    1975-01-01

    The crack-closure and crack-growth characteristics of the titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V were determined experimentally on surface-flawed plate specimens. Under cyclic loading from zero to tension, cracks deeper than 1 mm opened at approximately 50 percent of the maximum load. Cracks shallower than 1 mm opened at higher loads. The correlation between crack-growth rate and the total stress-intensity range showed a lower threshold behavior. This behavior was attributed to the high crack-opening loads at short cracks because the lower threshold was much less evident in correlations between the crack-growth rates and the effective stress-intensity range.

  19. Crack growth monitoring at CFRP bond lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahammer, M.; Adebahr, W.; Sachse, R.; Gröninger, S.; Kreutzbruck, M.

    2016-02-01

    With the growing need for lightweight technologies in aerospace and automotive industries, fibre-reinforced plastics, especially carbon-fibre (CFRP), are used with a continuously increasing annual growth rate. A promising joining technique for composites is adhesive bonding. While rivet holes destroy the fibres and cause stress concentration, adhesive bond lines distribute the load evenly. Today bonding is only used in secondary structures due to a lack of knowledge with regard to long-term predictability. In all industries, numerical simulation plays a critical part in the development process of new materials and structures, while it plays a vital role when it comes to CFRP adhesive bondings conducing the predictability of life time and damage tolerance. The critical issue with adhesive bondings is crack growth. In a dynamic tensile stress testing machine we dynamically load bonded CFRP coupon specimen and measure the growth rate of an artificially started crack in order to feed the models with the results. We also investigate the effect of mechanical crack stopping features. For observation of the bond line, we apply two non-contact NDT techniques: Air-coupled ultrasound in slanted transmission mode and active lockin-thermography evaluated at load frequencies. Both methods give promising results for detecting the current crack front location. While the ultrasonic technique provides a slightly higher accuracy, thermography has the advantage of true online monitoring, because the measurements are made while the cyclic load is being applied. The NDT methods are compared to visual inspection of the crack front at the specimen flanks and show high congruence. Furthermore, the effect of crack stopping features within the specimen on the crack growth is investigated. The results show, that not all crack fronts are perfectly horizontal, but all of them eventually come to a halt in the crack stopping feature vicinity.

  20. A finite element analysis of fatigue crack closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Experiments have shown that fatigue cracks close at positive loads during constant-amplitude load cycling. The crack-closure phenomenon is caused by residual plastic deformations remaining in the wake of an advancing crack tip. The present paper is concerned with the application of a two-dimensional, nonlinear, finite-element analysis for predicting crack-closure and crack-opening stresses during cyclic loading. A two-dimensional finite-element computer program, which accounts for both elastic-plastic material behavior and changing boundary conditions associated with crack extension and intermittent contact of the crack surfaces under cyclic loading, has been developed. An efficient technique to account for changing boundary conditions was also incorporated into the nonlinear analysis program. This program was subsequently used to study crack extension and crack closure under constant-amplitude and two-level block loading. The calculated crack-closure and crack-opening stresses were qualitatively consistent with experimental observations.

  1. The fracture mechanics of fatigue crack propagation in compact bone.

    PubMed

    Wright, T M; Hayes, W C

    1976-07-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to apply the techniques of fracture mechanics to a study of fatigue crack propagation in compact bone. Small cracks parallel to the long axis of the bone were initiated in standardized specimens of bovine bone. Crack growth was achieved by cyclically loading these specimens. The rate of crack growth was determined from measurements of crack length versus cycles of loading. The stress intensity factor at the tip of the crack was calculated from knowledge of the applied load, the crack length, and the specimen geometry. A strong correlation was found between the experimentally determined crack growth rate and the applied stress intensity. The relationship takes the form of a power law similar to that for other materials. Visual observation and scanning electron microscopy revealed that crack propagation occurred by initiation of subcritical cracks ahead of the main crack.

  2. Early stages in the development of stress corrosion cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.H.; Simonen, E.P.

    1993-12-01

    Processes in growth of short cracks and stage I of long stress corrosion cracks were identified and evaluated. There is evidence that electrochemical effects can cause short stress corrosion cracks to grow at rates faster or slower than long cracks. Short cracks can grow at faster rates than long cracks for a salt film dissolution growth mechanism or from reduced oxygen inhibition of hydrolytic acidification. An increasing crack growth rate with increasing crack length could result from a process of increasing crack tip concentration of a critical anion, such as Cl{sup {minus}}, with increasing crack length in a system where the crack velocity is dependent on the Cl{sup {minus}} or some other anion concentration. An increasing potential drop between crack tip and mouth would result in an increased anion concentration at the crack tip and hence an increasing crack velocity. Stage I behavior of long cracks is another early development stage in the life of a stress corrosion crack which is poorly understood. This stage can be described by da/dt = AK{sup m} where da/dt is crack velocity, A is a constant, K is stress intensity and m ranges from 2 to 24 for a variety of materials and environments. Only the salt film dissolution model was found to quantitatively describe this stage; however, the model was only tested on one material and its general applicability is unknown.

  3. Crack Growth Properties of Sealing Glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jonathan A.; Tandon, R.

    2008-01-01

    The crack growth properties of several sealing glasses were measured using constant stress rate testing in 2% and 95% RH (relative humidity). Crack growth parameters measured in high humidity are systematically smaller (n and B) than those measured in low humidity, and velocities for dry environments are approx. 100x lower than for wet environments. The crack velocity is very sensitivity to small changes in RH at low RH. Confidence intervals on parameters that were estimated from propagation of errors were comparable to those from Monte Carlo simulation.

  4. Reconstruction of complex cracks by exterior measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krutitskii, Pavel; Liu, Jijun; Sini, Mourad

    2008-11-01

    In this paper, we deal with the acoustic inverse scattering problem for reconstructing complex cracks from the far field map, which models the diffraction of waves by thin two-sided cylindrical screens. A complex crack is characterized by its shape, the type of boundary data and the boundary coefficients (surface impedance). We give explicit formulas which can be used to reconstruct the shape of the crack, distinguish its type of boundary conditions and reconstruct the possible material coefficients on it by using the far-field map. Some numerical examples are also presented. Similar results could be given using near field measurements.

  5. TEM observations of crack tip: cavity interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, J.A.; Ohr, S.M.; Jesser, W.A.

    1981-01-01

    Crack tip-cavity interactions have been studied by performing room temperature deformation experiments in a transmission electron microscope on ion-irradiated type 316 stainless steel with small helium containing cavities. Slip dislocations emitted from a crack tip cut, sheared, and thereby elongated cavities without a volume enlargement. As the crack tip approached, a cavity volume enlargement occurred. Instead of the cavities continuing to enlarge until they touch, the walls between the cavities fractured. Fracture surface dimples do not correlate in size or density with these enlarged cavities.

  6. Shear cracks in thermoplastic and poroelastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craster, R. V.; Atkinson, C.

    1992-05-01

    T O UNDERSTAND the mechanism of quasi-static plane strain fracture in poro- and thermoelastic materials for arbitrary stress fields, it is necessary to consider not only tensile fracture but also shear fracture. An impulsively sheared semi-infinite crack is considered for the mathematically analogous cases of coupled quasi-static thermo- and poroelastic materials. The exact solution is obtained in Laplace and Fourier transform domains using the Wiener—Hopf technique. The crack tip behaviour is then analysed. The stress intensity factors as a function of the Laplace transform variable are identified for cracks with either permeable (conducting) or impermeable (insulating) crack faces, and are inverted numerically for all times and asymptotically for small times. The case of a steadily propagating shear crack with either permeable or impermeable crack faces is also examined; the crack tip behaviour is examined in detail and compared with the result for a permeable fault. Analytical results are found in the neighbourhood of the crack tip. The pore pressure fields are found explicitly for all x and y.The case where the entire fault is assumed impermeable is reworked and an analytical solution is given for the pore pressure. The relevance of the results for stabilising shear faults and earthquake mechanics is briefly discussed. For the most part, the solutions in this paper and an earlier one refer to situations involving a complete coupling of the poroelastic equations and boundary conditions. This occurs when the material ahead of the crack is continuous and is relevant to the fracture of "virgin" rock. In the other papers cited in this article and elsewhere this has not usually been the case; the interface along which the crack propagates has usually been assumed to have a particular property as far as the pore pressure is concerned. It is worth stressing that the most complete situation is considered here; the pore pressure condition ahead of the crack is set only

  7. MECHANICS OF CRACK BRIDGING UNDER DYNAMIC LOADS

    SciTech Connect

    N. SRIDHAR; ET AL

    2001-02-01

    A bridging law for fiber reinforced composites under dynamic crack propagation conditions has been derived. Inertial effects in the mechanism of fiber pullout during dynamic propagation of a bridged crack are critically examined for the first time. By reposing simple shear lag models of pullout as problems of dynamic wave propagation, the effect of the frictional coupling between the fibers and the matrix is accounted for in a fairly straightforward way. The solutions yield the time-dependent relationship between the crack opening displacement and the bridging traction. Engineering criteria and the role of material and geometrical parameters for significant inertial effects are identified.

  8. Ignition characteristics of cracked JP-7 fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Puri, Puneesh; Ma, Fuhua; Choi, Jeong-Yeol; Yang, Vigor

    2005-09-01

    The ignition characteristics of cracked JP-7 fuel with both oxygen and air is studied over a wide range of pressures (1-20 atm), temperatures (1200-2000 K), and equivalence ratios (0.5-1.5). Correlations of ignition delay times, of the form t=Aexp(E/RT)[F]a[O2]b, are established using the Chemkin-II package and least-squares analysis. The effect of C3 hydrocarbons in cracked JP-7 fuel is examined by comparing ignition delay times for two different cracked compositions.

  9. Slow crack growth in spinel in water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwantes, S.; Elber, W.

    1983-01-01

    Magnesium aluminate spinel was tested in a water environment at room temperature to establish its slow crack-growth behavior. Ring specimens with artificial flaws on the outside surface were loaded hydraulically on the inside surface. The time to failure was measured. Various precracking techniques were evaluated and multiple precracks were used to minimize the scatter in the static fatigue tests. Statistical analysis techniques were developed to determine the strength and crack velocities for a single flaw. Slow crack-growth rupture was observed at stress intensities as low as 70 percent of K sub c. A strengthening effect was observed in specimens that had survived long-time static fatigue tests.

  10. Catalytic cracking process utilizing an iso-olefin enhancer catalyst additive

    SciTech Connect

    Haag, W.O.; Harandi, M.N.; Owen, H.

    1993-08-10

    A fluid catalytic cracking process is described for upgrading C[sub 9] + aromatic containing feeds to produce gasoline, distillate, and C[sub 4] olefins, including 1-butene, cis-2-butene, trans-2-butene, in a fluid catalytic cracking unit which includes a riser, a stripping unit and a regenerator, wherein the process comprises: (a) cracking a C[sub 9] + containing feed, selected from the group consisting of gas oil, resid and admixtures thereof, in a riser in the presence of a first catalyst component, under fluid catalytic cracking conditions, wherein the first catalyst component comprises an amorphous cracking catalyst, a large pore crystalline cracking catalyst or admixtures thereof, to provide gasoline boiling range components, and an amount of C[sub 4] olefins in a first product mixture; wherein the fluid catalytic cracking conditions include a riser top temperature within the range of from 950-1,150 F, a catalyst to feed ratio from 3:1-10:1, and a catalyst contact time from 0.5-10 seconds; (b) contacting said first product mixture with a second catalyst component which comprises ZSM-23, under conditions effective to increase isomerization, with no significant oligomerization to heavier molecules, of at least one of C[sub 4] olefins to 2-methylpropene, with no significant oligomerization to heavier molecules, and recovering a second product mixture which contains amounts of 2-methylpropene greater than that in the first effluent, wherein the conditions of the vapor phase catalytic isomerization of the 1-butene, cis-2-butene, and trans-2-butene to the isobutylene include a temperature within the range of from 950-1,150 F, a catalyst to feed ratio of from 3:1-10:1, and a catalyst contact time from 0.5-10 seconds.

  11. Catechol oxidase activity of a series of new dinuclear copper(II) complexes with 3,5-DTBC and TCC as substrates: syntheses, X-ray crystal structures, spectroscopic characterization of the adducts and kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Banu, Kazi Sabnam; Chattopadhyay, Tanmay; Banerjee, Arpita; Bhattacharya, Santanu; Suresh, Eringathodi; Nethaji, Munirathinam; Zangrando, Ennio; Das, Debasis

    2008-08-18

    A series of dinuclear copper(II) complexes has been synthesized with the aim to investigate their applicability as potential structure and function models for the active site of catechol oxidase enzyme. They have been characterized by routine physicochemical techniques as well as by X-ray single-crystal structure analysis: [Cu 2(H 2L2 (2))(OH)(H 2O)(NO 3)](NO 3) 3.2H 2O ( 1), [Cu(HL1 (4))(H 2O)(NO 3)] 2(NO 3) 2.2H 2O ( 2), [Cu(L1 (1))(H 2O)(NO 3)] 2 ( 3), [Cu 2(L2 (3))(OH)(H 2O) 2](NO 3) 2, ( 4) and [Cu 2(L2 (1))(N 3) 3] ( 5) [L1 = 2-formyl-4-methyl-6R-iminomethyl-phenolato and L2 = 2,6-bis(R-iminomethyl)-4-methyl-phenolato; for L1 (1) and L2 (1), R = N-propylmorpholine; for L2 (2), R = N-ethylpiperazine; for L2 (3), R = N-ethylpyrrolidine, and for L1 (4), R = N-ethylmorpholine]. Dinuclear 1 and 4 possess two "end-off" compartmental ligands with exogenous mu-hydroxido and endogenous mu-phenoxido groups leading to intermetallic distances of 2.9794(15) and 2.9435(9) A, respectively; 2 and 3 are formed by two tridentate compartmental ligands where the copper centers are connected by endogenous phenoxido bridges with Cu-Cu separations of 3.0213(13) and 3.0152(15) A, respectively; 5 is built by an end-off compartmental ligand having exogenous mu-azido and endogenous mu-phenoxido groups with a Cu-Cu distance of 3.133(2) A (mean of two independent molecules). The catecholase activity of all of the complexes has been investigated in acetonitrile and methanol medium by UV-vis spectrophotometric study using 3,5-di- tert-butylcatechol (3,5-DTBC) and tetrachlorocatechol (TCC) as substrates. In acetonitrile medium, the conversion of 3,5-DTBC to 3,5-di- tert-butylbenzoquinone (3,5-DTBQ) catalyzed by 1- 5 is observed to proceed via the formation of two enzyme-substrate adducts, ES1 and ES2, detected spectroscopically for the first time. In methanol medium no such enzyme-substrate adduct has been detected, and the 3,5-DTBC to 3,5-DTBQ conversion is observed to be catalyzed by 1- 5

  12. Kids, Crack and the Community: Reclaiming Drug-Exposed Infants and Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, Barbara Barrett; Wilson, Gregory A., Ed.

    This book examines the growing epidemic of children born to mothers who use cocaine, particularly the highly addictive version known as "crack," focusing on the health and educational needs of such children. Nine chapters address: (1) the origins of cocaine use in the United States, as well as the chemical properties and physiological effects of…

  13. Interfacial Crack Arrest in Sandwich Panels with Embedded Crack Stoppers Subjected to Fatigue Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martakos, G.; Andreasen, J. H.; Berggreen, C.; Thomsen, O. T.

    2016-08-01

    A novel crack arresting device has been implemented in sandwich panels and tested using a special rig to apply out-of-plane loading on the sandwich panel face-sheets. Fatigue crack propagation was induced in the face-core interface of the sandwich panels which met the crack arrester. The effect of the embedded crack arresters was evaluated in terms of the achieved enhancement of the damage tolerance of the tested sandwich panels. A finite element (FE) model of the experimental setup was used for predicting propagation rates and direction of the crack growth. The FE simulation was based on the adoption of linear fracture mechanics and a fatigue propagation law (i.e. Paris law) to predict the residual fatigue life-time and behaviour of the test specimens. Finally, a comparison between the experimental results and the numerical simulations was made to validate the numerical predictions as well as the overall performance of the crack arresters.

  14. The initiation of environmentally-assisted cracking in semi-elliptical surface cracks

    SciTech Connect

    James, L.A.

    1997-02-01

    A criterion to predict under what conditions EAC would Initiate In cracks In a high-sulfur steel in contact with low-oxygen water was recently proposed by Wire and U. This EAC Initiation Criterion was developed using transient analyses for the diffusion of sulfides plus experimental test results. The experiments were conducted mainly on compact tension-type specimens with initial crack depths of about 2.54 mm. The present paper expands upon the work of Wire and U by presenting results for significantly deeper initial semi-elliptical surface cracks. In addition, in one specimen, the surface crack penetrated weld-deposited cladding into the high-sulfur steel. The results for the semi-elliptical surface cracks agreed quite well with the EAC Initiation Criterion, and provide confirmation of the applicability of the criterion to crack configurations with more restricted access to water.

  15. Thermographic detection of cracks in thin sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, K. E.; Syed, Hazari; Winfree, William P.

    1991-01-01

    A thermographic inspection technique for crack detection based on a 2D filter convolved with the thermal temperature images is presented. The filter is designed to approximate operating on the temperature images with a Laplacian operator. This operation yields an image which approximates changes in the heat flux in a thin plate. This filtering method results in an enhanced contrast due to the presence of cracks. Measurements have been performed on samples with fabricated electrical discharge machining (EDM) notches (both through-the-thickness and surface notches) and closed fatigue cracks around rivets. It is shown that the technique is effective for the detection of various crack lengths down to the resolution limits of the imager used.

  16. Mean stress effect in fatigue crack propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabeshfar, K.; Williams, T. R. G.

    1980-01-01

    Crack propagation rates in three different grades of mild steel and two types of age hardening aluminium alloys have been measured for different stress ratios. The results show a pronounced stress ratio effect for all these materials. A model of fatigue crack propagation is formulated in terms of the size of the cyclic plastic instability zone at the crack tip rather than the zone of plastic yielding. The micro-plastic instability zone is measured by a parameter involving the ratio of the maximum stress intensity and the stress level at which macro-plastic instability occurs in the {S}/{N} curve of plain fatigue test pieces. Such a parameter provides a means of normalizing crack propagation results obtained for various stress ratios.

  17. Cracked shells under skew-symmetric loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lelale, F.

    1982-01-01

    A shell containing a through crack in one of the principal planes of curvature and under general skew-symmetric loading is considered. By employing a Reissner type shell theory which takes into account the effect of transverse shear strains, all boundary conditions on the crack surfaces are satisfied separately. Consequently, unlike those obtained from the classical shell theory, the angular distributions of the stress components around the crack tips are shown to be identical to the distributions obtained from the plane and antiplane elasticity solutions. Extensive results are given for axially and circumferentially cracked cylindrical shells, spherical shells, and toroidal shells under uniform inplane shearing, out of plane shearing, and torsion. The effect of orthotropy on the results is also studied.

  18. Causes of Cracking of Ignition Cable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silsbee, F B

    1921-01-01

    The experiments described here show that the cracking at sharp bends, observed in the insulation of internal combustion engine high tension ignition wires after service, is due to a chemical attack upon the rubber by the ozone produced by the electric discharge that takes place at the surface of the cable. This cracking does not occur if the insulating material is not under tension, or if the cable is surrounded by some medium other than air. But it does occur even if the insulation is not subjected to electric stress, provided that the atmosphere near the cable contains ozone. The extent of this cracking varies greatly with the insulating material used. The cracking can be materially reduced by using braided cable and by avoiding sharp bends.

  19. Inner Crack Detection Method for Cantilever Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zheng; Zhang, Wei; Li, Yixuan; Su, Xianyue

    2008-02-01

    In this paper, continuous wavelet transform has been performed to extract the inner crack information from the guided waves in cantilever beams, and the location and size of crack can be detected exactly. Considering its best time-frequency property, Gabor continuous wavelet transform is employed to analyze the complicated flexible wave signals in cantilever beam, which is inspirited by an impact on the free end. Otherwise, in order to enhance the sensitivity of detection for some small cracks, an improved method is discussed. Here, both computational and experimental methods are carried out for comparing the influence of different crack location in beam. Therefore, the method proposed can be expected to expand to a powerful damage detection method in a broad engineering application.

  20. Application of ac tomography to crack identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saguy, H.; Rittel, D.

    2007-08-01

    The depth of penetration of alternating currents in conductors depends on their frequency and material properties. A tomographiclike technique was proposed, in which the frequency is systematically varied to detect and size flaws (emerging and hidden) in electrical conductors, based on an analysis of the skin effect [Saguy and Rittel, Appl. Phys. Lett. 89, 094107 (2006); 87, 084103 (2005)]. Initial results were reported for notched specimens [Saguy and Rittel, NDT & E Int. 40, 505 (2007)] This letter presents experimental results on the detection of actual sharp fatigue cracks, differing from notches in terms of sharpness and partial conduction through the crack flanks. The results show that hidden cracks with arbitrary crack-front shape can be accurately identified.

  1. Analysis of cracking in glass molds made of cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leushin, I. O.; Chistyakov, D. G.

    2014-09-01

    The cracking in the parts of cast iron molds intended for glass is considered, and this cracking substantially affects the operation of glass-blowing equipment, maintainability, and the replacement of mold sets. The processes that cause cracking in the parts of glass molds and initiate crack growth are studied.

  2. High-temperature healing of lithographically introduced cracks in sapphire

    SciTech Connect

    Rodel, J.; Glaeser, A.M. . Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering)

    1990-03-01

    A new method for producing controlled-geometry, controlled-crystallography, cracklike defects using photolithography has been developed. The method has been applied to sapphire, and used to study crack healing behavior at 1800{degrees}C. Effects of crack face and crack perimeter crystallography, crack face microstructure, and impurities on healing behavior have been identified.

  3. Three-dimensional measurements of fatigue crack closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, S. K.; Grandt, A. F., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth and retardation experiments conducted in polycarbonate test specimen are described. The transparent test material allows optical interferometry measurements of the fatigue crack opening (and closing) profiles. Crack surface displacements are obtained through the specimen thickness and three dimensional aspects of fatigue crack closure are discussed.

  4. Measurement and analysis of critical crack tip processes associated with variable amplitude fatigue crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudak, S. J., Jr.; Davidson, D. L.; Chan, K. S.

    1983-01-01

    Crack growth retardation following overloads can result in overly conservative life predictions in structures subjected to variable amplitude fatigue loading when linear damage accumulation procedures are employed. Crack closure is believed to control the crack growth retardation, although the specific closure mechanism is debatable. Information on the relative contributions to crack closure from: (1) plasticity left in the wake of the advancing crack and (2) crack tip residual stresses is provided. The delay period and corresponding crack growth rate transients following overloads are systematically measured as a function of load ratio (R) and overload magnitude. These responses are correlated in terms of the local 'driving force' for crack growth as measured by crack tip opening loads and delta K sub eff. The latter measurements are obtained using a scanning electron microscope equipped with a cyclic loading stage; measurements are quantified using a relatively new stereoimaging technique. Combining experimental results with analytical predictions suggests that both plastic wake and residual stress mechanism are operative, the latter becoming predominate as R increases.

  5. The effects of crack surface friction and roughness on crack tip stress fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballarini, Roberto; Plesha, Michael E.

    1987-01-01

    A model is presented which can be used to incorporate the effects of friction and tortuosity along crack surfaces through a constitutive law applied to the interface between opposing crack surfaces. The problem of a crack with a saw-tooth surface in an infinite medium subjected to a far-field shear stress is solved and the ratios of Mode-I stress intensity to Mode-II stress intensity are calculated for various coefficients of friction and material properties. The results show that tortuosity and friction lead to an increase in fracture loads and alter the direction of crack propagation.

  6. Effects of crack geometry and material behavior on scattering by cracks for QNDE applications

    SciTech Connect

    Achenbach, J.D.

    1989-09-15

    In work carried out on this project, the usual mathematical modeling of ultrasonic wave scattering by flaws is being extended to account for several typical characteristics of fatigue and stress-corrosion cracks, and the environment of such cracks. Work has been completed on scattering by macrocrack-microcrack configurations. We have also investigated reflection and transmission by a flaw plane consisting of an infinite array of randomly oriented cracks. In another investigation the propagation of mechanical disturbances in solids with periodically distributed cracks has been studied.

  7. Discrete crack growth analysis methodology for through cracks in pressurized fuselage structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potyondy, David O.; Wawrzynek, Paul A.; Ingraffea, Anthony R.

