Science.gov

Sample records for cranberry juice concentrate

  1. Cranberry juice: effects on health

    Cranberries have long been used as a part of traditional and folk medicine. Most cranberry juice is consumed as a product containing 27% v/v with sweeteners derived from other fruit juices or other sweeteners. Cranberry juice contains a rich profile of phenolic compounds, especially proanthocyanidin...

  2. How Much Cranberry Juice Is in Cranberry-Apple Juice? A General Chemistry Spectrophotometric Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edionwe, Etinosa; Villarreal, John R.; Smith, K. Christopher

    2011-01-01

    A laboratory experiment that spectrophotometrically determines the percent of cranberry juice in cranberry-apple juice is described. The experiment involves recording an absorption spectrum of cranberry juice to determine the wavelength of maximum absorption, generating a calibration curve, and measuring the absorbance of cranberry-apple juice.…

  3. Low-calorie cranberry juice supplementation reduces plasma oxidized LDL and cell adhesion molecule concentrations in men.

    PubMed

    Ruel, Guillaume; Pomerleau, Sonia; Couture, Patrick; Lemieux, Simone; Lamarche, Benoît; Couillard, Charles

    2008-02-01

    Elevated circulating concentrations of oxidized LDL (OxLDL) and cell adhesion molecules are considered to be relevant markers of oxidative stress and endothelial activation which are implicated in the development of CVD. On the other hand, it has been suggested that dietary flavonoid consumption may be cardioprotective through possible favourable impacts on LDL particle oxidation and endothelial activation. The present study was undertaken to determine the effect of the daily consumption of low-calorie cranberry juice cocktail on plasma OxLDL, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and E-selectin concentrations in men. Thirty men (mean age 51 (sd 10) years) were recruited and asked to consume increasing daily doses of cranberry juice cocktail (125, 250 and 500 ml/d) over three successive periods of 4 weeks. Plasma OxLDL and adhesion molecule concentrations were measured by ELISA before and after each phase. We noted a significant decrease in plasma OxLDL concentrations following the intervention (P < 0.0001). We also found that plasma ICAM-1 (P < 0.0001) and VCAM-1 (P < 0.05) concentrations decreased significantly during the course of the study. In summary, the present results show that daily cranberry juice cocktail consumption is associated with decreases in plasma OxLDL, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 concentrations in men.

  4. A combination of grapefruit seed extract and concentrated cranberry juice as a potential antimicrobial preservative for the improvement of microbiological stability of hypromellose gel.

    PubMed

    Bernatoniene, Jurga; Keraitė, Rasa; Masteiková, Ruta; Pavilonis, Alvydas; Savickas, Arūnas

    2013-10-01

    Aqueous hypromellose gels are not microbiologically stable - they show signs of microorganism growth during storage. To extend the shelf-life of the gels, antimicrobial preservatives are needed. Some substances of plant origin are known for their antimicrobial properties, and thus they may be used as an alternative to synthetic preservatives. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the microbiological stability of aqueous hypromellose gel and the effectiveness of natural substances - grapefruit seed extract (GSE), concentrated cranberry juice, and a combination thereof - on the antimicrobial protection of the gel. The evaluation of the antimicrobial activity of GSE and cranberry juice showed that their antimicrobial effects differed. Both cranberry juice and GSE inhibited the growth of the standard gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, but the effect of GSE was significantly stronger. Candida albicans was sensitive only to GSE. For this reason, in order to affect all the microorganisms studied, either a combination of 0.7% GSE and 10% cranberry juice, or 5% GSE alone may be used. The combination of GSE and cranberry juice was effective only in acidic medium (pH being 2.5-5), while the antimicrobial effect of GSE was not dependent on the pH value.

  5. Cranberry

    MedlinePlus

    ... protect against bacteria, as 20 ounces of cranberry juice. A 2012 research review of 13 clinical trials ... review of 24 clinical trials concluded that cranberry juice and supplements don’t prevent UTIs but many ...

  6. Impact of different stages of juice processing on the anthocyanin, flavonol, and procyanidin contents of cranberries.

    PubMed

    White, Brittany L; Howard, Luke R; Prior, Ronald L

    2011-05-11

    Juice is the most common form in which cranberries are consumed; however there is limited information on the changes of polyphenolic content of the berries during juice processing. This study investigated the effects of three different pretreatments (grinding plus blanching; only grinding; only blanching) for cranberry juice processing on the concentrations of anthocyanins, flavonols, and procyanidins throughout processing. Flavonols and procyanidins were retained in the juice to a greater extent than anthocyanins, and pressing resulted in the most significant losses in polyphenolics due to removal of the seeds and skins. Flavonol aglycones were formed during processing as a result of heat treatment. Drying of cranberry pomace resulted in increased extraction of flavonols and procyanidin oligomers but lower extraction of polymeric procyanidins. The results indicate that cranberry polyphenolics are relatively stable during processing compared to other berries; however, more work is needed to determine their fate during storage of juices.

  7. Cranberry juice increases antioxidant status without affecting cholesterol homeostasis in orchidectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Deyhim, Farzad; Patil, Bhimanagouda S; Villarreal, Arnulfo; Lopez, Erica; Garcia, Kristi; Rios, Ryan; Garcia, Claudia; Gonzales, Cheri; Mandadi, Kranthi

    2007-03-01

    Oxidative stress and hypogonadism are linked to the increased incidence of cardiovascular disease in males. The objective of this research was to delineate whether drinking cranberry juice for 4 months affects antioxidant capacity and lipid profile in orchidectomized rats. Thirty-two 1-year-old male rats were randomized to two groups: a sham-control group (n = 8) and an orchidectomized group (n = 24). The orchidectomized group was divided into three groups of eight and assigned to one of the following treatments: orchidectomy, orchidectomy plus 27% cranberry juice, and orchidectomy plus 45% cranberry juice. At 120 days after initiation of the study, all rats were killed, blood was collected, and plasma was harvested for total antioxidant status, malondialdehyde, nitrate + nitrite, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in liver, and concentrations of cholesterol and triglyceride in liver and in plasma. Orchidectomy depressed (P < .05) plasma antioxidant capacity and SOD activity, elevated (P < .05) nitrate + nitrite and malondialdehyde in plasma, and increased (P < .05) triglyceride and cholesterol values in liver and in plasma. Cranberry juice increased (P < .05) plasma antioxidant capacity and SOD activity and reduced (P < .05) nitrate + nitrite and malondialdehyde concentrations. Drinking cranberry juice did not affect cholesterol concentrations in liver and in plasma. Triglyceride concentration in plasma of orchidectomized rats that were drinking cranberry juice increased (P < .05), but its concentration in liver decreased (P < .05) to the level of shams. The protective effect of cranberry juice from oxidative damage may be mediated by a decrease in nitrate + nitrite and dose-dependent decrease in peroxidation.

  8. Flavonoids and phenolic acids from cranberry juice are bioavailable and bioactive in healthy older adults.

    PubMed

    McKay, Diane L; Chen, C-Y Oliver; Zampariello, Carly A; Blumberg, Jeffrey B

    2015-02-01

    Cranberries (Vaccinium macrocarpon) are a rich source of phenolic phytochemicals, which likely contribute to their putative health benefits. A single-dose pharmacokinetic trial was conducted in 10 healthy adults ⩾50y to evaluate the acute (24-h) absorption and excretion of flavonoids, phenolic acids and proanthocyanidins (PACs) from a low-calorie cranberry juice cocktail (54% juice). Inter-individual variability was observed in the Cmax and Tmax of many of these compounds in both plasma and urine. The sum total concentration of phenolics detected in plasma reached a peak of 34.2μg/ml between 8 and 10h, while in urine this peak was 269.8μg/mg creatinine, and appeared 2-4h earlier. The presence of PAC-A2 dimers in human urine has not previously been reported. After cranberry juice consumption, plasma total antioxidant capacity assessed using ORAC and TAP assays correlated with individual metabolites. Our results show phenolic compounds in cranberry juice are bioavailable and exert antioxidant actions in healthy older adults. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Cranberry juice consumption lowers markers of cardiometabolic risk, including blood pressure and circulating C-reactive protein, triglyceride, and glucose concentrations in adults.

    PubMed

    Novotny, Janet A; Baer, David J; Khoo, Christina; Gebauer, Sarah K; Charron, Craig S

    2015-06-01

    Cardiometabolic risk is the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes, or stroke, which are leading causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide. The objective of this study was to determine the potential of low-calorie cranberry juice (LCCJ) to lower cardiometabolic risk. A double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-arm study was conducted with controlled diets. Thirty women and 26 men (mean baseline characteristics: 50 y; weight, 79 kg; body mass index, 28 kg/m(2)) completed an 8-wk intervention with LCCJ or a flavor/color/energy-matched placebo beverage. Twice daily volunteers consumed 240 mL of LCCJ or the placebo beverage, containing 173 or 62 mg of phenolic compounds and 6.5 or 7.5 g of total sugar per 240-mL serving, respectively. Fasting serum triglycerides (TGs) were lower after consuming LCCJ and demonstrated a treatment × baseline interaction such that the participants with higher baseline TG concentrations were more likely to experience a larger treatment effect (1.15 ± 0.04 mmol/L vs. 1.25 ± 0.04 mmol/L, respectively; P = 0.027). Serum C-reactive protein (CRP) was lower for individuals consuming LCCJ than for individuals consuming the placebo beverage [ln transformed values of 0.522 ± 0.115 ln(mg/L) vs. 0.997 ± 0.120 ln(mg/L), P = 0.0054, respectively, and equivalent to 1.69 mg/L vs. 2.71 mg/L back-transformed]. LCCJ lowered diastolic blood pressure (BP) compared with the placebo beverage (69.2 ± 0.8 mm Hg for LCCJ vs. 71.6 ± 0.8 mm Hg for placebo; P = 0.048). Fasting plasma glucose was lower (P = 0.03) in the LCCJ group (5.32 ± 0.03 mmol/L) than in the placebo group (5.42 ± 0.03 mmol/L), and LCCJ had a beneficial effect on homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance for participants with high baseline values (P = 0.035). LCCJ can improve several risk factors of CVD in adults, including circulating TGs, CRP, and glucose, insulin resistance, and diastolic BP. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01295684. © 2015

  10. Cranberry juice-- a well-characterized folk-remedy against bacterial urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Nowack, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) is a North-American folk remedy for treating and preventing infection. Research has identified an anti-adhesive mechanism of cranberry-proanthocyanidins that inhibit docking of bacteria on tissues "in vitro". This efficacy mechanism can be traced in the patient's urine following oral intake of cranberry juice. The efficacy of cranberry juice and extracts as a prophylactic agent against recurrent urinary infections is well documented in women. The anti-adhesion effect of cranberry-proanthocyandins can also be applied for treatment of other common diseases of bacterial pathogenesis, e.g. Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis and dental caries/periodontal disease.

  11. Effects of cranberry juice consumption on vascular function in patients with coronary artery disease

    Cranberry juice contains polyphenolic compounds that could improve endothelial function and reduce cardiovascular disease risk. The objective was to examine the effects of cranberry juice on vascular function in subjects with coronary artery disease. We completed an acute pilot study with no placebo...

  12. Effects of Cranberry Juice on Pharmacokinetics of β-Lactam Antibiotics following Oral Administration▿

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meng; Andrew, Marilee A.; Wang, Joanne; Salinger, David H.; Vicini, Paolo; Grady, Richard W.; Phillips, Brian; Shen, Danny D.; Anderson, Gail D.

    2009-01-01

    Cranberry juice consumption is often recommended along with low-dose oral antibiotics for prophylaxis for recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI). Because multiple membrane transporters are involved in the intestinal absorption and renal excretion of β-lactam antibiotics, we evaluated the potential risk of pharmacokinetic interactions between cranberry juice and the β-lactams amoxicillin (amoxicilline) and cefaclor. The amoxicillin-cranberry juice interaction was investigated in 18 healthy women who received on four separate occasions a single oral test dose of amoxicillin at 500 mg and 2 g with or without cranberry juice cocktail (8 oz) according to a crossover design. A parallel cefaclor-cranberry juice interaction study was also conducted in which 500 mg cefaclor was administered with or without cranberry juice cocktail (12 oz). Data were analyzed by noncompartmental methods and nonlinear mixed-effects compartmental modeling. We conclude that the concurrent use of cranberry juice has no significant effect on the extent of oral absorption or the renal clearance of amoxicillin and cefaclor. However, delays in the absorption of amoxicillin and cefaclor were observed. These results suggest that the use of cranberry juice at usual quantities as prophylaxis for UTI is not likely to alter the pharmacokinetics of these two oral antibiotics. PMID:19398645

  13. Human glycemic response and phenolic content of unsweetened cranberry juice.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Ted; Singh, Ajay P; Vorsa, Nicholi; Goettl, Christopher D; Kittleson, Katrina M; Roe, Cindy M; Kastello, Gary M; Ragsdale, Frances R

    2008-03-01

    This cross-sectional study determined the phenolic composition of an over-the-counter cranberry juice (CBJ) with high-performance liquid chromatography and examined the effects of low- and normal-calorie CBJ formulations on the postprandial glycemic response in healthy humans. The CBJ used in this study contained seven phenolic acids, with 3- and 5-caffeoylquinic acid being the primary components, and 15 flavonol glycosides, with myricetin-3-galactoside and quercetin-3-galactoside being the most prevalent. CBJ proanthocyanidins consisted of three different tetramers and a heptamer, which were confirmed with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry analysis. Participants received one of the following six treatments: nothing (no water/beverage), water (480 mL), unsweetened low-calorie CBJ (38 Cal/480 mL), normal-calorie CBJ (280 Cal/480 mL), isocaloric normal calorie (high fructose corn syrup [HFCS]), or isocaloric low-calorie beverages. No significant differences in postprandial blood glucose or insulin were observed in the groups receiving nothing, water, or low-calorie treatments. In contrast, the ingestion of normal-calorie CBJ and normal-calorie control beverage resulted in significantly higher blood glucose concentrations 30 minutes postprandially, although the differences were no longer significant after 180 minutes. Plasma insulin of normal-calorie CBJ and control (HFCS) recipients was significantly higher 60 minutes postprandially, but not significantly different 120 minutes postprandially. CBJ ingestion did not affect heart rate or blood pressure. This study suggests that the consumption of a low-calorie CBJ rich in previously uncharacterized trimer and heptamer proanthocyanidins is associated with a favorable glycemic response and may be beneficial for persons with impaired glucose tolerance.

  14. Cranberry Juice and Combinations of Its Organic Acids Are Effective against Experimental Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Heidi D.; Struve, Carsten; Christensen, Søren B.; Krogfelt, Karen A.

    2017-01-01

    The antibacterial effect of cranberry juice and the organic acids therein on infection by uropathogenic Escherichia coli was studied in an experimental mouse model of urinary tract infection (UTI). Reduced bacterial counts were found in the bladder (P < 0.01) of mice drinking fresh cranberry juice. Commercially available cranberry juice cocktail also significantly reduced (P < 0.01) bacterial populations in the bladder, as did the hydrophilic fraction of cranberry juice (P < 0.05). Quinic, malic, shikimic, and citric acid, the preponderant organic acids in cranberry juice, were tested in combination and individually. The four organic acids also decreased bacterial levels in the bladder when administered together (P < 0.001), and so did the combination of malic plus citric acid (P < 0.01) and malic plus quinic acid (P < 0.05). The other tested combinations of the organic acids, and the acids administered singly, did not have any effect in the UTI model. Apparently, the antibacterial effect of the organic acids from cranberry juice on UTI can be obtained by administering a combination of malic acid and either citric or quinic acid. This study show for the first time that cranberry juice reduce E. coli colonization of the bladder in an experimental mouse model of urinary tract infection and that the organic acids are active agents. PMID:28421045

  15. Cranberry Juice and Combinations of Its Organic Acids Are Effective against Experimental Urinary Tract Infection.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Heidi D; Struve, Carsten; Christensen, Søren B; Krogfelt, Karen A

    2017-01-01

    The antibacterial effect of cranberry juice and the organic acids therein on infection by uropathogenic Escherichia coli was studied in an experimental mouse model of urinary tract infection (UTI). Reduced bacterial counts were found in the bladder ( P < 0.01) of mice drinking fresh cranberry juice. Commercially available cranberry juice cocktail also significantly reduced ( P < 0.01) bacterial populations in the bladder, as did the hydrophilic fraction of cranberry juice ( P < 0.05). Quinic, malic, shikimic, and citric acid, the preponderant organic acids in cranberry juice, were tested in combination and individually. The four organic acids also decreased bacterial levels in the bladder when administered together ( P < 0.001), and so did the combination of malic plus citric acid ( P < 0.01) and malic plus quinic acid ( P < 0.05). The other tested combinations of the organic acids, and the acids administered singly, did not have any effect in the UTI model. Apparently, the antibacterial effect of the organic acids from cranberry juice on UTI can be obtained by administering a combination of malic acid and either citric or quinic acid. This study show for the first time that cranberry juice reduce E. coli colonization of the bladder in an experimental mouse model of urinary tract infection and that the organic acids are active agents.

  16. Gallic acid as a protective antioxidant against anthocyanin degradation and color loss in vitamin-C fortified cranberry juice.

    PubMed

    Roidoung, Sunisa; Dolan, Kirk D; Siddiq, Muhammad

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate different antioxidants for anthocyanin (ACY) retention in vitamin C fortified cranberry juice and assess its quality. Cranberry juice was fortified with 40-80mg/100mL vitamin C and added hesperidin, catechin, and gallic acid at different concentrations. Juice was pasteurized at 85°C for 1min and stored at 23°C for 16days. ACYs, vitamin C, color intensity, and browning index (BI) were evaluated at 2-day intervals. Gallic acid was found to be the most effective antioxidant against ACYs degradation and significantly (p<0.05) increased red color intensity by 37% and ACY concentration by 41%, compared to the control. After 16-day storage, the BI of gallic acid-added juice was significantly lower (0.80 vs 1.00) than the control juice. The outcome of this research provided a potential solution of using gallic acid to preserve a health-beneficial component (ACYs), and endogenous red color in cranberry juice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of daily ingestion of cranberry juice on the pharmacokinetics of warfarin, tizanidine, and midazolam--probes of CYP2C9, CYP1A2, and CYP3A4.

    PubMed

    Lilja, J J; Backman, J T; Neuvonen, P J

    2007-06-01

    Case reports suggest that cranberry juice can increase the anticoagulant effect of warfarin. We investigated the effects of cranberry juice on R-S-warfarin, tizanidine, and midazolam; probes of CYP2C9, CYP1A2, and CYP3A4. Ten healthy volunteers took 200 ml cranberry juice or water t.i.d. for 10 days. On day 5, they ingested 10 mg racemic R-S-warfarin, 1 mg tizanidine, and 0.5 mg midazolam, with juice or water, followed by monitoring of drug concentrations and thromboplastin time. Cranberry juice did not increase the peak plasma concentration or area under concentration-time curve (AUC) of the probe drugs or their metabolites, but slightly decreased (7%; P=0.051) the AUC of S-warfarin. Cranberry juice did not change the anticoagulant effect of warfarin. Daily ingestion of cranberry juice does not inhibit the activities of CYP2C9, CYP1A2, or CYP3A4. A pharmacokinetic mechanism for the cranberry juice-warfarin interaction seems unlikely.

  18. Media acidification by Escherichia coli in the presence of cranberry juice

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The inhibition of Escherichia coli growth in the presence of Vaccinium macrocarpon has been extensively described; however, the mechanisms of this activity are not well characterized. Findings Here, E. coli was grown in media spiked with cranberry juice. The growth rate and media pH were monitored over more than 300 generations. The pH of the growth media was found to decrease during cell growth. This result was unique to media spiked with cranberry juice and was not reproduced through the addition of sugars, proanthocyanidins, or metal chelators to growth media. Conclusion This study demonstrated that factors other than sugars or proanthocyanidins in cranberry juice result in acidification of the growth media. Further studies are necessary for a complete understanding of the antimicrobial activity of cranberry products. PMID:19909515

  19. Inhibition of bacterial adherence by cranberry juice: potential use for the treatment of urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Sobota, A E

    1984-05-01

    Cranberry juice has been widely used for the treatment and prevention of urinary tract infections and is reputed to give symptomatic relief from these infections. Attempts to account for the potential benefit derived from the juice have focused on urine acidification and bacteriostasis. In this investigation it is demonstrated that cranberry juice is a potent inhibitor of bacterial adherence. A total of 77 clinical isolates of Escherichia coli were tested. Cranberry juice inhibited adherence by 75 per cent or more in over 60 per cent of the clinical isolates. Cranberry cocktail was also given to mice in the place of their normal water supply for a period of 14 days. Urine collected from these mice inhibited adherence of E. coli to uroepithelial cells by approximately 80 per cent. Antiadherence activity could also be detected in human urine. Fifteen of 22 subjects showed significant antiadherence activity in the urine 1 to 3 hours after drinking 15 ounces of cranberry cocktail. It is concluded that the reported benefits derived from the use of cranberry juice may be related to its ability to inhibit bacterial adherence.

  20. Anthocyanin profile, antioxidant activity and enzyme inhibiting properties of blueberry and cranberry juices: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Cásedas, Guillermo; Les, Francisco; Gómez-Serranillos, María Pilar; Smith, Carine; López, Víctor

    2017-11-15

    Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) and blueberry (Vaccinium myrtillus) juices are commonly consumed as a source of antioxidants. The aim of this study was to compare bioactivities as well as the differences in the polyphenol content and anthocyanin profile of both juices. Polyphenol and anthocyanin contents were quantified using spectrophotometric and chromatographic methods. Bioassays were carried out in terms of antioxidant properties in cell and cell free systems as well as inhibition of physiological enzymes that are targets involved in the prevention of chronic diseases (monoamine oxidase A, tyrosinase, acetylcholinesterase, α-glucosidase and dipeptidyl peptidase-4). Both juices contained a significant amount of anthocyanins (3.909 mg anthocyanins per mg extract for blueberry juice and 0.398 for cranberry juice) and also exhibited antioxidant properties against DPPH, superoxide radicals and hydrogen peroxide. These juices showed inhibitory effects on the enzymes, showing substantial potential as antioxidant, neuroprotective and anti-hyperglycaemic agents. The total anthocyanin and polyphenol content was higher in blueberry juice, which is indicative of a higher antioxidant activity. Both juices were also able to inhibit monoamine oxidase A, tyrosinase, α-glucosidase and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 in a dose-dependent manner. However, cranberry juice had a greater capacity than blueberry juice as an α-glucosidase inhibitor, revealing a similar activity to acarbose.

  1. Adhesion of Asaia bogorensis to Glass and Polystyrene in the Presence of Cranberry Juice.

    PubMed

    Antolak, Hubert; Kregiel, Dorota; Czyzowska, Agata

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the adhesion abilities of the acetic acid bacterium Asaia bogorensis to glass and polystyrene in the presence of American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) juice. The strain of A. bogorensis used was isolated from spoiled commercial fruit-flavored drinking water. The cranberry juice was analyzed for polyphenols, organic acids, and carbohydrates using high-performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry techniques. The adhesive abilities of bacterial cells in culture medium supplemented with cranberry juice were determined using luminometry and microscopy. The viability of adhered and planktonic bacterial cells was determined by the plate count method, and the relative adhesion coefficient was calculated. This strain of A. bogorensis was characterized by strong adhesion properties that were dependent upon the type of surface. The highest level of cell adhesion was found on the polystyrene. However, in the presence of 10% cranberry juice, attachment of bacterial cells was three times lower. Chemical analysis of juice revealed the presence of sugars, organic acids, and anthocyanins, which were identified as galactosides, glucosides, and arabinosides of cyanidin and peonidin. A-type proanthocyanidins responsible for the antiadhesion properties of V. macrocarpon also were detected.

  2. Cranberry juice for prophylaxis of urinary tract infections--conclusions from clinical experience and research.

    PubMed

    Nowack, Rainer; Schmitt, Wilhelm

    2008-09-01

    Cranberry juice (Vaccinium macrocarpon) is a widely used and recommended North-American folk remedy for prophylaxis of urinary tract infections (UTI). Clinical trials have documented its efficacy in women with recurrent UTI, but so far not in other groups of patients. The composition of effective cranberry products and its dosage in UTI prophylaxis have not been defined. Intriguing experimental research has identified an anti-adhesive mechanism of cranberry juice that prevents docking of bacteria on host tissues. This efficacy mechanism can be traced in patients' urine following oral intake of cranberry products and appears to be due to proanthocyanidins with an A-type linkage of flavanols. The application of this anti-adhesion mechanism of cranberry-proanthocyandins is currently also investigated in other common diseases of bacterial pathogenesis, for example Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis and dental caries/periodontal disease. The use of cranberry products appears to be safe and provide additional benefits by anti-oxidant and cholesterol-lowering activity.

  3. Effects of cranberry juice consumption on vascular function in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Dohadwala, Mustali M; Holbrook, Monika; Hamburg, Naomi M; Shenouda, Sherene M; Chung, William B; Titas, Megan; Kluge, Matthew A; Wang, Na; Palmisano, Joseph; Milbury, Paul E; Blumberg, Jeffrey B; Vita, Joseph A

    2011-05-01

    Cranberry juice contains polyphenolic compounds that could improve endothelial function and reduce cardiovascular disease risk. The objective was to examine the effects of cranberry juice on vascular function in subjects with coronary artery disease. We completed an acute pilot study with no placebo (n = 15) and a chronic placebo-controlled crossover study (n = 44) that examined the effects of cranberry juice on vascular function in subjects with coronary artery disease. In the chronic crossover study, subjects with coronary heart disease consumed a research preparation of double-strength cranberry juice (54% juice, 835 mg total polyphenols, and 94 mg anthocyanins) or a matched placebo beverage (480 mL/d) for 4 wk each with a 2-wk rest period between beverages. Beverage order was randomly assigned, and participants refrained from consuming other flavonoid-containing beverages during the study. Vascular function was measured before and after each beverage, with follow-up testing ≥12 h after consumption of the last beverage. Mean (±SD) carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, a measure of central aortic stiffness, decreased after cranberry juice (8.3 ± 2.3 to 7.8 ± 2.2 m/s) in contrast with an increase after placebo (8.0 ± 2.0 to 8.4 ± 2.8 m/s) (P = 0.003). Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation, digital pulse amplitude tonometry, blood pressure, and carotid-radial pulse wave velocity did not change. In the uncontrolled pilot study, we observed improved brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (7.7 ± 2.9% to 8.7 ± 3.1%, P = 0.01) and digital pulse amplitude tonometry ratio (0.10 ± 0.12 to 0.23 ± 0.16, P = 0.001) 4 h after consumption of a single 480-mL portion of cranberry juice. Chronic cranberry juice consumption reduced carotid femoral pulse wave velocity-a clinically relevant measure of arterial stiffness. The uncontrolled pilot study suggested an acute benefit; however, no chronic effect on measures of endothelial vasodilator function was found. This trial

  4. Effects of cranberry juice consumption on vascular function in patients with coronary artery disease123

    PubMed Central

    Dohadwala, Mustali M; Holbrook, Monika; Hamburg, Naomi M; Shenouda, Sherene M; Chung, William B; Titas, Megan; Kluge, Matthew A; Wang, Na; Palmisano, Joseph; Milbury, Paul E; Blumberg, Jeffrey B; Vita, Joseph A

    2011-01-01

    Background: Cranberry juice contains polyphenolic compounds that could improve endothelial function and reduce cardiovascular disease risk. Objective: The objective was to examine the effects of cranberry juice on vascular function in subjects with coronary artery disease. Design: We completed an acute pilot study with no placebo (n = 15) and a chronic placebo-controlled crossover study (n = 44) that examined the effects of cranberry juice on vascular function in subjects with coronary artery disease. Results: In the chronic crossover study, subjects with coronary heart disease consumed a research preparation of double-strength cranberry juice (54% juice, 835 mg total polyphenols, and 94 mg anthocyanins) or a matched placebo beverage (480 mL/d) for 4 wk each with a 2-wk rest period between beverages. Beverage order was randomly assigned, and participants refrained from consuming other flavonoid-containing beverages during the study. Vascular function was measured before and after each beverage, with follow-up testing ≥12 h after consumption of the last beverage. Mean (±SD) carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, a measure of central aortic stiffness, decreased after cranberry juice (8.3 ± 2.3 to 7.8 ± 2.2 m/s) in contrast with an increase after placebo (8.0 ± 2.0 to 8.4 ± 2.8 m/s) (P = 0.003). Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation, digital pulse amplitude tonometry, blood pressure, and carotid-radial pulse wave velocity did not change. In the uncontrolled pilot study, we observed improved brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (7.7 ± 2.9% to 8.7 ± 3.1%, P = 0.01) and digital pulse amplitude tonometry ratio (0.10 ± 0.12 to 0.23 ± 0.16, P = 0.001) 4 h after consumption of a single 480-mL portion of cranberry juice. Conclusions: Chronic cranberry juice consumption reduced carotid femoral pulse wave velocity—a clinically relevant measure of arterial stiffness. The uncontrolled pilot study suggested an acute benefit; however, no chronic effect on measures of

  5. Cranberry juice capsules and urinary tract infection after surgery: results of a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Foxman, Betsy; Cronenwett, Anna E W; Spino, Cathie; Berger, Mitchell B; Morgan, Daniel M

    2015-08-01

    The risk of urinary tract infection (UTI) among women undergoing elective gynecological surgery during which a catheter is placed is high: 10-64% following catheter removal. We conducted the first randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of the therapeutic efficacy of cranberry juice capsules in preventing UTI after surgery. We recruited patients from a single hospital between August 2011 and January 2013. Eligible participants were undergoing elective gynecological surgery that did not involve a fistula repair or vaginal mesh removal. One hundred sixty patients were randomized and received 2 cranberry juice capsules 2 times a day, equivalent to 2 8 ounce servings of cranberry juice, for 6 weeks after surgery or matching placebo. The primary endpoint was the proportion of participants who experienced clinically diagnosed and treated UTI with or without positive urine culture. Kaplan-Meier plots and log rank tests compared the 2 treatment groups. The occurrence of UTI was significantly lower in the cranberry treatment group compared with the placebo group (15 of 80 [19%] vs 30 of 80 [38%]; odds ratio, 0.38; 95% confidence interval, 0.19-0.79; P = .008). After adjustment for known confounders, including the frequency of intermittent self-catheterization in the postoperative period, the protective effects of cranberry remained (odds ratio, 0.42; 95% confidence interval, 0.18-0.94). There were no treatment differences in the incidence of adverse events, including gastrointestinal upset (56% vs 61% for cranberry vs placebo). Among women undergoing elective benign gynecological surgery involving urinary catheterization, the use of cranberry extract capsules during the postoperative period reduced the rate of UTI by half. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Cranberry juice capsules and urinary tract infection post surgery: Results of a randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Foxman, Betsy; Cronenwett, Ms. Anna E.W.; Spino, Cathie; Berger, Mitchell B.; Morgan, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The risk of urinary tract infection (UTI) among women undergoing elective gynecologic surgery where a catheter is placed is high: 10 to 64% following catheter removal. We conducted the first randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of the therapeutic efficacy of cranberry juice capsules in preventing UTI post surgery. Study Design We recruited patients from a single hospital between August 2011 and January 2013. Eligible participants were undergoing elective gynecologic surgery that did not involve a fistula repair or vaginal mesh removal. 160 patients were randomized and received two cranberry juice capsules two times a day, equivalent to two 8-ounce servings of cranberry juice, for 6 weeks after surgery, or matching placebo. The primary endpoint was the proportion of participants who experienced clinically-diagnosed and treated UTI with or without positive urine culture. Kaplan-Meier plots and logrank tests compared the two treatment groups. Results The occurrence of UTI was significantly lower in the cranberry treatment group compared to the placebo group (15/80 (19%) versus 30/80 (38%); OR=0.38; 95% CI: 0.19, 0.79; p=0.008). After adjustment for known confounders, including frequency of intermittent self-catheterization in the post- operative period, the protective effects of cranberry remained (OR=0.42; 95% CI: 0.18, 0.94). There were no treatment differences in the incidence of adverse events; including gastrointestinal upset (56% vs. 61% for cranberry vs. placebo). Conclusions Among women undergoing elective benign gynecologic surgery involving urinary catheterization, use of cranberry extract tablets during the postoperative period reduced the rate of UTI by half. PMID:25882919

  7. Estimation of kinetic parameters of anthocyanins and color degradation in vitamin C fortified cranberry juice during storage.

    PubMed

    Roidoung, Sunisa; Dolan, Kirk D; Siddiq, Muhammad

    2017-04-01

    Color degradation in cranberry juice during storage is the most common consumer complaint. To enhance nutritional quality, juice is typically fortified with vitamin C. This study determined effect of gallic acid, a natural antioxidant, for the preservation of anthocyanins (ACYs) and color, and estimated kinetics of ACYs and color degradation. Juice, fortified with 40-80mg/100mL vitamin C and 0-320mg/100mL gallic acid, was pasteurized at 85°C for 1min and stored at 23°C for 16days. Total monomeric anthocyanins and red color intensity were evaluated spectrophotometrically and data were used to determine degradation rate constants (k values) and order of reaction (n) of ACYs and color. Due to high correlation, k and n could not be estimated simultaneously. To overcome this difficulty, both n and k were held at different constant values in separate analyses to allow accurate estimation of each. Parameters n and k were modeled empirically as functions of vitamin C, and of vitamin C and gallic acid, respectively. Reaction order n ranged from 1.2 to 4.4, and decreased with increasing vitamin C concentration. The final model offers an effective tool that could be used for predicting ACYs and color retention in cranberry juice during storage. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. UHPLC-Q-Orbitrap-HRMS-based global metabolomics reveal metabolome modifications in plasma of young women after cranberry juice consumption.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiyan; Garrett, Timothy J; Su, Zhihua; Khoo, Christina; Gu, Liwei

    2017-07-01

    Plasma metabolome in young women following cranberry juice consumption were investigated using a global UHPLC-Q-Orbitrap-HRMS approach. Seventeen female college students, between 21 and 29 years old, were given either cranberry juice or apple juice for three days using a cross-over design. Plasma samples were collected before and after juice consumption. Plasma metabolomes were analyzed using UHPLC-Q-Orbitrap-HRMS followed by orthogonal partial least squares-discriminant analyses (OPLS-DA). S-plot was used to identify discriminant metabolites. Validated OPLS-DA analyses showed that the plasma metabolome in young women, including both exogenous and endogenous metabolites, were altered following cranberry juice consumption. Cranberry juice caused increases of exogenous metabolites including quinic acid, vanilloloside, catechol sulfate, 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl ethanol sulfate, coumaric acid sulfate, ferulic acid sulfate, 5-(trihydroxphenyl)-gamma-valerolactone, 3-(hydroxyphenyl)proponic acid, hydroxyphenylacetic acid and trihydroxybenzoic acid. In addition, the plasma levels of endogenous metabolites including citramalic acid, aconitic acid, hydroxyoctadecanoic acid, hippuric acid, 2-hydroxyhippuric acid, vanilloylglycine, 4-acetamido-2-aminobutanoic acid, dihydroxyquinoline, and glycerol 3-phosphate were increased in women following cranberry juice consumption. The metabolic differences and discriminant metabolites observed in this study may serve as biomarkers of cranberry juice consumption and explain its health promoting properties in human. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Modulation of Helicobacter pylori colonization with cranberry juice and Lactobacillus johnsonii La1 in children.

    PubMed

    Gotteland, Martin; Andrews, Monica; Toledo, Marcela; Muñoz, Loreto; Caceres, Paola; Anziani, Alyerina; Wittig, Emma; Speisky, Hernan; Salazar, Gabriela

    2008-05-01

    Probiotics and cranberry have been shown to inhibit Helicobacter pylori in vitro owing to bacteriocin production and high levels of proanthocyanidins, respectively. These effects have been confirmed in clinical trials with H. pylori-positive subjects. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether regular intake of cranberry juice and the probiotic Lactobacillus johnsonii La1 (La1) may result in an additive or synergistic inhibition of H. pylori in colonized children. A multicentric, randomized, controlled, double-blind trial was carried out in 295 asymptomatic children (6-16 y of age) who tested positive for H. pylori by (13)C-urea breath test (UBT). Subjects were allocated in four groups: cranberry juice/La1 (CB/La1), placebo juice/La1 (La1), cranberry juice/heat-killed La1 (CB), and placebo juice/heat-killed La1 (control). Cranberry juice (200 mL) and La1 product (80 mL) were given daily for 3 wk, after which a second UBT was carried out. A third UBT was done after a 1-mo washout in those children who tested negative in the second UBT. Two hundred seventy-one children completed the treatment period (dropout 8.1%). Helicobacter pylori eradication rates significantly differed in the four groups: 1.5% in the control group compared with 14.9%, 16.9%, and 22.9% in the La1, CB, and CB/La1 groups, respectively (P < 0.01); the latter group showed a slight but not significant increase when compared with the other treated groups. The third UBT was carried out only in 19 of the 38 children who tested negative in the second UBT and H. pylori was detected in 80% of them. These results suggest that regular intake of cranberry juice or La1 may be useful in the management of asymptomatic children colonized by H. pylori; however, no synergistic inhibitory effects on H. pylori colonization were observed when both foodstuffs were simultaneously consumed.

  10. Recurrent urinary tract infection and urinary Escherichia coli in women ingesting cranberry juice daily: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, Ann E; Dziura, James; Hooton, Thomas M; Cox, Marsha E; Yarova-Yarovaya, Yuliya; Chen, Shu; Gupta, Kalpana

    2012-02-01

    To compare the time to urinary tract infection (UTI) and the rates of asymptomatic bacteriuria and urinary P-fimbriated Escherichia coli during a 6-month period in women ingesting cranberry vs placebo juice daily. Premenopausal women with a history of recent UTI were enrolled from November 16, 2005, through December 31, 2008, at 2 centers and randomized to 1 of 3 arms: 4 oz of cranberry juice daily, 8 oz of cranberry juice daily, or placebo juice. Time to UTI (symptoms plus pyuria) was the main outcome. Asymptomatic bacteriuria, adherence, and adverse effects were assessed at monthly visits. A total of 176 participants were randomized (120 to cranberry juice and 56 to placebo) and followed up for a median of 168 days. The cumulative rate of UTI was 0.29 in the cranberry juice group and 0.37 in the placebo group (P=.82). The adjusted hazard ratio for UTI in the cranberry juice group vs the placebo group was 0.68 (95% confidence interval, 0.33-1.39; P=.29). The proportion of women with P-fimbriated urinary E coli isolates during the intervention phase was 10 of 23 (43.5%) in the cranberry juice group and 8 of 10 (80.0%) in the placebo group (P=.07). The mean dose adherence was 91.8% and 90.3% in the cranberry juice group vs the placebo group. Minor adverse effects were reported by 24.2% of those in the cranberry juice group and 12.5% in the placebo group (P=.07). Cranberry juice did not significantly reduce UTI risk compared with placebo. The potential protective effect we observed is consistent with previous studies and warrants confirmation in larger, well-powered studies of women with recurrent UTI. The concurrent reduction in urinary P-fimbriated E coli strains supports the biological plausibility of cranberry activity. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00128128. Copyright © 2012 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. American cranberry products: proanthocyanidin purification and concentrations

    American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) phenolics have important roles within the plant; they also contribute to harvest and product quality, and have potential human health benefits. Proanthocyanidins (phenolic polymers) may aid in preventing urinary tract infections (UTIs), although litera...

  12. Daily cranberry juice for the prevention of asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy: A randomized, controlled pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Wing, Deborah A.; Rumney, Pamela J.; Preslicka, Christine; Chung, Judith H.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To compare daily cranberry juice cocktail to placebo during pregnancy on asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) and symptomatic urinary tract infections (UTIs). Study Design 188 women were randomized to cranberry or placebo in three treatment arms: A: Cranberry three times daily (n=58), B: Cranberry at breakfast, then placebo at lunch and dinner (n=67), C. Placebo three times daily (n=63). After 27.7% (52/188) of the subjects were enrolled, the dosing regimens were changed to twice daily dosing to improve compliance. Results There were 27 UTIs in 18 subjects in this cohort: 6 in 4 subjects in Group A, 10 in 7 subjects in Group B, and 11 in 7 subjects in Group C, p=0.71. There were 57% and 41% reductions in the frequency of ASB and all UTIs in the multiple daily dosing group, however, this study was not sufficiently powered at the alpha 0.05 level (CI 0.14–1.39 and 0.22–1.60, respectively, incidence rate ratios). 73/188 (38.8%) subjects withdrew, most for gastrointestinal upset. Conclusion These data suggest there may be a protective effect of cranberry ingestion against ASB and symptomatic UTIs in pregnancy. Further studies are planned to evaluate this effect. PMID:18707726

  13. Daily cranberry juice for the prevention of asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy: a randomized, controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    Wing, Deborah A; Rumney, Pamela J; Preslicka, Christine W; Chung, Judith H

    2008-10-01

    We compared the effects of daily cranberry juice cocktail to those of placebo during pregnancy on asymptomatic bacteriuria and symptomatic urinary tract infections. A total of 188 women were randomized to cranberry or placebo in 3 treatment arms of A-cranberry 3 times daily (58), B-cranberry at breakfast then placebo at lunch and dinner (67), and C-placebo 3 times daily (63). After 27.7% (52 of 188) of the subjects were enrolled in the study the dosing regimens were changed to twice daily dosing to improve compliance. There were 27 urinary tract infections in 18 subjects in this cohort, with 6 in 4 group A subjects, 10 in 7 group B subjects and 11 in 7 group C subjects (p = 0.71). There was a 57% and 41% reduction in the frequency of asymptomatic bacteriuria and all urinary tract infections, respectively, in the multiple daily dosing group. However, this study was not sufficiently powered at the alpha 0.05 level (CI 0.14-1.39 and 0.22-1.60, respectively, incidence rate ratios). Of 188 subjects 73 (38.8%) withdrew, most for gastrointestinal upset. These data suggest there may be a protective effect of cranberry ingestion against asymptomatic bacteriuria and symptomatic urinary tract infections in pregnancy. Further studies are planned to evaluate this effect.

  14. Total quality index of ultrasound-treated blueberry and cranberry juices and nectars.

    PubMed

    Režek Jambrak, Anet; Šimunek, Marina; Djekic, Ilija

    2018-01-01

    The influence of ultrasound in combination with elevated temperature (thermosonication) is important in inactivation effects on microorganisms. However, overall quality of these products can be deteriorated. The aim of this study was to examine the use of a single quality index in evaluating effects of ultrasound technology on quality characteristics of blueberry and cranberry juices and nectars. For the purpose of this study based on 10 quality parameters, two mathematical models for calculating a single total quality index have been introduced. Samples were treated according to the experimental design, with high power ultrasound frequency of 20 kHz under various conditions (treatment time: 3, 6 and 9 min, sample temperature: 20 ℃, for thermosonication: 40 and 60 ℃ and amplitude: 60, 90 and 120 µm). Mathematical index of total quality index in order to evaluate total quality of ultrasound-treated juices and nectars was established. For cranberry juices, treatments '11' (amplitude 120 µm) and '16' (amplitude 60 µm) both for 9 min and the temperature of 20 ℃ were best scored for both models. Treatment '6' (amplitude 120 µm, 3 min treatment time and the sample temperature of 20 ℃) for cranberry nectars was among the best for both models. Ultrasound treatments '6' of amplitude 120 µm, 3 min and the temperature of 20 ℃ and '11' same amplitude 120 µm and temperature, but 9 min were best scored blueberry juices for both models. Blueberry nectar had best total quality index for treatments '5' (amplitude 120 µm, 6 min treatment time and the sample temperature of 40 ℃) and '6' (amplitude 120 µm, 3 min treatment time and the sample temperature of 20 ℃).

  15. Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using lingonberry and cranberry juices and their antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Puišo, Judita; Jonkuvienė, Dovilė; Mačionienė, Irena; Šalomskienė, Joana; Jasutienė, Ina; Kondrotas, Rokas

    2014-09-01

    In this study lingonberry and cranberry juices were used for silver nanoparticle synthesis. The berry juices were characterized by total phenolics, total anthocyanins and benzoic acid content, respectively 1.9-2.7mg/ml, 55.2-83.4mg/l and 590.8-889.2mg/l. The synthesis of silver nanoparticles was performed at room temperature assisting in solutions irradiated by ultraviolet for 30min. Ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy and microscopy confirmed the formation of nanoparticles as well as the dark red color of colloid of silver samples showed the formation of stable nanoparticles. Broad localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) peaks in UV-vis spectra indicated the formation of polydispersive silver nanoparticles and LSPR was observed at 485nm and 520nm for the silver nanoparticles synthesis using lingonberry and cranberry juices, respectively. The antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles was determined against the reference strains of microorganisms that could be found in food products: Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Salmonella typhimurium ATCC 13076, Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19111, Bacillus cereus ATCC 11778, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633, Candida albicans ATCC 10231 and foodborne B. cereus producing and non-producing enterotoxins. Silver nanoparticles showed a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity and were most active against S. aureus ATCC 25923, B. subtilis ATCC 6633 and B. cereus ATCC 11778 reference cultures, and less active against C. albicans ATCC 10231 and foodborne B. cereus. It can be concluded that lingonberry and cranberry juices could be used as bioreductants for silver ions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Influence of high power ultrasound on selected moulds, yeasts and Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris in apple, cranberry and blueberry juice and nectar.

    PubMed

    Režek Jambrak, Anet; Šimunek, Marina; Evačić, Silva; Markov, Ksenija; Smoljanić, Goran; Frece, Jadranka

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of non-thermal technology, high power ultrasound (HPU) on inactivation of Aspergillus ochraceus 318, Penicillium expansum 565, Rhodotorula sp. 74, Saccharomyces cerevisiae 5 and Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris DSM 3922 in clear juices and nectars from apple, blueberry and cranberry juice concentrate. Inoculated juice and nectars were treated by high power ultrasound (20kHz) according to procedure set by central composite design (CCD). Three operational parameters, amplitude (60, 90 and 120μm), temperature (20, 40 and 60°C), and treatment time (3, 6 or 9min) were varied in order to observe the influence of ultrasound and combination of ultrasound and slight heating (thermosonication) on growth and inactivation of selected microorganisms. Number of vegetative cells of A. acidoterrestris DSM 3922 were not significantly reduced by high power ultrasound (p>0.05), except in apple juice, where statistical significant (p<0.05) influence of quadratic interaction of amplitude on bacteria reduction were observed. In all samples of fruit juices and nectars in terms of ultrasonic treatment at 60°C and times of 3, 6 and 9min, regardless of the value of the amplitude, complete inactivation of the growth of yeasts and moulds were achieved, while at 20 and 40°C it is not observed. The value of reduction of cells of selected yeasts and moulds for ultrasound treatments at 60°C and the duration of the 3, 6 and 9min ranged from 3.556 to 5.934 log units, depending on the initial number of selected yeasts and moulds before treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Concentrations and export of phosphorus during the cranberry harvest flood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, C. D.; Kleinman, P. J. A.; DeMoranville, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    The cranberry industry occupies a unique place in the history of southeastern Massachusetts, where commercial production of cranberries has existed for nearly two centuries. Currently, water quality represents one of the greatest challenges facing the industry, with federal regulations limiting the use of phosphorus (P) fertilizer via total maximum daily load (TMDL) implementation. In response to environmental concerns, cranberry growers have decreased their annual P fertilizer application rates by a factor of four, from ~40 kg P ha-1 in the early 1970s to ~10 kg P ha-1 in 2013. Despite these industry-wide reductions, legacy P derived from periods of high P fertilizer application likely make cranberry farms non-point sources of P to surface water. In this study, concentrations and export of P were determined to characterize the sources and transport pathways of P in harvest floodwaters for four cranberry farms. Among the sites, a general pattern emerged of sharp increases in concentrations of total dissolved P (TDP) and total particulate P (TPP) during the later part of the flood release. Differences in the exact timing of increases in TDP and TPP were interpreted to represent distinct transport pathways: (1) near-surface transport of TDP derived from soils, and (2) subsurface transport of TPP resulting from resuspension and erosion of ditch sediments. Values of total P (TP = TDP + TPP) export were relatively low for three sites (0.3-0.8 kg P ha-1) and high for one site (5.3 kg P ha-1). Export of TP from the high-P site accounted for roughly half of the annual value allocated to cranberry farms in a recent TMDL. Historical P fertilizer records from 2005-2013 showed similar present-day application rates among the sites (~10 kg P ha-1), but higher rates between 2005 and 2007 for the high-P site (30 vs. 10 kg P ha-1). Although other factors likely contribute, legacy P derived from past fertilizer applications imparts an important control on P export in cranberry

  18. Survival of hepatitis A virus and Aichi virus in cranberry-based juices at refrigeration (4 °C).

    PubMed

    Sewlikar, Snigdha; D'Souza, Doris H

    2017-04-01

    Viral foodborne illness continues to be a health-concern globally, with numerous fruit and juice outbreaks of Hepatitis A virus (HAV) reported worldwide. Aichi virus (AiV) is an emerging pathogen with limited epidemiological data. Both, HAV and AiV are resistant to low pH and can survive under adverse environmental conditions leading to transmission ease. The objective of this study was to evaluate the survival of HAV and AiV in commercially-available cranberry-based juices (Cranberry juice cocktail, CJ and a 100% juice with cranberry, MJ) over 21 days at refrigeration (4 °C). Equal volumes of juice was mixed with each virus individually (final titer of 6 log PFU/mL) and stored at refrigeration over 21 days. At each time interval, the inoculated juices were serially diluted in cell culture media and infectious virus survival was determined by standard plaque assays. Each experiment was carried out in duplicate and replicated thrice. Reductions of 0.72 ± 0.06 (after day 1) to 2.3 ± 0.18 log PFU/mL (after day 21) and 0.63 ± 0.02 (after day 1) to 1.84 ± 0.14 log PFU/mL (after day 21) were obtained for AiV with MJ and CJ, respectively. Reductions ranging from 0.67 ± 0.03 (after day 1) to 1.09 ± 0.1 log PFU/mL (after day 21) and 0.93 ± 0.27 (after day1) to 1.49 ± 0.18 log PFU/mL (after day 21) were obtained for HAV at refrigeration in MJ and CJ, respectively. HAV showed greater survival than AiV in these juices over refrigerated storage. These results provide survival data of HAV and AiV in cranberry-based juices that can be used in risk-modeling and risk assessment studies. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Cranberry Juice Fails to Prevent Recurrent Urinary Tract Infection: Results From a Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa-Cesnik, Cibele; Brown, Morton B.; Buxton, Miatta; Zhang, Lixin; DeBusscher, Joan

    2011-01-01

    Background. A number of observational studies and a few small or open randomized clinical trials suggest that the American cranberry may decrease incidence of recurring urinary tract infection (UTI). Methods. We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of the effects of cranberry on risk of recurring UTI among 319 college women presenting with an acute UTI. Participants were followed up until a second UTI or for 6 months, whichever came first. A UTI was defined on the basis of the combination of symptoms and a urine culture positive for a known uropathogen. The study was designed to detect a 2-fold difference between treated and placebo groups, as was detected in unblinded trials. We assumed 30% of participants would experience a UTI during the follow-up period. Results. Overall, the recurrence rate was 16.9% (95% confidence interval, 12.8%–21.0%), and the distribution of the recurrences was similar between study groups, with the active cranberry group presenting a slightly higher recurrence rate (20.0% vs 14.0%). The presence of urinary symptoms at 3 days, 1–2 weeks, and at ≥1 month was similar between study groups, with overall no marked differences. Conclusions. Among otherwise healthy college women with an acute UTI, those drinking 8 oz of 27% cranberry juice twice daily did not experience a decrease in the 6-month incidence of a second UTI, compared with those drinking a placebo. PMID:21148516

  20. Anthocyanins are bioavailable in humans following an acute dose of cranberry juice

    Research suggests that anthocyanins from berry fruit may affect a variety of physiological responses, including endothelial function, but little information is available regarding the pharmacokinetics of these flavonoids in humans. To determine the pharmacokinetics of cranberry anthocyanins a study ...

  1. Extraction and Quantitation of FD&C Red Dye #40 from Beverages Containing Cranberry Juice: A College-Level Analytical Chemistry Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossi, Henry F., III; Rizzo, Jacqueline; Zimmerman, Devon C.; Usher, Karyn M.

    2012-01-01

    A chemical separation experiment can be an interesting addition to an introductory analytical chemistry laboratory course. We have developed an experiment to extract FD&C Red Dye #40 from beverages containing cranberry juice. After extraction, the dye is quantified using colorimetry. The experiment gives students hands-on experience in using solid…

  2. 21 CFR 146.150 - Canned concentrated orange juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... dilution ratio greater than 3 plus 1 is “Canned concentrated orange juice, ___ plus 1” or “Canned orange juice concentrate, ___ plus 1”, the blank being filled in with the whole number showing the dilution ratio; for example, “Canned orange juice concentrate, 4 plus 1”. However, where the label bears...

  3. 21 CFR 146.150 - Canned concentrated orange juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... dilution ratio greater than 3 plus 1 is “Canned concentrated orange juice, ___ plus 1” or “Canned orange juice concentrate, ___ plus 1”, the blank being filled in with the whole number showing the dilution ratio; for example, “Canned orange juice concentrate, 4 plus 1”. However, where the label bears...

  4. 21 CFR 146.150 - Canned concentrated orange juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... dilution ratio greater than 3 plus 1 is “Canned concentrated orange juice, ___ plus 1” or “Canned orange juice concentrate, ___ plus 1”, the blank being filled in with the whole number showing the dilution ratio; for example, “Canned orange juice concentrate, 4 plus 1”. However, where the label bears...

  5. 21 CFR 146.150 - Canned concentrated orange juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... dilution ratio greater than 3 plus 1 is “Canned concentrated orange juice, ___ plus 1” or “Canned orange juice concentrate, ___ plus 1”, the blank being filled in with the whole number showing the dilution ratio; for example, “Canned orange juice concentrate, 4 plus 1”. However, where the label bears...

  6. 21 CFR 146.150 - Canned concentrated orange juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... dilution ratio greater than 3 plus 1 is “Canned concentrated orange juice, ___ plus 1” or “Canned orange juice concentrate, ___ plus 1”, the blank being filled in with the whole number showing the dilution ratio; for example, “Canned orange juice concentrate, 4 plus 1”. However, where the label bears...

  7. 21 CFR 146.145 - Orange juice from concentrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... sweetening ingredients referred to in paragraph (a) of this section are sugar, sugar sirup, invert sugar... Juices and Beverages § 146.145 Orange juice from concentrate. (a) Orange juice from concentrate is the...), orange oil, orange pulp, and one or more of the sweetening ingredients listed in paragraph (b) of this...

  8. 21 CFR 146.145 - Orange juice from concentrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... sweetening ingredients referred to in paragraph (a) of this section are sugar, sugar sirup, invert sugar... Juices and Beverages § 146.145 Orange juice from concentrate. (a) Orange juice from concentrate is the...), orange oil, orange pulp, and one or more of the sweetening ingredients listed in paragraph (b) of this...

  9. 21 CFR 146.145 - Orange juice from concentrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... sweetening ingredients referred to in paragraph (a) of this section are sugar, sugar sirup, invert sugar... Juices and Beverages § 146.145 Orange juice from concentrate. (a) Orange juice from concentrate is the...), orange oil, orange pulp, and one or more of the sweetening ingredients listed in paragraph (b) of this...

  10. 21 CFR 146.145 - Orange juice from concentrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... sweetening ingredients referred to in paragraph (a) of this section are sugar, sugar sirup, invert sugar... Juices and Beverages § 146.145 Orange juice from concentrate. (a) Orange juice from concentrate is the...), orange oil, orange pulp, and one or more of the sweetening ingredients listed in paragraph (b) of this...

  11. 21 CFR 146.145 - Orange juice from concentrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... sweetening ingredients referred to in paragraph (a) of this section are sugar, sugar sirup, invert sugar... Juices and Beverages § 146.145 Orange juice from concentrate. (a) Orange juice from concentrate is the...), orange oil, orange pulp, and one or more of the sweetening ingredients listed in paragraph (b) of this...

  12. Stable Binding of Alternative Protein-enriched Food Matrices with Concentrated Cranberry Bioflavonoids for Functional Food Applications

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Mary H.; Guzman, Ivette; Roopchand, Diana E.; Moskal, Kristin; Cheng, Diana M.; Pogrebnyak, Natasha; Raskin, Ilya; Howell, Amy; Lila, Mary Ann

    2013-01-01

    Defatted soy flour (DSF), soy protein isolate (SPI), hemp protein isolate (HPI), medium roast peanut flour (MPF) and pea protein isolate (PPI) stably bind and concentrate cranberry (CB) polyphenols, creating protein/polyphenol-enriched matrices. Proanthocyanidins (PAC) in the enriched matrices ranged from 20.75 mg/g (CB-HPI) to 10.68 mg/g (CB-SPI). Anthocyanins (ANC) ranged from 3.19 mg/g (CB-DSF) to 1.68 mg/g (CB-SPI), while total phenolics (TP) ranged from 37.61 mg/g (CB-HPI) to 21.29 mg/g (CB-SPI). LC-MS indicated that the enriched matrices contained all identifiable ANC, PAC and flavonols present in CB juice. Complexation with SPI stabilized and preserved the integrity of the CB polyphenolic components for at least 15 weeks at 37 °C. PAC isolated from enriched matrices demonstrated comparable anti-adhesion bioactivity to PAC isolated directly from CB juice (MIC 0.4 to 0.16 mg/mL), indicating their potential utility for maintenance of urinary tract health. Approximately 1.0 g of polyphenol-enriched matrix delivered the same amount of PAC available in one cup (300 mL) of commercial CB juice cocktail; which has been shown clinically to be the prophylactic dose for reducing recurring urinary tract infections. CB-SPI inhibited gram- positive and gram-negative bacterial growth. Nutritional and sensory analyses indicated that the targeted CB-matrix combinations have high potential for incorporation in functional food formulations. PMID:23786629

  13. Consumption of a cranberry juice beverage lowered the number of clinical urinary tract infection episodes in women with a recent history of urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Maki, Kevin C; Kaspar, Kerrie L; Khoo, Christina; Derrig, Linda H; Schild, Arianne L; Gupta, Kalpana

    2016-06-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common bacterial infections and are often treated with antibiotics. Concerns about multidrug-resistant uropathogens have pointed to the need for safe and effective UTI-prevention strategies such as cranberry consumption. We assessed the effects of the consumption of a cranberry beverage on episodes of clinical UTIs. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter clinical trial, women with a history of a recent UTI were assigned to consume one 240-mL serving of cranberry beverage/d (n = 185) or a placebo (n = 188) beverage for 24 wk. The primary outcome was the clinical UTI incidence density, which was defined as the total number of clinical UTI events (including multiple events per subject when applicable) per unit of observation time. The dates of the random assignment of the first subject and the last subject's final visit were February 2013 and March 2015, respectively. The mean age was 40.9 y, and characteristics were similar in both groups. Compliance with study product consumption was 98%, and 86% of subjects completed the treatment period in both groups. There were 39 investigator-diagnosed episodes of clinical UTI in the cranberry group compared with 67 episodes in the placebo group (antibiotic use-adjusted incidence rate ratio: 0.61; 95% CI: 0.41, 0.91; P = 0.016). Clinical UTI with pyuria was also significantly reduced (incidence rate ratio: 0.63; 95% CI: 0.40, 0.97; P = 0.037). One clinical UTI event was prevented for every 3.2 woman-years (95% CI: 2.0, 13.1 woman-years) of the cranberry intervention. The time to UTI with culture positivity did not differ significantly between groups (HR: 0.97; 95% CI: 0.56, 1.67; P = 0.914). The consumption of a cranberry juice beverage lowered the number of clinical UTI episodes in women with a recent history of UTI. This study was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01776021. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  14. 21 CFR 146.146 - Frozen concentrated orange juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146.146 Frozen concentrated orange juice. (a) Frozen concentrated orange... sweetening ingredients specified in paragraph (b) of this section may be added to adjust the final... any added optional sweetening ingredients. The dilution ratio shall be not less than 3 plus 1. For the...

  15. 21 CFR 146.146 - Frozen concentrated orange juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146.146 Frozen concentrated orange juice. (a) Frozen concentrated orange... sweetening ingredients specified in paragraph (b) of this section may be added to adjust the final... any added optional sweetening ingredients. The dilution ratio shall be not less than 3 plus 1. For the...

  16. 21 CFR 146.146 - Frozen concentrated orange juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146.146 Frozen concentrated orange juice. (a) Frozen concentrated orange... sweetening ingredients specified in paragraph (b) of this section may be added to adjust the final... any added optional sweetening ingredients. The dilution ratio shall be not less than 3 plus 1. For the...

  17. 21 CFR 146.146 - Frozen concentrated orange juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146.146 Frozen concentrated orange juice. (a) Frozen concentrated orange... sweetening ingredients specified in paragraph (b) of this section may be added to adjust the final... any added optional sweetening ingredients. The dilution ratio shall be not less than 3 plus 1. For the...

  18. 21 CFR 146.146 - Frozen concentrated orange juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146.146 Frozen concentrated orange juice. (a) Frozen concentrated orange... sweetening ingredients specified in paragraph (b) of this section may be added to adjust the final... any added optional sweetening ingredients. The dilution ratio shall be not less than 3 plus 1. For the...

  19. 21 CFR 146.153 - Concentrated orange juice for manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Concentrated orange juice for manufacturing. 146.153 Section 146.153 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CANNED FRUIT JUICES Requirements for Specific Standardized...

  20. 21 CFR 146.154 - Concentrated orange juice with preservative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Concentrated orange juice with preservative. 146.154 Section 146.154 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CANNED FRUIT JUICES Requirements for Specific Standardized...

  1. Coumaroyl Iridoids and a Depside from Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon)

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Allison; Chen, Shao-Nong; Nikolic, Dejan; van Breemen, Richard; Farnsworth, Norman R.; Pauli, Guido F.

    2006-01-01

    Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait., Ericaceae) juice has been used for urinary tract infections for approximately 50 years. Recent research suggests that this botanical blocks adherence of pathogenic E. coli to urinary tract cells, thus preventing infection. While current evidence indicates that proanthocyanidins are responsible for this activity, these compounds may not reach the urinary tract, thus further investigation is warranted. Fractionation of cranberry juice concentrate was guided by a recently published antiadherence assay, and the resulting fractions were phytochemically characterized. Two new coumaroyl iridoid glycosides, 10-p-trans- (1) and 10-p-cis-coumaroyl-1S-dihydromonotropein (2), and a depside, 2-O-(3,4-dihydroxybenzoyl)-2,4,6-trihydroxyphenylmethylacetate (3) were isolated, and although these compounds did not have antiadherent activity in isolation, they might constitute a new group of marker compounds for this active fraction of cranberry. PMID:17269823

  2. Coumaroyl iridoids and a depside from cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon).

    PubMed

    Turner, Allison; Chen, Shao-Nong; Nikolic, Dejan; van Breemen, Richard; Farnsworth, Norman R; Pauli, Guido F

    2007-02-01

    Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) juice has been used for urinary tract infections for approximately 50 years. Recent research suggests that this botanical blocks adherence of pathogenic E. coli to urinary tract cells, thus preventing infection. While current evidence indicates that proanthocyanidins are responsible for this activity, these compounds may not reach the urinary tract; thus further investigation is warranted. Fractionation of cranberry juice concentrate was guided by a recently published antiadherence assay, and the resulting fractions were phytochemically characterized. Two new coumaroyl iridoid glycosides, 10-p-trans- (1) and 10-p-cis-coumaroyl-1S-dihydromonotropein (2), and a depside, 2-O-(3,4-dihydroxybenzoyl)-2,4,6-trihydroxyphenylmethylacetate (3), were isolated, and although these compounds did not have antiadherent activity in isolation, they might constitute a new group of marker compounds for this active fraction of cranberry.