    1995-05-01

    A methodology for simulating the growth of long through cracks in the skin of pressurized aircraft fuselage structures is described. Crack trajectories are allowed to be arbitrary and are computed as part of the simulation. The interaction between the mechanical loads acting on the superstructure and the local structural response near the crack tips is accounted for by employing a hierarchical modelling strategy. The structural response for each cracked configuration is obtained using a geometrically non-linear shell finite element analysis procedure. Four stress intensity factors, two for membrane behavior and two for bending using Kirchhoff plate theory, are computed using an extension of the modified crack closure integral method. Crack trajectories are determined by applying the maximum tangential stress criterion. Crack growth results in localized mesh deletion, and the deletion regions are remeshed automatically using a newly developed all-quadrilateral meshing algorithm. The effectiveness of the methodology, and its applicability to performing practical analyses of realistic structures, is demonstrated by simulating curvilinear crack growth in a fuselage panel that is representative of a typical narrow-body aircraft. The predicted crack trajectory and fatigue life compare well with measurements of these same quantities from a full-scale pressurized panel test.

  8. Discrete crack growth analysis methodology for through cracks in pressurized fuselage structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potyondy, David O.; Wawrzynek, Paul A.; Ingraffea, Anthony R.

    1994-09-01

    A methodology for simulating the growth of long through cracks in the skin of pressurized aircraft fuselage structures is described. Crack trajectories are allowed to be arbitrary and are computed as part of the simulation. The interaction between the mechanical loads acting on the superstructure and the local structural response near the crack tips is accounted for by employing a hierarchical modeling strategy. The structural response for each cracked configuration is obtained using a geometrically nonlinear shell finite element analysis procedure. Four stress intensity factors, two for membrane behavior and two for bending using Kirchhoff plate theory, are computed using an extension of the modified crack closure integral method. Crack trajectories are determined by applying the maximum tangential stress criterion. Crack growth results in localized mesh deletion, and the deletion regions are remeshed automatically using a newly developed all-quadrilateral meshing algorithm. The effectiveness of the methodology and its applicability to performing practical analyses of realistic structures is demonstrated by simulating curvilinear crack growth in a fuselage panel that is representative of a typical narrow-body aircraft. The predicted crack trajectory and fatigue life compare well with measurements of these same quantities from a full-scale pressurized panel test.

  9. Composite Pressure Vessel Including Crack Arresting Barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Thomas K. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A pressure vessel includes a ported fitting having an annular flange formed on an end thereof and a tank that envelopes the annular flange. A crack arresting barrier is bonded to and forming a lining of the tank within the outer surface thereof. The crack arresting barrier includes a cured resin having a post-curing ductility rating of at least approximately 60% through the cured resin, and further includes randomly-oriented fibers positioned in and throughout the cured resin.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulation of propagating cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullins, M.

    1982-01-01

    Steady state crack propagation is investigated numerically using a model consisting of 236 free atoms in two (010) planes of bcc alpha iron. The continuum region is modeled using the finite element method with 175 nodes and 288 elements. The model shows clear (010) plane fracture to the edge of the discrete region at moderate loads. Analysis of the results obtained indicates that models of this type can provide realistic simulation of steady state crack propagation.

  11. Cracking of general relativistic anisotropic polytropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, L.; Fuenmayor, E.; León, P.

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the effect that small fluctuations of the local anisotropy of pressure and of the energy density may have on the occurrence of cracking in spherical compact objects, satisfying a polytropic equation of state. Two different kinds of polytropes are considered. For both, it is shown that departures from equilibrium may lead to the appearance of cracking, for a wide range of values of the parameters defining the polytrope. Prospective applications of the obtained results to some astrophysical scenarios are pointed out.

  12. Dynamic behaviour of a rotating cracked beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yashar, Ahmed; Ghandchi-Tehrani, Maryam; Ferguson, Neil

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a new approach to investigate and analyse the vibrational behaviour of cracked rotating cantilever beams, which can for example represent helicopter or wind turbine blades. The analytical Hamiltonian method is used in modelling the rotating beam and two numerical methods, the Rayleigh-Ritz and FEM, are used to study the natural frequencies and the mode shapes of the intact rotating beams. Subsequently, a crack is introduced into the FE model and simulations are performed to identify the modal characteristics for an open cracked rotating beam. The effect of various parameters such as non-dimensional rotating speed, hub ratio and slenderness ratio are investigated for both the intact and the cracked rotating beam, and in both directions of chordwise and flapwise motion. The veering phenomena in the natural frequencies as a function of the rotational speed and the buckling speed are considered with respect to the slenderness ratio. In addition, the mode shapes obtained for the flapwise vibration are compared using the modal assurance criterion (MAC). Finally, a new three dimensional design chart is produced, showing the effect of crack location and depth on the natural frequencies of the rotating beam. This chart will be subsequently important in identifying crack defects in rotating blades.

  13. Fatigue crack growth in lithium hydride

    SciTech Connect

    Healy, T.E.

    1993-09-01

    Subcritical fatigue crack growth, from cyclic tensile loading, was demonstrated in warm pressed Polycrystalline lithium hydride. Experiments were performed with cyclic tension-tension crack opening (mode I) loads applied to a pre-cracked compact type specimen in an argon environment at a temperature of 21C (70F). The fatigue crack growth was found to occur between 7.56 {times} 10{sup {minus}ll} M/cycle (2.98 {times} l0{sup {minus}9} in/cycle) and 2.35 {times} l0{sup {minus}8} m/cycle (9.24{times}10{sup {minus}7} in/cycle) for a range of stress intensity factors between 1.04 MPa{center_dot}{radical}m (0.95 ksi{center_dot}{radical}in) and 1.49 MPa{center_dot}{radical}m (1.36 ksi{center_dot}{radical}in). The rate of fatigue crack growth from cyclic tensile loading was found to be in excess of crack growth from sustained loading at an equivalent stress intensity factor. Furthermore, a fatigue threshold was not evident from the acquired data.

  14. Fatigue crack propagation analysis of plaque rupture.

    PubMed

    Pei, Xuan; Wu, Baijian; Li, Zhi-Yong

    2013-10-01

    Rupture of atheromatous plaque is the major cause of stroke or heart attack. Considering that the cardiovascular system is a classic fatigue environment, plaque rupture was treated as a chronic fatigue crack growth process in this study. Fracture mechanics theory was introduced to describe the stress status at the crack tip and Paris' law was used to calculate the crack growth rate. The effect of anatomical variation of an idealized plaque cross-section model was investigated. The crack initiation was considered to be either at the maximum circumferential stress location or at any other possible locations around the lumen. Although the crack automatically initialized at the maximum circumferential stress location usually propagated faster than others, it was not necessarily the most critical location where the fatigue life reached its minimum. We found that the fatigue life was minimum for cracks initialized in the following three regions: the midcap zone, the shoulder zone, and the backside zone. The anatomical variation has a significant influence on the fatigue life. Either a decrease in cap thickness or an increase in lipid pool size resulted in a significant decrease in fatigue life. Comparing to the previously used stress analysis, this fatigue model provides some possible explanations of plaque rupture at a low stress level in a pulsatile cardiovascular environment, and the method proposed here may be useful for further investigation of the mechanism of plaque rupture based on in vivo patient data.

  15. Creep Behavior and Durability of Cracked CMC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, R. T.; Fox, Dennis; Smith, Craig

    2015-01-01

    To understand failure mechanisms and durability of cracked Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), Melt Infiltration (MI) SiCSiC composites with Sylramic-iBN fibers and full Chemical vapour infiltration SiCSiC composites with Sylramic-ion bombarded BN (iBN) and Hi-Nicalon -S fibers were pre-cracked between 150 to 200 megapascal and then creep and Sustained Peak Low Cycle Fatigue (SPLCF) tested at 13150 C at stress levels from 35 to 103 megapascal for up to 200 hours under furnace and burner rig conditions. In addition creep testing was also conducted on pre-cracked full Chemical vapour infiltration SiCSiC composites at 14500 C between 35 and 103 megapascal for up to 200 hours under furnace conditions. If the specimens survived the 200 hour durability tests, then they were tensile tested at room temperature to determine their residual tensile properties. The failed specimens were examined by Scanning electron microscope (SEM) to determine the failure modes and mechanisms. The influence of crack healing matrix, fiber types, crack density, testing modes and interface oxidation on durability of cracked Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) will be discussed.

  16. Protection of brittle film against cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musil, J.; Sklenka, J.; Čerstvý, R.

    2016-05-01

    This article reports on the protection of the brittle Zrsbnd Sisbnd O film against cracking in bending by the highly elastic top film (over-layer). In experiments the Zrsbnd Sisbnd O films with different elemental composition and structure were used. Both the brittle and highly elastic films were prepared by magnetron sputtering using a dual magnetron. The brittle film easily cracks in bending. On the other hand, the highly elastic film exhibits enhanced resistance to cracking in bending. Main characteristic parameters of both the brittle and highly elastic films are given. Special attention is devoted to the effect of the structure (crystalline, amorphous) of both the brittle and highly elastic top film on the resistance of cracking of the brittle film. It was found that (1) both the X-ray amorphous and crystalline brittle films easily crack in bending, (2) the highly elastic film can have either X-ray amorphous or crystalline structure and (3) both the X-ray amorphous and crystalline, highly elastic top films perfectly protect the brittle films against cracking in bending. The structure, mechanical properties and optical transparency of the brittle and highly elastic sputtered Zrsbnd Sisbnd O films are described in detail. At the end of this article, the principle of the low-temperature formation of the highly elastic films is also explained.

  17. Thermal crack damage is dominated by cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, John; Meredith, Philip; Gudmundsson, Agust

    2016-04-01

    Most studies of thermally-induced cracking to date have focused on the generation of cracks formed during heating and thermal expansion. Both the nature and mechanism of crack formation during cooling are hypothesised to be different from those formed during heating. We present in-situ acoustic emission data recorded as a proxy for crack damage evolution throughout a series of heating and cooling experiments on samples of basalt and dacite. The results show that both the rate and energy of acoustic emission are consistently much higher during cooling than during heating. When comparing the AE during the heating phase with the AE during the cooling phase of a comparable duration heating and cooling cycle; we find that there are ~ 150 times as many hits during cooling. Furthermore, the average energy of those AE are more than 3 times greater, resulting in a total AE energy that is almost 500 times higher during cooling than during heating. Seismic velocity comparisons and crack morphology analysis of our heated and cooled samples support the contemporaneous acoustic emission data and also indicate that thermal cracking is largely isotropic. These new data are important for assessing the contribution of cooling-induced damage within volcanic structures and layers such as dikes, sills and lava flows.

  18. Thermally activated processes of fatigue crack growth in steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masaki; Fujii, Atsushi; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Higashida, Kenji

    2014-02-01

    Fatigue crack growth rates in steels at high and low temperatures have been investigated using Paris curves. The fatigue crack growth rates at high temperatures are quite different from those at low temperatures. Arrhenius plots between fatigue crack growth rate (da/dN) and test temperatures at constant stress intensity factor range (ΔKI) indicate a difference of the rate-controlling process for fatigue crack growth with temperature. Slip deformation at the crack tip governs fatigue crack growth at high temperatures, while hydrogen diffusion is associated with crack growth at low temperatures.

  19. Finite element microscopic stress analysis of cracked composite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, W. L.

    1978-01-01

    This paper considers the stress concentration problems of two types of cracked composite systems: (1) a composite system with a broken fiber (a penny-shaped crack problem), and (2) a composite system with a cracked matrix (an annular crack problem). The cracked composite systems are modeled with triangular and trapezoidal ring finite elements. Using NASTRAN (NASA Structural Analysis) finite element computer program, the stress and deformation fields in the cracked composite systems are calculated. The effect of fiber-matrix material combination on the stress concentrations and on the crack opening displacements is studied.

  20. Crack growth direction in unidirectional off-axis graphite epoxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herakovich, C. T.; Gregory, M. A.; Beuth, J. L., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    An anisotropic elasticity crack tip stress analysis is implemented using three crack extension direction criteria (the normal stress ratio, the tensor polynominal and the strain energy density) to predict the direction of crack extension in unidirectional off axis graphite-epoxy. The theoretical predictions of crack extension direction are then compared with experimental results for 15 deg off axis tensile coupons with center cracks. Specimens of various aspect ratios and crack orientations are analyzed. It is shown that only the normal stress ratio criterion predicts the correct direction of crack growth.

  1. Hierarchical Formation of Intrasplat Cracks in Thermal Spray Ceramic Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Cheng-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2016-06-01

    Intrasplat cracks, an essential feature of thermally sprayed ceramic coatings, play important roles in determining coating properties. However, final intrasplat crack patterns are always considered to be disordered and irregular, resulting from random cracking during splat cooling, since the detailed formation process of intrasplat cracks has scarcely been considered. In the present study, the primary formation mechanism for intrasplat cracking was explored based on both experimental observations and mechanical analysis. The results show that the intrasplat crack pattern in thermally sprayed ceramic splats presents a hierarchical structure with four sides and six neighbors, indicating that intrasplat crack patterns arise from successive domain divisions due to sequential cracking during splat cooling. The driving forces for intrasplat cracking are discussed, and the experimental data quantitatively agree well with theoretical results. This will provide insight for further coating structure designs and tailoring by tuning of intrasplat cracks.

  2. Analysis of internal crack healing mechanism under rolling deformation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Haitao; Ai, Zhengrong; Yu, Hailiang; Wu, Hongyan; Liu, Xianghua

    2014-01-01

    A new experimental method, called the 'hole filling method', is proposed to simulate the healing of internal cracks in rolled workpieces. Based on the experimental results, the evolution in the microstructure, in terms of diffusion, nucleation and recrystallisation were used to analyze the crack healing mechanism. We also validated the phenomenon of segmented healing. Internal crack healing involves plastic deformation, heat transfer and an increase in the free energy introduced by the cracks. It is proposed that internal cracks heal better under high plastic deformation followed by slow cooling after rolling. Crack healing is controlled by diffusion of atoms from the matrix to the crack surface, and also by the nucleation and growth of ferrite grain on the crack surface. The diffusion mechanism is used to explain the source of material needed for crack healing. The recrystallisation mechanism is used to explain grain nucleation and growth, accompanied by atomic migration to the crack surface.

  3. Catalytic cracking of vacuum gasoil in the presence of activating additives

    SciTech Connect

    Abdul'menov, R.G.; Serikov, P.Y.; Smidovich, E.V.; Syunyaev, Z.I.

    1985-07-01

    These authors perform catalytic cracking of vacuum gas oil in a singlepass laboratory flow unit with mechanized mixing of a bed of the microbead zeolitic catalyst KMTsR. They present data in a series of three tables and in a set of three charts. Analysis of these data leads them to conclude that the use of activating additives makes it possible to reduce the coke yield and bring coke deposition down to a preassigned level. They further conclude that their method for intensifying catalytic cracking is especially promising for heavy types of feed with high carbon residues.

  4. Biogenic Cracks in Porous Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmerle, A.; Hartung, J.; Hallatschek, O.; Goehring, L.; Herminghaus, S.

    2014-12-01

    Microorganisms growing on and inside porous rock may fracture it by various processes. Some of the mechanisms of biofouling and bioweathering are today identified and partially understood but most emphasis is on chemical weathering, while mechanical contributions have been neglected. However, as demonstrated by the perseverance of a seed germinating and cracking up a concrete block, the turgor pressure of living organisms can be very significant. Here, we present results of a systematic study of the effects of the mechanical forces of growing microbial populations on the weathering of porous media. We designed a model porous medium made of glass beads held together by polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), a curable polymer. The rheological properties of the porous medium, whose shape and size are tunable, can be controlled by the ratio of crosslinker to base used in the PDMS (see Fig. 1). Glass and PDMS being inert to most chemicals, we are able to focus on the mechanical processes of biodeterioration, excluding any chemical weathering. Inspired by recent measurements of the high pressure (~0.5 Mpa) exerted by a growing population of yeasts trapped in a microfluidic device, we show that yeast cells can be cultured homogeneously within porous medium until saturation of the porous space. We investigate then the effects of such an inner pressure on the mechanical properties of the sample. Using the same model system, we study also the complex interplay between biofilms and porous media. We focus in particular on the effects of pore size on the penetration of the biofilm within the porous sample, and on the resulting deformations of the matrix, opening new perspectives into the understanding of life in complex geometry. Figure 1. Left : cell culture growing in a model porous medium. The white spheres represent the grains, bonds are displayed in grey, and microbes in green. Right: microscopy picture of glass beads linked by PDMS bridges, scale bar: 100 μm.

  5. Fatigue crack layer propagation in silicon-iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birol, Y.; Welsch, G.; Chudnovsky, A.

    1986-01-01

    Fatigue crack propagation in metal is almost always accompanied by plastic deformation unless conditions strongly favor brittle fracture. The analysis of the plastic zone is crucial to the understanding of crack propagation behavior as it governs the crack growth kinetics. This research was undertaken to study the fatigue crack propagation in a silicon iron alloy. Kinetic and plasticity aspects of fatigue crack propagation in the alloy were obtained, including the characterization of damage evolution.

  6. 40 CFR 63.1567 - What are my requirements for inorganic HAP emissions from catalytic reforming units?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of HCl on a dry basis in ppmv, as measured by Method 26A in 40 CFR part 60, appendix A; and %O2... Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, Sulfur Recovery Units, and Bypass Lines § 63.1567...

  7. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Chung, H. M.; Clark, R. W.; Gruber, E. E.; Shack, W. J.; Soppet, W. K.; Strain, R. V.

    2007-11-06

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors (LWRs) from January to December 2002. Topics that have been investigated include: (a) environmental effects on fatigue crack initiation in carbon and low-alloy steels and austenitic stainless steels (SSs), (b) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic SSs in BWRs, (c) evaluation of causes and mechanisms of irradiation-assisted cracking of austenitic SS in PWRs, and (d) cracking in Ni-alloys and welds. A critical review of the ASME Code fatigue design margins and an assessment of the conservation in the current choice of design margins are presented. The existing fatigue {var_epsilon}-N data have been evaluated to define the effects of key material, loading, and environmental parameters on the fatigue lives of carbon and low-alloy steels and austenitic SSs. Experimental data are presented on the effects of surface roughness on fatigue crack initiation in these materials in air and LWR environments. Crack growth tests were performed in BWR environments on SSs irradiated to 0.9 and 2.0 x 10{sup 21} n x cm{sup -2}. The crack growth rates (CGRs) of the irradiated steels are a factor of {approx}5 higher than the disposition curve proposed in NUREG-0313 for thermally sensitized materials. The CGRs decreased by an order of magnitude in low-dissolved oxygen (DO) environments. Slow-strain-rate tensile (SSRT) tests were conducted in high-purity 289 C water on steels irradiated to {approx}3 dpa. The bulk S content correlated well with the susceptibility to intergranular SCC in 289 C water. The IASCC susceptibility of SSs that contain >0.003 wt. % S increased drastically. bend tests in inert environments at 23 C were conducted on broken pieces of SSRT specimens and on unirradiated specimens of the same materials after hydrogen charging. The results of the tests and a review of other data in the literature

  8. Stochastic modeling of crack initiation and short-crack growth under creep and creep-fatigue conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitamura, Takayuki; Ghosn, Louis J.; Ohtani, Ryuichi

    1992-01-01

    A simplified stochastic model is proposed for crack initiation and short-crack growth under creep and creep-fatigue conditions. Material inhomogeneity provides the random nature of crack initiation and early growth. In the model, the influence of microstructure is introduced by the variability of: (1) damage accumulation along grain boundaries, (2) critical damage required for crack initiation or growth, and (3) the grain-boundary length. The probabilities of crack initiation and growth are derived by using convolution integrals. The model is calibrated and used to predict the crack density and crack-growth rate of short cracks of 304 stainless steel under creep and creep-fatigue conditions. The mean-crack initiation lives are predicted to be within an average deviation of about 10 percent from the experimental results. The predicted comulative distributions of crack-growth rate follow the experimental data closely. The applicability of the simplified stochastic model is discussed and the future research direction is outlined.

  9. Stochastic modeling of crack initiation and short-crack growth under creep and creep-fatigue conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitamura, Takayuki; Ghosn, Louis J.; Ohtani, Ryuichi

    1989-01-01

    A simplified stochastic model is proposed for crack initiation and short-crack growth under creep and creep-fatigue conditions. Material inhomogeneity provides the random nature of crack initiation and early growth. In the model, the influence of microstructure is introduced by the variability of: (1) damage accumulation along grain boundaries, (2) critical damage required for crack initiation or growth, and (3) the grain-boundary length. The probabilities of crack initiation and growth are derived by using convolution integrals. The model is calibrated and used to predict the crack density and crack-growth rate of short cracks of 304 stainless steel under creep and creep-fatigue conditions. The mean-crack initiation lives are predicted to be within an average deviation of about 10 percent from the experimental results. The predicted cumulative distributions of crack-growth rate follow the experimental data closely. The applicability of the simplified stochastic model is discussed and the future research direction is outlined.

  10. Acoustic emission measurement of fatigue crack closure

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.S.; Rhyim, Y.M. . Center for Advanced Aerospace Materials); Kwon, D. . Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering); Ono, K. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1995-03-01

    In this study the acoustic emission (AE) technique has been applied to measure the crack closure loads precisely and the results have been compared with those measured by the conventional techniques such as the crack opening displacement (COD) method, back face strain gage (BFS) method, and surface strain gage method. In addition, fatigue tests at high stress ratio (R=0.8) have also been conducted to compared the results with those of the above methods at R=0.1 and to verify the accuracy of each method. The material used in the present investigation was an Al-Li 8090 alloy which was supplied as a 44.5mm thick rolled plate in the solution heat treated, 6% stretched and naturally aged condition. The COD and BFS methods show relatively good agreement with each other and measure the through-thickness mean value of crack closure loads. In the plane strain condition, the crack closure levels obtained by the COD and BFS methods were lower than those by the AE and surface train gage methods. The data obtained by the surface strain gage method must be interpreted carefully, because the shape of the compliance curves is affected by the location relative to the crack tip. The intrinsic fatigue life curve (da/dN vs. [Delta]K[sub eff]) obtained by the AE technique fitted well with the curve of high stress ratio (R=0.8) test at high [Delta]K, suggesting that the AE technique is sensitive to local crack-tip behavior on a microscopic scale and can be considered as a reliable measurement method for crack closure phenomena under repetitive loads.

  11. Crack propagation modeling using Peridynamic theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafezi, M. H.; Alebrahim, R.; Kundu, T.

    2016-04-01

    Crack propagation and branching are modeled using nonlocal peridynamic theory. One major advantage of this nonlocal theory based analysis tool is the unifying approach towards material behavior modeling - irrespective of whether the crack is formed in the material or not. No separate damage law is needed for crack initiation and propagation. This theory overcomes the weaknesses of existing continuum mechanics based numerical tools (e.g. FEM, XFEM etc.) for identifying fracture modes and does not require any simplifying assumptions. Cracks grow autonomously and not necessarily along a prescribed path. However, in some special situations such as in case of ductile fracture, the damage evolution and failure depend on parameters characterizing the local stress state instead of peridynamic damage modeling technique developed for brittle fracture. For brittle fracture modeling the bond is simply broken when the failure criterion is satisfied. This simulation helps us to design more reliable modeling tool for crack propagation and branching in both brittle and ductile materials. Peridynamic analysis has been found to be very demanding computationally, particularly for real-world structures (e.g. vehicles, aircrafts, etc.). It also requires a very expensive visualization process. The goal of this paper is to bring awareness to researchers the impact of this cutting-edge simulation tool for a better understanding of the cracked material response. A computer code has been developed to implement the peridynamic theory based modeling tool for two-dimensional analysis. A good agreement between our predictions and previously published results is observed. Some interesting new results that have not been reported earlier by others are also obtained and presented in this paper. The final objective of this investigation is to increase the mechanics knowledge of self-similar and self-affine cracks.

  12. Treatment of singularities in cracked bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivakumar, K. N.; Raju, I. S.

    1989-01-01

    Three-dimensional finite-element analyses of middle-crack tension (M-T) and bend specimens subjected to mode I loadings were performed to study the stress singularity along the crack front. The specimen was modeled using 20-node isoparametric elements. The displacements and stresses from the analysis were used to estimate the power of singularities using a log-log regression analysis along the crack front. The analyses showed that finite-sized cracked bodies have two singular stress fields of the form rho = C sub o (theta, z) r to the -1/2 power + D sub o (theta, phi) R to the lambda rho power. The first term is the cylindrical singularity with the power -1/2 and is dominant over the middle 96 pct (for Poisson's ratio = 0.3) of the crack front and becomes nearly zero at the free surface. The second singularity is a vertex singularity with the vertex point located at the intersection of the crack front and the free surface. The second term is dominant at the free surface and becomes nearly zero away from the the boundary layer. The thickness of the boundary layer depends on Poisson's ratio of the material and is independent of the specimen type. The thickness of the boundary layer varied from 0 pct to about 5 pct of the total specimen thickness as Poisson's ratio varied from 0.0 to 0.45. Because there are two singular stress fields near the free surface, the strain energy release rate (G) is an appropriate parameter to measure the severity of the crack.

  13. TRANSPORT THROUGH CRACKED CONCRETE: LITERATURE REVIEW

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.

    2012-05-11

    Concrete containment structures and cement-based fills and waste forms are used at the Savannah River Site to enhance the performance of shallow land disposal systems designed for containment of low-level radioactive waste. Understanding and measuring transport through cracked concrete is important for describing the initial condition of radioactive waste containment structures at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and for predicting performance of these structures over time. This report transmits the results of a literature review on transport through cracked concrete which was performed by Professor Jason Weiss, Purdue University per SRR0000678 (RFP-RQ00001029-WY). This review complements the NRC-sponsored literature review and assessment of factors relevant to performance of grouted systems for radioactive waste disposal. This review was performed by The Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses, San Antonio, TX, and The University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen Scotland and was focused on tank closure. The objective of the literature review on transport through cracked concrete was to identify information in the open literature which can be applied to SRS transport models for cementitious containment structures, fills, and waste forms. In addition, the literature review was intended to: (1) Provide a framework for describing and classifying cracks in containment structures and cementitious materials used in radioactive waste disposal, (2) Document the state of knowledge and research related to transport through cracks in concrete for various exposure conditions, (3) Provide information or methodology for answering several specific questions related to cracking and transport in concrete, and (4) Provide information that can be used to design experiments on transport through cracked samples and actual structures.

  14. Crack-tip-opening angle measurements and crack tunneling under stable tearing in thin sheet 2024-T3 aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawicke, D. S.; Sutton, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    The stable tearing behavior of thin sheets 2024-T3 aluminum alloy was studied for middle crack tension specimens having initial cracks that were: flat cracks (low fatigue stress) and 45 degrees through-thickness slant cracks (high fatigue stress). The critical crack-tip-opening angle (CTOA) values during stable tearing were measured by two independent methods, optical microscopy and digital image correlation. Results from the two methods agreed well. The CTOA measurements and observations of the fracture surfaces showed that the initial stable tearing behavior of low and high fatigue stress tests is significantly different. The cracks in the low fatigue stress tests underwent a transition from flat-to-slant crack growth, during which the CTOA values were high and significant crack tunneling occurred. After crack growth equal to about the thickness, CTOA reached a constant value of 6 deg and after crack growth equal to about twice the thickness, crack tunneling stabilized. The initial high CTOA values, in the low fatigue crack tests, coincided with large three-dimensional crack front shape changes due to a variation in the through-thickness crack tip constraint. The cracks in the high fatigue stress tests reach the same constant CTOA value after crack growth equal to about the thickness, but produced only a slightly higher CTOA value during initial crack growth. For crack growth on the 45 degree slant, the crack front and local field variables are still highly three-dimensional. However, the constant CTOA values and stable crack front shape may allow the process to be approximated with two-dimensional models.

  15. Recent evaluations of crack-opening-area in circumferentially cracked pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, S.; Brust, F.; Ghadiali, N.; Wilkowski, G.; Miura, N.

    1997-04-01

    Leak-before-break (LBB) analyses for circumferentially cracked pipes are currently being conducted in the nuclear industry to justify elimination of pipe whip restraints and jet shields which are present because of the expected dynamic effects from pipe rupture. The application of the LBB methodology frequently requires calculation of leak rates. The leak rates depend on the crack-opening area of the through-wall crack in the pipe. In addition to LBB analyses which assume a hypothetical flaw size, there is also interest in the integrity of actual leaking cracks corresponding to current leakage detection requirements in NRC Regulatory Guide 1.45, or for assessing temporary repair of Class 2 and 3 pipes that have leaks as are being evaluated in ASME Section XI. The objectives of this study were to review, evaluate, and refine current predictive models for performing crack-opening-area analyses of circumferentially cracked pipes. The results from twenty-five full-scale pipe fracture experiments, conducted in the Degraded Piping Program, the International Piping Integrity Research Group Program, and the Short Cracks in Piping and Piping Welds Program, were used to verify the analytical models. Standard statistical analyses were performed to assess used to verify the analytical models. Standard statistical analyses were performed to assess quantitatively the accuracy of the predictive models. The evaluation also involved finite element analyses for determining the crack-opening profile often needed to perform leak-rate calculations.

  16. Extended displacement discontinuity boundary integral equation and boundary element method for cracks in thermo-magneto-electro-elastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Dang, HuaYang; Xu, GuangTao; Fan, CuiYing; Zhao, MingHao

    2016-08-01

    The extended displacement discontinuity boundary integral equation (EDDBIE) and boundary element method is developed for the analysis of planar cracks of arbitrary shape in the isotropic plane of three-dimensional (3D) transversely isotropic thermo-magneto-electro-elastic (TMEE) media. The extended displacement discontinuities (EDDs) include conventional displacement discontinuity, electric potential discontinuity, magnetic potential discontinuity, as well as temperature discontinuity across crack faces; correspondingly, the extended stresses represent conventional stress, electric displacement, magnetic induction and heat flux. Employing a Hankel transformation, the fundamental solutions for unit point EDDs in 3D transversely isotropic TMEE media are derived. The EDDBIEs for a planar crack of arbitrary shape in the isotropic plane of a 3D transversely isotropic TMEE medium are then established. Using the boundary integral equation method, the singularities of near-crack border fields are obtained and the extended stress field intensity factors are expressed in terms of the EDDs on crack faces. According to the analogy between the EDDBIEs for an isotropic thermoelastic material and TMEE medium, an analogical solution method for crack problems of a TMEE medium is proposed for coupled multi-field loadings. Employing constant triangular elements, the EDDBIEs are discretized and numerically solved. As an application, the problems of an elliptical crack subjected to combined mechanical-electric-magnetic-thermal loadings are investigated.

  17. How to crack nuts: acquisition process in captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) observing a model.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Satoshi; Morimura, Naruki; Houki, Chiharu

    2009-10-01

    Stone tool use for nut cracking consists of placing a hard-shelled nut onto a stone anvil and then cracking the shell open by pounding it with a stone hammer to get to the kernel. We investigated the acquisition of tool use for nut cracking in a group of captive chimpanzees to clarify what kind of understanding of the tools and actions will lead to the acquisition of this type of tool use in the presence of a skilled model. A human experimenter trained a male chimpanzee until he mastered the use of a hammer and anvil stone to crack open macadamia nuts. He was then put in a nut-cracking situation together with his group mates, who were naïve to this tool use; we did not have a control group without a model. The results showed that the process of acquisition could be broken down into several steps, including recognition of applying pressure to the nut,emergence of the use of a combination of three objects, emergence of the hitting action, using a tool for hitting, and hitting the nut. The chimpanzees recognized these different components separately and practiced them one after another. They gradually united these factors in their behavior leading to their first success. Their behavior did not clearly improve immediately after observing successful nut cracking by a peer, but observation of a skilled group member seemed to have a gradual, long-term influence on the acquisition of nut cracking by naïve chimpanzees. PMID:19727866

  18. The Effects of Crack Openings on Crack Initiation, Propagation and Coalescence Behavior in Rock-Like Materials Under Uniaxial Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hao; Zhou, Xiaoping; Zhu, Jiang; Qian, Qihu

    2016-09-01

    This paper experimentally investigates the cracking behavior of rock-like specimens containing artificial open flaws under uniaxial compressive loads. The present experiments mainly focus on the effects of crack openings on crack propagation and coalescence behavior in rock-like materials under uniaxial compression. The real-time crack coalescence processes in the specimens with different crack openings are analyzed. The experimental results show that the crack openings significantly affect the crack initiation stresses and the crack initiation modes. The initiation stresses of wing cracks and coplanar secondary cracks decrease with increasing crack openings. However, the initiation stress of anti-wing cracks increases with increasing crack openings. Moreover, five types of crack coalescence in the specimens containing three pre-existing open flaws under uniaxial compression are observed. The effects of crack openings on the mechanical properties of rock-like materials, which include the complete axial stress-strain curves, peak stresses, peak strains and initiation stresses, are investigated in detail.

  19. Crack-tip chemistry modeling of stage I stress corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.H.; Simonen, E.P.

    1991-10-01

    Stage I stress corrosion cracking usually exhibits a very strong K dependence with Paris law exponents of up to 30. 2 Model calculations indicate that the crack velocity in this regime is controlled by transport through a salt film and that the K dependence results from crack opening controlled salt film dissolution. An ionic transport model that accounts for both electromigration through the resistive salt film and Fickian diffusion through the aqueous solution was used for these predictions. Predicted crack growth rates are in excellent agreement with measured values for Ni with P segregated to the grain boundaries and tested in IN H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} at +900 mV. This salt film dissolution may be applicable to stage I cracking of other materials.

  20. Stress Ratio Effects on Crack Opening Loads and Crack Growth Rates in Aluminum Alloy 2024

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riddell, William T.; Piascik, Robert S.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of stress ratio (R) and crack opening behavior on fatigue crack growth rates (da/dN) for aluminum alloy (AA) 2024-T3 were investigated using constant-delta K testing, closure measurements, and fractography. Fatigue crack growth rates were obtained for a range of delta K and stress ratios. Results show that constant delta K fatigue crack growth for R ranging from near 0 to 1 is divided into three regions. In Region 1, at low R, da/dN increases with increasing R. In Region 2, at intermediate R, fatigue crack growth rates are relatively independent of R. In Region 3, at high R, further increases in da/dN are observed with increasing R.

  1. CRACK TIP OPENING DISPLACEMENT AND ANGLE FOR A GROWING CRACK IN CARBON STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    LAM, POH-SANG

    2005-01-18

    The crack tip opening displacements and angles (CTOD/CTOA) are calculated with finite element method based on the test data of a set of constraint-dependent J-R curves for A285 carbon steel. The values of the CTOD/CTOA are initially high at initiation, but rapidly decrease to a nearly constant value. When the common practice is adopted by using only the constant part of CTOD/CTOA as the fracture criterion, the crack growth behavior is shown to be severely underestimated. However, with a bilinear form of CTOD/CTOA fracture criterion which approximates the initial non-constant portion, the experimental load vs. crack extension curves can be closely predicted. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the CTOD/CTOA is crack tip constraint dependent. The values of CTOD/CTOA for specimens with various ratios of crack length to specimen width (a/W) are reflected by the J-R curves and their slopes.

  2. Crack injection in silver gold alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiying

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is a materials degradation phenomena resulting from a combination of stress and a corrosive environment. Among the alphabet soup of proposed mechanism of SCC the most important are film-rupture, film-induced cleavage and hydrogen embrittlement. This work examines various aspects of film-induced cleavage in gold alloys for which the operation of hydrogen embrittlement processes can be strictly ruled out on thermodynamic grounds. This is so because in such alloys SCC occurs under electrochemical conditions within which water is stable to hydrogen gas evolution. The alloy system examined in this work is AgAu since the corrosion processes in this system occur by a dealloying mechanism that results in the formation of nanoporous gold. The physics behind the dealloying process as well as the resulting formation of nanoporous gold is today well understood. Two important aspects of the film-induced cleavage mechanism are examined in this work: dynamic fracture in monolithic nanoporous gold and crack injection. In crack injection there is a finite thickness dealloyed layer formed on a AgAu alloy sample and the question of whether or not a crack that nucleates within this layer can travel for some finite distance into the un-corroded parent phase alloy is addressed. Dynamic fracture tests were performed on single edge-notched monolithic nanoporous gold samples as well as "infinite strip" sample configurations for which the stress intensity remains constant over a significant portion of the crack length. High-speed photography was used to measure the crack velocity. In the dynamic fracture experiments cracks were observed to travel at speeds as large as 270 m/s corresponding to about 68% of the Raleigh wave velocity. Crack injection experiments were performed on single crystal Ag77Au23, polycrystalline Ag72Au28 and pure gold, all of which had thin nanoporous gold layers on the surface of samples. Through-thickness fracture was seen in both the

  3. Description of crack growth using the strip-yield model for computation of crack opening loads, crack tip stretch, and strain rates

    SciTech Connect

    Koning, A.U. de; Hoeve, H.J. ten; Henriksen, T.K.

    1999-07-01

    Nowadays, application of the strip-yield model for computation of crack opening load levels is well known. In this paper the incremental formulation of a fatigue crack growth law is used to demonstrate the role of the crack opening load level in time-independent fatigue crack growth. Less known is the ability of the strip-yield model to define the strain rate at the crack tip. A threshold level {dot {var{underscore}epsilon}}{sub th} of this strain rate is introduced and used to formulate a criterion for initiation of time-dependent accelerated fatigue crack growth. This process is called corrosion fatigue. To account for effects of environment and frequency on the crack growth rate a time-dependent part is added to the incremental fatigue crack growth law. The resulting incremental crack growth equation is integrated to obtain the crack growth rate for a load cycle. The model discussed in this paper is a mechanical model. Physical aspects other than strain rate, loading frequency and load wave shape are not modeled in an explicit way. Hence, the model is valid for specific environment/base metal combinations. However, in consideration of the effects of small variations of environment, temperature, and other variables on the crack growth rates, it can be used as a reference solution. The fatigue crack growth model has been implemented in the NASGRO (ESACRACK) software. The time-dependent part is still subject to further evaluation.

  4. Surface crack growth in fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Im, J.; Mandell, J. F.; Wang, S. S.; Mcgarry, F. J.

    1976-01-01

    The results of an experimental study of damage extension and failure in glass and graphite/epoxy laminates containing partially through-thickness surface cracks are presented. The laminates studied are divided between those containing four plies, 90/0/0/90, 15/-15/-15/15, and 45/-45/-45/45, and those containing 12-16 plies of the general configurations 0/90, + or - 45, and 0/+ or - 60. Most of the results are for surface cracks of various lengths and several depths. Stable damage extension in laminates containing surface cracks is predominantly delamination between plies, and tends to be much more extensive prior to failure than is the case with through-thickness cracks, resulting in approximately notch-insensitive behavior in most cases. A greater tendency for notch-sensitive behavior is found for 0/90 graphite/epoxy laminates for which stable damage extension is more limited. The rate of damage extension with increasing applied stress depends upon the composite system and ply configuration as well as the crack length and depth. An approximate semiempirical method is presented for estimating the growth rate of large damage-regions.

  5. Crack Detection with Lamb Wave Wavenumber Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Leckey, Cara; Rogge, Matt; Yu, Lingyu

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we present our study of Lamb wave crack detection using wavenumber analysis. The aim is to demonstrate the application of wavenumber analysis to 3D Lamb wave data to enable damage detection. The 3D wavefields (including vx, vy and vz components) in time-space domain contain a wealth of information regarding the propagating waves in a damaged plate. For crack detection, three wavenumber analysis techniques are used: (i) two dimensional Fourier transform (2D-FT) which can transform the time-space wavefield into frequency-wavenumber representation while losing the spatial information; (ii) short space 2D-FT which can obtain the frequency-wavenumber spectra at various spatial locations, resulting in a space-frequency-wavenumber representation; (iii) local wavenumber analysis which can provide the distribution of the effective wavenumbers at different locations. All of these concepts are demonstrated through a numerical simulation example of an aluminum plate with a crack. The 3D elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT) was used to obtain the 3D wavefields, of which the vz (out-of-plane) wave component is compared with the experimental measurement obtained from a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (SLDV) for verification purposes. The experimental and simulated results are found to be in close agreement. The application of wavenumber analysis on 3D EFIT simulation data shows the effectiveness of the analysis for crack detection. Keywords: : Lamb wave, crack detection, wavenumber analysis, EFIT modeling

  6. STRESS CORROSION CRACKING IN TEAR DROP SPECIMENS

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, P; Philip Zapp, P; Jonathan Duffey, J; Kerry Dunn, K

    2009-05-01

    Laboratory tests were conducted to investigate the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of 304L stainless steel used to construct the containment vessels for the storage of plutonium-bearing materials. The tear drop corrosion specimens each with an autogenous weld in the center were placed in contact with moist plutonium oxide and chloride salt mixtures. Cracking was found in two of the specimens in the heat affected zone (HAZ) at the apex area. Finite element analysis was performed to simulate the specimen fabrication for determining the internal stress which caused SCC to occur. It was found that the tensile stress at the crack initiation site was about 30% lower than the highest stress which had been shifted to the shoulders of the specimen due to the specimen fabrication process. This finding appears to indicate that the SCC initiation took place in favor of the possibly weaker weld/base metal interface at a sufficiently high level of background stress. The base material, even subject to a higher tensile stress, was not cracked. The relieving of tensile stress due to SCC initiation and growth in the HAZ and the weld might have foreclosed the potential for cracking at the specimen shoulders where higher stress was found.

  7. Modified pressure system for imaging egg cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, Kurt C.; Yoon, Seung Chul; Jones, Deana R.; Heitschmidt, Gerald W.; Park, Bosoon; Windham, William R.

    2008-04-01

    One aspect of grading table eggs is shell checks or cracks. Currently, USDA voluntary regulations require that humans grade a representative sample of all eggs processed. However, as processing plants and packing facilities continue to increase their volume and throughput, human graders are having difficulty matching the pace of the machines. Additionally, some plants also have a problem with micro-cracks that the graders often miss because they are very small and hard to see immediately post-processing but grow and become readily apparent before they reach market. An imaging system was developed to help the grader detect these small micro-cracks. The imaging system utilized one image captured at atmospheric pressure and a second at a slight negative pressure to enhance the crack and make detection much easier. A simple image processing algorithm was then applied to the ratio of these two images and the resulting image, containing both cracked and/or intact eggs were color-coded to simplify identification. The imaging system was capable of imaging 15 eggs in about 3/4 second and the algorithm processing took about another 10 seconds. These times could easily be reduced with a dedicated, multi-threaded computer program. In analyzing 1000 eggs, the system was 99.6% accurate overall with only 0.3% false positives compared to 94.2% accurate overall for the human graders with 1.2% false positives. An international patent on the system was filed and further automation of the system is needed.

  8. Imaging Cracks by Laser Excited Thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlichting, J.; Kervalishvili, G. N.; Maierhofer, Ch.; Kreutzbruck, M.

    2010-02-01

    During the last years active thermography is increasingly used in a number of NDT problems in production and maintenance. In this work we focus on the detection of vertical cracks starting at the surface, which is an important indication of structural failure. By using local thermal excitation it is possible to image anisotropies in the lateral diffusivity by recording the temporal temperature data with an infrared camera. The regional transient behaviour of temperature distribution then can provide quantitative information of the crack parameter. In doing so, we present an advanced technique for the determination of the crack depth. The experimental set-up is based on an Nd:YAG laser. The beam is focused on the test sample by using an optical scanner to create the required lateral heat flow. The time resolved temperature distribution is recorded with an infrared camera (InSb FPA, 3 to 5 μm) providing a frame rate of up to 500 Hz. In addition we report on numerical simulation to investigate the concept of local heat excitation for a quantitative estimation of crack parameters. The modeling also includes the influence of surface to surface radiation inside the crack. We obtained a good consistency between experimental and theoretical data.

  9. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Shack, W.J.; Kassner, T.F.; Maiya, P.S.; Park, J.Y.; Ruther, W.E.

    1988-10-01

    Research during the past year focused on (1) stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of austentitic stainless steels (SS), (2) fatigue of Type 316NG SS, and (3) SCC of ferritic steels used in reactor piping, pressure vessels, and steam generators. Stress corrosion cracking studies on austentitic SS explored the critical strains required for crack initiation, the effects of crevice conditions on SCC susceptibility, heat-to-heat variations in SCC susceptibility of Type 316NG and modified Type 347 SS, the effect of heat treatment on the susceptibility of Type 347 SS, threshold stress intensity values for crack growth in Type 316NG SS, and the effects of cuprous ion and several organic salts on the SCC of sensitized Type 304 SS. Crevice conditions were observed to strongly promote SCC. Significant heat-to-heat variations were observed in SCC susceptibility of Types 316NG and 347 SS. No correlation was found between SCC behavior and minor variations in chemical composition. A significant effect of heat treatment was observed in Type 347 SS. A heat that was extremely resistant to SCC after heat treatment at 650/degree/C for 24 h was susceptible to transgranular stress corrosion cracking (TGSCC) in the solution-annealed condition. Although there was no sensitization in either condition, the presence or absence of precipitates and differences in precipitate morphology appear to influence the SCC behavior. 20 refs., 20 figs., 11 tabs.

  10. Effect of slurry in cat cracking reactor on product yield and quality

    SciTech Connect

    Useinova, M.S.; Guseinov, A.M.; Kapustin, V.M.

    1994-07-01

    Cracking on microbead zeolitic catalysts is becoming one of the most extensively used processes in petroleum refining. Many paths have been taken in improving the cat cracking process. One of these paths is based on logical application of the principles of physicochemical technology. Feasibility was demonstrated for intensifying the catalytic cracking of vacuum distillate by means of various activating additives, mainly refinery by-products, added to the feed in certain concentrations. By varying the concentration of the additive, the process parameters can be regulated. Of the various parameters, the coke deposition on the catalyst is the most sensitive to the action of additives. We have investigated the possibility of intensifying the cat cracking process by optimizing the quantity of slurry fed to the trapping device of the reactor. It was assumed that the slurry acts in the same manner as additions of products from a different source. In a laboratory unit, we determined the effect of small concentrations of slurry on the material balance in cracking.

  11. Implementation of a symmetric boundary integral formulation for cohesive cracks in homogeneous media and at interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Tavara, Luis; Mantic, Vladislav; Salvadori, Alberto; Gray, Leonard J; Paris, Federico

    2009-01-01

    A symmetric boundary integral formulation for cohesive cracks growing in the interior of homogeneous linear elastic isotropic media and/or at interfaces between these media is developed and implemented in a numerical code. The solution of a problem that includes cohesive cracks depends on the cohesive law adopted. In the present work, models based on the concept of free energy density per unit undeformed area are considered. The corresponding constitutive cohesive equations present a softening branch which induces to the problem a potential instability. Thus, the development and implementation of a suitable solution algorithm capable of following the growth of the cohesive zone becomes an important issue. An arc-length control combined with a Newton-Raphson algorithm for iterative solution of nonlinear equations is used. The Boundary Element Method is very attractive for modeling cohesive crack problems as all nonlinearities are located on the boundaries (including the crack boundaries) of linear elastic domains. A Galerkin approximation scheme, applied to a suitable symmetric integral formulation, ensures an easy treatment of cracks in homogeneous media and excellent convergence behavior of the numerical solution. Numerical results for the wedge split test are presented and compared with experimental results available in the literature.

  12. Eccentric annular crack under general nonuniform internal pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeini-Ardakani, S.; Kamali, M. T.; Shodja, H. M.

    2016-08-01

    For a better approximation of ring-shaped and toroidal cracks, a new eccentric annular crack model is proposed and an analytical approach for determination of the corresponding stress intensity factors is given. The crack is subjected to arbitrary mode I loading. A rigorous solution is provided by mapping the eccentric annular crack to a concentric annular crack. The analysis leads to two decoupled Fredholm integral equations of the second kind. For the sake of verification, the problem of a conventional annular crack is examined. Furthermore, for various crack configurations of an eccentric annular crack under uniform tension, the stress intensity factors pertaining to the inner and outer crack edges are delineated in dimensionless plots.

  13. Environmental Effects on Fatigue Crack Growth in 7075 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonakdar, A.; Wang, F.; Williams, J. J.; Chawla, N.

    2012-08-01

    The fatigue behavior of aluminum alloys is greatly influenced by the environmental conditions. In this article, fatigue crack growth rates were measured for 7075-T651 Al alloy under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV, ~10-10 Torr), dry air, and water vapor. Standard compact tension (CT) specimens were tested along the L-T orientation under various load ratios of 0.1, 0.5, and 0.8. Fracture surfaces and crack morphologies were studied using scanning electron microscopy and crack deflection analysis. The crack growth behavior under vacuum was affected by friction and possible rewelding of crack surfaces, causing an asymmetry in the crack growth behavior, from load shedding to constant load. The enhancement of crack growth at higher moisture levels was observed and is discussed in terms of moisture decreasing friction between the crack faces. The effect of crack deflection as a function of R ratio and environment is also presented.

  14. Modeling the Interactions Between Multiple Crack Closure Mechanisms at Threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Riddell, William T.; Piascik, Robert S.