  3. Phytochemical, antimicrobial, and antioxidant activities of different citrus juice concentrates.

    PubMed

    Oikeh, Ehigbai I; Omoregie, Ehimwenma S; Oviasogie, Faith E; Oriakhi, Kelly

    2016-01-01

    The search for new antimicrobial compounds is ongoing. Its importance cannot be overemphasized in an era of emerging resistant pathogenic organisms. This study therefore investigated the phytochemical composition and antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of different citrus juice concentrates. Fruit juices of Citrus tangerine (tangerine), Citrus paradisi (grape), Citrus limon (lemon), and Citrus aurantifolia (lime) were evaluated. Antimicrobial activities against five bacterial and three fungal strains were evaluated. The results revealed the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids, steroids, terpenoids, saponins, cardiac glycosides, and reducing sugars in all the juice concentrates. DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) radical scavenging capacities varied with tangerine and grape juices having better scavenging capacities than lemon and lime juices. Grape juice was observed to have a significantly higher (P < 0.05) ferric-reducing antioxidant potential (FRAP) value (364.2 ± 10.25 μmol/L Fe(II)/g of the extract) than the reference antioxidant, ascorbic acid (312.88 ± 5.61 μmol/L). Antimicrobial studies revealed differential antimicrobial activities against different microbial strains. Zones of inhibition ranging from 4 to 26 mm were observed for the antibacterial tests with 0-24 mm for antifungal test. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) and minimum bacteriostatic concentrations (MBC) for concentrates against bacterial strains ranged from 12.5 to 200 μg/mL. Lemon and lime juice concentrates had lower MIC and MBC values with orange and tangerine having the highest values. Minimum fungicidal concentrations ranged from 50 to 200 μg/mL. The results of this study suggest that these juice concentrates may have beneficial antimicrobial roles that can be exploited in controlling unwanted microbial growth.

  4. Cranberries for Preventing Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections in Uncircumcised Boys.

    PubMed

    Wan, Kong-Sang; Liu, Chih-Kuang; Lee, Wen-Kai; Ko, Ming-Chung; Huang, Che-Sheng

    2016-11-01

    Background • Highly concentrated cranberry juice has long been considered to have protective properties against urinary tract infections (UTIs), on the basis of its content of cranberry proanthocyanidins, with A-type interflavan bonds. Objective • This study intended to evaluate the benefits of a highly concentrated cranberry juice for the prevention of repeated episodes of UTI in uncircumcised boys. Design • The study was a randomized, controlled trial. Setting • The study took place at Taipei City Hospital, Renai and Zhongxing Branches (Taipei City, Taiwan). Participants • Participants were 55 uncircumcised boys and 12 circumcised boys, aged 6 to 18 y, with histories of uncomplicated UTI, who were patients at the hospital. Intervention • The uncircumcised boys were randomly divided into 2 groups: (1) group 1 (n = 28) took 4 oz (120 mL) daily of cranberry juice for 6 mo; and (2) group 2 (n = 27), the negative control group, drank a placebo juice for 6 months. The circumcised boys in group 3, a positive control group, also drank a placebo juice for 6 mo. Outcome Measures • The time to UTI (ie, to the appearance of symptoms plus pyuria) was the main outcome. Asymptomatic bacteriuria, adherence to the treatment, and adverse effects were assessed at monthly visits. Results • After 6 mo of a prophylactic treatment with cranberry juice, the incidence of bacteriuria, mainly Escherichia coli, as shown in urine cultures at ≥1 × 105, were 25% (7/28), 37% (10/27), and 33.3% (4/12) in groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively. The comparisons of the rate of prevention of a recurrence of UTI between group 1 and group 2 and between group 1 and group 3 showed that group 1 had fewer recurrent episodes of UTI. No children withdrew from the study. No adverse events or side effects were recorded. Conclusions • Cranberry juice may reduce the number of repeated episodes of UTI in uncircumcised boys and may have beneficial effects against the growth of Gram

  5. Protective potential of non-dialyzable material fraction of cranberry juice on the virulence of P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum mixed infection.

    PubMed

    Polak, David; Naddaf, Raja; Shapira, Lior; Weiss, Ervin I; Houri-Haddad, Yael

    2013-07-01

    Periodontitis is a polymicrobial infectious disease. A novel potential chemical treatment modality may lie in bacterial anti-adhesive materials, such as cranberry juice fractions. The aim of this study is to explore the effect of high molecular weight cranberry constituent (non-dialyzable material [NDM]) on the virulence of a mixed infection with Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum in mice. In vitro, the anti-adhesive property of NDM was validated on epithelial cell culture, and inhibition of coaggregation was tested using a coaggregation assay. The in vivo effect was tested on the outcome of experimental periodontitis induced by a P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum mixed infection, and also on the local host response using the subcutaneous chamber model of infection. Phagocytosis was also tested on RAW macrophages by the use of fluorescent-labeled bacteria. NDM was found to inhibit the adhesion of both species of bacteria onto epithelial cells and to inhibit coaggregation in a dose-dependent manner. NDM consumption by mice attenuated the severity of experimental periodontitis compared with a mixed infection without NDM treatment. In infected subcutaneous chambers, NDM alone reduced tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels induced by the mixed infection. In vitro, NDM eliminated TNF-α expression by macrophages that were exposed to P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum, without impairing their viability. Furthermore, NDM increased the phagocytosis of P. gingivalis. The results indicate that the use of NDM may hold potential protective and/or preventive modalities in periodontal disease. Underlying mechanisms for this trait may perhaps be the anti-adhesive properties of NDM or its potential effect on inflammation.

  6. Study of the impact of cranberry extract on the virulence factors and biofilm formation by Enterococcus faecalis strains isolated from urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Wojnicz, Dorota; Tichaczek-Goska, Dorota; Korzekwa, Kamila; Kicia, Marta; Hendrich, Andrzej B

    2016-12-01

    Drinking of cranberry fruit juice and application of commercial preparations containing the cranberry extracts are recommended in the prevention and treatment of urinary tract infections (UTIs), especially in women with recurrent UTIs. Many studies focus on the activity of cranberries against uropathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli) strains. However, the knowledge of the cranberry effect on Gram-positive Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) is limited. Therefore, the aim of our study was to establish the activity of commercial concentrated cranberry extract on the growth, virulence factors and biofilm formation of E. faecalis strains isolated from urine. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of cranberry extract were determined by the broth microdilution method. Disc diffusion method was used to determine antimicrobial susceptibility. The impact of cranberry extract on bacterial survival, hydrophobicity, synthesis of lipase, lecithinase, DNase, hemolysin, gelatinase and biofilm mass was determined. Results show that cranberry extract inhibits the growth, enzymatic activities of bacteria and limits biofilm formation. The antibacterial activities of the studied cranberry extract confirm that it could be successfully used in prevention of UTIs caused by E. faecalis.

  7. Characterization of molecular structural changes in pectin during juice cloud destabilization in frozen concentrated orange juice

    Pectin comprises one of the major components of cloud material in citrus juices. Juice cloud is a complex mixture of polysaccharides, proteins and lower molecular weight compounds that are responsible for the turbid appearance of citrus juices. The stability of juice cloud depends on a number of fac...

  8. 21 CFR 146.148 - Reduced acid frozen concentrated orange juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... that the ratio of the Brix reading to the grams of acid, expressed as anhydrous citric acid, per 100... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Reduced acid frozen concentrated orange juice. 146... Canned Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146.148 Reduced acid frozen concentrated orange juice. (a) Reduced...

  9. 21 CFR 146.148 - Reduced acid frozen concentrated orange juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... that the ratio of the Brix reading to the grams of acid, expressed as anhydrous citric acid, per 100... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Reduced acid frozen concentrated orange juice. 146... Canned Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146.148 Reduced acid frozen concentrated orange juice. (a) Reduced...

  10. 21 CFR 146.148 - Reduced acid frozen concentrated orange juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... that the ratio of the Brix reading to the grams of acid, expressed as anhydrous citric acid, per 100... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Reduced acid frozen concentrated orange juice. 146... Canned Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146.148 Reduced acid frozen concentrated orange juice. (a) Reduced...

  11. 21 CFR 146.148 - Reduced acid frozen concentrated orange juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... that the ratio of the Brix reading to the grams of acid, expressed as anhydrous citric acid, per 100... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Reduced acid frozen concentrated orange juice. 146... Canned Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146.148 Reduced acid frozen concentrated orange juice. (a) Reduced...

  12. Promising results of cranberry in the prevention of oral Candida biofilms.

    PubMed

    Girardot, Marion; Guerineau, Amandine; Boudesocque, Leslie; Costa, Damien; Bazinet, Laurent; Enguehard-Gueiffier, Cécile; Imbert, Christine

    2014-04-01

    In the context of dental caries prevention by natural foodstuff sources, antifungal and antibiofilm activities of dry commercial extracts of cranberry fruit (Vaccinium macrocarpon Aiton) and two other red fruits (Vaccinium myrtillus L. and Malpighia punicifolia L.) were assessed on Candida albicans and Candida glabrata yeasts. When added to the culture medium, the cranberry extract displayed a significant anti-adhesion activity against Candida spp. when used at low concentrations. In addition, the pretreatment of surfaces with this extract induced an anti-adhesion activity mainly against C. glabrata yeasts and an antibiofilm activity against C. albicans. This activity was dependent on concentration, species, and strain. A phytochemical investigation bioguided by anti-adhesion tests against the two Candida species was carried out on crude cranberry juice to determine the active fractions. Three subfractions enriched in proanthocyanidins showed an anti-adhesion activity at low concentrations. This study investigated for the first time the interest of crude extracts of cranberry and cranberry juice fractions to prevent biofilms of C. glabrata. It highlighted the potency of consuming this fruit and using it as a source of anti-adhesion agents. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Cranberry xyloglucan structure and inhibition of Escherichia coli adhesion to epithelial cells

    Cranberry juice has been used to treat urinary tract infections based on scientific reports of proanthocyanidin anti-adhesion activity for Escherichia coli as well as folklore. Xyloglucan oligosaccharides were also detected in cranberry juice and the pulp remaining following commercial juice extract...

  14. Consumption of cranberry beverage improved endogenous antioxidant status and protected against bacteria adhesion in healthy humans: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Mathison, Bridget D; Kimble, Lindsey L; Kaspar, Kerrie L; Khoo, Christina; Chew, Boon P

    2014-05-01

    Consumption of polyphenol-rich foods is associated with lower risk from many chronic diseases. We hypothesized that a single dose of cranberry beverage would improve indices of oxidative stress, inflammation, and urinary antibacterial adhesion activity in healthy humans. Six males and 6 females (18-35 years; body mass index, 19-25 kg/m(2)) consumed placebo, cranberry leaf extract beverage, or low-calorie cranberry juice cocktail (LCJC) once in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over experimental design trial. The washout period between beverages was 1 week. Blood was collected 0, 2, 4, 8, and 24 hours after beverage consumption for measuring oxidative and inflammatory biomarkers. Urine was collected at 0, 0 to 3, 3 to 6, 6 to 9, 9 to 12, and 24 hours postintervention to assess antibacterial adhesion activity. Consumption of cranberry leaf extract beverage elevated (P < .05) blood glutathione peroxidase activity, whereas LCJC consumption increased (P < .05) glutathione concentrations and superoxide dismutase activity compared with placebo. Cranberry leaf extract beverage and LCJC consumption had no effect on the inflammatory biomarkers measured as compared with placebo. At 0 to 3 hours postconsumption, urine from participants who consumed cranberry beverages had higher (P < .05) ex vivo antiadhesion activity against P-fimbriated Escherichia coli compared with placebo. An acute dose of cranberry beverages improved biomarkers of antioxidant status and inhibition of bacterial adhesion in urine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Cranberry-derived proanthocyanidins prevent formation of Candida albicans biofilms in artificial urine through biofilm- and adherence-specific mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Rane, Hallie S.; Bernardo, Stella M.; Howell, Amy B.; Lee, Samuel A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Candida albicans is a common cause of nosocomial urinary tract infections (UTIs) and is responsible for increased morbidity and healthcare costs. Moreover, the US Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services no longer reimburse for hospital-acquired catheter-associated UTIs. Thus, development of specific approaches for the prevention of Candida urinary infections is needed. Cranberry juice-derived proanthocyanidins (PACs) have efficacy in the prevention of bacterial UTIs, partially due to anti-adherence properties, but there are limited data on their use for the prevention and/or treatment of Candida UTIs. Therefore, we sought to systematically assess the in vitro effect of cranberry-derived PACs on C. albicans biofilm formation in artificial urine. Methods C. albicans biofilms in artificial urine were coincubated with cranberry PACs at serially increasing concentrations and biofilm metabolic activity was assessed using the XTT assay in static microplate and silicone disc models. Results Cranberry PAC concentrations of ≥16 mg/L significantly reduced biofilm formation in all C. albicans strains tested, with a paradoxical effect observed at high concentrations in two clinical isolates. Further, cranberry PACs were additive in combination with traditional antifungals. Cranberry PACs reduced C. albicans adherence to both polystyrene and silicone. Supplementation of the medium with iron reduced the efficacy of cranberry PACs against biofilms. Conclusions These findings indicate that cranberry PACs have excellent in vitro activity against C. albicans biofilm formation in artificial urine. We present preliminary evidence that cranberry PAC activity against C. albicans biofilm formation is due to anti-adherence properties and/or iron chelation. PMID:24114570

  16. Cranberry-derived proanthocyanidins prevent formation of Candida albicans biofilms in artificial urine through biofilm- and adherence-specific mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Rane, Hallie S; Bernardo, Stella M; Howell, Amy B; Lee, Samuel A

    2014-02-01

    Candida albicans is a common cause of nosocomial urinary tract infections (UTIs) and is responsible for increased morbidity and healthcare costs. Moreover, the US Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services no longer reimburse for hospital-acquired catheter-associated UTIs. Thus, development of specific approaches for the prevention of Candida urinary infections is needed. Cranberry juice-derived proanthocyanidins (PACs) have efficacy in the prevention of bacterial UTIs, partially due to anti-adherence properties, but there are limited data on their use for the prevention and/or treatment of Candida UTIs. Therefore, we sought to systematically assess the in vitro effect of cranberry-derived PACs on C. albicans biofilm formation in artificial urine. C. albicans biofilms in artificial urine were coincubated with cranberry PACs at serially increasing concentrations and biofilm metabolic activity was assessed using the XTT assay in static microplate and silicone disc models. Cranberry PAC concentrations of ≥16 mg/L significantly reduced biofilm formation in all C. albicans strains tested, with a paradoxical effect observed at high concentrations in two clinical isolates. Further, cranberry PACs were additive in combination with traditional antifungals. Cranberry PACs reduced C. albicans adherence to both polystyrene and silicone. Supplementation of the medium with iron reduced the efficacy of cranberry PACs against biofilms. These findings indicate that cranberry PACs have excellent in vitro activity against C. albicans biofilm formation in artificial urine. We present preliminary evidence that cranberry PAC activity against C. albicans biofilm formation is due to anti-adherence properties and/or iron chelation.

  17. 7 CFR 926.11 - Processed cranberries or cranberry products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Processed cranberries or cranberry products. 926.11... COLLECTION, REPORTING AND RECORDKEEPING REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.11 Processed cranberries or cranberry products. Processed cranberries or cranberry...

  18. 7 CFR 926.11 - Processed cranberries or cranberry products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Processed cranberries or cranberry products. 926.11... COLLECTION, REPORTING AND RECORDKEEPING REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.11 Processed cranberries or cranberry products. Processed cranberries or cranberry...

  19. 7 CFR 926.11 - Processed cranberries or cranberry products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Processed cranberries or cranberry products. 926.11... COLLECTION, REPORTING AND RECORDKEEPING REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.11 Processed cranberries or cranberry products. Processed cranberries or cranberry...

  20. 7 CFR 926.11 - Processed cranberries or cranberry products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Processed cranberries or cranberry products. 926.11... COLLECTION, REPORTING AND RECORDKEEPING REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.11 Processed cranberries or cranberry products. Processed cranberries or cranberry...

  1. 75 FR 76754 - Non-Frozen Apple Juice Concentrate From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-09

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 731-TA-841 (Second Review)] Non-Frozen Apple Juice Concentrate From China AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Termination... whether revocation of the antidumping duty order on non- frozen apple juice concentrate from China would...

  2. Reverse osmosis as a potential technique to improve antioxidant properties of fruit juices used for functional beverages.

    PubMed

    Gunathilake, K D P P; Yu, Li Juan; Rupasinghe, H P Vasantha

    2014-04-01

    Reverse osmosis (RO) as a potential technique to improve the antioxidant properties of cranberry, blueberry and apple juices was evaluated for the formulation of a functional beverage. The effects of temperature (20-40 °C) and trans-membrane pressure (25-35 bars) on physico-chemical and antioxidant properties of fruit juices were evaluated to optimize the operating parameters for each fruit juice. There was no significant effect on any quality parameters of fruit juices under studied operating parameters of RO. However, total soluble solid, total acidity and colour (a(∗)) of the concentrated juices increased in proportion to their volumetric concentrations. Antioxidant capacity measured by FRAP assay of concentrated apple, blueberry and cranberry juice was increased by 40%, 34%, and 30%, respectively. LDL oxidation inhibition by concentrated blueberry and cranberry juice was increased up to 41% and 45%, respectively. The results suggest that RO can be used for enhancing the health promoting properties of fruit juices. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Seasonal and daily variations in concentrations of methyl-tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) at Cranberry Lake, New Jersey

    Toran, L.; Lipka, C.; Baehr, A.; Reilly, T.; Baker, R.

    2003-01-01

    Methyl-tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE), an additive used to oxygenate gasoline, has been detected in lakes in northwestern New Jersey. This occurrence has been attributed to the use of gasoline-powered watercraft. This paper documents and explains both seasonal and daily variations in MTBE concentrations at Cranberry Lake. During a recent boating season (late April to September 1999), concentrations of MTBE typically exceeded 20??g/L. MTBE concentrations varied daily from 12 to 24??g/L over a 2-week period that included the Labor Day holiday. Concentrations were highest on weekends when there is more boat traffic, which had an immediate effect on MTBE mass throughout the lake. MTBE concentrations decreased to about 2??g/L shortly after the end of the summer recreational season. The loss of MTBE can be accounted for by volatilization, with a half-life on the order of 10 days. The volatilization rate was modeled with the daily decrease in MTBE then the modeled rate was validated using the data from the seasonal decline. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Changes in pectins and product consistency during the concentration of tomato juice to paste.

    PubMed

    Anthon, Gordon E; Diaz, Jerome V; Barrett, Diane M

    2008-08-27

    Concentrating tomato juice to paste during the tomato season allows for preservation and long-term storage, but subsequent dilution for formulation of value-added products is known to result in a loss of consistency. To understand the reasons for this, samples of unconcentrated juice, processing intermediates, and concentrated paste were collected from an industrial processing plant during normal commercial production. All samples were diluted with water to 5 degrees Brix and then analyzed for consistency and pectin content. Whole juice consistency, measured with a Bostwick consistometer, decreased through the course of juice concentration, with the largest change occurring early in the process, as the juice was concentrated from 5 to 10 degrees Brix. This decrease in consistency occurred during the production of paste from both hot- and cold-break juices. The change in Bostwick value was correlated with a decrease in the precipitate weight ratio. The loss of consistency during commercial processing was not the direct result of water removal because a sample of this same 5 degrees Brix juice could be concentrated 2-fold in a vacuum oven and then diluted back to 5 degrees Brix with no change in consistency or precipitate ratio. Total pectin content did not change as the juice was concentrated to paste, but the proportion of the total pectin that was water soluble increased. The greatest increases in pectin solubility occurred during the hot break and late in the process where the evaporator temperature was the highest.

  5. Effect of extraction method on the concentrations of selected bioactive compounds in mandarin juice.

    PubMed

    Nogata, Yoichi; Ohta, Hideaki; Sumida, Takashi; Sekiya, Keizo

    2003-12-03

    A mandarin-type citrus fruit, ponkan (Citrus reticulata), was processed by in-line, chopper pulper, and hand-press extractions to investigate the effect of extraction method on the concentrations of bioactive compounds in processed juice. Concentrations of polymethoxylated flavones (tangeretin, nobiletin, and sinensetin) and beta-cryptoxanthin in juice, and inhibitory activities against arachidonate cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenases of the juice extract were analyzed. The juice processed by hand-press extraction contained the largest amounts of nobiletin (3.56 mg/100 mL), tangeretin (4.10 mg/100 mL), and sinensetin (0.13 mg/100 mL). Concentrations of beta-cryptoxanthin were 0.66, 0.59, 0.55, and 0.50 mg/100 mL in chopper pulper, in-line (5/64 in.), in-line (8/64 in.) and hand-press juices, respectively. Both extracts of in-line juices showed greater inhibitory activity toward platelet 12-lipoxygenase than the others. The inhibitory effect of hand-press juice extract on platelet cyclooxygenase activity was remarkable among juice extracts. All juice extracts effectively inhibited polymorphonuclear 5-lipoxygenase activity at nearly the same rate.

  6. 21 CFR 146.148 - Reduced acid frozen concentrated orange juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reduced acid frozen concentrated orange juice. 146.148 Section 146.148 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CANNED FRUIT JUICES Requirements for Specific Standardized...

  7. Not-from-concentrate blueberry juice extraction utilizing frozen fruit, heated mash, and enzyme processes

    Juice production is a multibillion dollar industry and an economical way to use fruit past seasonal harvests. To evaluate how production steps influence not-from-concentrate (NFC) blueberry (Vaccinium sp.) juice recovery, bench top and pilot scale experiments were performed. In bench-top, southern h...

  8. Not-from-concentrate pilot plant ‘Wonderful’ cultivar pomegranate juice changes: Volatiles

    Pilot plant ultrafiltration was used to mimic the dominant U.S. commercial pomegranate juice extraction method (hydraulic pressing whole fruit), to deliver a not-from-concentrate (NFC) juice that was high-temperature short-time pasteurized and stored at 4 and 25 °C. Recovered were 46 compounds, of ...

  9. Immunoglobulin E-reactive proteins in cashew (Anacardium occidentale) apple juice concentrate.

    PubMed

    Comstock, Sarah S; Robotham, Jason M; Tawde, Pallavi; Kshirsagar, Harshal; Sathe, Shridhar K; Roux, Kenneth H; Teuber, Suzanne S

    2008-07-23

    Cashew apple juice has the potential to be a natural source of vitamin C and sugar in processed foods. The juice of the cashew apple is obtained by pressing the fleshy peduncle or receptacle, which forms a rounded apple that sits above the true fruit, the cashew nut. Cashew nut allergy is the second most commonly reported tree nut allergy in the United States. To determine if cashew apple juice contains cashew nut allergens, immunoblotting was performed using a cashew apple juice 6X concentrate that was extracted and further concentrated through dialysis, lyophilization, and resuspension. Serum IgE of individuals allergic to cashew nut bound proteins in the cashew apple juice concentrate extract. For some serum samples, IgE reactivity could be inhibited by preincubation of the serum with cashew nut extract, suggesting the presence of cashew nut-related allergens. Using monoclonal antibodies specific for cashew nut allergens, the concentrate was found to contain Ana o 1 (vicilin) and Ana o 2 (legumin). Neither IgE from cashew nut allergic sera nor the monoclonal antibodies bound any peptides in 5 kDa filtered cashew apple juice concentrate. The cashew apple juice concentrate used in these studies contains proteins with IgE-reactive epitopes, including cashew nut legumin and vicilin. No IgE-binding peptides remained after 5 kDa filtration of the concentrate.

  10. Incidence of osmophilic yeasts and Zygosaccharomyces rouxii during the production of concentrate grape juices.

    PubMed

    Rojo, M C; Torres Palazzolo, C; Cuello, R; González, M; Guevara, F; Ponsone, M L; Mercado, L A; Martínez, C; Combina, M

    2017-06-01

    Zygosaccharomyces rouxii is the main spoilage yeast of grape juice concentrates. Detection and identification of Z. rouxii during the production of grape juice concentrate is critical to prevent spoilage in the final product. In this work, three grape juice concentrate processing plants were assessed by identifying osmophilic yeasts in juices and surfaces during different stages of a complete production line. Subsequently, molecular typing of Z. rouxii isolates was done to determine the strain distribution of this spoilage yeast. Osmotolerant yeast species, other than Z. rouxii, were mainly recovered from processing plant environments. Z. rouxii was only isolated from surface samples with grape juice remains. Z. rouxii was largely isolated from grape juice samples with some degree of concentration. Storage of grape juice pre-concentrate and concentrate allowed an increase in the Z. rouxii population. A widely distributed dominant molecular Z. rouxii pattern was found in samples from all three processing plants, suggesting resident microbes inside the plant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Drying-induced physico-chemical changes in cranberry products.

    PubMed

    Michalska, Anna; Wojdyło, Aneta; Honke, Joanna; Ciska, Ewa; Andlauer, Wilfried

    2018-02-01

    Sugar-free cranberry juice (XAD) and juice with 15% of maltodextrin were dried by freeze-, vacuum and spray drying methods. Total phenolics (589-6435mg/kg dry matter) including 5 flavonols, 3 phenolic acids, 2 procyanidins and 5 anthocyanins were stronger affected by juice formulation than by drying methods. Spray drying of juice, regardless of its formulation, was competitive to freeze drying in terms of polyphenols' retention. Increase in temperature up to 100°C during vacuum drying of XAD extracts resulted in degradation of polyphenolics (down to 4%), except chlorogenic acid. Its content increased with rise in temperature and accelerated hydroxymethylfurfural formation. The stronger the impact of drying, the more chlorogenic acid is present in cranberry products. In all powders analysed, formation of furoylmethyl amino acids was noted. Antioxidant capacity of cranberry products was influenced by juice formulation and was linked to content of polyphenols. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Cranberry use among pediatric nephrology patients.

    PubMed

    Super, Elizabeth A; Kemper, Kathi J; Woods, Charles; Nagaraj, Shashi

    2005-01-01

    Recurrent urinary tract infections are common in children, and the use of complementary therapies is common in other children with recurrent illnesses. However, little is known about the use of cranberry products by children with renal disease. We hypothesized that, because cranberry is often used to prevent urinary tract infections (UTI) in adult women, many parents would give it to their children, particularly to children prone to recurrent UTI (rUTI). Anonymous, cross-sectional, self-administered survey of parents of children seen in the pediatric nephrology clinic at Brenner Children's Hospital between June 1, 2004, and August 13, 2004. Of the 117 parents surveyed, the patients' average age was 10.3 years, and 15% reported rUTI as a problem. Overall, 29% of surveyed parents gave cranberry products therapeutically; as expected, use was higher among those with rUTI (65%) than among those with other renal conditions (23%); odds ratio = 6.1 (2.0, 18.4, P < .001); many parents gave cranberry to treat as well as prevent diverse renal problems. Most felt it was beneficial and only 1 parent reported a side effect (nausea). Only 23% of those who used it had discussed cranberry use with their physician. Cranberry is commonly used therapeutically among patients seen in a pediatric nephrology clinic and is perceived as useful by parents, though uncommonly discussed with physicians. Randomized controlled trials are needed to determine the effectiveness of cranberry juice therapy for rUTI in children.

  13. Consumer liking of fruit juices with different açaí (Euterpe oleracea Mart.) concentrations.

    PubMed

    Sabbe, Sara; Verbeke, Wim; Deliza, Rosires; Matta, Virginia M; Van Damme, Patrick

    2009-06-01

    Overall liking, flavor, and perceived healthiness of one newly developed fruit juice with high açaí content (40% açaí) and 5 commercially available fruit juices with lower (4% to 20%) açaí concentrations were evaluated by consumers in Belgium. General trends for the overall sample were examined by means of analysis of variance, whereas individual consumer preferences were evaluated using internal preference mapping and hierarchical cluster analysis. The relative contribution of flavor and perceived health benefits as predictors of consumers' overall liking of the 6 açaí-based fruit juices was estimated through linear regression analysis. The results showed a negative relationship between the juices' overall liking and their açaí concentrations. Although the vast majority of consumers preferred the juices having a low açaí content (4% to 5% açaí), a small consumer segment liked the juice with 40% açaí. Flavor or taste experience superseded consumers' perceived health benefits as the primary determinant of the fruit juices' overall liking. The impact of perceived health benefits on the overall liking of the açaí juices decreased with higher taste dissatisfaction.

  14. 75 FR 61127 - Non-Frozen Apple Juice Concentrate from the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time Limit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [A-570-855] Non-Frozen Apple Juice... order on non-frozen apple juice concentrate from the People's Republic of China (``PRC'').\\1\\ This... currently due no later than October 28, 2010. \\1\\ See Certain Non-Frozen Apple Juice Concentrate from the...

  15. Impact of cranberry on Escherichia coli cellular surface characteristics

    SciT

    Johnson, Brandy J.; Lin Baochuan; Dinderman, Michael A.

    2008-12-19

    The anti-adhesive effects of cranberry have been attributed to both interactions of its components with the surface of bacterial cells and to inhibition of p-fimbriae expression. Previous reports also suggested that the presence of cranberry juice changed the Gram stain characteristics of Escherichia coli. Here, we show that the morphology of E. coli is changed when grown in the presence of juice or extract from Vaccinium macrocarpon (cranberry). Gene expression analysis indicates the down regulation of flagellar basal body rod and motor proteins. Consistent with this finding and previous reports, the SEM images indicate a decrease in the visible p-fimbriae.more » The iodine used in Gram-staining protocols was found to interact differently with the bacterial membrane when cells were cultured in spiked media. Slight alterations in the Gram stain protocol demonstrated that culturing in the presence of cranberry juice does not change the Gram stain characteristics contradicting other reports.« less

  16. 27 CFR 24.180 - Use of concentrated and unconcentrated fruit juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... density, or to 22 degrees Brix, or to any degree of Brix between its original density and 22 degrees Brix... between its original density and 22 degrees Brix. The proprietor, prior to using concentrated fruit juice...

  17. 27 CFR 24.180 - Use of concentrated and unconcentrated fruit juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... density, or to 22 degrees Brix, or to any degree of Brix between its original density and 22 degrees Brix... between its original density and 22 degrees Brix. The proprietor, prior to using concentrated fruit juice...

  18. 27 CFR 24.180 - Use of concentrated and unconcentrated fruit juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... density, or to 22 degrees Brix, or to any degree of Brix between its original density and 22 degrees Brix... between its original density and 22 degrees Brix. The proprietor, prior to using concentrated fruit juice...

  19. 27 CFR 24.180 - Use of concentrated and unconcentrated fruit juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... density, or to 22 degrees Brix, or to any degree of Brix between its original density and 22 degrees Brix... between its original density and 22 degrees Brix. The proprietor, prior to using concentrated fruit juice...

  20. 27 CFR 24.180 - Use of concentrated and unconcentrated fruit juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... density, or to 22 degrees Brix, or to any degree of Brix between its original density and 22 degrees Brix... between its original density and 22 degrees Brix. The proprietor, prior to using concentrated fruit juice...

  1. 75 FR 69628 - Non-Frozen Apple Juice Concentrate From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of Sunset...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-15

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [A-570-855] Non-Frozen Apple Juice... order on non-frozen apple juice concentrate from the People's Republic of China (``PRC''). Because the... June 5, 2000, the Department issued an antidumping duty order on certain non-frozen apple juice...

  2. Inhibition of host extracellular matrix destructive enzyme production and activity by a high-molecular-weight cranberry fraction.

    PubMed

    Bodet, C; Chandad, F; Grenier, D

    2007-04-01

    Periodontal diseases are a group of inflammatory disorders that are initiated by specific gram-negative bacteria and lead to connective tissue destruction. Proteolytic enzymes, including matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and elastase, produced by resident and inflammatory cells in response to periodontopathogens and their products, play a major role in gingival tissue destruction. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a high-molecular-weight fraction prepared from cranberry juice concentrate on MMP-3, MMP-9 and elastase activities, as well as on MMP production by human cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. MMP-3 and MMP-9 production by gingival fibroblasts and macrophages treated with the cranberry fraction and then stimulated with lipopolysaccharide was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. MMP-3, MMP-9 and elastase activities in the presence of the cranberry fraction were evaluated using colorimetric or fluorogenic substrates. The changes in expression and phosphorylation state of fibroblast intracellular signaling proteins induced by A. actinomycetemcomitans lipopolysaccharide and the cranberry fraction were characterized by antibody microarrays. The lipopolysaccharide-induced MMP-3 and MMP-9 responses of fibroblasts and macrophages were inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by the cranberry fraction. This fraction was found to inhibit fibroblast intracellular signaling proteins, a phenomenon that may lead to a down-regulation of activating protein-1 activity. MMP-3, MMP-9 and elastase activities were also efficiently inhibited by the cranberry fraction, even when it was used at low concentrations. These results suggest that cranberry compounds offer promising perspectives for the development of novel host-modulating strategies for an adjunctive treatment of periodontitis.

  3. Effects of cranberry components on human aggressive periodontitis gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Tipton, D A; Babu, J P; Dabbous, M Kh

    2013-08-01

    Aggressive periodontitis (AgP) causes rapid periodontal breakdown involving AgP gingival fibroblast production of cytokines [i.e. interleukin (IL)-6, a bone metabolism regulator], and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3. Lipopolysaccharide upregulates fibroblast IL-6 and MMP-3, via transcription factors (i.e. NF-κB). Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) inhibits lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophage and normal gingival fibroblast activities, but little is known of its effects on AgP fibroblasts. Objectives of this study are to use AgP fibroblasts, to determine cytotoxicity of cranberry components or periodontopathogen (Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis) lipopolysaccharide ± cranberry components, and effects of cranberry components on lipopolysaccharide-stimulated NF-κB activation and IL-6 and MMP-3 production. AgP fibroblasts were incubated ≤ 6 d with high molecular weight non-dialyzable material (NDM) (derived from cranberry juice (1-500 μg/mL) or lipopolysaccharide (1 μg/mL) ± NDM. Membrane damage and viability were assessed by enzyme activity released into cell supernatants and activity of a mitochondrial enzyme, respectively. Secreted IL-6 and MMP-3 were measured by ELISA. NF-κB p65 was measured via binding to an oligonucleotide containing the NF-κB consensus site. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance and Scheffe's F procedure for post hoc comparisons. Short-term exposure to NDM, or lipopolysaccharide ± NDM caused no membrane damage. NDM (≤ 100 μg/mL) or lipopolysaccharide ± NDM had no effect on viability ≤ 7 d exposure. NDM (50 μg/mL) inhibited lipopolysaccharide-stimulated p65 (P ≤ 0.003) and constitutive or lipopolysaccharide-stimulated MMP-3 (P ≤ 0.02). NDM increased AgP fibroblast constitutive or lipopolysaccharide-stimulated IL-6 (P ≤ 0.0001), but inhibited normal human gingival fibroblast IL-6 (P ≤ 0.01). Lack of toxicity of low NDM concentrations, and its inhibition of NF-κB and MMP-3, suggest that

  4. Potential of membrane distillation for production of high quality fruit juice concentrate.

    PubMed

    Onsekizoglu Bagci, Pelin

    2015-01-01

    Fruit juices are generally concentrated in order to improve the stability during storage and to reduce handling, packaging, and transportation costs. Thermal evaporation is the most widely used technique in industrial fruit juice concentrate production. In addition to high energy consumption, a large part of the characteristics determining the quality of the fresh juice including aroma, color, vitamins, and antioxidants undergoes remarkable alterations through the use of high operation temperatures. Increasing consumer demand for minimally or naturally processed stable products able to retain as much possible the uniqueness of the fresh fruit has engendered a growing interest for development of nonthermal approaches for fruit juice concentration. Among them, membrane distillation (MD) and its variants have attracted much attention for allowing very high concentrations to be reached under atmospheric pressure and temperatures near ambient temperature. This review will provide an overview of the current status and recent developments in the use of MD for concentration of fruit juices. In addition to the most basic concepts of MD variants, crucial suggestions for membrane selection and operating parameters will be presented. Challenges and future trends for industrial adaptation taking into account the possibility of integrating MD with other existing processes will be discussed.

  5. Grape Juice Concentrate Protects Rat Liver Against Cadmium Intoxication: Histopathology, Cytochrome C and Metalloproteinases Expression.

    PubMed

    de Moura, C F G; Ribeiro, F A P; Handan, B A; Aguiar, O; Oshima, C T F; Ribeiro, D A

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if grape juice concentrate is able to protect rat liver against cadmium toxicity. For this purpose, histopathological analysis, cytochrome C expression and immunoexpresssion of metalloproteinases (MMP) 2 and 9 were investigated. A total of 15 Wistar rats weighing 250 g on the average, and 8 weeks age were distributed into 3 groups (n=5), as follows: Control group (non-treated group, CTRL); Cadmium group (Cd) and grape juice concentrate group (Cd+GJ). Histopathological analysis revealed that liver from animals treated with grape juice concentrate improved tissue degeneration induced by cadmium intoxication. Animals intoxicated with cadmium and treated with grape juice concentrate showed higher cytochrome C gene expression in liver cells. No significant statistically differences (p>0.05) were found to MMP 2 and 9 immunoexpression between groups. Taken together, our results demonstrate that grape juice concentrate is able to prevent tissue degeneration in rat liver as a result of increasing apoptosis. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Inhibition of Nonenzymatic Protein Glycation by Pomegranate and Other Fruit Juices

    PubMed Central

    Dorsey, Pamela Garner; Greenspan, Phillip

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The nonenzymatic glycation of proteins and the formation of advanced glycation endproducts in diabetes leads to the crosslinking of proteins and disease complications. Our study sought to demonstrate the effect of commonly consumed juices (pomegranate, cranberry, black cherry, pineapple, apple, and Concord grape) on the fructose-mediated glycation of albumin. Albumin glycation decreased by 98% in the presence of 10 μL of pomegranate juice/mL; other juices inhibited glycation by only 20%. Pomegranate juice produced the greatest inhibition on protein glycation when incubated at both the same phenolic concentration and the same antioxidant potential. Both punicalagin and ellagic acid significantly inhibited the glycation of albumin by ∼90% at 5 μg/mL. Sodium dodecyl sulfate–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that pomegranate, but not apple juice, protected albumin from modification. These results demonstrate that pomegranate juice and two of its major constituents are potent inhibitors of fructose-mediated protein glycation. PMID:24433074

  7. Protection of polyphenols in blueberry juice by vacuum-assisted block freeze concentration.

    PubMed

    Orellana-Palma, Patricio; Petzold, Guillermo; Pierre, Lissage; Pensaben, José Manuel

    2017-11-01

    Block freeze concentration allows produces high-quality cryoconcentrates with important protection of valuable components from fresh fruit juices. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of vacuum-assisted block freeze concentration under different experimental conditions to protect polyphenols in the elaboration of concentrated blueberry juice. Fresh blueberry juice was radial or unidirectional frozen at -20 and -80 °C for 12 h and vacuum process was performed at 80 kPa during 120 min. Results showed a significant solute increased in the concentrated fraction in all treatments, and the best treatment was - 20 °C/unidirectional with a value of ≈63 °Brix, equivalent to an increase of 3.8 times in the total polyphenol content (76% of retention). The color of concentrated samples was darker than the initial sample, with ΔE* values of >25 CIELab units in all treatments. The vacuum-assisted block freeze concentrations was an effective technology for protecting polyphenols and obtain a concentrated with a higher concentration of solids from blueberry juice, as well as interesting values of process parameters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of nonstructural carbohydrates across cranberry cultivars

    explain low fruit set and biennial bearing tendencies of cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon). Yet, comparisons of nonstructural carbohydrate concentrations during critical phenological stages across cultivars that differ in biennial bearing tendencies and return bloom potential are lacking, particular...

  9. Influence of three different concentration techniques on evaporation rate, color and phenolics content of blueberry juice.

    PubMed

    Elik, Aysel; Yanık, Derya Koçak; Maskan, Medeni; Göğüş, Fahrettin

    2016-05-01

    The present study was undertaken to assess the effects of three different concentration processes open-pan, rotary vacuum evaporator and microwave heating on evaporation rate, the color and phenolics content of blueberry juice. Kinetics model study for changes in soluble solids content (°Brix), color parameters and phenolics content during evaporation was also performed. The final juice concentration of 65° Brix was achieved in 12, 15, 45 and 77 min, for microwave at 250 and 200 W, rotary vacuum and open-pan evaporation processes, respectively. Color changes associated with heat treatment were monitored using Hunter colorimeter (L*, a* and b*). All Hunter color parameters decreased with time and dependently studied concentration techniques caused color degradation. It was observed that the severity of color loss was higher in open-pan technique than the others. Evaporation also affected total phenolics content in blueberry juice. Total phenolics loss during concentration was highest in open-pan technique (36.54 %) and lowest in microwave heating at 200 W (34.20 %). So, the use of microwave technique could be advantageous in food industry because of production of blueberry juice concentrate with a better quality and short time of operation. A first-order kinetics model was applied to modeling changes in soluble solids content. A zero-order kinetics model was used to modeling changes in color parameters and phenolics content.

  10. Concentration of Umami Compounds in Pork Meat and Cooking Juice with Different Cooking Times and Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Rotola-Pukkila, Minna K; Pihlajaviita, Seija T; Kaimainen, Mika T; Hopia, Anu I

    2015-12-01

    This study examined the concentrations of umami compounds in pork loins cooked at 3 different temperatures and 3 different lengths of cooking times. The pork loins were cooked with the sous vide technique. The free amino acids (FAAs), glutamic acid and aspartic acid; the 5'-nucleotides, inosine-5'-monophosphate (IMP) and adenosine-5'-monophosphate (AMP); and corresponding nucleoside inosine of the cooked meat and its released juice were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Under the experimental conditions used, the cooking temperature played a more important role than the cooking time in the concentration of the analyzed compounds. The amino acid concentrations in the meat did not remain constant under these experimental conditions. The most notable effect observed was that of the cooking temperature and the higher amino acid concentrations in the released juice of meat cooked at 80 °C compared with 60 and 70 °C. This is most likely due to the heat induced hydrolysis of proteins and peptides releasing water soluble FAAs from the meat into the cooking juice. In this experiment, the cooking time and temperature had no influence on the IMP concentrations observed. However, the AMP concentrations increased with the increasing temperature and time. This suggests that the choice of time and temperature in sous vide cooking affects the nucleotide concentration of pork meat. The Sous vide technique proved to be a good technique to preserve the cooking juice and the results presented here show that cooking juice is rich in umami compounds, which can be used to provide a savory or brothy taste. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  11. 75 FR 81564 - Certain Non-Frozen Apple Juice Concentrate From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [A-570-855] Certain Non-Frozen Apple... order covering certain non-frozen apple juice concentrate from the People's Republic of China. See...: Certain Non-Frozen Apple Juice Concentrate From the People's Republic of China, 65 FR 35606 (June 5, 2000...

  12. Cranberry Products for the Prophylaxis of Urinary Tract Infections in Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Durham, Spencer H; Stamm, Pamela L; Eiland, Lea S

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the existing data regarding the use of cranberry products for the prevention of urinary tract infections (UTIs) in pediatric patients. A literature search of Medline databases from 1966 to June 2015 was conducted. The databases were searched using the terms "pediatrics," "children," "cranberry," "cranberry juice," and "urinary tract infections." The identified trials were then searched for additional references applicable to this topic. A total of 8 clinical trials were identified that examined the use of cranberry products, mostly juice, for the prevention of UTIs in children. Three trials examined the use in otherwise healthy children. Five trials examined the use in pediatric patients with underlying urogenital abnormalities of which 2 compared cranberry to antibiotics. In healthy pediatric patients, cranberry use was associated with a reduction in the overall number of UTIs and a decrease in the number of antibiotic days per year for UTI treatment. In patients with urogenital abnormalities, results were conflicting, with some studies showing no reduction in UTIs compared with placebo, but others demonstrating a significant reduction. However, cranberry products had similar efficacy when compared with both cefaclor and trimethoprim. All studies used a wide variety of doses and frequencies of cranberry, making specific product recommendations difficult. Cranberry appears effective for the prevention of UTIs in otherwise healthy children and is at least as effective as antibiotics in children with underlying urogenital abnormalities. However, recommendations for cranberry dosing and frequency cannot be confidently made at this time. Larger, well-designed trials are recommended. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Sugar composition and concentrations in sugarcane juice as affected by sampling date and internode position

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp. hybrids) harvest season lasts about six months from late-October through mid-April in Florida. Cane juice sugar concentration and composition are important for sucrose yield and profits, however research is lacking on the influence of harvesting time and intermodal position...

  14. Temperature, soluble solids and pH effect on Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris viability in lemon juice concentrate.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, María C; Belfiore, Carolina; Navarro, Antonio R

    2008-02-01

    Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris is a thermoacidophilic, non-pathogenic, spore-forming bacterium detected in spoiled commercial pasteurized fruit juice. Apple, white grape and tomato are particularly susceptible. A. acidoterrestris spores are resistant to lemon juice pasteurization (2 min at 82 degrees C), and they can germinate and grow causing spoilage. This contamination is characterized by a medicinal or disinfectant smell attributed to guaiacol (o-dihydroxybenzene) production and other taint chemicals. The aim of this work was to study the influence of temperature (82, 86, 92 and 95 degrees C), total soluble solids (SS) (6.20, 9.8, 50 and 68 degrees Brix) and pH (2.28, 2.45, 2.80, 3.25, 3.5) on decimal reduction time (D) of the A. acidoterrestris in clarified and non-clarified concentrated lemon juice. Once D-value was determined, the resistance of A. acidoterrestris at the assayed temperatures was confirmed. SS and pH influence spore viability, because spore resistance increases with higher SS (50 degrees Brix 22 min 82 degrees C-68 degrees Brix 28 min 82 degrees C) and pH values (pH 2.28, 17 min-pH 4.00, 22 min). Bacterial growth was lower in clarified lemon juice, 26 min at 82 degrees C, than in non-clarified lemon juice, 51 min at 82 degrees C. Temperature was the parameter that had the greatest influence on the D value.

  15. Electrical separation of protein concentrate from juice of forages. Final report

    SciT

    Koegel, R.G.; Straub, R.J.; McFate, K.L.

    1993-03-01

    Previous research has shown that large quantities of high-quality, low-fiber protein concentrate can be separated from the juice of forage crops such as alfalfa. The value of adding such extracted protein to the diet of undernourished children in Mexico and other developing countries has been well demonstrated. In the past, protein separation has been achieved by either heat coagulation of the protein or by a pH adjustment of the juice. Both techniques have disadvantages including irreversible changes in the protein and high energy or material costs. This used electrostatic fields to manipulate the small charges found in protein molecules. Suchmore » an approach could result in an on-farm or portable protein separation system that does not require the transport of large quantities of forage. Researchers, using a dc power supply with appropriately placed electrodes to separate protein from juices, varied voltage levels to modify field strength and tried various shapes of electrodes and configurations of apparatus. The relative impact of centrifugation, use of various flocculents, and ultrafiltration in attempts to enhance dc voltage-supply test results were explored. One steady-flow system used a plastic vessel with stainless steel walls that served as electrodes. Another steady-flow ac voltage system used a trough through which juice was allowed to flow While two spinning-disk electrodes passed electricity directly through the juice. A four-step process was developed using an, ac power supply. The juice is first treated with an ac current, then held for approximately 60 minutes, after which it is centrifuged at 10,000 g. In the final phase the soluble protein is concentrated 5--10 fold by ultrafiltration using filters with a 10,000 molecular weight cutoff. This process shows potential for meeting project objectives.« less

  16. Use of the refractometer as a tool to monitor dietary formula concentration in gastric juice.

    PubMed

    Chang, W-K; Chen, M-Z; Chao, Y-C

    2002-12-01

    Critically ill patients do not always tolerate nasogastric tube feeding. Gastric residual volumes are widely used to evaluate feeding tolerance, but controversy exists about what constitutes the residual volume (diet formula or digestive juice). In this paper, we describe the use of the refractometer as a tool to monitor dietary formula concentration in gastric juice and evaluate gastric juice refractometry as a possible clinical application. Brix value (an index of the total solutes in solution) readings for polymeric diet at pH 1, 4, 7 and 8, and at 4 degrees C, 25 degrees C and 37 degrees C, and in fasting gastric juice were determined with a refractometer. We found that distilled water, minerals, and vitamins had low Brix values of 0+/-0, 1.2+/-0.1, and 0.4+/-0.1, respectively. On the other hand, because carbohydrate (17 g/100 ml), protein (5.3 g/100 ml), fat (4.1 g/100 ml), and full-strength polymeric diet had high concentrations of dissolved nutrients, they also had high Brix values (12.1+/-0.6, 6.5+/-0.1, 6.0+/-0.1, and 23.5+/-0.1, respectively). The Brix values of polymeric diet had a linear additive relationship with the diet formula concentration at various pHs, temperatures, and in the gastric juice. Brix value measurement can be used to monitor stomach dietary formula concentration. Such information can be obtained at the bedside and used to evaluate feeding-intolerant patients receiving enteral feeding.

  17. Reduction of non-enzymatic browning of orange juice and semi-concentrates by removal of reaction substrate.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Satish K; Juyal, Shashibala; Rao, V K; Yadav, V K; Dixit, A K

    2014-07-01

    A study was conducted to standardize the technology for the removal of amino acids (one of the browning reaction substrates) from sweet orange cv. Malta Common juice to reduce colour and quality deterioration in single strength juice and during subsequent concentration. Juice of sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) cv. Malta Common fruits was extracted by screw type juice extractor, preserved in 500 ppm SO2 and clarified by using "Pectinase CCM" enzyme (0.2% for 2 h at 50 ± 2 °C). For removal of amino acids juice was passed under gravity through a glass column packed with an acidic cation exchange resin (CER), Dowex-50 W and quantity to be treated in one lot was standardized. The CER treated and untreated juices were concentrated to 15 and 30°Brix in a rotary vacuum evaporator. Results indicate that 121 ml of orange juice when passed through a glass column (5 cm internal diameter) packed with cation exchange resin (Dowex-50 W) upto a height of 8 cm, could remove about 98.4% of the amino acids with minimum losses in other juice constituents. With cation exchange resin treatment, the non-enzymatic browning and colour deterioration of orange juice semi-concentrates was reduced to about 3 folds in comparison to untreated counterparts. The retention of vitamin C and sugars was also better in semi-concentrates prepared from cation exchange resin treated juice. Thus, cation exchange resin treatment of orange juice prior to concentration and storage is highly beneficial in reduction of non-enzymatic browning, colour deterioration and retention of nutritional, sensory quality of product during preparation and storage.

  18. Optimization of Progressive Freeze Concentration on Apple Juice via Response Surface Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsuri, S.; Amran, N. A.; Jusoh, M.

    2018-05-01

    In this work, a progressive freeze concentration (PFC) system was developed to concentrate apple juice and was optimized by response surface methodology (RSM). The effects of various operating conditions such as coolant temperature, circulation flowrate, circulation time and shaking speed to effective partition constant (K) were investigated. Five different level of central composite design (CCD) was employed to search for optimal concentration of concentrated apple juice. A full quadratic model for K was established by using method of least squares. A coefficient of determination (R2) of this model was found to be 0.7792. The optimum conditions were found to be coolant temperature = -10.59 °C, circulation flowrate = 3030.23 mL/min, circulation time = 67.35 minutes and shaking speed = 30.96 ohm. A validation experiment was performed to evaluate the accuracy of the optimization procedure and the best K value of 0.17 was achieved under the optimized conditions.

  19. Characterization of color fade during frozen storage of red grapefruit juice concentrates.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyoung S; Coates, Gary A

    2002-07-03

    Color changes in red grapefruit juice concentrates during storage at -23 degrees C for 12 months were studied. Concentrate (38 degrees Brix) was packed in both plastic (16 oz) and metal (6 oz) cans. Decrease in red intensity (CIE a) in juice color and slight increases in CIE L*, b*, and hue values from analysis of reconstituted juices were the characteristic color changes in concentrate during frozen storage. With respect to fresh concentrate, juice color in stored concentrate shifted toward the direction between negative DeltaC* and positive DeltaL*, indicating the color became slightly paler. A color difference seems to exist between the two containers, especially for the magnitude of DeltaE*; color changes were more pronounced in concentrates packed in plastic. There are significant changes (P < 0.05) in major carotenoid pigments (beta-carotene and lycopene) in the concentrates. More than 20% loss of lycopene and about 7% loss of beta-carotene occurred with plastic containers after a 12-month period. Regression analysis showed that the rate of decline was about 0.291 ppm per month (r = 0.990) for lycopene compared to 0.045 ppm (r = 0.817) for beta-carotene in concentrate stored in plastic. In the metal can, the same trends were observed but pigment losses were slightly smaller than those with plastic. An estimated shelf life for lycopene was 26.1 months in the metal can compared to 18 months in plastic. Shelf life for beta-carotene was more than 39 months, more than twice that of lycopene in plastic container.

  20. High concentrations of anthocyanins in genuine cherry-juice of old local Austrian Prunus avium varieties.

    PubMed

    Schüller, Elisabeth; Halbwirth, Heidi; Mikulic-Petkovsek, Maja; Slatnar, Ana; Veberic, Robert; Forneck, Astrid; Stich, Karl; Spornberger, Andreas

    2015-04-15

    Antioxidant activity and polyphenols were quantified in vapour-extracted juice of nine Austrian, partially endemic varieties of sweet cherry (Prunus avium): cv. 'Spätbraune von Purbach', cv. 'Early Rivers', cv. 'Joiser Einsiedekirsche', cv. 'Große Schwarze Knorpelkirsche' and four unidentified local varieties. Additionally the effect of storage was evaluated for six of the varieties. A variety showing the highest antioxidant capacity (9.64 μmol Trolox equivalents per mL), total polyphenols (2747 mg/L) and total cyanidins (1085 mg/L) was suitable for mechanical harvest and its juice did not show any losses of antioxidant capacity and total anthocyanin concentration during storage. The juice of cv. 'Große Schwarze Knorpelkirsche' had also high concentrations of total anthocyanins (873 mg/L), but showed substantial losses through storage. The local Austrian sweet cherry varieties from the Pannonian climate zone are particularly suitable for the production of processed products like cherry juice with high content of anthocyanins and polyphenols. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. 75 FR 5763 - Certain Non-Frozen Apple Juice Concentrate from the People's Republic of China: Initiation of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [A-570-855] Certain Non-Frozen Apple... request for a new shipper review (``NSR'') of the antidumping duty order on certain non-frozen apple juice concentrate (``apple juice'') from the People's Republic of China (``PRC''), received on December 15, 2009...

  2. Not-from-concentrate pilot plant 'Wonderful' cultivar pomegranate juice changes: Volatiles.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, John C; Obando-Ulloa, Javier M

    2017-08-15

    Pilot plant ultrafiltration was used to mimic the dominant U.S. commercial pomegranate juice extraction method (hydraulic pressing whole fruit), to deliver a not-from-concentrate (NFC) juice that was high-temperature short-time pasteurized and stored at 4 and 25°C. Recovered were 46 compounds, of which 38 were routinely isolated and subjected to analysis of variance to assess these NFC juices. Herein, 18 of the 21 consensus pomegranate compounds were recovered. Ultrafiltration resulted in significant decreases for many compounds. Conversely, pasteurization resulted in compound increases. Highly significant decreases in 12 consensus compounds were observed during storage. Principal component analysis demonstrated clearly which compounds were tightly associated, and how storage samples behaved very similarly, independent of temperature. Based on these data and previous work we reported, this solid-phase microextraction (SPME) method delivered a robust 'Wonderful' volatile profile in NFC juices that is likely superior qualitatively and perhaps quantitatively to typical commercial offerings. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. 7 CFR 926.11 - Processed cranberries or cranberry products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Section 926.11 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DATA... MARKETING ORDER § 926.11 Processed cranberries or cranberry products. Processed cranberries or cranberry...

  4. 75 FR 47270 - Certain Non-Frozen Apple Juice Concentrate from the People's Republic of China: Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-05

    ... negotiate and sign contracts and other agreements; and (4) has autonomy from the government regarding the... concentrate. In addition, we have surrogate financial ratios from a Polish juice company. Of the countries...

  5. Characterization of in vitro antifungal activities of small and American cranberry (Vaccinium oxycoccos L. and V. macrocarpon Aiton) and lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea L.) concentrates in sugar reduced fruit spreads.

    PubMed

    Ermis, Ertan; Hertel, Christian; Schneider, Christin; Carle, Reinhold; Stintzing, Florian; Schmidt, Herbert

    2015-07-02

    In this study, cranberry and lingonberry concentrates were added to commercial sugar-reduced fruit spreads (raspberry-Aloe vera, strawberry-guava, and strawberry-lime), and tested for their antifungal activities. Selected strains of the species Absidia glauca, Penicillium brevicompactum, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zygosaccharomyces bailii, as well as xerophilic environmental isolates of the genera Penicillium and Eurotium were used for challenge testing. Initially, varying concentrations of synthetic antifungal agents, such as sodium benzoate, potassium sorbate and butyl 4-hydroxybenzoate were tested against these fungi on wort agar containing 31% fructose at different pH values. Subsequently, the experiments were conducted in fruit spreads containing different concentrations of cranberry and lingonberry concentrates. The results of this study demonstrate that these concentrates were able to inhibit growth of visible colonies of xerophilic and non-xerophilic fungi. Cranberry and lingonberry concentrates are interesting candidates for natural preservation against fungal growth in sugar reduced fruit spreads. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Grape juice concentrate modulates p16 expression in high fat diet-induced liver steatosis in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Andressa Orlandeli; Gollücke, Andréa Pittelli Boiago; Noguti, Juliana; da Silva, Victor Hugo Pereira; Yamamura, Elsa Tiemi Hojo; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki

    2012-04-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate whether subchronic treatment with grape juice concentrate is able to protect the liver from high fat diet injury in rats. The effects of grape juice concentrate treatment on histopathological changes, and immunohistochemistry for p53, p16 and p21 were evaluated. Male Wistar rats (n = 18) were distributed into three groups: group 1: negative control; group 2: cholesterol at 1% (w/w) in their diet, treated during 5 weeks; and group 3: cholesterol at 1% in their chow during 5 weeks, and grape juice concentrate at 222 mg per day in their drinking-water in the last week only. The results pointed out that treatment with grape juice concentrate did not show remarkable differences regarding liver tissue in the cholesterol-exposed group when compared to group 2. However, grape juice concentrate was able to modulate p16 immunoexpression when compared to high fat diet group. p53 and p21 did not show any significant statistical differences among groups. Taken together, our results suggest that subchronic grape juice concentrate administration was able to modulate cell cycle control by downregulation of p16 immunoexpression in high fat diet-induced liver steatosis in rats.

  7. Grape juice concentrate prevents oxidative DNA damage in peripheral blood cells of rats subjected to a high-cholesterol diet.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Odair; Gollücke, Andréa Pittelli Boiago; de Moraes, Bárbara Bueno; Pasquini, Gabriela; Catharino, Rodrigo Ramos; Riccio, Maria Francesca; Ihara, Silvia Saiuli Miki; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki

    2011-03-01

    The goal of the present study was to investigate whether subchronic treatment with grape juice concentrate is able to protect liver and peripheral blood cells against cholesterol-induced injury in rats. The effects of the grape juice concentrate treatment on histopathological changes, immunohistochemistry for cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2), and basal and oxidative DNA damage induced by H2O2 using a single-cell gel (comet) assay were evaluated. Male Wistar rats (n 18) were divided into three groups: group 1--negative control; group 2--cholesterol at 1 % (w/w) in their diet, treated for 5 weeks; group 3--cholesterol at 1 % in their chow, treated for 5 weeks, and grape juice concentrate at 222 mg/d in their drinking-water in the final week only. The results indicated that the treatment with grape juice concentrate did not show remarkable differences regarding liver tissue in group 3 compared with group 2. However, grape juice concentrate was able to decrease oxidative DNA damage induced by H2O2 in peripheral blood cells, as depicted by the tail moment results. COX-2 expression in the liver did not show statistically significant differences (P>0·05) between groups. Taken together, the present results suggest that the administration of subchronic grape juice concentrate prevents oxidative DNA damage in peripheral blood cells.

  8. Toxicity of chelated iron (Fe-DTPA) in American cranberry

    American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) is naturally adapted to environments with high concentrations of soluble iron. Yet, there is a need to further explore iron nutrition in cranberry given concerns of toxicity problems from irrigation with iron-rich water. This study investigated the threat o...

  9. Survey of molds, yeast and Alicyclobacillus spp. from a concentrated apple juice productive process.

    PubMed

    de Cássia Martins Salomão, Beatriz; Muller, Chalana; do Amparo, Hudson Couto; de Aragão, Gláucia Maria Falcão

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria and molds may spoil and/or contaminate apple juice either by direct microbial action or indirectly by the uptake of metabolites as off-flavours and toxins. Some of these microorganisms and/or metabolites may remain in the food even after extensive procedures. This study aim to identify the presence of molds (including heat resistant species) and Alicyclobacillus spp., during concentrated apple juice processing. Molds were isolated at different steps and then identified by their macroscopic and microscopic characteristics after cultivation on standard media at 5, 25 and 37 °C, during 7 days. Among the 19 isolated found, 63% were identified as Penicillium with 50% belonging to the P. expansum specie. With regards to heat resistant molds, the species Neosartorya fischeri, Byssochlamys fulva and also the genus Eupenicillium sp., Talaromyces sp. and Eurotium sp. were isolated. The thermoacidophilic spore-forming bacteria were identified as A. acidoterrestris by a further investigation based on 16S rRNA sequence similarity. The large contamination found indicates the need for methods to eliminate or prevent the presence of these microorganisms in the processing plants in order to avoid both spoilage of apple juice and toxin production.

  10. New beverages of lemon juice with elderberry and grape concentrates as a source of bioactive compounds.

    PubMed

    González-Molina, Elena; Gironés-Vilaplana, Amadeo; Mena, Pedro; Moreno, Diego A; García-Viguera, Cristina

    2012-06-01

    Considering the health potential of lemon and berry fruits, different functional beverages rich in antioxidant phytochemicals, which demonstrated beneficial effects, were developed. To fulfill this objective, lemon juice was combined with 2 different concentrates, elderberry and grape, in a proportion of 5% (w/v). Bioactive composition (flavonoids and vitamin C) and color stability, as well as the antioxidant capacity of mixtures, during a period of 56 d of storage, were studied. A protective role of anthocyanins on ascorbic acid preservation was noted for both lemon-berry blends, keeping vitamin C stable until the end of the storage. In addition, the new drink combining lemon and elderberry performed better than the grape-lemon mixture in terms of health-promoting phytochemicals content, just as in vitro antioxidant capacity and color characteristics. Beverages made from lemon juice and berries could contribute to develop new drinks with a prolonged preservation of bioactive compounds throughout storage, keeping an attractive color and a high antioxidant activity during long periods of time. The information obtained in the present work is in agreement to the rules of health and safety for juices established by the Directive of European Commission Dir2001/112/CE incorporated to the Spanish law through the RD1050/2003 regulation. Consequently, an improved performance of industrial products would be achieved. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  11. Effect of irradiation on the patulin content and chemical composition of apple juice concentrate.