    2003-01-01

    A fatigue crack closure model is developed that includes interactions between the three closure mechanisms most likely to occur at threshold; plasticity, roughness, and oxide. This model, herein referred to as the CROP model (for Closure, Roughness, Oxide, and Plasticity), also includes the effects of out-of plane cracking and multi-axial loading. These features make the CROP closure model uniquely suited for, but not limited to, threshold applications. Rough cracks are idealized here as two-dimensional sawtooths, whose geometry induces mixed-mode crack- tip stresses. Continuum mechanics and crack-tip dislocation concepts are combined to relate crack face displacements to crack-tip loads. Geometric criteria are used to determine closure loads from crack-face displacements. Finite element results, used to verify model predictions, provide critical information about the locations where crack closure occurs.

  15. Burst Pressure Prediction of Multiple Cracks in Pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razak, N. A.; Alang, N. A.; Murad, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    Available industrial code such as ASME B1G, modified ASME B1G and DNV RP-F101 to assess pipeline defects appear more conservative for multiple crack like- defects than single crack-like defects. Thus, this paper presents burst pressure prediction of pipe with multiple cracks like defects. A finite element model was developed and the burst pressure prediction was compared with the available code. The model was used to investigate the effect of the distance between the cracks and the crack length. The coalescence diagram was also developed to evaluate the burst pressure of the multiple cracks. It was found as the distance between crack increases, the interaction effect comes to fade away and multiple cracks behave like two independent single cracks.

  16. Propagation of stress corrosion cracks in alpha-brasses

    SciTech Connect

    Beggs, Dennis Vinton

    1981-01-01

    Transgranular and intergranular stress corrosion cracks were investigated in alpha-brasses in a tarnishing ammoniacal solution. Surface observation indicated that the transgranular cracks propagated discontinuously by the sudden appearance of a fine crack extending several microns ahead of the previous crack tip, often associated with the detection of a discrete acoustic emission (AE). By periodically increasing the deflection, crack front markings were produced on the resulting fracture surfaces, showing that the discontinuous propagation of the crack trace was representative of the subsurface cracking. The intergranular crack trace appeared to propagate continuously at a relatively blunt crack tip and was not associated with discrete AE. Under load pulsing tests with a time between pulses, ..delta..t greater than or equal to 3 s, the transgranular fracture surfaces always exhibited crack front markings which corresponded with the applied pulses. The spacing between crack front markings, ..delta..x, decreased linearly with ..delta..t. With ..delta..t less than or equal to 1.5 s, the crack front markings were in a one-to-one correspondence with applied pulses only at relatively long crack lengths. In this case, ..delta..x = ..delta..x* which approached a limiting value of 1 ..mu..m. No crack front markings were observed on intergranular fracture surfaces produced during these tests. It is concluded that transgranular cracking occurs by discontinuous mechanical fracture of an embrittled region around the crack tip, while intergranular cracking results from a different mechanism with cracking occurring via the film-rupture mechanism.

  17. Environmentally assisted cracking in LWR materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Kassner, T.F.; Park, J.H.; Shack, W.J.; Zhang, J.; Brust, F.W.; Dong, P.

    1998-03-01

    The effect of dissolved oxygen level on fatigue life of austenitic stainless steels is discussed and the results of a detailed study of the effect of the environment on the growth of cracks during fatigue initiation are presented. Initial test results are given for specimens irradiated in the Halden reactor. Impurities introduced by shielded metal arc welding that may affect susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking are described. Results of calculations of residual stresses in core shroud weldments are summarized. Crack growth rates of high-nickel alloys under cyclic loading with R ratios from 0.2--0.95 in water that contains a wide range of dissolved oxygen and hydrogen concentrations at 289 and 320 C are summarized.

  18. Environmentally assisted cracking of LWR materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Chung, H. M.; Kassner, T. F.; Park, J. H.; Shack, W. J.; Zhang, J.; Brust, F. W.; Dong, P.

    1997-12-05

    The effect of dissolved oxygen level on fatigue life of austenitic stainless steels is discussed and the results of a detailed study of the effect of the environment on the growth of cracks during fatigue initiation are presented. Initial test results are given for specimens irradiated in the Halden reactor. Impurities introduced by shielded metal arc welding that may affect susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking are described. Results of calculations of residual stresses in core shroud weldments are summarized. Crack growth rates of high-nickel alloys under cyclic loading with R ratios from 0.2-0.95 in water that contains a wide range of dissolved oxygen and hydrogen concentrations at 289 and 320 C are summarized.

  19. Seacoast stress corrosion cracking of aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1981-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking resistance of high strength, wrought aluminum alloys in a seacoast atmosphere was investigated and the results were compared with those obtained in laboratory tests. Round tensile specimens taken from the short transverse grain direction of aluminum plate and stressed up to 100 percent of their yield strengths were exposed to the seacoast and to alternate immersion in salt water and synthetic seawater. Maximum exposure periods of one year at the seacoast, 0.3 or 0.7 of a month for alternate immersion in salt water, and three months for synthetic seawater were indicated for aluminum alloys to avoid false indications of stress corrosion cracking failure resulting from pitting. Correlation of the results was very good among the three test media using the selected exposure periods. It is concluded that either of the laboratory test media is suitable for evaluating the stress corrosion cracking performance of aluminum alloys in seacoast atmosphere.

  20. Crack detection using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Migliori, Albert; Bell, Thomas M.; Rhodes, George W.

    1994-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for detecting crack-like flaws in components. A plurality of exciting frequencies are generated and applied to a component in a dry condition to obtain a first ultrasonic spectrum of the component. The component is then wet with a selected liquid to penetrate any crack-like flaws in the component. The plurality of exciting frequencies are again applied to the component and a second ultrasonic spectrum of the component is obtained. The wet and dry ultrasonic spectra are then analyzed to determine the second harmonic components in each of the ultrasonic resonance spectra and the second harmonic components are compared to ascertain the presence of crack-like flaws in the component.

  1. Slow crack propagation in heterogeneous materials.

    PubMed

    Kierfeld, J; Vinokur, V M

    2006-05-01

    Statistics and thermally activated dynamics of crack nucleation and propagation in a two-dimensional heterogeneous material containing quenched randomly distributed defects are studied theoretically. Using the generalized Griffith criterion we derive the equation of motion for the crack tip position accounting for dissipation, thermal noise, and the random forces arising from the defects. We find that aggregations of defects generating long-range interaction forces (e.g., clouds of dislocations) lead to anomalously slow creep of the crack tip or even to its complete arrest. We demonstrate that heterogeneous materials with frozen defects contain a large number of arrested microcracks and that their fracture toughness is enhanced to the experimentally accessible time scales.

  2. Modeling radon transport in dry, cracked soil

    SciTech Connect

    Holford, D.J. ); Schery, S.D.; Wilson, J.L.; Phillips, F.M. )

    1993-01-10

    A two-dimensional finite element code was used to investigate the effect of changes in surface air pressure on radon flux from soil with parallel, partially penetrating cracks. A sensitivity analysis investigates the effects of various crack dimensions, soil characteristics, and surface air pressure on radon flux from the soil surface to the atmosphere. Simulation results indicate that radon flux is most sensitive to soil properties; the diffusion coefficient is most important, followed by permeability and porosity. Radon flux is also sensitive to changes in barometric pressure, which cause variations in radon flux above and below the average diffusive flux. Sinusoidal variations in barometric pressure cause a net increase in the average radon flux from the soil, because increases in flux during periods of decreasing pressure are greater than the decreases in flux during periods of decreasing pressure of equal magnitude. Cracks were found to significantly increase radon flux from soils of low permeability. 33 refs. 19 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Barnacles resist removal by crack trapping.

    PubMed

    Hui, Chung-Yuen; Long, Rong; Wahl, Kathryn J; Everett, Richard K

    2011-06-01

    We study the mechanics of pull-off of a barnacle adhering to a thin elastic layer which is bonded to a rigid substrate. We address the case of barnacles having acorn shell geometry and hard, calcarious base plates. Pull-off is initiated by the propagation of an interface edge crack between the base plate and the layer. We compute the energy release rate of this crack as it grows along the interface using a finite element method. We also develop an approximate analytical model to interpret our numerical results and to give a closed-form expression for the energy release rate. Our result shows that the resistance of barnacles to interfacial failure arises from a crack-trapping mechanism.

  4. Inverse Crack Problems in Piezoelectric Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sladek, Jan; Sladek, Vladimir; Zhang, Chuanzeng

    2010-05-01

    In the present paper, the meshless local Petrov-Galerkin (MLPG) method is applied to cracked piezoelectric solids under a stationary or transient dynamic load and unspecified electrical conditions on the crack surfaces. On the outer surface of the cracked solid the electrical boundary conditions are over-specified. The coupled governing partial differential equations are satisfied in a weak-form on small fictitious sub-domains. Nodal points are introduced and spread on the analyzed domain and each node is surrounded by a small circle for simplicity, but without loss of generality. The spatial variations of the displacements and the electric potential are approximated by the Moving Least-Squares (MLS) scheme. After performing the spatial integrations, a system of linear algebraic equations for unknown nodal values is obtained. Singular value decomposition (SVD) is applied to solve the ill-conditioned linear system of algebraic equations obtained from the local integral equations (LIEs) after the MLS approximation.

  5. FInal Report - Investment Casting Shell Cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Von Richards

    2003-12-01

    This project made a significant contribution to the understanding of the investment casting shell cracking problem. The effects of wax properties on the occurrence of shell cracking were demonstrated and can be measured. The properties measured include coefficient of thermal expansion, heating rate and crystallinity of the structure. The important features of production molds and materials properties have been indicated by case study analysis and fractography of low strength test bars. It was found that stress risers in shell cavity design were important and that typical critical flaws were either oversize particles or large pores just behind the prime coat. It was also found that the true effect of fugitive polymer fibers was not permeability increase, but rather a toughening mechanism due to crack deflection.

  6. Crack detection using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Migliori, A.; Bell, T.M.; Rhodes, G.W.

    1994-10-04

    Method and apparatus are provided for detecting crack-like flaws in components. A plurality of exciting frequencies are generated and applied to a component in a dry condition to obtain a first ultrasonic spectrum of the component. The component is then wet with a selected liquid to penetrate any crack-like flaws in the component. The plurality of exciting frequencies are again applied to the component and a second ultrasonic spectrum of the component is obtained. The wet and dry ultrasonic spectra are then analyzed to determine the second harmonic components in each of the ultrasonic resonance spectra and the second harmonic components are compared to ascertain the presence of crack-like flaws in the component. 5 figs.

  7. Catalytic cracking process with vanadium passivation

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, J.V.; Jossens, L.W.

    1991-03-26

    This paper discusses a process for the catalytic cracking of metal-containing hydrocarbonaceous feedstock. It comprises contacting the feedstock under cracking conditions with a dual component catalyst composition. The catalyst composition comprises a first component comprising an active cracking catalyst; and a second component, as a separate and distinct entity, the second component comprising the following materials: a calcium and magnesium containing material selected from the group consisting of dolomite, substantially amorphous calcium magnesium silicate, calcium magnesium oxide, calcium magnesium acetate, calcium magnesium carbonate, and calcium magnesium subcarbonate; a magnesium containing material comprising a hydrous magnesium silicate; and a binder selected from the group consisting of kaolin, bentonite, montmorillonite, saponite, hectorite, alumina, silica, titania, zirconia, silica-alumina, and combinations thereof.

  8. Barnacles resist removal by crack trapping

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Chung-Yuen; Long, Rong; Wahl, Kathryn J.; Everett, Richard K.

    2011-01-01

    We study the mechanics of pull-off of a barnacle adhering to a thin elastic layer which is bonded to a rigid substrate. We address the case of barnacles having acorn shell geometry and hard, calcarious base plates. Pull-off is initiated by the propagation of an interface edge crack between the base plate and the layer. We compute the energy release rate of this crack as it grows along the interface using a finite element method. We also develop an approximate analytical model to interpret our numerical results and to give a closed-form expression for the energy release rate. Our result shows that the resistance of barnacles to interfacial failure arises from a crack-trapping mechanism. PMID:21208968

  9. Crack velocity jumps engendered by a transformational process zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulbitch, A.; Korzhenevskii, A. L.

    2016-06-01

    We study a concerted propagation of a fast crack with the process zone where a rearrangement of the solid structure takes place. The latter is treated as a second-order local phase transformation. We demonstrate that the propagation of such a zone gives rise to a nonlinear frictionlike force exerted on the crack tip, resisting its propagation. Depending on the temperature, it produces three regimes of crack motion, which differ in the behavior of the crack tip process zone: (i) always existing, (ii) only emerging at a high crack speed, and (iii) flickering. We show that the latter regime exhibits crack velocity jumps.

  10. Interaction of Cracks Between Two Adjacent Indents in Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, S. R.; Salem, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    Experimental observations of the interaction behavior of cracks between two adjacent indents were made using an indentation technique in soda-lime glass. It was specifically demonstrated how one indent crack initiates and propagates in the vicinity of another indent crack. Several types of crack interactions were examined by changing the orientation and distance of one indent relative to the other. It was found that the residual stress field produced by elastic/plastic indentation has a significant influence on controlling the mode of crack interaction. The interaction of an indent crack with a free surface was also investigated for glass and ceramic specimens.

  11. Creep failure of cracking heater at a petrochemical plant

    SciTech Connect

    El-Batahgy, A. . E-mail: elbatahgy@yahoo.com; Zaghloul, B.

    2005-03-15

    After two and half years of operation, a bend tube in a cracking heater at an ethylene plant failed due to creep cracking. Creep damage occurred as a result of metallurgical instability including coarsening of carbides that caused softening and initiation of voids or wedge-type intergranular cracks. This was accelerated due to increasing inner surface temperature during decoking process. Thermal fatigue contributed to the failure as a result of temperature variations due to several shutdown-startup operations. To minimize such failure in futures, periodic inspection to monitor crack formation was scheduled. Nondestructive tests including dye penetrant test for surface cracking and radiographic test for internal crack were implemented.

  12. Acceleration of Fatigue Crack Growth after Overload in Carbon Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, A.; Miyahara, H.; Makabe, C.; Miyazaki, T.

    The effects of an overload on fatigue crack growth behavior have been investigated by using carbon steel. Delayed retardation and acceleration of crack growth were both observed. These phenomena depended not only on overload conditions but also on the baseline stress conditions. Moreover, the mechanical properties of the materials affected the crack growth rate after overload. It was found that crack growth accelerated when tensile residual stress was distributed in front of the crack tip. The residual stress distribution is related to the crack opening geometry at the overload stage.

  13. Velocity-dependent fatigue crack paths in nanograined Pt films.

    PubMed

    Meirom, R A; Clark, T; Polcawich, R; Pulskamp, J; Dubey, M; Muhlstein, C L

    2008-08-22

    Studies of crack growth in nanograined films assert that mechanical damage accumulates at grain boundaries irrespective of the crack velocity and loading conditions. This work shows that crack advance in nanograined Pt films involves a dislocation-slip mechanism that is a function of the crack growth rate and mode of loading. Crack paths in Pt were initially intergranular, but transitioned to a transgranular mode that persisted until catastrophic failure. This research demonstrates that crack growth mechanisms modeled for nanograined Ni cannot be generalized to other pure, metallic systems.

  14. Evaluation of a Small-Crack Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Johnston, William M.

    2010-01-01

    A new system has been developed to obtain fatigue crack growth rate data from a series of images acquired during fatigue testing of specimens containing small surface cracks that initiate at highly-polished notches. The primary benefit associated with replica-based crack growth rate data methods is preserving a record of the crack configuration during the life of the specimen. Additionally, this system has the benefits of both reducing time and labor, and not requiring introduction of surface replica media into the crack. Fatigue crack growth rate data obtained using this new system are found to be in good agreement with similar results obtained from surface replicas.

  15. Crack detection using pulsed eddy current stimulated thermography

    SciTech Connect

    Kostson, E.; Weekes, B.; Almond, D. P.; Wilson, J.; Tian, G. Y.

    2011-06-23

    This contribution presents results from studies investigating factors that influence the detection of surface breaking cracks using pulsed eddy current thermography. The influences of the current strength and crack orientation in both ferromagnetic and non-ferromagnetic metals have been investigated. It has been found that crack detection is far more sensitive to crack orientation in non-ferromagnetic metals than in ferromagnetic metals. The effects of crack size on detectability are presented for a large number of steel, nickel alloy and titanium samples. Results of studies comparing crack images obtained prior and after coating a nickel alloy sample with a thermal barrier coating are presented.

  16. Restoration of strength along the parth of a healed crack

    SciTech Connect

    Finkel`, V.M.; Sergeeva, O.G.; Ruvinskii, M.A.

    1994-09-01

    The authors study the properties of healed cracks in crystals of CaCO{sub 3} and NaCl. The application of pressure has been shown to heal a major portion of the cracks, but the strength of the crystal is still deteriorated along the crack boundary. The authors anneal the healed specimens, which results in the motion of dislocations, and the formation of an array of pores along the crack boundary. They then study the rate of crack velociy propagation using high-speed photography, to learn how the pores and relocated dislocations affect the crack propagation speed.

  17. Fatigue Crack Growth Analysis Models for Functionally Graded Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Dag, Serkan; Yildirim, Bora; Sabuncuoglu, Baris

    2008-02-15

    The objective of this study is to develop crack growth analysis methods for functionally graded materials (FGMs) subjected to mode I cyclic loading. The study presents finite elements based computational procedures for both two and three dimensional problems to examine fatigue crack growth in functionally graded materials. Developed methods allow the computation of crack length and generation of crack front profile for a graded medium subjected to fluctuating stresses. The results presented for an elliptical crack embedded in a functionally graded medium, illustrate the competing effects of ellipse aspect ratio and material property gradation on the fatigue crack growth behavior.

  18. COD measurements at various positions along a crack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharpe, W. N., Jr.; Su, X.

    1988-01-01

    Load versus crack-opening-displacement (COD) was measured at various positions along the border of a fatigue crack as it grew from a small surface crack on the edge of an aluminum specimen into a through-the-thickness crack. Displacements were measured with a laser-based interferometric system with a gage length of 70 microns and a resolution of 0.01 micron. These load-COD curves can be used to determine opening loads and thereby investigate the effect of closure on the growth of small cracks. In general, the opening loads decrease as the crack grows.

  19. Realistic and efficient 2D crack simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadegar, Jacob; Liu, Xiaoqing; Singh, Abhishek

    2010-04-01

    Although numerical algorithms for 2D crack simulation have been studied in Modeling and Simulation (M&S) and computer graphics for decades, realism and computational efficiency are still major challenges. In this paper, we introduce a high-fidelity, scalable, adaptive and efficient/runtime 2D crack/fracture simulation system by applying the mathematically elegant Peano-Cesaro triangular meshing/remeshing technique to model the generation of shards/fragments. The recursive fractal sweep associated with the Peano-Cesaro triangulation provides efficient local multi-resolution refinement to any level-of-detail. The generated binary decomposition tree also provides efficient neighbor retrieval mechanism used for mesh element splitting and merging with minimal memory requirements essential for realistic 2D fragment formation. Upon load impact/contact/penetration, a number of factors including impact angle, impact energy, and material properties are all taken into account to produce the criteria of crack initialization, propagation, and termination leading to realistic fractal-like rubble/fragments formation. The aforementioned parameters are used as variables of probabilistic models of cracks/shards formation, making the proposed solution highly adaptive by allowing machine learning mechanisms learn the optimal values for the variables/parameters based on prior benchmark data generated by off-line physics based simulation solutions that produce accurate fractures/shards though at highly non-real time paste. Crack/fracture simulation has been conducted on various load impacts with different initial locations at various impulse scales. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed system has the capability to realistically and efficiently simulate 2D crack phenomena (such as window shattering and shards generation) with diverse potentials in military and civil M&S applications such as training and mission planning.

  20. Nucleation of squat cracks in rail, calculation of crack initiation angles in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeimi, Meysam; Li, Zili; Dollevoet, Rolf

    2015-07-01

    A numerical model of wheel-track system is developed for nucleation of squat-type fatigue cracks in rail material. The model is used for estimating the angles of squat cracks in three dimensions. Contact mechanics and multi-axial fatigue analysis are combined to study the crack initiation mechanism in rails. Nonlinear material properties, actual wheel-rail geometries and realistic loading conditions are considered in the modelling process. Using a 3D explicit finite element analysis the transient rolling contact behaviour of wheel on rail is simulated. Employing the critical plane concept, the material points with the largest possibility of crack initiation are determined; based on which, the 3D orientations/angles of the possible squat cracks are estimated. Numerical estimations are compared with sample results of experimental observations on a rail specimen with squat from the site. The findings suggest a proper agreement between results of modelling and experiment. It is observed that squat cracks initiate at an in-plane angle around 13°-22° relative to the rail surface. The initiation angle seen on surface plane is calculated around 29°-48°, while the crack tend to initiate in angles around 25°-31° in the rail cross-section.

  1. Multiple Gastrointestinal Complications of Crack Cocaine Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Carlin, Neal; Nguyen, Nhat; DePasquale, Joseph R.

    2014-01-01

    Cocaine and its alkaloid free base “crack-cocaine” have long since been substances of abuse. Drug abuse of cocaine via oral, inhalation, intravenous, and intranasal intake has famously been associated with a number of medical complications. Intestinal ischemia and perforation remain the most common manifestations of cocaine associated gastrointestinal disease and have historically been associated with oral intake of cocaine. Here we find a rare case of two relatively uncommon gastrointestinal complications of hemorrhage and pancreatitis presenting within a single admission in a chronic crack cocaine abuser. PMID:24839446

  2. Crack detection on HU-25 Guardian aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, D.G.; Jones, C.R.; Mihelic, J.E.; Dassler, E.; Walizer, J.

    1996-10-01

    An ultrasonic inspection method was developed at FAA`s Airworthiness Assurance NDI Validation Center (AANC) to easily and rapidly detect hidden fatigue cracks in the copilot vertical windshield post on USCG (Coast Guard) HU-25 `Guardian` aircraft. The inspection procedure locates hidden cracks as small as 3.2 mm emanating from internal fastener holes and determines their length. A test procedure was developed and a baseline assessment of the USCG fleet conducted. Inspection results on 41 aircraft revealed good correlation with results made during subsequent structural disassembly and visual inspection of selected aircraft.

  3. Fatigue crack growth under variable amplitude loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidawi, Jihad A.

    1994-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth tests were conducted on an Fe 510 E C-Mn steel and a submerged arc welded joint from the same material under constant, variable, and random loading amplitudes. Paris-Erdogan's crack growth rate law was tested for the evaluation of m and C using the stress intensity factor K, the J-integral, the effective stress intensity factor K(sub eff), and the root mean square stress intensity factor K(sub rms) fracture mechanics concepts. The effect of retardation and residual stresses resulting from welding was also considered. It was found that all concepts gave good life predictions in all cases.

  4. Matrix cracking of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites in shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, Varun P.; Zok, Frank W.

    2014-12-01

    The mechanics of cracking in fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) under general loadings remains incomplete. The present paper addresses one outstanding aspect of this problem: the development of matrix cracks in unidirectional plies under shear loading. To this end, we develop a model based on potential energy differences upstream and downstream of a fully bridged steady-state matrix crack. Through a combination of analytical solutions and finite element simulations of the constituent stresses before and after cracking, we identify the dominant stress components that drive crack growth. We show that, when the axial slip lengths are much larger than the fiber diameter and when interfacial slip precedes cracking, the shear stresses in the constituents are largely unaffected by the presence of the crack; the changes that do occur are confined to a 'core' region within a distance of about one fiber diameter from the crack plane. Instead, the driving force for crack growth derives mainly from the axial stresses-tensile in the fibers and compressive in the matrix-that arise upon cracking. These stresses are well-approximated by solutions based on shear-lag analysis. Combining these solutions with the governing equation for crack growth yields an analytical estimate of the critical shear stress for matrix cracking. An analogous approach is used in deriving the critical stresses needed for matrix cracking under arbitrary in-plane loadings. The applicability of these results to cross-ply CMC laminates is briefly discussed.

  5. Evolving fracture patterns: columnar joints, mud cracks and polygonal terrain.

    PubMed

    Goehring, Lucas

    2013-01-01

    When cracks form in a thin contracting layer, they sequentially break the layer into smaller and smaller pieces. A rectilinear crack pattern encodes information about the order of crack formation, as later cracks tend to intersect with earlier cracks at right angles. In a hexagonal pattern, in contrast, the angles between all cracks at a vertex are near 120°. Hexagonal crack patterns are typically seen when a crack network opens and heals repeatedly, in a thin layer, or advances by many intermittent steps into a thick layer. Here, it is shown how both types of pattern can arise from identical forces, and how a rectilinear crack pattern can evolve towards a hexagonal one. Such an evolution is expected when cracks undergo many opening cycles, where the cracks in any cycle are guided by the positions of cracks in the previous cycle but when they can slightly vary their position and order of opening. The general features of this evolution are outlined and compared with a review of the specific patterns of contraction cracks in dried mud, polygonal terrain, columnar joints and eroding gypsum-sand cements.