    PubMed

    Zegota, H; Zegota, A; Bachman, S

    1988-09-01

    The influence of ionizing radiation on the patulin content of apple juice concentrate was investigated. The results indicated that patulin, at an initial concentration of about 2 mg/kg, disappeared after irradiation of the concentrate with doses as low as 2.5 kGy. For lower doses, the extent of patulin degradation was proportional to the absorbed dose. Irradiation of the concentrate with doses sufficient for patulin disappearance did not change the titratable acidity, the content of reducing sugars and carbonyl compounds or the amino acid composition. The content of ascorbic acid slightly decreased and the colour of the concentrate brightened. The intensity of the patulin absorption spectra after irradiation of mycotoxin in aqueous solutions decreased.

  12. Modeling the rheological behavior of thermosonic extracted guava, pomelo, and soursop juice concentrates at different concentration and temperature using a new combination model

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Norazlin; Yusof, Yus A.; Talib, Rosnita A.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract This study has modeled the rheological behavior of thermosonic extracted pink‐fleshed guava, pink‐fleshed pomelo, and soursop juice concentrates at different concentrations and temperatures. The effects of concentration on consistency coefficient (K) and flow behavior index (n) of the fruit juice concentrates was modeled using a master curve which utilized the concentration‐temperature shifting to allow a general prediction of rheological behaviors covering a wide concentration. For modeling the effects of temperature on K and n, the integration of two functions from the Arrhenius and logistic sigmoidal growth equations has provided a new model which gave better description of the properties. It also alleviated the problems of negative region when using the Arrhenius model alone. The fitted regression using this new model has improved coefficient of determination, R 2 values above 0.9792 as compared to using the Arrhenius and logistic sigmoidal models alone, which presented minimum R 2 of 0.6243 and 0.9440, respectively. Practical applications In general, juice concentrate is a better form of food for transportation, preservation, and ingredient. Models are necessary to predict the effects of processing factors such as concentration and temperature on the rheological behavior of juice concentrates. The modeling approach allows prediction of behaviors and determination of processing parameters. The master curve model introduced in this study simplifies and generalized rheological behavior of juice concentrates over a wide range of concentration when temperature factor is insignificant. The proposed new mathematical model from the combination of the Arrhenius and logistic sigmoidal growth models has improved and extended description of rheological properties of fruit juice concentrates. It also solved problems of negative values of consistency coefficient and flow behavior index prediction using existing model, the Arrhenius equation. These rheological

  13. Utilization of concentrate after membrane filtration of sugar beet thin juice for ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Kawa-Rygielska, Joanna; Pietrzak, Witold; Regiec, Piotr; Stencel, Piotr

    2013-04-01

    The subject of this study was to investigate the feasibility of the concentrate obtained after membrane ultrafiltration of sugar beet thin juice for ethanol production and selection of fermentation conditions (yeast strain and media supplementation). Resulting concentrate was subjected to batch ethanol fermentation using two strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Ethanol Red and Safdistill C-70). The effect of different forms of media supplementation (mineral salts: (NH4)2SO4, K2HPO4, MgCl2; urea+Mg3(PO4)2 and yeast extract) on the fermentation course was also studied. It was stated that sugar beet juice concentrate is suitable for ethanol production yielding, depending on the yeast strain, ca. 85-87 g L(-1) ethanol with ca. 82% practical yield and more than 95% of sugars consumption after 72 h of fermentation. Nutrients enrichment further increased ethanol yield. The best results were obtained for media supplemented with urea+Mg3(PO4)2 yielding 91.16-92.06 g L(-1) ethanol with practical yield ranging 84.78-85.62% and full sugars consumption. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Effect of irradiation and storage on patulin disappearance and some chemical constituents of apple juice concentrate.

    PubMed

    Zegota, H; Zegota, A; Bachmann, S

    1988-10-01

    The effect of irradiation on the patulin content and on the chemical composition of apple juice concentrate during storage at 4 degrees C over a period of several weeks was investigated. The radiation-induced disappearance of the mycotoxin in relation to the absorbed dose followed an exponential relationship. The radiation dose (D50), i.e., the dose which reduced the patulin content to 50% of its initial value was equal to 0.35 kGy. Storage of the irradiated concentrate had no effect on the patulin content; however, storage did lead to a slight increase in the titratable acidity and a decrease in the amounts of the carbonyl compounds and the ascorbic acid concentration. The development of non-enzymatic browning during storage of the irradiated samples followed the same kinetics as that of the non-irradiated samples.

  15. Effects of heating method and conditions on the evaporation rate and quality attributes of black mulberry (Morus nigra) juice concentrate.

    PubMed

    Fazaeli, Mahboubeh; Hojjatpanah, Ghazale; Emam-Djomeh, Zahra

    2013-02-01

    Black mulberry juice was concentrated by different heating methods, including conventional heating and microwave heating, at different operational pressures (7.3, 38.5 and 100 kPa). The effects of each method on evaporation rate, quality attributes of concentrated juice were investigated. The final juice concentration of 42° Brix was achieved in 140, 120, and 95 min at 100, 38.5, and 7.3 kPa respectively by using a rotary evaporator. Applying microwave energy decreased required times to 115, 95, and 60 min. The changes in color, anthocyanin content during the concentration processes were investigated. Hunter parameters (L, a, and b) were measured to estimate the intensity of color loss. All Hunter color parameters decreased with time. Results showed that the degradation of color and consequently anthocyanins, was more pronounced in rotary evaporation compared to microwave heating method.

  16. An encapsulated fruit and vegetable juice concentrate increases skin microcirculation in healthy women.

    PubMed

    De Spirt, S; Sies, H; Tronnier, H; Heinrich, U

    2012-01-01

    Microcirculation in the dermis of the skin is important for nutrient delivery to this tissue. In this study, the effects of a micronutrient concentrate (Juice Plus+®; 'active group'), composed primarily of fruit and vegetable juice powder, on skin microcirculation and structure were compared to placebo. This 12-week study had a monocentric, double-blind placebo and randomized controlled design with two treatment groups consisting of 26 healthy middle-aged women each. The 'oxygen to see' device was used to evaluate microcirculation. Skin density and thickness were measured using ultrasound. Measurements for skin hydration (Corneometer®), transepidermal water loss and serum analysis for carotenoids and α-tocopherol were also performed. By 12 weeks, microcirculation of the superficial plexus increased by 39%. Furthermore, skin hydration increased by 9% while skin thickness increased by 6% and skin density by 16% in the active group. In the placebo group, microcirculation decreased, and a slight increase in skin density was observed. Ingestion of a fruit- and vegetable-based concentrate increases microcirculation of the skin at 12 weeks of intervention and positively affects skin hydration, density and thickness. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Patulin reduction in apple juice from concentrate by UV radiation and comparison of kinetic degradation models between apple juice and apple cider.

    PubMed

    Assatarakul, Kitipong; Churey, John J; Manns, David C; Worobo, Randy W

    2012-04-01

    Patulin, a mycotoxin produced by several genera of fungi, including Byssochlamys, Aspergillus, and Penicillium, has been an important concern in apple cider and apple juice due to its toxicity and health consequences. In this study, the effects of UV on the patulin level, physical and chemical properties, and sensory attributes in apple juice from concentrate were investigated. Kinetic modeling of patulin reduction by UV radiation in apple juice from concentrate was calculated and compared with the degradation rate observed previously in apple cider. From an initial patulin contamination of approximately 1,000 ppb (μg/liter), the UV exposure, ranging from 14.2 mJ/cm(2) (one pass) to 99.4 mJ/cm(2) (seven passes), was successful in reducing patulin levels by 72.57% ± 2.76% to 5.14% ± 0.70%, respectively. Patulin reduction by UV radiation followed first-order kinetic modeling in a fashion similar to first-order microbial inactivation. An exponential correlation between UV exposure and the percentage of patulin remaining was observed, giving an r(2) value of 0.9950. Apple juice was repeatedly exposed to 14.2 mJ/cm(2) for each treatment, and patulin levels were significantly decreased when compared with the level obtained with the previous UV exposure treatment. While there were no significant differences in the percentages of titratable acidity and ascorbic acid (P > 0.05), there were minor yet random sampling differences in pH and degrees Brix (1 °Brix is 1 g of sucrose in 100 g of solution; the °Brix represents the soluble solids content of the solution as percentage by weight [%, wt/wt]) (P ≤ 0.05). A significant difference (P ≤ 0.05) in sensory perception for the finished apple juice was detected between the control and the full seven-pass UV radiation treatment using an experienced consumer panel and a triangle test. Patulin reduction by UV radiation from both the current study and a previous study involving apple cider was compared, which showed that

  18. Meat juice: An alternative matrix for assessing animal health by measuring acute phase proteins. Correlations of pig-MAP and haptoglobin concentrations in pig meat juice and plasma.

    PubMed

    Piñeiro, M; Gymnich, S; Knura, S; Piñeiro, C; Petersen, B

    2009-10-01

    Quantification of acute phase proteins (APPs) in blood can be used for monitoring animal health and welfare on farms, and could be also of interest for the detection of diseased animals during the meat inspection process. However serum or plasma is not always available for end-point analysis at slaughter. Meat juice might provide an adequate, alternative matrix that can be easily obtained for post-mortem analysis at abattoirs. The concentrations of pig Major Acute phase Protein (pig-MAP) and haptoglobin, two of the main APPs in pigs, were determined in approximately 300 paired samples of plasma and meat juice from the diaphragm (pars costalis), obtained after freezing and thawing the muscle. APPs concentrations in meat juice were closely correlated to those in plasma (r=0.695 for haptoglobin, r=0.858 for pig-MAP, p<0.001). These results open new possibilities for the assessment of animal health in pig production, with implications for food safety and meat quality.

  19. Effects of an Encapsulated Fruit and Vegetable Juice Concentrate on Obesity-Induced Systemic Inflammation: A Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Evan J.; Baines, Katherine J.; Berthon, Bronwyn S.; Wood, Lisa G.

    2017-01-01

    Phytochemicals from fruit and vegetables reduce systemic inflammation. This study examined the effects of an encapsulated fruit and vegetable (F&V) juice concentrate on systemic inflammation and other risk factors for chronic disease in overweight and obese adults. A double-blinded, parallel, randomized placebo-controlled trial was conducted in 56 adults aged ≥40 years with a body mass index (BMI) ≥28 kg/m2. Before and after eight weeks daily treatment with six capsules of F&V juice concentrate or placebo, peripheral blood gene expression (microarray, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR)), plasma tumour necrosis factor (TNF)α (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)), body composition (Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA)) and lipid profiles were assessed. Following consumption of juice concentrate, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and plasma TNFα decreased and total lean mass increased, while there was no change in the placebo group. In subjects with high systemic inflammation at baseline (serum C-reactive protein (CRP) ≥3.0 mg/mL) who were supplemented with the F&V juice concentrate (n = 16), these effects were greater, with decreased total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and plasma TNFα and increased total lean mass; plasma CRP was unchanged by the F&V juice concentrate following both analyses. The expression of several genes involved in lipogenesis, the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and 5′ adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signalling pathways was altered, including phosphomevalonate kinase (PMVK), zinc finger AN1-type containing 5 (ZFAND5) and calcium binding protein 39 (CAB39), respectively. Therefore, F&V juice concentrate improves the metabolic profile, by reducing systemic inflammation and blood lipid profiles and, thus, may be useful in reducing the risk of obesity-induced chronic disease. PMID:28208713

  20. Effects of an Encapsulated Fruit and Vegetable Juice Concentrate on Obesity-Induced Systemic Inflammation: A Randomised Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Williams, Evan J; Baines, Katherine J; Berthon, Bronwyn S; Wood, Lisa G

    2017-02-08

    Phytochemicals from fruit and vegetables reduce systemic inflammation. This study examined the effects of an encapsulated fruit and vegetable (F&V) juice concentrate on systemic inflammation and other risk factors for chronic disease in overweight and obese adults. A double-blinded, parallel, randomized placebo-controlled trial was conducted in 56 adults aged ≥40 years with a body mass index (BMI) ≥28 kg/m². Before and after eight weeks daily treatment with six capsules of F&V juice concentrate or placebo, peripheral blood gene expression (microarray, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR)), plasma tumour necrosis factor (TNF)α (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)), body composition (Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA)) and lipid profiles were assessed. Following consumption of juice concentrate, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and plasma TNFα decreased and total lean mass increased, while there was no change in the placebo group. In subjects with high systemic inflammation at baseline (serum C-reactive protein (CRP) ≥3.0 mg/mL) who were supplemented with the F&V juice concentrate ( n = 16), these effects were greater, with decreased total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and plasma TNFα and increased total lean mass; plasma CRP was unchanged by the F&V juice concentrate following both analyses. The expression of several genes involved in lipogenesis, the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signalling pathways was altered, including phosphomevalonate kinase (PMVK), zinc finger AN1-type containing 5 (ZFAND5) and calcium binding protein 39 (CAB39), respectively. Therefore, F&V juice concentrate improves the metabolic profile, by reducing systemic inflammation and blood lipid profiles and, thus, may be useful in reducing the risk of obesity-induced chronic disease.

  1. Are High Proanthocyanidins Key to Cranberry Efficacy in the Prevention of Recurrent Urinary Tract Infection?

    PubMed

    Vostalova, Jitka; Vidlar, Ales; Simanek, Vilim; Galandakova, Adela; Kosina, Pavel; Vacek, Jan; Vrbkova, Jana; Zimmermann, Benno F; Ulrichova, Jitka; Student, Vladimir

    2015-10-01

    Most research on American cranberry in the prevention of urinary tract infection (UTI) has used juices. The spectrum of components in juice is limited. This study tested whether whole cranberry fruit powder (proanthocyanidin content 0.56%) could prevent recurrent UTI in 182 women with two or more UTI episodes in the last year. Participants were randomized to a cranberry (n = 89) or a placebo group (n = 93) and received daily 500 mg of cranberry for 6 months. The number of UTI diagnoses was counted. The intent-to-treat analyses showed that in the cranberry group, the UTIs were significantly fewer [10.8% vs. 25.8%, p = 0.04, with an age-standardized 12-month UTI history (p = 0.01)]. The Kaplan-Meier survival curves showed that the cranberry group experienced a longer time to first UTI than the placebo group (p = 0.04). Biochemical parameters were normal, and there was no significant difference in urinary phenolics between the groups at baseline or on day180. The results show that cranberry fruit powder (peel, seeds, pulp) may reduce the risk of symptomatic UTI in women with a history of recurrent UTIs. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Quantifying and characterizing proanthocyanidins in cranberries in relation to urinary tract health.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Christian G; Reed, Jess D; Feliciano, Rodrigo P; Howell, Amy B

    2013-05-01

    The "A-type" proanthocyanidins in cranberry fruit (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) are bioactive components associated with prevention of urinary tract infections (UTI). Cranberry juice, fruit (fresh and dried), functional foods, and cranberry dietary supplements are promoted for prevention of UTI and for maintenance of urinary tract health (UTH), on the basis of their content of cranberry proanthocyanidins (c-PAC) with "A-type" interflavan bonds. With increasing consumer use of cranberries for maintenance of UTH and an expanding number of commercial cranberry products of different types, the availability of unified methods for measuring levels of c-PAC is important. This review discusses quantitative and qualitative analysis of c-PAC with "A-type" interflavan bonds in relation to their biological activity for UTI prevention. The integrity (including authenticity, standardization, efficacy, and safety) of cranberry fruit, juices, and dietary supplements may now be measured by using recent advances in mass spectrometry, liquid chromatography, production of c-PAC standards, and improved simple quantitative techniques.

  3. Measurements, patterns, and controls of nitrogen flux in a cranberry bed during the harvest flood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, C. D.

    2012-12-01

    Nitrogen (N) is an essential nutrient for cranberry production but also a source of freshwater eutrophication in southeastern Massachusetts. Surface application of N fertilizer is pervasive throughout the cranberry industry, accounting for 93% of total annual N export from farms. The agricultural practice of "wet harvesting", involving the flooding of farms with ~1 ft of water, may promote the vertical transport and transformation of nitrogen in cranberry beds. A cranberry bed at the University of Massachusetts Cranberry Station (East Wareham, MA) has been instrumented with a network of hydrological monitoring equipment for quantifying patterns and controls of nitrogen dynamics during the harvest flood. Here, data of (1) hydraulic head gradient between floodwater and groundwater (J), (2) hydraulic conductivity (K), and (3) N concentration in groundwater (C) collected from multiple points on the cranberry bed will be presented, and used to evaluate the patterns and controls N fluxes (f = JKC) in the cranberry bed.

  4. Ultrasound assisted forward osmosis concentration of fruit juice and natural colorant.

    PubMed

    Chanukya, B S; Rastogi, Navin K

    2017-01-01

    The present study deals with the effect of higher and lower molecular weight compounds present in the feed on concentration polarization during forward osmosis concentration and its mitigation by the application of ultrasound. The effects of ultrasound on transmembrane water flux at different forward osmosis membrane orientations and different model feed solutions consisting of sucrose and pectin have also been evaluated. The feed containing sucrose and pectin subjected towards active layer of the membrane was found to be the most suitable orientation. The application of ultrasound (30kHz) significantly reduced the concentration polarization when the feed contains sucrose concentration up to 5%. Whereas, in case of feed containing 0.5% pectin, the ultrasound was not found to be effective in dislodging the gel layer formation resulting in severe external concentration polarization on the membrane surface. In comparison to the ordinary forward osmosis process, the ultrasound-assisted forward osmosis process resulted in higher water fluxes in case of sweet lime juice as well as rose extract containing anthocyanin. The degradation of rose anthocyanin due to ultrasound was found to be 1.82%. Application of ultrasound was found to be an effective way in mitigating concentration polarization on the forward osmosis membrane resulting in increased flux. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry quantification of urinary proanthocyanin A2 dimer and its potential use as a biomarker of cranberry intake

    The lack of a biomarker for the consumption of cranberries has confounded the interpretation of several studies investigating the effect of cranberry products, especially juices, on health outcomes. The objectives of this pilot study were to develop a liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometric ...

  6. 7 CFR 926.4 - Cranberries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cranberries. 926.4 Section 926.4 Agriculture... RECORDKEEPING REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.4 Cranberries. Cranberries means all varieties of the fruit Vaccinium Macrocarpon and Vaccinium oxycoccus, known...

  7. 7 CFR 926.4 - Cranberries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cranberries. 926.4 Section 926.4 Agriculture... RECORDKEEPING REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.4 Cranberries. Cranberries means all varieties of the fruit Vaccinium Macrocarpon and Vaccinium oxycoccus, known...

  8. 7 CFR 926.4 - Cranberries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Cranberries. 926.4 Section 926.4 Agriculture... RECORDKEEPING REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.4 Cranberries. Cranberries means all varieties of the fruit Vaccinium Macrocarpon and Vaccinium oxycoccus, known...

  9. 7 CFR 926.4 - Cranberries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cranberries. 926.4 Section 926.4 Agriculture... RECORDKEEPING REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.4 Cranberries. Cranberries means all varieties of the fruit Vaccinium Macrocarpon and Vaccinium oxycoccus, known...

  10. Cranberry vulnerability statement

    Cranberries, Vaccinium macrocarpon Aiton, are native to North America. The U.S. is the world’s largest producer with Canada and Chile also producing significant quantities. The top producing states are Wisconsin, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Washington, Oregon, and Maine. In 2016, production was 683.7...

  11. Free amino nitrogen concentration correlates to total yeast assimilable nitrogen concentration in apple juice.

    PubMed

    Boudreau, Thomas F; Peck, Gregory M; O'Keefe, Sean F; Stewart, Amanda C

    2018-01-01

    Yeast assimilable nitrogen (YAN) is essential for yeast growth and metabolism during apple ( Malus x domestica Borkh.) cider fermentation. YAN concentration and composition can impact cider fermentation kinetics and the formation of volatile aroma compounds by yeast. The YAN concentration and composition of apples grown in Virginia, USA over the course of two seasons was determined through analysis of both free amino nitrogen (FAN) and ammonium ion concentration. FAN was the largest fraction of YAN, with a mean value of 51 mg N L -1 FAN compared to 9 mg N L -1 ammonium. Observed YAN values ranged from nine to 249 mg N L -1 , with a mean value of 59 mg N L -1 . Ninety-four percent of all samples analyzed in this study contained <140 mg N L -1 YAN, a concentration generally considered the minimum level needed in grape-based wines for yeast to fully utilize all of the fermentable sugars. FAN concentration was correlated with total YAN concentration, but ammonium concentration was not. Likewise, there was no correlation between FAN and ammonium concentration.

  12. A mathematical model of the pancreatic duct cell generating high bicarbonate concentrations in pancreatic juice.

    PubMed

    Whitcomb, David C; Ermentrout, G Bard

    2004-08-01

    To develop a simple, physiologically based mathematical model of pancreatic duct cell secretion using experimentally derived parameters that generates pancreatic fluid bicarbonate concentrations of >140 mM after CFTR activation. A new mathematical model was developed simulating a duct cell within a proximal pancreatic duct and included a sodium-2-bicarbonate cotransporter (NBC) and sodium-potassium pump (NaK pump) on a chloride-impermeable basolateral membrane, CFTR on the luminal membrane with 0.2 to 1 bicarbonate to chloride permeability ratio. Chloride-bicarbonate antiporters (Cl/HCO3 AP) were added or subtracted from the basolateral (APb) and luminal (APl) membranes. The model was integrated over time using XPPAUT. This model predicts robust, NaK pump-dependent bicarbonate secretion with opening of the CFTR, generates and maintains pancreatic fluid secretion with bicarbonate concentrations >140 mM, and returns to basal levels with CFTR closure. Limiting CFTR permeability to bicarbonate, as seen in some CFTR mutations, markedly inhibited pancreatic bicarbonate and fluid secretion. A simple CFTR-dependent duct cell model can explain active, high-volume, high-concentration bicarbonate secretion in pancreatic juice that reproduces the experimental findings. This model may also provide insight into why CFTR mutations that predominantly affect bicarbonate permeability predispose to pancreatic dysfunction in humans.

  13. The use of fuzzy logic to determine the concentration of betel leaf essential oil and its potency as a juice preservative.

    PubMed

    Basak, Suradeep

    2018-02-01

    The present study was attempted to determine organoleptically acceptable concentration of betel leaf essential oil (BLEO) in raw apple juice using fuzzy logic approach, and to evaluate the efficacy of the acceptable concentration in the juice under refrigerated storage. The presence of BLEO components in treated juice was confirmed by FTIR spectroscopy. Based on similarity values, the acceptable concentration in the juice was found to be 0.19µl/ml of BLEO. Total antioxidant capacity of untreated juice was found to be 16% less than treated juice at the end of storage. The treated juice exceeded total aerobic plate count of 2 log 10 (cfu/ml) on 15th day of storage. Based on safe limits of microbial load, the shelf life of treated juice was extended by 6days as compared to untreated juice under refrigerated storage. BLEO contributes to green consumerism and its application as food preservative will add value to the product. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Assessment of colour changes during storage of elderberry juice concentrate solutions using the optimization method.

    PubMed

    Walkowiak-Tomczak, Dorota; Czapski, Janusz; Młynarczyk, Karolina

    2016-01-01

    Elderberries are a source of dietary supplements and bioactive compounds, such as anthocyanins. These dyes are used in food technology. The aim of the study was to assess the changes in colour parameters, anthocyanin contents and sensory attributes in solutions of elderberry juice concentrates during storage in a model system and to determine predictability of sensory attributes of colour in solutions based on regression equations using the response surface methodology. The experiment was carried out according to the 3-level factorial design for three factors. Independent variables included pH, storage time and temperature. Dependent variables were assumed to be the components and colour parameters in the CIE L*a*b* system, pigment contents and sensory attributes. Changes in colour components X, Y, Z and colour parameters L*, a*, b*, C* and h* were most dependent on pH values. Colour lightness L* and tone h* increased with an increase in experimental factors, while the share of the red colour a* and colour saturation C* decreased. The greatest effect on the anthocyanin concentration was recorded for storage time. Sensory attributes deteriorated during storage. The highest correlation coefficients were found between the value of colour tone h* and anthocyanin contents in relation to the assessment of the naturalness and desirability of colour. A high goodness-of-fit of the model to data and high values of R2 for regression equations were obtained for all responses. The response surface method facilitates optimization of experimental factor values in order to obtain a specific attribute of the product, but not in all cases of the experiment. Within the tested range of factors, it is possible to predict changes in anthocyanin content and the sensory attributes of elderberry juice concentrate solutions as food dye, on the basis of the lack of a fit test. The highest stability of dyes and colour of elderberry solutions was found in the samples at pH 3.0, which confirms

  15. Isolation and Identification of Intestinal CYP3A Inhibitors from Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) using Human Intestinal Microsomes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eunkyung; Sy-Cordero, Arlene; Graf, Tyler N.; Brantley, Scott J.; Paine, Mary F.; Oberlies, Nicholas H.

    2010-01-01

    Cranberry juice is used routinely, especially among women and the elderly, to prevent and treat urinary tract infections. These individuals are likely to be taking medications concomitantly with cranberry juice, leading to concern about potential drug-dietary substance interactions, particularly in the intestine, which, along with the liver, is rich in expression of the prominent drug metabolizing enzyme, cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A). Using a systematic in vitro-in vivo approach, a cranberry juice product was identified recently that elicited a pharmacokinetic interaction with the CYP3A probe substrate midazolam in 16 healthy volunteers. Relative to water, a cranberry juice inhibited intestinal first-pass midazolam metabolism. In vitro studies were initiated to identify potential enteric CYP3A inhibitors from cranberry via a bioactivity-directed fractionation approach involving dried whole cranberry [Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait. (Ericaceae)], midazolam, and human intestinal microsomes (HIM). Three triterpenes (maslinic acid, corosolic acid, and ursolic acid) were isolated. The inhibitory potency (IC50) of maslinic acid, corosolic acid, and ursolic acid was 7.4, 8.8, and <10 μM, respectively, using HIM as the enzyme source and was 2.8, 4.3, and <10 μM, respectively, using recombinant CYP3A4 as the enzyme source. These in vitro inhibitory potencies, which are within the range of those reported for two CYP3A inhibitory components in grapefruit juice, suggest that these triterpenes may have contributed to the midazolam-cranberry juice interaction observed in the clinical study. PMID:20717876

  16. Isolation and identification of intestinal CYP3A inhibitors from cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) using human intestinal microsomes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunkyung; Sy-Cordero, Arlene; Graf, Tyler N; Brantley, Scott J; Paine, Mary F; Oberlies, Nicholas H

    2011-02-01

    Cranberry juice is used routinely, especially among women and the elderly, to prevent and treat urinary tract infections. These individuals are likely to be taking medications concomitantly with cranberry juice, leading to concern about potential drug-dietary substance interactions, particularly in the intestine, which, along with the liver, is rich in expression of the prominent drug metabolizing enzyme, cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A). Using a systematic in vitro-in vivo approach, a cranberry juice product was identified recently that elicited a pharmacokinetic interaction with the CYP3A probe substrate midazolam in 16 healthy volunteers. Relative to water, cranberry juice inhibited intestinal first-pass midazolam metabolism. In vitro studies were initiated to identify potential enteric CYP3A inhibitors from cranberry via a bioactivity-directed fractionation approach involving dried whole cranberry [Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait. (Ericaceae)], midazolam, and human intestinal microsomes (HIM). Three triterpenes (maslinic acid, corosolic acid, and ursolic acid) were isolated. The inhibitory potency (IC(50)) of maslinic acid, corosolic acid, and ursolic acid was 7.4, 8.8, and < 10 µM, respectively, using HIM as the enzyme source and 2.8, 4.3, and < 10 µM, respectively, using recombinant CYP3A4 as the enzyme source. These in vitro inhibitory potencies, which are within the range of those reported for two CYP3A inhibitory components in grapefruit juice, suggest that these triterpenes may have contributed to the midazolam-cranberry juice interaction observed in the clinical study. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Effects of Apple Juice Concentrate, Blackcurrant Concentrate and Pectin Levels on Selected Qualities of Apple-Blackcurrant Fruit Leather

    PubMed Central

    Diamante, Lemuel M.; Li, Siwei; Xu, Qianqian; Busch, Janette

    2013-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of different levels of apple juice concentrate (AJC), blackcurrant concentrate (BCC) and pectin on the moisture content, water activity, color, texture and ascorbic acid content of apple-blackcurrant fruit leather using the response surface methodology. The results showed the moisture content increased with increasing pectin level and with greater increases at higher AJC and BCC levels while the water activity increased with increasing pectin level and with increasing AJC level, at low pectin levels, but with decreasing AJC, at high pectin levels. The chroma decreased with increasing pectin level and with lower values at the middle AJC level. The puncturing force decreased with increasing AJC level but with a lower value at the middle pectin level. Lastly, the ascorbic acid content increased with increasing BCC level regardless of AJC and pectin levels. There is a need to reduce the drying temperature or time of apple-blackcurrant fruit leather just enough to bring the water activity closer to 0.60, thereby increasing the moisture content resulting in higher product yield. PMID:28239127

  18. Effects of Apple Juice Concentrate, Blackcurrant Concentrate and Pectin Levels on Selected Qualities of Apple-Blackcurrant Fruit Leather.

    PubMed

    Diamante, Lemuel M; Li, Siwei; Xu, Qianqian; Busch, Janette

    2013-09-12

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of different levels of apple juice concentrate (AJC), blackcurrant concentrate (BCC) and pectin on the moisture content, water activity, color, texture and ascorbic acid content of apple-blackcurrant fruit leather using the response surface methodology. The results showed the moisture content increased with increasing pectin level and with greater increases at higher AJC and BCC levels while the water activity increased with increasing pectin level and with increasing AJC level, at low pectin levels, but with decreasing AJC, at high pectin levels. The chroma decreased with increasing pectin level and with lower values at the middle AJC level. The puncturing force decreased with increasing AJC level but with a lower value at the middle pectin level. Lastly, the ascorbic acid content increased with increasing BCC level regardless of AJC and pectin levels. There is a need to reduce the drying temperature or time of apple-blackcurrant fruit leather just enough to bring the water activity closer to 0.60, thereby increasing the moisture content resulting in higher product yield.

  19. Food-drug interactions precipitated by fruit juices other than grapefruit juice: An update review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Meng; Zhou, Shu-Yi; Fabriaga, Erlinda; Zhang, Pian-Hong; Zhou, Quan

    2018-04-01

    This review addressed drug interactions precipitated by fruit juices other than grapefruit juice based on randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Literature was identified by searching PubMed, Cochrane Library, Scopus and Web of Science till December 30 2017. Among 46 finally included RCTs, six RCTs simply addressed pharmacodynamic interactions and 33 RCTs studied pharmacokinetic interactions, whereas seven RCTs investigated both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions. Twenty-two juice-drug combinations showed potential clinical relevance. The beneficial combinations included orange juice-ferrous fumarate, lemon juice- 99m Tc-tetrofosmin, pomegranate juice-intravenous iron during hemodialysis, cranberry juice-triple therapy medications for H. pylori, blueberry juice-etanercept, lime juice-antimalarials, and wheat grass juice-chemotherapy. The potential adverse interactions included decreased drug bioavailability (apple juice-fexofenadine, atenolol, aliskiren; orange juice-aliskiren, atenolol, celiprolol, montelukast, fluoroquinolones, alendronate; pomelo juice-sildenafil; grape juice-cyclosporine), increased bioavailability (Seville orange juice-felodipine, pomelo juice-cyclosporine, orange-aluminum containing antacids). Unlike furanocoumarin-rich grapefruit juice which could primarily precipitate drug interactions by strong inhibition of cytochrome P450 3A4 isoenzyme and P-glycoprotein and thus cause deadly outcomes due to co-ingestion with some medications, other fruit juices did not precipitate severely detrimental food-drug interaction despite of sporadic case reports. The extent of a juice-drug interaction may be associated with volume of drinking juice, fruit varieties, type of fruit, time between juice drinking and drug intake, genetic polymorphism in the enzymes or transporters and anthropometric variables. Pharmacists and health professionals should properly screen for and educate patients about potential adverse juice-drug interactions and help

  20. Inoculation of cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) with the ericoid mycorrhizal fungus Rhizoscyphus ericae increases nitrate influx.

    PubMed

    Kosola, Kevin R; Workmaster, Beth Ann A; Spada, Piero A

    2007-01-01

    Despite the ubiquitous presence of ericoid mycorrhizal (ERM) fungi in cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon), no prior studies have examined the effect of ERM colonization on NO(3)(-) influx kinetics. Here, (15)NO(3)(-) influx was measured in nonmycorrhizal and mycorrhizal cranberry in hydroponics. Mycorrhizal cranberry were inoculated with the ERM fungus Rhizoscyphus (syn. Hymenoscyphus) ericae. (15)NO(3)(-) influx by R. ericae in solution culture was also measured. Rhizoscyphus ericae NO(3)(-) influx kinetics were linear when mycelium was exposed for 24 h to 3.8 mm NH(4)(+), and saturable when pretreated with 3.8 mm NO(3)(-), 50 microm NO(3)(-), or 50 microm NH(4)(+). Both low-N pretreatments induced greater NO(3)(-) influx than either of the high-N pretreatments. Nonmycorrhizal cranberry exhibited linear NO(3)(-) influx kinetics. By contrast, mycorrhizal cranberry had saturable NO(3)(-) influx kinetics, with c. eightfold greater NO(3)(-) influx than nonmycorrhizal cranberry at NO(3)(-) concentrations from 20 microm to 2 mm. There was no influence of pretreatments on cranberry NO(3)(-) influx kinetics, regardless of mycorrhizal status. Inoculation with R. ericae increased the capacity of cranberry to utilize NO(3)(-)-N. This finding is significant both for understanding the potential nutrient niche breadth of cranberry and for management of cultivated cranberry when irrigation water sources contain nitrate.

  1. Effects of heat, pH, antioxidant, agitation and light on betacyanin stability using red-fleshed dragon fruit (Hylocereus polyrhizus) juice and concentrate as models.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yen-Ming; Siow, Lee-Fong

    2015-05-01

    Red-fleshed dragon fruit (Hylocereus polyrhizus) is rich in antioxidants. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of heat pasteurization, pH adjustment, ascorbic acid addition as well as storage under agitation and light or dark condition on betacyanin content in red-fleshed dragon fruit (Hylocereus polyrhizus) juice and concentrate. The concentrate was produced by concentrating clarified red-fleshed dragon fruit juice in a rotary evaporator at 40 °C. UV-Visible spectrophotometer was used for analyzing betacyanin content. Addition of 0.25 % ascorbic acid, pH 4.0, and pasteurization at 65 °C for 30 min were selected as the best processing conditions to retain betacyanin content in red-fleshed dragon fruit juice. Storage at the agitation speed of 220 rpm showed that the concentrated samples had higher betacyanin stability compared to juice, while both juice and concentrate had almost similar betacyanin stability when tested for storage in the presence of light. In summary, ascorbic acid stabilized betacyanin in both juice and concentrate at agitated or non-agitated conditions. In contrast, light degraded betacyanin in both juice and concentrate models.

  2. Application of cranberry concentrate (Vaccinium macrocarpon) to control Escherichia coli O157:H7 in ground beef and its antimicrobial mechanism related to the downregulated slp, hdeA and cfa.

    PubMed

    Wu, Vivian C H; Qiu, Xujian; de los Reyes, Benildo G; Lin, Chih-Sheng; Pan, Yingjie

    2009-02-01

    The possible use of cranberry concentrate (CC) as a natural food preservative was studied by examining its antimicrobial effect on the growth of Escherichia coli O157:H7 inoculated in ground beef, its organoleptical effect on beef patties, and its antimicrobial mechanism on the gene regulation level. Inoculated ground beef was added with CC and stored at 4 degrees C for 5 days. Bacteria were detected on day 0, 1, 3, and 5. Cranberry concentrate (2.5%, 5%, and 7.5% w/w) reduced total aerobic bacteria 1.5 log, 2.1 log, and 2.7 log CFU/g and E. coli O157:H7 0.4 log, 0.7 log, and 2.4 log CFU/g, respectively, when compared to the control on day 5. Fifty panelists evaluated the burgers supplemented with CC. No differences in appearance, flavor, and taste were found among burgers with 0%, 2.5%, and 5% CC. The expression of E. coli O157:H7 cyclopropane fatty acyl phospholipid synthase (cfa), hypothetical protein (hdeA), outer membrane porin protein C (ompC), hyperosmotically inducible periplasmic protein (osmY), and outer membrane protein induced after carbon starvation (slp) genes with or without CC (2.5% v/v) treatment was investigated by quantitative real-time PCR. Compared to the control, slp, hdeA, and cfa were markedly downregulated, ompC was slightly downregulated, while osmY was slightly affected.

  3. Effects of soil characteristics on grape juice nutrient concentrations and other grape quality parameters in Shiraz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Concepción Ramos, Maria; Romero, Maria Paz

    2017-04-01

    This study investigated the response of grapes to soil properties in the variety Shiraz (SH) cultivated in the Costers de Segre Designation of Origin (NE, Spain). The research was carried out in two areas with differences in vigor, which was examined using the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). Soil properties such as organic matter content, pH, electrical conductivity and nutrients (N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Cu, Zn and Mn) were analysed in the two areas. Soil analyses were limited to the upper 40 cm. Soil N-NO3 was measured in 2M KCl extracts. Assimilable phosphorus was analysed by extraction with 0.5 M NaHCO3 at pH 8.5 using the Olsen method. The available K, Ca and Mg were evaluated in hemaaxinecobalt trichloride extracts and the available fraction of Cu, Zn, Mn and Fe in DTPA- trietanolamine extracts, by spectroscopy atomic emission/absorption. Berry grapes were collected at maturity. Nutrients in grape juice (K, Ca, Mg Cu, Zn, Mn and Fe) were determined after a microwave hydrogen peroxide digestion in a closed vessel microwave digestion system and measured by spectroscopy. Other grape properties that determine grape quality such as pH, berry weight and sugar content were analysed using the methods proposed by the OIV. Differences in soil properties were observed between plots, which determined the differences in vigour. The vines with lower vigour were grown in the soils with higher pH, electrical conductivity and silt content, which had in addition higher Ca, Mg and K available levels as well as higher levels of Fe and Mn than the soil in which vines had higher vigour. However, the available fraction of Cu and Zn was smaller. Similar differences in nutrient concentration in the berry were observed for all nutrients except for Cu. Grape juice pH and total soluble solids (°Brix) were higher in the most vigorous vines. However, the differences in berry weight and total acidity at ripening were not significant. Keywords: acidity; berry weight; nutrients; p

  4. Effect of freezing, irradiation, and frozen storage on survival of Salmonella in concentrated orange juice.

    PubMed

    Niemira, Brendan A; Sommers, Christopher H; Boyd, Glenn

    2003-10-01

    Six strains of Salmonella (Anatum F4317, Dublin 15480, Enteritidis 13076, Enteritidis WY15159, Stanley H0588, and Typhimurium 14028) were individually inoculated into orange juice concentrate (OJC) and frozen to -20 degrees C. The frozen samples were treated with 0 (nonirradiated), 0.5, 1.0, or 2.0 kGy of gamma radiation and held frozen for 1 h, and the surviving bacterial population was assessed. The strains showed significant variability in their response to freezing and to freezing in combination with irradiation. The response was dose dependent. Relative to the nonfrozen, nonirradiated control, the reduction following the highest dose (2.0 kGy) ranged from 1.29 log CFU/ml (Salmonella Typhimurium) to 2.17 log CFU/ml (Salmonella Stanley). Samples of OJC inoculated with Salmonella Enteritidis WY15159 and irradiated were stored at -20 degrees C for 1, 2, 7, or 14 days, and the surviving population was determined. Relative to the nonfrozen, nonirradiated control, after 14 days, the population was reduced by 1.2 log CFU/ml in the nonirradiated samples and by 3.3 log CFU/ml following treatment with 2.0 kGy. The combination of frozen storage plus irradiation resulted in greater overall reductions than either process alone.

  5. Serum nitrate/nitrite concentration correlates with gastric juice nitrate/nitrite: a possible marker for mutagenesis of the proximal stomach.

    PubMed

    Kishikawa, Hiroshi; Nishida, Jiro; Ichikawa, Hitoshi; Kaida, Shogo; Matsukubo, Takashi; Miura, Soichiro; Morishita, Tetsuo; Hibi, Toshifumi

    2011-01-01

    In the normal acid-secreting stomach, luminally generated nitric oxide, which contributes to carcinogenesis in the proximal stomach, is associated with the concentration of nitrate plus nitrite (nitrate/nitrite) in gastric juice. We investigated whether the serum nitrate/nitrite concentration is associated with that of gastric juice and whether it can be used as a serum marker. Serum and gastric juice nitrate/nitrite concentration, Helicobacter pylori antibody, and gastric pH were measured in 176 patients undergoing upper endoscopy. Multiple regression analysis revealed that serum nitrate/nitrite concentration was the best independent predictor of gastric juice nitrate/nitrite concentration. On single regression analysis, serum and gastric juice nitrate/nitrite concentration were significantly correlated, according to the following equation: gastric juice nitrate/nitrite concentration (μmol/l) = 3.93 - 0.54 × serum nitrate/nitrite concentration (μmol/l; correlation coefficient = 0.429, p < 0.001). In analyses confined to subjects with gastric pH less than 2.0, and in those with serum markers suggesting normal acid secretion (pepsinogen-I >30 ng/ml and negative H. pylori antibody), the serum nitrate/nitrite concentration was an independent predictor of the gastric juice nitrate/nitrite concentration (p < 0.001). Measuring the serum nitrate/nitrite concentration has potential in estimating the gastric juice nitrate/nitrite concentration. The serum nitrate/nitrite concentration could be useful as a marker for mutagenesis in the proximal stomach. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Density of the concentrates of peach and pome granate juices at elevated state parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magerramov, M. A.

    2006-07-01

    Investigation of the density of pomegranate and peach juices in the temperature range from 278.15 to 403.15 K at pressures of 0.1 and 5 MPa is carried out. The dependence of the density of the juices on the content of dry substances in them has been studied. The equations of state are written down and the coefficients of thermal expansion are calculated.

  7. Safety and efficacy of cranberry (vaccinium macrocarpon) during pregnancy and lactation.

    PubMed

    Dugoua, Jean-Jacques; Seely, Dugald; Perri, Daniel; Mills, Edward; Koren, Gideon

    2008-01-01

    There is a lack of basic knowledge on the part of both clinicians and patients as to the indications for use and safety of herbs used during pregnancy and lactation. This is one article in a series that systematically reviews the evidence for herbs commonly used during pregnancy and lactation. To systematically review the literature for evidence on the use, safety and pharmacology of cranberry, focusing on issues pertaining to pregnancy and lactation. We searched 7 electronic databases and compiled data according to the grade of evidence found. There is no direct evidence of safety or harm to the mother or fetus as a result of consuming cranberry during pregnancy. Indirectly, there is good scientific evidence that cranberry may be of minimal risk, where a survey of 400 pregnant women did not uncover any adverse events when cranberry was regularly consumed. In lactation, the safety or harm of cranberry is unknown. Women experience urinary tract infections with greater frequency during pregnancy. Given the evidence to support the use of cranberry for urinary tract infections (UTIs) and its safety profile, cranberry supplementation as fruit or fruit juice may be a valuable therapeutic choice in the treatment of UTIs during pregnancy.

  8. Microbial modeling of thermal resistance of Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris CRA7152 spores in concentrated orange juice with nisin addition

    PubMed Central

    Peña, Wilmer Edgard Luera; de Massaguer, Pilar Rodriguez; Teixeira, Luciano Quintão

    2009-01-01

    The nisin effect on thermal death of Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris CRA 7152 spores in concentrated orange juice (64°Brix) was studied. Concentrations of 0, 50, 75 and 100 IU of nisin/ml juice, at temperatures of 92, 95, 98 and 102°C were evaluated. The quadratic polynomial model was used to analyze the effects of the factors and their interaction. Verification of surviving spores was carried out through plating in K medium (pH 3.7). The results showed that the D values without nisin addition were 25.5, 12.9, 6.1 and 2.3 min for 92, 95, 98 and 102°C respectively. With addition of nisin into the juice there was a drop of heat resistance as the concentration was increased at a same temperature. With 30, 50, 75, 100 and 150 IU/ml at 95°C, the D values were 12.34, 11.38, 10.49, 9.49 and 9.42 min respectively, showing that a decrease in the D value up to 27% can be obtained. The second order polynomial model established with r2 = 0.995 showed that the microorganism resistance was affected by the action of temperature followed by the nisin concentration. Nisin therefore is an alternative for reducing the rigor of the A. acidoterrestris CRA 7152 thermal treatment. PMID:24031405

  9. [Determination of arbutin in apple juice concentrate by ultra performance liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Kong, Xianghong; He, Qiang; Yue, Aishan; Wu, Shuangmin; Li, Jianhua

    2010-06-01

    An ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/ MS) method was developed for the determination of arbutin in apple juice concentrate. Samples were diluted with water, then cleaned-up with a PS-DVB column. Quantitation was carried out using an external standard method. UPLC was performed on an Eclipse Plus C, column (100 mm x 2.1 mm, 1.8 microm) using a gradient solvent system (methanol-water). MS/MS was performed with multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. The detection limit of arbutin was 0.02 mg/L. The method showed good linear relationship at the range of 0.04-2.0 mg/L. The recoveries ranged from 75.2% to 102.7% with relative standard deviations (RSDs) less than 8.9%. The method is simple, fast and sensitive. It's suitable for quantitative and qualitative analysis of arbutin in apple juice concentrate.

  10. Effects of pH and sugar concentration in Zygosaccharomyces rouxii growth and time for spoilage in concentrated grape juice at isothermal and non-isothermal conditions.

    PubMed

    Rojo, M C; Arroyo López, F N; Lerena, M C; Mercado, L; Torres, A; Combina, M

    2014-04-01

    The effect of pH (1.7-3.2) and sugar concentration (64-68 °Brix) on the growth of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii MC9 using response surface methodology was studied. Experiments were carried out in concentrated grape juice inoculated with Z. rouxii at isothermal conditions (23 °C) for 60 days. pH was the variable with the highest effect on growth parameters (potential maximum growth rate and lag phase duration), although the effect of sugar concentration were also significant. In a second experiment, the time for spoilage by this microorganism in concentrated grape juice was evaluated at isothermal (23 °C) and non-isothermal conditions, in an effort to reproduce standard storage and overseas shipping temperature conditions, respectively. Results show that pH was again the environmental factor with the highest impact on delaying the spoilage of the product. Thereby, a pH value below 2.0 was enough to increase the shelf life of the product for more than 60 days in both isothermal and non-isothermal conditions. The information obtained in the present work could be used by producers and buyers to predict the growth and time for spoilage of Z. rouxii in concentrated grape juice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Grape juice concentrate alleviates epididymis and sperm damage in cadmium-intoxicated rats.

    PubMed

    Lamas, Celina de A; Cuquetto-Leite, Livia; do Nascimento da Silva, Emanueli; Thomazini, Bruna F; Cordeiro, Gabriel da S; Predes, Fabrícia de S; Gollücke, Andrea P B; Dolder, Heidi

    2017-04-01

    The possibility of long-term grape juice concentrate (GJC) consumption conferring a protective effect against cadmium (Cd)-induced damage to the epididymis, completely preserving sperm profile, was evaluated here for the first time in the scientific literature. Male Wistar rats (n = 6/per group) received an intraperitoneal Cd injection (1.2 mg/Kg) at age 80 days and GJC (2 g/Kg) by gavage from 50 days until 136 days old. Groups receiving either Cd or GJC were added. An intraperitoneal injection of saline (0.9%) and water by gavage was administered in the absence of treatment with Cd or GJC. Animals were anaesthetized and exsanguinated at 136 days; the vas deferens, left testis and epididymis were removed; and perfusion continued with fixative. The right epididymis was collected for morphological analysis. Cd had a devastating effect demonstrated by reduced sperm count in testes and epididymis, sperm production and normal sperm count, besides increased epididymis sperm transit time and completely disorganized morphology. These alterations were attributed to higher Cd levels in the testes and a lipid peroxidation (LP) process. Consumption of GJC plus Cd intoxication was effective, reducing metal accumulation and LP. Consequently, we could identify a preserved sperm profile, with improvement in testis and epididymis sperm count, normal sperm structure and sperm transit time. Moreover, GJC extends its protective effect to the epididymis, allowing complete re-establishment of its morphology, ensuring successful sperm maturation process. In conclusion, our study indicates long-term GJC as a promising therapy against reproductive chemical intoxication injury damage, preserving sperm prior to ejaculation. © 2017 The Authors. International Journal of Experimental Pathology © 2017 International Journal of Experimental Pathology.

  12. Role of gastric mucosal and gastric juice cytokine concentrations in development of bisphosphonate damage to gastric mucosa.

    PubMed

    Thomson, A B R; Appleman, S; Keelan, M; Wallace, J L

    2003-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that the bisphosphonates (BP) vary in their damaging effect on the gastric mucosa, and endoscopy scores (erosions or erosions plus ulcers) after 1 and 2 weeks use of BP were significantly lower in H. pylori-positive versus -negative subjects. The mechanism of this damaging effect of BP and the interaction with H. pylori is unknown. As part of a separately reported study of the incidence of gastric damage after 2 weeks of treatment of healthy female postmenopausal volunteers with risedronate (5 mg/day) or alendronate (10 mg/day), gastric aspirates were taken at the time of the baseline esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD), and again at 1 and 2 weeks after daily intake of a BP At the time of the third EGD, when the volunteers had been on risedronate or alendronate for 2 weeks, antral biopsies were taken from normal-appearing mucosa. Gastric juice and antral biopsies were assessed for their concentration of the cytokines interleukin-la (IL-1alpha), IL-8, IL-13, and epidermal growth factor (EGF). H. pylori, the use of BP, and development of gastric mucosal lesions had no effect on gastric mucosal concentrations of IL-1alpha, IL-13, or EGF. In contrast, the concentration of IL-8 in antral mucosal biopsies of volunteers given BP for 2 weeks was higher in the presence than in the absence of an H. pylori infection and was increased further in those who develop lesions associated with the use of BP. There was no correlation between gastric mucosal and gastric juice concentrations of IL-8. Gastric juice concentrations of IL-8 and EGF were not affected by H. pylori status, the use of BP, or the development of lesions. However, gastric juice concentrations of IL-1alpha were numerically lower in those who were negative for H. pylori with no mucosal lesions (Hp-L-), intermediate in those who were H. pylori-negative with lesions (Hp-L+), and highest in those who were positive for H. pylori and had lesions (Hp+L+). The gastric juice concentration of IL-13

  13. Cranberry derivatives enhance biofilm formation and transiently impair swarming motility of the uropathogen Proteus mirabilis HI4320.

    PubMed

    O'May, Che; Amzallag, Olivier; Bechir, Karim; Tufenkji, Nathalie

    2016-06-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a major cause of catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI), emphasizing that novel strategies for targeting this bacterium are needed. Potential targets are P. mirabilis surface-associated swarming motility and the propensity of these bacteria to form biofilms that may lead to catheter blockage. We previously showed that the addition of cranberry powder (CP) to lysogeny broth (LB) medium resulted in impaired P. mirabilis swarming motility over short time periods (up to 16 h). Herein, we significantly expanded on those findings by exploring (i) the effects of cranberry derivatives on biofilm formation of P. mirabilis, (ii) whether swarming inhibition occurred transiently or over longer periods more relevant to real infections (∼3 days), (iii) whether swarming was also blocked by commercially available cranberry juices, (iv) whether CP or cranberry juices exhibited effects under natural urine conditions, and (v) the effects of cranberry on medium pH, which is an indirect indicator of urease activity. At short time scales (24 h), CP and commercially available pure cranberry juice impaired swarming motility and repelled actively swarming bacteria in LB medium. Over longer time periods more representative of infections (∼3 days), the capacity of the cranberry material to impair swarming diminished and bacteria would start to migrate across the surface, albeit by exhibiting a different motility phenotype to the regular "bull's-eye" swarming phenotype of P. mirabilis. This bacterium did not swarm on urine agar or LB agar supplemented with urea, suggesting that any potential application of anti-swarming compounds may be better suited to settings external to the urine environment. Anti-swarming effects were confounded by the ability of cranberry products to enhance biofilm formation in both LB and urine conditions. These findings provide key insights into the long-term strategy of targeting P. mirabilis CAUTIs.

  14. Cranberry (poly)phenol metabolites correlate with improvements in vascular function: A double-blind, randomized, controlled, dose-response, crossover study.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Mateos, Ana; Feliciano, Rodrigo P; Boeres, Albert; Weber, Timon; Dos Santos, Claudia Nunes; Ventura, M Rita; Heiss, Christian

    2016-10-01

    Cranberries are rich in potentially bioactive (poly)phenols. The aim of this paper was to investigate whether cranberry juice intake can improve vascular function in healthy men in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and to understand which of the circulating (poly)phenol metabolites correlate with vascular effects. A double-blind randomized controlled crossover trial was conducted in ten healthy males. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD), blood pressure, pulse wave velocity and augmentation index were investigated at baseline, 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 h post-consumption of cranberry juices containing 409, 787, 1238, 1534, and 1910 mg of total cranberry (poly)phenols (TP), and a control drink. Plasma (poly)phenol metabolites were analyzed by UPLC-Q-TOF MS using authentic standards. We observed dose-dependent increases in FMD at 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 h with a peak at 4 h and maximal effects with juice containing 1238 mg TP. A total of 60 metabolites were quantified in plasma after cranberry consumption. Twelve (poly)phenol metabolites significantly correlated with the increases in FMD, including ferulic and caffeic acid sulfates, quercetin-3-O-ß-D-glucuronide and a γ-valerolactone sulfate. (Poly)phenols in cranberry juice can improve vascular function in healthy males and this is linked to the presence of specific newly identified plasma metabolites. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Grape juice concentrate (G8000(®) ) intake mitigates testicular morphological and ultrastructural damage following cadmium intoxication.

    PubMed

    Lamas, Celina A; Gollücke, Andrea P B; Dolder, Heidi

    2015-10-01

    Cadmium is a well-known testicular toxicant, and parts of the world population are exposed chronically by inhalation or by food and water intake. Grape products have been highlighted as important sources of bioactive compounds, having anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and metal chelating properties. Since maintenance of tissue morphology is essential for testicular sperm development and hence male fertility, we analysed the protective effect of grape juice concentrate (GJC) (G8000(®) ) consumption on testicular morphology in rats exposed to cadmium. Thus, four groups of male Wistar rats (n = 6 per group), 50 days old, ingested either water or G8000(®) (2 g/kg/day) until they had completed one spermatogenic cycle in adult life (136 days old). Cadmium (1.2 mg / kg) was injected intraperitoneally when the animals were 80 days old into one of the water and one of the G8000 groups; intraperitoneal saline was used as a control in the other two groups. Animals anaesthetised and exsanguinated at 136 days and then perfused with Karnovsky's fixative and then the testes were collected for morphological analysis. We describe evident disruption of testicular morphology by cadmium, with alteration in tissue component proportions, reduced Leydig cells volume and initial signs of an inflammatory process. Ultrastructural analysis showed greater damage, suggesting spermatogenesis disruption. G8000(®) ingestion allowed tissue architecture to be re-established, as was corroborated by our stereological and morphometric findings. Animals from the group where G8000(®) had been administered together with cadmium revealed a significant reduction in macrophages and blood vessel volume, suggesting diminished inflammation, when compared to animals that received only cadmium. Moreover, smaller number of ultrastructural alterations was noted, revealing fewer areas of degeneration and disorganized interstitium. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that GJC consumption prevented the

  16. Cranberry juice consumption lowers markers of cardiometabolic risk, including blood pressure and circulating c-reactive protein, triglyceride, and glucose concentrations in adults

    Cardiometabolic risk is the risk for cardiovascular disease, diabetes, or stroke which are leading causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Risk for these conditions are grouped together because they represent three of the top health risks, yet can be changed by lifestyle. The objective of thi...

  17. An encapsulated juice powder concentrate improves markers of pulmonary function and cardiovascular risk factors in heavy smokers.

    PubMed

    Bamonti, Fabrizia; Pellegatta, Marco; Novembrino, Cristina; Vigna, Luisella; De Giuseppe, Rachele; de Liso, Federica; Gregori, Dario; Noce, Cinzia Della; Patrini, Lorenzo; Schiraldi, Gianfranco; Bonara, Paola; Calvelli, Laura; Maiavacca, Rita; Cighetti, Giuliana

    2013-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is associated with reduced pulmonary function and increased risk factors for cardiovascular disease. This randomized placebo-controlled double-blind study evaluated the effects of two different combinations of mixed fruit and vegetable juice powder concentrate (Juice Plus+, NSA, Collierville, TN) on heavy smokers. At baseline (T 0) and after 3 months' supplementation (T 1), pulmonary function parameters and cardiovascular risk factors-that is, plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) with related B vitamins and cysteine (tCys) concentrations-were assessed in 75 apparently healthy smokers (aged 49.2 ± 10.6 years, >20 cigarettes/d, duration ≥10 years) randomized into 3 groups: placebo (P), fruit/vegetable (FV) and fruit/vegetable/berry (FVB). T 0: most smokers showed abnormalities in tHcy and tCys concentrations. T 1: respiratory function was unchanged in P and slightly, but not significantly, improved in FV, whereas FVB showed a significant improvement in forced expiratory flow at 25% (FEF25; p < 0.0001 vs P and FV) and significant improvement in CO diffusion lung/alveolar volume (DLCO/VA). FV and FVB (50%) showed significant reduction in tHcy and tCys compared to T 0 ( p < 0.0001) and P ( p < 0.0001). At T 1, both supplemented groups, but to a greater extent the FVB group, showed improvements in some pulmonary parameters, cardiovascular risk factors, and folate status. The beneficial effects of Juice Plus+ supplementation could potentially help smokers, even if smoking cessation is advisable.

  18. Effects of Long-Term Cranberry Supplementation on Endocrine Pancreas in Aging Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Min; Hu, Jingping; Perez, Evelyn; Phillips, Dawn; Kim, Wook; Ghaedian, Reza; Napora, Joshua K.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of long-term cranberry consumption on age-related changes in endocrine pancreas are not fully understood. Here we treated male Fischer 344 rats with either 2% whole cranberry powder supplemented or normal rodent chow from 6 to 22 month old. Both groups displayed an age-related decline in basal plasma insulin concentrations, but this age-related decline was delayed by cranberry. Cranberry supplementation led to increased β-cell glucose responsiveness during the oral glucose tolerance test. Portal insulin concentration was 7.6-fold higher in rats fed cranberry, coupled with improved β-cell function. However, insulin resistance values were similar in both groups. Total β-cell mass and expression of pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 and insulin within islets were significantly enhanced in rats fed cranberry relative to controls. Furthermore, cranberry increased insulin release of an insulin-producing β-cell line, revealing its insulinotropic effect. These findings suggest that cranberry is of particular benefit to β-cell function in normal aging rats. PMID:21768504

  19. Atomic force microscopy-guided fractionation reveals the influence of cranberry phytochemicals on adhesion of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Prachi; Song, Biqin; Neto, Catherine; Camesano, Terri A

    2016-06-15

    Cranberry juice has been long used to prevent infections because of its effect on the adhesion of the bacteria to the host surface. Proanthocyanidins (PACs) comprise of one of the major classes of phytochemicals found in cranberry, which have been extensively studied and found effective in combating adhesion of pathogenic bacteria. The role of other cranberry constituents in impacting bacterial adhesion haven't been studied very well. In this study, cranberry juice fractions were prepared, characterized and tested for their effect on the surface adhesion of the pathogenic clinical bacterial strain E. coli B78 and non-pathogenic control E. coli HB101. The preparations tested included crude cranberry juice extract (CCE); three fractions containing flavonoid classes including proanthocyanidins, anthocyanins and flavonols; selected sub-fractions, and commercially available flavonol glycoside, quercetin-3-O-galactoside. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to quantify the adhesion forces between the bacterial surface and the AFM probe after the treatment with the cranberry fractions. Adhesion forces of the non-pathogenic, non fimbriated lab strain HB101 are small (average force 0.19 nN) and do not change with cranberry treatments, whereas the adhesion forces of the pathogenic, Dr adhesion E. coli strain B78 (average force of 0.42 nN) show a significant decrease when treated with cranberry juice extract or fractions (average force of 0.31 nN, 0.37 nN and 0.39 nN with CCE, Fraction 7 and Fraction 4 respectively). In particular, the fractions that contained flavonols in addition to PACs were more efficient at lowering the force of adhesion (average force of 0.31 nN-0.18 nN between different sub-fractions containing flavonols and PACs). The sub-fractions containing flavonol glycosides (from juice, fruit and commercial quercetin) all resulted in reduced adhesion of the pathogenic bacteria to the model probe. This strongly suggests the anti adhesive role of other classes of

  20. Dietary feeding of freeze-dried whole cranberry inhibits intestinal tumor development in Apcmin/+ mice

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Wenxiao; Zhang, Yujie; Wang, Sinan; Xie, Runxiang; Wang, Bangmao; Cao, Hailong

    2017-01-01

    It is increasingly perceived that dietary components have been linked with the prevention of intestinal cancer. Cranberry is a rich source of phenolic constituents and non-digestible fermentable dietary fiber, which shows anti-proliferation effect in colorectal cancer cells. Herein, we investigated the efficacy of long-term cranberry diet on intestinal adenoma formation in Apcmin/+ mice. Apcmin/+ mice were fed a basal diet or a diet containing 20% (w/w) freeze-dried whole cranberry powder for 12 weeks, and the number and size of tumors were recorded after sacrifice. Our results showed that cranberry strongly prevented the growth of intestinal tumors by 33.1%. Decreased cell proliferation and increased apoptosis were observed in tumors of cranberry-fed mice. Cranberry diet reduced the expression profile of colonic inflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-1β and TNF-α) accompanied with increased levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10). Moreover, the number of colonic goblet cells and MUC2 production were increased, and the intestinal barrier function was also improved. In addition, cranberry diet increased caecal short chain fatty acids concentrations, and down-regulated epidermal growth factor receptor signaling pathway. These data firstly show the efficacy and associated mechanisms of cranberry diet on intestinal tumor growth in Apcmin/+ mice, suggesting its chemopreventive potential against intestinal cancer. PMID:29228651

  1. Transport pathways of nitrogen and phosphorus in tile-drained cranberry farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, C. D.; Alversion, N.; Jeranyama, P.; DeMoranville, C.; Sandler, H.; Caruso, F.

    2013-12-01

    Rapid, controlled drainage of cranberry farms is critical to optimizing production in Massachusetts, where approximately 1/3 of the industry's crop is produced. Relatively new to cranberry farming, tile drainage has been billed as a low-cost drainage management option for reducing crop disease and weed infestations. Despite its well documented agronomic benefits, tile drainage may exacerbate nutrient loss and promote eutrophication in nearby ponds receiving cranberry drainage waters. In this study, a monitoring program was established on a Massachusetts cranberry bed to quantify (1) mass loss of nitrogen and phosphorous via tile drainage to a perimeter ditch surrounding the cranberry bed, (2) the attenuation of N and P in the ditch prior to discharge from the cranberry bed, and (3) and the component contributions of preferential vs. matrix transport of N and P in tile drainage. A combination of compound weirs, acoustic-velocity meters, propeller-driven flow meters, and rain gauges were installed to quantify drainage management characteristics of the cranberry bed. Automatic samplers were also installed to collect water samples at each monitoring site (i.e., four tile drains, an irrigation pond, and a flume used to control ditch height) for analysis of N and P concentrations and hydrogen and oxygen stable isotope ratios to estimate nutrient loss and transport pathways. These data will be used to develop a mechanistic synthesis of nutrient cycling in tile-drained cranberry beds.

  2. Cranberry intervention in patients with prostate cancer prior to radical prostatectomy. Clinical, pathological and laboratory findings.

    PubMed

    Student, Vladimir; Vidlar, Ales; Bouchal, Jan; Vrbkova, Jana; Kolar, Zdenek; Kral, Milan; Kosina, Pavel; Vostalova, Jitka

    2016-12-01

    Recently, we described an inverse association between cranberry supplementation and serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) in patients with negative biopsy for prostate cancer (PCa) and chronic nonbacterial prostatitis. This double blind placebo controlled study evaluates the effects of cranberry consumption on PSA values and other markers in men with PCa before radical prostatectomy. Prior to surgery, 64 patients with prostate cancer were randomized to a cranberry or placebo group. The cranberry group (n=32) received a mean 30 days of 1500 mg cranberry fruit powder. The control group (n=32) took a similar amount of placebo. Selected blood/urine markers as well as free and total phenolics in urine were measured at baseline and on the day of surgery in both groups. Prostate tissue markers were evaluated after surgery. The serum PSA significantly decreased by 22.5% in the cranberry arm (n=31, P<0.05). A trend to down-regulation of urinary beta-microseminoprotein (MSMB) and serum gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase, as well as upregulation of IGF-1 was found after cranberry supplementation. There were no changes in prostate tissue markers or, composition and concentration of phenolics in urine. Daily consumption of a powdered cranberry fruit lowered serum PSA in patients with prostate cancer. The whole fruit contains constituents that may regulate the expression of androgen-responsive genes.

  3. 7 CFR 926.4 - Cranberries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... RECORDKEEPING REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.4... as cranberries. Effective Date Note: At 71 FR 78046, Dec. 28, 2006, § 926.4 was suspended...

  4. 7 CFR 929.5 - Cranberries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cranberries. 929.5 Section 929.5 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF... LONG ISLAND IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 929.5 Cranberries...

  5. 7 CFR 929.59 - Excess cranberries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Excess cranberries. 929.59 Section 929.59 Agriculture... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF... LONG ISLAND IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK Order Regulating Handling Regulations § 929.59 Excess cranberries...

  6. 7 CFR 929.59 - Excess cranberries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Excess cranberries. 929.59 Section 929.59 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF... LONG ISLAND IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK Order Regulating Handling Regulations § 929.59 Excess cranberries...

  7. 7 CFR 929.59 - Excess cranberries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Excess cranberries. 929.59 Section 929.59 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF... LONG ISLAND IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK Order Regulating Handling Regulations § 929.59 Excess cranberries...

  8. 7 CFR 929.59 - Excess cranberries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Excess cranberries. 929.59 Section 929.59 Agriculture... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF... LONG ISLAND IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK Order Regulating Handling Regulations § 929.59 Excess cranberries...

  9. 7 CFR 929.5 - Cranberries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cranberries. 929.5 Section 929.5 Agriculture... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF... LONG ISLAND IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 929.5 Cranberries...

  10. 7 CFR 929.5 - Cranberries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Cranberries. 929.5 Section 929.5 Agriculture... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF... LONG ISLAND IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 929.5 Cranberries...

  11. 7 CFR 929.5 - Cranberries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cranberries. 929.5 Section 929.5 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF... LONG ISLAND IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 929.5 Cranberries...

  12. 7 CFR 929.5 - Cranberries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cranberries. 929.5 Section 929.5 Agriculture... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF... LONG ISLAND IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 929.5 Cranberries...

  13. Registration of ‘Krimson’ cranberry bean

    Cranberry is an important dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) market class grown in the United States and Canada. Beet curly top virus (BCTV) plagues cranberry bean production in the western U.S. (CA, ID, OR, WA). ‘Krimson’ (Reg. No. CV PI 663911 ) cranberry bean released by the USDA-ARS in 2009, ...

  14. Exploring the role of cranberry polyphenols in periodontits: A brief review

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Malancha; Bandyopadhyay, Prasanta; Kundu, Debabrata

    2014-01-01

    Cranberry juice polyphenols have gained importance over the past decade due to their promising health benefits. The bioactive component, proanthocyanidins is mainly responsible for its protective effect. A lot has been said about its role in urinary tract infection and other systemic diseases, but little is known about its oral benefits. An extensive search was carried out in the PubMed database using the terms “cranberry polyphenols” and “periodontitis” together. The institute library was also thoroughly scrutinized for all relevant information. Thus, a paper was formulated, the aim of which was to review the role of high molecular weight cranberry fraction on oral tissues and periodontal diseases. PMID:24872617

  15. Cranberry for prevention of urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Darren M

    2004-12-01

    Traditionally, cranberry has been used for the treatment and prophylaxis of urinary tract infections. Research suggests that its mechanism of action is preventing bacterial adherence to host cell surface membranes. Systematic reviews have concluded that no reliable evidence supports the use of cranberry in the treatment or prophylaxis of urinary tract infections; however, more recent, randomized controlled trials demonstrate evidence of cranberry's utility in urinary tract infection prophylaxis. Supporting studies in humans are lacking for other clinical uses of cranberry. Cranberry is a safe, well-tolerated herbal supplement that does not have significant drug interactions.

  16. Determination of Anthocyanins in Cranberry Fruit and Cranberry Fruit Products by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography with Ultraviolet Detection: Single-Laboratory Validation

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Paula N.; Shipley, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    A single-laboratory validation study was conducted on an HPLC method for the detection and quantification of cyanidin-3-O-galactoside (C3Ga), cyanidin-3-O-glucoside (C3Gl), cyanidin-3-O-arabinoside (C3Ar), peonidin-3-O-galactoside (P3Ga), and peonidin-3-O-arabinoside (P3Ar) in cranberry fruit (Vaccinium macrocarpon Aiton) raw material and finished products. An extraction procedure using a combination of sonication and shaking with acidified methanol was optimized for all five anthocyanins in freeze-dried cranberry fruit and finished products (commercial extract powder, juice, and juice cocktail). Final extract solutions were analyzed by HPLC using a C18 RP column. Calibration curves for all anthocyanin concentrations had correlation coefficients (r2) of ≥99.8%. The method detection limits for C3Ga, C3Gl, C3Ar, P3Ga, and P3Ar were estimated to be 0.018, 0.016, 0.006, 0.013, and 0.011 μg/mL, respectively. Separation was achieved with a chromatographic run time of 35 min using a binary mobile phase with gradient elution. Quantitative determination performed in triplicate on four test materials on each of 3 days (n = 12) resulted in RSDr from 1.77 to 3.31%. Analytical range, as defined by the calibration curves, was 0.57–36.53 μg/mL for C3Ga, 0.15–9.83 μg/mL for C3Gl, 0.28–17.67 μg/mL for C3Ar, 1.01–64.71 μg/mL for P3Ga, and 0.42–27.14 μg/mL for P3Ar. For solid materials prepared by the described method, this translates to 0.06–3.65 mg/g for C3Ga, 0.02–0.98 mg/g for C3Gl, 0.03–1.77 mg/g for C3Ar, 0.10–6.47 mg/g for P3Ga, and 0.04–2.71 mg/g for P3Ar. PMID:21563679

  17. Effects of Supplemental Acerola Juice on the Mineral Concentrations in Liver and Kidney Tissue Samples of Mice Fed with Cafeteria Diet.

    PubMed

    Leffa, Daniela Dimer; dos Santos, Carla Eliete Iochims; Daumann, Francine; Longaretti, Luiza Martins; Amaral, Livio; Dias, Johnny Ferraz; da Silva, Juliana; Andrade, Vanessa Moraes

    2015-09-01

    We evaluated the impact of a supplemental acerola juice (unripe, ripe, and industrial) and its main pharmaceutically active components on the concentrations of minerals in the liver and kidney of mice fed with cafeteria diet. Swiss male mice were fed with a cafeteria (CAF) diet for 13 weeks. The CAF consisted of a variety of supermarket products with high energy content. Subsequently, animals received one of the following food supplements for 1 month: water, unripe acerola juice, ripe acerola juice, industrial acerola juice, vitamin C, or rutin. Mineral concentrations of the tissues were determined by particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE). Our study suggests that the simultaneous intake of acerola juices, vitamin C, or rutin in association with a hypercaloric and hyperlipidic diet provides change in the mineral composition of organisms in the conditions of this study, which plays an important role in the antioxidant defenses of the body. This may help to reduce the metabolism of the fat tissue or even to reduce the oxidative stress.

  18. Efficacy of cranberry in prevention of urinary tract infection in a susceptible pediatric population.

    PubMed

    Foda, M M; Middlebrook, P F; Gatfield, C T; Potvin, G; Wells, G; Schillinger, J F

    1995-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate liquid cranberry products as prophylaxis against bacterial urinary tract infection in a pediatric neuropathic bladder population. Forty cases managed by clean intermittent catheterization with or without pharmacotherapy were enrolled in a randomized single-blind cross-over study. Subjects ingested 15 mL/kg/day of cranberry cocktail or water for six months followed by the reverse for another six months. Initial catheter urine samples and subsequent monthly and interim cultures were obtained. Associated symptoms were recorded along with follow-up attendance/compliance registry. The number of negative culture months to the number of months contributed was tabulated and compared between interventions. Individual, cumulative and antimicrobial subset analysis was performed. Twenty one patients completed the study;12 dropped out for reasons related to the cranberry (taste, caloric load and cost); seven patients dropped out for other reasons (parents too busy, death, no stated reason). Wilcoxon matched-pairs Signed-ranks analysis revealed no difference between intervention periods (2-tailed P=.5566 [whole group]; p=.2845 [antimicrobial subset]) with respect to infection. Fewer infections were observed in nine patients taking cranberry juice and in nine patients given water; no difference was noted in three. Liquid cranberry products, on a daily basis, at the dosage employed, did not have any effect greater than that of water in preventing urinary tract infections in this pediatric neuropathic bladder population.

  19. Lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea) and European cranberry (Vaccinium microcarpon) proanthocyanidins: isolation, identification, and bioactivities.

    PubMed

    Kylli, Petri; Nohynek, Liisa; Puupponen-Pimiä, Riitta; Westerlund-Wikström, Benita; Leppänen, Tiina; Welling, Jukka; Moilanen, Eeva; Heinonen, Marina

    2011-04-13

    European, small-fruited cranberries (Vaccinium microcarpon) and lingonberries (Vaccinium vitis-idaea) were characterized for their phenolic compounds and tested for antioxidant, antimicrobial, antiadhesive, and antiinflammatory effects. The main phenolic compounds in both lingonberries and cranberries were proanthocyanidins comprising 63-71% of the total phenolic content, but anthocyanins, hydroxycinnamic acids, hydroxybenzoic acids, and flavonols were also found. Proanthocyanidins are polymeric phenolic compounds consisting mainly of catechin, epicatechin, gallocatechin, and epigallocatechin units. In the present study, proanthocyanidins were divided into three groups: dimers and trimers, oligomers (mDP 4-10), and polymers (mDP > 10). Catechin, epicatechin, A-type dimers and trimers were found to be the terminal units of isolated proanthocyanidin fractions. Inhibitions of lipid oxidation in liposomes were over 70% and in emulsions over 85%, and in most cases the oligomeric or polymeric fraction was the most effective. Polymeric proanthocyanidin extracts of lingonberries and cranberries were strongly antimicrobial against Staphylococcus aureus, whereas they had no effect on other bacterial strains such as Salmonella enterica sv. Typhimurium, Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Escherichia coli. Polymeric fraction of cranberries and oligomeric fractions of both lingonberries and cranberries showed an inhibitory effect on hemagglutination of E. coli, which expresses the M hemagglutin. Cranberry phenolic extract inhibited LPS-induced NO production in a dose-dependent manner, but it had no major effect on iNOS of COX-2 expression. At a concentration of 100 μg/mL cranberry phenolic extract inhibited LPS-induced IL-6, IL-1β and TNF-α production. Lingonberry phenolics had no significant effect on IL-1β production but inhibited IL-6 and TNF-α production at a concentration of 100 μg/mL similarly to cranberry phenolic extract. In conclusion the phenolics, notably

  20. Effects of cranberry extracts and ursolic acid derivatives on P-fimbriated Escherichia coli, COX-2 activity, pro-inflammatory cytokine release and the NF-κβ transcriptional response in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yue; Nikolic, Dejan; Pendland, Susan; Doyle, Brian J.; Locklear, Tracie D.; Mahady, Gail B.

    2010-01-01

    Cranberry, the fresh or dried ripe fruit of Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait. (Ericaceae), is currently used as adjunct therapy for the prevention and symptomatic treatment of urinary tract infections. Data from clinical trials suggest that extracts of cranberry or cranberry juice reduce the bacterial load of E. coli and also suppress the inflammatory symptoms induced by E. coli infections. A methanol extract prepared from 10 kg of dehydrated cranberries did not directly inhibit the growth of E coli strains ATCC 700336 or ATCC 25922 in concentrations up to 256 μg/mL in vitro. However, the methanol extract (CR-ME) inhibited the activity of cyclooxygenase-2, with an IC50 of 12.8 μg/mL. Moreover, CR-ME also inhibited the NF-κβ transcriptional activation in human T lymphocytes with an IC50 of 19.4 μg/mL, and significantly (p < 0.01) inhibited the release of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and tumor necrosis factor-α from E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro, at a concentration of 50 μg/mL. The extract had no effect on inducible nitric oxide synthase activity in the murine macrophage cell line RAW 264.7. The compounds responsible for this activity were identified using a novel LC-MS based assay as ursolic acid and ursolic acid derivatives. Taken together, these data suggest CR-ME and its constituent chemical compounds target specific pathways involved in E. coli-induced inflammation. PMID:20376297

  1. Inhibition of clostridium perfringens spore germination and outgrowth by buffered vinegar and lemon juice concentrate during chilling.....of ground turkey road containing minimal ingredients

    Inhibition of Clostridium perfringens spore germination and outgrowth in ground turkey roast containing minimal ingredients (salt and sugar), by buffered vinegar (MoStatin V) and a blend (buffered) of lemon juice concentrate and vinegar (MoStatin LV) was evaluated. Ground turkey roast was formulat...

  2. Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity of a flavonoid-rich concentrate recovered from Opuntia ficus-indica juice.

    PubMed

    Matias, A; Nunes, S L; Poejo, J; Mecha, E; Serra, A T; Madeira, Paulo J Amorim; Bronze, M R; Duarte, C M M

    2014-12-01

    In this work, Opuntia ficus indica juice was explored as a potential source of natural antioxidant and anti-inflammatory ingredients towards intestinal inflammation. An adsorption separation process was used to produce a natural flavonoid-rich concentrate (FRC) from Opuntia ficus-indica juice. The FRC effect (co- or pre-incubation) on induced-oxidative stress and induced-inflammation was evaluated in human Caco-2 cells. The main constituents identified and present in the extract are flavonoids (namely isorhamnetins and their derivatives such as isorhamnetin 3-O-rhamnose-rutinoside and isorhamnetin 3-O-rutinoside) and phenolic acids (such as ferulic, piscidic and eucomic acids). Our results showed that co-incubation of FRC with the stress-inducer attenuates radicals production in a much more significant manner than pre-incubation. These results suggest that FRC compounds which cannot pass the cell membrane freely (isorhamnetin derivatives) have an ability to inhibit the formation of H2O2-induced radicals in the surrounding environment of intestinal epithelial cells. The capacity of FRC (co-incubation) for suppressing (at the extracellular level) free radicals chain initiation or propagation reaction was probably related with a more pronounced reduction in protein oxidation. A similar response was observed in the inflammatory state, where a marked decrease in IL-8 secretion and blocked degradation of IκBα was achieved for FRC co-incubation. Simultaneously, treatment with FRC significantly reduces NO and TNF-α expression and modulates apparent permeability in Caco-2 cells. In these cases, no significant differences were found between pre- and co-incubation treatments suggesting that bioavailable phenolics, such as ferulic, eucomic and piscidic acids and isorhamnetin, act at the intracellular environment.

  3. Effects of tomato juice consumption on plasma and lipoprotein carotenoid concentrations and the susceptibility of low density lipoprotein to oxidative modification.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, C; Imamura, K; Oshima, S; Suzukawa, M; Egami, S; Tonomoto, M; Baba, N; Harada, M; Ayaori, M; Inakuma, T; Ishikawa, T

    2001-06-01

    Effects of tomato juice supplementation on the carotenoid concentration in lipoprotein fractions and the oxidative susceptibility of LDL were investigated in 31 healthy Japanese female students. These subjects were randomized to one of three treatment groups; Control, Low and High. The Control, Low and High groups consumed 480 g of a control drink, 160 g of tomato juice plus 320 g of the control drink, and 480 g of tomato juice, providing 0, 15 and 45 mg of lycopene, respectively, for one menstrual cycle. The ingestion of tomato juice, rich in lycopene but having little beta-carotene, increased both lycopene and beta-carotene. Sixty-nine percent of lycopene in plasma was distributed in the LDL fraction and 24% in the HDL fraction. In the Low group, the lycopene concentration increased 160% each in the VLDL+IDL, LDL and HDL fractions (p<0.01). In the High group, the lycopene concentration increased 270% each in the VLDL+IDL and LDL fractions, and 330% in the HDL fraction (p<0.01). Beta-carotene also increased 120% and 180% in LDL fractions of the Low and the High groups, respectively. Despite these carotenoid increases in LDL, the lag time before oxidation was not prolonged as compared with that of the Control group. The propagation rate decreased significantly after consumption in the High group. Multiple regression analysis showed a positive correlation between lag time changes and changes in the alpha-tocopherol concentration per triglyceride in LDL, and a negative correlation between propagation rate changes and changes in the lycopene concentration per phospholipid in LDL. These data suggest that alpha-tocopherol is a major determinant in protecting LDL from oxidation, while lycopene from tomato juice supplementaion may contribute to protect phospholipid in LDI, from oxidation. Thus, oral intake of lycopene might be beneficial for ameliorating atherosclerosis.

  4. Loss of body weight and fat and improved lipid profiles in obese rats fed apple pomace or apple juice concentrate.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyung-Dong; Han, Chan-Kyu; Lee, Bog-Hieu

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of apple pomace (AP) and apple juice concentrate (AC) supplementation on body weight and fat loss as well as lipid metabolism in obese rats fed a high-fat diet. Diet-induced obese rats were assigned to three groups (n=8 for each group): high fat diet (HFD) control, HFD containing 10% (w/w) AP, and HFD containing 10% (w/w) AC. There was also a normal diet group (n=8). After 5 weeks, body weight gain, adipose tissue weight, serum and hepatic lipid profiles, liver morphology, and adipocyte size were measured. Body weight gain, white adipose tissue (WAT) weight, serum total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations, epididymal adipocyte size, and lesion scores were significantly lower and serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration and brown adipose tissue weights were significantly higher in the AP and AC groups compared with the HFD group. In addition, atherogenic indices in the AP and AC groups were significantly lower than in the HFD group. These results indicate that supplementing apple products such as AP and AC may help suppress body weight and WAT gain, as well as improve lipid profiles in diet-induced obese rats.

  5. Loss of Body Weight and Fat and Improved Lipid Profiles in Obese Rats Fed Apple Pomace or Apple Juice Concentrate

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kyung-Dong; Han, Chan-Kyu

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of apple pomace (AP) and apple juice concentrate (AC) supplementation on body weight and fat loss as well as lipid metabolism in obese rats fed a high-fat diet. Diet-induced obese rats were assigned to three groups (n=8 for each group): high fat diet (HFD) control, HFD containing 10% (w/w) AP, and HFD containing 10% (w/w) AC. There was also a normal diet group (n=8). After 5 weeks, body weight gain, adipose tissue weight, serum and hepatic lipid profiles, liver morphology, and adipocyte size were measured. Body weight gain, white adipose tissue (WAT) weight, serum total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations, epididymal adipocyte size, and lesion scores were significantly lower and serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration and brown adipose tissue weights were significantly higher in the AP and AC groups compared with the HFD group. In addition, atherogenic indices in the AP and AC groups were significantly lower than in the HFD group. These results indicate that supplementing apple products such as AP and AC may help suppress body weight and WAT gain, as well as improve lipid profiles in diet-induced obese rats. PMID:23909905

  6. In-vitro and in-vivo evidence of dose-dependent decrease of uropathogenic Escherichia coli virulence after consumption of commercial Vaccinium macrocarpon (cranberry) capsules.

    PubMed

    Lavigne, J-P; Bourg, G; Combescure, C; Botto, H; Sotto, A

    2008-04-01

    This study evaluated the antibacterial efficacy of the consumption of cranberry capsules vs. placebo in the urine of healthy volunteers. A first double-blind, randomised, crossover trial involved eight volunteers who had followed three regimens, with or without cranberry, with a wash-out period of at least 6 days between each regimen. Twelve hours after consumption of cranberry or placebo hard capsules, the first urine of the morning was collected. Different Escherichia coli strains were cultured in the urine samples. Urinary antibacterial adhesion activity was measured in vitro using the human T24 epithelial cell-line, and in vivo using the Caenorhabditis elegans killing model. With the in-vitro model, 108 mg of cranberry induced a significant reduction in bacterial adherence to T24 cells as compared with placebo (p <0.001). A significant dose-dependent decrease in bacterial adherence in vitro was noted after the consumption of 108 and 36 mg of cranberry (p <0.001). The in-vivo model confirmed that E. coli strains had a reduced ability to kill C. elegans after growth in the urine of patients who consumed cranberry capsules. Overall, these in-vivo and in-vitro studies suggested that consumption of cranberry juice represents an interesting new strategy to prevent recurrent urinary tract infection.

  7. In-vitro and in-vivo evidence of dose-dependent decrease of uropathogenic Escherichia coli virulence after consumption of commercial Vaccinium macrocarpon (cranberry) capsules

    PubMed Central

    Lavigne, Jean-Philippe; Bourg, Gisèle; Combescure, Christophe; Botto, Henri; Sotto, Albert

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the antibacterial efficacy of the consumption of cranberry capsules vs. placebo in the urine of healthy volunteers. A first double-blind, randomised, crossover trial involved eight volunteers who had followed three regimens, with or without cranberry, with a wash-out period of at least 6 days between each regimen. Twelve hours after consumption of cranberry or placebo hard capsules, the first urine of the morning was collected. Different Escherichia coli strains were cultured in the urine samples. Urinary antibacterial adhesion activity was measured in vitro using the human T24 epithelial cell-line, and in vivo using the Caenorhabditis elegans killing model. With the in-vitro model, 108 mg of cranberry induced a significant reduction in bacterial adherence to T24 cells as compared with placebo (p <0.001). A significant dose-dependent decrease in bacterial adherence in vitro was noted after the consumption of 108 and 36 mg of cranberry (p <0.001). The in-vivo model confirmed that E. coli strains had a reduced ability to kill C. elegans after growth in the urine of patients who consumed cranberry capsules. Overall, these in-vivo and in-vitro studies suggested that consumption of cranberry juice represents an interesting new strategy to prevent recurrent urinary tract infection. PMID:18190583

  8. Multi-species mating disruption in cranberries

    Cranberries in Wisconsin are often attacked by three moth species, known commonly as Sparganothis fruitworm, cranberry fruitworm, and black-headed fireworm. These moth species require multiple insecticide applications each season in Wisconsin. With the loss of certain broad-spectrum insecticides and...

  9. Anthocyanins, antioxidative, and antimicrobial properties of American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) and their press cakes.

    PubMed

    Viskelis, P; Rubinskiene, M; Jasutiene, I; Sarkinas, A; Daubaras, R; Cesoniene, L

    2009-03-01

    Amounts of total phenolics, anthocyanins, and ascorbic acid in 4 American cranberry varieties harvested at 4 stages of maturity were measured. The larger amount of phenolic compounds was found in berries of "Black Veil" cultivar (504 mg/100 g) at II stage of maturity. Significantly larger amounts of anthocyanins were determined in the overripe berries of the cultivars "Ben Lear" and "Black Veil." The amount of ascorbic acid in berries increased during ripening from I to III stage, and slightly decreased in the overripe berries. The biggest quantities of ascorbic acid were found in the ripe berries of "Ben Lear" cultivar (15.8 mg/100 g). The distribution of anthocyanins pigments was determined by HPLC-UV/MS in mature berries. The composition of individual anthocyanins in berries was quite similar in all the studied cranberry cultivars. While skins of cranberries are rich in anthocyanins and other phenolic compounds, the extracts of the by-products of cranberries juice-berry cakes, were analyzed and obtained results were compared with the properties of extracts made from whole berries. The anthocyanins and total phenolics content, radical scavenging activity, antimicrobial activity of the whole berries, and their press cakes extracts were measured. All investigated extracts from berries and their press cakes showed good radical scavenging activity and revealed antimicrobial properties. It was found that Bacillus cereus (ATCC 10876) and Micrococcus luteus (ATCC 9341) were the most sensitive among 10 tested Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria.

  10. Do cranberries help prevent urinary tract infections?

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Janet

    Cranberries are widely used in the treatment and prevention of urinary tract infections (UTIs) and for those at risk of such infections. With the growing resistance to antibiotics, cranberries can be viewed as a useful non-pharmaceutical remedy (Lavender, 2000). The initial studies that looked at the effects of cranberries on urine showed that the excretion of hippuric acid from the berries helped the urine to remain acidic, which could explain why they could be used to treat and prevent infection (Harkin, 2000). Recent studies argue that cranberries prevent Escherichia coli (E. coli) from adhering to uroepithelial cells in the bladder (Howell and Foxman, 2002). Cranberries contain a group of compounds, called proanthocyanidins, which are condensed tannins (Gray, 2002; Lowe and Fagelman, 2001; Kuzminski, 1996). These are thought to be the key factors in inhibiting E. coli adherence.

  11. 75 FR 28601 - Cranberry Pipeline Corporation; Notice of Compliance Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. PR10-4-001] Cranberry... 4, 2010, Cranberry Pipeline Corporation (Cranberry), filed its Statement of Operating Conditions in... regulations. Cranberry states that it made revisions to the SOC, including stand- alone statement of rates, as...

  12. 7 CFR 929.104 - Outlets for excess cranberries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Outlets for excess cranberries. 929.104 Section 929... SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES... excess cranberries. (a) In accordance with § 929.61, excess cranberries may be disposed of only in the...

  13. 7 CFR 929.61 - Outlets for excess cranberries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Outlets for excess cranberries. 929.61 Section 929.61... Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF... excess cranberries. (a) Noncommercial outlets. Excess cranberries may be disposed of in noncommercial...

  14. 7 CFR 929.104 - Outlets for excess cranberries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Outlets for excess cranberries. 929.104 Section 929... SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES... excess cranberries. (a) In accordance with § 929.61, excess cranberries may be disposed of only in the...

  15. 7 CFR 929.61 - Outlets for excess cranberries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Outlets for excess cranberries. 929.61 Section 929.61... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF... excess cranberries. (a) Noncommercial outlets. Excess cranberries may be disposed of in noncommercial...

  16. 7 CFR 929.61 - Outlets for excess cranberries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Outlets for excess cranberries. 929.61 Section 929.61... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF... excess cranberries. (a) Noncommercial outlets. Excess cranberries may be disposed of in noncommercial...

  17. 7 CFR 929.61 - Outlets for excess cranberries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Outlets for excess cranberries. 929.61 Section 929.61... Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF... excess cranberries. (a) Noncommercial outlets. Excess cranberries may be disposed of in noncommercial...

  18. 7 CFR 929.104 - Outlets for excess cranberries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Outlets for excess cranberries. 929.104 Section 929... SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES... excess cranberries. (a) In accordance with § 929.61, excess cranberries may be disposed of only in the...

  19. 7 CFR 929.104 - Outlets for excess cranberries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Outlets for excess cranberries. 929.104 Section 929... SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES... excess cranberries. (a) In accordance with § 929.61, excess cranberries may be disposed of only in the...

  20. Effects of a Variety of Food Extracts and Juices on the Specific Binding Ability of Norovirus GII.4 P Particles

    PubMed Central

    LI, DAN; BAERT, LEEN; XIA, MING; ZHONG, WEIMING; JIANG, XI; UYTTENDAELE, MIEKE

    2014-01-01

    The effects of 13 food extracts and juices, including shellfish, fruits, and vegetables, on the binding ability of human norovirus (NoV) were examined, using P particles of human NoV GII.4 as a research surrogate. The enhancements (positive values) or reductions (negative values) of NoV P particle detection (changes in optical density at 450 nm) in the presence of different food extracts and juices as compared with P particles diluted in phosphate-buffered saline were tested by saliva-binding, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in triplicate. In the presence of different food extracts and juices at different concentrations, an increase or decrease of the receptor-binding ability of the NoV P particles was observed. Due to a higher specific binding and thus a higher accumulation of the viral particles, oysters may be contaminated with human NoV more often than other shellfish species (mussel, hard clams, and razor clams). Cranberry and pomegranate juices were shown to reduce the specific binding ability of human NoV P particles. No such binding inhibition effects were observed for the other tested extracts of fresh produce (strawberry, blackberry, blueberry, cherry tomato, spinach, romaine lettuce) or, notably, for raspberry, which has been associated with human NoV outbreaks. PMID:22980024

  1. Effects of a variety of food extracts and juices on the specific binding ability of norovirus GII.4 P particles.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Baert, Leen; Xia, Ming; Zhong, Weiming; Jiang, Xi; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2012-07-01

    The effects of 13 food extracts and juices, including shellfish, fruits, and vegetables, on the binding ability of human norovirus (NoV) were examined, using P particles of human NoV GII.4 as a research surrogate. The enhancements (positive values) or reductions (negative values) of NoV P particle detection (changes in optical density at 450 nm) in the presence of different food extracts and juices as compared with P particles diluted in phosphate-buffered saline were tested by saliva-binding, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in triplicate. In the presence of different food extracts and juices at different concentrations, an increase or decrease of the receptor-binding ability of the NoV P particles was observed. Due to a higher specific binding and thus a higher accumulation of the viral particles, oysters may be contaminated with human NoV more often than other shellfish species (mussel, hard clams, and razor clams). Cranberry and pomegranate juices were shown to reduce the specific binding ability of human NoV P particles. No such binding inhibition effects were observed for the other tested extracts of fresh produce (strawberry, blackberry, blueberry, cherry tomato, spinach, romaine lettuce) or, notably, for raspberry, which has been associated with human NoV outbreaks.

  2. Beneficial effects of dried pomegranate juice concentrated powder on ultraviolet B-induced skin photoaging in hairless mice.

    PubMed

    Kang, Su-Jin; Choi, Beom-Rak; Kim, Seung-Hee; Yi, Hae-Yeon; Park, Hye-Rim; Song, Chang-Hyun; Ku, Sae-Kwang; Lee, Young-Joon

    2017-08-01

    The present study investigated the anti-aging effects of pomegranate juice concentrated powder (PCP) in hairless mice following 15 weeks of UVB irradiation (three times a week; 0.18 J/cm 2 ). Skin moisturizing effects were evaluated through skin water, collagen type I and hyaluronan contents, as well as collagen type I and hyaluronan synthesis-related transcript levels. Wrinkle formation and edema scores (skin weights) were also assessed, along with skin matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, MMP-9 and MMP-13 transcript levels. To determine the anti-inflammatory effects of PCP, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-10 contents were observed. Caspase-3 and cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) were used as an apoptotic index in epidermal keratinocytes. To determine the anti-oxidative effects of PCP, nitrotyrosine and 4-hydroxynonenal immunoreactive cells were detected and glutathione (GSH) content, malondialdehyde levels, superoxide anion production, Nox2, and GSH reductase mRNA expression were all measured. The results indicated that skin wrinkles induced by photoaging were significantly reduced by PCP, whereas skin water contents, collagen type I and hyaluronan contents all increased. Furthermore, IL-1β levels in the PCP-treated groups were lower than those in the UVB-exposed control group. UVB-induced GSH depletion was also inhibited by PCP. Taken together, the results of the current study suggest that PCP has favorable protective effects against UVB-induced photoaging through anti-apoptotic effects, MMP activity inhibition and ECM (COL1 and hyaluronan) synthesis-related moisturizing, anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects.

  3. Beneficial effects of dried pomegranate juice concentrated powder on ultraviolet B-induced skin photoaging in hairless mice

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Su-Jin; Choi, Beom-Rak; Kim, Seung-Hee; Yi, Hae-Yeon; Park, Hye-Rim; Song, Chang-Hyun; Ku, Sae-Kwang; Lee, Young-Joon

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigated the anti-aging effects of pomegranate juice concentrated powder (PCP) in hairless mice following 15 weeks of UVB irradiation (three times a week; 0.18 J/cm2). Skin moisturizing effects were evaluated through skin water, collagen type I and hyaluronan contents, as well as collagen type I and hyaluronan synthesis-related transcript levels. Wrinkle formation and edema scores (skin weights) were also assessed, along with skin matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, MMP-9 and MMP-13 transcript levels. To determine the anti-inflammatory effects of PCP, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-10 contents were observed. Caspase-3 and cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) were used as an apoptotic index in epidermal keratinocytes. To determine the anti-oxidative effects of PCP, nitrotyrosine and 4-hydroxynonenal immunoreactive cells were detected and glutathione (GSH) content, malondialdehyde levels, superoxide anion production, Nox2, and GSH reductase mRNA expression were all measured. The results indicated that skin wrinkles induced by photoaging were significantly reduced by PCP, whereas skin water contents, collagen type I and hyaluronan contents all increased. Furthermore, IL-1β levels in the PCP-treated groups were lower than those in the UVB-exposed control group. UVB-induced GSH depletion was also inhibited by PCP. Taken together, the results of the current study suggest that PCP has favorable protective effects against UVB-induced photoaging through anti-apoptotic effects, MMP activity inhibition and ECM (COL1 and hyaluronan) synthesis-related moisturizing, anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects. PMID:28810554

  4. Relation between gastric histology and gastric juice pH and nitrite and N-nitroso compound concentrations in the stomach after surgery for duodenal ulcer.

    PubMed Central

    Watt, P C; Sloan, J M; Donaldson, J; Campbell, G; Kennedy, T L

    1984-01-01

    Formation of N-nitroso compounds in gastric juice has been implicated in the pathogenesis of cancer in the stomach after operation. Gastric juice was aspirated from 85 subjects: 23 were controls, 51 had previously undergone vagotomy and gastrojejunostomy, and 11 had previously undergone vagotomy and pyloroplasty. The gastric juice samples were analysed for pH, nitrite, and total N-nitroso compounds. A significant correlation was found between pH and nitrite concentration (p less than 0.01). No significant correlation was found between pH and total N-nitroso compound concentration or between nitrite and N-nitroso compound concentration. The vagotomy and gastrojejunostomy patients had higher pH values and higher concentrations of nitrites and N-nitroso compounds than controls (p = 0.01 in all cases). The 51 vagotomy and gastrojejunostomy patients also underwent endoscopy and biopsy. They were divided into three groups: group 1 (21 patients) had no intestinal metaplasia and no more than mild dysplasia; group 2 (20 patients) had intestinal metaplasia; and group 3 (10 patients) had moderate or severe dysplasia. Groups 2 and 3 both had higher pH values and higher nitrite concentrations than group 1 (p = 0.01 in all cases). There was no significant difference, however, between either group 2 or 3 and group 1 for total N-nitroso compound concentration. Since there was no simple linear relation between pH and N-nitroso compound concentration, it was concluded that formation of N-nitroso compounds at high pH was unlikely to be involved in the pathogenesis of gastric cancer in the hypochlorhydric stomach after operation. The relation between nitrite and histological abnormality was not associated with a similar relation between N-nitroso compounds and histological abnormality. It therefore appears that there is no simple relation between N-nitroso compounds and the pathogenesis of premalignant gastric mucosal changes. PMID:6725597

  5. Effects of supplementation with pomegranate juice on plasma C-reactive protein concentrations: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Gurban, Camelia; Serban, Alexandru; Andrica, Florina; Serban, Maria-Corina

    2016-10-15

    Pomegranate juice (PJ) has a high content of antioxidants and bioactive polyphenols, being widely used for its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and chemopreventive effects. The objective of this meta-analysis consisted in investigating the impact of PJ on plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations. The search included SCOPUS, Medline and two Iranian bibliographic databases namely MagIran and Scientific Information Database (from inception to December 09, 2014) to identify prospective trials for investigating the impact of pomegranate preparations on serum concentrations of CRP. Two independent reviewers extracted data on study characteristics, methods and outcomes. Among 427 participants in the selected studies, 216 were allocated to PJ groups, and 211 to control group. Meta-analysis of data from 5 eligible randomized controlled trials (RCTs) arms did not provide compelling evidence as to a significant CRP-lowering effect of supplementation with pomegranate juice (WMD: -0.22 mg/l, 95% CI: -0.45, 0.01, p = 0.061). The impact of pomegranate juice on plasma CRP levels was found to be independent of duration of supplementation (slope: 0.003; 95% CI: -0.005, 0.011; p = 0.444). In conclusion, this meta-analysis of data from 5 prospective trials did not indicate a significant effect of PJ on plasma CRP levels, and this effect was independent of duration of supplementation. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  6. Screening of binding activity of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus agalactiae and Streptococcus suis to berries and juices.

    PubMed

    Toivanen, Marko; Huttunen, Sanna; Duricová, Jana; Soininen, Pasi; Laatikainen, Reino; Loimaranta, Vuokko; Haataja, Sauli; Finne, Jukka; Lapinjoki, Seppo; Tikkanen-Kaukanen, Carina

    2010-01-01

    Antiadhesion therapy is a promising approach to the fight against pathogens. Antibiotic resistance and the lack of effective vaccines have increased the search for new methods to prevent infectious diseases. Previous studies have shown the antiadhesion activity of juice from cultivated cranberries (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) against bacteria, especially E. coli. In this study, the binding of two streptococcal strains, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus agalactiae, to molecular size fractions (FI, FII and FIII, <10 kDa, 10-100 kDa, and >100 kDa, respectively) of berries and berry and fruit juices from 12 plant species were studied using a microtiter well assay. For Streptococcus suis a hemagglutination inhibition assay was used. In general, binding activity was detected especially to wild cranberry (Vaccinium oxycoccos L.) and to other Vaccinium species. S. pneumoniae cells bound most to cranberry juice fraction FI and S. agalactiae cells to cranberry fraction FIII. Hemagglutination induced by S. suis was most effectively inhibited by cranberry fraction FII. NMR spectra of some characteristic active and non-active fractions were also measured. They indicate that fractions FII and FIII contained proanthocyanidins and/or other phenolic compounds. The results suggest Vaccinium berries as possible sources of antiadhesives against bacterial infections.

  7. Cranberry flowering times and climate change in southern Massachusetts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellwood, Elizabeth R.; Playfair, Susan R.; Polgar, Caroline A.; Primack, Richard B.

    2014-09-01

    Plants in wild and agricultural settings are being affected by the warmer temperatures associated with climate change. Here we examine the degree to which the iconic New England cranberry, Vaccinium macrocarpon, is exhibiting signs of altered flowering phenology. Using contemporary records from commercial cranberry bogs in southeastern Massachusetts in the United States, we found that cranberry plants are responsive to temperature. Flowering is approximately 2 days earlier for each 1 °C increase in May temperature. We also investigated the relationship between cranberry flowering and flight dates of the bog copper, Lycaena epixanthe—a butterfly dependent upon cranberry plants in its larval stage. Cranberry flowering and bog copper emergence were found to be changing disproportionately over time, suggesting a potential ecological mismatch. The pattern of advanced cranberry flowering over time coupled with increased temperature has implications not only for the relationship between cranberry plants and their insect associates but also for agricultural crops in general and for the commercial cranberry industry.

  8. Cranberry flowering times and climate change in southern Massachusetts.

    PubMed

    Ellwood, Elizabeth R; Playfair, Susan R; Polgar, Caroline A; Primack, Richard B

    2014-09-01

    Plants in wild and agricultural settings are being affected by the warmer temperatures associated with climate change. Here we examine the degree to which the iconic New England cranberry, Vaccinium macrocarpon, is exhibiting signs of altered flowering phenology. Using contemporary records from commercial cranberry bogs in southeastern Massachusetts in the United States, we found that cranberry plants are responsive to temperature. Flowering is approximately 2 days earlier for each 1 °C increase in May temperature. We also investigated the relationship between cranberry flowering and flight dates of the bog copper, Lycaena epixanthe-a butterfly dependent upon cranberry plants in its larval stage. Cranberry flowering and bog copper emergence were found to be changing disproportionately over time, suggesting a potential ecological mismatch. The pattern of advanced cranberry flowering over time coupled with increased temperature has implications not only for the relationship between cranberry plants and their insect associates but also for agricultural crops in general and for the commercial cranberry industry.

  9. Cranberries and lower urinary tract infection prevention

    PubMed Central

    Hisano, Marcelo; Bruschini, Homero; Nicodemo, Antonio Carlos; Srougi, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Lower urinary tract infections are very common diseases. Recurrent urinary tract infections remain challenging to treat because the main treatment option is long-term antibiotic prophylaxis; however, this poses a risk for the emergence of bacterial resistance. Some options to avoid this risk are available, including the use of cranberry products. This article reviews the key methods in using cranberries as a preventive measure for lower urinary tract infections, including in vitro studies and clinical trials. PMID:22760907

  10. 21 CFR 146.132 - Grapefruit juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION CANNED FRUIT JUICES Requirements for Specific Standardized Canned Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146... essential composition and quality factors of the juice. It may be sweetened with the dry nutritive... concentrate. (iii) One or any combination of two or more of the dry or liquid forms of sugar, invert sugar...

  11. 21 CFR 146.132 - Grapefruit juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION CANNED FRUIT JUICES Requirements for Specific Standardized Canned Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146... essential composition and quality factors of the juice. It may be sweetened with the dry nutritive... concentrate. (iii) One or any combination of two or more of the dry or liquid forms of sugar, invert sugar...

  12. 21 CFR 146.132 - Grapefruit juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION CANNED FRUIT JUICES Requirements for Specific Standardized Canned Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146... essential composition and quality factors of the juice. It may be sweetened with the dry nutritive... concentrate. (iii) One or any combination of two or more of the dry or liquid forms of sugar, invert sugar...

  13. 21 CFR 146.132 - Grapefruit juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION CANNED FRUIT JUICES Requirements for Specific Standardized Canned Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146... essential composition and quality factors of the juice. It may be sweetened with the dry nutritive... concentrate. (iii) One or any combination of two or more of the dry or liquid forms of sugar, invert sugar...

  14. 21 CFR 146.132 - Grapefruit juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION CANNED FRUIT JUICES Requirements for Specific Standardized Canned Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146... essential composition and quality factors of the juice. It may be sweetened with the dry nutritive... concentrate. (iii) One or any combination of two or more of the dry or liquid forms of sugar, invert sugar...

  15. Four week supplementation with mixed fruit and vegetable juice concentrates increased protective serum antioxidants and folate and decreased plasma homocysteine in Japanese subjects.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Akira; Madarame, Takeo; Koike, Hiroto; Komatsu, Yasuhiro; Wise, John A

    2007-01-01

    Fruit and vegetable consumption has been inversely associated with the risk of chronic diseases including cancer and cardiovascular disease, with the beneficial effects attributed to a variety of protective antioxidants, carotenoids and phytonutrients. The objective of the present study was to determine the effect of supplementation with dehydrated concentrates from mixed fruit and vegetable juices (Juice Plus+R) on serum antioxidant and folate status, plasma homocysteine levels and markers for oxidative stress and DNA damage. Japanese subjects (n=60; age 27.8 yrs; BMI 22.1) were recruited to participate in a double-blind placebo controlled study and were randomized into 2 groups of 30, matched for sex, age, BMI and smoking status (39 males, 22 smokers; 21 females, 13 smokers). Subjects were given encapsulated supplements containing mixed fruit and vegetable juice concentrates or a matching placebo for 28 days, with blood and urine samples collected at baseline, day 14 and day 28 for analytical testing. Compared with the placebo, 28 day supplementation significantly increased the concentration of serum beta-carotene 528% (p<0.0001), lycopene 80.2% (p<0.0005), and alpha tocopherol 39.5% (p<0.0001). Serum folate increased 174.3% (p<0.0001) and correlated with a decrease in plasma homocysteine of -19.9% (p<0.03). Compared with baseline, measures of oxidative stress decreased with serum lipid peroxides declining -10.5% (p<0.02) and urine 8OHdG decreasing -21.1% (p<0.02). Evaluation of data from smokers only (n=17) after 28 days of active supplementation showed comparable changes. In the absence of dietary modification, supplementation with the fruit and vegetable juice concentrate capsules proved to be a highly bioavailable source of phytonutrients. Important antioxidants were elevated to desirable levels associated with decreased risk of disease while markers of oxidative stress were reduced, and folate status improved with a concomitant decrease in homocysteine, and

  16. Quantitative assessment of citric acid in lemon juice, lime juice, and commercially-available fruit juice products.

    PubMed

    Penniston, Kristina L; Nakada, Stephen Y; Holmes, Ross P; Assimos, Dean G

    2008-03-01

    Knowledge of the citric acid content of beverages may be useful in nutrition therapy for calcium urolithiasis, especially among patients with hypocitraturia. Citrate is a naturally-occurring inhibitor of urinary crystallization; achieving therapeutic urinary citrate concentration is one clinical target in the medical management of calcium urolithiasis. When provided as fluids, beverages containing citric acid add to the total volume of urine, reducing its saturation of calcium and other crystals, and may enhance urinary citrate excretion. Information on the citric acid content of fruit juices and commercially-available formulations is not widely known. We evaluated the citric acid concentration of various fruit juices. The citric acid content of 21 commercially-available juices and juice concentrates and the juice of three types of fruits was analyzed using ion chromatography. Lemon juice and lime juice are rich sources of citric acid, containing 1.44 and 1.38 g/oz, respectively. Lemon and lime juice concentrates contain 1.10 and 1.06 g/oz, respectively. The citric acid content of commercially available lemonade and other juice products varies widely, ranging from 0.03 to 0.22 g/oz. Lemon and lime juice, both from the fresh fruit and from juice concentrates, provide more citric acid per liter than ready-to-consume grapefruit juice, ready-to-consume orange juice, and orange juice squeezed from the fruit. Ready-to-consume lemonade formulations and those requiring mixing with water contain < or =6 times the citric acid, on an ounce-for-ounce basis, of lemon and lime juice.

  17. Mathematical modeling of the ethanol fermentation of cashew apple juice by a flocculent yeast: the effect of initial substrate concentration and temperature.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Álvaro Daniel Teles; da Silva Pereira, Andréa; Barros, Emanuel Meneses; Antonini, Sandra Regina Ceccato; Cartaxo, Samuel Jorge Marques; Rocha, Maria Valderez Ponte; Gonçalves, Luciana Rocha B

    2017-08-01

    In this work, the effect of initial sugar concentration and temperature on the production of ethanol by Saccharomyces cerevisiae CCA008, a flocculent yeast, using cashew apple juice in a 1L-bioreactor was studied. The experimental results were used to develop a kinetic model relating biomass, ethanol production and total reducing sugar consumption. Monod, Andrews, Levenspiel and Ghose and Tyagi models were investigated to represent the specific growth rate without inhibition, with inhibition by substrate and with inhibition by product, respectively. Model validation was performed using a new set of experimental data obtained at 34 °C and using 100 g L -1 of initial substrate concentration. The model proposed by Ghose and Tyagi was able to accurately describe the dynamics of ethanol production by S. cerevisiae CCA008 growing on cashew apple juice, containing an initial reducing sugar concentration ranging from 70 to 170 g L -1 and temperature, from 26 to 42 °C. The model optimization was also accomplished based on the following parameters: percentage volume of ethanol per volume of solution (%V ethanol /V solution ), efficiency and reaction productivity. The optimal operational conditions were determined using response surface graphs constructed with simulated data, reaching an efficiency and a productivity of 93.5% and 5.45 g L -1  h -1 , respectively.

  18. Proanthocyanidin-rich extracts from cranberry fruit (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) selectively inhibit the growth of human pathogenic fungi Candida spp. and Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Patel, Kunal D; Scarano, Frank J; Kondo, Miwako; Hurta, Robert A R; Neto, Catherine C

    2011-12-28

    Cranberry ( Vaccinium macrocarpon ) has been shown in clinical studies to reduce infections caused by Escherichia coli and other bacteria, and proanthocyanidins are believed to play a role. The ability of cranberry to inhibit the growth of opportunistic human fungal pathogens that cause oral, skin, respiratory, and systemic infections has not been well-studied. Fractions from whole cranberry fruit were screened for inhibition of five Candida species and Cryptococcus neoformans , a causative agent of fungal meningitis. Candida glabrata , Candida lusitaniae , Candida krusei , and Cryptococcus neoformans showed significant susceptibility to treatment with cranberry proanthocyanidin fractions in a broth microdilution assay, with minimum inhibitory concentrations as low as 1 μg/mL. MALDI-TOF MS analysis of subfractions detected epicatechin oligomers of up to 12 degrees of polymerization. Those containing larger oligomers caused the strongest inhibition. This study suggests that cranberry has potential as an antifungal agent.

  19. Multi-species mating disruption in Wisconsin cranberries

    Previous work has shown pheromone-based mating disruption to be a promising method of pest control in cranberries. Three moth species, cranberry fruitworm, Acrobasis vaccinii Riley (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), Sparganothis fruitworm, Sparganothis sulfureana Clemens (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), and black...

  20. Pheromone-based mating disruption in Wisconsin cranberries

    Pheromone-based mating disruption is a promising method of pest control in cranberries. Three moth species, cranberry fruitworm, Acrobasis vaccinii Riley (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), Sparganothis fruitworm, Sparganothis sulfureana Clemens (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), and black-headed fireworm, Rhopobota...

  1. Effect of cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) oligosaccharides on the formation of advanced glycation end-products.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiadong; Liu, Weixi; Ma, Hang; Marais, Jannie P J; Khoo, Christina; Dain, Joel A; Rowley, David C; Seeram, Navindra P

    2016-06-16

    BACKGROUND: The formation and accumulation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are implicated in several chronic human illnesses including type-2 diabetes, renal failure, and neurodegenerative diseases. The cranberry ( Vaccinium macrocarpon ) fruit has been previously reported to show anti-AGEs effects, attributed primarily to its phenolic constituents. However, there is lack of similar data on the non-phenolic constituents found in the cranberry fruit, in particular, its carbohydrate constituents. Herein, a chemically characterized oligosaccharide-enriched fraction purified from the cranberry fruit was evaluated for its potential anti-AGEs and free radical scavenging effects. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro anti-AGEs and free radical scavenging effects of a chemically characterized oligosaccharide-enriched fraction purified from the North American cranberry ( Vaccinium macrocarpon ) fruit. METHOD: The cranberry oligosaccharide-enriched fraction was purified from cranberry hull powder and characterized based on spectroscopic and spectrometric (NMR, MALDI-TOF-MS, and HPAEC-PAD) data. The oligosaccharide-enriched fraction was evaluated for its anti-AGEs and free radical scavenging effects by the bovine serum albumin-fructose, and DPPH assays, respectively. RESULTS: Fractionation of cranberry hull material yielded an oligosaccharide-enriched fraction named Cranf1b-CL. The 1 H NMR and MALDI-TOF-MS revealed that Cranf1b-CL consists of oligosaccharides ranging primarily from 6-mers to 9-mers. The monosaccharide composition of Cranf1b-CL was arabinose (25%), galactose (5%), glucose (47%) and xylose (23%). In the bovine serum albumin-fructose assay, Cranf1b-CL inhibited AGEs formation in a concentration-dependent manner with comparable activity to the synthetic antiglycating agent, aminoguanidine, used as the positive control (57 vs. 75%; both at 500μg/mL). In the DPPH free radical scavenging assay, Cranf1b-CL showed superior activity

  2. Effect of cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) oligosaccharides on the formation of advanced glycation end-products

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiadong; Liu, Weixi; Ma, Hang; Marais, Jannie P. J.; Khoo, Christina; Dain, Joel A.; Rowley, David C.; Seeram, Navindra P.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The formation and accumulation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are implicated in several chronic human illnesses including type-2 diabetes, renal failure, and neurodegenerative diseases. The cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) fruit has been previously reported to show anti-AGEs effects, attributed primarily to its phenolic constituents. However, there is lack of similar data on the non-phenolic constituents found in the cranberry fruit, in particular, its carbohydrate constituents. Herein, a chemically characterized oligosaccharide-enriched fraction purified from the cranberry fruit was evaluated for its potential anti-AGEs and free radical scavenging effects. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro anti-AGEs and free radical scavenging effects of a chemically characterized oligosaccharide-enriched fraction purified from the North American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) fruit. METHOD: The cranberry oligosaccharide-enriched fraction was purified from cranberry hull powder and characterized based on spectroscopic and spectrometric (NMR, MALDI-TOF-MS, and HPAEC-PAD) data. The oligosaccharide-enriched fraction was evaluated for its anti-AGEs and free radical scavenging effects by the bovine serum albumin-fructose, and DPPH assays, respectively. RESULTS: Fractionation of cranberry hull material yielded an oligosaccharide-enriched fraction named Cranf1b-CL. The 1H NMR and MALDI-TOF-MS revealed that Cranf1b-CL consists of oligosaccharides ranging primarily from 6-mers to 9-mers. The monosaccharide composition of Cranf1b-CL was arabinose (25%), galactose (5%), glucose (47%) and xylose (23%). In the bovine serum albumin-fructose assay, Cranf1b-CL inhibited AGEs formation in a concentration-dependent manner with comparable activity to the synthetic antiglycating agent, aminoguanidine, used as the positive control (57 vs. 75%; both at 500μg/mL). In the DPPH free radical scavenging assay, Cranf1b-CL showed superior activity to the

  3. Consumption of cranberry polyphenols enhances human γδ-T cell proliferation and reduces the number of symptoms associated with colds and influenza: a randomized, placebo-controlled intervention study.

    PubMed

    Nantz, Meri P; Rowe, Cheryl A; Muller, Catherine; Creasy, Rebecca; Colee, James; Khoo, Christina; Percival, Susan S

    2013-12-13

    Our main objective was to evaluate the ability of cranberry phytochemicals to modify immunity, specifically γδ-T cell proliferation, after daily consumption of a cranberry beverage, and its effect on health outcomes related to cold and influenza symptoms. The study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel intervention. Subjects drank a low calorie cranberry beverage (450 ml) made with a juice-derived, powdered cranberry fraction (n = 22) or a placebo beverage (n = 23), daily, for 10 wk. PBMC were cultured for six days with autologous serum and PHA-L stimulation. Cold and influenza symptoms were self-reported. The proliferation index of γδ-T cells in culture was almost five times higher after 10 wk of cranberry beverage consumption (p <0.001). In the cranberry beverage group, the incidence of illness was not reduced, however significantly fewer symptoms of illness were reported (p = 0.031). Consumption of the cranberry beverage modified the ex vivo proliferation of γδ-T cells. As these cells are located in the epithelium and serve as a first line of defense, improving their function may be related to reducing the number of symptoms associated with a cold and flu.

  4. Adjunctive daily supplementation with encapsulated fruit, vegetable and berry juice powder concentrates and clinical periodontal outcomes: a double-blind RCT

    PubMed Central

    Chapple, Iain L C; Milward, Michael R; Ling-Mountford, Nicola; Weston, Paul; Carter, Kevin; Askey, Keeley; Dallal, Gerard E; De Spirt, Silke; Sies, Helmut; Patel, Dina; Matthews, John B

    2012-01-01

    Aim A double-blind randomized controlled trial to determine whether dietary supplementation with fruit/vegetable/berry juice powder concentrates, simultaneously with non-surgical periodontal therapy, improved 2-month treatment outcomes. Methods Volunteers with chronic periodontitis were randomly assigned to one of three groups: fruit/vegetable (FV), fruit/vegetable/berry (FVB) or placebo. Supplements were taken daily during non-surgical debridement and maintenance and outcomes assessed at 2, 5 and 8 months after completion. Primary outcomes were mean probing pocket depth (PPD), clinical attachment gain, % sites bleeding on probing (% BOP) at 2 months. Adherence and plasma β-carotene were determined. Results Sixty-one nutritionally replete (by serum biochemistry) volunteers enrolled and 60 (n = 20 per arm) completed the 2-month review. Clinical outcomes improved in all groups at 2 months, with additional improvement in PPD versus placebo for FV (p < 0.03). Gingival crevicular fluid volumes diminished more in supplement groups than placebo (FVB; p < 0.05) at 2 months, but not at later times. The % BOP (5 months) and cumulative plaque scores (8 months) were lowered more in the FV group (p < 0.05). Conclusions Adjunctive juice powder concentrates appear to improve initial pocket depth reductions in nutritionally replete patients, where plasma micronutrient bioavailability is attainable. Definitive multicentre studies in untreated and treated patients are required to ascertain the clinical significance of such changes. PMID:22093005

  5. Tree age, fruit size and storage conditions affect levels of ascorbic acid, total phenolic concentrations and total antioxidant activity of 'Kinnow' mandarin juice.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Samina; Malik, Aman U; Khan, Ahmad S; Shahid, Muhammad; Shafique, Muhammad

    2016-03-15

    Bioactive compounds (ascorbic acid, total phenolics and total antioxidants) are important constituents of citrus fruit juice; however, information with regard to their concentrations and changes in relation to tree age and storage conditions is limited. 'Kinnow' (Citrus nobilis Lour × Citrus deliciosa Tenora) mandarin juice from fruit of three tree ages (6, 18 and 35 years old) and fruit sizes (large, medium and small) were examined for their bioactive compounds during 7 days under ambient storage conditions (20 ± 2 °C and 60-65% relative humidity (RH)) and during 60 days under cold storage (4 ± 1 °C and 75-80% RH) conditions. Under ambient conditions, a reduction in total phenolic concentrations (TPC) and in total antioxidant activity (TAA) was found for the juice from all tree ages and fruit sizes. Overall, fruit from 18-year-old trees had higher mean TPC (95.86 µg mL(-1) ) and TAA (93.68 mg L(-1) ), as compared to 6 and 35-year-old trees. Likewise, in cold storage, TAA decreased in all fruit size groups from 18 and 35-year-old trees. In all tree age and fruit size groups, TPC decreased initially during 15 days of cold storage and then increased gradually with increase in storage duration. Ascorbic acid concentrations showed an increasing trend in all fruit size groups from 35-year-old trees. Overall, during cold storage, fruit from 18-year-old trees maintained higher mean ascorbic acid (33.05 mg 100 mL(-1) ) concentrations, whereas fruit from 6-year-old trees had higher TAA (153.1 mg L(-1) ) and TPC (115.1 µg mL(-1) ). Large-sized fruit had higher ascorbic acid (32.08 mg 100 mL(-1) ) concentrations and TAA (157.5 mg L(-1) ). Fruit from 18-year-old trees maintained higher TPC and TAA under ambient storage conditions, whereas fruit from 6-year-old trees maintained higher TPC and TAA during cold storage. Small-sized fruit had higher TPC after ambient temperature storage, whereas large fruit size showed higher ascorbic acid concentrations and TAA after cold

  6. 7 CFR 929.57 - Outlets for restricted cranberries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Outlets for restricted cranberries. 929.57 Section 929... SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES....57 Outlets for restricted cranberries. (a) Except as provided in this section and in § 929.56...

  7. 7 CFR 929.57 - Outlets for restricted cranberries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Outlets for restricted cranberries. 929.57 Section 929... SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES....57 Outlets for restricted cranberries. (a) Except as provided in this section and in § 929.56...

  8. 7 CFR 929.57 - Outlets for restricted cranberries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Outlets for restricted cranberries. 929.57 Section 929... SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES....57 Outlets for restricted cranberries. (a) Except as provided in this section and in § 929.56...

  9. 7 CFR 929.57 - Outlets for restricted cranberries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Outlets for restricted cranberries. 929.57 Section 929... SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES....57 Outlets for restricted cranberries. (a) Except as provided in this section and in § 929.56...

  10. 7 CFR 929.57 - Outlets for restricted cranberries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Outlets for restricted cranberries. 929.57 Section 929... SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES....57 Outlets for restricted cranberries. (a) Except as provided in this section and in § 929.56...

  11. Evaluation of Web-based Dietary Assessment Software for Children: comparing reported fruit, juice and vegetable intakes with plasma carotenoid concentration and school lunch observations.

    PubMed

    Biltoft-Jensen, Anja; Bysted, Anette; Trolle, Ellen; Christensen, Tue; Knuthsen, Pia; Damsgaard, Camilla T; Andersen, Lene F; Brockhoff, Per; Tetens, Inge

    2013-07-14

    Web-based Dietary Assessment Software for Children (WebDASC) was developed to estimate dietary intake in a school meal intervention study among 8- to 11-year-old Danish children. The present study validates self-reported fruit, juice and vegetable (FJV) intakes in 8- to 11-year-old children by comparing intake with plasma carotenoid concentration, and by comparing the reported FJV intake to actually eaten FJV, as observed by a photographic method. A total of eighty-one children, assisted by parents, reported their diet for seven consecutive days. For the same five schooldays as they reported their diet, the children's school lunch was photographed and weighed before and after eating. In the week after the diet reporting, fasting blood samples were taken. Self-reported intake of FJV and estimated intake of carotenoids were compared with plasma carotenoid concentration. Accuracy of self-reported food and FJV consumption at school lunch was measured in terms of matches, intrusion, omission and faults, when compared with images and weights of lunch intake. Self-reported intake of FJV was significantly correlated with the total carotenoid concentration (0·58) (P< 0·01). Fruit and juice consumption showed higher correlations than vegetables with plasma carotenoid concentration (0·38 and 0·42 v. 0·33) (P< 0·01). A total of 82 % of the participants fell into the same or adjacent quartiles when cross-classified by FJV intake and carotenoids biomarkers. WebDASC attained 82 % reporting matches overall and a higher percentage match for reporting fruits compared with beverages. The present study indicated that WebDASC can be used to rank 8- to 11-year-old Danish children according to their intake of FJV overall and at school meals.