  6. Comparison of fatigue crack propagation in Modes I and III

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, R.O.

    1985-06-01

    The propagation behavior of fatigue cracks in Mode III (anti-plane shear), measured under cyclic torsion, is described and compared with more commonly encountered behavior under Mode I (tensile opening) loads. It is shown that a unique, global characterization of Mode III growth rates, akin to the Paris ''law'' in Mode I, is only possible if characterizating parameters appropriate to large-scale yielding are employed and allowance is made for crack tip shielding from sliding crack surface interference (i.e., friction and abrasion) between mating fracture surfaces. Based on the crack tip stress and deformation fields for Mode III stationary cracks, the cyclic crack tip displacement, (..delta..CTD/sub III/, and plastic strain intensity range ..delta..GAMMA/sub III/, have been proposed and are found to provide an adequate description of behavior in a range of steels, provided crack surface interference is minimized. The magnitude of this interference, which is somewhat analogous to crack closure in Mode I, is further examined in the light of the complex fractography of torsional fatigue failures and the question of a ''fatigue threshold'' for Mode III crack growth. Finally, micro-mechanical models for cyclic crack extension in anti-plane shear are briefly described, and the contrasting behavior between Mode III and Mode I cracks subjected to simple variable amplitude spectra is examined in terms of the differing role of crack tip blunting and closure in influencing shear, as opposed to tensile opening, modes of crack growth.

  7. Evaluation of multi-phase heat transfer and droplet evaporation in petroleum cracking flows

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.; Petrick, M.; Zhou, C.Q.

    1996-04-01

    A computer code ICRKFLO was used to simulate the multiphase reacting flow of fluidized catalytic cracking (FCC) riser reactors. The simulation provided a fundamental understanding of the hydrodynamics and heat transfer processes in an FCC riser reactor, critical to the development of a new high performance unit. The code was able to make predictions that are in good agreement with available pilot-scale test data. Computational results indicate that the heat transfer and droplet evaporation processes have a significant impact on the performance of a pilot-scale FCC unit. The impact could become even greater on scale-up units.

  8. Short-crack growth behaviour in various aircraft materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, P. R. (Compiler); Newman, James C., Jr. (Compiler)

    1990-01-01

    The results of the first phase of an AGARD Cooperative Test Program on the behavior and growth of short fatigue cracks are reviewed. The establishment of a common test method, means of data collection/analysis and crack growth modeling in an aircraft alloy AA 2024-T3 are described. The second phase allowed testing of various materials and loading conditions. The results of this second phase are described. All materials exhibited a short-crack effect to some extent. The effect was much less evident in 4340 steel than in the other materials. For the aluminum, aluminum-lithium, and titanium alloys, short cracks grew at stress-intensity factor ranges lower, in some cases much lower, than the thresholds obtained from long crack tests. Several laboratories used the same crack growth model to analyze the growth of short cracks. Reasonable agreement was found between measured and predicted short-crack growth rates and fatigue lives.

  9. Strain oxidation cracking of austenitic stainless steels at 610 C

    SciTech Connect

    Calvar, M. Le; Scott, P.M.; Magnin, T.; Rieux, P.

    1998-02-01

    Strain oxidation cracking of both forged and welded austenitic stainless steels (SS) was studied. Creep and slow strain rate tests (SSRT) were performed in vacuum, air, and a gas furnace environment (air + carbon dioxide [CO{sub 2}] + water [H{sub 2}O]). Results showed cracking was environmentally dependent. Almost no cracking was observed in vacuum, whereas intergranular cracking was observed with increasing severity in passing from an air to a gas furnace environment. The most severe cracking was associated with formation of a less protective film formed in the gas furnace environment (air: haematite-like M{sub 2}O{sub 3} oxide; gas furnace environment: spinel M{sub 3}O{sub 4} oxide). Cracking depended strongly on the carbon content and the sensitization susceptibility of the material: the higher the carbon content, the more susceptible the alloy. This cracking was believed to be similar to other oxidation-induced cracking phenomena.

  10. Control and Manipulation of Nano Cracks Mimicking Optical Wave

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Young D.; Yeo, Junyeob; Lee, Habeom; Hong, Sukjoon; Kwon, Jinhyeong; Kim, Kyunkyu; Ko, Seung Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Generally, a fracture is considered as an uncontrollable thus useless phenomenon due to its highly random nature. The aim of this study is to investigate highly ordered cracks such as oscillatory cracks and to manipulate via elaborate control of mechanical properties of the cracking medium including thickness, geometry, and elastic mismatch. Specific thin film with micro-sized notches was fabricated on a silicon based substrate in order to controllably generate self-propagating cracks in large area. Interestingly, various nano-cracks behaved similar to optical wave including refraction, total internal reflection and evanescent wave. This novel phenomena of controlled cracking was used to fabricate sophisticated nano/micro patterns in large area which cannot be obtained even with conventional nanofabrication methods. We also have showed that the cracks are directly implementable into a nano/micro-channel application since the cracks naturally have a form of channel-like shape. PMID:26612107

  11. Influence of Subsurface Cracks on Laser Induced Surface Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Feit, M D; Rubenchik, A M

    2003-11-07

    Cracks can affect laser damage susceptibility in three ways. These are field intensification due to interference, enhanced absorption due to trapped material in the cracks, and increased mechanical weakness. Enhanced absorption is the most important effect.

  12. Cracking the Genetic Code | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Cracking the Genetic Code, From NIH Director Dr. Francis S. Collins Past ... moment in science in 2000: Cracking of the genetic code raised the prospect of pinpointing the root ...

  13. Research progress on expansive soil cracks under changing environment.

    PubMed

    Shi, Bei-xiao; Zheng, Cheng-feng; Wu, Jin-kun

    2014-01-01

    Engineering problems shunned previously rise to the surface gradually with the activities of reforming the natural world in depth, the problem of expansive soil crack under the changing environment becoming a control factor of expansive soil slope stability. The problem of expansive soil crack has gradually become a research hotspot, elaborates the occurrence and development of cracks from the basic properties of expansive soil, and points out the role of controlling the crack of expansive soil strength. We summarize the existing research methods and results of expansive soil crack characteristics. Improving crack measurement and calculation method and researching the crack depth measurement, statistical analysis method, crack depth and surface feature relationship will be the future direction. PMID:25013869

  14. Acoustic emission assessment of interface cracking in thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li; Zhong, Zhi-Chun; Zhou, Yi-Chun; Zhu, Wang; Zhang, Zhi-Biao; Cai, Can-Ying; Lu, Chun-Sheng

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, acoustic emission (AE) and digital image correlation methods were applied to monitor interface cracking in thermal barrier coatings under compression. The interface failure process can be identified via its AE features, including buckling, delamination incubation and spallation. According to the Fourier transformation of AE signals, there are four different failure modes: surface vertical cracks, opening and sliding interface cracks, and substrate deformation. The characteristic frequency of AE signals from surface vertical cracks is 0.21 MHz, whilst that of the two types of interface cracks are 0.43 and 0.29 MHz, respectively. The energy released of the two types of interface cracks are 0.43 and 0.29 MHz, respectively. Based on the energy released from cracking and the AE signals, a relationship is established between the interface crack length and AE parameters, which is in good agreement with experimental results.

  15. Unrecognized "crack" cocaine abuse in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Campbell, D; Parr, M J; Shutt, L E

    1996-10-01

    We report a case of "crack" cocaine abuse in a pregnant patient associated with haematuria, proteinuria, haemolytic anaemia, renal impairment, thrombocytopenia and pulmonary oedema. The case illustrates the problems for clinicians where unrecognized cocaine abuse interferes with the diagnosis and management of a complicated pregnancy. In addition, we discuss the principles for the safe conduct of anaesthesia in the pregnant cocaine abuser.

  16. Thermosonic imaging of cracks: applications to teeth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiaoyan; Favro, Lawrence D.; Thomas, Robert L.

    2001-10-01

    A novel nondestructive imaging technique, thermosonics, which combines ultrasonic/sonic excitation and advanced infrared imaging, will be described. In this paper, the authors will illuminate the physical principles underlining this technique, and demonstrate its applications to detection of cracks in teeth.

  17. Method for repairing cracks in structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Stephen W. (Inventor); Newman, John A. (Inventor); Piascik, Robert S. (Inventor); Glaessgen, Edward H. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A first material with a known maximum temperature of operation is coated with a second material on at least one surface of the first material. The coating has a melting temperature that is greater than the maximum temperature of operation of the first material. The coating is heated to its melting temperature until the coating flows into any cracks in the first material's surface.

  18. Intrusion of Soil Water through Pipe Cracks

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes a series of experiments conducted at U.S. EPA’s Test and Evaluation Facility in 2013-2014 to study the intrusion of contaminated soil water into a pipe crack during simulated backflow events. A test rig was used consisting of a 3’ x 3’ x 3’ acrylic soil bo...

  19. Digital radiographic systems detect boiler tube cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, S.

    2008-06-15

    Boiler water wall leaks have been a major cause of steam plant forced outages. But conventional nondestructive evaluation techniques have a poor track record of detecting corrosion fatigue cracking on the inside surface of the cold side of waterwall tubing. EPRI is performing field trials of a prototype direct-digital radiographic system that promises to be a game changer. 8 figs.

  20. Strip edge cracking simulation in cold rolling

    SciTech Connect

    Hubert, C.; Dubar, L.; Dubar, M.; Dubois, A.

    2011-01-17

    This research work focuses on a specific defect which occurs during cold rolling of steel strips: edge-serration. Investigations on the industrial processes have led to the conclusion that this defect is the result of the edge-trimming and cold rolling sequences. The aim of this research work is to analyze the effect of the cutting process and the cold rolling on cracks occurrence, especially on strip edges.This study is performed using an experimental testing stand called Upsetting Rolling Test (URT). It allows to reproduce cold rolling contact parameters such as forward slip, reduction ratio and friction coefficients. Specimens sampled near trimmed industrial strip edges are deformed using the URT stand. Two sets of specimens with different stress states, obtained by annealing, are submitted to two reduction passes with extreme forward slips.Scanning electron microscopy observations added to 3D optical surface profiler topographies show that on one hand, forward slip has a major effect on cracks opening. On the other hand, cracks opening decreases according to high roll strip speed gradient. Concerning the heat-treated specimens, no crack appeared after all reduction passes, showing a large influence of the cutting process and consequently of the local stress state in the vicinity of the burnish and fracture regions.

  1. Crack Detection for Aerospace Quality Spur Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Harry J.

    2002-01-01

    Health and Usage Monitoring System research and development involves analysis of the vibration signals produced by a gearbox throughout its life. There are two major advantages of knowing the actual lifetime of a gearbox component: safety and cost. In this report, a technique is proposed to help extract the critical data and present it in a manner that can be easy to understand. The key feature of the technique is to make it independent of speed, torque and prior history for localized, single tooth damage such as gear cracks. This extraction technique is demonstrated on two sets of digitized vibration data from cracked spur gears. Standard vibration diagnostic parameters are calculated and presented for comparison. Several new detection algorithms are also presented. The results of this study indicate that crack detection methods examined are not robust or repeatable. The proposed techniques provide a limited improvement to existing diagnostic parameters. Current techniques show that the cracks progressed at a much faster rate than anticipated which reduced available time for detection.

  2. Instantaneous crack detection using dual PZT transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seung Bum; Sohn, Hoon

    2008-03-01

    A new guided wave based nondestructive testing (NDT) technique is developed to detect crack damage in metallic plates commonly used in aircraft without using prior baseline data or a predetermined decision boundary. In conventional guided wave based techniques, damage is often identified by comparing the "current" data obtained from a potentially damaged condition of a structure with the "past" baseline data collected at the pristine condition of the structure. However, it has been reported that this type of pattern comparison with the baseline data can lead to increased false alarms due to its susceptibility to varying operational and environmental conditions of the structure. In order to tackle this issue, a reference-free damage detection technique is previously developed using two pairs of collocated lead zirconate titanate transducers (PZTs) placed on both sides of a plate. In this study, this reference-free technique is further advanced so that the PZT transducers can be placed only on one side of the specimen. Crack formation creates Lamb wave mode conversion due to a sudden change in the thickness of the structure. Then, the proposed technique instantly detects the appearance of the crack by extracting this mode conversion from the measured Lamb waves. This study suggests a reference-free statistical approach that enables damage classification using only the current data set. Numerical and experimental results are presented to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed technique to instantaneous crack detection.

  3. Unrecognized "crack" cocaine abuse in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Campbell, D; Parr, M J; Shutt, L E

    1996-10-01

    We report a case of "crack" cocaine abuse in a pregnant patient associated with haematuria, proteinuria, haemolytic anaemia, renal impairment, thrombocytopenia and pulmonary oedema. The case illustrates the problems for clinicians where unrecognized cocaine abuse interferes with the diagnosis and management of a complicated pregnancy. In addition, we discuss the principles for the safe conduct of anaesthesia in the pregnant cocaine abuser. PMID:8942348

  4. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Gruber, E.E.

    1996-07-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors (LWRs) from April 1995 to December 1995. Topics that have been investigated include fatigue of carbon and low-alloy steel used in reactor piping and pressure vessels, EAC of Alloy 600 and 690, and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of Type 304 SS. Fatigue tests were conducted on ferritic steels in water that contained various concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO) to determine whether a slow strain rate applied during different portions of a tensile-loading cycle are equally effective in decreasing fatigue life. Crack-growth-rate tests were conducted on compact-tension specimens from several heats of Alloys 600 and 690 in simulated LWR environments. Effects of fluoride-ion contamination on susceptibility to intergranular cracking of high- and commercial- purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-tensile tests at 288 degrees Centigrade. Microchemical changes in the specimens were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy to determine whether trace impurity elements may contribute to IASCC of these materials.

  5. System for Repairing Cracks in Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Stephen W. (Inventor); Newman, John A. (Inventor); Piascik, Robert S. (Inventor); Glaessgen, Edward H. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A first material with a known maximum temperature of operation is coated with a second material on at least one surface of the first material. The coating has a melting temperature that is greater than the maximum temperature of operation of the first material. The coating is heated to its melting temperature until the coating flows into any cracks in the first material's surface.

  6. The partially closed Griffith crack. [under polynomial loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thresher, R. W.; Smith, F. W.

    1973-01-01

    A solution is presented for a Griffith crack subjected to an arbitrary polynomial loading function which causes one end of the crack to remain closed. Closed form expressions are presented for the crack opening length and for the stress and displacements in the plane of the crack. The special case of pure bending is presented as an example and for this case the stress intensity factor is computed.

  7. Dynamic crack arrest in ceramics and ceramic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobayashi, A. S.; Yang, K. H.

    1989-01-01

    The results of past dynamic crack arrest experiments involving structural ceramics and ceramic composites are reviewed and analyzed. The lack of dynamic crack arrest in very brittle materials is discussed and contrasted with dynamic crack arrest in somewhat brittle metallic and polymeric materials. Numerical analyses show that the lack of crack arrest is due to reduced dynamic fracture resistance of the material and is not due to the kinetic energy.

  8. Analysis of small crack behavior for airframe applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclung, R. C.; Chan, K. S.; Hudak, S. J., Jr.; Davidson, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    The small fatigue crack problem is critically reviewed from the perspective of airframe applications. Different types of small cracks-microstructural, mechanical, and chemical-are carefully defined and relevant mechanisms identified. Appropriate analysis techniques, including both rigorous scientific and practical engineering treatments, are briefly described. Important materials data issues are addressed, including increased scatter in small crack data and recommended small crack test methods. Key problems requiring further study are highlighted.

  9. A thermodynamic analysis of propagating subcritical cracks with cohesive zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, David H.

    1993-01-01

    The results of the so-called energetic approach to fracture with particular attention to the issue of energy dissipation due to crack propagation are applied to the case of a crack with cohesive zone. The thermodynamic admissibility of subcritical crack growth (SCG) is discussed together with some hypotheses that lead to the derivation of SCG laws. A two-phase cohesive zone model for discontinuous crack growth is presented and its thermodynamics analyzed, followed by an example of its possible application.

  10. Detection and sizing of underbead cracks using ultrasonic nondestructive examination

    SciTech Connect

    Scarbrough, J.D.; Wierzbicki, W.M.

    1982-02-11

    Ultrasonic nondestructive examination (NDE) will detect three mil deep underbead cracks in welds joining thin walled iridium hemishells. A correlation was developed to relate the amplitude of the signal reflected from the crack with crack wall area. The observed cracks occur in the weld underbead in the arc taper area during encapsulation of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ pellets for thermoelectric generators used in deep space exploration.

  11. Analysis of Multiple Cracks in an Infinite Functionally Graded Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shbeeb, N. I.; Binienda, W. K.; Kreider, K. L.

    1999-01-01

    A general methodology was constructed to develop the fundamental solution for a crack embedded in an infinite non-homogeneous material in which the shear modulus varies exponentially with the y coordinate. The fundamental solution was used to generate a solution to fully interactive multiple crack problems for stress intensity factors and strain energy release rates. Parametric studies were conducted for two crack configurations. The model displayed sensitivity to crack distance, relative angular orientation, and to the coefficient of nonhomogeneity.

  12. Tritium distribution at the crack tip of high-strength steels submitted to stress corrosion cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brass, A. M.; Chêne, J.; Gonzalez, J.

    1994-06-01

    The experimental results presented in this article are the first direct evidence of hydrogen diffusion in 4120 and 4130 high-strength steels undergoing a stress corrosion cracking (SCC) test with an enhancement of the hydrogen concentration at the crack tip. The hydrogen entry is evidenced by electrochemical permeation experiments performed either at the corrosion potential or under cathodic polarization in selected microstructures. The autoradiography of tritium associated with microdensitometric measurements allows measurement of the hydrogen distribution and local concentration at the crack tip of specimens undergoing SCC in a tritiated aqueous medium. The small enhancement in the tritium concentration measured at the crack tip of the 4120 steel may be a consequence of a strong contribution of trapping sites throughout the microstructure, prevailing on the effect of the stress state on the local concentration of tritium.

  13. Thermal cracking and amplitude dependent attenuation

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, D.H.; Toksoez, M.N.

    1980-02-10

    The role of crack and grain boundary contacts in determining seismic wave attenuation in rock is investigated by examining Q as a function of thermal cycling (cracking) and wave strain amplitude. Q values are obtained using a longitudinal resonant bar technique in the 10- to 20-kHz range for maximum strain amplitudes varying from roughly 10/sup -8/ to 10/sup -5/. The samples studied include the Berea and Navajo sandstones, Plexiglas, Westerly granite, Solenhofen limestone, and Frederick diabase, the latter two relatively crack free in their virgin state. Measurements were made at room temperature and pressure in air. Q values for both sandstones are constant at low strains (<10/sup -6/) but decrease rapidly with amplitude at higher strains. There is no hysteresis of Q with amplitude. Q values for Plexiglas show no indication of amplitude dependent behavior. The granite, limestone, and diabase are thermally cycled at both fast and slow heating rates in order to induce cracking. Samples slowly cycled at 400/sup 0/C show a marked increase in Q that cannot be entirely explained by outgassing of volatiles. Cycling may also widen thin cracks and grain boundaries, reducing contact areas. Samples heated beyond 400/sup 0/C, or rapidly heated, result in generally decreasing Q values. The amplitude dependence of Q is found to be coupled to the effects of thermal cycling. For rock slowly cycled 400)C or less, the transition from low-amplitude contant Q to high-amplitude variable Q behavior decreases to lower amplitudes as a function of maximum temperature. Above 400/sup 0/C, and possibly in th rapidly heated samples also, the transition moves to higher amplitudes.

  14. Estimating crack growth in temperature damaged concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recalde, Juan Jose

    2009-12-01

    Evaluation of the structural condition of deteriorated concrete infrastructure and evaluation of new sustainable cementitious materials require an understanding of how the material will respond to applied loads and environmental exposures. A fundamental understanding of how microstructural changes in these materials relate to changes in mechanical properties and changes in fluid penetrability is needed. The ability to provide rapid, inexpensive assessment of material characteristics and relevant engineering properties is valuable for decision making and asset management purposes. In this investigation, the effects of changes in dynamic elastic properties with water content and fluid penetrability properties before and after a 300°C exposure were investigated based on estimates of the crack density parameter from dry and saturated cracked media. The experimental and analytical techniques described in this dissertation allow calculation of a value for the crack density parameter using nondestructive determination of wet and dry dynamic shear modulus of relatively thin disks. The techniques were used to compare a conventional concrete mixture to several mixtures with enhanced sustainability characteristics. The three enhanced sustainable materials investigated were a very high fly ash mixture, a magnesium phosphate cement based mortar, and a magnesium phosphate cement based concrete, and were compared to a conventional concrete mixture. The analysis provided both quantitative assessment of changes with high temperature damage and autogenous healing, and estimates of changes in mean crack trace lengths. The results showed that water interaction, deterioration due to damage, and autogenous healing recovery were different for the magnesium phosphate cement based mixtures than the portland cement based concrete mixtures. A strong correlation was found between log-transformed Air Permeability Index, dynamic shear modulus, and crack density parameter. The findings imply

  15. Weak Elastic Anisotropy in a Cracked Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W.; Wong, T.

    2006-12-01

    Crack and textural fabrics have significant control over the development of mechanical anisotropy in a rock. Bedding in sedimentary rocks, cleavage in slates, preferred orientation of anisotropic minerals and anisotropic distribution of microcracks can all contribute to elastic anisotropy. Using Kachanov's (1992, 1993) formulation we analyzed the effects of an axisymmetric system of microcracks on seismic anisotropy. The elastic behavior of such a cracked rock is transversely isotropic, and its seismic properties can be characterized by the three Thomsen parameters. In this study we calculated the parameters ɛ, δ and γ under dry and saturated conditions. We derived analytic expressions for the model proposed by Sayers & Kachanov (1995), which assumes that the contribution from the fourth rank crack density tensor is negligible. This model predicts that the elliptic anisotropy condition ɛ=δ is obeyed in a dry rock. Guided by microstructural observations we adopted a two-parameter axisymmetric distribution to characterize the crack density, which predicts that δ and γ in a fluid saturated rock are related to ɛ in a nonlinear manner. All three Thomsen parameters are sensitively dependent on the crack density difference. While our model shows basic agreement with some of the laboratory data on seismic anisotropy in saturated shale, there are discrepancies which suggest that the petrofabric associated with preferred orientation of clay minerals and elastic anisotropy of the rock matrix may have considerable influence which should not be neglected in model. Preliminary comparison with borehole log data suggests rock physics tests which may be useful for interpreting the shear wave anisotropy observations.

  16. Application of the cracked pipe element to creep crack growth prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Brochard, J.; Charras, T.

    1997-04-01

    The modification of a computer code for leak before break analysis is very briefly described. The CASTEM2000 code was developed for ductile fracture assessment of piping systems with postulated circumferential through-wall cracks under static or dynamic loading. The modification extends the capabilities of the cracked pipe element to the determination of fracture parameters under creep conditions (C*, {phi}c and {Delta}c). The model has the advantage of evaluating significant secondary effects, such as those from thermal loading.

  17. On the interaction of ultrasound with cracks: Applications to fatigue crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, O.; Thompson, R. B.; Rehbein, D. K.

    1986-01-01

    Partial contact of two rough fatigue crack surfaces leads to transmission and diffraction of an acoustic signal at those contacts. Recent experimental and theoretical efforts to understand and quantify such contact in greater detail are discussed. The objective is to develop an understanding of the closure phenomenon and its application to the interpretation of fatigue data, in particular the R-ratio, spike overload/underload and threshold effects on crack propagation.