  12. Investigation and Modeling of Cranberry Weather Stress.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, Paul Joseph

    Cranberry bog weather conditions and weather-related stress were investigated for development of crop yield prediction models and models to predict daily weather conditions in the bog. Field investigations and data gathering were completed at the Rutgers University Blueberry/Cranberry Research Center experimental bogs in Chatsworth, New Jersey. Study indicated that although cranberries generally exhibit little or no stomatal response to changing atmospheric conditions, the evaluation of weather-related stress could be accomplished via use of micrometeorological data. Definition of weather -related stress was made by establishing critical thresholds of the frequencies of occurrence, and magnitudes of, temperature and precipitation in the bog based on values determined by a review of the literature and a grower questionnaire. Stress frequencies were correlated with cranberry yield to develop predictive models based on the previous season's yield, prior season data, prior and current season data, current season data; and prior and current season data through July 31 of the current season. The predictive ability of the prior season models was best and could be used in crop planning and production. Further examination of bog micrometeorological data permitted the isolation of those weather conditions conducive to cranberry scald and allowed for the institution of a pilot scald advisory program during the 1991 season. The micrometeorological data from the bog was also used to develop models to predict daily canopy temperature and precipitation, based on upper air data, for grower use. Models were developed for each month for maximum and minimum temperatures and for precipitation and generally performed well. The modeling of bog weather conditions is an important first step toward daily prediction of cranberry weather-related stress.

  13. Great heterogeneity of commercial fruit juices to induce endothelium-dependent relaxations in isolated porcine coronary arteries: role of the phenolic content and composition.

    PubMed

    Auger, Cyril; Pollet, Brigitte; Arnold, Cécile; Marx, Céline; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B

    2015-01-01

    Since polyphenol-rich products such as red wine, grape juice, and grape extracts have been shown to induce potent endothelium-dependent relaxations, we have evaluated whether commercial fruit juices such as those from berries are also able to induce endothelium-dependent relaxations of isolated coronary arteries and, if so, to determine whether this effect is related to their phenolic content. Among the 51 fruit juices tested, 2/12 grape juices, 3/7 blackcurrant juices, 4/5 cranberry juices, 1/6 apple juices, 0/5 orange juices, 2/6 red fruit and berry juices, 3/6 blends of red fruit juices, and 0/4 non-red fruit juices were able to induce relaxations achieving more than 50% at a volume of 1%. The active fruit juices had phenolic contents ranging from 0.31 to 1.86 g GAE/L, which were similar to those of most of the less active juices with the exception of one active grape juice (2.14 g GAE/L) and one active blend of red fruit juices (3.48 g GAE/L). Altogether, these findings indicate that very few commercial fruit juices have the ability to induce potent endothelium-dependent relaxations, and that this effect is not related to their quantitative phenolic content, but rather to their qualitative phenolic composition.

  14. Effect of an oral supplementation with a proprietary melon juice concentrate (Extramel®) on stress and fatigue in healthy people: a pilot, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Milesi, Marie-Anne; Lacan, Dominique; Brosse, Hervé; Desor, Didier; Notin, Claire

    2009-01-01

    Background Recent studies have demonstrated a correlation between perceived stress and oxidative stress. As SOD is the main enzyme of the enzymatic antioxidant defence system of the body, we evaluated the effect of an oral daily intake of a proprietary melon juice concentrate rich in SOD (EXTRAMEL®) on the signs and symptoms of stress and fatigue in healthy volunteers. Methods This randomized, double blind, placebo controlled clinical study was conducted with seventy healthy volunteers aged between 30 and 55 years, who feel daily stress and fatigue. They took the dietary supplement based on the melon juice concentrate (10 mg Extramel® corresponding to 140 IU SOD per capsule) or a placebo one time daily during 4 weeks. Stress and fatigue were measured using four observational psychometric scales: FARD, PSS-14, SF-12 and Epworth scale. The study was conducted by Isoclin, a clinical research organization, located in Poitiers, France. Results No adverse effect was noted. The supplementation with the proprietary melon juice concentrate bringing 140 IU SOD/day significantly improved signs and symptoms of stress and fatigue linked to performance, physical (pain, sleep troubles), cognitive (concentration, weariness, sleep troubles) or behavioural (attitude, irritability, difficulty of contact) compared to the placebo. In the same way, quality of life and perceived stress were significantly improved with SOD supplementation. Conclusion This pilot study showed that an oral supplementation with a proprietary melon juice concentrate rich in SOD may have a positive effect on several signs and symptoms of perceived stress and fatigue. PMID:19754931

  15. 7 CFR 929.59 - Excess cranberries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... MASSACHUSETTS, RHODE ISLAND, CONNECTICUT, NEW JERSEY, WISCONSIN, MICHIGAN, MINNESOTA, OREGON, WASHINGTON, AND LONG ISLAND IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK Order Regulating Handling Regulations § 929.59 Excess cranberries...

  16. Pheromone loading in cranberry insect lures

    We examined the lures for the cranberry fruitworm (CFW), the sparganothis fruitworm (SFW), and the blackheaded fireworm (BHFW). These lures were purchased from ISCA Technologies, Great Lakes IPM, Scentry, and Trécé. Based on our first analyses of lure compositions at the University of Wisconsin BioT...

  17. Addition of Orange Pomace to Orange Juice Attenuates the Increases in Peak Glucose and Insulin Concentrations after Sequential Meal Ingestion in Men with Elevated Cardiometabolic Risk.

    PubMed

    Dong, Honglin; Rendeiro, Catarina; Kristek, Angelika; Sargent, Laura J; Saunders, Caroline; Harkness, Laura; Rowland, Ian; Jackson, Kim G; Spencer, Jeremy Pe; Lovegrove, Julie A

    2016-06-01

    Prospective cohort studies show that higher dietary fiber intake is associated with reduced cardiovascular disease risk, yet the impact on postprandial glucose and insulin responses is unclear. This study aims to evaluate the effects of orange beverages with differing fiber concentrations on postprandial glycemic responses (secondary outcome measure) after a sequential breakfast and lunch challenge in men with increased cardiometabolic risk. Thirty-six men (aged 30-65 y; body mass index 25-30 kg/m(2): fasting triacylglycerol or total cholesterol concentrations: 0.8-2.2 or 6.0-8.0 mmol/L, respectively) were provided with a high-fat mixed breakfast and were randomly assigned to consume 240 mL Tropicana (PepsiCo, Inc.) pure premium orange juice without pulp (OJ), OJ with 5.5 g added orange pomace fiber (OPF), juice made from lightly blended whole orange, or an isocaloric sugar-matched control (Control) on 4 occasions separated by 2 wk. A medium-fat mixed lunch was provided at 330 min. Blood samples were collected before breakfast and on 11 subsequent occasions for 420 min (3 time points postlunch) to determine postprandial glucose, insulin, lipid, and inflammatory biomarker responses. Repeated-measures ANOVA was used for data analysis. OPF significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the maximal change in glucose concentrations (1.9 ± 0.21 mmol/L) reached after breakfast compared with other treatments (2.3-2.4 mmol/L) and after lunch (3.0 ± 0.05 mmol/L) compared with OJ (3.6 ± 0.05 mmol/L). The maximal change in insulin concentration (313 ± 25 pmol/L) was also lower compared with Control (387 ± 30 pmol/L) and OJ (418 ± 39 pmol/L) after breakfast. OPF significantly delayed the time to reach the peak glucose concentration compared with Control and OJ, and of insulin compared with Control after breakfast. OPF consumed with breakfast may lower postprandial glycemic and insulinemic responses to typical meal ingestion in men with increased cardiometabolic risk. This trial is

  18. Seville orange juice-felodipine interaction: comparison with dilute grapefruit juice and involvement of furocoumarins.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, S; Bailey, D G; Paine, M F; Watkins, P B

    2001-01-01

    Our objective was to determine whether Seville orange juice produces a grapefruit juice-like interaction with felodipine and whether bergamottin, 6',7'-dihydroxybergamottin, or other furocoumarins are involved. In a randomized three-way crossover design, 10 volunteers received a felodipine 10-mg extended-release tablet with 240 mL of Seville orange juice, dilute grapefruit juice (that contained equivalent total molar concentrations of bergamottin plus 6',7'-dihydroxybergamottin), or common orange juice (negative control). The pharmacokinetics of felodipine and its dehydrofelodipine metabolite were determined. Juice concentrations of furocoumarins were measured. CYP3A4 inhibitory activity of newly identified furocoumarins was assessed. The felodipine area under the plasma concentration-time curve was increased by 76% and 93% after Seville orange juice and grapefruit juice ingestion, respectively, compared with common orange juice. The effects of Seville orange juice and grapefruit juice were similar in that the felodipine maximum concentration was augmented while the terminal elimination half-life was unchanged and the dehydrofelodipine area under the plasma concentration time-curve was increased, but the dehydrofelodipine-felodipine area under the plasma concentration-time curve ratio was reduced. Bergamottin and 6',7'-dihydroxybergamottin concentrations were 5 and 36 micromol/L, respectively, in Seville orange juice and were 16 and 23 micromol/L, respectively, in dilute grapefruit juice. A newly identified furocoumarin, bergapten, was detected only in Seville orange juice (31 micromol/L), and it was found to be a mechanism-based inhibitor of recombinant CYP3A4. Relative to the control, 6',7'-dihydroxybergamottin (10 micromol/L) inhibited CYP3A4 activity in cultured intestinal epithelial cells by 93%, whereas bergapten (10 micromol/L) inhibited the activity by only 34%. Seville orange juice and grapefruit juice interact with felodipine by a common mechanism, which

  19. Volatility of patulin in apple juice.

    PubMed

    Kryger, R A

    2001-08-01

    Patulin is a mycotoxin produced by certain fungi, such as those found commonly on apples. The patulin content of apple juice is a regulatory concern because patulin is a suspected carcinogen and mutagen. A simple model of the apple juice concentration process was carried out to examine the possible contamination of patulin in apple aroma, a distillate produced commercially in the concentration of apple juice. The results show no evidence for patulin volatility, and document a reduction in patulin content by at least a factor of 250 in the apple distillate obtained from apple juice. Furthermore, a survey of several commercial apple aroma samples found no evidence of patulin content.

  20. Improvement of physico-chemical properties and phenolic compounds bioavailability by concentrating dietary fiber of peach (Prunus persica) juice by-product.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-González, Sarahí; Pérez-Ramírez, Iza F; Castaño-Tostado, Eduardo; Amaya-Llano, Silvia; Rodríguez-García, Mario E; Reynoso-Camacho, Rosalía

    2018-06-01

    This study aimed to concentrate dietary fiber (DF) from peach (Prunus persica) juice by-product (PJBP), to improve its functional properties, and its polyphenols bioavailability. The dietary fiber concentrates (DFCs) were obtained from PJBP using water/ethanol treatments (100:0, 20:80, 50:50, 80:20, and 0:100, v/v) at 1:5 ratio (wet weight/solvent, w/v) for 5 and 20 min at 21 °C. All treatments concentrated condensed tannins, total and insoluble DF, with the highest content found with 100% H 2 O treatment. The major polyphenols of DFC were 4-O-caffeoylquinic, chlorogenic, and 1,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acids. Water and oil retention capacity and maximum glucose diffusion rate were improved mainly with 100% H 2 O treatment. Healthy rats were fed with a standard diet supplemented with 8% of PJBP, DFC obtained with 100% H 2 O for 5 min, or DFC obtained with 20% EtOH for 5 min. Gastrointestinal digesta weight and viscosity were increased in animals supplemented with 100% H 2 O DFC. Moreover, the urinary excretion of polyphenol metabolites, mainly glucuronide and sulfate conjugates, was increased with this treatment, indicating a greater bioavailability of PJBP polyphenols, which was associated with an increased dietary fiber porosity. Water treatment could be used to potentiate PJBP functional properties and polyphenols bioavailability. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Inhibition of interleukin-17-stimulated interleukin-6 and -8 production by cranberry components in human gingival fibroblasts and epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tipton, D A; Cho, S; Zacharia, N; Dabbous, M K

    2013-10-01

    Gingival epithelial cells and fibroblasts participate in periodontal inflammation and destruction, producing interleukin (IL)-6, a regulator of osteoclastic bone resorption, and the neutrophil chemoattractant IL-8. IL-17, a product of T-helper 17 cells, may play a role in periodontitis by stimulating cytokine production by gingival cells. The cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) is rich in polyphenols, particularly proanthocyanidins, which have antioxidant and other beneficial properties. Cranberry components inhibit pro-inflammatory activities of lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human macrophages, gingival fibroblasts, and epithelial cells, but little is known of its effects on IL-17-stimulated cytokine production. The objectives were to determine the effects of IL-17 ± cranberry components on IL-6 and IL-8 production by human gingival epithelial cells and fibroblasts. Cranberry high molecular weight non-dialyzable material (NDM), which is rich in proanthocyanidins, was derived from cranberry juice. Human gingival epithelial cells and normal human gingival fibroblasts were incubated with NDM (5-50 μg/mL), IL-17 (0.5-100 ng/mL), or NDM + IL-17 in serum-free medium for 6 d. IL-6 and IL-8 in culture supernatants were measured by ELISA. Membrane damage and viability were assessed by lactate dehydrogenase activity released into cell supernatants and activity of a mitochondrial enzyme, respectively. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Scheffe's F procedure for post hoc comparisons. In both cell lines, IL-17 (≥ ~5-10 ng/mL) significantly stimulated production of IL-6 (p < 0.005) and IL-8 (p < 0.03). Non-toxic levels of NDM inhibited constitutive IL-6 and IL-8 production by epithelial cells (p ≤ 0.01) and fibroblasts (p ≤ 0.03) as well as IL-17-stimulated cytokine production by epithelial cells [IL-6 (maximum ~80% inhibition; p ≤ 0.0001); IL-8 (maximum ~70% inhibition; p ≤ 0.03)] and fibroblasts [IL-6 (maximum ~90% inhibition; p ≤ 0.0001); IL

  2. Cranberries (Vaccinium macrocarpon) and cardiovascular disease risk factors.

    PubMed

    McKay, Diane L; Blumberg, Jeffrey B

    2007-11-01

    The American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) is one of the three commercially important fruits native to North America. Cranberries are a particularly rich source of phenolic phytochemicals, including phenolic acids (benzoic, hydroxycinnamic, and ellagic acids) and flavonoids (anthocyanins, flavonols, and flavan-3-ols). A growing body of evidence suggests that polyphenols, including those found in cranberries, may contribute to reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) by increasing the resistance of LDL to oxidation, inhibiting platelet aggregation, reducing blood pressure, and via other anti-thrombotic and anti-inflammatory mechanisms. Research regarding the bioactivity of cranberries and their constituents on risk factors for CVD is reviewed.

  3. 7 CFR 929.104 - Outlets for excess cranberries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES... development of foreign and domestic markets, including, but not limited to dehydration, radiation, freeze...

  4. Dietary supplementation with apple juice concentrate alleviates the compensatory increase in glutathione synthase transcription and activity that accompanies dietary- and genetically-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Tchantchou, F; Graves, M; Ortiz, D; Rogers, E; Shea, T B

    2004-01-01

    Increased oxidative stress, which can arise from dietary, environmental and/or genetic sources, contributes to the decline in cognitive performance during normal aging and in neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease. Supplementation with fruits and vegetables that are high in antioxidant potential can compensate for dietary and/or genetic deficiencies that promote increased oxidative stress. We have recently demonstrated that apple juice concentrate (AJC) prevents the increase in oxidative damage to brain tissue and decline in cognitive performance observed when transgenic mice lacking apolipoprotein E (ApoE-/-) are maintained on a vitamin-deficient diet and challenged with excess iron (included in the diet as a pro-oxidant). However, the mechanism by which AJC provided neuroprotection was not conclusively determined. Herein, we demonstrate that supplementation with AJC also prevents the compensatory increases in glutathione synthase transcription and activity that otherwise accompany maintenance of ApoE-/- mice on this vitamin-free diet in the presence of iron. Inclusion of the equivalent composition and concentration of sugars of AJC did not prevent these increases. These findings provide further evidence that the antioxidant potential of AJC can compensate for dietary and genetic deficiencies that otherwise promote neurodegeneration.

  5. Interactions between cranberries and fungi: the proposed function of organic acids in virulence suppression of fruit rot fungi

    PubMed Central

    Tadych, Mariusz; Vorsa, Nicholi; Wang, Yifei; Bergen, Marshall S.; Johnson-Cicalese, Jennifer; Polashock, James J.; White, James F.

    2015-01-01

    Cranberry fruit are a rich source of bioactive compounds that may function as constitutive or inducible barriers against rot-inducing fungi. The content and composition of these compounds change as the season progresses. Several necrotrophic fungi cause cranberry fruit rot disease complex. These fungi remain mostly asymptomatic until the fruit begins to mature in late August. Temporal fluctuations and quantitative differences in selected organic acid profiles between fruit of six cranberry genotypes during the growing season were observed. The concentration of benzoic acid in fruit increased while quinic acid decreased throughout fruit development. In general, more rot-resistant genotypes (RR) showed higher levels of benzoic acid early in fruit development and more gradual decline in quinic acid levels than that observed in the more rot-susceptible genotypes. We evaluated antifungal activities of selected cranberry constituents and found that most bioactive compounds either had no effects or stimulated growth or reactive oxygen species (ROS) secretion of four tested cranberry fruit rot fungi, while benzoic acid and quinic acid reduced growth and suppressed secretion of ROS by these fungi. We propose that variation in the levels of ROS suppressive compounds, such as benzoic and quinic acids, may influence virulence by the fruit rot fungi. Selection for crops that maintain high levels of virulence suppressive compounds could yield new disease resistant varieties. This could represent a new strategy for control of disease caused by necrotrophic pathogens that exhibit a latent or endophytic phase. PMID:26322038

  6. Effects of cranberry components on IL-1β-stimulated production of IL-6, IL-8 and VEGF by human TMJ synovial fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Tipton, David A; Christian, James; Blumer, Adam

    2016-08-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) in the TMJ is characterized by deterioration of articular cartilage and secondary inflammatory changes. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) stimulates IL-6, IL-8, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in synovial fluid of TMJ with internal derangement and bony changes. The cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) contains polyphenolic compounds that inhibit production of pro-inflammatory molecules by gingival cells in response to several stimulators. This study examined effects of cranberry components on IL-1β-stimulated IL-6, IL-8, and VEGF production by human TMJ synovial fibroblast-like cells. Cranberry high molecular weight non-dialyzable material (NDM) was derived from cranberry juice. Human TMJ synovial fibroblast-like cells from joints with degenerative OA and an ankylosed TMJ without degeneration were incubated with IL-1β (0.001-1nM)±NDM (25-250μg/ml) (2h preincubation). Viability was assessed via activity of a mitochondrial enzyme. IL-6, IL-8, and VEGF in culture supernatants were measured by ELISA; NF-κB and AP-1 transcription factors were measured in nuclear extracts via binding to specific oligonucleotides. ANOVA and Scheffe's F procedure for post hoc comparisons. NDM did not affect cell viability but inhibited IL-1β stimulated IL-6, IL-8, and VEGF production in all cell lines (p<0.05). NDM partially reduced nuclear levels of NF-κB and AP-1 (p<0.04), depending upon cell line and time of exposure to IL-1β+NDM. Cranberry NDM inhibition of IL-1β-stimulated IL- 6, IL-8, and VEGF production by TMJ synovial fibroblast-like cells suggests that cranberry components may be useful as a host modulatory therapeutic agent to prevent or treat inflammatory arthropathies of the TMJ. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Ursolic acid and its esters: occurrence in cranberries and other Vaccinium fruit and effects on matrix metalloproteinase activity in DU145 prostate tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Miwako; MacKinnon, Shawna L; Craft, Cheryl C; Matchett, Michael D; Hurta, Robert A R; Neto, Catherine C

    2011-03-30

    Ursolic acid and its cis- and trans-3-O-p-hydroxycinnamoyl esters have been identified as constituents of American cranberries (Vaccinium macrocarpon), which inhibit tumor cell proliferation. Since the compounds may contribute to berry anticancer properties, their content in cranberries, selected cranberry products, and three other Vaccinium species (V. oxycoccus, V. vitis-idaea and V. angustifolium) was determined by liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy. The ability of these compounds to inhibit growth in a panel of tumor cell lines and inhibit matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity associated with tumor invasion and metastasis was determined in DU145 prostate tumor cells. The highest content of ursolic acid and esters was found in V. macrocarpon berries (0.460-1.090 g ursolic acid and 0.040-0.160 g each ester kg(-1) fresh weight). V. vitis-idaea and V. angustifolium contained ursolic acid (0.230-0.260 g kg(-1) ), but the esters were not detected. V. oxycoccus was lowest (0.129 g ursolic acid and esters per kg). Ursolic acid content was highest in cranberry products prepared from whole fruit. Ursolic acid and its esters inhibited tumor cell growth at micromolar concentrations, and inhibited MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity at concentrations below those previously reported for cranberry polyphenolics. Cranberries (V. macrocarpon) were the best source of ursolic acid and its esters among the fruit and products tested. These compounds may limit prostate carcinogenesis through matrix metalloproteinase inhibition. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. 21 CFR 73.250 - Fruit juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.250 Fruit juice. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive fruit... the water infusion of the dried fruit. The color additive may be concentrated or dried. The definition of fruit juice in this paragraph is for the purpose of identity as a color additive only and shall...

  9. 21 CFR 73.260 - Vegetable juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.260 Vegetable juice. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive..., or by the water infusion of the dried vegetable. The color additive may be concentrated or dried. The definition of vegetable juice in this paragraph is for the purpose of identity as a color additive only, and...

  10. 21 CFR 156.145 - Tomato juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... be applied by any method which does not add water thereto. Such juice is strained free from peel, seeds, and other coarse or hard substances, but contains finely divided insoluble solids from the flesh... have been concentrated and later reconstituted with water and/or tomato juice to a tomato soluble...

  11. Survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 ATCC 43895 in a Model Apple Juice Medium with Different Concentrations of Proline and Caffeic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Reinders, Robert D.; Biesterveld, Steef; Bijker, Peter G. H.

    2001-01-01

    The effects of proline and caffeic acid on the survival of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157:H7 strain ATCC 43895 in a model apple juice medium were studied. It is hypothesized that the inhibitory effect of caffeic acid may explain why almost all outbreaks of STEC O157:H7 infections linked to apple juice or cider have occurred in October or November. PMID:11375209

  12. The growth of Propionibacterium cyclohexanicum in fruit juices and its survival following elevated temperature treatments.

    PubMed

    Walker, Michelle; Phillips, Carol A

    2007-06-01

    This study investigated the growth of Propionibacterium cyclohexanicum in orange juice over a temperature range from 4 to 40 degrees C and its ability to multiply in tomato, grapefruit, apple, pineapple and cranberry juices at 30 and 35 degrees C. Survival after 10 min exposure to 50, 60, 70, 80, 85, 90 and 95 degrees C in culture medium and in orange juice was also assessed. In orange juice the organism was able to multiply by 2 logs at temperatures from 4 to 35 degrees C and survived for up to 52 days. However, at 40 degrees C viable counts were reduced after 6 days and no viable cells isolated after 17 days. The optimum growth temperature in orange juice over 6 days was 25 degrees C but over 4 days it was 35 degrees C. The growth of P. cyclohexanicum was monitored in tomato, grapefruit, cranberry, pineapple and apple juices at 30 and 35 degrees C over 29 days. Cranberry, grapefruit and apple juice did not support the growth of P. cyclohexanicum. At 30 degrees C no viable cells were detected after 8 days in cranberry juice or after 22 days in grapefruit juice while at 35 degrees C no viable cells were detected after 5 and 15 days, respectively. However, in apple juice, although a 5 log reduction occurred, viable cells could be detected after 29 days. P. cyclohexanicum was able to multiply in both tomato and pineapple juices. In tomato juice, there was a 2 log increase in viable counts after 8 days at 30 degrees C but no increase at 35 degrees C, while in pineapple juice there was a 1 log increase in numbers over 29 days with no significant difference between numbers of viable cells present at 30 and 35 degrees C. The organism survived at 50 degrees C for 10 min in culture medium without a significant loss of viability while similar treatment at 60, 70 and 80 degrees C resulted in approximately a 3-4 log reduction, with no viable cells detected after treatment at 85 or 90 or 95 degrees C but, when pre-treated at intermediate temperatures before exposure to higher

  13. Hydrologic and nutrient response of groundwater to flooding of cranberry farms in southeastern Massachusetts, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Casey D.

    2015-06-01

    Seasonal flooding of cranberry farms is essential for commercial production of cranberries in southeastern Massachusetts, with close to 90% of growers using a flood for harvesting and winter protection. Although periodic flooding results in increased groundwater recharge, it may also exacerbate subsurface transport of dissolved forms of nitrogen and phosphorus. Given the paucity of information on groundwater exchange with cranberry floodwaters, hydrometric measurements were used to solve for the residual term of groundwater recharge in water budgets for three cranberry farms during the harvest and winter floods. Combined with continuous monitoring of water-table depth and discrete sampling of groundwater for analysis of nitrate (NO3-), ammonium (NH4+), and total dissolved phosphorus (TDP), values of groundwater recharge were used to evaluate the hydrologic and nutrient response of groundwater to flooding of cranberry farms. Mean values of groundwater recharge were 11 (±6) and 47 (±11) cm for the harvest and winter floods, respectively (one standard deviation in parentheses). The factor-of-four difference in ground recharge was related to flood holding times that, on average, were twenty days longer for the winter flood. The total estimated seasonal groundwater recharge of 58 cm was about four times higher than that assigned to cranberry farms in regional groundwater flow models. During the floods, 10 to 20-cm increases in water-table depth were observed for wells within 10 m of the farm, contrasting with decreases (or minimal variation) in water-table depth for wells located 100 m or farther from the farm. These spatial patterns in the hydrologic response of groundwater suggested a zone of influence of approximately 100 m from the flooded edge of the farm. Analysis of 43 groundwater samples collected from 10 wells indicated generally low concentrations of TDP in groundwater (<0.32 μM for 84% of the samples). Nitrate accounted for 85% of the dissolved inorganic N

  14. Cranberry Products Inhibit Adherence of P-Fimbriated Escherichia Coli to Primary Cultured Bladder and Vaginal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, K.; Chou, M. Y.; Howell, A.; Wobbe, C.; Grady, R.; Stapleton, A. E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Cranberry proanthocyanidins have been identified as possible inhibitors of Escherichia coli adherence to uroepithelial cells. However, little is known about the dose range of this effect. Furthermore, it has not been studied directly in the urogenital system. To address these issues we tested the effect of a cranberry powder and proanthocyanidin extract on adherence of a P-fimbriated uropathogenic E. coli isolate to 2 new urogenital model systems, namely primary cultured bladder epithelial cells and vaginal epithelial cells. Materials and Methods E. coli IA2 was pre-incubated with a commercially available cranberry powder (9 mg proanthocyanidin per gm) or with increasing concentrations of proanthocyanidin extract. Adherence of E. coli IA2 to primary cultured bladder epithelial cells or vaginal epithelial cells was measured before and after exposure to these products. Results Cranberry powder decreased mean adherence of E. coli IA2 to vaginal epithelial cells from 18.6 to 1.8 bacteria per cell (p <0.001). Mean adherence of E. coli to primary cultured bladder epithelial cells was decreased by exposure to 50 μg/ml proanthocyanidin extract from 6.9 to 1.6 bacteria per cell (p <0.001). Inhibition of adherence of E. coli by proanthocyanidin extract occurred in linear, dose dependent fashion over a proanthocyanidin concentration range of 75 to 5 μg/ml. Conclusions Cranberry products can inhibit E. coli adherence to biologically relevant model systems of primary cultured bladder and vaginal epithelial cells. This effect occurs in a dose dependent relationship. These findings provide further mechanistic evidence and biological plausibility for the role of cranberry products for preventing urinary tract infection. PMID:17509358

  15. Release of bound procyanidins from cranberry pomace by alkaline hydrolysis

    Procyanidins in plant products are present as extractable or unextractable/bound forms. We optimized alkaline hydrolysis conditions to liberate bound procyanidins from dried cranberry pomace. Five mL of sodium hydroxide (2, 4, or 6N) was added to 0.5 g of cranberry pomace in screw top glass tubes,...

  16. 7 CFR 457.132 - Cranberry crop insurance provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cranberry crop insurance provisions. 457.132 Section 457.132 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FEDERAL CROP INSURANCE CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMON CROP INSURANCE REGULATIONS § 457.132 Cranberry crop insurance...

  17. The USDA Cranberry Entomology Lab: Highlights from 2011-2017

    Biological, chemical, and cultural control methods have been investigated as part of the cranberry crop protection program pursued in the USDA Cranberry Entomology Laboratory. Surveys of native entomopathogenic nematodes in Wisconsin have produced a new bio-insecticide agent (Oscheius onirici subsp....

  18. Linking growing degree-days and cranberry plant phenology

    The Steffan lab has coordinated cranberry growers as citizen scientists since 2014 to record growing degree-days and make observations of cranberry plant phenology. The data from the last three years was analyzed to link plant phenology with degree-days....

  19. Causes and effects of poor drainage in cranberry farms

    Soils that support the growth of cranberries often cap geologic deposits of organic sediment, such as peat. However, low-permeability organic sediments may result in inadequate drainage that diminishes plant productivity and enhances fruit rot. Consequently, new constructions of cranberry farms are ...

  20. Cranberries and their bioactive constituents in human health

    Recent observational and clinical studies have raised interest in the potential health effects of cranberry consumption, an association that appears due to the phytochemical content of this fruit. The profile of cranberry bioactives is distinct from other berry fruit, being rich in A-type proanthocy...

  1. Native nematodes as new bio-insecticides for cranberries

    In the summer of 2015, an effort was made in central Wisconsin to find an entomopathogenic nematode capable controlling Wisconsin’s cranberry pests. Using a standard baiting method, a nematode of the Oscheius genus was collected from the mossy, sandy, peat-filled soils of a wild cranberry marsh. Thi...

  2. Precision agriculture and soil and water management in cranberry production

    Recent research on soil and water management of cranberry farms is presented in a special issue in Canadian Journal of Soil Science. The special issue (“Precision Agriculture and Soil Water Management in Cranberry Production”) consists of ten articles that include field, laboratory, and modeling stu...

  3. 7 CFR 929.110 - Transfers or sales of cranberry acreage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Transfers or sales of cranberry acreage. 929.110... CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF MASSACHUSETTS, RHODE ISLAND, CONNECTICUT, NEW JERSEY, WISCONSIN, MICHIGAN... Transfers or sales of cranberry acreage. (a) Sales or transfers of cranberry acreage shall be reported by...

  4. 7 CFR 929.110 - Transfers or sales of cranberry acreage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Transfers or sales of cranberry acreage. 929.110... CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF MASSACHUSETTS, RHODE ISLAND, CONNECTICUT, NEW JERSEY, WISCONSIN, MICHIGAN... Transfers or sales of cranberry acreage. (a) Sales or transfers of cranberry acreage shall be reported by...

  5. 7 CFR 929.110 - Transfers or sales of cranberry acreage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Transfers or sales of cranberry acreage. 929.110... CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF MASSACHUSETTS, RHODE ISLAND, CONNECTICUT, NEW JERSEY, WISCONSIN, MICHIGAN... Transfers or sales of cranberry acreage. (a) Sales or transfers of cranberry acreage shall be reported by...

  6. 7 CFR 929.110 - Transfers or sales of cranberry acreage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Transfers or sales of cranberry acreage. 929.110... CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF MASSACHUSETTS, RHODE ISLAND, CONNECTICUT, NEW JERSEY, WISCONSIN, MICHIGAN... Transfers or sales of cranberry acreage. (a) Sales or transfers of cranberry acreage shall be reported by...

  7. Consumption of sweetened, dried cranberries may reduce urinary tract infection incidence in susceptible women – a modified observational study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most common bacterial infections, and over 50% of women will have a UTI during their lifetimes. Antibiotics are used for prophylaxis of recurrent UTIs but can lead to emergence of drug-resistant bacteria. Therefore, it is reasonable to investigate nutritional strategies for prevention of UTIs. Cranberry juices and supplements have been used for UTI prophylaxis, but with variable efficacy. Because dried cranberries may contain a different spectrum of polyphenolics than juice, consuming berries may or may not be more beneficial than juice in decreasing the incidence of UTIs in susceptible women. The primary objectives of this study were to determine if consumption of sweetened, dried cranberries (SDC) decreases recurrent UTIs and whether this intervention would alter the heterogeneity, virulence factor (VF) profiles, or numbers of intestinal E. coli. Methods Twenty women with recurrent UTIs were enrolled in the trial and consumed one serving of SDC daily for two weeks. Clinical efficacy was determined by two criteria, a decrease in the six-month UTI rates pre- and post-consumption and increased time until the first UTI since beginning the study. Strain heterogeneity and virulence factor profiles of intestinal E. coli isolated from rectal swabs were determined by DNA fingerprinting and muliplex PCR, respectively. The numbers of intestinal E. coli eluted from rectal swabs pre- and post-consumption were also quantified. Results Over one-half of the patients did not experience a UTI within six months of SDC consumption, and the mean UTI rate per six months decreased significantly. Kaplan-Meier analysis of infection incidence in women consuming SDC compared to patients in a previous control group showed a significant reduction in time until first UTI within six months. The heterogeneity, VF profiles, and prevalence of intestinal E. coli strains were not significantly different after cranberry consumption

  8. Effects of vegetable juice powder concentration and storage time on some chemical and sensory quality attributes of uncured, emulsified cooked sausages.

    PubMed

    Sindelar, J J; Cordray, J C; Sebranek, J G; Love, J A; Ahn, D U

    2007-06-01

    Uncured, no-nitrate/nitrite-added meat products can be manufactured with vegetable juice powder (VJP) and a starter culture containing Staphylococcus carnosus, resulting in quality and sensory attributes similar to traditional cured products. The 1st objective of this study was to determine the effects of varying concentrations of VJP and incubation times (MIN-HOLD) on quality characteristics, including lipid oxidation, color, and cured meat pigment concentrations, of emulsified-frankfurter-style-cooked (EFSC) sausages over a 90-d storage period. The 2nd objective was to compare residual nitrate and nitrite content resulting from different processing treatments and the 3rd objective was to assess sensory properties of finished products. Four EFSC sausage treatments (TRT) (TRT 1: 0.20% VJP, 30 MIN-HOLD; TRT 2: 0.20% VJP, 120 MIN-HOLD; TRT 3: 0.40% VJP, 30 MIN-HOLD; TRT 4: 0.40% VJP, 120 MIN-HOLD) and a sodium nitrite-added control (C) were used for this study. No differences for lipid oxidation (TBARS) between any TRTs and C or over time were observed. No differences (P > 0.05) for CIE L* values were found between TRTs. CIE a* and reflectance ratio values revealed that TRTs 2, 4, and C were redder than TRTs 1 and 3 at day 0. Trained sensory intensity ratings for cured aroma, cured color, cured flavor, uniform color, and firmness determined that all but TRT 1 were similar to C. These results indicate a longer incubation time (120 compared with 30 min) was found more critical than VJP level (0.20% or 0.40%) to result in products comparable to a sodium nitrite-added control.

  9. Trace elements in fruit juices.

    PubMed

    Bragança, Victor Luiz Cordoba; Melnikov, Petr; Zanoni, Lourdes Z

    2012-05-01

    Fruit juices are widely consumed in tropical countries as part of habitual diet. The concentrations of several minerals in these beverages were evaluated. Four commercially available brands of juices were analyzed for cadmium, lead, copper, zinc, aluminum, iron, chromium, manganese, and molybdenum. The levels ranged from 0.02 to 0.08 mg/L for copper, from 0.05 to 0.23 mg/L for zinc, from 0.1 to 0.4 mg/L for aluminum, from 0.02 to 0.45 mg/L for iron, and from 0.01 to 0.22 mg/L for manganese. The levels of cadmium, lead, and chromium in all samples were very low or undetectable. The metal contents of fruit juices depend on a number of factors, including the soil composition, the external conditions during fruit growing and fruit harvesting, as well as on details of the fruit juice manufacturing processes employed. The concentrations of none of the metals in juice samples analyzed exceeded the limits imposed by local legislation.

  10. Impact of Cranberries on Gut Microbiota and Cardiometabolic Health: Proceedings of the Cranberry Health Research Conference 2015.

    PubMed

    Blumberg, Jeffrey B; Basu, Arpita; Krueger, Christian G; Lila, Mary Ann; Neto, Catherine C; Novotny, Janet A; Reed, Jess D; Rodriguez-Mateos, Ana; Toner, Cheryl D

    2016-07-01

    Recent advances in cranberry research have expanded the evidence for the role of this Vaccinium berry fruit in modulating gut microbiota function and cardiometabolic risk factors. The A-type structure of cranberry proanthocyanidins seems to be responsible for much of this fruit's efficacy as a natural antimicrobial. Cranberry proanthocyanidins interfere with colonization of the gut by extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli in vitro and attenuate gut barrier dysfunction caused by dietary insults in vivo. Furthermore, new studies indicate synergy between these proanthocyanidins, other cranberry components such as isoprenoids and xyloglucans, and gut microbiota. Together, cranberry constituents and their bioactive catabolites have been found to contribute to mechanisms affecting bacterial adhesion, coaggregation, and biofilm formation that may underlie potential clinical benefits on gastrointestinal and urinary tract infections, as well as on systemic anti-inflammatory actions mediated via the gut microbiome. A limited but growing body of evidence from randomized clinical trials reveals favorable effects of cranberry consumption on measures of cardiometabolic health, including serum lipid profiles, blood pressure, endothelial function, glucoregulation, and a variety of biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress. These results warrant further research, particularly studies dedicated to the elucidation of dose-response relations, pharmacokinetic/metabolomics profiles, and relevant biomarkers of action with the use of fully characterized cranberry products. Freeze-dried whole cranberry powder and a matched placebo were recently made available to investigators to facilitate such work, including interlaboratory comparability. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  11. The Hospital-Acquired Conditions (HAC) reduction program: using cranberry treatment to reduce catheter-associated urinary tract infections and avoid Medicare payment reduction penalties.

    PubMed

    Saitone, T L; Sexton, R J; Sexton Ward, A

    2018-01-01

    patients would be able to consume cranberry in either juice or capsule form, but this may not be true in 100% of cases. Most hospitals can improve their HAC scores and many can avoid Medicare reimbursement reductions if they are able to attain a percentage reduction in CAUTI comparable to that documented for cranberry-treatment regimes in the existing literature.

  12. Cashew juice containing prebiotic oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Isabel Moreira; Rabelo, Maria Cristiane; Rodrigues, Sueli

    2014-09-01

    The enzyme dextransucrase in a medium containing sucrose and an acceptor as substrate synthesizes prebiotics oligosaccharides. The cashew apple juice works as a source of acceptors because it is rich in glucose and fructose (enzyme acceptors). The use of cashew apple juice becomes interesting because it aims at harnessing the peduncle of the cashew that is wasted during the nut processing, which is the product of greater economic expression. The production of dextransucrase enzyme was done by fermentative process by inoculating the bacterium Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL B512F into a culture medium containing sucrose as the only carbon source. Thus, the aim of this work was the production of prebiotic oligosaccharides by enzymatic process with addition of the dextransucrase enzyme to the clarified cashew apple juice. Dextran yield was favored by the combination of low concentrations of sucrose and reducing sugars. The formation of oligosaccharides was favored by increasing the concentration of reducing sugars and by the combination of high concentrations of sucrose and reducing sugars, the highest concentration of oligosaccharides obtained was 104.73 g/L and the qualitative analysis showed that at concentrations of 25 g/L and 75 g/L of sucrose and reducing sugar, respectively, it is possible to obtain oligosaccharides of degree of polymerization up to 12. The juice containing prebiotic oligosaccharide is a potential new functional beverage.

  13. Comparison of the Effects of Blending and Juicing on the Phytochemicals Contents and Antioxidant Capacity of Typical Korean Kernel Fruit Juices

    PubMed Central

    Pyo, Young-Hee; Jin, Yoo-Jeong; Hwang, Ji-Young

    2014-01-01

    Four Korean kernel fruit (apple, pear, persimmon, and mandarin orange) juices were obtained by household processing techniques (i.e., blending, juicing). Whole and flesh fractions of each fruit were extracted by a blender or a juicer and then examined for phytochemical content (i.e., organic acids, polyphenol compounds). The antioxidant capacity of each juice was determined by ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assays. Results revealed that juices that had been prepared by blending whole fruits had stronger antioxidant activities and contained larger amounts of phenolic compounds than juices that had been prepared by juicing the flesh fraction of the fruit. However, the concentration of ascorbic acid in apple, pear, and mandarin orange juices was significantly (P<0.05) higher in juice that had been processed by juicing, rather than blending. The juices with the highest ascorbic acid (233.9 mg/serving), total polyphenols (862.3 mg gallic acid equivalents/serving), and flavonoids (295.1 mg quercetin equivalents/serving) concentrations were blended persimmon juice, blended mandarin orange juice, and juiced apple juice, respectively. These results indicate that juice extraction techniques significantly (P<0.05) influences the phytochemical levels and antioxidant capacity of fruit juices. PMID:25054109

  14. Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) oligosaccharides decrease biofilm formation by uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiadong; Marais, Jannie P J; Khoo, Christina; LaPlante, Kerry; Vejborg, Rebecca M; Givskov, Michael; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Seeram, Navindra P; Rowley, David C

    2015-08-01

    The preventive effects of the American cranberry ( Vaccinium macrocarpon ) against urinary tract infections are supported by extensive studies which have primarily focused on its phenolic constituents. Herein, a phenolic-free carbohydrate fraction (designated cranf1b-F2) was purified from cranberry fruit using ion exchange and size exclusion chromatography. MALDI-TOF-MS analysis revealed that the cranf1b-F2 constituents are predominantly oligosaccharides possessing various degrees of polymerisation and further structural analysis (by GC-MS and NMR) revealed mainly xyloglucan and arabinan residues. In antimicrobial assays, cranf1b-F2 (at 1.25 mg/mL concentration) reduced biofilm production by the uropathogenic Escherichia coli CFT073 strain by over 50% but did not inhibit bacterial growth. Cranf1b-F2 (ranging from 0.625 - 10 mg/mL) also inhibited biofilm formation of the non-pathogenic E. coli MG1655 strain up to 60% in a concentration-dependent manner. These results suggest that cranberry oligosaccharides, in addition to its phenolic constituents, may play a role in its preventive effects against urinary tract infections.

  15. Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) oligosaccharides decrease biofilm formation by uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiadong; Marais, Jannie P. J.; Khoo, Christina; LaPlante, Kerry; Vejborg, Rebecca M.; Givskov, Michael; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Seeram, Navindra P.; Rowley, David C.

    2015-01-01

    The preventive effects of the American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) against urinary tract infections are supported by extensive studies which have primarily focused on its phenolic constituents. Herein, a phenolic-free carbohydrate fraction (designated cranf1b-F2) was purified from cranberry fruit using ion exchange and size exclusion chromatography. MALDI-TOF-MS analysis revealed that the cranf1b-F2 constituents are predominantly oligosaccharides possessing various degrees of polymerisation and further structural analysis (by GC-MS and NMR) revealed mainly xyloglucan and arabinan residues. In antimicrobial assays, cranf1b-F2 (at 1.25 mg/mL concentration) reduced biofilm production by the uropathogenic Escherichia coli CFT073 strain by over 50% but did not inhibit bacterial growth. Cranf1b-F2 (ranging from 0.625 - 10 mg/mL) also inhibited biofilm formation of the non-pathogenic E. coli MG1655 strain up to 60% in a concentration-dependent manner. These results suggest that cranberry oligosaccharides, in addition to its phenolic constituents, may play a role in its preventive effects against urinary tract infections. PMID:26613004

  16. Fatty acid binding proteins 4 and 5 in overweight prepubertal boys: effect of nutritional counselling and supplementation with an encapsulated fruit and vegetable juice concentrate.

    PubMed

    Canas, Jose A; Damaso, L; Hossain, J; Balagopal, P Babu

    2015-01-01

    Elevated fatty acid binding proteins (FABP) may play a role in obesity and co-morbidities. The role of nutritional interventions in modulating these levels remains unclear. The aim of this post hoc study was to determine the effect of overweight (OW) on FABP4 and FABP5 in boys in relation to indices of adiposity, insulin resistance and inflammation, and to investigate the effects of a 6-month supplementation with an encapsulated fruit and vegetable juice concentrate (FVJC) plus nutritional counselling (NC) on FABP levels. A post hoc analysis of a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled study of children recruited from the general paediatric population was performed. A total of thirty age-matched prepubertal boys (nine lean and twenty-one OW; aged 6-10 years) were studied. Patients received NC by a registered dietitian and were randomised to FVJC or placebo capsules for 6 months. FABP4, FABP5, glucose, insulin, homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), glucose-induced acute insulin response (AIR), lipid-corrected β-carotene (LCβC), adiponectin, leptin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), IL-6 and body composition by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry were determined before and after the intervention. FABP were higher (P < 0·01) in the OW v. lean boys and correlated directly with HOMA-IR, abdominal fat mass (AFM), hs-CRP, IL-6, and LCβC (P < 0·05 for all). FABP4 was associated with adiponectin and AIR (P < 0·05). FVJC plus NC reduced FABP4, HOMA-IR and AFM (P < 0·05 for all) but not FABP5. OW boys showed elevated FABP4 and FABP5, but only FABP4 was lowered by the FVJC supplement.

  17. The role of shoreland development and commercial cranberry farming in a lake in Wisconsin, USA

    Garrison, P.J.; Fitzgerald, S.A.

    2005-01-01

    Musky Bay in Lac Courte Oreilles, Wisconsin, USA, is currently eutrophic. This large, shallow bay of an oligotrophic lake possesses the densest aquatic plant growth and a floating algal mat. Paleoecological reconstructions encompassing the last 130 years, were based on multiproxy analyses of sediment cores from three coring sites, two within the bay and one in the lake itself. These data were compared to historical records of the construction and expansion of two commercial cranberry bogs and shoreline residential homes to identify temporal and causal relations of eutrophication. The proxies investigated included: minor and trace elements; biogenic silica; and the diatom community. Post-depositional diagenesis of organic carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus in the upper 30 cm of the core obscured records of historical ambient nutrient concentrations in the bay obviating their usefulness for this purpose. In contrast, calcium, magnesium, and potassium concentration profiles appeared to reflect runoff of soil amendments applied to the cranberry bogs and aerial fertilizer spraying over the eastern bog adjacent to Musky Bay. The increase in aluminum content since about 1930 coincided with the historical trend in shoreland development and construction of the original commercial cranberry farm. The biogenic silica profile recorded a steady increase of nutrients to Musky Bay over the last several decades. Stratigraphic changes in the diatom community indicated that nutrient input began to increase in the 1940s and accelerated in the mid-1990s with the onset of a noxious floating algal mat. The diatom community indicates the bay has possessed a significant macrophyte community for at least the last 200 years, but increased nutrient input was manifested by a change in the composition, and an increase in the density of the epiphytic diatom community. Cranberry farming appeared to be the major source of nutrients because the diatom community changes occurred prior to the

  18. Effects of cranberry (Vaccinum macrocarpon) supplementation on iron status and inflammatory markers in rowers.

    PubMed

    Skarpańska-Stejnborn, Anna; Basta, Piotr; Trzeciak, Jerzy; Michalska, Alicja; Kafkas, M Emin; Woitas-Ślubowska, Donata

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of supplementation with cranberry ( Vaccinum macrocarpon ) on the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, hepcidin and selected markers of iron metabolism in rowers subjected to exhaustive exercise. This double-blind study included 16 members of the Polish Rowing Team. The subjects were randomly assigned to the supplemented group ( n  = 9), receiving 1200 mg of cranberry extract for 6 weeks, or to the placebo group ( n  = 7). The participants performed a 2000-m test on a rowing ergometer at the beginning and at the end of the preparatory camp. Blood samples were obtained from the antecubital vein prior to each exercise test, one minute after completing the test, and after a 24-h recovery period. The levels of hepcidin, interleukin 6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), ferritin, iron, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) and myoglobin were determined, along with total iron-binding capacity (TIBC), unbound iron-binding capacity (UIBC) and total antioxidant capacity (TAC). Both prior and after the supplementation, a significant post-exercise increase in the concentration of IL-6 was observed in both groups. At the end of the study period, cranberry-supplemented athletes presented with significantly higher resting, post-exercise and post-recovery levels of TAC than the controls. However, a significant exercise-induced increase in the concentrations of TNF-alpha, myoglobin and hepcidin was observed solely in the control group. Supplementation with cranberry extract contributed to a significant strengthening of antioxidant potential in individuals exposed to strenuous physical exercise. However, supplementation did not exert direct effects on other analyzed parameters: inflammatory markers and indices of iron metabolism (TNF-alpha, hepcidin and myoglobin).

  19. Proximate and polyphenolic characterization of cranberry pomace.

    PubMed

    White, Brittany L; Howard, Luke R; Prior, Ronald L

    2010-04-14

    The proximate composition and identification and quantification of polyphenolic compounds in dried cranberry pomace were determined. Proximate analysis was conducted based on AOAC methods for moisture, protein, fat, dietary fiber, and ash. Other carbohydrates were determined by the difference method. Polyphenolic compounds were identified and quantified by HPLC-ESI-MS. The composition of dried cranberry pomace was 4.5% moisture, 2.2% protein, 12.0% fat, 65.5% insoluble fiber, 5.7% soluble fiber, 8.4% other carbohydrates, 1.1% ash, and 0.6% total polyphenolics. It contained six anthocyanins (111.5 mg/100 g of DW) including derivatives of cyanidin and peonidin. Thirteen flavonols were identified (358.4 mg/100 g of DW), and the aglycones myricetin (55.6 mg/100 g of DW) and quercetin (146.2 mg/100 g of DW) were the most prominent. Procyanidins with degrees of polymerization (DP) of 1-6 were identified (167.3 mg/100 g of DW), the most abundant being an A-type of DP2 (82.6 mg/100 g of DW).

  20. Electronic tongue response to chemicals in orange juice that change concentration in relation to harvest maturity and citrus greening or Huanglongbing (HLB) disease

    In an earlier study, the electronic tongue system (etongue) was used to differentiate between orange juice made from healthy fruit and from fruit affected by the citrus greening or Huanglongbing (HLB) disease. This study investigated the reaction of an etongue system to the main chemicals in orange ...

  1. Electronic Tongue Response to Chemicals in Orange Juice that Change Concentration in Relation to Harvest Maturity and Citrus Greening or Huanglongbing (HLB) Disease.

    PubMed

    Raithore, Smita; Bai, Jinhe; Plotto, Anne; Manthey, John; Irey, Mike; Baldwin, Elizabeth

    2015-12-02

    In an earlier study, an electronic tongue system (e-tongue) has been used to differentiate between orange juice made from healthy fruit and from fruit affected by the citrus greening or Huanglongbing (HLB) disease. This study investigated the reaction of an e-tongue system to the main chemicals in orange juice that impact flavor and health benefits and are also impacted by HLB. Orange juice was spiked with sucrose (0.2-5.0 g/100 mL), citric acid (0.1%-3.0% g/100 mL) and potassium chloride (0.1-3.0 g/100 mL) as well as the secondary metabolites nomilin (1-30 µg/mL), limonin (1-30 µg/mL), limonin glucoside (30-200 µg/mL), hesperidin (30-400 µg/mL) and hesperetin (30-400 µg/mL). Performance of Alpha MOS sensor sets #1 (pharmaceutical) and #5 (food) were compared for the same samples, with sensor set #1 generally giving better separation than sensor set #5 for sucrose, sensor set #5 giving better separation for nomilin and limonin, both sets being efficient at separating citric acid, potassium chloride, hesperitin and limonin glucoside, and neither set discriminating hesperidin efficiently. Orange juice made from fruit over the harvest season and from fruit harvested from healthy or HLB-affected trees were separated by harvest maturity, disease state and disease severity.

  2. Electronic Tongue Response to Chemicals in Orange Juice that Change Concentration in Relation to Harvest Maturity and Citrus Greening or Huanglongbing (HLB) Disease

    PubMed Central

    Raithore, Smita; Bai, Jinhe; Plotto, Anne; Manthey, John; Irey, Mike; Baldwin, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    In an earlier study, an electronic tongue system (e-tongue) has been used to differentiate between orange juice made from healthy fruit and from fruit affected by the citrus greening or Huanglongbing (HLB) disease. This study investigated the reaction of an e-tongue system to the main chemicals in orange juice that impact flavor and health benefits and are also impacted by HLB. Orange juice was spiked with sucrose (0.2–5.0 g/100 mL), citric acid (0.1%–3.0% g/100 mL) and potassium chloride (0.1–3.0 g/100 mL) as well as the secondary metabolites nomilin (1–30 µg/mL), limonin (1–30 µg/mL), limonin glucoside (30–200 µg/mL), hesperidin (30–400 µg/mL) and hesperetin (30–400 µg/mL). Performance of Alpha MOS sensor sets #1 (pharmaceutical) and #5 (food) were compared for the same samples, with sensor set #1 generally giving better separation than sensor set #5 for sucrose, sensor set #5 giving better separation for nomilin and limonin, both sets being efficient at separating citric acid, potassium chloride, hesperitin and limonin glucoside, and neither set discriminating hesperidin efficiently. Orange juice made from fruit over the harvest season and from fruit harvested from healthy or HLB-affected trees were separated by harvest maturity, disease state and disease severity. PMID:26633411

  3. Comparative in vitro fermentations of cranberry and grape seed polyphenols with colonic microbiota.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Patán, Fernando; Barroso, Elvira; van de Wiele, Tom; Jiménez-Girón, Ana; Martín-Alvarez, Pedro J; Moreno-Arribas, M Victoria; Martínez-Cuesta, M Carmen; Peláez, Carmen; Requena, Teresa; Bartolomé, Begoña

    2015-09-15

    In this study, we have assessed the phenolic metabolism of a cranberry extract by microbiota obtained from the ascending colon and descending colon compartments of a dynamic gastrointestinal simulator (SHIME). For comparison, parallel fermentations with a grape seed extract were carried out. Extracts were used directly without previous intestinal digestion. Among the 60 phenolic compounds targeted, our results confirmed the formation of phenylacetic, phenylpropionic and benzoic acids as well as phenols such as catechol and its derivatives from the action of colonic microbiota on cranberry polyphenols. Benzoic acid (38.4μg/ml), 4-hydroxy-5-(3'-hydroxyphenyl)-valeric acid (26.2μg/ml) and phenylacetic acid (19.5μg/ml) reached the highest concentrations. Under the same conditions, microbial degradation of grape seed polyphenols took place to a lesser extent compared to cranberry polyphenols, which was consistent with the more pronounced antimicrobial effect observed for the grape seed polyphenols, particularly against Bacteroides, Prevotella and Blautia coccoides-Eubacterium rectale. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Phytochemical Compounds and Antioxidant Activity in Different Cultivars of Cranberry (Vaccinium Macrocarpon L).

    PubMed

    Oszmiański, Jan; Kolniak-Ostek, Joanna; Lachowicz, Sabina; Gorzelany, Józef; Matłok, Natalia

    2017-11-01

    Cranberries can be a component of a healthy diet, because they are a great source of health-promoting compounds and nutrients. The aims of this study were to evaluated phytochemicals and antioxidant activity in 6 cultivars of cranberry fruit grown in Poland. The content of polyphenols, carotenoids, chlorophylls, and triterpenoids were determined with the use of UPLC-PDA-MS/MS, although antioxidant activity was examined with DPPH, ABTS, and FRAP assays. The cvs. "Franklin," "Howes," and "Stevens" were characterized by the highest concentration of total polyphenols (4219, 3995, and 3584 mg/100 g dm), triterpenoids (3582, 3671, and 3451 mg/kg dm), carotenoids (9.75, 8.52, and 7.94 mg/kg dm), and antioxidant activity (ABTS: 226, 264, 246; FRAP: 102, 139, 124; DPPH: 235, 320, 284 μmolTE/g dm), making these 3 cultivars especially recommendable for consumption. Furthermore, a positive correlation between content of phytochemicals and antioxidant activity was found. The manuscript "Phytochemical compounds and antioxidant activity in different cultivars of cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon L)" represents cultivars commonly grown in Poland that maybe beneficial offer the food industry, to develop attractive foods with a high content of biologically active substances. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  5. Microwave-Osmotic/Microwave-Vacuum Drying of Whole Cranberries: Comparison with Other Methods.

    PubMed

    Wray, Derek; Ramaswamy, Hosahalli S

    2015-12-01

    A novel drying method for frozen-thawed whole cranberries was developed by combining microwave osmotic dehydration under continuous flow medium spray (MWODS) conditions with microwave vacuum finish-drying. A central composite rotatable design was used to vary temperature (33 to 67 °C), osmotic solution concentration (33 to 67 °B), contact time (5 to 55 min), and flow rate (2.1 to 4.1 L/min) in order to the determine the effects of MWODS input parameters on quality of the dried berry. Quality indices monitored included colorimetric and textural data in addition to anthocyanin retention and cellular structure. Overall it was found that the MWODS-MWV process was able to produce dried cranberries with quality comparable to freeze dried samples in much shorter time. Additionally, cranberries dried via the novel process exhibited much higher quality than those dried via either vacuum or convective air drying in terms of color, anthocyanin content, and cellular structure. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  6. Cranberry Proanthocyanidins - Protein complexes for macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Carballo, Sergio M; Haas, Linda; Krueger, Christian G; Reed, Jess D

    2017-09-20

    In this work we characterize the interaction of cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) proanthocyanidins (PAC) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and hen egg-white lysozyme (HEL) and determine the effects of these complexes on macrophage activation and antigen presentation. We isolated PAC from cranberry and complexed the isolated PAC with BSA and HEL. The properties of the PAC-protein complexes were studied by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), gel electrophoresis and zeta-potential. The effects of PAC-BSA complexes on macrophage activation were studied in RAW 264.7 macrophage like cells after treatment with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Fluorescence microscopy was used to study the endocytosis of PAC-BSA complexes. The effects of the PAC complexes on macrophage antigen presentation were studied in an in vitro model of HEL antigen presentation by mouse peritoneal mononuclear cells to a T-cell hybridoma. The mass spectra of the PAC complexes with BSA and HEL differed from the spectra of the proteins alone by the presence of broad shoulders on the singly and doubly charged protein peaks. Complexation with PAC altered the electrophoretic mobility shift assay in native agarose gel and the electrophoretic mobility (ζ-potential) values. These results indicate that the PAC-protein complexes are stable and alter the protein structure without precipitating the protein. Fluorescence microscopy showed that the RAW 264.7 macrophages endocytosed BSA and PAC-BSA complexes in discrete vesicles that surrounded the nucleus. Macrophages treated with increasing amounts of PAC-BSA complexes had significantly reduced COX-2 and iNOS expression in response to treatment with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in comparison to the controls. The PAC-HEL complexes modulated antigen uptake, processing and presentation in murine peritoneal macrophages. After 4 h of pre-incubation, only trace amounts of IL-2 were detected in the co-cultures treated with HEL

  7. 76 FR 34974 - Cranberry Pipeline Corporation; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-15

    ... points for each transaction. Cranberry requests waiver so that it can identify ``production pool'' as the... filing. \\1\\ Contract Reporting Requirements of Intrastate Natural Gas Companies, Order No. 735, 131 FERC...

  8. A phenology model for Sparganothis fruitworm in Cranberries

    Larvae of Sparganothis sulfureana Clemens, frequently attack cranberries, often resulting in economic damage to the crop. Because temperature dictates insect growth rate, development can be accurately estimated based on daily temperature measurements. To better predict S. sulfureana development acro...

  9. Cranberries and Their Bioactive Constituents in Human Health12

    PubMed Central

    Blumberg, Jeffrey B.; Camesano, Terri A.; Cassidy, Aedin; Kris-Etherton, Penny; Howell, Amy; Manach, Claudine; Ostertag, Luisa M.; Sies, Helmut; Skulas-Ray, Ann; Vita, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    Recent observational and clinical studies have raised interest in the potential health effects of cranberry consumption, an association that appears to be due to the phytochemical content of this fruit. The profile of cranberry bioactives is distinct from that of other berry fruit, being rich in A-type proanthocyanidins (PACs) in contrast to the B-type PACs present in most other fruit. Basic research has suggested a number of potential mechanisms of action of cranberry bioactives, although further molecular studies are necessary. Human studies on the health effects of cranberry products have focused principally on urinary tract and cardiovascular health, with some attention also directed to oral health and gastrointestinal epithelia. Evidence suggesting that cranberries may decrease the recurrence of urinary tract infections is important because a nutritional approach to this condition could lower the use of antibiotic treatment and the consequent development of resistance to these drugs. There is encouraging, but limited, evidence of a cardioprotective effect of cranberries mediated via actions on antioxidant capacity and lipoprotein profiles. The mixed outcomes from clinical studies with cranberry products could result from interventions testing a variety of products, often uncharacterized in their composition of bioactives, using different doses and regimens, as well as the absence of a biomarker for compliance to the protocol. Daily consumption of a variety of fruit is necessary to achieve a healthy dietary pattern, meet recommendations for micronutrient intake, and promote the intake of a diversity of phytochemicals. Berry fruit, including cranberries, represent a rich source of phenolic bioactives that may contribute to human health. PMID:24228191

  10. Cranberries and their bioactive constituents in human health.

    PubMed

    Blumberg, Jeffrey B; Camesano, Terri A; Cassidy, Aedin; Kris-Etherton, Penny; Howell, Amy; Manach, Claudine; Ostertag, Luisa M; Sies, Helmut; Skulas-Ray, Ann; Vita, Joseph A

    2013-11-01

    Recent observational and clinical studies have raised interest in the potential health effects of cranberry consumption, an association that appears to be due to the phytochemical content of this fruit. The profile of cranberry bioactives is distinct from that of other berry fruit, being rich in A-type proanthocyanidins (PACs) in contrast to the B-type PACs present in most other fruit. Basic research has suggested a number of potential mechanisms of action of cranberry bioactives, although further molecular studies are necessary. Human studies on the health effects of cranberry products have focused principally on urinary tract and cardiovascular health, with some attention also directed to oral health and gastrointestinal epithelia. Evidence suggesting that cranberries may decrease the recurrence of urinary tract infections is important because a nutritional approach to this condition could lower the use of antibiotic treatment and the consequent development of resistance to these drugs. There is encouraging, but limited, evidence of a cardioprotective effect of cranberries mediated via actions on antioxidant capacity and lipoprotein profiles. The mixed outcomes from clinical studies with cranberry products could result from interventions testing a variety of products, often uncharacterized in their composition of bioactives, using different doses and regimens, as well as the absence of a biomarker for compliance to the protocol. Daily consumption of a variety of fruit is necessary to achieve a healthy dietary pattern, meet recommendations for micronutrient intake, and promote the intake of a diversity of phytochemicals. Berry fruit, including cranberries, represent a rich source of phenolic bioactives that may contribute to human health.

  11. CRANBERRY WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, WEST VIRGINIA.

    Meissner, Charles R.; Mory, P.C.

    1984-01-01

    The Cranberry Wilderness Study Area, West Virginia contains a large demonstrated resource of bituminous coal of coking quality. Demonstrated coal resources in beds more than 14 in. thick are about 110 million short tons of which 56. 5 million tons are in beds more than 28 in. thick in areas of substantiated coal resource potential. Other mineral resources in the study area include peat, shale and clay suitable for building brick and lightweight aggregate, sandstone suitable for low-quality glass sand, and sandstone suitable for construction material. These commodities are found in abundance in other areas throughout the State. Study of the drill-hole data did not reveal indications of a potential for oil and gas resources in the study area. Evidence of metallic mineral potential was not found during this investigation.