  18. The effect of fatigue cracks on fastener flexibility, load distribution, and fatigue crack growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitman, Zachary Layne

    Fatigue cracks typically occur at stress risers such as geometry changes and holes. This type of failure has serious safety and economic repercussions affecting structures such as aircraft. The need to prevent catastrophic failure due to fatigue cracks and other discontinuities has led to durability and damage tolerant methodologies influencing the design of aircraft structures. Holes in a plate or sheet filled with a fastener are common fatigue critical locations in aircraft structure requiring damage tolerance analysis (DTA). Often, the fastener is transferring load which leads to a loading condition involving both far-field stresses such as tension and bending, and localized bearing at the hole. The difference between the bearing stress and the tensile field at the hole is known as load transfer. The ratio of load transfer as well as the magnitude of the stresses plays a significant part in how quickly a crack will progress to failure. Unfortunately, the determination of load transfer in a complex joint is far from trivial. Many methods exist in the open literature regarding the analysis of splices, doublers and attachment joints to determine individual fastener loads. These methods work well for static analyses but greater refinement is needed for crack growth analysis. The first fastener in a splice or joint is typically the most critical but different fastener flexibility equations will all give different results. The constraint of the fastener head and shop end, along with the type of fastener, affects the stiffness or flexibility of the fastener. This in turn will determine the load that the fastener will transfer within a given fastener pattern. However, current methods do not account for the change in flexibility at a fastener as the crack develops. It is put forth that a crack does indeed reduce the stiffness of a fastener by changing its constraint, thus lessening the load transfer. A crack growth analysis utilizing reduced load transfer will result in

  19. Research on pavement crack recognition methods based on image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yingchun; Zhang, Yamin

    2011-06-01

    In order to overview and analysis briefly pavement crack recognition methods , then find the current existing problems in pavement crack image processing, the popular methods of crack image processing such as neural network method, morphology method, fuzzy logic method and traditional image processing .etc. are discussed, and some effective solutions to those problems are presented.

  20. Atomic simulation of cracks under mixed mode loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullins, M.

    1984-01-01

    A discrete atomic model of a crack tip in iron under mixed mode loads is examined. The results indicate that the behavior of the crack at the atomic scale as a function of the ratio of mode I to mode II component of load is quite complex. In general, crack tip plasticity appears to increase as the mode II component of load increases.

  1. Feedback algorithm for simulation of multi-segmented cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Chady, T.; Napierala, L.

    2011-06-23

    In this paper, a method for obtaining a three dimensional crack model from a radiographic image is discussed. A genetic algorithm aiming at close simulation of crack's shape is presented. Results obtained with genetic algorithm are compared to those achieved in authors' previous work. The described algorithm has been tested on both simulated and real-life cracks.

  2. Improved hairline crack detector and poor shell-quality eggs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cracks frequently occur throughout various points of egg collection and processing and there are numerous high-speed online commercial crack detectors in use. The accuracy of crack detectors is validated by USDA human graders to ensure that they are in compliance with voluntary grade standards USDA...

  3. 40 CFR Table 22 to Subpart Uuu of... - Inorganic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Reforming Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 22 Table 22 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Inorganic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Reforming Units... Catalytic Reforming Units 22 Table 22 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment...

  4. 40 CFR Table 22 to Subpart Uuu of... - Inorganic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Reforming Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 22 Table 22 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Inorganic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Reforming Units... Catalytic Reforming Units 22 Table 22 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment...

  5. Controlled mud-crack patterning and self-organized cracking of polydimethylsiloxane elastomer surfaces.

    PubMed

    Seghir, Rian; Arscott, Steve

    2015-10-06

    Exploiting pattern formation - such as that observed in nature - in the context of micro/nanotechnology could have great benefits if coupled with the traditional top-down lithographic approach. Here, we demonstrate an original and simple method to produce unique, localized and controllable self-organised patterns on elastomeric films. A thin, brittle silica-like crust is formed on the surface of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) using oxygen plasma. This crust is subsequently cracked via the deposition of a thin metal film - having residual tensile stress. The density of the mud-crack patterns depends on the plasma dose and on the metal thickness. The mud-crack patterning can be controlled depending on the thickness and shape of the metallization - ultimately leading to regularly spaced cracks and/or metal mesa structures. Such patterning of the cracks indicates a level of self-organization in the structuring and layout of the features - arrived at simply by imposing metallization boundaries in proximity to each other, separated by a distance of the order of the critical dimension of the pattern size apparent in the large surface mud-crack patterns.

  6. Controlled mud-crack patterning and self-organized cracking of polydimethylsiloxane elastomer surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Seghir, Rian; Arscott, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Exploiting pattern formation – such as that observed in nature – in the context of micro/nanotechnology could have great benefits if coupled with the traditional top-down lithographic approach. Here, we demonstrate an original and simple method to produce unique, localized and controllable self-organised patterns on elastomeric films. A thin, brittle silica-like crust is formed on the surface of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) using oxygen plasma. This crust is subsequently cracked via the deposition of a thin metal film – having residual tensile stress. The density of the mud-crack patterns depends on the plasma dose and on the metal thickness. The mud-crack patterning can be controlled depending on the thickness and shape of the metallization – ultimately leading to regularly spaced cracks and/or metal mesa structures. Such patterning of the cracks indicates a level of self-organization in the structuring and layout of the features – arrived at simply by imposing metallization boundaries in proximity to each other, separated by a distance of the order of the critical dimension of the pattern size apparent in the large surface mud-crack patterns. PMID:26437880

  7. Controlled mud-crack patterning and self-organized cracking of polydimethylsiloxane elastomer surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seghir, Rian; Arscott, Steve

    2015-10-01

    Exploiting pattern formation - such as that observed in nature - in the context of micro/nanotechnology could have great benefits if coupled with the traditional top-down lithographic approach. Here, we demonstrate an original and simple method to produce unique, localized and controllable self-organised patterns on elastomeric films. A thin, brittle silica-like crust is formed on the surface of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) using oxygen plasma. This crust is subsequently cracked via the deposition of a thin metal film - having residual tensile stress. The density of the mud-crack patterns depends on the plasma dose and on the metal thickness. The mud-crack patterning can be controlled depending on the thickness and shape of the metallization - ultimately leading to regularly spaced cracks and/or metal mesa structures. Such patterning of the cracks indicates a level of self-organization in the structuring and layout of the features - arrived at simply by imposing metallization boundaries in proximity to each other, separated by a distance of the order of the critical dimension of the pattern size apparent in the large surface mud-crack patterns.

  8. Topology of desiccation crack patterns in clay and invariance of crack interface area with thickness.

    PubMed

    Khatun, Tajkera; Dutta, Tapati; Tarafdar, Sujata

    2015-08-01

    We study the crack patterns developed on desiccating films of suspensions of three different clays-bentonite, halloysite nanoclay and laponite on a glass substrate. Varying the thickness of the layer, h gives the following new and interesting results: i) We can identify a critical thickness h c for bentonite and halloysite, above which isolated cracks join each other to form a fully connected network. ii) A topological analysis involving the Euler number is shown to be useful for characterising the patterns. iii) We find, further, that the total vertical surface area of the clay A v, which has opened up due to cracking, and the total area of the glass substrate A s, exposed by the hierarchical sequence of cracks are constant, independent of the layer thickness for a certain range of h. These results are shown to be consistent with a simple energy conservation argument, neglecting dissipative losses. Finally we show that if the crack pattern is viewed at successively finer resolution, the total cumulative area of cracks visible at a certain resolution scales with the layer thickness. PMID:26248703

  9. Fatigue Crack Growth and Crack Bridging in SCS-6/Ti-24-11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosn, Louis J.; Kantzos, Pete; Telesman, Jack

    1995-01-01

    Interfacial damage induced by relative fiber/matrix sliding was found to occur in the bridged zone of unidirectional SCS-6/Ti-24Al-11Nb intermetallic matrix composite specimens subjected to fatigue crack growth conditions. The degree of interfacial damage was not uniform along the bridged crack wake. Higher damage zones were observed near the machined notch in comparison to the crack tip. The interfacial friction shear strength tau(sub f) measured in the crack wake using pushout testing revealed lower values than the as-received interface. Interfacial wear also reduced the strength of the bridging fibers. The reduction in fiber strength is thought to be a function of the magnitude of relative fiber/matrix displacements ind the degree of interfacial damage. Furthermore, two different fiber bridging models were used to predict the influence of bridging on the fatigue crack driving force. The shear lag model required a variable tau(sub f) in the crack wake (reflecting the degradation of the interface) before its predictions agreed with trends exhibited by the experimental data. The fiber pressure model did an excellent job in predicting both the FCG data and the DeltaCOD in the bridged zone even though it does not require a knowledge of tau(sub f).

  10. Analytical Modelling of Transverse Matrix Cracking of [plus or minus Theta/90(sub n)](sub s) Composite Laminates Under Multiaxial Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayugo, J A.; Camanho, P. P.; Maimi, P.; Davila, C. G.

    2010-01-01

    An analytical model based on the analysis of a cracked unit cell of a composite laminate subjected to multiaxial loads is proposed to predict the onset and accumulation of transverse matrix cracks in the 90(sub n) plies of uniformly stressed [plus or minus Theta/90(sub n)](sub s) laminates. The model predicts the effect of matrix cracks on the stiffness of the laminate, as well as the ultimate failure of the laminate, and it accounts for the effect of the ply thickness on the ply strength. Several examples describing the predictions of laminate response, from damage onset up to final failure under both uniaxial and multiaxial loads, are presented.

  11. Nonclassical nucleation and growth of cohesive tensile cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rundle, John B.; Klein, W.

    1989-07-01

    We analyze the nucleation and growth of cohesive tensile cracks using a field-theoretic formulation in which the free energy is written as a functional of the crack separation (offset field). Our results indicate that for certain materials, crack nucleation and growth proceed through the formation and extension of a diffuse ``halo'' surrounding the classical portion of the crack. This is similar to nonclassical nucleation in magnetic systems. Theoretical considerations and numerical calculations strongly suggest that the diffuse halo can be identified with the fracture ``process zone'' seen in laboratory studies of advancing cracks.

  12. Apollo experience report: The problem of stress-corrosion cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    Stress-corrosion cracking has been the most common cause of structural-material failures in the Apollo Program. The frequency of stress-corrosion cracking has been high and the magnitude of the problem, in terms of hardware lost and time and money expended, has been significant. In this report, the significant Apollo Program experiences with stress-corrosion cracking are discussed. The causes of stress-corrosion cracking and the corrective actions are discussed, in terminology familiar to design engineers and management personnel, to show how stress-corrosion cracking can be prevented.

  13. Role of heavy oil cracking in refinery processing

    SciTech Connect

    Rush, J.B.

    1981-01-01

    Heavy oil cracking was developed by Borger Refinery to dispose of the residual portion of the crude. The use of catalysts of higher activity, riser cracking, and the passivation of metals resulted in operations that are comparable with the good gas oil operations. The experience with heavy oil cracking has revealed three problem areas unique to heavy oil cracking. These are: high coke yields; metal contamination and high gas yields; and high sulfur content of the regenerator flue gas. Some discussion is given on: methods of sulfur removal; the effect of hydrotreated heavy-oil cracker charge; and the role of heavy oil cracking in a modern refinery. 7 refs.

  14. Etiology of cracked teeth: a review and proposal.

    PubMed

    Sabiston, C B

    1994-10-01

    Factors in the etiology of the cracked or fractured tooth can be generally divided into three categories: tooth strength, magnitude of applied force, and control of applied force. Dental caries, restorations and endodontic procedures appear to play a major part in the etiology of most cracked or fractured teeth though sound teeth frequently are cracked or fractured. Tentative evidence indicates that females, who can apply less force, may crack more teeth than do males. Control of occlusal forces applied may be an overlooked factor. Drugs affecting proprioception and other sensory receptors modulating force and reflex should be evaluated as possible contributors to the etiology of cracked or fractured teeth.

  15. Nonlinear Scattering by a Partially Closed Surface Breaking Crack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poznić, M.; Pecorari, C.

    2005-04-01

    Nonlinear scattering from a partially closed, two dimensional, surface-breaking crack in a homogenous linear elastic half-space is considered. The boundary conditions along the crack are described in terms of the mechanics of two distributions of nonlinear springs. Both the linear and the nonlinear acoustic response of the crack shows to be highest when the surface breaking crack is insonified by a shear vertical wave at the longitudinal critical angle. The increased efficiency of generation of higher harmonics under the above circumstances suggests a means of localizing the nonlinear crack. Finally, the model provides a simple interpretation of the highly localized nonlinear response of delaminations observed in thin composites.

  16. Breaking/cracking and seating concrete pavements. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, M.R.

    1989-03-01

    This synthesis will be of interest to pavement designers, maintenance engineers, and others interested in reducing reflection cracking of asphalt overlays on portland cement concrete (PCC) pavement. Information is presented on the technique of breaking or cracking of the concrete pavement into small segments before overlaying with asphalt concrete. Asphalt concrete overlays on existing PCC pavements are subject to reflection cracking induced by thermal movements of PCC pavement. The report of the Transportation Research Board discusses the technique of breaking/cracking and seating of the existing PCC before an overlay as a means to reduce or eliminate reflection cracking.

  17. Crack growth behavior of AISI-4340 steel during environmental exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Giannuzzi, L.A.

    1995-11-01

    AISI-4340 is observed to undergo stress corrosion cracking when subjected to a constant load during exposure to a 3.5% NaCl solution. Crack initiation, nucleation, and growth has been monitored as a function of time. Stepped regions consisting of fast and slow crack growth periods are shown to correspond to microstructural changes observed in the fracture surface of the steel. These regions of fast and slow crack rate variations with time show that the crack growth rates do not increase continuously with an increase in the stress intensity.

  18. Implementation of a Smeared Crack Band Model in a Micromechanics Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pineda, Evan J.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Waas, Anthony M.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    The smeared crack band theory is implemented within the generalized method of cells and high-fidelity generalized method of cells micromechanics models to capture progressive failure within the constituents of a composite material while retaining objectivity with respect to the size of the discretization elements used in the model. An repeating unit cell containing 13 randomly arranged fibers is modeled and subjected to a combination of transverse tension/compression and transverse shear loading. The implementation is verified against experimental data (where available), and an equivalent finite element model utilizing the same implementation of the crack band theory. To evaluate the performance of the crack band theory within a repeating unit cell that is more amenable to a multiscale implementation, a single fiber is modeled with generalized method of cells and high-fidelity generalized method of cells using a relatively coarse subcell mesh which is subjected to the same loading scenarios as the multiple fiber repeating unit cell. The generalized method of cells and high-fidelity generalized method of cells models are validated against a very refined finite element model.

  19. Corrosion pitting and environmentally assisted small crack growth

    PubMed Central

    Turnbull, Alan

    2014-01-01

    In many applications, corrosion pits act as precursors to cracking, but qualitative and quantitative prediction of damage evolution has been hampered by lack of insights into the process by which a crack develops from a pit. An overview is given of recent breakthroughs in characterization and understanding of the pit-to-crack transition using advanced three-dimensional imaging techniques such as X-ray computed tomography and focused ion beam machining with scanning electron microscopy. These techniques provided novel insights with respect to the location of crack development from a pit, supported by finite-element analysis. This inspired a new concept for the role of pitting in stress corrosion cracking based on the growing pit inducing local dynamic plastic strain, a critical factor in the development of stress corrosion cracks. Challenges in quantifying the subsequent growth rate of the emerging small cracks are then outlined with the potential drop technique being the most viable. A comparison is made with the growth rate for short cracks (through-thickness crack in fracture mechanics specimen) and long cracks and an electrochemical crack size effect invoked to rationalize the data. PMID:25197249

  20. Bed-limited cracks in effective medium theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tod, S. R.

    2003-02-01

    An effective medium theory typically requires the description of a mean crack shape. In general, for simplicity, this is taken to be a flat, circular (`penny-shaped') crack. However, this places an unnecessary limitation on the theory, when it is perhaps more realistic to describe a crack in terms of having a bounded width and an otherwise ellipsoidal shape. The generalization of the method of smoothing, as proposed by Hudson (1994, Geophys. J. Int.,117, 555-561) , to extend his original model (Hudson, 1980. Math. proc. Camb. phil. Soc.,88, 371-384), has been used to study the role of the crack width and the ratio of the two larger dimensions in determining the properties of the effective medium. In general, this leads to a description of the medium as having orthorhombic symmetry, and provides a suitable description of a material where the crack dimensions are restricted in one direction owing to, for example, bed-limiting effects, while remaining unconfined in other directions. An elliptical flat crack limit is determined, analoguous to the circular crack description of the original Hudson model. In addition to the isolated crack description, the theory is extended to include the fluid flow mechanism of Tod (2001, Geophys. J. Int.,146, 249-263) that models the flow as being dominated by crack-to-crack flow and is valid for low matrix porosities and over a large range of frequencies, provided that the wavelength is much greater than the crack dimensions.

  1. Corrosion pitting and environmentally assisted small crack growth.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, Alan

    2014-09-01

    In many applications, corrosion pits act as precursors to cracking, but qualitative and quantitative prediction of damage evolution has been hampered by lack of insights into the process by which a crack develops from a pit. An overview is given of recent breakthroughs in characterization and understanding of the pit-to-crack transition using advanced three-dimensional imaging techniques such as X-ray computed tomography and focused ion beam machining with scanning electron microscopy. These techniques provided novel insights with respect to the location of crack development from a pit, supported by finite-element analysis. This inspired a new concept for the role of pitting in stress corrosion cracking based on the growing pit inducing local dynamic plastic strain, a critical factor in the development of stress corrosion cracks. Challenges in quantifying the subsequent growth rate of the emerging small cracks are then outlined with the potential drop technique being the most viable. A comparison is made with the growth rate for short cracks (through-thickness crack in fracture mechanics specimen) and long cracks and an electrochemical crack size effect invoked to rationalize the data. PMID:25197249

  2. A dynamic model of a cantilever beam with a closed, embedded horizontal crack including local flexibilities at crack tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Zhu, W. D.; Charalambides, P. G.; Shao, Y. M.; Xu, Y. F.; Fang, X. M.

    2016-11-01

    As one of major failure modes of mechanical structures subjected to periodic loads, embedded cracks due to fatigue can cause catastrophic failure of machineries. Understanding the dynamic characteristics of a structure with an embedded crack is helpful for early crack detection and diagnosis. In this work, a new three-segment beam model with local flexibilities at crack tips is developed to investigate the vibration of a cantilever beam with a closed, fully embedded horizontal crack, which is assumed to be not located at its clamped or free end or distributed near its top or bottom side. The three-segment beam model is assumed to be a linear elastic system, and it does not account for the nonlinear crack closure effect; the top and bottom segments always stay in contact at their interface during the beam vibration. It can model the effects of local deformations in the vicinity of the crack tips, which cannot be captured by previous methods in the literature. The middle segment of the beam containing the crack is modeled by a mechanically consistent, reduced bending moment. Each beam segment is assumed to be an Euler-Bernoulli beam, and the compliances at the crack tips are analytically determined using a J-integral approach and verified using commercial finite element software. Using compatibility conditions at the crack tips and the transfer matrix method, the nature frequencies and mode shapes of the cracked cantilever beam are obtained. The three-segment beam model is used to investigate the effects of local flexibilities at crack tips on the first three natural frequencies and mode shapes of the cracked cantilever beam. A stationary wavelet transform (SWT) method is used to process the mode shapes of the cracked cantilever beam; jumps in single-level SWT decomposition detail coefficients can be used to identify the length and location of an embedded horizontal crack.

  3. Development of a Distributed Crack Sensor Using Coaxial Cable.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhi; Jiao, Tong; Zhao, Peng; Liu, Jia; Xiao, Hai

    2016-01-01

    Cracks, the important factor of structure failure, reflect structural damage directly. Thus, it is significant to realize distributed, real-time crack monitoring. To overcome the shortages of traditional crack detectors, such as the inconvenience of installation, vulnerability, and low measurement range, etc., an improved topology-based cable sensor with a shallow helical groove on the outside surface of a coaxial cable is proposed in this paper. The sensing mechanism, fabrication method, and performances are investigated both numerically and experimentally. Crack monitoring experiments of the reinforced beams are also presented in this paper, illustrating the utility of this sensor in practical applications. These studies show that the sensor can identify a minimum crack width of 0.02 mm and can measure multiple cracks with a spatial resolution of 3 mm. In addition, it is also proved that the sensor performs well to detect the initiation and development of cracks until structure failure. PMID:27483280

  4. Development of a Distributed Crack Sensor Using Coaxial Cable.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhi; Jiao, Tong; Zhao, Peng; Liu, Jia; Xiao, Hai

    2016-01-01

    Cracks, the important factor of structure failure, reflect structural damage directly. Thus, it is significant to realize distributed, real-time crack monitoring. To overcome the shortages of traditional crack detectors, such as the inconvenience of installation, vulnerability, and low measurement range, etc., an improved topology-based cable sensor with a shallow helical groove on the outside surface of a coaxial cable is proposed in this paper. The sensing mechanism, fabrication method, and performances are investigated both numerically and experimentally. Crack monitoring experiments of the reinforced beams are also presented in this paper, illustrating the utility of this sensor in practical applications. These studies show that the sensor can identify a minimum crack width of 0.02 mm and can measure multiple cracks with a spatial resolution of 3 mm. In addition, it is also proved that the sensor performs well to detect the initiation and development of cracks until structure failure.

  5. Research of infrared laser based pavement imaging and crack detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Hanyu; Wang, Shu; Zhang, Xiuhua; Jing, Genqiang

    2013-08-01

    Road crack detection is seriously affected by many factors in actual applications, such as some shadows, road signs, oil stains, high frequency noise and so on. Due to these factors, the current crack detection methods can not distinguish the cracks in complex scenes. In order to solve this problem, a novel method based on infrared laser pavement imaging is proposed. Firstly, single sensor laser pavement imaging system is adopted to obtain pavement images, high power laser line projector is well used to resist various shadows. Secondly, the crack extraction algorithm which has merged multiple features intelligently is proposed to extract crack information. In this step, the non-negative feature and contrast feature are used to extract the basic crack information, and circular projection based on linearity feature is applied to enhance the crack area and eliminate noise. A series of experiments have been performed to test the proposed method, which shows that the proposed automatic extraction method is effective and advanced.

  6. Development of a Distributed Crack Sensor Using Coaxial Cable

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhi; Jiao, Tong; Zhao, Peng; Liu, Jia; Xiao, Hai

    2016-01-01

    Cracks, the important factor of structure failure, reflect structural damage directly. Thus, it is significant to realize distributed, real-time crack monitoring. To overcome the shortages of traditional crack detectors, such as the inconvenience of installation, vulnerability, and low measurement range, etc., an improved topology-based cable sensor with a shallow helical groove on the outside surface of a coaxial cable is proposed in this paper. The sensing mechanism, fabrication method, and performances are investigated both numerically and experimentally. Crack monitoring experiments of the reinforced beams are also presented in this paper, illustrating the utility of this sensor in practical applications. These studies show that the sensor can identify a minimum crack width of 0.02 mm and can measure multiple cracks with a spatial resolution of 3 mm. In addition, it is also proved that the sensor performs well to detect the initiation and development of cracks until structure failure. PMID:27483280

  7. Cracking of coated materials under transient thermal stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizk, A. A.; Erdogan, F.

    1989-01-01

    The crack problem for a relatively thin layer bonded to a very thick substrate under thermal shock conditions is considered. The effect of surface cooling rate is studied by assuming the temperature boundary condition to be a ramp function. Among the crack geometries considered are the edge crack in the coating layer, the broken layer, the edge crack going through the interface, the undercoat crack in the substrate and the embedded crack crossing the interface. The primary calculated quantity is the stress intensity factor at various singular points and the main variables are the relative sizes and locations of cracks, the time, and the duration of the cooling ramp. The problem is solved and rather extensive results are given for two material pairs, namely a stainless steel layer welded on a ferritic medium and a ceramic coating on a steel substrate.

  8. Cracking of coated materials under transient thermal stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizk, A. A.; Erdogan, Fazil

    1988-01-01

    The crack problem for a relatively thin layer bonded to a very thick substrate under thermal shock conditions is considered. The effect of surface cooling rate is studied by assuming the temperature boundary condition to be a ramp function. Among the crack geometries considered are the edge crack in the coating layer, the broken layer, the edge crack going through the interface, the undercoat crack in the substrate and the embedded crack crossing the interface. The primary calculated quantity is the stress intensity factor at various singular points and the main variables are the relative sizes and locations of cracks, the time, and the duration of the cooling ramp. The problem is solved and rather extensive results are given for two material pairs, namely a stainless steel layer welded on a ferritic medium and a ceramic coating on a steel substrate.

  9. Experimental and theoretical strain distributions for stationary and growing cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerberich, W. W.; Davidson, D. L.; Kaczorowski, M.

    E XPERIMENTAL strain distributions are determined very near the crack tip in Fe-3wt.%Si single crystals. Both in situ stereoimaging and electron channeling techniques give reasonably reproducible distributions. By growing fatigue cracks on a {100} cleavage plane, the singularity strengths have been determined for both growing and stationary cracks under relatively plane stress and plane strain conditions. This has allowed a comparison to existing theoretical models. It is shown that the HRR singularity (Hutchinson, Rice and Rosengren, 1968) for stationary cracks is very good to within I μm of the crack tip and a hardening model for the growing crack (gao and hwang, Advances in Fracture Research, edited by D. Francois. 5th Int. Conf. on Fracture, Cannes, France, 2, 669, 1981) is surprisingly good. Other issues such as fracture criteria are discussed since strains greater than unity were measured at the crack tip in this relatively brittle material.