  12. Cranberry Wilderness study area, West Virginia

    SciT

    Meissner, C.R. Jr.; Mory, P.C.

    1984-01-01

    The Cranberry Wilderness study area contains a large demonstrated resource of bituminous coal of coking quality according to studies made in 1977. Demonstrated coal resources in beds more than 14 in. thick are about 110 million short tons of which 56.5 million tons are in beds more than 28 in. thick in areas of substantiated coal resource potential. Other mineral resources in the study area include peat, shale and clay suitable for building brick and lightweight aggregate, sandstone suitable for low-quality glass sand, and sandstone suitable for construction material. These commodities are found in abundance in other areas throughout themore » State. Study of the drill-hole data did not reveal indications of a potential for oil and gas resources in the study area. Evidence of metallic mineral potential was not found during this investigation.« less

  13. Characterization of flavonols in cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) powder.

    PubMed

    Vvedenskaya, Irina O; Rosen, Robert T; Guido, Jane E; Russell, David J; Mills, Kent A; Vorsa, Nicholi

    2004-01-28

    Flavonoids were extracted from cranberry powder with acetone and ethyl acetate and subsequently fractionated with Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography. The fraction eluted with a 60% methanol solution was composed primarily of phenolic constituents with maximum absorbance at 340 nm. A high-performance liquid chromatography procedure was developed, which resolved 22 distinct peaks with UV/vis and mass spectra corresponding to flavonol glycoside conjugates. Six new constituents not previously reported in cranberry or in cranberry products were determined through NMR spectroscopy to be myricetin-3-beta-xylopyranoside, quercetin-3-beta-glucoside, quercetin-3-alpha-arabinopyranoside, 3'-methoxyquercetin-3-alpha-xylopyranoside, quercetin-3-O-(6' '-p-coumaroyl)-beta-galactoside, and quercetin-3-O-(6' '-benzoyl)-beta-galactoside. Quercetin-3-O-(6' '-p-coumaroyl)-beta-galactoside and quercetin-3-O-(6' '-benzoyl)-beta-galactoside represent a new class of cranberry flavonol compounds with three conjugated components consisting of a flavonol, sugar, and carboxylic acid (benzoic or hydroxycinnamic acids). This is also the first report identifying quercetin-3-arabinoside in both furanose and pyranose forms in cranberry. Elucidation of specific flavonol glycosides in cranberry is significant since the specificity of the sugar moiety may play a role in the bioavailability of the flavonol glycosides in vivo.

  14. Toxicological and analytical investigations of noni (Morinda citrifolia) fruit juice.

    PubMed

    Westendorf, Johannes; Effenberger, Katharina; Iznaguen, Hassan; Basar, Simla

    2007-01-24

    Morinda citrifolia (noni) is known to contain genotoxic anthraquinones in the roots. Because of the widespread use of noni juice, the possible genotoxic risk was examined through a battery of short-term tests. Noni juice was also chemically analyzed for the possible presence of anthraquinones. Noni juice extract in the Salmonella microsome assay showed a slight mutagenic effect in strain TA1537, due to the presence of flavonoids. No mutagenicity was observed in the mammalian mutagenicity test with V79 Chinese hamster fibroblasts. Rats treated with a noni juice concentrate did not show DNA repair synthesis (UDS) in primary rat hepatocytes, nor could DNA adducts or DNA strand breaks be observed. HPLC analysis of noni juice for anthraquinones was negative, with a sensitivity of <1 ppm. In summary, chemical analysis and genotoxicity tests reveal that noni juice does not have a genotoxic potential and that genotoxic anthraquinones do not exist in noni juice.

  15. Reduction of common cold symptoms by encapsulated juice powder concentrate of fruits and vegetables: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Roll, Stephanie; Nocon, Marc; Willich, Stefan N

    2011-01-01

    Dietary supplements have been suggested in the prevention of the common cold, but previous investigations have been inconsistent. The present study was designed to determine the preventive effect of a dietary supplement from fruits and vegetables on common cold symptoms. In a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, healthcare professionals (mainly nursing staff aged 18-65 years) from a university hospital in Berlin, Germany, were randomised to four capsules of dietary supplement (Juice Plus+®) or matching placebo daily for 8 months, including a 2-month run-in period. The number of days with moderate or severe common cold symptoms within 6 months (primary outcome) was assessed by diary self-reports. We determined means and 95 % CI, and differences between the two groups were analysed by ANOVA. A total of 529 subjects were included into the primary analysis (Juice Plus+®: 263, placebo: 266). The mean age of the participants was 39·9 (sd 10·3) years, and 80 % of the participants were female. The mean number of days with moderate or severe common cold symptoms was 7·6 (95 % CI 6·5, 8·8) in the Juice Plus+® group and 9·5 (8·4, 10·6) in the placebo group (P = 0·023). The mean number of total days with any common cold symptoms was similar in the Juice Plus+® and in the placebo groups (29·4 (25·8, 33·0) v. 30·7 (27·1, 34·3), P = 0·616). Intake of a dietary supplement from fruits and vegetables was associated with a 20 % reduction of moderate or severe common cold symptom days in healthcare professionals particularly exposed to patient contact.

  16. Spray Drying of Mosambi Juice in Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. V.; Verma, A.

    2014-01-01

    The studies on spray drying of mosambi juice were carried out with Laboratory spray dryer set-up (LSD-48 MINI SPRAY DRYER-JISL). Inlet and outlet air temperature and maltodextrin (drying agent) concentration was taken as variable parameters. Experiments were conducted by using 110 °C to 140 °C inlet air temperature, 60 °C to 70 °C outlet air temperature and 5-7 % maltodextrin concentration. The free flow powder of mosambi juice was obtained with 7 % maltodextrin at 140 °C inlet air temperature and 60 °C outlet air temperature. Fresh and reconstituted juices were evaluated for vitamin C, titrable acidity and sensory characteristics. The reconstituted juice was found slightly acceptable by taste panel.

  17. Fresh squeezed orange juice odor: a review.

    PubMed

    Perez-Cacho, Pilar Ruiz; Rouseff, Russell L

    2008-08-01

    Fresh orange juice is a highly desirable but unstable product. This review examines analytical findings, odor activity, and variations due to cultivar, sampling methods, manner of juicing, plus possible enzymatic and microbial artifacts. Initial attempts to characterize orange juice odor were based on volatile quantitation and overemphasized the importance of high concentration volatiles. Although over 300 volatiles have been reported from GC-MS analytical studies, this review presents 36 consensus aroma active components from GC-olfactometry studies consisting of 14 aldehydes, 7 esters, 5 terpenes, 6 alcohols, and 4 ketones. Most are trace (microg/L) components. (+)-Limonene is an essential component in orange juice odor although its exact function is still uncertain. Total amounts of volatiles in mechanically squeezed juices are three to 10 times greater than hand-squeezed juices because of elevated peel oil levels. Elevated peel oil changes the relative proportion of several key odorants. Odor active components from solvent extraction studies differ from those collected using headspace techniques as they include volatiles with low vapor pressure such as vanillin. Some reported odorants such as 2,3-butanedione are microbial contamination artifacts. Orange juice odor models confirm that fresh orange aroma is complex as the most successful models contain 23 odorants.

  18. Flight synchrony among the major moth pests of cranberries in the Upper Midwest, USA

    The cranberry fruitworm (Acrobasis vaccinii), Sparganothis fruitworm (Sparganothis sulfureana), and black-headed fireworm (Rhopobota naevana) are major insect pests of the American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) in Wisconsin. While much is known of their natural histories, relatively little has b...

  19. Phytochemicals in fruits of Hawaiian wild cranberry relatives.

    PubMed

    Hummer, Kim; Durst, Robert; Zee, Francis; Atnip, Allison; Giusti, M Monica

    2014-06-01

    Cranberries (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) contain high levels of phytochemicals such as proanthocyanidins (PACs). These polymeric condensations of flavan-3-ol monomers are associated with health benefits. Our objective was to evaluate phytochemicals in fruit from Hawaiian cranberry relatives, V. reticulatum Sm. and V. calycinum Sm. Normal-phase HPLC coupled with fluorescence and ESI-MS detected PACs; the colorimetric 4-dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde (DMAC) assay was used to determine total PACs. Spectrophotometric tests and reverse-phase HPLC coupled to photodiode array and refractive index detectors evaluated phenolics, sugars, and organic acids. Antioxidant capacity was determined by the ORAC and FRAP assays. Antioxidant capacities of Hawaiian berries were high. The FRAP measurement for V. calycinum was 454.7 ± 90.2 µmol L(-1) Trolox equivalents kg(-1) for pressed fruit. Hawaiian berries had lower peonidin, quinic and citric acids amounts and invert (∼1) glucose/fructose ratio compared with cranberry. Both Hawaiian Vaccinium species were good sources of PACs; they contained phenolics and PAC monomers, A and B-type trimers, tetramers and larger polymers. Vaccinium reticulatum and V. calycinum showed comparable or higher PAC levels than in cranberry. Cranberries had higher percentage of A-type dimers than did V. reticulatum. A and B-type dimers were not differentiated in V. calycinum. The total PACs (as measured by DMAC) for V. calycinum (24.3 ± 0.10 mg catechin equivalents kg(-1) ) were about twice that in cranberry. Berries of V. reticulatum and V. calycinum could serve as a rich dietary source of PACs, comparable to or greater than cranberries. These finding suggest that Hawaiian Vaccinium berries could be a functional food. Additional examination of the phytochemicals in other wild Vaccinium species is warranted. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  20. The colligative properties of fruit juices by photopyroelectric calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frandas, A.; Surducan, V.; Nagy, G.; Bicanic, D.

    1999-03-01

    The photopyroelectric method was used to study the depression of freezing point in juices prepared from selected apple and orange juice concentrates. By using the models for real solutions, the effective molecular weight of the dissolved solids was obtained. The acids concentration in the fruit juice is reflected both in the equivalent molecular weight (by lowering it) and in the interaction coefficients b and C. Using the data for the molecular weight and the characteristic coefficients, prediction curves for the samples investigated can be used in practice. Freezing point depression can also be used as an indicator of the degree of spoilage of fruit juices.

  1. Electrodialytic removal of nitrate from pineapple juice: effect on selected physicochemical properties, amino acids, and aroma components of the juice.

    PubMed

    Ackarabanpojoue, Yuwadee; Chindapan, Nathamol; Yoovidhya, Tipaporn; Devahastin, Sakamon

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed at investigating the effect of nitrate removal from pineapple juice by electrodialysis (ED) on selected properties of the ED-treated juice. Single-strength pineapple juice with reduced pulp content was treated by ED to reduce the nitrate concentration to 15, 10, or 5 ppm. After ED, the removed pulp was added to the ED-treated juice and its properties, including electrical conductivity, acidity, pH, total soluble solids (TSS), color, amino acids, and selected aroma compounds, were determined and compared with those of the untreated juice. ED could reduce the nitrate content of 1 L of pineapple juice from an initial value of 50 ppm to less than 5 ppm within 30 min. A significant decrease in the electrical conductivity, acidity, pH, TSS, and yellowness, but a significant increase in the lightness, of the juice was observed upon ED. Concentrations of almost all amino acids of the ED-treated juice significantly decreased. The concentrations of 8 major compound contributors to the pineapple aroma also significantly decreased. Adding the pulp back to the ED-treated juice increased the amino acids concentrations; however, it led to a significant decrease in the concentrations of the aroma compounds. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  2. The Flame Spectrometric Determination of Calcium in Fruit Juice by Standard Addition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strohl, Arthur N.

    1985-01-01

    Provides procedures to measure the calcium concentration in fruit juice by atomic absorption. Fruit juice is used because: (1) it is an important consumer product; (2) large samples are available; and (3) calcium exists in fruit juice at concentrations that do not require excessive dilution or preconcentration prior to measurement. (JN)

  3. 78 FR 937 - Cranberry Pipeline Corporation; Notice of Petition for Rate Approval

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-07

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. PR13-19-000] Cranberry Pipeline Corporation; Notice of Petition for Rate Approval Take notice that on December 18, 2012, Cranberry Pipeline Corporation (Cranberry) filed pursuant to 284.123 of the Commissions regulations a petition for...

  4. 7 CFR 929.56 - Special provisions relating to withheld (restricted) cranberries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) cranberries. 929.56 Section 929.56 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF MASSACHUSETTS, RHODE ISLAND, CONNECTICUT, NEW JERSEY, WISCONSIN... Regulations § 929.56 Special provisions relating to withheld (restricted) cranberries. (a) A handler shall...

  5. 7 CFR 929.56 - Special provisions relating to withheld (restricted) cranberries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) cranberries. 929.56 Section 929.56 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF MASSACHUSETTS, RHODE ISLAND, CONNECTICUT, NEW JERSEY, WISCONSIN... Regulations § 929.56 Special provisions relating to withheld (restricted) cranberries. (a) A handler shall...

  6. 7 CFR 929.102 - Procedure to determine quantity of screened cranberries in unscreened lots.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... cranberries in unscreened lots. 929.102 Section 929.102 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of..., Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF MASSACHUSETTS, RHODE ISLAND... NEW YORK Rules and Regulations § 929.102 Procedure to determine quantity of screened cranberries in...

  7. 7 CFR 929.102 - Procedure to determine quantity of screened cranberries in unscreened lots.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... cranberries in unscreened lots. 929.102 Section 929.102 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of..., NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF MASSACHUSETTS, RHODE ISLAND... NEW YORK Rules and Regulations § 929.102 Procedure to determine quantity of screened cranberries in...

  8. 7 CFR 929.56 - Special provisions relating to withheld (restricted) cranberries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...) cranberries. 929.56 Section 929.56 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF MASSACHUSETTS, RHODE ISLAND, CONNECTICUT, NEW JERSEY, WISCONSIN... Regulations § 929.56 Special provisions relating to withheld (restricted) cranberries. (a) A handler shall...

  9. 7 CFR 929.56 - Special provisions relating to withheld (restricted) cranberries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) cranberries. 929.56 Section 929.56 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF MASSACHUSETTS, RHODE ISLAND, CONNECTICUT, NEW JERSEY, WISCONSIN... Regulations § 929.56 Special provisions relating to withheld (restricted) cranberries. (a) A handler shall...

  10. 7 CFR 929.102 - Procedure to determine quantity of screened cranberries in unscreened lots.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... cranberries in unscreened lots. 929.102 Section 929.102 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of..., NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF MASSACHUSETTS, RHODE ISLAND... NEW YORK Rules and Regulations § 929.102 Procedure to determine quantity of screened cranberries in...

  11. 7 CFR 929.102 - Procedure to determine quantity of screened cranberries in unscreened lots.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... cranberries in unscreened lots. 929.102 Section 929.102 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of..., Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF MASSACHUSETTS, RHODE ISLAND... NEW YORK Rules and Regulations § 929.102 Procedure to determine quantity of screened cranberries in...

  12. Development of educational tools to connect public audiences with cranberry researchers and growers

    Cranberry, Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait., is a native fruit crop of North America and a member of the Ericaceae family. The delicious tangy cranberry is associated with health benefits due to its abundant phytochemicals, including vitamin C, manganese, and anti-oxidants. Cranberries are major cash crop...

  13. Retention of antioxidant capacity of vacuum microwave dried cranberry.

    PubMed

    Leusink, Gwen J; Kitts, David D; Yaghmaee, Parastoo; Durance, Tim

    2010-04-01

    In this study, cranberries were dried by vacuum-microwave drying (VMD), freeze-drying (FD), or hot air-drying (AD), to compare the effects of different drying processes on both physical changes as well as the retention of bioactive components in dried samples. Total porosity (%) and average pore radius of dehydrated cranberries were greater using VMD compared to FD and AD (P < 0.05). Crude methanol cranberry powdered extracts were fractionated by solid phase extraction (SPE) into organic acid-, total phenolics-, anthocyanin-, or proanthocyanidin-enriched extracts, respectively. The chemical composition of the 60% acidified methanol fractions contained cyanidin-3-galactoside, cyanidin-3-arabinoside, peonidin-3-galactoside, and peonidin-3-arabinoside, as assessed by HPLC. Antioxidant activities of cranberry fractions were measured using chemical ORAC and ABTS methods. The 60% acidified methanol fraction had a significantly higher (P < 0.05) antioxidant potential than the other chemical fractions, which was largely attributed to the relatively higher anthocyanin content. In general, vacuum-microwave drying and freeze-drying resulted in similar retention of anthocyanins and antioxidant activity, which were both relatively higher (P < 0.05) than that recovered from cranberries dried by hot air drying.

  14. Bioactive compounds and quality parameters of natural cloudy lemon juices.

    PubMed

    Uçan, Filiz; Ağçam, Erdal; Akyildiz, Asiye

    2016-03-01

    In this study, bioactive compounds (phenolic and carotenoid) and some quality parameters (color, browning index and hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF)) of natural cloudy lemon juice, pasteurized (90 °C/15 s) and storage stability of concentrated lemon juice (-25 °C/180 days) were carried out. Fifteen phenolic compounds were determined in the lemon juice and the most abounded phenolic compounds were hesperidin, eriocitrin, chlorogenic acid and neoeriocitrin. In generally, phenolic compound concentrations of lemon juice samples increased after the pasteurization treatment. Four carotenoid compounds (β-carotene, β-cryptoxanthin, lutein and zeaxanthin) were detected in natural cloudy lemon juice. Lutein and β-cryptoxanthin were the most abounded carotenoid compounds in the lemon juice. Color values of the lemon juices were not affected by processing and storage periods. HMF and browning index of the lemon juices increased with concentration and storage. According to the results, storing at -25 °C was considered as sufficient for acceptable quality limits of natural cloudy lemon juice.

  15. Quality Characteristics and Antioxidant Activity of Yogurt Supplemented with Aronia (Aronia melanocarpa) Juice.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Linh; Hwang, Eun-Sun

    2016-12-01

    We investigated the quality characteristics and antioxidant activities of yogurt supplemented with 1%, 2%, and 3% aronia juice and fermented for 24 h at 37°C. The total acidity increased with increasing levels of aronia juice and incubation time. Lightness and yellowness of the yogurt decreased, but redness increased, with increasing aronia juice content and incubation time. The number of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) increased with increased incubation time, and yogurt containing 2% and 3% aronia juice showed higher LAB counts than 1% aroinia juice-supplemented yogurt. The total polyphenol and flavonoid contents increased proportionally with increasing levels of aronia juice. Antioxidant activity of aronia-containing yogurt was significantly higher than that of the control and increased proportionally with aronia juice concentration. Yogurt with 2% aronia juice had the best taste ( P <0.05). Aronia juice may be a useful additive for improving the taste and antioxidant potential of yogurt.

  16. Quality Characteristics and Antioxidant Activity of Yogurt Supplemented with Aronia (Aronia melanocarpa) Juice

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Linh; Hwang, Eun-Sun

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the quality characteristics and antioxidant activities of yogurt supplemented with 1%, 2%, and 3% aronia juice and fermented for 24 h at 37°C. The total acidity increased with increasing levels of aronia juice and incubation time. Lightness and yellowness of the yogurt decreased, but redness increased, with increasing aronia juice content and incubation time. The number of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) increased with increased incubation time, and yogurt containing 2% and 3% aronia juice showed higher LAB counts than 1% aroinia juice-supplemented yogurt. The total polyphenol and flavonoid contents increased proportionally with increasing levels of aronia juice. Antioxidant activity of aronia-containing yogurt was significantly higher than that of the control and increased proportionally with aronia juice concentration. Yogurt with 2% aronia juice had the best taste (P<0.05). Aronia juice may be a useful additive for improving the taste and antioxidant potential of yogurt. PMID:28078255

  17. 21 CFR 146.120 - Frozen concentrate for lemonade.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... lemonade is the frozen food prepared from one or both of the lemon juice ingredients specified in paragraph... percent by weight. (b) The lemon juice ingredients referred to in paragraph (a) of this section are: (1) Lemon juice or frozen lemon juice or a mixture of these. (2) Concentrated lemon juice or frozen...

  18. Improving water resources management efficiency for cranberry production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, A. N.; Bigah, Y.; Gumiere, S.

    2016-12-01

    Water needs vary significantly from one plant to another and unlike many other plants cranberry is a very sensitive to weather conditions. This inherent sensitivity requires irrigation for protection against frost and excessive heat when the air temperature falls below 0o C and rises above 25o C, respectively. In addition, cranberry fields require significant amount of water as fields require about 406 mm of water to ease the harvesting process. Lastly, fields need icing for protection during winter months and that requires maintaining almost 203 mm of water above cranberry plants for at least three consecutive days. The intensive use of water for cranberry production has triggered several water management projects, particularly in Canada, the second largest producer in the world. The outcomes of these projects have improved water management to a point where nowadays most cranberry farms recycle water in a closed circuit during the production cycle, especially during the harvesting and icing phases. However, up till now very little effort had been put into assessing the efficiency of the recycling system such that a question remained: how much does a closed circuit system contribute to reducing the annual water use? The objective of this project is to assess water use for cranberry production and associated management efficiency of two different recycling systems located within watersheds under slightly different climatic conditions. The methodological approach is based on the development of a mathematical model capable of simulating water needs for a wide range of climatic conditions and over an extended period of time (e.g., 30 years). The outcome of this project has potential to further improve our understanding of the inter-annual dynamics of water needs and supply and ultimately improved recycling systems.

  19. 21 CFR 146.120 - Frozen concentrate for lemonade.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... acidity of the lemonade, calculated as anhydrous citric acid, shall be not less than 0.70 gram per 100... juice expressed from mature lemons of an acid variety; and concentrated lemon juice is lemon juice from...

  20. 21 CFR 146.120 - Frozen concentrate for lemonade.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... acidity of the lemonade, calculated as anhydrous citric acid, shall be not less than 0.70 gram per 100... juice expressed from mature lemons of an acid variety; and concentrated lemon juice is lemon juice from...

  1. 21 CFR 146.120 - Frozen concentrate for lemonade.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... acidity of the lemonade, calculated as anhydrous citric acid, shall be not less than 0.70 gram per 100... juice expressed from mature lemons of an acid variety; and concentrated lemon juice is lemon juice from...

  2. Controlled-atmosphere effects on postharvest quality and antioxidant activity of cranberry fruits.

    PubMed

    Gunes, Gurbuz; Liu, Rui Hai; Watkins, Christopher B

    2002-10-09

    The effects of controlled-atmosphere (CA) storage on the firmness, respiration rate, quality, weight loss, total phenolics and flavonoids contents, and total antioxidant activities of the Pilgrim and Stevens cultivars of cranberries (Vaccinium macrocarpon Aiton) have been studied during storage in atmospheres of 2, 21, and 70% O(2) with 0, 15, and 30% CO(2) (balance N(2)); and 100% N(2) at 3 degrees C. Elevated CO(2) concentrations decreased bruising, physiological breakdown, and decay of berries, thereby reducing fruit losses. Respiration and weight loss of fruits decreased, but fruit softening increased, at higher CO(2) concentrations. Accumulations of acetaldehyde, ethanol, and ethyl acetate varied by cultivar and storage atmosphere but were generally highest in the 2 and 70% O(2) and 100% N(2) atmospheres and increased in response to elevated CO(2) concentrations. Overall, the 30% CO(2) plus 21% O(2) atmosphere appeared optimal for the storage of cranberries. Sensory analysis is required, however, to confirm that accumulations of fermentation products at this atmosphere are acceptable for consumers. Stevens fruits had a higher phenolics content and total antioxidant activity than Pilgrim fruits. The storage atmosphere did not affect the content of total phenolics or flavonoids. However, the total antioxidant activity of the fruits increased overall by about 45% in fruits stored in air. This increase was prevented by storage in 30% CO(2) plus 21% O(2).

  3. Proanthocyanidins from the American Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) inhibit matrix metalloproteinase-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 activity in human prostate cancer cells via alterations in multiple cellular signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Déziel, Bob A; Patel, Kunal; Neto, Catherine; Gottschall-Pass, Katherine; Hurta, Robert A R

    2010-10-15

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers in the Western world, and it is believed that an individual's diet affects his risk of developing cancer. There has been an interest in examining phytochemicals, the secondary metabolites of plants, in order to determine their potential anti-cancer activities in vitro and in vivo. In this study we document the effects of proanthocyanidins (PACs) from the American Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) on matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity in DU145 human prostate cancer cells. Cranberry PACs decreased cellular viability of DU145 cells at a concentration of 25 µg/ml by 30% after 6 h of treatment. Treatment of DU145 cells with PACs resulted in an inhibition of both MMPs 2 and 9 activity. PACs increased the expression of TIMP-2, a known inhibitor of MMP activity, and decreased the expression of EMMPRIN, an inducer of MMP expression. PACs decreased the expression of PI-3 kinase and AKT proteins, and increased the phosphorylation of both p38 and ERK1/2. Cranberry PACs also decreased the translocation of the NF-κB p65 protein to the nucleus. Cranberry PACs increased c-jun and decreased c-fos protein levels. These results suggest that cranberry PACs decreases MMP activity through the induction and/or inhibition of specific temporal MMP regulators, and by affecting either the phosphorylation status and/or expression of MAP kinase, PI-3 kinase, NF-κB and AP-1 pathway proteins. This study further demonstrates that cranberry PACs are a strong candidate for further research as novel anti-cancer agents. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Identification of Natural Antimicrobial Substances in Red Muscadine Juice against Enterobacter sakazakii

    Red muscadine (Vitis rotundifolia Michx.) juices with natural organic, phenolic acids and polyphenol compounds were tested against Cronobacter sakazakii. The concentration of total phenolic compounds of commercial baby juices ranged from 176.7 to 347.7 mg/mL. Commercial baby juices showed poor antim...

  5. Urinary tract infections cranberry juice, underwear, and probiotics in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jane L; Krieger, John N

    2002-08-01

    There is a substantial gap between the viewpoint of urologists and the rest of society regarding UTIs. Urologists spend little time and effort thinking about UTIs. In contrast, UTIs are a major issue for many women. There is substantial concern about "natural compounds" and probiotics that allow women to take charge of their health care. It is easy to understand this concern because UTIs are common, costly, and cause considerable morbidity.

  6. Agricultural water requirements for commercial production of cranberries

    Abundant water resources are essential for the commercial production of cranberries, which use irrigated water for frost protection, soil moisture management, and harvest and winter floods. Given water resource demands in southeastern Massachusetts, we sought to quantify the annual water requirement...

  7. Value of Weather Information in Cranberry Marketing Decisions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morzuch, Bernard J.; Willis, Cleve E.

    1982-04-01

    Econometric techniques are used to establish a functional relationship between cranberry yields and important precipitation, temperature, and sunshine variables. Crop forecasts are derived from the model and are used to establish posterior probabilities to be used in a Bayesian decision context pertaining to leasing space for the storage of the berries.

  8. Development of Sparganothis sulfureana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) on Cranberry Cultivars

    PubMed Central

    McMahan, Erin E.; Guédot, Christelle

    2018-01-01

    Sparganothis fruitworm (Sparganothis sulfureana Clemens) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) is a serious pest of cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Aiton), a native North American fruit cultivated in northern regions of the United States and southeastern Canada. This study assessed antibiosis in several cranberry cultivars commonly grown in Wisconsin. Five cultivars previously shown to host different levels of populations of S. sulfureana in commercial cranberry were assessed in this study to evaluate the performance of S. sulfureana amongst these cultivars. We measured growth and time to developmental stages of newly emerged larvae to adulthood on selected cranberry cultivars in the laboratory. There was no difference in the rates of survival to pupation and to adult emergence among any of the cultivars tested. Mid-instar larvae that fed on the cultivar ‘Ben Lear’ were heavier than those feeding on ‘GH-1’, ‘Stevens’, or ‘HyRed’, and larvae that fed on ‘Mullica Queen’ were heavier than those feeding on ‘HyRed’. However, there were no significant differences in pupal weights or in the number of days from neonate to adult emergence among varieties. Therefore, this study did not provide evidence of antibiosis among the cultivars tested, and found that larval weight was not correlated with other measurements of performance. PMID:29301287

  9. Automated cycled sprinkler irrigation for spring frost protection of cranberries

    Sprinkler irrigation is essential for preventing spring frost bud damage in cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait). Risk-averse growers have been reluctant to adopt the intermittent cycling of irrigation pumps as a standard management practice. In the spring of 2013 and 2014, an experiment was conduc...

  10. Dragonflies are biocontrol agents in Wisconsin cranberry marshes

    Dragonflies (Order Odonata) are abundant predators that emerge in large hatch events each summer in Wisconsin cranberry marshes. They seem to be a potential group of biocontrol agents for pest management that may be influenced by the diversity found on the marsh. In fact, our evidence shows that dra...

  11. Arthropod fauna associated with wild and cultivated cranberries in Wisconsin

    The cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Aiton) is an evergreen, trailing, dwarf shrub native to North American peatlands. It is cultivated commercially in the US and Canada, with major production centers in Wisconsin, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Québec, and British Columbia. Despite the agricultural imp...

  12. Evaluating tensiometers and moisture sensors for cranberry irrigation

    Irrigation scheduling continues to be a major challenge in cranberry (Vaccinium marcrocarpon Ait.) production. Many growers tend to rely on the 25 mm per week “rule” from rain and irrigation despite evidence that in most years this results in some weeks with inadequate water and others with excess. ...

  13. The effect of plum juice on the prevention of struvite calculus formation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huaijun; Sun, Xizhao; Lu, Jianlin; Wang, Meihua; Fang, Yun; Ge, Weihong

    2012-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of plum juice on struvite calculus formation in vitro and to explore the effect of plum juice on urease-producing bacteria and urease activity. The compliance of available drugs is low for struvite calculus after surgical treatment and functional food may represent a good choice as an alternative therapy. Antibacterial activity was assessed using a microdilution antimicrobial susceptibility test. Urease activity was determined by measuring ammonia production. Struvite crystals were induced by Proteus mirabilis in artificial urine with natural and pH-adjusted plum juice. The optical density (OD)(600) and pH of artificial urine were examined, as well the shape and weights of crystals. Natural plum juice showed an antibacterial effect on urease-producing bacteria, whereas the pH-adjusted juice did not. A concentration-dependent inhibition on urease activity was found for both natural and pH-adjusted juice. Natural plum juice at a high concentration of 0.5% showed an obvious inhibition on the increase of OD(600) and pH of the artificial urine, and crystal formation was prevented by up to or more than 8 h, depending on the concentration of juice. Crystal weight in the natural plum juice groups was decreased in a concentration-dependent manner. The pH-adjusted plum juice did not show any effect on OD(600) and pH, although the presence of juice changed the crystal habit, indicating that the juice slowed the growth rate of crystals. Natural plum juice at high and moderate concentrations prevented the formation of P. mirabilis-induced crystals for up to 8 h in artificial urine. Although pH-adjusted and low-concentration natural juice did not prevent the occurrence of crystals, both types of juice slowed their growth rate.

  14. The effect of grapefruit juice on drug disposition

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, Michael J.; Cancalon, Paul; Widmer, Wilbur W.; Greenblatt, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Since their initial discovery in 1989, grapefruit juice-drug interactions have received extensive interest from the scientific, medical, regulatory, and lay communities. Although knowledge regarding the effects of grapefruit juice on drug disposition continues to expand, the list of drugs studied in the clinical setting remains relatively limited. Areas covered This article reviews the in vitro effects of grapefruit juice and its constituents on the activity of cytochrome P450 enzymes, organic anion-transporting polypeptides, P-glycoprotein, esterases and sulfotransferases. The translational applicability of the in vitro findings to the clinical setting is discussed for each drug metabolizing enzyme and transporter. Reported area under the plasma concentration-time curve ratios for available grapefruit juice-drug interaction studies are also provided. Relevant investigations were identified by searching the Pubmed electronic database from 1989 to 2010. Expert opinion Grapefruit juice increases the bioavailability of some orally-administered drugs that are metabolized by CYP3A and normally undergo extensive presystemic extraction. In addition, grapefruit juice can decrease the oral absorption of a few drugs that rely on organic anion-transporting polypeptides in the gastrointestinal tract for their uptake. The number of drugs shown to interact with grapefruit juice in vitro is far greater than the number of clinically relevant grapefruit juice-drug interactions. For the majority of patients, complete avoidance of grapefruit juice is unwarranted. PMID:21254874

  15. A review and critical analysis of the scientific literature related to 100% fruit juice and human health.

    PubMed

    Hyson, Dianne A

    2015-01-01

    The association between the consumption of pure (100%) fruit juice (PFJ) and human health is uncertain. The current review summarizes data published between 1995 and 2012 related to PFJ with a focus on juices that are widely available and studied in forms representing native juice without supplemental nutrients or enhanced phytochemical content. The effects of apple, cranberry, grape, grapefruit, orange, and pomegranate PFJ intake on outcomes linked to cancer, cardiovascular disease, cognition, hypertension, inflammation, oxidation, platelet function, urinary tract infection, and vascular reactivity are reviewed. Implications for bodyweight regulation are also addressed. The collective data are provocative although challenges and unanswered questions remain. There are many plausible mechanisms by which PFJ might be protective, and investigation of its effects on human health and disease prevention must remain an active area of research. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  16. A Review and Critical Analysis of the Scientific Literature Related to 100% Fruit Juice and Human Health12

    PubMed Central

    Hyson, Dianne A

    2015-01-01

    The association between the consumption of pure (100%) fruit juice (PFJ) and human health is uncertain. The current review summarizes data published between 1995 and 2012 related to PFJ with a focus on juices that are widely available and studied in forms representing native juice without supplemental nutrients or enhanced phytochemical content. The effects of apple, cranberry, grape, grapefruit, orange, and pomegranate PFJ intake on outcomes linked to cancer, cardiovascular disease, cognition, hypertension, inflammation, oxidation, platelet function, urinary tract infection, and vascular reactivity are reviewed. Implications for bodyweight regulation are also addressed. The collective data are provocative although challenges and unanswered questions remain. There are many plausible mechanisms by which PFJ might be protective, and investigation of its effects on human health and disease prevention must remain an active area of research. PMID:25593142

  17. Inhibition of Helicobacter pylori and Associated Urease by Oregano and Cranberry Phytochemical Synergies

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Y. T.; Kwon, Y. I.; Labbe, R. G.; Shetty, K.

    2005-01-01

    Ulcer-associated dyspepsia is caused by infection with Helicobacter pylori. H. pylori is linked to a majority of peptic ulcers. Antibiotic treatment does not always inhibit or kill H. pylori with potential for antibiotic resistance. The objective of this study was to determine the potential for using phenolic phytochemical extracts to inhibit H. pylori in a laboratory medium. Our approach involved the development of a specific phenolic profile with optimization of different ratios of extract mixtures from oregano and cranberry. Subsequently, antimicrobial activity and antimicrobial-linked urease inhibition ability were evaluated. The results indicated that the antimicrobial activity was greater in extract mixtures than in individual extracts of each species. The results also indicate that the synergistic contribution of oregano and cranberry phenolics may be more important for inhibition than any species-specific phenolic concentration. Further, based on plate assay, the likely mode of action may be through urease inhibition and disruption of energy production by inhibition of proline dehydrogenase at the plasma membrane. PMID:16332847

  18. Influence of power ultrasound on the main quality properties and cell viability of osmotic dehydrated cranberries.

    PubMed

    Nowacka, Malgorzata; Fijalkowska, Aleksandra; Wiktor, Artur; Dadan, Magdalena; Tylewicz, Urszula; Dalla Rosa, Marco; Witrowa-Rajchert, Dorota

    2018-02-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of ultrasound treatment in two osmotic solutions, carried out at different time, on some physical properties, antioxidant activity and cell survival of cranberries. Ultrasound treatment was conducted at 21kHz for 30 and 60min in liquid medium: 61.5% sucrose solution and 30% sucrose solution with 0.1% steviol glycosides addition. Some samples before the ultrasound treatment were subjected to cutting or blanching. The results showed that dry matter content and concentration of the dissolved substances increased during ultrasound treatment in osmotic solution, however higher value was observed for treatment in 61.5% sucrose solution and for longer time. Water activity and volume of cranberries did not change after the ultrasonic treatment. Combined treatment led to colour and antioxidant activity alterations as well. A cell viability of whole and cut samples decreased after 60min of osmotic treatment and completely lost in the blanched samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. 6'7'-Dihydroxybergamottin contributes to the grapefruit juice effect.

    PubMed

    Kakar, Shefali M; Paine, Mary F; Stewart, Paul W; Watkins, Paul B

    2004-06-01

    Our objective was to assess the contribution of 6',7'-dihydroxybergamottin (DHB) to the inhibitory effect of grapefruit juice toward intestinal cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4. An aqueous extract was prepared from grapefruit juice by centrifugation, filtration, and repeated washing of the particulate with water. The concentrations of various furanocoumarins in this grapefruit juice "serum" and in whole grapefruit juice were measured by HPLC and their identities confirmed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Five healthy volunteers were given a single tablet of felodipine (10 mg) with whole grapefruit juice, orange juice-containing serum, or plain orange juice (control). The pharmacokinetic outcomes of felodipine were evaluated by noncompartmental methods. The effects of serum and purified DHB (at the same concentrations as those measured in the orange juice-containing serum used in the clinical study) were compared, in vitro, with regard to (1) the reversible and mechanism-based inhibition of the catalytic activity of complementary deoxyribonucleic acid-expressed CYP3A4 and (2) the time-dependent loss of immunoreactive CYP3A4 protein in modified Caco-2 cells. The concentration of DHB in serum was comparable to that measured in whole grapefruit juice (38 micromol/L versus 43 micromol/L), and the concentrations of other known furanocoumarins were well below the lowest published concentration required to inhibit catalytic activity by 50%. Relative to plain orange juice, orange juice-containing serum significantly increased the median felodipine area under the plasma concentration-time curve by 1.9-fold (P =.04) and increased the maximum concentration by 1.7-fold (P =.01). In vitro, serum and purified DHB had similar inhibitory effects toward CYP3A4 activity with respect to both reversible inhibition (95% confidence interval, 85% +/- 5.7% and 75% +/- 4.5%, respectively) and mechanism-based inhibition after a 15-minute preincubation (95% confidence interval, 79

  20. Heated apple juice supplemented with onion has greatly improved nutritional quality and browning index.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bonggi; Seo, Jeong Dae; Rhee, Jin-Kyu; Kim, Choon Young

    2016-06-15

    Although fruit juices are very popular, enzymatic browning occurs easily. Browning of fruit juice deteriorates nutrition value and product quality due to oxidation of polyphenol compounds. Therefore, development of natural food additives that reduce browning will be beneficial for improving quality of fruit juices. Onion has been reported to be a potent natural anti-browning agent. Here, we compared unheated and heated apple juices pre-supplemented with onion with respect to browning and nutritional quality. The unheated apple juice supplemented with onion showed reduced browning as well as increased total soluble solid, total phenol concentration, radical scavenging activities, and ferric reducing and copper chelating activities without any change in flavonoid concentration. On the other hand, heated juice supplemented with onion not only showed improved values for these parameters but also markedly increased flavonoid concentration. Thus, we conclude that application of heating and onion addition together may greatly improve quality of apple juice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. LC-MS/MS and UPLC-UV evaluation of anthocyanins and anthocyanidins during rabbiteye blueberry juice processing

    Blueberry juice processing includes multiple steps and each affect the chemical composition of the berries, including thermal degradation of anthocyanins. Not from concentrate juice was made by heating and enzyme processing blueberries before pressing followed by ultrafiltration and pasteurization. ...

  2. Influence of antioxidant rich fresh vegetable juices on starch induced postprandial hyperglycemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Ashok K; Reddy, K Srikanth; Radhakrishnan, Janani; Kumar, D Anand; Zehra, Amtul; Agawane, Sachin B; Madhusudana, K

    2011-09-01

    This research analyzed the major chemical components and multiple antioxidant activities present in the fresh juice of eight vegetables, and studied their influence on starch induced postprandial glycemia in rats. A SDS-PAGE based protein fingerprint of each vegetable juice was also prepared. The yields of juice, chemical components like total proteins, total polyphenols, total flavonoids, total anthocyanins and free radicals like the ABTS˙(+) cation, DPPH, H(2)O(2), scavenging activities and reducing properties for NBT and FeCl(3) showed wide variations. Vegetable juice from brinjal ranked first in displaying total antioxidant capacity. Pretreatment of rats with vegetable juices moderated starch induced postprandial glycemia. The fresh juice from the vegetables ridge gourd, bottle gourd, ash gourd and chayote significantly mitigated postprandial hyperglycemic excursion. Total polyphenol concentrations present in vegetable juices positively influenced ABTS˙(+) scavenging activity and total antioxidant capacity. However, NBT reducing activity of juices was positively affected by total protein concentration. Contrarily, however, high polyphenol content in vegetable juice was observed to adversely affect the postprandial antihyperglycemic activity of vegetable juices. This is the first report exploring antihyperglycemic activity in these vegetable juices and highlights the possible adverse influence of high polyphenol content on the antihyperglycemic activity of the vegetable juices. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  3. Carbohydrate absorption from one serving of fruit juice in young children: age and carbohydrate composition effects.

    PubMed

    Nobigrot, T; Chasalow, F I; Lifshitz, F

    1997-04-01

    (white 20%, purple 24%) [p < 0.05]. Further outcome measures of BH2 excretion did not elicit differences beyond those detected by the above-mentioned parameters. Parents reported diarrhea in six children after pear juice, two after apple juice and two after purple grape juice and these children had the highest BH2 levels in their respective groups. No other symptoms were reported. The data show that the efficiency of carbohydrate absorption of one age-specific serving of juice increases with advancing age of children. Decreased carbohydrate absorption occurs more often after ingestion of juices that contain more sorbitol, a nonabsorbable sugar and higher concentrations of fructose over glucose than after ingestion of juices which lack sorbitol and contain equal amounts of fructose and glucose.

  4. [Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) and urinary tract infections: study model and review of literature].

    PubMed

    Lavigne, J-P; Bourg, G; Botto, H; Sotto, A

    2007-11-01

    Cranberries (Vaccinium macrocarpon) have long been the focus of interest for their beneficial effects in preventing urinary tract infections. Among cranberry compounds, a group of proanthocyanidins (PACs) with A-type linkages were isolated which exhibit bacterial anti-adhesion activity against uropathogenic Escherichia coli strains. These PAC inhibit P-fimbriae synthesis and induce a bacterial deformation. This activity was demonstrated on both antibiotic susceptible and resistant bacteria. This review focused on the last discoveries in the knowledge of cranberry effects.

  5. Cranberry supplementation in the prevention of non-severe lower urinary tract infections: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ledda, A; Bottari, A; Luzzi, R; Belcaro, G; Hu, S; Dugall, M; Hosoi, M; Ippolito, E; Corsi, M; Gizzi, G; Morazzoni, P; Riva, A; Giacomelli, L; Togni, S

    2015-01-01

    Cranberry extracts have been tested as a nutritional supplementation in the prevention of recurrent lower-urinary tract infections (R-UTIs), with mixed results. This pilot, registry study evaluates the prophylactic effects of oral supplementation with a new well-standardized cranberry extract in patients with R-UTI, over a 2-month follow-up. All subjects were suggested to take one capsule containing a cranberry extract (Anthocran™) for 60 days and were also given lifestyle advice. Clinical outcomes were compared between patients on cranberry extracts and those who don't take this supplementation. In total, 22 subjects completed the study in each of the two groups. In the cranberry group, the reduction in the frequency of UTI episodes during the study period compared with the two months before the inclusion was 73.3% (p < 0.05). This figure was 15.4% in the control group (p < 0.05; p = 0.012 vs cranberry group). Seven (31.8%) subjects in the cranberry group were symptom-free; no patient was symptom-free in the control group (p < 0.05). The mean duration of UTI episodes was 2.5 ± 1.3 days in the cranberry group, compared with 3.6 ± 1.7 days in subjects not on cranberry (p < 0.05). Three subjects (13.6%) in the cranberry group and 8 (36.3%) in the control group required medical consultation for UTI symptoms (p < 0.05). Urine evaluation was completely negative in 20/22 subjects in the Cranberry group (90.9%) and in 11 control subjects (50.0%; p < 0.005). No adverse events were observed. These preliminary results, obtained in a field-practice setting, indicates the effectiveness and safety of a well-standardized cranberry extract in the prevention of R-UTI.

  6. Stabilization of anthocyanins in blackberry juice by glutathione fortification.

    PubMed

    Stebbins, Nathan B; Howard, Luke R; Prior, Ronald L; Brownmiller, Cindi; Mauromoustakos, Andy

    2017-10-18

    Blackberry anthocyanins provide attractive color and antioxidant activity. However, anthocyanins degrade during juice processing and storage, so maintaining high anthocyanin concentrations in berry juices may lead to greater antioxidant and health benefits for the consumer. This study evaluated potential additives to stabilize anthocyanins during blackberry juice storage. The anthocyanin stabilizing agents used were: glutathione, galacturonic acid, diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid and tannic acid, which were added at a level of 500 mg L -1 . Juice anthocyanin, flavonol, and ellagitannin content and percent polymeric color were measured over five weeks of accelerated storage at 30 °C. Glutathione had the greatest protective effect on total anthocyanins and polymeric color. Therefore a second study was performed with glutathione in combination with lipoic and ascorbic acids in an effort to use antioxidant recycling to achieve a synergistic effect. However, the antioxidant recycling system had no protective effect relative to glutathione alone. Glutathione appears to be a promising blackberry juice additive to protect against anthocyanin degradation during storage.

  7. Mining and validation of pyrosequenced simple sequence repeats (SSRs) from American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.).

    PubMed

    Zhu, H; Senalik, D; McCown, B H; Zeldin, E L; Speers, J; Hyman, J; Bassil, N; Hummer, K; Simon, P W; Zalapa, J E

    2012-01-01

    The American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) is a major commercial fruit crop in North America, but limited genetic resources have been developed for the species. Furthermore, the paucity of codominant DNA markers has hampered the advance of genetic research in cranberry and the Ericaceae family in general. Therefore, we used Roche 454 sequencing technology to perform low-coverage whole genome shotgun sequencing of the cranberry cultivar 'HyRed'. After de novo assembly, the obtained sequence covered 266.3 Mb of the estimated 540-590 Mb in cranberry genome. A total of 107,244 SSR loci were detected with an overall density across the genome of 403 SSR/Mb. The AG repeat was the most frequent motif in cranberry accounting for 35% of all SSRs and together with AAG and AAAT accounted for 46% of all loci discovered. To validate the SSR loci, we designed 96 primer-pairs using contig sequence data containing perfect SSR repeats, and studied the genetic diversity of 25 cranberry genotypes. We identified 48 polymorphic SSR loci with 2-15 alleles per locus for a total of 323 alleles in the 25 cranberry genotypes. Genetic clustering by principal coordinates and genetic structure analyzes confirmed the heterogeneous nature of cranberries. The parentage composition of several hybrid cultivars was evident from the structure analyzes. Whole genome shotgun 454 sequencing was a cost-effective and efficient way to identify numerous SSR repeats in the cranberry sequence for marker development.

  8. Cranberry interacts with dietary macronutrients to promote healthy aging in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cecilia; Yolitz, Jason; Alberico, Thomas; Laslo, Mara; Sun, Yaning; Wheeler, Charles T; Sun, Xiaoping; Zou, Sige

    2014-08-01

    Botanicals possess numerous bioactivities, and some promote healthy aging. Dietary macronutrients are major determinants of life span. The interaction between botanicals and macronutrients that modulates life span is not well understood. Here, we investigated the effect of a cranberry-containing botanical on life span and the influence of macronutrients on the longevity-related effect of cranberry in Drosophila. Flies were supplemented with cranberry on three dietary conditions: standard, high sugar-low protein, and low sugar-high protein diets. We found that cranberry slightly extended life span in males fed with the low sugar-high protein diet but not with other diets. Cranberry extended life span in females fed with the standard diet and more prominently the high sugar-low protein diet but not with the low sugar-high protein diet. Life-span extension was associated with increased reproduction and higher expression of oxidative stress and heat shock response genes. Moreover, cranberry improved survival of sod1 knockdown and dfoxo mutant flies but did not increase wild-type fly's resistance to acute oxidative stress. Cranberry slightly extended life span in flies fed with a high-fat diet. These findings suggest that cranberry promotes healthy aging by increasing stress responsiveness. Our study reveals an interaction of cranberry with dietary macronutrients and stresses the importance of considering diet composition in designing interventions for promoting healthy aging. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Gerontological Society of America 2013.

  9. IN VITRO ACTIVITY OF VACCINIUM MACROCARPON (CRANBERRY) ON URINARY TRACT PATHOGENS IN UNCOMPLICATED URINARY TRACT INFECTION.

    PubMed

    Bukhari, Saima; Chiragh, Sadia; Tariq, Sumbal; Alam, Muhammad Adeel; Wazir, Muhammad Salim; Suleman, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infection is the most common bacterial infection in the community, mainly caused by Escherichia coli (E coli). Due to its high incidence and recurrence, problems are faced in the treatment with antibiotics. Cranberry being herbal remedy have long been the focus of interest for their beneficial effects in preventing urinary tract infections. This study was conducted to analyse in vitro activity of cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) on uropathogenic E coli in uncomplicated urinary tract infections. In this laboratory based single group experimental study, anti-bacterial activity of Vaccinium macrocarpon concentrate on urinary tract E coli was investigated, in vitro. Ninety-six culture positive cases of different uropathogens were identified. Vaccinium macrocarpon concentrate at different concentrations was prepared in distilled water and put in wells punched in nutrient agar. E coli isolates were inoculated on the plates and incubated at 37 °C for 24 hours. A citric acid solution of the same pH as that of Vaccinium macrocarpon was used and put in a well on the same plate to exclude the effect of pH. A total of 35 isolates of E coli were identified out of 96 culture positive specimens of urine and found sensitive to Vaccinium macrocarpon (p<0.000). Results revealed that Vaccinium macrocarpon has antibacterial effect against E coli. Furthermore the antibacterial activity of Vaccinium macrocarpon has dose response relationship. Acidic nature of Vaccinium macrocarpon due to its pH is not contributory towards its antibacterial effect. Vaccinium macrocarpon concentrate may be used in urinary tract infection caused by E coli.

  10. Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles using cranberry powder aqueous extract: characterization and antimicrobial properties.

    PubMed

    Ashour, Asmaa A; Raafat, Dina; El-Gowelli, Hanan M; El-Kamel, Amal H

    2015-01-01

    The growing threat of microbial resistance against traditional antibiotics has prompted the development of several antimicrobial nanoparticles (NPs), including silver NPs (AgNPs). In this article, a simple and eco-friendly method for the synthesis of AgNPs using the cranberry powder aqueous extract is reported. Cranberry powder aqueous extracts (0.2%, 0.5%, and 0.8% w/v) were allowed to interact for 24 hours with a silver nitrate solution (10 mM) at 30°C at a ratio of 1:10. The formation of AgNPs was confirmed by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy and their concentrations were determined using atomic absorption spectroscopy. The prepared NPs were evaluated by transmission electron microscopy, measurement of ζ-potential, and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The in vitro antimicrobial properties of AgNPs were then investigated against several microbial strains. Finally, in vivo appraisal of both wound-healing and antimicrobial properties of either plain AgNPs (prepared using 0.2% extract) or AgNP-Pluronic F-127 gel was conducted in a rat model after induction of a Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538P wound infection. The formation of AgNPs was confirmed by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, where a surface-plasmon resonance absorption peak was observed between 432 and 438 nm. Both size and concentration of the formed AgNPs increased with increasing concentration of the extracts. The developed NPs were stable, almost spherical, and polydisperse, with a size range of 1.4-8.6 nm. The negative ζ-potential values, as well as Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy analysis, indicated the presence of a capping agent adsorbed onto the surface of the particles. In vitro antimicrobial evaluation revealed a size-dependent activity of the AgNPs against the tested organisms. Finally, AgNPs prepared using 0.2% extract exhibited a substantial in vivo healing potential for full-thickness excision wounds in rats. AgNPs were successfully synthesized from a silver nitrate solution

  11. Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles using cranberry powder aqueous extract: characterization and antimicrobial properties

    PubMed Central

    Ashour, Asmaa A; Raafat, Dina; El-Gowelli, Hanan M; El-Kamel, Amal H

    2015-01-01

    Background The growing threat of microbial resistance against traditional antibiotics has prompted the development of several antimicrobial nanoparticles (NPs), including silver NPs (AgNPs). In this article, a simple and eco-friendly method for the synthesis of AgNPs using the cranberry powder aqueous extract is reported. Materials and methods Cranberry powder aqueous extracts (0.2%, 0.5%, and 0.8% w/v) were allowed to interact for 24 hours with a silver nitrate solution (10 mM) at 30°C at a ratio of 1:10. The formation of AgNPs was confirmed by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy and their concentrations were determined using atomic absorption spectroscopy. The prepared NPs were evaluated by transmission electron microscopy, measurement of ζ-potential, and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The in vitro antimicrobial properties of AgNPs were then investigated against several microbial strains. Finally, in vivo appraisal of both wound-healing and antimicrobial properties of either plain AgNPs (prepared using 0.2% extract) or AgNP-Pluronic F-127 gel was conducted in a rat model after induction of a Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538P wound infection. Results The formation of AgNPs was confirmed by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, where a surface-plasmon resonance absorption peak was observed between 432 and 438 nm. Both size and concentration of the formed AgNPs increased with increasing concentration of the extracts. The developed NPs were stable, almost spherical, and polydisperse, with a size range of 1.4–8.6 nm. The negative ζ-potential values, as well as Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy analysis, indicated the presence of a capping agent adsorbed onto the surface of the particles. In vitro antimicrobial evaluation revealed a size-dependent activity of the AgNPs against the tested organisms. Finally, AgNPs prepared using 0.2% extract exhibited a substantial in vivo healing potential for full-thickness excision wounds in rats. Conclusion AgNPs were

  12. Antibacterial activity of vegetables and juices.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yee-Lean; Cesario, Thomas; Wang, Yang; Shanbrom, Edward; Thrupp, Lauri

    2003-01-01

    We evaluated the antibacterial activities of various fruit and vegetable extracts on common potential pathogens including antibiotic-resistant strains. Standardized bacterial inocula were added to serial dilutions of sterile vegetable and fruit extracts in broth, with final bacterial concentrations of 10(4-5) cells/mL. After overnight incubation at 35 degrees C, antibacterial activity was measured by minimum inhibitory and minimum bactericidal dilutions (for raw juices) or concentrations (for tea). Among the vegetable and fruit extracts tested, all green vegetables showed no antibacterial activity on Staphylococcus epidermidis and Klebsiella pneumoniae. All purple and red vegetable and fruit juices had antibacterial activities in dilutions ranging from 1:2 to 1:16. Garlic juice had significant activity, with bactericidal action in dilutions ranging up to 1:128 of the original juice. Tea also had significant activity, with bactericidal action in concentrations ranging up to 1.6 mg/mL, against a spectrum of pathogens including resistant strains such as methicillin- and ciprofloxacin-resistant staphylococci, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, and ciprofloxacin-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Tea and garlic have the potential for exploration of broader applications as antibacterial agents.

  13. New and Emerging Viruses of Blueberry and Cranberry

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Robert R.; Polashock, James J.; Tzanetakis, Ioannis E.

    2012-01-01

    Blueberry and cranberry are fruit crops native to North America and they are well known for containing bioactive compounds that can benefit human health. Cultivation is expanding within North America and other parts of the world raising concern regarding distribution of existing viruses as well as the appearance of new viruses. Many of the known viruses of these crops are latent or asymptomatic in at least some cultivars. Diagnosis and detection procedures are often non-existent or unreliable. Whereas new viruses can move into cultivated fields from the wild, there is also the threat that devastating viruses can move into native stands of Vaccinium spp. or other native plants from cultivated fields. The aim of this paper is to highlight the importance of blueberry and cranberry viruses, focusing not only on those that are new but also those that are emerging as serious threats for production in North America and around the world. PMID:23202507

  14. Looking beyond fertilizer: Assessing the contribution of nitrogen from hydrologic inputs and organic matter to plant growth in the cranberry agroecosystem

    Stackpoole, S.M.; Kosola, K.R.; Workmaster, B.A.A.; Guldan, N.M.; Browne, B.A.; Jackson, R. D.

    2011-01-01

    Even though nitrogen (N) is a key nutrient for successful cranberry production, N cycling in cranberry agroecosystems is not completely understood. Prior research has focused mainly on timing and uptake of ammonium fertilizer, but the objective of our study was to evaluate the potential for additional N contributions from hydrologic inputs (flooding, irrigation, groundwater, and precipitation) and organic matter (OM). Plant biomass, soil, surface and groundwater samples were collected from five cranberry beds (cranberry production fields) on four different farms, representing both upland and lowland systems. Estimated average annual plant uptake (63.3 ?? 22.5 kg N ha-1 year-1) exceeded total average annual fertilizer inputs (39.5 ?? 11.6 kg N ha-1 year-1). Irrigation, precipitation, and floodwater N summed to an average 23 ?? 0.7 kg N ha-1 year-1, which was about 60% of fertilizer N. Leaf and stem litterfall added 5.2 ?? 1.2 and 24.1 ?? 3.0 kg N ha-1 year-1 respectively. The estimated net N mineralization rate from the buried bag technique was 5 ?? 0.2 kg N ha-1 year-1, which was nearly 15% of fertilizer N. Dissolved organic nitrogen represented a significant portion of the total N pool in both surface water and soil samples. Mixed-ion exchange resin core incubations indicated that 80% of total inorganic N from fertilizer, irrigation, precipitation, and mineralization was nitrate, and approximately 70% of recovered inorganic N from groundwater was nitrate. There was a weak but significant negative relationship between extractable soil ammonium concentrations and ericoid mycorrhizal colonization (ERM) rates (r = -0.22, P < 0.045). Growers may benefit from balancing the N inputs from hydrologic sources and OM relative to fertilizer N in order to maximize the benefits of ERM fungi in actively mediating N cycling in cranberry agroecosystems. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  15. Vortex- and CO2 -gas-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction with salt addition for the high-performance liquid chromatographic determination of furanic compounds in concentrated juices and dried fruits.

    PubMed

    Abu-Bakar, Nur-Bahiyah; Makahleh, Ahmad; Saad, Bahruddin

    2016-03-01

    A novel microextraction method based on vortex- and CO2 -assisted liquid-liquid microextraction with salt addition for the isolation of furanic compounds (5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde, 5-methyl-2-furaldehyde, 2-furaldehyde, 3-furaldehyde, 2-furoic and 3-furoic acids) was developed. Purging the sample with CO2 was applied after vortexing to enhance the phase separation and mass transfer of the analytes. The optimum extraction conditions were: extraction solvent (volume), propyl acetate (125 μL); sample pH, 2.4; vortexing time, 45 s; salt concentration, 25% w/v and purging time, 5 min. The analytes were separated using an ODS Hypersil C18 column (250×4.6 mm i.d, 5 μm) under gradient flow. The proposed method showed good linearities (r(2) >0.999), low detection limits (0.08-1.9 μg/L) and good recoveries (80.7-122%). The validated method was successfully applied for the determination of the furanic compounds in concentrated juice (mango, date, orange, pomegranate, roselle, mangosteen and soursop) and dried fruit (prune, date and apricot paste) samples. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Effect of Cranberry Capsules on Bacteriuria Plus Pyuria among Older Women in Nursing Homes: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Juthani-Mehta, Manisha; Van Ness, Peter H.; Bianco, Luann; Rink, Andrea; Rubeck, Sabina; Ginter, Sandra; Argraves, Stephanie; Charpentier, Peter; Acampora, Denise; Trentalange, Mark; Quagliarello, Vincent; Peduzzi, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Importance Bacteriuria plus pyuria is highly prevalent among older women living in nursing homes. Cranberry capsules are an understudied, non-antimicrobial, prevention strategy used in this population. Objective To test the effect of two oral cranberry capsules once per day on presence of bacteriuria plus pyuria among women residing in nursing homes Design, Setting, and Participants This study was a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled efficacy trial with stratification by nursing home and surveillance of one year. 21 nursing homes with at least 90 beds and within 50 miles of New Haven, CT participated. 185 English-speaking, female, nursing home residents, age 65 or older, with or without bacteriuria and pyuria at baseline, were randomized. The study was conducted from 8/24/12-10/26/15. Intervention Two oral cranberry capsules, each capsule containing 36mg of the active ingredient proanthocyanidin (i.e., 72mg total, equivalent to 20 ounces of cranberry juice), versus placebo administered once per day in 92 treatment and 93 control group participants. Main Outcomes and Measures The primary outcome was the presence of bacteriuria (i.e., at least 105 cfu/mL of one or two microorganisms on urine culture) plus pyuria (i.e., any number of white blood cells on urinalysis) assessed every two months for a total of six assessments over the one year of surveillance; any positive finding was considered to meet the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes were symptomatic urinary tract infection (UTI), all-cause death, all-cause hospitalization, all multi-drug antibiotic resistant organisms, antibiotics administered for suspected UTI, and total antimicrobial administration. Results Among 185 women who were randomized (mean age 86.4 years [± 8.2], 90.3% white, 31.4% with bacteriuria plus pyuria at baseline), 147 completed the study. Overall adherence to capsule administration was 80.1%. Unadjusted results showed the presence of bacteriuria plus pyuria in 25.5% (95% CI 18

  17. Effect of Cranberry Capsules on Bacteriuria Plus Pyuria Among Older Women in Nursing Homes: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Juthani-Mehta, Manisha; Van Ness, Peter H; Bianco, Luann; Rink, Andrea; Rubeck, Sabina; Ginter, Sandra; Argraves, Stephanie; Charpentier, Peter; Acampora, Denise; Trentalange, Mark; Quagliarello, Vincent; Peduzzi, Peter

    2016-11-08

    Bacteriuria plus pyuria is highly prevalent among older women living in nursing homes. Cranberry capsules are an understudied, nonantimicrobial prevention strategy used in this population. To test the effect of 2 oral cranberry capsules once a day on presence of bacteriuria plus pyuria among women residing in nursing homes. Double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled efficacy trial with stratification by nursing home and involving 185 English-speaking women aged 65 years or older, with or without bacteriuria plus pyuria at baseline, residing in 21 nursing homes located within 50 miles (80 km) of New Haven, Connecticut (August 24, 2012-October 26, 2015). Two oral cranberry capsules, each capsule containing 36 mg of the active ingredient proanthocyanidin (ie, 72 mg total, equivalent to 20 ounces of cranberry juice) vs placebo administered once a day in 92 treatment and 93 control group participants. Presence of bacteriuria (ie, at least 105 colony-forming units [CFUs] per milliliter of 1 or 2 microorganisms in urine culture) plus pyuria (ie, any number of white blood cells on urinalysis) assessed every 2 months over the 1-year study surveillance; any positive finding was considered to meet the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes were symptomatic urinary tract infection (UTI), all-cause death, all-cause hospitalization, all multidrug antibiotic-resistant organisms, antibiotics administered for suspected UTI, and total antimicrobial administration. Of the 185 randomized study participants (mean age, 86.4 years [SD, 8.2], 90.3% white, 31.4% with bacteriuria plus pyuria at baseline), 147 completed the study. Overall adherence was 80.1%. Unadjusted results showed the presence of bacteriuria plus pyuria in 25.5% (95% CI, 18.6%-33.9%) of the treatment group and in 29.5% (95% CI, 22.2%-37.9%) of the control group. The adjusted generalized estimating equations model that accounted for missing data and covariates showed no significant difference in the presence of bacteriuria

  18. The effect of American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) constituents on the growth inhibition, membrane integrity, and injury of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes in comparison to Lactobacillus rhamnosus.