  10. Unloading behavior of dislocations emitted from a crack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Rui-Huan; Li, J. C. M.

    1985-12-01

    Upon unloading, dislocations emitted from a crack can be retracted partially (stationary crack with lattice friction for dislocation motion) or completely (moving crack or zero friction for dislocation motion). The behavior of the plastic zone, the dislocation distribution, and the dislocation-free zone during the retraction process are studied by computer simulation. A propagating crack always moves forward upon unloading until all the dislocations are retracted. Its speed could be much faster during retraction than during the emission of dislocations. The rate of dislocation retraction or crack motion is slow in the beginning but then suddenly the crack jumps forward to retract all the rest of dislocations. This incubation period before the sudden crack surge seems to depend on the size of the dislocation-free zone.

  11. Crack growth in high temperature materials

    SciTech Connect

    Stoloff, N.S.

    1998-12-31

    Many intermetallic compounds are brittle at low temperatures. Some compounds, including NiAl and MoSi, seem to be intrinsically brittle. Other compounds, including Ni{sub 3}Al, FeAl and Fe{sub 3}Al, are reasonably ductile when tested in inert environments. Water and water vapor can severely embrittle these and other compounds because they contain an active element such as aluminum or silicon. The release of atomic hydrogen from water leads, at room temperature, to hydrogen embrittlement. Another source of embrittlement, at elevated temperatures, is oxygen from the atmosphere. The effects of aggressive environments on the crack growth behavior of several intermetallics under monotonic or cyclic loading are described. Alleviation of embrittlement by means of alloying, the use of coatings or by prestrain are described, although no single method is effective for all intermetallics. A brief survey of environmentally induced crack growth in superalloys is included.

  12. Crack evolution in bulk metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Pauly, Simon; Lee, Min Ha; Kim, Do Hyang; Kim, Ki Buem; Sordelet, Daniel J.; Eckert, Juergen

    2009-11-15

    In the present study, the mechanisms underlying plastic deformation of a Ni-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) are explored. Based on the microstructural investigations, a model is proposed how fracture emerges in BMGs. After deformation, the glass is macroscopically more fragile indicating a decrease in the viscosity within the shear bands due to shear softening. These fluctuations of viscosity and therefore Poisson ratio between the deformed and undeformed regions appear to be the initiation sites for nanometer-scale cracks, which are aligned parallel to the applied force. Coalescence of voids is believed to form these small cracks, which eventually interconnect along the interface between the sheared and unsheared regions to form a detrimental defect resulting in fracture.

  13. Process for magnetic beneficiating petroleum cracking catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Doctor, R.D.

    1993-10-05

    A process is described for beneficiating a particulate zeolite petroleum cracking catalyst having metal values in excess of 1000 ppm nickel equivalents. The particulate catalyst is passed through a magnetic field in the range of from about 2 Tesla to about 5 Tesla generated by a superconducting quadrupole open-gradient magnetic system for a time sufficient to effect separation of said catalyst into a plurality of zones having different nickel equivalent concentrations. A first zone has nickel equivalents of about 6,000 ppm and greater, a second zone has nickel equivalents in the range of from about 2000 ppm to about 6000 ppm, and a third zone has nickel equivalents of about 2000 ppm and less. The zones of catalyst are separated and the second zone material is recycled to a fluidized bed of zeolite petroleum cracking catalyst. The low nickel equivalent zone is treated while the high nickel equivalent zone is discarded. 1 figures.

  14. Process for magnetic beneficiating petroleum cracking catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Doctor, Richard D.

    1993-01-01

    A process for beneficiating a particulate zeolite petroleum cracking catalyst having metal values in excess of 1000 ppm nickel equivalents. The particulate catalyst is passed through a magnetic field in the range of from about 2 Tesla to about 5 Tesla generated by a superconducting quadrupole open-gradient magnetic system for a time sufficient to effect separation of said catalyst into a plurality of zones having different nickel equivalent concentrations. A first zone has nickel equivalents of about 6,000 ppm and greater, a second zone has nickel equivalents in the range of from about 2000 ppm to about 6000 ppm, and a third zone has nickel equivalents of about 2000 ppm and less. The zones of catalyst are separated and the second zone material is recycled to a fluidized bed of zeolite petroleum cracking catalyst. The low nickel equivalent zone is treated while the high nickel equivalent zone is discarded.

  15. Stress-corrosion cracking of titanium alloys.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, M. J.; Feeney, J. A.; Beck, T. R.

    1973-01-01

    In the light of research material published up to May 1970, the current understanding of the experimental variables involved in the stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of titanium and its alloys is reviewed. Following a brief summary of the metallurgy and electrochemistry of titanium alloys, the mechanical, electrochemical, and metallurgical parameters influencing SCC behavior are explored with emphasis on crack growth kinetics. Macro- and microfeatures of fractures are examined, and it is shown that many transgranular SCC failures exhibit morphological and crystallographic features similar to mechanical cleavage failures. Current SCC models are reviewed with respect to their ability to explain the observed SCC behavior of titanium and its alloys. Possible methods for eliminating or minimizing stress corrosion hazards in titanium or titanium alloy components are described.

  16. SCREENING TESTS FOR IMPROVED METHANE CRACKING MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J; Jeffrey Holder, J

    2007-07-16

    Bench scale (1 to 6 gram) methane cracking tests have been performed on a variety of pure elements, some alloys, and SAES{reg_sign} commercial getters St 101, St 198, St 707, St 737, and St 909 to determine methane cracking performance (MCP) of 5% methane in a helium carrier at 700 C, 101.3 kPa (760 torr) with a 10 sccm feed. The MCP was almost absent from some materials tested while others showed varying degrees of MCP. Re, Cr, V, Gd, and Mo powders had good MCP, but limited capacities. Nickel supported on kieselguhr (Ni/k), a Zr-Ni alloy, and the SAES{reg_sign} getters had good MCP in a helium carrier. The MCP of these same materials was suppressed in a hydrogen carrier stream and the MCP of the Zr-based materials was reduced by nitride formation when tested with a nitrogen carrier gas.

  17. Fast electromigration crack in nanoscale aluminum film

    SciTech Connect

    Emelyanov, O. A. Ivanov, I. O.

    2014-08-14

    The current-induced breakage of 20 nm thin aluminum layers deposited onto capacitor grade polypropylene (PP) films is experimentally studied. Biexponential current pulses of different amplitude (10–15 A) and duration (0.1–1 μs) were applied to the samples. Breakage occurred after fast development of electromigrating ∼200 nm-wide cracks with initial propagation velocity of ∼1 m/s under a high current density of ∼10{sup 12 }A/m{sup 2}. The cracks stopped when their lengths reached 250–450 μm. This behavior is explained by the balance of electromigration and stress-induced atomic fluxes.

  18. Multiple zone catalytic cracking of hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Harandi, M.N.; Owen, H.

    1992-10-13

    This patent describes a method of cracking a heavy hydrocarbon feedstock and a light hydrocarbon feedstock in a riser reactor, the method producing spent catalyst and regenerated catalyst, the spent and regeneration catalyst comprising a large pore size aluminosilicate zeolite cracking catalyst selected form zeolite Y or USY. It comprises: contacting the light hydrocarbon feedstock with spent catalyst at an initial contact location in the riser; passing a suspension comprising the light hydrocarbon feedstock and the spent catalyst through the riser; introducing the heavy hydrocarbon feedstock into the suspension at a second location downstream of the initial contact location; and introducing the regenerated catalyst into the suspension at a location in the riser downstream of the initial contact location.

  19. Characterization of Cracking and Crack Growth Properties of the C5A Aircraft Tie-Box Forging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Smith, Stephen W.; Newman, John A.; Willard, Scott A.

    2003-01-01

    Detailed destructive examinations were conducted to characterize the integrity and material properties of two aluminum alloy (7075-T6) horizontal stabilizer tie box forgings removed.from US. Air Force C5A and C5B transport aircraft. The C5B tie box forging was,found to contain no evidence of cracking. Thirteen cracks were found in the CSA,forging. All but one of the cracks observed in the C5A component were located along the top cap region (one crack was located in the bottom cap region). The cracks in the C5A component initiated at fastener holes and propagated along a highly tunneled intergranular crack path. The tunneled crack growth configuration is a likelv result of surface compressive stress produced during peening of the .forging suijace. The tie box forging ,fatigue crack growth, fracture and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) properties were characterized. Reported herein are the results of laboratory air ,fatigue crack growth tests and 95% relative humidity SCC tests conducted using specimens machined from the C5A ,forging. SCC test results revealed that the C5A ,forging material was susceptible to intergranular environmental assisted cracking: the C5A forging material exhibited a SCC crack-tip stress-intensity factor threshold of less than 6 MPadn. Fracture toughness tests revealed that the C5A forging material exhibited a fracture toughness that was 25% less than the C5B forging. The C5A forging exhibited rapid laboratory air fatigue crack growth rates having a threshold crack-tip stress-intensity factor range of less than 0.8 MPa sup m. Detailed fractographic examinations revealed that the ,fatigue crack intergranular growth crack path was similar to the cracking observed in the C5A tie box forging. Because both fatigue crack propagation and SCC exhibit similar intergranular crack path behavior, the damage mechanism resulting in multi-site cracking of tie box forgings cannot be determined unless local cyclic stresses can be quantified.

  20. Crack resistance of a constructional ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Pisarenko, G.S.; Gogotsi, G.A.; Zavada, V.P.

    1985-04-01

    The purpose of this article is the development and substantiation of methods of determination of crack resistance and the investigation of features of fracture of a machine building ceramic intended for use at high temperatures. Studied were a silicon nitride base reaction-sintered ceramic, designated NKKKM, and self-bonded silicon carbide produced by industry. Electrical porcelain and sodium glass were used as model materials in the development and testing of the methods.

  1. Structures for dense, crack free thin films

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Craig P.; Visco, Steven J.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2011-03-08

    The process described herein provides a simple and cost effective method for making crack free, high density thin ceramic film. The steps involve depositing a layer of a ceramic material on a porous or dense substrate. The deposited layer is compacted and then the resultant laminate is sintered to achieve a higher density than would have been possible without the pre-firing compaction step.

  2. Mode 2 fatigue crack growth specimen development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buzzard, R. J.; Gross, B.; Srawley, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    A Mode II test specimen was developed which has potential application in understanding phemonena associated with mixed mode fatigue failures in high performance aircraft engine bearing races. The attributes of the specimen are: it contains one single ended notch, which simplifiers data gathering and reduction; the fatigue crack grous in-line with the direction of load application; a single axis test machine is sufficient to perform testing; and the Mode I component is vanishingly small.

  3. CDF central preshower and crack detector upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Artikov, A.; Boudagov, J.; Chokheli, D.; Drake, G.; Gallinaro, M.; Giunta, M.; Grudzinski, J.; Huston, J.; Iori, M.; Kim, D.; Kim, M.; /Dubna, JINR /Argonne /Rockefeller U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /Michigan State U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /CHEP, Taegu /Seoul Natl. U.

    2007-02-01

    The CDF Central Preshower and Crack Detector Upgrade consist of scintillator tiles with embedded wavelength-shifting fibers, clear-fiber optical cables, and multi-anode photomultiplier readout. A description of the detector design, test results from R&D studies, and construction phase are reported. The upgrade was installed late in 2004, and a large amount of proton-antiproton collider data has been collected since then. Detector studies using those data are also discussed.

  4. A theory of crack healing in polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wool, R. P.; O'Connor, K. M.

    1981-10-01

    A theory of crack healing in polymers is presented in terms of the stages of crack healing, namely, (a) surface rearrangement, (b) surface approach, (c) wetting, (d) diffusion, and (e) randomization. The recovery ratio R of mechanical properties with time was determined as a convolution product, R = Rh (t)*φ(t), where Rh (t) is an intrinsic healing function, and φ(t) is a wetting distribution function for the crack interface or plane in the material. The reptation model of a chain in a tube was used to describe self-diffusion of interpenetrating random coil chains which formed a basis for Rh (t). Applications of the theory are described, including crack healing in amorphous polymers and melt processing of polymer resins by injection or compression molding. Relations are developed for fracture stress σ, strain ɛ, and energy E as a function of time t, temperature T, pressure P, and molecular weight M. Results include (i) during healing or processing at t

  5. Scaling and universality in real cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Daguier, P.; Bouchaud, E.

    1996-12-01

    The morphology of fracture surfaces in complex metallic alloys is analyzed. The simultaneous use of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) allows the measurement of the universal roughness exponent {zeta}{sub {perpendicular}} = 0.78 over five decades of lengthscales (0.5 nm--0.5 mm). Furthermore, a small lengthscales regime (1 nm--11 {micro}m) is shown to be characterized by a roughness index {zeta}{sub {perpendicular}Qs} {approx_equal} 0.5. On the other hand, cracks fronts stopped during their propagation at pinning microstructural obstacles in two different metallic alloys is analyzed, and their in-plane roughness index is determined for the first time. In the case of the 8090 Al-Li alloy, which has a very anisotropic microstructure, the roughness of the tensile crack front propagating along the grains length is equal to {zeta} {approx_equal} 0.60. On the other hand, the roughness of the purely three-dimensional fatigue crack front in the Super{alpha}{sub 2} Ti{sub 3}Al-based alloy is equal to {zeta} {approx_equal} 0.54.

  6. Wild bearded capuchin monkeys crack nuts dexterously.

    PubMed

    Mangalam, Madhur; Fragaszy, Dorothy M

    2015-05-18

    Dexterous tool use has been crucial in the evolution of hominid percussive technology. According to Newell, "dexterity" is the ability of an organism to make goal-directed corrections in movements to optimize effort. Dexterous movements are smooth and effective and accomplish the same goal with less energy than less dexterous movements. Dexterity develops during the later phases of refining a motor skill as the actor becomes sensitive to the outcome of the preceding movement, or to its modulation. In the present study, we examined how wild bearded capuchin monkeys, Sapajus libidinosus, at Fazenda Boa Vista in Piauí, Brazil, that routinely crack palm nuts using stones by placing them on rock outcrops, boulders, and logs (collectively termed anvils) modulate the kinematic parameters of the strikes while processing a single tucum, Astrocaryum campestre nut. The monkeys cracked the nuts by repeatedly striking them with moderate force (i.e., not exceeding a threshold), rather than by striking them more forcefully once, and modulated the kinematic parameters of the current strike on the basis of the condition of the nut following the preceding strike (i.e., the development of any fracture or crack). Repeatedly striking the nuts with moderate force is energetically more efficient than forcefully striking them once and reduces the likelihood of smashing the kernel. Determining the changing energetic constraints of the task and dynamically optimizing movements using those as criteria are dexterous accomplishments. We discuss the implications of the present findings. PMID:25936553

  7. Fabrication of reconfigurable protein matrices by cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaoyue; Mills, Kristen L.; Peters, Portia R.; Bahng, Joong Hwan; Liu, Elizabeth Ho; Shim, Jeongsup; Naruse, Keiji; Csete, Marie E.; Thouless, M. D.; Takayama, Shuichi

    2005-05-01

    The interface between extracellular matrices and cells is a dynamic environment that is crucial for regulating important cellular processes such as signal transduction, growth, differentiation, motility and apoptosis. In vitro cellular studies and the development of new biomaterials would benefit from matrices that allow reversible modulation of the cell adhesive signals at a scale that is commensurate with individual adhesion complexes. Here, we describe the fabrication of substrates containing arrays of cracks in which cell-adhesive proteins are selectively adsorbed. The widths of the cracks (120-3,200 nm) are similar in size to individual adhesion complexes (typically 500-3,000 nm) and can be modulated by adjusting the mechanical strain applied to the substrate. Morphology of cells can be reversibly manipulated multiple times through in situ adjustment of crack widths and hence the amount of the cell-adhesive proteins accessible to the cell. These substrates provide a new tool for assessing cellular responses associated with exposure to matrix proteins.

  8. Hydrogen Induced Cracking of Drip Shield

    SciTech Connect

    G. De

    2003-02-24

    One potential failure mechanism for titanium and its alloys under repository conditions is via the absorption of atomic hydrogen in the metal crystal lattice. The resulting decreased ductility and fracture toughness may lead to brittle mechanical fracture called hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC) or hydrogen embrittlement. For the current design of the engineered barrier without backfill, HIC may be a problem since the titanium drip shield can be galvanically coupled to rock bolts (or wire mesh), which may fall onto the drip shield, thereby creating conditions for hydrogen production by electrochemical reaction. The purpose of this scientific analysis and modeling activity is to evaluate whether the drip shield will fail by HIC or not under repository conditions within 10,000 years of emplacement. This Analysis and Model Report (AMR) addresses features, events, and processes related to hydrogen induced cracking of the drip shield. REV 00 of this AMR served as a feed to ''Waste Package Degradation Process Model Report'' and was developed in accordance with the activity section ''Hydrogen Induced Cracking of Drip Shield'' of the development plan entitled ''Analysis and Model Reports to Support Waste Package PMR'' (CRWMS M&O 1999a). This AMR, prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan for: Waste Package Materials Data Analyses and Modeling'' (BSC 2002), is to feed the License Application.

  9. Wild bearded capuchin monkeys crack nuts dexterously.

    PubMed

    Mangalam, Madhur; Fragaszy, Dorothy M

    2015-05-18

    Dexterous tool use has been crucial in the evolution of hominid percussive technology. According to Newell, "dexterity" is the ability of an organism to make goal-directed corrections in movements to optimize effort. Dexterous movements are smooth and effective and accomplish the same goal with less energy than less dexterous movements. Dexterity develops during the later phases of refining a motor skill as the actor becomes sensitive to the outcome of the preceding movement, or to its modulation. In the present study, we examined how wild bearded capuchin monkeys, Sapajus libidinosus, at Fazenda Boa Vista in Piauí, Brazil, that routinely crack palm nuts using stones by placing them on rock outcrops, boulders, and logs (collectively termed anvils) modulate the kinematic parameters of the strikes while processing a single tucum, Astrocaryum campestre nut. The monkeys cracked the nuts by repeatedly striking them with moderate force (i.e., not exceeding a threshold), rather than by striking them more forcefully once, and modulated the kinematic parameters of the current strike on the basis of the condition of the nut following the preceding strike (i.e., the development of any fracture or crack). Repeatedly striking the nuts with moderate force is energetically more efficient than forcefully striking them once and reduces the likelihood of smashing the kernel. Determining the changing energetic constraints of the task and dynamically optimizing movements using those as criteria are dexterous accomplishments. We discuss the implications of the present findings.

  10. Hydrogen-induced cracking of drip shield

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, S C

    1999-08-01

    A simple and conservative model has been developed to evaluate the effects of hydrogen-induced cracking on the drip shield. The basic premise of the model is that failure will occur once the hydrogen content exceeds a certain limit or critical value, HC. This model is very conservative because it assumes that, once the environmental and material conditions can support that particular corrosion process, failure will be effectively instantaneous. In the description of the HIC model presented in Section 6.1, extensive evidence has been provided to support a qualitative assessment of Ti-7 as an excellent choice of material for the drip shield with regard to degradation caused by hydrogen-induced cracking. LTCTF test data observed at LLNL, although unqualified, provides additional indication beyond a qualitative level that hydrogen concentration appears to be low in titanium materials. Quantitative evaluation based on the HIC model described in Section 6.1 indicates that the hydrogen concentration does not exceed the critical value. It is concluded that drip shield material (Ti-7) is able to sustain the effects of hydrogen-induced cracking.

  11. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 232: Area 25 Sewage Lagoons Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    DOE /NV Operations Office

    1999-05-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense. The CAIP is a document that provides or references all of the specific information for investigation activities associated with Corrective Action Units (CAUs) or Corrective Action Sites (CASs). According to the FFACO, CASs are sites potentially requiring corrective action(s) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites. A CAU consists of one or more CASs grouped together based on geography, technical similarity, or agency responsibility for the purpose of determining corrective actions. This CAIP contains the environmental sample collection objectives and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at CAU 232, Area 25 Sewage Lagoons. Corrective Action Unit 232 consists of CAS 25-03-01, Sewage Lagoon, located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1) (DOE/NV, 1996a). The Area 25 Sewage Lagoons (Figure 1-2) (IT, 1999b) are located approximately 0.3 mi south of the Test Cell 'C' (TCC) Facility and were used for the discharge of sanitary effluent from the TCC facility. For purposes of this discussion, this site will be referred to as either CAU 232 or the sewage lagoons.

  12. Refinement and evaluation of crack-opening-area analyses for circumferential through-wall cracks in pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, S.; Brust, F.; Ghadiali, N.; Krishnaswamy, P.; Wilkowski, G.; Choi, Y.H. |; Moberg, F.; Brickstad, B. |

    1995-04-01

    Leak-before-break (LBB) analyses for circumferentially cracked pipes are currently being conducted in the nuclear industry to justify elimination of pipe whip restraints and jet impingement shields which are present because of the expected dynamic effects from pipe rupture. The application of the LBB methodology frequently requires calculation of leak rates. These leak rates depend on the crack-opening area of a through-wall crack in the pipe. In addition to LBB analyses, which assume a hypothetical flaw size, there is also interest in the integrity of actual leaking cracks corresponding to current leakage detection requirements in NRC Regulatory Guide 1.45, or for assessing temporary repair of Class 2 and 3 pipes that have leaks as are being evaluated in ASME Section 11. This study was requested by the NRC to review, evaluate, and refine current analytical models for crack-opening-area analyses of pipes with circumferential through-wall cracks. Twenty-five pipe experiments were analyzed to determine the accuracy of the predictive models. Several practical aspects of crack-opening such as; crack-face pressure, off-center cracks, restraint of pressure-induced bending, cracks in thickness transition regions, weld residual stresses, crack-morphology models, and thermal-hydraulic analysis, were also investigated. 140 refs., 105 figs., 41 tabs.

  13. A viscoelastic Unitary Crack-Opening strain tensor for crack width assessment in fractured concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciumè, Giuseppe; Benboudjema, Farid

    2016-09-01

    A post-processing technique which allows computing crack width in concrete is proposed for a viscoelastic damage model. Concrete creep is modeled by means of a Kelvin-Voight cell while the damage model is that of Mazars in its local form. Due to the local damage approach, the constitutive model is regularized with respect to finite element mesh to avoid mesh dependency in the computed solution (regularization is based on fracture energy). The presented method is an extension to viscoelasticity of the approach proposed by Matallah et al. (Int. J. Numer. Anal. Methods Geomech. 34(15):1615-1633, 2010) for a purely elastic damage model. The viscoelastic Unitary Crack-Opening (UCO) strain tensor is computed accounting for evolution with time of surplus of stress related to damage; this stress is obtained from decomposition of the effective stress tensor. From UCO the normal crack width is then derived accounting for finite element characteristic length in the direction orthogonal to crack. This extension is quite natural and allows for accounting of creep impact on opening/closing of cracks in time dependent problems. A graphical interpretation of the viscoelastic UCO using Mohr's circles is proposed and application cases together with a theoretical validation are presented to show physical consistency of computed viscoelastic UCO.

  14. Cyclic fatigue-crack propagation in ceramics: Long and small crack behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen, A.A.; Dauskardt, R.H.; Ritchie, R.O California Univ., Berkeley, CA . Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering)

    1989-12-01

    Stress/life (S/N) and cyclic fatigue-crack growth properties are studied in a Mg-PSZ, with particular reference to the role of crack size. S/N data from unnotched specimens show markedly lower lives under tension-compression compared to tension-tension loading; fatigue limits'' (at 10{sup 8} cycles) for the former case approach 50% of the tensile strength. Under tension-tension loading, cyclic crack-growth rates of long'' (> 3 mm) cracks are found to be power-law dependent on the stress-intensity range {Delta}K with a fatigue threshold, {Delta}K{sub TH}, of order 50% K{sub c}. Conversely, naturally-occurring small'' (1 to 100 {mu}m) surface cracks were observed to grow at {Delta}K levels some 2 to 3 times smaller than {Delta}K{sub TH}. The implications of such data for structural design with ceramics is briefly discussed. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Velocity Dispersion Measurements in Cracked Quartzite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schijns, H. M.; Schmitt, D. R.; Jackson, I.