    PubMed

    Lacombe, Alison; McGivney, Christine; Tadepalli, Shravani; Sun, Xiaohong; Wu, Vivian C H

    2013-06-01

    The antimicrobial properties of the American cranberry were studied against Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, and Lactobacillus rhamnosus to determine the effects on growth inhibition, membrane permeability, and injury. Cranberry powder was separated using a C-18 Sep-Pak cartridge into sugars plus organic acids (F1), monomeric phenolics (F2), and anthocyanins plus proanthocyanidins (F3). Fraction 3 was further separated into anthocyanins (F4) and proanthocyanidins (F5) using an LH-20 Sephadex column. Each fraction was diluted in the brain heart infusion (BHI) broth to determine the minimum inhibitory/bactericidal concentrations (MIC/MBC). L. monocytogenes was the most susceptible to cranberry fraction treatment with the lowest MIC/MBC for each treatment, followed by E. coli O157:H7 and L. rhamnosus. Membrane permeability and potential was studied using LIVE/DEAD viability assay and using Bis (1, 3-dibutylbarbituric acid) trimethine oxonol (DiBAC4), respectively. L. rhamnosus demonstrated the highest permeability followed by E. coli O157:H7, and L. monocytogenes. L. rhamnosus demonstrated the highest recovery followed by E. coli O157:H7, and L. monocytogenes. Each cranberry fraction demonstrated membrane hyperpolarization at their native pH, while F2, F3, and F5 demonstrated membrane depolarization at neutral pH. With this knowledge cranberry compounds may be used to prevent maladies and potentially substitute for synthetic preservatives and antibiotics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of the biochemical components and chromatic properties of the juice of Vaccinium macrocarpon Aiton and Vaccinium oxycoccos L.

    PubMed

    Cesonienė, Laima; Daubaras, Remigijus; Jasutienė, Ina; Venclovienė, Jonė; Miliauskienė, Inga

    2011-09-01

    Benzoic acid, total anthocyanins, soluble solids, titratable acidity, and colour properties in juice of the American cranberry Vaccinium macrocarpon and the European cranberry Vaccinium oxycoccos were investigated. Berry juices of V. macrocarpon cultivars were distinguished by their higher total anthocyanin and benzoic acid amounts. These cultivars accumulated on average 43.11 mg/l of benzoic acid and 92.45 mg/l of total anthocyanins. The levels of benzoic acid and total anthocyanins in V. oxycoccos cultivars were 17.52 mg/l and 42.54 mg/l, respectively. The V. macrocarpon cultivars 'Franklin', 'Le Munyon', 'Searles', and 'Early Richard' were selected as the best according to the enhanced total anthocyanins and benzoic acid amounts. The separation of anthocyanins by HPLC-UV-VIS revealed the presence of six anthocyanins, with peonidin-3-galactoside being the most prevalent. Galactoside together with glucoside conjugates comprised the largest percentage of total anthocyanins in the juices of V. macrocarpon and V. oxycoccos cultivars.

  20. Targeted and non-targeted detection of lemon juice adulteration by LC-MS and chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhengfang; Jablonski, Joseph E

    2016-01-01

    Economically motivated adulteration (EMA) of lemon juice was detected by LC-MS and principal component analysis (PCA). Twenty-two batches of freshly squeezed lemon juice were adulterated by adding an aqueous solution containing 5% citric acid and 6% sucrose to pure lemon juice to obtain 30%, 60% and 100% lemon juice samples. Their total titratable acidities, °Brix and pH values were measured, and then all the lemon juice samples were subject to LC-MS analysis. Concentrations of hesperidin and eriocitrin, major phenolic components of lemon juice, were quantified. The PCA score plots for LC-MS datasets were used to preview the classification of pure and adulterated lemon juice samples. Results showed a large inherent variability in the chemical properties among 22 batches of 100% lemon juice samples. Measurement or quantitation of one or several chemical properties (targeted detection) was not effective in detecting lemon juice adulteration. However, by using the LC-MS datasets, including both chromatographic and mass spectrometric information, 100% lemon juice samples were successfully differentiated from adulterated samples containing 30% lemon juice in the PCA score plot. LC-MS coupled with chemometric analysis can be a complement to existing methods for detecting juice adulteration.

  1. Study of flavour compounds from orange juices by HS-SPME and GC-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmutzer, G.; Avram, V.; Covaciu, F.; Feher, I.; Magdas, A.; David, L.; Moldovan, Z.

    2013-11-01

    The flavour of the orange juices, which gives the taste and odour of the product, is an important criterion about the products quality for consumers. A fresh single strength and two commercial orange juices (obtained from concentrate) flavour profile were studied using a selective and sensitive gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analytical system, after a solvent free, single step preconcentration and extraction technique, the headspace solid phase microextraction (HP-SPME). In the studied orange juices 55 flavour compounds were detected and classified as belonging to the esters, alcohols, ketones, monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes chemical families. The fresh single strength orange juice was characterized by high amount of esters, monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes. Limonene and valencene were the most abundant flavours in this fresh natural orange juice. Alcohols and ketones were found in higher concentration in the commercial orange juices made from concentrate, than in the single strength products. Nevertheless, in commercial juices the most abundant flavour was limonene and α-terpineol. The results highlight clear differences between fresh singles strength orange juice and juice from concentrate. The orange juices reconstructed from concentrate, made in Romania, present low quantity of flavour compounds, suggesting the absence or a low rearomatization process, but extraneous components were not detected.

  2. Cranberry for Urinary Tract Infection: From Bench to Bedside.

    PubMed

    Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Sureda, Antoni; Daglia, Maria; Izadi, Morteza; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    Urinary tract infections are common infectious diseases which can occur in any part of the urinary tract such as bladder, kidney, ureters, and urethra. They are commonly caused by bacteria that enter through the urethra. Urinary tract infections commonly develop in the bladder and spread to renal tissues. Up to now, there are different antimicrobial agents which have beneficial role on urinary tract infections. However, most of them cause different adverse effects and therefore, much attention has been paid to the search for effective therapeutic agents with negligible adverse effects. Cranberry is known as one of the most important edible plants, which possesses potent antimicrobial effects against the bacteria responsible for urinary tract infections. Growing evidence has shown that cranberry suppresses urinary tract infections and eradicates the bacteria. Therefore, the aim of this study is to critically review the available literature regarding the antimicrobial activities of cranberry against urinary tract infection microorganisms. In addition, we discuss etiology, epidemiology, risk factors, and current drugs of urinary tract infections to provide a more complete picture of this disease.

  3. Composition of apple juice.

    PubMed

    Mattick, L R; Moyer, J C

    1983-09-01

    Thirty-one samples from 8 geographic growing regions of the United States and 15 varieties common to these areas were converted to apple juice and analyzed for their attributes over the 3 year period 1979, 1980, and 1981. The total of 93 samples were analyzed for ash, brix, pH, proline, specific gravity, total acid, sorbitol, sucrose, fructose, and glucose. The elements cadmium, calcium, iron, lead, phosphorus, potassium, sodium, and zinc were also determined. These data are presented to serve as a data base for the detection of fraudulent or adulterated apple juice.

  4. Browning Index of Anthocyanin-Rich Fruit Juice Depends on pH and Anthocyanin Loss More Than the Gain of Soluble Polymeric Pigments.

    PubMed

    Dorris, Matthew R; Voss, Danielle M; Bollom, Mark A; Krawiec-Thayer, Mitchell P; Bolling, Bradley W

    2018-04-01

    Browning index (BI, ABS 520 nm /ABS 420 nm ) is a measure of anthocyanin-rich fruit juice pigmentation quality. This study sought to determine the extent to which BI describes anthocyanin quality and degradation in fruit juices. Commercial fruit juices were assayed for monomeric anthocyanin (MA) content, percent polymeric color (%PC), pH, and BI. BI varied, 0.29 to 1.72, among cranberry, cherry, grape, aronia, and pomegranate juices. Principal component analysis (PCA) revealed that BI was strongly inversely associated with %PC, and positively correlated with MAs to a lesser extent. The BI of grape and cherry juices varied linearly with pH from 2.0 to 4.0 in pH-adjusted juices. Cherry and grape juices at pH approximately 2.0 to 4.0 were incubated at 50 °C to induce juice browning. BI and MA decreased, and %PC increased, but the amount of MA degradation was not explained by %PC. In the aged juices, BI and MA were strongly correlated using PCA. In aged grape juice, chromatographic analysis was used characterize anthocyanins, proanthocyanidins, and anthocyanin scission products. Anthocyanin loss and a gain of unresolved components absorbing at 420 nm decreased BI. Proanthocyanidins and co-eluting pigments with varying BI decreased during aging. Scission products did not account for anthocyanin loss. Thus, MA loss more so than the gain in pigments associated with juice proanthocyanidins contribute to the increase in %PC and decline of the BI during accelerated aging of grape juice. Thus, BI is a useful marker of fruit juice quality within juices of the same pH and anthocyanin composition. Fruit juice pigmentation depends on anthocyanins, pH, and other matrix components. Spectrophotometric methods to determine pigmentation include the browning index (ABS 520 nm /ABS 420 nm ), pH differential method for monomeric anthocyanin (MA) content, and bisulfite bleaching to determine percent polymeric color (%PC). In this study, anthocyanin-rich fruit juice browning index was

  5. Studies on jicama juice processing.

    PubMed

    Juarez, M S; Paredes-Lopez, O

    1994-09-01

    Juice was extracted from jicama (Pachyrrizus erosus Urban) and clarified using a 10,000 daltons molecular weight cut-off membrane to improve its stability. Ultrafiltered juice was tested for general composition and Hunter color. Ultrafiltration (UF) retentate and UF permeate showed some changes, compared to fresh juice, in total and soluble solids, total sugars, and nitrogen, whereas ash and pH remained constant. Hunter color of juice samples exhibited some variation by UF. Results suggest that UF has potential to produce jicama juice with desirable and stable aroma and flavor.

  6. Consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages, but not 100% fruit juice, is associated with fasting high-density lipoprotein and triglyceride concentrations in U.S. adults

    Introduction: Dyslipidemia, characterized by high triglyceride (TG) and low HDL concentrations, is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Decreasing dietary sugar consumption is one dietary modification that may influence dyslipidemia risk to reduce the risk for CVD. Two major sources of di...

  7. Acute oxalate nephropathy due to 'Averrhoa bilimbi' fruit juice ingestion.

    PubMed

    Bakul, G; Unni, V N; Seethaleksmy, N V; Mathew, A; Rajesh, R; Kurien, G; Rajesh, J; Jayaraj, P M; Kishore, D S; Jose, P P

    2013-07-01

    Irumban puli (Averrhoa bilimbi) is commonly used as a traditional remedy in the state of Kerala. Freshly made concentrated juice has a very high oxalic acid content and consumption carries a high risk of developing acute renal failure (ARF) by deposition of calcium oxalate crystals in renal tubules. Acute oxalate nephropathy (AON) due to secondary oxalosis after consumption of Irumban puli juice is uncommon. AON due to A. bilimbi has not been reported before. We present a series of ten patients from five hospitals in the State of Kerala who developed ARF after intake of I. puli fruit juice. Seven patients needed hemodialysis whereas the other three improved with conservative management.

  8. Disappearance of patulin during alcoholic fermentation of apple juice.

    PubMed

    Stinson, E E; Osman, S F; Huhtanen, C N; Bills, D D

    1978-10-01

    Eight yeast strains were used in three typical American processes to ferment apple juice containing 15 mg of added patulin per liter. Patulin was reduced to less than the minimum detectable level of 50 microgram/liter in all but two cases; in all cases, the level of patulin was reduced by over 99% during alcoholic fermentation. In unfermented samples of apple juice, the concentration of added patulin declined by only 10% when the juice was held for 2 weeks, a period equivalent to the time required for fermentation.

  9. Multi-species mating disruption in cranberries (Ericales: Ericaceae): Early evidence using a flowable emulsion

    Pheromone-based mating disruption has proven to be a powerful pest management tool in many cropping systems, helping to reduce reliance on insecticide applications. However, a sustainable mating disruption program has not yet been developed for cranberries. In the cranberry system, two of the major ...

  10. Irrigation and drainage management strategies to enhance cranberry production and optimize water use in North America

    Recent funding, as well as technological and management changes, have led to important advances in irrigation and drainage strategies for the North American cranberry industry. This paper represents a synthesis of water management research on cranberry, as well as an introduction to a special issue ...

  11. Managing surface water inputs to reduce phosphorus loss from Cranberry farms

    Calcium phosphate (Ca-P) precipitation holds great promise in the mitigation of dissolved phosphorus (DP) loss from cranberry bogs, with precipitated Ca-P potentially serving as a fertilizer source for the subsequent cranberry crop. We quantified Ca-P precipitation following calcite application to h...

  12. Chemical and isotopic tracers illustrate pathways of nitrogen loss in a cranberry bed

    Limited research exists on the hydrological processes driving nitrogen (N) loss from cranberry production, which has been identified as a prominent source of watershed N loading in southeastern Massachusetts (MA). To quantify the hydrological processes underlying N export in cranberry farms, the geo...

  13. Enhanced oil and gas recovery in Michigan: Cranberry Lake Field, Richfield Oil Pool

    SciT

    Wilson, S.E.; Layton, F.L.; Lorenz, J.S.

    1976-01-01

    The Cranberry Lake Field was a multilevel reservoir in northwestern Clare County. The Richfield Pool interval, unitized in 1969, is being successfully waterflooded. The Cranberry Lake Field was associated with an anticlinal structure and the reservoir rocks are assigned to the basal part of the Lucas Formation, Detroit River Group. 4 figures, 2 tables.

  14. Phenology of Dasineura oxycoccana (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) on cranberry and blueberry indicates potential for gene flow.

    PubMed

    Cook, Melissa A; Fitzpatrick, Sheila M; Roitberg, Bernard D

    2012-08-01

    Dasineura oxycoccana (Johnson) (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) is a pest of cranberry, Vaccinium macrocarpon (Aiton) (Ericales: Ericaceae), and highbush blueberry, Vaccinium corymbosum (L.) (Ericales: Ericaceae), in North America. In British Columbia, Canada, D. oxycoccana was first found on highbush blueberry in 1991 and then on cranberry seven years later. Because many cranberry and highbush blueberry farms are adjacent to one another, we hypothesized that D. oxycoccana was moving from highbush blueberry onto cranberry. Cranberry and highbush blueberry differ in phenology, and adaptation to these different phenologies may result in host races or cryptic species on these two crops. We recognized the alternative hypothesis that D. oxycoccana had arrived as immature stages with cranberry vines imported from another region of North America. During spring and summer, we recorded the phenology of D. oxycoccana and the development of plant shoots from three cranberry and three highbush blueberry farms to determine whether the opportunity exists for successful movement of D. oxycoccana between the two crops. Our results show that D. oxycoccana from cranberry and highbush blueberry overlap in phenology for much of the season, indicating a high potential for movement and gene flow. However, differences were seen in number of larvae per shoot, location of pupae, and heat unit accumulation during larval development suggesting that instead there may be the potential for host race or cryptic species formation.

  15. Cranberry magnetite deposits Avery County, N.C., and Carter County, Tenn.

    Kline, M.H.; Ballard, T.J.

    1948-01-01

    The Cranberry magnetite deposits occur in pre-Cambrian granite-gneiss in a belt extending from 3 miles southeast of Cranberry, N.C., to about 6 miles southwest of Magnetic City, Tenn. The belt forms a curve, elongated to the north, approximately 26 miles in length.

  16. Hydrologic and nutrient response of groundwater to flooding of cranberry farms in southeastern Massachusetts, USA

    Seasonal flooding of cranberry farms is essential for long-term sustainability of cranberry production in southeastern Massachusetts, with roughly 90% of growers flooding for fall harvesting and winter protection. Although considered a significant source of recharge to the regional unconfined aquif...

  17. Comparison of controlled release and soluble granular fertilizers on cranberry growth, yield, and soil nutrients

    Cranberry growers are looking for ways to reduce off-site movement of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). Controlled-release fertilizers (CRF) may increase nutrient uptake efficiency in cranberry and decrease potential for nutrient leaching or lateral movement into drainage. Data regarding N and P in...

  18. 75 FR 5900 - Cranberries Grown in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-05

    ...; FV09-929-1 PR] Cranberries Grown in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Michigan, Minnesota, Oregon, Washington, and Long Island in the State of New York; Revised... cranberries produced in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin...

  19. A geospatial model to quantify mean thickness of peat in cranberry bogs

    Commercial cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) is cultivated on peatlands, which consist of sedimentary deposits of peat capped by a 0.3-1 m of artificial sand. Despite distinct soil layering, a general paucity of information exists on the physical properties of cranberry bogs. Field measurement...

  20. Endophytic and pathogenic fungi of developing cranberry ovaries from flower to mature fruit: diversity and succession

    Culturable fungal population diversity and succession were investigated in developing cranberry ovaries of fruit rot-resistant and rot-susceptible cranberry selections, from flower through mature fruit. Fungi were recovered in culture from 1185 of 1338 ovary tissues collected from June to September,...

  1. A geospatial model to quantify mean thickness of peat in cranberry bogs

    Commercial cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) is cultivated on peatlands, which consist of sedimentary deposits of peat capped by a 0.3-1 m of artificial sand. Despite distinct soil layering, a general paucity of information exists on the physical properties of cranberry bogs. Field measurements...

  2. Pheromone-based mating disruption to control the historical top three insect pests of Wisconsin cranberries

    In 2012, the first 3-species pheromone mating disruption program was tested in Wisconsin cranberries. Preliminary data suggest that there was substantial disruption of blackheaded fireworm and Sparganothis fruitworm mating. The pheromone of cranberry fruitworm only contained a single component, and ...

  3. Antibiotic susceptibility of urinary isolates in nursing home residents consuming cranberry capsules versus placebo

    PubMed Central

    Madden, Gregory R.; Argraves, Stephanie M.; Van Ness, Peter H.; Juthani-Mehta, Manisha

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility of urinary isolates is compared amongst nursing home participants from a randomized controlled trial of cranberry capsules versus placebo. We hypothesized that cranberry spares non-Escherichia coli Enterobacteriaceae, which tend to be less susceptible to oral antibiotics. Analyses showed no differences in susceptibility or proportions of non-E. coli Enterobacteriaceae. PMID:25695180

  4. Creation of citizen science project to correlate growing degree days with cranberry phenology

    We are coordinating a citizen science project among cranberry growers. Collaborators will be collecting daily high and low temperatures and recording plant phenology throughout the summer according to a standardized protocol. This project will allow for more accurate correlation between cranberry gr...

  5. Citizen science project to correlate growing degree days with cranberry phenology

    We are coordinating a citizen science project among cranberry growers. Collaborators will be collecting daily high and low temperatures and recording plant phenology throughout the summer according to a standardized protocol. This project will allow for more accurate correlation between cranberry gr...

  6. 75 FR 71458 - Cranberry Lumber Company Including Workers of the Following Operating Entities: Butternut One...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-23

    ... production of green and kiln dried lumber. The workers are not separately identifiable by product line. At... Stafftrak Beckley, WV, Cranberry Lumber Company Including Workers of Greenbrier Forest Products, Inc. Smoot... Cranberry Hardwoods, Inc., in Beckley, West Virginia; Greenbrier Forest Products in Smoot, West Virginia...

  7. Pomegranate juice adulteration by addition of grape or peach juices.

    PubMed

    Nuncio-Jáuregui, Nallely; Calín-Sánchez, Ángel; Hernández, Francisca; Carbonell-Barrachina, Ángel A

    2014-03-15

    Pomegranate juice has gained a high reputation for its health properties and consequently is now a highly demanded product. However, owing to the limited production and high price of fresh pomegranates, adulteration of pomegranate juice seems to be happening. Hence it is imperative to establish criteria for detecting adulteration. Addition of grape juice significantly increased the contents of Ca, Mg and Fe and especially tartaric acid and proline and simultaneously decreased the content of K. Addition of peach juice up to 10% (v/v) only resulted in a significant increase in sucrose content. Regarding the volatile composition, adulteration of pomegranate juice with grape juice resulted in significant increases in acetic acid, isoamyl butyrate and especially 1-hexanol and linalool, while adulteration with peach juice resulted in significant increases in butyl acetate, isobutyl butyrate, benzyl acetate and especially isoamyl butyrate. The control protocols used in this study can serve as a basis for identification of pomegranate juice adulteration. It is important to highlight that it is necessary to simultaneously analyze and have results from several parameters to conclude that a particular pomegranate juice has been adulterated by mixing with another fruit juice. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Chemical markers of shiikuwasha juice adulterated with calamondin juice.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kenta; Yahada, Ayumi; Sasaki, Kumi; Ogawa, Kazunori; Koga, Nobuyuki; Ohta, Hideaki

    2012-11-07

    Detection of shiikuwasha (Citrus depressa Hayata) juice adulterated with calamondin (Citrus madurensis Lour.) juice was investigated by the analyses of (1) phloretin dihydrochalcone glucoside, 3',5'-di-C-β-glucopyranosylphloretin (PD) detected by thin-layer chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), (2) polymethoxylated flavones (PMFs), included nobiletin, tangeretin, and sinensetin, detected by HPLC, and (3) γ-terpinene peak percentage obtained by headspace solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography with cryofocusing. PD was detected in calamondin juice (25.5 mg/100 mL) but not in shiikuwasha juice. Shiikuwasha juice contained higher levels of nobiletin (48.8 mg/100 mL) than calamondin juice (2.4 mg/100 mL). Shiikuwasha juice was characterized by containing a higher percentage of γ-terpinene (12.3%) than calamondin juice (0.7%). A discrimination function obtained by a linear discriminant analysis with PMFs and a peak ratio of [nobiletin/tangeretin] and γ-terpinene detected the adulteration with accuracies of 91.7%. These three chemical markers were useful to detect shiikuwasha juice that is suspected of being adulterated with calamondin juice.

  9. Effects of orange juice on the pharmacokinetics of atenolol.

    PubMed

    Lilja, J J; Raaska, K; Neuvonen, P J

    2005-07-01

    Fruit juices can significantly change the pharmacokinetics of several drugs. Our objective was to investigate the effect of orange juice on the pharmacokinetics of the beta-blocking agent atenolol. In a randomized cross-over study with two phases and a washout of 2 weeks, ten healthy volunteers took either 200 ml orange juice or water thrice daily for 3 days and twice on the fourth day. On the morning of day 3, each subject ingested 50 mg atenolol with an additional amount of either 200 ml orange juice or water. The plasma concentrations of atenolol and the cumulative excretion of atenolol into urine were measured up to 33 h after its dosing. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures and heart rate were recorded in a sitting position before the intake of atenolol and 2, 4, 6, and 10 h after. Orange juice decreased the mean peak plasma concentration (C(max)) of atenolol by 49% (range 16-59%, P<0.01), and the mean area under the plasma atenolol concentration-time curve (AUC(0-33 h)) by 40% (range 25-55%, P<0.01). The time of the peak concentration (t(max)) and the elimination half-life (t(1/2)) of atenolol remained unchanged by orange juice. The amount of atenolol excreted into urine was decreased by 38% (range 17-60%, P<0.01), but the renal clearance remained unaltered. The average heart rate was slightly higher during the orange juice+atenolol phase than during the water+atenolol phase. Orange juice moderately interferes with the gastrointestinal absorption of atenolol. This food-drug interaction can be of clinical significance.

  10. A comparison of nutrient density scores for 100% fruit juices.

    PubMed

    Rampersaud, G C

    2007-05-01

    The 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend that consumers choose a variety of nutrient-dense foods. Nutrient density is usually defined as the quantity of nutrients per calorie. Food and nutrition professionals should be aware of the concept of nutrient density, how it might be quantified, and its potential application in food labeling and dietary guidance. This article presents the concept of a nutrient density score and compares nutrient density scores for various 100% fruit juices. One hundred percent fruit juices are popular beverages in the United States, and although they can provide concentrated sources of a variety of nutrients, they can differ considerably in their nutrient profiles. Six methodologies were used to quantify nutrient density and 7 100% fruit juices were included in the analysis: apple, grape, pink grapefruit, white grapefruit, orange, pineapple, and prune. Food composition data were obtained from the USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 18. Application of the methods resulted in nutrient density scores with a range of values and magnitudes. The relative scores indicated that citrus juices, particularly pink grapefruit and orange juice, were more nutrient dense compared to the other nonfortified 100% juices included in the analysis. Although the methods differed, the relative ranking of the juices based on nutrient density score was similar for each method. Issues to be addressed regarding the development and application of a nutrient density score include those related to food fortification, nutrient bioavailability, and consumer education and behavior.

  11. Six-day randomized safety trial of intravaginal lime juice.

    PubMed

    Mauck, Christine K; Ballagh, Susan A; Creinin, Mitchell D; Weiner, Debra H; Doncel, Gustavo F; Fichorova, Raina N; Schwartz, Jill L; Chandra, Neelima; Callahan, Marianne M

    2008-11-01

    Nigerian women reportedly apply lime juice intravaginally to protect themselves against HIV. In vitro data suggest that lime juice is virucidal, but only at cytotoxic concentrations. This is the first controlled, randomized safety trial of lime juice applied to the human vagina. Forty-seven women were randomized to apply water or lime juice (25%, 50%, or undiluted) intravaginally twice daily for two 6-day intervals, separated by a 3-week washout period. Product application also was randomized: during 1 interval, product was applied using a saturated tampon and in the other by douche. Vaginal pH, symptoms, signs of irritation observed via naked eye examination and colposcopy, microflora, and markers of inflammation in cervicovaginal lavages were evaluated after 1 hour and on days 3 and 7. The largest reduction in pH was about one-half a pH unit, seen 1 hour after douching with 100% lime juice. We observed a dose-dependent pattern of symptoms and clinical and laboratory findings that were consistent with a compromised vaginal barrier function. The brief reduction in pH after vaginal lime juice application is unlikely to be virucidal in the presence of semen. Lime juice is unlikely to protect against HIV and may actually be harmful.

  12. Cranberry extract inhibits in vitro adhesion of F4 and F18+Escherichia coli to pig intestinal epithelium and reduces in vivo excretion of pigs orally challenged with F18+ verotoxigenic E. coli.

    PubMed

    Coddens, Annelies; Loos, Michaela; Vanrompay, Daisy; Remon, Jean Paul; Cox, Eric

    2017-04-01

    F4 + E. coli and F18 + E. coli infections are an important threat for pig industry worldwide. Antibiotics are commonly used to treat infected piglets, but the emerging development of resistance against antibiotics raises major concerns. Hence, alternative therapies to prevent pigs from F4 + E. coli and F18 + E. coli infections need to be developed. Since cranberry previously showed anti-adhesive activity against uropathogenic E. coli, we aimed to investigate whether cranberry extract could also inhibit binding of F4 + E. coli and F18 + E. coli to pig intestinal epithelium. Using the in vitro villus adhesion assay, we found that low concentrations of cranberry extract (20μg or 100μg/ml) have strong inhibitory activity on F4 + E. coli (75.3%, S.D.=9.31 or 95.8%, S.D.=2.56, respectively) and F18 + E. coli adherence (100% inhibition). This effect was not due to antimicrobial activity. Moreover, cranberry extract (10mg or 100mg) could also abolish in vivo binding of F4 and F18 fimbriae to the pig intestinal epithelium in ligated loop experiments. Finally, two challenge experiments with F18 + E. coli were performed to address the efficacy of in-feed or water supplemented cranberry extract. No effect could be observed in piglets that received cranberry extract only in feed (1g/kg or 10g/kg). However, supplementation of feed (10g/kg) and drinking water (1g/L) significantly decreased excretion and diarrhea. The decreased infection resulted in a decreased serum antibody response indicating reduced exposure to F18 + E. coli. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Patulin surveillance in apple cider and juice marketed in Michigan.

    PubMed

    Harris, Kerri L; Bobe, Gerd; Bourquin, Leslie D

    2009-06-01

    Patulin is the most common mycotoxin found in apples and apple juices. The objective of this study was to determine the concentrations of patulin in (i) apple cider produced and marketed by Michigan apple cider mills during the fall seasons of 2002 to 2003 and 2003 to 2004 and (ii) apple juice and cider, including shelf-stable products, marketed in retail grocery stores in Michigan throughout 2005 and 2006. End product samples (n=493) obtained from 104 Michigan apple cider mills were analyzed for patulin concentration by using solid-phase extraction followed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Patulin was detected (> or =4 microg/liter) in 18.7% of all cider mill samples, with 11 samples (2.2%) having patulin concentrations of > or =50 microg/liter. A greater percentage of cider samples obtained from mills using thermal pasteurization contained detectable patulin (28.4%) than did those from mills using UV light radiation (13.5%) or no pathogen reduction treatment (17.0%). Among retail grocery store samples (n=159), 23% of apple juice and cider samples contained detectable patulin, with 18 samples (11.3%) having patulin concentrations of > or =50 microg/liter. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) action level for patulin is 50 microg/kg. Some apple juice samples obtained from retail grocery stores had exceptionally high patulin concentrations, ranging up to 2700 microg/liter. Collectively, these results indicate that most apple cider and juice test samples from Michigan were below the FDA action level for patulin but that certain apple cider and juice processors have inadequate controls over patulin concentrations in final products. The industry, overall, should focus on improved quality of fruit used in juice production and improve culling procedures to reduce patulin concentrations.

  14. Effect of continuous ohmic heating to inactivate Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes in orange juice and tomato juice.

    PubMed

    Lee, S-Y; Sagong, H-G; Ryu, S; Kang, D-H

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of continuous ohmic heating for reducing Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes in orange juice and tomato juice. Orange juice and tomato juice were treated with electric field strengths in the range of 25-40 V cm(-1) for different treatment times. The temperature of the samples increased with increasing treatment time and electric field strength. The rate of temperature change for tomato juice was higher than for orange juice at all voltage gradients applied. Higher electric field strength or longer treatment time resulted in a greater reduction of pathogens. Escherichia coli O157:H7 was reduced by more than 5 log after 60-, 90- and 180-s treatments in orange juice with 40, 35 and 30 V cm(-1) electric field strength, respectively. In tomato juice, treatment with 25 V cm(-1) for 30 s was sufficient to achieve a 5-log reduction in E. coli O157:H7. Similar results were observed in Salm. Typhimurium and L. monocytogenes. The concentration of vitamin C in continuous ohmic heated juice was significantly higher than in conventionally heated juice (P < 0·05). Continuous ohmic heating can be effective in killing foodborne pathogens on orange juice and tomato juice with lower degradation of quality than conventional heating. These results suggest that continuous ohmic heating might be effectively used to pasteurize fruit and vegetable juices in a short operating time and that the effect of inactivation depends on applied electric field strengths, treatment time and electric conductivity. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  15. Sensitivity of drainage efficiency of cranberry fields to edaphic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Periard, Yann; José Gumiere, Silvio; Rousseau, Alain N.; Caron, Jean; Hallema, Dennis W.

    2014-05-01

    Water management on a cranberry farm requires intelligent irrigation and drainage strategies to sustain strong productivity and minimize environmental impact. For example, to avoid propagation of disease and meet evapotranspiration demand, it is imperative to maintain optimal moisture conditions in the root zone, which depends on an efficient drainage system. However, several drainage problems have been identified in cranberry fields. Most of these drainage problems are due to the presence of a restrictive layer in the soil profile (Gumiere et al., 2014). The objective of this work is to evaluate the effects of a restrictive layer on the drainage efficiency by the bias of a multi-local sensitivity analysis. We have tested the sensitivity of the drainage efficiency to different input parameters set of soil hydraulic properties, geometrical parameters and climatic conditions. Soil water flux dynamic for every input parameters set was simulated with finite element model Hydrus 1D (Simanek et al., 2008). Multi-local sensitivity was calculated with the Gâteaux directional derivatives with the procedure described by Cheviron et al. (2010). Results indicate that drainage efficiency is more sensitive to soil hydraulic properties than geometrical parameters and climatic conditions. Then, the geometrical parameters of the depth are more sensitive than the thickness. The drainage efficiency was very insensitive to the climatic conditions. Understanding the sensitivity of drainage efficiency according to soil hydraulic properties, geometrical and climatic conditions are essential for diagnosis drainage problems. However, it becomes important to identify the mechanisms involved in the genesis of anthropogenic soils cranberry to identify conditions that may lead to the formation of a restrictive layer. References: Cheviron, B., S.J. Gumiere, Y. Le Bissonnais, R. Moussa and D. Raclot. 2010. Sensitivity analysis of distributed erosion models: Framework. Water Resources Research

  16. Patulin reduction in apple juice by inactivated Alicyclobacillus spp.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Y; Wang, X; Hatab, S; Wang, Z; Wang, Y; Luo, Y; Yue, T

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the reduction of patulin (PAT) in apple juice by 12 inactivated Alicyclobacillus strains. The reduction rate of PAT by each strain was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The results indicated that the removal of PAT was strain specific. Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris 92 and A. acidoterrestris 96 were the most effective ones among the 12 tested strains in the removal of PAT. Therefore, these two strains were selected to study the effects of incubation time, initial PAT concentration and bacteria powder amount on PAT removal abilities of Alicyclobacillus. The highest PAT reduction rates of 88·8 and 81·6% were achieved after 24-h incubation with initial PAT concentration of 100 μg l(-1) and bacteria powder amount of 40 g l(-1) , respectively. Moreover, it was found that the treatment by these 12 inactivated Alicyclobacillus strains had no negative effect on the quality parameters of apple juice. Similar assays were performed in supermarket apple juice, where inactivated Alicyclobacillus cells could efficiently reduce PAT content. Taken together, these data suggest the possible application of this strategy as a means to detoxify PAT-contaminated juices. Inactivated Alicyclobacillus cells can efficiently reduce patulin concentration in apple juice. It provides a theoretical foundation for recycling of Alicyclobacillus cells from spoiled apple juice to reduce the source of pollution and the cost of juice industry. This is the first report on the use of Alicyclobacillus to remove patulin from apple juice. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  17. Determination of Aflatoxins and Ochratoxin A in Traditional Turkish Concentrated Fruit Juice Products by Multi-Immunoaffinity Column Cleanup and LC Fluorescence Detection: Single-Laboratory Validation.

    PubMed

    Kaymak, Tugrul; Türker, Levent; Tulay, Hüseyin; Stroka, Joerg

    2018-04-27

    Background : Pekmez and pestil are traditional Turkish foods made from concentrated grapejuice, which can be contaminated with mycotoxins such as aflatoxins and ochratoxin A (OTA). Objective : To carry out a single-laboratory validation of a method to simultaneously determine aflatoxins B 1 , B₂, G 1 , and G₂ and ochratoxin A in pekmez and pestil. Methods : The homogenized sample is extracted with methanol-water (80 + 20) using a high-speed blender. The (sample) extract is filtered, diluted with phosphate-buffered saline solution, and applied to a multi-immunoaffinity column (AFLAOCHRA PREP®). Aflatoxins and ochratoxin A are removed with (neat) methanol and then directly analyzed by reversed-phase LC with fluorescence detection using post-column bromination (Kobra cell®). Results : Test portions of blank pekmez and pestil were spiked with a mixture of aflatoxins and ochratoxin A to give levels ranging from 2.6 to 10.4 μg/kg and 1.0-4.0 μg/kg, respectively. Recoveries for total aflatoxins and ochratoxin A ranged from 84 to 106% and 80-97%, respectively, for spiked samples. Based on results for spiked pekmez and pestil (30 replicates each at three levels), the repeatability RSD ranged from 1.6 to 12% and 2.7-11% for total aflatoxins and ochratoxin A, respectively. Conclusions : The method performance in terms of recovery, repeatability, and detection limits has been demonstrated to be suitable for use as an Official Method. Highlights : First immunoaffinity column method validated for simultaneous analysis of aflatoxins and ochratoxin A in pekmez and pestil. Suitability for use for official purposes in Turkey, demonstrated by single-laboratory validation. Co-occurrence of aflatoxins and OTA in mulberry and carob pekmez reported for the first time.

  18. Morphometric abnormalities in spleen and kidney of the progeny of mice fed American cranberry extract (Vaccinium macrocarpon) during pregnancy and lactation.

    PubMed

    Bałan, B J; Lewicki, S; Siwicki, A K; Stelmasiak, M; Skopiński, P; Skopińska-Różewska, E; Wasiutyński, A; Zdanowski, R

    2017-03-28

    Cranberries and cranberry-derived diet supplements are often recommended for the treatment of urinary tract infections, also during pregnancy. These products contain strongly anti-angiogenic chemical compounds which could not be indifferent to the developing fetus. In the present work we evaluated the effect of feeding pregnant and lactating mice American cranberry extract (daily dose 0.88 mg) on the morphology and some parameters of spleen and kidney function of their adult progeny. Six weeks after delivery the morphometry of spleen and kidney, cytometric analysis of spleen lymphocytes, evaluation of humoral response to SRBC (Sheep Red Blood Cells), and examination of serum creatinine/urea concentration, were performed in the offspring. Spleens of progeny from experimental (E) group differed from the spleens of progeny of control mice in the lower number of lymphatic nodules and their larger diameter. Cytometry of spleen cells from progeny of E mothers revealed more CD19+ and CD8+ lymphocytes than in the control group. No difference was seen in the response to immunization by red blood cells of sheep (SRBC) between control and E offspring. An increase in the diameter of glomeruli was observed in the kidneys of the experimental group in comparison with the control group. No abnormalities in creatinine and urea serum level were observed. A higher concentration of VEGF and bFGF in E offspring sera in comparison to the controls was seen. Although the observed differences between the control and experimental group were not large, caution is recommended in using cranberries and their extracts during pregnancy until more research will be done on this topic.

  19. The first genetic map of the American cranberry: exploration of synteny conservation and quantitative trait loci.

    PubMed

    Georgi, Laura; Johnson-Cicalese, Jennifer; Honig, Josh; Das, Sushma Parankush; Rajah, Veeran D; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Bassil, Nahla; Rowland, Lisa J; Polashock, James; Vorsa, Nicholi

    2013-03-01

    The first genetic map of cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) has been constructed, comprising 14 linkage groups totaling 879.9 cM with an estimated coverage of 82.2 %. This map, based on four mapping populations segregating for field fruit-rot resistance, contains 136 distinct loci. Mapped markers include blueberry-derived simple sequence repeat (SSR) and cranberry-derived sequence-characterized amplified region markers previously used for fingerprinting cranberry cultivars. In addition, SSR markers were developed near cranberry sequences resembling genes involved in flavonoid biosynthesis or defense against necrotrophic pathogens, or conserved orthologous set (COS) sequences. The cranberry SSRs were developed from next-generation cranberry genomic sequence assemblies; thus, the positions of these SSRs on the genomic map provide information about the genomic location of the sequence scaffold from which they were derived. The use of SSR markers near COS and other functional sequences, plus 33 SSR markers from blueberry, facilitates comparisons of this map with maps of other plant species. Regions of the cranberry map were identified that showed conservation of synteny with Vitis vinifera and Arabidopsis thaliana. Positioned on this map are quantitative trait loci (QTL) for field fruit-rot resistance (FFRR), fruit weight, titratable acidity, and sound fruit yield (SFY). The SFY QTL is adjacent to one of the fruit weight QTL and may reflect pleiotropy. Two of the FFRR QTL are in regions of conserved synteny with grape and span defense gene markers, and the third FFRR QTL spans a flavonoid biosynthetic gene.

  20. Determination of traces of silicone defoamer in fruit juices by solvent extraction/atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gooch, E G

    1993-01-01

    Silicone defoamers are used to control foam during the processing of fruit juices. Residual silicones in fruit juices can be separated from the naturally occurring siliceous materials in fruit products and selectively recovered by solvent extraction, after suitable pretreatment. The recovered silicone is measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Silicone concentrations as low as about 1 ppm can be measured. The juices are accurately spiked for recovery studies by the addition of silicone dispersed in D-sorbitol.

  1. Effect of probiotics on patulin removal from synbiotic apple juice.

    PubMed

    Zoghi, Alaleh; Khosravi-Darani, Kianoush; Sohrabvandi, Sara; Attar, Hosein; Alavi, Sayed Abolhasan

    2017-06-01

    Studies have reported the occurrence of the mycotoxin patulin in apple products. The aim of this study was to produce synbiotic apple juice and investigate the detoxification of patulin by Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus plantarum as probiotic strains. The impact of seven process variables on efficiency of toxin removal was investigated using Plackett-Burman design and presence of the surface-layer proteins as binding site of probiotics to patulin was confirmed during 6 weeks of cold storage. Results showed that the removal of patulin by probiotic bacteria from apple juice depends significantly (P < 0.05) on the fructooligosaccharide content (as a prebiotic), concentration of patulin and the addition of ascorbic acid. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of cell surface proteins of probiotic strains revealed that surface layer proteins have an important role in patulin removal from apple juice. In the best conditions, 91.23% of initial patulin concentration was removed from juice during 6 weeks refrigerated storage. No significant difference was observed in organoleptic properties of the synbiotic apple juice and raw sample. In the best condition reported in this study, contaminated synbiotic apple juice by patulin will be safe for consumers after the first day of probiotic inoculation. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Failure of juice or juice extract from the noni plant (Morinda citrifolia) to protect rats against oxygen toxicity.

    PubMed

    Berg, John T; Furusawa, Eiichi

    2007-02-01

    Noni juice possesses antioxidant activity and prevents superoxide-mediated tissue injury in laboratory animals. A polysaccharide-rich precipitate of noni juice (noni-ppt) also stimulates tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin 1 (IL-1) in mice. Endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide) stimulates TNF and IL-1 in rats and protects against superoxide-mediated oxygen toxicity. Accordingly, we hypothesized that noni juice, or noni-ppt, would protect rats against pulmonary oxygen toxicity. Rats were divided into four groups; one received noni-ppt to test for cytokine-induced protection; another received noni juice to test for antioxidant activity; a third received saline as hyperoxia control; a fourth received no treatment in air. Rats were then exposed to either hyperoxia (> 97% oxygen at sea level for 52 or 60 hours) or air and lung injury assessed. Rats receiving saline, noni-ppt or noni juice exhibited typical signs of oxygen toxicity with hemorrhagic lungs, large pleural effusions and increases in protein concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. They also developed heavy lungs with increases in wet/dry weight ratios, hematocrit values and ratios of effusion protein to plasma protein concentration. These results show that Noni juice and Noni-ppt do not prevent oxygen toxicity in rats when administered according to the protocols used in this study.

  3. White wine taste and mouthfeel as affected by juice extraction and processing.

    PubMed

    Gawel, Richard; Day, Martin; Van Sluyter, Steven C; Holt, Helen; Waters, Elizabeth J; Smith, Paul A

    2014-10-15

    The juice used to make white wine can be extracted using various physical processes that affect the amount and timing of contact of juice with skins. The influence of juice extraction processes on the mouthfeel and taste of white wine and their relationship to wine composition were determined. The amount and type of interaction of juice with skins affected both wine total phenolic concentration and phenolic composition. Wine pH strongly influenced perceived viscosity, astringency/drying, and acidity. Despite a 5-fold variation in total phenolics among wines, differences in bitter taste were small. Perceived viscosity was associated with higher phenolics but was not associated with either glycerol or polysaccharide concentration. Bitterness may be reduced by using juice extraction and handling processes that minimize phenolic concentration, but lowering phenolic concentration may also result in wines of lower perceived viscosity.

  4. Apple juice inhibits human low density lipoprotein oxidation.

    PubMed

    Pearson, D A; Tan, C H; German, J B; Davis, P A; Gershwin, M E

    1999-01-01

    Dietary phenolic compounds, ubiquitous in vegetables and fruits and their juices possess antioxidant activity that may have beneficial effects on human health. The phenolic composition of six commercial apple juices, and of the peel (RP), flesh (RF) and whole fresh Red Delicious apples (RW), was determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and total phenols were determined by the Folin-Ciocalteau method. HPLC analysis identified and quantified several classes of phenolic compounds: cinnamates, anthocyanins, flavan-3-ols and flavonols. Phloridzin and hydroxy methyl furfural were also identified. The profile of phenolic compounds varied among the juices. The range of concentrations as a percentage of total phenolic concentration was: hydroxy methyl furfural, 4-30%; phloridzin, 22-36%; cinnamates, 25-36%; anthocyanins, n.d.; flavan-3-ols, 8-27%; flavonols, 2-10%. The phenolic profile of the Red Delicious apple extracts differed from those of the juices. The range of concentrations of phenolic classes in fresh apple extracts was: hydroxy methyl furfural, n.d.; phloridzin, 11-17%; cinnamates, 3-27%; anthocyanins, n.d.-42%; flavan-3-ols, 31-54%; flavonols, 1-10%. The ability of compounds in apple juices and extracts from fresh apple to protect LDL was assessed using an in vitro copper catalyzed human LDL oxidation system. The extent of LDL oxidation was determined as hexanal production using static headspace gas chromatography. The apple juices and extracts, tested at 5 microM gallic acid equivalents (GAE), all inhibited LDL oxidation. The inhibition by the juices ranged from 9 to 34%, and inhibition by RF, RW and RP was 21, 34 and 38%, respectively. Regression analyses revealed no significant correlation between antioxidant activity and either total phenolic concentration or any specific class of phenolics. Although the specific components in the apple juices and extracts that contributed to antioxidant activity have yet to be identified, this study

  5. Pesticides in surface water, bed sediment, and ground water adjacent to commercial cranberry bogs, Lac du Flambeau Reservation, Vilas County, Wisconsin

    Saad, David A.

    2005-01-01

    In samples from the Trout River, which is used as a source of water to maintain lake levels in the Corn Lakes, the only pesticides detected were the non-targeted compounds atrazine and deethyl atrazine, indicating it was not a source of targeted compounds detected in the Corn Lakes. Only two pesticides (chlorpyrifos and metolachlor) were detected in bed-sediment samples collected from the lakes; chlorpyrifos from Little Trout Lake and metolachlor from the Corn Lakes. Four pesticides (the targeted compounds napropamide and norflurazon and the non-targeted compounds atrazine and deethyl atrazine) were detected in ground-water samples from two of four sampled monitor wells. The highest ground-water concentrations (up to 0.14 ?g/L napropamide and 0.56 ?g/L norflurazon) were measured in samples from the monitoring well located directly downgradient from the Corn Lakes and commercial cranberry operations. No pesticides were detected in samples from the reference well located upgradient from the Corn Lakes and cranberry operations. Further study is needed to identify additional pesticides as well as chronic effects on aquatic organisms to determine whether cranberry-related pesticides affect the lake ecosystems of the Lac du Flambeau Reservation.

  6. Anti-Adhesive Activity of Cranberry Phenolic Compounds and Their Microbial-Derived Metabolites against Uropathogenic Escherichia coli in Bladder Epithelial Cell Cultures.

    PubMed

    de Llano, Dolores González; Esteban-Fernández, Adelaida; Sánchez-Patán, Fernando; Martínlvarez, Pedro J; Moreno-Arribas, Maria Victoria; Bartolomé, Begoña

    2015-05-27

    Cranberry consumption has shown prophylactic effects against urinary tract infections (UTI), although the mechanisms involved are not completely understood. In this paper, cranberry phenolic compounds and their potential microbial-derived metabolites (such as simple phenols and benzoic, phenylacetic and phenylpropionic acids) were tested for their capacity to inhibit the adherence of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) ATCC®53503™ to T24 epithelial bladder cells. Catechol, benzoic acid, vanillic acid, phenylacetic acid and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid showed anti-adhesive activity against UPEC in a concentration-dependent manner from 100-500 µM, whereas procyanidin A2, widely reported as an inhibitor of UPEC adherence on uroepithelium, was only statistically significant (p < 0.05) at 500 µM (51.3% inhibition). The results proved for the first time the anti-adhesive activity of some cranberry-derived phenolic metabolites against UPEC in vitro, suggesting that their presence in the urine could reduce bacterial colonization and progression of UTI.

  7. Cranberry proanthocyanidins inhibit esophageal adenocarcinoma in vitro and in vivo through pleiotropic cell death induction and PI3K/AKT/mTOR inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Kresty, Laura A.; Weh, Katherine M.; Zeyzus-Johns, Bree; Perez, Laura N.; Howell, Amy B.

    2015-01-01

    Cranberries are rich in bioactive constituents known to improve urinary tract health and more recent evidence supports cranberries possess cancer inhibitory properties. However, mechanisms of cancer inhibition by cranberries remain to be elucidated, particularly in vivo. Properties of a purified cranberry-derived proanthocyanidin extract (C-PAC) were investigated utilizing acid-sensitive and acid-resistant human esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) cell lines and esophageal tumor xenografts in athymic NU/NU mice. C-PAC induced caspase-independent cell death mainly via autophagy and low levels of apoptosis in acid-sensitive JHAD1 and OE33 cells, but resulted in cellular necrosis in acid-resistant OE19 cells. Similarly, C-PAC induced necrosis in JHAD1 cells pushed to acid-resistance via repeated exposures to an acidified bile cocktail. C-PAC associated cell death involved PI3K/AKT/mTOR inactivation, pro-apoptotic protein induction (BAX, BAK1, deamidated BCL-xL, Cytochrome C, PARP), modulation of MAPKs (P-P38/P-JNK) and G2-M cell cycle arrest in vitro. Importantly, oral delivery of C-PAC significantly inhibited OE19 tumor xenograft growth via modulation of AKT/mTOR/MAPK signaling and induction of the autophagic form of LC3B supporting in vivo efficacy against EAC for the first time. C-PAC is a potent inducer of EAC cell death and is efficacious in vivo at non-toxic behaviorally achievable concentrations, holding promise for preventive or therapeutic interventions in cohorts at increased risk for EAC, a rapidly rising and extremely deadly malignancy. PMID:26378019

  8. Determination of limonin in grapefruit juice and other citrus juices by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Van Beek, T A; Blaakmeer, A

    1989-03-03

    A method has been developed for the quantitation of the bitter component limonin in grapefruit juice and other citrus juices. The sample clean-up consisted of centrifugation, filtration and a selective, rapid and reproducible purification with a C2 solid-phase extraction column. The limonin concentration was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography on a C18 column with UV detection at 210 nm. A linear response was obtained from 0.0 to 45 ppm limonin. The minimum detectable amount was 2 ng. The minimum concentration which was detected without concentration with good precision was 0.1 ppm. The method was also used for the determination of limonin in different types of oranges, including navel oranges, mandarins, lemons, limes, pomelos and uglis.

  9. Bioactive compounds of juices from two Brazilian grape cultivars.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Juliana Kelly; Cazarin, Cinthia Baú Betim; Correa, Luiz Claudio; Batista, Ângela Giovana; Furlan, Cibele Priscila Busch; Biasoto, Aline Camarão Telles; Pereira, Giuliano Elias; de Camargo, Adriano Costa; Maróstica Junior, Mário Roberto

    2016-04-01

    Grape juice consumption may prevent several chronic diseases owing to the presence of phenolic compounds, which have an important role in the reduction of oxidative stress. This study investigated the polyphenol content and antioxidant activities of grape juices from two cultivars: BRS-Cora and Isabella. Total polyphenol content (TPC), anthocyanins, antioxidant capacity (oxygen radical absorbance capacity, ferric reducing antioxidant power and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl), and phenolic profile (high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array and fluorescence detection--HPLC-DAD-FLD) were determined. BRS-Cora grape juice showed higher concentrations of total polyphenols and anthocyanins, as well as higher antioxidant potential, than those of Isabella grape juice. A significant positive correlation was found in TPC or anthocyanin contents when correlated with the remaining antioxidant assays. In addition, HPLC-DAD-FLD showed a higher total phenolic content in BRS-Cora grape juice compared to Isabella. The present results show BRS-Cora as a promising cultivar for grape juice production with an improved functional potential. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Modeling the impacts of wetland restoration in former cranberry farms on nitrogen removal

    EPA Science Inventory

    In population-dense Massachusetts (USA) acquiring historical wetlands for ecological restoration efforts can be difficult and expensive. Retiring cranberry bogs create a rare opportunity to restore historical wetlands. Environmental managers face important decisions about how to ...

  11. Temperature-mediated development thresholds of Sparganothis sulfureana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) in cranberries

    Larvae of Sparganothis sulfureana Clemens, frequently attack cranberries, often resulting in economic damage to the crop. Because temperature dictates insect growth rate, development can be accurately estimated based on daily temperature measurements. To better predict S. sulfureana development acro...

  12. Effect of grapefruit juice or cimetidine coadministration on albendazole bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Nagy, J; Schipper, H G; Koopmans, R P; Butter, J J; Van Boxtel, C J; Kager, P A

    2002-03-01

    The assumed metabolic breakdown of albendazole by mucosal CYP3A4 enzymes was studied by coadministering albendazole (10 mg/kg) with grapefruit juice. Concentrations of albendazole sulfoxide (ABZSX), the active metabolite of albendazole, were compared with those after albendazole was administered with water, a fatty meal, or grapefruit juice plus cimetidine (10 mg/kg). In comparison to water, maximum ABZSX concentration (Cmax) was enhanced 6.5-fold by a fatty meal (from 0.24 +/- 0.09 mg/l to 1.55 +/- 0.30 mg/l; mean +/- SD; P < 0.001) and 3.2-fold by grapefruit juice (from 0.24 +/- 0.09 mg/l to 0.76 +/- 0.37 mg/L; P = 0.031). When grapefruit juice was combined with cimetidine, Cmax was significantly lower than with grapefruit juice alone (0.41 +/- 0.29 mg/l and 0.76 +/- 0.37 mg/l, respectively; P = 0.022). The area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to infinity (AUC(0-omega)) followed a comparable pattern. Half-life (T(1/2)) was 8.8 +/- 4.2 hr and 8.2 +/- 4.3 hr after administration with water or a fatty meal (P = 1.000). Grapefruit juice shortened T(1/2) by 46% (P = 0.026). We hypothesize that albendazole is metabolized by CYP3A4 enzymes in the intestinal mucosa. This process can be inhibited by grapefruit juice. Cimetidine decreased albendazole bioavailability.

  13. Lifespan extension by cranberry supplementation partially requires SOD2 and is life stage independent.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yaning; Yolitz, Jason; Alberico, Thomas; Sun, Xiaoping; Zou, Sige

    2014-02-01

    Many nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals have been shown to promote healthspan and lifespan. However, the mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of prolongevity interventions and the time points at which interventions should be implemented to achieve beneficial effects are not well characterized. We have previously shown that a cranberry-containing nutraceutical can promote lifespan in worms and flies and delay age-related functional decline of pancreatic cells in rats. Here we investigated the mechanism underlying lifespan extension induced by cranberry and the effects of short-term or life stage-specific interventions with cranberry on lifespan in Drosophila. We found that lifespan extension induced by cranberry was associated with reduced phosphorylation of ERK, a component of oxidative stress response MAPK signaling, and slightly increased phosphorylation of AKT, a component of insulin-like signaling. Lifespan extension was also associated with a reduced level of 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts, a biomarker of lipid oxidation. Moreover, lifespan extension induced by cranberry was partially suppressed by knockdown of SOD2, a major mitochondrial superoxide scavenger. Furthermore, cranberry supplementation was administered in three life stages of adult flies, health span (3-30 days), transition span (31-60 days) and senescence span (61 days to the end when all flies died). Cranberry supplementation during any of these life stages extended the remaining lifespan relative to the non-supplemented and life stage-matched controls. These findings suggest that cranberry supplementation is sufficient to promote longevity when implemented during any life stage, likely through reducing oxidative damage. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. [Efficacy and safety profile of cranberry in infants and children with recurrent urinary tract infection].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Puentes, V; Uberos, J; Rodríguez-Belmonte, R; Nogueras-Ocaña, M; Blanca-Jover, E; Narbona-López, E

    2015-06-01

    Cranberry prophylaxis of recurrent urinary tract infection in infants has proven effective in the experimental model of the adult. There are few data on its efficacy, safety and recommended dose in the pediatric population. A controlled, double-blind Phase III clinical trial was conducted on children older than 1 month of age to evaluate the efficacy and safety of cranberry in recurrent urinary tract infection. The assumption was of the non-inferiority of cranberry versus trimethoprim. Statistical analysis was performed using Kaplan Meier analysis. A total of 85 patients under 1 year of age and 107 over 1 year were recruited. Trimethoprim was prescribed to 75 patients and 117 received cranberry. The cumulative rate of urinary infection associated with cranberry prophylaxis in children under 1 year was 46% (95% CI; 23-70) in children and 17% (95% CI; 0-38) in girls, effectively at doses inferior to trimethoprim. In children over 1 year-old cranberry was not inferior to trimethoprim, with a cumulative rate of urine infection of 26% (95% CI; 12-41). The cranberry was well tolerated and with no new adverse effects. Our study confirms that cranberry is safe and effective in the prophylaxis of recurrent urinary tract infection in infants and children. With the doses used, their efficiency is not less than that observed for trimethoprim among those over 1 year-old. (Clinical Trials Registry ISRCTN16968287). Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. 21 CFR 156.145 - Tomato juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION VEGETABLE JUICES Requirements for Specific Standardized Vegetable Juices § 156.145 Tomato juice. (a) Identity—(1) Definition. Tomato juice is the food intended for direct consumption, obtained from...

  16. 21 CFR 146.114 - Lemon juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Lemon juice. 146.114 Section 146.114 Food and....114 Lemon juice. (a) Identity—(1) Description. Lemon juice is the unfermented juice, obtained by mechanical process, from sound, mature lemons (Citrus limon (L.) Burm. f.), from which seeds (except...

  17. Does cranberry have a role in catheter-associated urinary tract infections?

    PubMed

    Thomas, Dominique; Rutman, Matthew; Cooper, Kimberly; Abrams, Andrew; Finkelstein, Julia; Chughtai, Bilal

    2017-11-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CA-UTIs) are a prevalent and costly condition, with very few therapeutic options. We sought to evaluate the efficacy of an oral cranberry supplement on CA-UTIs over a six-month period. Subjects with long-term indwelling catheters and recurrent symptomatic CA-UTIs were enrolled to take a once-daily oral cranberry supplement with 36 mg of the active ingredient proanthocyanidin (PACs). Primary outcome was reducing the number of symptomatic CA-UTIs. This was defined by ≥10 3 (cfu)/mL of ≥1 bacterial species in a single catheter urine specimen and signs and symptoms compatible with CA-UTI. Secondary outcomes included bacterial counts and resistance patterns to antibiotics. Thirty-four patients were enrolled in the trial; 22 patients (mean age 77.22 years, 77.27% were men) completed the study. Cranberry was effective in reducing the number of symptomatic CA-UTIs in all patients (n=22). Resistance to antibiotics was reduced by 28%. Furthermore, colony counts were reduced by 58.65%. No subjects had adverse events while taking cranberry. The cranberry supplement reduced the number of symptomatic CA-UTIs, antibiotic resistances, and major causative organisms in this cohort. Larger, placebo-controlled studies are needed to further define the role of cranberry in CA-UTIs.

  18. Does cranberry have a role in catheter-associated urinary tract infections?

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Dominique; Rutman, Matthew; Cooper, Kimberly; Abrams, Andrew; Finkelstein, Julia; Chughtai, Bilal

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CA-UTIs) are a prevalent and costly condition, with very few therapeutic options. We sought to evaluate the efficacy of an oral cranberry supplement on CA-UTIs over a six-month period. Methods Subjects with long-term indwelling catheters and recurrent symptomatic CA-UTIs were enrolled to take a once-daily oral cranberry supplement with 36 mg of the active ingredient proanthocyanidin (PACs). Primary outcome was reducing the number of symptomatic CA-UTIs. This was defined by ≥103 (cfu)/mL of ≥1 bacterial species in a single catheter urine specimen and signs and symptoms compatible with CA-UTI. Secondary outcomes included bacterial counts and resistance patterns to antibiotics. Results Thirty-four patients were enrolled in the trial; 22 patients (mean age 77.22 years, 77.27% were men) completed the study. Cranberry was effective in reducing the number of symptomatic CA-UTIs in all patients (n=22). Resistance to antibiotics was reduced by 28%. Furthermore, colony counts were reduced by 58.65%. No subjects had adverse events while taking cranberry. Conclusions The cranberry supplement reduced the number of symptomatic CA-UTIs, antibiotic resistances, and major causative organisms in this cohort. Larger, placebo-controlled studies are needed to further define the role of cranberry in CA-UTIs. PMID:29072566

  19. Amino Acid profile as a feasible tool for determination of the authenticity of fruit juices.

    PubMed

    Asadpoor, Mostafa; Ansarin, Masoud; Nemati, Mahboob

    2014-12-01

    Fruit juice is a nutrient rich food product with a direct connection to public health. The purpose of this research was to determine the amino acid profile of juices and provide a quick and accurate indicator for determining their authenticity. The method of analysis was HPLC with fluorescence detector and pre-column derivatization by orthophtaldialdehyde (OPA). Sixty-six samples of fruit juices were analyzed, and fourteen amino acids were identified and determined in the sampled fruit juices. The fruit samples used for this analysis were apples, oranges, cherry, pineapple, mango, apricot, pomegranate, peach and grapes. The results showed that 32% of samples tested in this study had a lower concentrate percentage as compared to that of their labels and/or other possible authenticity problems in the manufacturing process. The following samples showed probable adulteration: four cherry juice samples, two pomegranate juice samples, one mango, three grape, four peach, seven orange, two apple and one apricot juice samples. In general, determining the amount of amino acids and comparing sample amino acids profiles with the standard values seems to be an indicator for quality control. This method can provide the regulatory agencies with a tool, to help produce a healthier juice. The aim of this study is the analytical control of the fruit juice composition is becoming an important issue, and HPLC can provide an important and essential tool for more accurate research as well as for routine analysis.

  20. A novel approach to the measurement of surfactant parameters in arthropod digestive juices.

    PubMed

    Romih, Tea; Kogej, Ksenija; Drobne, Damjana

    2016-05-01

    In arthropods, the determination of two important parameters of digestive juices, i.e. the total surfactant concentration and the critical micelle concentration (CMC), is challenging due to small sample volumes and low surfactant concentrations. In this work, we report a successful implementation of potentiometric titrations using the surfactant ion-selective electrode (SISE) and the pyrene fluorescence method (PFM) for the determination of the total surfactant concentration and CMC in the digestive juice of terrestrial isopod crustaceans Porcellio scaber. Pooled digestive juice extracts of four (SISE) or two (PFM) animals were used per measurement run. In both cases, digestive juice extracts in 100 μL of deionized water were sufficient for one measurement run. The total surfactant concentration of P. scaber digestive juice was determined to be 9.2 ± 3.5mM and the CMC was approximately 90 μM. Our work presents an important improvement towards easy CMC determination in small volume samples in comparison with the commonly used stalagmometric technique, where much larger sample volumes are usually needed. To date, the total surfactant concentration was not measured in the digestive juices of arthropods other than Homarus vulgaris, Astacus leptodactylus and Cancer pagurus, for which complex separation and analytical techniques were required. Our results obtained by SISE and PFM therefore present the first successful quantification of surfactants and their CMC in small volumes of arthropod digestive juice without prior separation or purification techniques. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Food-drug interaction of tacrolimus with pomelo, ginger, and turmeric juice in rats.

    PubMed

    Egashira, Kanoko; Sasaki, Hitoshi; Higuchi, Shun; Ieiri, Ichiro

    2012-01-01

    Tacrolimus is a well-known potent immunosuppressant agent, which has various drug-drug or food-drug interactions. Previously, we found a renal transplant recipient who increased tacrolimus blood concentrations after ingestion of pomelo as a rare case. So, we investigated the effect of pomelo after its administration for one day or 3 consecutive days on the pharmacokinetics of tacrolimus in rats. We also confirmed the effects of grapefruit, turmeric, and ginger. The tacrolimus blood concentrations of the rats pre-treated with 100% pomelo juice were significantly higher than those pre-treated with water. On the other hand, the tacrolimus blood concentrations of the rats pre-treated with 50% pomelo juice were not significantly different from those pre-treated with water. The pomelo-tacrolimus interaction showed concentration dependency. Even low concentration of pomelo juice could enhance the blood concentrations of tacrolimus by repeated administration. The inhibitory effect of 100% pomelo juice disappeared 3 days after intake. The AUC values of tacrolimus in the rats pre-treated with grapefruit juice, ginger juice, and turmeric juice were significantly larger than those pre-treated with water. We could confirm the pomelo-tacrolimus interaction, which we discovered in a case study, quantitatively. We newly found the influence of turmeric and ginger on tacrolimus pharmacokinetics, comparable to pomelo.

  2. Decoding the Nonvolatile Sensometabolome of Orange Juice ( Citrus sinensis).

    PubMed

    Glabasnia, Anneke; Dunkel, Andreas; Frank, Oliver; Hofmann, Thomas

    2018-03-14

    Activity-guided fractionation in combination with the taste dilution analysis, followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance experiments, led to the identification of 10 polymethoxylated flavones (PMFs), 6 limonoid glucosides, and 2 limonoid aglycones as the key bitterns of orange juice. Quantitative studies and calculation of dose-over-threshold factors, followed by taste re-engineering, demonstrated for the first time 25 sensometabolites to be sufficient to reconstruct the typical taste profile of orange juices and indicated that not a single compound can be considered a suitable marker for juice bitterness. Intriguingly, the taste percept of orange juice seems to be created by a rather complex interplay of limonin, limonoid glucosides, PMFs, organic acids, and sugars. For the first time, sub-threshold concentrations of PMFs were shown to enhance the perceived bitterness of limonoids. Moreover, the influence of sugars on the perceived bitterness of limonoids and PMFs in orange juice relevant concentration ranges was quantitatively elucidated.

  3. In vitro and in vivo antibacterial activities of cranberry press cake extracts alone or in combination with β-lactams against Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cranberry fruits possess many biological activities partly due to their various phenolic compounds; however the underlying modes of action are poorly understood. We studied the effect of cranberry fruit extracts on the gene expression of Staphylococcus aureus to identify specific cellular processes involved in the antibacterial action. Methods Transcriptional profiles of four S. aureus strains grown in broth supplemented or not with 2 mg/ml of a commercial cranberry preparation (Nutricran®90) were compared using DNA arrays to reveal gene modulations serving as markers for biological activity. Ethanol extracted pressed cakes from fresh fruits also produced various fractions and their effects on marker genes were demonstrated by qPCR. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of the most effective cranberry fraction (FC111) were determined against multiple S. aureus strains and drug interactions with β-lactam antibiotics were also evaluated. Incorporation assays with [3H]-radiolabeled precursors were performed to evaluate the effect of FC111 on DNA, RNA, peptidoglycan (PG) and protein biosynthesis. Results Treatment of S. aureus with Nutricran®90 or FC111 revealed a transcriptional signature typical of PG-acting antibiotics (up-regulation of genes vraR/S, murZ, lytM, pbp2, sgtB, fmt). The effect of FC111 on PG was confirmed by the marked inhibition of incorporation of D-[3H]alanine. The combination of β-lactams and FC111 in checkerboard assays revealed a synergistic activity against S. aureus including strain MRSA COL, which showed a 512-fold drop of amoxicillin MIC in the presence of FC111 at MIC/8. Finally, a therapeutic proof of concept was established in a mouse mastitis model of infection. S. aureus-infected mammary glands were treated with amoxicillin, FC111 or a combination of both; only the combination significantly reduced bacterial counts from infected glands (P<0.05) compared to the untreated mice. Conclusions The cranberry fraction FC111

  4. Comparison of the nutrient content of fresh fruit juices vs commercial fruit juices.

    PubMed

    Densupsoontorn, Narumon; Jirapinyo, Pipop; Thamonsiri, Nuchnoi; Wongarn, Renu; Phosuya, Panarat; Tritiprat, Amornrat; Patraarat, Siriphan; Pidatcha, Pannee; Suwannthol, Lerson

    2002-08-01

    To compare the types and quantities of carbohydrate, electrolytes, pH and osmolarity of fresh fruit juices and commercial fruit juices. Forty kinds of fresh fruits available in Thai markets were analyzed for types and quantities of carbohydrate, electrolyte, pH and osmolarity and compared with previously obtained data for commercial fruit juices. Most fresh fruit juices did not contain sucrose, whereas, commercial fruit juices mostly have sucrose in the range of 3-112 g/L. Although both fruit juices were acidic (pH varied from 3.6-6.7 and 3.2-5.8 of fresh juice and commercial juice), fresh fruit juices had a more neutral pH than commercial fruit juices. Apple, guava, orange, pear, and pineapple juices from commercial fruit juices had a high osmolarity compared with fresh fruit juices. All types of fresh fruit juices contained less sodium than commercial ones, whereas, most fresh fruit juices contained more potassium, phosphorus, and magnesium than commercial fluids. The nutrient content of fresh fruit juices and commercial fruit juices from the same kinds of fruits are not the same, possibly due to the manufacturing process. Therefore, physicians should know the composition of fruit juices in order to advise patients properly.

  5. [Intervention of antioxidant system function of aged rats by giving fruit juices with different antioxidant capacities].

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing; Guo, Chang-jiang; Yang, Ji-jun; Wei, Jing-yu; Li, Yun-feng; Pang, Wei; Jiang, Yu-gang; Cheng, Shuang

    2005-03-01

    To observe the effects of fruit juices with different antioxidant capacity on antioxidant system function of aged rats. Thirty Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups: pomegranate juice and apple juice as two experimental groups, while distilled water as normal control group. They were administrated fruit juices or distilled water respectively by gavage daily for 4 weeks. At the end of experiment, the antioxidant system function was assessed. The aged rats in pomegranate juice group showed significantly higher serum antioxidant capacity (0.90 +/- 0.13) mmol/L than that in control group (0.79 +/- 0.10) mmol/L (P < 0.05). The concentrations of serum carbonyl and oxLDL were decreased significantly in pomegranate juice group as compared to the control group (P < 0.05). The percentage of injured blood lymphocyte DNA and the ratio of tail length/total length were declined significantly in pomegranate juice group (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01 respectively). The apple juice showed no effects except decreased ratio of tail length/total length of injured lymphocyte DNA. There were no changes in concentrations of serum vitamin C, vitamin E, urinary 8-OH-dG excretion and the activities of serum SOD, GSH-Px, CAT among three groups. The pomegranate juice should possess higher antioxidant capacity and might improve the antioxidant system function of aged rats, while the apple juice is relatively lower in antioxidant capacity and not very effective. The polyphenols in pomegranate juice might be the important functional components.

  6. Construction of a high-density American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) composite map using genotyping-by-sequencing for multi-pedigree linkage mapping

    The American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) is a recently domesticated, but economically important, fruit crop with limited molecular resources. New genetic resources could accelerate genetic gain in cranberry through characterization of its genomic structure and by enabling molecular-assist...

  7. Effect of cranberry dietary supplements with different brands on human CYP3A4 enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Wanwimolruk, Sompon; Prachayasittikul, Supaluk; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Bernichi, Bouchra

    2012-01-01

    The use of dietary supplements has increased dramatically, making drug interactions with those supplements a major concern. Because dietary supplements are not subject to the same regulations as prescription drugs, we hypothesize that the content of their active ingredients may vary among manufacturers, potentially causing a large variation in therapeutic outcome. The current study aimed to test this hypothesis on commonly used cranberry dietary supplements. Activity of human CYP3A4 enzyme was used as a parameter to determine the effect of cranberry supplement from nine manufacturers. The content of a cranberry product, equivalent to one capsule, was extracted with methanol. Aliquots of the extract were tested for their ability to inhibit the metabolism of the human CYP3A4 substrate quinine, using an in vitro liver microsomal technique. Human liver microsomes and quinine were incubated with or without (i.e. as control) cranberry extract. Formation of quinine's metabolite 3-hydroxyquinine, generated by the CYP3A4-mediated reaction was measured by a HPLC method. Of nine cranberry products tested, eight products had little or no effect but only one brand (Nature's Herbs 600 mg) caused very strong inhibition (67.2 %) of CYP3A4. The reason for this inhibition is unknown. The effect of cranberry was varied and ranged from 4.4 % activation by Ride Aid 800 mg to 67.2 % inhibition by Nature's Herbs 600 mg. Lack of effect on human CYP3A4 activity suggests that use of cranberry dietary supplement is unlikely to cause significant interactions with drugs metabolized by CYP3A4. PMID:27366135

  8. Anti-microbial Activity of Urine after Ingestion of Cranberry: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yee Lean; Najm, Wadie I; Owens, John; Thrupp, Laurie; Baron, Sheryl; Shanbrom, Edward; Cesario, Thomas

    2010-06-01

    We explore the anti-microbial activity of urine specimens after the ingestion of a commercial cranberry preparation. Twenty subjects without urinary infection, off antibiotics and all supplements or vitamins were recruited. The study was conducted in two phases: in phase 1, subjects collected the first morning urine prior to ingesting 900 mg of cranberry and then at 2, 4 and 6 h. In phase 2, subjects collected urine on 2 consecutive days: on Day 1 no cranberry was ingested (control specimens), on Day 2, cranberry was ingested. The pH of all urine specimens were adjusted to the same pH as that of the first morning urine specimen. Aliquots of each specimen were independently inoculated with Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae or Candida albicans. After incubation, colony forming units/ml (CFU ml(-1)) in the control specimen was compared with CFU ml(-1) in specimens collected 2, 4 and 6 h later. Specimens showing ≥50% reduction in CFU ml(-1) were considered as having 'activity' against the strains tested. In phase 1, 7/20 (35%) subjects had anti-microbial activity against E. coli, 13/20 (65%) against K. pneumoniae and 9/20 (45%) against C. albicans in specimens collected 2-6 h after ingestion of cranberry. In phase 2, 6/9 (67%) of the subjects had activity against K. pneumoniae. This pilot study demonstrates weak anti-microbial activity in urine specimens after ingestion of a single dose of commercial cranberry. Anti-microbial activity was noted only against K. pneumoniae 2-6 h after ingestion of the cranberry preparation.

  9. Exploiting genotyping by sequencing to characterize the genomic structure of the American cranberry through high-density linkage mapping.

    PubMed

    Covarrubias-Pazaran, Giovanny; Diaz-Garcia, Luis; Schlautman, Brandon; Deutsch, Joseph; Salazar, Walter; Hernandez-Ochoa, Miguel; Grygleski, Edward; Steffan, Shawn; Iorizzo, Massimo; Polashock, James; Vorsa, Nicholi; Zalapa, Juan

    2016-06-13

    The application of genotyping by sequencing (GBS) approaches, combined with data imputation methodologies, is narrowing the genetic knowledge gap between major and understudied, minor crops. GBS is an excellent tool to characterize the genomic structure of recently domesticated (~200 years) and understudied species, such as cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.), by generating large numbers of markers for genomic studies such as genetic mapping. We identified 10842 potentially mappable single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a cranberry pseudo-testcross population wherein 5477 SNPs and 211 short sequence repeats (SSRs) were used to construct a high density linkage map in cranberry of which a total of 4849 markers were mapped. Recombination frequency, linkage disequilibrium (LD), and segregation distortion at the genomic level in the parental and integrated linkage maps were characterized for first time in cranberry. SSR markers, used as the backbone in the map, revealed high collinearity with previously published linkage maps. The 4849 point map consisted of twelve linkage groups spanning 1112 cM, which anchored 2381 nuclear scaffolds accounting for ~13 Mb of the estimated 470 Mb cranberry genome. Bin mapping identified 592 and 672 unique bins in the parentals and a total of 1676 unique marker positions in the integrated map. Synteny analyses comparing the order of anchored cranberry scaffolds to their homologous positions in kiwifruit, grape, and coffee genomes provided initial evidence of homology between cranberry and closely related species. GBS data was used to rapidly saturate the cranberry genome with markers in a pseudo-testcross population. Collinearity between the present saturated genetic map and previous cranberry SSR maps suggests that the SNP locations represent accurate marker order and chromosome structure of the cranberry genome. SNPs greatly improved current marker genome coverage, which allowed for genome-wide structure investigations such

  10. Detection of mandarin in orange juice by single-nucleotide polymorphism qPCR assay.

    PubMed

    Aldeguer, Miriam; López-Andreo, María; Gabaldón, José A; Puyet, Antonio

    2014-02-15

    A dual-probe real time PCR (qPCR) DNA-based analysis was devised for the identification of mandarin in orange juice. A single nucleotide polymorphism at the trnL-trnF intergenic region of the chloroplast chromosome was confirmed in nine orange (Citrus sinensis) and thirteen commercial varieties of mandarin, including Citrus reticulata and Citrus unshiu species and a mandarin × tangelo hybrid. Two short minor-groove binding fluorescent probes targeting the polymorphic sequence were used in the dual-probe qPCR, which allowed the detection of both species in single-tube reactions. The similarity of PCR efficiencies allowed a simple estimation of the ratio mandarin/orange in the juice samples, which correlated to the measured difference of threshold cycle values for both probes. The limit of detection of the assay was 5% of mandarin in orange juice, both when the juice was freshly prepared (not from concentrate) or reconstituted from concentrate, which would allow the detection of fraudulently added mandarin juice. The possible use of the dual-probe system for quantitative measurements was also tested on fruit juice mixtures. qPCR data obtained from samples containing equal amounts of mandarin and orange juice revealed that the mandarin target copy number was approximately 2.6-fold higher than in orange juice. The use of a matrix-adapted control as calibrator to compensate the resulting C(T) bias allowed accurate quantitative measurements to be obtained. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Identification of gamma-irradiated fruit juices by EPR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksieva, K. I.; Dimov, K. G.; Yordanov, N. D.

    2014-10-01

    The results of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study on commercially available juices from various fruits and different fruit contents: 25%, 40%, 50%, and 100%, homemade juices, nectars and concentrated fruit syrups, before and after gamma-irradiation are reported. In order to remove water from non- and irradiated samples all juices and nectars were filtered; the solid residue was washed with alcohol and dried at room temperature. Only concentrated fruit syrups were dried for 60 min at 40 °C in a standard laboratory oven. All samples under study show a singlet EPR line with g=2.0025 before irradiation with exception of concentrated fruit syrups, which are EPR silent. Irradiation of juice samples gives rise to complex EPR spectra which gradually transferred to "cellulose-like" EPR spectrum from 25% to 100% fruit content. Concentrated fruit syrups show typical "sugar-like" spectra due to added saccharides. All EPR spectra are characteristic and can prove radiation treatment. The fading kinetics of radiation-induced EPR signals were studied for a period of 60 days after irradiation.

  12. Pregnancy outcome after use of cranberry in pregnancy – the Norwegian mother and child cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cranberry is one of the most commonly used herbs during pregnancy. The herb has been used traditionally against urinary tract infections. No studies are found that specifically address the risk of malformations after use of cranberry during pregnancy. The aim of the study was to investigate the safety of cranberry use during pregnancy, including any effects on congenital malformations and selected pregnancy outcomes. Methods The study is based on data from The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study including more than 100,000 pregnancies from 1999 to 2008. Information on use of cranberry and socio-demographic factors was retrieved from three self-administered questionnaires completed by the women in pregnancy weeks 17 and 30, and 6 months after birth. Information on pregnancy outcomes was retrieved from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway. Results Among the 68,522 women in the study, 919 (1.3%) women had used cranberry while pregnant. We did not detect any increased risk of congenital malformations after use of cranberry. Furthermore, the use of cranberry was also not associated with increased risk for stillbirth/neonatal death, low birth weight, small for gestational age, preterm birth, low Apgar score (<7), neonatal infections or maternal vaginal bleeding in early pregnancy. Although an association was found between use of cranberry in late pregnancy and vaginal bleeding after pregnancy week 17, further sub-analyses of more severe bleeding outcomes did not support a significant risk. Conclusions The findings of this study, revealing no increased risk of malformations nor any of the following pregnancy outcomes; stillbirth/neonatal death, preterm delivery, low birth weight, small for gestational age, low Apgar score and neonatal infections are reassuring. However, maternal vaginal bleeding should be investigated further before any firm conclusion can be drawn. Treatment guidelines on asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy recommend antimicrobial

  13. Optimization of Water Management of Cranberry Fields under Current and Future Climate Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Létourneau, G.; Gumiere, S.; Mailhot, E.; Rousseau, A. N.

    2016-12-01

    In North America, cranberry production is on the rise. Since 2005, land area dedicated to cranberry doubled, principally in Canada. Recent studies have shown that sub-irrigation could lead to improvements in yield, water use efficiency and pumping energy requirements compared to conventional sprinkler irrigation. However, the experimental determination of the optimal water table level of each production site may be expensiveand time-consuming. The primary objective of this study is to optimize the water table level as a function of typical soil properties, and climatic conditions observed in major production areas using a numerical modeling approach. The second objective is to evaluate the impacts of projected climatic conditions on water management of cranberry fields. To that end, cranberry-specific management operations such as harvest flooding, rapid drainage following heavy rainfall, or hydric stress management during dry weather conditions were simulated with the HYDRUS 2D software. Results have shown that maintaining the water table approximately at 60 cm provides optimal results for most of the studied soils. However, under certain extreme climatic conditions, the drainage system design may not allow maintaining optimal hydric conditions for cranberry growth. The long-term benefit of this study has potential to advance the design of drainage/sub-irrigation systems.

  14. Development of a high-density cranberry SSR linkage map for comparative genetic analysis and trait detection

    Since its domestication 200 years ago, breeding of the American Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) has relied on phenotypic selection because applicable resources for molecular improvement strategies such as marker-assisted selection (MAS) remain limited. To enable MAS in cranberry, the first high de...

  15. The American cranberry crowned jewel of the bog at the 2014 U.S.A. Science & Engineering Festival

    For researchers in Dr. Juan Zalapa’s Cranberry Genetics and Genomics Lab, part of the USDA-ARS Vegetable Crops Research Unit, cranberries are more than a side dish on their Thanksgiving tables, they are the main course in their daily studies. The majority of these little red super-fruits come from t...

  16. Continuous conversion of sweet sorghum juice to ethanol using immobilized yeast cells

    SciT

    Mohite, U.; SivaRaman, H.

    1984-01-01

    While extensive work has been reported on sugarcane and sugarcane molasses for ethanol production, relatively few reports are available on ethanol production from sweet sorghum juice. With the advent of immobilized cell technology, an attempt has been made to utilize this technology for the production of ethanol from sweet sorghum juice. The species was Sorghum bicolar (Moench). The maximum productivity obtained at 30/sup 0/C with Saccharomyces uvarum cells immobilized in gelatin was 168 g/L h at an ethanol concentration of 2.4 g (w/v) using sweet sorghum juice having 11.5% fermentable sugars. The calculated value for full conversion was 86 g/Lmore » at an ethanol concentration of 5.5 g (w/v). The low concentration of total sugars in the juice, however, would make ethanol recovery expensive unless a uniformly high concentration of 16% or more of total sugars can be obtained.« less

  17. Relationship between peat geochemistry and depositional environments, Cranberry Island, Maine

    Raymond, R.; Cameron, C.C.; Cohen, A.D.

    1987-01-01

    The Heath, Great Cranberry Island, Maine, offers a unique locality for studying lateral and vertical relationships between radically different peat types within 1 km2. The majority of The Heath is a Sphagnum moss-dominated raised bog. Surrounding the raised bog is a swamp/marsh complex containing grass, sedge, Sphagnum moss, alder, tamarack, and skunk cabbage. Swamp/ marsh-deposited peat occurs both around the margins of The Heath and under Sphagnum-dominated peat, which was deposited within the raised bog. A third peat type, dominated by herbaceous aquatics, is present underlying the swamp/marsh-dominated peat but is not present as a dominant botanical community of The Heath. The three peat types have major differences in petrographic characteristics, ash contents, and associated minerals. Sulfur contents range from a low of 0.19 wt.% (dry) within the raised bog to a high of 4.44 wt% (dry) near the west end of The Heath, where swamp/marsh peat occurring directly behind a storm beach berm has been influenced by marine waters. The presence of major geochemical variations within a 1-km2 peat deposit suggests the need for in-depth characterization of potential peat resources prior to use. ?? 1987.

  18. Response of cranberry weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) to host plant volatiles.

    PubMed

    Szendrei, Zsofia; Malo, Edi; Stelinski, Lukasz; Rodriguez-Saona, Cesar

    2009-06-01

    The oligophagous cranberry weevil, Anthonomus musculus Say, causes economic losses to blueberry growers in New Jersey because females deposit eggs into developing flower buds and subsequent larval feeding damages buds, which fail to produce fruit. A cost-effective and reliable method is needed for monitoring this pest to correctly time insecticide applications. We studied the behavioral and antennal responses of adult A. musculus to its host plant volatiles to determine their potential for monitoring this pest. We evaluated A. musculus response to intact and damaged host plant parts, such as buds and flowers in Y-tube bioassays. We also collected and identified host plant volatiles from blueberry buds and open flowers and performed electroantennograms with identified compounds to determine the specific chemicals eliciting antennal responses. Male weevils were more attracted to blueberry flower buds and were repelled by conspecific-damaged buds compared with clean air. In contrast, females were more attracted to open flowers compared with flower buds. Nineteen volatiles were identified from blueberry buds; 10 of these were also emitted from blueberry flowers. Four of the volatiles emitted from both blueberry buds and flowers [hexanol, (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate, hexyl acetate, and (Z)-3-hexenyl butyrate] elicited strong antennal responses from A. musculus. Future laboratory and field testing of the identified compounds in combination with various trap designs is planned to develop a reliable monitoring trap for A. musculus.

  19. Determination of Key Flavor Components in Methylene Chloride Extracts from Processed Grapefruit Juice.

    PubMed

    Jella; Rouseff; Goodner; Widmer

    1998-01-19

    The relative correlation of 52 aroma and 5 taste components in commercial not-from-concentrate grapefruit juices with flavor panel preference was determined. Methylene chloride extracts of juice were analyzed using GC/MS with a DB-5 column. Nonvolatiles determined included limonin and naringin by HPLC, degrees Brix, total acids, and degrees Brix/acid ratio. Juice samples were classified into low, medium, or high categories, based on average taste panel preference scores (nine-point hedonic scale). Principal component analysis demonstrated that highest quality juices were tightly clustered. Discriminant analysis indicated that 82% of the samples could be identified in the correct preference category using only myrcene, beta-caryophyllene, linalool, nootkatone, and degrees Brix. Nootkatone alone was not strongly associated with preference scores. The most preferred juices were strongly associated with low myrcene, low linalool, and intermediate levels of beta-caryophyllene.

  20. Characterization by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode-array detection coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry of the phenolic fraction in a cranberry syrup used to prevent urinary tract diseases, together with a study of its antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Iswaldi, Ihsan; Gómez-Caravaca, Ana María; Arráez-Román, David; Uberos, José; Lardón, Marita; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto

    2012-01-25

    The phenolic fraction of a commercial cranberry syrup, which is purported to have good properties for the prevention of urinary diseases, has been thoroughly characterized using HPLC-DAD-TOF-MS. A study of its antibacterial activity has also been carried out. For this purpose a new HPLC-DAD-TOF-MS method using negative and positive ionization modes was developed and it was thus possible to identify 34 different compounds, nine of which have been tentatively characterized for the first time in cranberry syrup. It is also important to highlight that different coumarins in this matrix were also determined, which, to our knowledge, have not been found previously in the cranberry. The phenolic fraction obtained by HPLC-DAD was found to be 5.47 mg/mL. Catechin and procyanidins belonging to flavanols were the family of compounds found at the highest concentrations (2.37 mg/mL); flavonols were at a concentration of 1.91 mg/mL and phenolic-acid derivatives were found at the lowest concentration (0.15 mg/mL). With regard to antibacterial activity, the incubation of Escherichia coli with cranberry syrup was found to reduce surface hydrophobicity as a function of the concentration of the extract. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of Inulin on the Viability of L. plantarum during Storage and In Vitro Digestion and on Composition Parameters of Vegetable Fermented Juices.

    PubMed

    Valero-Cases, Estefanía; Frutos, María José

    2017-06-01

    The prebiotic effect of different concentrations of inulin (0, 1 and 2%) on the growth and survival of Lactobacillus plantarum (LP) CECT 220 in blended carrot and orange juices was investigated after 24 h of fermentation, during 30 days of storage at 4 °C and through the phases of gastrointestinal digestion after different storage periods. Microbiological and chemical determinations were also carried out in all juices. The lactic fermentation increased the shelf life of the fermented juices with inulin. The hygienic-sanitary quality in fermented juices was better than the control juices. During storage, the inulin improved the viability of LP and the monosaccharide concentration remained higher with respect to the juice without inulin (40% lower). At 30 days, the fermented juices with 2% inulin after in vitro digestion presented the highest survival of L. plantarum.

  2. Stability of Pycnogenol® as an ingredient in fruit juices subjected to in vitro gastrointestinal digestion.

    PubMed

    Frontela, Carmen; Ros, Gaspar; Martínez, Carmen; Sánchez-Siles, Luis M; Canali, Raffaella; Virgili, Fabio

    2011-01-30

    The enrichment of fruit juices with concentrated polyphenolic extracts is an expedient strategy to compensate possible phenolic loss through gastrointestinal processing. Pycnogenol, a standardised procyanidin-rich extract from pine bark, has been proposed as a potential candidate for polyphenol enrichment of foods. In this study the effects of in vitro digestion on the phenolic profile of fruit juices enriched with Pycnogenol were investigated. After in vitro digestion the level of detectable total phenolic compounds (expressed as gallic acid equivalent) was higher in both pineapple and red fruit juices enriched with Pycnogenol than in non-enriched commercial juices. Five phenolic monomeric compounds were identified by high-performance liquid chromatography, namely chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, gallic acid and taxifolin, the last two being predominant. In vitro digestion of both Pycnogenol-enriched pineapple and red fruit juices led to a significant (P < 0.05) increase in detectable chlorogenic and ferulic acids, indicating that hydrolysis of more complex molecules occurs. On the other hand, in vitro digestion of non-enriched juices was associated with a decrease in gallic and caffeic acids in pineapple juice and with a decrease in ferulic acid in red fruit juice. In no case did in vitro digestion increase the amount of detectable phenolic compounds in non-enriched juices. The stability of Pycnogenol after in vitro gastrointestinal digestion makes it a good choice for phenolic enrichment of fruit juices. 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Effects of granulation on organic acid metabolism and its relation to mineral elements in Citrus grandis juice sacs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xian-You; Wang, Ping; Qi, Yi-Ping; Zhou, Chen-Ping; Yang, Lin-Tong; Liao, Xin-Yan; Wang, Liu-Qing; Zhu, Dong-Huang; Chen, Li-Song

    2014-02-15

    We investigated the effects of granulation on organic acid metabolism and its relation to mineral elements in 'Guanximiyou' pummelo (Citrus grandis) juice sacs. Granulated juice sacs had decreased concentrations of citrate and isocitrate, thus lowering juice sac acidity. By contrast, malate concentration was higher in granulated juice sacs than in normal ones. The reduction in citrate concentration might be caused by increased degradation, as indicated by enhanced aconitase activity, whilst the increase in malate concentration might be caused by increased biosynthesis, as indicated by enhanced phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC). Real time quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis showed that the activities of most acid-metabolizing enzymes were regulated at the transcriptional level, whilst post-translational modifications might influence the PEPC activity. Granulation led to increased accumulation of mineral elements (especially phosphorus, magnesium, sulphur, zinc and copper) in juice sacs, which might be involved in the incidence of granulation in pummelo fruits. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Urea and ammonia excretion into gastric juice in regularly dialyzed patients and patients after renal transplantation. I. Dialyzed patients.

    PubMed

    Skála, I; Marecková, O; Růzicková, J; Bláha, J; Straková, M; Reneltová, I; Jirka, J; Kocandrle, V; Zvolánková, K

    1978-01-01

    In regularly dialyzed patients in basal gastric juice and after stimulation with pentagastrin the volume of titrable acidity, urea and ammonia were assessed. It was revealed that in relation to the plasma urea concentration in basal juice the mean urea and ammonia concentration is roughly half and in stimulation juice roughly one third. The urea concentration in gastric juice is negatively correlated to the ammonia concentration. Urea excretion into the stomach depends on the plasma urea level and on the secretory gastric activity. The decisive factor of gastric secretion is probably parietal cell secretion. From the results ensues that gastric juice of dialyzed patients contains a quantitatively significant amount of urea and ammonia. Ammonia due to its neutralizing action distorts the examination of gastric acidity assessed by titration. The findings call for a revision of hitherto known data concerning gastric secretion of uraemic patients.

  5. Use of Banana (Musa acuminata Colla AAA) Peel Extract as an Antioxidant Source in Orange Juices.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Lucía; Dorta, Eva; Gloria Lobo, M; González-Mendoza, L Antonio; Díaz, Carlos; González, Mónica

    2017-03-01

    Using banana peel extract as an antioxidant in freshly squeezed orange juices and juices from concentrate was evaluated. Free radical scavenging capacity increased by adding banana peel extracts to both types of orange juice. In addition, remarkable increases in antioxidant capacity using 2,2'-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline)-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) radical were observed when equal or greater than 5 mg of banana peel extract per ml of freshly squeezed juice was added. No clear effects were observed in the capacity to inhibit lipid peroxidation. Adding 5 mg banana peel extract per ml of orange juice did not substantially modify the physicochemical and sensory characteristics of either type of juice. However, undesirable changes in the sensory characteristics (in-mouth sensations and colour) were detected when equal or greater than 10 mg banana peel extract per ml of orange juice was added. These results confirm that banana peel is a promising natural additive that increases the capacity to scavenge free radicals of orange juice with acceptable sensory and physicochemical characteristics for the consumer.

  6. In vitro and in vivo study of effect of lemon juice on urinary lithogenesis.

    PubMed

    Oussama, Abdelkhalek; Touhami, Mohamed; Mbarki, Mohamed

    2005-12-01

    The diversity of experimental results obtained in the study of the effect of citrus juice on urinary lithogenicity moved us to study the effect of these substances in vitro and in-vivo. The in-vitro study is based on the turbidimetric method on calcium oxalate crystallization. In vivo, we studied the effect of lemon juice consumption on urinary chemistry and we tested it on calcium oxalate crystallization in natural urine. The formation of crystals is induced by the addition of the oxalate and calcium solution. Optical density (OD) is measured in a closed system at physiological conditions. The effects of the various juices of lemon, was evaluated by the addition of 50 ml of juice. A male volunteer with no history of kidney stone participated in this study, by lemon juice ingestion. The pH, concentration of oxalate, calcium and citrate were determined before and after ingestion and urine was freshly analyzed by microscopy. In synthetic urine, the inhibition rate of calcium oxalate crystallization increases gradually with the lemon juice concentration. In natural urine, we noted that the kinetics of crystallization of calcium oxalate, before and after ingestion of lemon juice, are comparable. In vivo, after ingestion, a small increase in mean urinary pH (from 6.7 +/- 0.1 to 6.9 +/- 0.1) was noted. Indeed, oxalate calcium means and citrate excretion increased during this period with 33.41%, 6.85% and 3.53% respectively. This increase in the oxalate excretion is probably explained by the conversion of the exogenous ascorbic acid contained in the lemon juice. These results show that the lemon juice presents an important inhibitory effect in vitro. The ingestion of the lemon juice seems to dissipate a effect of great quantity of citrates which in turn increases the excretion of oxalates. The presence of these two elements simultaneously: citrate and oxalate compensate for their opposite effect.

  7. Palatability and chemical safety of apple juice fortified with pomegranate peel extract.

    PubMed

    Altunkaya, Arzu; Hedegaard, Rikke V; Harholt, Jesper; Brimer, Leon; Gökmen, Vural; Skibsted, Leif H

    2013-10-01

    Pomegranate peel extract (PPE), a by-product of the pomegranate juice industry with potential health effects, was explored for use to fortify reconstituted apple juice in the concentration range 0.5 to 2.0% (w/w). Radical scavenging and antioxidative capacities of the fortified apple juices were evaluated using (i) electron spin resonance (ESR) to quantify their ability to scavenge the stable radical Fremy's salt and (ii) the Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) assay and compared to apple juice without fortification as control. The highest antioxidative capacity was found in the apple juice fortified with the highest percentage of pomegranate peel extract, while the optimal sensory quality was found by addition of 0.5 g PPE per 100 mL. The Artemia salina assay was used as a fast screening method for evaluating overall toxicity, and showed little toxicity with up to 1.0 g per 100 mL addition of PPE, but increasing toxicity at higher concentrations. Accordingly, it is important to balance addition of PPE, when used for enrichment of apple juice in order to obtain a healthier product, without compromising the sensorial quality or toxicological safety of the apple juice. Concentrations between 0.5 and 1.0 g PPE per 100 mL seem to be acceptable.

  8. Variability of the polyphenolic composition of cider apple (Malus domestica) fruits and juices.

    PubMed

    Guyot, Sylvain; Marnet, Nathalie; Sanoner, Philippe; Drilleau, Jean-François

    2003-10-08

    Five French cider apple varieties were compared on the basis of their detailed polyphenol profile in the cortex and in the juices. Among the factors studied, variety was the most important variability factor in fruits, whereas polyphenol profiles showed an overall stability from one year to another, and a limited decrease of polyphenol concentration was observed during the starch regression period of fruit maturation. In juices, procyanidins remained the preponderant polyphenol class with concentrations up to 2.4 g/L even in centrifuged juices. Compared to the fruits, the average degree of polymerization of procyanidins was significantly reduced in the juice. Centrifugation of the crude juice had only minor effects on the polyphenol composition. For one variety, highly polymerized procyanidins with average degrees of polymerization of 25 were shown to be soluble in the centrifuged juice at a concentration of close to 1.2 g/L. Oxygenation of the juices during processing resulted in a significant decrease of all classes of native polyphenols. Catechins and procyanidins were particularly affected by oxidation, whereas caffeoylquinic acid was partly preserved. The transfer of polyphenols after pressing was maximal for dihydrochalcones and minimal for procyanidins with extraction yield values close to 80 and 30%, respectively.

  9. Noni juice is not hepatotoxic

    PubMed Central

    West, Brett J; Jensen, C Jarakae; Westendorf, Johannes

    2006-01-01

    Noni juice (Morinda citrifolia) has been approved for use as a safe food within the European Union, following a review of safety. Since approval, three cases of acute hepatitis in Austrian noni juice consumers have been published, where a causal link is suggested between the liver dysfunction and ingestion of anthraquinones from the plant. Measurements of liver function in a human clinical safety study of TAHITIAN NONI® Juice, as well as subacute and subchronic animal toxicity tests revealed no evidence of adverse liver effects at doses many times higher than those reported in the case studies. Additionally, M. citrifolia anthraquinones occur in the fruit in quantities too small to be of any toxicological significance. Further, these do not have chemical structures capable of being reduced to reactive anthrone radicals, which were implicated in previous cases of herbal hepototoxicity. The available data reveals no evidence of liver toxicity. PMID:16773722

  10. The effectiveness of dried cranberries ( Vaccinium macrocarpon) in men with lower urinary tract symptoms.

    PubMed

    Vidlar, Ales; Vostalova, Jitka; Ulrichova, Jitka; Student, Vladimir; Stejskal, David; Reichenbach, Richard; Vrbkova, Jana; Ruzicka, Filip; Simanek, Vilim

    2010-10-01

    Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) are a common condition in older men. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) powder in men at risk of prostate disease with LUTS, elevated prostate-specific antigen (PSA), negative prostate biopsy and clinically confirmed chronic non-bacterial prostatitis. Forty-two participants received either 1500 mg of the dried powdered cranberries per d for 6 months (cranberry group; n 21) or no cranberry treatment (control group; n 21). Physical examination, International Prostate Symptom Score, quality of life (QoL), five-item version of the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5), basic clinical chemistry parameters, haematology, Se, testosterone, PSA (free and total), C-reactive protein (CRP), antioxidant status, transrectal ultrasound prostate volume, urinary flow rate, ultrasound-estimated post-void residual urine volume at baseline, and at 3 and 6 months, and urine ex vivo anti-adherence activity were determined in all subjects. In contrast to the control group, patients in the cranberry group had statistically significant improvement in International Prostate Symptom Score, QoL, urination parameters including voiding parameters (rate of urine flow, average flow, total volume and post-void residual urine volume), and lower total PSA level on day 180 of the study. There was no influence on blood testosterone or serum CRP levels. There was no statistically significant improvement in the control group. The results of the present trial are the first firm evidence that cranberries may ameliorate LUTS, independent of benign prostatic hyperplasia or C-reactive protein level.

  11. Multi-Species Mating Disruption in Cranberries (Ericales: Ericaceae): Early Evidence Using a Flowable Emulsion.

    PubMed

    Steffan, Shawn A; Chasen, Elissa M; Deutsch, Annie E; Mafra-Neto, Agenor

    2017-01-01

    Pheromone-based mating disruption has proven to be a powerful pest management tactic in many cropping systems. However, in the cranberry system, a viable mating disruption program does not yet exist. There are commercially available pheromones for several of the major pests of cranberries, including the cranberry fruitworm, Acrobasis vaccinii Riley (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) and blackheaded fireworm, Rhopobota naevana (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae). Previous studies have shown that mating disruption represents a promising approach for R. naevana management although carrier and delivery technologies have remained unresolved. The present study examined the suitability of Specialized Pheromone & Lure Application Technology (SPLAT; ISCA Technologies, Inc., Riverside, CA), a proprietary wax and oil blend, to serve as a pheromone carrier in the cranberry system. In 2013 and 2014, we tested a blend of pheromones targeting A. vaccinii and R. naevana in field-scale, replicated trials. Pheromones were loaded into SPLAT and the resulting "SPLAT BFW CFW" formulation was deployed in commercial cranberry marshes. We compared moth trap-catch counts within SPLAT-treated blocks to those of conventionally managed blocks. In 2013, applications of SPLAT BFW CFW resulted in highly successful disruption of R. naevana and promising, though inconsistent, disruption of A. vaccinii. To improve disruption of A. vaccinii, the pheromone load was increased in 2014, providing 92% and 74% reductions in trap-catch for R. naevana and A. vaccinii, respectively. Importantly, larval infestation rates in SPLAT-treated blocks were lower than those of conventionally managed blocks. These results suggest that a multispecies mating disruption system (SPLAT BFW CFW) may represent an effective pesticide-alternative for serious pests of cranberries. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America 2017. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the

  12. 21 CFR 146.135 - Orange juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Orange juice. 146.135 Section 146.135 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CANNED FRUIT JUICES Requirements for Specific Standardized Canned Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146...

  13. 21 CFR 146.114 - Lemon juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lemon juice. 146.114 Section 146.114 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CANNED FRUIT JUICES Requirements for Specific Standardized Canned Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146...

  14. 21 CFR 146.185 - Pineapple juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION CANNED FRUIT JUICES Requirements for Specific Standardized Canned Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146... of shell, seeds, or other coarse or hard substances or excess pulp. It may be sweetened with any safe... pineapple juice (exclusive of added sugars) without added water shall not be less than 10.5° Brix as...

  15. 21 CFR 146.185 - Pineapple juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION CANNED FRUIT JUICES Requirements for Specific Standardized Canned Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146... of shell, seeds, or other coarse or hard substances or excess pulp. It may be sweetened with any safe... pineapple juice (exclusive of added sugars) without added water shall not be less than 10.5° Brix as...

  16. 21 CFR 146.185 - Pineapple juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION CANNED FRUIT JUICES Requirements for Specific Standardized Canned Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146... of shell, seeds, or other coarse or hard substances or excess pulp. It may be sweetened with any safe... pineapple juice (exclusive of added sugars) without added water shall not be less than 10.5° Brix as...

  17. 21 CFR 146.185 - Pineapple juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION CANNED FRUIT JUICES Requirements for Specific Standardized Canned Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146... of shell, seeds, or other coarse or hard substances or excess pulp. It may be sweetened with any safe... pineapple juice (exclusive of added sugars) without added water shall not be less than 10.5° Brix as...

  18. 21 CFR 146.185 - Pineapple juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION CANNED FRUIT JUICES Requirements for Specific Standardized Canned Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146... of shell, seeds, or other coarse or hard substances or excess pulp. It may be sweetened with any safe... pineapple juice (exclusive of added sugars) without added water shall not be less than 10.5° Brix as...

  19. Cranberry Proanthocyanidins are Cytotoxic to Human Cancer Cells and Sensitize Platinum-Resistant Ovarian Cancer Cells to Paraplatin

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ajay P.; Singh, Rakesh K.; Kim, Kyu Kwang; Satyan, K. S.; Nussbaum, Roger; Torres, Monica; Brard, Laurent; Vorsa, Nicholi

    2010-01-01

    Polyphenolic extracts of the principal flavonoid classes present in cranberry were screened in vitro for cytotoxicity against solid tumor cells lines, identifying two fractions composed principally of proanthocyanidins (PACs) with potential anticancer activity. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) analysis of the proanthocyanidins (PACs) fractions indicated the presence of A-type PACs with 1–4 linkages containing between 2–8 epicatechin units with a maximum of 1 epigallocatechin unit. PACs exhibited in vitro cytotoxicity against platinum-resistant human ovarian, neuroblastoma and prostate cancer cell lines (IC50 = 79–479 μg/mL) but were non-cytotoxic to lung fibroblast cells (IC50 > 1000 μg/ml). SKOV-3 ovarian cancer cells treated with PACs exhibited classic apoptotic changes. PACs acted synergistically with paraplatin in SKOV-3 cells. Pretreatment of SKOV-3 cells with PACs (106 μg/ ml) resulted in a significant reduction of the paraplatin IC50 value. Similarly, in a BrdU incorporation assay, co-treatment of SKOV-3 cells with PACs and paraplatin revealed reduced cell proliferation at lower concentrations than with either individually. In SKOV-3 cell cultures co-treated with PAC-1 and paraplatin, an HPLC analysis indicated differential quantitative presence of various PAC oligomers such as DP-8, -9, -11 and -14 indicating either selective binding or uptake. Cranberry proanthocyanidins exhibit cell-line specific cytotoxicity, induce apoptotic markers and augment cytotoxicity of paraplatin in platinum-resistant SKOV-3 ovarian cancer cells. PMID:19172579

  20. Cranberry Flavonoids Modulate Cariogenic Properties of Mixed-Species Biofilm through Exopolysaccharides-Matrix Disruption.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dongyeop; Hwang, Geelsu; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Yifei; Singh, Ajay P; Vorsa, Nicholi; Koo, Hyun

    2015-01-01

    The exopolysaccharides (EPS) produced by Streptococcus mutans-derived glucosyltransferases (Gtfs) are essential virulence factors associated with the initiation of cariogenic biofilms. EPS forms the core of the biofilm matrix-scaffold, providing mechanical stability while facilitating the creation of localized acidic microenvironments. Cranberry flavonoids, such as A-type proanthocyanidins (PACs) and myricetin, have been shown to inhibit the activity of Gtfs and EPS-mediated bacterial adhesion without killing the organisms. Here, we investigated whether a combination of cranberry flavonoids disrupts EPS accumulation and S. mutans survival using a mixed-species biofilm model under cariogenic conditions. We also assessed the impact of cranberry flavonoids on mechanical stability and the in situ pH at the biofilm-apatite interface. Topical application of an optimized combination of PACs oligomers (100-300 μM) with myricetin (2 mM) twice daily was used to simulate treatment regimen experienced clinically. Treatments with cranberry flavonoids effectively reduced the insoluble EPS content (>80% reduction vs. vehicle-control; p<0.001), while hindering S. mutans outgrowth within mixed-species biofilms. As a result, the 3D architecture of cranberry-treated biofilms was severely compromised, showing a defective EPS-matrix and failure to develop microcolonies on the saliva-coated hydroxyapatite (sHA) surface. Furthermore, topical applications of cranberry flavonoids significantly weaken the mechanical stability of the biofilms; nearly 90% of the biofilm was removed from sHA surface after exposure to a shear stress of 0.449 N/m2 (vs. 36% removal in vehicle-treated biofilms). Importantly, in situ pH measurements in cranberry-treated biofilms showed significantly higher pH values (5.2 ± 0.1) at the biofilm-apatite interface vs. vehicle-treated biofilms (4.6 ± 0.1). Altogether, the data provide important insights on how cranberry flavonoids treatments modulate virulence

  1. Orange juice substantially reduces the bioavailability of the beta-adrenergic-blocking agent celiprolol.

    PubMed

    Lilja, Jari J; Juntti-Patinen, Laura; Neuvonen, Pertti J

    2004-03-01

    Grapefruit juice was recently found to decrease plasma concentrations of the beta-adrenergic receptor-blocking agent celiprolol. Our objective was to investigate the effect of orange juice on the pharmacokinetics of celiprolol in healthy subjects. In a randomized crossover study with 2 phases and a washout of 2 weeks, 10 healthy volunteers ingested either 200 mL normal-strength orange juice or water 3 times a day for 2 days. On the morning of day 3, 1 hour after ingestion of 200 mL orange juice or water, each subject ingested 100 mg celiprolol with either 200 mL orange juice or water. In addition, 200 mL orange juice or water was ingested at 4, 10, 22, and 27 hours after celiprolol intake. The concentrations of celiprolol in plasma and its excretion into urine were measured up to 33 hours after its dosing. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures and heart rate were recorded up to 10 hours. Orange juice reduced the mean peak plasma concentration of celiprolol by 89% (P <.01) and the mean area under the plasma celiprolol concentration-time curve by 83% (P <.01). The time to peak concentration of celiprolol increased from 4 to 6 hours (P <.05), and the half-life was prolonged from 4.6 to 10.8 hours (P =.05) after ingestion of orange juice. Orange juice reduced the urinary excretion of celiprolol by 77% (P <.01). No significant differences were observed in the hemodynamic variables between the phases. Orange juice substantially reduces the bioavailability of celiprolol, but the mechanism of this interaction remains to be resolved. For example, modulation of intestinal pH and of function of transporters implicated in the absorption of celiprolol may be involved. Because of the great extent of the orange juice-celiprolol interaction and a wide use of orange juice, this interaction is likely to have clinical importance in some patients, although hemodynamic consequences were not seen in young healthy subjects.

  2. An infrared spectroscopy method to detect ammonia in gastric juice.

    PubMed

    Giovannozzi, Andrea M; Pennecchi, Francesca; Muller, Paul; Balma Tivola, Paolo; Roncari, Silvia; Rossi, Andrea M

    2015-11-01

    Ammonia in gastric juice is considered a potential biomarker for Helicobacter pylori infection and as a factor contributing to gastric mucosal injury. High ammonia concentrations are also found in patients with chronic renal failure, peptic ulcer disease, and chronic gastritis. Rapid and specific methods for ammonia detection are urgently required by the medical community. Here we present a method to detect ammonia directly in gastric juice based on Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The ammonia dissolved in biological liquid samples as ammonium ion was released in air as a gas by the shifting of the pH equilibrium of the ammonium/ammonia reaction and was detected in line by a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy system equipped with a gas cell for the quantification. The method developed provided high sensitivity and selectivity in ammonia detection both in pure standard solutions and in a simulated gastric juice matrix over the range of diagnostic concentrations tested. Preliminary analyses were also performed on real gastric juice samples from patients with gastric mucosal injury and with symptoms of H. pylori infection, and the results were in agreement with the clinicopathology information. The whole analysis, performed in less than 10 min, can be directly applied on the sample without extraction procedures and it ensures high specificity of detection because of the ammonia fingerprint absorption bands in the infrared spectrum. This method could be easily used with endoscopy instrumentation to provide information in real time and would enable the endoscopist to improve and integrate gastroscopic examinations.

  3. Green tea extract as an anti-browning agent for cloudy apple juice.

    PubMed

    Klimczak, Inga; Gliszczyńska-Świgło, Anna

    2017-03-01

    Enzymatic browning of fruits and vegetables and their products is an important factor worsening their quality. The influence of five green tea extracts at the concentrations of 1 g L -1 , 2 g L -1 and 3 g L -1 on polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity in fresh cloudy apple juice was investigated. Moreover, PPO inhibition by tea extract and colour stability of juice during short-time refrigerated storage was studied. The changes of juice colour during storage was expressed as the total colour differences (ΔE*), browning index (BI), yellowness index (YI), and the absorbance at 420 nm (A 420 ). All extracts inhibited PPO activity in fresh apple juice in concentration-dependent manner. PPO activity in pure apple juice decreased by 7% after 48 h, whereas PPO activity in samples with 1 g L -1 , 2 g L -1 and 3 g L -1 tea extract decreased by 53%, 74%, and 96%, respectively. Browning of apple juice during storage decreased with increased concentration of green tea extract. After 48 h, extract at 1 g L -1 , 2 g L -1 and 3 g L -1 inhibited browning of juice expressed as BI by 48%, 60%, and 86%, respectively, comparing to pure apple juice. Green tea extract may be an effective anti-browning agent for short-time stored cloudy apple juices. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Solid state fermentation for extracellular polysaccharide production by Lactobacillus confusus with coconut water and sugar cane juice as renewable wastes.

    PubMed

    Seesuriyachan, Phisit; Techapun, Charin; Shinkawa, Hidenori; Sasaki, Ken

    2010-01-01

    Extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) production by Lactobacillus confusus in liquid and solid state fermentation was carried out using coconut water and sugarcane juice as renewable wastes. High concentrations of EPS of 62 (sugarcane juice) and 18 g/l of coconut water were produced in solid state fermentation when nitrogen sources were reduced 5-fold from the original medium.

  5. Characterization and quantification of flavonoids and organic acids over fruit development in American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) cultivars using HPLC and APCI-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yifei; Johnson-Cicalese, Jennifer; Singh, Ajay P; Vorsa, Nicholi

    2017-09-01

    Cranberry flavonoids, including anthocyanins, flavonol glycosides and proanthocyanidins, and organic acids were characterized and quantified by HPLC and LC-MS/MS during fruit development and ripening in eight cranberry cultivars. Anthocyanin biosynthesis initiated at early fruit development and reached highest level in mature fruit, with significant differences between cultivars. Major flavonol glycosides, including the most abundant quercetin-3-galactoside and myricetin-3-galactoside, showed consistent concentrations during the season with moderate fluctuation, and were at similar levels in mature fruits of the eight cultivars. Proanthocyanidins declined during fruit development and then increased slightly in later maturation stages. Levels of various proanthocyanidin oligomers/polymers with different degree-of-polymerization were highly correlated within a cultivar during fruit development. Cultivars with coancestry exhibited similar levels (high/low) of anthocyanins or proanthocyanidins, indicating genetic effects on biosynthesis of such flavonoids. All cultivars showed similar levels of malic and citric acids, and declining levels of quinic acid during fruit development. Benzoic acid was extremely low early in the season and increased sharply during fruit ripening. Levels of quinic and citric acids were significantly different among cultivars in the mature fruit. Concentrations of proanthocyanidins, anthocyanins, quinic acid and benzoic acid have a strong developmental association in developing ovaries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Acute oxalate nephropathy due to ‘Averrhoa bilimbi’ fruit juice ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Bakul, G.; Unni, V. N.; Seethaleksmy, N. V.; Mathew, A.; Rajesh, R.; Kurien, G.; Rajesh, J.; Jayaraj, P. M.; Kishore, D. S.; Jose, P. P.

    2013-01-01

    Irumban puli (Averrhoa bilimbi) is commonly used as a traditional remedy in the state of Kerala. Freshly made concentrated juice has a very high oxalic acid content and consumption carries a high risk of developing acute renal failure (ARF) by deposition of calcium oxalate crystals in renal tubules. Acute oxalate nephropathy (AON) due to secondary oxalosis after consumption of Irumban puli juice is uncommon. AON due to A. bilimbi has not been reported before. We present a series of ten patients from five hospitals in the State of Kerala who developed ARF after intake of I. puli fruit juice. Seven patients needed hemodialysis whereas the other three improved with conservative management. PMID:23960349

  7. The Research of the Effect of the Olive Juice on Anxiety and Depression Behavior.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiguo

    2015-01-01

    In order to evaluate the effect of olive juice on the anxiety and depression behavior, the paper uses olive juice concentrate as experimental material, and uses mice as experimental subjects. Mice are randomly divided into negative, positive, high, medium and low-dose group, administered orally for 7 days. And observe the impact on the mice elevated plus maze test, the opening acts test and forced swim test. The experimental results show that under conditions of the sub-acute administration, olive juice can induce anti-anxiety behavior of mice, but also has the potential to improve depression of mice.

  8. Orange juice (poly)phenols are highly bioavailable in humans.

    PubMed

    Pereira-Caro, Gema; Borges, Gina; van der Hooft, Justin; Clifford, Michael N; Del Rio, Daniele; Lean, Michael E J; Roberts, Susan A; Kellerhals, Michele B; Crozier, Alan

    2014-11-01

    intake. When colon-derived phenolic catabolites are included with flavanone glucuronide and sulfate metabolites, orange juice (poly)phenols are much-more bioavailable than previously envisaged. In vitro and ex vivo studies on mechanisms underlying the potential protective effects of orange juice consumption should use in vivo metabolites and catabolites detected in this investigation at physiologic concentrations. The trial was registered at BioMed Central Ltd (www.controlledtrials.com) as ISRCTN04271658. © 2014 American Society for Nutrition.

  9. Bioactive potential of Vitis labrusca L. grape juices from the Southern Region of Brazil: phenolic and elemental composition and effect on lipid peroxidation in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Toaldo, Isabela Maia; Cruz, Fernanda Alves; Alves, Tatiana de Lima; de Gois, Jefferson Santos; Borges, Daniel L G; Cunha, Heloisa Pamplona; da Silva, Edson Luiz; Bordignon-Luiz, Marilde T

    2015-04-15

    Grapes are rich in polyphenols with biologically active properties. Although the bioactive potential of grape constituents are frequently reported, the effects of Brazilian Vitis labrusca L. grape juices ingestion have not been demonstrated in humans. This study identified the phenolic and elemental composition of red and white grape juices and the effect of organic and conventional red grape juice consumption on lipid peroxidation in healthy individuals. Concentrations of anthocyanins, flavanols and phenolic acids and the in vitro antioxidant activity were significantly higher in the organic juice. The macro-elements K, Ca, Na and Mg were the most abundant minerals in all juices. The acute consumption of red grape juices promoted significant decrease of lipid peroxides in serum and TBARS levels in plasma. It is concluded that red V. labrusca L. grape juices produced in Southern Brazil showed lipid peroxidation inhibition abilities in healthy subjects, regardless of the cultivation system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Polyphenol composition and antioxidant activity of Kei-apple (Dovyalis caffra) juice.

    PubMed

    Loots, Du Toit; van der Westhuizen, Francois H; Jerling, Johann

    2006-02-22

    The polyphenolic and ascorbate (ASC) components as well as the antioxidant capacity of Kei-apple (Dovyalis caffra) juice were analyzed and compared to three other fruit juices. The Kei-apple juice had significantly the highest total polyphenolic concentrations (1013 mg gallic acid equivalent/L), and solid phase (C(18)) fractionation identified the majority of these polyphenols to be phenolic acids. The Kei-apple juice also had significantly the highest ASC concentrations (658 mg/L), which showed exceptional heat stability with very little conversion to dehydroascorbate (DHA). Antioxidant capacities of both the unfractionated fruit juices and their solid phase-extracted fractions, as determined by oxygen radical absorbance capacity and ferric reducing antioxidant power analyses, correlated well to the polyphenol concentrations. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses showed caffeic acid as the most abundant polyphenol present (128.7 mg/L) in the Kei-apple juice; it contributed to 63% of the total antioxidant capacity (of all of the individual compounds identified). Other notable polyphenols identified in higher concentrations included p-coumaric acid, p-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, and protocatechuic acid. Our results therefore support the putative high antioxidant value linked to this fruit and better define this potential in terms of the major antioxidants that exist in the Kei-apple.

  11. Conserving carnivorous arthropods: an example from early-season cranberry (Ericaceae) flooding

    Biological control plays an important role in many IPM programs, but can be disrupted by other control strategies, including chemical and cultural controls. In commercial cranberry production, a spring flood can replace an insecticide application, providing an opportunity to study the compatibility ...

  12. 7 CFR 929.56 - Special provisions relating to withheld (restricted) cranberries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF MASSACHUSETTS, RHODE ISLAND, CONNECTICUT, NEW JERSEY, WISCONSIN, MICHIGAN, MINNESOTA, OREGON, WASHINGTON, AND LONG ISLAND IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK Order Regulating Handling...

  13. Development of a Thiolysis HPLC Method for the Analysis of Procyanidins in Cranberry Products.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chi; Cunningham, David G; Liu, Haiyan; Khoo, Christina; Gu, Liwei

    2018-03-07

    The objective of this study was to develop a thiolysis HPLC method to quantify total procyanidins, the ratio of A-type linkages, and A-type procyanidin equivalents in cranberry products. Cysteamine was utilized as a low-odor substitute of toluene-α-thiol for thiolysis depolymerization. A reaction temperature of 70 °C and reaction time of 20 min, in 0.3 M of HCl, were determined to be optimum depolymerization conditions. Thiolytic products of cranberry procyanidins were separated by RP-HPLC and identified using high-resolution mass spectrometry. Standards curves of good linearity were obtained on thiolyzed procyanidin dimer A2 and B2 external standards. The detection and quantification limits, recovery, and precision of this method were validated. The new method was applied to quantitate total procyanidins, average degree of polymerization, ratio of A-type linkages, and A-type procyanidin equivalents in cranberry products. Results showed that the method was suitable for quantitative and qualitative analysis of procyanidins in cranberry products.

  14. Multi-species pheromone-based mating disruption: Moth birth control in cranberries

    Pheromone-based mating disruption is a proven method of pest control, but in cranberries, tailoring this technology to modern production practices has been difficult. Using the wax carrier, SPLAT, we have overcome many of these difficulties and now have three years of data suggesting that mating dis...

  15. Sparganothis fruitworm degree-day benchmarks provide key treatmen timings for cranberry IPM

    Degree-day benchmarks indicate discrete biological events in the development of insect pests. For the Sparganothis fruitworm, we have isolated all key development events and linked them to degree-day accumulations. These degree-day accumulations can greatly improve treatment timings for cranberry ...

  16. Cranberries and Urinary Tract Infections: How Can the Same Evidence Lead to Conflicting Advice?123

    PubMed Central

    Liska, DeAnn J; Kern, Hua J; Maki, Kevin C

    2016-01-01

    Cranberry has been used traditionally to prevent urinary tract infections (UTIs), primarily among generally healthy women prone to recurrent UTIs. Results from a number of published clinical studies have supported this benefit; however, meta-analyses on cranberry and UTI prevention have reported conflicting conclusions. This article explores the methodological differences that contributed to these disparate findings. Despite similar research questions, the meta-analyses varied in the studies that were included, as well as the data that were extracted. In the 2 most comprehensive systematic reviews, heterogeneity was handled differently, leading to an I2 of 65% in one and 43% in the other. Most notably, the populations influencing the conclusions varied. In one analysis, populations with pathological/physiological conditions contributed 75.6% of the total weight to the summary risk estimate (RR: 0.86; 95% CI: 0.71, 1.04); another weighted the evidence relatively equally across UTI populations (RR: 0.62; 95% CI: 0.49, 0.80); and a third included only women with recurrent UTIs (RR: 0.53; 95% CI: 0.33, 0.83). Because women with recurrent UTIs are the group to whom most recommendations regarding cranberry consumption is directed, inclusion of other groups in the efficacy assessment could influence clinical practice quality. Therefore, conclusions on cranberry and UTIs should consider differences in results across various populations studied when interpreting results from meta-analyses. PMID:27184277

  17. Cranberry Resistance to Dodder Parasitism: Induced Chemical Defenses and Behavior of a Parasitic Plant.

    PubMed

    Tjiurutue, Muvari Connie; Sandler, Hilary A; Kersch-Becker, Monica F; Theis, Nina; Adler, Lynn A

    2016-02-01

    Parasitic plants are common in many ecosystems, where they can structure community interactions and cause major economic damage. For example, parasitic dodder (Cuscuta spp.) can cause up to 80-100 % yield loss in heavily infested cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) patches. Despite their ecological and economic importance, remarkably little is known about how parasitic plants affect, or are affected by, host chemistry. To examine chemically-mediated interactions between dodder and its cranberry host, we conducted a greenhouse experiment asking whether: (1) dodder performance varies with cranberry cultivar; (2) cultivars differ in levels of phytohormones, volatiles, or phenolics, and whether such variation correlates with dodder parasitism; (3) dodder parasitism induced changes in phytohormones, volatiles, or phenolics, and whether the level of inducible response varied among cultivars. We used five cranberry cultivars to assess host attractiveness to dodder and dodder performance. Dodder performance did not differ across cultivars, but there were marginally significant differences in host attractiveness to dodder, with fewer dodder attaching to Early Black than to any other cultivar. Dodder parasitism induced higher levels of salicylic acid (SA) across cultivars. Cultivars differed in overall levels of flavonols and volatile profiles, but not phenolic acids or proanthocyanidins, and dodder attachment induced changes in several flavonols and volatiles. While cultivars differed slightly in resistance to dodder attachment, we did not find evidence of chemical defenses that mediate these interactions. However, induction of several defenses indicates that parasitism alters traits that could influence subsequent interactions with other species, thus shaping community dynamics.

  18. Comparative genetic mapping reveals synteny and collinearity between the American cranberry and diploid blueberry genomes

    Cranberry (section Oxcycoccus) and blueberry (section Cyanococcus), are closely related and recently domesticated fruit crops in the genus Vaccinium (family Ericaceae). Both the Oxycoccus and Cyanococcus sections are presumed to have an American origin and likely evolved from a common ancestor; howe...

  19. Augmented insulin effects on plasma glucose by cranberry procyanidins in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    Objectives of this study were to determine if cranberry proanthocyanidins (CPACs) had an antihyperglycemic effect in the presence or absence of insulin in male diabetic Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats (approximately 250 g)(n=6-10/ trt) were given a single intraperitoneal (ip) injection of freshly prepared...

  20. 75 FR 20514 - Cranberries Grown in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-20

    ...; FV10-929-1 FR] Cranberries Grown in the States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Michigan, Minnesota, Oregon, Washington, and Long Island in the State of New York; Changes to... States of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Michigan, Minnesota, Oregon...