    2011-12-01

    Oscillating stress induced by seismic waves is expected to cause reversible fluid flow within low aspect ratio cracks, resulting in strongly frequency dependent seismic wave velocities. Laboratory measurements of seismic velocities typically made at MHz frequencies, well logging undertaken at kHz frequencies and in-situ exploration seismic (10-300 Hz) measurements are unlikely to be directly comparable as a result of this fluid flow effect. Experimental measurements over a broad range of frequencies are necessary to constrain theoretical velocity dispersion models. Here we present a preliminary comparison of ultrasonic (MHz) measurements on two cracked quartzite samples with measurements made in the mHz-Hz frequency band using forced oscillation. Quartzite samples from Cape Sorell, Australia and Alberta, Canada are cracked by thermally heating the samples to 1100 C and quenching them in liquid nitrogen and water, respectively. A relatively isotropic distribution of cracks, with average aperture of 1 μm and aspect ratio of <0.01, is induced in both samples for total porosities of ~2%. Measurements are made on the quartzite samples when they are dry, and after saturating with argon and water. The difference in viscosity between argon (0.025 mPa s at 10 MPa and 20 C) and water (1 mPa s) allow the investigation of different time scales of fluid flow. Further, measurements are made over effective pressures from 10-150 MPa, with progressive crack closure observed between 10-100 MPa. High frequency (0.64 MHz) measurements using piezoelectric transducers are used in conjunction with density measurements to calculate high frequency Young's and shear moduli. Low frequency (mHz-Hz) moduli are measured using a forced oscillation apparatus at Australian National University. The experimental assembly consists of a long cylindrical beam; the top of the beam is held fixed while the bottom is driven using time-varying electromagnetic drivers. The polarization of the applied force

  16. Method for suppressing the poisoning effects of contaminant metals on cracking catalysts in fluid catalytic cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Ramamoorthy, P.; Sobrante, E.L.; Krishna, A.S.

    1988-11-15

    This patent describes a process for the conversion of hydrocarbon oil feed which comprises contacting a hydrocarbon feed containing metal contaminants including nickel, vanadium and iron with a cracking catalyst in a fluid catalytic cracking system. The improvement consists of: (a) analyzing the hydrocarbon feed for nickel equivalents (defined as (nickel + 0.2 vanadium + 0.1 iron)) and determining the quantity of nickel equivalents in the hydrocarbon feed, and (b) introducing a composition for mitigating or suppressing the contaminants-caused poisoning of the catalyst into the catalytic cracking system, the composition selected from the group consisting of bismuth, bismuth compounds and mixtures thereof, in a weight ratio of introduced bismuth composition to nickel equivalents of between about 0.01:1 and about 1:1.

  17. Development Of Simulation Model For Fluid Catalytic Cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sobhan

    2010-10-01

    Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC) is the most widely used secondary conversion process in the refining industry, for producing gasoline, olefins, and middle distillate from heavier petroleum fractions. There are more than 500 units in the world with a total processing capacity of about 17 to 20% of the crude capacity. FCC catalyst is the highest consumed catalyst in the process industry. On one hand, FCC is quite flexible with respect to it's ability to process wide variety of crudes with a flexible product yield pattern, and on the other hand, the interdependence of the major operating parameters makes the process extremely complex. An operating unit is self balancing and some fluctuations in the independent parameters are automatically adjusted by changing the temperatures and flow rates at different sections. However, a good simulation model is very useful to the refiner to get the best out of the process, in terms of selection of the best catalyst, to cope up with the day to day changing of the feed quality and the demands of different products from FCC unit. In addition, a good model is of great help in designing the process units and peripherals. A simple empirical model is often adequate to monitor the day to day operations, but they are not of any use in handling the other problems such as, catalyst selection or, design / modification of the plant. For this, a kinetic based rigorous model is required. Considering the complexity of the process, large number of chemical species undergoing "n" number of parallel and consecutive reactions, it is virtually impossible to develop a simulation model based on the kinetic parameters. The most common approach is to settle for a semi empirical model. We shall take up the key issues for developing a FCC model and the contribution of such models in the optimum operation of the plant.

  18. Self-repair of cracks in brittle material systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dry, Carolyn M.

    2016-04-01

    One of the most effective uses for self repair is in material systems that crack because the cracks can allow the repair chemical to flow into the crack damage sites in all three dimensions. In order for the repair chemical to stay in the damage site and flow along to all the crack and repair there must be enough chemical to fill the entire crack. The repair chemical must be designed appropriately for the particular crack size and total volume of cracks. In each of the three examples of self repair in crackable brittle systems, the viscosity and chemical makeup and volume of the repair chemicals used is different for each system. Further the chemical delivery system has to be designed for each application also. Test results from self repair of three brittle systems are discussed. In "Self Repair of Concrete Bridges and Infrastructure" two chemicals were used due to different placements in bridges to repair different types of cracks- surface shrinkage and shear cracks, In "Airplane Wings and Fuselage, in Graphite" the composite has very different properties than the concrete bridges. In the graphite for airplane components the chemical also had to survive the high processing temperatures. In this composite the cracks were so definite and deep and thin that the repair chemical could flow easily and repair in all layers of the composite. In "Ceramic/Composite Demonstrating Self Repair" the self repair system not only repaired the broken ceramic but also rebounded the composite to the ceramic layer

  19. Deformation fields near a steady fatigue crack with anisotropic plasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Yanfei

    2015-11-30

    In this work, from finite element simulations based on an irreversible, hysteretic cohesive interface model, a steady fatigue crack can be realized if the crack extension exceeds about twice the plastic zone size, and both the crack increment per loading cycle and the crack bridging zone size are smaller than the plastic zone size. The corresponding deformation fields develop a plastic wake behind the crack tip and a compressive residual stress field ahead of the crack tip. In addition, the Hill’s plasticity model is used to study the role of plastic anisotropy on the retardation of fatigue crack growth and the elastic strain fields. It is found that for Mode-I cyclic loading, an enhanced yield stress in directions that are inclined from the crack plane will lead to slower crack growth rate, but this retardation is insignificant for typical degrees of plastic anisotropy. Furthermore, these results provide key inputs for future comparisons to neutron and synchrotron diffraction measurements that provide full-field lattice strain mapping near fracture and fatigue crack tips, especially in textured materials such as wrought or rolled Mg alloys.

  20. Crack tip plasticity in single crystal UO2: Atomistic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Yongfeng Zhang; Paul C. Millett; Michael Tonks; Bulent Biner; Xiang-Yang Liu; David A. Andersson

    2012-11-01

    The fracture behavior of single crystal uranium dioxide is studied using molecular dynamics simulations at room temperature. Initially, an elliptical notch is created on either {111} or {110} planes, and tensile loading is applied normal to the crack planes. For cracks on both planes, shielding of crack tips by plastic deformation is observed, and crack extension occurs for crack on {111} planes only. Two plastic processes, dislocation emission and phase transformation are identified at crack tips. The dislocations have a Burgers vector of ?110?/2, and glide on {100} planes. Two metastable phases, the so-called Rutile and Scrutinyite phases, are identified during the phase transformation, and their relative stability is confirmed by separate density- functional-theory calculations. Examination of stress concentration near crack tips reveals that dislocation emission is not an effective shielding mechanism. The formation of new phases may effectively shield the crack provided all phase interfaces formed near the crack tips are coherent, as in the case of cracks residing on {110} planes.

  1. Cracked tooth diagnosis and treatment: An alternative paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Mamoun, John S.; Napoletano, Donato

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the diagnosis and treatment of cracked teeth, and explores common clinical examples of cracked teeth, such as cusp fractures, fractures into tooth furcations, and root fractures. This article provides alternative definitions of terms such as cracked teeth, complete and incomplete fractures and crack lines, and explores the scientific rationale for dental terminology commonly used to describe cracked teeth, such as cracked tooth syndrome, structural versus nonstructural cracks, and vertical, horizontal, and oblique fractures. The article explains the advantages of high magnification loupes (×6–8 or greater), or the surgical operating microscope, combined with co-axial or head-mounted illumination, when observing teeth for microscopic crack lines or enamel craze lines. The article explores what biomechanical factors help to facilitate the development of cracks in teeth, and under what circumstances a full coverage crown may be indicated for preventing further propagation of a fracture plane. Articles on cracked tooth phenomena were located via a PubMed search using a variety of keywords, and via selective hand-searching of citations contained within located articles. PMID:26038667

  2. Dynamic delamination crack propagation in a graphite/epoxy laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, J. E.; Sun, C. T.

    1991-01-01

    Dynamic delamination crack propagation in a (90/0) 5s Graphite/Epoxy laminate with an embedded interfacial crack was investigated experimentally using high speed photography. The dynamic motion was produced by impacting the beamlike laminate specimen with a silicon rubber ball. The threshold impact velocities required to initiate dynamic crack propagation in laminates with varying initial crack positions were determined. The crack propagation speeds were estimated from the photographs. Results show that the through the thickness position of the embedded crack can significantly affect the dominant mechanism and the threshold impact velocity for the onset of crack movement. If the initial delamination is placed near the top of bottom surface of the laminate, local buckling of the delaminated plies may cause instability of the crack. If the initial delamination lies on the midplane, local buckling does not occur and the initiation of crack propagation appears to be dominated by Mode II fracture. The crack propagation and arrest observed was seen to be affected by wave motion within the delamination region.

  3. Crack monitoring capability of plastic optical fibers for concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jinlei; Bao, Tengfei; Chen, Rui

    2015-08-01

    Optical fibers have been widely used in structural health monitoring. Traditional silica fibers are easy to break in field applications due to their brittleness. Thus, silica fibers are proposed to be replaced by plastic optical fibers (POFs) in crack monitoring in this study. Moreover, considering the uncertainty of crack propagation direction in composite materials, the influence of the angles between fibers and cracks on the monitoring capability of plastic optical fibers is studied. A POF sensing device was designed and the relationship between light intensity loss and crack width under different fiber/crack angles was first measured through the device. Then, three-point bend tests were conducted on concrete beams. POFs were glued to the bottom surfaces of the beams and light intensity loss with crack width was measured. Experimental results showed that light intensity loss in plastic optical fibers increased with crack width increase. Therefore, application of plastic optical fibers in crack monitoring is feasible. Moreover, the results also showed that the sensitivity of the POF crack sensor decreased with the increase of angles between fibers and cracks.

  4. Deformation fields near a steady fatigue crack with anisotropic plasticity

    DOE PAGES

    Gao, Yanfei

    2015-11-30

    In this work, from finite element simulations based on an irreversible, hysteretic cohesive interface model, a steady fatigue crack can be realized if the crack extension exceeds about twice the plastic zone size, and both the crack increment per loading cycle and the crack bridging zone size are smaller than the plastic zone size. The corresponding deformation fields develop a plastic wake behind the crack tip and a compressive residual stress field ahead of the crack tip. In addition, the Hill’s plasticity model is used to study the role of plastic anisotropy on the retardation of fatigue crack growth andmore » the elastic strain fields. It is found that for Mode-I cyclic loading, an enhanced yield stress in directions that are inclined from the crack plane will lead to slower crack growth rate, but this retardation is insignificant for typical degrees of plastic anisotropy. Furthermore, these results provide key inputs for future comparisons to neutron and synchrotron diffraction measurements that provide full-field lattice strain mapping near fracture and fatigue crack tips, especially in textured materials such as wrought or rolled Mg alloys.« less

  5. Fatigue crack growth in an aluminum alloy-fractographic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salam, I.; Muhammad, W.; Ejaz, N.

    2016-08-01

    A two-fold approach was adopted to understand the fatigue crack growth process in an Aluminum alloy; fatigue crack growth test of samples and analysis of fractured surfaces. Fatigue crack growth tests were conducted on middle tension M(T) samples prepared from an Aluminum alloy cylinder. The tests were conducted under constant amplitude loading at R ratio 0.1. The stress applied was from 20,30 and 40 per cent of the yield stress of the material. The fatigue crack growth data was recorded. After fatigue testing, the samples were subjected to detailed scanning electron microscopic (SEM) analysis. The resulting fracture surfaces were subjected to qualitative and quantitative fractographic examinations. Quantitative fracture analysis included an estimation of crack growth rate (CGR) in different regions. The effect of the microstructural features on fatigue crack growth was examined. It was observed that in stage II (crack growth region), the failure mode changes from intergranular to transgranular as the stress level increases. In the region of intergranular failure the localized brittle failure was observed and fatigue striations are difficult to reveal. However, in the region of transgranular failure the crack path is independent of the microstructural features. In this region, localized ductile failure mode was observed and well defined fatigue striations were present in the wake of fatigue crack. The effect of interaction of growing fatigue crack with microstructural features was not substantial. The final fracture (stage III) was ductile in all the cases.

  6. Insights into oil cracking based on laboratory experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, R.J.; Tang, Y.; Kaplan, I.R.

    2003-01-01

    The objectives of this pyrolysis investigation were to determine changes in (1) oil composition, (2) gas composition and (3) gas carbon isotope ratios and to compare these results with hydrocarbons in reservoirs. Laboratory cracking of a saturate-rich Devonian oil by confined, dry pyrolysis was performed at T = 350-450??C, P = 650 bars and times ranging from 24 h to 33 days. Increasing thermal stress results in the C15+ hydrocarbon fraction cracking to form C6-14 and C1-5 hydrocarbons and pyrobitumen. The C6-14 fraction continues to crack to C 1-5 gases plus pyrobitumen at higher temperatures and prolonged heating time and the ?? 13Cethane-?? 13Cpropane difference becomes greater as oil cracking progresses. There is considerable overlap in product generation and product cracking. Oil cracking products accumulate either because the rate of generation of any product is greater than the rate of removal by cracking of that product or because the product is a stable end member under the experimental conditions. Oil cracking products decrease when the amount of product generated from a reactant is less than the amount of product cracked. If pyrolysis gas compositions are representative of gases generated from oil cracking in nature, then understanding the processes that alter natural gas composition is critical. ?? 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Small-crack effects in high-strength aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Wu, X. R.; Venneri, S. L.; Li, C. G.

    1994-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Chinese Aeronautical Establishment participated in a Fatigue and Fracture Mechanics Cooperative Program. The program objectives were to identify and characterize crack initiation and growth of small cracks (10 microns to 2 mm long) in commonly used US and PRC aluminum alloys, to improve fracture mechanics analyses of surface- and corner-crack configurations, and to develop improved life-prediction methods. Fatigue and small-crack tests were performed on single-edgenotch tension (SENT) specimens and large-crack tests were conducted on center-crack tension specimens for constant-amplitude (stress ratios of -1, 0, and 0.5) and Mini-TWIST spectrum loading. The plastic replica method was used to monitor the initiation and growth of small fatigue cracks at the semicircular notch. Crack growth results from each laboratory on 7075-T6 bare and LC9cs clad aluminum alloys agreed well and showed that fatigue life was mostly crack propagation from a material defect (inclusion particles or void) or from the cladding layer. Finite-element and weight-function methods were used to determine stress intensity factors for surface and corner cracks in the SENT specimens. Equations were then developed and used in a crack growth and crack-closure model to correlate small- and large-crack data and to make life predictions for various load histories. The cooperative program produced useful experimental data and efficient analysis methods for improving life predictions. The results should ultimately improve aircraft structural reliability and safety.

  8. Floating Node Method and Virtual Crack Closure Technique for Modeling Matrix Cracking-Delamination Migration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeCarvalho, Nelson V.; Chen, B. Y.; Pinho, Silvestre T.; Baiz, P. M.; Ratcliffe, James G.; Tay, T. E.

    2013-01-01

    A novel approach is proposed for high-fidelity modeling of progressive damage and failure in composite materials that combines the Floating Node Method (FNM) and the Virtual Crack Closure Technique (VCCT) to represent multiple interacting failure mechanisms in a mesh-independent fashion. In this study, the approach is applied to the modeling of delamination migration in cross-ply tape laminates. Delamination, matrix cracking, and migration are all modeled using fracture mechanics based failure and migration criteria. The methodology proposed shows very good qualitative and quantitative agreement with experiments.

  9. Floating Node Method and Virtual Crack Closure Technique for Modeling Matrix Cracking-Delamination Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeCarvalho, N. V.; Chen, B. Y.; Pinho, S. T.; Baiz, P. M.; Ratcliffe, J. G.; Tay, T. E.

    2013-01-01

    A novel approach is proposed for high-fidelity modeling of progressive damage and failure in composite materials that combines the Floating Node Method (FNM) and the Virtual Crack Closure Technique (VCCT) to represent multiple interacting failure mechanisms in a mesh-independent fashion. In this study, the approach is applied to the modeling of delamination migration in cross-ply tape laminates. Delamination, matrix cracking, and migration are all modeled using fracture mechanics based failure and migration criteria. The methodology proposed shows very good qualitative and quantitative agreement with experiments.

  10. Application of the cracked pipe element to creep crack growth prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Brochard, J.; Charras, T.

    1997-04-01

    Modifications to a computer code for ductile fracture assessment of piping systems with postulated circumferential through-wall cracks under static or dynamic loading are very briefly described. The modifications extend the capabilities of the CASTEM2000 code to the determination of fracture parameters under creep conditions. The main advantage of the approach is that thermal loads can be evaluated as secondary stresses. The code is applicable to piping systems for which crack propagation predictions differ significantly depending on whether thermal stresses are considered as primary or secondary stresses.

  11. Slow Crack Growth of Brittle Materials With Exponential Crack-Velocity Formulation. Part 1; Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Nemeth, Noel N.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2002-01-01

    Extensive slow-crack-growth (SCG) analysis was made using a primary exponential crack-velocity formulation under three widely used load configurations: constant stress rate, constant stress, and cyclic stress. Although the use of the exponential formulation in determining SCG parameters of a material requires somewhat inconvenient numerical procedures, the resulting solutions presented gave almost the same degree of simplicity in both data analysis and experiments as did the power-law formulation. However, the fact that the inert strength of a material should be known in advance to determine the corresponding SCG parameters was a major drawback of the exponential formulation as compared with the power-law formulation.

  12. Fatigue crack growth behavior in equine cortical bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, Debbie Renee

    2001-07-01

    Objectives for this research were to experimentally determine crack growth rates, da/dN, as a function of alternating stress intensity factor, DeltaK, for specimens from lateral and dorsal regions of equine third metacarpal cortical bone tissue, and to determine if the results were described by the Paris law. In one set of experiments, specimens were oriented for crack propagation in the circumferential direction with the crack plane transverse to the long axis of the bone. In the second set of experiments, specimens were oriented for radial crack growth with the crack plane parallel to the long axis of the bone. Results of fatigue tests from the latter specimens were used to evaluate the hypothesis that crack growth rates differ regionally. The final experiments were designed to determine if crack resistance was dependent on region, proportion of hooped osteons (those with circumferentially oriented collagen fibers in the outer lamellae) or number of osteons penetrated by the crack, and to address the hypothesis that hooped osteons resist invasion by cracks better than other osteonal types. The transverse crack growth data for dorsal specimens were described by the Paris law with an exponent of 10.4 and suggested a threshold stress intensity factor, DeltaKth, of 2.0 MPa·m1/2 and fracture toughness of 4.38 MPa·m 1/2. Similar results were not obtained for lateral specimens because the crack always deviated from the intended path and ran parallel to the loading direction. Crack growth for the dorsal and lateral specimens in the radial orientation was described by the Paris law with exponents of 8.7 and 10.2, respectively, and there were no regional differences in the apparent DeltaK th (0.5 MPa·m1/2) or fracture toughness (1.2 MPa·m 1/2). Crack resistance was not associated with cortical region, proportion of hooped osteons or the number of osteons penetrated by the crack. The extent to which cracks penetrate osteons was influenced by whether the collagen fiber

  13. Nanoscale void nucleation and growth and crack tip stress evolution ahead of a growing crack in a single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shaowen; Deng, Xiaomin

    2008-03-01

    A constrained three-dimensional atomistic model of a cracked aluminum single crystal has been employed to investigate the growth behavior of a nanoscale crack in a single crystal using molecular dynamics simulations with the EAM potential. This study is focused on the stress field around the crack tip and its evolution during fast crack growth. Simulation results of the observed nanoscale fracture behavior are presented in terms of atomistic stresses. Major findings from the simulation results are the following: (a) crack growth is in the form of void nucleation, growth and coalescence ahead of the crack tip, thus resembling that of ductile fracture at the continuum scale; (b) void nucleation occurs at a certain distance ahead of the current crack tip or the forward edge of the leading void ahead of the crack tip; (c) just before void nucleation the mean atomic stress (or equivalently its ratio to the von Mises effective stress, which is called the stress constraint or triaxiality) has a high concentration at the site of void nucleation; and (d) the stress field ahead of the current crack tip or the forward edge of the leading void is more or less self-similar (so that the forward edge of the leading void can be viewed as the effective crack tip).

  14. Influence of crack history on the stable tearing behavior of a thin-sheet material with multiple cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawicke, D. S.; Newman, J. C., Jr.; Sutton, M. A.; Amstutz, B. E.

    1994-01-01

    Fracture tests were conducted on 2.3mm thick, 305mm wide sheets of 2024-T3 aluminum alloy with from one to five collinear cracks. The cracks were introduced (crack history) into the specimens by three methods: saw cutting, fatigue precracking at a low stress range, and fatigue precracking at a high stress range. For the single crack tests, the initial crack history influenced the stress required for the onset of stable crack growth and the first 10mm of crack growth. The effect on failure stress was about 4 percent or less. For the multiple crack tests, the initial crack history was shown to cause differences of more than 20 percent in the link-up stress and 13 percent in failure stress. An elastic-plastic finite element analysis employing the CTOA fracture criterion was used to predict the fracture behavior of the single and multiple crack tests. The numerical predictions were within 7 percent of the observed link-up and failure stress in all the tests.

  15. Lamb wave inspection for large cracks in centrifugally cast stainless steel: Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-08-01

    The objective of the present research project is to develop an inspection technique to detect and size large-scale cracks in centrifugally cast stainless steel (CCSS) pipes. This technique is based on the use of Lamb waves, or generally the resonant modes of propagation in the considered geometry, to circumvent the difficulties encountered when the conventional ultrasonic bulk waves are used to inspect the anisotropic, highly absorptive CCSS material. The research activities in 1987 were focused on probe design, Lamb-wave mode selection and excitation, detection mechanism, and anisotropy and curvature effects. The optimal design of a laboratory search unit was determined to be a tandem dual-element system built on the liquid-wedge principle. A reliable mechanism, which features a strong amplitude reduction when the search unit is scanned over a crack, was identified for crack detection and location. The preliminary experimental and analytical findings indicate that the best resonant modes were identified to be the four lowest modes in light of their excitability and minimization of the anisotropy effect. Finally, for typical geometrical dimensions under consideration, the curvature effect was found to be minimal.

  16. 40 CFR Table 22 to Subpart Uuu of... - Inorganic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Reforming Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Catalytic Reforming Units 22 Table 22 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 22 Table 22 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Inorganic HAP Emission Limits for...

  17. 40 CFR Table 22 to Subpart Uuu of... - Inorganic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Reforming Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Catalytic Reforming Units 22 Table 22 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 22 Table 22 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Inorganic HAP Emission Limits for...

  18. 40 CFR Table 22 to Subpart Uuu of... - Inorganic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Reforming Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Catalytic Reforming Units 22 Table 22 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63, Subpt. UUU, Table 22 Table 22 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Inorganic HAP Emission Limits for...

  19. Cooling-dominated cracking in thermally stressed volcanic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, John; Meredith, Philip; Gudmundsson, Agust

    2016-08-01

    Most studies of thermally induced cracking in rocks have focused on the generation of cracks formed during heating and thermal expansion. Both the nature and the mechanism of crack formation during cooling are hypothesized to be different from those formed during heating. We present in situ acoustic emission data recorded as a proxy for crack damage evolution in a series of heating and cooling experiments on samples of basalt and dacite. Results show that both the rate and the energy of acoustic emission are consistently much higher during cooling than during heating. Seismic velocity comparisons and crack morphology analysis of our heated and cooled samples support the contemporaneous acoustic emission data and also indicate that thermal cracking is largely isotropic. These new data are important for assessing the contribution of cooling-induced damage within volcanic structures and layers such as dikes, sills, and lava flows.

  20. Nonclassical Nucleation and Growth of Cohesive Tensile Cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gran, Joseph; Rundle, John; Klein, William

    2011-03-01

    We analyze the nucleation and growth of cohesive tensile cracks using a Hamiltonian which is written as a functional of the crack separation (offset field). We simulate the nucleation events on a square lattice using a Metropolis Monte Carlo algorithm. Several modes of crack propagation are seen in the simulations. Our results indicate that for certain materials, crack nucleation and growth proceed through the formation and extension of a diffuse ``halo'' surrounding the classical portion of the crack. This is similar to nonclassical nucleation near the spinodal in magnetic systems. Theoretical considerations and numerical calculations strongly suggest that the diffuse halo can be identified with the fracture ``process zone'' seen in laboratory studies of advancing cracks. We are investigating scaling exponents associated with this apparent phase transition.